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Sample records for high-temperature irradiation-resistant thermocouples

  1. High Temperature Irradiation-Resistant Thermocouple Performance Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua Daw; Joy Rempe; Darrell Knudson

    2009-04-01

    Traditional methods for measuring temperature in-pile degrade at temperatures above 1100 ºC. To address this instrumentation need, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed and evaluated the performance of a high temperature irradiation-resistant thermocouple (HTIR-TC) that contains alloys of molybdenum and niobium. Data from high temperature (up to 1500 ºC) long duration (up to 4000 hours) tests and on-going irradiations at INL’s Advanced Test Reactor demonstrate the superiority of these sensors to commercially-available thermocouples. However, several options have been identified that could further enhance their reliability, reduce their production costs, and allow their use in a wider range of operating conditions.more » This paper presents results from on-going Idaho National Laboratory (INL)/University of Idaho (UI) efforts to investigate options to improve HTIR-TC ductility, reliability, and resolution by investigating specially-formulated alloys of molybdenum and niobium and alternate diameter thermoelements (wires). In addition, on-going efforts to evaluate alternate fabrication approaches, such as drawn and loose assembly techniques will be discussed. Efforts to reduce HTIR-TC fabrication costs, such as the use of less expensive extension cable will also be presented. Finally, customized HTIR-TC designs developed for specific customer needs will be summarized to emphasize the varied conditions under which these sensors may be used.« less

  2. High Temperature Irradiation Resistant Thermocouple (HTIR-TC)

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, Joy; Condie, Keith; Knudson, Darrell

    2011-01-01

    INL researchers have created a new thermocouple that can resist high temperature and radiation. This device will improve safety and reduce costs associated with unit failures. Learn more about INL research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  3. High Temperature Irradiation Resistant Thermocouple (HTIR-TC)

    ScienceCinema

    Rempe, Joy; Condie, Keith; Knudson, Darrell

    2018-05-16

    INL researchers have created a new thermocouple that can resist high temperature and radiation. This device will improve safety and reduce costs associated with unit failures. Learn more about INL research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  4. High-Temperature, Oxidation-Resistant Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Gedwill, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    Aluminum substituted for rhodium, which is scarce and expensive. Electromotive force increases with aluminum content in Pt/Al leg of Pt(Pt/Al) thermocouple. Wires baked longer in aluminizing bed produce larger voltages. Thermocouples containing platinum/aluminum legs used instead of thermocouples of type R in furnaces, heat engines, and chemical reactors. Expecially suited to high-velocity oxidizing environments. Constructed as thin-film sensors on turbine blades and vanes, where pre-oxidation provides insulating film needed between thermocouple legs. Because aluminum content slowly depleted by oxidation, long-term use recommended only where maximum temperature is 1,200 degrees C or less.

  5. Enhancements to High Temperature In-Pile Thermocouple Performance

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Crepeau; J.L. Rempe; J.E. Daw

    2008-03-31

    A joint University of Idaho (UI) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) University Nuclear Research Initiative (UNERI) was to initiated to extend initial INL efforts to develop doped molybdenum/niobium alloy High Temperature Irradiation Resistant Thermocouples (HTIR-TCs). The overall objective of this UNERI was to develop recommendations for an optimized thermocouple design for high temperature, long duration, in-pile testing by expanding upon results from initial INL efforts. Tasks to quantify the impact of candidate enhancements, such as alternate alloys, alternate geometries, and alternate thermocouple fabrication techniques, on thermocouple performance were completed at INL's High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL), a state of themore » art facility equipped with specialized equipment and trained staff in the area of high temperature instrumentation development and evaluation. Key results of these evaluations, which are documented in this report, are as follows. The doped molybdenum and Nb-1%Zr, which were proposed in the initial INL HTIR-TC design, were found to retain ductility better than the developmental molybdenum-low niobium alloys and the niobium-low molybdenum alloys evaluated. Hence, the performance and lower cost of the commercially available KW-Mo makes a thermocouple containing KW-Mo and Nb-1%Zr the best option at this time. HTIR-TCs containing larger diameter wires offer the potential to increase HTIR-TC stability and reliability at higher temperatures. HTIR-TC heat treatment temperatures and times should be limited to not more than 100 C above the proposed operating temperatures and to durations of at least 4 to 5 hours. Preliminary investigations suggest that the performance of swaged and loose assembly HTIR-TC designs is similar. However, the swaged designs are less expensive and easier to construct. In addition to optimizing HTIR-TC performance, This UNERI project provided unique opportunities to several University of Idaho students, allowing

  6. Enhancements to High Temperature In-Pile Thermocouple Performance

    SciTech Connect

    J. C. Crepeau; J. L. Rempe; J. E. Daw

    2008-03-01

    A joint University of Idaho (UI) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) University Nuclear Research Initiative (UNERI) was to initiated to extend initial INL efforts to develop doped lybdenum/niobium alloy High Temperature Irradiation Resistant Thermocouples (HTIR-TCs). The overall objective of this UNERI was to develop recommendations for an optimized thermocouple design for high temperature, long duration, in-pile testing by expanding upon results from initial INL efforts. Tasks to quantify the impact of candidate enhancements, such as alternate alloys, alternate geometries, and alternate thermocouple fabrication techniques, on thermocouple performance were completed at INL's High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL), a state of themore » art facility equipped with specialized equipment and trained staff in the area of high temperature instrumentation development and evaluation. Key results of these evaluations, which are documented in this report, are as follows. The doped molybdenum and Nb-1%Zr, which were proposed in the initial INL HTIR-TC design, were found to retain ductility better than the developmental molybdenum-low niobium alloys and the niobium-low molybdenum alloys evaluated. Hence, the performance and lower cost of the commercially available KW-Mo makes a thermocouple containing KW-Mo and Nb-1%Zr the best option at this time. HTIR-TCs containing larger diameter wires offer the potential to increase HTIR-TC stability and reliability at higher temperatures. HTIR-TC heat treatment temperatures and times should be limited to not more than 100 °C above the proposed operating temperatures and to durations of at least 4 to 5 hours. Preliminary investigations suggest that the performance of swaged and loose assembly HTIR-TC designs is similar. However, the swaged designs are less expensive and easier to construct. In addition to optimizing HTIR-TC performance, This UNERI project provided unique opportunities to several University of Idaho students, allowing

  7. New fixed-point mini-cell to investigate thermocouple drift in a high-temperature environment under neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Laurie, M.; Vlahovic, L.; Rondinella, V.V.

    Temperature measurements in the nuclear field require a high degree of reliability and accuracy. Despite their sheathed form, thermocouples subjected to nuclear radiations undergo changes due to radiation damage and transmutation that lead to significant EMF drift during long-term fuel irradiation experiment. For the purpose of a High Temperature Reactor fuel irradiation to take place in the High Flux Reactor Petten, a dedicated fixed-point cell was jointly developed by LNE-Cnam and JRC-IET. The developed cell to be housed in the irradiation rig was tailor made to quantify the thermocouple drift during the irradiation (about two year duration) and withstand highmore » temperature (in the range 950 deg. C - 1100 deg. C) in the presence of contaminated helium in a graphite environment. Considering the different levels of temperature achieved in the irradiation facility and the large palette of thermocouple types aimed at surveying the HTR fuel pebble during the qualification test both copper (1084.62 deg. C) and gold (1064.18 deg. C) fixed-point materials were considered. The aim of this paper is to first describe the fixed-point mini-cell designed to be embedded in the reactor rig and to discuss the preliminary results achieved during some out of pile tests as much as some robustness tests representative of the reactor scram scenarios. (authors)« less

  8. High temperature, oxidation resistant noble metal-Al alloy thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Gedwill, Michael G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermocouple is disclosed. The thermocouple is comprised of an electropositive leg formed of a noble metal-Al alloy and an electronegative leg electrically joined to form a thermocouple junction. The thermocouple provides for accurate and reproducible measurement of high temperatures (600 - 1300 C) in inert, oxidizing or reducing environments, gases, or vacuum. Furthermore, the thermocouple circumvents the need for expensive, strategic precious metals such as rhodium as a constituent component. Selective oxidation of rhodium is also thereby precluded.

  9. HIGH TEMPERATURE THERMOCOUPLE

    DOEpatents

    Eshayu, A.M.

    1963-02-12

    This invention contemplates a high temperature thermocouple for use in an inert or a reducing atmosphere. The thermocouple limbs are made of rhenium and graphite and these limbs are connected at their hot ends in compressed removable contact. The rhenium and graphite are of high purity and are substantially stable and free from diffusion into each other even without shielding. Also, the graphite may be thick enough to support the thermocouple in a gas stream. (AEC)

  10. High-temperature thermocouples and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Rempe, Joy L [Idaho Falls, ID; Knudson, Darrell L [Firth, ID; Condie, Keith G [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilkins, S Curt [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-01-18

    A high-temperature thermocouple and methods for fabricating a thermocouple capable of long-term operation in high-temperature, hostile environments without significant signal degradation or shortened thermocouple lifetime due to heat induced brittleness.

  11. Improving High-Temperature Measurements in Nuclear Reactors with Mo/Nb Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villard, J.-F.; Fourrez, S.; Fourmentel, D.; Legrand, A.

    2008-10-01

    Many irradiation experiments performed in research reactors are used to assess the effects of nuclear radiations on material or fuel sample properties, and are therefore a crucial stage in most qualification and innovation studies regarding nuclear technologies. However, monitoring these experiments requires accurate and reliable instrumentation. Among all measurement systems implemented in irradiation devices, temperature—and more particularly high-temperature (above 1000°C)—is a major parameter for future experiments related, for example, to the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Program or the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project. In this context, the French Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA) develops and qualifies innovative in-pile instrumentation for its irradiation experiments in current and future research reactors. Logically, a significant part of these research and development programs concerns the improvement of in-pile high-temperature measurements. This article describes the development and qualification of innovative high-temperature thermocouples specifically designed for in-pile applications. This key study has been achieved with technical contributions from the Thermocoax Company. This new kind of thermocouple is based on molybdenum and niobium thermoelements, which remain nearly unchanged by thermal neutron flux even under harsh nuclear environments, whereas typical high-temperature thermocouples such as Type C or Type S are altered by significant drifts caused by material transmutations under the same conditions. This improvement has a significant impact on the temperature measurement capabilities for future irradiation experiments. Details of the successive stages of this development are given, including the results of prototype qualification tests and the manufacturing process.

  12. Summary of Thermocouple Performance During Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor and Out-of-Pile Thermocouple Testing in Support of Such Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    A. J. Palmer; DC Haggard; J. W. Herter

    alumina insulation and molybdenum sheath. The most current version of the High Temperature Irradiation Resistant Thermocouple (HTIR-TC) based on molybdenum/niobium alloys, and developed at Idaho National Laboratory, was also tested.« less

  13. Summary of thermocouple performance during advanced gas reactor fuel irradiation experiments in the advanced test reactor and out-of-pile thermocouple testing in support of such experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A. J.; Haggard, DC; Herter, J. W.

    assembly thermocouple with hard-fired alumina insulation and a molybdenum sheath. The most current version of the High Temperature Irradiation Resistant Thermocouple, based on molybdenum/niobium alloys and developed at Idaho National Laboratory, was also tested. (authors)« less

  14. New Temperature Monitoring Devices for High-Temperature Irradiation Experiments in the High Flux Reactor Petten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurie, M.; Futterer, M. A.; Lapetite, J. M.; Fourrez, S.; Morice, R.

    2011-10-01

    Within the European High Temperature Reactor Technology Network (HTR-TN) and related projects a number of HTR fuel irradiations are planned in the High Flux Reactor Petten (HFR), The Netherlands, with the objective to explore the potential of recently produced fuel for even higher temperature and burn-up. Irradiating fuel under defined conditions to extremely high burn-ups will provide a better understanding of fission product release and failure mechanisms if particle failure occurs. After an overview of the irradiation rigs used in the HFR, this paper sums up data collected from previous irradiation tests in terms of thermocouple data. Some R&D for further improvement of thermocouples and other on-line instrumentation will be outlined.

  15. High-Temperature Resistance Strain Gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1994-01-01

    Resistance strain gauges developed for use at high temperatures in demanding applications like testing aircraft engines and structures. Measures static strains at temperatures up to 800 degrees C. Small and highly reproducible. Readings corrected for temperature within small tolerances, provided temperatures measured simultaneously by thermocouples or other suitable devices. Connected in wheatstone bridge.

  16. A Self-Validation Method for High-Temperature Thermocouples Under Oxidizing Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokdad, S.; Failleau, G.; Deuzé, T.; Briaudeau, S.; Kozlova, O.; Sadli, M.

    2015-08-01

    Thermocouples are prone to significant drift in use particularly when they are exposed to high temperatures. Indeed, high-temperature exposure can affect the response of a thermocouple progressively by changing the structure of the thermoelements and inducing inhomogeneities. Moreover, an oxidizing atmosphere contributes to thermocouple drift by changing the chemical nature of the metallic wires by the effect of oxidation. In general, severe uncontrolled drift of thermocouples results from these combined influences. A periodic recalibration of the thermocouple can be performed, but sometimes it is not possible to remove the sensor out of the process. Self-validation methods for thermocouples provide a solution to avoid this drawback, but there are currently no high-temperature contact thermometers with self-validation capability at temperatures up to . LNE-Cnam has developed fixed-point devices integrated to the thermocouples consisting of machined alumina-based devices for operation under oxidizing atmospheres. These devices require small amounts of pure metals (typically less than 2 g). They are suitable for self-validation of high-temperature thermocouples up to . In this paper the construction and the characterization of these integrated fixed-point devices are described. The phase-transition plateaus of gold, nickel, and palladium, which enable coverage of the temperature range between and , are assessed with this self-validation technique. Results of measurements performed at LNE-Cnam with the integrated self-validation module at several levels of temperature will be presented. The performance of the devices are assessed and discussed, in terms of robustness and metrological characteristics. Uncertainty budgets are also proposed and detailed.

  17. Material Problems in Using High-Temperature Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, F.

    2011-08-01

    The material compatibility and thermal stability of ceramic-composite coatings of different oxide ceramics deposited on alumina tubes to prevent the reduction of the alumina were investigated in the high-temperature range between 1750 °C and 1850 °C. It turned out that the coatings were thermally unstable and did not provide adequate protection against the reduction of the alumina tubes. The oxide ceramics formed eutectic compositions with low melting temperatures and were also prone to reduction to elementary metals by carbon. A new type of high-temperature thermocouple on the basis of refractory and noble metals was tested in the temperature range between 1325 °C and 1800 °C. Two metal-sheathed prototypes were constructed. The thermoelectric behavior of the tungsten5%rhenium/iridium thermocouples (W5%Re/Ir) was investigated by different high-temperature exposures, and the thermoelectric stability was checked by repeated measurements at the ice point.

  18. Preparation of W-Ta thin-film thermocouple on diamond anvil cell for in-situ temperature measurement under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jie; Fundamental Department, Aviation University, Changchun 130022; Li Ming

    2011-04-15

    In this paper, a W-Ta thin-film thermocouple has been integrated on a diamond anvil cell by thin-film deposition and photolithography methods. The thermocouple was calibrated and its thermal electromotive force was studied under high pressure. The results indicate that the thermal electromotive force of the thermocouple exhibits a linear relationship with temperature and is not associated with pressure. The resistivity measurement of ZnS powders under high pressure at different temperatures shows that the phase transition pressure decreases as the temperature increases.

  19. Thin film thermocouples for high temperature measurement on ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond

    1992-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples have been developed for use on metal parts in jet engines to 1000 C. However, advanced propulsion systems are being developed that will use ceramic materials and reach higher temperatures. The purpose of this work is to develop thin film thermocouples for use on ceramic materials. The thin film thermocouples are Pt13Rh/Pt fabricated by the sputtering process. Lead wires are attached using the parallel-gap welding process. The ceramic materials are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and mullite. Both steady state and thermal cycling furnace tests were performed in the temperature range to 1500 C. High-heating-rate tests were performed in an arc lamp heat-flux-calibration facility. The fabrication of the thin film thermocouples is described. The thin film thermocouple output was compared to a reference wire thermocouple. Drift of the thin film thermocouples was determined, and causes of drift are discussed. The results of high-heating-rate tests up to 2500 C/sec are presented. The stability of the ceramic materials is examined. It is concluded that Pt13Rh/Pt thin film thermocouples are capable of meeting lifetime goals of 50 hours or more up to temperatures of 1500 C depending on the stability of the particular ceramic substrate.

  20. Preparation of W-Ta thin-film thermocouple on diamond anvil cell for in-situ temperature measurement under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Li, Ming; Zhang, Honglin; Gao, Chunxiao

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, a W-Ta thin-film thermocouple has been integrated on a diamond anvil cell by thin-film deposition and photolithography methods. The thermocouple was calibrated and its thermal electromotive force was studied under high pressure. The results indicate that the thermal electromotive force of the thermocouple exhibits a linear relationship with temperature and is not associated with pressure. The resistivity measurement of ZnS powders under high pressure at different temperatures shows that the phase transition pressure decreases as the temperature increases. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  1. Development of Thin Film Ceramic Thermocouples for High Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali; Blaha, Charles A.; Gonzalez, Jose M.

    2004-01-01

    The maximum use temperature of noble metal thin film thermocouples of 1100 C (2000 F) may not be adequate for use on components in the increasingly harsh conditions of advanced aircraft and next generation launch technology. Ceramic-based thermocouples are known for their high stability and robustness at temperatures exceeding 1500 C, but are typically found in the form of rods or probes. NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating the feasibility of ceramics as thin film thermocouples for extremely high temperature applications to take advantage of the stability and robustness of ceramics and the non-intrusiveness of thin films. This paper will discuss the current state of development in this effort.

  2. High-temperature, long-term drift of platinum-rhodium thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szaniszlo, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Contamination of thermocouples is minimized by use of pure alumina insulators and a controlled low-impurity-level high-vacuum environment. Average thermal electromotive force change for platinum-rhodium thermocouples was -2.8 deg K after 3700 hours exposure to a mean temperature of 1530 deg K.

  3. Thermocouples of tantalum and rhenium alloys for more stable vacuum-high temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Thermocouples of the present invention provide stability and performance reliability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums by employing a bimetallic thermocouple sensor wherein each metal of the sensor is selected from a group of metals comprising tantalum and rhenium and alloys containing only those two metals. The tantalum, rhenium thermocouple sensor alloys provide bare metal thermocouple sensors having advantageous vapor pressure compatibilities and performance characteristics. The compatibility and physical characteristics of the thermocouple sensor alloys of the present invention result in improved emf, temperature properties and thermocouple hot junction performance. The thermocouples formed of the tantalum, rhenium alloys exhibit reliability and performance stability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums and are adaptable to space propulsion and power systems and nuclear environments.

  4. Refractory oxide insulated thermocouple designed and analyzed for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popper, G. F.; Zeren, T. Z.

    1969-01-01

    Study establishes design criteria for constructing high temperature thermocouple to measure nuclear fuel pin temperature. The study included a literature search to determine the compatibility of material useful for thermocouples, a hot zone error analysis, and a prototype design for hot junction and connector pin connections.

  5. A miniature high-temperature fixed point for self-validation of type C thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongrai, O.; Pearce, J. V.; Machin, G.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2011-10-01

    Reliable high-temperature (>1500 °C) measurement is crucial for a wide range of industrial processes as well as specialized applications, e.g. aerospace. The most common type of sensor used for high-temperature measurement is the thermocouple. At and above 1500 °C, tungsten-rhenium (W-Re) thermocouples are the most commonly used temperature sensors due to their utility up to 2300 °C. However, the achievable accuracy of W-Re thermocouples is seriously limited by the effects of their inhomogeneity, drift and hysteresis. Furthermore, due to their embrittlement at high temperature, the removal of these thermocouples from environments such as nuclear power plants or materials processing furnaces for recalibration is generally not possible. Even if removal for recalibration were possible, this would be of, at best, very limited use due to large inhomogeneity effects. Ideally, these thermocouples require some mechanism to monitor their drift in situ. In this study, we describe a miniature Co-C eutectic fixed-point cell to evaluate the stability of type C (W5%Re/W26%Re) thermocouples by means of in situ calibration.

  6. Threaded average temperature thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Stanley W. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A threaded average temperature thermocouple 11 is provided to measure the average temperature of a test situs of a test material 30. A ceramic insulator rod 15 with two parallel holes 17 and 18 through the length thereof is securely fitted in a cylinder 16, which is bored along the longitudinal axis of symmetry of threaded bolt 12. Threaded bolt 12 is composed of material having thermal properties similar to those of test material 30. Leads of a thermocouple wire 20 leading from a remotely situated temperature sensing device 35 are each fed through one of the holes 17 or 18, secured at head end 13 of ceramic insulator rod 15, and exit at tip end 14. Each lead of thermocouple wire 20 is bent into and secured in an opposite radial groove 25 in tip end 14 of threaded bolt 12. Resulting threaded average temperature thermocouple 11 is ready to be inserted into cylindrical receptacle 32. The tip end 14 of the threaded average temperature thermocouple 11 is in intimate contact with receptacle 32. A jam nut 36 secures the threaded average temperature thermocouple 11 to test material 30.

  7. High temperature thermocouple development program, part A and part B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toenshoff, D. A.; Zysk, E. D.; Fleischner, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of extending the useful life of thermocouples intended for in-core and out-of-core thermionic applications in a vacuum environment at temperatures up to 2273 K for periods of time up to 10,000 hours was investigated. Many factors that may influence this useful life were examined, and a basic probe design was developed. With a few modifications, twenty-three thermocouple assemblies were fabricated. Generally the finished thermocouple consisted of solid doped W-3% Re and W-25% Re wires and high purity and high density BeO insulators, and was sheathed in a high purity tantalum tube. In a few probes, stranded thermocouple wires were substituted; commercial grade BeO was used; and in two cases, CVD W-22% Re tubing was used. Each of the components was made of the highest purity materials available; was subjected to special cleaning steps, and was assembled in a class 10,000 clean room. Pertinent physical and chemical properties were determined on each of the components. Special processing techniques were used in the fabrication of the high purity (99.95%), high density (over 95% of theoretical) BeO.

  8. Design of thermocouple probes for measurement of rocket exhaust plume temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, R. C.

    1994-06-01

    This paper summarizes a literature survey on high temperature measurement and describes the design of probes used in plume measurements. There were no cases reported of measurements in extreme environments such as exist in solid rocket exhausts, but there were a number of thermocouple designs which had been used under less extreme conditions and which could be further developed. Tungsten-rhenium(W-Rh) thermocouples had the combined properties of strength at high temperatures, high thermoelectric emf, and resistance to chemical attack. A shielded probe was required, both to protect the thermocouple junction, and to minimise radiative heat losses. After some experimentation, a twin shielded design made from molybdenum gave acceptable results. Corrections for thermal conduction losses were made based on a method obtained from the literature. Radiation losses were minimized with this probe design, and corrections for these losses were too complex and unreliable to be included.

  9. Temperature monitoring device and thermocouple assembly therefor

    DOEpatents

    Grimm, Noel P.; Bauer, Frank I.; Bengel, Thomas G.; Kothmann, Richard E.; Mavretish, Robert S.; Miller, Phillip E.; Nath, Raymond J.; Salton, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    A temperature monitoring device for measuring the temperature at a surface of a body, composed of: at least one first thermocouple and a second thermocouple; support members supporting the thermocouples for placing the first thermocouple in contact with the body surface and for maintaining the second thermocouple at a defined spacing from the body surface; and a calculating circuit connected to the thermocouples for receiving individual signals each representative of the temperature reading produced by a respective one of the first and second thermocouples and for producing a corrected temperature signal having a value which represents the temperature of the body surface and is a function of the difference between the temperature reading produced by the first thermocouple and a selected fraction of the temperature reading provided by the second thermocouple.

  10. Vapor deposition process provides new method for fabricating high temperature thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remley, G. A.; Zellner, G. J.

    1967-01-01

    Fabrication techniques for high temperature thermocouples bind all components so that differential thermal expansion and contraction do not result in mechanical slippage and localized stress concentrations. Installation space is reduced or larger thermoelements and thicker insulation can be used to improve temperature measurement accuracy.

  11. Applications of Thin Film Thermocouples for Surface Temperature Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lisa C.; Holanda, Raymond

    1994-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples provide a minimally intrusive means of measuring surface temperature in hostile, high temperature environments. Unlike wire thermocouples, thin films do not necessitate any machining of the surface, therefore leaving intact its structural integrity. Thin films are many orders of magnitude thinner than wire, resulting in less disruption to the gas flow and thermal patterns that exist in the operating environment. Thin film thermocouples have been developed for surface temperature measurement on a variety of engine materials. The sensors are fabricated in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Thin Film Sensor Lab, which is a class 1000 clean room. The thermocouples are platinum-13 percent rhodium versus platinum and are fabricated by the sputtering process. Thin film-to-leadwire connections are made using the parallel-gap welding process. Thermocouples have been developed for use on superalloys, ceramics and ceramic composites, and intermetallics. Some applications of thin film thermocouples are: temperature measurement of space shuttle main engine turbine blade materials, temperature measurement in gas turbine engine testing of advanced materials, and temperature and heat flux measurements in a diesel engine. Fabrication of thin film thermocouples is described. Sensor durability, drift rate, and maximum temperature capabilities are addressed.

  12. Problems Encountered in Fluctuating Flame Temperature Measurements by Thermocouple

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Nadir; Gill, Walt; Donaldson, A. Burl; Lucero, Ralph E.

    2008-01-01

    Some thermocouple experiments were carried out in order to obtain sensitivity of thermocouple readings to fluctuations in flames and to determine if the average thermocouple reading was representative of the local volume temperature for fluctuating flames. The thermocouples considered were an exposed junction thermocouple and a fully sheathed thermocouple with comparable time constants. Either the voltage signal or indicated temperature for each test was recorded at sampling rates between 300-4,096 Hz. The trace was then plotted with respect to time or sample number so that time variation in voltage or temperature could be visualized and the average indicated temperature could be determined. For experiments where high sampling rates were used, the signal was analyzed using Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) to determine the frequencies present in the thermocouple signal. This provided a basic observable as to whether or not the probe was able to follow flame oscillations. To enhance oscillations, for some experiments, the flame was forced. An analysis based on thermocouple time constant, coupled with the transfer function for a sinusoidal input was tested against the experimental results. PMID:27873964

  13. Problems Encountered in Fluctuating Flame Temperature Measurements by Thermocouple.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Nadir; Gill, Walt; Donaldson, A Burl; Lucero, Ralph E

    2008-12-04

    Some thermocouple experiments were carried out in order to obtain sensitivity of thermocouple readings to fluctuations in flames and to determine if the average thermocouple reading was representative of the local volume temperature for fluctuating flames. The thermocouples considered were an exposed junction thermocouple and a fully sheathed thermocouple with comparable time constants. Either the voltage signal or indicated temperature for each test was recorded at sampling rates between 300-4,096 Hz. The trace was then plotted with respect to time or sample number so that time variation in voltage or temperature could be visualized and the average indicated temperature could be determined. For experiments where high sampling rates were used, the signal was analyzed using Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) to determine the frequencies present in the thermocouple signal. This provided a basic observable as to whether or not the probe was able to follow flame oscillations. To enhance oscillations, for some experiments, the flame was forced. An analysis based on thermocouple time constant, coupled with the transfer function for a sinusoidal input was tested against the experimental results.

