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Sample records for high-temperature aerospace alloys

  1. Advances in processing of NiAl intermetallic alloys and composites for high temperature aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochenek, Kamil; Basista, Michal

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades intermetallic compounds such as NiAl have been considered as potential high temperature structural materials for aerospace industry. A large number of investigations have been reported describing complex fabrication routes, introducing various reinforcing/alloying elements along with theoretical analyses. These research works were mainly focused on the overcoming of main disadvantage of nickel aluminides that still restricts their application range, i.e. brittleness at room temperature. In this paper we present an overview of research on NiAl processing and indicate methods that are promising in solving the low fracture toughness issue at room temperature. Other material properties relevant for high temperature applications are also addressed. The analysis is primarily done from the perspective of NiAl application in aero engines in temperature regimes from room up to the operating temperature (over 1150 °C) of turbine blades.

  2. Metals Technology for Aerospace Applications in 2020: Development of High Temperature Aluminum Alloys For Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The role of trace additions on the nucleation and stability of the primary strengthening phase, omega, is of paramount importance for the enhancement of mechanical properties for moderate temperature application of Al-Cu-Mg-(Ag) alloys. In order to better understand the competition for solute, which governs the microstructural evolution of these alloys, a series of Al-Cu-Mg-Si quaternary alloys were prepared to investigate the role of trace Si additions on the nucleation of the omega phase. Si additions were found to quell omega nucleation in conjunction with the enhanced matrix precipitation of competing phases. These initial results indicate that it is necessary to overcome a critical Mg/Si ratio for omega precipitation, rather than a particular Si content.

  3. System integration and demonstration of adhesive bonded high temperature aluminum alloys for aerospace structure, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falcone, Anthony; Laakso, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive bonding materials and processes were evaluated for assembly of future high-temperature aluminum alloy structural components such as may be used in high-speed civil transport aircraft and space launch vehicles. A number of candidate high-temperature adhesives were selected and screening tests were conducted using single lap shear specimens. The selected adhesives were then used to bond sandwich (titanium core) test specimens, adhesive toughness test specimens, and isothermally aged lap shear specimens. Moderate-to-high lap shear strengths were obtained from bonded high-temperature aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced (SiC(sub p)) aluminum specimens. Shear strengths typically exceeded 3500 to 4000 lb/in(sup 2) and flatwise tensile strengths exceeded 750 lb/in(sup 2) even at elevated temperatures (300 F) using a bismaleimide adhesive. All faceskin-to-core bonds displayed excellent tear strength. The existing production phosphoric acid anodize surface preparation process developed at Boeing was used, and gave good performance with all of the aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced aluminum alloys investigated. The results of this program support using bonded assemblies of high-temperature aluminum components in applications where bonding is often used (e.g., secondary structures and tear stoppers).

  4. Application of thermal life prediction model to high-temperature aerospace alloys B1900+Hf and Haynes 188

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Saltsman, James F.; Verrilli, Michael J.; Arya, Vinod K.

    1990-01-01

    The results of the application of a newly proposed thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) life prediction method to a series of laboratory TMF results on two high-temperature aerospace engine alloys are presented. The method, referred to as TMF/TS-SRP, is based on three relatively recent developments: the total strain version of the method of Strainrange Partitioning (TS-SRP), the bithermal testing technique for characterizing TMF behavior, and advanced viscoplastic constitutive models. The high-temperature data reported in a companion publication are used to evaluate the constants in the model and to provide the TMF verification data to check its accuracy. Predicted lives are in agreement with the experimental lives to within a factor of approximately 2.

  5. Potential aerospace applications of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selim, Raouf

    1994-01-01

    The recent discovery of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) with superconducting transition temperature, T(sub c), above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen has opened the door for using these materials in new and practical applications. These materials have zero resistance to electric current, have the capability of carrying large currents and as such have the potential to be used in high magnetic field applications. One of the space applications that can use superconductors is electromagnetic launch of payloads to low-earth-orbit. An electromagnetic gun-type launcher can be used in small payload systems that are launched at very high velocity, while sled-type magnetically levitated launcher can be used to launch larger payloads at smaller velocities. Both types of launchers are being studied by NASA and the aerospace industry. The use of superconductors will be essential in any of these types of launchers in order to produce the large magnetic fields required to obtain large thrust forces. Low Temperature Superconductor (LTS) technology is mature enough and can be easily integrated in such systems. As for the HTS, many leading companies are currently producing HTS coils and magnets that potentially can be mass-produced for these launchers. It seems that designing and building a small-scale electromagnetic launcher is the next logical step toward seriously considering this method for launching payloads into low-earth-orbit. A second potential application is the use of HTS to build sensitive portable devices for the use in Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE). Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUID's) are the most sensitive instruments for measuring changes in magnetic flux. By using HTS in SQUID's, one will be able to design a portable unit that uses liquid nitrogen or a cryocooler pump to explore the use of gradiometers or magnetometers to detect deep cracks or corrosion in structures. A third use is the replacement of Infra-Red (IR) sensor leads on

  6. The fabrication of rapidly solidified high temperature aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, P. S.; Rateick, R. G.; Testa, A.

    The application of rapid solidification/powder metallurgy processing to metallic materials has led to a series of rapidly solidified aluminum-iron-vanadium-silicon alloys which combine a balanced set of elevated temperature strengths and ambient temperature properties critical for aerospace use. The rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si alloys are finding widespread interest throughout the aerospace community. However, to be fully utilized the high temperature Al-Fe-V-Si alloys must be amendable to traditional metalworking, machining and finishing operations. Powder metallurgy derived high performance alloys at times have proven difficult to fabricate. Recent progress in the fabrication of the high temperature Al-Fe-V-Si alloys into desirable product forms will be discussed, for example the production of thin foils and spun metal components. The effects of various fabrication sequences on material properties will be described.

  7. Aerospace applications of high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinen, V. O.; Connolly, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Space application of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials may occur before most terrestrial applications because of the passive cooling possibilities in space and because of the economic feasibility of introducing an expensive new technology which has a significant system benefit in space. NASA Lewis Research Center has an ongoing program to develop space technology capitalizing on the potential benefit of HTS materials. The applications being pursued include space communications, power and propulsion systems, and magnetic bearings. In addition, NASA Lewis is pursuing materials research to improve the performance of HTS materials for space applications.

  8. Aerospace applications of high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.; Heinen, V. O.; Aron, P. R.; Lazar, J.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    A review is presented of all the applications that are part of the NASA program to develop space technology capitalizing on the potential benefit of high temperature superconducting materials. The applications in three major areas are being pursued: sensors and cryogenic systems, space communications, and propulsion and power systems. This review places emphasis on space communications applications and the propulsion and power applications. It is concluded that the power and propulsion applications will eventually be limited by structural considerations rather than by the availability of suitable superconductors. A cursory examination of structural limitations implied by the virial theorem suggested that there is an upper limit to the size of high field magnetic systems that are feasible in space.

  9. High temperature arc-track resistant aerospace insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorogy, William

    1994-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: high temperature aerospace insulation; Foster-Miller approach to develop a 300 C rated, arc-track resistant aerospace insulation; advantages and disadvantages of key structural features; summary goals and achievements of the phase 1 program; performance goals for selected materials; materials under evaluation; molecular structures of candidate polymers; candidate polymer properties; film properties; and a detailed program plan.

  10. Development of an advanced high-temperature fastener system for advanced aerospace vehicle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kull, F. R.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a program to develop a lightweight high temperature reusable fastening system for aerospace vehicle thermal protection system applications are documented. This feasibility program resulted in several fastener innovations which will meet the specific needs of the heat shield application. Three systems were designed from Hayes 188 alloy and tested by environmental exposure and residual mechanical properties. The designs include a clinch stud with a collar retainer, a weld stud with a split ring retainer, and a caged stud with a collar retainer. The results indicated that a lightweight, reusable, high temperature fastening system can be developed for aerospace vehicle application.

  11. Computational technology for high-temperature aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Card, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    The status and some recent developments of computational technology for high-temperature aerospace structures are summarized. Discussion focuses on a number of aspects including: goals of computational technology for high-temperature structures; computational material modeling; life prediction methodology; computational modeling of high-temperature composites; error estimation and adaptive improvement strategies; strategies for solution of fluid flow/thermal/structural problems; and probabilistic methods and stochastic modeling approaches, integrated analysis and design. Recent trends in high-performance computing environment are described and the research areas which have high potential for meeting future technological needs are identified.

  12. Caldron For High-Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geringer, Henry J.

    1989-01-01

    Induction-heated caldron melts high-temperature alloys. Prevents sort of contamination of melts occurring during arc melting in ceramic crucibles. Liquefies 200 grams of solid metal components of alloy like niobium aluminum and makes alloy homogeneous in less than 3 minutes. Plugged sleeve constitutes main body of caldron. Coolant flows through sleeve to prevent it from melting. Mandrel-wound induction coils adjusted to tune source of power. Also serves as mold for casting alloys into such shapes as bars.

  13. Copper Alloy For High-Temperature Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, Robert L.; Ellis, David L.; Michal, Gary

    1994-01-01

    Alloy of Cu/8Cr/4Nb (numbers indicate parts by atom percent) improved over older high-temperature copper-based alloys in that it offers enhanced high temperature strength, resistance to creep, and ductility while retaining most of thermal conductivity of pure copper; in addition, alloy does not become embrittled upon exposure to hydrogen at temperatures as high as 705 degrees C. Designed for use in presence of high heat fluxes and active cooling; for example, in heat exchangers in advanced aircraft and spacecraft engines, and other high-temperature applications in which there is need for such material. High conductivity and hardness of alloy exploited in welding electrodes and in high-voltage and high-current switches and other applications in which wear poses design problem.

  14. National Aerospace Plane Engine Seals: High Temperature Seal Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1991-01-01

    The key to the successful development of the single stage to orbit National Aerospace Plane (NASP) is the successful development of combined cycle ramjet/scramjet engines that can propel the vehicle to 17,000 mph to reach low Earth orbit. To achieve engine performance over this speed range, movable engine panels are used to tailor engine flow that require low leakage, high temperature seals around their perimeter. NASA-Lewis is developing a family of new high temperature seals to form effective barriers against leakage of extremely hot (greater than 2000 F), high pressure (up to 100 psi) flow path gases containing hydrogen and oxygen. Preventing backside leakage of these explosive gas mixtures is paramount in preventing the potential loss of the engine or the entire vehicle. Seal technology development accomplishments are described in the three main areas of concept development, test, and evaluation and analytical development.

  15. Optical Fiber Strain Instrumentation for High Temperature Aerospace Structural Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the program is the development and laboratory demonstration of sensors based on silica optical fibers for measurement of high temperature strain for aerospace materials evaluations. A complete fiber strain sensor system based on white-light interferometry was designed and implemented. An experiment set-up was constructed to permit testing of strain measurement up to 850 C. The strain is created by bending an alumina cantilever beam to which is the fiber sensor is attached. The strain calibration is provided by the application of known beam deflections. To ensure the high temperature operation capability of the sensor, gold-coated single-mode fiber is used. Moreover, a new method of sensor surface attachment which permits accurate sensor gage length determination is also developed. Excellent results were obtained at temperatures up to 800-850 C.

  16. Nickel alloys combat high-temperature corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Herda, W.R.; Brill, U.

    1995-10-01

    During the last few decades, a better understanding of alloying effects, advances in melting technology, and the development of controlled thermomechanical processing have led to new and improved high-temperature alloys. Most such alloys have sufficient amounts of chromium (with or without additions of aluminum or silicon) to form chromium oxide, alumina, and/or silica protective oxide scales, which provide resistance to environmental degradation. However, oxides cannot protect against failure by creep, mechanical or thermal fatigue, thermal shock, or embrittlement. In the real world, failure is typically caused by a combination of two or more attack modes, which synergistically accelerate degradation. To counter these attacks, two new nickel-base alloys have been developed, in which high-temperature corrosion resistance has been optimized by the careful addition of elements such as chromium, aluminum, silicon, and rare earths. They provide economical and reliable solutions to attack by oxygen, sulfur, halogens, carbon compounds, and nitrogen in a range of high-temperature applications. For example, Alloy 602CA is utilized in heat treating equipment, catalytic automotive parts, and chemical processing apparatus. Alloy 45TM has been successfully used in coal gasification equipment, incinerators, refineries, and process machinery involving severe sulfidizing conditions.

  17. The metallurgy of high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Purushothaman, S.

    1976-01-01

    Nickel-base, cobalt-base, and high nickel and chromium iron-base alloys are dissected, and their microstructural and chemical components are assessed with respect to the various functions expected of high temperature structural materials. These functions include the maintenance of mechanical integrity over the strain-rate spectrum from creep resistance through fatigue crack growth resistance, and such alloy stability expectations as microstructural coarsening resistance, phase instability resistance and oxidation and corrosion resistance. Special attention will be given to the perennial conflict and trade-off between strength, ductility and corrosion and oxidation resistance. The newest developments in the constitution of high temperature alloys will also be discussed, including aspects relating to materials conservation.

  18. High-Temperature Strain Sensing for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazza, Anthony; Richards, Lance W.; Hudson, Larry D.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) and hot structures are utilizing advanced materials that operate at temperatures that exceed abilities to measure structural performance. Robust strain sensors that operate accurately and reliably beyond 1800 F are needed but do not exist. These shortcomings hinder the ability to validate analysis and modeling techniques and hinders the ability to optimize structural designs. This presentation examines high-temperature strain sensing for aerospace applications and, more specifically, seeks to provide strain data for validating finite element models and thermal-structural analyses. Efforts have been made to develop sensor attachment techniques for relevant structural materials at the small test specimen level and to perform laboratory tests to characterize sensor and generate corrections to apply to indicated strains. Areas highlighted in this presentation include sensors, sensor attachment techniques, laboratory evaluation/characterization of strain measurement, and sensor use in large-scale structures.

  19. Precipitation Hardenable High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald Dean (Inventor); Draper, Susan L. (Inventor); Nathal, Michael V. (Inventor); Crombie, Edwin A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A composition of the invention is a high temperature shape memory alloy having high work output, and is made from (Ni+Pt+Y),Ti(100-x) wherein x is present in a total amount of 49-55 atomic % Pt is present in a total amount of 10-30 atomic %, Y is one or more of Au, Pd. and Cu and is present in a total amount of 0 to 10 atomic %. The alloy has a matrix phase wherein the total concentration of Ni, Pt, and the one or more of Pd. Au, and Cu is greater than 50 atomic %.

  20. Simulated Single Tooth Bending of High Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert, F.; Burke, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Future unmanned space missions will require mechanisms to operate at extreme conditions in order to be successful. In some of these mechanisms, very high gear reductions will be needed to permit very small motors to drive other components at low rotational speed with high output torque. Therefore gearing components are required that can meet the mission requirements. In mechanisms such as this, bending fatigue strength capacity of the gears is very important. The bending fatigue capacity of a high temperature, nickel-based alloy, typically used for turbine disks in gas turbine engines and two tool steel materials with high vanadium content, were compared to that of a typical aerospace alloy-AISI 9310. Test specimens were fabricated by electro-discharge machining without post machining processing. Tests were run at 24 and at 490 C. As test temperature increased from 24 to 490 C the bending fatigue strength was reduced by a factor of five.

  1. Precipitate Phases in Several High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan

    Initiated by the aerospace industry, there has been a great interest to develop high temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs) for actuator type of application at elevated temperatures. Several NiTi based ternary systems have been shown to be potential candidates for HTSMAs and this work focuses on one or more alloys in the TiNiPt, TiNiPd, NiTiHf, NiPdTiHf systems. The sheer scope of alloys of varying compositions across all four systems suggests that the questions raised and addressed in this work are just the tip of the iceberg. This work focuses on materials characterization and aims to investigate microstructural evolution of these alloys as a function of heat treatment. The information gained through the study can serve as guidance for future alloy processing. The emphasis of this work is to describe novel precipitate phases that are formed under aging in the ternary systems and one quaternary system. Employing conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), 3D atom probe tomography (3D APT), as well as ab initio calculations, the complete description of the unit cell for the new precipitates was determined. The methodology is summarized in the appendix to help elucidate some basics of such a process.

  2. High temperature erosion of nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.

    1995-12-31

    High temperature erosion behavior was studied on three commercial nickel alloys, Inconel 718, Inconel 601 and Inconel X-750, using a vertical sand-blast type of erosion test rig. Effect of temperature on erosion was investigated by varying test temperature in six steps from ambient up to 800 C. Other erosion variables investigated included impingement angle, changed from 10{degree} to 90{degree}, and impingement velocity, covered a range of 40 to 90 m/s. Extensive studies on erosion surface morphological features were done on eroded or eroded-corroded specimen surfaces using scanning electron microscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis and scratch test revealed corrosion rate, characteristics of oxide scale formed at high temperature, and some effects of corrosion on erosion. It was found that variation of erosion rate with temperature was directly related to temperature-dependent mechanical property changes of the materials. The mechanisms of the high-temperature erosion were analyzed based on test results. It was observed that erosion was dominant in temperature range up to 800 C, while corrosion played increased roles in upper portion of the temperature range tested.

  3. Laser Brazing of High Temperature Braze Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Y. P.; Seaman, R. F.; McQuillan, T. J.; Martiens, R. F.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) consists of 1080 conical tubes, which are furnace brazed themselves, manifolds, and surrounding structural jacket making almost four miles of braze joints. Subsequent furnace braze cycles are performed due to localized braze voids between the coolant tubes. SSME nozzle experiences extremely high heat flux (180 mW/sq m) during hot fire. Braze voids between coolant tubes may result in hot combustion gas escape causing jacket bulges. The nozzle can be disqualified for flight or result in mission failure if the braze voids exceed the limits. Localized braze processes were considered to eliminate braze voids, however, damage to the parent materials often prohibited use of such process. Being the only manned flight reusable rocket engine, it has stringent requirement on the braze process. Poor braze quality or damage to the parent materials limits the nozzle service life. The objective of this study was to develop a laser brazing process to provide quality, localized braze joints without adverse affect on the parent materials. Gold (Au-Cu-Ni-Pd-Mn) based high temperature braze alloys were used in both powder and wire form. Thin section iron base superalloy A286 tube was used as substrate materials. Different Laser Systems including CO2 (10.6 micrometers, 1kW), ND:YAG (1.06 micrometers, 4kW). and direct diode laser (808nm. 150W) were investigated for brazing process. The laser process variables including wavelength. laser power, travel speed and angle of inclination were optimized according to bead geometry and braze alloy wetting at minimum heat input level, The properties of laser brazing were compared to that of furnace brazing. Microhardness profiles were used for braze joint property comparison between laser and furnace brazing. The cooling rate of laser brazing was compared to furnace brazing based on secondary dendritic arm spacing, Both optical and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) were used to evaluate the microstructures of

  4. High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, C. A.; Tuissi, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, an experimental study of laser micro-processing on a Cu-Zr-based shape memory alloy (SMA), which is suitable for high-temperature (HT) applications, is discussed. A first evaluation of the interaction between a laser beam and Zr50Cu28Ni7Co15 HT SMA is highlighted. Single laser pulses at various levels of power and pulse duration were applied to evaluate their effect on the sample surfaces. Blind and through microholes were produced with sizes on the order of a few hundreds of microns; the results were characterized from the morphological viewpoint using a scanning electron microscope. The high beam quality allows the holes to be created with good circularity and little melted material around the hole periphery. An analysis of the chemical composition was performed using energy dispersive spectroscopy, revealing that compositional changes were limited, while important oxidation occurred on the hole surfaces. Additionally, laser micro-cutting tests were also proposed to evaluate the cut edge morphology and dimensions. The main result of this paper concerned the good behavior of the material upon interaction with the laser beam, which suggests that microfeatures can be successfully produced in this alloy.

  5. Alloys based on NiAl for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedula, K. M.; Pathare, V.; Aslanidis, I.; Titran, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The NiAl alloys for potential high temperature applications were studied. Alloys were prepared by powder metallurgy techniques. Flow stress values at slow strain rates and high temperatures were measured. Some ternary alloying additions (Hf, Ta and Nb) were identified. The mechanism of strengthening in alloys containing these additions appears to be a form of particle dislocation interaction. The effects of grain size and stoichiometry in binary alloys are also presented.

  6. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700.degree. C.-1200.degree. C. to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy.

  7. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, J.H.

    1995-06-06

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy are disclosed. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700--1200 C to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy. 13 figs.

  8. High temperature cyclic oxidation data. Part 1: Turbine alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.; Garlick, Ralph G.; Lowell, Carl E.

    1989-01-01

    Specific-weight-change-versus-time data and x ray diffraction results are presented derived from high temperature cyclic tests on high temperature, high strength nickel-base gamma/gamma prime and cobalt-base turbine alloys. Each page of data summarizes a complete test on a given alloy sample.

  9. High-temperature cyclic oxidation data. Part 2: Turbine alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.; Garlick, Ralph G.

    1989-01-01

    Specific-weight-change-versus-time data and x ray diffraction results are presented derived from high temperature cyclic tests on high temperature, high strength nickel-base gamma/gamma prime and cobalt-base turbine alloys. Each page of data summarizes a complete test on a given alloy sample.

  10. A polytetrafluorethylene insulated cable for high temperature oxygen aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, A. T.; Webber, R. G.

    For electrical cables to function and survive in the severe high temperature oxygen environment that will be experienced in the external tanks of the space shuttle, extreme cleanliness and material purity is required. A flexible light weight cable has been developed for use in pure oxygen at worst case temperatures of -190 to +260 degrees Centigrade and pressures as high as 44 pounds per square inch absolute. A comprehensive series of tests were performed on cables manufactured to the best commercial practices in order to establish the basic guidelines for control of build configuration as well as each material used in construction of the cable.

  11. High-temperature alloys: Single-crystal performance boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütze, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys are lightweight and have attractive properties for high-temperature applications. A new growth method that enables single-crystal production now boosts their mechanical performance.

  12. The oxidation performance of modern high-temperature alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deodeshmukh, V. P.; Srivastava, S. K.

    2009-07-01

    The high-temperature oxidation resistance of an alloy is a key design criterion for components in a variety of industrial applications, such as advanced gas turbines, industrial heating, automotive, waste incineration, power generation and energy conversion, chemical and petrochemical processing, and metals and minerals processing. The importance of correctly assessing the long-term oxidation behavior of high-temperature alloys is illustrated. As applications move to higher temperatures, new alloys are needed. In this paper, the oxidation performance of three newly developed alloys, an alumina-forming Ni-Fe-Cr-Al alloy, a γ'-strengthened Ni-Cr-Co-Mo-(Al+Ti) alloy, and a nitride-strengthened Co-Cr-Fe-Ni-(Ti+Nb) alloy is presented.

  13. Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    Originally developed by NASA as high performance piston alloys to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low exhaust emission, the novel NASA alloys now offer dramatic increase in tensile strength for many other applications at elevated temperatures from 450 F (232 C) to about 750 F (400 C). It is an ideal low cost material for cast automotive components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. It can be very economically produced from conventional permanent mold, sand casting or investment casting, with silicon content ranging from 6% to 18%. At high silicon levels, the alloy exhibits excellent dimensional stability, surface hardness and wear resistant properties.

  14. High temperature creep resistant austenitic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Swindeman, Robert W.; Goodwin, Gene M.

    1989-01-01

    An improved austenitic alloy having in wt % 19-21 Cr, 30-35 Ni, 1.5-2.5 Mn, 2-3 Mo, 0.1-0.4 Si, 0.3-0.5 Ti, 0.1-0.3 Nb, 0.1-0.5 V, 0.001-0.005 P, 0.08-0.12 C, 0.01-0.03 N, 0.005-0.01 B and the balance iron that is further improved by annealing for up to 1 hour at 1150.degree.-1200.degree. C. and then cold deforming 5-15 %. The alloy exhibits dramatically improved creep rupture resistance and ductility at 700.degree. C.

  15. Improved high temperature creep resistant austenitic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1988-05-13

    An improved austenitic alloy having in wt% 19-21 Cr, 30-35 Ni, 1.5-2.5 Mn, 2-3 Mo, 0.1-0.4 Si, 0.3-0.5 Ti, 0.1-0.3 Nb, 0.1-0.5 V, 0.001-0.005 P, 0.08-0.12 C, 0.01-0.03 N, 0.005-0.01 B and the balance iron that is further improved by annealing for up to 1 hour at 1150-1200/degree/C and then cold deforming 5-15%. The alloy exhibits dramatically improved creep rupture resistance and ductility at 700/degree/C. 2 figs.

  16. Erosion/corrosion behavior of commercial high temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kloewer, J.

    1995-12-31

    The erosion/corrosion behavior of five commercial high temperature materials (alloy 800H, AISI 314, alloy AC66, alloy 45-TM, alloy 625) was investigated in synthetic waste incineration atmosphere using silica sand as erosive particles. It was found that the erosion/corrosion behavior depended sensitively on the particle velocity. As long as the velocity was low (880 m/h) corrosion attack occurred mainly by chlorination. Consequently materials with a high resistance to chlorine-containing atmospheres like alloys 45-TM and 625 showed the lowest corrosion rates. If the particle velocity was increased to 1660 m/h, material wastage by erosion dominated.

  17. High Temperature Fracture Characteristics of a Nanostructured Ferritic Alloy (NFA)

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Kim, Jeoung H; Ji Hyun, Yoon; Hoelzer, David T

    2010-01-01

    High temperature fracture behavior has been investigated for the nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT (SM10). The fracture toughness of the alloy was above 140 MPa m at low temperatures, room temperature (RT) and 200 C, but decreased to a low fracture toughness range of 52 82 MPa m at higher temperatures up to 700 C. This behavior was explained by the fractography results indicating that the unique nanostructure of 14YWT alloy produced shallow plasticity layers at high temperatures and a low-ductility grain boundary debonding occurred at 700 C.

  18. High temperature corrosion behavior of commercial high temperature alloys under deposits of alkali salts

    SciTech Connect

    Kloewer, J.

    1995-12-31

    Corrosive deposits containing high amounts of alkali sulphates, chlorides and/or carbonates are encountered by heat exchanger tubes in a variety of industrial processes. Due to their low melting point the alkali salts can cause basic or acidic dissolution of the subjacent material, which results in rapid wastage of the tube. In order to select appropriate materials for application in heat recovery systems eight commercial high temperature materials (alloy 800H, Alloy 31, Alloy AC66, alloy 45-TM, Alloy 625, Alloy 59 and Alloy C-4) were investigated in sulphate, sulphate/chloride and sulphate/chloride/carbonate salt mixtures. The temperature range was between 550 and 750 C. In agreement with field tests the corrosion attack was high for most of the alloys tested with the corrosion rate depending sensitively on salt composition, test temperature and alloy composition. High molybdenum contents were found to be detrimental. Chromium did not effect the corrosion behavior significantly, whereas silicon had a beneficial effect on the corrosion resistance in molten alkali salts.

  19. High-temperature corrosion: Issues in alloy selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, George Y.

    1991-11-01

    This article examines the modes of high-temperature corrosion that are often responsible for equipment failures in a variety of industries, including aerospace and gas turbines; heat treating; mineral and metallurgical processing; chemical processing; refining and petrochemical processing; ceramic, electronic, and glass manufacturing; automotive; pulp and paper; waste incineration; and power generation and energy conversion. Corrosion data related to each corrosion mode are reviewed to provide readers with a brief materials selection guide.

  20. Potential High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloys Identified in the Ti(Ni,Pt) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald D.; Biles, Tiffany A.; Garg, Anita; Nathal, Michael V.

    2004-01-01

    "Shape memory" is a unique property of certain alloys that, when deformed (within certain strain limits) at low temperatures, will remember and recover to their original predeformed shape upon heating. It occurs when an alloy is deformed in the low-temperature martensitic phase and is then heated above its transformation temperature back to an austenitic state. As the material passes through this solid-state phase transformation on heating, it also recovers its original shape. This behavior is widely exploited, near room temperature, in commercially available NiTi alloys for connectors, couplings, valves, actuators, stents, and other medical and dental devices. In addition, there are limitless applications in the aerospace, automotive, chemical processing, and many other industries for materials that exhibit this type of shape-memory behavior at higher temperatures. But for high temperatures, there are currently no commercial shape-memory alloys. Although there are significant challenges to the development of high-temperature shape-memory alloys, at the NASA Glenn Research Center we have identified a series of alloy compositions in the Ti-Ni-Pt system that show great promise as potential high-temperature shape-memory materials.

  1. High-temperature alloys for high-power thermionic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Kwang S.; Jacobson, D.L.; D'cruz, L.; Luo, Anhua; Chen, Bor-Ling.

    1990-08-01

    The need for structural materials with useful strength above 1600 k has stimulated interest in refractory-metal alloys. Tungsten possesses an extreme high modulus of elasticity as well as the highest melting temperature among metals, and hence is being considered as one of the most promising candidate materials for high temperature structural applications such as space nuclear power systems. This report is divided into three chapters covering the following: (1) the processing of tungsten base alloys; (2) the tensile properties of tungsten base alloys; and (3) creep behavior of tungsten base alloys. Separate abstracts were prepared for each chapter. (SC)

  2. The use of β titanium alloys in the aerospace industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, R. R.; Briggs, R. D.

    2005-12-01

    Beta titanium alloys have been available since the 1950s (Ti-13V-11Cr-3Mo or B120VCA), but significant applications of these alloys, beyond the SR-71 Blackbird, have been slow in coming. The next significant usage of a β alloy did not occur until the mid-1980s on the B-1B bomber. This aircraft used Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn sheet due to its capability for strip rolling, improved formability, and higher strength than Ti-6Al-4V. The next major usage was on a commercial aircraft, the Boeing 777, which made extensive use of Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al high-strength forgings. Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn environmental control system ducting, castings, and springs were also used, along with Ti-3Al-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr (β-C) springs. Beta-21S was also introduced for high-temperature usage. More recent work at Boeing has focused on the development of Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr, a high-strength alloy that can be used at higher strength than Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al and is much more robust; it has a much wider, or friendlier, processing window. This, along with additional studies at Boeing, and from within the aerospace industry in general will be discussed in detail, summarizing applications and the rationale for the selection of this alloy system for aerospace applications.

  3. High-entropy alloys as high-temperature thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shafeie, Samrand; Guo, Sheng; Hu, Qiang; Fahlquist, Henrik; Erhart, Paul; Palmqvist, Anders

    2015-11-14

    Thermoelectric (TE) generators that efficiently recycle a large portion of waste heat will be an important complementary energy technology in the future. While many efficient TE materials exist in the lower temperature region, few are efficient at high temperatures. Here, we present the high temperature properties of high-entropy alloys (HEAs), as a potential new class of high temperature TE materials. We show that their TE properties can be controlled significantly by changing the valence electron concentration (VEC) of the system with appropriate substitutional elements. Both the electrical and thermal transport properties in this system were found to decrease with a lower VEC number. Overall, the large microstructural complexity and lower average VEC in these types of alloys can potentially be used to lower both the total and the lattice thermal conductivity. These findings highlight the possibility to exploit HEAs as a new class of future high temperature TE materials.

  4. High-entropy alloys as high-temperature thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafeie, Samrand; Guo, Sheng; Hu, Qiang; Fahlquist, Henrik; Erhart, Paul; Palmqvist, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) generators that efficiently recycle a large portion of waste heat will be an important complementary energy technology in the future. While many efficient TE materials exist in the lower temperature region, few are efficient at high temperatures. Here, we present the high temperature properties of high-entropy alloys (HEAs), as a potential new class of high temperature TE materials. We show that their TE properties can be controlled significantly by changing the valence electron concentration (VEC) of the system with appropriate substitutional elements. Both the electrical and thermal transport properties in this system were found to decrease with a lower VEC number. Overall, the large microstructural complexity and lower average VEC in these types of alloys can potentially be used to lower both the total and the lattice thermal conductivity. These findings highlight the possibility to exploit HEAs as a new class of future high temperature TE materials.

  5. High temperature ductility loss in titanium alloys -- A review

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, B.B.; Imam, M.A.; Damkroger, B.K.; Edwards, G.R.

    1994-02-01

    It is well known that two phase titanium alloy systems suffer from an abrupt drop in ductility at elevated temperatures in the range of 1,000 to 1,150 K. This loss of ductility is manifested by easy decohesion of polycrystalline aggregates along the grain boundaries of the high temperature beta phase. If the alloy is in a state of tensile stress at the aforementioned temperatures, cracks initiate at the grain boundaries and propagate readily through the alloy, leading to premature failure. This phenomenon is a cause of major concern in titanium alloy fabrication and welding. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain high temperature crack nucleation and growth along the boundaries. A critical review of the phenomenon and possible mechanisms responsible for the observed behavior will be discussed.

  6. Hot Workability of CuZr-Based Shape Memory Alloys for Potential High-Temperature Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, Carlo Alberto; Tuissi, Ausonio

    2014-07-01

    The research on high-temperature shape memory alloys has been growing because of the interest of several potential industrial fields, such as automotive, aerospace, mechanical, and control systems. One suitable candidate is given by the CuZr system, because of its relative low price in comparison with others, like the NiTi-based one. In this context, the goal of this work is the study of hot workability of some CuZr-based shape memory alloys. In particular, this study addresses on the effect of hot rolling process on the metallurgical and calorimetric properties of the CuZr system. The addition of some alloying elements (Cr, Co, Ni, and Ti) is taken into account and their effect is also put in comparison with each other. The alloys were produced by means of an arc melting furnace in inert atmosphere under the shape of cigars. Due to the high reactivity of these alloys at high temperature, the cigars were sealed in a stainless steel can before the processing and two different procedures of hot rolling were tested. The characterization of the rolled alloys is performed using discrete scanning calorimetry in terms of evolution of the martensitic transformation and scanning electron microscopy for the microstructural investigations. Additionally, preliminary tests of laser interaction has been also proposed on the alloy more interesting for potential applications, characterized by high transformation temperatures and its good thermal stability.

  7. Nonequilibrium Phase Chemistry in High Temperature Structure Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, R.

    1991-01-01

    Titanium and nickel aluminides of nonequilibrium microstructures and in thin gauge thickness were identified, characterized and produced for potential high temperature applications. A high rate sputter deposition technique for rapid surveillance of the microstructures and nonequilibrium phase is demonstrated. Alloys with specific compositions were synthesized with extended solid solutions, stable dispersoids, and specific phase boundaries associated with different heat treatments. Phase stability and mechanical behavior of these nonequilibrium alloys were investigated and compared.

  8. Alloy performance in high temperature oil refining environments

    SciTech Connect

    Sorell, G.; Humphries, M.J.; McLaughlin, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The performance of steels and alloys in high temperature petroleum refining applications is strongly influenced by detrimental interactions with aggressive process environments. These are encountered in conventional refining processes and especially in processing schemes for fuels conversion and upgrading. Metal-environment interactions can shorten equipment life and cause impairment of mechanical properties, metallurgical stability and weldability. Corrosion and other high temperature attack modes discussed are sulfidation, hydrogen attack, carburization, and metal dusting. Sulfidation is characterized by bulky scales that are generally ineffective corrosion barriers. Metal loss is often accompanied by sub-surface sulfide penetration. Hydrogen attack and carburization proceed without metal loss and are detectable only by metallographic examination. In advanced stages, these deterioration modes cause severe impairment of mechanical properties. Harmful metal-environment interactions are characterized and illustrated with data drawn from test exposures and plant experience. Alloys employed for high temperature oil refining equipment are identified, including some promising newcomers.

  9. NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structures technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Haviland, John K.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Pilkey, Walter D.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Scully, John R.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Swanson, Robert E.; Thornton, Earl A.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The general objective of the NASA-UVa Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program was to conduct research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites, and associated thermal gradient structures. The following research areas were actively investigated: (1) mechanical and environmental degradation mechanisms in advanced light metals and composites; (2) aerospace materials science; (3) mechanics of materials and composites for aerospace structures; and (4) thermal gradient structures.

  10. High Temperature Irradiation Effects in Selected Generation IV Structural Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; McClintock, David A; Hoelzer, David T; Tan, Lizhen; Allen, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    In the Generation IV Materials Program cross-cutting task, irradiation and testing were carried out to address the issue of high temperature irradiation effects with selected current and potential candidate metallic alloys. The materials tested were (1) a high-nickel iron-base alloy (Alloy 800H); (2) a nickel-base alloy (Alloy 617); (3) two advanced nano-structured ferritic alloys (designated 14YWT and 14WT); and (4) a commercial ferritic-martensitic steel (annealed 9Cr-1MoV). Small tensile specimens were irradiated in rabbit capsules in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor at temperatures from about 550 to 700 C and to irradiation doses in the range 1.2 to 1.6 dpa. The Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 exhibited significant hardening after irradiation at 580 C; some hardening occurred at 660 C as well, but the 800H showed extremely low tensile elongations when tested at 700 C. Notably, the grain boundary engineered 800H exhibited even greater hardening at 580 C and retained a high amount of ductility. Irradiation effects on the two nano-structured ferritic alloys and the annealed 9Cr-1MoV were relatively slight at this low dose.

  11. Computational and Experimental Development of Novel High Temperature Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, M.J.; Ray, P.K.; and Akinc, M.

    2010-06-29

    The work done in this paper is based on our earlier work on developing an extended Miedema model and then using it to downselect potential alloy systems. Our approach is to closely couple the semi-empirical methodologies to more accurate ab initio methods to dentify the best candidates for ternary alloying additions. The architectural framework for our material's design is a refractory base metal with a high temperature intermetallic which provides both high temperature creep strength and a source of oxidatively stable elements. Potential refractory base metals are groups IIIA, IVA and VA. For Fossil applications, Ni-Al appears to be the best choice to provide the source of oxidatively stable elements but this system requires a 'boost' in melting temperatures to be a viable candidate in the ultra-high temperature regime (> 1200C). Some late transition metals and noble elements are known to increase the melting temperature of Ni-Al phases. Such an approach suggested that a Mo-Ni-Al system would be a good base alloy system that could be further improved upon by dding Platinum group metals (PGMs). In this paper, we demonstrate the variety of microstructures that can be synthesized for the base alloy system, its oxidation behavior as well as the oxidation behavior of the PGM substituted oxidation resistant B2 NiAl phase.

  12. High temperature seal for joining ceramics and metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maiya, P. Subraya; Picciolo, John J.; Emerson, James E.; Dusek, Joseph T.; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    1998-01-01

    For a combination of a membrane of SrFeCo.sub.0.5 O.sub.x and an Inconel alloy, a high-temperature seal is formed between the membrane and the alloy. The seal is interposed between the alloy and the membrane, and is a fritted compound of Sr oxide and boric oxide and a fritted compound of Sr, Fe and Co oxides. The fritted compound of SrFeCo.sub.0.50 O.sub.x is present in the range of from about 30 to 70 percent by weight of the total sealant material and the fritted compound of Sr oxide and boric oxide has a mole ratio of 2 moles of the Sr oxide for each mole of boric oxide. A method of sealing a ceramic to an Inconel metal alloy is also disclosed.

  13. High temperature seal for joining ceramics and metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maiya, P.S.; Picciolo, J.J.; Emerson, J.E.; Dusek, J.T.; Balachandran, U.

    1998-03-10

    For a combination of a membrane of SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} and an Inconel alloy, a high-temperature seal is formed between the membrane and the alloy. The seal is interposed between the alloy and the membrane, and is a fritted compound of Sr oxide and boric oxide and a fritted compound of Sr, Fe and Co oxides. The fritted compound of SrFeCo{sub 0.50}O{sub x} is present in the range of from about 30 to 70 percent by weight of the total sealant material and the fritted compound of Sr oxide and boric oxide has a mole ratio of 2 moles of the Sr oxide for each mole of boric oxide. A method of sealing a ceramic to an Inconel metal alloy is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  14. Spectroscopic Challenges in the Modelling and Diagnostics of High Temperature Air Plasma Radiation for Aerospace Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Laux, Christophe O.

    2007-04-06

    State-of-the-art spectroscopic models of the radiative transitions of interest for Earth re-entry and ground-based diagnostic facilities for aerospace applications are reviewed. The spectral range considered extends from the vacuum ultraviolet to the mid-infrared range (80 nm to 5.5 {mu}m). The modeling results are compared with absolute intensity measurements of the ultraviolet-visible-infrared emission of a well-characterized high-temperature air plasma produced with a 50 kW inductively coupled radio-frequency plasma torch, and with high-resolution absorption spectra from the Center for Astrophysics in the vacuum ultraviolet. The Spectroscopic data required to better model the spectral features of interest for aerospace applications are discussed.

  15. High temperature, oxidation resistant noble metal-Al alloy thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Gedwill, Michael G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermocouple is disclosed. The thermocouple is comprised of an electropositive leg formed of a noble metal-Al alloy and an electronegative leg electrically joined to form a thermocouple junction. The thermocouple provides for accurate and reproducible measurement of high temperatures (600 - 1300 C) in inert, oxidizing or reducing environments, gases, or vacuum. Furthermore, the thermocouple circumvents the need for expensive, strategic precious metals such as rhodium as a constituent component. Selective oxidation of rhodium is also thereby precluded.

  16. Oxidation of Palladium-Chromium Alloys for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piltch, Nancy D.; Jih-Fen, Lei; Zeller, Mary V.

    1994-01-01

    An alloy consisting of Pd with 13 wt % Cr is a promising material for high temperature applications. High temperature performance is degraded by the oxidation of the material, which is more severe in the fine wires and thin films used for sensor applications than in the bulk. The present study was undertaken to improve our understanding of the physical and chemical changes occurring at these temperatures and to identify approaches to limit oxidation of the alloy. The alloy was studied in both ribbon and wire forms. Ribbon samples were chosen to examine the role of grain boundaries in the oxidation process because of the convenience of handling for the oxidation studies. Wire samples 25 microns in diameter which are used in resistance strain gages were studied to correlate chemical properties with observed electrical, physical, and structural properties. Overcoating the material with a metallic Cr film did prevent the segregation of Pd to the surface; however, it did not eliminate the oxidation of the alloy.

  17. Damping of High-temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Padula, Santo A., II; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center have been investigating high temperature shape memory alloys as potential damping materials for turbomachinery rotor blades. Analysis shows that a thin layer of SMA with a loss factor of 0.04 or more would be effective at reducing the resonant response of a titanium alloy beam. Two NiTiHf shape memory alloy compositions were tested to determine their loss factors at frequencies from 0.1 to 100 Hz, at temperatures from room temperature to 300 C, and at alternating strain levels of 34-35x10(exp -6). Elevated damping was demonstrated between the M(sub s) and M(sub f) phase transformation temperatures and between the A(sub s) and A(sub f) temperatures. The highest damping occurred at the lowest frequencies, with a loss factor of 0.2-0.26 at 0.1 Hz. However, the peak damping decreased with increasing frequency, and showed significant temperature hysteresis in heating and cooling. Keywords: High-temperature, shape memory alloy, damping, aircraft engine blades, NiTiHf

  18. A shape-memory alloy for high-temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Duerig, T.W.; Albrecht, J.; Gessinger, G.H.

    1982-12-01

    An alloy based on the Cu-Al-Ni ternary system has been developed at the research center of Brown, Boveri and Co., Baden, Switzerland, which provides a fully reversible (two-way) shape memory effect at significantly higher temperatures than those afforded by commercial memory alloys such as NiTi and Cu-Zn-Al. The higher temperature capability of this alloy could open new fields for the application of the shape memory effect, particularly in thermal switching and protection devices. After suitable deformation and processing, a shape change is observed while heating the alloy through the temperature interval from 175 to 190/sup 0/C. This shape change can be completely reversed during subsequent cooling from 155 to 125/sup 0/C. The magnitude of the reversible strain produced by this alloy is 1.5%; somewhat higher strains can be achieved if lower memory temperatures can be accepted, and conversely, better high temperature capabilities can be achieved by accepting smaller reversible strains. The memory effects in this alloy have been found to be unaffected by short overheatings to temperatures as high as 300/sup 0/C.

  19. Amorphous Alloy Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, K

    2013-09-30

    At the beginning of this project, thin film amorphous alloy membranes were considered a nascent but promising new technology for industrial-scale hydrogen gas separations from coal- derived syngas. This project used a combination of theoretical modeling, advanced physical vapor deposition fabricating, and laboratory and gasifier testing to develop amorphous alloy membranes that had the potential to meet Department of Energy (DOE) targets in the testing strategies outlined in the NETL Membrane Test Protocol. The project is complete with Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), and Western Research Institute (WRI) having all operated independently and concurrently. GT studied the hydrogen transport properties of several amorphous alloys and found that ZrCu and ZrCuTi were the most promising candidates. GT also evaluated the hydrogen transport properties of V, Nb and Ta membranes coated with different transition-metal carbides (TMCs) (TM = Ti, Hf, Zr) catalytic layers by employing first-principles calculations together with statistical mechanics methods and determined that TiC was the most promising material to provide catalytic hydrogen dissociation. SwRI developed magnetron coating techniques to deposit a range of amorphous alloys onto both porous discs and tubular substrates. Unfortunately none of the amorphous alloys could be deposited without pinhole defects that undermined the selectivity of the membranes. WRI tested the thermal properties of the ZrCu and ZrNi alloys and found that under reducing environments the upper temperature limit of operation without recrystallization is ~250 °C. There were four publications generated from this project with two additional manuscripts in progress and six presentations were made at national and international technical conferences. The combination of the pinhole defects and the lack of high temperature stability make the theoretically identified most promising candidate amorphous alloys

  20. NASA-UVA light aerospace alloy and structures technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Haviland, John K.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Pilkey, Walter D.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Stoner, Glenn E.; Swanson, Robert E.; Thornton, Earl A.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.; Wert, John A.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites, and associated thermal gradient structures. Individual technical objectives are established for each project. Efforts aim to produce basic understanding of material behavior, monolithic and composite alloys, processing methods, solid and mechanics analyses, measurement advances, and a pool of educated graduate students. Progress is reported for 11 areas of study.

  1. High Temperature Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Alloy 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2001-01-01

    Methods to improve the high temperature, dwell crack growth resistance of Alloy 10, a high strength, nickel-base disk alloy, were studied. Two approaches, heat treat variations and composition modifications, were investigated. Under the heat treat approach, solution temperature, cooling rates, and stabilization, were studied. It was found that higher solution temperatures, which promote coarser grain sizes, coupled with a 1550 F stabilization treatment were found to significantly reduce dwell crack growth rates at 1300 F Changes in the niobium and tantalum content were found to have a much smaller impact on crack growth behavior. Lowering the niobium:tantalum ratio did improve crack growth resistance and this effect was most pronounced for coarse grain microstructures. Based on these findings, a coarse grain microstructure for Alloy 10 appears to be the best option for improving dwell crack growth resistance, especially in the rim of a disk where temperatures can reach or exceed 1300 T. Further, the use of advanced processing technologies, which can produce a coarse grain rim and fine grain bore, would be the preferred option for Alloy 10 to obtain the optimal balance between tensile, creep, and crack growth requirements for small gas turbine engines.

  2. High-temperature, high-frequency fretting fatigue of a single crystal nickel alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlik, John Frederick

    Fretting is a structural damage mechanism arising from a combination of wear, corrosion, and fatigue between two nominally clamped surfaces subjected to an oscillatory loading. A critical location for fretting induced damage has been identified at the blade/disk and blade/damper interfaces of gas turbine engine turbomachinery and space propulsion components. The high-temperature, high-frequency loading environment seen by these components lead to severe stress gradients at the edge-of-contact that could potentially foster crack growth leading to component failure. These contact stresses drive crack nucleation in fretting and are very sensitive to the geometry of the contacting bodies, the contact loads, materials, temperature, and contact surface tribology (friction). To diagnose the threat that small and relatively undetectable fretting fatigue cracks pose to damage tolerance and the ensuing structural integrity of aerospace components, a strong motivation exists to develop a quantitative mechanics based understanding of fretting crack nucleation in advanced aerospace alloys. In response to this need, the objective of this work is to characterize the fretting behavior exhibited by a polycrystalline/single crystal nickel contact subjected to elevated frequency and temperature. The effort to meet this objective is two fold: (1) to develop a well-characterized experimental fretting rig to investigate fretting behavior of advanced aerospace alloys at high frequency and high temperature, and (2) to develop the associated contact modeling tools for calculating contact stresses given in-situ experimentally measured remote contact loads. By coupling the experimental results and stress analysis, this effort aims to correlate the fretting crack nucleation behavior with the local contact stresses calculated from the devised three dimensional, anisotropic, dissimilar material contact model. The experimental effort is first motivated by a survey of recent fretting issues and

  3. Cyclic Oxidation of High-Temperature Alloy Wires in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reigel, Marissa M.

    2004-01-01

    High-temperature alloy wires are proposed for use in seal applications for future re-useable space vehicles. These alloys offer the potential for improved wear resistance of the seals. The wires must withstand the high temperature environments the seals are subjected to as well as maintain their oxidation resistance during the heating and cooling cycles of vehicle re-entry. To model this, the wires were subjected to cyclic oxidation in stagnant air. of this layer formation is dependent on temperature. Slow growing oxides such as chromia and alumina are desirable. Once the oxide is formed it can prevent the metal from further reacting with its environment. Cyclic oxidation models the changes in temperature these wires will undergo in application. Cycling the temperature introduces thermal stresses which can cause the oxide layer to break off. Re-growth of the oxide layer consumes more metal and therefore reduces the properties and durability of the material. were used for cyclic oxidation testing. The baseline material, Haynes 188, has a Co base and is a chromia former while the other two alloys, Kanthal A1 and PM2000, both have a Fe base and are alumina formers. Haynes 188 and Kanthal A1 wires are 250 pm in diameter and PM2000 wires are 150 pm in diameter. The coiled wire has a total surface area of 3 to 5 sq cm. The wires were oxidized for 11 cycles at 1204 C, each cycle containing a 1 hour heating time and a minimum 20 minute cooling time. Weights were taken between cycles. After 11 cycles, one wire of each composition was removed for analysis. The other wire continued testing for 70 cycles. Post-test analysis includes X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) for phase identification and morphology.

  4. High-temperature Hydrogen Permeation in Nickel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    P. Calderoni; M. Ebner; R. Pawelko

    2010-10-01

    In gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor concepts, tritium is produced as a tertiary fission product and by activation of graphite core contaminants, such as lithium; of the helium isotope, He-3, that is naturally present in the He gas coolant; and the boron in the B4C burnable poison. Because of its high mobility at the reactor outlet temperatures, tritium poses a risk of permeating through the walls of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) or steam generator (SG) systems, potentially contaminating the environment and in particular the hydrogen product when the reactor heat is utilized in connection with a hydrogen generation plant. An experiment to measure tritium permeation in structural materials at temperatures up to 1000 C has been constructed at the Idaho National Laboratory Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant program. The design is based on two counter flowing helium loops to represent heat exchanger conditions and was optimized to allow control of the materials surface condition and the investigation of the effects of thermal fatigue. In the ongoing campaign three nickel alloys are being considered because of their high-temperature creep properties, alloy 617, 800H and 230. This paper introduces the general issues related to tritium in the on-going assessment of gas cooled VHTR systems fission product transport and outlines the planned research activities in this area; outlines the features and capabilities of the experimental facility being operated at INL; presents and discusses the initial results of hydrogen permeability measurements in two of the selected alloys and compares them with the available database from previous studies.

  5. Constitutive relationships for anisotropic high-temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.

    1982-01-01

    A constitutive theory is presented for representing the anisotropic viscoplastic behavior of high temperature alloys that posses directional properties resulting from controlled grain growth or solidification. The theory is an extension of a viscoplastic model that was applied in structural analyses involving isotropic metals. Anisotropy is introduced through the definition of a vector field that identifies a preferential (solidification) direction at each material point. Following the development of a full multiaxial theory, application is made to homogeneously stressed elements in pure shear and to a uniaxially stressed rectangular block in plane stress with the stress direction oriented at an arbitrary angle with the material direction. It is shown that an additional material parameter introduced to characterize the degree of anisotropy can be determined on the basis of simple creep tests.

  6. The 1992 NASA Langley Measurement Technology Conference: Measurement Technology for Aerospace Applications in High-Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J. (Editor); Antcliff, Richard R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    An intensive 2-day conference to discuss the current status of measurement technology in the areas of temperature/heat flux, stress/strain, pressure, and flowfield diagnostics for high temperature aerospace applications was held at Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, on April 22 and 23, 1993. Complete texts of the papers presented at the Conference are included in these proceedings.

  7. High temperature deformation of friction stir processed 7075 aluminium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaliere, P. . E-mail: pasquale.cavaliere@unile.it; Squillace, A.

    2005-08-15

    The mechanical and microstructural properties of 7075 aluminium alloy resulting from Friction Stir Processing (FSP), into sheets of 7 mm thickness, were analysed in the present study. The sheets were processed perpendicularly to the rolling direction; the tensile mechanical properties were evaluated at room temperature in the transverse and longitudinal directions with respect to the processing one. Tensile tests were also performed at higher temperatures and different strain rates in the nugget zone, in order to analyse the superplastic properties of the recrystallized material and to observe the differences from the parent material as a function of the strong grain refinement due to the Friction Stir Process. The high temperature behaviour of the material was studied, in the parallel direction, by means of tensile tests in the temperature and strain rate ranges of 150-500 deg. C and 10{sup -} {sup 2}-10{sup -} {sup 4} s{sup -} {sup 1} respectively, electron microscopy (FEGSEM) observations were carried out to investigate more closely the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested at different temperatures and strain rates.

  8. Statistical Analysis of Strength Data for an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neergaard, L.; Malone, T.

    2001-01-01

    Aerospace vehicles are produced in limited quantities that do not always allow development of MIL-HDBK-5 A-basis design allowables. One method of examining production and composition variations is to perform 100% lot acceptance testing for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper discusses statistical trends seen in strength data for one Al alloy. A four-step approach reduced the data to residuals, visualized residuals as a function of time, grouped data with quantified scatter, and conducted analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  9. Statistical Analysis of Strength Data for an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neergaard, Lynn; Malone, Tina; Gentz, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerospace vehicles are produced in limited quantities that do not always allow development of MIL-HDBK-5 A-basis design allowables. One method of examining production and composition variations is to perform 100% lot acceptance testing for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper discusses statistical trends seen in strength data for one Al alloy. A four-step approach reduced the data to residuals, visualized residuals as a function of time, grouped data with quantified scatter, and conducted analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  10. Fabrication of intermetallic coatings for electrical insulation and corrosion resistance on high-temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.-H.; Cho, W.D.

    1996-11-01

    Several intermetallic films were applied to high-temperature alloys (V alloys and 304, 316 stainless steels) to provide electrical insulation and corrosion resistance. Alloy grain growth at 1000 C for the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy was investigated to determine stability of the alloy substrate during coating formation by CVD or metallic vapor processes at 800-850 C. Film layers were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and by electron-energy-dispersive and XRD analysis; they were also tested for electrical resistivity and corrosion resistance. Results elucidated the nature of the coatings, which provided both electrical insulation and high-temperature corrosion protection.

  11. Burner rig alkali salt corrosion of several high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion of five alloys was studied in cyclic tests in a Mach 0.3 burner rig into whose combustion chamber various aqueous salt solutions were injected. Three nickel-based alloys, a cobalt-base alloy, and an iron-base alloy were studied at temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 C with various salt concentrations and compositions. The relative resistance of the alloys to hot corrosion attack was found to vary with temperature and both concentration and composition of the injected salt solution. Results indicate that the corrosion of these alloys is a function of both the presence of salt condensed as a liquid on the surface and of the composition of the gas phases present.

  12. High-Temperature Alloys for Automotive Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Titran, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Stirling engine is external-combustion engine that offers fuel economy, low emissions, low noise, and low vibrations. One of most critical areas in engine development concerns material selection for component parts. Alloys CG-27 and XF-818 identified capable of withstanding rigorous requirements of automotive Stirling engine. Alloys chosen for availability, performance, and manufacturability. Advanced iron-base alloys have potential for variety of applications, including stationary solar-power systems.

  13. Aerospace applications of advanced aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellman, D. J.; Langenbeck, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced metallic materials within the Al-base family are being developed for applications on current and future aerospace vehicles. These advanced materials offer significant improvements in density, strength, stiffness, fracture resistance, and/or higher use temperature which translates into improved vehicle performance. Aerospace applications of advanced metallic materials include space structures, fighters, military and commercial transport aircraft, and missiles. Structural design requirements, including not only static and durability/damage tolerance criteria but also environmental considerations, drive material selections. Often trade-offs must be made regarding strength, fracture resistance, cost, reliability, and maintainability in order to select the optimum material for a specific application. These trade studies not only include various metallic materials but also many times include advanced composite materials. Details of material comparisons, aerospace applications, and material trades will be presented.

  14. Progress toward a tungsten alloy wire/high temperature alloy composite turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzert, F. J.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    A tungsten alloy wire reinforced high temperature alloy composite is being developed for potential application as a hollow turbine blade for advanced rocket engine turbopumps. The W-24Re-HfC alloy wire used for these composite blades provides an excellent balance of strength and wire ductility. Preliminary fabrication, specimen design, and characterization studies were conducted by using commercially available W218 tungsten wire in place of the W-24Re-Hfc wire. Subsequently, two-ply, 50 vol pct composite panels using the W-24Re-HfC wire were fabricated. Tensile tests and metallographic studies were performed to determine the material viability. Tensile strengths of a Waspaloy matrix composite at 870 C were 90 pct of the value expected from rule-of-mixtures calculations. During processing of this Waspaloy matrix composite, a brittle phase was formed at the wire/matrix interface. Circumferential wire cracks were found in this phase. Wire coating and process evaluation efforts were performed in an attempt to solve the reaction problem. Although problems were encountered in this study, wire reinforced high temperature alloy composites continue to show promise for turbopump turbine blade material improvement.

  15. Evaluating the Hot Corrosion Behavior of High-Temperature Alloys for Gas Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deodeshmukh, V. P.

    2015-11-01

    The hot corrosion behavior of high-temperature alloys is critically important for gas turbine engine components operating near the marine environments. The two test methods—Two-Zone and Burner-Rig—used to evaluate the hot corrosion performance of high-temperature alloys are illustrated by comparing the Type I hot corrosion behavior of selected high-temperature alloys. Although the ranking of the alloys is quite comparable, it is evident that the two-zone hot corrosion test is significantly more aggressive than the burner-rig test. The effect of long-term exposures and the factors that influence the hot corrosion performance of high-temperature alloys are briefly discussed.

  16. Correlation between Mechanical Behavior and Actuator-type Performance of Ni-Ti-Pd High-temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Glen S.; Padula, Santo A., II; Garg, Anita; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    High-temperature shape memory alloys in the NiTiPd system are being investigated as lower cost alternatives to NiTiPt alloys for use in compact solid-state actuators for the aerospace, automotive, and power generation industries. A range of ternary NiTiPd alloys containing 15 to 46 at.% Pd has been processed and actuator mimicking tests (thermal cycling under load) were used to measure transformation temperatures, work behavior, and dimensional stability. With increasing Pd content, the work output of the material decreased, while the amount of permanent strain resulting from each load-biased thermal cycle increased. Monotonic isothermal tension testing of the high-temperature austenite and low temperature martensite phases was used to partially explain these behaviors, where a mismatch in yield strength between the austenite and martensite phases was observed at high Pd levels. Moreover, to further understand the source of the permanent strain at lower Pd levels, strain recovery tests were conducted to determine the onset of plastic deformation in the martensite phase. Consequently, the work behavior and dimensional stability during thermal cycling under load of the various NiTiPd alloys is discussed in relation to the deformation behavior of the materials as revealed by the strain recovery and monotonic tension tests.

  17. Deformation and thermal fatigue in high temperature austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, P.D.; Yost, B.; Swindeman, R.W.; Li, Che-Yu . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1991-03-01

    The flow properties of modified austenitic alloys are reviewed. The important strengthening mechanisms discussed include precipitation hardening produced by a combination of cold work and aging and by creep aging. Grain boundary sliding enhanced by reduced grain size is shown to reduce the flow strength of these alloys. 5 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Constitutive Modeling of High-Temperature Flow Behavior of Al-0.62Mg-0.73Si Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Ye, W. H.; Hu, L. X.

    2016-04-01

    The high-temperature flow behavior of an aerospace structural material Al-0.62 Mg-0.73Si aluminum alloy was researched in this work. The isothermal compression tests were carried out in the temperature range of 683-783 K and strain rate range of 0.001-1 s-1. Based on the obtained true stress-true strain curves, the constitutive relationship of the alloy was revealed by establishing the Arrhenius-type constitutive model and a modified Johnson-Cook model. It was found that the flow characteristics were closely related to deformation temperature and strain rate. The activation energy of the studied material was calculated to be approximately 174 kJ mol-1. A comparative study has been conducted on the accuracy and reliability of the proposed models using statistics analysis method. It was proved by error analysis that the Arrhenius-type model had a better performance than the modified Johnson-Cook model.