  14. Measured drift of irradiated and unirradiated W3%Re/W25%Re thermocouples at a nominal 2000 K.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckelman, J. D.; Kozar, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    Seven tantalum sheathed, BeO insulated, 0.157-cm-diam, grounded-junction W-3%Re/W-25%Re thermocouples were irradiated in a helium-argon environment at a temperature of 1900 to 2100 K. Six other thermocouples from the same lot were operated out-of-pile with the same temperature history as the in-pile thermocouples. Drift-in-pile was determined by periodically replacing a 'reference' thermocouple in the irradiation capsule. Drift out-of-pile was determined with an optical pyrometer. After 8000 hours irradiation, the estimated neutron fluence was 4 x 10 to the 21st power thermal neutrons/sq cm and 0.9 x 10 to the 21st power fast neutrons/sq cm (E greater than 0.18 MeV). At this time the in-pile group had decreased in output the equivalent of 340 K at 2073 K, while the out-of-pile group had decreased in output the equivalent of 54 K at 2073 K. The maximum deviation in drift between thermocouples of the in-pile group and between thermocouples of the out-of-pile group was less than plus or minus 15 K and less than plus or minus 10 K, respectively.

  15. Problems encountered in fluctuating flame temperature measurements by thermocouple.

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, A. Burl; Lucero, Ralph E.; Gill, Walter

    2008-11-01

    Some thermocouple experiments were carried out in order to obtain sensitivity of thermocouple readings to fluctuations in flames and to determine if the average thermocouple reading was representative of the local volume temperature for fluctuating flames. The thermocouples considered were an exposed junction thermocouple and a fully sheathed thermocouple with comparable time constants. Either the voltage signal or indicated temperature for each test was recorded at sampling rates between 300-4,096 Hz. The trace was then plotted with respect to time or sample number so that time variation in voltage or temperature could be visualized and the average indicated temperature couldmore » be determined. For experiments where high sampling rates were used, the signal was analyzed using Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) to determine the frequencies present in the thermocouple signal. This provided a basic observable as to whether or not the probe was able to follow flame oscillations. To enhance oscillations, for some experiments, the flame was forced. An analysis based on thermocouple time constant, coupled with the transfer function for a sinusoidal input was tested against the experimental results.« less

  16. High-Temperature, Thin-Film Ceramic Thermocouples Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali; Blaha, Charles A.; Gonzalez, Jose M.

    2005-01-01

    To enable long-duration, more distant human and robotic missions for the Vision for Space Exploration, as well as safer, lighter, quieter, and more fuel efficient vehicles for aeronautics and space transportation, NASA is developing instrumentation and material technologies. The high-temperature capabilities of thin-film ceramic thermocouples are being explored at the NASA Glenn Research Center by the Sensors and Electronics Branch and the Ceramics Branch in partnership with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). Glenn s Sensors and Electronics Branch is developing thin-film sensors for surface measurement of strain, temperature, heat flux, and surface flow in propulsion system research. Glenn s Ceramics Branch, in conjunction with CWRU, is developing structural and functional ceramic technology for aeropropulsion and space propulsion.

  17. Self-validating type C thermocouples to 2300 °C using high temperature fixed points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, J. V.; Elliott, C. J.; Machin, G.; Ongrai, O.

    2013-09-01

    Above 1500 °C, tungsten-rhenium (W-Re) thermocouples are the most commonly used contact thermometers because they are practical and inexpensive. However in general loss of calibration is very rapid, and, due to their embrittlement at high temperature, it is generally not possible to remove them for recalibration from the process environments in which they are used. Even if removal for recalibration was possible this would be of, at best, very limited use due to large inhomogeneity effects. Ideally, these thermocouples require some mechanism to monitor their drift in-situ. In this study, we describe self-validation of Type C (W5%Re/W26%Re) thermocouples by means of miniature high temperature fixed points comprising crucibles containing respectively Co-C, Pt-C, Ru-C, and Ir-C eutectic alloys. An overview of developments in this area is presented.

  18. Contact Thermocouple Methodology and Evaluation for Temperature Measurement in the Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Ethan J.; Pawlik, Ralph J.; Krause, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory testing of advanced aerospace components very often requires highly accurate temperature measurement and control devices, as well as methods to precisely analyze and predict the performance of such components. Analysis of test articles depends on accurate measurements of temperature across the specimen. Where possible, this task is accomplished using many thermocouples welded directly to the test specimen, which can produce results with great precision. However, it is known that thermocouple spot welds can initiate deleterious cracks in some materials, prohibiting the use of welded thermocouples. Such is the case for the nickel-based superalloy MarM-247, which is used in the high temperature, high pressure heater heads for the Advanced Stirling Converter component of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator space power system. To overcome this limitation, a method was developed that uses small diameter contact thermocouples to measure the temperature of heater head test articles with the same level of accuracy as welded thermocouples. This paper includes a brief introduction and a background describing the circumstances that compelled the development of the contact thermocouple measurement method. Next, the paper describes studies performed on contact thermocouple readings to determine the accuracy of results. It continues on to describe in detail the developed measurement method and the evaluation of results produced. A further study that evaluates the performance of different measurement output devices is also described. Finally, a brief conclusion and summary of results is provided.

  19. Thin film thermocouples for high temperature turbine application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lisa C.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to develop thin film thermocouples (TFTC) for Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) components such as the high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) blades and to test TFTC survivability and durability in the SSME environment. The purpose for developing TFTC's for SSME components is to obtain blade temperatures for computational models developed for fluid mechanics and structures. The TFTC must be able to withstand the presence of high temperature, high pressure hydrogen as well as a severe thermal transient due to a cryogenic to combustion temperature change. The TFTC's will eventually be installed and tested on SSME propulsion system components in the SSME test bed engine. The TFTC's were successfully fabricated on flat coupons of MAR-M 246 (Hf+), which is the superalloy material used for HPFTP turbine blades. The TFTC's fabricated on flat coupons survived thermal shock cycling as well as testing in a heat flux measurement facility which provided a rapid thermal transient. The same fabrication procedure was used to deposit TFTC's on HPFTP first stage rotor blades. Other results from the experiments are presented, and future testing plans are discussed.

  20. Oxidation-resisting technology of W-Re thermocouples and their industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Dai, M.; Dong, J.; Wang, L.; Wang, T.

    2013-09-01

    We use DSC/TG, SEM and EPMA approaches to investigate the high temperature oxidation behaviors of the Type C W-Re thermocouple wires and W-Re powders which the wires were made from. To solve the oxidization of W-Re thermocouples the chemical method, other than the commonly used physical method, i.e. vacuum-pumping method, was developed. Several solid-packed techniques such as stuffing with inert material, chemical deoxidizing, gas-absorbing and sealing were employed to prevent the W-Re thermocouples from oxidizing. Based on comprehensive consideration of various parameters in process industries, a series of industrial W-Re thermocouples has been successfully used in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres, high temperature alkali and other harsh environments. The service life is 6 to 12 months in strong oxidizing atmosphere of Cr2O3-Al2O3 brick kiln and 2 to 3 months in high temperature alkali and in reducing atmosphere of CO.

  1. Thermocouple Extension-Wire-Connections and Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Mitchell, Mark; Richardson, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine the casue of erroneous readings from thermocouples of type K when measuring temperatures of liquid hydrogen. It was believed to be linked to te temperature of the connector used to extend the thermocouple wires to the voltage meter.

  2. In situ temperature measurements with thermocouple probes during laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT): quantification and correction of a measurement artifact.

    PubMed

    Manns, F; Milne, P J; Gonzalez-Cirre, X; Denham, D B; Parel, J M; Robinson, D S

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to quantify the magnitude of an artifact induced by stainless steel thermocouple probes in temperature measurements made in situ during experimental laser interstitial thermo-therapy (LITT). A procedure for correction of this observational error is outlined. A CW Nd:YAG laser system emitting 20W for 25-30 s delivered through a fiber-optic probe was used to create localized heating. The temperature field around the fiber-optic probe during laser irradiation was measured every 0.3 s in air, water, 0.4% intralipid solution, and fatty cadaver pig tissue, with a field of up to fifteen needle thermocouple probes. Direct absorption of Nd:YAG laser radiation by the thermocouple probes induced an overestimation of the temperature, ranging from 1.8 degrees C to 118.6 degrees C in air, 2.2 degrees C to 9.9 degrees C in water, 0.7 C to 4.7 C in intralipid and 0.3 C to 17.9 C in porcine tissue after irradiation at 20W for 30 s and depending on the thermocouple location. The artifact in porcine tissue was removed by applying exponential and linear fits to the measured temperature curves. Light absorption by thermocouple probes can induce a significant artifact in the measurement of laser-induced temperature increases. When the time constant of the thermocouple effect is much smaller than the thermal relaxation time of the surrounding tissue, the artifact can be accurately quantified. During LITT experiments where temperature differences of a few degrees are significant, the thermocouple artifact must be removed in order to be able accurately to predict the treatment outcome.

  3. Miniature sheathed thermocouples for turbine blade temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, R.; Glawe, G. E.; Krause, L. N.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was made of sheathed thermocouples for turbine blade temperature measurements. Tests were performed on the Chromel-Alumel sheathed thermocouples with both two-wire and single-wire configurations. Sheath diameters ranged from 0.25 to 0.76 mm, and temperatures ranged from 1080 to 1250 K. Both steady-state and thermal cycling tests were performed for times up to 450 hr. Special-order and commercial-grade thermocouples were tested. The tests showed that special-order single-wire sheathed thermocouples can be obtained that are reliable and accurate with diameters as small as 0.25 mm. However, all samples of 0.25-mm-diameter sheathed commercial-grade two-wire and single-wire thermocouples that were tested showed unacceptable drift rates for long-duration engine testing programs. The drift rates were about 1 percent in 10 hr. A thermocouple drift test is recommended in addition to the normal acceptance tests in order to select reliable miniature sheathed thermocouples for turbine blade applications.

  4. High temperature blackbody BB2000/40 for calibration of radiation thermometers and thermocouple

    SciTech Connect

    Ogarev, S. A.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Samoylov, M. L.

    2013-09-11

    The cavity-type high temperature blackbody (HTBB) models of BB3200/3500 series are the most spread among metrological institutes worldwide as sources for radiometry and radiation thermometry, due to their ultra high working temperatures, high emissivity and stability. The materials of radiating cavities are graphite, pyrolytic graphite (PG) and their combination. The paper describes BB2000/40 blackbody with graphite-tube cavity that was developed for calibration of radiation thermometers at SCEI (Singapore). The peculiarity of BB2000/40 is a possibility to use it, besides calibration of pyrometers, as an instrument for thermocouples calibration. Operating within the temperature range from 900 °C to 2000 °C, themore » blackbody has a wide cavity opening of 40 mm. Emissivity of the cavity, with PG heater rings replaced partly by graphite elements, was estimated as 0.998 ± 0.0015 in the spectral range from 350 nm to 2000 nm. The uniformity along the cavity axis, accounting for 10 °C, was measured using a B-type thermocouple at 1500 °C. The BB2000/40, if necessary, can be easily modified, by replacing the graphite radiator with a set of PG rings, to be able to reach temperatures as high as 3200 °C. The HTBB utilizes an optical feedback system which allows temperature stabilization within 0.1 °C. This rear-view feedback allows the whole HTBB aperture to be used for measurements.« less

  5. Thermocouple design for measuring temperatures of small insects.

    PubMed

    Hanson, A A; Venette, R C

    2013-01-01

    Contact thermocouples often are used to measure surface body temperature changes of insects during cold exposure. However, small temperature changes of minute insects can be difficult to detect, particularly during the measurement of supercooling points. We developed two thermocouple designs, which use 0.51 mm diameter or 0.127 mm diameter copper-constantan wires, to improve our ability to resolve insect exotherms. We tested the designs with adults from three parasitoid species: Tetrastichus planipennisi, Spathius agrili, and S. floridanus. These species are <3 mm long and <0.1 mg. Mean exotherms were greater for fine-gauge thermocouples than thick-gauge thermocouples for the smallest species tested, T. planipennisi. This difference was not apparent for larger species S. agrili and S. floridanus. Thermocouple design did not affect the mean supercooling point for any of the species. The cradle thermocouple design developed with the fine gauge wire was reusable and allowed for easy insect recovery after cold exposure.

  6. Temperature measurement reliability and validity with thermocouple extension leads or changing lead temperature.

    PubMed

    Jutte, Lisa S; Long, Blaine C; Knight, Kenneth L

    2010-01-01

    Thermocouples' leads are often too short, necessitating the use of an extension lead. To determine if temperature measures were influenced by extension-lead use or lead temperature changes. Descriptive laboratory study. Laboratory. Experiment 1: 10 IT-21 thermocouples and 5 extension leads. Experiment 2: 5 IT-21 and PT-6 thermocouples. In experiment 1, temperature data were collected on 10 IT-21 thermocouples in a stable water bath with and without extension leads. In experiment 2, temperature data were collected on 5 IT-21 and PT-6 thermocouples in a stable water bath before, during, and after ice-pack application to extension leads. In experiment 1, extension leads did not influence IT-21 validity (P  =  .45) or reliability (P  =  .10). In experiment 2, postapplication IT-21 temperatures were greater than preapplication and application measures (P < .05). Extension leads had no influence on temperature measures. Ice application to leads may increase measurement error.

  7. Temperature measurements during high flux ion beam irradiations

    DOE PAGES

    Crespillo, Miguel L.; Graham, Joseph T.; Zhang, Yanwen; ...

    2016-02-16

    A systematic study of the ion beam heating effect was performed in a temperature range of –170 to 900 °C using a 10 MeV Au 3+ ion beam and a Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) sample at a flux of 5.5 × 10 12 cm –2 s –1. Different geometric configurations of beam, sample, thermocouple positioning, and sample holder were compared to understand the heat/charge transport mechanisms responsible for the observed temperature increase. The beam heating exhibited a strong dependence on the background (initial) sample temperature with the largest temperature increases occurring at cryogenic temperatures and decreasing with increasing temperature. Comparisonmore » with numerical calculations suggests that the observed heating effect is, in reality, a predominantly electronic effect and the true temperature rise is small. Furthermore, a simple model was developed to explain this electronic effect in terms of an electrostatic potential that forms during ion irradiation. Such an artificial beam heating effect is potentially problematic in thermostated ion irradiation and ion beamanalysis apparatus, as the operation of temperature feedback systems can be significantly distorted by this effect.« less

  8. Thermocouple design for measuring temperatures of small insects

    Treesearch

    A.A. Hanson; R.C. Venette

    2013-01-01

    Contact thermocouples often are used to measure surface body temperature changes of insects during cold exposure. However, small temperature changes of minute insects can be difficult to detect, particularly during the measurement of supercooling points. We developed two thermocouple designs, which use 0.51 mm diameter or 0.127 mm diameter copper-constantan wires, to...

  9. A two-thermocouple probe technique for estimating thermocouple time constants in flows with combustion: In situ parameter identification of a first-order lag system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, M.; Shimoji, T.; Ohta, Y.

    1998-09-01

    A two-thermocouple probe, composed of two fine-wire thermocouples of unequal diameters, is a novel technique for estimating thermocouple time constants without any dynamic calibration of the thermocouple response. This technique is most suitable for measuring fluctuating temperatures in turbulent combustion. In the present study, the reliability and applicability of this technique are appraised in a turbulent wake of a heated cylinder (without combustion). A fine-wire resistance thermometer (cold wire) of fast response is simultaneously used to provide a reference temperature. A quantitative and detailed comparison between the cold-wire measurement and the compensated thermocouple ones shows that a previous estimation scheme gives thermocouple time constants smaller than appropriate values, unless the noise in the thermocouple signals is negligible and/or the spatial resolution of the two-thermocouple probe is sufficiently high. The scheme has been improved so as to maximize the correlation coefficient between the two compensated-thermocouple outputs. The improved scheme offers better compensation of the thermocouple response. The present approach is generally applicable to in situ parameter identification of a first-order lag system.

  10. High Speed Surface Thermocouples Interface to Wireless Transmitters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-15

    Government and/or Private Sector Use Being able to measure high-speed surface temperatures in hostile environments where wireless transmission of the data...09/16/2016 See Item 16 Draft Reg Repro 16. REMARKS Eric Gingrich, COR I Item 0: High Speed Surface Thermocouples Interface to Wireless ...Speed Surface Thermocouples Interface to Wireless Transmitters W56HZV-16-C-0149 Sb. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT

  11. Advances in Thin Film Thermocouple Durability Under High Temperature and Pressure Testing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lisa C.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Taylor, Keith F.

    1999-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples for measuring material surface temperature have been previously demonstrated on several material systems and in various hostile test environments. A well-developed thin film fabrication procedure utilizing shadow masking for patterning the sensors elements had produced thin films with sufficient durability for applications in high temperature and pressure environments that exist in air-breathing and hydrogen-fueled burner rig and engine test facilities. However, while shadow masking had been a reliable method for specimens with flat and gently curved surfaces, it had not been consistently reliable for use on test components with sharp contours. This work reports on the feasibility of utilizing photolithography processing for patterning thin film thermocouples. Because this patterning process required changes in the thin film deposition process from that developed for shadow masking, the effect of these changes on thin film adherence during burner rig testing was evaluated. In addition to the results of changing the patterning method, the effects on thin film adherence of other processes used in the thin film fabrication procedure is also presented.

  12. Surface microstructure and high temperature corrosion resistance of arc-sprayed FeCrAl coating irradiated by high current pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Shengzhi; Zhao, Limin; He, Dongyun

    2013-10-01

    The surface microstructure of arc-sprayed FeCrAl coating irradiated by high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) with long pulse duration of 200 μs was characterized by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. The distribution of chemical composition in modified surface layer was measured with electron probe micro-analyzer. The high temperature corrosion resistance of FeCrAl coating was tested in a saturated Na2SO4 and K2SO4 solution at 650 °C. After HCPEB irradiation, the coarse surface of arc-sprayed coating was changed as discrete bulged nodules with smooth and compact appearance. When using low energy density of 20 J/cm2, the surface modified layer was continuous entirely with an average melting depth of ˜30 μm. In the surface remelted layer, Fe and Cr elements gave a uniform distribution, while Al and O elements agglomerated particularly at the concave part between nodule structures to form α-Al2O3 phase. After high temperature corrosion tests, the FeCrAl coating treated with HCPEB of 20 J/cm2 remained a glossy surface with weight increment of ˜51 mg/cm2, decreased by 20% as compared to the initial sample. With the increasing energy density of HCPEB irradiation, the integrity of surface modified layer got segmented due to the formation of larger bulged nodules and cracks at the concave parts. For the HCPEB irradiation of 40 J/cm2, the high temperature corrosion resistance of FeCrAl coating was deteriorated drastically.

  13. Development of an Integrated Thermocouple for the Accurate Sample Temperature Measurement During High Temperature Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (HT-ESEM) Experiments.

    PubMed

    Podor, Renaud; Pailhon, Damien; Ravaux, Johann; Brau, Henri-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    We have developed two integrated thermocouple (TC) crucible systems that allow precise measurement of sample temperature when using a furnace associated with an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). Sample temperatures measured with these systems are precise (±5°C) and reliable. The TC crucible systems allow working with solids and liquids (silicate melts or ionic liquids), independent of the gas composition and pressure. These sample holder designs will allow end users to perform experiments at high temperature in the ESEM chamber with high precision control of the sample temperature.

  14. Unique thermocouple to measure the temperatures of squibs, igniters, propellants, and rocket nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanigian, Jacob; Nanigian, Dan

    2006-05-01

    The temperatures produced by the various components in the propulsion system of rockets and missiles determine the performance of the rocket. Since these temperatures occur very rapidly and under extreme conditions, standard thermocouples fail before any meaningful temperatures are measured. This paper describes the features of a special family of high performance thermocouples, which can measure these transient temperatures with millisecond response times and under the most severe conditions of erosion. Examples of igniter, propellant and rocket nozzle temperatures are included in this paper. Also included is heat flux measurements made by these sensors in rocket applications.

  15. Temperature distributions measurement of high intensity focused ultrasound using a thin-film thermocouple array and estimation of thermal error caused by viscous heating.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Kosuke; Narumi, Ryuta; Azuma, Takashi; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Akira; Okita, Kohei; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2013-01-01

    To improve the throughput of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, we have considered a focus switching method at two points. For this method, it is necessary to evaluate the thermal distribution under exposure to ultrasound. The thermal distribution was measured using a prototype thin-film thermocouple array, which has the advantage of minimizing the influence of the thermocouple on the acoustic and temperature fields. Focus switching was employed to enlarge the area of temperature increase and evaluate the proposed evaluation parameters with respect to safety and uniformity. The results indicate that focus switching can effectively expand the thermal lesion while maintaining a steep thermal boundary. In addition, the influence caused by the thin-film thermocouple array was estimated experimentally. This thermocouple was demonstrated to be an effective tool for the measurement of temperature distributions induced by HIFU.

  16. Incidences of esophageal injury during esophageal temperature monitoring: a comparative study of a multi-thermocouple temperature probe and a deflectable temperature probe in atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Taishi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Takahashi, Yoshihide; Okubo, Kenji; Takagi, Katsumasa; Fujino, Tadashi; Kusa, Shigeki; Takigawa, Masateru; Watari, Yuji; Yamao, Kazuya; Nakashima, Emiko; Kawaguchi, Naohiko; Hikita, Hiroyuki; Sato, Akira; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2014-04-01

    The study aim was to compare the incidence of esophageal injuries between different temperature probes in the monitoring of esophageal temperature during atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. One hundred patients with drug-resistant AF were prospectively and randomly assigned into two groups according to the esophageal temperature probe used: the multi-thermocouple probe group (n = 50) and the deflectable temperature probe group (n = 50). Extensive pulmonary vein (PV) isolation was performed with a 3.5-mm open irrigated tip ablation catheter by using a radiofrequency (RF) power of 25-30 W. In both groups, the esophageal temperature thermocouple was placed on the area of the esophagus adjacent to the ablation site. When the esophageal temperature reached 42 °C, the RF energy delivery was stopped. Esophageal endoscopy was performed 1 day after the catheter ablation. No differences existed between the two groups in terms of clinical background and various parameters related to the catheter ablation, including RF delivery time and number of RF deliveries at an esophageal temperature of >42 °C. Esophageal lesions, such as esophagitis and esophageal ulcers, occurred in 10/50 (20 %) and 15/50 (30 %) patients in the multi-thermocouple and deflectable temperature probe groups, respectively (P = 0.25). Most lesions were mild to moderate injuries, and all were cured using conservative treatment. The incidence of esophageal injury was almost equal between the multi-thermocouple temperature probe and the deflectable temperature probe during esophageal temperature monitoring. Most of the esophageal lesions that developed during esophageal temperature monitoring were mild to moderate and reversible.

  17. Low drift type N thermocouples in out-of-pile advanced gas reactor mock-up test: metallurgical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Scervini, M.; Palmer, J.; Haggard, D.C.

    2015-07-01

    Thermocouples are the most commonly used sensors for temperature measurement in nuclear reactors. They are crucial for the control of current nuclear reactors and for the development of GEN IV reactors. In nuclear applications thermocouples are strongly affected by intense neutron fluxes. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. Thermocouple drift can be very significant for in-pile temperature measurements and may render the temperature sensors unreliable after exposure to nuclear radiation formore » relatively short times compared to the life required for temperature sensors in nuclear applications. Previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of Nickel based thermocouples is limited to temperatures lower than 1000 deg. C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. As part of a collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the University of Cambridge a variety of Type N thermocouples have been exposed at INL in an Advanced Gas Reactor mock-up test at 1150 deg. C for 2000 h, 1200 deg. C for 2000 h, 125 deg. C for 200 h and 1300 deg. C for 200 h, and later analysed metallurgically at the University of Cambridge. The use of electron microscopy allows to identify the metallurgical changes occurring in the thermocouples during high temperature exposure and correlate the time dependent thermocouple drift with the microscopic changes experienced by the thermoelements of different thermocouple designs. In this paper conventional Inconel 600 sheathed type N thermocouples and a type N using a customized sheath developed at the

  18. Thermocouple shield

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN

    2009-11-24

    A thermocouple shield for use in radio frequency fields. In some embodiments the shield includes an electrically conductive tube that houses a standard thermocouple having a thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube protects the thermocouple from damage by an RF (including microwave) field and mitigates erroneous temperature readings due to the microwave or RF field. The thermocouple may be surrounded by a ceramic sheath to further protect the thermocouple. The ceramic sheath is generally formed from a material that is transparent to the wavelength of the microwave or RF energy. The microwave transparency property precludes heating of the ceramic sheath due to microwave coupling, which could affect the accuracy of temperature measurements. The ceramic sheath material is typically an electrically insulating material. The electrically insulative properties of the ceramic sheath help avert electrical arcing, which could damage the thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube is generally disposed around the thermocouple junction and disposed around at least a portion of the ceramic sheath. The concepts of the thermocouple shield may be incorporated into an integrated shielded thermocouple assembly.

  19. Thin-Film Ceramic Thermocouples Fabricated and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali; Gregory, Otto J.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    The Sensors and Electronics Technology Branch of the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing thin-film-based sensors for surface measurement in propulsion system research. Thin-film sensors do not require special machining of the components on which they are mounted, and they are considerably thinner than wire- or foil-based sensors. One type of sensor being advanced is the thin-film thermocouple, specifically for applications in high-temperature combustion environments. Ceramics are being demonstrated as having the potential to meet the demands of thin-film thermocouples in advanced aerospace environments. The maximum-use temperature of noble metal thin-film thermocouples, 1500 C (2700 F), may not be adequate for components used in the increasingly harsh conditions of advanced aircraft and next-generation launch vehicles. Ceramic-based thermocouples are known for their high stability and robustness at temperatures exceeding 1500 C, but are typically in the form of bulky rods or probes. As part of ASTP, Glenn's Sensors and Electronics Technology Branch is leading an in-house effort to apply ceramics as thin-film thermocouples for extremely high-temperature applications as part of ASTP. Since the purity of the ceramics is crucial for the stability of the thermocouples, Glenn's Ceramics Branch and Case Western Reserve University are developing high-purity ceramic sputtering targets for fabricating high-temperature sensors. Glenn's Microsystems Fabrication Laboratory, supported by the Akima Corporation, is using these targets to fabricate thermocouple samples for testing. The first of the materials used were chromium silicide (CrSi) and tantalum carbide (TaC). These refractory materials are expected to survive temperatures in excess of 1500 C. Preliminary results indicate that the thermoelectric voltage output of a thin-film CrSi versus TaC thermocouple is 15 times that of the standard type R (platinum-rhodium versus platinum) thermocouple, producing 20 mV with a 200

  20. Response of thermocouples interfaced to electrothermometers when immersed in 5 water bath temperatures.

    PubMed

    Long, Blaine C; Jutte, Lisa S; Knight, Kenneth L

    2010-01-01

    Thermocouples and electrothermometers are used in therapeutic modality research. Until recently, researchers assumed that these instruments were valid and reliable. To examine 3 different thermocouple types in 5 degrees C, 15 degrees C, 18.4 degrees C, 25 degrees C, and 35 degrees C water baths. Randomized controlled trial. Therapeutic modality laboratory. Eighteen thermocouple leads were inserted through the wall of a foamed polystyrene cooler. The cooler was filled with water. Six thermocouples (2 of each model) were plugged into the 6 channels of the Datalogger and 6 randomly selected channels in the 2 Iso-Thermexes. A mercury thermometer was immersed into the water and was read every 10 seconds for 4 minutes during each of 6 trials. The entire process was repeated for each of 5 water bath temperatures (5 degrees C, 15 degrees C, 18.4 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 35 degrees C). Temperature and absolute temperature differences among 3 thermocouple types (IT-21, IT-18, PT-6) and 3 electrothermometers (Datalogger, Iso-Thermex calibrated from -50 degrees C to 50 degrees C, Iso-Thermex calibrated from -20 degrees C to 80 degrees C). Validity and reliability were dependent on thermocouple type, electrothermometer, and water bath temperature (P < .001; modified Levene P < .05). Statistically, the IT-18 and PT-6 thermocouples were not reliable in each electrothermometer; however, these differences were not practically different from each other. The PT-6 thermocouples were more valid than the IT-18s, and both thermocouple types were more valid than the IT-21s, regardless of water bath temperature (P < .001). The validity and reliability of thermocouples interfaced to an electrothermometer under experimental conditions should be tested before data collection. We also recommend that investigators report the validity, the reliability, and the calculated uncertainty (validity + reliability) of their temperature measurements for therapeutic modalities research. With this

  1. High temperature thermocouple and heat flux gauge using a unique thin film-hardware hot juncture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Holanda, R.; Hippensteele, S. A.; Andracchio, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    A special thin film-hardware material thermocouple (TC) and heat flux gauge concept for a reasonably high temperature and high flux flat plate heat transfer experiment was fabricated and tested to gauge temperatures of 911 K. This concept was developed for minimal disturbance of boundary layer temperature and flow over the plates and minimal disturbance of heat flux through the plates. Comparison of special heat flux gauge Stanton number output at steady-state conditions with benchmark literature data was good and agreement was within a calculated uncertainty of the measurement system. Also, good agreement of special TC and standard TC outputs was obtained and the results are encouraging. Oxidation of thin film thermoelements was a primary failure mode after about 5 of operation.