  19. High temperature exchange bias effect in melt-spun Mn55Bi45alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yiming; Xiang, Zhen; Wang, Taolei; Niu, Junchao; Xia, Kada; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Hong; Cao, Yongze; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we report a high-temperature exchange bias (EB) effect in melt-spun Mn55Bi45 alloy ribbons. A remarkable spontaneous exchange bias (up to 1700 Oe) was achieved at temperature from 300 K to 550 K, which is far higher than what has so far been observed in other alloy systems. Such a phenomenon is attributed to the local antiferromagnetic cluster formed in the ferromagnetic matrix. The observation of high-temperature EB in the Mn55Bi45 alloy is of interest from the perspective of practical applications, and it is a good starting point for designing high-temperature spintronic devices.

  20. Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Liu, C.T.; Takeyama, Masao.

    1994-02-01

    The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250 C and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr[sub 2]Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements. 14 figures.

  1. Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.; Takeyama, Masao

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250.degree. C. and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr.sub.2 Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements.

  2. Ceramic Matrix Composites: High Temperature Effects. (Latest Citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development and testing of ceramic matrix composites for high temperature use. Tests examining effects of the high temperatures on bond strength, thermal degradation, oxidation, thermal stress, thermal fatigue, and thermal expansion properties are referenced. Applications of the composites include space structures, gas turbine and engine components, control surfaces for spacecraft and transatmospheric vehicles, heat shields, and heat exchangers.

  3. Optical investigation of oxide scales on high-temperature alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uran, Serif

    all crystallographic phases with Zr doping. The oxide scales are also thinner on the Zr doped specimen. The effects of reactive element (i.e., Zr) doping on deformation and residual stresses which develop in the vicinity of edges in single crystal β-NiAl is investigated as it is thermally oxidized at temperatures in the range 1100-1450°C. Data for both the deformation and stress are presented for the following pair of orientations: (001) and (11¯0), (111), and (11¯0). The effect of surface roughness on the properties of the oxide scale that is formed on Fe-Cr-Al alloys during oxidation in air at high temperatures has been investigated. Large and systematic differences in scale thickness, in the composition of the oxides forming the scale, and in the residual stress levels are found.

  4. Directions for High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys' Improvement: Straight Way to High-Entropy Materials?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firstov, G. S.; Kosorukova, T. A.; Koval, Yu N.; Verhovlyuk, P. A.

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays, all thermo-mechanical effects, associated with the martensitic structural phase transitions, are still in the focus of scientists and engineers, especially once these phenomena are taking place at elevated temperatures. The list of the materials, undergoing high-temperature martensitic transformation, is constantly widening. Still, industrial application of these materials, called high-temperature shape memory alloys, is far enough due to the lack of understanding of the peculiarities of the high-temperature martensitic transformation and shape memory effect. The present work attempts to show how the development of the proper directions for high-temperature shape memory alloys' improvement might lead to the creation of essentially new functional materials.

  5. Computational Thermodynamics and Kinetics-Based ICME Framework for High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arróyave, Raymundo; Talapatra, Anjana; Johnson, Luke; Singh, Navdeep; Ma, Ji; Karaman, Ibrahim

    2015-11-01

    Over the last decade, considerable interest in the development of High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs) for solid-state actuation has increased dramatically as key applications in the aerospace and automotive industry demand actuation temperatures well above those of conventional SMAs. Most of the research to date has focused on establishing the (forward) connections between chemistry, processing, (micro)structure, properties, and performance. Much less work has been dedicated to the development of frameworks capable of addressing the inverse problem of establishing necessary chemistry and processing schedules to achieve specific performance goals. Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) has emerged as a powerful framework to address this problem, although it has yet to be applied to the development of HTSMAs. In this paper, the contributions of computational thermodynamics and kinetics to ICME of HTSMAs are described. Some representative examples of the use of computational thermodynamics and kinetics to understand the phase stability and microstructural evolution in HTSMAs are discussed. Some very recent efforts at combining both to assist in the design of HTSMAs and limitations to the full implementation of ICME frameworks for HTSMA development are presented.

  6. Nickel aluminide alloy for high temperature structural use

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1991-01-01

    The specification discloses nickel aluminide alloys including nickel, aluminum, chromium, zirconium and boron wherein the concentration of zirconium is maintained in the range of from about 0.05 to about 0.35 atomic percent to improve the ductility, strength and fabricability of the alloys at 1200.degree. C. Titanium may be added in an amount equal to about 0.2 to about 0.5 atomic percent to improve the mechanical properties of the alloys and the addition of a small amount of carbon further improves hot fabricability.

  7. Development and Processing Improvement of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. Barry; Bales, Thomas T.

    2007-01-01

    This final report, in multiple presentation format, describes a comprehensive multi-tasked contract study to improve the overall property response of selected aerospace alloys, explore further a newly-developed and registered alloy, and correlate the processing, metallurgical structure, and subsequent properties achieved with particular emphasis on the crystallographic orientation texture developed. Modifications to plate processing, specifically hot rolling practices, were evaluated for Al-Li alloys 2195 and 2297, for the recently registered Al-Cu-Ag alloy, 2139, and for the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy, 7050. For all of the alloys evaluated, the processing modifications resulted in significant improvements in mechanical properties. Analyses also resulted in an enhanced understanding of the correlation of processing, crystallographic texture, and mechanical properties.

  8. High temperature static strain gage alloy development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulse, C. O.; Bailey, R. S.; Lemkey, F. D.

    1985-01-01

    The literature, applicable theory and finally an experimental program were used to identify new candidate alloy systems for use as the electrical resistance elements in static strain gages up to 1250K. The program goals were 50 hours of use in the environment of a test stand gas turbine engine with measurement accuracies equal to or better than 10 percent of full scale for strains up to + or - 2000 microstrain. As part of this effort, a computerized electrical resistance measurement system was constructed for use at temperatures between 300K and 1250K and heating and cooling rates of 250K/min and 10K/min. The two best alloys were an iron-chromium-aluminum alloy and a palladium base alloy. Although significant progress was made, it was concluded that a considerable additional effort would be needed to fully optimize and evaluate these candidate systems.

  9. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    McKamey, Claudette G.; Liu, Chain T.

    1990-01-01

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO.sub.3 type that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy corrosion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26-30 at. % aluminum, 0.5-10 at. % chromium, 0.02-0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron.

  10. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    McKamey, C.G.; Liu, C.T.

    1990-10-09

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO[sub 3] type is described that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy conversion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26--30 at. % aluminum, 0.5--10 at. % chromium, 0.02--0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron. 3 figs.

  11. Applications of high-temperature powder metal aluminum alloys to small gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millan, P. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A program aimed at the development of advanced powder-metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys for high-temperature applications up to 650 F using the concepts of rapid solidification and mechanical alloying is discussed. In particular, application of rapidly solidified PM aluminum alloys to centrifugal compressor impellers, currently used in auxiliary power units for both military and commercial aircraft and potentially for advanced automotive gas turbine engines, is examined. It is shown that substitution of high-temperature aluminum for titanium alloy impellers operating in the 360-650 F range provides significant savings in material and machining costs and results in reduced component weight, and consequently, reduced rotating group inertia requirements.

  12. High Work Output Ni-Ti-Pt High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys and Associated Processing Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor); Draper, Susan L. (Inventor); Nathal, Michael V. (Inventor); Garg, Anita (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    According to the invention, compositions of Ni-Ti-Pt high temperature, high force, shape memory alloys are disclosed that have transition temperatures above 100 C.; have narrow hysteresis; and produce a high specific work output.

  13. Iron-niobium-aluminum alloy having high-temperature corrosion resistance

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Huey S.

    1988-04-14

    An alloy for use in high temperature sulfur and oxygen containing environments, having aluminum for oxygen resistance, niobium for sulfur resistance and the balance iron, is discussed. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. NASA-UVA light aerospace alloy and structures technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Haviland, John K.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Pilkey, Walter D.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Thornton, Earl A.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Swanson, Robert E.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.; Wert, John A.

    1989-01-01

    The report on progress achieved in accomplishing of the NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program is presented. The objective is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys and associated thermal gradient structures in close collaboration with researchers. The efforts will produce basic understanding of material behavior, new monolithic and composite alloys, processing methods, solid and fluid mechanics analyses, measurement advances, and a pool of educated graduate students. The presented accomplishments include: research on corrosion fatigue of Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090; research on the strengthening effect of small In additions to Al-Li-Cu alloys; research on localized corrosion of Al-Li alloys; research on stress corrosion cracking of Al-Li-Cu alloys; research on fiber-matrix reaction studies (Ti-1100 and Ti-15-3 matrices containing SCS-6, SCS-9, and SCS-10 fibers); and research on methods for quantifying non-random particle distribution in materials that has led to generation of a set of computer programs that can detect and characterize clusters in particles.

  15. Martensite transformation and shape memory effect on NiTi-Zr high temperature shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Z.; Tseng, H.; Wu, K.

    1995-10-17

    NiTi-Zr high temperature alloys possess relatively poor shape memory properties and ductility in comparison with NiTi-Hf and NiTi-Pd alloys. During martensite transformation of the newly-developed NiTi-Zr high temperature shape memory alloys (SMAs) the temperature increases along with Zr content when the Zr content is more than 10 at%. As the Zr content increases, the fully reversible strain of the alloys decreases. However, complete strain recovery behavior is exhibited by all the alloys studied in this paper, even those with a Zr content of 20 at%. Stability of the NiTi-Zr alloys during thermal cycling was also tested and results indicate that the NiTi-Zr alloys have poor stability against thermal cycling. The reasons for the deterioration of the shape memory effect and stability have yet to be determined.

  16. Oxidation behaviors of porous Haynes 214 alloy at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Yong; Tang, Huiping; Li, Weijie

    2015-09-15

    The oxidation behaviors of porous Haynes 214 alloy at temperatures from 850 to 1000 °C were investigated. The porous alloys before and after the oxidation were examined by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The oxidation kinetics of the porous alloy approximately follows a parabolic rate law and exhibits two stages controlled by different oxidation courses. Complex oxide scales composed of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are formed on the oxidized porous alloys, and the formation of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on its outer layer is promoted with the oxidation proceeding. The rough surface as well as the micropores in the microstructures of the porous alloy caused by the manufacturing process provides fast diffusion paths for oxygen so as to affect the formation of the oxide layers. Both the maximum pore size and the permeability of the porous alloys decrease with the increase of oxidation temperature and exposure time, which may limit its applications. - Highlights: • Two-stage oxidation kinetics controlled by different oxidation courses is showed. • Oxide scale mainly consists of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Rough surface and micropores lead to the formation of uneven oxide structure. • Content of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the outer layer of the scale increases with time at 1000 °C. • Maximum pore size and permeability decrease with increasing temperature and time.

  17. A Review of TiNiPdCu Alloy System for High Temperature Shape Memory Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. Imran; Kim, Hee Young; Miyazaki, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    High temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs) are important smart materials and possess a significant potential to improve many engineering systems. Many TiNi-based high temperature ternary alloy systems have been reported in literature including TiNiPd, TiNiPt, TiNiZr, TiNiAu, TiNiHf, etc. Some quaternary additions of certain elements in the above systems have been successful to further improve many important shape memory and mechanical properties. The success criteria for an HTSMA become strict in terms of its cyclic stability, maximum recoverable strain, creep resistance, and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. TiNiPdCu alloy system has been recently proposed as a promising HTSMA. Unique nanoscaled precipitates formed in TiNiPdCu-based HTSMAs are found to be stable at temperatures above 773 K, while keeping the benefits of ease of fabrication. It is expected that this alloy system possesses significant potential especially for the high temperature shape memory applications. Till now many research reports have been published on this alloy system. In the present work, a comprehensive review of the TiNiPdCu system is presented in terms of thermomechanical behavior, nanoscale precipitation mechanism, microstructural features, high temperature shape memory and mechanical properties, and the important parameters to control the high temperature performance of these alloys.

  18. Dynamic High-Temperature Characterization of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High Strain Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bignell, John L.; Ulrich, G. B.; George, E. P.

    2014-06-01

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-temperature high-strain-rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe elevated-temperature environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain-rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. Current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques are not capable of obtaining satisfactory high-temperature high-strain-rate stress-strain response of thin iridium specimens investigated in this study. We analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky compression bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens. Appropriate modifications were made to the current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar technique to obtain reliable compressive stress-strain response of an iridium alloy at high strain rates (300 – 10000 s-1) and temperatures (750°C and 1030°C). Uncertainties in such high-temperature high-strain-rate experiments on thin iridium specimens were also analyzed. The compressive stress-strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to strain rate and temperature.

  19. Recent progress in the modeling of high-temperature creep and its application to alloy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L.; Northwood, D. O.

    1995-04-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of high-temperature creep of alloys is discussed in the context of theoretical modeling and its application to alloy development. Emphasis is placed upon those engineering alloys specifically designed for high-temperature applications, such as precipitation and dispersion-strengthened (DS) alloys and metal-matrix composites (MMCs). Currently, these theoretical models use one of two different approaches, (a) a phenomenological approach, which is used in such models as those based on the internal stress concept, and those based on empirical creep equations; and (b) micromechanical models that are based on dislocation mechanisms and the interactions of dislocations with solute atoms, second-phase particles, and other reinforcements such as fibers. All these theoretical models have a common goal, namely, the understanding of high-temperature strengthening mechanisms and the relationship between high-temperature strength and the micromechanical mechanisms during high-temperature plastic deformation of the alloys. These theoretical studies can provide information that is useful in alloy design and processing, such as the selection of alloy chemistry, and the optimization of phase microstructural features (e.g., reinforcement amount, shape, size, and distribution; matrix grain size; and matrix and reinforcement interfaces) by optimization of processing methods.

  20. Computational simulation of probabilistic lifetime strength for aerospace materials subjected to high temperature, mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Lola; Bast, Callie C.; Trimble, Greg A.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of a fourth year effort of a research program, conducted for NASA-LeRC by the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). The research included on-going development of methodology that provides probabilistic lifetime strength of aerospace materials via computational simulation. A probabilistic material strength degradation model, in the form of a randomized multifactor interaction equation, is postulated for strength degradation of structural components of aerospace propulsion systems subject to a number of effects or primitive variables. These primitive variables may include high temperature, fatigue or creep. In most cases, strength is reduced as a result of the action of a variable. This multifactor interaction strength degradation equation has been randomized and is included in the computer program, PROMISS. Also included in the research is the development of methodology to calibrate the above-described constitutive equation using actual experimental materials data together with regression analysis of that data, thereby predicting values for the empirical material constants for each effect or primitive variable. This regression methodology is included in the computer program, PROMISC. Actual experimental materials data were obtained from industry and the open literature for materials typically for applications in aerospace propulsion system components. Material data for Inconel 718 has been analyzed using the developed methodology.

  1. Computational simulation of probabilistic lifetime strength for aerospace materials subjected to high temperature, mechanical fatigue, creep, and thermal fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Lola; Bast, Callie C.; Trimble, Greg A.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a fourth year effort of a research program conducted for NASA-LeRC by The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) are presented. The research included on-going development of methodology that provides probabilistic lifetime strength of aerospace materials via computational simulation. A probabilistic material strength degradation model, in the form of a randomized multifactor interaction equation, is postulated for strength degradation of structural components of aerospace propulsion systems subjected to a number of effects or primitive variables. These primitive variables may include high temperature, fatigue, or creep. In most cases, strength is reduced as a result of the action of a variable. This multifactor interaction strength degradation equation was randomized and is included in the computer program, PROMISC. Also included in the research is the development of methodology to calibrate the above-described constitutive equation using actual experimental materials data together with regression analysis of that data, thereby predicting values for the empirical material constants for each effect or primitive variable. This regression methodology is included in the computer program, PROMISC. Actual experimental materials data were obtained from industry and the open literature for materials typically for applications in aerospace propulsion system components. Material data for Inconel 718 was analyzed using the developed methodology.

  2. Creep Testing of High-Temperature Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb Alloy Completed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb (Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb) alloy is under development for high-temperature, high heatflux applications, such as actively cooled, hypersonic vehicle heat exchangers and rocket engine combustion chambers. Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb offers a superior combination of strength and conductivity. It has also shown exceptional low-cycle fatigue properties. Following preliminary testing to determine the best processing route, a more detailed testing program was initiated to determine the creep lives and creep rates of Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb alloy specimens produced by extrusion. Testing was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center with constant-load vacuum creep units. Considering expected operating temperatures and mission lives, we developed a test matrix to accurately determine the creep properties of Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb between 500 and 800 C. Six bars of Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb were extruded. From these bars, 54 creep samples were machined and tested. The figure on the left shows the steady-state, or second-stage, creep rates for the samples. Comparison data for NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt % Ag-0.5 wt % Zr), the alloy currently used in combustion chamber liners, were not unavailable. Therefore the steady-state creep rates for Cu at similar temperatures are presented. As expected, in comparison to pure Cu, the creep rates for Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb are much lower. The lives of the samples are presented in the figure on the right. As shown, Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb at 800 C is comparable to NARloy-Z at 648 C. At equivalent temperatures, Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb enjoys a 20 to 50 percent advantage in stress for a given life and 1 to 3 orders of magnitude greater life at a given stress. The improved properties allow for design tradeoffs and improvements in new and existing heat exchangers such as the next generation of combustion chamber liners. Average creep rates for Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb and pure Cu are shown. Average creep lives for Cu-8 Cr- 4 Nb and NARloy-Z are also shown. Currently, two companies are interested in the commercial usage of the Cu

  3. Corrosion of Candidate High Temperature Alloys in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Curtis J.

    The corrosion resistance of three candidate alloys is tested in supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO2) at different levels of temperature and pressure for up to 3000 hours. The purpose of the testing is to evaluate the compatibility of different engineering alloys in S-CO2 for use in a S-CO 2 Brayton cycle. The three alloys used are austenitic stainless steel 316, iron-nickel-base superalloy 718, and nickel-base superalloy 738. Each alloy is exposed to four combinations of temperature and pressure, consisting of either 550°C or 700°C at either 15 or 25 MPa for up to 1500 hours. At each temperature, an additional sample set is tested for 3000 hours and experienced an increase in pressure from 15 MPa to 25 MPa after 1500 hours of testing. All three alloys are successful in producing a protective oxide layer at the lower temperature of 550°C based on the logarithmic weight gain trends. At the higher temperature of 700°C, 316SS exhibits unfavourable linear weight gain trends at both pressures of 15 and 25 MPa. In comparison, IN-718 and IN-738 performs similarly in producing a protective oxide layer illustrated through a power weight gain relation. The effect of pressure is most pronounced at the operating temperature of 700°C, where the higher pressure of 25 MPa results in an increased rate of oxide formation. SEM analysis exposes a thin film oxide for both IN-718 and IN-738 but severe intergranular corrosion is exhibited by IN-738. Based on the testing conducted, both alloys show favourable characteristics for use in S-CO 2 conditions up to 700°C, but further testing is required to characterize the effect of the intergranular corrosion on the stability of oxide in IN-738. 316SS provided favourable results for use in temperatures of 550°C, but the protective oxide deteriorated at an operating temperature of 700°C.

  4. Corrosion Testing of Ni Alloy HVOF Coatings in High Temperature Environments for Biomass Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports the corrosion behavior of Ni alloy coatings deposited by high velocity oxyfuel spraying, and representative boiler substrate alloys in simulated high temperature biomass combustion conditions. Four commercially available oxidation resistant Ni alloy coating materials were selected: NiCrBSiFe, alloy 718, alloy 625, and alloy C-276. These were sprayed onto P91 substrates using a JP5000 spray system. The corrosion performance of the coatings varied when tested at ~525, 625, and 725 °C in K2SO4-KCl mixture and gaseous HCl-H2O-O2 containing environments. Alloy 625, NiCrBSiFe, and alloy 718 coatings performed better than alloy C-276 coating at 725 °C, which had very little corrosion resistance resulting in degradation similar to uncoated P91. Alloy 625 coatings provided good protection from corrosion at 725 °C, with the performance being comparable to wrought alloy 625, with significantly less attack of the substrate than uncoated P91. Alloy 625 performs best of these coating materials, with an overall ranking at 725 °C as follows: alloy 625 > NiCrBSiFe > alloy 718 ≫ alloy C-276. Although alloy C-276 coatings performed poorly in the corrosion test environment at 725 °C, at lower temperatures (i.e., below the eutectic temperature of the salt mixture) it outperformed the other coating types studied.

  5. Copper modified austenitic stainless steel alloys with improved high temperature creep resistance

    DOEpatents

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1987-04-28

    An improved austenitic stainless steel that incorporates copper into a base Fe-Ni-Cr alloy having minor alloying substituents of Mo, Mn, Si, T, Nb, V, C, N, P, B which exhibits significant improvement in high temperature creep resistance over previous steels. 3 figs.

  6. Advances in Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jeff; Schneider, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Many of the metals used in the oil and gas industry are difficult to fusion weld including Titanium and its alloys. Solid state joining processes are being pursued as an alternative process to produce robust structures more amenable to high pressure applications. Various solid state joining processes include friction stir welding (FSW) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSW). The configuration of TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material minimizing the burden on the weld tool extending its life. This provides the ability to precisely select and control the temperature to avoid detrimental changes to the microstructure. The work presented in this presentation investigates the feasibility of joining various titanium alloys using the solid state welding processes of FSW and TSW. Process descriptions and attributes of each weld process will be presented. Weld process set ]up and welding techniques will be discussed leading to the challenges experienced. Mechanical property data will also be presented.

  7. Environmental protection of titanium alloys at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. G.; Wood, R. A.; Seltzer, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    Various concepts were evaluated for protecting titanium alloys from oxygen contamination at 922 K (1200 F) and from hot-salt stress-corrosion at 755 K (900 F). It is indicated that oxygen-contamination resistance can be provided by a number of systems, but for hot-salt stress-corrosion resistance, factors such as coating integrity become very important. Titanium aluminides resist oxygen ingress at 922 K through the formation of alumina (on TiAl3) or modified TiO2 (on Ti3Al, TiAl) scales. TiAl has some resistance to attack by hot salt, but has limited ductility. Ductile Ti-Ni and Ti-Nb-Cr-Al alloys provide limited resistance to oxygen ingress, but are not greatly susceptible to hot-salt stress-corrosion cracking.

  8. High Strength Aluminum Alloy For High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A cast article from an aluminum alloy has improved mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The cast article has the following composition in weight percent: Silicon 6.0-25.0, Copper 5.0-8.0, Iron 0.05-1.2, Magnesium 0.5-1.5, Nickel 0.05-0.9, Manganese 0.05-1.2, Titanium 0.05-1.2, Zirconium 0.05-1.2, Vanadium 0.05-1.2, Zinc 0.05-0.9, Strontium 0.001-0.1, Phosphorus 0.001-0.1, and the balance is Aluminum, wherein the silicon-to-magnesium ratio is 10-25, and the copper-to-magnesium ratio is 4-15. The aluminum alloy contains a simultaneous dispersion of three types of Al3X compound particles (X=Ti, V, Zr) having a LI2 crystal structure, and their lattice parameters are coherent to the aluminum matrix lattice. A process for producing this cast article is also disclosed, as well as a metal matrix composite, which includes the aluminum alloy serving as a matrix containing up to about 60% by volume of a secondary filler material.

  9. Effect of high temperature fatigue on the fracture toughness of a nickel-base alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to investigate the effect of cyclic loading at high temperature on the fracture toughness of a precipitate hardened alloy. A ..gamma..' precipitate hardened Inconcel X-750 alloy was chosen because of its importance in practical applications as well as its relatively well defined microstructure compared to other superalloys. This paper presents a study of the variation of the relative fracture toughness of this alloy during continuous and hold-time fatigue at 973/sup 0/K.

  10. Innovations in alloy metallurgy for furnace rolls and other high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Brill, U.; Kettler, H.W.; Giersbach, G.

    1995-12-31

    For high temperature applications proper alloy selection is important for safety and economic reasons. Since all high temperature materials have certain limitations, the optimum choice is often a compromise between the mechanical property constraints (creep and stress-rupture strength), environmental constraints (resistance to various high temperature degradation phenomena), fabricability characteristics and cost. This paper presents the fundamentals of the role of various alloying elements and the utilization of this knowledge to develop a new high temperature alloy Nicrofer 6025HT, known as alloy 602CA (UNS N06025). This innovative development is characterized by superior creep and stress rupture strength properties up to 1,200 C with excellent resistance to cyclic oxidation, carburization, halogenization and nitridation type attack. This unique combination of strength and high temperature corrosion resistance has led to many applications such as furnace rolls in annealing furnaces, hangers in enamelling furnace, conveyor belts, muffles for bright annealing furnaces and other applications. This paper presents alloy 602CA`s various properties, and some design calculations along with long term experience with this alloy for uncooled furnace rolls and description of its technical and economical advantages over water cooled asbestos rolls currently used in industry.

  11. Fretting fatigue of 2XXX series aerospace aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giummarra, Cindie

    Fretting is a wear mechanism that occurs at the contact region between two materials subject to minute cyclic relative motion. Fretting causes the initiation of surface cracks within the first few thousand cycles, which in the presence of a fatigue stress, grow to cause material failure approximately 10 to 100 times earlier than expected under standard fatigue conditions. Examples of fretting fatigue have been seen in joints in aircraft, and the aerospace industry acknowledges the possibility of catastrophic failure from this mechanism. Improvements in a material's resistance to fretting would benefit aluminum alloys in aerospace applications. This research investigated the effect of microstructural properties on the fretting response in 2XXX series aerospace aluminum alloys. Fretting wear and fretting fatigue tests were conducted to determine the influence of slip characteristics, alloy purity, grain orientation and yield strength on fretting crack initiation and growth. Crack length measurements and micrographs of the fretting indicated there was no significant difference in the fretting response of these alloys based on their microstructural characteristics. Results showed that fretting initiated cracks in the first 1--8% of the life while standard fatigue initiation took around 90% of the life. This reduction in initiation resulted in a shorter life under fretting conditions. Additionally, fretting normalized the initiation time in all alloys which eliminated any intrinsic initiation resistance. The alloys with the highest stress-life (S-N) fatigue properties exhibiting a greater reduction in fatigue strength under fretting conditions. The fretting stresses appeared to influence the crack growth to a distance below the surface of approximately 17mum under fretting fatigue conditions, after which some cracks changed direction and propagated under the influence of the fatigue stress. Under fretting wear conditions, the cracks tended to arrest at a depth of 8

  12. High temperature solder alloys for underhood applications. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Drewien, C.A.; Yost, F.G.; Sackinger, S.; Kern, J.; Weiser, M.W.

    1995-02-01

    Under a cooperative research and development agreement with General Motors Corporation, lead-free solder systems including the flux, metallization, and solder are being developed for high temperature, underhood applications. Six tin-rich solders, five silver-rich metallizations, and four fluxes were screened using an experimental matrix whereby every combination was used to make sessile drops via hot plate or Heller oven processing. The contact angle, sessile drop appearance, and in some instances the microstructure was evaluated to determine combinations that would yield contact angles of less than 30{degrees}, well-formed sessile drops, and fine, uniform microstructures. Four solders, one metallization, and one flux were selected and will be used for further aging and mechanical property studies.

  13. Temperature and heat flux measurements: Challenges for high temperature aerospace application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Richard D.

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of high temperatures and the influence of heat transfer data is not strictly a problem of either the high temperatures involved or the level of the heating rates to be measured at those high temperatures. It is a problem of duration during which measurements are made and the nature of the materials in which the measurements are made. Thermal measurement techniques for each application must respect and work with the unique features of that application. Six challenges in the development of measurement technology are discussed: (1) to capture the character and localized peak values within highly nonuniform heating regions; (2) to manage large volumes of thermal instrumentation in order to efficiently derive critical information; (3) to accommodate thermal sensors into practical flight structures; (4) to broaden the capabilities of thermal survey techniques to replace discrete gages in flight and on the ground; (5) to provide supporting instrumentation conduits which connect the measurement points to the thermally controlled data acquisition system; and (6) to develop a class of 'vehicle tending' thermal sensors to assure the integrity of flight vehicles in an efficient manner.

  14. Dynamic high-temperature characterization of an iridium alloy in tension

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Jin, Helena; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bignell, John; Ulrich, G. B.; George, E. P.

    2015-09-01

    Iridium alloys have been utilized as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications, due to their superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures. The mechanical properties, including failure response at high strain rates and elevated temperatures of the iridium alloys need to be characterized to better understand high-speed impacts at elevated temperatures. A DOP-26 iridium alloy has been dynamically characterized in compression at elevated temperatures with high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques. However, the dynamic high-temperature compression tests were not able to provide sufficient dynamic high-temperature failure information of the iridium alloy. In this study, we modified current room-temperature Kolsky tension bar techniques for obtaining dynamic tensile stress-strain curves of the DOP-26 iridium alloy at two different strain rates (~1000 and ~3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750°C and ~1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress-strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. The DOP-26 iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress-strain response that strongly depended on both strain rate and temperature.

  15. Weld induced base metal microfissuring in high temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lingenfelter, A.C.; Shoemaker, L.E.

    1984-06-22

    Three variables control the weld-induced, base-metal microfissuring sensitivity of Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Fe: thermal/mechanical history of the base material, chemical analysis of the base material, and the welding process used. Elements which tend to segregate to the grain boundaries such as B, C, and Zr, and to a lesser extent P, Si, S and Mg, increase the sensitivity. Welding processes listed from most to least severe in their tendency to produce microfissures are: gas metal arc - spray transfer, electron beam, gas metal arc - pulsed transfer, gas metal arc - short circuiting transfer, gas tungsten arc, submerged arc, and shielded metal arc. Microfissuring is always intergranular in nature. Coarse-grain size, whether arrived at by hot-working procedures or pre-weld annealing treatment, increases the sensitivity to microfissuring. Literature data and data for alloy 617 developed at Huntington Alloys suggest that microfissures, at least to 0.030 in. in length, do not affect the fatigue life, room-temperature tensile, and stress-rupture properties of a weldment.

  16. High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Iridium-Rhenium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1995-01-01

    The life-limiting mechanism for radiation-cooled rockets made from iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) is the diffusion of Re into the Ir layer and the subsequent oxidation of the resulting Ir-Re alloy from the inner surface. In a previous study, a life model for Ir/Re rockets was developed. It incorporated Ir-Re diffusion and oxidation data to predict chamber lifetimes as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Oxidation testing at 1540 deg C suggested that a 20-wt percent Re concentration at the inner wall surface should be established as the failure criterion. The present study was performed to better define Ir-oxidation behavior as a function of Re concentration and to supplement the data base for the life model. Samples ranging from pure Ir to Ir-40 wt percent Re (Ir-40Re) were tested at 1500 deg C, in two different oxygen environments. There were indications that the oxidation rate of the Ir-Re alloy increased significantly when it went from a single-phase solid solution to a two-phase mixture, as was suggested in previous work. However, because of testing anomalies in this study, there were not enough dependable oxidation data to definitively raise the Ir/Re rocket failure criterion from 20-wt percent Re to a Re concentration corresponding to entry into the two-phase region.

  17. Advances in Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeff; Schneider, Judy; Walker, Bryant

    2011-01-01

    Many of the metals used in the oil and gas industry are difficult to fusion weld including titanium and its alloys. Thus solid state joining processes, such as friction stir welding (FSWing) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSWing), are being pursued as alternatives to produce robust structures more amenable to high pressure applications. Unlike the FSWing process where the tool is used to heat the workpiece, TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material prior to stirring thus minimizing the burden on the weld tool and thereby extending its life. This study reports on the initial results of using a hybrid (H)-TSW process to join commercially pure, 1.3cm thick panels of titanium (CP Ti) Grade 2.

  18. Modified ferritic iron alloys with improved high-temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    An alloy modification program was conducted in which the compositions of two existing Fe-Cr-Al alloys (Armco 18SR and GE-1541) were changed to achieve either improved high-temperature strength or improved fabricability. Only modifications of Armco 18SR were successful in achieving increased strength without loss of fabricability or oxidation resistance. The best modified alloy, designated NASA-18T, had twice the rupture strength of Armco 18SR at 800 and 1000 C. The NASA-18T alloy also had better oxidation resistance than Armco 18SR and comparable fabricability. The nominal composition of NASA-18T is Fe-18Cr-2Al-1Si-1.25Ta. All attempted modifications of the GE-1541 alloy were unsuccessful in terms of achieving better fabricability without sacrificing high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance.

  19. Isothermal oxidation behavior of ternary Zr-Nb-Y alloys at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Prajitno, Djoko Hadi; Soepriyanto, Syoni; Basuki, Eddy Agus; Wiryolukito, Slameto

    2014-03-24

    The effect of yttrium content on isothermal oxidation behavior of Zr-2,5%Nb-0,5%Y, Zr-2,5%Nb-1%Y Zr-2,5%Nb-1,5%Y alloy at high temperature has been studied. High temperature oxidation carried out at tube furnace in air at 600,700 and 800°C for 1 hour. Optical microscope is used for microstructure characterization of the alloy. Oxidized and un oxidized specimen was characterized by x-ray diffraction. In this study, kinetic oxidation of Zr-2,5%Nb with different Y content at high temperature has also been studied. Characterization by optical microscope showed that microstructure of Zr-Nb-Y alloys relatively unchanged and showed equiaxed microstructure. X-ray diffraction of the alloys depicted that the oxide scale formed during oxidation of zirconium alloys is monoclinic ZrO2 while unoxidised alloy showed two phase α and β phase. SEM-EDS examination shows that depletion of Zr composition took place under the oxide layer. Kinetic rate of oxidation of zirconium alloy showed that increasing oxidation temperature will increase oxidation rate but increasing yttrium content in the alloys will decrease oxidation rate.

  20. Strength of copper alloys in high temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Y.; Suzuki, R.; Saito, M.

    2002-12-01

    The first wall of ITER is expected to be hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonded structure of copper-alloy/SS316. Firstly, fracture toughness and crack propagation tests were performed on DS-Cu and DS-Cu/SS316 HIP joints at ambient temperature and 573 K T. Yamada, M. Uno, M. Saito, Fall Meeting of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, vol. I, 1998, p. 187 (in Japanese). JIC values of DS-Cu and DS-Cu/SS316 decreased significantly at 573 K. In crack propagation test, DS-Cu lost its ductility at 573 K. Secondly, we performed fracture toughness tests on CuCrZr and CuCrZr/CuCrZr, CuCrZr/SS316 HIP joints at ambient and 573 K. CuCrZr base metal had higher JIC values than DS-Cu. Concerning CuCrZr/CuCrZr and CuCrZr/SS316 HIP joint, its JIC value decreased to less than that of CuCrZr base metal.

  1. GRCop-84: A High-Temperature Copper Alloy for High-Heat-Flux Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) is a new high-temperature copper-based alloy. It possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance and low-cycle fatigue up to 700 C (1292 F) along with low thermal expansion and good conductivity. GRCop-84 can be processed and joined by a variety of methods such as extrusion, rolling, bending, stamping, brazing, friction stir welding, and electron beam welding. Considerable mechanical property data has been generated for as-produced material and following simulated braze cycles. The data shows that the alloy is extremely stable during thermal exposures. This paper reviews the major GRCop-84 mechanical and thermophysical properties and compares them to literature values for a variety of other high-temperature copper-based alloys.

  2. Controlling remelting processes for superalloys and aerospace Ti alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melgaard, D. K.; Williamson, R. L.; Beaman, J. J.

    1998-03-01

    Remelting is performed to facilitate the production of clean, fully dense, homogeneous castings of superalloys and aerospace titanium alloys and is crucial to the defect-free production of these important materials. Modern electroslag remelting and vacuum arc remelting control systems are closed-loop, single input-single output systems that oversimplify the physical properties of the processes; the ever-increasing demand for cleaner, more highly engineered, chemically tuned alloys has pushed these control methodologies to their limit. A new generation of these controllers is being developed by the Specialty Metals Process Consortium and Sandia National Laboratories to answer the challenges of remelting control for the next generation of alloys; these control systems will use multiple sensor inputs and apply material-specific system and process models.

  3. Fabrication of intermetallic coatings for electrical and corrosion resistance on high-temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Cho, W.D.

    1994-10-01

    Several intermetallic films were fabricated to high-temperature alloys (V-alloys and 304 and 316 stainless steels) to provide electrical insulation and corrosion resistance. Alloy grain-growth behavior at 1000{degrees}C for the V-5Cr-5Ti was investigated to determine the stability of alloy substrate during coating formation by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or metallic vapor processes at 800-850{degrees}C. Film layers were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and by electron-energy-dispersive and X-ray diffraction analysis and tested for electrical resistivity and corrosion resistance. The results elucidated the nature of the coatings, which provided both electrical insulation and high-temperature corrosion protection.

  4. Shape memory effect of the Ni-Ti-Hf high temperature shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.H.; Pu, Z.; Tseng, H.K.; Biancaniello, F.S.

    1995-11-17

    The one-way shape memory effect of the newly-developed TiNi-Hf high temperature shape memory alloys has been investigated. The results of the study show that TiNi-Hf high temperature alloys possess a relatively high shape memory effect. All the alloys, even those with an Hf content as high as 30at%, exhibit complete strain recovery behavior. However, as the Hf content increases, the fully reversible strain of the alloys decreases. The increase of the second phase as the Hf content increases is the primary reason for the deterioration of the shape memory effect and ductility. The shape memory properties also deteriorate as the deformation temperature increases.

  5. Combating high temperature environmental degradation by existing and new nickel and iron base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Brill, U.

    1994-12-31

    The need for high temperature materials is encountered in a wide variety of modem industries such as in metallurgical, chemical, petrochemical, glass manufacture, heat treatment, waste incinerators, heat recovery, advanced energy conversion systems and others. Depending on the condition of chemical make-up and temperatures, a variety of aggressive corrosive environments are produced, which could be either sulfidizing, carburizing, halogenizing, nitriding, reducing and oxidizing in nature or a combination thereof All high temperature alloys have certain limitations and the optimum choice is often a compromise between the mechanical property requirement constraints at maximum temperature of operation and environmental degradation constraints imposed due to the corrosive species present. This paper addresses the various deterioration mechanisms in metallic alloys system due to the above modes of attack and the role of various alloying elements in minimizing the environmental degradation. Some laboratory and field data on two new nickel base alloys are also presented.

  6. Thermocouples of tantalum and rhenium alloys for more stable vacuum-high temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Thermocouples of the present invention provide stability and performance reliability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums by employing a bimetallic thermocouple sensor wherein each metal of the sensor is selected from a group of metals comprising tantalum and rhenium and alloys containing only those two metals. The tantalum, rhenium thermocouple sensor alloys provide bare metal thermocouple sensors having advantageous vapor pressure compatibilities and performance characteristics. The compatibility and physical characteristics of the thermocouple sensor alloys of the present invention result in improved emf, temperature properties and thermocouple hot junction performance. The thermocouples formed of the tantalum, rhenium alloys exhibit reliability and performance stability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums and are adaptable to space propulsion and power systems and nuclear environments.

  7. Mechanisms Governing the Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Vijay; Carroll, Laura; Sham, Sam

    2015-04-06

    This research project, which includes collaborators from INL and ORNL, focuses on the study of alloy 617 and alloy 800H that are candidates for applications as intermediate heat exchangers in GEN IV nuclear reactors, with an emphasis on the effects of grain size, grain boundaries and second phases on the creep properties; the mechanisms of dislocation creep, diffusional creep and cavitation; the onset of tertiary creep; and theoretical modeling for long-term predictions of materials behavior and for high temperature alloy design.

  8. Thermocouples of molybdenum and iridium alloys for more stable vacuum-high temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Thermocouples providing stability and performance reliability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums by employing a bimetallic thermocouple sensor are described. Each metal of the sensor is selected from a group of metals comprising molybdenum and iridium and alloys containing only those two metals. The molybdenum, iridium thermocouple sensor alloys provide bare metal thermocouple sensors having advantageous vapor pressure compatibility and performance characteristics. The compatibility and physical characteristics of the thermocouple sensor alloys result in improved emf, temperature properties and thermocouple hot junction performance.

  9. Twin solution calorimeter determines heats of formation of alloys at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darby, J. B., Jr.; Kleb, R.; Kleppa, O. J.

    1968-01-01

    Calvert-type, twin liquid metal solution calorimeter determines the heats of formation of transition metal alloys at high temperatures. The twin differential calorimeter measures the small heat effects generated over extended periods of time, has maximum operating temperature of 1073 degrees K and an automatic data recording system.

  10. HIGH TEMPERATURE BRAZING ALLOY FOR JOINT Fe-Cr-Al MATERIALS AND AUSTENITIC AND FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    DOEpatents

    Cost, R.C.

    1958-07-15

    A new high temperature brazing alloy is described that is particularly suitable for brazing iron-chromiumaluminum alloys. It consists of approximately 20% Cr, 6% Al, 10% Si, and from 1.5 to 5% phosphorus, the balance being iron.

  11. Summary of workshop on alloys for very high-temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    In current fossil energy systems, the maximum operating temperatures experienced by critical metal structures do not exceed approximately 732{degrees}C and the major limitation on the use of the alloys typically is corrosion resistance. In systems intended for higher performance and higher efficiency, increasingly higher working fluid temperatures will be employed, which will require materials with higher-temperature capabilities, in particular, higher creep strength and greater environmental resistance. There have been significant developments in alloys in recent years, from modifications of currently-used wrought ferritic and austenitic alloys with the intent of improving their high-temperature capabilities, to oxide dispersion-strengthened alloys targeted at extremely high-temperature applications. The aim of this workshop was to examine the temperature capability of these alloys compared to current alloys, and compared to the needs of advanced fossil fuel combustion or conversion systems, with the goals of identifying where modified/new alloys would be expected to find application, their limitations, and the information/actions required or that are being taken to qualify them for such use.

  12. The effect of the existing state of Y on high temperature oxidation properties of magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaowen; Shen, Shijun; Jiang, Bin; Jiang, Zhongtao; Yang, Hong; Pan, Fusheng

    2016-05-01

    This paper studies the effect of the existing state of Y element on the high temperature oxidation resistance of magnesium alloys. Different levels of Al element were added into Mg-2.5Y alloy to obtain different existing state of Y. The oxidation rate of Mg-2.5Y-2.5Al alloy is the highest among Mg-2.5Y, Mg-2.5Y-2.5Al and Mg-2.5Y-4.2Al alloys at 500 °C. An effective and protective Y2O3/MgO composite oxide film was formed on the surface of Mg-2.5Y alloy after oxidized at 500 °C for 360 min. The results show that the dissolved Y element in the matrix was beneficial to improve the oxidation resistance of magnesium alloys. Once Y element transformed to the high temperature stable Al2Y compound, its ability in preventing oxidation would disappear. The formation of Al2Y compound severely deteriorated the oxidation resistance of Mg-2.5Y alloy. In addition, the dissolved Al can also cause the rise of oxidation resistance at a certain extent.

  13. Materials Properties Database for Selection of High-Temperature Alloys and Concepts of Alloy Design for SOFC Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Paxton, Dean M.; Weil, K. Scott; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2002-11-24

    To serve as an interconnect / gas separator in an SOFC stack, an alloy should demonstrate the ability to provide (i) bulk and surface stability against oxidation and corrosion during prolonged exposure to the fuel cell environment, (ii) thermal expansion compatibility with the other stack components, (iii) chemical compatibility with adjacent stack components, (iv) high electrical conductivity of the surface reaction products, (v) mechanical reliability and durability at cell exposure conditions, (vii) good manufacturability, processability and fabricability, and (viii) cost effectiveness. As the first step of this approach, a composition and property database was compiled for high temperature alloys in order to assist in determining which alloys offer the most promise for SOFC interconnect applications in terms of oxidation and corrosion resistance. The high temperature alloys of interest included Ni-, Fe-, Co-base superal

  14. Considerations of Alloy N for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs) are a promising new class of thermal-spectrum nuclear reactors. The reactor structural materials must possess high-temperature strength and chemical compatibility with the liquid fluoride salt as well as with a power cycle fluid such as supercritical water while remaining resistant to residual air within the containment. Alloy N was developed for use with liquid fluoride salts and it possesses adequate strength and chemical compatibility up to about 700 C. A distinctive property of FHRs is that their maximum allowable coolant temperature is restricted by their structural alloy maximum service temperature. As the reactor thermal efficiency directly increases with the maximum coolant temperature, higher temperature resistant alloys are strongly desired. This paper reviews the current status of Alloy N and its relevance to FHRs including its design principles, development history, high temperature strength, environmental resistance, metallurgical stability, component manufacturability, ASME codification status, and reactor service requirements. The review will identify issues and provide guidance for improving the alloy properties or implementing engineering solutions.

  15. Alloying effects on the high-temperature oxidation resistance of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    Alloying effects on the high-temperature oxidation resistance of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb were examined on the basis of isothermal exposures to air at 950 C. Additions of either Re and Al or Fe, Ni, and Al had relatively little effect on weight gains relative to the Cr-6% Nb binary alloy. One alloying element that improved the mechanical behavior of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloys substantially increased the oxidation rates and spallation susceptibilities of Cr-6 and -12% Nb alloys. However, the addition of another element completely offset these deleterious effects. The presence of this latter element resulted in the best overall oxidation behavior (in terms of both weight gains and spallation tendencies) of all Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb compositions. Its beneficial effect can be attributed to improvement in the oxidation resistance of the Cr-rich phase.

  16. Commercialization of NASA's High Strength Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the commercialization of a new high strength cast aluminum alloy, invented by NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, for high temperature applications will be presented. Originally developed to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low- exhaust emission, the novel NASA aluminum alloy offers dramatic improvement in tensile and fatigue strengths at elevated temperatures (450 F-750 F), which can lead to reducing part weight and cost as well as improving performance for automotive engine applications. It is an ideal low cost material for cast components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. NASA alloy also offers greater wear resistance, dimensional stability, and lower thermal expansion compared to conventional aluminum alloys, and the new alloy can be produced economically from sand, permanent mold and investment casting. Since 2001, this technology was licensed to several companies for automotive and marine internal combustion engines applications.

  17. High temperature properties of alloys being considered for design of a concentric canister launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Kassner, M E; Lowry, R W; Rosen, R S

    1998-06-01

    This report describes a study to determine the high temperature mechanical properties of several titanium alloys and to compare them with properties of AISI 316L stainless steel and ASTM A 387 structural steel. The steel materials are less costly to procure but exhibit good resistance to corrosion in seawater environments. Six titanium alloys were evaluated as candidate materials for use in a c Concentric Canister Launcher (CCL). Each titanium alloy was tested at three temperatures (68°, 2000°F, and 2400°F). Strain-rate changes tests were used to determine the strain rate sensitivity of the alloys at each test temperature. Optical metallography was performed on two of the alloys to determine the relationship between test temperature and microstructure (presence of second phase precipitates, grain size). Complete test results are includes, a long with figures and tables of test data.

  18. SCC Initiation in Alloy 600 Heat Affected Zones Exposed to High Temperature Water

    SciTech Connect

    E Richey; DS Morton; RA Etien; GA Young; RB Bucinell

    2006-11-03

    Studies have shown that grain boundary chromium carbides improve the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of nickel based alloys exposed to high temperature, high purity water. However, thermal cycles from welding can significantly alter the microstructure of the base material near the fusion line. In particular, the heat of welding can solutionize grain boundary carbides and produce locally high residual stresses and strains, reducing the SCC resistance of the Alloy 600 type material in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Testing has shown that the SCC growth rate in Alloy 600 heat affected zone samples can be {approx}30x faster than observed in the Alloy 600 base material under identical testing conditions due to fewer intergranular chromium rich carbides and increased plastic strain in the HAZ [1, 2]. Stress corrosion crack initiation tests were conducted on Alloy 600 HAZ samples at 360 C in hydrogenated, deaerated water to determine if these microstructural differences significantly affect the SCC initiation resistance of Alloy 600 heat affected zones compared to the Alloy 600 base material. Alloy 600 to EN82H to Alloy 600 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) specimens where fabricated from an Alloy 600 to Alloy 600 narrow groove weld with EN82H filler metal. The approximate middle third of the specimen gauge region was EN82H such that each specimen had two HAZ regions. Tests were conducted with in-situ monitored smooth tensile specimens under a constant load, and a direct current electric potential drop was used for in-situ detection of SCC. Test results suggest that the SCC initiation resistance of Alloy 600 and its weld metal follows the following order: EN82H > Alloy 600 HAZ > Alloy 600. The high SCC initiation resistance observed to date in Alloy 600 heat affected zones compared to wrought Alloy 600 is unexpected based on the microstructure of HAZ versus wrought material and based on prior SCC growth rate studies. The observed behavior for the HAZ specimens is likely

  19. Super-High Temperature Alloys and Composites from NbW-Cr Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shailendra Varma

    2008-12-31

    Nickel base superalloys must be replaced if the demand for the materials continues to rise for applications beyond 1000{sup o}C which is the upper limit for such alloys at this time. There are non-metallic materials available for such high temperature applications but they all present processing difficulties because of the lack of ductility. Metallic systems can present a chance to find materials with adequate room temperature ductility. Obviously the system must contain elements with high melting points. Nb has been chosen by many investigators which has a potential of being considered as a candidate if alloyed properly. This research is exploring the Nb-W-Cr system for the possible choice of alloys to be used as a high temperature material.

  20. Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600ÀC with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

  1. Development and Characterization of Improved NiTiPd High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloys by Solid-Solution Strengthening and Thermomechanical Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Glen; Noebe, Ronald; Padula, Santo, II; Garg, Anita; Olson, David

    2006-01-01

    The need for compact, solid-state actuation systems for use in the aerospace, automotive, and other transportation industries is currently motivating research in high-temperature shape-memory alloys (HTSMA) with transformation temperatures greater than 100 C. One of the basic high-temperature alloys investigated to fill this need is Ni(19.5)Ti(50.5)Pd30. Initial testing has indicated that this alloy, while having acceptable work characteristics, suffers from significant permanent deformation (or ratcheting) during thermal cycling under load. In an effort to overcome this deficiency, various solid-solution alloying and thermomechanical processing schemes were investigated. Solid-solution strengthening was achieved by substituting 5at% gold or platinum for palladium in Ni(19.5)Ti(50.5)Pd30, the so-called baseline alloy, to strengthen the martensite and austenite phases against slip processes and improve thermomechanical behavior. Tensile properties, work behavior, and dimensional stability during repeated thermal cycling under load for the ternary and quaternary alloys were compared. The relative difference in yield strength between the martensite and austenite phases and the dimensional stability of the alloy were improved by the quaternary additions, while work output was only minimally impacted. The three alloys were also thermomechanically processed by cycling repeatedly through the transformation range under a constant stress. This so-called training process dramatically improved the dimensional stability in these samples and also recovered the slight decrease in work output caused by quaternary alloying. An added benefit of the solid-solution strengthening was maintenance of enhanced dimensional stability of the trained material to higher temperatures compared to the baseline alloy, providing a greater measure of over-temperature capability.

  2. Improved Mo-Re VPS Alloys for High-Temperature Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, Robert; Martin, James; McKechnie, Timothy; O'Dell, John Scott

    2011-01-01

    Dispersion-strengthened molybdenum- rhenium alloys for vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) fabrication of high-temperature-resistant components are undergoing development. In comparison with otherwise equivalent non-dispersion-strengthened Mo-Re alloys, these alloys have improved high-temperature properties. Examples of VPS-fabricated high-temperature-resistant components for which these alloys are expected to be suitable include parts of aircraft and spacecraft engines, furnaces, and nuclear power plants; wear coatings; sputtering targets; x-ray targets; heat pipes in which liquid metals are used as working fluids; and heat exchangers in general. These alloys could also be useful as coating materials in some biomedical applications. The alloys consist of 60 weight percent Mo with 40 weight percent Re made from (1) blends of elemental Mo and Re powders or (2) Re-coated Mo particles that have been subjected to a proprietary powder-alloying-and-spheroidization process. For most of the dispersion- strengthening experiments performed thus far in this development effort, 0.4 volume percent of transition-metal ceramic dispersoids were mixed into the feedstock powders. For one experiment, the proportion of dispersoid was 1 volume percent. In each case, the dispersoid consisted of either ZrN particles having sizes <45 m, ZrO2 particles having sizes of about 1 m, HfO2 particles having sizes <45 m, or HfN particles having sizes <1 m. These materials were chosen for evaluation on the basis of previously published thermodynamic stability data. For comparison, Mo-Re feedstock powders without dispersoids were also prepared.

  3. High-precision Non-Contact Measurement of Creep of Ultra-High Temperature Materials for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan R.; Hyers, Robert

    2008-01-01

    For high-temperature applications (greater than 2,000 C) such as solid rocket motors, hypersonic aircraft, nuclear electric/thermal propulsion for spacecraft, and more efficient jet engines, creep becomes one of the most important design factors to be considered. Conventional creep-testing methods, where the specimen and test apparatus are in contact with each other, are limited to temperatures approximately 1,700 C. Development of alloys for higher-temperature applications is limited by the availability of testing methods at temperatures above 2000 C. Development of alloys for applications requiring a long service life at temperatures as low as 1500 C, such as the next generation of jet turbine superalloys, is limited by the difficulty of accelerated testing at temperatures above 1700 C. For these reasons, a new, non-contact creep-measurement technique is needed for higher temperature applications. A new non-contact method for creep measurements of ultra-high-temperature metals and ceramics has been developed and validated. Using the electrostatic levitation (ESL) facility at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, a spherical sample is rotated quickly enough to cause creep deformation due to centrifugal acceleration. Very accurate measurement of the deformed shape through digital image analysis allows the stress exponent n to be determined very precisely from a single test, rather than from numerous conventional tests. Validation tests on single-crystal niobium spheres showed excellent agreement with conventional tests at 1985 C; however the non-contact method provides much greater precision while using only about 40 milligrams of material. This method is being applied to materials including metals and ceramics for non-eroding throats in solid rockets and next-generation superalloys for turbine engines. Recent advances in the method and the current state of these new measurements will be presented.

  4. Atomistic modeling of high temperature uranium-zirconium alloy structure and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, A. P.; Beeler, B.; Deo, C.; Baskes, M. I.; Okuniewski, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    A semi-empirical Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM) potential is developed for application to the high temperature body-centered-cubic uranium-zirconium alloy (γ-U-Zr) phase and employed with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the high temperature thermo-physical properties of U-Zr alloys. Uranium-rich U-Zr alloys (e.g. U-10Zr) have been tested and qualified for use as metallic nuclear fuel in U.S. fast reactors such as the Integral Fast Reactor and the Experimental Breeder Reactors, and are a common sub-system of ternary metallic alloys like U-Pu-Zr and U-Zr-Nb. The potential was constructed to ensure that basic properties (e.g., elastic constants, bulk modulus, and formation energies) were in agreement with first principles calculations and experimental results. After which, slight adjustments were made to the potential to fit the known thermal properties and thermodynamics of the system. The potentials successfully reproduce the experimental melting point, enthalpy of fusion, volume change upon melting, thermal expansion, and the heat capacity of pure U and Zr. Simulations of the U-Zr system are found to be in good agreement with experimental thermal expansion values, Vegard's law for the lattice constants, and the experimental enthalpy of mixing. This is the first simulation to reproduce the experimental thermodynamics of the high temperature γ-U-Zr metallic alloy system. The MEAM potential is then used to explore thermodynamics properties of the high temperature U-Zr system including the constant volume heat capacity, isothermal compressibility, adiabatic index, and the Grüneisen parameters.

  5. Corrosion of high temperature alloys in solar salt at 400, 500, and 680ÀC.

    SciTech Connect

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    Corrosion tests at 400, 500, and 680ÀC were performed using four high temperature alloys; 347SS, 321SS In625, and HA230. Molten salt chemistry was monitored over time through analysis of nitrite, carbonate, and dissolved metals. Metallography was performed on alloys at 500 and 680ÀC, due to the relatively thin oxide scale observed at 400ÀC. At 500ÀC, corrosion of iron based alloys took the form of chromium depletion and iron oxides, while nickel based alloys also had chromium depletion and formation of NiO. Chromium was detected in relatively low concentrations at this temperature. At 680ÀC, significant surface corrosion occurred with metal losses greater than 450microns/year after 1025hours of exposure. Iron based alloys formed complex iron, sodium, and chromium oxides. Some data suggests grain boundary chromium depletion of 321SS. Nickel alloys formed NiO and metallic nickel corrosion morphologies, with HA230 displaying significant internal oxidation in the form of chromia. Nickel alloys both exhibited worse corrosion than iron based alloys likely due to preferential dissolution of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten.

  6. Long-Term Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of Wrought Commercial Alloys at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bingtao Li

    2003-08-05

    The oxidation resistance of a high-temperature alloy is dependent upon sustaining the formation of a protective scale, which is strongly related to the alloying composition and the oxidation condition. The protective oxide scale only provides a finite period of oxidation resistance owing to its eventual breakdown, which is especially accelerated under thermal cycling conditions. This current study focuses on the long-term cyclic oxidation behavior of a number of commercial wrought alloys. The alloys studied were Fe- and Ni-based, containing different levels of minor elements, such as Si, Al, Mn, and Ti. Oxidation testing was conducted at 1000 and 1100 C in still air under both isothermal and thermal cycling conditions (1-day and 7-days). The specific aspects studied were the oxidation behavior of chromia-forming alloys that are used extensively in industry. The current study analyzed the effects of alloying elements, especially the effect of minor element Si, on cyclic oxidation resistance. The behavior of oxide scale growth, scale spallation, subsurface changes, and chromium interdiffusion in the alloy were analyzed in detail. A novel model was developed in the current study to predict the life-time during cyclic oxidation by simulating oxidation kinetics and chromium interdiffusion in the subsurface of chromia-forming alloys.

  7. High temperature corrosion of a nickel base alloy by helium impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouillard, F.; Cabet, C.; Wolski, K.; Terlain, A.; Tabarant, M.; Pijolat, M.; Valdivieso, F.

    2007-05-01

    High temperature corrosion properties of Haynes 230 were investigated in a purposely-designed facility under a typical very high temperature reactor (VHTR) impure helium medium. The study was focused on the surface oxide scale formation and its stability at about 1223 K. The alloy developed a Mn/Cr rich oxide layer on its surface under impure helium at 1173 K. Nevertheless, a deleterious reaction destructing the chromium oxide was evidenced above a critical temperature, TA. Reagents and products of this last reaction were investigated.

  8. Microstructural changes during high temperature deformation of an Al-Li(8090) alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Eddahbi, M.; Carreno, F.; Ruano, O.A.

    1998-05-05

    In this work, the high temperature tensile behavior of an aluminum-lithium (8090) alloy is studied at various strain rates and temperatures. In particular, special attention was paid to the oscillations observed in the true stress versus strain curves at high strain rate, 0.8 s{sup {minus}1}, and high temperatures in excess of 380 C (> 0.57 T{sub m}, where T{sub m} is the melting temperature). The changes in the microstructure were analyzed and correlated to the flow curves of the deformed samples.

  9. High temperature reactivity of two chromium-containing alloys in impure helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabet, C.; Chapovaloff, J.; Rouillard, F.; Girardin, G.; Kaczorowski, D.; Wolski, K.; Pijolat, M.

    2008-04-01

    Chromium-rich nickel base alloys 617 and 230 are promising candidate materials for very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR) but they must resist corrosion in the impure primary cooling helium over very long times. The impurities of the hot helium can promote the development of chromium-rich surface oxides that appear to protect the alloys against intensive corrosion processes. However above a critical temperature (typically in the range 1173-1273 K), chromium oxide is reduced by carbon from the alloy and the surface layer is not stable anymore. Depending on the gas composition, the unprotected material rapidly either gains or loses carbon with a dramatic impact on its mechanical properties. The deleterious reaction of chromia and carbon thus fixes an ultimate reactor operating temperature. Critical temperature measurements are presented for alloys 617 and 230 and the influence of carbon monoxide partial pressure in helium is discussed.

  10. Long-term-high temperature stability of alloy 803 in the chemical process industry

    SciTech Connect

    Sizek, H.W.; Baker, B.A.; Smith, G.D.

    1999-11-01

    Alloy 803 is used in the chemical process industry for its high temperature strength and corrosion resistance. Knowledge of the microstructural characteristics as a function of time and temperature are essential for accurate rationalization of mechanical property performance under actual service conditions. This paper seeks to determine the microstructure of alloy 803 as a function of time and temperature for times up to 34,000 hours and temperatures ranging from 595 C to 1095 C. Post-exposure room temperature tensile data are also presented as an indication of the alloy`s tolerance to downtime strains. Intermediate temperature mechanical strength can be attributed primarily to gamma prime ({gamma}{prime}) and higher temperature strength to M{sub 23}C{sub 6} content.

  11. Effect of High Temperature Aging on the Corrosion Resistance of Iron Based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S D; Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C; Rebak, R B

    2007-08-10

    Iron-based amorphous alloys can be more resistant to corrosion than polycrystalline materials of similar compositions. However, when the amorphous alloys are exposed to high temperatures they may recrystallize (or devitrify) thus losing their resistance to corrosion. Four different types of amorphous alloys melt spun ribbon specimens were exposed to several temperatures for short periods of time. The resulting corrosion resistance was evaluated in seawater at 90 C and compared with the as-prepared ribbons. Results show that the amorphous alloys can be exposed to 600 C for 1-hr. without losing the corrosion resistance; however, when the ribbons were exposed at 800 C for 1-hr. their localized corrosion resistance decreased significantly.

  12. Pu-ZR Alloy high-temperature activation-measurement foil

    DOEpatents

    McCuaig, Franklin D.

    1977-08-02

    A nuclear reactor fuel alloy consists essentially of from slightly greater than 7 to about 4 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, and is characterized in that the alloy is castable and is rollable to thin foils. A preferred embodiment of about 7 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, has a melting point substantially above the melting point of plutonium, is rollable to foils as thin as 0.0005 inch thick, and is compatible with cladding material when repeatedly cycled to temperatures above 650.degree. C. Neutron flux densities across a reactor core can be determined with a high-temperature activation-measurement foil which consists of a fuel alloy foil core sandwiched and sealed between two cladding material jackets, the fuel alloy foil core being a 7 w/o zirconium, plutonium foil which is from 0.005 to 0.0005 inch thick.

  13. Pu-Zr alloy for high-temperature foil-type fuel

    DOEpatents

    McCuaig, Franklin D.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel alloy consists essentially of from slightly greater than 7 to about 4 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, and is characterized in that the alloy is castable and is rollable to thin foils. A preferred embodiment of about 7 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, has a melting point substantially above the melting point of plutonium, is rollable to foils as thin as 0.0005 inch thick, and is compatible with cladding material when repeatedly cycled to temperatures above 650.degree. C. Neutron reflux densities across a reactor core can be determined with a high-temperature activation-measurement foil which consists of a fuel alloy foil core sandwiched and sealed between two cladding material jackets, the fuel alloy foil core being a 7 w/o zirconium, plutonium foil which is from 0.005 to 0.0005 inch thick.

  14. The variation of the yield stress of Ti alloys with strain rate at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, R. S.; Paddon, S. P.; Kassner, M. E.

    1999-06-01

    This study extended investigation on the elevated-temperature yield-strength dependence of beta-phase titanium alloys on strain rate and temperature. Yield stresses were found to increase substantially with increasing strain rate at elevated temperatures due to the high strain-rate sensitivity of titanium at high temperatures. Above 1000 °C, the strain-rate sensitivities were found to increase substantially with increasing temperature and/or decreasing strain rate. The six alloys examined were TIMETAL 21S, Ti-15-3, Ti-6-4, Ti-13-11-3, Beta C, and Beta III. There was particular interest in determining the strain-rate sensitivity of these alloys through strain-rate change tests above 1000 °C. The yield stresses of all the titanium alloys at temperatures above 1093 °C were less than 1% of their ambient temperature values. Strain hardening was negligible in the alloys tested at these high temperatures. Extended tensile ductilities of 100 to 200% were observed due to the pronounced strain-rate sensitivity. The rate controlling mechanism for plasticity, based on activation energy and the strain-rate sensitivity measurements, is discussed.

  15. The variation of the yield stress of Ti alloys with strain rate at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, R.S.; Paddon, S.P.; Kassner, M.E.

    1999-06-01

    This study extended investigation on the elevated-temperature yield-strength dependence of beta-phase titanium alloys on strain rate and temperature. Yield stresses were found to increase substantially with increasing strain rate at elevated temperatures due to the high strain-rate sensitivity of titanium at high temperatures. Above 1000 C, the strain-rate sensitivities were found to increase substantially with increasing temperature and/or decreasing strain rate. The six alloys examined were TIMETAL 21S, Ti-15-3-, Ti-6-4, Ti-13-11-3, Beta C, and Beta III. There was particular interest in determining the strain-rate sensitivity of these alloys through strain-rate change tests above 1000 C. The yield stresses of all the titanium alloys at temperatures above 1093 C were less than 1% of their ambient temperature values. strain hardening was negligible in the alloys tested at these high temperatures. Extended tensile ductilities of 100 to 200% were observed due to the pronounced strain-rare sensitivity. The rate controlling mechanism for plasticity, based on activation energy and the strain-rate sensitivity measurements, is discussed.

  16. Behavior of some high-temperature alloys under simulated erosion-corrosion environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kloewer, J.; Brill, U.; Agarwal, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    Although material wastage by combined erosion-corrosion attack is well-known in a variety of commercial high-temperature processes like coal gasifiers, stationary and flying gas turbines, fluidized bed combustion, industrial furnaces and other high-temperature heat-treatment furnaces, less information is available on material-related parameters and low velocity environments typical for industrial furnaces. Consequently the aim of the present paper is to introduce a newly developed erosion-corrosion testing facility enabling investigations in a wide range of velocities and to provide first test results on the influence of alloying elements with special emphasis on the oxide forming elements like chromium, aluminum and silicon on erosion-corrosion resistance. Six alloys 600H, 690, 800H, 602CA, 45TM and Ni{sub 3}Al were tested in order to find a ranking in the combined erosion-corrosion environment. The experimental test results reveal that the mechanism of metal degradation under combined erosion-corrosion attack at low particle velocities is dominated by metal wastage by removal of oxide scales with subsequent regrowth by oxidation. The resistance of the alloys against erosion-corrosion increased with increasing aluminum content. Independent of the particle velocities, the nickel aluminide showed the best performance followed by alloy 602CA and the iron-base alloy 800H.

  17. The strengthening mechanism of a nickel-based alloy after laser shock processing at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinghong; Zhou, Liucheng; He, Weifeng; He, Guangyu; Wang, Xuede; Nie, Xiangfan; Wang, Bo; Luo, Sihai; Li, Yuqin

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the strengthening mechanism of laser shock processing (LSP) at high temperatures in the K417 nickel-based alloy. Using a laser-induced shock wave, residual compressive stresses and nanocrystals with a length of 30-200 nm and a thickness of 1 μm are produced on the surface of the nickel-based alloy K417. When the K417 alloy is subjected to heat treatment at 900 °C after LSP, most of the residual compressive stress relaxes while the microhardness retains good thermal stability; the nanocrystalline surface has not obviously grown after the 900 °C per 10 h heat treatment, which shows a comparatively good thermal stability. There are several reasons for the good thermal stability of the nanocrystalline surface, such as the low value of cold hardening of LSP, extreme high-density defects and the grain boundary pinning of an impure element. The results of the vibration fatigue experiments show that the fatigue strength of K417 alloy is enhanced and improved from 110 to 285 MPa after LSP. After the 900 °C per 10 h heat treatment, the fatigue strength is 225 MPa the heat treatment has not significantly reduced the reinforcement effect. The feature of the LSP strengthening mechanism of nickel-based alloy at a high temperature is the co-working effect of the nanocrystalline surface and the residual compressive stress after thermal relaxation.

  18. Niobium-aluminum base alloys having improved, high temperature oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G. (Inventor); Stephens, Joseph R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A niobium-aluminum base alloy having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures and consisting essentially of 48%-52% niobium, 36%-42% aluminum, 4%-10% chromium, 0%-2%, more preferably 1%-2%, silicon and/or tungsten with tungsten being preferred, and 0.1%-2.0% of a rare earth selected from the group consisting of yttrium, ytterbium and erbium. Parabolic oxidation rates, k.sub.p, at 1200.degree. C. range from about 0.006 to 0.032 (mg/cm.sup.2).sup.2 /hr. The new alloys also exhibit excellent cyclic oxidation resistance.

  19. High-temperature structural intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, M.; Inui, H.; Ito, K.

    2000-01-01

    In the last one and a half decades, a great deal of fundamental and developmental research has been made on high-temperature structural intermetallics aiming at the implementation of these intermetallics in aerospace, automotive and land-based applications. These intermetallics include aluminides formed with either titanium, nickel or iron and silicides formed with transition metals. Of these high-temperature intermetallics, TiAl-based alloys with great potential in both aerospace and automotive applications have been attracting particular attention. Recently TiAl turbocharger wheels have finally started being used for turbochargers for commercial passenger cars of a special type. The current status of the research and development of these high-temperature intermetallics is summarized and a perspective on what directions future research and development of high-temperature intermetallics should take is provided.

  20. High-temperature steam oxidation kinetics of the E110G cladding alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Márton; Kulacsy, Katalin; Hózer, Zoltán; Perez-Feró, Erzsébet; Novotny, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    In the course of recent years, several experiments were performed at MTA EK (Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences) on the isothermal high-temperature oxidation of the improved Russian cladding alloy E110G in steam/argon atmosphere. Using these data and designing additional supporting experiments, the oxidation kinetics of the E110G alloy was investigated in a wide temperature range, between 600 °C and 1200 °C. For short durations (below 500 s) or high temperatures (above 1065 °C) the oxidation kinetics was found to follow a square-root-of-time dependence, while for longer durations and in the intermediate temperature range (800-1000 °C) it was found to approach a cube-root-of-time dependence rather than a square-root one. Based on the results a new best-estimate and a conservative oxidation kinetics model were created.

  1. Dynamic High-temperature Testing of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High-strain Rates: Dynamic High-temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Song, B.; Nelson, K.; Lipinski, R.; Bignell, J.; Ulrich, G.; George, E. P.

    2014-08-21

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-strain -rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain -rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. In our study, we analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens in compression. We made appropriate modifications using the current high-temperature Kolsky bar technique in order to obtain reliable compressive stress–strain response of an iridium alloy at high-strain rates (300–10 000 s-1) and temperatures (750 and 1030°C). The compressive stress–strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to both strain rate and temperature.

  2. Dynamic High-temperature Testing of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High-strain Rates: Dynamic High-temperature Testing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, B.; Nelson, K.; Lipinski, R.; Bignell, J.; Ulrich, G.; George, E. P.

    2014-08-21

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-strain -rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain -rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. In our study, we analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens in compression. We made appropriate modifications using themore » current high-temperature Kolsky bar technique in order to obtain reliable compressive stress–strain response of an iridium alloy at high-strain rates (300–10 000 s-1) and temperatures (750 and 1030°C). The compressive stress–strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to both strain rate and temperature.« less

  3. Hot corrosivity of coal conversion product on high temperature alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, G.H.

    1984-08-29

    This report describes research begun under Contract AS01-76-ET-10577, most of which was continued when the same project was continued under a new number, Contract AC01-79-ET-13547. The areas studied are thermochemistry of high temperature corrosion, hot corrosion of turbine alloys and coatings, and electrochemistry of sulfate melts. A background to the problem of hot corrosion is presented first followed by a description of results obtained in the three areas of this project.

  4. Characterization of Ternary NiTiPt High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, Orlando; Noebe, Ronald; Biles, Tiffany; Garg, Anita; Palczer, Anna; Scheiman, Daniel; Seifert, Hans Jurgen; Kaufman, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Pt additions substituted for Ni in NiTi alloys are known to increase the transformation temperature of the alloy but only at fairly high Pt levels. However, until now only ternary compositions with a very specific stoichiometry, Ni50-xPtxTi50, have been investigated and then only to very limited extent. In order to learn about this potential high-temperature shape memory alloy system, a series of over twenty alloys along and on either side of a line of constant stoichiometry between NiTi and TiPt were arc melted, homogenized, and characterized in terms of their microstructure, transformation temperatures, and hardness. The resulting microstructures were examined by scanning electron microscopy and the phase compositions quantified by energy dispersive spectroscopy."Stoichiometric" compositions along a line of constant stoichiometry between NiTi to TiPt were essentially single phase but by any deviations from a stoichiometry of (Ni,Pt)50Ti50 resulted in the presence of at least two different intermetallic phases, depending on the overall composition of the alloy. Essentially all alloys, whether single or two-phase, still under went a martensitic transformation. It was found that the transformation temperatures were depressed with initial Pt additions but at levels greater than 10 at.% the transformation temperature increased linearly with Pt content. Also, the transformation temperatures were relatively insensitive to alloy stoichiometry within the range of alloys examined. Finally, the dependence of hardness on Pt content for a series of Ni50-xPtxTi50 alloys showed solution softening at low Pt levels, while hardening was observed in ternary alloys containing more than about 10 at.% Pt. On either side of these "stoichiometric" compositions, hardness was also found to increase significantly.

  5. High-temperature microstructural stability in iron- and nickel-base alloys from rapid solidification processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flinn, J.E. ); Bae, J.C.; Kelly, T.F. )

    1991-08-01

    The properties and performance of metallic alloys for heat resistant applications depend on the fineness, homogeneity, and stability of their microstructures, particularly after high temperature exposures. Potential advantages of rapid solidification processing (RSP) of alloys for such applications are the homogeneity in composition and fine microstructural features derived from the nature of the RSP process. The main RSP product form is powder, is which obtained by atomizing a narrow melt stream into fine molten droplets. Rapid cooling of the droplets is typically achieved through convective cooling with noble gases such as argon or helium. Consolidation of RSP powder, either using near-net-shape methods or into forms that can be converted to final product shapes, requires exposures to fairly high temperatures, usually 900 to 1200{degrees}C for iron- and nickel-base alloys. Full consolidation, i.e., complete densification with accompanying particle bonding, usually requires pressure or stress assistance. Consolidation, as well as any subsequent thermal-mechanical processing, may affect the chemical homogeneity and fine microstructures. A study has been performed on a series of RSP iron- and nickel-base alloys. The results of microstructure examinations and mechanical properties tests of the consolidated powders, and their correlation, will be covered in this paper. 14 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Vacuum thermal-mechanical fatigue testing of two iron base high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.

    1974-01-01

    Ultrahigh vacuum elevated temperature low cycle fatigue and thermal fatigue tests of 304 stainless steel and A-286 alloy have shown significant effects of frequency and combined temperature-strain cycling on fatigue life. At constant temperature, the cyclic life of both alloys was lower at lower frequencies. Combined temperature-strain cycling reduced fatigue life with respect to isothermal life at the maximum temperature of the thermal cycle. Life reductions with in-phase thermal cycling (tension at high temperature, compression at low temperature) were attributed to grain boundary cavitation caused by unreversed tensile grain boundary sliding. The proposed mechanism for out-of-phase cavity generation involved accumulation of unreversed compressive grain boundary displacements which could not be geometrically accomodated by intragranular deformation in the low-ductility A-286 alloy.

  7. Oxidation of High-temperature Alloy Wires in Dry Oxygen and Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Lorincz, Jonathan A.; DeMange, Jeffrey J.

    2004-01-01

    Small diameter wires (150 to 250 microns) of the high temperature alloys Haynes 188, Haynes 230, Haynes 230, Haynes 214, Kanthal Al and PM2000 were oxidized at 1204 C in dry oxygen or 50% H2O /50% O2 for 70 Hours. The oxidation kinetics were monitored using a thermogravimetric technique. Oxide phase composition and morphology of the oxidized wires were determined by X-ray diffraction,field emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The alumina-forming alloys, Kanthal Al and PM2000, out-performed the chromia-forming alloys under this conditions. PM2000 was recommended as the most promising candidate for advanced hybrid seal applications for space reentry control surface seals or hypersonic propulsion system seals. This study also demonstrated that thermogravimetric analysis of small diameter wires is a powerful technique for the study of oxide volatility, oxide adherence, and breakaway oxidation.

  8. High-temperature thermodynamic activities of zirconium in platinum alloys determined by nitrogen-nitride equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.A.

    1980-05-01

    A high-temperature nitrogen-nitride equilibrium apparatus is constructed for the study of alloy thermodynamics to 2300/sup 0/C. Zirconium-platinum alloys are studied by means of the reaction 9ZrN + 11Pt ..-->.. Zr/sub 9/Pt/sub 11/ + 9/2 N/sub 2/. Carful attention is paid to the problems of diffusion-limited reaction and ternary phase formation. The results of this study are and a/sub Zr//sup 1985/sup 0/C/ = 2.4 x 10/sup -4/ in Zr/sub 9/Pt/sub 11/ ..delta..G/sub f 1985/sup 0/C//sup 0/ Zr/sub 9/Pt/sub 11/ less than or equal to -16.6 kcal/g atom. These results are in full accord with the valence bond theory developed by Engel and Brewer; this confirms their prediction of an unusual interaction of these alloys.

  9. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, John R.; Shiflet, Gary J.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Wert, John A.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program was initiated in 1986 and continues with a high level of activity. The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are presented for each research project. We generally aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies. Three research areas are being actively investigated, including: (1) Mechanical and environmental degradation mechanisms in advanced light metals, (2) Aerospace materials science, and (3) Mechanics of materials for light aerospace structures.

  10. NASA-UVA light aerospace alloy and structures technology program (LA(sup 2)ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Haviland, John K.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Pilkey, Walter D.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Scully, John R.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Thornton, Earl A.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The general objective of the Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA(sup 2)ST) Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites, and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are established for each research project. We aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material behavior and microstructure, new monolithic and composite alloys, advanced processing methods, new solid and fluid mechanics analyses, measurement advances, and critically, a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies. Four research areas are being actively investigated, including: (1) Mechanical and Environmental Degradation Mechanisms in Advanced Light Metals and Composites; (2) Aerospace Materials Science; (3) Mechanics of Materials and Composites for Aerospace Structures; and (4) Thermal Gradient Structures.

  11. High Temperature, Slow Strain Rate Forging of Advanced Disk Alloy ME3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; OConnor, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    The advanced disk alloy ME3 was designed in the HSR/EPM disk program to have extended durability at 1150 to 1250 F in large disks. This was achieved by designing a disk alloy and process producing balanced monotonic, cyclic, and time-dependent mechanical properties. combined with robust processing and manufacturing characteristics. The resulting baseline alloy, processing, and supersolvus heat treatment produces a uniform, relatively fine mean grain size of about ASTM 7, with as-large-as (ALA) grain size of about ASTM 3. There is a long term need for disks with higher rim temperature capabilities than 1250 F. This would allow higher compressor exit (T3) temperatures and allow the full utilization of advanced combustor and airfoil concepts under development. Several approaches are being studied that modify the processing and chemistry of ME3, to possibly improve high temperature properties. Promising approaches would be applied to subscale material, for screening the resulting mechanical properties at these high temperatures. n obvious path traditionally employed to improve the high temperature and time-dependent capabilities of disk alloys is to coarsen the grain size. A coarser grain size than ASTM 7 could potentially be achieved by varying the forging conditions and supersolvus heat treatment. The objective of this study was to perform forging and heat treatment experiments ("thermomechanical processing experiments") on small compression test specimens of the baseline ME3 composition, to identify a viable forging process allowing significantly coarser grain size targeted at ASTM 3-5, than that of the baseline, ASTM 7.

  12. Thermogravimetric Study of Oxidation-Resistant Alloys for High-Temperature Solar Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, Rene I.; Stein, Wes; Marvig, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Three special alloys likely to be suitable for high-temperature solar receivers were studied for their resistance to oxidation up to a temperature of 1050°C in dry atmospheres of CO2 and air. The alloys were Haynes HR160, Hastelloy X, and Haynes 230, all nickel-based alloys with greater than 20% chromium content. The oxidation rate of specimens cut from sample master alloys was followed by thermogravimetry by continuously monitoring the weight change with a microbalance for a test duration of 10 h. The corrosion resistance was deduced from the total weight increase of the specimens and the morphology of the oxide scale. The surface oxide layer formed (scale) was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and in all cases was found to be chromia. Oxidation was analyzed by means of parabolic rate law, albeit in some instances linear breakaway corrosion was also observed. For the temperature range investigated, all alloys corroded more in CO2 than in air due to the formation of a stronger and more protective oxide scale in the presence of air. At 1000°C, the most resistant alloy to corrosion in CO2 was Haynes 230. Alloy Haynes HR160 was the most oxidized alloy at 1000°C in both CO2 and air. Hastelloy X oxidized to a similar extent in CO2 at both 900°C and 1000°C, but in air, it resisted oxidation better at 1000°C than either at 900°C or 1000°C.

  13. Basic principles of creating a new generation of high- temperature brazing filler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Suchkov, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    The development of new materials is based on the formation of a structural-phase state providing the desired properties by selecting the base and the complex of alloying elements. The development of amorphous filler alloys for a high-temperature brazing has its own features that are due to the limited life cycle and the production method of brazing filler alloys. The work presents a cycle of analytical and experimental materials science investigations including justification of the composition of a new amorphous filler alloy for brazing the products from zirconium alloys at the temperature of no more than 800 °C and at the unbrazing temperature of permanent joints of more than 1200 °C. The experimental alloys have been used for manufacture of amorphous ribbons by rapid quenching, of which the certification has been made by X-ray investigations and a differential-thermal analysis. These ribbons were used to obtain permanent joints from the spacer grid cells (made from the alloy Zr-1% Nb) of fuel assemblies of the thermal nuclear reactor VVER-440. The brazed samples in the form of a pair of cells have been exposed to corrosion tests in autoclaves in superheated water at a temperature of 350 °C, a pressure of 160 MPa and duration of up to 6,000 h. They have been also exposed to destructive tests using a tensile machine. The experimental results obtained have made it possible to propose and patent a brazing filler alloy of the following composition: Zr-5.5Fe-(2.5-3.5)Be-1Nb-(5-8)Cu-2Sn-0.4Cr-(0.5-1.0)Ge. Its melting point is 780 °C and the recommended brazing temperature is 800°C.

  14. Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, James; Heuser, Brent; Robertson, Ian; Sehitoglu, Huseyin; Sofronis, Petros; Gewirth, Andrew

    2015-04-22

    This “Blue Sky” project was directed at exploring the opportunities that would be gained by developing Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys based on the Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloy system. A great deal of research effort has been directed toward ferritic and ferritic/martensitic ODS alloys which has resulted in reasonable advances in alloy properties. Similar gains should be possible with austenitic alloy which would also take advantage of other superior properties of that alloy system. The research effort was aimed at the developing an in-depth understanding of the microstructural-level strengthening effects of ODS particles in austentic alloys. This was accomplished on a variety of alloy compositions with the main focus on 304SS and 316SS compositions. A further goal was to develop an understanding other the role of ODS particles on crack propagation and creep performance. Since these later two properties require bulk alloy material which was not available, this work was carried out on promising austentic alloy systems which could later be enhanced with ODS strengthening. The research relied on a large variety of micro-analytical techniques, many of which were available through various scientific user facilities. Access to these facilities throughout the course of this work was instrumental in gathering complimentary data from various analysis techniques to form a well-rounded picture of the processes which control austenitic ODS alloy performance. Micromechanical testing of the austenitic ODS alloys confirmed their highly superior mechanical properties at elevated temperature from the enhanced strengthening effects. The study analyzed the microstructural mechanisms that provide this enhanced high temperature performance. The findings confirm that the smallest size ODS particles provide the most potent strengthening component. Larger particles and other thermally- driven precipitate structures were less effective contributors and, in some cases, limited

  15. Thermomechanical behavior of NiTiPdPt high temperature shape memory alloy springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, D. E.; Padula, S. A., II; Noebe, R. D.; Benafan, O.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2014-12-01

    Transformation strains in high temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs) are generally smaller than for conventional NiTi alloys and can be purposefully limited in cases where stability and repeatability at elevated temperatures are desired. Yet such alloys can still be used in actuator applications that require large strokes when used in the form of springs. Thus there is a need to understand the thermomechanical behavior of shape memory alloy spring actuators, particularly those consisting of alternative alloys. In this work, a modular test setup was assembled with the objective of acquiring stroke, stress, temperature, and moment data in real time during joule heating and forced convective cooling of Ni19.5Ti50.5Pd25Pt5 HTSMA springs. The spring actuators were subjected to both monotonic axial loading and thermomechanical cycling. The role of rotational constraints (i.e., by restricting rotation or allowing for free rotation at the ends of the springs) on stroke performance was also assessed. Finally, recognizing that evolution in the material microstructure can result in changes in HTSMA spring geometry, the effect of material microstructural evolution on spring performance was examined. This was done by taking into consideration the changes in geometry that occurred during thermomechanical cycling. This work thus provides insight into designing with HTSMA springs and predicting their thermomechanical performance.

  16. A computer program for engineering assessment of alloy corrosion in complex, high temperature gases

    SciTech Connect

    John, R.C.; Young, A.L.; Thompson, W.T.

    1997-08-01

    A user-friendly Windows program has been developed with the capability to assess corrosion of commercial alloys in complex gases at high temperatures. Thermochemical predictions of the stable alloy corrosion products are used to infer the likely corrosion mechanism. Regression analysis is used to produce correlations of alloy corrosion with exposure conditions. A large data collection has been compiled and represents nearly 4.7 million hours of exposure time for 71 alloys. The data represent total metal penetration (sound metal loss by surface scale plus internal corrosion) and have been collected from public plus private sources representing a time period of nearly 40 years. The data originate from well-defined exposures with known concentrations of H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, COS, O{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, temperature, exposure time, and alloy. A large amount of information is now available to predict corrosion for the conditions of interest. The capabilities of the program are reviewed in this presentation for corrosion by oxidation, sulfidation, oxidation/sulfidation, and carburization.

  17. High temperature coarsening of Cr2Nb precipitates in Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Kenneth Reed

    1996-01-01

    A new high-temperature-strength, high-conductivity Cu-Cr-Nb alloy with a CrNb ratio of 2:1 was developed to achieve improved performance and durability. The Cu-8 Cr4 Nb alloy studied has demonstrated remarkable thermal and microstructural stability after long exposures at temperatures up to 0.98 T(sub m). This stability was mainly attributed to the slow coarsening kinetics of the Cr2Nb precipitates present in the alloy. At all temperatures, the microstructure consists of a bimodal and sometimes trimodal distribution of strengthening Cr2Nb precipitates, depending on precipitation condition, i.e. from liquid or solid solution, and cooling rates. These precipitates remain in the same size range, i.e. large precipitates of approximately I pm, and small precipitates less dm 300 nm, and effectively pin the grain boundaries thus retaining a fine grain size of 2.7 micro-m after 100 h at 1323 K. (A relatively small number of Cr-rich and Nb-rich particles were also present.) This grain boundary pinning and sluggish coarsening of Cr2Nb particles explain the retention of good mechanical properties after prolonged holding at very high temperatures, e.g., 75% of the original hardness after aging for 100 h at 1273 K. Application of LSW-based coarsening models indicated that the coarsening kinetics of the large precipitates are most likely governed by grain boundary diffsion and, to a lesser extent, volume diffusion mechanisms.

  18. In situ high temperature microscopy study of the surface oxidation and phase transformations in titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Malinov, S; Sha, W; Voon, C S

    2002-09-01

    Two popular commercial titanium alloys, Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.08Si, were used for in situ high temperature microscopy study. The experiments were performed on an optical microscope equipped with high temperature stage using both normal and florescence lights. Two kinds of experiments were performed, at continuous heating/cooling with different rates and in isothermal conditions at different temperatures. The changes taking place on the sample surface during the experiments were monitored. The morphology of the alpha ==> beta ==> alpha phase transformation was recorded at different heat treatment conditions using the effect of thermal etching. An effect of sample surface oxidation and deoxidation was observed during continuous heating. The appearance and disappearance of ordered titanium oxides Ti3O and Ti2O are discussed based on the phase equilibrium diagram. The kinetics of the surface oxidation was monitored in both isothermal and continuous cooling conditions.

  19. High temperature behavior of nanostructured Al powders obtained by mechanical alloying under NH3 flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, E. S.; Cintas, J.; Cuevas, F. G.; Montes, J. M.; Herrera-García, M.

    2015-03-01

    Aluminium powder was mechanically alloyed under ammonia gas flow for different times (1-5 h) in order to produce a second-phase reinforcement, mainly by aluminium nitride (AlN). After milling, powders were consolidated by cold uniaxial pressing and vacuum sintering. A small amount of copper powder was added to the Al milled powder to improve its sintering behavior. Hardness and indirect tensile test were carried out at room and high temperature to evaluate the mechanical properties evolution. Results showed an remarkable hardness increase with the second phases content, even at high temperature (up to 229 HB at 400 °C). However, the high content of second phases of ceramic nature decreases the ductility, resulting in low values of tensile strength (lower than 160 MPa).

  20. On thermomechanical testing in support of constitutive equation development for high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.

    1985-01-01

    Three major categories of testing are identified that are necessary to provide support for the development of constitutive equations for high temperature alloys. These are exploratory, charactrization and verification tests. Each category is addressed and specific examples of each are given. An extensive, but not exhaustive, set of references is provided concerning pertinent experimental results and their relationships to theoretical development. This guide to formulating a meaningful testing effort in support of consitutive equation development can also aid in defining the necessary testing equipment and instrumentation for the establishment of a deformation and structures testing laboratory.

  1. Phase transformation of oxide film in zirconium alloy in high temperature hydrogenated water

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taeho; Kim, Jongjin; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-07-23

    The effect of the variation of the dissolved hydrogen concentration on the oxide phase transformation under high-temperature hydrogenated water conditions was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectrum in 50 cm(3)/kg of dissolved hydrogen concentration indicated the formation of monoclinic and tetragonal zirconium oxide at the water-substrate interface. As the dissolved hydrogen concentration decreased to 30 cm(3)/kg, the Raman peaks corresponding to the zirconium oxide phase changed, indicating an oxide phase transformation. And, the results of SEM and TEM analyses were compared with those of in situ analyses obtained for the oxide structure formed on the zirconium alloy.

  2. High-temperature relaxation in a Fe-Cr-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z. C.; Han, F. S.

    2003-09-01

    Two relaxational internal friction peaks were found in a (wt%)Fe-25Cr-5Al alloy. The low-temperature peak is related to Zener relaxation and the high-temperature one to grain-boundary relaxation. Their activation energy values are 2.55 (+/-0.14) eV for the Zener peak and 4.07(+/-0.15) eV for the grain-boundary relaxation peak, respectively. Grain-boundary relaxation strength remarkably increases with decreasing grain size, while the Zener peak is independent of the grain size. (

  3. Strees Corrosion Cracking Initiation of Ni-Bassed Alloys in High Temperature Water

    SciTech Connect

    E Richey; D Morton

    2005-03-21

    The goal of the work is to provide stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation data for Alloy 600 that is not compromised by (1) specimens that suffer from stress relaxation, (2) specimens which have an unknown stress state, (3) specimens which are tested at unknown positions electrochemically relative to the Ni/NiO phase transition, and (4) testing which relies on the period of time between specimen inspection intervals to estimate SCC initiation times. The current study was aimed at studying the effects of temperature and coolant hydrogen concentration on SCC initiation in high purity, high temperature water.

  4. Fracture characteristics of structural aerospace alloys containing deep surface flaws. [aluminum-titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, J. N.; Bixler, W. D.; Finger, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Conditions controlling the growth and fracture of deep surface flaws in aerospace alloys were investigated. Static fracture tests were performed on 7075-T651 and 2219-T87 aluminum, and 6Ai-4V STA titanium . Cyclic flaw growth tests were performed on the two latter alloys, and sustain load tests were performed on the titanium alloy. Both the cyclic and the sustain load tests were performed with and without a prior proof overload cycle to investigate possible growth retardation effects. Variables included in all test series were thickness, flaw depth-to-thickness ratio, and flaw shape. Results were analyzed and compared with previously developed data to determine the limits of applicability of available modified linear elastic fracture solutions.

  5. High strain rate behavior of alloy 800H at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiei, E.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a new model using linear estimation of strain hardening rate vs. stress, has been developed to predict dynamic behavior of alloy 800H at high temperatures. In order to prove the accuracy and competency of the presented model, Johnson-Cook model pertaining modeling of flow stress curves was used. Evaluation of mean error of flow stress at deformation temperatures from 850 °C to 1050 °C and at strain rates of 5 S-1 to 20 S-1 indicates that the predicted results are in a good agreement with experimentally measured ones. This analysis has been done for the stress-strain curves under hot working condition for alloy 800H. However, this model is not dependent on the type of material and can be extended for any similar conditions.

  6. Hot corrosion and high temperature corrosion behavior of a new gas turbine material -- alloy 603GT

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Brill, U.; Klower, J.

    1998-12-31

    Salt deposits encountered in a variety of high temperature processes have caused premature failures in heat exchangers and superheater tubes in pulp and paper recovery boilers, waste incinerators and coal gasifiers. Molten salt corrosion studies in both land based and air craft turbines have been the subject of intense study by many researchers. This phenomenon referred to as ``hot corrosion`` has primarily been attributed to corrosion by alkali sulfates, and there is somewhat general agreement in the literature that this is caused by either basic or acidic dissolution (fluxing) of the protective metal oxide layers by complex salt deposits containing both sulfates and chlorides. This paper describes experimental studies conducted on the hot corrosion behavior of a new Ni-Cr-Al alloy 603GT (UNS N06603) in comparison to some commercially established alloys used in gas turbine components.

  7. A metallographic technique for high temperature creep damage assessment in single crystal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, P.; Komenda, J.

    1999-10-01

    The use of single crystal (SX) nickel-base superalloys will increase in the future with the introduction of SX blades into large gas turbines for base-load electricity production. Prolonged periods of use at high temperatures may cause creep deformation and the assessment of damage can give large financial savings. A number of techniques can be applied for life assessment, e.g., calculations based on operational data, nondestructive testing for material interrogation, but because of the uncertainties involved the techniques are often used in combination. This paper describes a material interrogation (metallographic) technique for creep strain assessment in SX alloys. Creep tests have been performed at 950 C on the SX alloy CMSX-4 and quantitative microstructural studies performed on specimens interrupted at various levels of strain. It was found that the strengthening {gamma}{prime}-particles, initially cuboidal in shape, coalesced to form large plates or rafts normal to the applied stress. The rafts reached their maximum length before 2% strain, but continued to thicken with increasing strain. Although of different dimensions, the aspect ratios (length/thickness ratio) of the gamma-prime rafts and gamma plates were similar at similar levels of strain, increasing from {approximately} 1 at zero strain to a maximum of {approximately} 3 at about 1--2% strain. Analysis of microstructural measurements from rafting studies on SX alloys presented in the literature showed that the aspect ratios of the {gamma} and {gamma}{prime}-phases were similar and that at a temperature of 950--1,000 C a maximum length/thickness ratio of about 2.5--3.5 is reached at 1 to 2% creep strain. Measurement of gamma-prime raft or (or gamma plate) dimensions on longitudinal sections of blades is thus a suitable method for high temperature creep damage assessment of SX alloys.

  8. Challenges and Progress in the Development of High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys Based on NiTiX Compositions for High-Force Actuator Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo, II; Bigelow, Glen; Noebe, Ronald; Gaydosh, Darrell; Garg, Anita

    2006-01-01

    Interest in high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMA) has been growing in the aerospace, automotive, process control, and energy industries. However, actual materials development has seriously lagged component design, with current commercial NiTi alloys severely limited in their temperature capability. Additions of Pd, Pt, Au, Hf, and Zr at levels greater than 10 at.% have been shown to increase the transformation temperature of NiTi alloys, but with few exceptions, the shape memory behavior (strain recovery) of these NiTiX systems has been determined only under stress free conditions. Given the limited amount of basic mechanical test data and general lack of information regarding the work attributes of these materials, a program to investigate the mechanical behavior of potential HTSMAs, with transformation temperatures between 100 and 500 C, was initiated. This paper summarizes the results of studies, focusing on both the practical temperature limitations for ternary TiNiPd and TiNiPt systems based on the work output of these alloys and the ability of these alloys to undergo repeated thermal cycling under load without significant permanent deformation or "walking". These issues are ultimately controlled by the detwinning stress of the martensite and resistance to dislocation slip of the individual martensite and austenite phases. Finally, general rules that govern the development of useful, high work output, next-generation HTSMA materials, based on the lessons learned in this work, will be provided

  9. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Gangloff, Richard P.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Scully, John R.; Shiflet, Gary J.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Wert, John A.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites, and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. The general aim is to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environment/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated students for aerospace technologies. Specific technical objectives are presented for each of the following research projects: time-temperature dependent fracture in advanced wrought ingot metallurgy, and spray deposited aluminum alloys; cryogenic temperature effects on the deformation and fracture of Al-Li-Cu-In alloys; effects of aging and temperature on the ductile fracture of AA2095 and AA2195; mechanisms of localized corrosion in alloys 2090 and 2095; hydrogen interactions in aluminum-lithium alloys 2090 and selected model alloys; mechanisms of deformation and fracture in high strength titanium alloys (effects of temperature and hydrogen and effects of temperature and microstructure); evaluations of wide-panel aluminum alloy extrusions; Al-Si-Ge alloy development; effects of texture and precipitates on mechanical property anisotropy of Al-Cu-Mg-X alloys; damage evolution in polymeric composites; and environmental effects in fatigue life prediction - modeling crack propagation in light aerospace alloys.

  10. Low Cycle Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617 at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Cabet, Celine; Carroll, Laura; Wright, Richard

    2013-10-01

    Alloy 617 is the leading candidate material for an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) application of the Very High Temperature Nuclear Reactor (VHTR), expected to have an outlet temperature as high as 950 degrees C. Acceptance of Alloy 617 in Section III of the ASME Code for nuclear construction requires a detailed understanding of the creep-fatigue behavior. Initial creep-fatigue work on Alloy 617 suggests a more dominant role of environment with increasing temperature and/or hold times evidenced through changes in creep-fatigue crack growth mechanism/s and failure life. Continuous cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue testing of Alloy 617 was conducted at 950 degrees C and 0.3% and 0.6% total strain in air to simulate damage modes expected in a VHTR application. Continuous cycle specimens exhibited transgranular cracking. Intergranular cracking was observed in the creep-fatigue specimens, although evidence of grain boundary cavitation was not observed. Despite the absence of grain boundary cavitation to accelerate crack propagation, the addition of a hold time at peak tensile strain was detrimental to cycle life. This suggests that creepfatigue interaction may occur by a different mechanism or that the environment may be partially responsible for accelerating failure.

  11. Oxidation characteristics of the electron beam surface-treated Alloy 617 in high temperature helium environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho Jung; Sah, Injin; Kim, Donghoon; Kim, Hyunmyung; Jang, Changheui

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation characteristics of the electron beam surface-treated Alloy 617, which has an Al-rich surface layer, were evaluated in high temperature helium environments. Isothermal oxidation tests were performed in helium (99.999% purity) and VHTR-helium (helium of prototypical VHTR chemistry containing impurities like CO, CO2, CH4, and H2) environments at 900 °C for up to 1000 h. The surface-treated Alloy 617 showed an initial transient oxidation stage followed by the steady-state oxidation in all test environments. In addition, the steady-state oxidation kinetics of the surface-treated Alloy 617 was 2-order of magnitude lower than that of the as-received Alloy 617 in both helium environments as well as in air. The improvement in oxidation resistance was primarily due to the formation of the protective Al2O3 layer on the surface. The weight gain was larger in the order of air, helium, and VHTR-helium, while the parabolic rate constants (kp) at steady-state were similar for all test environments. In both helium environments, the oxide structure consisted of the outer transition Al2O3 with a small amount of Cr2O3 and inner columnar structured Al2O3 without an internal oxide. In the VHTR-helium environment, where the impurities were added to helium, the initial transient oxidation increased but the steady state kinetics was not affected.

  12. High temperature ultrasonic transducers for imaging and measurements in a liquid Pb/Bi eutectic alloy.

    PubMed

    Kazys, Rymantas; Voleisis, Algirdas; Sliteris, Reimondas; Mazeika, Liudas; Van Nieuwenhove, Rudi; Kupschus, Peter; Abderrahim, Hamid Aït

    2005-04-01

    In some nuclear reactors or accelerator-driven systems (ADS) the core is intended to be cooled by means of a heavy liquid metal, for example, lead-bismuth (Pb/Bi) eutectic alloy. For safety and licensing reasons, an imaging method of the interior of ADS, based on application of ultrasonic waves, has thus to be developed. This paper is devoted to description of developed various ultrasonic transducers suitable for long term imaging and measurements in the liquid Pb/Bi alloy. The results of comparative experimental investigations of the developed transducers of different designs in a liquid Pb/Bi alloy up to 450 degrees C are presented. Prototypes with different high temperature piezoelectric materials were investigated: PZT, bismuth titanate (Bi4Ti3O12), lithium niobate (LiNbO3), gallium orthophosphate (GaPO4) and aluminum nitride (A1N). For acoustic coupling with the metal alloy, it was proposed to coat the active surface of the transducers by diamond like carbon (DLC). The radiation robustness was assessed by exposing the transducers to high gamma dose rates in one of the irradiation facilities at SCK x CEN. The experimental results proved that the developed transducers are suitable for long-term operation in harsh conditions.

  13. High-temperature dilatometry of Ti-46Al-8Nb refractory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavykh, A. V.; Tcherdyntcev, V. V.; Stepashkin, A. A.; Gorshenkov, M. V.

    2013-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the linear thermal expansion coefficient K L of the intermetallic Ti-46Al-8Nb (at %) alloy is experimentally determined for the first time within the temperature range from 373 to 1773 K (solidus point). The determined boundaries of phase fields are compared with the results of differential thermal analysis and the calculated phase diagram of the alloy. The high-temperature limit (1384 K) of the alloy structure thermostability is detected from signs of the α2 + γ ⇆ α + γ phase transition in dilatometric curves. The restructuring mechanism in the α + γ field is studied by scanning electron microscopy. It is shown that the α2 + γ → α + γ phase transition is accompanied by selective structural degradation of single-crystalline α2 lamellae and the related destruction of a fine lamellar α2-Ti3Al(Nb) + γ-TiAl(Nb) texture. The average values of K L of the alloy are calculated within 100-K ranges in the low-temperature α2 + γ phase field, which is of interest from a practical viewpoint, according to the State Standard GOST 8.018-2007.

  14. High Temperature Heat Capacity of Alloy D9 Using Drop Calorimetry Based Enthalpy Increment Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Aritra; Raju, S.; Divakar, R.; Mohandas, E.

    2007-02-01

    Alloy D9 is a void-swelling resistant nuclear grade austenitic stainless steel (SS) based on AISI type 316-SS in which titanium constitutes an added predetermined alloying composition. In the present study, the high-temperature enthalpy values of alloy D9 with three different titanium-to-carbon mass percent ratios, namely Ti/C = 4, 6, and 8, have been measured using inverse drop calorimetry in the temperature range from 295 to 1323 K. It is found that within the level of experimental uncertainty, the enthalpy values are independent of the Ti-C mass ratio. The temperature dependence of the isobaric specific heat C P is obtained by a linear regression of the measured enthalpy data. The measured C P data for alloy D9 may be represented by the following best-fit expression: C_P(J \\cdot kg^{-1}\\cdot K^{-1})= 431 + 17.7 × 10^{-2}T + 8.72 × 10^{-5}/T^2. It is found that the measured enthalpy and specific heat values exhibit good agreement with reported data on 316 and other related austenitic stainless steels.

  15. Corrosion behavior of some high-temperature alloys under high velocity burnt fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Brill, U.; Ibas, O.

    1995-12-31

    In a laboratory burner rig facility developed by Krupp VDM, the corrosion behavior of three high-temperature alloys was investigated under high velocity burnt fuel. A hot gas stream of burnt natural gas hits a sample at an angle of 45{degree}. Gas velocities of up to 80 m/s are obtained, and can be continuously adjusted by varying the air volume. By changing the sample to burner nozzle distance, a temperature gradient from 1,000 C in the center to 880 C at the edges of the sample can be achieved. Corrosion behavior of the two Fe-base alloys 310 S and 800H, and the Ni-base alloy 602CA, was evaluated by means of optical microscopy and SEM/EDAX analysis. According to results obtained so far, the alumina-former, alloy 602CA, provides best performance under high velocity burnt fuel at 880--1,000 C, as well as under steady state cyclic oxidation testing in air.

  16. High-temperature alloys and thermal spray coatings for energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Taie, I.; Brigham, R.J.; Lafreniere, Y.

    1995-12-31

    Materials continue to be of primary concern as the potential limiting factor for the implementation of coal gasification technology in Canada. Superalloys and thermal spray coatings for syngas coolers represent one class of materials where a knowledge of general trends in oxidation/sulphidation and erosion resistance for a range of chemical compositions is thought to be essential for reliable operation of such technology. Alloy 800H, 304, 310, T91, Monit and Sanicro 28 along with four types of coatings (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni3Al and CoCrAlYNi) applied on each one of the above alloys have been subjected to a series of exposures (6 {times} 250h cycles) in two different gas mixtures containing CO, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}O at 600 C. The kinetics and mechanisms of corrosion and erosion of these alloys have been investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy and surface analytical techniques. Thermal spray coatings of ceramic and composite materials were found to be problematic on austenitic alloys because of spallation. Ceramic, composite and metallic coatings adhered well to the ferritic alloy. Nickel aluminide in combination with aluminum oxide as a composite did not display the expected high degree of corrosion resistance. High temperature erosion rates were found to be low on the bare superalloys and to be decreased by highly alloyed metallic coatings such as CoCrAlYNi, FeCrAlYMo and NiCrAlYCo. Ceramic and composite coatings were ineffective in reducing erosion rates because of spallation and reactivity in the simulated gasification environment.

  17. MULTI-PHASE HIGH TEMPERATURE ALLOYS: EXPLORATION OF LAVES-STRENGTHENED STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P; Lu, Zhao Ping; Liu, Chain T

    2007-01-01

    Exploratory effort was initiated for the development of Fe-base alloys strengthened by intermetallic Laves phase combined with MC (M: metals) carbide for improved elevated-temperature strength in fossil energy system components such as super-heater tubes and industrial gas turbines. Work in FY 2006 was focused on strengthening of Fe-Cr-Ni base austenitic stainless alloys by Fe2Nb Laves-phase precipitates with/without MC carbides, in combination with the improvement of oxidation resistance via Al-modification to promote alumina scale formation. A series of Fe-Cr-Ni-Nb base austenitic alloys with additions of Mo, Al, Si, C, B, etc. were cast and thermomechanically processed, and then tensile creep-rupture tested at the conditions of 750-850oC/70-170 MPa. The Al-modified alloys strengthened by Laves + MC show superior creep strength to that of conventional type 347 stainless steels, and their creep life-limit reaches up to 500 h at 750 oC/100 MPa. These alloys also show an excellent oxidation resistance from 650-800oC in air and air + 10% water vapor environments due to formation of a protective Al2O3 scale. Microstructural analysis of alloys strengthened by only Laves phase revealed that the Laves phase was effective to pin dislocations when the particle size is less than 0.5 m, but the resultant creep rupture lives were relatively short. The Al-modification was also applied to an advanced carbide-strengthened austenitic stainless steel, and it yielded creep resistance comparable to state-of-the-art austenitic alloys such as NF709, together with protective alumina scale formation. Modification of this alloy composition for its creep strength and oxidation resistance will be pursued in FY2007. Preliminary results suggest that the developed alloys with Al-modification combined with MC carbide strengthening are promising as a new class of high-temperature austenitic stainless steels.

  18. A Promising New Class of High-Temperature Alloys: Eutectic High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yiping; Dong, Yong; Guo, Sheng; Jiang, Li; Kang, Huijun; Wang, Tongmin; Wen, Bin; Wang, Zhijun; Jie, Jinchuan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Ruan, Haihui; Li, Tingju

    2014-08-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) can have either high strength or high ductility, and a simultaneous achievement of both still constitutes a tough challenge. The inferior castability and compositional segregation of HEAs are also obstacles for their technological applications. To tackle these problems, here we proposed a novel strategy to design HEAs using the eutectic alloy concept, i.e. to achieve a microstructure composed of alternating soft fcc and hard bcc phases. As a manifestation of this concept, an AlCoCrFeNi2.1 (atomic portion) eutectic high-entropy alloy (EHEA) was designed. The as-cast EHEA possessed a fine lamellar fcc/B2 microstructure, and showed an unprecedented combination of high tensile ductility and high fracture strength at room temperature. The excellent mechanical properties could be kept up to 700°C. This new alloy design strategy can be readily adapted to large-scale industrial production of HEAs with simultaneous high fracture strength and high ductility.

  19. A promising new class of high-temperature alloys: eutectic high-entropy alloys.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yiping; Dong, Yong; Guo, Sheng; Jiang, Li; Kang, Huijun; Wang, Tongmin; Wen, Bin; Wang, Zhijun; Jie, Jinchuan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Ruan, Haihui; Li, Tingju

    2014-01-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) can have either high strength or high ductility, and a simultaneous achievement of both still constitutes a tough challenge. The inferior castability and compositional segregation of HEAs are also obstacles for their technological applications. To tackle these problems, here we proposed a novel strategy to design HEAs using the eutectic alloy concept, i.e. to achieve a microstructure composed of alternating soft fcc and hard bcc phases. As a manifestation of this concept, an AlCoCrFeNi2.1 (atomic portion) eutectic high-entropy alloy (EHEA) was designed. The as-cast EHEA possessed a fine lamellar fcc/B2 microstructure, and showed an unprecedented combination of high tensile ductility and high fracture strength at room temperature. The excellent mechanical properties could be kept up to 700°C. This new alloy design strategy can be readily adapted to large-scale industrial production of HEAs with simultaneous high fracture strength and high ductility. PMID:25160691

  20. A Promising New Class of High-Temperature Alloys: Eutectic High-Entropy Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yiping; Dong, Yong; Guo, Sheng; Jiang, Li; Kang, Huijun; Wang, Tongmin; Wen, Bin; Wang, Zhijun; Jie, Jinchuan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Ruan, Haihui; Li, Tingju

    2014-01-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) can have either high strength or high ductility, and a simultaneous achievement of both still constitutes a tough challenge. The inferior castability and compositional segregation of HEAs are also obstacles for their technological applications. To tackle these problems, here we proposed a novel strategy to design HEAs using the eutectic alloy concept, i.e. to achieve a microstructure composed of alternating soft fcc and hard bcc phases. As a manifestation of this concept, an AlCoCrFeNi2.1 (atomic portion) eutectic high-entropy alloy (EHEA) was designed. The as-cast EHEA possessed a fine lamellar fcc/B2 microstructure, and showed an unprecedented combination of high tensile ductility and high fracture strength at room temperature. The excellent mechanical properties could be kept up to 700°C. This new alloy design strategy can be readily adapted to large-scale industrial production of HEAs with simultaneous high fracture strength and high ductility. PMID:25160691

  1. Effect of rhenium on short term oxidation of niobium based alloys for high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, Ruth M.

    resulted in the negative weight gain. Alloys with this type of weight gain is advantageous as it refers to nullifying the formation of bulky Nb2O5. There was no metal left at 1400°C. Pesting was no observed at low temperature range. However, spalling was noticed at 1200 and 1300°C. Tungsten additions have helped in the formation of Nb5Si 3, Cr2Re3, NbCr2, and NbSS. All the phases formed were intermetallics, except the solid solution. These high temperature phases have helped to resist oxidation to an extent. The formation of a CrNbO 4 and SiO2 has helped in lowering the oxidation kinetics. No pesting was observed, spalling of the oxide was noticed only at 1300°C. Oxidation behavior of these alloys were characterized by the weight change per unit surface area method. Oxidation products were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy in several modes including backscatter imaging, secondary imaging, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray mapping

  2. Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xingshuo

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is one of the leading concepts of the Generation IV nuclear reactor development, which is the core component of Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The major challenge in the research and development of NGNP is the performance and reliability of structure materials at high temperature. Alloy 617, with an exceptional combination of high temperature strength and oxidation resistance, has been selected as a primary candidate material for structural use, particularly in Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) which has an outlet temperature in the range of 850 to 950°C and an inner pressure from 5 to 20MPa. In order to qualify the material to be used at the operation condition for a designed service life of 60 years, a comprehensive scientific understanding of creep behavior at high temperature and low stress regime is necessary. In addition, the creep mechanism and the impact factors such as precipitates, grain size, and grain boundary characters need to be evaluated for the purpose of alloy design and development. In this study, thermomechanically processed specimens of alloy 617 with different grain sizes were fabricated, and creep tests with a systematic test matrix covering the temperatures of 850 to 1050°C and stress levels from 5 to 100MPa were conducted. Creep data was analyzed, and the creep curves were found to be unconventional without a well-defined steady-state creep. Very good linear relationships were determined for minimum creep rate versus stress levels with the stress exponents determined around 3-5 depending on the grain size and test condition. Activation energies were also calculated for different stress levels, and the values are close to 400kJ/mol, which is higher than that for self-diffusion in nickel. Power law dislocation climb-glide mechanism was proposed as the dominant creep mechanism in the test condition regime. Dynamic recrystallization happening at high strain range enhanced dislocation climb and

  3. Transformation-induced plasticity in high-temperature shape memory alloys: a one-dimensional continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhaei, Amir Hosein; Lim, Kian-Meng

    2016-07-01

    A constitutive model based on isotropic plasticity consideration is presented in this work to model the thermo-mechanical behavior of high-temperature shape memory alloys. In high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs), both martensitic transformation and rate-dependent plasticity (creep) occur simultaneously at high temperatures. Furthermore, transformation-induced plasticity is another deformation mechanism during martensitic transformation. All these phenomena are considered as dissipative processes to model the mechanical behavior of HTSMAs in this study. The constitutive model was implemented for one-dimensional cases, and the results have been compared with experimental data from thermal cycling test for actuator applications.

  4. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    The general objective of the Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites, and associated thermal gradient structures in close collaboration with Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are established for each research project. Relevant data and basic understanding of material behavior and microstructure, new monolithic and composite alloys, advanced processing methods, new solid and fluid mechanic analyses, measurement advances, and a pool of educated graduate students are sought.

  5. Structural Evolution and Mechanical Properties of a VT22 Titanium Alloy Under High-Temperature Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratochka, I. V.; Mishin, I. P.; Lykova, O. N.; Naydenkin, E. V.; Varlamova, N. V.

    2016-07-01

    The special features inherent in the development of high-temperature deformation and structural evolution in materials are investigated, using a VT22 titanium alloy of the transition class (Ti - 4.74 mass% Al - 5.57 mass% Mo - 5.04 mass% V) subjected to helical rolling + aging as an example. This treatment is found to give rise to an intragrain fine acicular martensite structure with fine inclusions of α-phase particles of size ~1 μm. It is shown that in the alloy undergoing plastic deformation at temperatures approaching the polymorphic transformation temperature, the elongation to failure is in excess of 300%. The high plasticity of the alloy in the conditions considered is likely to be due to vigorous development of phase transformations and intensification of diffusion-controlled processes, including the effects of the evolution of the dislocation structure, growth of subgrains, and formation of new grains in the bulk of the pre-existing ones during plastic deformation.

  6. GRCop-84: A High Temperature Copper-based Alloy For High Heat Flux Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    While designed for rocket engine main combustion chamber liners, GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) offers potential for high heat flux applications in industrial applications requiring a temperature capability up to approximately 700 C (1292 F). GRCop-84 is a copper-based alloy with excellent elevated temperature strength, good creep resistance, long LCF lives and enhanced oxidation resistance. It also has a lower thermal expansion than copper and many other low alloy copper-based alloys. GRCop-84 can be manufactured into a variety of shapes such as tubing, bar, plate and sheet using standard production techniques and requires no special production techniques. GRCop-84 forms well, so conventional fabrication methods including stamping and bending can be used. GRCop-84 has demonstrated an ability to be friction stir welded, brazed, inertia welded, diffusion bonded and electron beam welded for joining to itself and other materials. Potential applications include plastic injection molds, resistance welding electrodes and holders, permanent metal casting molds, vacuum plasma spray nozzles and high temperature heat exchanger applications.

  7. Oxidation Kinetics of a NiPtTi High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Humphrey, Donald L.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    A high temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA), Ni30Pt50Ti, with an M(sub s) near 600 C, was isothermally oxidized in air for 100 hr over the temperature range of 500 to 900 C. Parabolic kinetics were confirmed by log-log and parabolic plots and showed no indication of fast transient oxidation. The overall behavior could be best described by the Arrhenius relationship: k(sub p) = 1.64 x 10(exp 12)[(-250 kJ/mole)/RT] mg(sup 2)/cm(sup 4)hr. This is about a factor of 4 reduction compared to values measured here for a binary Ni47Ti commercial SMA. The activation energy agreed with most literature values for TiO2 scale growth measured for elemental Ti and other NiTi alloys. Assuming uniform alloy depletion of a 20 mil (0.5 mm) dia. HTSMA wire, approx. 1 percent Ti reduction is predicted after 20,000 hr oxidation at 500 C, but becomes much more serious at higher temperatures.

  8. High temperature oxidation of copper and copper aluminium alloys: Impact on furnace side wall cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia Barrera, Gabriel

    The high temperature oxidation behaviours of copper and dilute Cu-Al alloys were investigated. Experiments were carried out by: (i) Oxidizing under various oxygen potentials at different temperatures using a combined TG-DTA apparatus. (ii) Oxidizing in a muffle furnace (in air) at different temperatures for extended periods of time. The oxidation mechanisms were evaluated based upon the kinetic data obtained as well as by X-ray diffraction and microscopical (SEM and optical) analyses. It was found that oxidation of copper strongly depends on the temperature. Two distinct mechanisms were encountered. Between 300 and 500°C, the oxidation rate is controlled by lateral growth of the oxide on the metal surface, whereas between 600 and 1000°C oxidation is controlled by lattice diffusion of copper ions through the oxide scale. On the other hand, the partial pressure of oxygen only has a small effect on the oxidation of copper. Alloy oxidation is also dependent on the temperature. As temperature increases, more aluminium is required to protect copper from being oxidized. It was shown that if the amount of oxygen that dissolves in the alloy exceeds the solubility limit of oxygen in copper, an internal oxidation layer will develop, leading to the formation of a tarnishing scale. On the other hand if the oxygen content in the alloy lies below the solubility limit of oxygen in copper, no oxidation products will form since a tight protective alumina layer will form on the alloy surface. Surface phenomena may affect the oxidation behaviour of dilute Cu-Al alloys. Immersion tests in molten copper matte and copper converting slag, using laboratory scale cooling elements with various copper based materials, were conducted. Results from these tests showed that alloying copper with 3 to 4 wt% Al decreases the oxidation rate of pure copper by 4 orders of magnitude; however due to a significant drop in thermal conductivity, the ability to extract heat is compromised, leading to

  9. Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloy Tubes for USC and Heat-Exchanger Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal Kad

    2011-12-31

    The principal objective of this project was to develop materials enabling joining technologies for use in forward looking heat-exchanger fabrication in Brayton cycle HIPPS, IGCC, FutureGen concepts capable of operating at temperatures in excess of 1000{degree}C as well as conventional technology upgrades via Ultra Super-Critical (USC) Rankine-cycle boilers capable of operating at 760{degree}C (1400F)/38.5MPa (5500psi) steam, while still using coal as the principal fossil fuel. The underlying mission in Rankine, Brayton or Brayton-Rankine, or IGCC combined cycle heat engine is a steady quest to improving operating efficiency while mitigating global environmental concerns. There has been a progressive move to higher overall cycle efficiencies, and in the case of fossil fuels this has accelerated recently in part because of concerns about greenhouse gas emissions, notably CO{sub 2}. For a heat engine, the overall efficiency is closely related to the difference between the highest temperature in the cycle and the lowest temperature. In most cases, efficiency gains are prompted by an increase in the high temperature, and this in turn has led to increasing demands on the materials of construction used in the high temperature end of the systems. Our migration to new advanced Ni-base and Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys poses significant fabrication challenges, as these materials are not readily weldable or the weld performs poorly in the high temperature creep regime. Thus the joining challenge is two-fold to a) devise appropriate joining methodologies for similar/dissimilar Ni-base and ODS alloys while b) preserving the near baseline creep performance in the welded region. Our program focus is on solid state joining of similar and dissimilar metals/alloys for heat exchanger components currently under consideration for the USC, HIPPS and IGCC power systems. The emphasis is to manipulate the joining methods and variables available to optimize joint creep

  10. Corrosion protection of aerospace grade magnesium alloy Elektron 43(TM) for use in aircraft cabin interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillio, Sarah S.