  2. High-temperature thermocouple and heat flux gauge using a unique thin film-hardware hot junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Holanda, R.; Hippensteele, S. A.; Andracchio, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A special thin film-hardware material thermocouple (TC) and heat flux gauge concept for a reasonably high temperature and high flux flat plate heat transfer experiment was fabricated and tested to gauge temperatures of 911 K. This concept was developed for minimal disturbance of boundary layer temperature and flow over the plates and minimal disturbance of heat flux through the plates. Comparison of special heat flux gauge Stanton number output at steady-state conditions with benchmark literature data was good and agreement was within a calculated uncertainty of the measurement system. Also, good agreement of special TC and standard TC outputs was obtained and the results are encouraging. Oxidation of thin film thermoelements was a primary failure mode after about 5 of operation.

  3. Thermocouple-Signal-Conditioning Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    Thermocouple-signal-conditioning circuit acting in conjunction with thermocouple, exhibits electrical behavior of voltage in series with resistance. Combination part of input bridge circuit of controller. Circuit configured for either of two specific applications by selection of alternative resistances and supply voltages. Includes alarm circuit detecting open circuit in thermocouple and provides off-scale output to signal malfunctions.

  4. Temperature and SAR measurements in deep-body hyperthermia with thermocouple thermometry.

    PubMed

    De Leeuw, A A; Crezee, J; Lagendijk, J J

    1993-01-01

    Multisensor (7-14) thermocouple thermometry is used at our department for temperature measurement with our 'Coaxial TEM' regional hyperthermia system. A special design of the thermometry system with high resolution (0.005 degrees C) and fast data-acquisition (all channels within 320 ms) together with a pulsed power technique allows assessment of specific absorption rate (SAR) information in patients along catheter tracks. A disadvantage of thermocouple thermometry, EM interference, is almost entirely eliminated by application of absorbing ferrite beads around the probe leads. We investigated the effect of remaining disturbance on the temperature decay after power-off, both experimentally in phantoms and in the clinic, and with numerical simulations. Probe and tissue characteristics influence the response time tau dist of the decay of the disturbance. In our clinical practice a normal pulse sequence is 50 s power-on, 10 s power-off: a response time longer than the power-off time results in a deflection of the temperature course at the start. Based on analysis of temperature decays correction of temperature is possible. A double-pulse technique is introduced to provide an initial correction of temperature, and fast information about accuracy. Sometimes disturbance with a relatively long response time occurs, probably due to a bad contact between probe, catheter and/or tissue. Thermocouple thermometry proved to be suitable to measure the SAR along a catheter track. This is used to optimize the SAR distribution by patient positioning before treatment. A clinical example illustrates this.

  5. Noncatalytic thermocouple coatings produced with chemical vapor deposition for flame temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Bahlawane, N; Struckmeier, U; Kasper, T S; Osswald, P

    2007-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) have been employed to develop alumina thin films in order to protect thermocouples from catalytic overheating in flames and to minimize the intrusion presented to the combustion process. Alumina films obtained with a CVD process using AlCl(3) as the precursor are dense, not contaminated, and crystallize in the corundum structure, while MOCVD using Al(acetyl acetone)(3) allows the growth of corundum alumina with improved growth rates. These films, however, present a porous columnar structure and show some carbon contamination. Therefore, coated thermocouples using AlCl(3)-CVD were judged more suitable for flame temperature measurements and were tested in different fuels over a typical range of stoichiometries. Coated thermocouples exhibit satisfactory measurement reproducibility, no temporal drifts, and do not suffer from catalytic effects. Furthermore, their increased radiative heat loss (observed by infrared spectroscopy) allows temperature measurements over a wider range when compared to uncoated thermocouples. A flame with a well-known temperature profile established with laser-based techniques was used to determine the radiative heat loss correction to account for the difference between the apparent temperature measured by the coated thermocouple and the true flame temperature. The validity of the correction term was confirmed with temperature profile measurements for several flames previously studied in different laboratories with laser-based techniques.

  6. Heat-Conducting Anchors for Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdavid, Kenton S.

    1987-01-01

    Metal particles in adhesive aid heat transfer. Aluminum caps containing silver-filled epoxy used as high-thermal-conductance anchors for thermocouples, epoxy providing thermal path between mounting surfaces and thermocouple measuring junctions. Normally, epoxy-filled aluminum caps used when measuring steady-state temperatures. Silver-filled epoxy used when thermocouple not isolated electrically from surface measured.

  7. High-Temperature Properties of Mold Flux Observed and Measured In Situ by Single/Double Hot-Thermocouple Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wanlin; Lyu, Peisheng; Zhou, Lejun; Li, Huan; Zhang, Tongsheng

    2018-05-01

    Mold flux plays very important roles in the continuous casting process, and its high-temperature properties affect the quality of the final as-cast product greatly. Investigations on the melting, isothermal and nonisothermal crystallization, and phase evolution behaviors under a simulated temperature field for the mold flux system using the single/double hot-thermocouple technique (S/DHTT) were reviewed. Meanwhile, further in situ observations on the wetting behavior and heat transfer ability of the mold flux system were also carried out using the S/DHTT. The results summarized here provide a clear understanding of both the high-temperature properties of mold flux and the detailed application of advanced real-time visual high-temperature S/DHTT to this molten slag system.

  8. Comparison of infrared thermometer with thermocouple for monitoring skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, T; Ozaki, M; Nishiyama, T; Imamura, M; Kumazawa, T

    2000-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that the infrared thermometer (Genius) is comparably useful with thermocouples that are routinely used for skin temperature monitoring. Prospective, controlled, not blinded study. Operating room of a university hospital. Ten healthy male volunteers. Volunteers were minimally clothed and were initially warmed by a forced air warmer until they became vasodilated at the finger and the foot for approximately 30 mins. Subsequently, they were kept in the room with no blanket. Skin temperatures were measured continuously with the Mon-a-Therm thermocouple and were also measured with the Genius thermometer just before and after the warming and subsequently every 10 mins for 70 mins. Forearm and finger-tip skin temperatures and skin-surface temperature gradients (from arm to finger and from calf to toe) measured by the Genius thermometer were compared with those measured by the Mon-a-Therm thermocouple using linear regression and Bland and Altman statistics. Forearm temperature and finger-tip temperature ranged from approximately 31 degrees to approximately 36.5 degrees C (87.8-97.7 degrees F) and approximately 22.5 degrees to approximately 36 degrees C (72.5-96.8 degrees F), respectively. Gradients (from arm to finger and from calf to toe) ranged from approximately -3 degrees to approximately 10 degrees C (26.6-50.0 degrees F) and approximately -3 degrees to approximately 11 degrees C (26.6-51.8 degrees F), respectively. Correlations between the temperatures measured by the Genius thermometer and those by the Mon-a-Therm thermocouple were similar and reliable. The correlation coefficients were as follows: 0.78 at forearm, 0.97 at finger-tip, and 0.97 at skin-surface temperature gradients. The infrared thermometer with a special probe is useful to measure the change of skin-surface temperatures and to evaluate the severity of shock in patients.

  9. Evaluation of miniature single-wire sheathed thermocouples for turbine blade temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollanda, R.

    1979-01-01

    Chromel Alumel thermocouples were used, with sheath diameters of 0.15 and 0.25 mm. Tests were conducted at temperatures ranging from 750 to 1250 K. Both steady state and thermal cycling tests were performed for times up to 200 hours. Initial testing was performed in a low velocity gas stream for long time periods using a Meker-type burner. Additional testing was done in a high velocity gas stream for short time periods using a hot gas tunnel and also in a J75 jet engine. A total of eleven 0.15 mm diameter thermocouples and six 0.25 mm diameter thermocouples were tested. Drift rates up to 2.5% in 10 hours were observed. Photomicrographs show that this design is near the limit of miniaturization based on present manufacturing capabilities. Results indicate that the effects of miniaturization on reliability and accuracy must be considered when choosing thermocouples for a particular application.

  10. Effect of the Thermocouple on Measuring the Temperature Discontinuity at a Liquid-Vapor Interface.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Mohammad Amin; Nobes, David S; Elliott, Janet A W

    2017-07-18

    The coupled heat and mass transfer that occurs in evaporation is of interest in a large number of fields such as evaporative cooling, distillation, drying, coating, printing, crystallization, welding, atmospheric processes, and pool fires. The temperature jump that occurs at an evaporating interface is of central importance to understanding this complex process. Over the past three decades, thermocouples have been widely used to measure the interfacial temperature jumps at a liquid-vapor interface during evaporation. However, the reliability of these measurements has not been investigated so far. In this study, a numerical simulation of a thermocouple when it measures the interfacial temperatures at a liquid-vapor interface is conducted to understand the possible effects of the thermocouple on the measured temperature and features in the temperature profile. The differential equations of heat transfer in the solid and fluids as well as the momentum transfer in the fluids are coupled together and solved numerically subject to appropriate boundary conditions between the solid and fluids. The results of the numerical simulation showed that while thermocouples can measure the interfacial temperatures in the liquid correctly, they fail to read the actual interfacial temperatures in the vapor. As the results of our numerical study suggest, the temperature jumps at a liquid-vapor interface measured experimentally by using a thermocouple are larger than what really exists at the interface. For a typical experimental study of evaporation of water at low pressure, it was found that the temperature jumps measured by a thermocouple are overestimated by almost 50%. However, the revised temperature jumps are still in agreement with the statistical rate theory of interfacial transport. As well as addressing the specific application of the liquid-vapor temperature jump, this paper provides significant insight into the role that heat transfer plays in the operation of thermocouples

  11. [Problems of using a thermocouple for measurements of skin temperature rise during the exposure to millimeter waves].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, S I; Ziskin, M S; Fesenko, E E

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of using thermocouples for the artifact-free measurements of skin temperature during millimeter wave exposure was studied. The distributions of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human skin were calculated for different orientations of the thermocouple relative to the E-field of exposure. It was shown that, at the parallel orientation of a thermocouple relative to the E-field, SAR significantly increased at the tip of the thermocouple. This can result in an overheating of the thermocouple. At the perpendicular orientation of a thermocouple, the distortions of the SAR were insignificant. The data obtained confirm that the skin temperature can be measured with a thermocouple during exposure under the condition that the thermocouple is located perpendicular to the E-vector of the electromagnetic field. For the accurate determination of SAR from the rate of the initial temperature rise, it is necessary to fit the temperature kinetics measured with the thermocouple to the solution of the bio-heat transfer equation.

  12. Comparisons of Gas-phase Temperature Measurements in a Flame Using Thin-Filament Pyrometry and Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter; Dietrich, Daniel; Valentine, Russell; Feier, Ioan

    2003-01-01

    Less-intrusive, fast-responding, and full-field temperature measurements have long been a desired tool for the research community. Recently, the emission of a silicon-carbide (SiC) fiber placed in a flowing hot (or reacting) gas has been used to measure the temperature profile along the length of the fiber. The relationship between the gas and fiber temperature comes from an energy balance on the fiber. In the present work, we compared single point flame temperature measurements using thin-filament pyrometry (TFP) and thermocouples. The data was from vertically traversing a thermocouple and a SiC fiber through a methanol/air diffusion flame of a porous-metal wick burner. The results showed that the gas temperature using the TFP technique agreed with the thermocouple measurements (25.4 m diameter wire) within 3.5% for temperatures above 1200 K. Additionally, we imaged the entire SiC fiber (with a spatial resolution of 0.14 mm) while it was in the flame using a high resolution CCD camera. The intensity level along the fiber length is a function of the temperature. This results in a one-dimensional temperature profiles at various heights above the burner wick. This temperature measurement technique, while having a precision of less than 1 K, showed data scatter as high as 38 K. Finally, we discuss the major sources of uncertainty in gas temperature measurement using TFP.

  13. Error sources affecting thermocouple thermometry in RF electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, D P; Brezovich, I A

    1982-03-01

    Thermocouple thermometry errors in radiofrequency (typically 13, 56 MHZ) electromagnetic fields such as are encountered in hyperthermia are described. RF currents capacitatively or inductively coupled into the thermocouple-detector circuit produce errors which are a combination of interference, i.e., 'pick-up' error, and genuine rf induced temperature changes at the junction of the thermocouple. The former can be eliminated by adequate filtering and shielding; the latter is due to (a) junction current heating in which the generally unequal resistances of the thermocouple wires cause a net current flow from the higher to the lower resistance wire across the junction, (b) heating in the surrounding resistive material (tissue in hyperthermia), and (c) eddy current heating of the thermocouple wires in the oscillating magnetic field. Low frequency theories are used to estimate these errors under given operating conditions and relevant experiments demonstrating these effects and precautions necessary to minimize the errors are described. It is shown that at 13.56 MHz and voltage levels below 100 V rms these errors do not exceed 0.1 degrees C if the precautions are observed and thermocouples with adequate insulation (e.g., Bailey IT-18) are used. Results of this study are being currently used in our clinical work with good success.

  14. Computer program for pulsed thermocouples with corrections for radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    A pulsed thermocouple was used for measuring gas temperatures above the melting point of common thermocouples. This was done by allowing the thermocouple to heat until it approaches its melting point and then turning on the protective cooling gas. This method required a computer to extrapolate the thermocouple data to the higher gas temperatures. A method that includes the effect of radiation in the extrapolation is described. Computations of gas temperature are provided, along with the estimate of the final thermocouple wire temperature. Results from tests on high temperature combustor research rigs are presented.

  15. Thermocouple, multiple junction reference oven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, L. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved oven for maintaining the junctions of a plurality of reference thermocouples at a common and constant temperature is described. The oven is characterized by a cylindrical body defining a heat sink with axially extended-cylindrical cavity a singularized heating element which comprises a unitary cylindrical heating element consisting of a resistance heating coil wound about the surface of metallic spool with an axial bore defined and seated in the cavity. Other features of the oven include an annular array of radially extended bores defined in the cylindrical body and a plurality of reference thermocouple junctions seated in the bores in uniformly spaced relation with the heating element, and a temperature sensing device seated in the axial bore for detecting temperature changes as they occur in the spool and circuit to apply a voltage across the coil in response to detected drops in temperatures of the spool.

  16. Measurements of fluctuating gas temperatures using compensated fine wire thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nina, M. N. R.; Pita, G. P.

    1985-09-01

    Thermocouples with three different wire diameters (15, 40 and 50 microns) were used in association with an analog compensation circuit connected to a data acquisition system. Measurements of the time constant were performed using two different heating techniques; Joule effect and external heating by laser beam. The thermocouples were used to quantify the fluctuating temperature field in a hot air jet and in a premixed propane flame. In the reacting case the catalytic effect was evaluated by comparing coated and uncoated wires. Conclusions were also obtained regarding frequency spectra, temperature probability distribution function and time constant.

  17. Instrument for stable high temperature Seebeck coefficient and resistivity measurements under controlled oxygen partial pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Sharma, Peter Anand

    2015-04-28

    The transport properties of ceramic materials strongly depend on oxygen activity, which is tuned by changing the partial oxygen pressure (pO 2) prior to and during measurement. Within, we describe an instrument for highly stable measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity at temperatures up to 1300 K with controlled oxygen partial pressure. An all platinum construction is used to avoid potential materials instabilities that can cause measurement drift. Two independent heaters are employed to establish a small temperature gradient for Seebeck measurements, while keeping the average temperature constant and avoiding errors associated with pO 2-induced drifts in thermocouple readings.more » Oxygen equilibrium is monitored using both an O 2 sensor and the transient behavior of the resistance as a proxy. A pO 2 range of 10 -25–10 0 atm can be established with appropriate gas mixtures. Seebeck measurements were calibrated against a high purity platinum wire, Pt/Pt–Rh thermocouple wire, and a Bi 2Te3 Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material. To demonstrate the utility of this instrument for oxide materials we present measurements as a function of pO 2 on a 1 % Nb-doped SrTiO 3 single crystal, and show systematic changes in properties consistent with oxygen vacancy defect chemistry. Thus, an approximately 11% increase in power factor over a pO 2 range of 10 -19–10 -8 atm at 973 K for the donor-doped single crystals is observed.« less

  18. An Accurate Temperature Correction Model for Thermocouple Hygrometers 1

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Michael J.; Cass, Alfred; de Jager, James M.

    1982-01-01

    Numerous water relation studies have used thermocouple hygrometers routinely. However, the accurate temperature correction of hygrometer calibration curve slopes seems to have been largely neglected in both psychrometric and dewpoint techniques. In the case of thermocouple psychrometers, two temperature correction models are proposed, each based on measurement of the thermojunction radius and calculation of the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. The first model relies on calibration at a single temperature and the second at two temperatures. Both these models were more accurate than the temperature correction models currently in use for four psychrometers calibrated over a range of temperatures (15-38°C). The model based on calibration at two temperatures is superior to that based on only one calibration. The model proposed for dewpoint hygrometers is similar to that for psychrometers. It is based on the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. Comparison with empirical data from three dewpoint hygrometers calibrated at four different temperatures indicates that these instruments need only be calibrated at, e.g. 25°C, if the calibration slopes are corrected for temperature. PMID:16662241

  19. Attaching Thermocouples by Peening or Crimping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murtland, Kevin; Cox, Robert; Immer, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Two simple, effective techniques for attaching thermocouples to metal substrates have been devised for high-temperature applications in which attachment by such conventional means as welding, screws, epoxy, or tape would not be effective. The techniques have been used successfully to attach 0.005- in. (0.127-mm)-diameter type-S thermocouples to substrates of niobium alloy C-103 and stainless steel 416 for measuring temperatures up to 2,600 F (1,427 C). The techniques are equally applicable to other thermocouple and substrate materials. In the first technique, illustrated in the upper part of the figure, a hole slightly wider than twice the diameter of one thermocouple wire is drilled in the substrate. The thermocouple is placed in the hole, then the edge of the hole is peened in one or more places by use of a punch (see figure). The deformed material at the edge secures the thermocouple in the hole. In the second technique a hole is drilled as in the first technique, then an annular relief area is machined around the hole, resulting in structure reminiscent of a volcano in a crater. The thermocouple is placed in the hole as in the first technique, then the "volcano" material is either peened by use of a punch or crimped by use of sidecutters to secure the thermocouple in place. This second technique is preferable for very thin thermocouples [wire diameter .0.005 in. (.0.127 mm)] because standard peening poses a greater risk of clipping one or both of the thermocouple wires. These techniques offer the following advantages over prior thermocouple-attachment techniques: . Because these techniques involve drilling of very small holes, they are minimally invasive . an important advantage in that, to a first approximation, the thermal properties of surrounding areas are not appreciably affected. . These techniques do not involve introduction of any material, other than the substrate and thermocouple materials, that could cause contamination, could decompose, or oxidize

  20. An Automated Thermocouple Calibration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bethea, Mark D.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.

    1992-01-01

    An Automated Thermocouple Calibration System (ATCS) was developed for the unattended calibration of type K thermocouples. This system operates from room temperature to 650 C and has been used for calibration of thermocouples in an eight-zone furnace system which may employ as many as 60 thermocouples simultaneously. It is highly efficient, allowing for the calibration of large numbers of thermocouples in significantly less time than required for manual calibrations. The system consists of a personal computer, a data acquisition/control unit, and a laboratory calibration furnace. The calibration furnace is a microprocessor-controlled multipurpose temperature calibrator with an accuracy of +/- 0.7 C. The accuracy of the calibration furnace is traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The computer software is menu-based to give the user flexibility and ease of use. The user needs no programming experience to operate the systems. This system was specifically developed for use in the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the NASA LeRC.

  1. Validation diagnostics for defective thermocouple circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.

    Thermocouples, properly used under favorable conditions, can measure temperature with an accepted tolerance. However, when improperly applied or exposed to hostile mechanical, chemical, thermal, or radiation environments, they often fail without the error being evident in the temperature record. Conversely, features that appear to be unreasonable in temperature records can be authentic. When hidden failure occurs during measurement, deliberate recording of supplementary information is necessary to distinguish valid from faulty data. Loop resistance change, circuit isolation, isolated noise potential, and other measures can reveal symptoms of developing defects. Monitored continually along with temperature, they can reveal the occurrence, location, and natures of damage incurred during measurement. Special multiterminal branched thermocouple circuits and combinatorial multiplex switching allow detection of dc measurement noise and decalibration. Symptoms of insidious failure, often consequential, are illustrated by examples from field experience in measuring temperature of a propagating retorting front in underground coal gasification.

  2. Base metal thermocouples drift rate dependence from thermoelement diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlasek, P.; Duris, S.; Palencar, R.

    2015-02-01

    Temperature measurements are one of the key factors in many industrial applications that directly affect the quality, effectiveness and safety of manufacturing processes. In many industrial applications these temperature measurements are realized by thermocouples. Accuracy of thermocouples directly affects the quality of the final product of manufacturing and their durability determines the safety margins required. One of the significant effects that affect the precision of the thermocouples is short and long term stability of their voltage output. This stability issue occurs in every type of thermocouples and is caused by multiple factors. In general these factors affect the Seebeck coefficient which is a material constant, which determines the level of generated voltage when exposed to a temperature gradient. Changes of this constant result in the change of the thermocouples voltage output thus indicated temperature which can result in production quality issues, safety and health hazards. These alternations can be caused by physical and chemical changes within the thermocouple lead material. Modification of this material constant can be of temporary nature or permanent. This paper concentrates on the permanent, or irreversible changes of the Seebeck coefficient that occur in commonly used swaged MIMS Type N thermocouples. These permanent changes can be seen as systematic change of the EMF of the thermocouple when it is exposed to a high temperature over a period of time. This change of EMF by time is commonly known as the drift of the thermocouple. This work deals with the time instability of thermocouples EMF at temperatures above 1200 °C. Instability of the output voltage was taken into relation with the lead diameter of the tested thermocouples. This paper concentrates in detail on the change of voltage output of thermocouples of different diameters which were tested at high temperatures for the overall period of more than 210 hours. The gather data from this

  3. Temporary Thermocouple Attachment for Thermal/Vacuum Testing at Non-Extreme Temperatures - Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Sarah E.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2017-01-01

    Post-test examination and data analysis that followed a two week long vacuum test showed that numerous self-stick thermocouples became detached from the test article. The thermocouples were reattached with thermally conductive epoxy and the test was repeated to obtain the required data. Because the thermocouple detachment resulted in significant expense and rework, it was decided to investigate the temporary attachment methods used around NASA and to perform a test to assess their efficacy. The present work describes the testing that was performed in early and mid-2017. The test article and the temporary thermocouple attachment methods tested are described. During the first test, fully half of the thermocouples detached - although the detachment showed subtly in the data for some. The second test was performed to confirm the data from the first test and to investigate the effect of test article and thermocouple grounding. The results of the testing over temperatures ranging from -150 to 200degF are detailed and preliminary recommendations are made for temporary thermocouple attachment methods.

  4. Probe with integrated heater and thermocouple pack

    DOEpatents

    McCulloch, Reginald W.; Dial, Ralph E.; Finnell, Wilber K. R.

    1988-01-01

    A probe for measuring heat includes an elongate rod fitted within a sheath, and a plurality of annular recesses are formed on the surface of the rod in a spaced-apart relationship to form annular chambers that are resistant to heat flow. A longitudinal bore extends axially into the rod and within the cylinders defined by the annular chambers, and an integrated heater and thermocouple pack is dimensioned to fit within the bore. In construction, the integrated pack includes a plurality of wires disposed in electrical insulation within a sheath and a heater cable. These wires include one common wire and a plurality of thermocouple wires. The common wire is constructed of one type of conductive material while the thermocouple wires are each constructed of two types of materials so that at least one thermocouple junction is formed therein. All of the wires extend the length of the integrated pack and are connected together at their ends. The thermocouple wires are constructed to form thermocouple junctions proximate to each annular chamber for producing electromotive forces corresponding to the temperature of the rod within the annular chambers relative to outside the chambers. In the preferred embodiment, each thermocouple wire forms two thermocouple junctions, one junction being disposed within an annular chamber and the second junction being disposed outside of, but proximate to, the same annular chamber. In one embodiment two thermocouple wires are configured to double the sensitivity of the probe in one region.

  5. Metallic and Ceramic Thin Film Thermocouples for Gas Turbine Engines

    PubMed Central

    Tougas, Ian M.; Amani, Matin; Gregory, Otto J.

    2013-01-01

    Temperatures of hot section components in today's gas turbine engines reach as high as 1,500 °C, making in situ monitoring of the severe temperature gradients within the engine rather difficult. Therefore, there is a need to develop instrumentation (i.e., thermocouples and strain gauges) for these turbine engines that can survive these harsh environments. Refractory metal and ceramic thin film thermocouples are well suited for this task since they have excellent chemical and electrical stability at high temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres, they are compatible with thermal barrier coatings commonly employed in today's engines, they have greater sensitivity than conventional wire thermocouples, and they are non-invasive to combustion aerodynamics in the engine. Thin film thermocouples based on platinum:palladium and indium oxynitride:indium tin oxynitride as well as their oxide counterparts have been developed for this purpose and have proven to be more stable than conventional type-S and type-K thin film thermocouples. The metallic and ceramic thin film thermocouples described within this paper exhibited remarkable stability and drift rates similar to bulk (wire) thermocouples. PMID:24217356

  6. Metallic and ceramic thin film thermocouples for gas turbine engines.

    PubMed

    Tougas, Ian M; Amani, Matin; Gregory, Otto J

    2013-11-08

    Temperatures of hot section components in today's gas turbine engines reach as high as 1,500 °C, making in situ monitoring of the severe temperature gradients within the engine rather difficult. Therefore, there is a need to develop instrumentation (i.e., thermocouples and strain gauges) for these turbine engines that can survive these harsh environments. Refractory metal and ceramic thin film thermocouples are well suited for this task since they have excellent chemical and electrical stability at high temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres, they are compatible with thermal barrier coatings commonly employed in today's engines, they have greater sensitivity than conventional wire thermocouples, and they are non-invasive to combustion aerodynamics in the engine. Thin film thermocouples based on platinum:palladium and indium oxynitride:indium tin oxynitride as well as their oxide counterparts have been developed for this purpose and have proven to be more stable than conventional type-S and type-K thin film thermocouples. The metallic and ceramic thin film thermocouples described within this paper exhibited remarkable stability and drift rates similar to bulk (wire) thermocouples.