    Magnesium alloys exhibit desirable properties for use in transportation technology. In particular, the low density and high specific strength of these alloys is of interest to the aerospace community. However, the concerns of flammability and susceptibility to corrosion have limited the use of magnesium alloys within the aircraft cabin. This work studies a magnesium alloy containing rare earth elements designed to increase resistance to ignition while lowering rate of corrosion. The microstructure of the alloy was documented using scanning electron microscopy. Specimens underwent salt spray testing and the corrosion products were examined using energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  11. THE DEVELOPMENT OF MICROSTRUCTURAL DAMAGE DURING HIGH TEMPERATURE CREEP-FATIGUE OF A NICKEL ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    L.J. Carroll; M.C. Carroll; C. Cabet; R.N. Wright

    2013-02-01

    Alloy 617 is the leading candidate material for an Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). To evaluate the behavior of this material in the expected service conditions, strain-controlled cyclic tests that include hold times up to 9000 s at maximum tensile strain were conducted at 950 degrees C. The fatigue resistance decreased when a hold time was added at peak tensile strain, owing to the mechanisms resulting in a change in fracture mode from transgranular in pure fatigue to intergranular in creep–fatigue. Increases in the tensile hold duration beyond an initial value were not detrimental to the creep–fatigue resistance. An analysis of the evolving failure modes was facilitated by interrupting tests during cycling for ex situ microstructural investigation.

  12. Lattice dynamics of the high-temperature shape-memory alloy Nb-Ru

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S. M.; Xu, G.; Gu, G.; Fonda, R. W.

    2006-06-01

    Nb-Ru is a high-temperature shape-memory alloy that undergoes a martensitic transformation from a parent cubic {beta}-phase into a tetragonal {beta}{sup '} phase at T{sub M}{approx}900 deg. C. Measurements of the phonon dispersion curves on a single crystal show that the [110]-TA{sub 2} phonon branch, corresponding in the q=0 limit to the elastic constant C{sup '}=1/2(C{sub 11}-C{sub 12}) has an anomalous temperature dependence. Nearly the entire branch softens with decreasing temperature as T{sub M} is approached. The temperature dependence of the low-q phonon energies suggests that the elastic constants would approach 0 as T approaches T{sub M}, indicating a second-order transition. No additional lattice modulation is observed in the cubic phase.

  13. High temperature seals between ceramic separation membranes and super-alloy housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honea, G.; Sridhar, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    One of the concepts for oxygen production from Martian atmospheric carbon dioxide involves the use of tubular electrochemical membranes for oxygen separation. The tubular configuration offers the advantage of being able to separate the oxygen at pressures of up to 500 psi, thereby eliminating the need for a pre-liquefaction oxygen compressor. A key technology that has to be developed in order for the electrochemical separator to combine as a compressor is a high temperature static seal between the ceramic separation cell and the nickel-based super-alloy tube. Equipment was designed and fabricated to test the seals. Efforts are under way to develop a finite element model to study the thermal stresses at the joints and on the seal, and the optimal shape of the seal. The choice of seal materials and the technique to be used to fabricate the seals are also being investigated.

  14. Martensite aging effect in a Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50} high temperature shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, W.; Otsuka, Kazuhiro

    1999-11-19

    Ti-Pd alloy system is one of the potential high temperature shape memory alloys due to its high martensitic transformation temperatures. Thus, many researches including shape memory characteristics, martensitic transformations and mechanical behavior of the alloys have been done in recent yeas. However, martensite aging effect in the alloy, which is an important issue as to the stability of martensite at high temperature, has not been reported yet. Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50} transforms from B2 parent phase to B19 martensite upon cooling, and M{sub s} is 823 K (25) and T{sub m} is 1,673 K (26). Thus M{sub s}/T{sub m} ratio of the alloy is about 0.49, and the alloy may show strong martensite aging effect according to the above proposal. It is now of interest to examine whether the Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50} alloy show martensite aging effect. As will be shown, the Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50} alloy indeed shows the aging effect, as expected; however, the aging effect of this alloy exhibits a unique feature, which is not found in other shape memory alloys.

  15. Design of High Temperature Ti-Pd-Cr Shape Memory Alloys with Small Thermal Hysteresis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Deqing; Yuan, Ruihao; Zhou, Yumei; Xue, Dezhen; Lookman, Turab; Zhang, Guojun; Ding, Xiangdong; Sun, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The large thermal hysteresis (ΔT) during the temperature induced martensitic transformation is a major obstacle to the functional stability of shape memory alloys (SMAs), especially for high temperature applications. We propose a design strategy for finding SMAs with small thermal hysteresis. That is, a small ΔT can be achieved in the compositional crossover region between two different martensitic transformations with opposite positive and negative changes in electrical resistance at the transformation temperature. We demonstrate this for a high temperature ternary Ti-Pd-Cr SMA by achieving both a small ΔT and high transformation temperature. We propose two possible underlying physics governing the reduction in ΔT. One is that the interfacial strain is accommodated at the austenite/martensite interface via coexistence of B19 and 9R martensites. The other is that one of transformation eigenvalues equal to 1, i.e., λ2 = 1, indicating a perfect coherent interface between austenite and martensite. Our results are not limited to Ti-Pd-Cr SMAs but potentially provide a strategy for searching for SMAs with small thermal hysteresis. PMID:27328764

  16. Design of High Temperature Ti-Pd-Cr Shape Memory Alloys with Small Thermal Hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Deqing; Yuan, Ruihao; Zhou, Yumei; Xue, Dezhen; Lookman, Turab; Zhang, Guojun; Ding, Xiangdong; Sun, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The large thermal hysteresis (ΔT) during the temperature induced martensitic transformation is a major obstacle to the functional stability of shape memory alloys (SMAs), especially for high temperature applications. We propose a design strategy for finding SMAs with small thermal hysteresis. That is, a small ΔT can be achieved in the compositional crossover region between two different martensitic transformations with opposite positive and negative changes in electrical resistance at the transformation temperature. We demonstrate this for a high temperature ternary Ti-Pd-Cr SMA by achieving both a small ΔT and high transformation temperature. We propose two possible underlying physics governing the reduction in ΔT. One is that the interfacial strain is accommodated at the austenite/martensite interface via coexistence of B19 and 9R martensites. The other is that one of transformation eigenvalues equal to 1, i.e., λ2 = 1, indicating a perfect coherent interface between austenite and martensite. Our results are not limited to Ti-Pd-Cr SMAs but potentially provide a strategy for searching for SMAs with small thermal hysteresis.

  17. Design of High Temperature Ti-Pd-Cr Shape Memory Alloys with Small Thermal Hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Deqing; Yuan, Ruihao; Zhou, Yumei; Xue, Dezhen; Lookman, Turab; Zhang, Guojun; Ding, Xiangdong; Sun, Jun

    2016-06-22

    The large thermal hysteresis (ΔT) during the temperature induced martensitic transformation is a major obstacle to the functional stability of shape memory alloys (SMAs), especially for high temperature applications. We propose a design strategy for finding SMAs with small thermal hysteresis. That is, a small ΔT can be achieved in the compositional crossover region between two different martensitic transformations with opposite positive and negative changes in electrical resistance at the transformation temperature. We demonstrate this for a high temperature ternary Ti-Pd-Cr SMA by achieving both a small ΔT and high transformation temperature. We propose two possible underlying physics governing the reduction in ΔT. One is that the interfacial strain is accommodated at the austenite/martensite interface via coexistence of B19 and 9R martensites. The other is that one of transformation eigenvalues equal to 1, i.e., λ2 = 1, indicating a perfect coherent interface between austenite and martensite. Our results are not limited to Ti-Pd-Cr SMAs but potentially provide a strategy for searching for SMAs with small thermal hysteresis.

  18. High-temperature corrosion behavior of coatings and ODS alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-06-01

    Iron aluminides containing greater than about 20-25 @ % Al have oxidation/sulfidation resistance at temperatures well above those at which these alloys have adequate mechanical strength. In addition to alloying modifications for improved creep resistance of wrought material, this strength limitation is being addressed by development of oxide-dispersion- strengthened (ODS) iron aluminides and by evaluation of Fe{sub 3}Al alloy compositions as coatings or claddings on higher-strength, less corrosion-resistant materials. As part of these efforts, the high-temperature corrosion behavior of iron-aluminide weld overlays and ODS alloys is being characterized and compared to previous results for ingot-processed material.

  19. NASA-UVA light aerospace alloy and structures technology program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA-UVa Light Aerospace Alloy and Structure Technology (LAST) Program continues to maintain a high level of activity, with projects being conducted by graduate students and faculty advisors in the Departments of Materials Science and Engineering, Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Virginia. This work is funded by the NASA-Langley Research Center under Grant NAG-1-745. Here, we report on progress achieved between January 1 and June 30, 1992. The objectives of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of the next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with Langley researchers. Technical objectives are established for each research project. We aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement advances; and critically, a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies. The accomplishments presented in this report cover topics including: (1) Mechanical and Environmental Degradation Mechanisms in Advance Light Metals and Composites; (2) Aerospace Materials Science; (3) Mechanics of Materials and Composites for Aerospace Structures; and (4) Thermal Gradient Structures.

  20. Creep and Environmental Effects on High Temperature Creep-Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617

    SciTech Connect

    L. J. Carroll; C. Cabet; R. Madland; R. Wright

    2011-06-01

    Alloy 617 is the leading candidate material for Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), expected to have an outlet temperature as high as 950 C. System start-ups and shut-downs as well as power transients will produce low cycle fatigue (LCF) loadings of components. Acceptance of Alloy 617 in Section III of the ASME Code for nuclear construction requires a detailed understanding of the creep-fatigue behavior in both air and impure helium, representative of the VHTR primary coolant. Strain controlled LCF tests including hold times at maximum tensile strain were conducted at total strain range of 0.3% in air at 950 C. Creep-fatigue testing was also performed in a simulated VHTR impure helium coolant for selected experimental conditions. The fatigue resistance decreased when a hold time was added at peak tensile stress, consistent with the observed change in fracture mode from transgranular to intergranular with introduction of a tensile hold. Increases in the tensile hold time, beyond 180 sec, was not detrimental to the creep-fatigue resistance. Grain boundary damage in the form of grain boundary cracking was present in the bulk of the creep-fatigue specimens. This bulk cracking was quantified and found to be similar for hold times of up to 1800 sec consistent with the saturation in failure lives and rapid stress relaxation observed during the creep portion of the creep-fatigue cycle.

  1. Strengthening effect of Cr 2O 3 thermally grown on alloy 617 foils at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. K.; Li, F. X.; Ko, G. D.; Kang, K. J.

    2010-10-01

    Alloy 617 has been selected for the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) of the very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) for the economic production of electricity and hydrogen. In this work, the strengthening effects of Cr 2O 3 thermally grown on alloy 617 foils at 800 and 900 °C were investigated. A micro-tensile test system was used for in situ measurement of tensile strain in the foils and superficial thermally-grown Cr 2O 3. Each foil was heated until the thermally-grown Cr 2O 3 reached a predetermined thickness; then, a load was applied to measure the tensile response. As the Cr 2O 3 layer thickened on the surface of the metal foils, the strengths and stiffnesses of the foils were enhanced. We assumed that there was no interaction between the substrate and the superficial chromia, and the strength of Cr 2O 3 itself was measured. At 800 °C, the Cr 2O 3 was brittle and the strength was governed by crack initiation. At 900 °C, the Cr 2O 3 was much more ductile, and strain hardening was observed for even the smallest thickness. The strength was maintained even after crack initiation was observed on the surface.

  2. High-temperature corrosion behavior of iron-aluminide alloys and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.; Saunders, S.R.J.

    1995-07-01

    An Fe-28 at.% Al-2% Cr alloy doped with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed improved scale adhesion relative to a dispersion-free form of the same composition. However, doping with CeO{sub 2} or La{sub 2}O{sub 3} was detrimental to oxidation behavior. A study of weld-overlay iron-aluminide coatings showed that, those with sufficiently high aluminum concentrations had sulfidation resistance in H{sub 2}S-H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-Ar at 800 C equivalent to the most resistant bulk iron aluminides. These corrosion-resistant coatings have the potential to be effective barriers in high-temperature sulfidizing environments provided the appropriate combinations of filler metal, process parameters, and substrate are used to produce adequate aluminum concentrations and minimal chromium contents. Exposures in an oxidizing/sulfidizing environment containing varying amounts of HCI at 450 and 550 C showed that Fe{sub 3}Al alloys had good corrosion resistance.

  3. Permeation of hydrogen in hastelloy C-276 alloy at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.; Liu, W.; Qian, Y.; Que, J.

    2015-03-15

    Tritium is generated by the interaction of neutrons with the lithium and beryllium in the molten salt reactors (MSRs), which use FLiBe as one of solvents of fluoride fuel. Tritium as by-product in the MSRs is an important safety issue because it could easily diffuse into environment through high temperature heat exchangers. The experimental technique of gas driven permeation has been used to investigate the transport parameter of hydrogen in Hastelloy C-276 which is considered as one of the candidate for structure materials. The measurements were carried out at the temperature range of 400-800 Celsius degrees with hydrogen loading pressures ranging from 5*10{sup 3} to 4*10{sup 4} Pa. The H diffusive transport parameters for Hastelloy C-276 follow an Arrhenius law in this temperature range. Regarding diffusivity and Sieverts' constant, Hastelloy C-276 has lower values compared with Ni201 alloy. The possible reason may be the trapping effects, which were formed by the alloying elements of Mo and Cr in the matrix. At the same time, the thin oxidation layer formed by the high Cr content could lead to a slower dissociation process of H{sub 2} at the surface. (authors)

  4. Static rock splitters based on high temperature shape memory alloys for planetary explorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benafan, O.; Noebe, R. D.; Halsmer, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    A static rock splitter device based on high-force, high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs) was developed for space related applications requiring controlled geologic excavation in planetary bodies such as the moon, Mars, and near-Earth asteroids. The device, hereafter referred to as the shape memory alloy rock splitter (SMARS), consisted of active (expanding) elements made of Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 (at%) that generate extremely large forces in response to thermal input. The pre-shaping (training) of these elements was accomplished using isothermal, isobaric and cyclic training methods, which resulted in active components capable of generating stresses in excess of 1.5 GPa. The corresponding strains (or displacements) were also evaluated and were found to be 2-3%, essential to rock fracturing and/or splitting when placed in a borehole. SMARS performance was evaluated using a testbed consisting of a temperature controller, custom heaters and heater holders, and an enclosure for rock placement and breakage. The SMARS system was evaluated using various rock types including igneous rocks (e.g., basalt, quartz, granite) and sedimentary rocks (e.g., sandstone, limestone).

  5. Development of a Numerical Model for High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Melcher, Kevin J.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Gaydosh, Darrell J.

    2006-01-01

    A thermomechanical hysteresis model for a high-temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) actuator material is presented. The model is capable of predicting strain output of a tensile-loaded HTSMA when excited by arbitrary temperature-stress inputs for the purpose of actuator and controls design. Common quasi-static generalized Preisach hysteresis models available in the literature require large sets of experimental data for model identification at a particular operating point, and substantially more data for multiple operating points. The novel algorithm introduced here proposes an alternate approach to Preisach methods that is better suited for research-stage alloys, such as recently-developed HTSMAs, for which a complete database is not yet available. A detailed description of the minor loop hysteresis model is presented in this paper, as well as a methodology for determination of model parameters. The model is then qualitatively evaluated with respect to well-established Preisach properties and against a set of low-temperature cycled loading data using a modified form of the one-dimensional Brinson constitutive equation. The computationally efficient algorithm demonstrates adherence to Preisach properties and excellent agreement to the validation data set.

  6. Influence of dissolved hydrogen on nickel alloy SCC in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, D.S.; Attanasio, S.A.; Fish, J.S.; Schurman, M.K.

    1999-03-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth rate (SCCGR) tests of nickel alloys were conducted at 338 C and 360 C as a function of the hydrogen concentration in high purity water. Test results identified up to a 7 x effect of hydrogen levels in the water on crack growth rate, where the lowest growth rates were associated with the highest hydrogen levels. At 338 C, the crack growth rate decreased as the hydrogen levels were increased. However, different results were observed for the test conducted at 360 C. As the hydrogen level was increased in the 360 C tests, the crack growth rate initially increased, a maximum was exhibited at a hydrogen level of {approximately} 20 scc/kg, and thereafter the crack growth rate decreased. Based on this testing and a review of the commercial literature, the thermodynamic stability of nickel oxide, not the dissolved hydrogen concentration, was identified as a fundamental parameter influencing the susceptibility of nickel alloys to SCC. These test results are discussed in relation to the accuracy of extrapolating high temperature SCC results to lower temperatures.

  7. Influence of dissolved hydrogen on nickel alloy SCC in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, D.S.; Attanasio, S.A.; Fish, J.S.; Schurman, M.K.

    1999-07-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth rate (SCCGR) tests of nickel alloys were conducted at 338 C and 360 C as a function of the hydrogen concentration in high purity water. Test results identified up to a 7x effect of hydrogen levels in the water on crack growth rate, where the lowest growth rates were associated with the highest hydrogen levels. At 338 C, the crack growth rate decreased as the hydrogen levels were increased. However, different results were observed for the test conducted at 360 C. As the hydrogen level was increased in the 360 C tests, the crack growth rate initially increased, a maximum was exhibited at a hydrogen level of {approximately}20 scc/kg, and thereafter the crack growth rate decreased. Based on this testing and a review of the commercial literature, the thermodynamic stability of nickel oxide, not the dissolved hydrogen concentration, was identified as a fundamental parameter influencing the susceptibility of nickel alloys to SCC. These test results are discussed in relation to the accuracy of extrapolating high temperature SCC results to lower temperatures.

  8. Processing of Ni30Pt20Ti50 High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloy Into Thin Rod Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald D.; Draper, Susan L.; Biles, Tiffany A.; Leonhardt, Todd

    2005-01-01

    High-temperature shape-memory alloys (HTSMAs) based on nickel-titanium (NiTi) with significant ternary additions of palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt), gold (Au), or hafnium (Hf) have been identified as potential high-temperature actuator materials for use up to 500 C. These materials provide an enabling technology for the development of "smart structures" used to control the noise, emissions, or efficiency of gas turbine engines. The demand for these high-temperature versions of conventional shape-memory alloys also has been growing in the automotive, process control, and energy industries. However these materials, including the NiPtTi alloys being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, will never find widespread acceptance unless they can be readily processed into useable forms.

  9. Low temperature magnetic transition and high temperature oxidation in INCONEL alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Seehra, M.S.; Babu, V.S.

    1996-05-01

    X-ray diffraction and temperature dependent (5 K{endash}380 K) magnetic measurements have been carried out in INCONEL 718 superalloy before and after high temperature aging treatments (INCONEL is a trademark of the INCO family of companies). The nominal composition of this alloy is Ni (52.5{percent}), Cr (19.0{percent}), Fe (18.5{percent}), Nb (5.1{percent}), Mo (3.0{percent}), Ti (0.9{percent}), Al (0.5{percent}), Cu (0.15{percent}) and C (0.08{percent}) and it yields an x-ray diffraction pattern consisting of a fcc phase with {ital a}=3.5987 (3) A and an orthorhombic phase associated with {delta}{minus}Ni{sub 3}Nb. It is concluded that the fcc pattern is due to both the {gamma} austenitic phase and {gamma}{prime} Ni{sub 3}(Al,Ti) phase of alloy 718. The standard annealing and aging treatment carried out in air at temperatures between 621 and 982{degree}C produces surface oxides (Cr,Fe){sub 2}O{sub 3} and FeNbO{sub 4} (which are easily removed by etching and polishing) and contracts the lattice. Magnetic measurements show a distinct phase transition at {ital T}{sub {ital c}}=14 K, which has been attributed to the {gamma}{prime}{minus}Ni{sub 3}(Al,Ti) phase by the process of elimination and by observing that it has most of the characteristics of the weak itinerant ferromagnet Ni{sub 74.5}Al{sub 25.5}. This transition may have some effects on the cryogenic applications of this alloy. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  10. Substitution of ceramics for high temperature alloys. [advantages of using silicon carbides and silicon nitrides in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.

    1978-01-01

    The high temperature capability of ceramics such as silicon nitride and silicon carbide can result in turbine engines of improved efficiency. Other advantages when compared to the nickel and cobalt alloys in current use are raw material availability, lower weight, erosion/corrosion resistance, and potentially lower cost. The use of ceramics in three different sizes of gas turbine is considered; these are the large utility turbines, advanced aircraft turbines, and small automotive turbines. Special consideration, unique to each of these applications, arise when one considers substituting ceramics for high temperature alloys. The effects of material substitutions are reviewed in terms of engine performance, operating economy, and secondary effects.

  11. High-temperature ordered intermetallic alloys III; Proceedings of the Third Symposium, Boston, MA, Nov. 29-Dec. 1, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. T. (Editor); Taub, A. I. (Editor); Stoloff, N. S. (Editor); Koch, C. C. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference on high-temperature ordered intermetallic alloys discusses alloy theory and phase stability, defects and microstructures, mechanical behavior, alloy design and material processing, multiphase and composite materials, nickel aluminides, titanium aluminides, and other ordered intermetallics. Attention is given to compositional effects on processing and properties of nickel aluminides, dynamic compaction and hot-isostatic-pressing of nickel aluminides, improvement of elevated-temperature material properties in Ni3Al, the effect of microalloying B on the high-temperature mechanical properties of Ti3Al, the effects of structure on creep of Ti-53.4 mol pct Al intermetallics, the deformation microstructure in Ni3Si polycrystals strained over the range of temperature of flow stress anomaly, and the microstructure and mechanical properties of dual phase alloys consisting of the intermetallic phases.

  12. Application of neutron diffraction in characterization of texture evolution during high-temperature creep in magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Sven C; Sediako, Dimitry; Shook, S; Sediako, A

    2010-01-01

    A good combination of room-temperature and elevated temperature strength and ductility, good salt-spray corrosion resistance and exceUent diecastability are frequently among the main considerations in development of a new alloy. Unfortunately, there has been much lesser effort in development of wrought-stock alloys for high temperature applications. Extrudability and high temperature performance of wrought material becomes an important factor in an effort to develop new wrought alloys and processing technologies. This paper shows some results received in creep testing and studies of in-creep texture evolution for several wrought magnesium alloys developed for use in elevated-temperature applications. These studies were performed using E3 neutron spectrometer of the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre in Chalk River, ON, and HIPPO time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, NM.

  13. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Scully, John R.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Thornton, Earl A.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.; Wert, John A.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program continues a high level of activity. Progress achieved between 1 Jan. and 30 Jun. 1993 is reported. The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites, and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. The following projects are addressed: environmental fatigue of Al-Li-Cu alloys; mechanisms of localized corrosion and environmental fracture in Al-Cu-Li-Mg-Ag alloy X2095 and compositional variations; the effect of zinc additions on the precipitation and stress corrosion cracking behavior of alloy 8090; hydrogen interactions with Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 and model alloys; metastable pitting of aluminum alloys; cryogenic fracture toughness of Al-Cu-Li + In alloys; the fracture toughness of Weldalite (TM); elevated temperature cracking of advanced I/M aluminum alloys; response of Ti-1100/SCS-6 composites to thermal exposure; superplastic forming of Weldalite (TM); research to incorporate environmental effects into fracture mechanics fatigue life prediction codes such as NASA FLAGRO; and thermoviscoplastic behavior.

  14. Evaluation of Sc-Bearing Aluminum Alloy C557 for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.; Dicus, Dennis L.

    2002-01-01

    The performance of the Al-Mg-Sc alloy C557 was evaluated to assess its potential for a broad range of aerospace applications, including airframe and launch vehicle structures. Of specific interest were mechanical properties at anticipated service temperatures and thermal stability of the alloy. Performance was compared with conventional airframe aluminum alloys and with other emerging aluminum alloys developed for specific service environments. Mechanical properties and metallurgical structure were evaluated for commercially rolled sheet in the as-received H116 condition and after thermal exposures at 107 C. Metallurgical analyses were performed to de.ne grain morphology and texture, strengthening precipitates, and to assess the effect of thermal exposure.

  15. Benign joining of ultrafine grained aerospace aluminum alloys using nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Longtin, Rémi; Hack, Erwin; Neuenschwander, Jürg; Janczak-Rusch, Jolanta

    2011-12-22

    Ultrafine grained aluminum alloys have restricted applicability due to their limited thermal stability. Metalized 7475 alloys can be soldered and brazed at room temperature using nanotechnology. Reactive foils are used to release heat for milliseconds directly at the interface between two components leading to a metallurgical joint without significantly heating the bulk alloy, thus preserving its mechanical properties.

  16. Benign joining of ultrafine grained aerospace aluminum alloys using nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Longtin, Rémi; Hack, Erwin; Neuenschwander, Jürg; Janczak-Rusch, Jolanta

    2011-12-22

    Ultrafine grained aluminum alloys have restricted applicability due to their limited thermal stability. Metalized 7475 alloys can be soldered and brazed at room temperature using nanotechnology. Reactive foils are used to release heat for milliseconds directly at the interface between two components leading to a metallurgical joint without significantly heating the bulk alloy, thus preserving its mechanical properties. PMID:22105915

  17. Flow and failure of an aluminium alloy from low to high temperature and strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Rafael; Cendón, David; Gálvez, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical behaviour of an aluminium alloy is presented in this paper. The study has been carried out to analyse the flow and failure of the aluminium alloy 7075-T73. An experimental study has been planned performing tests of un-notched and notched tensile specimens at low strain rates using a servo-hydraulic machine. High strain rate tests have been carried out using the same geometry in a Hopkinson Split Tensile Bar. The dynamic experiments at low temperature were performed using a cryogenic chamber, and the high temperature ones with a furnace, both incorporated to the Hopkinson bar. Testing temperatures ranged from - 50 ∘C to 100 ∘C and the strain rates from 10-4 s-1 to 600 s-1. The material behaviour was modelled using the Modified Johnson-Cook model and simulated using LS-DYNA. The results show that the Voce type of strain hardening is the most accurate for this material, while the traditional Johnson-Cook is not enough accurate to reproduce the necking of un-notched specimens. The failure criterion was obtained by means of the numerical simulations using the analysis of the stress triaxiality versus the strain to failure. The diameters at the failure time were measured using the images taken with an image camera, and the strain to failure was computed for un-notched and notched specimens. The numerical simulations show that the analysis of the evolution of the stress triaxiality is crucial to achieve accurate results. A material model using the Modified Johnson-Cook for flow and failure is proposed.

  18. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Kelly, Robert G.; Scully, John R.; Shiflet, Gary J.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Wert, John A.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program was initiated in 1986 and continues with a high level of activity. Here, we report on progress achieved between July I and December 31, 1996. The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are presented for each research project. We generally aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies. The accomplishments presented in this report are summarized as follows. Three research areas are being actively investigated, including: (1) Mechanical and Environmental Degradation Mechanisms in Advanced Light Metals, (2) Aerospace Materials Science, and (3) Mechanics of Materials for Light Aerospace Structures.

  19. A Novel Vibrating Finger Viscometer for High-Temperature Measurements in Liquid Metals and Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubberstein, T.; Schürmann, M.; Chaves, H.; Heller, H.-P.; Aneziris, C. G.

    2016-10-01

    A novel vibrating finger viscometer for high-temperature measurement in liquid metals and alloys up to 1823 K was constructed. The dynamic viscosity (η ) of the liquid fluid is measured as a product of (ρ \\cdot η )^{0.5} and the relative change of the field coil input for a constant amplitude recording at the resonant frequency of the oscillator. The viscometer was calibrated at 298 K using reference silicon oils with varying kinematic viscosities (ν ), (0.79 to 200)× 10^{-6} m2\\cdot s^{-1}. In the present study, the viscosity of liquid gold (99.99 % Au), silver (99.9 % Ag), and tin (99.9 % Sn) was measured. The viscosities expressed as an Arrhenius function of temperature are: {for Au:}quad quad ln η= & {} -0.1990+2669/T {for Ag:} quad quad ln η= & {} -0.4631+2089/T {for Sn:} quad quad ln η= & {} -0.5472+671/T The viscosity values are consistent within the range of available literature data.

  20. The nano-particle dispersion strengthening of V-4Cr-4Ti alloys for high temperature application in fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Pengfei; Chen, Jiming; Xu, Zengyu; Duan, Xuru

    2013-10-01

    V-4Cr-4Ti was identified as an attractive structural material for Li blanket in fusion reactors. However, both high temperature and irradiation induced degradation are great challenges for this material. It was thought that the nano-particles with high thermal stability can efficiently strengthen the alloy at elevated temperatures, and accommodate the irradiation induced defects at the boundaries. This study is a starting work aiming at improving the creep resistance and reducing the irradiation induced degradation for V-4Cr-4Ti alloy. Currently, we focus on the preparation of some comparative nano-particle dispersion strengthened V-4Cr-4Ti alloys. A mechanical alloying (MA) route is used to fabricate yttrium and carbides added V-4Cr-4Ti alloys. Nano-scale yttria, carbides and other possible particles have a combined dispersion-strengthening effect on the matrices of these MA-fabricated V-4Cr-4Ti alloys. High-temperature annealing is carried out to stabilize the optimized nano-particles. Mechanical properties are tested. Microstructures of the MA-fabricated V-4Cr-4Ti alloys with yttrium and carbide additions are characterized. Based on these results, the thermal stability of different nano-particle agents are classified. ITER related China domestic project 2011GB108007.

  1. Effects of Cryogenic Treatment on the Residual Stress and Mechanical Properties of an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Po; Malone, Tina; Bod, Robert; Torres, Pablo

    2000-01-01

    Investigators at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are studying the potential benefits of cryogenic treatment for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper reports the effects of cryogenic treatment on residual stress, tensile strength, hardness, fatigue life, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance.

  2. Effects of Cryogenic Treatment on the Residual Stress and Mechanical Properties of an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, P.; Malone, T.; Bond, R.; Torres, P.

    2001-01-01

    Investigators at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are studying the potential benefits of cryogenic treatment for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper reports the effects of cryogenic treatment on residual stress, tensile strength, hardness, fatigue life, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance.

  3. Effect of nanostructured composite powders on the structure and strength properties of the high-temperature inconel 718 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, A. N.; Ovcharenko, V. E.

    2015-12-01

    The experimental results of the effect of powder nanomodifiers of refractory compounds on the strength properties, the macro- and microstructure of the high-temperature Inconel 718 alloy have been presented. It has been shown that the introduction of powder modifiers into the melt leads to a decrease in the average grain size by a factor of 1.5-2 in the alloy. The long-term tensile strength of the alloy at 650°C increases 1.5-2 times, and the number of cycles at 482°C before fracture grows by more than three times. The effect of nanoparticles on the grain structure and strength properties of the alloy is due to an increase in the number of generated crystallization centers and the formation of nanoparticle clusters of refractory compounds at boundaries and junctions in the formed grain structure, which hinder the development of recrystallization processes in the alloy.

  4. Metal Injection Molding of Alloy 718 for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Eric A.; Peretti, Michael W.

    2012-02-01

    The metal injection molding process, used in the automotive, medical, and consumer markets for several decades, was investigated for application to superalloys for small, complex-shaped, aerospace components. With sufficient control on processing, inclusion risks, and chemistry, the process can successfully be applied to superalloy 718 components. Assessments included tensile and fatigue property evaluation, characterization of microstructure, and development of an AMS specification.

  5. Structure and fracture mechanism of a two-phase chromium-nickel alloy during high-temperature deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironenko, V. N.; Aronin, A. S.; Vasenev, V. V.; Aristova, I. M.; Shmyt'ko, I. M.; Trushnikova, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of a two-phase Kh65N33V2FT alloy has been studied after tests at room and high temperatures. The morphology of the main phases, namely, solid solutions of nickel in chromium (α) and chromium in nickel (γ), is changed depending on temperature. The lattice parameters of the main phases have been determined. The main mechanism of deformation for this alloy is shown to be grain-boundary sliding. Bulk and grain-boundary diffusion creep and self-regulating diffusion-viscous flow is possible in the γ phase during high-temperature deformation. The heat resistance of this alloy is restricted to 1000°C because of the formation of a γ-phase percolation cluster.

  6. High Temperature - Thin Film Strain Gages Based on Alloys of Indium Tin Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J.; Cooke, James D.; Bienkiewicz, Joseph M.

    1998-01-01

    A stable, high temperature strain gage based on reactively sputtered indium tin oxide (ITO) was demonstrated at temperatures up to 1050 C. These strain sensors exhibited relatively large, negative gage factors at room temperature and their piezoresistive response was both linear and reproducible when strained up to 700 micro-in/in. When cycled between compression and tension, these sensors also showed very little hysteresis, indicating excellent mechanical stability. Thin film strain gages based on selected ITO alloys withstood more than 50,000 strain cycles of +/- 500 micro-in/in during 180 hours of testing in air at 1000 C, with minimal drift at temperature. Drift rates as low as 0.0009%/hr at 1000 C were observed for ITO films that were annealed in nitrogen at 700 C prior to strain testing. These results compare favorably with state of the art 10 micro-m thick PdCr films deposited by NASA, where drift rates of 0.047%/hr at 1050 C were observed. Nitrogen annealing not only produced the lowest drift rates to date, but also produce the largest dynamic gage factors (G = 23.5). These wide bandgap, semiconductor strain sensors also exhibited moderately low temperature coefficients of resistance (TCR) at temperatures up to 1100 C, when tested in a nitrogen ambient. A TCR of +230 ppm/C over the temperature range 200 C < T < 500 C and a TCR of -469 ppm/C over the temperature range 600 C < T < 1100 C was observed for the films tested in nitrogen. However, the resistivity behavior changed considerably when the same films were tested in oxygen ambients. A TCR of -1560 ppm/C was obtained over the temperature range of 200 C < T < 1100 C. When similar films were protected with an overcoat or when ITO films were prepared with higher oxygen contents in the plasma, two distinct TCR's were observed. At T < 800 C, a linear TCR of -210 ppm/C was observed and at T > 800 C, a linear TCR of -2170 DDm/C was observed. The combination of a moderately low TCR and a relatively large gage

  7. A high-temperature shape memory alloy sensor for combustion monitoring and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Greg S.; Snyder, Joseph T.; Prince, Troy S.; Willett, Michael C.

    2005-05-01

    Innovations in the use of thin film SMA materials have enabled the development of a harsh environment pressure sensor useful for combustion monitoring and control. Development of such active combustion control has been driven by rising fuel costs and environmental pressures. Active combustion control, whether in diesel, spark ignited or turbine engines requires feedback to the engine control system in order to adjust the quantity, timing, and placement of fuel charges. To be fully effective, sensors must be integrated into each engine in a manner that will allow continuous combustion monitoring (turbine engines) or monitoring of each discrete combustion event (diesel and SI engines). To date, the sensors available for detection of combustion events and processes have suffered from one or more of three problems: 1) Low sensitivity: The sensors are unable to provide and adequate signal-to-noise ratio in the high temperature and electrically noisy environment of the engine compartment. Attempts to overcome this difficulty have focused on heat removal and/or temperature compensation or more challenging high temperature electronics. 2) Low reliability: Sensors and/or sensor packages have been unable to withstand the engine environment for extended periods of time. Issues have included gross degradation and more subtle issues such as migration of dopants in semiconductor sensor materials. 3) High cost: The materials that have been used, the package concepts employed, and the required support electronics have all contributed to the high cost of the few sensor systems available. Prices have remained high due to the limited demand associated with the poor reliability and the high price itself. Ternary titanium nickel alloys, with platinum group metal substitution for the nickel, are deposited as thin films on MEMS-based diaphragms and patterned to form strain gages of a standard metal film configuration. The strain induced phase transformation of the SMA is used as a

  8. Improved microstructure for creep strength in high-temperature austenitic alloys for energy conversion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Garrett

    The current dominant role of fossil fuels for use in energy conversion applications is unlikely to change in the foreseeable future. In order to ensure the continued availability of these limited resources, it is critically important that remaining fossil fuel reserves are utilized as efficiently as possible. Increasing operating temperature in power plants is the most straightforward method of increasing plant efficiency, but over long life cycles in the harsh operating conditions of modern supercritical coal-fired power plants, current-generation materials are cannot be used above ˜620°C due to corrosion and/or creep-strength limitations. One possible class of materials for higher-temperature use are dispersion-strengthened alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels: in this work, Fe-20Cr-(20-30)Ni-2Nb-5Al at. % strengthened by a fine Fe2Nb C14 Laves phase dispersion. While the Laves phase has not been successfully used as a strengthener before, some prior research has indicated that the Laves phase could act as a stable high-temperature strengthener, if it could be more finely dispersed. This work attempted to refine the Laves phase by first solutionizing the alloy, then cold-working to introduce a dense dislocation structure, and finally aging in order to allow the Laves phase to nucleate on these dislocations. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to analyze the material after thermomechanical processing. Final results showed that the size, scale, homogeneity of dispersion, and volume fraction of precipitated Laves phase particles were all altered by prestraining, and at high levels of prestrain (90% reduction in thickness), a significantly finer Laves phase dispersion was obtained when compared with the non-prestrained aged material.

  9. NASA-UVA light aerospace alloy and structures technology program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Scully, John R.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Thornton, Earl A.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.; Wert, John A.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program was initiated in 1986, and continues a high level of activity, with projects being conducted by graduate students and faculty advisors in the Departments of Materials Science and Engineering, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Virginia. This work is funded by the NASA-Langley Research Center under Grant NAG-1-745. Here, we report on progress achieved between July 1 and December 31, 1993. The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are presented for each research project. We generally aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement and modeling advances; and critically, a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies.

  10. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program: LA(2)ST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Haviland, John K.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Pilkey, Walter D.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Scully, John R.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Thornton, Earl A.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.; Wert, John A.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA(2)ST) Program continues a high level of activity, with projects being conducted by graduate students and faculty advisors in the Departments of Materials Science and Engineering, Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Virginia. This work is funded by the NASA-Langley Research Center under Grant NAG-1-745. We report on progress achieved between July 1 and December 31, 1992. The objective of the LA(2)ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are presented for each research project. We generally aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement advances; and critically, a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies.

  11. High temperature mechanical properties of a zirconium-modified, precipitation- strengthened nickel, 30 percent copper alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A precipitation-strengthened Monel-type alloy has been developed through minor alloying additions of zirconium to a base Ni-30Cu alloy. The results of this exploratory study indicate that thermomechanical processing of a solution-treated Ni-30Cu-0.2Zr alloy produced a dispersion of precipitates. The precipitates have been tentatively identified as a Ni5Zr compound. A comparison of the mechanical properties, as determined by testing in air, of the zirconium-modified alloy to those of a Ni-30Cu alloy reveals that the precipitation-strengthened alloy has improved tensile properties to 1200 K and improved stress-rupture properties to 1100 K. The oxidation characteristics of the modified alloy appeared to be equivalent to those of the base Ni-30Cu alloy.

  12. Influence of Crucible Materials on High-temperature Properties of Vacuum-melted Nickel-chromium-cobalt Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R F; Rowe, John P; Freeman, J W

    1957-01-01

    A study of the effect of induction-vacuum-melting procedure on the high-temperature properties of a titanium-and-aluminum-hardened nickel-base alloy revealed that a major variable was the type of ceramic used as a crucible. Reactions between the melt and magnesia or zirconia crucibles apparently increased high-temperature properties by introducing small amounts of boron or zirconium into the melts. Heats melted in alumina crucibles had relatively low rupture life and ductility at 1,600 F and cracked during hot-working as a result of deriving no boron or zirconium from the crucible.

  13. Creating textured substrate tapes of Cu-Fe alloys for second-generation high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlebnikova, Yu. V.; Gervas'eva, I. V.; Suaridze, T. R.; Rodionov, D. P.; Egorova, L. Yu.

    2014-10-01

    It is established that Cu-1.6 at % Fe alloy tapes obtained through cold rolling to 98.9% followed by recrystallization annealing possess a sharp cube texture, which opens prospects of using thin tapes of this alloy as substrates for second-generation high-temperature superconductors. The optimum regime of annealing is determined that allows an alloy with sharp biaxial texture containing more than 97% cubic grains to be obtained. The yield stress of a 90-μm-thick Cu-1.6 at % Fe alloy tape upon recrystallization annealing at 800°C for 1 h amounts to 78 MPa, which is about three times higher than the value for a pure copper tape with sharp cube texture.

  14. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  15. Microstructure and High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Cr-W Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.

    2007-02-01

    Cr alloys containing 0-30%W by weight were investigated for use in elevated temperature applications. The alloys were melted in a water-cooled, copper-hearth arc furnace. Microstructure of the alloys was characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy. A pseudocyclic oxidation test was employed to study scale formation at 1000ºC in dry air. The scale was predominantly chromia and spalled upon cooling. Alloying with aluminum up to 8 weight percent reduced the spalling drastically. Furthermore, aluminizing the surface of the Cr-W alloys completely stopped the spalling.

  16. Thermal oxidation induced degradation of carbon fiber reinforced composites and carbon nanotube sheet enhanced fiber/matrix interface for high temperature aerospace structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Mohammad Hamidul

    Recent increase in the use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite, especially for high temperature applications in aerospace primary and secondary structures along with wind energy and automotive industries, have generated new challenges to predict its failure mechanisms and service life. This dissertation reports the experimental study of a unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced bismaleimide (BMI) composites (CFRC), an excellent candidate for high temperature aerospace components, undergoing thermal oxidation at 260 °C in air for over 3000 hours. The key focus of the work is to investigate the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber BMI composite subjected to thermal aging in three key aspects - first, studying its bulk flexural properties (in macro scale), second, characterizing the crack propagation along the fiber direction, representing the interfacial bonding strength between fiber and matrix (in micro scale), and third, introducing nano-structured materials to modify the interface (in nano scale) between the carbon fiber and BMI resin and mechanical characterization to study its influence on mitigating the aging effect. Under the first category, weight loss and flexural properties have been monitored as the oxidation propagates through the fiber/matrix interface. Dynamic mechanical analysis and micro-computed tomography analysis have been performed to analyze the aging effects. In the second category, the long-term effects of thermal oxidation on the delamination (between the composite plies) and debonding (between fiber and matrix) type fracture toughness have been characterized by preparing two distinct types of double cantilever beam specimens. Digital image correlation has been used to determine the deformation field and strain distribution around the crack propagation path. Finally the resin system and the fiber/matrix interface have been modified using nanomaterials to mitigate the degradations caused by oxidation. Nanoclay modified

  17. Phase Transformation and Creep Behavior in Ti50Pd30Ni20 High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy in Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Parikshith K.; Desai, Uri; Monroe, James; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Karaman, Ibrahim; Noebe, Ron; Bigelow, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    The creep behavior and the phase transformation of Ti50Pd30Ni20 High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy (HTSMA) is investigated by standard creep tests and thermomechanical tests. Ingots of the alloy are induction melted, extruded at high temperature, from which cylindrical specimens are cut and surface polished. A custom high temperature test setup is assembled to conduct the thermomechanical tests. Following preliminary monotonic tests, standard creep tests and thermally induced phase transformation tests are conducted on the specimen. The creep test results suggest that over the operating temperatures and stresses of this alloy, the microstructural mechanisms responsible for creep change. At lower stresses and temperatures, the primary creep mechanism is a mixture of dislocation glide and dislocation creep. As the stress and temperature increase, the mechanism shifts to predominantly dislocation creep. If the operational stress or temperature is raised even further, the mechanism shifts to diffusion creep. The thermally induced phase transformation tests show that actuator performance can be affected by rate independent irrecoverable strain (transformation induced plasticity + retained martensite) as well as creep. The rate of heating and cooling can adversely impact the actuators performance. While the rate independent irrecoverable strain is readily apparent early in the actuators life, viscoplastic strain continues to accumulate over the lifespan of the HTSMA. Thus, in order to get full actuation out of the HTSMA, the heating and cooling rates must be sufficiently high enough to avoid creep.

  18. Protection of zirconium by alumina- and chromia-forming iron alloys under high-temperature steam exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Parish, Chad M.; Shin, Dongwon; Pint, Bruce A.

    2013-07-01

    The viability of advanced oxidation-resistant Fe-base alloys to protect zirconium from rapid oxidation in high-temperature steam environments has been examined. Specimens were produced such that outer layers of FeCrAl ferritic alloy and Type 310 austenitic stainless steel were incorporated on the surface of zirconium metal slugs. The specimens were exposed to high-temperature 0.34 MPa steam at 1200 and 1300 °C. The primary degradation mechanism for the protective layer was interdiffusion with the zirconium, as opposed to high-temperature oxidation in steam. The FeCrAl layer experienced less degradation and protected the zirconium at 1300 °C for 8 h. Constituents of the Fe-base alloys rapidly diffused into the zirconium and resulted in the formation of various intermetallic layers at the interface and precipitates inside the bulk zirconium. The nature of this interaction for FeCrAl and 310SS has been characterized by use of microscopic techniques as well as computational thermodynamics. Finally, a reactor physics discussion on the applicability of these protective layers in light-water-reactor nuclear fuel structures is offered.

  19. Development of powder metallurgy Al alloys for high temperature aircraft structural applications, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellman, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    In this continuing study, the development of mechanically alloyed heat resistant aluminum alloys for aircraft were studied to develop higher strength targets and higher service temperatures. The use of higher alloy additions to MA Al-Fe-Co alloys, employment of prealloyed starting materials, and higher extrusion temperatures were investigated. While the MA Al-Fe-Co alloys exhibited good retention of strength and ductility properties at elevated temperatures and excellent stability of properties after 1000 hour exposure at elevated temperatures, a sensitivity of this system to low extrusion strain rates adversely affected the level of strength achieved. MA alloys in the Al-Li family showed excellent notched toughness and property stability after long time exposures at elevated temperatures. A loss of Li during processing and the higher extrusion temperature 482 K (900 F) resulted in low mechanical strengths. Subsequent hot and cold working of the MA Al-Li had only a mild influence on properties.

  20. Low Cost Al-Si Casting Alloy As In-Situ Composite for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    A new aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloy has been successfully developed at NASA- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) that has significant improvement in tensile and fatigue strength at elevated temperatures (500 F-700 F). The alloy offers a number of benefits such as light weight, high hardness, low thermal expansion and high surface wear resistance. In hypereutectic form, this alloy is considered as an in-situ Al-Si composite with tensile strength of about 90% higher than the auto industry 390 alloy at 600 F. This composite is very economically produced by using either conventional permanent steel molds or die casting. The projected material cost is less than $0.90 per pound, and automotive components such as pistons can be cast for high production rate using conventional casting techniques with a low and fully accounted cost. Key Words: Metal matrix composites, In-situ composite, aluminum-silicon alloy, hypereutectic alloy, permanent mold casting, die casting.

  1. Eutectic alloys. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, P.

    1980-01-01

    These 250 abstracts from the international literature provide summaries of the preparation, treatments, composition and structure, and properties of eutectic alloys. Techniques for directional solidification and treatments including glazing, coating, and fiber reinforcement are discussed. In addition to the mechanical and thermal properties, the superconducting, corrosion, resistance, and thermionic emission and adsorption properties are described.

  2. Mechanical Properties and High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Ti-Al Coating Reinforced by Nitrides on Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jingjie; Yu, Huijun; Zhu, Jiyun; Weng, Fei; Chen, Chuanzhong

    2016-05-01

    Ti-Al alloyed coating reinforced by nitrides was fabricated by laser surface alloying technique to improve mechanical properties and high temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy. Microstructures, mechanical properties and high temperature oxidation behavior of the alloyed coating were analyzed. The results show that the alloyed coating consisted of Ti3Al, TiAl2, TiN and Ti2AlN phases. Nitrides with different morphologies were dispersed in the alloyed coating. The maximum microhardness of the alloyed coating was 906HV. The friction coefficients of the alloyed coating at room temperature and high temperature were both one-fourth of the substrate. Mass gain of the alloyed coating oxidized at 800∘C for 1000h in static air was 5.16×10-3mg/mm2, which was 1/35th of the substrate. No obvious spallation was observed for the alloyed coating after oxidation. The alloyed coating exhibited excellent mechanical properties and long-term high temperature oxidation resistance, which improved surface properties of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy significantly.

  3. Constitutive Modeling of High Temperature Uniaxial Creep-Fatigue and Creep-Ratcheting Responses of Alloy 617

    SciTech Connect

    P.G. Pritchard; L.J. Carroll; T. Hassan

    2013-07-01

    Inconel Alloy 617 is a high temperature creep and corrosion resistant alloy and is a leading candidate for use in Intermediate Heat Exchangers (IHX) of the Next Generation Nuclear Plants (NGNP). The IHX of the NGNP is expected to experience operating temperatures in the range of 800 degrees - 950 degrees C, which is in the creep regime of Alloy 617. A broad set of uniaxial, low-cycle fatigue, fatigue-creep, ratcheting, and ratcheting-creep experiments are conducted in order to study the fatigue and ratcheting responses, and their interactions with the creep response at high temperatures. A unified constitutive model developed at North Carolina State University is used to simulate these experimental responses. The model is developed based on the Chaboche viscoplastic model framework. It includes cyclic hardening/softening, strain rate dependence, strain range dependence, static and dynamic recovery modeling features. For simulation of the alloy 617 responses, new techniques of model parameter determination are developed for optimized simulations. This paper compares the experimental responses and model simulations for demonstrating the strengths and shortcomings of the model.

  4. High temperature embrittlement caused by traces of calcium or strontium in an Al-5.5 mol% Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Horikawa, Keitaro; Kuramoto, Shigeru; Kanno, Motohiro

    1998-09-04

    Al-5--10mol%Mg alloys are now being developed for automotive parts since they have good formability. However, an alloy containing magnesium of more than 5mol% has poor hot rolling characteristics. It has been reported that an Al-5.5mol%Mg alloy shows high temperature embrittlement (HTE) based on intergranular fracture at around 300 C depending on strain rate. This embrittlement is considered to be closely related to the unfavorable hot rolling characteristics of the Al-Mg alloy. One of the present authors reported recently that this embrittlement is caused by a trace amount of sodium of only of only 0.6mass ppm (0.7mol ppm) in a coarse-grained Al-5.5mol%Mg alloy produced using high purity ingots. Although numerous studies have been made on the effect of sodium, little is known about the effect of alkali and alkaline-earth elements other than sodium. However, unusual impurities may inevitably creep in the recycling process in future. For example, it is reported that the Al-Mg alloy is contaminated by calcium through the ceramic tube filter using during melting and casting, and strontium is used commercially as an additional element in Al-Si alloys. Hence, aluminum alloys made using recycled stock may be contaminated at least by calcium and strontium. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of traces of calcium or strontium on hot ductility of an Al-5.5mol%Mg alloy.

  5. Development of high-emittance scales on thoriated nickel-chromium-aluminum-base alloys. [produced by high temperature oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, M. S.; Wright, I. G.; Wilcox, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    The surface regions of a DSNiCrAl alloy have been doped, by a pack diffusion process, with small amounts of Mn, Fe, or Co, and the effect of these dopants on the total normal emissivity of the scales produced by subsequent high temperature oxidation has been measured. While all three elements lead to a modest increase in emissivity, (up to 23% greater than the undoped alloy) only the change caused by manganese is thermally stable. However, this increased emissivity is within 85 percent of that of TDNiCr oxidized to form a chromia scale. The maganese-doped alloy is some 50 percent weaker than undoped DSNiCrAl after the doping treatment, and approximately 30 percent weaker after oxidation.

  6. Auger electron spectroscopy study of oxidation of a PdCr alloy used for high-temperature sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Darwin L.; Zeller, Mary V.; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos

    1993-01-01

    A Pd-13 wt. percent Cr solid solution is a promising high-temperature strain gage alloy. In bulk form it has a number of properties that are desirable in a resistance strain gage material, such as a linear electrical resistance versus temperature curve to 1000 C and stable electrical resistance in air at 1000 C. However, unprotected fine wire gages fabricated from this alloy perform well only to 600 C. At higher temperatures severe oxidation degrades their electrical performance. In this work Auger electron spectroscopy was used to study the oxidation chemistry of the alloy wires and ribbons. Results indicate that the oxidation is caused by a complex mechanism that is not yet fully understood. As expected, during oxidation, a layer of chromium oxide is formed. This layer, however, forms beneath a layer of metallic palladium. The results of this study have increased the understanding of the oxidation mechanism of Pd-13 wt. percent Cr.

  7. Static and dynamic cyclic oxidation of 12 nickel-, cobalt-, and iron-base high-temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Johnston, J. R.; Sanders, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    Twelve typical high-temperature nickel-, cobalt-, and iron-base alloys were tested by 1 hr cyclic exposures at 1038, 1093, and 1149 C and 0.05 hr exposures at 1093 C. The alloys were tested in both a dynamic burner rig at Mach 0.3 gas flow and in static air furnace for times up to 100 hr. The alloys were evaluated in terms of specific weight loss as a function of time, and X-ray diffraction analysis and metallographic examination of the posttest specimens. A method previously developed was used to estimate specific metal weight loss from the specific weight change of the sample. The alloys were then ranked on this basis. The burner-rig test was more severe than a comparable furnace test and resulted in an increased tendency for oxide spalling due to volatility of Cr in the protective scale and the more drastic cooling due to the air-blast quench of the samples. Increased cycle frequency also increased the tendency to spall for a given test exposure. The behavior of the alloys in both types of tests was related to their composition and their tendency to form scales. The alloys with the best overall behavior formed alpha-Al2O3 aluminate spinels.

  8. Development of Cast Alumina-forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys for use in High Temperature Process Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P; Pint, Bruce A; Pankiw, Roman; Voke, Don

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in the development of alumina-forming, creep resistant alloys for use in various industrial process environments. It is expected that these alloys can be fabricated into components for use in these environments through centrifugal casting and welding. Based on the successful earlier studies on the development of wrought versions of Alumina-Forming Austenitic (AFA) alloys, new alloy compositions have been developed for cast products. These alloys achieve good high-temperature oxidation resistance due to the formation of protective Al2O3 scales while multiple second-phase precipitation strengthening contributes to excellent creep resistance. This work will summarize the results on the development and properties of a centrifugally cast AFA alloy. This paper highlights the strength, oxidation resistance in air and water vapor containing environments, and creep properties in the as-cast condition over the temperature range of 750°C to 900°C in a centrifugally cast heat. Preliminary results for a laboratory cast AFA composition with good oxidation resistance at 1100°C are also presented.

  9. Development of platinum-modified gamma-nickel+gamma-nickel-aluminum-based alloys for high-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidloff, Andrew James

    Nickel-base superalloys have been used extensively in high-temperature applications where strength and structural stability are required, most notably in aero gas turbine engines. To increase the efficiency of such engines, a continuous increase in superalloy operating temperatures has been observed. As temperatures continue to increase, multiple aspects of alloy stability become increasingly important. In that regard, the high-temperature performance of superalloys can be generally discussed from two important standpoints, surface stability and structural stability. Historically, structural stability has been the primary concern to alloy designers, such that superalloys that may be exposed to high-temperature applications exceeding 1100°C typically utilize a coating for environmental protection. However, the use of coatings introduces potential deficiencies. For instance, aluminide coatings can lead to extensive instabilities when in contact with newer generation superalloys. Also, a few niche applications exist where the use of a coating is impractical. In such cases, the alloys require both environmental resistance and high-temperature strength. The primary goal of this study was to develop novel heat-treatable gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni 3Al-based alloys having excellent resistance to both high-temperature oxidation and creep. The alloys were developed in a systematic manner using multiple alloying additions, including Pt and Ir, i.e., platinum group metals (PGMs). The microstructures and environmental and thermal stabilities of the alloys studied were fully characterized through a series of experiments, including: oxidation (both isothermal and cyclic); hot corrosion (both Type I and Type II); microstructure analysis (including lattice misfit); and phase equilibria calculations with partitioning coefficient analysis. Pt modification was found to significantly affect the lattice misfit of an alloy by expanding the gamma' lattice parameter through its Ni sublattice site

  10. Aerospace Patented High-Strength Aluminum Alloy Used in Commercial Industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA structural materials engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama developed a high-strength aluminum alloy for aerospace applications with higher strength and wear-resistance at elevated temperatures. The alloy is a solution to reduce costs of aluminum engine pistons and lower engine emissions for the automobile industry. The Boats and Outboard Engines Division at Bombardier Recreational Products of Sturtevant, Wisconsin is using the alloy for pistons in its Evinrude E-Tec outboard, 40-90 horsepower, engine line. The alloy pistons make the outboard motor quieter and cleaner, while improving fuel mileage and increasing engine durability. The engines comply with California Air resources Board emissions standards, some of the most stringent in the United States. (photo credit: Bombardiier Recreational Products)

  11. NASA-UVA light aerospace alloy and structures technology program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Gangloff, Richard P.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Scully, John R.; Shiflet, Gary J.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Wert, John A.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA-UVa Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program was initiated in 1986 and continues with a high level of activity. Projects are being conducted by graduate students and faculty advisors in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, as well as in the Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, at the University of Virginia. Here, we report on progress achieved between July 1 and December 31, 1994. The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are presented for each research project. We generally aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies.

  12. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program was initiated in 1986 and continues with a high level of activity. Projects are being conducted by graduate students and faculty advisors in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, as well as in the Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, at the University of Virginia. This work is funded by the NASA-Langley Research Center under Grant NAG-1-745. Here, we report on progress achieved between January 1 and June 30, 1994. These results were presented at the Fifth Annual NASA LA2ST Grant Review Meeting held at the Langley Research Center in July of 1994. The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, lightweight aerospace alloys, composites, and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are presented for each research project. We generally aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies.

  13. High-temperature corrosion of metallic alloys in an oxidizing atmosphere containing NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Federer, J.I.

    1989-02-01

    A particular heat-exchanger application involved metallic alloys exposed to flue gases of an aluminum remelt furnace. Because the flue gases might contain NaCl and other halides, the corrosion behavior of the alloys was to be investigated. Planned direct exposure of candidate alloys to the flue gases, however, was not conducted because of premature termination of the project. Complementary laboratory testing was conducted on seven commercially available alloys and two nickel aluminides. These materials were exposed to an oxidizing atmosphere containing 0.06 wt % NaCl for 1100 h at 1000/degree/C. Most of the alloy exhibited grain-boundary attack, which resulted in complete oxidation of enveloped grains. The alloys Incoloy MA-956, Incoloy 800, Inconel 625, Inconel 601, Hastelloy X, Haynes 188, and nickel aluminide IC-50 were substantially more corroded than Alloy 214 and nickel aluminide IC-221. The latter two alloys, therefore, would probably be superior to the others in application involving flue gases containing NaCl. Strength fabricability, and weldability, which are briefly discussed, would also affect selection of materials. 8 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. High-temperature corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide (FeAl) alloys exhibiting improved weldability

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Goodwin, Gene M.; Liu, Chain T.

    1996-01-01

    This invention relates to improved corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide intermetallic alloys. The alloys of this invention comprise, in atomic percent, from about 30% to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.1% to about 0.5% carbon, no more than about 0.04% boron such that the atomic weight ratio of boron to carbon in the alloy is in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.08:1, from about 0.01 to about 3.5% of one or more transition metals selected from Group IVB, VB, and VIB elements and the balance iron wherein the alloy exhibits improved resistance to hot cracking during welding.

  15. High-temperature corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide (FeAl) alloys exhibiting improved weldability

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Goodwin, G.M.; Liu, C.T.

    1996-08-13

    This invention relates to improved corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide intermetallic alloys. The alloys of this invention comprise, in atomic percent, from about 30% to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.1% to about 0.5% carbon, no more than about 0.04% boron such that the atomic weight ratio of boron to carbon in the alloy is in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.08:1, from about 0.01 to about 3.5% of one or more transition metals selected from Group IVB, VB, and VIB elements and the balance iron wherein the alloy exhibits improved resistance to hot cracking during welding. 13 figs.

  16. Precipitation-Strengthened, High-Temperature, High-Force Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald D.; Draper, Susan L.; Nathal, Michael V.; Crombie, Edwin A.

    2008-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are an enabling component in the development of compact, lightweight, durable, high-force actuation systems particularly for use where hydraulics or electrical motors are not practical. However, commercial shape memory alloys based on NiTi are only suitable for applications near room temperature, due to their relatively low transformation temperatures, while many potential applications require higher temperature capability. Consequently, a family of (Ni,Pt)(sub 1-x)Ti(sub x) shape memory alloys with Ti concentrations ranging from about 15 to 25 at.% have been developed for applications in which there are requirements for SMA actuators to exert high forces at operating temperatures higher than those of conventional binary NiTi SMAs. These alloys can be heat treated in the range of 500 C to produce a series of fine precipitate phases that increase the strength of alloy while maintaining a high transformation temperature, even in Ti-lean compositions.

  17. Properties and Potential of Two (ni,pt)ti Alloys for Use as High-temperature Actuator Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald; Gaydosh, Darrell; Padula, Santo, II.; Garg, Anita; Biles, Tiffany; Nathal, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The microstructure, transformation temperatures, basic tensile properties, shape memory behavior, and work output for two (Ni,Ti)Pt high-temperature shape memory alloys have been characterized. One was a Ni30Pt20Ti50 alloy (referred to as 20Pt) with transformation temperatures above 230 C and the other was a Ni20Pt30Ti50 alloy (30Pt) with transformation temperatures about 530 C. Both materials displayed shape memory behavior and were capable of 100% (no-load) strain recovery for strain levels up to their fracture limit (3-4%) when deformed at room temperature. For the 20Pt alloy, the tensile strength, modulus, and ductility dramatically increased when the material was tested just about the austenite finish (A(sub f)) temperature. For the 30Pt alloy, a similar change in yield behavior at temperatures above the A(sub f) was not observed. In this case the strength of the austentite phase was at best comparable and generally much weaker than the martensite phase. A ductility minimum was also observed just below the A(sub s) temperature in this alloy. As a result of these differences in tensile behavior, the two alloys performed completely different when thermally cycled under constant load. The 20Pt alloy behaved similar to conventional binary NiTi alloys with work output due to the martensite-to-austenite transformation initially increasing with applied stress. The maximum work output measured in the 20Pt alloy was nearly 9 J/cu cm and was limited by the tensile ductility of the material. In contrast, the martensite-to-austenite transformation in the 30Pt alloy was not capable of performing work against any bias load. The reason for this behavior was traced back to its basic mechanical properties, where the yield strength of the austenite phase was similar to or lower than that of the martensite phase, depending on temperature. Hence, the recovery or transformation strain for the 30Pt alloy under load was essentially zero, resulting in zero work output.

  18. Monolithic Cu-Cr-Nb Alloys for High Temperature, High Heat Flux Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Locci, Ivan E.; Michal, Gary M.; Humphrey, Derek M.

    1999-01-01

    Work during the prior four years of this grant has resulted in significant advances in the development of Cu-8 Cr4 Nb and related Cu-Cr-Nb alloys. The alloys are nearing commercial use in the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) where they are candidate materials for the thrust cell liners of the aerospike engines being developed by Rocketdyne. During the fifth and final year of the grant, it is proposed to complete development of the design level database of mechanical and thermophysical properties and transfer it to NASA Glenn Research Center and Rocketdyne. The database development work will be divided into three main areas: Thermophysical Database Augmentation, Mechanical Testing and Metallography and Fractography. In addition to the database development, work will continue that is focussed on the production of alternatives to the powder metallurgy alloys currently used. Exploration of alternative alloys will be aimed at both the development of lower cost materials and higher performance materials. A key element of this effort will be the use of Thermo-Calc software to survey the solubility behavior of a wide range of alloying elements in a copper matrix. The ultimate goals would be to define suitable alloy compositions and processing routes to produce thin sheets of the material at either a lower cost, or, with improved mechanical and thermal properties compared to the current Cu-Cr-Nb powder metallurgy alloys.

  19. A new Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb alloy for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, D. L.; Michal, G. M.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    Various applications exist where a high conductivity alloy with good strength and creep resistance are required. NASA LeRC has developed a Cu-8 at. percent Cr-4 at. percent Nb (Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb) alloy for these applications. The alloy is designed for use up to 700 C and shows exceptional strength, low cycle fatigue (LCF) resistance, and creep resistance. Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb also has a thermal conductivity of at least 72 percent that of pure Cu. Furthermore, the microstructure and mechanical properties of the alloy are very stable. In addition to the original application in combustion chambers, Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb shows promise for welding electrodes, brazing fixtures, and other applications requiring high conductivity and strength at elevated temperatures.

  20. High-temperature oxidation behavior of two-phase iron-manganese-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.Y.; Lee, C.L.; Kao, C.H.; Perng, T.P.

    2000-04-01

    Oxidation behavior of two series of two-phase Fe-Mn-Al alloys in air up to 800 C was investigated. For the first series of alloys with various ratios of ferrite-austenite, the oxidation resistance of these alloys increased as the ferrite content increased. Two layers of oxide were formed mainly on the austenite grains, and oxidation in the ferrite phase was much less severe. The other layer of the scale on austenite was enriched with Mn and Fe, while Al was concentrated in the inner layer. For the second series of alloys with nearly the same contents of ferrite and C but various contents of Cr, the addition of Cr changed the oxidation characteristics and increased the oxidation resistance. Cr assisted the formation of a dense film of alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to prevent further oxidation.

  1. Solid state thin film battery having a high temperature lithium alloy anode

    DOEpatents

    Hobson, David O.

    1998-01-01

    An improved rechargeable thin-film lithium battery involves the provision of a higher melting temperature lithium anode. Lithium is alloyed with a suitable solute element to elevate the melting point of the anode to withstand moderately elevated temperatures.

  2. Nickel-rhenium compound sheds light on the potency of rhenium as a strengthener in high-temperature nickel alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisel, Sascha B.; Schindzielorz, Nils; Mottura, Alessandro; Reed, Roger C.; Müller, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    For many decades, it has been known that rhenium imparts a tremendous resistance to creep to the nickel-based high-temperature alloys colloquially known as superalloys. This effect is so pronounced that is has been dubbed "the rhenium effect." Its origins are ill-understood, even though it is so critical to the performance of these high-temperature alloys. In this paper we show that the currently known phase diagram is inaccurate, and neglects a stoichiometric compound at 20 at.% Re (Nimathvariant="bold">4Re). The presence of this precipitate at low temperatures and the short-range ordering of Re in fcc-Ni observed at higher temperatures have important ramifications for the Ni-based superalloys. The Nimathvariant="bold">4Re compound is shown to be stable by quantum mechanical high-throughput calculations at 0 K. Monte Carlo simulations show that it is thermally persistent up to ≈930 K when considering configurational entropy. The existence of this compound is investigated using extended x-ray absorption fine spectroscopy on a Ni96.62Re3.38 alloy.

  3. Corrosion of V and V-base alloys in high-temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy, I.M.; Toben, P.T.; Kassner, T.F.

    1996-04-01

    Corrosion of nonalloyed V, V-5Cr-5Ti, and V-15Cr-5Ti were conducted in high-purity deoxygenated water at 230{degrees}C for up to {approx}4500h. The effects of Cr concentration in the alloy and temperature on the corrosion behavior were determined from weight-change measurements and microstructural observations. An expression was obtained for the kinetics of corrosion as a function of Cr content of the alloy and temperature.

  4. Thermal conductivities and conduction mechanisms of Sb-Te Alloys at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Rui; Endo, Rie; Kobayashi, Yoshinao; Susa, Masahiro; Kuwahara, Masashi

    2011-07-15

    Sb-Te alloys have drawn much attention due to its application in phase change memory as well as the unique properties as chalcogenide. In this work, the thermal conductivities of Sb-x mol%Te alloys (x = 14, 25, 44, 60, 70, and 90) have been measured by the hot strip method from room temperature up to temperature just below the respective melting points. For the intermetallic compound Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} (x = 60), the thermal conductivity decreases up to approximately 600 K and then increases. For other Sb-x mol%Te alloys where x > 60, the thermal conductivities of the alloys decrease with increasing temperature. In contrast, for x < 60, the thermal conductivities of the alloys keep roughly constant up to approximately 600 K and then increase with increasing temperature. It is proposed that free electron dominates the heat transport below 600 K, and ambipolar diffusion also contributes to the increase in the thermal conductivity at higher temperatures. The prediction equation from temperature and chemical composition has been proposed for thermal conductivities of Sb-Te alloys.

  5. Corrosion reduction of aluminum alloys in flowing high-temperature water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draley, J. E.; Ruther, W. E.

    1969-01-01

    Report describes a technique for reducing the corrosion rate of aluminum by adding colloidal substances in a closed-loop system. Experimental work shows that the addition of graphite and colloidal hydrated aluminum oxide significantly reduces the corrosion rate in flowing high-temperature water.

  6. A novel smart rotor support with shape memory alloy metal rubber for high temperatures and variable amplitude vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yanhong; Zhang, Qicheng; Zhang, Dayi; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Liu, Baolong; Hong, Jie

    2014-12-01

    The work describes the design, manufacturing and testing of a smart rotor support with shape memory alloy metal rubber (SMA-MR) elements, able to provide variable stiffness and damping characteristics with temperature, motion amplitude and excitation frequency. Differences in damping behavior and nonlinear stiffness between SMA-MR and more traditional metal rubber supports are discussed. The mechanical performance shown by the prototype demonstrates the feasibility of using the SMA-MR concept for active vibration control in rotordynamics, in particular at high temperatures and large amplitude vibrations.

  7. The corrosion behavior of Alloy 52 weld metal in cyclic hydrogenated and oxygenated water chemistry in high temperature aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2015-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of Alloy 52 weld metal in cyclic hydrogenated and oxygenated water chemistry in high temperature water is studied by in situ monitoring corrosion potential (Ecorr), contact electric resistance (CER) and electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS), and ex situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The Ecorr and film resistance show large change when the environment is changed from hydrogenated water to oxygenated water and changeable with changing environment while the morphology and composition only show obvious distinction in the first cycle. The main factor controlling the electric/electrochemical properties of the oxide film is Ecorr.

  8. Stabilization of the high-temperature phases in ceramic coatings on zirconium alloy produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apelfeld, A. V.; Betsofen, S. Y.; Borisov, A. M.; Vladimirov, B. V.; Savushkina, S. V.; Knyazev, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    The composition and structure of ceramic coatings obtained on Zr-1%Nb alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in aqueous electrolyte comprising 2 g/L KOH, 6 g/L NaAlO2 and 2 g/L Na2SiO3 with addition of yttria nanopowder, have been studied. The PEO coatings of thickness ∼⃒20 μm were studied using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis and X-ray phase analysis. Additives in the electrolyte of yttria nanopowder allowed stabilizing the high-temperature tetragonal and cubic zirconia in the coating.

  9. Effects of high temperature aging in an impure helium environment on low temperature embrittlement of Alloy 617 and Haynes 230

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daejong; Sah, Injin; Jang, Changheui

    2010-10-01

    The effects of high temperature environmental damage on low temperature embrittlement of wrought nickel-base superalloys, Alloy 617 and Haynes 230 were evaluated. They were aged in an impure helium environment at 1000 °C for up to 500 h before tensile tested at room temperature. The tensile test results showed that the loss of ductility was associated with the increase in the inter-granular fracture with aging time. For Alloy 617, inter-granular oxidation and coarsening of grain boundary carbides contributed to the embrittlement. The significant loss of ductility in Haynes 230 was only observed after 500 h of aging when the globular intermetallic precipitates were extensively formed and brittle inter-granular cracking began to occur.

  10. Structure and thermoelastic martensitic transformations in ternary Ni-Ti-Hf alloys with a high-temperature shape memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushin, V. G.; Kuranova, N. N.; Pushin, A. V.; Uksusnikov, A. N.; Kourov, N. I.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of alloying by 12-20 at % Hf on the structure, the phase composition, and the thermoelastic martensitic transformations in ternary alloys of the quasi-binary NiTi-NiHf section is studied by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and X-ray diffraction. The electrical resistivity is measured at various temperatures to determine the critical transformation temperatures. The data on phase composition are used to plot a full diagram for the high-temperature thermoelastic B2 ↔ B19' martensitic transformations, which occur in the temperature range 320-600 K when the hafnium content increases from 12 to 20 at %. The lattice parameters of the B2 and B19' phases are measured, and the microstructure of the B19' martensite is analyzed.

  11. High Strength and Wear Resistant Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Chen, Po Shou

    2003-01-01

    Originally developed by NASA as high performance piston alloys to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low exhaust emission, the novel NASA alloys now offer dramatic increase in tensile strength for many other applications at elevated temperatures from 450 F (232 C) to about 750 F (400 C). It is an ideal low cost material for cast automotive components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. It can be very economically produced from conventional permanent mold, sand casting or investment casting, with silicon content ranging from 6% to 18%. At high silicon levels, the alloy exhibits excellent thermal growth stability, surface hardness and wear resistant properties.

  12. Potential High-Temperature Shape-Memory-Alloy Actuator Material Identified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald D.; Gaydosh, Darrell J.; Biles, Tiffany A.; Garg, Anita

    2005-01-01

    Shape-memory alloys are unique "smart materials" that can be used in a wide variety of adaptive or "intelligent" components. Because of a martensitic solid-state phase transformation in these materials, they can display rather unusual mechanical properties including shape-memory behavior. This phenomenon occurs when the material is deformed at low temperatures (below the martensite finish temperature, Mf) and then heated through the martensite-to-austenite phase transformation. As the material is heated to the austenite finish temperature Af, it is able to recover its predeformed shape. If a bias is applied to the material as it tries to recover its original shape, work can be extracted from the shape-memory alloy as it transforms. Therefore, shape-memory alloys are being considered for compact solid-state actuation devices to replace hydraulic, pneumatic, or motor-driven systems.

  13. On the achievement of strength at high temperature in binary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Louat, N.P.; Imam, M.A. )

    1989-05-01

    The authors address the fining that the strengthening encountered in polycrystals, the Hall-Petch effect, can also be expected in materials which are not necessarily polycrystalline but, insofar as the effect is concerned, are similar to them. Specifically considered were two-phase alloys in which the matrix forms the minor constituent and in which the other, major phase, is particulate. Such alloys are to be considered as equivalent to polycrystals if the matrix is so thin that, at the stress involved, it cannot, independent of the particles, deform plastically. This restriction is also available in circumstances where the particles are replaced by rods or plates, effectively infinite in length.

  14. Elevated Temperature, In Situ Micromechanical Characterization of a High Temperature Ternary Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. M.; Niederberger, C.; Raghavan, R.; Thompson, G.; Weaver, M.; Michler, J.

    2015-12-01

    The microthermomechanical behavior of a precipitation-hardenable Ni-48Ti-25Pd (at.%) shape memory alloy has been investigated as a function of temperature. Micropillars were fabricated within a large <145>-oriented grain and compressed in situ in the SEM at elevated temperatures corresponding to the martensite and austenite phase transformation temperatures. The precipitation-strengthened alloys exhibited stable pseudoelastic behavior with little or no residual strains when near the transformation temperatures. In the plastic regime, slip was observed to occur via pencil glide, circumventing the fine scale precipitates along multiple slip planes.

  15. High Temperature Analysis of Aluminum-Lithium 2195 Alloy to Aid in the Design of Improved Welding Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talia, George E.; Widener, Christian

    1996-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys have extraordinary properties. The addition of lithium to an aluminum alloy decreases its density, while making large increases in its strength and hardness. The down side is that they are unstable at higher temperatures, and are subsequently difficult to weld or even manufacture. Martin Marietta, though, developed an aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 that was reported to have exceptional properties and good weldability. Thus, it was chosen as the alloy for the space shuttles super light external tank. Unfortunately, welding 2195 has turned out to be much more of a challenge than anticipated. Thus, research has been undergone in order to understand the mechanisms that are causing the welding problems. Gas reactions have been observed to be detrimental to weld strength. Water vapor has often been identified as having a significant role in these reactions. Nitrogen, however, has also been shown to have a direct correlation to porosity. These reactions were suspected as being complex and responsible for the two main problems of welding 2195. One, the initial welds of 2195 are much weaker than the parent metal. Second, each subsequent welding pass increases the size and number of cracks and porosity, yielding significant reductions in strength. Consequently, the objective of this research was to characterize the high-temperature reactions of 2195 in order to understand the mechanisms for crack growth and the formation of porosity in welds. In order to accomplish that goal, an optical hot-stage microscope, HSM, was used to observe those reactions as they occurred. Surface reactions of 2195 were observed in a variety of environments, such as air, vacuum, nitrogen and helium. For comparison, some samples of Al-2219 were also observed. Some of the reacted surfaces were then analyzed on a scanning electron microscope, SEM. Additionally, a gas chromatograph was used to analyze the gaseous products of the high temperature reactions.

  16. Nanostructured Hypoeutectic Fe-B Alloy Prepared by a Self-propagating High Temperature Synthesis Combining a Rapid Cooling Technique

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We have successfully synthesized bulk nanostructured Fe94.3B5.7 alloy using the one-step approach of a self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) combining a rapid cooling technique. This method is convenient, low in cost, and capable of being scaled up for processing the bulk nanostructured materials. The solidification microstructure is composed of a relatively coarse, uniformly distributed dendriteto a nanostructured eutectic matrix with α-Fe(B) and t-Fe2B phases. The fine eutectic structure is disorganized, and the precipitation Fe2B is found in the α-Fe(B) phase of the eutectic. The dendrite phase has the t-Fe2B structure rather than α-Fe(B) in the Fe94.3B5.7 alloy, because the growth velocity of t-Fe2B is faster than that of the α-Fe with the deeply super-cooling degree. The coercivity (Hc) and saturation magnetization (Ms) values of the Fe94.3B5.7 alloy are 11 A/m and 1.74T, respectively. Moreover, the Fe94.3B5.7 alloy yields at 1430 MPa and fractures at 1710 MPa with a large ductility of 19.8% at compressive test. PMID:20596402

  17. Thermal Decoating of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys for Aircraft Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñiz Lerma, Jose Alberto; Jung, In-Ho; Brochu, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    Recycling of aircraft aluminum alloys can be complex due to the presence of their corrosion protection coating that includes inorganic compounds containing Cr(VI). In this study, the characterization and thermal degradation behavior of the coating on aluminum substrates coming from an aircraft destined for recycling are presented. Elements such as Sr, Cr, Si, Ba, Ti, S, C, and O were found in three different layers by EDS elemental mapping corresponding to SrCrO4, Rutile-TiO2, SiO2, and BaSO4 with an overall particle size D 50 = 1.96 µm. The thermal degradation profile analyzed by TGA showed four different stages. The temperature of complete degradation at the fourth stage occurred at 753.15 K (480 °C) at lower heating rates. At higher heating rates and holding an isotherm at the same temperature, the residence time to fully decompose the aircraft coating has been estimated as 4.0 ± 0.2 minutes. The activation energy calculated by the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and the modified Coats-Redfern methods for multiple fraction of decomposition showed a non-constant behavior indicating the complexity of the reaction. Finally, the concentration of Cr(VI) released to the environment during thermal decoating was obtained by UV-Vis spectroscopy. It was found that 2.6 ± 0.1 µg of Cr(VI)/mm2 of aluminum substrate could be released unless adequate particle controls are used.

  18. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  19. High temperature corrosion behavior of iron-aluminide alloys and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1997-08-01

    The long-term oxidation performance of ingot- and powder-processed Fe-28 at.% Al-(2--5)% Cr alloys with minor oxygen-active element or oxide additions was characterized for exposures in air at 1,000--1,300 C. Additions of zirconium or yttria substantially improved the adhesion of alumina scales grown on iron aluminides. At lower temperatures, the ingot-processed alloys performed similarly to ODS Fe{sub 3}Al alloys and other alumina-formers. However, at 1,200 and 1,300 C, the oxidation resistance of the ingot-processed Fe{sub 3}Al was degraded due to deformation of the substrate and some localized reaction product growth. Other oxidation experiments showed that the addition of an oxide dispersion to iron aluminides reduced the critical aluminum concentration for protective alumina scale formation. Oxide-dispersion-strengthened Fe{sub 3}Al alloys made from commercially prepared powders and an iron-aluminide coating with 21% Al and 1% Cr, prepared by a gas metal arc weld-overlay techniques, showed excellent oxidation/sulfidation resistance.

  20. A View of Compatible Heat-Resistant Alloy and Coating Systems at High-Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Narita, Toshio

    2009-09-14

    Conventional and advanced coatings were reviewed, and it was pointed out that the coated Ni-base superalloys decreased their creep rupture life significantly at higher temperatures, and the advanced high strength superalloy became more remarkably. Concept of diffusion barrier coating system (DBC system) and their formation process was introduced, and the results obtained for several heat-resistant alloys, stainless steel (SUS310S), Ni-Mo base alloy (Hastelloy-X), and 4{sup th} generation single crystal superalloy (TMS-138) were given. It was noted that creep-rupture life of the SUS310S and Hastelloy-X with the DBC system became longer than those of the bare alloys with or without conventional {beta}-NiAl coatings. This is due to slow creep-deformation of the Re-base alloy layer as the diffusion barrier. A novel concept based on combination of superalloys and coatings was proposed, by taking both the materials science and corrosion science into consideration.

  1. Vibrational entropy changes the solid solubility of a random alloy at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulumba, Nina; Hellman, Olle; Raza, Zamaan; Barrirero, Jenifer; Mücklich, Frank; Abrikosov, Igor A.; Odén, Magnus

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a method to accurately and efficiently determine vibrational entropy as a function of temperature and volume for substitutional alloys from first principles. Using Ti1-xAlxN metal alloy as a model system we calculate the isostructural phase diagram by minimization of the free energy, solving the original Gibbs problem of finding its global minimum corresponding to the true equilibrium state of the system. We demonstrate that the vibrational contribution to the free energy has a decisive impact on the calculated phase diagram of Ti1-xAlxN alloy, lowering the maximum temperature for the miscibility gap from 9000 K to 2400 K. The solubility limit of the predicted phase diagram is experimentally verified by local chemical composition measurements of thermally aged Ti50Al50N alloys. DocMASE, SECO Tools AB, SSF RMA 08-0069 and SRL 10-002, VR 2012-4401 and 637-2013-7296, Vinnova M-ERA.net, MC2, (KAW) (Isotopic Control for Ultimate Material Properties).

  2. Solid state thin film battery having a high temperature lithium alloy anode

    DOEpatents

    Hobson, D.O.

    1998-01-06

    An improved rechargeable thin-film lithium battery involves the provision of a higher melting temperature lithium anode. Lithium is alloyed with a suitable solute element to elevate the melting point of the anode to withstand moderately elevated temperatures. 2 figs.

  3. A View of Compatible Heat-Resistant Alloy and Coating Systems at High-Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Toshio

    2009-09-01

    Conventional and advanced coatings were reviewed, and it was pointed out that the coated Ni-base superalloys decreased their creep rupture life significantly at higher temperatures, and the advanced high strength superalloy became more remarkably. Concept of diffusion barrier coating system (DBC system) and their formation process was introduced, and the results obtained for several heat-resistant alloys, stainless steel (SUS310S), Ni-Mo base alloy (Hastelloy-X), and 4th generation single crystal superalloy (TMS-138) were given. It was noted that creep-rupture life of the SUS310S and Hastelloy-X with the DBC system became longer than those of the bare alloys with or without conventional β-NiAl coatings. This is due to slow creep-deformation of the Re-base alloy layer as the diffusion barrier. A novel concept based on combination of superalloys and coatings was proposed, by taking both the materials science and corrosion science into consideration.

  4. Development of powder metallurgy 2XXX series Al alloys for high temperature aircraft structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellman, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to improve the strength and fracture toughness combination of P/M 2124 Al alloys in accordance with NASA program goals for damage tolerance and fatigue resistance. Two (2) P/M compositions based on Al-3.70 Cu-1.85 Mg-0.20 Mn with 0.12 and 0.60 wt. pct. Zr were selected for investigation. The rapid solidification rates produced by atomization were observed to prohibit the precipitation of coarse, primary Al3Zr in both alloys. A major portion of the Zr precipitated as finely distributed, coherent Al3Zr phases during vacuum preheating and solution heat treatment. The proper balance between Cu and Mg contents eliminated undissolved, soluble constituents such as Al2CuMg and Al2Cu during atomization. The resultant extruded microstructures produced a unique combination of strength and fracture toughness. An increase in the volume fraction of coherent Al3Zr, unlike incoherent Al20Cu2Mn3 dispersoids, strengthened the P/M Al base alloy either directly by dislocation-precipitate interactions, indirectly by a retardation of recrystallization, or a combination of both mechanisms. Furthermore, coherent Al3Zr does not appear to degrade toughness to the extent that incoherent Al20Cu2Mn3 does. Consequently, the addition of 0.60 wt. pct. Zr to the base alloy, incorporated with a 774K (935 F) solution heat treatment temperature, produces an alloy which exceeds all tensile property and fracture toughness goals for damage tolerant and fatigue resistant applications in the naturally aged condition.

  5. Corrosion and Creep of Candidate Alloys in High Temperature Helium and Steam Environments for the NGNP

    SciTech Connect

    Was, Gary; Jones, J. W.

    2013-06-21

    This project aims to understand the processes by which candidate materials degrade in He and supercritical water/steam environments characteristic of the current NGNP design. We will focus on understanding the roles of temperature, and carbon and oxygen potential in the 750-850 degree C range on both uniform oxidation and selective internal oxidation along grain boundaries in alloys 617 and 800H in supercritical water in the temperature range 500-600 degree C; and examining the application of static and cyclic stresses in combination with impure He environments in the temperature rang 750-850 degree C; and examining the application of static and cyclic stresses in combination with impure He environments in the temperature range 750-850 degree C over a range of oxygen and carbon potentials in helium. Combined, these studies wil elucidate the potential high damage rate processes in environments and alloys relevant to the NGNP.

  6. Constitutive Equation for 3104 Alloy at High Temperatures in Consideration of Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Fuqiang; Sun, Jianlin; Li, Jian

    2016-06-01

    The flow behavior of 3104 aluminum alloy was investigated at temperatures ranging from 250°C to 500°C, and strain rates from 0.01 to 10 s-1 by isothermal compression tests. The true stress-strain curves were obtained from the measured load-stroke data and then modified by friction and temperature correction. The effects of temperature and strain rate on hot deformation behavior were represented by Zener-Hollomon parameter including Arrhenius term. Additionally, the influence of strain was incorporated considering the effect of strain on material constants. The derived constitution equation was applied to the finite element analysis of hot compression. The results show that the simulated force is consistent with the measured one. Consequently, the developed constitution equation is valid and feasible for numerical simulation in hot deformation process of 3104 alloy.

  7. Palladium/Copper Alloy Composite Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way; Paul M. Thoen

    2005-08-31

    This report summarizes progress made during the second year of research funding from DOE Grant DE-FG26-03NT41792 at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2004 through August of 2005. We have reformulated our Pd plating process to minimize the presence of carbon contamination in our membranes. This has improved durability and increased permeability. We have developed techniques for plating the outside diameter of ceramic and metal substrate tubes. This configuration has numerous advantages including a 40% increase in specific surface area, the ability to assay the alloy composition non-destructively, the ability to potentially repair defects in the plated surface, and the ability to visually examine the plated surfaces. These improvements have allowed us to already meet the 2007 DOE Fossil Energy pure H{sub 2} flux target of 100 SCFH/ft{sup 2} for a hydrogen partial pressure difference of 100 psi with several Pd-Cu alloy membranes on ceramic microfilter supports. Our highest pure H{sub 2} flux on inexpensive, porous alumina support tubes at the DOE target conditions is 215 SCFH/ft{sup 2}. Progress toward meeting the other DOE Fossil Energy performance targets is also summarized. Additionally, we have adapted our membrane fabrication procedure to apply Pd and Pd alloy films to commercially available porous stainless steel substrates. Stable performance of Pd-Cu films on stainless steel substrates was demonstrated over a three week period at 400 C. Finally, we have fabricated and tested Pd-Au alloy membranes. These membranes also exceed both the 2007 and 2010 DOE pure H{sub 2} flux targets and exhibit ideal H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivities of over 1000 at partial pressure difference of 100 psi.

  8. Studies of the Crystallization Process of Aluminum-Silicon Alloys Using a High Temperature Microscope. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justi, S.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that primary silicon crystals grow polyhedral in super-eutectic AlSi melts and that phosphorus additives to the melt confirm the strong seeding capacity. Primary silicon exhibits strong dendritic seeding effects in eutectic silicon phases of various silicon alloys, whereas primary aluminum does not possess this capacity. Sodium addition also produces a dendritic silicon network growth in the interior of the sample that is attributed to the slower silicon diffusion velocity during cooling.

  9. On massive carbide precipitation during high temperature low cycle fatigue in alloy 800H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankararao, K. Bhanu; Schuster, H.; Halford, G. R.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of strain rate on massive precipitation and the mechanism for the occurrence of massive precipitation of M23C6 in alloy 800H is investigated during elevated temperature low cycle fatigue testing. It was observed that large M23C6 platelets were in the vicinity of grain and incoherent twin boundaries. The strain controlled fatigue testing at higher strain rates that promoted cyclic hardening enabled massive precipitation to occur more easily.

  10. An Integrated Study of a Novel Thermal Coating for Nb-Based High Temperature Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shizhong

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes our recent works of ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation on the interfaces between niobium substrate and coatings at atomic level. Potential oxidation barrier bond coat, Nb₂AlC and high entropy alloys, and top coat candidates were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated in our labs. The simulation methods, experimental validation techniques, achievements already reached, students and postdoc training, and future improvement are briefly introduced.

  11. Mechanical and functional behavior of high-temperature Ni-Ti-Pt shape memory alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Buchheit, Thomas E.; Susan, Donald F.; Massad, Jordan E.; McElhanon, James R.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2016-01-22

    A series of Ti-rich Ni-Ti-Pt ternary alloys with 13 to 18 at. pct Pt were processed by vacuum arc melting and characterized for their transformation behavior to identify shape memory alloys (SMA) that undergo transformation between 448 K and 498 K (175 °C and 225 °C) and achieve recoverable strain exceeding 2 pct. From this broader set of compositions, three alloys containing 15.5 to 16.5 at. pct Pt exhibited transformation temperatures in the vicinity of 473 K (200 °C), thus were targeted for more detailed characterization. Preliminary microstructural evaluation of these three compositions revealed a martensitic microstructure with small amountsmore » of Ti2(Ni,Pt) particles. Room temperature mechanical testing gave a response characteristic of martensitic de-twinning followed by a typical work-hardening behavior to failure. Elevated mechanical testing, performed while the materials were in the austenitic state, revealed yield stresses of approximately 500 MPa and 3.5 pct elongation to failure. Thermal strain recovery characteristics were more carefully investigated with unbiased incremental strain-temperature tests across the 1 to 5 pct strain range, as well as cyclic strain-temperature tests at 3 pct strain. As a result, the unbiased shape recovery results indicated a complicated strain recovery path, dependent on prestrain level, but overall acceptable SMA behavior within the targeted temperature and recoverable strain range.« less

  12. Mechanical and Functional Behavior of High-Temperature Ni-Ti-Pt Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchheit, Thomas E.; Susan, Donald F.; Massad, Jordan E.; McElhanon, James R.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2016-04-01

    A series of Ti-rich Ni-Ti-Pt ternary alloys with 13 to 18 at. pct Pt were processed by vacuum arc melting and characterized for their transformation behavior to identify shape memory alloys (SMA) that undergo transformation between 448 K and 498 K (175 °C and 225 °C) and achieve recoverable strain exceeding 2 pct. From this broader set of compositions, three alloys containing 15.5 to 16.5 at. pct Pt exhibited transformation temperatures in the vicinity of 473 K (200 °C), thus were targeted for more detailed characterization. Preliminary microstructural evaluation of these three compositions revealed a martensitic microstructure with small amounts of Ti2(Ni,Pt) particles. Room temperature mechanical testing gave a response characteristic of martensitic de-twinning followed by a typical work-hardening behavior to failure. Elevated mechanical testing, performed while the materials were in the austenitic state, revealed yield stresses of approximately 500 MPa and 3.5 pct elongation to failure. Thermal strain recovery characteristics were more carefully investigated with unbiased incremental strain-temperature tests across the 1 to 5 pct strain range, as well as cyclic strain-temperature tests at 3 pct strain. The unbiased shape recovery results indicated a complicated strain recovery path, dependent on prestrain level, but overall acceptable SMA behavior within the targeted temperature and recoverable strain range.

  13. Influence of gaseous hydrogen on the mechanical properties of high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Tensile tests of six nickel-base and one cobalt-base alloy were conducted in 34.5 MN/sq m helium and hydrogen environments at temperatures from 297 K to 1,088 K. Mechanical properties tests of the nickel-base alloy MAR M-246 (Hf modified), in two cast conditions, were conducted in gaseous environments at temperatures from 297 K to 1,144 K and pressures from one atmosphere to 34.5 MN/sq m. The objective of this program was to obtain the mechanical properties of the various alloys proposed for use in space propulsion systems in a pure hydrogen environment at different temperatures and to compare with the mechanical properties in helium at the same conditions. All testing was conducted on solid specimens exposed to external gaseous pressure. Smooth and notched tensile properties were determined using ASTM tensile testing techniques, and creep-rupture life was determined using ASTM creep-rupture techniques. Low-cycle fatigue life was established by constant total strain and constant stress testing using smooth specimens and a closed-loop test machine.

  14. Research of aluminium alloy aerospace structure aperture measurement based on 3D digital speckle correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lu; Wang, Hongbo; Zhou, Jiangfan; Yang, Rong; Zhang, Hui

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the aperture change of the aluminium alloy aerospace structure under real load is researched. Static experiments are carried on which is simulated the load environment of flight course. Compared with the traditional methods, through experiments results, it's proved that 3D digital speckle correlation method has good adaptability and precision on testing aperture change, and it can satisfy measurement on non-contact,real-time 3D deformation or stress concentration. The test results of new method is compared with the traditional method.

  15. Hardening behavior after high-temperature solution treatment of Ag-20Pd-12Au-xCu alloys with different Cu contents for dental prosthetic restorations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonghwan; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Hieda, Junko; Nakai, Masaaki; Cho, Ken; Fukui, Hisao

    2014-07-01

    Ag-Pd-Au-Cu alloys have been used widely for dental prosthetic applications. Significant enhancement of the mechanical properties of the Ag-20Pd-12Au-14.5Cu alloy as a result of the precipitation of the β' phase through high-temperature solution treatment (ST), which is different from conventional aging treatment in these alloys, has been reported. The relationship between the unique hardening behavior and precipitation of the β' phase in Ag-20Pd-12Au-xCu alloys (x=6.5, 13, 14.5, 17, and 20mass%) subjected to the high-temperature ST at 1123K for 3.6ks was investigated in this study. Unique hardening behavior after the high-temperature ST also occurs in Ag-20Pd-12Au-xCu alloys (x=13, 17, and 20) with precipitation of the β' phase. However, hardening is not observed and the β' phase does not precipitate in the Ag-20Pd-12Au-6.5Cu alloy after the same ST. The tensile strength and 0.2% proof stress also increase in Ag-20Pd-12Au-xCu alloys (x=13, 14.5, 17, and 20) after the high-temperature ST. In addition, these values after the high-temperature ST increase with increasing Cu content in Ag-20Pd-12Au-xCu alloys (x=14.5, 17, and 20). The formation process of the β' phase can be explained in terms of diffusion of Ag and Cu atoms and precipitation of the β' phase. Clarification of the relationship between hardening and precipitation of the β' phase via high-temperature ST is expected to help the development of more effective heat treatments for hardening in Ag-20Pd-12Au-xCu alloys.

  16. PALLADIUM/COPPER ALLOY COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE HYDROGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way

    2004-08-31

    This report summarizes progress made during the first year of research funding from DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-03NT41792 at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2003 through August of 2004. Composite membranes, consisting of a thin Pd alloy film supported on a porous substrate have been investigated as a means of reducing the membrane cost and improving H{sub 2} flux. An electroless plating technique was utilized to deposit subsequent layers of palladium and copper over zirconia and alumina-based microfilters. The composite membranes thus made were annealed and tested at temperatures ranging from 250 to 500 C, under very high feed pressures (up to 450 psig) using pure gases and gaseous mixtures containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}S, with the purpose of determining the effects these variables had on the H{sub 2} permeation rate, selectivity and percent recovery. The inhibition caused by CO/CO{sub 2} gases on a 7 {micro}m thick Pd-Cu composite membrane was less than 17% over a wide range of compositions at 350 C. H{sub 2}S caused a strong inhibition of the H{sub 2} flux of the same Pd-Cu composite membrane, which is accentuated at levels of 100 ppm or higher. The membrane was exposed to 50 ppm three times without permanent damage. At higher H{sub 2}S levels, above 100 ppm the membrane suffered some physical degradation and its performances was severely affected. The use of sweep gases improved the hydrogen flux and recovery of a Pd-Cu composite membrane. Recently, we have been able to dramatically reduce the thickness of these Pd alloy membranes to approximately one micron. This is significant because at this thickness, it is the cost of the porous support that controls the materials cost of a composite Pd alloy membrane, not the palladium inventory. Very recent results show that the productivity of our membranes is very high, essentially meeting the DOE pure hydrogen flux target value set by the DOE Hydrogen

  17. Characterization of Ternary NiTiPd High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloys under Load-Biased Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Glen S.; Padula, Santo A.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Garg, Anita; Gaydosh, Darrell

    2010-01-01

    While NiTiPd alloys have been extensively studied for proposed use in high-temperature shape-memory applications, little is known about the shape-memory response of these materials under stress. Consequently, the isobaric thermal cyclic responses of five (Ni,Pd)49.5Ti50.5 alloys with constant stoichiometry and Pd contents ranging from 15 to 46 at. pct were investigated. From these tests, transformation temperatures, transformation strain (which is proportional to work output), and unrecovered strain per cycle (a measure of dimensional instability) were determined as a function of stress for each alloy. It was found that increasing the Pd content over this range resulted in a linear increase in transformation temperature, as expected. At a given stress level, work output decreased while the amount of unrecovered strain produced during each load-biased thermal cycle increased with increasing Pd content, during the initial thermal cycles. However, continued thermal cycling at constant stress resulted in a saturation of the work output and nearly eliminated further unrecovered strain under certain conditions, resulting in stable behavior amenable to many actuator applications.

  18. High Temperature Corrosion studies on Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welded Alloy C-276 in Molten Salt Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, M.; Arivarasu, M.; Arivazhagan, N.; Puneeth, T.; Sivakumar, N.; Murugan, B. Arul; Sathishkumar, M.; Sivalingam, S.

    2016-09-01

    Alloy C-276 is widely used in the power plant environment due to high strength and corrosion in highly aggressive environment. The investigation on high- temperature corrosion resistance of the alloy C-276 PCGTA weldment is necessary for prolonged service lifetime of the components used in corrosive environments. Investigation has been carried out on Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding by autogenous and different filler wires (ERNiCrMo-3 and ERNiCrMo-4) under molten state of K2SO4-60% NaCl environment at 675oC under cyclic condition. Thermogravimetric technique was used to establish the kinetics of corrosion. Weight gained in the molten salt reveals a steady-state parabolic rate law while the kinetics with salt deposits displays multi-stage growth rates. PCGTA ERNiCrMo-3 shows the higher parabolic constant compared to others. The scale formed on the weldment samples upon hot corrosion was characterized by using X-ray diffraction, SEM and EDAX analysis to understand the degradation mechanisms. From the results of the experiment the major phases are identified as Cr2O3, Fe2O3, and NiCr2O4. The result showed that weld fabricated by ERNiCrMo-3 found to be more prone to degradation than base metal and ERNiCrMo-4 filler wire due to higher segregation of alloying element of Mo and W in the weldment

  19. Vacuum-arc chromium-based coatings for protection of zirconium alloys from the high-temperature oxidation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuprin, A. S.; Belous, V. A.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Bryk, V. V.; Vasilenko, R. L.; Ovcharenko, V. D.; Reshetnyak, E. N.; Tolmachova, G. N.; V'yugov, P. N.

    2015-10-01

    Multilayer Cr-Zr/Cr/Cr-N coatings for protection of zirconium alloys from the high-temperature oxidation in air have been obtained by the vacuum-arc evaporation technique with application of filters for plasma cleaning from macroparticles. The effect of the coatings on the corrosion resistance of zirconium alloys at test temperatures between 660 and 1100 °C for 3600 s has been investigated. The thickness, structure, phase composition, mechanical properties of the coatings and oxide layers before and after oxidation tests were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and nanoindentation technique. It is shown that the hard multilayer coating effectively protects zirconium from the oxidation in air for 1 h at test temperatures. As a result of the oxidation in the coating the CrO and Cr2O3 oxides are formed which reduce the oxygen penetration through the coating. At maximum test temperature of 1100 °C the oxide layer thickness in the coating is about 5 μm. The tube shape remains unchanged independent of alloy type. It has been found that uncoated zirconium oxidizes rapidly throughout the temperature range under study. At 1100 °C a porous monoclinic ZrO2 oxide layer of ≥120 μm is formed that leads to the deformation of the samples, cracking and spalling of the oxide layer.

  20. Effect of interstitial content on high- temperature fatigue crack propagation and low- cycle fatigue of alloy 720

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, S.; Thomas, M. C.

    1993-08-01

    Alloy 720 is a high-strength cast and wrought turbine disc alloy currently in use for temperatures up to about 650 °C in Allison’s T800, T406, GMA 2100, and GMA 3007 engines. In the original composition in-tended for use as turbine blades, large carbide and boride stringers formed and acted as preferred crack initiators. Stringering was attributed to relatively higher boron and carbon levels. These interstitials are known to affect creep and ductility of superalloys, but the effects on low-cycle fatigue and fatigue crack propagation have not been studied. Recent emphasis on the total life approach in the design of turbine discs necessitates better understanding of the interactive fatigue crack propagation and low-cycle fatigue behavior at high temperatures. The objective of this study was to improve the damage tolerance of Alloy 720 by systematically modifying boron and carbon levels in the master melt, without altering the low-cy-cle fatigue and strength characteristics of the original composition. Improvement in strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue life was achieved by fragmenting the continuous stringers via composition modifica-tion. The fatigue crack propagation rate was reduced by a concurrent reduction of both carbon and bo-ron levels to optimally low levels at which the frequency of brittle second phases was minimal. The changes in composition have been incorporated for production disc forgings.

  1. Palladium/Copper Alloy Composite Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way; Paul M. Thoen

    2006-08-31

    This report summarizes progress made during the a three year University Coal Research grant (DEFG26-03NT41792) at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2003 through August of 2006. We made excellent progress toward our goal of contributing to the development of high productivity, sulfur tolerant composite metal membranes for hydrogen production and membrane reactors. Composite Pd and Pd alloy metal membranes with thin metal films (1-7 {micro}m) were prepared on porous stainless steel and ceramic supports that meet or exceed the DOE 2010 and 2015 pure hydrogen flux targets at differential pressure of only 20 psi. For example, a 2 {micro}m pure Pd membrane on a Pall AccuSep{reg_sign} substrate achieved an ideal H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation factor of over 6000, with a pure hydrogen flux of 210 SCFH/ft{sup 2} at only 20 psig feed pressure. Similar performance was achieved with a Pd{sub 80}Au{sub 20} composite membrane on a similar stainless steel substrate. Extrapolating the pure hydrogen flux of this PdAu membrane to the DOE Fossil Energy target conditions of 150 psia feed pressure and 50 psia permeate pressure gives a value of 508 SCFH/ft{sup 2}, exceeding the 2015 target. At these thicknesses, it is the support cost that will dominate the cost of a large scale module. In a direct comparison of FCC phase PdCu and PdAu alloys on identical supports, we showed that a Pd{sub 85}Au{sub 15} (mass %) alloy membrane is not inhibited by CO, CO{sub 2}, or steam present in a water-gas shift feed mixture at 400 C, has better resistance to sulfur than a Pd{sub 94}Cu{sub 6} membrane, and has over twice the hydrogen permeance.

  2. Welding of dissimilar alloys for high temperature heat exchangers for SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.D.; Hatem, J.; Dogan, O.N.; King, P.E.

    2006-10-01

    Reduction in the cost of balance of plant applications is one of the top priority focus areas for the successful implementation of solid oxide fuel cell technology. High temperature heat exchangers are employed to heat cathode air utilizing either hot gases coming from the anode side of the stack or other hot gases generated by external processes. In order to reduce the cost of heat exchangers, it may be necessary to apply several different materials, each in a different temperature zone, for the construction of the heat exchanger. This technique would require the joining of dissimilar materials in the construction. In this work, welding of commercial candidate dissimilar materials is explored. Filler materials were identified using equilibrium phase diagrams and thermodynamic simulation software. Autogenous welding was performed and the welding defects were characterized. Finally, experimental weld microstructures were compared to phases predicted by the simulations.

  3. Processing, Microstructure and Creep Behavior of Mo-Si-B-Based Intermetallic Alloys for Very High Temperature Structural Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vijay Vasudevan

    2008-03-31

    This research project is concerned with developing a fundamental understanding of the effects of processing and microstructure on the creep behavior of refractory intermetallic alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system. In the first part of this project, the compression creep behavior of a Mo-8.9Si-7.71B (in at.%) alloy, at 1100 and 1200 C was studied, whereas in the second part of the project, the constant strain rate compression behavior at 1200, 1300 and 1400 C of a nominally Mo-20Si-10B (in at.%) alloy, processed such as to yield five different {alpha}-Mo volume fractions ranging from 5 to 46%, was studied. In order to determine the deformation and damage mechanisms and rationalize the creep/high temperature deformation data and parameters, the microstructure of both undeformed and deformed samples was characterized in detail using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with back scattered electron imaging (BSE) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD)/orientation electron microscopy in the SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microstructure of both alloys was three-phase, being composed of {alpha}-Mo, Mo{sub 3}Si and T2-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} phases. The values of stress exponents and activation energies, and their dependence on microstructure were determined. The data suggested the operation of both dislocation as well as diffusional mechanisms, depending on alloy, test temperature, stress level and microstructure. Microstructural observations of post-crept/deformed samples indicated the presence of many voids in the {alpha}-Mo grains and few cracks in the intermetallic particles and along their interfaces with the {alpha}-Mo matrix. TEM observations revealed the presence of recrystallized {alpha}-Mo grains and sub-grain boundaries composed of dislocation arrays within the grains (in Mo-8.9Si-7.71B) or fine sub-grains with a high density of b = 1/2<111> dislocations (in Mo-20Si-10B), which

  4. Creep-resistant, cobalt-free alloys for high temperature, liquid-salt heat exchanger systems

    DOEpatents

    Holcomb, David E; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2016-09-06

    An essentially Fe- and Co-free alloy is composed essentially of, in terms of weight percent: 6.0 to 7.5 Cr, 0 to 0.15 Al, 0.5 to 0.85 Mn, 11 to 19.5 Mo, 0.03 to 4.5 Ta, 0.01 to 9 W, 0.03 to 0.08 C, 0 to 1 Re, 0 to 1 Ru, 0 to 0.001 B, 0.0005 to 0.005 N, balance Ni, the alloy being characterized by, at 850.degree. C., a yield strength of at least 25 Ksi, a tensile strength of at least 38 Ksi, a creep rupture life at 12 Ksi of at least 25 hours, and a corrosion rate, expressed in weight loss [g/(cm.sup.2 sec)]10.sup.-11 during a 1000 hour immersion in liquid FLiNaK at 850.degree. C., in the range of 3 to 10.

  5. Cyclic creep-rupture behavior of three high-temperature alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    Study of some important characteristics of the cyclic creep-rupture curves for the titanium alloy 6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo at 900 and 1100 F (755 and 865 K), the cobalt-base alloy L-605 at 1180 F (910 K), and for two hardness levels of 316 stainless steel at 1300 F (980 K). The cyclic creep-rupture curve relates tensile stress and tensile time-to-rupture for strain-limited cyclic loading and has been found to be independent of the total strain range and the level of compressive stress employed in the cyclic creep-rupture tests. The cyclic creep-rupture curve was always found to be above and to the right of the conventional (constant load) monotonic creep-rupture curve by factors ranging from 2 to 10 in time-to-rupture. This factor tends to be greatest when the creep ductility is large. Cyclic creep acceleration was observed in every cyclic creep-rupture test conducted. The phenomenon was most pronounced at the highest stress levels and when the tensile and compressive stresses were completely reversed. In general, creep rates were found to be lower in compression than in tension for equal true stresses. The differences, however, were strongly material-dependent.

  6. Slip Resistance of Ti-Based High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, A.; Sehitoglu, H.

    2016-03-01

    Titanium with Nb, Zr, and Ta alloying substitutions possesses high plastic slip resistance and high transformation strains upon bcc (β) to orthorhombic (α^'') transformation. In the current study, we determine the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) for slip in Ti alloyed for a wide composition range of Nb, Ta, and Zr. The CRSS is obtained with a proposed Peierls-Nabarro formalism incorporating the generalized stacking fault energy barrier profile for slip obtained from the first-principles Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The CRSS for slip of the orthorhombic martensite increases from 80 to 280 MPa linearly with increasing unstable fault energy. The addition of tantalum is most effective in raising the energy barriers. We also demonstrate the composition dependence of the lattice parameters of both β and α^'' crystal structures as a function of Nb, Ta, and Zr additions showing agreement with experiments. Using the lattice constants, the transformation strain is determined as high as 11 % in the [011] pole and its magnitude increases mainly with Zr addition.

  7. The effect of alloying additions on the high temperature deformation characteristics of Ti-48Al (at%) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sabinash, C.M.; Sastry, S.M.L.; Jerina, K.L.

    1995-05-01

    Addition of ternary and quaternary alloying elements at levels between one and three atomic percent increase the room temperature ductility of Ti-48Al (at%) based titanium aluminides. In this investigation the deformation characteristics of Ti-48Al-2X (X = Cr, Mn) alloys at temperatures of 1,200 C to 1,300 C and strain rates of 10{sup {minus}3}s{sup {minus}1} to 10{sup {minus}1}s{sup {minus}1} were studied and compared with the deformation characteristics of Ti-48Al using the same conditions. Three titanium aluminide alloys with target compositions of Ti-48Al, Ti-48Al-2Cr, and Ti-48Al-2Mn (at%) were induction skull melted and cast into 69.85 mm. diameter ingots. The cast ingots were hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) at 103.5 MPa, 1,177 C for 4 hours to close casting porosity and homogenize the alloy microstructure and composition. Cylindrical test specimens 10 mm dia by 15 mm height were excised by EDM from the ingot and were subjected to isothermal compression testing in air at 1,200--1,300 C and the effective strain rates of 10{sup {minus}3}--10{sup {minus}1}s{sup {minus}1}.

  8. Effect of thermal exposure on mechanical properties hypo eutectic aerospace grade aluminium-silicon alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagesh Kumar, R.; Ram Prabhu, T.; Siddaraju, C.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of thermal exposure on the mechanical properties of a C355.0 aerospace grade aluminum-silicon alloy (5% Si - 1.2% Cu - 0.5% Mg) was investigated in the present study. The alloy specimens were subjected to T6 (solution treatment and artificial ageing treatment) temper treatment to enhance the strength properties through precipitation hardening. The T6 temper treatment involved solution heat treatment at 520oC for 6h, followed by water quenching and ageing at 150oC. After the heat treatment, the specimens were exposed to various temperatures (50oC, 100oC, 150oC, 200oC and 250oC) for 5 and 10 h to study the structural applications of this alloy to the various Mach number military aircrafts. After the thermal exposure, specimens were tested for tensile, hardness and impact properties (Charpy). The microstructure of the thermal exposed specimens was examined in the optical microscopes and correlated with the mechanical properties results. In summary, an increase of exposure time has a different effect on the tensile and hardness properties of the alloy. For the exposure time 5h, the tensile and hardness properties increase upto 100oC and later decrease with an increase of temperature. In contrast, the tensile and hardness properties linearly decrease with an increase of temperature. Several factors such as matrix grain growth, diffusion rate, Si particles size and distribution, precipitate stability play a key role on deciding the tensile properties of the alloy. Comparing the relative effects of temperature and time, the temperature effects dominate more in deteriorating tensile properties of the alloy. There are no effects of exposure temperature and/or time on the impact properties of the alloy.

  9. Zinc Treatment Effects on Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 600 in High Temperature, Hydrogenated Water

    SciTech Connect

    SE Ziemniak; ME Hanson

    2004-11-16

    Trace levels of soluble zinc(II) ions (30 ppb) maintained in mildly alkaline, hydrogenated water at 260 C were found to reduce the corrosion rate of Alloy 600 (UNS N06600) by about 40% relative to a non-zinc baseline test [2]. Characterizations of the corrosion oxide layer via SEM/TEM and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction confirmed the presence of a chromite-rich oxide phase and recrystallized nickel. The oxide crystals had an approximate surface density of 3500 {micro}m{sup -2} and an average size of 11 {+-} 5 nm. Application of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with argon ion milling, followed by target factor analyses, permitted speciated composition vs. depth profiles to be obtained. Numerical integration of the profiles revealed that: (1) alloy oxidation occurred non-selectively and (2) zinc(II) ions were incorporated into the chromite-rich spinel: (Zn{sub 0.55}Ni{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 0.15})(Fe{sub 0.25}Cr{sub 0.75}){sub 2}O{sub 4}. Spinel stoichiometry places the trivalent ion composition in the single phase oxide region, consistent with the absence of the usual outer, ferrite-rich solvus layer. By comparison with compositions of the chromite-rich spinel obtained in the non-zinc baseline test, it is hypothesized that zinc(II) ion incorporation was controlled by the equilibrium for 0.55 Zn{sup 2+}(aq) + (Ni{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.3})(Fe{sub 0.3}Cr{sub 0.7}){sub 2}O{sub 4}(s) {r_equilibrium} 0.40 Ni{sup 2+}(aq) + 0.15 Fe{sup 2+}(aq) + (Zn{sub 0.55}Ni{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 0.15})(Fe{sub 0.3}Cr{sub 0.7}){sub 2}O{sub 4}(s). It is estimated that only 8% of the Ni(II) ions generated during non-selective oxidation of the alloy were retained as Ni(II) in the corrosion layer; the remainder either recrystallized to Ni(0) (38%) or were released to the aqueous phase (54%).

  10. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST). Progress report, 1 January-30 June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, R.P.; Scully, J.R.; Stoner, G.E.; Thornton, E.A.; Wawner, F.E. Jr.; Wert, J.A.

    1993-07-01

    The NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program continues a high level of activity. Progress achieved between 1 Jan. and 30 Jun. 1993 is reported. The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites, and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. The following projects are addressed: environmental fatigue of Al-Li-Cu alloys; mechanisms of localized corrosion and environmental fracture in Al-Cu-Li-Mg-Ag alloy X2095 and compositional variations; the effect of zinc additions on the precipitation and stress corrosion cracking behavior of alloy 8090; hydrogen interactions with Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 and model alloys; metastable pitting of aluminum alloys; cryogenic fracture toughness of Al-Cu-Li + In alloys; the fracture toughness of Weldalite (TM); elevated temperature cracking of advanced I/M aluminum alloys; response of Ti-1100/SCS-6 composites to thermal exposure; superplastic forming of Weldalite (TM); research to incorporate environmental effects into fracture mechanics fatigue life prediction codes such as NASA FLAGRO; and thermoviscoplastic behavior.

  11. High temperature inelastic deformation of the B1900 + Hf alloy under multiaxial loading - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. S.; Lindholm, U. S.; Nagy, A.; Bodner, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    The multiaxial deformation behavior of the Ni-based alloy B1900 + Hf has been studied at elevated temperatures in the range of 649-982 C. Combined tension/torsion cyclic tests were performed on thin-wall tubular specimens under both in-phase and out-of-phase strain-controlled loading cycles. Both straining conditions resulted in stress loci of comparable magnitude, exhibiting no difference in cyclic hardening response. A phase angle was observed between the deviatoric stress and the incremental plastic strain vectors during 90-deg out-of-phase strain cycling, and nonproportional stress relaxation occurred under biaxial strain hold. The overall results have been used to assess the flow law, the hardening equations, and the applicability of the J2-based, elastic-viscoplastic model of Bodner-Partom (1979) for multiaxial loading conditions. The overall agreement between theory and experiment is good. Discrepancies are discussed in relation to micromechanical considerations.

  12. [Dissertations 25 years after date 44. Behaviour at high temperatures of palladium based dental alloys].

    PubMed

    van der Zel, J M

    2016-02-01

    In the Netherlands in the 1980s palladium based dental alloys were often used in substructures of metal-ceramic restorations. However, after their introduction to the market some unexplained problems came to light: porosity on the metal-ceramic interface, frequent failure of solder joints, margin lift and distortion of bigger constructions. Later, palladium allergies could be added to the list. A 1989 dissertation investigated these problems and underlying causes and came up with answers and solutions. Recent problems like the breakage and chipping of porcelain on zirconia cores shows again that industry is sometimes unaware of adjustment problems at the moment that a new product is introduced to the market. PMID:26878716

  13. High temperature oxidation behavior of gamma-nickel+gamma'-nickel aluminum alloys and coatings modified with platinum and reactive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Nan

    Materials for high-pressure turbine blades must be able to operate in the high-temperature gases (above 1000°C) emerging from the combustion chamber. Accordingly, the development of nickel-based superalloys has been constantly motivated by the need to have improved engine efficiency, reliability and service lifetime under the harsh conditions imposed by the turbine environment. However, the melting point of nickel (1455°C) provides a natural ceiling for the temperature capability of nickel-based superalloys. Thus, surface-engineered turbine components with modified diffusion coatings and overlay coatings are used. Theses coatings are capable of forming a compact and adherent oxide scale, which greatly impedes the further transport of reactants between the high-temperature gases and the underlying metal and thus reducing attack by the atmosphere. Typically, these coatings contain beta-NiAl as a principal constituent phase in order to have sufficient aluminum content to form an Al2O3 scale at elevated temperatures. The drawbacks to the currently-used beta-based coatings, such as phase instabilities, associated stresses induced by such phase instabilities, and extensive coating/substrate interdiffusion, are major motivations in this study to seek next-generation coatings. The high-temperature oxidation resistance of novel Pt+Hf-modified gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni 3Al-based alloys and coatings were investigated in this study. Both early-stage and 4-days isothermal oxidation behavior of single-phase gamma-Ni and gamma'-Ni3Al alloys were assessed by examining the weight changes, oxide-scale structures, and elemental concentration profiles through the scales and subsurface alloy regions. It was found that Pt promotes Al 2O3 formation by suppressing the NiO growth on both gamma-Ni and gamma'-Ni3Al single-phase alloys. This effect increases with increasing Pt content. Moreover, Pt exhibits this effect even at lower temperatures (˜970°C) in the very early stage of oxidation. It

  14. Dynamic measurements of thermophysical properties of metals and alloys at high temperatures by subsecond pulse heating techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cezairliyan, Ared

    1993-01-01

    Rapid (subsecond) heating techniques developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology for the measurements of selected thermophysical and related properties of metals and alloys at high temperatures (above 1000 C) are described. The techniques are based on rapid resistive self-heating of the specimen from room temperature to the desired high temperature in short times and measuring the relevant experimental quantities, such as electrical current through the specimen, voltage across the specimen, specimen temperature, length, etc., with appropriate time resolution. The first technique, referred to as the millisecond-resolution technique, is for measurements on solid metals and alloys in the temperature range 1000 C to the melting temperature of the specimen. It utilizes a heavy battery bank for the energy source, and the total heating time of the specimen is typically in the range of 100-1000 ms. Data are recorded digitally every 0.5 ms with a full-scale resolution of about one part in 8000. The properties that can be measured with this system are as follows: specific heat, enthalpy, thermal expansion, electrical resistivity, normal spectral emissivity, hemispherical total emissivity, temperature and energy of solid-solid phase transformations, and melting temperature (solidus). The second technique, referred to as the microsecond-resolution technique, is for measurements on liquid metals and alloys in the temperature range 1200 to 6000 C. It utilizes a capacitor bank for the energy source, and the total heating time of the specimen is typically in the range 50-500 micro-s. Data are recorded digitally every 0.5 micro-s with a full-scale resolution of about one part in 4000. The properties that can be measured with this system are: melting temperature (solidus and liquidus), heat of fusion, specific heat, enthalpy, and electrical resistivity. The third technique is for measurements of the surface tension of liquid metals and alloys at their melting

  15. Effect of aging on the phase transformation and mechanical behavior of Ti{sub 36}Ni{sub 49}Hf{sub 15} high temperature shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, X.L.; Zheng, Y.F.; Wang, Z.; Zhao, L.C.

    2000-01-31

    The TiNiHf alloys are newly developed as high temperature shape memory alloys with the high transformation temperatures and with lower cost in comparison with TiNiX (X = Pd, Pt) alloys. Until now, no results about the effects of aging at high temperature (above 953K) in the TiNiHf alloys are reported. The purpose of the present work is to investigate the microstructure, transformation temperature, mechanical properties and shape memory effects (SMEs) for Ti{sub 36}Ni{sub 49}Hf{sub 15} alloy aged at 973K for different hours by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques, electrical resistance-temperature measurement, bending and tensile tests.