  7. Study on structural recovery of graphite irradiated with swift heavy ions at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellemoine, F.; Avilov, M.; Bender, M.; Ewing, R. C.; Fernandes, S.; Lang, M.; Li, W. X.; Mittig, W.; Schein, M.; Severin, D.; Tomut, M.; Trautmann, C.; Zhang, F. X.

    2015-12-01

    Thin graphite foils bombarded with an intense high-energy (8.6 MeV/u) gold beam reaching fluences up to 1 × 1015 ions/cm2 lead to swelling and electrical resistivity changes. As shown earlier, these effects are diminished with increasing irradiation temperature. The work reported here extends the investigation of beam induced changes of these samples by structural analysis using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. A nearly complete recovery from swelling at irradiation temperatures above about 1500 °C is identified.

  8. Thread-Mounted Thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Stanley W.

    1988-01-01

    Thread-mounted thermocouple developed to accurately measure temperature of surrounding material. Comprised of threaded rod or bolt drilled along length, dual-hole ceramic insulator rod, thermocouple wire, optional ceramic filler, and epoxy resin. In contact with and takes average temperature of, surrounding material. Fabricated easily in size and metal to suit particular application. Because of simplicity and ability to measure average temperature, widespread use of design foreseen in varity of applications.

  9. Self-Validating Thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M. (Inventor); Mata, Carlos T. (Inventor); Santiago, Josephine B. (Inventor); Vokrot, Peter (Inventor); Zavala, Carlos E. (Inventor); Burns, Bradley M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Self-Validating Thermocouple (SVT) Systems capable of detecting sensor probe open circuits, short circuits, and unnoticeable faults such as a probe debonding and probe degradation are useful in the measurement of temperatures. SVT Systems provide such capabilities by incorporating a heating or excitation element into the measuring junction of the thermocouple. By heating the measuring junction and observing the decay time for the detected DC voltage signal, it is possible to indicate whether the thermocouple is bonded or debonded. A change in the thermal transfer function of the thermocouple system causes a change in the rise and decay times of the thermocouple output. Incorporation of the excitation element does not interfere with normal thermocouple operation, thus further allowing traditional validation procedures as well.

  10. Safe and consistent method of spot-welding platinum thermocouple wires and foils for high temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Orr, G; Roth, M

    2012-08-01

    A low-voltage (mV) electronically triggered spot welding system for fabricating fine thermocouples and thin sheets used in high-temperature characterization of materials' properties is suggested. The system is based on the capacitance discharge method with a timed trigger for obtaining reliable and consistent welds. In contrast to existing techniques based on employing high voltage DC supplies for charging the capacitor or supplies with positive and negative rails, this method uses a simple, standard dual power supply available at most of the physical laboratories or can be acquired at a low cost. In addition, an efficient and simple method of fabricating non-sticking electrodes that do not contaminate the weld area is suggested and implemented.

  11. Welding Wires To Thin Thermocouple Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond; Kim, Walter S.; Danzey, Gerald A.; Pencil, Eric; Wadel, Mary

    1993-01-01

    Parallel-gap resistance welding yields joints surviving temperatures of about 1,000 degrees C. Much faster than thermocompression bonding. Also exceeds conductive-paste bonding and sputtering thin films through porous flame-sprayed insulation on prewelded lead wires. Introduces no foreign material into thermocouple circuit and does not require careful control of thickness of flame-sprayed material.

  12. Thermocouple assembly

    DOEpatents

    Thermos, Anthony Constantine; Rahal, Fadi Elias

    2002-01-01

    A thermocouple assembly includes a thermocouple; a plurality of lead wires extending from the thermocouple; an insulating jacket extending along and enclosing the plurality of leads; and at least one internally sealed area within the insulating jacket to prevent fluid leakage along and within the insulating jacket. The invention also provides a method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple including the steps of a) attaching a plurality of lead wires to a thermocouple; b) adding a heat sensitive pseudo-wire to extend along the plurality of lead wires; c) enclosing the lead wires and pseudo-wire inside an insulating jacket; d) locally heating axially spaced portions of the insulating jacket to a temperature which melts the pseudo-wire and fuses it with an interior surface of the jacket.

  13. High temperature deformation behavior, thermal stability and irradiation performance in Grade 92 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan

    The 9Cr-2W ferritic-martensitic steel (i.e. Grade 92 steel) possesses excellent mechanical and thermophysical properties; therefore, it has been considered to suit more challenging applications where high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties are required. The high temperature deformation mechanism was investigated through a set of tensile testing at elevated temperatures. Hence, the threshold stress concept was applied to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. It was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations due to the particle-dislocation interactions and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed. In addition, the microstructural evolution at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. For instance, the microstructural evolution under loading was more pronounced and carbide precipitation showed more coarsening tendency. The growth of these carbide precipitates, by removing W and Mo from matrix, significantly deteriorates the solid solution strengthening. The MX type carbonitrides exhibited better coarsening resistance. To better understand the thermal microstructural stability, long tempering schedules up to 1000 hours was conducted at 560, 660 and 760°C after normalizing the steel. Still, the coarsening rate of M23C 6 carbides was higher than the MX-type particles. Moreover, the Laves phase particles were detected after tempering the steel for long periods before they dissolve back into the matrix at high temperature (i.e. 720°C). The influence of the tempering temperature and time was studied for Grade 92 steel via Hollomon-Jaffe parameter. Finally, the irradiation performance of Grade 92 steel was evaluated to examine the feasibility of its eventual reactor use. To that end, Grade 92 steel was irradiated with iron (Fe2+) ions to 10, 50 and 100 dpa at 30 and 500°C. Overall, the irradiated samples showed some irradiation-induced hardening which was more noticeable at 30°C. Additionally

  14. Beam localization in HIFU temperature measurements using thermocouples, with application to cooling by large blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Subhashish; Banerjee, Rupak K; Hariharan, Prasanna; Myers, Matthew R

    2011-02-01

    Experimental studies of thermal effects in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) procedures are often performed with the aid of fine wire thermocouples positioned within tissue phantoms. Thermocouple measurements are subject to several types of error which must be accounted for before reliable inferences can be made on the basis of the measurements. Thermocouple artifact due to viscous heating is one source of error. A second is the uncertainty regarding the position of the beam relative to the target location or the thermocouple junction, due to the error in positioning the beam at the junction. This paper presents a method for determining the location of the beam relative to a fixed pair of thermocouples. The localization technique reduces the uncertainty introduced by positioning errors associated with very narrow HIFU beams. The technique is presented in the context of an investigation into the effect of blood flow through large vessels on the efficacy of HIFU procedures targeted near the vessel. Application of the beam localization method allowed conclusions regarding the effects of blood flow to be drawn from previously inconclusive (because of localization uncertainties) data. Comparison of the position-adjusted transient temperature profiles for flow rates of 0 and 400ml/min showed that blood flow can reduce temperature elevations by more than 10%, when the HIFU focus is within a 2mm distance from the vessel wall. At acoustic power levels of 17.3 and 24.8W there is a 20- to 70-fold decrease in thermal dose due to the convective cooling effect of blood flow, implying a shrinkage in lesion size. The beam-localization technique also revealed the level of thermocouple artifact as a function of sonication time, providing investigators with an indication of the quality of thermocouple data for a given exposure time. The maximum artifact was found to be double the measured temperature rise, during initial few seconds of sonication. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B

  15. Probe with integrated heater and thermocouple pack

    DOEpatents

    McCulloch, Reg W.; Dial, Ralph E.; Finnell, Wilber K. R.

    1990-01-01

    A probe for measuring heat includes an elongate rod fitted within a sheath, and a plurality of annular recesses are formed on the surface of the rod in a spaced-apart relationship to form annular chambers that are resistant to heat flow. A longitudinal bore extends axially into the rod and within the cylinders defined by the annular chambers, and an integrated heater and thermocouple pack is dimensioned to fit within the bore. In construction, the integrated pack includes a plurality of wires disposed in electrical insulation within a sheath and a heater cable. These wires include one common wire and a plurality of thermocuple wires. The common wire is constructed of one type of conductive material while the thermocouple wires are each constructed of two types of materials so that at least one thermocouple junction is formed therein. All of the wires extend the length of the integrated pack and are connected together at their ends. The thermocouple wires are constructed to form thermocouple junctions proximate to each annular chamber for producing electromotive forces corresponding to the temperature of the rod within the annular chambers relative to outside the chambers. In the preferred embodiment, each thermocouple wire forms two thermocouple junctions, one junction being disposed within an annular chamber and the second junction being disposed outside of, but proximate to, the same annular chamber. In one embodiment two thermocouple wires are configured to double the sensitivity of the probe in one region.

  16. Advanced Microscopic Integrated Thermocouple Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettigrew, Penny J.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop and refine a technique for making microscopic thermocouple arrays for use in measuring the temperature gradient across a solid-liquid interface during the solidification process. Current thermocouple technology does not allow for real-time measurements across the interface due to the prohibitive size of available thermocouples. Microscopic thermocouple arrays will offer a much greater accuracy and resolution of temperature measurements across the solid-liquid interface which will lead to a better characterization of the solidification process and interface reaction which affect the properties of the resulting material.

  17. A Highly Thermostable In₂O₃/ITO Thin Film Thermocouple Prepared via Screen Printing for High Temperature Measurements.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yantao; Ren, Wei; Shi, Peng; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Ye, Zuo-Guang; Jing, Weixuan; Tian, Bian; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2018-03-23

    An In₂O₃/ITO thin film thermocouple was prepared via screen printing. Glass additives were added to improve the sintering process and to increase the density of the In₂O₃/ITO films. The surface and cross-sectional images indicate that both the grain size and densification of the ITO and In₂O₃ films increased with the increase in annealing time. The thermoelectric voltage of the In₂O₃/ITO thermocouple was 53.5 mV at 1270 °C at the hot junction. The average Seebeck coefficient of the thermocouple was calculated as 44.5 μV/°C. The drift rate of the In₂O₃/ITO thermocouple was 5.44 °C/h at a measuring time of 10 h at 1270 °C.

  18. Multiwire thermocouples: Frequency response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental measurements are made with a novel two wire thermocouple. Signals from two wires of unequal diameters are recorded from the thermocouple suspended in constant flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the two wire thermocouple requires no compensation for omega less than or equal to 2 omega(sub 1) where omega is the natural frequency of the smaller wire. A compensation factor is recommended for larger frequencies omega greater than 2 omega(sub 1). Theory and experimental measurements are compared with a novel three wire thermocouple. Signals from three wires of unequal diameters are recorded from the thermocouple suspended in constant flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the three wire thermocouple requires no compensation for omega less than or equal to 5 omega(sub 1) where omega (sub 1) is the natural frequency of the smaller wire. The latter result represents a significant improvement compared to previous work with two wire thermocouples. A correction factor has also been derived to account for wires of arbitrary diameter. Measurements are recorded for multiwire thermocouples consisting of either two or three wires of unequal diameters. Signals from the multiwire probe are recorded for a reversing gas flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the multiwire thermocouple requires no compensation provided omega/omega(sub 1) is less than 2.3 for two wires or omega/omega(sub 1) is less than 3.6 for three wires where omega(sub 1) is the natural frequency of the smaller wire based on the maximum gas velocity. The latter results were possible provided Fourier transformed data were used and knowledge of the gas velocity is available.

  19. Gold ink coating of thermocouple sheaths

    DOEpatents

    Ruhl, H. Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for applying a gold ink coating to a thermocouple sheath which includes the steps of electropolishing and oxidizing the surface of the thermocouple sheath, then dipping the sheath into liquid gold ink, and finally heat curing the coating. The gold coating applied in this manner is highly reflective and does not degrade when used for an extended period of time in an environment having a temperature over 1000.degree. F. Depending on the application, a portion of the gold coating covering the tip of the thermocouple sheath is removed by abrasion.

  20. Uncertainty of a hybrid surface temperature sensor for silicon wafers and comparison with an embedded thermocouple.

    PubMed

    Iuchi, Tohru; Gogami, Atsushi

    2009-12-01

    We have developed a user-friendly hybrid surface temperature sensor. The uncertainties of temperature readings associated with this sensor and a thermocouple embedded in a silicon wafer are compared. The expanded uncertainties (k=2) of the hybrid temperature sensor and the embedded thermocouple are 2.11 and 2.37 K, respectively, in the temperature range between 600 and 1000 K. In the present paper, the uncertainty evaluation and the sources of uncertainty are described.

  1. Measuring soil and tree temperatures during prescribed fires with thermocouple probes

    Treesearch

    Stephen S. Sackett; Sally M. Haase

    1992-01-01

    Soil and cambium temperatures must be known to ascertain certain effects of prescribed fires on trees. Thermocouple-based systems were devised for measuring soil and cambium temperatures during prescribed fires. The systems, which incorporate both commercially available and custom components, perform three basic functions: data collection, data retrieval, and data...

  2. Attachment of Free Filament Thermocouples for Temperature Measurements on Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Cuy, Michael D.; Wnuk, Stephen P.

    1998-01-01

    At the NASA Lewis Research Center, a new installation technique utilizing convoluted wire thermocouples (TC's) was developed and proven to produce very good adhesion on CMC's, even in a burner rig environment. Because of their unique convoluted design, such TC's of various types and sizes adhere to flat or curved CMC specimens with no sign of delamination, open circuits, or interactions-even after testing in a Mach 0.3 burner rig to 1200 C (2200 F) for several thermal cycles and at several hours at high temperatures. Large differences in thermal expansion between metal thermocouples and low-expansion materials, such as CMC's, normally generate large stresses in the wires. These stresses cause straight wires to detach, but convoluted wires that are bonded with strips of coating allow bending in the unbonded portion to relieve these expansion stresses.

  3. Thermocouple error correction for measuring the flame temperature with determination of emissivity and heat transfer coefficient.

    PubMed

    Hindasageri, V; Vedula, R P; Prabhu, S V

    2013-02-01

    Temperature measurement by thermocouples is prone to errors due to conduction and radiation losses and therefore has to be corrected for precise measurement. The temperature dependent emissivity of the thermocouple wires is measured by the use of thermal infrared camera. The measured emissivities are found to be 20%-40% lower than the theoretical values predicted from theory of electromagnetism. A transient technique is employed for finding the heat transfer coefficients for the lead wire and the bead of the thermocouple. This method does not require the data of thermal properties and velocity of the burnt gases. The heat transfer coefficients obtained from the present method have an average deviation of 20% from the available heat transfer correlations in literature for non-reacting convective flow over cylinders and spheres. The parametric study of thermocouple error using the numerical code confirmed the existence of a minimum wire length beyond which the conduction loss is a constant minimal. Temperature of premixed methane-air flames stabilised on 16 mm diameter tube burner is measured by three B-type thermocouples of wire diameters: 0.15 mm, 0.30 mm, and 0.60 mm. The measurements are made at three distances from the burner tip (thermocouple tip to burner tip/burner diameter = 2, 4, and 6) at an equivalence ratio of 1 for the tube Reynolds number varying from 1000 to 2200. These measured flame temperatures are corrected by the present numerical procedure, the multi-element method, and the extrapolation method. The flame temperatures estimated by the two-element method and extrapolation method deviate from numerical results within 2.5% and 4%, respectively.

  4. Thermocouple error correction for measuring the flame temperature with determination of emissivity and heat transfer coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindasageri, V.; Vedula, R. P.; Prabhu, S. V.

    2013-02-01

    Temperature measurement by thermocouples is prone to errors due to conduction and radiation losses and therefore has to be corrected for precise measurement. The temperature dependent emissivity of the thermocouple wires is measured by the use of thermal infrared camera. The measured emissivities are found to be 20%-40% lower than the theoretical values predicted from theory of electromagnetism. A transient technique is employed for finding the heat transfer coefficients for the lead wire and the bead of the thermocouple. This method does not require the data of thermal properties and velocity of the burnt gases. The heat transfer coefficients obtained from the present method have an average deviation of 20% from the available heat transfer correlations in literature for non-reacting convective flow over cylinders and spheres. The parametric study of thermocouple error using the numerical code confirmed the existence of a minimum wire length beyond which the conduction loss is a constant minimal. Temperature of premixed methane-air flames stabilised on 16 mm diameter tube burner is measured by three B-type thermocouples of wire diameters: 0.15 mm, 0.30 mm, and 0.60 mm. The measurements are made at three distances from the burner tip (thermocouple tip to burner tip/burner diameter = 2, 4, and 6) at an equivalence ratio of 1 for the tube Reynolds number varying from 1000 to 2200. These measured flame temperatures are corrected by the present numerical procedure, the multi-element method, and the extrapolation method. The flame temperatures estimated by the two-element method and extrapolation method deviate from numerical results within 2.5% and 4%, respectively.

  5. Atom probe tomography analysis of high dose MA957 at selected irradiation temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Nathan A.; Stergar, Erich; Toloczko, Mychailo; Hosemann, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are meritable structural materials for nuclear reactor systems due to the exemplary resistance to radiation damage and high temperature creep. Summarized in this work are atom probe tomography (APT) investigations on a heat of MA957 that underwent irradiation in the form of in-reactor creep specimens in the Fast Flux Test Facility-Materials Open Test Assembly (FFTF-MOTA) for the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program. The oxide precipitates appear stable under irradiation at elevated temperature over extended periods of time. Nominally, the precipitate chemistry is unchanged by the accumulated dose; although, evidence suggests that ballistic dissolution and reformation processes are occurring at all irradiation temperatures. At 412 °C-109 dpa, chromium enrichments - consistent with the α‧ phase - appear between the oxide precipitates, indicating radiation induced segregation. Grain boundaries, enriched with several elements including nickel and titanium, are observed at all irradiation conditions. At 412 °C-109 dpa, the grain boundaries are also enriched in molecular titanium oxide (TiO).

  6. A coaxial thermocouple for shock tunnel applications.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Viren; Bhat, Sandeep

    2010-10-01

    A chromel-constantan coaxial surface junction thermocouple has been designed, fabricated, calibrated, and tested to measure the temperature-time history on the surface of a body in a hypersonic freestream of Mach 8 in a shock tunnel. The coaxial thermocouple with a diameter of 3.25 mm was flush mounted in the surface of a hemisphere of 25 mm diameter. The hypersonic freestream was of a very low temperature and density, and had a flow time of about a millisecond. Preliminary test results indicate that the thermocouple is quite sensitive to low temperature-rarefied freestreams, and also has a response time of a few microseconds (≈5 μs) to meet the requirements of short duration transient measurements. The sensor developed is accurate, robust, reproducible, and is highly inexpensive.

  7. Microstructure and hardness evolution of nanochannel W films irradiated by helium at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wenjing; Wang, Yongqiang; Tang, Ming; Ren, Feng; Fu, Qiang; Cai, Guangxu; Dong, Lan; Hu, Lulu; Wei, Guo; Jiang, Changzhong

    2018-04-01

    Plasma facing materials (PFMs) face one of the most serious challenges in fusion reactors, including unprecedented harsh environment such as 14.1 MeV neutron and transmutation gas irradiation at high temperature. Tungsten (W) is considered to be one of the most promising PFM, however, virtually insolubility of helium (He) in W causes new material issues such as He bubbles and W "fuzz" microstructure. In our previous studies, we presented a new strategy using nanochannel structure designed in the W film to increase the releasing of He atoms and thus to minimize the He nucleation and "fuzz" formation behavior. In this work, we report the further study on the diffusion of He atoms in the nanochannel W films irradiated at a high temperature of 600 °C. More specifically, the temperature influences on the formation and growth of He bubbles, the lattice swelling, and the mechanical properties of the nanochannel W films were investigated. Compared with the bulk W, the nanochannel W films possessed smaller bubble size and lower bubble areal density, indicating that noticeable amounts of He atoms have been released out along the nanochannels during the high temperature irradiations. Thus, with lower He concentration in the nanochannel W films, the formation of the bubble superlattice is delayed, which suppresses the lattice swelling and reduces hardening. These aspects indicate the nanochannel W films have better radiation resistance even at high temperature irradiations.

  8. Realization of Ru-C Eutectic Point for Evaluation of W-Re and IrRh/Ir Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, H.; Masuyama, S.; Izuchi, M.; Yamazawa, K.; Arai, M.

    2015-03-01

    Tungsten-rhenium (W-Re) thermocouples are widely used in industry for measurements at high temperatures, up to . Since the electromotive force (emf) of a W-Re thermocouple is known to change during exposure at high temperatures, evaluation of the emf stability is essential for measuring temperature precisely and for realizing precise temperature control used to ensure the quality of products subject to annealing processes. To evaluate precisely the thermoelectric stability around , two Ru-C cells (crucible and Ru-C eutectic alloy) were constructed in our laboratory. The key feature of the cells is that their dimensions are large to ensure there is sufficient immersion available to evaluate the homogeneity characteristics of the thermocouples. By using one of the Ru-C cells, the drift and inhomogeneity of Type C (tungsten-5 % rhenium vs tungsten-26 % rhenium) thermocouples during an exposure to high temperature around were evaluated. Furthermore, to explore possible applications of the eutectic point to other types of high-temperature thermocouples, the drift of an IrRh/Ir thermocouple (iridium-40 % rhodium vs iridium) was also evaluated using another Ru-C cell. The tests with W-Re and IrRh/Ir thermocouples demonstrate that the newly developed Ru-C cells can be used to successfully realize melting plateaux repeatedly. This enables the long-term drift measurements essential for the evaluation and improvement of high-temperature thermocouples. The results obtained in this study will also be useful for evaluating the uncertainty of thermocouple calibrations at around.

  9. Tungsten-rhenium thin film thermocouples for SiC-based ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Bian; Zhang, Zhongkai; Shi, Peng; Zheng, Chen; Yu, Qiuyue; Jing, Weixuan; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2017-01-01

    A tungsten-rhenium thin film thermocouple is designed and fabricated, depending on the principle of thermal-electric effect caused by the high temperature. The characteristics of thin film thermocouples in different temperatures are investigated via numerical analysis and analog simulation. The working mechanism and thermo-electric features of the thermocouples are analyzed depending on the simulation results. Then the thin film thermocouples are fabricated and calibrated. The calibration results show that the thin film thermocouples based on the tungsten-rhenium material achieve ideal static characteristics and work well in the practical applications.

  10. Modern Thermocouple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, K. N.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes a thermocouple circuit used to measure Joule heating as well as Peltier heating and cooling for a copper-Constantan metallic junction. Shows how the Seebeck effect from a thermocouple can monitor the temperature condition of a junction with regard to input power and Peltier effect. (Author/GA)

  11. Performance Evaluation of an Infrared Thermocouple

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiachung; Weng, Yu-Kai; Shen, Te-Ching

    2010-01-01

    The measurement of the leaf temperature of forests or agricultural plants is an important technique for the monitoring of the physiological state of crops. The infrared thermometer is a convenient device due to its fast response and nondestructive measurement technique. Nowadays, a novel infrared thermocouple, developed with the same measurement principle of the infrared thermometer but using a different detector, has been commercialized for non-contact temperature measurement. The performances of two-kinds of infrared thermocouples were evaluated in this study. The standard temperature was maintained by a temperature calibrator and a special black cavity device. The results indicated that both types of infrared thermocouples had good precision. The error distribution ranged from −1.8 °C to 18 °C as the reading values served as the true values. Within the range from 13 °C to 37 °C, the adequate calibration equations were the high-order polynomial equations. Within the narrower range from 20 °C to 35 °C, the adequate equation was a linear equation for one sensor and a two-order polynomial equation for the other sensor. The accuracy of the two kinds of infrared thermocouple was improved by nearly 0.4 °C with the calibration equations. These devices could serve as mobile monitoring tools for in situ and real time routine estimation of leaf temperatures. PMID:22163458

  12. Performance evaluation of an infrared thermocouple.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiachung; Weng, Yu-Kai; Shen, Te-Ching

    2010-01-01

    The measurement of the leaf temperature of forests or agricultural plants is an important technique for the monitoring of the physiological state of crops. The infrared thermometer is a convenient device due to its fast response and nondestructive measurement technique. Nowadays, a novel infrared thermocouple, developed with the same measurement principle of the infrared thermometer but using a different detector, has been commercialized for non-contact temperature measurement. The performances of two-kinds of infrared thermocouples were evaluated in this study. The standard temperature was maintained by a temperature calibrator and a special black cavity device. The results indicated that both types of infrared thermocouples had good precision. The error distribution ranged from -1.8 °C to 18 °C as the reading values served as the true values. Within the range from 13 °C to 37 °C, the adequate calibration equations were the high-order polynomial equations. Within the narrower range from 20 °C to 35 °C, the adequate equation was a linear equation for one sensor and a two-order polynomial equation for the other sensor. The accuracy of the two kinds of infrared thermocouple was improved by nearly 0.4 °C with the calibration equations. These devices could serve as mobile monitoring tools for in situ and real time routine estimation of leaf temperatures.

  13. Ultrasound-guided thermocouple placement for cryosurgery.

    PubMed

    Abramovits, W; Pruiksma, R; Bose, S

    1996-09-01

    Although cryosurgical methods have high cure rates, imprecise estimates of both skin lesion depth and destructive temperature front location result in subjective technique in skin malignancy treatments. We evaluated the possibility of newer ultrasound equipment to assist in the precise placement of thermocouples in human skin. DermaScan C ver. 3 ultrasonographic equipment fitted with a sharp focus probe with a frequency of 20 MHz and a scan length of 12.1 mm was used to locate thermocouples with 27- and 30-gauge needles. We successfully and reproducibly located thermocouples and thin needles, and accurately measured their distance from the skin surface. Ultrasound is a useful method for the accurate placement of thermocouples, and needles as thin as 30 gauge for monitoring in cryosurgery.

  14. Seebeck Coefficient of Thermocouples from Nickel-Coated Carbon Fibers: Theory and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Hardianto, Hardianto; De Mey, Gilbert; Ciesielska-Wrόbel, Izabela; Hertleer, Carla; Van Langenhove, Lieva

    2018-05-30

    Thermocouples made of etched and non-etched nickel-coated carbon yarn (NiCCY) were investigated. Theoretic Seebeck coefficients were compared to experimental results from measurements of generated electric voltage by these thermocouples. The etching process for making thermocouples was performed by immersion of NiCCY in the solution containing a mixture of hydrochloric acid (HCl) (37% of concentration), and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) in three different concentrations-3%, 6%, and 10%. Thirty minutes of etching to remove Ni from NiCCY was followed by washing and drying. Next, the ability to generate electrical voltage by the thermocouples (being a junction of the etched and the non-etched NiCCY) was measured in different ranges of temperatures, both a cold junction (291.15⁻293.15 K) and a hot junction (293.15⁻325.15 K). A formula predicting the Seebeck coefficient of this thermocouple was elaborated, taking into consideration resistance values of the tested samples. It was proven that there is a good agreement between the theoretical and experimental data, especially for the yarns etched with 6% and 10% peroxide (both were mixed with HCl). The electrical resistance of non-fully etched nickel remaining on the carbon fiber surface ( R 1 ) can have a significant effect on the thermocouples' characteristics.

  15. A preliminary study of factors affecting the calibration stability of the iridium versus iridium-40 percent rhodium thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Shaffiq; Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    An iridium versus iridium-40% rhodium thermocouple was studied. Problems associated with the use of this thermocouple for high temperature applications (up to 2000 C) were investigated. The metallurgical studies included X-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. The thermocouples in the as-received condition from the manufacturer revealed large amounts of internal stress caused by cold working during manufacturing. The thermocouples also contained a large amount of inhomogeneities and segregations. No phase transformations were observed in the alloy up to 1100 C. It was found that annealing the thermocouple at 1800 C for two hours, and then at 1400 C for 2 to 3 hours yielded a fine grain structure, relieving some of the strains, and making the wire more ductile. It was also found that the above annealing procedure stabilized the thermal emf behavior of the thermocouple for application below 1800 C (an improvement from + or - 1% to + or - 0.02% within the range of the test parameters used).

  16. A fine-wire thermocouple probe for measurement of stagnation temperatures in real gas hypersonic flows of nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Griffith, Wayland C.; Yanta, William J.

    1991-01-01

    A fine-wire thermocouple probe was used to determine freestream stagnation temperatures in hypersonic flows. Data were gathered in a N2 blowdown wind tunnel with runtimes of 1-5 s. Tests were made at supply pressures between 30 and 1400 atm and supply temperatures between 700 and 1900 K, with Mach numbers of 14 to 16. An iterative procedure requiring thermocouple data, pilot pressure measurements, and supply conditions was used to determine test cell stagnation temperatures. Probe conduction and radiation losses, as well as real gas behavior of N2, were accounted for during analysis. Temperature measurement error was found to be 5 to 10 percent. A correlation was drawn between thermocouple diameter Reynolds number and temperature recovery ratio. Transient probe behavior was studied and was found to be adequate in temperature gradients up to 1000 K/s.

  17. Blind system identification of two-thermocouple sensor based on cross-relation method.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanfeng; Zhang, Zhijie; Hao, Xiaojian

    2018-03-01

    In dynamic temperature measurement, the dynamic characteristics of the sensor affect the accuracy of the measurement results. Thermocouples are widely used for temperature measurement in harsh conditions due to their low cost, robustness, and reliability, but because of the presence of the thermal inertia, there is a dynamic error in the dynamic temperature measurement. In order to eliminate the dynamic error, two-thermocouple sensor was used to measure dynamic gas temperature in constant velocity flow environments in this paper. Blind system identification of two-thermocouple sensor based on a cross-relation method was carried out. Particle swarm optimization algorithm was used to estimate time constants of two thermocouples and compared with the grid based search method. The method was validated on the experimental equipment built by using high temperature furnace, and the input dynamic temperature was reconstructed by using the output data of the thermocouple with small time constant.

  18. Blind system identification of two-thermocouple sensor based on cross-relation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanfeng; Zhang, Zhijie; Hao, Xiaojian

    2018-03-01

    In dynamic temperature measurement, the dynamic characteristics of the sensor affect the accuracy of the measurement results. Thermocouples are widely used for temperature measurement in harsh conditions due to their low cost, robustness, and reliability, but because of the presence of the thermal inertia, there is a dynamic error in the dynamic temperature measurement. In order to eliminate the dynamic error, two-thermocouple sensor was used to measure dynamic gas temperature in constant velocity flow environments in this paper. Blind system identification of two-thermocouple sensor based on a cross-relation method was carried out. Particle swarm optimization algorithm was used to estimate time constants of two thermocouples and compared with the grid based search method. The method was validated on the experimental equipment built by using high temperature furnace, and the input dynamic temperature was reconstructed by using the output data of the thermocouple with small time constant.

  19. Effect of annealing high-dose heavy-ion irradiated high-temperature superconductor wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, N. M.; Wimbush, S. C.; Kluth, P.; Mota-Santiago, P.; Ridgway, M. C.; Kennedy, J. V.; Long, N. J.

    2017-10-01

    Heavy-ion irradiation of high-temperature superconducting thin films has long been known to generate damage tracks of amorphized material that are of close-to-ideal dimension to effectively contribute to pinning of magnetic flux lines and thereby enhance the in-field critical current. At the same time, though, the presence of these tracks reduces the superconducting volume fraction available to transport current while the irradiation process itself generates oxygen depletion and disorder in the remaining superconducting material. We have irradiated commercially available superconducting coated conductors consisting of a thick film of (Y,Dy)Ba2Cu3O7 deposited on a buffered metal tape substrate in a continuous reel-to-reel process. Irradiation was by 185 MeV 197Au ions. A high fluence of 3 × 1011 ions/cm2 was chosen to emphasize the detrimental effects. The critical current was reduced following this irradiation, but annealing at relatively low temperatures of 200 °C and 400 °C substantially restore the critical current of the irradiated material. At high fields and high temperatures there is a net benefit of critical current compared to the untreated material.

  20. High temperature resistant cermet and ceramic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Cermet compositions having high temperature oxidation resistance, high hardness and high abrasion and wear resistance, and particularly adapted for production of high temperature resistant cermet insulator bodies are presented. The compositions are comprised of a sintered body of particles of a high temperature resistant metal or metal alloy, preferably molybdenum or tungsten particles, dispersed in and bonded to a solid solution formed of aluminum oxide and silicon nitride, and particularly a ternary solid solution formed of a mixture of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride. Also disclosed are novel ceramic compositions comprising a sintered solid solution of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride.

  1. A comparison between internal and surface temperature measurement techniques during phacoemulsification cataract surgery: thermocamera versus thermocouple.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, B; Diciotti, S; Bocchi, L; Mencucci, R; Corvi, A

    2008-01-01

    Corneal and scleral burns, one of the main complications that can occur during a cataract operation, are produced by overheating due to the use of the phacoemulsifier. The temperature of the anterior chamber of the eye can be measured both invasively using thermocouples and non-invasively, but only superficially, using a thermocamera. To compare the measures obtained from both techniques an in vitro experimental analysis was conducted on pigs' eyes. During a simulated phacoemulsification cataract operation both the surface temperature with a thermocamera and the temperature inside the anterior chamber with a thermocouple were recorded. For each procedure, the maximum temperature values measured by each technique were compared. The results of this research show that the difference between the maximum values measured with the two techniques is on average 0.5 degrees C. It is possible to employ a thermocamera technique instead of a thermocouple technique to provide an indication of the temperature inside the anterior chamber.

  2. Anomalous Annealing of a High-Resistivity CCD Irradiated at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautz, M.; Prigozhin, G.; Kissel, S.; LaMarr, B.; Grant, C.; Brown, S.

    2005-04-01

    The front-illuminated charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors in the Chandra X-ray Observatory's ACIS instrument suffered radiation damage from soft protons focused by the telescope mirror early in the mission. In the course of assessing this damage, the focal plane was temporarily warmed from its normal operating temperature (then -100/spl deg/C) to +30/spl deg/C. Following this "bakeout", the radiation-damaged CCDs exhibited significantly greater charge transfer inefficiency (CTI). We performed a laboratory experiment with a sibling of the flight detectors in an attempt to reproduce and better understand this phenomenon. The test CCD was cooled to -100/spl deg/C, irradiated by 120 keV protons and then warmed to +30/spl deg/C for 8 hours. As expected, after the initial irradiation, but before detector warmup, a substantial CTI increase was observed. The subsequent warmup itself then produced an additional factor /spl ap/2.5 increase in CTI. Following smaller subsequent irradiations with the detector cold, a "bakeout" for 8 hours at -60/spl deg/C produced no observable increase in CTI. However, a subsequent bakeout to +30/spl deg/C for another 8 hours resulted in an additional increase in CTI of roughly 15%. The CTI changes produced by the room temperature bakeout are accompanied by dramatic changes in the de-trapping times of electron traps responsible for the CTI. The distributions of signal amplitudes in the pixels trailing X-ray events indicate that annealing at room temperature can cause large changes of the trap emission times, from which we infer that conversion of trapping defects takes place. The observed phenomena can be explained by the previously suggested mechanism of carbon-related defect transformation. Specifically, the room-temperature annealing may allow carbon interstitials to form metastable complexes with phosphorus and/or carbon substitutional atoms.

  3. In situ resistivity measurements of RAFM base alloys at cryogenic temperatures: The effect of proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ferrer, B.; Vila, R.; Jiménez-Rey, D.; Ortiz, C. J.; Mota, F.; García, J. M.; Rodríguez, A.

    2014-04-01

    A four-probe technique for measurement of electrical resistance on low-temperature ion-irradiated metallic sheets is described. The design, temperature control system, preparation method of samples and the resistivity measurements are described in detail. The resistivity recovery (RR) curve has been measured on a Fe-5%Cr model alloy irradiated with 5 MeV protons. The procedure to obtain the RR derivative curve is outlined and experimental errors are identified and quantified. Special care has been taken to use a sample with very low impurity content and low dislocation density (1.2 × 108 cm-2). Thus, effects in recovery spectrum of the Fe-5%Cr alloy are only due to the presence of Cr and irradiation defects, which will be mainly Frenkel Pairs (FPs) given that the mean energy of the Primary Knock-on Atoms (PKA) is close to 0.35 keV. The results obtained for the Fe-5%Cr under 5 MeV proton irradiation are found to be in overall agreement with previous experimental measurements performed under electron irradiation although some differences appear probably due to the different spatial distribution of the created defects and the higher temperature resolution of annealing steps. The RR spectrum obtained reveals the appearance of the structure of stages I and II and also a partial suppression of the stage III peak with respect to previous results obtained after electron irradiation. The stage III suppression is explained as a superposition of vacancy recombination effects and short-range ordering (SRO) effects which are apparently dependent on the spatial distribution of defects created during irradiation. Moreover, recombination phenomena are observed beyond stage III up to 500 K.

  4. A comparison of thermocouple and infrared thermographic analysis of temperature rise on the root surface during the continuous wave of condensation technique.

    PubMed

    Mc Cullagh, J J; Setchell, D J; Gulabivala, K; Hussey, D L; Biagioni, P; Lamey, P J; Bailey, G

    2000-07-01

    This study was designed to use two methods of temperature measurement to analyse and quantify the in vitro root surface temperature changes during the initial stage of the continuous wave technique of obturation of 17 single-rooted premolar teeth with standard canal preparations. A model was designed to allow simultaneous temperature measurement with both thermocouples and an infrared thermal imaging system. Two thermocouples were placed on the root surface, one coronally and the other near the root apex. A series of thermal images were recorded by an infrared thermal imaging camera during the downpack procedure. The mean temperature rises on the root surface, as measured by the two thermocouples, averaged 13.9 degrees C over the period of study, whilst the infrared thermal imaging system measured an average rise of 28.4 degrees C at the same sites. Temperatures at the more apical point were higher than those measured coronally. After the first wave of condensation, the second activation of the plugger in the canal prior to its removal always resulted in a secondary rise in temperature. The thermal imaging system detected areas of greater temperature change distant from the two selected thermocouple sites. The continuous wave technique of obturation may result in high temperatures on the external root surface. Infrared thermography is a useful device for mapping patterns of temperature change over a large area.

  5. Effects produced by iodine irradiation on high resistivity silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lazanu, S.; Slav, A.; Lepadatu, A.-M.

    2012-12-10

    The effects of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -26+}I{sup 127} ions of 28 MeV kinetic energy on high resistivity (100) Si were studied. The profile of primary defects was simulated. The defects produced by irradiation which act as traps were investigated. Thermally stimulated current measurements without externally applied bias were used, and for this the traps were charged by illuminating samples with 1000, 800, and 400 nm wavelengths. The discharge currents were recorded and modeled, and therefore the parameters of the traps were determined. The presence of I ions, heavier than Si, stopped into the target was modeled as amore » temperature independent electric field.« less

  6. Integration of thermocouple microelectrode in the scanning electrochemical microscope at variable temperatures: simultaneous temperature and electrochemical imaging and its kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Pan, He; Zhang, Hailing; Lai, Junhui; Gu, Xiaoxin; Sun, Jianjun; Tang, Jing; Jin, Tao

    2017-03-24

    We describe herein a method for the simultaneous measurement of temperature and electrochemical signal with a new type of thermocouple microelectrode. The thermocouple microelectrode can be used not only as a thermometer but also as a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) tip in the reaction between tip-generated bromine and a heated Cu sample. The influence of temperature on the SECM imaging process and the related kinetic parameters have been studied, such as kinetic constant and activation energy.

  7. Integration of thermocouple microelectrode in the scanning electrochemical microscope at variable temperatures: simultaneous temperature and electrochemical imaging and its kinetic studies

    PubMed Central

    Pan, He; Zhang, Hailing; Lai, Junhui; Gu, Xiaoxin; Sun, Jianjun; Tang, Jing; Jin, Tao

    2017-01-01

    We describe herein a method for the simultaneous measurement of temperature and electrochemical signal with a new type of thermocouple microelectrode. The thermocouple microelectrode can be used not only as a thermometer but also as a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) tip in the reaction between tip-generated bromine and a heated Cu sample. The influence of temperature on the SECM imaging process and the related kinetic parameters have been studied, such as kinetic constant and activation energy. PMID:28338002

  8. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  9. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through cladmore » melting at 1370/sup 0/C.« less

  10. Development of Thin Film Thermocouples on Ceramic Materials for Advanced Propulsion System Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, R.

    1992-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples have been developed for use on metal parts in jet engines to 1000 c. However, advanced propulsion systems are being developed that will use ceramic materials and reach higher temperatures. The purpose of this work is to develop thin film thermocouples for use on ceramic materials. The new thin film thermocouples are Pt13Rh/Pt fabricated by the sputtering process. Lead wires are attached using the parallel-gap welding process. The ceramic materials tested are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and mullite. Both steady state and thermal cycling furnace tests were performed in the temperature range to 1500 C. High-heating-rate tests were performed in an arc lamp heat-flux-calibration facility. The fabrication of the thin film thermocouples is described. The thin film thermocouple output was compared to a reference wire thermocouple. Drift of the thin film thermocouples was determined, and causes of drift are discussed. The results of high heating rate tests up to 2500 C/sec are presented. The stability of the ceramic materials is examined. It is concluded that Pt13Rh/Pt thin film thermocouples are capable of meeting lifetime goals of 50 hours or more up to temperature of 1500 C depending on the stability of the particular ceramic substrate.

  11. Development of thin film thermocouples on ceramic materials for advanced propulsion system applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond

    1993-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples were developed for use on metal parts in jet engines to 1000 C. However, advanced propulsion systems are being developed that will use ceramic materials and reach higher temperatures. The purpose is to develop thin film thermocouples for use on ceramic materials. The new thin film thermocouples are Pt13Rh/Pt fabricated by the sputtering process. Lead wires are attached using the parallel-gap welding process. The ceramic materials tested are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and mullite. Both steady state and thermal cycling furnace tests were performed in the temperature range to 1500 C. High-heating-rate tests were performed in an arc lamp heat-flux-calibration facility. The fabrication of the thin film thermocouples is described. The thin film thermocouple output was compared to a reference wire thermocouple. Drift of the thin film thermocouples was determined, and causes of drift are discussed. The results of high heating rate tests up to 2500 C/sec are presented. The stability of the ceramic materials is examined. It is concluded that Pt13Rh/Pt thin film thermocouples are capable of meeting lifetime goals of 50 hr or more up to temperatures of 1500 C depending on the stability of the particular ceramic substrate.

  12. Reliability and validity of electrothermometers and associated thermocouples.

    PubMed

    Jutte, Lisa S; Knight, Kenneth L; Long, Blaine C

    2008-02-01

    Examine thermocouple model uncertainty (reliability+validity). First, a 3x3 repeated measures design with independent variables electrothermometers and thermocouple model. Second, a 1x3 repeated measures design with independent variable subprobe. Three electrothermometers, 3 thermocouple models, a multi-sensor probe and a mercury thermometer measured a stable water bath. Temperature and absolute temperature differences between thermocouples and a mercury thermometer. Thermocouple uncertainty was greater than manufactures'claims. For all thermocouple models, validity and reliability were better in the Iso-Themex than the Datalogger, but there were no practical differences between models within an electrothermometers. Validity of multi-sensor probes and thermocouples within a probe were not different but were greater than manufacturers'claims. Reliability of multiprobes and thermocouples within a probe were within manufacturers claims. Thermocouple models vary in reliability and validity. Scientists should test and report the uncertainty of their equipment rather than depending on manufactures' claims.

  13. In vitro pulp chamber temperature rise from irradiation and exotherm of flowable composites.

    PubMed

    Baroudi, Kusai; Silikas, Nick; Watts, David C

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pulpal temperature rise induced during the polymerization of flowable and non-flowable composites using light-emitting diode (LED) and halogen (quartz-tungsten-halogen) light-curing units (LCUs). Five flowable and three non-flowable composites were examined. Pulpal temperature changes were recorded over 10 min in a sample primary tooth by a thermocouple. A conventional quartz-tungsten-halogen source and two LEDs, one of which was programmable, were used for light curing the resin composites. Three repetitions per material were made for each LCU. There was a wide range of temperature rises among the materials (P < 0.05). Temperature rises ranged between 1.3 degrees C for Filtek Supreme irradiated by low-power LED and 4.5 degrees C for Grandio Flow irradiated by high-power LED. The highest temperature rises were observed with both the LED high-power and soft-start LCUs. The time to reach the exothermic peak varied significantly between the materials (P < 0.05). Pulpal temperature rise is related to both the radiant energy output from LCUs and the polymerization exotherm of resin composites. A greater potential risk for heat-induced pulp damage might be associated with high-power LED sources. Flowable composites exhibited higher temperature rises than non-flowable materials, because of higher resin contents.

  14. Instrumentation System Diagnoses a Thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose; Santiago, Josephine; Mata, Carlos; Vokrot, Peter; Zavala, Carlos; Burns, Bradley

    2008-01-01

    An improved self-validating thermocouple (SVT) instrumentation system not only acquires readings from a thermocouple but is also capable of detecting deterioration and a variety of discrete faults in the thermocouple and its lead wires. Prime examples of detectable discrete faults and deterioration include open- and short-circuit conditions and debonding of the thermocouple junction from the object, the temperature of which one seeks to measure. Debonding is the most common cause of errors in thermocouple measurements, but most prior SVT instrumentation systems have not been capable of detecting debonding. The improved SVT instrumentation system includes power circuitry, a cold-junction compensator, signal-conditioning circuitry, pulse-width-modulation (PWM) thermocouple-excitation circuitry, an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), a digital data processor, and a universal serial bus (USB) interface. The system can operate in any of the following three modes: temperature measurement, thermocouple validation, and bonding/debonding detection. The software running in the processor includes components that implement statistical algorithms to evaluate the state of the thermocouple and the instrumentation system. When the power is first turned on, the user can elect to start a diagnosis/ monitoring sequence, in which the PWM is used to estimate the characteristic times corresponding to the correct configuration. The user also has the option of using previous diagnostic values, which are stored in an electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory so that they are available every time the power is turned on.

  15. Temperature increasing in titanium implants using a high-intensity diode laser for peri-implantitis decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustino, C. N.; Ana, A. P.; Bachman, L.

    2018-02-01

    Peri-implantitis is a destructive inflammatory process that affects the tissues that provide support to the dental implant, the bone and gingiva, and can lead to the loss of the implant. Among the treatments of this disease, the irradiation of the contaminated surface with high intensity lasers is considered a promising alternative; Thus, irradiation parameters must be correctly adjusted in order to promote an efficient and safe treatment. This study investigated the temperature changes at the implant-bone interface during simulated implant surface decontamination using an 808nm diode laser. Dental implants were inserted in bovine bone, in which an artificial periimplant bone defect was made. Access holes of 0.5mm diameter were drilled to allow the positioning of four Ktype thermocouples in different regions: T0 Implant-bone interface, T1 inside the implant, T2 In the bone defect, T3 In the apex of the implant. For laser irradiation, an optical fiber was used at a distance of 0.5mm from the implant surface, and the mean output power varied between 0.5 to 3.0W on both pulsed (PW) and continuous (CW) wave modes. Irradiations were performed by 60s, and the temperature rises were registered for a period of 180s. It was observed that the critical threshold of 47ºC was exceeded at T0, T1 e T2 thermocouples when irradiations were performed at 1.0W; for T3 thermocouple, the threshold was exceeded at 3.0W CW mode. For PW mode, the thermocouples T0, T1, T2 had the threshold exceeded at the power of 1,0W and for T3 the threshold was exceeded at 3.0W. Decontamination of implant surfaces using the diode laser did not excessively heat the implant-bone interface within the mean output power ranging from 0.5 to 1.0W; however, the temperature rise is critical when using the mean power of 0.5W CW and 1.0W PW. Thus, using the PW mode up to the power of 1W seems to be a promising parameter for a safe clinical application.

  16. Fabrication and Characterization of Miniaturized Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munzel, Marco; Peinke, Joachim; Kittel, Achim

    2002-11-01

    The measurement of thermal fluctuations is important for discovering transport features of a passive scalar in fluids. We present a thermal sensor based on a miniaturized thermocouple. Its coaxial setup results from the fabrication as a micropipette normally used in neurobiology. The glass micropipettes contain a core of gold, antimony, or resistance wire and are coated with platinum. The core material is inserted as molten metal or wire and thinned during the fabrication process. The achieved tip diameters are 1μm and less which enhance the spatial and temporal resolution significantly. Because of its chemically inert coating, these sensors are applicative for detecting temperature fluctuations in large variety of liquids and gases. In addition, such thermocouples are intrinsically suitable for applications in scanning probe microscopy. The characterization of these sensors and first results from turbulent free-jet measurements are presented.

  17. Microhotplate Temperature Sensor Calibration and BIST.

    PubMed

    Afridi, M; Montgomery, C; Cooper-Balis, E; Semancik, S; Kreider, K G; Geist, J

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe a novel long-term microhotplate temperature sensor calibration technique suitable for Built-In Self Test (BIST). The microhotplate thermal resistance (thermal efficiency) and the thermal voltage from an integrated platinum-rhodium thermocouple were calibrated against a freshly calibrated four-wire polysilicon microhotplate-heater temperature sensor (heater) that is not stable over long periods of time when exposed to higher temperatures. To stress the microhotplate, its temperature was raised to around 400 °C and held there for days. The heater was then recalibrated as a temperature sensor, and microhotplate temperature measurements were made based on the fresh calibration of the heater, the first calibration of the heater, the microhotplate thermal resistance, and the thermocouple voltage. This procedure was repeated 10 times over a period of 80 days. The results show that the heater calibration drifted substantially during the period of the test while the microhotplate thermal resistance and the thermocouple-voltage remained stable to within about plus or minus 1 °C over the same period. Therefore, the combination of a microhotplate heater-temperature sensor and either the microhotplate thermal resistance or an integrated thin film platinum-rhodium thermocouple can be used to provide a stable, calibrated, microhotplate-temperature sensor, and the combination of the three sensor is suitable for implementing BIST functionality. Alternatively, if a stable microhotplate-heater temperature sensor is available, such as a properly annealed platinum heater-temperature sensor, then the thermal resistance of the microhotplate and the electrical resistance of the platinum heater will be sufficient to implement BIST. It is also shown that aluminum- and polysilicon-based temperature sensors, which are not stable enough for measuring high microhotplate temperatures (>220 °C) without impractically frequent recalibration, can be used to measure the

  18. Microhotplate Temperature Sensor Calibration and BIST

    PubMed Central

    Afridi, M.; Montgomery, C.; Cooper-Balis, E.; Semancik, S.; Kreider, K. G.; Geist, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe a novel long-term microhotplate temperature sensor calibration technique suitable for Built-In Self Test (BIST). The microhotplate thermal resistance (thermal efficiency) and the thermal voltage from an integrated platinum-rhodium thermocouple were calibrated against a freshly calibrated four-wire polysilicon microhotplate-heater temperature sensor (heater) that is not stable over long periods of time when exposed to higher temperatures. To stress the microhotplate, its temperature was raised to around 400 °C and held there for days. The heater was then recalibrated as a temperature sensor, and microhotplate temperature measurements were made based on the fresh calibration of the heater, the first calibration of the heater, the microhotplate thermal resistance, and the thermocouple voltage. This procedure was repeated 10 times over a period of 80 days. The results show that the heater calibration drifted substantially during the period of the test while the microhotplate thermal resistance and the thermocouple-voltage remained stable to within about plus or minus 1 °C over the same period. Therefore, the combination of a microhotplate heater-temperature sensor and either the microhotplate thermal resistance or an integrated thin film platinum-rhodium thermocouple can be used to provide a stable, calibrated, microhotplate-temperature sensor, and the combination of the three sensor is suitable for implementing BIST functionality. Alternatively, if a stable microhotplate-heater temperature sensor is available, such as a properly annealed platinum heater-temperature sensor, then the thermal resistance of the microhotplate and the electrical resistance of the platinum heater will be sufficient to implement BIST. It is also shown that aluminum- and polysilicon-based temperature sensors, which are not stable enough for measuring high microhotplate temperatures (>220 °C) without impractically frequent recalibration, can be used to measure the

  19. Modified thermocouple is effective from minus 250 deg to 5000 deg F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moen, W. K.

    1966-01-01

    Modified, commercially available thermocouple which measures the temperature of a spacecraft heat shield, is capable of continuous measurement in the range of minus 250 deg to 5000 deg F. The modified thermocouples may be used inside metal treating furnaces in high temperature technology, and in certain corrosive environments.

  20. NUCLEAR REACTOR SLUG PROVIDED WITH THERMOCOUPLE

    DOEpatents

    Kanne, W.R.

    1958-10-14

    A temperature measuring apparatus is described for use in a reactor. In this invention a cylindrlcal fuel slug is provided with an axial bore in which is disposed a thermocouple. The lead wires extend to a remote indicating device which indicates the temperature in the fuel element measured by the thermocouple.

  1. A Highly Thermostable In2O3/ITO Thin Film Thermocouple Prepared via Screen Printing for High Temperature Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yantao; Ren, Wei; Shi, Peng; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Jing, Weixuan; Tian, Bian; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2018-01-01

    An In2O3/ITO thin film thermocouple was prepared via screen printing. Glass additives were added to improve the sintering process and to increase the density of the In2O3/ITO films. The surface and cross-sectional images indicate that both the grain size and densification of the ITO and In2O3 films increased with the increase in annealing time. The thermoelectric voltage of the In2O3/ITO thermocouple was 53.5 mV at 1270 °C at the hot junction. The average Seebeck coefficient of the thermocouple was calculated as 44.5 μV/°C. The drift rate of the In2O3/ITO thermocouple was 5.44 °C/h at a measuring time of 10 h at 1270 °C. PMID:29570680

  2. Annealing Increases Stability Of Iridium Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.; Ahmed, Shaffiq

    1989-01-01

    Metallurgical studies carried out on samples of iridium versus iridium/40-percent rhodium thermocouples in condition received from manufacturer. Metallurgical studies included x-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. Revealed large amount of internal stress caused by cold-working during manufacturing, and large number of segregations and inhomogeneities. Samples annealed in furnace at temperatures from 1,000 to 2,000 degree C for intervals up to 1 h to study effects of heat treatment. Wire annealed by this procedure found to be ductile.