  16. Mechanical properties of Inconel 718 and Nickel 201 alloys after thermal histories simulating brazing and high temperature service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to evaluate two nickel base alloys (Nickel-201 and Inconel-718) in three heat treated conditions. These conditions were: (1) annealed; (2) after thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle; and (3) after a thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle plus one operational lifetime of high temperature service. For the Nickel-201, two different braze cycle temperatures were evaluated. A braze cycle utilizing a lower braze temperature resulted in less grain growth for Nickel-201 than the standard braze cycle used for joining Nickel-201 to Inconel-718. It was determined, however, that Nickel-201, was marginal for temperatures investigated due to large grain growth. After the thermal exposures described above, the mechanical properties of Nickel-201 were degraded, whereas similar exposure on Inconel-718 actually strengthened the material compared with the annealed condition. The investigation included tensile tests at both room temperature and elevated temperatures, stress-rupture tests, and metallographic examination.

  17. Advances in Solid State Joining of Haynes 230 High Temperature Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jeff; Schneider, Judy; Walker, Bryant

    2010-01-01

    The J-2X engine is being designed for NASA s new class of crew and launch vehicles, the Ares I and Ares V. The J-2X is a LOX/Hydrogen upper stage engine with 294,000 lbs of thrust and a minimum Isp of 448 seconds. As part of the design criteria to meet the performance requirements a large film-cooled nozzle extension is being designed to further expand the hot gases and increases the specific impulse. The nozzle extension is designed using Haynes 230, a nickel-chromium-tungsten-molybdenum superalloy. The alloy was selected for its high strength at elevated temperatures and resistance to hydrogen embrittlement. The nozzle extension is manufactured from Haynes 230 plate spun-forged to form the contour and chemically-milled pockets for weight reduction. Currently fusion welding is being evaluated for joining the panels which are then mechanically etched and thinned to required dimensions for the nozzle extension blank. This blank is then spun formed into the parabolic geometry required for the nozzle. After forming the nozzle extension, weight reduction pockets are chemically milled into the nozzle. Fusion welding of Haynes results in columnar grains which are prone to hot cracking during forming processes. This restricts the ability to use spin forging to produce the nozzle contour. Solid state joining processes are being pursued as an alternative process to produce a structure more amenable to spin forming. Solid state processes have been shown to produce a refined grain structure within the joint regions as illustrated in Figure 1. Solid state joining processes include friction stir welding (FSW) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSW). The configuration of TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material minimizing the burden on the weld tool extending its life. This provides the ability to precisely select and control the temperature. The work presented in this presentation investigates the feasibility of joining the Haynes 230

  18. High temperature characteristics and solidification microstructures of dental metallic materials. Part III alloys for metal-bond porcelain.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Sakae; Yoshida, Takamitsu; Terashima, Nobuyoshi; Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Yagasaki, Hiroshi; Kamijo, Koichiro; Ito, Michio; Platt, Jeffrey A; Oshida, Yoshiki

    2005-03-01

    The thermal expansion rate, coefficient of thermal expansion, and high temperature strength of two types of commercially available alloy for metal-bond porcelain, KIK-HII (KIK) and Degubond-J2 (J2), were evaluated up to the liquidus point temperature using a thermo-mechanical analyzer. Furthermore, microstructure in the solid-liquid coexisting region was observed for evaluation. Our results revealed the following findings: 1. For KIK, solidus point was 1,209.3 +/- 3.2 degrees C, liquidus point was 1,308.3 +/- 7.10 degrees C, and melting expansion rate was 0.41+/- 0.16%. 2. For J2, solidus point was 1,198.3 +/- 0.6 degrees C, liquidus point was 1,253.0 +/- 4.4 degrees C, and melting expansion rate was 4.50 +/- 0.80%. 3. At high temperature, the mechanical characteristics of KIK greatly differed from those of J2. The risk of causing deformation during porcelain baking was suggested for KIK. Removal of segregation during casting was considered difficult in J2. PMID:15881221

  19. High-temperature Tensile Properties and Creep Life Assessment of 25Cr35NiNb Micro-alloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatak, Amitava; Robi, P. S.

    2016-05-01

    Reformer tubes in petrochemical industries are exposed to high temperatures and gas pressure for prolonged period. Exposure of these tubes at severe operating conditions results in change in the microstructure and degradation of mechanical properties which may lead to premature failure. The present work highlights the high-temperature tensile properties and remaining creep life prediction using Larson-Miller parametric technique of service exposed 25Cr35NiNb micro-alloyed reformer tube. Young's modulus, yield strength, and ultimate tensile strength of the steel are lower than the virgin material and decreases with the increase in temperature. Ductility continuously increases with the increase in temperature up to 1000 °C. Strain hardening exponent increases up to 600 °C, beyond which it starts decreasing. The tensile properties are discussed with reference to microstructure and fractographs. Based on Larson-Miller technique, a creep life of at least 8.3 years is predicted for the service exposed material at 800 °C and 5 MPa.

  20. Influence of Hot-Working Conditions on High-Temperature Properties of a Heat-Resistant Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, John F; Freeman, J W

    1957-01-01

    The relationships between conditions of hot-working and properties at high temperatures and the influence of the hot-working on response to heat treatment were investigated for an alloy containing nominally 20 percent molybdenum, 2 percent tungsten, and 1 percent columbium. Commercially produced bar stock was solution-treated at 2,200 degrees F. to minimize prior-history effects and then rolled at temperatures of 2,200 degrees, 2,100 degrees, 2,000 degrees, 1,800 degrees, and 1,600 degrees F. Working was carried out at constant temperature and with incremental decreases in temperature simulating a falling temperature during hot-working. In addition, a few special repeated cyclic conditions involving a small reduction at high temperature followed by a small reduction at a low temperature were used to study the possibility of inducing very low strengths by the extensive precipitation accompanying such properties. Most of the rolling was done in open passes with a few check tests being made with closed passes. Heat treatments at both 2,050 degrees and 2,200 degrees F. subsequent to working were used to study the influence on response to heat treatment.

  1. Development of constitutive models for cyclic plasticity and creep behavior of super alloys at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisler, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    An uncoupled constitutive model for predicting the transient response of thermal and rate dependent, inelastic material behavior was developed. The uncoupled model assumes that there is a temperature below which the total strain consists essentially of elastic and rate insensitive inelastic strains only. Above this temperature, the rate dependent inelastic strain (creep) dominates. The rate insensitive inelastic strain component is modelled in an incremental form with a yield function, blow rule and hardening law. Revisions to the hardening rule permit the model to predict temperature-dependent kinematic-isotropic hardening behavior, cyclic saturation, asymmetric stress-strain response upon stress reversal, and variable Bauschinger effect. The rate dependent inelastic strain component is modelled using a rate equation in terms of back stress, drag stress and exponent n as functions of temperature and strain. A sequence of hysteresis loops and relaxation tests are utilized to define the rate dependent inelastic strain rate. Evaluation of the model has been performed by comparison with experiments involving various thermal and mechanical load histories on 5086 aluminum alloy, 304 stainless steel and Hastelloy X.

  2. The effect of molybdenum on niobium, titanium carbonitride precipitate evolution and grain refinement in high-temperature vacuum carburizing alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enloe, Charles M.

    Existing commercial carburizing alloys can be processed at higher temperatures and shorter processing times utilizing vacuum carburizing due to the suppression of intergranular oxidation. To provide resistance to undesired grain coarsening at these elevated temperatures and associated reduction in fatigue performance, microalloyed steel variants have been developed which employ fine Ti- and Nb-carbonitrides to suppress grain growth. Grain coarsening resistance is believed to be limited by the coarsening resistance of the precipitates themselves at high temperature, so further alloy/processing developments to enhance microalloy precipitate coarsening resistance based on a greater mechanistic understanding of solute interaction with microalloy precipitates would be beneficial. Molybdenum is known to affect microalloy precipitate evolution during processing in ferrite and austenite, but a unified explanation of the role of Mo in precipitate evolution is still lacking. Accordingly, the effect of molybdenum on microalloy precipitate size and composition evolutions and the associated onset of abnormal grain growth in austenite was investigated in Mo-bearing and Mo-free, Nb,Ti-microalloyed SAE 4120 steels. Molybdenum additions of 0.30 wt pct to alloys containing Nb additions of 0.05 and 0.10 wt pct Nb delayed the onset of abnormal grain growth in hot-rolled alloys reheated and soaked at 1050 °C and 1100 °C. The coarsening rate of microalloy precipitates was also reduced in Mo-bearing alloys relative to Mo-free alloys during isothermal soaking at 1050 °C, 1100 °C, and 1150 °C. The observed microalloy precipitate coarsening rates exceeded those predicted by the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner relation for volume-diffusion-controlled coarsening, which is attributed to an initial bimodal precipitate size distribution prior to reheating to elevated temperature. Heat-treatments of hot-rolled alloys (tempering and solutionizing) prior to reheating to elevated temperature in

  3. Deformation and Phase Transformation Processes in Polycrystalline NiTi and NiTiHf High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benafan, Othmane

    2012-01-01

    The deformation and transformation mechanisms of polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 and Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 (in at.%) shape memory alloys were investigated by combined experimental and modeling efforts aided by an in situ neutron diffraction technique at stress and temperature. The thermomechanical response of the low temperature martensite, the high temperature austenite phases, and changes between these two states during thermomechanical cycling were probed and reported. In the cubic austenite phase, stress-induced martensite, deformation twinning and slip processes were observed which helped in constructing a deformation map that contained the limits over which each of the identified mechanisms was dominant. Deformation of the monoclinic martensitic phase was also investigated where the microstructural changes (texture, lattice strains, and phase fractions) during room-temperature deformation and subsequent thermal cycling were compared to the bulk macroscopic response. When cycling between these two phases, the evolution of inelastic strains, along with the shape setting procedures were examined and used for the optimization of the transformation properties as a function of deformation levels and temperatures. Finally, this work was extended to the development of multiaxial capabilities at elevated temperatures for the in situ neutron diffraction measurements of shape memory alloys on the VULCAN Diffractometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  4. High temperature tensile and creep behaviour of low pressure plasma-sprayed Ni-Co-Cr-Al-Y coating alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, M. G.; Miner, R. V.

    1986-01-01

    The high temperature tensile and creep behavior of low pressure plasma-sprayed plates of a typical Ni-Co-Cr-Al-Y alloy has been studied. From room temperature to 800 K, the Ni-Co-Cr-Al-Y alloy studied has nearly a constant low ductility and a high strength. At higher temperatures, it becomes weak and highly ductile. At and above 1123 K, the behavior is highly dependent on strain rate and exhibits classic superplastic characteristics with a high ductility at intermediate strain rates and a strain rate sensitivity of about 0.5. At either higher or lower strain rates, the ductility decreases and the strain rate sensitivities are about 0.2. In the superplastic deformation range, the activation energy for creep is 120 + or - 20 kJ/mol, suggesting a diffusion-aided grain boundary sliding mechanism. Outside the superplastic range, the activation energy for creep is calculated to be 290 + or - 20 kJ/mol.

  5. High temperature x-ray and calorimetric studies of phase transformations in quasicrystalline Ti{endash}Zr{endash}Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, R.M.; Kelton, K.F.; Misture, S.T.

    1997-02-01

    We present the first high temperature x-ray diffraction (HTXRD) studies of {ital in situ} quasicrystal-crystal and crystal-crystal transformations in Ti{endash}Zr{endash}Ni alloys. Together with differential scanning calorimetry studies, these x-ray measurements indicate three separate paths for the Ti{endash}Zr{endash}Ni quasicrystal-crystal transformation: single exothermic, single endothermic, or multiple endothermic. The mode of transformation depends on the alloy composition and the level of environmental oxygen. The crystalline products include the Ti{sub 2}Ni, MgZn{sub 2} Laves, {alpha}{endash}(Ti,Zr) and {beta}{endash}(Ti,Zr) phases. In the absence of oxygen, the endothermic transformation of the quasicrystal demonstrates that it is the lowest free energy (stable) phase at the Ti{sub 53}Zr{sub 27}Ni{sub 20} composition. Oxygen stabilizes the Ti{sub 2}Ni phase, eliminating both the quasicrystal and the MgZn{sub 2} Laves phase, at partial pressures as low as a few hundred ppm. {copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  6. High-Temperature Deformation Characteristics of a β-Type Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, E.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.; Farghadany, E.; Abedi, H. R.; Khoddam, Sh.

    2016-04-01

    The hot deformation behavior of a biomedical β-type Ti-Nb-Ta-Zr alloy has been studied through applying hot compression tests over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates (600-900 °C and 0.003-0.3 s-1). The main microstructural feature of the specimens, which were deformed at 900 °C, is the pancaked primary grains decorated by the serrated boundaries. The latter may well imply to the occurrence of dynamic recovery. The dynamic recrystallization however is considered as the main restoration mechanism in the specimens, which were deformed at 800 °C under all strain rates. The sizes of the new recrystallized grains well follow the serration amplitude of the primary grain boundaries. At lower deformation temperatures (600 and 700 °C), the strain rate sensitivity is suddenly decreased and ended to the strain localization in the form of macro shear band. The higher accumulated energy within the shear band zones appears to stimulate the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization. To further clarify the high-temperature flow behavior of the experimental alloy, a quantitative approach has been also employed. The observed flow hardening and softening has been justified considering the evolved microstructural features.

  7. Composition, Compatibility, and the Functional Performances of Ternary NiTiX High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucsek, Ashley N.; Hudish, Grant A.; Bigelow, Glen S.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Stebner, Aaron P.

    2016-03-01

    A general procedure to optimize shape memory alloys (SMAs) for specific engineering performance metrics is outlined and demonstrated through a study of ternary, NiTiX high-temperature SMAs, where X = Pd, Hf, Zr. Transformation strains are calculated using the crystallographic theory of martensite and compared to the cofactor conditions, both requiring only lattice parameters as inputs. Measurements of transformation temperatures and hysteresis provide additional comparisons between microstructural-based and transformation properties. The relationships between microstructural-based properties and engineering performance metrics are then thoroughly explored. Use of this procedure demonstrates that SMAs can be tuned for specific applications using relatively simple, fast, and inexpensive measurements and theoretical calculations. The results also indicate an overall trade-off between compatibility and strains, suggesting that alloys may be optimized for either minimal hysteresis or large transformation strains and work output. However, further analysis of the effects of aging shows that better combinations of uncompromised properties are possible through solid solution strengthening.

  8. Corrosion Behavior of NiCrFe Alloy 600 in High Temperature, Hydrogenated Water

    SciTech Connect

    SE Ziemniak; ME Hanson

    2004-11-02

    The corrosion behavior of Alloy 600 (UNS N06600) is investigated in hydrogenated water at 260 C. The corrosion kinetics are observed to be parabolic, the parabolic rate constant being determined by chemical descaling to be 0.055 mg dm{sup -2} hr{sup -1/2}. A combination of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, supplemented by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, are used to identify the oxide phases present (i.e., spinel) and to characterize their morphology and thickness. Two oxide layers are identified: an outer, ferrite-rich layer and an inner, chromite-rich layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with argon ion milling and target factor analysis is applied to determine spinel stoichiometry; the inner layer is (Ni{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.3})(Fe{sub 0.3}Cr{sub 0.7}){sub 2}O{sub 4}, while the outer layer is (Ni{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1})(Fe{sub 0.85}Cr{sub 0.15}){sub 2}O{sub 4}. The distribution of trivalent iron and chromium cations in the inner and outer oxide layers is essentially the same as that found previously in stainless steel corrosion oxides, thus confirming their invariant nature as solvi in the immiscible spinel binary Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} (or NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}). Although oxidation occurred non-selectively, excess quantities of nickel(II) oxide were not found. Instead, the excess nickel was accounted for as recrystallized nickel metal in the inner layer, as additional nickel ferrite in the outer layer, formed by pickup of iron ions from the aqueous phase, and by selective release to the aqueous phase.

  9. Mechanisms of High-Temperature Fatigue Failure in Alloy 800H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    BhanuSankaraRao, K.; Schuster, H.; Halford, G. R.

    1996-01-01

    The damage mechanisms influencing the axial strain-controlled Low-Cycle Fatigue (LCF) behavior of alloy 800H at 850 C have been evaluated under conditions of equal tension/compression ramp rates (Fast-Fast (F-F): 4 X 10(sup -3)/s and Slow-Slow (S-S): 4 X 10(sup -5)/s) and asymmetrical ramp rates (Fast-Slow (F-S): 4 x 10(sup -3)/s / 4 X 10(sup -5/s and Slow-Fast (S-F): 4 X 10(sup -5) / 4 X 10(sup -3)/s) in tension and compression. The fatigue life, cyclic stress response, and fracture modes were significantly influenced by the waveform shape. The fatigue lives displayed by different loading conditions were in the following order: F-F greater than S-S greater than F-S greater than S-F. The fracture mode was dictated by the ramp rate adopted in the tensile direction. The fast ramp rate in the tensile direction led to the occurrence of transgranular crack initiation and propagation, whereas the slow ramp rate caused intergranular initiation and propagation. The time-dependent processes and their synergistic interactions, which were at the basis of observed changes in cyclic stress response and fatigue life, were identified. Oxidation, creep damage, dynamic strain aging, massive carbide precipitation, time-dependent creep deformation, and deformation ratcheting were among the several factors influencing cyclic life. Irrespective of the loading condition, the largest effect on life was exerted by oxidation processes. Deformation ratcheting had its greatest influence on life under asymmetrical loading conditions. Creep damage accumulated the greatest amount during the slow tensile ramp under S-F conditions.

  10. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb15Al10Ti alloy produced by mechanical alloying and high temperature processing.

    PubMed

    Rozmus, M; Blicharski, M; Dymek, S

    2010-03-01

    In this work, an Nb15Al10Ti alloy produced by mechanical alloying was investigated. The milling of elemental powders of Nb, Al as well as TiAl intermetallic phase resulted in the formation of homogenous niobium solid solution, Nb(ss), and refinement of powder particles. Powder after milling was consolidated by conventional hot pressing at 1300 degrees C under pressure of 25 MPa as well as by hot isostatic pressing at 1200 degrees C under pressure of 1 GPa. Microstructure of consolidated material was examined by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Materials after consolidation were composed of three phases: niobium solid solution Nb(ss), Nb(3)Al intermetallic phase and titanium oxide dispersoid TiO. The analysis of the mechanical properties indicated that both refinement of microstructure as well as introduction of ductile Nb(ss) into the microstructure contributed to very high yield strength and fracture toughness satisfactory for this strength. PMID:20500425

  11. Reactive molecular dynamics study of Mo-based alloys under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenkov, Alex; Newsome, David; Verners, Osvalds; Russo, Michael F.; Zaharieva, Roussislava; van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2012-07-01

    Structural metal alloys are of vital importance for a clean energy economy, but the current trial-and-error alloy development methodology is expensive and time consuming. In this study, we demonstrate the capability of the ReaxFF force field model to predict mechanical properties and provide a fully dynamic description of oxidation and sulfidation of Mo-based alloys under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions using molecular dynamics (MD) method. The advantage of the ReaxFF approach is in its ability to model the formation and breaking of chemical bonds within the quantum framework but several orders of magnitude faster than the traditional density functional theory models. ReaxFF-MD predictions were compared to the literature Mo shock compression measurements at 300 K and 1673 K in the pressure range of 0-350 Pa, and densities and Young's modulus in the temperature range of 300-1500 K. Analysis of oxidation of Mo and Ni clusters and surface slabs showed that Mo oxidation proceeded at a significantly higher rate than the Ni oxidation and involved oxygen transport inside the metal cluster coupled to large heat release that caused extensive surface melting. The oxidation simulations of Mo3Ni clusters showed high production of Mo oxides and a low concentration of Ni-oxides in the gas phase. This was attributed to the higher chemical stability of Mo-oxide gas phase species. Modeling of H2S interactions with Mo slab demonstrated that sulfur atoms increasingly agglomerated in the surfaces layers of the slab as the simulation proceeded, diffusing deeper into the slab in their atomic forms. A combined ReaxFF Mo/Ni/C/O/N/S/H parameter set enabled us to obtain a detailed atomistic analysis of complex physical and chemical events during the combustion of a complex fuel molecule on a reactor surface.

  12. Cast Aluminum Alloys for High Temperature Applications Using Nanoparticles Al2O3 and Al3-X Compounds (X = Ti, V, Zr)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of nanoparticles Al2O3 and Al3-X compounds (X = Ti, V, Zr) on the improvement of mechanical properties of aluminum alloys for elevated temperature applications is presented. These nanoparticles were selected based on their low cost, chemical stability and low diffusions rates in aluminum at high temperatures. The strengthening mechanism at high temperature for aluminum alloy is based on the mechanical blocking of dislocation movements by these nanoparticles. For Al2O3 nanoparticles, the test samples were prepared from special Al2O3 preforms, which were produced using ceramic injection molding process and then pressure infiltrated by molten aluminum. In another method, Al2O3 nanoparticles can also be homogeneously mixed with fine aluminum powder and consolidated into test samples through hot pressing and sintering. With the Al3-X nanoparticles, the test samples are produced as precipitates from in-situ reactions with molten aluminum using conventional permanent mold or die casting techniques. It is found that cast aluminum alloy using nanoparticles Al3-X is the most cost effective method to produce high strength aluminum alloys for high temperature applications in comparison to nanoparticles Al2O3. Furthermore, significant mechanical properties retention in high temperature environment could be achieved with Al3-X nanoparticles, resulting in tensile strength of nearly 3 times higher than most 300- series conventional cast aluminum alloys tested at 600 F.

  13. Metal-Coated Optical Fibers for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeakes, Jason; Murphy, Kent; Claus, Richard; Greene, Jonathan; Tran, Tuan

    1996-01-01

    This poster will highlight on-going research at the Virginia Tech Fiber & Electro-Optics Research Center (FEORC) in the area of thin films on optical fibers. Topics will include the sputter deposition of metals and metal; alloys onto optical fiber and fiber optic sensors for innovative applications. Specific information will be available on thin film fiber optic hydrogen sensors, corrosion sensors, and metal-coated optical fiber for high temperature aerospace applications.

  14. Effects of Stoichiometry on Transformation Temperatures and Actuator-Type Performance of NiTiPd and NiTiPdX High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Glen S.; Gaydosh, Darrell; Garg, Anita; Padula, Santo A., II; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    High-temperature shape memory NiTiPd and NiTiPdX (X=Au, Pt, Hf) alloys were produced with titanium equivalent (Ti+Hf) compositions of 50.5, 50.0, 49.5, and 49.0 at.%. Thermo-mechanical testing in compression was used to evaluate the transformation temperatures, transformation strain, work output, and permanent deformation behavior of each alloy to study the effects of quaternary alloying and stoichiometry on high-temperature shape memory alloy behavior. Microstructural evaluation showed the presence of second phases for all alloy compositions. No load transformation temperatures in the stoichiometric alloys were relatively unchanged by Au and Pt substitutions, while the substitution of Hf for Ti causes a drop in transformation temperatures. The NiTiPd, NiTiPdAu and NiTiPdHf alloys exhibited transformation temperatures that were highest in the Ti-rich compositions, slightly lower at stoichiometry, and significantly reduced when the Ti equivalent composition was less than 50 at.%. For the NiTiPdPt alloy, transformation temperatures were highest for the Ti-rich compositions, lowest at stoichiometry, and slightly higher in the Ni-rich composition. When thermally cycled under constant stresses of up to 300 MPa, all of the alloys had transformation strains, and therefore work outputs, which increased with increasing stress. In each series of alloys, the transformation strain and thus work output was highest for stoichiometric or Ti-rich compositions while permanent strain associated with the constant-load thermal cycling was lowest for alloys with Ni-equivalent-rich compositions. Based on these results, basic rules for optimizing the composition of NiTiPd alloys for actuator performance will be discussed.

  15. Hydrogen embrittlement, grain boundary segregation, and stress corrosion cracking of alloy X-750 in low- and high-temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W. J.; Lebo, M. R.; Kearns, J. J.

    1997-04-01

    The nature of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of alloy X-750 was characterized in low- and high-temperature water by testing as-notched and precracked fracture mechanics specimens. Materials given the AH, BH, and HTH heat treatments were studied. While all heat treatments were susceptible to rapid low-temperature crack propagation (LTCP) below 150 C, conditions AH and BH were particularly susceptible. Low-temperature tests under various loading conditions (e.g., constant displacement, constant load, and increasing load) revealed that the maximum stress intensity factors (K{sub P{sub max}}) from conventional rising load tests provide conservative estimates of the critical loading conditions in highly susceptible heats, regardless of the load path history. For resistant heats, K{sub P{sub max}} provides a reasonable, but not necessarily conservative, estimate of the critical stress intensity factor for LTCP. Testing of as-notched specimens showed that LTCP will not initiate at a smooth surface or notch, but will readily occur if a cracklike defect is present. Comparison of the cracking response in water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air demonstrated that LTCP is associated with hydrogen embrittlement of grain boundaries. The stress corrosion crack initiation and growth does occur in high-temperature water (>250 C), but crack growth rates are orders of magnitude lower than LTCP rates. The SCC resistance of HTH heats is far superior to that of AH heats as crack initiation times are two to three orders of magnitude greater and growth rates are one to two orders of magnitude lower.

  16. PALLADIUM/COPPER ALLOY COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE HYDROGEN SEPARATION FROM COAL-DERIVED GAS STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way

    2003-01-01

    For hydrogen from coal gasification to be used economically, processing approaches that produce a high purity gas must be developed. Palladium and its alloys, nickel, platinum and the metals in Groups 3 to 5 of the Periodic Table are all permeable to hydrogen. Hydrogen permeable metal membranes made of palladium and its alloys are the most widely studied due to their high hydrogen permeability, chemical compatibility with many hydrocarbon containing gas streams, and infinite hydrogen selectivity. Our Pd composite membranes have demonstrated stable operation at 450 C for over 70 days. Coal derived synthesis gas will contain up to 15000 ppm H{sub 2}S as well as CO, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and other gases. Highly selectivity membranes are necessary to reduce the H{sub 2}S concentration to acceptable levels for solid oxide and other fuel cell systems. Pure Pd-membranes are poisoned by sulfur, and suffer from mechanical problems caused by thermal cycling and hydrogen embrittlement. Recent advances have shown that Pd-Cu composite membranes are not susceptible to the mechanical, embrittlement, and poisoning problems that have prevented widespread industrial use of Pd for high temperature H{sub 2} separation. These membranes consist of a thin ({le} 5 {micro}m) film of metal deposited on the inner surface of a porous metal or ceramic tube. With support from this DOE Grant, we have fabricated thin, high flux Pd-Cu alloy composite membranes using a sequential electroless plating approach. Thin, Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} films exhibit a hydrogen flux more than ten times larger than commercial polymer membranes for H{sub 2} separation, resist poisoning by H{sub 2}S and other sulfur compounds typical of coal gas, and exceed the DOE Fossil Energy target hydrogen flux of 80 ml/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min = 0.6 mol/m{sup 2} {center_dot} s for a feed pressure of 40 psig. Similar Pd-membranes have been operated at temperatures as high as 750 C. We have developed practical electroless plating

  17. Experiment and Modeling of Simultaneous Creep, Plasticity and Transformation of High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys During Cyclic Actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Parikshith K.; Desai, Uri; Chatzigeorgiou, George; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Monroe, James; Karaman, Ibrahim; Noebe, Ron; Bigelow, Glen

    2010-01-01

    The present work is focused on studying the cycling actuation behavior of HTSMAs undergoing simultaneous creep and transformation. For the thermomechanical testing, a high temperature test setup was assembled on a MTS frame with the capability to test up to temperatures of 600 C. Constant stress thermal cycling tests were conducted to establish the actuation characteristics and the phase diagram for the chosen HTSMA. Additionally, creep tests were conducted at constant stress levels at different test temperatures to characterize the creep behavior of the alloy over the operational range. A thermodynamic constitutive model is developed and extended to take into account a) the effect of multiple thermal cycling on the generation of plastic strains due to transformation (TRIP strains) and b) both primary and secondary creep effects. The model calibration is based on the test results. The creep tests and the uniaxial tests are used to identify the viscoplastic behavior of the material. The parameters for the SMA properties, regarding the transformation and transformation induced plastic strain evolutions, are obtained from the material phase diagram and the thermomechanical tests. The model is validated by predicting the material behavior at different thermomechanical test conditions.

  18. Surface modification of Ti6Al4V alloy by PIII at high temperatures: Effects of plasma potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, M. M.; Ueda, M.; Pichon, L.; Reuther, H.; Lepienski, C. M.

    2007-04-01

    The present work is aimed to analyzing the influence of the plasma potential in the efficiency of plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) process with nitrogen, at high temperatures (550 °C and 800 °C), applied to the Ti6Al4V alloy to increase its wear resistance. Treatments with plasma potentials (PP) at 420 V and 90 V were carried out. In the first case, in accordance with AES (Auger Electron Spectroscopy) analysis, nitrogen rich layers of 100 nm and 150 nm of thickness had been obtained, for total treatment times of 60 min and 120 min, respectively. For the treatments with lower PP of 90 V, the treated layers thicknesses have been measured by GDOS (Glow Discharge Optical Spectroscopy) and their values are 1 μm and 1.5 μm for treatments of 120 min and 240 min, respectively. The hardness values were determined for the samples treated with high PP by nanoindentation technique and a significant increase was observed for this treatment, reaching 11 GPa (60 min) and 19 GPa (120 min), which can be compared to 3.5-4.0 GPa obtained for the untreated samples. Pin-on-disk wear tests show that wear resistance increases after all these treatments. The friction coefficient as well as the wear rates are measured with a tribometer.

  19. High temperature passive film on the surface of Co-Cr-Mo alloy and its tribological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feifei; Dong, Guangneng; Dong, Lishe

    2014-09-01

    For the artificial hip joints, passive film formed on the Co-Cr-Mo alloy acted as a highly protective barrier in the body fluid. But its stability, composition and structure always influenced the protection. In this work, passive film was obtained by high temperature treatment. The effect of passivation environment on the properties of the passive film was investigated. The film's surface roughness, micro-hardness and structure were analyzed. In order to study the tribological behavior of the passive film, pin-on-disk tribotest was carried out under bovine serum albumin (BSA) and saline solution. Results indicated the sample passivated in vacuum had friction coefficient of 0.18 under BSA solution and 0.53 under saline solution; the sample passivated in air had friction coefficient of 0.14 under BSA solution and 0.56 under saline solution. In addition, the reference sample without passivation was tested under the same condition. It showed friction of 0.22 under BSA solution and 0.45 under solution. The lubricating mechanism was attributed to BSA tribo-film absorption on the surface and high hardness passive film.

  20. High temperature characteristics and solidification microstructures of dental metallic materials part I: silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Sakae; Yoshida, Takamitsu; Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Terashima, Nobuyoshi; Ito, Michio; Platt, Jeffrey A; Oshida, Yoshiki

    2003-09-01

    Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy was subjected to a Thermo-Mechanical Analyzer to investigate high temperature properties up to its liquidus temperature. Microstructural examination and elemental analysis with EPMA were also conducted in the solid/liquid mixture region. The following conclusions were obtained. (1) The solidus temperature was 838.3 +/- 2.52 degrees C and 957.7 +/- 1.53 degrees C for the liquidus point. (2) Thermal expansion coefficients were 1.39 +/- 0.08% at the solidus, 2.338 +/- 0.13% at the liquidus, and the melting expansion coefficient was 0.932 +/- 0.058%. (3) The expansion during melting was controlled by a small amount of pressure such as 1/100 of the air pressure, therefore the fit accuracy of castings is suggested not to be influenced by the solidification shrinkage. (4) Although the softening heat treatment and casting exhibited an influence on thermal expansion behavior, casting temperature in addition to post-casting plastic deformation did not show an effect on the thermal expansion. (5) The yield strength at 750 degrees C was reduced down to about 1/400 of that at room temperature, and the modulus of elasticity was about 1/100 of the room temperature value. PMID:14620990

  1. Mechanical behaviour and functional properties of porous Ti-45 at. % Ni alloy produced by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnina, N.; Belyaev, S.; Voronkov, A.; Gracheva, A.

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical behaviour and shape memory effects were studied in the porous Ti-45.0 at. % Ni alloy produced by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis. It is shown that the porous Ti-45.0 at % Ni alloy is deformed by the same mechanisms as a cast Ti50Ni50 alloy. At low temperatures, the deformation of the porous alloy is realised via martensite reorientation at a low yield limit and by dislocation slip at a high yield limit. At high temperatures (in the austenite B2 phase) the porous Ti-45.0 at % Ni alloy is deformed by the stress-induced martensite at a low yield limit and by dislocation slip at a high yield limit. The pseudoelasticity effect is not found in this alloy, while the transformation plasticity and the shape memory effects are observed on cooling and heating under a constant load. The values of the transformation plasticity, and the shape memory effects, depend linearly on the stress acting on cooling and heating. The temperatures of the martensitic transformation increase linearly when the stress rises up to 80 MPa. The porous Ti-45.0 at % Ni alloy accumulates an irreversible strain on cooling and heating and demonstrates unstable functional behaviour during thermal cycling.

  2. NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structures technology program supplement: Aluminum-based materials for high speed aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This report on the NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structure technology program supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft covers the period from July 1, 1992. The objective of the research is to develop aluminum alloys and aluminum matrix composites for the airframe which can efficiently perform in the HSCT environment for periods as long as 60,000 hours (certification for 120,000 hours) and, at the same time, meet the cost and weight requirements for an economically viable aircraft. Current industry baselines focus on flight at Mach 2.4. The research covers four major materials systems: (1) Ingot metallurgy 2XXX, 6XXX, and 8XXX alloys, (2) Powder metallurgy 2XXX alloys, (3) Rapidly solidified, dispersion strengthened Al-Fe-X alloys, and (4) Discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites. There are ten major tasks in the program which also include evaluation and trade-off studies by Boeing and Douglas aircraft companies.

  3. High-temperature low-cycle fatigue and tensile properties of Hastelloy X and alloy 617 in air and HTGR-helium

    SciTech Connect

    Strizak, J.P.; Brinkman, C.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.

    1981-01-01

    Results of strain controlled fatigue and tensile tests are presented for two nickel base solution hardened alloys which are reference structural alloys for use in several high temperature gas cooled reactor concepts. These alloys, Hastelloy X Inconel 617, were tested at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 871/sup 0/C in air and impure helium. Materials were tested in the solution annealed as well as in the pre-aged condition where aging consisted of isothermal exposure at one of several temperatures for periods of up to 20,000 h. Comparisons are also given between the strain controlled fatigue lives of these alloys and several other commonly used alloys all tested at 538/sup 0/C.

  4. A Study on Formation and Thermal Stability of Nano-sized Oxide Clusters in Mechanically Alloyed Nickel Aluminum for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Deog

    The intermetallic compound, B2 NiAl, is a promising material for high temperature structural applications such as in aviation jet engines or gas turbines, provided that its high temperature mechanical properties can be improved. Although extensive efforts over the last several decades have been devoted toward enhancing ductility through alloying design and reducing impurities, as well as improving high temperature creep strength through precipitation and dispersion strengthening, these efforts have relied on traditional approaches, a combination of large grain size to limit diffusional creep and precipitation/dispersion (50 ˜ 100 nm size) strengthening to limit dislocation creep, for high temperature strengthening. While traditional approaches have shown a good improvement from a relatively high temperature strengthening point of view, the size and number density of dispersoids were not able to provide sufficient strength in the high temperature creep regime. Furthermore, details of the interaction mechanism between dislocations and dispersoids are not yet well understood. This study focuses on designing and developing advanced oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) NiAl intermetallics with improved high temperature creep strength by incorporating a high number density (˜1024 m-3) of very thermally stable Y-Ti-O nano-clusters, akin to those recently observed to improve creep strength and radiation resistance in nano-structured ferritic alloys. Advanced ODS NiAl alloys have been produced by mechanical alloying of pre-alloyed Ni-50at%Al with Y2O3 and Ti elemental powders. The milled powders were subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering, with the objective of producing very high number densities of nano-sized Y-Ti-O precipitates, along with fine grain size. Advanced experimental characterization techniques, combined with microhardness strength measurement, were used to investigate the material microstructure and strength following processing and to evaluate

  5. Total hemispherical emissivity of very high temperature reactor (VHTR) candidate materials: Hastelloy X, Haynes 230, and Alloy 617

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, Raymond K.

    An experimental system was constructed in accordance with the standard ASTM C835-06 to measure the total hemispherical emissivity of structural materials of interest in Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) systems. The system was tested with304 stainless steel as well as for oxidized and un-oxidized nickel, and good reproducibility and agreement with the literature data was found. Emissivity of Hastelloy X was measured under different conditions that included: (i) "as received" (original sample) from the supplier; (ii) with increased surface roughness; (iii) oxidized, and; (iv) graphite coated. Measurements were made over a wide range of temperatures. Hastelloy X, as received from the supplier, was cleaned before additional roughening of the surface and coating with graphite. The emissivity of the original samples (cleaned after received) varied from around 0.18 to 0.28 in the temperature range of 473 K to 1498 K. The apparent emissivity increased only slightly as the roughness of the surface increased (without corrections for the increased surface area due to the increased surface roughness). When Hastelloy X was coated with graphite or oxidized however, its emissivity was observed to increase substantially. With a deposited graphite layer on the Hastelloy, emissivity increased from 0.2 to 0.53 at 473 K and from 0.25 to 0.6 at 1473 K; a finding that has strong favorable safety implications in terms of decay heat removal in post-accident VHTR environments. Although initial oxidation of Hastelloy X increased the emissivity prolonged oxidation did not significantly increase emissivity. However as there is some oxidation of Hastelloy X used in the construction of VHTRs, this represents an essentially neutral finding in terms of the safety implications in post-accident VHTR environments. The total hemispherical emissivity of Haynes 230 alloy, which is regarded as a leading candidate material for heat exchangers in VHTR systems, was measured under various surface

  6. Structural evolution of electroless Ni-P coating on Al-12 wt.% Si alloy during heat treatment at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojtěch, D.; Novák, M.; Zelinková, M.; Novák, P.; Michalcová, A.; Fabián, T.

    2009-01-01

    The work is concerned with the high-temperature heat treatment of an Al-12 wt.% Si alloy coated by an electroless Ni-P layer. The electroless deposition took place on a pre-treated substrate in a bath containing nickel hypophosphite, nickel lactate and lactic acid. Resulting Ni-P deposit showed a thickness of about 8 μm. The coated samples were heat-treated at 200-550 °C/1-24 h. LM, SEM, EDS and XRD were used to investigate phase transformations. Adherence to the substrate was estimated from the scratch test and microhardness of the heat-treated layers was also measured. It is found that various phase transformations occur, as both temperature and annealing time increase. These include (1) amorphous Ni-P → Ni + Ni 3P, (2) Al + Ni → Al 3Ni, (3) Ni 3P → Ni 12P 5 + Ni, (4) Ni 12P 5 → Ni 2P + Ni, and (5) Al 3Ni + Ni → Al 3Ni 2. The formation of intermetallic phases, particularly Al 3Ni 2, leads to significant surface hardening, however, too thick layers of intermetallics reduce the adherence to the substrate. Based on the growth kinetics of the intermetallic phases, diffusion coefficients of Ni in Al 3Ni and Al 3Ni 2 at 450-550 °C are estimated as follows: D(Al 3Ni, 450 °C) ≈ 6 × 10 -12 cm 2 s -1, D(Al 3Ni, 550 °C) ≈ 4 × 10 -11 cm 2 s -1, D(Al 3Ni 2, 450 °C) ≈ 1 × 10 -12 cm 2 s -1 and D(Al 3Ni 2, 550 °C) ≈ 1 × 10 -11 cm 2 s -1. Mechanisms of phase transformations are discussed in relation to the elemental diffusion.

  7. Development of a quantitative method for the characterization of hole quality during laser trepan drilling of high-temperature alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongyu; Zhou, Ming; Wang, Yunlong; Zhang, Xiangchao; Yan, Yu; Wang, Rong

    2016-02-01

    Short-pulsed lasers are of significant industrial relevance in laser drilling, with an acceptable compromise between accuracy and efficiency. However, an intensive research with regard to qualitative and quantitative characterization of the hole quality has rarely been reported. In the present study, a series of through holes were fabricated on a high-temperature alloy workpiece with a thickness of 3 mm using a LASERTEC 80 PowerDrill manufacturing system, which incorporated a Nd:YAG millisecond laser into a five-axis positioning platform. The quality of the holes manufactured under different laser powers (80-140 W) and beam expanding ratios (1-6) was characterized by a scanning electron microscope associated with an energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, focusing mainly on the formation of micro-crack and recast layer. Additionally, the conicity and circularity of the holes were quantitatively evaluated by the apparent radius, root-mean-square deviation, and maximum deviation, which were calculated based on the extraction of hole edge through programming with MATLAB. The results showed that an amount of melting and spattering contents were presented at the entrance end and the exit end of the holes, and micro-cracks and recast layer (average thickness 15-30 µm) were detected along the side wall of the holes. The elemental composition of the melting and spattering contents and the recast layer was similar, with an obvious increase in the contents of O, Nb, and Cr and a great reduction in the contents of Fe and Ni in comparison with the bulk material. Furthermore, the conicity and circularity evaluation of the holes indicated that a laser power of 100 W and a beam expanding ratio of 4 or 5 represented the typical optimal drilling parameters in this specific experimental situation. It is anticipated that the quantitative method developed in the present study can be applied for the evaluation of hole quality in laser drilling and other drilling conditions.

  8. Formation behavior of basal texture under the high temperature plane strain compression deformation in AZ80 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Okayasu, K.; Fukutomi, H.

    2015-04-01

    The formation behavior of basal texture during high temperature deformation of AZ80 magnesium alloys in single phase was investigated by plane strain compression deformation. Three kinds of specimens with different initial textures were machined out from an extruded bar having a <101¯0> texture. Plane strain compression tests were conducted at temperatures of 623K and 723K and a strain rate of 5.0×10-2s-1, with a strain range of between - 0.4 and -1.0. After deformation, the specimens were immediately quenched in oil. Texture measurement was carried out on the compression planes by the Schulz reflection method using nickel filtered Cu Kα radiation. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements were also conducted in order to examine the spatial distribution of orientations. Three kinds of specimens named A, B and C were prepared from the same extruded bar. In the specimens A, B and C, {0001} was distributed preferentially parallel to ND, TD, and RD, respectively. After deformation, texture evaluation was conducted on the mid-plane section. At the plane strain compression deformation, peaks appeared in the true stress-true strain curves irrespective of the kinds of specimen used. It was found that the main components and the pole densities of the textures vary depending on deformation condition and initial texture. Six kinds of texture components were observed after deformation. The (0001)<101¯0> has formed regardless of the initial texture. There are two types of texture components; one exists before the deformation, and the other does not. Either types are considered to have stable orientations for plane strain compression. Also, the basal texture is composed of two crystal orientation components - (0001)<101¯0> and (0001)<112¯0>. When (0001) existed before deformation, an extremely sharp (0001) (compression plane) texture is formed.

  9. High-pressure and high-temperature phase diagram for Fe0.9Ni0.1-H alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibazaki, Yuki; Terasaki, Hidenori; Ohtani, Eiji; Tateyama, Ryuji; Nishida, Keisuke; Funakoshi, Ken-ichi; Higo, Yuji

    2014-03-01

    Planetary cores are considered to consist of an iron-nickel (Fe-Ni) alloy and light elements and hydrogen is one of plausible light elements in the core. Here we have performed in situ X-ray diffraction experiments on an Fe0.9Ni0.1-H system up to 15.1 GPa and 1673 K, and investigated the effect of Ni on phase relations of FeHx under high pressure and high temperature. The experimental system in the present work was oversaturated with hydrogen. We found a face-center-cubic (fcc) phase (with hydrogen concentration up to x∼1) and a body-center-cubic (bcc) phase (x < 0.1) as stable phases. The partial melting was observed below 6 GPa. We could not observe a double-hexagonal-close-packed (dhcp) phase because of limitations in pressure and temperature conditions. The stability field of each phase of Fe0.9Ni0.1Hx was almost same as that of FeHx. The solidus of Fe0.9Ni0.1Hx was 500-700 K lower than the melting curve of Fe and its liquidus was 400-600 K lower than that of Fe in the pressure range of this study. Both the solidus and liquidus of Fe0.9Ni0.1Hx were depressed at around 3.5 GPa, as was the solidus of FeHx. The hydrogen contents in fcc-Fe0.9Ni0.1Hx just below solidus were slightly lower than those of fcc-FeHx, which suggests that nickel is likely to prevent dissolution of hydrogen into iron. Due to the lower hydrogen solubilities in Fe0.9Ni0.1 compared to Fe, the solidus of Fe0.9Ni0.1Hx is about 100-150 K higher than that of FeHx.

  10. Improvement in the Shape Memory Response of Ti50.5Ni24.5Pd25 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy with Scandium Microalloying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atli, K. C.; Karaman, I; Noebe, R. D.; Garg, A.; Chumlyakov, Y. I.; Kireeva, I. V.

    2010-01-01

    A Ti(50.5)Ni(24.5)Pd25 high-temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) is microalloyed with 0.5 at. pct scandium (Sc) to enhance its shape-memory characteristics, in particular, dimensional stability under repeated thermomechanical cycles. For both Ti(50.5)Ni(24.5)Pd25 and the Sc-alloyed material, differential scanning calorimetry is conducted for multiple cycles to characterize cyclic stability of the transformation temperatures. The microstructure is evaluated using electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. Isobaric thermal cycling experiments are used to determine transformation temperatures, dimensional stability, and work output as a function of stress. The Sc-doped alloy displays more stable shape memory response with smaller irrecoverable strain and narrower thermal hysteresis than the baseline ternary alloy. This improvement in performance is attributed to the solid solution hardening effect of Sc.

  11. 10,000-Hour Cyclic Oxidation Behavior at 982 C (1800 F) of 68 High-Temperature Co-, Fe-, and Ni-Base Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.

    1997-01-01

    Sixty-eight high temperature Co-, Fe-, and Ni-base alloys were tested for 10-one thousand hour cycles in static air at 982 C (1800 F). The oxidation behavior of the test samples was evaluated by specific weight change/time data, x-ray diffraction of the post-test samples, and their final appearance. The gravimetric and appearance data were combined into a single modified oxidation parameter, KB4 to rank the cyclic oxidation resistance from excellent to catastrophic. The alloys showing the 'best' resistance with no significant oxidation attack were the alumina/aluminate spinel forming Ni-base turbine alloys: U-700, NASA-VIA and B-1900; the Fe-base ferritic alloys with Al: TRW-Valve, HOS-875, NASA-18T, Thermenol and 18SR; and the Ni-base superalloy IN-702.

  12. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology program (LA2ST). Progress report, 1 January 1995-30 June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, E.A. Jr.; Gangloff, R.P.; Herakovich, C.T.; Scully, J.R.; Shiflet, G.J.; Stoner, G.E.; Wert, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the= performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites, and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. The general aim is to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environment/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated students for aerospace technologies. Specific technical objectives are presented for each of the following research projects: time-temperature dependent fracture in advanced wrought ingot metallurgy, and spray deposited aluminum alloys; cryogenic temperature effects on the deformation and fracture of Al-Li-Cu-In alloys; effects of aging and temperature on the ductile fracture of AA2095 and AA2195; mechanisms of localized corrosion in alloys 2090 and 2095; hydrogen interactions in aluminum-lithium alloys 2090 and selected model alloys; mechanisms of deformation and fracture in high strength titanium alloys (effects of temperature and hydrogen and effects of temperature and microstructure); evaluations of wide-panel aluminum alloy extrusions; Al-Si-Ge alloy development; effects of texture and precipitates on mechanical property anisotropy of Al-Cu-Mg-X alloys; damage evolution in polymeric composites; and environmental effects in fatigue life prediction - modeling crack propagation in light aerospace alloys.

  13. Design stress evaluation based on strain-rate sensitivity analysis for nickel alloys used in the very-high temperature nuclear system

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, K.; Tung, H. M.; Chen, X.; Zhao, Y.; Stubbins, J. F.

    2012-07-01

    Both Alloy 617 and Alloy 230 have been considered the most promising structural materials for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). In this study, mechanical properties of both alloys were examined by performing tensile tests at three different strain rates and at temperatures up to 1000 deg.C. This range covers time-dependent (plasticity) to time-independent (creep) deformations. Strain-rate sensitivity analysis for each alloy was conducted in order to approximate the long-term flow stresses. The strain-rate sensitivities for the 0.2% flow stress were found to be temperature independent (m {approx_equal} 0) at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 700 deg.C due to dynamic strain aging. At elevated temperatures (800-1000 deg.C), the strain-rate sensitivity significantly increased (m > 0.1). Compared to Alloy 617, Alloy 230 displayed higher strain-rate sensitivities at high temperatures. This leads to a lower estimated long-term flow stresses. Results of this analysis were used to evaluate current American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) allowable design limits. According to the comparison with the estimated flow stresses, the allowable design stresses in ASME B and PV Code for either alloy did not provide adequate degradation estimation for the possible long-term service life in VHTR. However, rupture stresses for Alloy 617, developed in ASME code case N-47-28, can generally satisfy the safety margin estimated in the study following the strain-rate sensitivity analysis. Nevertheless, additional material development studies might be required, since the design parameters for rupture stresses are constrained such that current VHTR conceptual designs cannot satisfy the limits. (authors)

  14. Effect of Corrosion Film Composition and Structure on the Corrosion Kinetics of Ni-Cr-Fe Alloys in High Temperature Water

    SciTech Connect

    P.M. Rosecrans; N. Lewis; D.J. Duquette

    2002-02-27

    Nickel alloys such as Alloy 600 undergo Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in pure water at temperatures between about 260 C and the critical point. Increasing the level of Cr in Ni-Fe-Cr alloys increases SCC resistance in aerated and deaerated water. The mechanism is not understood. The effect of Cr composition on oxide microstructure and corrosion kinetics of Ni-Fe-Cr alloys was determined experimentally, to evaluate whether the anodic dissolution model for SCC can account for the effect of Cr on SCC. The alloy corrosion rate and corrosion product oxide microstructure is strongly influenced by the Cr composition. Corrosion kinetics are parabolic and influenced by chromium concentration, with the parabolic constant first increasing then decreasing as Cr increases from 5 to 39%. Surface analyses using Analytical Electron microscopy (AEM) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) show that the corrosion product film that forms initially on all alloys exposed to high purity high temperature water is a nickel rich oxide. With time, the amount of chromium in the oxide film increases and corrosion proceeds toward the formation of the more thermodynamically stable spinel or hexagonal Cr-rich oxides, similar to high temperature gaseous oxidation. Due to the slower diffusion kinetics at the temperatures of water corrosion compared to those in high temperature gaseous oxidation, however, the films remain as a mixture of NiO, mixed Ni, Fe and Cr spinels, NiCrO{sub 3} and FeCrO{sub 3}. As the amount of Cr in the film increases and the nature of the film changes from NiO to spinel or hexagonal oxides, cation diffusion through the films slows, slowing the corrosion rate. These observations are qualitatively consistent with an anodic dissolution SCC mechanism. However, parametric modeling of the SCC growth process, applying available creep, oxide rupture strain and corrosion kinetics data, indicates that the anodic dissolution mechanism accounts for only a fraction of the effect of Cr

  15. Directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography of grain boundary oxidation in a Ni-Al binary alloy exposed to high-temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-06-14

    Intergranular oxidation of a Ni-4Al alloy exposed to hydrogenated, high-temperature water was characterized using directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. These combined analyses revealed that discrete, well-separated oxides (NiAl2O4) precipitated along grain boundaries in the metal. Aluminum was depleted from the grain boundary between oxides and also from one side of the boundary as a result of grain boundary migration. The discrete oxide morphology, disconnected from the continuous surface oxidation, suggests intergranular solid-state internal oxidation of Al. Keywords: oxidation; grain boundaries; nickel alloys; atom probe tomography; transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  16. Cyclic degradation of titanium-tantalum high-temperature shape memory alloys — the role of dislocation activity and chemical decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niendorf, T.; Krooß, P.; Somsen, C.; Rynko, R.; Paulsen, A.; Batyrshina, E.; Frenzel, J.; Eggeler, G.; Maier, H. J.

    2015-05-01

    Titanium-tantalum shape memory alloys (SMAs) are promising candidates for actuator applications at elevated temperatures. They may even succeed in substituting ternary nickel-titanium high temperature SMAs, which are either extremely expensive or difficult to form. However, titanium-tantalum alloys show rapid functional and structural degradation under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading. The current work reveals that degradation is not only governed by the evolution of the ω-phase. Dislocation processes and chemical decomposition of the matrix at grain boundaries also play a major role.

  17. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  18. Standardization of shape memory alloy test methods toward certification of aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, D. J.; Mabe, J. H.; Benafan, O.; Coda, A.; Conduit, B.; Padan, R.; Van Doren, B.

    2015-08-01

    The response of shape memory alloy (SMA) components employed as actuators has enabled a number of adaptable aero-structural solutions. However, there are currently no industry or government-accepted standardized test methods for SMA materials when used as actuators and their transition to commercialization and production has been hindered. This brief fast track communication introduces to the community a recently initiated collaborative and pre-competitive SMA specification and standardization effort that is expected to deliver the first ever regulatory agency-accepted material specification and test standards for SMA as employed as actuators for commercial and military aviation applications. In the first phase of this effort, described herein, the team is working to review past efforts and deliver a set of agreed-upon properties to be included in future material certification specifications as well as the associated experiments needed to obtain them in a consistent manner. Essential for the success of this project is the participation and input from a number of organizations and individuals, including engineers and designers working in materials and processing development, application design, SMA component fabrication, and testing at the material, component, and system level. Going forward, strong consensus among this diverse body of participants and the SMA research community at large is needed to advance standardization concepts for universal adoption by the greater aerospace community and especially regulatory bodies. It is expected that the development and release of public standards will be done in collaboration with an established standards development organization.

  19. Conceptual design of a 20-kA current lead using forced-flow cooling and Ag-alloy-sheathed Bi-2223 high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Reinhard; Hull, John R.

    High-temperature superconductors (HTS's), consisting of Bi-2223 HTS tapes sheathed with Ag alloys are proposed for a 20-kA current lead for the planned stellarator WENDELSTEIN 7-X. Forced-flow He cooling is used, and 4-K He cooling of the whole lead as well as 60-K He cooling of the copper part of the lead, is discussed. Power consumption and behavior in case of loss of He flow are given.

  20. Effect of Mo on the High-Temperature Creep Resistance and Machinability of a Recycled Al-Alloy with High Iron Impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ain, W. Q.; Faisal, M. K.; Talari, M. K.; Darham, W.; Ratnam, M. M.; Kwon, Y.; Kim, N. J.; Prasada Rao, A. K.

    2016-08-01

    Reported work focuses on the effect of morphology of the Fe-rich intermetallic phases on the machinability of Al-alloy containing >2wt.% Fe, obtained from automotive scrap. Effect of Mo addition on the microstructure, high-temperature impression creep and thereby the machinability of the Al-recycled alloy were studied. The machinability of the recycled alloy was estimated by investigating the built-up-edge (BUE) and surface roughness (R a). SEM-EDS and TEM-SADP studies have shown that the crystal structure (BCC) of the Al8Fe2Si phase remained unchanged; however, Mo replaced few Fe atoms with little effect on the lattice dimension. It has been found that the addition of Mo to the recycled alloy suppresses the formation of β-phase (Al5FeSi) by suppressing the peritectic transformation of α (Al8Fe2Si) phase. Such suppression is found to improve the high-temperature creep resistance and the machinability with the increase in the Mo addition level.

  1. Effect of Mo on the High-Temperature Creep Resistance and Machinability of a Recycled Al-Alloy with High Iron Impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ain, W. Q.; Faisal, M. K.; Talari, M. K.; Darham, W.; Ratnam, M. M.; Kwon, Y.; Kim, N. J.; Prasada Rao, A. K.

    2016-10-01

    Reported work focuses on the effect of morphology of the Fe-rich intermetallic phases on the machinability of Al-alloy containing >2wt.% Fe, obtained from automotive scrap. Effect of Mo addition on the microstructure, high-temperature impression creep and thereby the machinability of the Al-recycled alloy were studied. The machinability of the recycled alloy was estimated by investigating the built-up-edge (BUE) and surface roughness ( R a). SEM-EDS and TEM-SADP studies have shown that the crystal structure (BCC) of the Al8Fe2Si phase remained unchanged; however, Mo replaced few Fe atoms with little effect on the lattice dimension. It has been found that the addition of Mo to the recycled alloy suppresses the formation of β-phase (Al5FeSi) by suppressing the peritectic transformation of α (Al8Fe2Si) phase. Such suppression is found to improve the high-temperature creep resistance and the machinability with the increase in the Mo addition level.

  2. Precipitation Behavior of Thermo-Mechanically Treated Ti50Ni20Au20Cu10 High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayani, Saif Haider; Imran Khan, M.; Khalid, Fazal Ahmad; Kim, Hee Young; Miyazaki, Shuichi

    2016-03-01

    In the present work, precipitation behavior of TiNiAuCu-based high-temperature shape-memory alloys is studied. Two alloys with compositions Ti50Ni30Au20 and Ti50Ni20Au20Cu10 were prepared. After 30 % cold rolling, both alloys were then annealed at different temperatures. Formation of Cu-rich TiAuCu and Ti-rich Ti3Au precipitates was observed in Ti50Ni20Au20Cu10 alloy when annealed at different temperatures after cold deformation. It was noticed that prior cold deformation has significant effect on the precipitation behavior. A similar kind of precipitation behavior has been previously reported in TiNiPdCu alloys. Both TiAuCu and Ti3Au type precipitates were found to be deficient in Ni content which causes an increase in Ni content of the matrix and a small decrease in transformation temperatures of the Ti50Ni20Au20Cu10 alloy.

  3. Microstructural Response During Isothermal and Isobaric Loading of a Precipitation-Strengthened Ni-29.7Ti-20Hf High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benafan, O.; Noebe, R. D.; Padula, S. A.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2012-12-01

    A stable Ni-rich Ni-29.7Ti-20Hf (at. pct) shape memory alloy, with relatively high transformation temperatures, was shown to exhibit promising properties at lower raw material cost when compared to typical NiTi-X (X = Pt, Pd, Au) high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs). The excellent dimensional stability and high work output for this alloy were attributed to a coherent, nanometer size precipitate phase observed using transmission electron microscopy. To establish an understanding of the role of these precipitates on the microstructure and ensuing stability of the NiTiHf alloy, a detailed study of the micromechanical and microstructural behaviors was performed. In-situ neutron diffraction at stress and temperature was used to obtain quantitative information on phase-specific internal strain, texture, and phase volume fractions during both isothermal and isobaric testing of the alloy. During isothermal testing, the alloy exhibited low isothermal strains due to limited detwinning, consistent with direct measurements of the bulk texture through neutron diffraction. This limited detwinning was attributed to the pinning of twin and variant boundaries by the dispersion of fine precipitates. During isobaric thermal cycling at 400 MPa, the high work output and near-perfect dimensional stability was attributed to the presence of the precipitates that act as homogeneous sources for the nucleation of martensite throughout the material, while providing resistance to irrecoverable processes such as plastic deformation.

  4. Three-dimensional rigid multiphase networks providing high-temperature strength to cast AlSi10Cu5Ni1-2 piston alloys

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Z.; Requena, G.; Boller, E.