  3. Some studies on the behavior of W-RE thermocouple materials at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, G. W.; Hurst, W. S.

    1972-01-01

    Bare 0.25 mm diameter W-Re alloy thermoelements (W, W-3% Re, W-5% Re and W-25%) and BeO-insulated W-3% Re and W-25% Re thermoelements were examined for metallurgical, chemical and thermal emf changes after testing for periods up to 1000 hours at temperatures principally in the range 2000 to 2400 K. Environments for the tests consisted of high purity argon, hydrogen, helium or nitrogen gases. Commercially obtained bare-wire thermoelements typically exhibited a shift in their emf-temperature relationship upon initial exposure. The shift was completed by thermally aging the W-3% Re thermoelement for 1 hour and the W-25% Re thermoelement for 2 minutes at 2400 K in argon or hydrogen. Aged thermoelements experienced no appreciable drift with subsequent exposure at 2400 K in the gaseous environments. The chemically doped W3% Re thermoelement retained a small-grained structure for exposure in excess of 50 hours at 2400 K. BeO-insulated thermoelement assemblies showed varied behavior that depended upon the method of exposure. However, when the assemblies were heated in a furnace, no serious material incompatibility problems were found if the materials were given prior thermal treatments. Thermocouples, assembled from aged W-3% Re and W-25% Re thermoelements and degassed sintered BeO insulators, exhibited a drift of only 2 to 3 K during exposure in argon at 2070 K for 1029 hours.

  4. More About High-Temperature Resistance Strain Gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englund, D. R.; Williams, W. D.; Lei, Jih-Fen; Hulse, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    Two reports present additional information on electrical-resistance strain gauges described in "High-Temperature Resistance Strain Gauges" (LEW-15379). For protection against oxidation at high temperatures, gauges covered, by flame spraying, with coats of alumina containing up to 1 weight percent of yttria or, perferably, containing 4 to 6 weight percent of zirconia.

  5. Self-Validating Thermocouples for Assured Measurement Confidence and Extended Useful Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, C. J.; Pearce, J. V.; Machin, G.; Schwarz, C.; Lindner, R.

    2012-07-01

    Accurate measurements of temperatures above 1500 °C pose unique and challenging requirements in space. Tungsten-rhenium (W-Re) thermocouples, which are commonly used, quickly exhibit significant thermoelectric inhomogeneity and drift. To address this issue, the National Physical Laboratory in cooperation with ESA/ESTEC is developing an innovative method of validating the performance of high-temperature thermocouples in-situ. The results of measurements using eutectic metal-carbon fixed-point cells containing Co-C (~1324 °C), Pt-C (~1738 °C), Ru-C (~1953 °C) and Ir-C (~2292°C) ingots incorporated onto the thermocouple in use are presented. By monitoring the thermoelectric signal each time the thermal environment passes through the melting temperature of the ingot, the user observes the degree of drift. This assures measurement confidence and extends the useful life of the thermocouple as the drift may be corrected for, if necessary. This approach opens the possibility for improved temperature measurement for ESA/ESTEC research applications and industrial use.

  6. The irradiation behavior of atomized U-Mo alloy fuels at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong-Man; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Meyer, M. K.; Hofman, G. L.; Strain, R. V.

    2001-04-01

    Post-irradiation examinations of atomized U-10Mo, U-6Mo, and U-6Mo-1.7Os dispersion fuels from the RERTR-3 experiment irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) were carried out in order to investigate the fuel behavior of high uranium loading (8 gU/cc) at a high temperature (higher than 200°C). It was observed after about 40 at% BU that the U-Mo alloy fuels at a high temperature showed similar irradiation bubble morphologies compared to those at a lower temperature found in the RERTR-1 irradiation result, but there was a thick reaction layer with the aluminum matrix which was found to be greatly affected by the irradiation temperature and to a lesser degree by the fuel composition. In addition, the chemical analysis for the irradiated U-Mo fuels using the Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) method were conducted to investigate the compositional changes during the formation of the reaction product.

  7. Temporary Thermocouple Attachment for Thermal/Vacuum Testing at Non-Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Wright, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Post-test examination and data analysis that followed a two week long vacuum test showed that numerous self-stick thermocouples became detached from the test article. The thermocouples were reattached with thermally conductive epoxy and the test was repeated to obtain the required data. Because the thermocouple detachment resulted in significant expense and rework, it was decided to investigate the temporary attachment methods used around NASA and to perform a test to assess their efficacy. The present work describes the original test and the analysis that showed that the thermocouples had become detached, temporary thermocouple attachment methods assessed in the retest and in the thermocouple attachment test, and makes a recommendation for attachment methods for future tests.

  8. Creep resistance. [of high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Malu, M.; Purushothaman, S.

    1976-01-01

    High-temperature structural applications usually require creep resistance because some average stress is maintained for prolonged periods. Alloy and microstructural design guidelines for creep resistance are presented through established knowledge on creep behavior and its functional dependences on alloy microstructure. Important considerations related to creep resistance of alloys as well as those that are harmful to high-temperature properties are examined. Although most of the creep models do not predict observed creep behavior quantitatively, they are sophisticated enough to provide alloy or microstructural design guidelines. It is shown that creep-resistant microstructures are usually in conflict with microstructures that improve such other properties as stress rupture ductility. Greater understanding of the effects of environments on creep and stress rupture behavior of materials is necessary before one can optimally design alloys for applications in different environments.

  9. Refractory thermowell for continuous high temperature measurement of molten metal

    DOEpatents

    Thiesen, Todd J.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for the continuous high temperature measurement of materials in vessels lined with rammed or cast refractory materials. A refractory housing member is integral with the refractory lining of the vessel and contains a plurality of high temperature sensing means, such as thermocouples. A face of the housing is flush with the refractory lining and contacts the high temperature material contained in the vessel. Continuous temperature measurement is achieved by a means which is coupled to the thermocouples for indicating the temperature.

  10. Apparatus Tests Thermocouples For Seebeck Inhomogeneity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.; Bauserman, Willard A., Jr.; West, James W.

    1995-01-01

    Automated apparatus reveals sources of error not revealed in calibration. Computer-controlled apparatus detects and measures Seebeck inhomogeneities in sheathed thermocouples. Measures thermocouple output voltage as function of position of probe along sharp gradient of temperature. Abnormal variations in voltage-versus-position data indicative of Seebeck inhomogeneities. Prototype for development of standard method and equipment for routine acceptance/rejection testing of sheathed thermocouples in industrial and research laboratories.

  11. Evaluation of Piecewise Polynomial Equations for Two Types of Thermocouples

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Andrew; Chen, Chiachung

    2013-01-01

    Thermocouples are the most frequently used sensors for temperature measurement because of their wide applicability, long-term stability and high reliability. However, one of the major utilization problems is the linearization of the transfer relation between temperature and output voltage of thermocouples. The linear calibration equation and its modules could be improved by using regression analysis to help solve this problem. In this study, two types of thermocouple and five temperature ranges were selected to evaluate the fitting agreement of different-order polynomial equations. Two quantitative criteria, the average of the absolute error values |e|ave and the standard deviation of calibration equation estd, were used to evaluate the accuracy and precision of these calibrations equations. The optimal order of polynomial equations differed with the temperature range. The accuracy and precision of the calibration equation could be improved significantly with an adequate higher degree polynomial equation. The technique could be applied with hardware modules to serve as an intelligent sensor for temperature measurement. PMID:24351627

  12. High-temperature annealing of proton irradiated beryllium – A dilatometry-based study

    DOE PAGES

    Simos, Nikolaos; Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; Zhong, Zhong; ...

    2016-04-07

    S—200 F grade beryllium has been irradiated with 160 MeV protons up to 1.2 10 20 cm –2 peak fluence and irradiation temperatures in the range of 100–200 °C. To address the effect of proton irradiation on dimensional stability, an important parameter in its consideration in fusion reactor applications, and to simulate high temperature irradiation conditions, multi-stage annealing using high precision dilatometry to temperatures up to 740 °C were conducted in air. X-ray diffraction studies were also performed to compliment the macroscopic thermal study and offer a microscopic view of the irradiation effects on the crystal lattice. The primary objectivemore » was to qualify the competing dimensional change processes occurring at elevated temperatures namely manufacturing defect annealing, lattice parameter recovery, transmutation 4He and 3H diffusion and swelling and oxidation kinetics. Further, quantification of the effect of irradiation dose and annealing temperature and duration on dimensional changes is sought. Here, the study revealed the presence of manufacturing porosity in the beryllium grade, the oxidation acceleration effect of irradiation including the discontinuous character of oxidation advancement, the effect of annealing duration on the recovery of lattice parameters recovery and the triggering temperature for transmutation gas diffusion leading to swelling.« less

  13. Multipurpose instrumentation cable provides integral thermocouple circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, G.

    1967-01-01

    Multipurpose cable with an integral thermocouple circuit measures strain, vibration, pressure, throughout a wide temperature range. This cable reduces bulky and complex circuitry by eliminating separate thermocouples for each transducer.

  14. Measurement of respiratory rate and timing using a nasal thermocouple.

    PubMed

    Marks, M K; South, M; Carter, B G

    1995-05-01

    The aims of this study were to assess aspects of the response of a small thermocouple to temperature change, and to evaluate whether such a thermocouple could be used intermittently to measure respiratory rate and timing by detecting the changes in nasal temperature occurring with breathing. The study had three parts. First, three similar, fast-responding thermocouples were immersed repeatedly in warm water. Second, the influence of atmospheric temperature on the signal of a thermocouple placed at different sites within the nasal orifice was studied. The signals produced were continuously displayed and analyzed using a laptop computer to allow evaluation of the thermocouples' response characteristics. Third, simultaneous respiratory recordings were acquired using a nasal thermocouple and a nasal pneumotachograph in 12 teenaged subjects. The respiratory rate and the periods of time taken for inspiration (Ti) and expiration (Te) were calculated and compared. The thermocouples' responses to the temperature changes associated with breathing and immersion into water were rapid and consistent. The rate of the signals' decay, following the peak signal marking expiration, was influenced by the atmospheric temperature. The time constants of the thermocouples were similar (mean time constant = 0.41 sec, standard deviation (SD) = 0.07). Optimal respiratory recordings were obtained, with least discomfort, when the thermocouple was positioned at 0 to 4 mm within the nasal orifice. In comparing the respiratory recordings acquired simultaneously with a thermocouple and pneumotachograph, the respiratory rates were identical, and the Ti and Te values were similar (mean difference 0.04 sec (95% CI: -0.11 to 0.21 sec) and -0.04 sec (95% CI: -0.20 to 0.12 sec), respectively). Intermittent measurements of respiratory rate and timing using a nasal thermocouple accurately reflected measurements obtained from nasal airflow using a pneumotachograph.

  15. Attachment of lead wires to thin film thermocouples mounted on high temperature materials using the parallel gap welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond; Kim, Walter S.; Pencil, Eric; Groth, Mary; Danzey, Gerald A.

    1990-01-01

    Parallel gap resistance welding was used to attach lead wires to sputtered thin film sensors. Ranges of optimum welding parameters to produce an acceptable weld were determined. The thin film sensors were Pt13Rh/Pt thermocouples; they were mounted on substrates of MCrAlY-coated superalloys, aluminum oxide, silicon carbide and silicon nitride. The entire sensor system is designed to be used on aircraft engine parts. These sensor systems, including the thin-film-to-lead-wire connectors, were tested to 1000 C.

  16. ITS-90 Thermocouple Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 60 NIST ITS-90 Thermocouple Database (Web, free access)   Web version of Standard Reference Database 60 and NIST Monograph 175. The database gives temperature -- electromotive force (emf) reference functions and tables for the letter-designated thermocouple types B, E, J, K, N, R, S and T. These reference functions have been adopted as standards by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

  17. Measurement of thermoelectric inhomogeneity of thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, R. P.; Bauserman, Willard A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    In a thermocouple probe that has significantly inhomogeneous legs, the relationship between emf and temperature is indefinite and depends on temperature distribution along the circuit. An inhomogeneous thermocouple cannot be calibrated to arbitrarily small uncertainty. Therefore, testing for inhomogeneities is a necessary preliminary to meaningful calibration. As most significant inhomogeneity that does occur is introduced during use (and sometimes during calibration) a post-test inhomogeneity measurement should also be employed to detect degradation that might have substantially affected the data. This paper presents a practical test method that is being developed for the observation, interpretation, and application of thermoelectric inhomogeneity as a routine quality assurance measurement that is an essential complement to traditional sheathed thermocouple calibration.

  18. Beyond "fire temperatures": calibrating thermocouple probes and modeling their response to surface fires in hardwood fuels

    Treesearch

    Anthony S. Bova; Matthew B. Dickinson

    2008-01-01

    The maximum temperatures of thermocouples, temperature-sensitive paints, and calorimeters exposed to flames in wildland fires are often called "fire temperatures" but are determined as much by the properties and deployment of the measurement devices as by the fires themselves. Rather than report device temperatures that are not generally comparable among...

  19. INTRAPUPAL TEMPERATURE VARIATION DURING ER,CR:YSGG ENAMEL IRRADIATION ON CARIES PREVENTION

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Patrícia Moreira; Soares-Geraldo, Débora; Biella-Silva, Ana Cristina; Silva, Amanda Verna; da Silveira, Bruno Lopes; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula

    2008-01-01

    Studies have shown the cariostatic effect of Er,Cr:YSGG (2.78 μm) laser irradiation on human enamel and have suggested its use on caries prevention. However there are still no reports on the intrapulpal temperature increase during enamel irradiation using parameters for caries prevention. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the temperature variation in the pulp chamber during human enamel irradiation with Er,Cr:YSGG laser at different energy densities. Fifteen enamel blocks obtained from third molars (3 x 3 x 3 mm) were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=5): G1 – Er,Cr:YSGG laser 0.25 W, 20 Hz, 2.84 J/cm2, G2 – Er,Cr:YSGG laser 0.50 W, 20 Hz, 5.68 J/cm2, G3 – Er,Cr:YSGG laser 0.75 W, 20 Hz, 8.52 J/cm2. During enamel irradiation, two thermocouples were fixed in the inner surface of the specimens and a thermal conducting paste was used. One-way ANOVA did not show statistically significant difference among the experimental groups (α=0.05). There was intrapulpal temperature variation ≤0.1°C for all irradiation parameters. In conclusion, under the tested conditions, the use of Er,Cr:YSGG laser with parameters set for caries prevention lead to an acceptable temperature increase in the pulp chamber. PMID:19089198

  20. Program Processes Thermocouple Readings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quave, Christine A.; Nail, William, III

    1995-01-01

    Digital Signal Processor for Thermocouples (DART) computer program implements precise and fast method of converting voltage to temperature for large-temperature-range thermocouple applications. Written using LabVIEW software. DART available only as object code for use on Macintosh II FX or higher-series computers running System 7.0 or later and IBM PC-series and compatible computers running Microsoft Windows 3.1. Macintosh version of DART (SSC-00032) requires LabVIEW 2.2.1 or 3.0 for execution. IBM PC version (SSC-00031) requires LabVIEW 3.0 for Windows 3.1. LabVIEW software product of National Instruments and not included with program.

  1. Characterization of a Method for Inverse Heat Conduction Using Real and Simulated Thermocouple Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, Michelle E.; Glass, David E.

    2017-01-01

    It is often impractical to instrument the external surface of high-speed vehicles due to the aerothermodynamic heating. Temperatures can instead be measured internal to the structure using embedded thermocouples, and direct and inverse methods can then be used to estimate temperature and heat flux on the external surface. Two thermocouples embedded at different depths are required to solve direct and inverse problems, and filtering schemes are used to reduce noise in the measured data. Accuracy in the estimated surface temperature and heat flux is dependent on several factors. Factors include the thermocouple location through the thickness of a material, the sensitivity of the surface solution to the error in the specified location of the embedded thermocouples, and the sensitivity to the error in thermocouple data. The effect of these factors on solution accuracy is studied using the methodology discussed in the work of Pizzo, et. al.1 A numerical study is performed to determine if there is an optimal depth at which to embed one thermocouple through the thickness of a material assuming that a second thermocouple is installed on the back face. Solution accuracy will be discussed for a range of embedded thermocouple depths. Moreover, the sensitivity of the surface solution to (a) the error in the specified location of the embedded thermocouple and to (b) the error in the thermocouple data are quantified using numerical simulation, and the results are discussed.

  2. Temperature Dependent Resistivity and Hall Effect in Proton Irradiated CdS Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guster, B.; Ghenescu, V.; Ion, L.; Radu, A.; Porumb, O.; Antohe, S.

    2011-10-01

    Cadmium sulphide finds extensive applications in a variety of optoelectronic devices. In particular, CdS thin films are suitable for use as windows in heterojunction solar cells that employ CdTe, Cu2S or CuInSe2 as an absorber. Such thin film based solar cells are well suited for use in space technology. For that specific application, it is important to know how ionizing radiations alter their performance. We have investigated the effects of irradiation with high energy protons (3 MeV), at 1014 fluency, on electrical properties of polycrystalline CdS thin layers. The samples were prepared by thermal vacuum deposition from single source onto optical glass substrate. Temperature dependent electrical resistivity and Hall effect, before and after irradiation, were recorded from 300 K down to 4 K. The experimental results can be explained in the frame of a two-band model. Above 100 K electrical properties are controlled by a defect level of donor type, with an ionization energy of about 0.060 eV. The possible origin of this defect is discussed.

  3. Irradiation effect of the insulating materials for fusion superconducting magnets at cryogenic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Koji; Akiyama, Yoko; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2017-09-01

    In ITER, superconducting magnets should be used in such severe environment as high fluence of fast neutron, cryogenic temperature and large electromagnetic forces. Insulating material is one of the most sensitive component to radiation. So radiation resistance on mechanical properties at cryogenic temperature are required for insulating material. The purpose of this study is to evaluate irradiation effect of insulating material at cryogenic temperature by gamma-ray irradiation. Firstly, glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) and hybrid composite were prepared. After irradiation at room temperature (RT) or liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT, 77 K), interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and glass-transition temperature (Tg) measurement were conducted. It was shown that insulating materials irradiated at room temperature were much degraded than those at cryogenic temperature.

  4. High temperature oxidation resistant cermet compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Cermet compositions are designed to provide high temperature resistant refractory coatings on stainless steel or molybdenum substrates. A ceramic mixture of chromium oxide and aluminum oxide form a coating of chromium oxide as an oxidation barrier around the metal particles, to provide oxidation resistance for the metal particles.

  5. Validity and reliability of temperature measurement by heat flow thermistors, flexible thermocouple probes and thermistors in a stirred water bath.

    PubMed

    Versey, Nathan G; Gore, Christopher J; Halson, Shona L; Plowman, Jamie S; Dawson, Brian T

    2011-09-01

    We determined the validity and reliability of heat flow thermistors, flexible thermocouple probes and general purpose thermistors compared with a calibrated reference thermometer in a stirred water bath. Validity (bias) was defined as the difference between the observed and criterion values, and reliability as the repeatability (standard deviation or typical error) of measurement. Data were logged every 5 s for 10 min at water temperatures of 14, 26 and 38 °C for ten heat flow thermistors and 24 general purpose thermistors, and at 35, 38 and 41 °C for eight flexible thermocouple probes. Statistical analyses were conducted using spreadsheets for validity and reliability, where an acceptable bias was set at ±0.1 °C. None of the heat flow thermistors, 17% of the flexible thermocouple probes and 71% of the general purpose thermistors met the validity criterion for temperature. The inter-probe reliabilities were 0.03 °C for heat flow thermistors, 0.04 °C for flexible thermocouple probes and 0.09 °C for general purpose thermistors. The within trial intra-probe reliability of all three temperature probes was 0.01 °C. The results suggest that these temperature sensors should be calibrated individually before use at relevant temperatures and the raw data corrected using individual linear regression equations.

  6. Thermocouple Errors when Mounted on Cylindrical Surfaces in Abnormal Thermal Environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakos, James T.; Suo-Anttila, Jill M.; Zepper, Ethan T.

    Mineral-insulated, metal-sheathed, Type-K thermocouples are used to measure the temperature of various items in high-temperature environments, often exceeding 1000degC (1273 K). The thermocouple wires (chromel and alumel) are protected from the harsh environments by an Inconel sheath and magnesium oxide (MgO) insulation. The sheath and insulation are required for reliable measurements. Due to the sheath and MgO insulation, the temperature registered by the thermocouple is not the temperature of the surface of interest. In some cases, the error incurred is large enough to be of concern because these data are used for model validation, and thus the uncertainties of themore » data need to be well documented. This report documents the error using 0.062" and 0.040" diameter Inconel sheathed, Type-K thermocouples mounted on cylindrical surfaces (inside of a shroud, outside and inside of a mock test unit). After an initial transient, the thermocouple bias errors typically range only about +-1-2% of the reading in K. After all of the uncertainty sources have been included, the total uncertainty to 95% confidence, for shroud or test unit TCs in abnormal thermal environments, is about +-2% of the reading in K, lower than the +-3% typically used for flat shrouds. Recommendations are provided in Section 6 to facilitate interpretation and use of the results. .« less

  7. Very High Output Thermoelectric Devices Based on ITO Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave; Gregory, Otto J.

    2009-01-01

    A material having useful thermoelectric properties was synthesized by combining indium-tin-oxide (ITO) with a NiCoCrAlY alloy/alumina cermet. This material had a very large Seebeck coefficient with electromotive-force-versustemperature behavior that is considered to be excellent with respect to utility in thermocouples and other thermoelectric devices. When deposited in thin-film form, ceramic thermocouples offer advantages over precious-metal (based, variously, on platinum or rhodium) thermocouples that are typically used in gas turbines. Ceramic thermocouples exhibit high melting temperatures, chemical stability at high temperatures, and little or no electromigration. Oxide ceramics also resist oxidation better than metal thermocouples, cost substantially less than precious-metal thermocouples, and, unlike precious-metal thermocouples, do not exert catalytic effects.

  8. Highly uniform resistive switching properties of amorphous InGaZnO thin films prepared by a low temperature photochemical solution deposition method.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Zou, Lilan; Chen, Xinman; Qin, Ni; Li, Shuwei; Bao, Dinghua

    2014-04-09

    We report on highly uniform resistive switching properties of amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) thin films. The thin films were fabricated by a low temperature photochemical solution deposition method, a simple process combining chemical solution deposition and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation treatment. The a-IGZO based resistive switching devices exhibit long retention, good endurance, uniform switching voltages, and stable distribution of low and high resistance states. Electrical conduction mechanisms were also discussed on the basis of the current-voltage characteristics and their temperature dependence. The excellent resistive switching properties can be attributed to the reduction of organic- and hydrogen-based elements and the formation of enhanced metal-oxide bonding and metal-hydroxide bonding networks by hydrogen bonding due to UV irradiation, based on Fourier-transform-infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis of the thin films. This study suggests that a-IGZO thin films have potential applications in resistive random access memory and the low temperature photochemical solution deposition method can find the opportunity for further achieving system on panel applications if the a-IGZO resistive switching cells were integrated with a-IGZO thin film transistors.

  9. Attachment of Free Filament Thermocouples for Temperature Measurements on CMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Cuy, Michael D.; Wnuk, Stephen P.

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) are being developed for use as enabling materials for advanced aeropropulsion engine and high speed civil transport applications. The characterization and testing of these advanced materials in hostile, high-temperature environments require accurate measurement of the material temperatures. Commonly used wire Thermo-Couples (TC) can not be attached to this ceramic based material via conventional spot-welding techniques. Attachment of wire TC's with commercially available ceramic cements fail to provide sufficient adhesion at high temperatures. While advanced thin film TC technology provides minimally intrusive surface temperature measurement and has good adhesion on the CMC, its fabrication requires sophisticated and expensive facilities and is very time consuming. In addition, the durability of lead wire attachments to both thin film TC's and the substrate materials requires further improvement. This paper presents a newly developed attachment technique for installation of free filament wire TC's with a unique convoluted design on ceramic based materials such as CMC's. Three CMC's (SiC/SiC CMC and alumina/alumina CMC) instrumented with type IC, R or S wire TC's were tested in a Mach 0.3 burner rig. The CMC temperatures measured from these wire TC's were compared to that from the facility pyrometer and thin film TC's. There was no sign of TC delamination even after several hours exposure to 1200 C. The test results proved that this new technique can successfully attach wire TC's on CMC's and provide temperature data in hostile environments. The sensor fabrication process is less expensive and requires very little time compared to that of the thin film TC's. The same installation technique/process can also be applied to attach lead wires for thin film sensor systems.

  10. Design and Operation of a Fast, Thin-Film Thermocouple Probe on a Turbine Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, Roger D.; Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Greer, Lawrence C., III; Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2014-01-01

    As a demonstration of technology maturation, a thin-film temperature sensor probe was fabricated and installed on a F117 turbofan engine via a borescope access port to monitor the temperature experienced in the bleed air passage of the compressor area during an engine checkout test run. To withstand the harsh conditions experienced in this environment, the sensor probe was built from high temperature materials. The thin-film thermocouple sensing elements were deposited by physical vapor deposition using pure metal elements, thus avoiding the inconsistencies of sputter-depositing particular percentages of materials to form standardized alloys commonly found in thermocouples. The sensor probe and assembly were subjected to a strict protocol of multi-axis vibrational testing as well as elevated temperature pressure testing to be qualified for this application. The thin-film thermocouple probe demonstrated a faster response than a traditional embedded thermocouple during the engine checkout run.

  11. High temperature annealing of ion irradiated tungsten

    DOE PAGES

    Ferroni, Francesco; Yi, Xiaoou; Arakawa, Kazuto; ...

    2015-03-21

    In this study, transmission electron microscopy of high temperature annealing of pure tungsten irradiated by self-ions was conducted to elucidate microstructural and defect evolution in temperature ranges relevant to fusion reactor applications (500–1200°C). Bulk isochronal and isothermal annealing of ion irradiated pure tungsten (2 MeV W + ions, 500°C, 1014 W +/cm 2) with temperatures of 800, 950, 1100 and 1400°C, from 0.5 to 8 h, was followed by ex situ characterization of defect size, number density, Burgers vector and nature. Loops with diameters larger than 2–3 nm were considered for detailed analysis, among which all loops had View themore » MathML source and were predominantly of interstitial nature. In situ annealing experiments from 300 up to 1200°C were also carried out, including dynamic temperature ramp-ups. These confirmed an acceleration of loop loss above 900°C. At different temperatures within this range, dislocations exhibited behaviour such as initial isolated loop hopping followed by large-scale rearrangements into loop chains, coalescence and finally line–loop interactions and widespread absorption by free-surfaces at increasing temperatures. An activation energy for the annealing of dislocation length was obtained, finding E a=1.34±0.2 eV for the 700–1100°C range.« less

  12. Tough, Microcracking-Resistant, High-Temperature Polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Razon, Pert; Smith, Ricky; Working, Dennis; Chang, Alice; Gerber, Margaret

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous synthesis from thermosetting and thermoplastic components yields polyimide with outstanding properties. Involves process in which one polymer cross-linked in immediate presence of other, undergoing simultaneous linear chain extension. New material, LaRC-RP40 synthesized from high-temperature thermosetting imide prepolymer and from thermoplastic monomer. Three significantly improved properties: toughness, resistance to microcracking, and glass-transition temperature. Shows promise as high-temperature matrix resin for variety of components of aircraft engines and for use in other aerospace structures.

  13. Thermal Recovery from Cold-Working in Type K Bare-Wire Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenen, A. D.; Webster, E. S.

    2017-12-01

    Cold-working of most thermocouples has a significant, direct impact on the Seebeck coefficient which can lead to regions of thermoelectric inhomogeneity and accelerated drift. Cold-working can occur during the wire swaging process, when winding the wire onto a bobbin, or during handling by the end user—either accidentally or deliberately. Swaging-induced cold-work in thermocouples, if uniformly applied, may result in a high level of homogeneity. However, on exposure to elevated temperatures, the subsequent recovery process from the cold-working can then result in significant drift, and this can in turn lead to erroneous temperature measurements, often in excess of the specified manufacturer tolerances. Several studies have investigated the effects of cold-work in Type K thermocouples usually by bending, or swaging. However, the amount of cold-work applied to the thermocouple is often difficult to quantify, as the mechanisms for applying the strains are typically nonlinear when applied in this fashion. A repeatable level of cold-working is applied to the different wires using a tensional loading apparatus to apply a known yield displacement to the thermoelements. The effects of thermal recovery from cold-working can then be accurately quantified as a function of temperature, using a linear gradient furnace and a high-resolution homogeneity scanner. Variation in these effects due to differing alloy compositions in Type K wire is also explored, which is obtained by sourcing wire from a selection of manufacturers. The information gathered in this way will inform users of Type K thermocouples about the potential consequences of varying levels of cold-working and its impact on the Seebeck coefficient at a range of temperatures between ˜ 70°C and 600° C. This study will also guide users on the temperatures required to rapidly alleviate the effects of cold-working using thermal annealing treatments.

  14. High temperature resistant cermet and ceramic compositions. [for thermal resistant insulators and refractory coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High temperature oxidation resistance, high hardness and high abrasion and wear resistance are properties of cermet compositions particularly to provide high temperature resistant refractory coatings on metal substrates, for use as electrical insulation seals for thermionic converters. The compositions comprise a sintered body of particles of a high temperature resistant metal or metal alloy, preferably molybdenum or tungsten particles, dispersed in and bonded to a solid solution formed of aluminum oxide and silicon nitride, and particularly a ternary solid solution formed of a mixture of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride. Ceramic compositions comprising a sintered solid solution of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride are also described.

  15. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6 carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followedmore » by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.« less

  16. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, copper, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followedmore » by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.« less

  17. IRRADIATION-CAPSULE STUDY OF URANIUM MONOCARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.B.; Stahl, D.; Stang, J.H.

    1960-03-01

    Small cylindrical specimens of enriched UC were irradiated to evaluate usefulness as a high-temperature fuel for stationary power reactors. Detailed thermal and nuclear analyses were made to arrive at an appropriate capsule design on the basis of target specimen center-line temperature ( approximately 1500 deg F), specimen surface temperature (1100 deg F), specimen composition (U--5 wt.% C), and acapsule o.d. of 1.125 in. Temperature data from thermocouples inside the capsule indicated that five of the six capsules irradiated operated at close to the design conditions. Irradiation periods for individual capsules were varied to give burnups ranging from 1,000 to 20,000more » Mwd/t of U. Preliminary evidence indicates that this range of burnups was achieved. By using temperature and heat-flux data from the actual irradiations to estimate effective in-pile specimen thermal conductivities, it was found that the conductivity did not appear to vary during the exposures. (auth)« less

  18. Grain Size Threshold for Enhanced Irradiation Resistance in Nanocrystalline and Ultrafine Tungsten

    DOE PAGES

    El Atwani, Osman; Hinks, Jonathan; Greaves, Graeme; ...

    2017-02-21

    Nanocrystalline metals are considered highly radiation-resistant materials due to their large grain boundary areas. Here, the existence of a grain size threshold for enhanced irradiation resistance in high-temperature helium-irradiated nanocrystalline and ultrafine tungsten is demonstrated. Average bubble density, projected bubble area and the corresponding change in volume were measured via transmission electron microscopy and plotted as a function of grain size for two ion fluences. Nanocrystalline grains of less than 35 nm size possess ~10–20 times lower change in volume than ultrafine grains and this is discussed in terms of the grain boundaries defect sink efficiency.

  19. Correction for Thermal EMFs in Thermocouple Feedthroughs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    A straightforward measurement technique provides for correction of thermal-electromotive-force (thermal-EMF) errors introduced by temperature gradients along the pins of non-thermocouple-alloy hermetic feedthrough connectors for thermocouple extension wires that must pass through bulkheads. This technique is an alternative to the traditional technique in which the thermal-EMF errors are eliminated by use of custom-made multipin hermetic feedthrough connectors that contain pins made of the same alloys as those of the thermocouple extension wires. One disadvantage of the traditional technique is that it is expensive and time-consuming to fabricate multipin custom thermocouple connectors. In addition, the thermocouple-alloy pins in these connectors tend to corrode easily and/or tend to be less rugged compared to the non-thermocouple-alloy pins of ordinary connectors. As the number of thermocouples (and thus pins) is increased in a given setup, the magnitude of these disadvantages increases accordingly. The present technique is implemented by means of a little additional hardware and software, the cost of which is more than offset by the savings incurred through the use of ordinary instead of thermocouple connectors. The figure schematically depicts a typical measurement setup to which the technique is applied. The additional hardware includes an isothermal block (made of copper) instrumented with a reference thermocouple and a compensation thermocouple. The reference thermocouple is connected to an external data-acquisition system (DAS) through a two-pin thermocouple-alloy hermetic feedthrough connector, but this is the only such connector in the apparatus. The compensation thermocouple is connected to the DAS through two pins of the same ordinary multipin connector that connects the measurement thermocouples to the DAS.

  20. Effect of gamma irradiation on high temperature hardness of low-density polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pei-Yun; Yang, Fuqian; Lee, Sanboh

    2015-11-01

    Gamma irradiation can cause the change of microstructure and molecular structure of polymer, resulting in the change of mechanical properties of polymers. Using the hardness measurement, the effect of gamma irradiation on the high temperature hardness of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) was investigated. The gamma irradiation caused the increase in the melting point, the enthalpy of fusion, and the portion of crystallinity of LDPE. The Vickers hardness of the irradiated LDPE increases with increasing the irradiation dose, annealing temperature, and annealing time. The activation energy for the rate process controlling the reaction between defects linearly decreases with the irradiation dose. The process controlling the hardness evolution in LDPE is endothermic because LDPE is semi-crystalline.

  1. Cu, Ag, Au: Electrical Resistivity Along their Melting Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secco, R.; Littleton, J. A. H.; Berrada, M.; Ezenwa, I.; Yong, W.

    2017-12-01

    Electrical resistivity of Cu, Ag and Au was measured at pressures up to 5 GPa and temperatures up to 300 K above melting in a 1000-ton cubic anvil press. Two W/Re thermocouples placed at opposite ends of the wire sample served as T probes as well as 4-wire resistance electrodes in a switched circuit. A polarity switch was also used to remove any bias associated with current flow and voltage measurement using thermocouple legs. Examination of the composition of recovered and sectioned samples was carried out using electron microprobe analyses. Melting temperatures at high pressures were determined from the large jump in resistivity on heating at constant pressure and these agree well with previous experimental and theoretical phase diagram studies. With increasing P and T, electrical resistivity behavior in these noble metals is consistent with 1atm data. The resistivity values at the melting temperature of Cu and Ag decrease with increasing high pressure and Au seems to behave similarly. The results are compared to prediction by Stacey and Anderson (PEPI, 2001).

  2. [Measurement of tympanic temperature by infrared and thermocouple thermometry. A comparative study].

    PubMed

    Nathan, N; Guillaume, A; Feiss, P

    1995-01-01

    To compare tympanic temperatures obtained with an infrared thermometer Core Check 2090A (IVAC), non in contact with the tympanic membrane, to values obtained with a thermocouple thermometer Mon-A-Therm (Mallinckrodt) in contact with it, and to assess whether the differences depend on the person measuring the temperature. Prospective comparative open study. The study included 150 adults in whom the tympanic temperatures were measured at their admission to recovery room by 10 nurse anaesthetists. Each thermometer was inserted in the same patient into an external acoustic meatus. The median and range of the temperature differences were used to assess the bias and the accuracy of the measures. Their reliability was analyzed with consideration of the measuring person and the presence of irrelevant values, defined as a temperature difference over 0.3 degrees C. The temperatures obtained with both devices were similar (36.2 +/- 0.7 degrees C with IVAC thermometer vs 36.2 +/- 0.8 degrees C with Mallinckrodt thermometer). The median value of the differences was 0 degrees C, with a range of 2.5 degrees C (maximum value + 1.5 degrees C, minimum value: -1 degree C). Nineteen patients could be qualified as hypothermic (temperature < 36.5 degrees C) with one thermometer and normothermic (temperature > or = 36.5 degrees C) with the other. Among them, only 9 (6%) had temperature differences above 0.3 degrees C. The temperature differences were not different according to the measuring nurse. Nevertheless two of them obtained major differences or irrelevant figures. As compared to the thermocouple thermometry, infrared thermometry has no bias but a low precision. The measurement error does not allow the recognition of hypothermia in 6% of patients. The error may be made by the measuring person and/or related to the anatomy and the patency of the external acoustic meatus. Tympanic infrared thermometry seems to be a convenient method for temperature measurements at short time

  3. A comprehensive survey of thermoelectric homogeneity of commonly used thermocouple types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machin, Jonathan; Tucker, Declan; Pearce, Jonathan V.

    2018-06-01

    Thermocouples are widely used as temperature sensors in industry. The electromotive force generated by a thermocouple is produced in a temperature gradient and not at the thermocouple tip. This means that the thermoelectric inhomogeneity represents one of the most important contributions to the overall measurement uncertainty associated with thermocouples. To characterise this effect, and to provide some general recommendations concerning the magnitude of this contribution to use when formulating uncertainty analyses, a comprehensive literature survey has been performed. Significant information was found for Types K, N, R, S, B, Pt/Pd, Au/Pt and various other Pt/Rh thermocouples. In the case of Type K and N thermocouples, the survey has been augmented by a substantial amount of data based on calibrations of mineral-insulated, metal-sheathed thermocouple cable reels from thermocouple manufacturers. Some general conclusions are drawn and outline recommendations given concerning typical values for the uncertainty arising from thermoelectric inhomogeneity for the most widely used thermocouple types in the as-new state. It is stressed that these recommendations should only be heeded when individual homogeneity measurements are not possible. It is also stressed that the homogeneity can deteriorate rapidly during use, particularly for base metal thermocouples.

  4. Solar Arrays for Low-Irradiance Low-Temperature and High-Radiation Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boca, Andreea (Principal Investigator); Stella, Paul; Kerestes, Christopher; Sharps, Paul

    2017-01-01

    This is the Base Period final report DRAFT for the JPL task 'Solar Arrays for Low-Irradiance Low-Temperature and High-Radiation Environments', under Task Plan 77-16518 TA # 21, for NASA's Extreme Environments Solar Power (EESP) project. This report covers the Base period of performance, 7/18/2016 through 5/2/2017.The goal of this project is to develop an ultra-high efficiency lightweight scalable solar array technology for low irradiance, low temperature and high-radiation (LILT/Rad) environments. The benefit this technology will bring to flight systems is a greater than 20 reduction in solar array surface area, and a six-fold reduction in solar array mass and volume. The EESP project objectives are summarized in the 'NRA Goal' column of Table 1. Throughout this report, low irradiance low temperature (LILT) refers to 5AU -125 C test conditions; beginning of life (BOL) refers to the cell state prior to radiation exposure; and end of life (EOL) refers to the test article condition after exposure to a radiation dose of 4e15 1MeV e(-)/cm(exp 2).

  5. Thermoelectric effects in graphene at high bias current and under microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Skoblin, Grigory; Sun, Jie; Yurgens, August

    2017-11-14

    We use a split top gate to induce doping of opposite signs in different parts of a graphene field-effect transistor, thereby effectively forming a graphene thermocouple. The thermocouple is sensitive to the electronic temperature in graphene, which can be several hundred kelvin higher than the ambient one at sufficiently high bias current. Combined with the high thermoelectric power of graphene, this allows for i) simple measurements of the electronic temperature and ii) building thermoelectric radiation detectors. A simple prototype graphene thermoelectric detector shows a temperature-independent optical responsivity of around 400 V/W at 94 GHz at temperatures of 4-50 K.

  6. A joint computational and experimental study to evaluate Inconel-sheathed thermocouple performance in flames.

    SciTech Connect

    Brundage, Aaron L.; Nicolette, Vernon F.; Donaldson, A. Burl

    2005-09-01

    A joint experimental and computational study was performed to evaluate the capability of the Sandia Fire Code VULCAN to predict thermocouple response temperature. Thermocouple temperatures recorded by an Inconel-sheathed thermocouple inserted into a near-adiabatic flat flame were predicted by companion VULCAN simulations. The predicted thermocouple temperatures were within 6% of the measured values, with the error primarily attributable to uncertainty in Inconel 600 emissivity and axial conduction losses along the length of the thermocouple assembly. Hence, it is recommended that future thermocouple models (for Inconel-sheathed designs) include a correction for axial conduction. Given the remarkable agreement between experiment and simulation,more » it is recommended that the analysis be repeated for thermocouples in flames with pollutants such as soot.« less

  7. Establishment of the Co-C Eutectic Fixed-Point Cell for Thermocouple Calibrations at NIMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongrai, O.; Elliott, C. J.

    2017-08-01

    In 2015, NIMT first established a Co-C eutectic temperature reference (fixed-point) cell measurement capability for thermocouple calibration to support the requirements of Thailand's heavy industries and secondary laboratories. The Co-C eutectic fixed-point cell is a facility transferred from NPL, where the design was developed through European and UK national measurement system projects. In this paper, we describe the establishment of a Co-C eutectic fixed-point cell for thermocouple calibration at NIMT. This paper demonstrates achievement of the required furnace uniformity, the Co-C plateau realization and the comparison data between NIMT and NPL Co-C cells by using the same standard Pt/Pd thermocouple, demonstrating traceability. The NIMT measurement capability for noble metal type thermocouples at the new Co-C eutectic fixed point (1324.06°C) is estimated to be within ± 0.60 K (k=2). This meets the needs of Thailand's high-temperature thermocouple users—for which previously there has been no traceable calibration facility.

  8. Three-Wire Thermocouple: Frequency Response in Constant Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1995-01-01

    Theory and experimental measurements are compared with a novel three-wire thermocouple. Signals from three wires of unequal diameters are recorded from the thermocouple suspended in constant flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the three-wire thermocouple requires no compensation for omega less than or equal to 5(omega(sub 1)), where omega(sub 1) is the natural frequency of the smaller wire. The latter result represents a significant improvement compared to previous work with two-wire thermocouples. A correction factor has also been derived to account for wires of arbitrary diameter.

  9. Three-wire Thermocouple: Frequency Response in Constant Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1995-01-01

    Theory and experimental measurements are compared with a novel three-wire thermocouple. Signals from three wires of unequal diameters arc recorded from the thermocouple suspended in constant flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the three-wire thermocouple requires no compensation for omega less than or equal to 5(sub omega1), where omega, is the natural frequency of the smaller wire. The latter result represents a significant improvement compared to previous work with two-wire thermocouples. A correction factor has also been derived to account for wires of arbitrary diameter.

  10. Measuring Inhomogeneities In Thermocouple Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.; West, James W.; Crum, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Spools rotated to pull thermocouple wires through liquid nitrogen, while output voltage of thermocouple recorded on strip chart. Wires exposed to severe temperature gradients, amounting to overall change of 200 degrees C, where they enter and leave liquid nitrogen. If wires homogeneous, net output voltage zero. If inhomogeneity passes through liquid-nitrogen/air interface, resulting deviation of output voltage from zero seen immediately on strip chart. If inhomogeneity greater than allowable, reels stopped temporarily so inhomogeneity tagged before wound onto takeup reel.

  11. Development of a Sheathed Miniature Aerothermal Reentry Thermocouple for Thermal Protection System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Edward R.; Weber, Carissa Tudryn; Oishi, Tomo; Santos, Jose; Mach, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The Sheathed Miniature Aerothermal Reentry Thermocouple is a micro-miniature thermocouple for high temperature measurement in extreme environments. It is available for use in Thermal Protection System materials for ground testing and flight. This paper discusses the heritage, and design of the instrument. Experimental and analytical methods used to verify its performance and limitations are described.

  12. Temperature control during regeneration of activated carbon fiber cloth with resistance-feedback.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, David L; Rood, Mark J

    2012-10-16

    Electrothermal swing adsorption (ESA) of organic compounds from gas streams with activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) reduces emissions to the atmosphere and recovers feedstock for reuse. Local temperature measurement (e.g., with a thermocouple) is typically used to monitor/control adsorbent regeneration cycles. Remote electrical resistance measurement is evaluated here as an alternative to local temperature measurement. ACFC resistance that was modeled based on its physical properties was within 10.5% of the measured resistance values during electrothermal heating. Resistance control was developed based on this measured relationship and used to control temperature to within 2.3% of regeneration set-point temperatures. Isobutane-laden adsorbent was then heated with resistance control. After 2 min of heating, the temperature of the adsorbent with isobutane was 13% less than the adsorbent without isobutane. This difference decreased to 2.1% after 9 min of heating, showing desorption of isobutane. An ACFC cartridge was also heated to 175 °C for 900 cycles with its resistance and adsorption capacity values remaining within 3% and 2%, respectively. This new method to control regeneration power application based on rapid sensing of the adsorbent's resistance removes the need for direct-contact temperature sensors providing a simple, cost-efficient, and long-term regeneration technique for ESA systems.

  13. Reliability of High-Temperature Fixed-Point Installations over 8 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, C. J.; Ford, T.; Ongrai, O.; Pearce, J. V.

    2017-12-01

    At NPL, high-temperature metal-carbon eutectic fixed points have been set up for thermocouple calibration purposes since 2006, for realising reference temperatures above the highest point specified in the International Temperature Scale of 1990 for contact thermometer calibrations. Additionally, cells of the same design have been provided by NPL to other national measurement institutes (NMIs) and calibration laboratories over this period, creating traceable and ISO 17025 accredited facilities around the world for calibrating noble metal thermocouples at 1324 {°}C (Co-C) and 1492 {°}C (Pd-C). This paper shows collections of thermocouple calibration results obtained during use of the high-temperature fixed-point cells at NPL and, as further examples, the use of cells installed at CCPI Europe (UK) and NIMT (Thailand). The lifetime of the cells can now be shown to be in excess of 7 years, whether used on a weekly or monthly basis, and whether used in an NMI or industrial calibration laboratory.

  14. Comparing the transient response of a resistive-type sensor with a thin film thermocouple during the post-exposure bake process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, Kenneth G.; DeWitt, David P.; Fowler, Joel B.; Proctor, James E.; Kimes, William A.; Ripple, Dean C.; Tsai, Benjamin K.

    2004-04-01

    Recent studies on dynamic temperature profiling and lithographic performance modeling of the post-exposure bake (PEB) process have demonstrated that the rate of heating and cooling may have an important influence on resist lithographic response. Measuring the transient surface temperature during the heating or cooling process with such accuracy can only be assured if the sensors embedded in or attached to the test wafer do not affect the temperature distribution in the bare wafer. In this paper we report on an experimental and analytical study to compare the transient response of embedded platinum resistance thermometer (PRT) sensors with surface-deposited, thin-film thermocouples (TFTC). The TFTCs on silicon wafers have been developed at NIST to measure wafer temperatures in other semiconductor thermal processes. Experiments are performed on a test bed built from a commercial, fab-qualified module with hot and chill plates using wafers that have been instrumented with calibrated type-E (NiCr/CuNi) TFTCs and commercial PRTs. Time constants were determined from an energy-balance analysis fitting the temperature-time derivative to the wafer temperature during the heating and cooling processes. The time constants for instrumented wafers ranged from 4.6 s to 5.1 s on heating for both the TFTC and PRT sensors, with an average difference less than 0.1 s between the TFTCs and PRTs and slightly greater differences on cooling.

  15. Localization of focused-ultrasound beams in a tissue phantom, using remote thermocouple arrays.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Prasanna; Dibaji, Seyed Ahmad Reza; Banerjee, Rupak K; Nagaraja, Srinidhi; Myers, Matthew R

    2014-12-01

    In focused-ultrasound procedures such as vessel cauterization or clot lysis, targeting accuracy is critical. To investigate the targeting accuracy of the focused-ultrasound systems, tissue phantoms embedded with thermocouples can be employed. This paper describes a method that utilizes an array of thermocouples to localize the focused ultrasound beam. All of the thermocouples are located away from the beam, so that thermocouple artifacts and sensor interference are minimized. Beam propagation and temperature rise in the phantom are simulated numerically, and an optimization routine calculates the beam location that produces the best agreement between the numerical temperature values and those measured with thermocouples. The accuracy of the method was examined as a function of the array characteristics, including the number of thermocouples in the array and their orientation. For exposures with a 3.3-MHz source, the remote-thermocouple technique was able to predict the focal position to within 0.06 mm. Once the focal location is determined using the localization method, temperatures at desired locations (including the focus) can be estimated from remote thermocouple measurements by curve fitting an analytical solution to the heat equation. Temperature increases in the focal plane were predicted to within 5% agreement with measured values using this method.

  16. Measurement of heating coil temperature for e-cigarettes with a "top-coil" clearomizer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenhao; Wang, Ping; Ito, Kazuhide; Fowles, Jeff; Shusterman, Dennis; Jaques, Peter A; Kumagai, Kazukiyo

    2018-01-01

    To determine the effect of applied power settings, coil wetness conditions, and e-liquid compositions on the coil heating temperature for e-cigarettes with a "top-coil" clearomizer, and to make associations of coil conditions with emission of toxic carbonyl compounds by combining results herein with the literature. The coil temperature of a second generation e-cigarette was measured at various applied power levels, coil conditions, and e-liquid compositions, including (1) measurements by thermocouple at three e-liquid fill levels (dry, wet-through-wick, and full-wet), three coil resistances (low, standard, and high), and four voltage settings (3-6 V) for multiple coils using propylene glycol (PG) as a test liquid; (2) measurements by thermocouple at additional degrees of coil wetness for a high resistance coil using PG; and (3) measurements by both thermocouple and infrared (IR) camera for high resistance coils using PG alone and a 1:1 (wt/wt) mixture of PG and glycerol (PG/GL). For single point thermocouple measurements with PG, coil temperatures ranged from 322 ‒ 1008°C, 145 ‒ 334°C, and 110 ‒ 185°C under dry, wet-through-wick, and full-wet conditions, respectively, for the total of 13 replaceable coil heads. For conditions measured with both a thermocouple and an IR camera, all thermocouple measurements were between the minimum and maximum across-coil IR camera measurements and equal to 74% ‒ 115% of the across-coil mean, depending on test conditions. The IR camera showed details of the non-uniform temperature distribution across heating coils. The large temperature variations under wet-through-wick conditions may explain the large variations in formaldehyde formation rate reported in the literature for such "top-coil" clearomizers. This study established a simple and straight-forward protocol to systematically measure e-cigarette coil heating temperature under dry, wet-through-wick, and full-wet conditions. In addition to applied power, the

  17. Study of performance characteristics of noble metal thermocouple materials to 2000 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeze, P. D.; Thomas, D.; Edelman, S.; Stern, J.

    1972-01-01

    Three performance characteristics of noble metal thermocouples in various environments are discussed. Catalytic effects cause significant errors when noble metal thermocouple materials are exposed to air containing unburned gases in temperature ranges from 25 C to 1500 C. The thermoelectric stability of the iridium 40 rhodium to iridium thermocouple system at 2000 C in an oxidizing medium is described. The effects of large and small temperature gradients on the accuracy and stability of temperature measurements are analyzed.

  18. Lipid and carotenoid production by Rhodotorula glutinis under irradiation/high-temperature and dark/low-temperature cultivation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiping; Zhang, Xu; Tan, Tianwei

    2014-04-01

    The capacity of lipid and carotenoid production by Rhodotorula glutinis was investigated under different irradiation conditions, temperatures and C/N ratios. The results showed that dark/low-temperature could enhance lipid content, while irradiation/high-temperature increased the yields of biomass and carotenoid. The optimum C/N ratio for production was between 80 and 100. A two-stage cultivation strategy was used for lipid and carotenoid production in a 5L fermenter. In the first stage, the maximum biomass reached 28.1g/L under irradiation/high-temperature. Then, the cultivation condition was changed to dark/low-temperature, and C/N ratio was adjusted to 90. After the second stage, the biomass, lipid content and carotenoid reached 86.2g/L, 26.7% and 4.2mg/L, respectively. More significantly, the yields of biomass and lipid were 43.1% and 11.5%, respectively. Lipids contained 79.7% 18C and 16.8% 16C fatty acids by GC analysis. HPLC quantified the main carotenoids were β-carotene (68.4%), torularhodin (21.5%) and torulene (10.1%). Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Method for forming a thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Metz, Hugh J.

    1979-01-01

    A method is provided for producing a fast response, insulated junction thermocouple having a uniform diameter outer sheath in the region of the measuring junction. One step is added to the usual thermocouple fabrication process that consists in expanding the thermocouple sheath following the insulation removal step. This makes it possible to swage the sheath back to the original diameter and compact the insulation to the desired high density in the final fabrication step.

  20. Post-irradiation examinations of THERMHET composite fuels for transmutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noirot, J.; Desgranges, L.; Chauvin, N.; Georgenthum, V.

    2003-07-01

    The thermal behaviour of composite targets dedicated to minor actinide transmutation was studied using THERMHET (thermal behaviour of heterogeneous fuel) irradiation in the SILOE reactor. Three inert matrix fuel designs were tested (macro-mass, jingle and microdispersion) all with a MgAl 2O 4 spinel inert matrix and around 40% weight of UO 2 to simulate minor actinide inclusions. The post-irradiation examinations led to a new interpretation of the temperature measurement by thermocouples located in the central hole of the pellets. A major change in the micro-dispersed structure was detected. The examinations enabled us to understand the behaviour of the spinel during the different stages of irradiation. They revealed an amorphisation at low temperature and then a nano re-crystallisation at high temperature of the spinel in the micro-dispersed case. These results, together with those obtained in the MATINA irradiation of an equivalent structure, show the importance of the irradiation temperature on spinel behaviour.