    2011-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) architecture of rigid multiphase networks present in AlSi10Cu5Ni1 and AlSi10Cu5Ni2 piston alloys in as-cast condition and after 4 h spheroidization treatment is characterized by synchrotron tomography in terms of the volume fraction of rigid phases, interconnectivity, contiguity and morphology. The architecture of both alloys consists of α-Al matrix and a rigid long-range 3-D network of Al7Cu4Ni, Al4Cu2Mg8Si7, Al2Cu, Al15Si2(FeMn)3 and AlSiFeNiCu aluminides and Si. The investigated architectural parameters of both alloys studied are correlated with room-temperature and high-temperature (300 °C) strengths as a function of solution treatment time. The AlSi10Cu5Ni1 and AlSi10Cu5Ni2 alloys behave like metal matrix composites with 16 and 20 vol.% reinforcement, respectively. Both alloys have similar strengths in the as-cast condition, but the AlSi10Cu5Ni2 is able to retain ∼15% higher high temperature strength than the AlSi10Cu5Ni1 alloy after more than 4 h of spheroidization treatment. This is due to the preservation of the 3-D interconnectivity and the morphology of the rigid network, which is governed by the higher degree of contiguity between aluminides and Si. PMID:21977004

  5. Three-dimensional rigid multiphase networks providing high-temperature strength to cast AlSi10Cu5Ni1-2 piston alloys.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Z; Requena, G; Boller, E

    2011-09-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) architecture of rigid multiphase networks present in AlSi10Cu5Ni1 and AlSi10Cu5Ni2 piston alloys in as-cast condition and after 4 h spheroidization treatment is characterized by synchrotron tomography in terms of the volume fraction of rigid phases, interconnectivity, contiguity and morphology. The architecture of both alloys consists of α-Al matrix and a rigid long-range 3-D network of Al(7)Cu(4)Ni, Al(4)Cu(2)Mg(8)Si(7), Al(2)Cu, Al(15)Si(2)(FeMn)(3) and AlSiFeNiCu aluminides and Si. The investigated architectural parameters of both alloys studied are correlated with room-temperature and high-temperature (300 °C) strengths as a function of solution treatment time. The AlSi10Cu5Ni1 and AlSi10Cu5Ni2 alloys behave like metal matrix composites with 16 and 20 vol.% reinforcement, respectively. Both alloys have similar strengths in the as-cast condition, but the AlSi10Cu5Ni2 is able to retain ∼15% higher high temperature strength than the AlSi10Cu5Ni1 alloy after more than 4 h of spheroidization treatment. This is due to the preservation of the 3-D interconnectivity and the morphology of the rigid network, which is governed by the higher degree of contiguity between aluminides and Si.

  6. Study of the transformation sequence on a high temperature martensitic transformation Ni-Mn-Ga-Co shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recarte, V.; Pérez-Landazábal, J. I.; Sánchez-Alarcos, V.; Rodríguez-Velamazán, J. A.

    2014-11-01

    Ni-Mn-Ga alloys show the highest magnetic-field-induced strain among ferromagnetic shape memory alloys. A great effort is being done in this alloy system to increase the application temperature range. In this sense, the addition of small amounts of Cobalt to NiMnGa alloys has been proved to increase the MT temperatures through the increase of the electron per atom relation (e/a). In this work, the analysis of the crystal structure of the present phases and the phase transformations has been performed on a Ni-Mn-Ga-Co alloy by neutron diffraction measurements from 10 K to 673 K. The study has been completed by means of calorimetric and magnetic measurements. On cooling the alloy undergoes a martensitic transformation from a face centered cubic structure to a nonmodulated tetragonal martensite. The appearance of intermartensite transformations can be disregarded in the whole temperature range below the martensitic transformation. However, a jump in the unit-cell volume of the tetragonal martensite has been observed at 325 K. Since this temperature is close to the Curie temperature of the alloy both, the structural and magnetic contributions are taken into account to explain the results.

  7. Microstructure of a complex Nb-Si-based alloy and its behavior during high-temperature oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leont'ev, L. I.; Udoeva, L. Yu.; Chumarev, V. M.; Gulyaeva, R. I.; Pankratov, A. A.; Sel'menskikh, N. I.; Zhidovinova, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    A in-situ composite Nb-Si-Ti-Hf-Cr-Mo-Al composite material alloyed with yttrium and zirconium is studied. The evolution of the structure-phase state of the alloy during oxidation under dynamic and isothermal conditions is considered on samples prepared by vacuum remelting and directional solidification. The phase composition and the microstructure of the alloy are examined by the methods of physico-chemical analysis, and the distribution of alloying elements in initial samples and the products of oxidation is estimated. Thermogravimetric experiments are performed on powders and compacted samples during continuous (in the range 25-1400°C) and isothermal (at 900 and 1100°C) heating in air. The directional solidification of an Nb-Si-Ti-Al-Hf-Cr-Mo-Zr-Y is found to cause the formation of an ultradispersed eutectic consisting of α-Nb ss and γ-Nb5Si3 ss cells. The as-cast sample prepared by vacuum remelting has a dendritic structure and contains Nb3Si apart from these phases. Oxidation leads to the formation of a double oxide layer and an inner oxidation zone, which retain the two-phase microstructure and the ratio of alloying elements that are characteristic of the initial alloy. Diffusion redistribution is only detected for molybdenum. The cyclicity of heating at the initial stage of oxidation weakly influences the oxidation resistance of the alloy.

  8. High temperature strain glass in Ti50(Pd50-xCrx) alloy and the associated shape memory effect and superelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yumei; Xue, Dezhen; Ding, Xiangdong; Otsuka, Kazuhiro; Sun, Jun; Ren, Xiaobing

    2009-10-01

    Strain glass has recently been reported in Ti50-xNi50+x (x≥1.5 at %) alloys and caused by the existence of point defects. This strain glass alloy, being nonmartensitic, exhibits shape memory effect (SME) and superelasticity (SE) around the freezing temperature T0. However, the T0 of Ti50-xNi50+x (x≥1.5 at %) strain glass alloy is very low (˜160 K), thus restricting its potential applications. In the present letter, we report a strain glass system, Ti50(Pd50-xCrx) (x≥9 at %), which has a significantly higher freezing temperature. It is based on a high-temperature martensitic system TiPd (with Ms˜810 K) and dopant Cr (as point defect). For Ti50(Pd40Cr10) strain glass, the freezing transition occurs at T0˜250 K, being close to the room temperature. Correspondingly, it exhibits SME and SE around its high T0. We further clarified that T0 of strain glass alloy is controlled by the martensitic transformation temperature Ms (i.e., martensite stability) of its corresponding host alloy without point defect. Our work provides insight into how to develop strain glass with desired T0 and the associated SME and SE for applications.

  9. Microstructure and high-temperature wear properties of in situ TiC composite coatings by plasma transferred arc surface alloying on gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hang; Li, Jian-jun; Zheng, Zhi-zhen; Wang, Ai-hua; Huang, Qi-wen; Zeng, Da-wen

    2015-12-01

    In this work, an in situ synthesized TiC-reinforced metal matrix composite (MMC) coating of approximately 350-400 µm thickness was fabricated on a gray cast iron (GCI) substrate by plasma transferred arc (PTA) surface alloying of Ti-Fe alloy powder. Microhardness tests showed that the surface hardness increased approximately four-fold after the alloying treatment. The microstructure of the MMC coating was mainly composed of residual austenite, acicular martensite, and eutectic ledeburite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analyzes revealed that the in situ TiC particles, which were formed by direct reaction of Ti with carbon originally contained in the GCI, was uniformly distributed at the boundary of residual austenite in the alloying zone. Pin-on-disc high-temperature wear tests were performed on samples both with and without the MMC coating at room temperature and at elevated temperatures (473 K and 623 K), and the wear behavior and mechanism were investigated. The results showed that, after the PTA alloying treatment, the wear resistance of the samples improved significantly. On the basis of our analysis of the composite coatings by optical microscopy, SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and microhardness measurements, we attributed this improvement of wear resistance to the transformation of the microstructure and to the presence of TiC particles.

  10. Investigation of Ni-B Alloys for Joining of TiB2 Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, L.; Kaban, I.; Nowak, R.; Bruzda, G.; Sobczak, N.; Stoica, M.; Eckert, J.

    2016-02-01

    Melting and wetting behavior of Ni83B17 and Ni50B50 alloys on TiB2 ceramic are investigated upon heating to 1105 and 1050 °C, respectively, using the sessile drop technique. Both alloys show a very good wetting on the TiB2 substrates immediately after incipient melting. Liquid Ni50B50 alloy is revealed not to dissolve TiB2, but penetrates along the grain boundaries into the ceramic. Upon heating and melting of the Ni83B17 alloy on TiB2, a small amount of ceramic is dissolved and the ternary Ni21Ti2B6 phase is formed. Whereas multiple microcracks are observed at the Ni83B17/TiB2 interface, the Ni50B50/TiB2 couple is well bonded and free of interfacial microcracks.

  11. Investigation of Ni-B Alloys for Joining of TiB2 Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, L.; Kaban, I.; Nowak, R.; Bruzda, G.; Sobczak, N.; Stoica, M.; Eckert, J.

    2016-08-01

    Melting and wetting behavior of Ni83B17 and Ni50B50 alloys on TiB2 ceramic are investigated upon heating to 1105 and 1050 °C, respectively, using the sessile drop technique. Both alloys show a very good wetting on the TiB2 substrates immediately after incipient melting. Liquid Ni50B50 alloy is revealed not to dissolve TiB2, but penetrates along the grain boundaries into the ceramic. Upon heating and melting of the Ni83B17 alloy on TiB2, a small amount of ceramic is dissolved and the ternary Ni21Ti2B6 phase is formed. Whereas multiple microcracks are observed at the Ni83B17/TiB2 interface, the Ni50B50/TiB2 couple is well bonded and free of interfacial microcracks.

  12. Application of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film as a low emissivity film on Ni-based alloy at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kewei; Zhou, Wancheng; Tang, Xiufeng; Luo, Fa

    2016-09-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) films as the low emissivity coatings of Ni-based alloy at high temperature were studies. ITO films were deposited on the polished surface of alloy K424 by direct current magnetron sputtering. These ITO-coated samples were heat-treated in air at 600-900 °C for 150 h to explore the effect of high temperature environment on the emissivity. The samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM and EDS. The results show that the surface of sample is integrity after heat processing at 700 °C and below it. A small amount of fine crack is observed on the surface of sample heated at 800 °C and Ti oxide appears. There are lots of fine cracks on the sample annealed at 900 °C and a large number of various oxides are detected. The average infrared emissivities at 3-5 μm and 8-14 μm wavebands were tested by an infrared emissivity measurement instrument. The results show the emissivity of the sample after annealed at 600 and 700 °C is still kept at a low value as the sample before annealed. The ITO film can be used as a low emissivity coating of super alloy K424 up to 700 °C.

  13. The Influence of Ni and V Trace Elements on High-Temperature Tensile Properties and Aging of A356 Aluminum Foundry Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Giovanni, Maria Teresa; Cerri, Emanuela; Casari, Daniele; Merlin, Mattia; Arnberg, Lars; Garagnani, Gian Luca

    2016-05-01

    High-temperature tensile properties of unmodified A356 alloy with and without the addition of Ni or V in traces (600 and 1000 ppm of Ni and V, respectively) were investigated by analyzing samples obtained from sand and permanent mold castings in the as-cast and T6 heat-treated conditions. Tensile tests were performed at 508 K (235 °C) at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. In addition, samples were subjected to artificial aging at 508 K (235 °C) for different times, and corresponding hardness curves were plotted. Microstructures and fracture surfaces, analyzed by FEG-SEM equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, showed that neither Ni nor V addition had a detrimental effect on high-temperature tensile properties. Aging curves showed a strong loss of hardness affecting the T6 class between 30-min and 1-h exposure time. After 6-h aging, no evidence of aging treatment persisted on hardness of the tested material. Hardness values did not reveal any significant difference between the reference alloy and the Ni- and V-containing alloys in both casting conditions, in complete analogy with the tensile properties. Unmodified eutectic silicon particles provided inhomogeneity in the α-Al matrix and acted as the principal source of stress concentration leading to fracture.

  14. Compressive Response of Polycrystalline NiCoMnGa High-Temperature Meta-magnetic Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaca, H. E.; Turabi, A. S.; Basaran, B.; Pathak, A. K.; Dubenko, I.; Ali, N.; Chumlyakov, Y. I.; Li, P.

    2013-10-01

    The effects of the addition of quaternary element, Co, to polycrystalline NiMnGa alloys on their magnetic and shape memory properties have been investigated. NiCoMnGa polycrystalline alloys have been found to demonstrate good shape memory and superelasticity behavior under compression at temperatures greater than 100 °C with about 3% transformation strain and low-temperature hysteresis. It is also possible to train the material to demonstrate a large two-way shape memory effect.

  15. NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structure technology program supplement: Aluminum-based materials for high speed aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This report on the NASA-UVa Light Aerospace Alloy and Structure Technology Program Supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft covers the period from January 1, 1992 to June 30, 1992. The objective of the research is to develop aluminum alloys and aluminum matrix composites for the airframe which can efficiently perform in the HSCT environment for periods as long as 60,000 hours (certification for 120,000 hours) and, at the same time, meet the cost and weight requirements for an economically viable aircraft. Current industry baselines focus on flight at Mach 2.4. The research covers four major materials systems: (1) ingot metallurgy 2XXX, 6XXX, and 8XXX alloys, (2) powder metallurgy 2XXX alloys, (3) rapidly solidified, dispersion strengthened Al-Fe-X alloys, and (4) discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites. There are ten major tasks in the program which also include evaluation and trade-off studies by Boeing and Douglas aircraft companies.

  16. High-Temperature Interaction Between Molten AlSr10 Alloy and Glass-Like Carbon Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewiorek, A.; Sobczak, N.; Sobczak, J.; Kudyba, A.; Kozera, R.; Boczkowska, A.

    2016-08-01

    Wettability of glass-like carbon substrate (Cglc) by molten Al-10 wt.% Sr alloy (AlSr10) has been examined by a sessile drop method at 700-800 °C for 120 min under vacuum. Non-contact heating to the test temperature combined with the removal of oxide film from the alloy drop was done using capillary purification procedure by squeezing the liquid alloy from a capillary. The influence of the type of capillary on wetting behavior of AlSr10/Cglc couples was noticed. Molten AlSr10 alloy does not wet Cglc at about 700 °C forming the contact angles of 111° with graphite capillary and 141° with alumina capillary. At 800 °C with alumina capillary, non-wetting-to-wetting transition takes place resulting in a final contact angle of 70°. After testing at 800 °C, the AlSr10/Cglc interface was revealed at the test temperature directly in the vacuum chamber by the drop suction procedure. Structural characterization of the interfaces by scanning and transmission electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and by scanning probe microscopy combined with Auger electron spectrometry did not show any new phases formed with Sr. It suggests that the dominant role in wettability improvement by alloying Al with 10 wt.% Sr was related with significant lowering of the surface tension of liquid metal and adsorption of Sr at the interface.

  17. Investigation of the oxidation behavior of dispersion stabilized alloys when exposed to a dynamic high temperature environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of TD-NiCr and TD-NiCrAlY alloys have been studied at 2000 and 2200 F in static and high speed flowing air environments. The TD-NiCrAlY alloys preoxidized to produce an Al2O3 scale on the surface showed good oxidation resistance in both types of environments. The TD-NiCr alloy which had a Cr2O3 oxide scale after preoxidation was found to oxidize more than an order of magnitude faster under the dynamic test conditions than at comparable static test conditions. Although Cr2O3 normally provides good oxidation protection, it was rapidly lost due to formation of volatile CrO3 when exposed to the high speed air stream. The preferred oxide arrangement for the dynamic test consisted of an external layer of NiO with a porous mushroom type morphology, an intermediate duplex layer of NiO and Cr2O3, and a continuous inner layer of Cr2O3 in contact with the alloy substrate. An oxidation model has been developed to explain the observed microstructure and overall oxidation behavior of all alloys.

  18. Deformation Behavior of Laser Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant Fe-Cr-Al Alloys for Fuel Cladding Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Gussev, Maxim N; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al in weight percent with a minor addition of yttrium using laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions for all alloys studied. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. No significant correlation was found between the deformation behavior/mechanical performance of welds and the level of Cr or Al in the alloy ranges studied.

  19. High-temperature piezoelectric sensing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Johnson, Joseph; Salazar, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented. PMID:24361928

  20. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Johnson, Joseph; Salazar, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented. PMID:24361928

  1. Resilient and Corrosion-Proof Rolling Element Bearings Made from Superelastic Ni-Ti Alloys for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical components (bearings, gears, mechanisms) typically utilize hardened construction materials to minimize wear and attain long life. In such components, loaded contact points (e.g., meshing gear teeth, bearing balls-raceway contacts) experience high contact stresses. The combination of high hardness and high elastic modulus often leads to damaging contact stress and denting, particularly during transient overload events such as shock impacts that occur during the launching of space vehicles or the landing of aircraft. In this webinar, Dr. DellaCorte will introduce the results of a research project that employs a superelastic alloy, Ni-Ti for rolling element bearing applications. Bearings and components made from such alloys can alleviate many problems encountered in advanced aerospace applications and may solve many terrestrial applications as well

  2. Effects of proof loads and combined mode loadings on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to determine the effects of (1) combined tensile and bending loadings, (2) combined tensile and shear loadings, and (3) proof overloads on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys. Tests were performed on four alloys: 2219-T87 aluminum, 5Al-2.5Sn (ELl) titanium, 6Al-4V beta STA titanium and high strength 4340 steel. Tests were conducted in room air, gaseous nitrogen at -200F (144K), liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen. Flat center cracked and surface flawed specimens, cracked tube specimens, circumferentially notched round bar and surface flawed cylindrical specimens were tested. The three-dimensional photoelastic technique of stress freezing and slicing was used to determine stress intensity factors for surface flawed cylindrical specimens subjected to tension or torsion. Results showed that proof load/temperature histories used in the tests have a small beneficial effect or no effect on subsequent fracture strength and flaw growth rates.

  3. Effec of high-temperature decomposition of the solid solution on the low-cycle fatigue resistance of semifinished products made of aluminum alloy 1163

    SciTech Connect

    Teleshov, V.V.; Kuzginov, V.I.; Golovleva, A.P.

    1995-11-01

    The surface of anodized parts made of 1163T aluminum alloy that are produced by mechanical treatment of large pressed or rolled semifinished products exhibits dark regions. These regions have a higher electrical conductivity {gamma} than the rest of the anodized surface, colored light-yellow. Some authors explain the appearance of the dark stains by high-temperature decomposition of the solid solution, which is initiated by secondary heating of these surface regions due to the heat of surrounding volumes in random interruptions of the cooling process. The aim of the present work is to refine the dependence of {gamma}on the endurance in tests for low-cycle fatigue of specimens from semifinished products made of 1163 alloy in order to establish the intensity of the decrease of the endurance and the admissible increase of {gamma} in the region of dark stains.

  4. A facility for conducting high-temperature oxidation experiments of alloys in helium environments containing part per million levels of impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Torbet, Christopher J.; Was, Gary S.

    2009-09-01

    An experimental facility was constructed to study the corrosion of alloys in helium containing part per million (ppm) levels of CO, CO2, CH4 and H2 as impurities, relevant to the environment in the heat exchanger of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor. The system provides the capability of exposing multiple specimens in up to seven separate helium environments, simultaneously, for durations of >1000 h and temperatures up to 1200 °C. Impurity concentrations are controlled down to 1 ppm accuracy and analyzed using a discharge ionization detector gas chromatograph. The utility and reliability of the facility in quantitatively accounting for the masses of reactants and products involved in the oxidation of alloy 617 at 900 °C and 1000 °C in the helium gas containing 15 ppm CO and 1.5 ppm CO2 is confirmed by the weight-gain measurements, gas-phase analysis and post-test microstructural analysis.

  5. The effect of high-temperature heat treatment on the electrical power factor and morphology of silicon germanium-gallium phosphide alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Gao; Rowe, D. M.

    1991-10-01

    The results of an experimental investigation into the effect of high-temperature heat treatment on the electrical resistivity and Seeback coefficient of silicon germanium-gallium phosphide alloys and the accompanying changes in morphology are reported. Substantial changes in the electrical properties and in morphology were observed after 15 min and 4-h periods of heat treatment, respectively. A less significant decrease in electrical resistivity accompanied further heat treatment. However, the Seeback coefficient remained almost constant which resulted in an increase in the electrical power factor. Prior to heat treatment, the alloy consisted of host matrix and a silicon-rich black phase. Heat treatment was accompanied by the appearance of a white phase which was rich in germanium and gallium phosphide.

  6. Trichite growth during oxidation of titanium and TA6V4 alloy by water vapor at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coddet, C.; Motte, F.; Sarrazin, P.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis by electron scanning microscope detected the formation of rutile trichites on the surface of specimens of titanium and titanium alloy TA6V4 oxidized in water vapor in the temperature range 650 to 950 C and the water vapor pressure range from 0.5 to 18 torr. In all specimens, two sublayers of rutile were formed: an external layer of basalt-like appearance, and a microcrystalline inner layer. Morphology of the trichites depends on temperature and the material (whether metal or alloy), but not on vapor pressure.

  7. In situ Growth of NixCu1-x Alloy Nanocatalysts on Redox-reversible Rutile (Nb,Ti)O4 Towards High-Temperature Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Haoshan; Xie, Kui; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yan; Qin, Yongqiang; Cui, Jiewu; Yan, Jian; Wu, Yucheng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report the in situ growth of NixCu1-x (x = 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0) alloy catalysts to anchor and decorate a redox-reversible Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 ceramic substrate with the aim of tailoring the electrocatalytic activity of the composite materials through direct exsolution of metal particles from the crystal lattice of a ceramic oxide in a reducing atmosphere at high temperatures. Combined analysis using XRD, SEM, EDS, TGA, TEM and XPS confirmed the completely reversible exsolution/dissolution of the NixCu1-x alloy particles during the redox cycling treatments. TEM results revealed that the alloy particles were exsolved to anchor onto the surface of highly electronically conducting Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 in the form of heterojunctions. The electrical properties of the nanosized NixCu1-x/Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 were systematically investigated and correlated to the electrochemical performance of the composite electrodes. A strong dependence of the improved electrode activity on the alloy compositions was observed in reducing atmospheres at high temperatures. Direct electrolysis of CO2 at the NixCu1-x/Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 composite cathodes was investigated in solid-oxide electrolysers. The CO2 splitting rates were observed to be positively correlated with the Ni composition; however, the Ni0.75Cu0.25 combined the advantages of metallic nickel and copper and therefore maximised the current efficiencies. PMID:24889679

  8. In situ Growth of NixCu1-x Alloy Nanocatalysts on Redox-reversible Rutile (Nb,Ti)O4 Towards High-Temperature Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Haoshan; Xie, Kui; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yan; Qin, Yongqiang; Cui, Jiewu; Yan, Jian; Wu, Yucheng

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we report the in situ growth of NixCu1-x (x = 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0) alloy catalysts to anchor and decorate a redox-reversible Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 ceramic substrate with the aim of tailoring the electrocatalytic activity of the composite materials through direct exsolution of metal particles from the crystal lattice of a ceramic oxide in a reducing atmosphere at high temperatures. Combined analysis using XRD, SEM, EDS, TGA, TEM and XPS confirmed the completely reversible exsolution/dissolution of the NixCu1-x alloy particles during the redox cycling treatments. TEM results revealed that the alloy particles were exsolved to anchor onto the surface of highly electronically conducting Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 in the form of heterojunctions. The electrical properties of the nanosized NixCu1-x/Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 were systematically investigated and correlated to the electrochemical performance of the composite electrodes. A strong dependence of the improved electrode activity on the alloy compositions was observed in reducing atmospheres at high temperatures. Direct electrolysis of CO2 at the NixCu1-x/Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 composite cathodes was investigated in solid-oxide electrolysers. The CO2 splitting rates were observed to be positively correlated with the Ni composition; however, the Ni0.75Cu0.25 combined the advantages of metallic nickel and copper and therefore maximised the current efficiencies.

  9. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni3Al Alloys and Coatings Modified with Pt and Reactive Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Nan

    2007-12-01

    Materials for high-pressure turbine blades must be able to operate in the high-temperature gases (above 1000 C) emerging from the combustion chamber. Accordingly, the development of nickel-based superalloys has been constantly motivated by the need to have improved engine efficiency, reliability and service lifetime under the harsh conditions imposed by the turbine environment. However, the melting point of nickel (1455 C) provides a natural ceiling for the temperature capability of nickel-based superalloys. Thus, surface-engineered turbine components with modified diffusion coatings and overlay coatings are used. Theses coatings are capable of forming a compact and adherent oxide scale, which greatly impedes the further transport of reactants between the high-temperature gases and the underlying metal and thus reducing attack by the atmosphere. Typically, these coatings contain β-NiAl as a principal constituent phase in order to have sufficient aluminum content to form an Al2O3 scale at elevated temperatures. The drawbacks to the currently-used {beta}-based coatings, such as phase instabilities, associated stresses induced by such phase instabilities, and extensive coating/substrate interdiffusion, are major motivations in this study to seek next-generation coatings. The high-temperature oxidation resistance of novel Pt + Hf-modified γ-Ni + γ-Ni3Al-based alloys and coatings were investigated in this study. Both early-stage and 4-days isothermal oxidation behavior of single-phase γ-Ni and γ'-Ni3Al alloys were assessed by examining the weight changes, oxide-scale structures, and elemental concentration profiles through the scales and subsurface alloy regions. It was found that Pt promotes Al2O3 formation by suppressing the NiO growth on both γ-Ni and γ'Ni3Al single-phase alloys. This effect increases with increasing Pt content. Moreover, Pt exhibits this effect even at lower

  10. Strengthening Aluminum Alloys for High Temperature Applications Using Nanoparticles of Al203 and Al3-X Compounds (X= Ti, V, Zr)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the effect of nanoparticles A12O3 and A13-X compounds (X= Ti, V, Zr) on the improvement of mechanical properties of aluminum alloys for elevated temperature applications is presented. These nanoparticles were selected based on their chemical stability and low diffusions rates in aluminum matrix at high temperatures. The strengthening mechanism for aluminum alloy is based on the mechanical blocking of dislocation movements by these nanoparticles. Samples were prepared from A12O3 nanoparticle preforms, which were produced using ceramic injection molding process and pressure infiltrated by molten aluminum. A12O3 nanoparticles can also be homogeneously mixed with aluminum powder and consolidated into samples through hot pressing and sintering. On the other hand, the Al3-X nanoparticles are produced as precipitates via in situ reactions with molten aluminum alloys using conventional casting techniques. The degree of alloy strengthening using nanoparticles will depend on the materials, particle size, shape, volume fraction, and mean inter-particle spacing.

  11. Atomic scale modelling of chromium diffusion and melting in α-iron and iron-chromium alloys using high-temperature molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentiev, Dmitri A.; Malerba, Lorenzo; Olsson, Par; Hou, Marc

    2004-04-01

    EAM interatomic potential to be used for radiation effect simulations in the Fe-Cr system has been recently proposed. In the present work, this potential is used to calculate by means of classical molecular dynamics (MD) the diffusivity of solute Cr atoms in Fe-12%Cr random alloy. Fe self-diffusivity is calculated as well, both in the alloy and in the pure metal, for comparison. In addition, the melting point for both the pure metal and the alloy, as predicted by the potential, has been determined and a comparison between the efficiency of vacancy and interstitial mechanisms for diffusion has been performed. This study allows the validity of the potential to be checked against experimental data outside its fitting range, while providing some insight into the description that this potential gives of irradiation effects. A correct prediction of the diffusivity of solute atoms at high temperature and the melting point are indeed an important pre-requisite for a correct prediction of ion mixing and point defect clustering within a displacement cascade during the thermal spike phase. The conclusion of the study is that the present potential is capable of reproducing with excellent accuracy both the diffusion coefficient and the melting point in Fe and in the Fe-Cr alloy. Atomic diffusion through interstitials is also seen to be a more efficient mechanism than through vacancies in the materials considered.

  12. PROCESSING, MICROSTRUCTURE AND CREEP BEHAVIOR OF MO-SI-B-BASED INTERMETALLIC ALLOYS FOR VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vijay K. Vasudevan

    2005-02-08

    This research project is concerned with developing a fundamental understanding of the effects of processing and microstructure on the creep behavior of refractory intermetallic alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system. During this year, the microstructure, bend strength and compressive creep behavior of a Mo-3Si-1B (in wt.%) alloy were studied. The microstructure of this alloy was three-phase, being composed of {alpha}-Mo, Mo{sub 3}Si and T2-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} phases. The elastic limit strength of the alloy remained quite high until 1200 C with a value of 800MPa, but dropped rapidly thereafter to a value of 220 MPa at 1400 C. Results of compressive creep tests at 1200 C showed that the creep rates were quite high and varied nearly linearly with stress between 250 and 500 MPa, which suggests that diffusional mechanisms dominate the creep process. Microstructural observations of post-crept samples indicated the presence of many voids in the {alpha}-Mo grains and few cracks in the intermetallic particles and along their interfaces with the {alpha}-Mo matrix. These results and presented and discussed.

  13. Computer Simulation and Experimental Validation on the Oxidation and Sulfate Corrosion Resistance of Novel Chromium Based High Temperature Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shizhong

    2013-02-28

    This report summarizes our recent works of ab initio molecular dynamics inter-atomic potentials development on dilute rare earth element yttrium (Y) etc. doped chromium (Cr) alloy systems, its applications in oxidation and corrosion resistance simulation, and experiment validation on the candidate systems. The simulation methods, experimental validation techniques, achievements already reached, students training, and future improvement are briefly introduced.

  14. High-temperature corrosion behavior of coatings and ODS alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-08-01

    Iron-aluminide coatings were prepared by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc weld-overlay techniques. All the weld overlays showed good oxidation/sulfidation behavior under isothermal conditions, including a gas metal arc deposit with only 21 at.% Al. A rapid degradation in corrosion resistance was observed under thermal cycling conditions when the initially grown scales spalled and the subsequent rate of reaction was not controlled by the formation of slowly growing aluminum oxides. Higher starting aluminum concentrations (>{approximately}25 at.%) are needed to assure adequate oxidation/sulfidation lifetimes of the weld overlays. A variety of stable oxides was added to a base Fe-28 at.% Al-2 % Cr alloy to assess the effect of these dopants on the oxidation behavior at 1200{degrees}C. A Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion improved the scale adhesion relative to a Zr alloy addition, but wasn`t as effective as it is in other alumina-forming alloys. Preliminary data for powder-processed Fe-28 at.% Al-2% Cr exposed to the H{sub 2}S-H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-Ar gas at 800{degrees}C showed that the oxidation/sulfidation rate was similar to that of many Fe{sub 3}Al alloys produced by ingot metallurgy routes.

  15. Deformation behavior of laser welds in high temperature oxidation resistant Fe-Cr-Al alloys for fuel cladding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance L.

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability and post-weld mechanical behavior of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al (wt.%) with a minor addition of yttrium using modern laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds using sub-sized, flat dog-bone tensile specimens and digital image correlation (DIC) has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. For all proposed alloys, laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions.

  16. Development and Processing Improvement of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys-Development of AL-Cu-Mg-Ag Alloy (2139)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Alex; Lisagor, W. Barry; Bales, Thomas T.

    2007-01-01

    This final report supplement in presentation format describes a comprehensive multi-tasked contract study to continue the development of the silver bearing alloy now registered as aluminum alloy 2139 by the Aluminum Association. Two commercial scale ingots were processed into nominal plate gauges of two, four and six inches, and were extensively characterized in terms of metallurgical and crystallographic structure, and resulting mechanical properties. This report includes comparisons of the property combinations for this alloy and 2XXX and 7XXX alloys more widely used in high performance applications. Alloy 2139 shows dramatic improvement in all combinations of properties, moreover, the properties of this alloy are retained in all gauge thicknesses, contrary to typical reductions observed in thicker gauges of the other alloys in the comparison. The advancements achieved in this study are expected to result in rapid, widespread use of this alloy in a broad range of ground based, aircraft, and spacecraft applications.

  17. Processing studies of powder metallurgically-produced high temperature alloys (Processing studies of oxide dispersed alloys for service above 1000/sup 0/ C). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, N.J.; Smith, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    It was demonstrated that the use of homogeneous, fine, R.S. powders of Nickel-base Superalloy IN-100 (a commercial jet engine blade alloy), converted to very fine flake and blended with Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, will produce an extremely stable alloy with outstanding creep and stress rupture properties from about 950 to at least 1100/sup 0/C. The RS OD IN-100 alloy has comparable properties to those reported for the MA-6000 alloy developed by Benjamin et al, but offers a cheaper, faster, much more reproducible product. An operating temperature advantage of 150 to 200/sup 0/C appears attainable for the RS OD IN-100 alloy over that for the commercial precision cast alloy of the same basic composition.

  18. Effect of thermal exposure, forming, and welding on high-temperature, dispersion-strengthened aluminum alloy: Al-8Fe-1V-2Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. R.; Gilman, P. S.; Zedalis, M. S.; Skinner, D. J.; Peltier, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of applying conventional hot forming and welding methods to high temperature aluminum alloy, Al-8Fe-1V-2Si (FVS812), for structural applications and the effect of thermal exposure on mechanical properties were determined. FVS812 (AA8009) sheet exhibited good hot forming and resistance welding characteristics. It was brake formed to 90 deg bends (0.5T bend radius) at temperatures greater than or equal to 390 C (730 F), indicating the feasibility of fabricating basic shapes, such as angles and zees. Hot forming of simple contoured-flanged parts was demonstrated. Resistance spot welds with good static and fatigue strength at room and elevated temperatures were readily produced. Extended vacuum degassing during billet fabrication reduced porosity in fusion and resistance welds. However, electron beam welding was not possible because of extreme degassing during welding, and gas-tungsten-arc welds were not acceptable because of severely degraded mechanical properties. The FVS812 alloy exhibited excellent high temperature strength stability after thermal exposures up to 315 C (600 F) for 1000 h. Extended billet degassing appeared to generally improve tensile ductility, fatigue strength, and notch toughness. But the effects of billet degassing and thermal exposure on properties need to be further clarified. The manufacture of zee-stiffened, riveted, and resistance-spot-welded compression panels was demonstrated.

  19. Effect of Thermal Treatments on Ni-Mn-Ga and Ni-Rich Ni-Ti-Hf/Zr High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarta, Ruben; Evirgen, Alper; Perez-Sierra, Aquilina M.; Pons, Jaume; Cesari, Eduard; Karaman, Ibrahim; Noebe, Ron D.

    2015-11-01

    Among all the promising high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs), the Ni-Mn-Ga and the Ni-Ti-Hf/Zr systems exhibit interesting shape memory and superelastic properties that may place them in a good position for potential applications. The present work shows that thermal treatments play a crucial role in controlling the martensitic phase transformation characteristics of both systems, but in different ways. On one hand, the equilibrium phase diagram of the Ni-Mn-Ga family allows selecting compositions with high transformation temperatures and outstanding thermal stability at relatively high temperatures in air, showing no significant changes in the transformation behavior for continuous aging up to ˜5 years at 500 °C. Moreover, the excellent thermal stability correlates with a good thermal cyclic stability and an exceptional oxidation resistance of the parent phase. On the other hand, precipitation processes controlled by thermal treatments are needed to manipulate the transformation temperatures, mechanical properties, and thermal stability of Ni-rich Ni-Ti-Hf/Zr alloys to become HTSMAs. These changes in the functional properties are a consequence of the competition between the mechanical and compositional effects of the precipitates on the martensitic transformation.

  20. The effect of chromium, carbon, and yttrium on the oxidation of nickel-base alloys in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Angeliu, T.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Was, G.S. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-07-01

    Since the surface film has been implicated in several models of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of nickel-base alloys, this study was initiated to provide a foundation for the future study of a possible link between the nature of the surface film and IG crack susceptibility. The influence of chromium, carbon, and yttrium on the nature of the surface film formed on nickel-base alloys was investigated after 100 h of exposure in high purity, deaerated, hydrogenated water at 360 C. XPS and SEM provided information on the chemical composition, structure, morphology, and thickness of the surface film. Increasing the content from 5 to 17 weight percent (w/o) of a Ni-xCr-9Fe-low C alloy dramatically changes the surface film from predominantly Ni(OH)[sub 2] to Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3]. An additional increase in Cr from 17 to 30 w/o does not significantly alter the type, distribution, or thickness of the oxide phases formed. This suggests that there is a critical chromium concentration that controls the formation of Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] under the test conditions. The presence of Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] in these alloys is attributed to the high affinity of Cr for oxygen, and the increased stability of Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] over many other oxides in reducing environments. The addition of 300 wppm carbon to a Ni-17Cr-9Fe-0.0030 C alloy increases the film thickness without changing Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] as the dominant surface species. Yttrium implantation to 2.4 atom percent at a depth of 70 nm in Ni-17Cr-9Fe-0.0030 and 0.030 C alloys produces a similar film thickness and similar composition profiles containing slightly more Ni(OH)[sub 2] than Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Yttrium is known for forming Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] which most likely promotes the formations of Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] by acting as nucleations sites for the similarly structured chromia.

  1. Corrosion characteristics of nickel alloys. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zollars, G. F.

    1979-01-01

    This bibliography cites 118 articles from the international literature concerning corrosion characteristics of nickel alloys. Articles dealing with corrosion resistance, corrosion tests, intergranular corrosion, oxidation resistance, and stress corrosion cracking of nickel alloys are included.

  2. Fundamental studies of stress distributions and stress relaxation in oxide scales on high temperature alloys. [Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Shores, D.A.; Stout, J.H.; Gerberich, W.W.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes a three-year study of stresses arising in the oxide scale and underlying metal during high temperature oxidation and of scale cracking. In-situ XRD was developed to measure strains during oxidation over 1000{degrees}C on pure metals. Acoustic emission was used to observe scale fracture during isothermal oxidation and cooling, and statistical analysis was used to infer mechanical aspects of cracking. A microscratch technique was used to measure the fracture toughness of scale/metal interface. A theoretical model was evaluated for the development and relaxation of stresses in scale and metal substrate during oxidation.

  3. High frequency, high temperature specific core loss and dynamic B-H hysteresis loop characteristics of soft magnetic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieserman, W. R.; Schwarze, G. E.; Niedra, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Limited experimental data exists for the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loops for soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high frequency and high temperature. This experimental study investigates the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loop characteristics of Supermalloy and Metglas 2605SC over the frequency range of 1 to 50 kHz and temperature range of 23 to 300 C under sinusoidal voltage excitation. The experimental setup used to conduct the investigation is described. The effects of the maximum magnetic flux density, frequency, and temperature on the specific core loss and on the size and shape of the B-H loops are examined.

  4. Arrhenius-Type Constitutive Model for High Temperature Flow Stress in a Nickel-Based Corrosion-Resistant Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Liu, F.; Cheng, J. J.; Zuo, Q.; Chen, C. F.

    2016-04-01

    Hot deformation behavior of Nickel-based corrosion-resistant alloy (N08028) was studied in compression tests conducted in the temperature range of 1050-1200 °C and the strain rate range of 0.001-1 s-1. The flow stress behavior and microstructural evolution were observed during the hot deformation process. The results show that the flow stress increases with deformation temperature decreasing and strain rate increasing, and that the deformation activation energy ( Q) is not a constant but increases with strain rate increasing at a given strain, which is closely related with dislocation movement. On this basis, a revised strain-dependent hyperbolic sine constitutive model was established, which considered that the "material constants" in the original model vary as functions of the strain and strain rate. The flow curves of N08028 alloy predicted by the proposed model are in good agreement with the experimental results, which indicates that the revised constitutive model can estimate precisely the flow curves of N08028 alloy.

  5. Isothermal nucleation and growth kinetics of Pd/Ag alloy phase via in-situ time-resolved high-temperature x-ray diffraction (HTXRD) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ayturk, Mahmut Engin; Payzant, E Andrew; Speakman, Scott A; Ma, Yi Hua

    2008-01-01

    Among several different approaches to form Pd/Ag alloys for hydrogen separation applications, ex-situ studies carried by conventional X-ray point scanning detectors might fail to reveal the key aspects of the phase transformation between Pd and Ag metals. In this respect, in-situ time-resolved high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) was employed to study the Pd/Ag alloy phase nucleation and growth kinetics. By the use of linear position sensitive detectors, advanced optics and profile fitting with the use of JADE-6.5 software, isothermal phase evolution of the Pd/Ag alloy at 500 C, 550 C and 600 C under hydrogen atmosphere were quantified to elucidate the mechanistic details of the Pd/Ag alloy phase nucleation and growth pattern. Analysis of the HTXRD data by the Avrami model indicated that the nucleation of the Pd/Ag alloy phase was instantaneous where the growth mechanism was through diffusion-controlled one-dimensional thickening of the Pd/Ag alloy layer. The value of the Avrami exponent, n, was found to increase with temperature with the values of 0.34, 0.39 and 0.67 at 500oC, 550oC and 600oC, respectively. In addition, parabolic rate law analysis suggested that the nucleation of the Pd/Ag alloy phase was through a heterogeneous nucleation mode, in which the nucleation sites were defined as the non-equilibrium defects. The cross-sectional SEI micrographs indicated that the Pd/Ag alloy phase growth was strongly dependent upon the deposition morphology of the as-synthesized Pd and Ag layers formed by the electroless plating. Based on the Avrami model and the parabolic rate law, the estimated activation energies for the phase transformation were 236.5 and 185.6 kJ/mol and in excellent agreement with the literature values (183-239.5 kJ/mol).

  6. Improving High-Temperature Tensile and Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Al-Si-Cu-Mg Alloys Through Micro-additions of Ti, V, and Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaha, S. K.; Czerwinski, F.; Kasprzak, W.; Friedman, J.; Chen, D. L.

    2015-07-01

    High-temperature tensile and low-cycle fatigue tests were performed to assess the influence of micro-additions of Ti, V, and Zr on the improvement of the Al-7Si-1Cu-0.5Mg (wt pct) alloy in the as-cast condition. Addition of transition metals led to modification of microstructure where in addition to conventional phases present in the Al-7Si-1Cu-0.5Mg base, new thermally stable micro-sized Zr-Ti-V-rich phases Al21.4Si4.1Ti3.5VZr3.9, Al6.7Si1.2TiZr1.8, Al2.8Si3.8V1.6Zr, and Al5.1Si35.4Ti1.6Zr5.7Fe were formed. The tensile tests showed that with increasing test temperature from 298 K to 673 K (25 °C to 400 °C), the yield stress and tensile strength of the present studied alloy decreased from 161 to 84 MPa and from 261 to 102 MPa, respectively. Also, the studied alloy exhibited 18, 12, and 5 pct higher tensile strength than the alloy A356, 354 and existing Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloy modified with additions of Zr, Ti, and Ni, respectively. The fatigue life of the studied alloy was substantially longer than those of the reference alloys A356 and the same Al-7Si-1Cu-0.5Mg base with minor additions of V, Zr, and Ti in the T6 condition. Fractographic analysis after tensile tests revealed that at the lower temperature up to 473 K (200 °C), the cleavage-type brittle fracture for the precipitates and ductile fracture for the matrix were dominant while at higher temperature fully ductile-type fracture with debonding and pull-out of cracked particles was identified. It is believed that the intermetallic precipitates containing Zr, Ti, and V improve the alloy performance at increased temperatures.

  7. Characterization of Ni19.5Ti50.5Pd25Pt5 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy Springs and their Potential Application in Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebner, Aaron; Padula, Santo A.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2008-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) have been used as actuators in many different industries since the discovery of the shape memory effect, but the use of SMAs as actuation devices in aeronautics has been limited due to the temperature constraints of commercially available materials. Consequently, work is being done at NASA's Glenn Research Center to develop new SMAs capable of being used in high temperature environments. One of the more promising high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs) is Ni19.5Ti50.5Pd25Pt5. Recent work has shown that this material is capable of being used in operating environments of up to 250 C. This material has been shown to have very useful actuation capabilities, demonstrating repeatable strain recoveries up to 2.5% in the presence of an externally applied load. Based on these findings, further work has been initiated to explore potential applications and alternative forms of this alloy, such as springs. Thus, characterization of Ni19.5Ti50.5Pd25Pt5 springs, including their mechanical response and how variations in this response correlate to changes in geometric parameters, are discussed. The effects of loading history, or training, on spring behavior were also investigated. A comparison of the springs with wire actuators is made and the benefits of using one actuator form as opposed to the other discussed. These findings are used to discuss design considerations for a surge-control mechanism that could be used in the centrifugal compressor of a T-700 helicopter engine.

  8. High-Temperature Deformation Processing Map Approach for Obtaining the Desired Microstructure in a Multi-component (Ni-Ti-Cu-Fe) Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayan, Niraj; Singh, Gaurav; Narayana Murty, S. V. S.; Jha, Abhay K.; Pant, Bhanu; George, Koshy M.

    2015-05-01

    An equiatomic NiTiCuFe multi-component alloy with simple body-centered cubic (bcc) and face-centered cubic solid-solution phases in the microstructure was processed by vacuum induction melting furnace under dynamic Ar atmosphere. High-temperature uniaxial compression experiments were conducted on it in the temperature range of 1073 K to 1303 K (800 °C to 1030 °C) and strain rate range of 10-3 to 10-1 s-1. The data generated were analyzed with the aid of the dynamic materials model through which power dissipation efficiency and instability maps were generated so as to identify the governing deformation mechanisms that are operative in different temperature-strain rate regimes with the aid of complementary microstructural analysis of the deformed specimens. Results indicate that the stable domain for the high temperature deformation of the multi-component alloy occurs in the temperature range of 1173 K to 1303 K (900 °C to 1030 °C) and range of 10-3 to 10-1.2 s-1, and the deformation is unstable at T = 1073 K to 1153 K (800 °C to 880 °C) and = 10-3 to 10-1.4 s-1 as well as T = 1223 K to 1293 K (950 °C to 1020 °C) and = 10-1.4 to 10-1 s-1, with adiabatic shear banding, localized plastic flow, or cracking being the unstable mechanisms. A constitutive equation that describes the flow stress of NiTiCuFe multi-component alloy as a function of strain rate and deformation temperature was also determined.

  9. Characterization of Ni 19.5Ti 50.5Pd 25Pt 5 high-temperature shape memory alloy springs and their potential applications in aeronautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebner, Aaron; Padula, Santo A., II; Noebe, Ronald D.; Quinn, D. Dane

    2008-03-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) have been used as actuators in many different industries since the discovery of the shape memory effect, but the use of SMAs as actuation devices in aeronautics has been limited due to the temperature constraints of commercially available materials. Consequently, work is being done at NASA's Glenn Research Center to develop new SMAs capable of being used in high temperature environments. One of the more promising high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs) is Ni 19.5Ti 50.5Pd 25Pt 5. Recent work has shown that this material is capable of being used in operating environments of up to 250°C. This material has been shown to have very useful actuation capabilities, demonstrating repeatable strain recoveries up to 2.5% in the presence of an externally applied load. Based on these findings, further work has been initiated to explore potential applications and alternative forms of this alloy, such as springs. Thus, characterization of Ni 19.5Ti 50.5Pd 25Pt 5 springs, including their mechanical response and how variations in this response correlate to changes in geometric parameters, are discussed. The effects of loading history, or training, on spring behavior were also investigated. A comparison of the springs with wire actuators is made and the benefits of using one actuator form as opposed to the other discussed. These findings are used to discuss design considerations for a surge-control mechanism that could be used in the centrifugal compressor of a T-700 helicopter engine.

  10. The Effect of Laves Phase (Fe,Al)2Zr on the High-Temperature Strength of Carbon-Alloyed Fe3Al Aluminide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratochvíl, Petr; Vodičková, Věra; Král, Robert; Švec, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The effects of carbon on the phase structure and on the yield stress σ 0.2 in the temperature range from 873 K to 1073 K (600 °C to 800 °C) of the Fe3Al type aluminides alloyed by Zr are analyzed. Four alloys with Zr and C in ranging from 1.0 to 5.0 at. pct of additives were used. The appearing of either Laves phase (Fe,Al)2Zr and/or carbides depend on the difference in concentrations, c Zr - c C. This parameter ( c Zr - c C) has been selected instead of the concentration ratio c Zr/ c C used in previous works since it exhibits a significantly better correlation with the Laves phase concentration which influences the high-temperature yield stress, σ 0.2, of the tested alloys. The presence of Laves phase or eutectic (matrix—Laves phase), respectively, enhances the value of the yield stress σ 0.2. The amount of Laves phase is decreased by the presence of C due to the affinity of carbon to Zr.

  11. Cyclic Degradation of Co49Ni21Ga30 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy: On the Roles of Dislocation Activity and Chemical Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krooß, P.; Kadletz, P. M.; Somsen, C.; Gutmann, M. J.; Chumlyakov, Y. I.; Schmahl, W. W.; Maier, H. J.; Niendorf, T.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional shape memory alloys (SMAs), such as binary Ni-Ti, are typically limited to service temperatures below 100 °C. Recent studies on Co-Ni-Ga high-temperature SMAs revealed the potential that these alloys can be used up to temperatures of about 400 °C. Analysis of the cyclic functional properties showed that degradation in these alloys is mainly triggered by intensive dislocation motion. However, data on the cyclic stress-strain response and the mechanisms leading to functional degradation of Co-Ni-Ga above 300 °C were missing in open literature. Current results reveal that above 300 °C diffusion-controlled mechanisms, e.g., precipitation of secondary phases and changes in the chemical degree of order, seem to dictate cyclic instability. Detailed neutron and transmission electron microscopy analyses following superelastic cycling in a temperature range of 200-400 °C were employed to characterize the changes in degradation behavior above 300 °C.

  12. Phase transformations in the Zn-Al eutectoid alloy after quenching from the high temperature triclinic beta phase

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval-Jimenez, A.; Torres-Villasenor, G.

    2010-11-15

    Ribbons of the Zn-Al eutectoid alloy obtained by melt-spinning, were heat treated at 350 deg. C during 30 min in a free atmosphere furnace, and then quenched in liquid nitrogen. The temperature correspond to {beta} phase zone, which has a triclinic crystalline structure [1, 2]. Some evidence, obtained by X-ray diffraction, show that the structures present in the just quenched material are both close-packed hexagonal ({eta}-phase) and rhombohedral (R-phase). X-ray diffractograms taken in the same ribbons after annealed 500 h at room temperature, show that the R phase its transform to {alpha} and {eta} phases.

  13. Study on High-Temperature Flow Behavior and Substructure and Texture Evolution of TA15 Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Ding, Yong-gen; Yao, Peng-peng; Xue, Ke-min; Li, Cheng-ming

    2016-08-01

    The hot deformation behaviors of TA15 titanium alloy were investigated by isothermal compression experiments on Gleeble-3500 thermal simulation machine. The results indicate that the flow stress curves of TA15 titanium alloy in the two-phase region are dynamic recrystallization (DRX) type while in the β single-phase region are main dynamic recovery (DRV) type. The evolution of microstructure and substructure (grain boundary misorientation and dislocation) under different process parameters were studied by using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Microstructure analysis shows that a large number of recrystallized α grains and martensite α' phase appear as the strain rate decreases under the condition of two-phase region. However, lath martensite microstructure is replaced by lamellar martensite microstructure at low strain rate in β single-phase region. Grain boundary misorientation analysis indicates that low angle boundaries (LABs) transform into high angle boundaries (HABs) sufficiently by reducing strain rate or increasing deformation temperature. Texture evolution analysis shows that the degree of preferred orientation after deformation weakens and the intensity of texture decreases with strain rate increasing in the two-phase region. However, more potential slip systems are activated in the β single-phase region. TEM analysis suggests that microscopic deformation bands with high density of parallel arrangement dislocations evolve into subboundaries or boundaries. As the deformation continues, dislocations are accumulated around the subboundaries, and they promote the transformation of subgrains with LABs into new grains with HABs.

  14. Comparison of high temperature, high frequency core loss and dynamic B-H loops of two 50 Ni-Fe crystalline alloys and an iron-based amorphous alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieserman, W. R.; Schwarze, G. E.; Niedra, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The availability of experimental data that characterizes the performance of soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high temperature and high frequency is almost nonexistent. An experimental investigation was conducted over the temperature range of 23 to 300 C and frequency range of 1 to 50 kHz to determine the effects of temperature and frequency on the core loss and dynamic B-H loops of three different soft magnetic materials; and oriented grain 50Ni-50Fe alloy, a nonoriented grain 50Ni-Fe alloy, and an iron based amorphous material (Metglas 2605SC). A comparison of these materials shows that the nonoriented grain 50Ni-50Fe alloy tends to have either the lowest or next lowest core loss for all temperatures and frequencies investigated.

  15. PROCESSING, MICROSTRUCTURE AND CREEP BEHAVIOR OF Mo-Si-B-BASED INTERMETALLIC ALLOYS FOR VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vijay K. Vasudevan

    2005-12-21

    This research project is concerned with developing a fundamental understanding of the effects of processing and microstructure on the creep behavior of refractory intermetallic alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system. During this year, the compressive creep behavior of a Mo-3Si-1B (in wt.%) alloy at 1100 and 1200 C were studied and related to the deformation mechanisms through electron microscopy observations of microstructural changes and deformation structures. The microstructure of this alloy was three-phase, being composed of {alpha}-Mo, Mo{sub 3}Si and T2-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} phases. Results of compressive creep tests at 1200 and 1100 C showed that the creep rates were quite high at stress levels between 250 and 500 MPa, Two minima in the creep strain rate versus strain data were noted, one at small strain values and the second at much larger strains. A stress exponent of 4.26 was obtained upon plotting the strain rate corresponding to the first minima versus stress, which suggests that dislocation climb and glide dominate the creep process in the early stages. On the other hand, the large strain, minimum creep rate versus stress data gave a stress exponent of {approx}1.18, which indicates diffusional mechanisms and recrystallization dominate the later stages of the creep process. At 1100 C, a stress exponent of 2.26 was obtained, which suggests that both diffusional and dislocation mechanisms contribute to the creep strain. Based on the minimum creep rate data at 1100 C and 1200 C, the activation energy for creep was determined to be 525 kJ/mole, which is somewhat higher than that reported for self diffusion in {alpha}-Mo. Microstructural observations of post-crept samples indicated the presence of many voids in the {alpha}-Mo grains and few cracks in the intermetallic particles and along their interfaces with the {alpha}-Mo matrix. In addition, TEM observations revealed the presence of recrystallized grains and sub-grain boundaries composed of dislocation arrays

  16. High temperature barrier coatings for refractory metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Walech, T.

    1995-01-01

    Improvements in high temperature oxidation resistant metal coating technology will allow NASA and commercial entities to develop competitive civil space transport and communication systems. The success of investigations completed in this program will have a positive impact on broadening the technology base for high temperature materials. The work reported herein describes processes and procedures for successfully depositing coherent oxidation barrier coatings on refractory metals to prevent degradation under very severe operating environments. Application of the new technology developed is now being utilized in numerous Phase 3 applications through several prominent aerospace firms. Major achievements have included: (1) development of means to deposit thick platinum and rhodium coatings with lower stress and fewer microcracks than could be previously achieved; (2) development of processes to deposit thick adherent coatings of platinum group metals on refractory substrates that remain bonded through high temperature excursions and without need for intermediate coatings (bonding processes unique to specific refractory metals and alloys have been defined; (3) demonstration that useful alloys of refractory and platinum coatings can be made through thermal diffusion means; (4) demonstration that selected barrier coatings on refractory substrates can withstand severe oxidizing environments in the range of 1260 deg and 1760 deg C for long time periods essential to the life requirements of the hardware; and (5) successful application of the processes and procedures to prototype hardware. The results of these studies have been instrumental in improved thermal oxidation barrier coatings for the NASP propulsion system. Other Phase 3 applications currently being exploited include small uncooled thrusters for spacecraft and microsatellite maneuvering systems.

  17. High-temperature, low-cycle fatigue of advanced copper-base alloys for rocket nozzles. Part 1: Narloy Z

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Short-term tensile and low-cycle fatigue data are reported for Narloy Z, a centrifugally cast, copper-base alloy. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature in air and in argon at 482, 538 and 593 C using an axial strain rate of .002/sec to the -1 power. In addition tensile tests were performed at 538 C in an evaluation of tensile properties at strain rates of .004 and .01/sec to the -1 power. Ultimate and yield strength values of about 315 and 200 MN/sq m respectively were recorded at room temperature and these decreased to about 120 and 105 respectively as the temperature was increased to 593 C. Reduction in area values were recorded in the range from 40 to 50% with some indication of a minimum ductility point at 538 C.

  18. Simulation of high-temperature superlocalization of plastic deformation in single-crystals of alloys with an L12 superstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'eva, Yu. V.; Fakhrutdinova, Ya. D.; Starenchenko, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    The processes of the superlocalization of plastic deformation in L12 alloys have been studied numerically based on a combination of the model of the dislocation kinetics of the deformation-induced and heat-treatment-induced strengthening of an element of a deformable medium with the model of the mechanics of microplastic deformation described in terms of elastoplastic medium. It has been shown that the superlocalization of plastic deformation is determined by the presence of stress concentrators and by the nonmonotonic strengthening of the elements of the deformable medium. The multiple nonmonotonicity of the process of strengthening of the elementary volume of the medium can be responsible for the multiplicity of bands of microplastic localization of deformation.

  19. Structure and microhardness of Al-Si-Cu-Ni alloy after severe plastic deformation and high-temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Karina; Khalikova, Gulnara; Korznikova, Elena; Trifonov, Vadim

    2015-10-01

    The effect of severe plastic deformation by high-pressure torsion (HPT) and subsequent annealing on the microstructure and microhardness of squeeze casting Al-22%Si-3%Cu-1.7%Ni alloy was investigated. HPT was performed at room temperature with 5 rotations under the pressure of 4 GPa. Annealing temperature range varied from 300 to 500°C for 5 min. HPT resulted in refinement and partial dissolution of the primary silicon and intermetallic particles in aluminum matrix and structure fragmentation that caused the microhardness increase. Subsequent annealing lead to the decomposition of the supersaturated solid solution that took place simultaneously with recovery and recrystallization of the fragmented structure. Increase of annealing temperature resulted in decrease of microhardness values.

  20. Constitutive Modeling of High-Temperature Flow Behavior of an Nb Micro-alloyed Hot Stamping Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiqi; Feng, Ding; Huang, Yunhua; Wei, Shizhong; Mohrbacher, Hardy; Zhang, Yue

    2016-03-01

    The thermal deformation behavior and constitutive models of an Nb micro-alloyed 22MnB5 steel were investigated by conducting isothermal uniaxial tensile tests at the temperature range of 873-1223 K with strain rates of 0.1-10 s-1. The results indicated that the investigated steel showed typical work hardening and dynamic recovery behavior during hot deformation, and the flow stress decreased with a decrease in strain rate and/or an increase in temperature. On the basis of the experimental data, the modified Johnson-Cook (modified JC), modified Norton-Hoff (modified NH), and Arrhenius-type (AT) constitutive models were established for the subject steel. However, the flow stress values predicted by these three models revealed some remarkable deviations from the experimental values for certain experimental conditions. Therefore, a new combined modified Norton-Hoff and Arrhenius-type constitutive model (combined modified NH-AT model), which accurately reflected both the work hardening and dynamic recovery behavior of the subject steel, was developed by introducing the modified parameter k ɛ. Furthermore, the accuracy of these constitutive models was assessed by the correlation coefficient, the average absolute relative error, and the root mean square error, which indicated that the flow stress values computed by the combined modified NH-AT model were highly consistent with the experimental values (R = 0.998, AARE = 1.63%, RMSE = 3.85 MPa). The result confirmed that the combined modified NH-AT model was suitable for the studied Nb micro-alloyed hot stamping steel. Additionally, the practicability of the new model was also verified using finite element simulations in ANSYS/LS-DYNA, and the results confirmed that the new model was practical and highly accurate.

  1. In situ atomic force microscope study of high-temperature untwinning surface relief in Mn-Fe-Cu antiferromagnetic shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Cui, Y. G.; Wan, J. F.; Rong, Y. H.; Zhang, J. H.; Jin, X.; Cai, M. M.

    2013-05-06

    The N-type untwinning surface relief associated with the fcc {r_reversible} fct martensitic transformation (MT) was observed in the Mn{sub 81.5}Fe{sub 14.0}Cu{sub 4.5} antiferromagnetic high-temperature shape memory alloy (SMA) by in situ atomic force microscopy. The measured untwinning relief angles ({theta}{sub {alpha}} Double-Vertical-Line {theta}{sub {beta}}) at the ridge and at the valley were different, and both angles were less than the conventional values. The surface relief exhibited good reversibility during heating and cooling because of the crystallographic reversibility of thermal-elastic SMAs. Untwinning shear was proposed as the main mechanism of the N-type surface relief. The order of the reverse MT was discussed based on the experimental measurements.

  2. Anomalous phonon behavior in the high-temperature shape-memory alloy Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50-x}Cr{sub x}

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S. M.; Xu Guangyong; Winn, B. L.; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T.; Erwin, R.

    2007-08-01

    Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50-x}Cr{sub x} is a high-temperature shape-memory alloy with a martensitic transformation temperature strongly dependent on the Cr composition. Prior to the transformation, a premartensitic phase is present with an incommensurate modulated cubic lattice with wave vector of q{sub 0}=(0.22,0.22,0). The temperature dependence of the diffuse scattering in the cubic phase is measured as a function temperature for x=6.5, 8.5, and 10 at. %. The lattice dynamics has been studied and reveals anomalous temperature and q dependences of the [110]-TA{sub 2} transverse phonon branch. The phonon linewidth is broad over the entire Brillouin zone and increases with decreasing temperature, contrary to the behavior expected for anharmonicity. No anomaly is observed at q{sub 0}. The results are compared with first principles calculation of the phonon structure.

  3. Constant-Strain Thermal Cycling of a Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benafan, O.; Noebe, R. D.; Halsmer, T. J.; Padula, S. A.; Bigelow, G. S.; Gaydosh, D. J.; Garg, A.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of various pre-straining routines on the recovery stresses of a Ni-rich Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 high-temperature shape memory alloy was investigated in tension and compression. The recovery stresses, obtained by means of constant-strain thermal cycling, were evaluated after isothermal (up to ±2 % applied strain at room temperature) or after isobaric thermal cycling at stress levels between ±100 and 400 MPa. The material exhibited high force generation capability with recovery stresses of nearly 1.5 GPa on the first cycle under particular pre-strain conditions. The recovery stresses are shown to decay during subsequent cycles using an upper cycle temperature of 300 °C with a saturated stress level nearing 1.1 GPa in compression.

  4. Role of the micro/macro structure of welds in crack nucleation and propagation in aerospace aluminum-lithium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talia, George E.

    1996-01-01

    Al-Li alloys offer the benefits of increased strength, elastic modulus and lower densities as compared to conventional aluminum alloys. Martin Marietta Laboratories has developed an Al-Li alloy designated 2195 which is designated for use in the cryogenic tanks of the space shuttle. The Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding process is currently being used to produce these welds [1]. VPPA welding utilizes high temperature ionized gas (plasma) to transfer heat to the workpiece. An inert gas, such as Helium, is used to shield the active welding zone to prevent contamination of the molten base metal with surrounding reactive atmospheric gases. [1] In the Space Shuttle application, two passes of the arc are used to complete a butt-type weld. The pressure of the plasma stream is increased during the first pass to force the arc entirely through the material, a practice commonly referred to as keyholing. Molten metal forms on either side of the arc and surface tension draws this liquid together as the arc passes. 2319 Al alloy filler material may also be fed into the weld zone during this pass. During the second pass, the plasma stream pressure is reduced such that only partial penetration of the base material is obtained. Al 2319 filler material is added during this pass to yield a uniform, fully filled welded joint. This additional pass also acts to alter the grain structure of the weld zone to yield a higher strength joint.

  5. Role of the micro/macro structure of welds in crack nucleation and propagation in aerospace aluminum-lithium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Talia, G.E.

    1996-02-01

    Al-Li alloys offer the benefits of increased strength, elastic modulus and lower densities as compared to conventional aluminum alloys. Martin Marietta Laboratories has developed an Al-Li alloy designated 2195 which is designated for use in the cryogenic tanks of the space shuttle. The Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding process is currently being used to produce these welds. VPPA welding utilizes high temperature ionized gas (plasma) to transfer heat to the workpiece. An inert gas, such as Helium, is used to shield the active welding zone to prevent contamination of the molten base metal with surrounding reactive atmospheric gases. (1) In the Space Shuttle application, two passes of the arc are used to complete a butt-type weld. The pressure of the plasma stream is increased during the first pass to force the arc entirely through the material, a practice commonly referred to as keyholing. Molten metal forms on either side of the arc and surface tension draws this liquid together as the arc passes. 2319 Al alloy filler material may also be fed into the weld zone during this pass. During the second pass, the plasma stream pressure is reduced such that only partial penetration of the base material is obtained. Al 2319 filler material is added during this pass to yield a uniform, fully filled welded joint. This additional pass also acts to alter the grain structure of the weld zone to yield a higher strength joint.

  6. High temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J. (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A ceramic strain gage based on reactively sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films is used to monitor the structural integrity of components employed in aerospace propulsion systems operating at temperatures in excess of 1500.degree. C. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the thick ITO sensors reveals a partially sintered microstructure comprising a contiguous network of submicron ITO particles with well defined necks and isolated nanoporosity. Densification of the ITO particles was retarded during high temperature exposure with nitrogen thus stabilizing the nanoporosity. ITO strain sensors were prepared by reactive sputtering in various nitrogen/oxygen/argon partial pressures to incorporate more nitrogen into the films. Under these conditions, sintering and densification of the ITO particles containing these nitrogen rich grain boundaries was retarded and a contiguous network of nano-sized ITO particles was established.

  7. High temperature structural silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    Structural silicides have important high temperature applications in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Most prominent are MoSi{sub 2}-based materials, which are borderline ceramic-intermetallic compounds. MoSi{sub 2} single crystals exhibit macroscopic compressive ductility at temperatures below room temperature in some orientations. Polycrystalline MoSi{sub 2} possesses elevated temperature creep behavior which is highly sensitive to grain size. MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites show an important combination of oxidation resistance, creep resistance, and low temperature fracture toughness. Current potential applications of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials include furnace heating elements, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, aerospace turbine engine components, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing.

  8. High-temperature ferromagnetism of Si1-xMnx (x≈0.52-0.55) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylkov, V. V.; Bugaev, A. S.; Novodvorskii, O. A.; Tugushev, V. V.; Kulatov, E. T.; Zenkevich, A. V.; Semisalova, A. S.; Nikolaev, S. N.; Vedeneev, A. S.; Shorokhova, A. V.; Aver‧yanov, D. V.; Chernoglazov, K. Yu.; Gan‧shina, E. A.; Granovsky, A. B.; Wang, Y.; Panchenko, V. Ya.; Zhou, S.

    2015-06-01

    The paper reports on the comprehensive study of properties of nonstoichiometric Si1-xMnx alloys slightly enriched in Mn (x≈0.51-0.55) as compared to the stoichiometric monosilicide MnSi. Mosaic type Si1-xMnx films 55-70 nm in thickness were produced by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method onto the single crystalline Al2O3 substrates at 340 °C. The Curie temperature TC in nonstoichiometric Si1-xMnx (x≈0.52-0.55) films exceeds room temperature, while in their stoichiometric counterpart, MnSi, the TC value does not exceed ≈30 K. The consistent data on anomalous Hall effect and transverse Kerr effect prove the global character of ferromagnetic (FM) order caused by magnetic defect formation rather than the presence of FM clusters. At Mn content x≤0.55, the magnetization data testify to a good homogeneity in the distribution of magnetic defects without their segregation: variations of the saturation magnetization Ms do not exceed 6% in the temperature range T=10-100 K and are well described by the Bloch law. It is also revealed that textured high-quality Si1-xMnx films with x≈0.52 and TC~300 K could be formed by PLD method in the "shadow" geometry (at lower energy of deposited atoms).

  9. Magnetic anisotropy peculiarities of high-temperature ferromagnetic MnxSi1-x (x ≈ 0.5) alloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drovosekov, A. B.; Kreines, N. M.; Savitsky, A. O.; Kapelnitsky, S. V.; Rylkov, V. V.; Tugushev, V. V.; Prutskov, G. V.; Novodvorskii, O. A.; Cherebilo, E. A.; Kulatov, E. T.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, S.

    2016-08-01

    Thin films of Mn x Si1-x alloys with different Mn concentration x≈0.44\\text{--}0.63 grown by the pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) method onto the Al2O3 (0001) substrate were investigated in the temperature range 4-300 K using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements in the wide range of frequencies (f = 7\\text{--}60 \\text{GHz}) and magnetic fields (H = 0\\text{--}30 \\text{kOe}) . For samples with x≈0.52\\text{--}0.55 , FMR data show clear evidence of ferromagnetism (FM) with high Curie temperatures TC ˜ 300 \\text{K} . These samples demonstrate the complex and unusual character of magnetic anisotropy described in the frame of phenomenological model as a combination of the essential second-order easy-plane anisotropy contribution and the additional fourth-order anisotropy contribution with the easy direction normal to the film plane. We explain the obtained results by a polycrystalline (mosaic) structure of the films caused by the film-substrate lattice mismatch.

  10. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST). Research on Materials for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Kelly, Robert G.; Scully, John R.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Wert, John A.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1986, the NASA-Langley Research Center has sponsored the NASA-UVa Light Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program at the University of Virginia (UVa). The fundamental objective of the LA2ST program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures. The LA2ST program has aimed to product relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies. The scope of the LA2ST Program is broad. Research areas include: (1) Mechanical and Environmental Degradation Mechanisms in Advanced Light Metals and Composites, (2) Aerospace Materials Science, (3) Mechanics of materials for Aerospace Structures, and (4) Thermal Gradient Structures. A substantial series of semi-annual progress reports issued since 1987 documents the technical objectives, experimental or analytical procedures, and detailed results of graduate student research in these topical areas.

  11. Effects of C and Cr content on high-temperature microstructures of Fe-9Al-30Mn-xC-yCr alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, May-Show; Cheng, Hsin-Chung; Huang, Chiung-Fang; Chao, Chih-Yeh; Ou, Keng-Liang; Yu, Chih-Hua

    2010-02-15

    This investigation elucidated the effects of C and Cr content on the high-temperature microstructures of Fe-9Al-30Mn-xC-yCr alloys by means of optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. With increasing Cr content, the phase transition sequence within the {alpha} phase was found to be {alpha} + B2 {yields} {alpha} + B2 + DO{sub 3} {yields} {alpha} + DO{sub 3}. And with increasing C content, a {gamma} {yields} ({gamma} + {kappa}) phase transition was observed within the {gamma} phase. The {kappa} phase carbides ((Fe,Mn){sub 3}AlC{sub x}) had an ordered L'1{sub 2}-type structure with lattice parameter a = 0.368 nm and were formed by a spinodal decomposition during quenching. The amounts of Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} increased with the C and Cr content. Moreover, the Al and Mn content played important roles in expanding the ({alpha} + {gamma}) region. These features have not been previously reported in the Fe-Al-Mn-C-Cr alloy system.

  12. A Comparative Study on Improved Arrhenius-Type and Artificial Neural Network Models to Predict High-Temperature Flow Behaviors in 20MnNiMo Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chun-tang; Liu, Ying-ying; Xia, Yu-feng

    2014-01-01

    The stress-strain data of 20MnNiMo alloy were collected from a series of hot compressions on Gleeble-1500 thermal-mechanical simulator in the temperature range of 1173∼1473 K and strain rate range of 0.01∼10 s−1. Based on the experimental data, the improved Arrhenius-type constitutive model and the artificial neural network (ANN) model were established to predict the high temperature flow stress of as-cast 20MnNiMo alloy. The accuracy and reliability of the improved Arrhenius-type model and the trained ANN model were further evaluated in terms of the correlation coefficient (R), the average absolute relative error (AARE), and the relative error (η). For the former, R and AARE were found to be 0.9954 and 5.26%, respectively, while, for the latter, 0.9997 and 1.02%, respectively. The relative errors (η) of the improved Arrhenius-type model and the ANN model were, respectively, in the range of −39.99%∼35.05% and −3.77%∼16.74%. As for the former, only 16.3% of the test data set possesses η-values within ±1%, while, as for the latter, more than 79% possesses. The results indicate that the ANN model presents a higher predictable ability than the improved Arrhenius-type constitutive model. PMID:24688358

  13. High-temperature creep rupture of low alloy ferritic steel butt-welded pipes subjected to combined internal pressure and end loadings.

    PubMed

    Vakili-Tahami, F; Hayhurst, D R; Wong, M T

    2005-11-15

    Constitutive equations are reviewed and presented for low alloy ferritic steels which undergo creep deformation and damage at high temperatures; and, a thermodynamic framework is provided for the deformation rate potentials used in the equations. Finite element continuum damage mechanics studies have been carried out using these constitutive equations on butt-welded low alloy ferritic steel pipes subjected to combined internal pressure and axial loads at 590 and 620 degrees C. Two dominant modes of failure have been identified: firstly, fusion boundary failure at high stresses; and, secondly, Type IV failure at low stresses. The stress level at which the switch in failure mechanism takes place has been found to be associated with the relative creep resistance and lifetimes, over a wide range of uniaxial stresses, for parent, heat affected zone, Type IV and weld materials. The equi-biaxial stress loading condition (mean diameter stress equal to the axial stress) has been confirmed to be the worst loading condition. For this condition, simple design formulae are proposed for both 590 and 620 degrees C.

  14. Microstructure and high temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-Ni gradient coating on TA2 titanium alloy fabricated by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fencheng; Mao, Yuqing; Lin, Xin; Zhou, Baosheng; Qian, Tao

    2016-09-01

    To improve the high temperature oxidation resistance of TA2 titanium alloy, a gradient Ni-Ti coating was laser cladded on the surface of the TA2 titanium alloy substrate, and the microstructure and oxidation behavior of the laser cladded coating were investigated experimentally. The gradient coating with a thickness of about 420-490 μm contains two different layers, e.g. a bright layer with coarse equiaxed grain and a dark layer with fine and columnar dendrites, and a transition layer with a thickness of about 10 μm exists between the substrate and the cladded coating. NiTi, NiTi2 and Ni3Ti intermetallic compounds are the main constructive phases of the laser cladded coating. The appearance of these phases enhances the microhardness, and the dense structure of the coating improves its oxidation resistance. The solidification procedure of the gradient coating is analyzed and different kinds of solidification processes occur due to the heat dissipation during the laser cladding process.

  15. High-temperature creep rupture of low alloy ferritic steel butt-welded pipes subjected to combined internal pressure and end loadings.

    PubMed

    Vakili-Tahami, F; Hayhurst, D R; Wong, M T

    2005-11-15

    Constitutive equations are reviewed and presented for low alloy ferritic steels which undergo creep deformation and damage at high temperatures; and, a thermodynamic framework is provided for the deformation rate potentials used in the equations. Finite element continuum damage mechanics studies have been carried out using these constitutive equations on butt-welded low alloy ferritic steel pipes subjected to combined internal pressure and axial loads at 590 and 620 degrees C. Two dominant modes of failure have been identified: firstly, fusion boundary failure at high stresses; and, secondly, Type IV failure at low stresses. The stress level at which the switch in failure mechanism takes place has been found to be associated with the relative creep resistance and lifetimes, over a wide range of uniaxial stresses, for parent, heat affected zone, Type IV and weld materials. The equi-biaxial stress loading condition (mean diameter stress equal to the axial stress) has been confirmed to be the worst loading condition. For this condition, simple design formulae are proposed for both 590 and 620 degrees C. PMID:16243708

  16. Inhibitory effect of boric acid on intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, H.; Hirano, H.; Koike, M.; Suda, M.

    1995-09-01

    The inhibitory effect of boric acid on the Intergranular Attack and Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGA/SCC) propagation behavior of steam generator (SG) tubing was studied under accelerated test conditions. Based on the analysis results of stress intensity factors at IGA/SCC crack tips, the notched C-ring tests were carried out to evaluate the effect of stress intensity and boric acid on the IGA/SCC crack propagation. The A.C. impedance measurement and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were also conducted to clarify the inhibitory effect of boric acid. Notched C-ring test results indicated that IGA/SCC crack velocity of alloy 600 increased gradually with increasing stress intensity factor in the range 4 to about 26 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}, which might be loaded on the IGA/SCC crack tips of actual SG tubes under PWR secondary conditions. Adding boric acid slightly retarded the crack velocity in both all volatile treatment (AVT) water and caustic solutions. IGA/SCC crack velocities were lower in nearly neutral solutions than in alkali or acidic solutions. Furthermore, A.C. impedance studies showed that the polarization resistances of oxide films formed in boric acid solutions were higher than those of films formed in acidic and alkali solutions. AES analysis revealed that boron content in the oxide films formed in acidic solution containing boric acid was lowest. Good agreement was obtained between the IGA/SCC inhibitory effect of boric acid and the formation of the stable oxide films containing boron.

  17. High-temperature, low-cycle fatigue of advanced copper-base alloys for rocket nozzles. Part 2: NASA 1.1, Glidcop, and sputtered copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Short-term tensile and low-cycle fatigue data are reported for five advance copper-base alloys: Sputtered Zr-Cu as received, sputtered Zr-Cu heat-treated, Glidcop AL-10, and NASA alloys 1-1A and 1-1B. Tensile tests were performed in argon at 538 C using an axial strain rate of 0.002/sec. Yield strength and ultimate tensile strength data are reported along with reduction in area values. Axial strain controlled low-cycle fatigue tests were performed in argon at 538C using an axial strain rate of 0.002/sec to define the fatigue life over the range from 100 to 3000 cycles for the five materials studied. It was found that the fatigue characteristics of the NASA 1-1A and NASA 1-1B compositions are identical and represent fatique life values which are much greater than those for the other materials tested. The effect of temperature on NASA 1-1B alloy at a strain rate of 0.002/sec was evaluated along with the effect of strain rates of 0.0004 and 0.01/sec at 538 C. Hold-time data are reported for the NASA 1-1B alloy at 538 C using 5 minute hold periods in tension only and compression only at two different strain range values. Hold periods in tension were much more detrimental than hold periods in compression.

  18. Thermomechanical behavior and microstructural evolution of a Ni(Pd)-rich Ni24.3Ti49.7Pd26 high temperature shape memory alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Benafan, O.; Garg, A.; Noebe, R. D.; Bigelow, G. S.; Padula, S. A.; Gaydosh, D. J.; Vaidyanathan, R.; Clausen, B.; Vogel, S. C.

    2015-04-20

    We investigated the effect of thermomechanical cycling on a slightly Ni(Pd)-rich Ni24.3Ti49.7Pd26 (near stochiometric Ni–Ti basis with Pd replacing Ni) high temperature shape memory alloy. Furthermore, aged tensile specimens (400 °C/24 h/furnace cooled) were subjected to constant-stress thermal cycling in conjunction with microstructural assessment via in situ neutron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), before and after testing. It was shown that in spite of the slightly Ni(Pd)-rich composition and heat treatment used to precipitation harden the alloy, the material exhibited dimensional instabilities with residual strain accumulation reaching 1.5% over 10 thermomechanical cycles. This was attributed to insufficient strengthening ofmore » the material (insufficient volume fraction of precipitate phase) to prevent plasticity from occurring concomitant with the martensitic transformation. In situ neutron diffraction revealed the presence of retained martensite while cycling under 300 MPa stress, which was also confirmed by transmission electron microscopy of post-cycled samples. Neutron diffraction analysis of the post-thermally-cycled samples under no-load revealed residual lattice strains in the martensite and austenite phases, remnant texture in the martensite phase, and peak broadening of the austenite phase. The texture we developed in the martensite phase was composed mainly of those martensitic tensile variants observed during thermomechanical cycling. Presence of a high density of dislocations, deformation twins, and retained martensite was revealed in the austenite state via in-situ TEM in the post-cycled material, providing an explanation for the observed peak broadening in the neutron diffraction spectra. Despite the dimensional instabilities, this alloy exhibited a biased transformation strain on the order of 3% and a two-way shape memory effect (TWSME) strain of ~2%, at relatively high actuation temperatures.« less

  19. Oxidation of high-temperature intermetallics; Proceedings of the Workshop, Cleveland, OH, Sept. 22, 23, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, Toni (Editor); Doychak, Joseph (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference on the high-temperature oxidation behavior of aerospace structures-applicable intermetallic compounds discusses the influence of reactive-element additions on the oxidation of Ni3Al base alloys, the effect of Ni3Al oxidation below 850 C on fracture behavior, the oxidation of FeAl + Hf, Zr, and B, the synergistic effect of Al and Si on the oxidation resistance of Fe alloys, and pack cementation coatings of Cr-Al on Fe, Ni, and Co alloys. Also discussed are the formation of alumina on Nb- and Ti-base alloys, the oxidation behavior of titanium aluminide alloys, silicide coatings for refractory metals, the oxidation of chromium disilicide, and the oxidation behavior of nickel beryllides.

  20. The Effects of Chemical Wash Additives on the Corrosion of Aerospace Alloys in Marine Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowell, Louis; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Joseph; Hodge, Tim; Barile, Ronald; Heidersbach, Robert; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology for comparing the relative effectiveness of four chemical products used for rinsing airplanes and helicopters. The products were applied on a weekly basis to a series of flat alloy panels exposed to an oceanfront marine environment for one year. The results are presented along with comparisons of exposures of the same alloys that were not washed, were washed with seawater, or washed with de-ionized water.

  1. Influence of Specimen Size on the SCC Growth Rate of Ni-Alloys Exposed to High Temperature Water

    SciTech Connect

    E Richey; D Morton; W Moshier

    2005-10-19

    Tests were conducted on a single heat of Alloy 600 using compact tension specimens ranging from 50.80 mm (2 inches) in gross thickness (2T) to 10.16 mm (0.4 inches, 0.4T) in gross thickness. Results indicated that at stress intensity factor (K) levels above 55 MPa{radical}m, the growth rate is affected by specimen size in deaerated primary water. The growth rate can be significantly faster in 0.4T and 0.6T (15.24 mm = 0.6 inches in gross thickness) specimens at these elevated K levels compared to 2T specimens. Stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth rates > 6 x 10{sup -7} mm/s were observed at 338 C and 40 cc/kg H{sub 2} in 0.6T and 0.4T specimens at these elevated K levels, although the fracture mode was not significantly affected by the specimen size. The SCC growth rate of 2T specimens under comparable test conditions was {approx}6 x 10{sup -8} mm/s. All of the specimens examined that were tested at K > 55 MPa{radical}m exhibited intergranular failure, although ductile dimples and cracked grains were observed in the 0.4T specimens loaded to the elevated K levels. The effect of specimen size on the crack growth behavior indicated by electric potential drop (EPD) monitoring at K > 55 MPa{radical}m was also reviewed. EPD indicated steady state crack growth during the tests conducted on 1T (25.4 mm = 1.0 inches in gross thickness) and 2T specimens. Steady state crack growth was not indicated by EPD for the 0.4T and 0.6T specimens loaded at K > 55 MPa{radical}m. EPD indicated large jumps in the crack length at discrete points. Initially, it was believed that these large, rapid increases in the crack length corresponded to ductile tearing of uncracked ligaments in the crack wake as the SCC crack advanced. However, examination of the fracture surfaces did not reveal any evidence of isolated regions of ductile tearing in the crack wake. The large increases in the EPD signal were due to strain bursts. These results highlight the need to base SCC growth rates on destructive

  2. Resilient and Corrosion-Proof Rolling Element Bearings Made from Superelastic Ni-Ti Alloys for Aerospace Mechanism Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Noebe, Ronald D.; Stanford, Malcolm; Padula, Santo A.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical components (bearings, gears, mechanisms) typically utilize hard materials to minimize wear and attain long life. In such components, heavily loaded contact points (e.g., meshing gear teeth, bearing ball-raceway contacts) experience high contact stresses. The combination of high hardness, heavy loads and high elastic modulus often leads to damaging contact stress. In addition, mechanical component materials, such as tool steel or silicon nitride exhibit limited recoverable strain (typically less than 1 percent). These material attributes can lead to Brinell damage (e.g., denting) particularly during transient overload events such as shock impacts that occur during the launching of space vehicles or the landing of aircraft. In this paper, a superelastic alloy, 60NiTi, is considered for rolling element bearing applications. A series of Rockwell and Brinell hardness, compressive strength, fatigue and tribology tests are conducted and reported. The combination of high hardness, moderate elastic modulus, large recoverable strain, low density, and intrinsic corrosion immunity provide a path to bearings largely impervious to shock load damage. It is anticipated that bearings and components made from alloys with such attributes can alleviate many problems encountered in advanced aerospace applications.

  3. The relative stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of candidate aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    Stress corrosion tests of Al-Li-Cu powder metallurgy alloys are described. Alloys investigated were Al-2.6% Li-1.4% and Al-2.6% Li-1.4% Cu-1.6% Mg. The base properties of the alloys were characterized. Process, heat treatment, and size/orientational effects on the tensile and fracture behavior were investigated. Metallurgical and electrochemical conditions are identified which provide reproducible and controlled parameters for stress corrosion evaluation. Preliminary stress corrosion test results are reported. Both Al-Li-Cu alloys appear more susceptible to stress corrosion crack initiation than 7075-T6 aluminum, with the magnesium bearing alloy being the most susceptible. Tests to determine the threshold stress intensity for the base and magnesium bearing alloys are underway. Twelve each, bolt loaded DCB type specimens are under test (120 days) and limited crack growth in these precracked specimens has been observed. General corrosion in the aqueous sodium chloride environment is thought to be obscuring results through crack tip blunting.

  4. Development and characterization of Powder Metallurgy (PM) 2XXX series Al alloy products and Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) 2XXX Al/SiC materials for high temperature aircraft structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellman, D. J.; Gurganus, T. B.; Walker, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a series of material studies performed by the Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company over the time period from 1980 to 1991 are discussed. The technical objective of these evaluations was to develop and characterize advanced aluminum alloy materials with temperature capabilities extending to 350 F. An overview is given of the first five alloy development efforts under this contract. Prior work conducted during the first five modifications of the alloy development program are listed. Recent developments based on the addition of high Zr levels to an optimum Al-Cu-Mg alloy composition by powder metallurgy processing are discussed. Both reinforced and SiC or B4C ceramic reinforced alloys were explored to achieve specific target goals for high temperature aluminum alloy applications.

  5. New vistas in the determination of hydrogen in aerospace engine metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    The application of diffusion theory to the analysis of hydrogen desorption data has been studied. From these analyses, important information concerning hydrogen solubilities and the nature of the hydrogen distributions in the metal has been obtained. Two nickel base alloys, Rene' 41 and Waspaloy, and one ferrous alloy, 4340 steel, were studied in this work. For the nickel base alloys, it was found that the hydrogen distributions after electrolytic charging conformed closely to those which would be predicted by diffusion theory. The hydrogen distributions in electrolytically charged 4340 steel, on the other hand, were essentially uniform in nature, which would not be predicted by diffusion theory. Finally, it has been found that the hydrogen desorption is completely explained by the nature of the hydrogen distribution in the metal, and that the 'fast' hydrogen is not due to surface and subsurface hydride formation, as was originally proposed.

  6. Fatigue-crack propagation in advanced aerospace materials: Aluminum-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1988-10-01

    Characteristics of fatigue-crack propagation behavior are reviewed for recently developed commercial aluminum-lithium alloys, with emphasis on the underlying micromechanisms associated with crack advance and their implications to damage-tolerant design. Specifically, crack-growth kinetics in Alcoa 2090-T8E41, Alcan 8090 and 8091, and Pechiney 2091 alloys, and in certain powder-metallurgy alloys, are examined as a function of microstructure, plate orientation, temperature, crack size, load ratio and loading sequence. In general, it is found that growth rates for long (> 10 mm) cracks are nearly 2--3 orders of magnitude slower than in traditional 2000 and 7000 series alloys at comparable stress-intensity levels. In additions, Al-Li alloys shown enhanced crack-growth retardations following the application of tensile overloads and retain superior fatigue properties even after prolonged exposure at overaging temperatures; however, they are less impressive in the presence of compression overloads and further show accelerated crack-growth behavior for microstructurally-small (2--1000 {mu}m) cracks (some three orders of magnitude faster than long cracks). These contrasting observations are attributed to a very prominent role of crack-tip shielding during fatigue-crack growth in Al-Li alloys, promoted largely by the tortuous and zig-zag nature of the crack-path morphologies. Such crack paths result in locally reduced crack-tip stress intensities, due to crack deflection and consequent crack wedging from fracture-surface asperities (roughness-induced crack closure); however, such mechanisms are far less potent in the presence of compressive loads, which act to crush the asperities, and for small cracks, where the limited crack wake severely restricts the shielding effect. 50 refs., 21 figs.

  7. Microstructural and Mechanical Property Characterization of Shear Formed Aerospace Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troeger, Lillianne P.; Domack, Marcia S.; Wagner, John A.

    2000-01-01

    Advanced manufacturing processes such as near-net-shape forming can reduce production costs and increase the reliability of launch vehicle and airframe structural components through the reduction of material scrap and part count and the minimization of joints. The current research is an investigation of the processing-microstructure-property relationships for shear formed cylinders of the Al-Cu-Li-Mg-Ag alloy 2195 for space applications and the Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy C415 for airframe applications. Cylinders which had undergone various amounts of shear-forming strain were studied to correlate the grain structure, texture, and mechanical properties developed during and after shear forming.

  8. On the Recovery Stress of a Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benafan, O.; Noebe, R. D.; Padula, S. A., II; Bigelow, G. S.; Gaydosh, D. J.; Garg, A.; Halsmer, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recovery stress in shape memory alloys (SMAs), also known as blocking stress, is an important property generally obtained during heating under a dimensional constraint as the material undergoes the martensitic phase transformation. This property has been instinctively utilized in most SMA shape-setting procedures, and has been used in numerous applications such as fastening and joining, rock splitting, safety release mechanisms, reinforced composites, medical devices, and many other applications. The stress generation is also relevant to actuator applications where jamming loads (e.g., in case the actuator gets stuck and is impeded from moving) need to be determined for proper hardware sizing. Recovery stresses in many SMA systems have been shown to reach stresses in the order of 800 MPa, achieved via thermo-mechanical training such as pre-straining, heat treatments or other factors. With the advent of high strength, high temperature SMAs, recovery stress data has been rarely probed, and there is no information pertinent to the magnitudes of these stresses. Thus, the purpose of this work is to investigate the recovery stress capability of a precipitation strengthened, Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 (at.) high temperature SMA in uniaxial tension and compression. This material has been shown to exhibit outstanding strength and stability during constant-stress, thermal cycling, but no data exists on constant-strain thermal cycling. Several training routines were implemented as part of this work including isothermal pre-straining, isobaric thermal cycling, and isothermal cyclic training routines. Regardless of the training method used, the recovery stress was characterized using constant-strain (strain-controlled condition) thermal cycling between the upper and lower cycle temperatures. Preliminary results indicate recovery stresses in excess of 1.5 GPa were obtained after a specific training routine. This stress magnitude is significantly higher than conventional NiTi stress

  9. Effect of high-temperature water and hydrogen on the fracture behavior of a low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, S.; Seifert, H.-P.; Spätig, P.; Que, Z.

    2016-09-01

    Structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is critical for safety and lifetime. Possible degradation of fracture resistance of RPV steel due to exposure to coolant and hydrogen is a concern. In this study tensile and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) tests in air (hydrogen pre-charged) and EFPM tests in hydrogenated/oxygenated high-temperature water (HTW) was done, using a low-alloy RPV steel. 2-5 wppm hydrogen caused embrittlement in air tensile tests at room temperature (25 °C) and at 288 °C, effects being more significant at 25 °C and in simulated weld coarse grain heat affected zone material. Embrittlement at 288 °C is strain rate dependent and is due to localized plastic deformation. Hydrogen pre-charging/HTW exposure did not deteriorate the fracture resistance at 288 °C in base metal, for investigated loading rate range. Clear change in fracture morphology and deformation structures was observed, similar to that after air tests with hydrogen.

  10. Effect of aluminizing of Cr-containing ferritic alloys on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell sealing glass

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2008-12-01

    A novel high-temperature alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two metallic coupons of Cr-containing ferritic stainless steel for seal strength evaluation. In previous work, SrCrO4 was found to form along the glass/steel interface, which led to severe strength degradation. In the present study, aluminization of the steel surface was investigated as a remedy to minimize or prevent the strontium chromate formation. Three different processes for aluminization were evaluated with Crofer22APU stainless steel: pack cementation, vapor phase deposition, and aerosol spraying. It was found that pack cementation resulted in a rough surface with occasional cracks in the Al-diffused region. Vapor phase deposition yielded a smoother surface, but the resulting high Al content increased the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), resulting in failure of joined coupons. Aerosol spraying of an Al-containing salt resulted in formation of a thin aluminum oxide layer without any surface damage. The room temperature seal strength was evaluated in the as-fired state and in environmentally aged conditions. In contrast to earlier results with uncoated Crofer22APU, the aluminized samples showed no strength degradation even for samples aged in air. Interfacial and chemical compatibility was also investigated. The results showed aluminization to be a viable candidate approach to minimize undesirable chromate formation between alkaline earth silicate sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloys for SOFC applications.

  11. Conceptual design of a forced-flow-cooled 20-kA current lead using Ag-alloy-sheathed Bi-2223 high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, R.; Hull, J.R.

    1994-11-01

    The use of high-temperature superconductors in current leads to reduce refrigeration power has been investigated by many groups in the past. Most used YBCO and Bi-2212 bulk superconductors, although their critical current density is not very high. In this paper, BI-2223 HTSC tapes sheathed with Ag alloys are used in the design of a 20-kA current lead because of their higher critical current in medium magnetic fields. The lead current of 20 kA is related to the coil current of the planned stellarator WENDELSTEIN 7-X. Forced-now helium cooling has been used in the design, allowing position-independent and well-controlled operation. The design characteristics of the lead are presented and 4-K helium cooling of the whole lead, as well as 60-K helium cooling of the copper part of the lead, is discussed. The power consumption at zero current, and the lead`s behaviour in case of loss of coolant flow, are given, The results of the design allow extrapolation to current leads of the 50-kA range.

  12. Effects of Alloying Elements on High-Temperature Oxidation and Sticking Occurring During Hot Rolling of Modified Ferritic STS430J1L Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Dae Jin; Lee, Jong Seog; Kim, Nack J.; Lee, Sunghak

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, mechanisms of sticking that occurs during hot rolling of modified STS430J1L ferritic stainless steels were investigated by using a pilot-plant-scale rolling machine, and the effects of alloying elements on sticking were analyzed by the high-temperature oxidation behavior. The hot-rolling test results indicated that the Cr oxide layer formed in a heating furnace was broken off and infiltrated the steel, thereby forming Cr oxides on the rolled steel surface. Because the surface region without oxides underwent a reduction in hardness rather than the surface region with oxides, the thickness of the surface oxide layer favorably affected the resistance to sticking. The addition of Zr, Cu, and Ni to the ferritic stainless steels worked in favor of the decreased sticking, but the Si addition negatively affected the resistance to sticking. In the Si-rich steel, Si oxides were continuously formed along the interfacial area between the Cr oxide layer and the base steel, and interrupted the formation and growth of the Cr oxide layer. Because the Si addition played a role in increasing sticking, the reduction in Si content was desirable for preventing sticking.

  13. AFM study of the effects of laser surface remelting on the morphology of Al-Fe aerospace alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pariona, Moises Meza; Teleginski, Viviane; Santos, Kelly dos; Leandro Ribeiro dos Santos, Everton; Aparecida de Oliveira Camargo de Lima, Angela; Riva, Rudimar

    2012-12-15

    Laser beam welding has recently been incorporated into the fabrication process of aircraft and automobile structures. Surface roughness is an important parameter of product quality that strongly affects the performance of mechanical parts, as well as production costs. This parameter influences the mechanical properties such as fatigue behavior, corrosion resistance, creep life, etc., and other functional characteristics such as friction, wear, light reflection, heat transmission, lubrification, electrical conductivity, etc. The effects of laser surface remelting (LSR) on the morphology of Al-Fe aerospace alloys were examined before and after surface treatments, using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), low-angle X-ray diffraction (LA-XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), microhardness measurements (Vickers hardness), and cyclic voltammetry. This analysis was performed on both laser-treated and untreated sanded surfaces, revealing significant differences. The LA-XRD analysis revealed the presence of alumina, simple metals and metastable intermetallic phases, which considerably improved the microhardness of laser-remelted surfaces. The morphology produced by laser surface remelting enhanced the microstructure of the Al-Fe alloys by reducing their roughness and increasing their hardness. The treated surfaces showed passivity and stability characteristics in the electrolytic medium employed in this study. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples laser-treated and untreated showed significant differences. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The La-XRD revealed the presence of alumina in Al-1.5 wt.% Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated reducing the roughness and increasing the hardness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated surfaces showed characteristic passive in the electrolytic medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated is a promising technique for applications technological.

  14. Effect of Thermomechanical Processing on the Microstructure, Properties, and Work Behavior of a Ti50.5 Ni29.5 Pt20 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald; Draper, Susan; Gaydosh, Darrell; Garga, Anita; Lerch, Brad; Penney, Nicholas; Begelow, Glen; Padula, Santo, II; Brown, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    TiNiPt shape memory alloys are particularly promising for use as solid state actuators in environments up to 300 C, due to a reasonable balance of properties, including acceptable work output. However, one of the challenges to commercializing a viable high-temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) is to establish the appropriate primary and secondary processing techniques for fabrication of the material in a required product form such as rod and wire. Consequently, a Ti(50.5)Ni(29.5)Pt20 alloy was processed using several techniques including single-pass high-temperature extrusion, multiple-pass high-temperature extrusion, and cold drawing to produce bar stock, thin rod, and fine wire, respectively. The effects of heat treatment on the hardness, grain size, room temperature tensile properties, and transformation temperatures of hot- and cold-worked material were examined. Basic tensile properties as a function of temperature and the strain-temperature response of the alloy under constant load, for the determination of work output, were also investigated for various forms of the Ti(50.5)Ni(29.5)Pt20 alloy, including fine wire.

  15. Analysis of thermoelectric properties of high-temperature complex alloys of nickel-base, iron-base and cobalt-base groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, R.

    1984-01-01

    The thermoelectric properties alloys of the nickel-base, iron-base, and cobalt-base groups containing from 1% to 25% 106 chromium were compared and correlated with the following material characteristics: atomic percent of the principle alloy constituent; ratio of concentration of two constituents; alloy physical property (electrical resistivity); alloy phase structure (percent precipitate or percent hardener content); alloy electronic structure (electron concentration). For solid-solution-type alloys the most consistent correlation was obtained with electron concentration, for precipitation-hardenable alloys of the nickel-base superalloy group, the thermoelectric potential correlated with hardener content in the alloy structure. For solid-solution-type alloys, no problems were found with thermoelectric stability to 1000; for precipitation-hardenable alloys, thermoelectric stability was dependent on phase stability. The effects of the compositional range of alloy constituents on temperature measurement uncertainty are discussed.

  16. Characterization of microstructure, local deformation and microchemistry in Alloy 690 heat-affected zone and stress corrosion cracking in high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhanpeng; Chen, Junjie; Shoji, Tetsuo; Takeda, Yoichi; Yamazaki, Seiya

    2015-10-01

    With increasing the distance from the weld fusion line in an Alloy 690 heat-affected zone, micro-hardness decreases, kernel average misorientation decreases and the fraction of Σ3 boundaries increases. Chromium depletion at grain boundaries in the Alloy 690 heat-affected zone is less significant than that in an Alloy 600 heat-affected zone. Alloy 690 heat-affected zone exhibits much higher IGSCC resistance than Alloy 600 heat-affected zone in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water. Heavily cold worked Alloy 690 exhibits localized intergranular stress corrosion cracking. The effects of metallurgical and mechanical properties on stress corrosion cracking in Alloy 690 are discussed.

  17. Characterization of a New Phase and Its Effect on the Work Characteristics of a Near-Stoichiometric Ni30Pt20Ti50 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy (HTSMA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, A.; Gaydosh, D.; Noebe, R.D.; Padula II, Santo; Bigelow, G.S.; Kaufman, M.; Kovarik, L.; Mills, M.J.; Diercks, D.; McMurray, S.

    2008-01-01

    A new phase observed in a nominal Ni30Pt20Ti50 (at.%) high temperature shape memory alloy has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy and 3-D atom probe tomography. This phase forms homogeneously in the B2 austenite matrix by a nucleation and growth mechanism and results in a concomitant increase in the martensitic transformation temperature of the base alloy. Although the structure of this phase typically contains a high density of faults making characterization difficult, it appears to be trigonal (-3m point group) with a(sub o) approx. 1.28 nm and c(sub o) approx. 1.4 nm. Precipitation of this phase increases the microhardness of the alloy substantially over that of the solution treated and quenched single-phase material. The effect of precipitation strengthening on the work characteristics of the alloy has been explored through load-biased strain-temperature testing in the solution-treated condition and after aging at 500 C for times ranging from 1 to 256 hours. Work output was found to increase in the aged alloy as a result of an increase in transformation strain, but was not very sensitive to aging time. The amount of permanent deformation that occurred during thermal cycling under load was small but increased with increasing aging time and stress. Nevertheless, the dimensional stability of the alloy at short aging times (1-4 hours) was still very good making it a potentially useful material for high-temperature actuator applications.

  18. Recent advances and developments in refractory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T.G.; Wadsworth, J.

    1993-11-01

    Refractory metal alloys based on Mo, W, Re, Ta, and Nb (Cb) find applications in a wide range of aerospace applications because of their high melting points and high-temperature strength. This paper, presents recent progress in understanding and applications of these alloys. Recent studies to improve the oxidation and mechanical behavior of refractory metal alloys, and particularly Nb alloys, are also discussed. Some Re structures, for extremely high temperature applications (> 2000C), made by CVD and P/M processes, are also illustrated. Interesting work on the development of new W alloys (W-HfC-X) and the characterization of some commercial refractory metals, e.g., K-doped W, TZM, and Nb-1%Zr, continues. Finally, recent developments in high temperature composites reinforced with refractory metal filaments, and refractory metal-based intermetallics, e.g., Nb{sub 3}Al, Nb{sub 2}Be{sub 17}, and MoSi{sub 2}, are briefly described.

  19. Analysis and Evaluation of Novel Al-Mg-Sc-Zr Aerospace Alloy Strip Produced Using the Horizontal Single Belt Casting (HSBC) Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Sa; Celikin, Mert; Isac, Mihaiela; Guthrie, Roderick I. L.

    2015-04-01

    Horizontal single belt casting (HSBC) is a near net shape casting process in which molten metal is directly cast into thin strips, at high cooling rates (order of several 100 °C/s), with the potential for high volume, friction free, continuous production of metal strips. This casting process was used in the present work to produce strips of Al-Mg alloys in the AA5000 series, with additions of Sc and Zr. Such aluminum alloys show exceptional potential as a structural material for transportation/aerospace applications. To demonstrate the suitability of the HSBC process to manufacture competitive strip products of Al-Mg-Sc-Zr, the mechanical properties and microstructures of the strips produced using the HSBC process were compared with conventionally cast products. The effects of annealing on the mechanical properties of the strip-cast Al-Mg-Sc-Zr alloys were also investigated.

  20. Comparison of high frequency, high temperature core loss and B-H loop characteristics of an 80 Ni-Fe crystalline alloy and two iron-based amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieserman, William R.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Niedra, Janis M.

    1991-01-01

    Limited experimental data exists for the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loops for soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high frequency and high temperature. This experimental study investigates the specific core loss and dynamic B-H characteristics of a nickel-iron crystalline magnetic alloy (Supermalloy) and two iron-based amorphous magnetic materials (Metglas 2605S-3A and Metglas 2605SC) over the frequency range of 1-50 kHz and temperature range of 23-300 C under sinusoidal voltage excitation. The effects of maximum magnetic flux density, frequency, and temperature on the specific core loss and on the size and shape of the B-H loops are examined. The Supermalloy and Metglass 2605S-3A and 2605SC data are used to compare the core loss of transformers with identical kVA and voltage ratings.

  1. Intermetallic-Based High-Temperature Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1999-04-25

    The intermetallic-based alloys for high-temperature applications are introduced. General characteristics of intermetallics are followed by identification of nickel and iron aluminides as the most practical alloys for commercial applications. An overview of the alloy compositions, melting processes, and mechanical properties for nickel and iron aluminizes are presented. The current applications and commercial producers of nickel and iron aluminizes are given. A brief description of the future prospects of intermetallic-based alloys is also given.

  2. Development of Semi-Stochastic Algorithm for Optimizing Alloy Composition of High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) for Desired Mechanical and Corrosion Properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Dulikravich, George S.; Sikka, Vinod K.; Muralidharan, G.

    2006-06-01

    The goal of this project was to adapt and use an advanced semi-stochastic algorithm for constrained multiobjective optimization and combine it with experimental testing and verification to determine optimum concentrations of alloying elements in heat-resistant and corrosion-resistant H-series stainless steel alloys that will simultaneously maximize a number of alloy's mechanical and corrosion properties.

  3. Method for producing evaporation inhibiting coating for protection of silicon--germanium and silicon--molybdenum alloys at high temperatures in vacuum

    DOEpatents

    Chao, P.J.

    1974-01-01

    A method is given for protecting Si--Ge and Si-- Mo alloys for use in thermocouples. The alloys are coated with silicon to inhibit the evaporation of the alloys at high tempenatures in a vacuum. Specific means and methods are provided. (5 fig) (Official Gazette)

  4. High-Frequency, High-Temperature Fretting Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matlik, J. F.; Farris, T. N.; Haake, F. K.; Swanson, G. R.; Duke, G. C.

    2005-01-01

    Fretting is a structural damage mechanism observed when two nominally clamped surfaces are subjected to an oscillatory loading. A critical location for fretting induced damage has been identified at the blade/disk and blade/damper interfaces of gas turbine engine turbomachinery and space propulsion components. The high-temperature, high-frequency loading environment seen by these components lead to severe stress gradients at the edge-of-contact. These contact stresses drive crack nucleation and propagation in fretting and are very sensitive to the geometry of the contacting bodies, the contact loads, materials, temperature, and contact surface tribology (friction). To diagnose the threat that small and relatively undetectable fretting cracks pose to damage tolerance and structural integrity of in-service components, the objective of this work is to develop a well-characterized experimental fretting rig capable of investigating fretting behavior of advanced aerospace alloys subjected to load and temperature conditions representative of such turbomachinery components.

  5. Improved High-Temperature Microstructural Stability and Creep Property of Novel Co-Base Single-Crystal Alloys Containing Ta and Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, F.; Zhou, H. J.; Feng, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The influence of Ta and Ti additions on microstructural stability and creep behavior in novel Co-Al-W base single-crystal alloys has been investigated. Compared to the ternary alloy, the γ' solvus temperature and γ' volume fraction were raised by individual additions of Ta and Ti, and increased further in the quinary alloy containing both alloying additions. In contrast to ternary and quaternary alloys, an improved microstructural stability with the stable γ- γ' two-phase microstructure and more than 60% γ' volume fraction existed in the quinary alloy after prolonged aging treatment at 1050°C for 1000 h. The creep behavior at 900°C revealed lower creep rates and longer rupture lives in the quaternary alloys compared to the ternary alloy, whereas the quinary alloy exhibited even better creep resistance. When the creep temperature was elevated to about 1000°C, the creep resistance of the quinary alloy exceeded the previously reported Co-Al-W-base alloys and first-generation Ni-base single-crystal superalloys. The improved creep resistance at approximately 1000°C was considered to be associated with high γ' volume fraction, γ' directional coarsening, and dislocation substructure, which included γ- γ' interfacial dislocation networks and the sheared γ' precipitates containing stacking faults and anti-phase boundaries.

  6. Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Severe Plastic Deformation and Thermomechanical Training on the Functional Stability of Ti50.5Ni24.5Pd25 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atli, K. C.; Karaman, I.; Noebe, R. D.; Maier, H. J.

    2010-01-01

    We compare the effectiveness of a conventional thermomechanical training procedure and severe plastic deformation via equal channel angular extrusion to achieve improved functional stability in a Ti50.5Ni24.5Pd25 high-temperature shape memory alloy. Thermomechanical testing indicates that both methods result in enhanced shape memory characteristics, such as reduced irrecoverable strain and thermal hysteresis. The mechanisms responsible for the improvements are discussed in light of microstructural findings from transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Properties of a Ni(sub 19.5)Pd(sub 30)Ti(sub 50.5) high-temperature shape memory alloy in tension and compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald; Padula, Santo, II; Bigelow, Glen; Rios, Orlando; Garg, Anita; Lerch, Brad

    2006-01-01

    Potential applications involving high-temperature shape memory alloys have been growing in recent years. Even in those cases where promising new alloys have been identified, the knowledge base for such materials contains gaps crucial to their maturation and implementation in actuator and other applications. We begin to address this issue by characterizing the mechanical behavior of a Ni19.5Pd30Ti50.5 high-temperature shape memory alloy in both uniaxial tension and compression at various temperatures. Differences in the isothermal uniaxial deformation behavior were most notable at test temperatures below the martensite finish temperature. The elastic modulus of the material was very dependent on strain level; therefore, dynamic Young#s Modulus was determined as a function of temperature by an impulse excitation technique. More importantly, the performance of a thermally activated actuator material is dependent on the work output of the alloy. Consequently, the strain-temperature response of the Ni19.5Pd30Ti50.5 alloy under various loads was determined in both tension and compression and the specific work output calculated and compared in both loading conditions. It was found that the transformation strain and thus, the specific work output were similar regardless of the loading condition. Also, in both tension and compression, the strain-temperature loops determined under constant load conditions did not close due to the fact that the transformation strain during cooling was always larger than the transformation strain during heating. This was apparently the result of permanent plastic deformation of the martensite phase with each cycle. Consequently, before this alloy can be used under cyclic actuation conditions, modification of the microstructure or composition would be required to increase the resistance of the alloy to plastic deformation by slip.

  8. High-Temperature Optical Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Varga, Donald J.; Floyd, Bertram M.

    2010-01-01

    A high-temperature optical sensor (see Figure 1) has been developed that can operate at temperatures up to 1,000 C. The sensor development process consists of two parts: packaging of a fiber Bragg grating into a housing that allows a more sturdy thermally stable device, and a technological process to which the device is subjected to in order to meet environmental requirements of several hundred C. This technology uses a newly discovered phenomenon of the formation of thermally stable secondary Bragg gratings in communication-grade fibers at high temperatures to construct robust, optical, high-temperature sensors. Testing and performance evaluation (see Figure 2) of packaged sensors demonstrated operability of the devices at 1,000 C for several hundred hours, and during numerous thermal cycling from 400 to 800 C with different heating rates. The technology significantly extends applicability of optical sensors to high-temperature environments including ground testing of engines, flight propulsion control, thermal protection monitoring of launch vehicles, etc. It may also find applications in such non-aerospace arenas as monitoring of nuclear reactors, furnaces, chemical processes, and other hightemperature environments where other measurement techniques are either unreliable, dangerous, undesirable, or unavailable.

  9. High temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chazen, Melvin L. (Inventor); Mueller, Thomas J. (Inventor); Kruse, William D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft (20) is provided herein. The high temperature thrust chamber comprises a hollow body member (12) having an outer surface and an internal surface (16) defining the high temperature chamber (10). The body member (12) is made substantially of rhenium. An alloy (18) consisting of iridium and at least alloying metal selected of the group consisting of rhodium, platinum and palladium is deposited on at least a portion of the internal surface (16) of the body member (12). The iridium and the alloying metal are electrodeposited onto the body member (12). A HIP cycle is performed upon the body member (12) to cause the coating of iridium and the alloying metal to form the alloy (18) which protects the body member (12) from oxidation.

  10. High-Strength Aluminum Casting Alloy for High-Temperature Applications (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Project No. 97-10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    A new aluminum-silicon alloy has been successfully developed at Marshall Space Flight Center that has a significant improvement in tensile strength at elevated temperatures (550 to 700 F). For instance, the new alloy shows in average tensile strength of at least 90 percent higher than the current 390 aluminum piston alloy tested at 500 F. Compared to conventional aluminum alloys, automotive engines using the new piston alloy will have improved gas mileage, and may produce less air pollution in order to meet the future U.S. automotive legislative requirements for low hydrocarbon emissions. The projected cost for this alloy is less than $0.95/lb, and it readily allows the automotive components to be cast at a high production volume with a low, fully accounted cost. It is economically produced by pouring molten metal directly into conventional permanent steel molds or die casting.

  11. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST). Supplement: Research on Materials for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the progress achieved over the past 6 to 12 months on four graduate student projects conducted within the NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program. These studies were aimed specifically at light metallic alloy issues relevant to the High Speed Civil Transport. Research on Hydrogen-Enhanced Fracture of High-Strength Titanium Alloy Sheet refined successfully the high resolution R-curve method necessary to characterize initiation and growth fracture toughnesses. For solution treated and aged Low Cost Beta without hydrogen precharging, fracture is by ductile transgranular processes at 25 C, but standardized initiation toughnesses are somewhat low and crack extension is resolved at still lower K-levels. This fracture resistance is degraded substantially, by between 700 and 1000 wppm of dissolved hydrogen, and a fracture mode change is affected. The surface oxide on P-titanium alloys hinders hydrogen uptake and complicates the electrochemical introduction of low hydrogen concentrations that are critical to applications of these alloys. Ti-15-3 sheet was obtained for study during the next reporting period. Research on Mechanisms of deformation and Fracture in High-Strength Titanium Alloys is examining the microstructure and fatigue resistance of very thin sheet. Aging experiments on 0. 14 mm thick (0.0055 inch) foil show microstructural agility that may be used to enhance fatigue performance. Fatigue testing of Ti-15-3 sheet has begun. The effects of various thermo-mechanical processing regimens on mechanical properties will be examined and deformation modes identified. Research on the Effect of Texture and Precipitates on Mechanical Property Anisotropy of Al-Cu-Mg-X and Al-Cu alloys demonstrated that models predict a minor influence of stress-induced alignment of Phi, caused by the application of a tensile stress during aging, on the yield stress anisotropy of both modified AA2519 and a model Al-Cu binary alloy. This project

  12. Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabeza, Sandra; Garcés, Gerardo; Pérez, Pablo; Adeva, Paloma

    2014-07-01

    The Mg98.5Gd1Zn0.5 alloy produced by a powder metallurgy route was studied and compared with the same alloy produced by extrusion of ingots. Atomized powders were cold compacted and extruded at 623 K and 673 K (350 °C and 400 °C). The microstructure of extruded materials was characterized by α-Mg grains, and Mg3Gd and 14H-LPSO particles located at grain boundaries. Grain size decreased from 6.8 μm in the extruded ingot, down to 1.6 μm for powders extruded at 623 K (350 °C). Grain refinement resulted in an increase in mechanical properties at room and high temperatures. Moreover, at high temperatures the PM alloy showed superplasticity at high strain rates, with elongations to failure up to 700 pct.

  13. Solidification Paths and Phase Components at High Temperatures of High-Zn Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloys with Different Mg and Cu Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, W. X.; Hou, L. G.; Liu, J. C.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, F.; Liu, J. T.; Zhuang, L. Z.; Zhang, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    Studies were carried out systematically on a series of Al-8.5 wt pct Zn- xMg- yCu alloys ( x is about 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 wt pct, and y is about 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 2.9 wt pct). The effects of alloying elements Mg and Cu on the microstructures of as-cast and homogenized alloys were investigated using the computational/experimental approach. It shows that Mg(Zn,Al,Cu)2 ( σ) phase can exist in all the as-cast alloys without any observable Mg32(Al,Zn)49/Al2Mg3Zn3 ( T) or Al2CuMg ( S) phase, whereas Al2Cu ( θ) phase is prone to exist in the alloys with low Mg and high Cu contents. Thermodynamic calculation shows that the real solidification paths of the designed alloys fall in between the Scheil and the equilibrium conditions, and close to the former. After the long-time homogenization [733 K (460 °C)/168 hours] and the two-step homogenization [733 K (460 °C)/24 hours + 748 K (475 °C)/24 hours], the phase components of the designed alloys are generally consistent with the calculated phase diagrams. At 733 K (460 °C), the phase components in the thermodynamic equilibrium state are greatly influenced by Mg content, and the alloys with low Mg content are more likely to be in single-Al phase field even if the alloys contain high Cu content. At 748 K (475 °C), the dissolution of the second phases is more effective, and the phase components in the thermodynamic equilibrium state are dominated primarily by (Mg + Cu) content, except the alloys with (Mg + Cu) ≳ 4.35 wt pct, all designed alloys are in single-Al phase field.

  14. Aluminum-lithium for aerospace

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, P.S.; Wolf, G.J.

    1996-10-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys were developed primarily to reduce the weight of aircraft and aerospace structures. Lithium is the lightest metallic element, and each 1% of lithium added to aluminum reduces alloy density by about 3% and increases modulus by about 5%. Though lithium has a solubility limit of 4.2% in aluminum, the amount of lithium ranges between 1 and 3% in commercial alloys. Aluminum-lithium alloys are most often selected for aerospace components because of their low density, high strength, and high specific modulus. However, other applications now exploit their excellent fatigue resistance and cryogenic toughness.

  15. Nanostructured Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} coatings for high-temperature protection of titanium alloy during ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chonggui; Wang You; Tian Wei; Yang Yong

    2010-08-15

    Plasma-sprayed nanostructured Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-13 wt.%TiO{sub 2} coatings were successfully fabricated on titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-4V) using as-prepared feedstock. Ablation experiments for the titanium alloy samples with or without a coating were carried out using a Metco 9MB plasma gun. The microstructure, phase constituents and mechanical properties of the titanium alloys before and after ablation were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Vickers hardness tester. The surface morphologies, cross-sectional microstructure and hardness of titanium alloys with coatings are similar before and after ablation. In contrast, the microstructure and mechanical properties of the titanium alloy without coating are significantly changed after ablation. The surface coating is found to serve as a protective coating during ablation.

  16. Improved high-temperature silicide coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopp, W. D.; Stephens, J. R.; Stetson, A. R.; Wimber, R. T.

    1969-01-01

    Special technique for applying silicide coatings to refractory metal alloys improves their high-temperature protective capability. Refractory metal powders mixed with a baked-out organic binder and sintered in a vacuum produces a porous alloy layer on the surface. Exposing the layer to hot silicon converts it to a silicide.

  17. Texture and mechanical properties of tape substrates from binary and ternary copper alloys for second-generation high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlebnikova, Yu. V.; Rodionov, D. P.; Gervas'eva, I. V.; Suaridze, T. R.; Egorova, L. Yu.; Akshentsev, Yu. N.; Kazantsev, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    The process of texture formation in tapes made of a number of binary and ternary copper alloys upon cold rolling to degrees of deformation of 98.6-99% and subsequent recrystallization annealing has been studied. The possibility of designing multicomponent alloys based on the binary Cu-30% Ni alloy additionally alloyed with elements that strengthen the fcc matrix, such as iron or chromium, has been shown. The opportunity of obtaining a perfect cube texture in a thin tape made of binary and ternary copper alloys opens prospects for their use as substrates in the technology of second-generation HTSC cables. Optimum regimes of annealing have been determined, which make it possible to obtain in the Cu- M and Cu-(30-40)Ni- M ( M = Fe, Cr, Mn) alloys a perfect biaxial texture with the fraction of cube grains {001}<100> on the surface of the tape more than 94%. The estimation of the mechanical properties of the textured tapes of the investigated alloys demonstrates a yield strength that is 2.5-4.5 times greater than that in the textured tape of pure copper.

  18. Incorporating the Johnson-Cook Constitutive Model and a Soft Computational Approach for Predicting the High-Temperature Flow Behavior of Sn-5Sb Solder Alloy: A Comparative Study for Processing Map Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafaeenezhad, H.; Seyedein, S. H.; Aboutalebi, M. R.; Eivani, A. R.

    2016-09-01

    The high-temperature flow behavior of Sn-5Sb lead-free solder alloy has been investigated using isothermal hot compression experiments at 298 K to 400 K and strain rate between 0.0005 s-1 and 0.01 s-1. The flow stress under these test conditions was modeled using constitutive equations based on the Johnson-Cook (J-C) model and an artificial neural network (ANN). Three input factors, i.e., temperature, strain rate, and true strain, were incorporated into the network, and the flow stress was considered as the system output. One hidden layer was adopted in the simulations. Furthermore, a comparative study was carried out on the potential of the two proposed models to characterize the high-temperature flow behavior of this alloy. The capability of the models was assessed by comparing the simulation predictions using a correlation coefficient (R 2). The stresses predicted by both models presented good agreement with experimental results. In addition, it was found that the ANN model could predict the high-temperature deformation more precisely over the whole temperature and strain rate ranges. However, this is strongly dependent on the availability of extensive, high-quality data and characteristic variables.

  19. Experimental Analysis and Numerical Simulation of Tensile Behaviour of TiNi Shape Memory Alloy Fibres Reinforced Epoxy Matrix Composite at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Sahli, M. L.; Necib, B.

    2011-05-04

    The shape memory alloys (SMA) possess both sensing and actuating functions due to their shape memory effect, pseudo-elasticity, high damping capability and other remarkable properties. Combining the SMA with other materials can create intelligent or smart composites. The epoxy resin composites filled with TiNi alloys fibres were fabricated and their mechanical properties have been investigated. In this study, stress/strain relationships for a composite with embedded shape memory materials (SMA) fibres are presented. The paper illustrates influence of the SMA fibres upon changes in mechanical behaviour of a composite plate with the SMA components, firstly and secondly, the actuating ability and reliability of shape memory alloy hybrid composites.

  20. Aerospace Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.