  1. Thermodynamic effects of laser irradiation of implants placed in bone: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Leja, Chris; Geminiani, Alessandro; Caton, Jack; Romanos, Georgios E

    2013-11-01

    Lasers have been proposed for various applications involving dental implants, including uncovering implants and treating peri-implantitis. However, the effect of laser irradiation on the implant surface temperature is only partially known. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of irradiation with diode, carbon dioxide, and Er:YAG lasers on the surface temperature of dental implants placed in bone, in vitro. For this study, one dental implant was placed in a bovine rib. A trephine bur was used to create a circumferential defect to simulate peri-implantitis, and thermocouples were placed at the coronal and apical aspect of the implant. The implant was irradiated for 60 s using four different lasers independently and change in temperature as well as time to reach a 10 °C increase in temperature were recorded. There was wide variability in results among the lasers and settings. Time for a 10 °C increase ranged from 0.9 to over 60 s for the coronal thermocouple and from 18 to over 60 s for the apical thermocouple. Maximum temperature ranged from 5.9 to 70.9 °C coronally and from 1.4 to 23.4 °C apically. During laser irradiation of dental implants, a surface temperature increase beyond the "critical threshold" of 10 °C can be reached after only 18 s.

  2. Micro-thermocouple on nano-membrane: thermometer for nanoscale measurements.

    PubMed

    Balčytis, Armandas; Ryu, Meguya; Juodkazis, Saulius; Morikawa, Junko

    2018-04-20

    A thermocouple of Au-Ni with only 2.5-μm-wide electrodes on a 30-nm-thick Si 3 N 4 membrane was fabricated by a simple low-resolution electron beam lithography and lift off procedure. The thermocouple is shown to be sensitive to heat generated by laser as well as an electron beam. Nano-thin membrane was used to reach a high spatial resolution of energy deposition and to realise a heat source of sub-1 μm diameter. This was achieved due to a limited generation of secondary electrons, which increase a lateral energy deposition. A low thermal capacitance of the fabricated devices is useful for the real time monitoring of small and fast temperature changes, e.g., due to convection, and can be detected through an optical and mechanical barrier of the nano-thin membrane. Temperature changes up to ~2 × 10 5 K/s can be measured at 10 kHz rate. A simultaneous down-sizing of both, the heat detector and heat source strongly required for creation of thermal microscopy is demonstrated. Peculiarities of Seebeck constant (thermopower) dependence on electron injection into thermocouple are discussed. Modeling of thermal flows on a nano-membrane with presence of a micro-thermocouple was carried out to compare with experimentally measured temporal response.

  3. Operating Temperatures of a Sodium-Cooled Exhaust Valve as Measured by a Thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, J. C.; Wilsted, H. D.; Mulcahy, B. A.

    1943-01-01

    A thermocouple was installed in the crown of a sodium-cooled exhaust valve. The valve was then tested in an air-cooled engine cylinder and valve temperatures under various engine operating conditions were determined. A temperature of 1337 F was observed at a fuel-air ratio of 0.064, a brake mean effective pressure of 179 pounds per square inch, and an engine speed of 2000 rpm. Fuel-air ratio was found to have a large influence on valve temperature, but cooling-air pressure and variation in spark advance had little effect. An increase in engine power by change of speed or mean effective pressure increased the valve temperature. It was found that the temperature of the rear spark-plug bushing was not a satisfactory indication of the temperature of the exhaust valve.

  4. Circuit for monitoring temperature of high-voltage equipment

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Martin E.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved circuit for measuring temperature in a region at high electric potential and generating a read-out of the same in a region at lower potential. The circuit is specially designed to combine high sensitivity, stability, and accuracy. A major portion of the circuit situated in the high-potential region can take the form of an integrated circuit. The preferred form of the circuit includes an input section which is situated in the high-potential region and comprises a temperature-compensated thermocouple circuit for sensing temperature, an oscillator circuit for generating a train of ramp voltages whose rise time varies inversely with the thermocouple output, a comparator and switching circuit for converting the oscillator output to pulses whose frequency is proportional to the thermocouple output, and a light-emitting diode which is energized by these pulses. An optical coupling transmits the light pulses generated by the diode to an output section of the circuit, situated in a region at ground. The output section comprises means for converting the transmitted pulses to electrical pulses of corresponding frequency, means for amplifying the electrical pulses, and means for displaying the frequency of the same. The preferred embodiment of the overall circuit is designed so that the frequency of the output signal in hertz and tenths of hertz is equal to the sensed temperature in degrees and tenths of degrees.

  5. Real-time temperature monitoring with fiber Bragg grating sensor during diffuser-assisted laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pham, Ngot Thi; Lee, Seul Lee; Park, Suhyun; Lee, Yong Wook; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2017-04-01

    High-sensitivity temperature sensors have been used to validate real-time thermal responses in tissue during photothermal treatment. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the feasible application of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor for diffuser-assisted laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) particularly to treat tubular tissue disease. A 600 - ? m core-diameter diffuser was employed to deliver 980-nm laser light for coagulation treatment. Both a thermocouple and a FBG were comparatively tested to evaluate temperature measurements in ex vivo liver tissue. The degree of tissue denaturation was estimated as a function of irradiation times and quantitatively compared with light distribution as well as temperature development. At the closer distance to a heat source, the thermocouple measured up to 41% higher maximum temperature than the FBG sensor did after 120-s irradiation (i.e., 98.7 ° C ± 6.1 ° C for FBG versus 131.0 ° C ± 5.1 ° C for thermocouple; p < 0.001 ). Ex vivo porcine urethra tests confirmed the real-time temperature measurements of the FBG sensor as well as consistently circumferential tissue denaturation after 72-s irradiation ( coagulation thickness = 2.2 ± 0.3 ?? mm ). The implementation of FBG can be a feasible sensing technique to instantaneously monitor the temperature developments during diffuser-assisted LITT for treatment of tubular tissue structure.

  6. Role of a single shield in thermocouple measurements in hot air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongwei; Shi, Lei; Tian, Yangtao

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the role of a single shield on steady temperature measurement using thermocouples in hot air flow, a methodology for solving convection, conduction, and radiation in one single model is provided. In order to compare with the experimental results, a cylindrical computational domain is established, which is the same size with the hot calibration wind-tunnel. In the computational domain, two kinds of thermocouples, the bare-bead and the single-shielded thermocouples, are simulated respectively. Surface temperature distribution and the temperature measurement bias of the two typical thermocouples are compared. The simulation results indicate that: 1) The existence of the shield reduces bead surface heat flux and changes the direction of wires inner heat conduction in a colder surrounding; 2) The existence of the shield reduces the temperature measurement bias both by improving bead surface temperature and by reducing surface temperature gradient; 3) The shield effectively reduces the effect of the ambient temperature on the temperature measurement bias; 4) The shield effectively reduces the influence of airflow velocity on the temperature measurement bias.

  7. Microstructural stability and mechanical behavior of FeNiMnCr high entropy alloy under ion irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Leonard, Keith J.; Bei, Hongbin; Zinkle, Steven J.; ...

    2016-05-13

    In recent years, high entropy alloys (HEAs) have attracted significant attention due to their excellent mechanical properties and good corrosion resistance, making them potential candidates for high temperature fission and fusion structural applications. However there is very little known about their radiation resistance, particularly at elevated temperatures relevant for energy applications. In the present study, a single phase (face centered cubic) concentrated solid solution alloy of composition 27%Fe-28%Ni-27%Mn-18%Cr was irradiated with 3 or 5.8 MeV Ni ions at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 700 °C and midrange doses from 0.03 to 10 displacements per atom (dpa). Transmission electron microscopymore » (TEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (STEM/EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the radiation defects and microstructural changes. Irradiation at higher temperatures showed evidence of relatively sluggish solute diffusion with limited solute depletion or enrichment at grain boundaries. The main microstructural feature at all temperatures was high-density small dislocation loops. Voids were not observed at any irradiation condition. Nano-indentation tests on specimens irradiated at room temperature showed a rapid increase in hardness ~35% and ~80% higher than the unirradiated value at 0.03 and 0.3 dpa midrange doses, respectively. The irradiation-induced hardening was less pronounced for 500 °C irradiations (<20% increase after 3 dpa). Overall, the examined HEA material exhibits superior radiation resistance compared to conventional single phase Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloys such as stainless steels. Furthermore, the present study provides insight on the fundamental irradiation behavior of a single phase HEA material over a broad range of irradiation temperatures.« less

  8. Thermocouple Probe Orientation Affects Prescribed Fire Behavior Estimation.

    PubMed

    Coates, T Adam; Chow, Alex T; Hagan, Donald L; Waldrop, Thomas A; Wang, G Geoff; Bridges, William C; Rogers, Mary-Frances; Dozier, James H

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between fire intensity and fuel mass is essential information for scientists and forest managers seeking to manage forests using prescribed fires. Peak burning temperature, duration of heating, and area under the temperature profile are fire behavior metrics obtained from thermocouple-datalogger assemblies used to characterize prescribed burns. Despite their recurrent usage in prescribed burn studies, there is no simple protocol established to guide the orientation of thermocouple installation. Our results from dormant and growing season burns in coastal longleaf pine ( Mill.) forests in South Carolina suggest that thermocouples located horizontally at the litter-soil interface record significantly higher estimates of peak burning temperature, duration of heating, and area under the temperature profile than thermocouples extending 28 cm vertically above the litter-soil interface ( < 0.01). Surprisingly, vertical and horizontal estimates of these measures did not show strong correlation with one another ( ≤ 0.14). The horizontal duration of heating values were greater in growing season burns than in dormant season burns ( < 0.01), but the vertical values did not indicate this difference ( = 0.52). Field measures of fuel mass and depth before and after fire showed promise as significant predictive variables ( ≤ 0.05) for the fire behavior metrics. However, all correlation coefficients were less than or equal to = 0.41. Given these findings, we encourage scientists, researchers, and managers to carefully consider thermocouple orientation when investigating fire behavior metrics, as orientation may affect estimates of fire intensity and the distinction of fire treatment effects, particularly in forests with litter-dominated surface fuels. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  9. Processing techniques for correlation of LDA and thermocouple signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nina, M. N. R.; Pita, G. P. A.

    1986-11-01

    A technique was developed to enable the evaluation of the correlation between velocity and temperature, with laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) as the source of velocity signals and fine wire thermocouple as that of flow temperature. The discontinuous nature of LDA signals requires a special technique for correlation, in particular when few seeding particles are present in the flow. The thermocouple signal was analog compensated in frequency and the effect of the value of time constant on the velocity temperature correlation was studied.

  10. Comparison of two surface temperature measurement using thermocouples and infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, Dariusz; Strąk, Kinga; Piasecka, Magdalena

    This paper compares two methods applied to measure surface temperatures at an experimental setup designed to analyse flow boiling heat transfer. The temperature measurements were performed in two parallel rectangular minichannels, both 1.7 mm deep, 16 mm wide and 180 mm long. The heating element for the fluid flowing in each minichannel was a thin foil made of Haynes-230. The two measurement methods employed to determine the surface temperature of the foil were: the contact method, which involved mounting thermocouples at several points in one minichannel, and the contactless method to study the other minichannel, where the results were provided with an infrared camera. Calculations were necessary to compare the temperature results. Two sets of measurement data obtained for different values of the heat flux were analysed using the basic statistical methods, the method error and the method accuracy. The experimental error and the method accuracy were taken into account. The comparative analysis showed that although the values and distributions of the surface temperatures obtained with the two methods were similar but both methods had certain limitations.

  11. The reliability of thermocouples in microwave ceramics processing.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Juan; Valdez, Zarel; Ortiz, Ubaldo

    2004-01-01

    It is not rare to hear arguments against the use of thermocouples for taking temperatures in processes that are taking place under microwave fields. However, the simplicity of this device makes it attractive to consider its use. One question that arises when thermocouples are employed is whether the electric field perturbs the measurement, and if the thermocouple affects the processing. The process that was chosen for conducting this test was the synthesis of spinel (MgAl2O4) using microwaves as a power supply and hematite (Fe2O3) as an additive for both spinel formation promotion and susceptor. The alumina-based systems are very important to study because this is one of the most common ingredients in refractory materials. There are many discussions about the improvement of the process when microwaves are used, but a kinetic comparison cannot be performed if the temperature is unknown, and that is the reason for emphasizing the measurement techniques. The analysis of the obtained samples was carried out by X-ray diffraction of powders. The results of this work show that there is no difference between the products obtained when the thermocouple was inserted in the system, compared to processing without it; hence the thermocouple is appropriate for this application.

  12. Operating Temperatures of a Sodium-Cooled Exhaust Valve as Measured by a Thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, J C; Wilsted, H D; Mulcahy, B A

    1943-01-01

    Report presents the results of a thermocouple installed in the crown of a sodium-cooled exhaust valve. The valve was tested in an air-cooled engine cylinder and valve temperatures under various engine operating conditions were determined. A temperature of 1337 degrees F. was observed at a fuel-air ratio of 0.064, a brake mean effective pressure of 179 pounds per square inch, and an engine speed of 2000 r.p.m. Fuel-air ratio was found to have a large influence on valve temperature, but cooling-air pressure and variation in spark advance had little effect. An increase in engine power by change of speed or mean effective pressure increased the valve temperature. It was found that the temperature of the rear-spark-plug bushing was not a satisfactory indication of the temperature of the exhaust valve.

  13. Temperature stabilized effusion cell evaporation source for thin film deposition and molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedje, H. F.; Brodie, D. E.

    2000-05-01

    A simple effusion cell evaporation source for thin film deposition and molecular-beam epitaxy is described. The source consists of a crucible with a thermocouple temperature sensor heated by a resistive crucible heater. Radiation heat transfer from the crucible to the thermocouple produces a consistent and reproducible thermocouple temperature for a given crucible temperature, without direct contact between the thermocouple and the crucible. The thermocouple temperature is somewhat less than the actual crucible temperature because of heat flow from the thermocouple junction along the thermocouple lead wires. In a typical case, the thermocouple temperature is 1007 °C while the crucible is at 1083 °C. The crucible temperature stability is estimated from the measured sensitivity of the evaporation rate of indium to temperature, and the observed variations in the evaporation rate for a fixed thermocouple temperature. The crucible temperature peak-to-peak variation over a one hour period is 1.2 °C. Machined molybdenum crucibles were used in the indium and copper sources for depositing CuInSe2 thin films for solar cells.

  14. Iron-niobium-aluminum alloy having high-temperature corrosion resistance

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Huey S.

    1988-04-14

    An alloy for use in high temperature sulfur and oxygen containing environments, having aluminum for oxygen resistance, niobium for sulfur resistance and the balance iron, is discussed. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Low-Cost Thermocouple Signal-Conditioning Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenzi, Marcelo K.; Silva, Fabricio M.; Lima, Enrique L.; Pinto, Jose Carlos; Cunningham, Michael F.

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that reaction rates and physical properties of any substance depend on the temperature. Therefore, an accurate temperature measurement is a key factor for successful activities both in chemical laboratories and industrial plants. Although plenty of sensors can be adopted for temperature measurements, thermocouples are the most…

  16. Method for analyzing passive silicon carbide thermometry with a continuous dilatometer to determine irradiation temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Anne A.; Porter, Wallace D.; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.

    2016-03-01

    Silicon carbide is used as a passive post-irradiation temperature monitor because the irradiation defects will anneal out above the irradiation temperature. The irradiation temperature is determined by measuring a property change after isochronal annealing, i.e., lattice spacing, dimensions, electrical resistivity, thermal diffusivity, or bulk density. However, such methods are time-consuming since the steps involved must be performed in a serial manner. This work presents the use of thermal expansion from continuous dilatometry to calculate the SiC irradiation temperature, which is an automated process requiring minimal setup time. Analysis software was written that performs the calculations to obtain the irradiation temperature and removes possible user-introduced error while standardizing the analysis. This method has been compared to an electrical resistivity and isochronal annealing investigation, and the results revealed agreement of the calculated temperatures. These results show that dilatometry is a reliable and less time-intensive process for determining irradiation temperature from passive SiC thermometry.

  17. Prototype thin-film thermocouple/heat-flux sensor for a ceramic-insulated diesel engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Walter S.; Barrows, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    A platinum versus platinum-13 percent rhodium thin-film thermocouple/heat-flux sensor was devised and tested in the harsh, high-temperature environment of a ceramic-insulated, low-heat-rejection diesel engine. The sensor probe assembly was developed to provide experimental validation of heat transfer and thermal analysis methodologies applicable to the insulated diesel engine concept. The thin-film thermocouple configuration was chosen to approximate an uninterrupted chamber surface and provide a 1-D heat-flux path through the probe body. The engine test was conducted by Purdue University for Integral Technologies, Inc., under a DOE-funded contract managed by NASA Lewis Research Center. The thin-film sensor performed reliably during 6 to 10 hr of repeated engine runs at indicated mean surface temperatures up to 950 K. However, the sensor suffered partial loss of adhesion in the thin-film thermocouple junction area following maximum cyclic temperature excursions to greater than 1150 K.

  18. High Accuracy Temperature Measurements Using RTDs with Current Loop Conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Gerald M.

    1997-01-01

    To measure temperatures with a greater degree of accuracy than is possible with thermocouples, RTDs (Resistive Temperature Detectors) are typically used. Calibration standards use specialized high precision RTD probes with accuracies approaching 0.001 F. These are extremely delicate devices, and far too costly to be used in test facility instrumentation. Less costly sensors which are designed for aeronautical wind tunnel testing are available and can be readily adapted to probes, rakes, and test rigs. With proper signal conditioning of the sensor, temperature accuracies of 0.1 F is obtainable. For reasons that will be explored in this paper, the Anderson current loop is the preferred method used for signal conditioning. This scheme has been used in NASA Lewis Research Center's 9 x 15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel, and is detailed.

  19. In-situ response time testing of thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemian, H. M.; Petersen, K. M.; Hashemian, M.; Beverly, D. D.; Miller, L. F.

    The Loop Current Step Response (LCSR) method has been developed for in situ response time testing of thermocouples and resistance thermometers. A means for measuring the sensor response for actual operating conditions and installation details is provided. This technology is ready to be assembled into an instrument for use in aerospace, nuclear, chemical and other industries where transient temperature measurements are important. The method provides time constant results within better than about 20 percent of value obtained from plunge tests. These results are based on tests performed in water at low flow rates (1M/sec) and in air flow rates ranging from a few meters per second to over a hundred kilometers per hour.

  20. A new approach for breeding low-temperature-resistant Volvariella volvacea strains: Genome shuffling in edible fungi.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ziping; Wu, Xiao; Lv, Beibei; Wu, Guogan; Wang, Jinbin; Jiang, Wei; Li, Peng; He, Jianhua; Chen, Jianzhong; Chen, Mingjie; Bao, Dapeng; Zhang, Jinsong; Tan, Qi; Tang, Xueming

    2016-09-01

    Volvariella volvacea is difficult to store fresh because of the lack of low-temperature resistance. Many traditional mutagenic strategies have been applied in order to select out strains resistant to low temperature, but few commercially efficient strains have been produced. In order to break through the bottleneck of traditional breeding and significantly improve low-temperature resistance of the edible fungus V. volvacea, strains resistant to low temperature were constructed by genome shuffling. The optimum conditions of V. volvacea strain mutation, protoplast regeneration, and fusion were determined. After protoplasts were treated with 1% (v/v) ethylmethylsulfonate (EMS), 40 Sec of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, 600 Gy electron beam implantation, and 750 Gy 60 Co-γ irradiation, separately, the lethality was within 70%-80%, which favored generating protoplasts being used in following forward mutation. Under these conditions, 16 strains of V. volvacea mutated by EMS, electron beam, UV irradiation, and 60 Co-γ irradiation were obtained. The 16 mutated protoplasts were selected to serve as the shuffling pool based on their excellent low-temperature resistance. After four rounds of genome shuffling and low-temperature resistance testing, three strains (VF 1 , VF 2 , and VF 3 ) with high genetic stability were screened. VF 1 , VF 2 , and VF 3 significantly enhanced fruit body shelf life to 20, 28, and 28 H at 10 °C, respectively, which exceeded 25%, 75%, and 75%, respectively, compared with the storage time of V23, the most low-temperature-resistant strain. Genome shuffling greatly improved the low-temperature resistance of V. volvacea, and shortened the course of screening required to generate desirable strains. To our knowledge, this is the first paper to apply genome shuffling to breeding new varieties of mushroom, and offers a new approach for breeding edible fungi with optimized phenotype. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

  1. A thermocouple thermode for small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Thermode composed of two thin-walled stainless steel hypodermic needles and cooper-constantan thermocouple or small thermistor to indicate temperature at point of perfusion is used to measure brain temperature in animals. Because of relatively small size of thermode, structural damage to brain is minimized.

  2. Fusion neutron irradiation of Ni-Si alloys at high temperature*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. S.; Guinan, M. W.; Hahn, P. A.

    1988-07-01

    Two Ni-4% Si alloys, with different cold work levels, have been irradiated with 14-MeV fusion neutrons at 623 K, and their Curie temperatures have been monitored during irradiation. The results are compared to those of an identical alloy irradiated by 2-MeV electrons. The results show that increasing dislocation density increases the Curie temperature change rate. At the same damage rate, the Curie temperature change rate for the alloy irradiated by 14-MeV fusion neutrons is only 6-7% of that for an identical alloy irradiated by 2-MeV electrons. It is well known that the migration of radiation induced defects contributes to segregation of silicon atoms at sinks in this alloy, causing the Curie temperature changes. The current results imply that the relative free defect production efficiency decreases from one for the electron irradiated sample to 6-7% for the fusion neutron irradiated sample.

  3. Method for analyzing passive silicon carbide thermometry with a continuous dilatometer to determine irradiation temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Campbell, Anne A.; Porter, Wallace D.; Katoh, Yutai; ...

    2016-01-14

    Silicon carbide is used as a passive post-irradiation temperature monitor because the irradiation defects will anneal out above the irradiation temperature. The irradiation temperature is determined by measuring a property change after isochronal annealing, i.e., lattice spacing, dimensions, electrical resistivity, thermal diffusivity, or bulk density. However, such methods are time-consuming since the steps involved must be performed in a serial manner. This work presents the use of thermal expansion from continuous dilatometry to calculate the SiC irradiation temperature, which is an automated process requiring minimal setup time. Analysis software was written that performs the calculations to obtain the irradiation temperaturemore » and removes possible user-introduced error while standardizing the analysis. In addition, this method has been compared to an electrical resistivity and isochronal annealing investigation, and the results revealed agreement of the calculated temperatures. These results show that dilatometry is a reliable and less time-intensive process for determining irradiation temperature from passive SiC thermometry.« less

  4. Determination of a response function of a thermocouple using a short acoustic pulse.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Yusuke; Biwa, Tetsushi; Yazaki, Taichi

    2007-04-01

    This paper reports on an experimental technique to determine a response function of a thermocouple using a short acoustic pulse wave. A pulse of 10 ms is generated in a tube filled with 1 bar helium gas. The temperature is measured using the thermocouple. The reference temperature is deduced from the measured pressure on the basis of a laminar oscillating flow theory. The response function of the thermocouple is obtained as a function of frequency below 50 Hz through a comparison between the measured and reference temperatures.

  5. Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Field, Kevin G.

    High temperature oxidation resistant iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are candidate alloys for nuclear applications due to their exceptional performance during off-normal conditions such as a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) compared to currently deployed zirconium-based claddings [1]. A series of studies have been completed to determine the weldability of the FeCrAl alloy class and investigate the weldment performance in the as-received (non-irradiated) state [2,3]. These initial studies have shown the general effects of composition and microstructure on the weldability of FeCrAl alloys. Given this, limited details on the radiation tolerance of FeCrAl alloys and their weldments exist. Here, the highest priority candidate FeCrAlmore » alloys and their weldments have been investigated after irradiation to enable a better understanding of FeCrAl alloy weldment performance within a high-intensity neutron field. The alloys examined include C35M (Fe-13%Cr-5% Al) and variants with aluminum (+2%) or titanium carbide (+1%) additions. Two different sub-sized tensile geometries, SS-J type and SS-2E (or SS-mini), were neutron irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor to 1.8-1.9 displacements per atom (dpa) in the temperature range of 195°C to 559°C. Post irradiation examination of the candidate alloys was completed and included uniaxial tensile tests coupled with digital image correlation (DIC), scanning electron microscopy-electron back scattered diffraction analysis (SEM-EBSD), and SEM-based fractography. In addition to weldment testing, non-welded parent material was examined as a direct comparison between welded and non-welded specimen performance. Both welded and non-welded specimens showed a high degree of radiation-induced hardening near irradiation temperatures of 200°C, moderate radiation-induced hardening near temperatures of 360°C, and almost no radiation-induced hardening at elevated temperatures near 550°C. Additionally, low-temperature irradiations

  6. Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitor Processing Improvements. Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Troy Casey; Daw, Joshua Earl; Ahamad Al Rashdan

    2016-01-29

    Silicon carbide (SiC) temperature monitors are used as temperature sensors in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) irradiations at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Although thermocouples are typically used to provide real-time temperature indication in instrumented lead tests, other indicators, such as melt wires, are also often included in such tests as an independent technique of detecting peak temperatures incurred during irradiation. In addition, less expensive static capsule tests, which have no leads attached for real-time data transmission, often rely on melt wires as a post-irradiation technique for peak temperature indication. Melt wires are limited in that they can only detect whethermore » a single temperature is or is not exceeded. SiC monitors are advantageous because a single monitor can be used to detect for a range of temperatures that occurred during irradiation. As part of the process initiated to make SiC temperature monitors available at the ATR, post-irradiation evaluations of these monitors have been previously completed at the High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL selected the resistance measurement approach for determining irradiation temperature from SiC temperature monitors because it is considered to be the most accurate measurement. The current process involves the repeated annealing of the SiC monitors at incrementally increasing temperature, with resistivity measurements made between annealing steps. The process is time consuming and requires the nearly constant attention of a trained staff member. In addition to the expensive and lengthy post analysis required, the current process adds many potential sources of error in the measurement, as the sensor must be repeatedly moved from furnace to test fixture. This time-consuming post irradiation analysis is a significant portion of the total cost of using these otherwise inexpensive sensors. An additional consideration of this research is that, if the SiC post processing can be

  7. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  8. Traceable Measurements of Seebeck Coefficients of Thermoelectric Materials by Using Noble Metal Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, Sebastian; Edler, Frank

    2018-06-01

    The characterization of thermoelectric materials as reference materials for Seebeck coefficients at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is based on the usage of gold/platinum differential thermocouples. In the case of thermoelectric materials containing silicon, the gold/platinum thermocouples are insufficient due to reactions with the silicon when the samples are at higher temperatures. To overcome this limitation and to expand the temperature range for the certification process, platinum/palladium thermocouples were incorporated in the measurement setup. This paper discusses the influence of the different differential thermocouples used for the measurement of the Seebeck coefficients. Results of a comparative investigation of Seebeck coefficient measurements of a metallic and two semiconducting reference materials in the temperature range from 300 K to 870 K are presented.

  9. Automatic thermocouple positioner for use in vacuum furnaces

    DOEpatents

    Mee, D.K.; Stephens, A.E.

    1980-06-06

    The invention is a simple and reliable mechanical arrangement for automatically positioning a thermocouple-carrying rod in a vacuum-furnace assembly of the kind including a casing, a furnace mounted in the casing, and a charge-containing crucible mounted in the furnace for vertical movement between a lower (loading) position and a raised (charge-melting) position. In a preferred embodiment, a welded-diaphragm metal bellows is mounted above the furnace, the upper end of the bellows being fixed against movement and the lower end of the bellows being affixed to support means for a thermocouple-carrying rod which is vertically oriented and extends freely through the furnace lid toward the mouth of the crucible. The support means and rod are mounted for relative vertical movement. Before pumpdown of the furnace, the differential pressure acting on the bellows causes it to contract and lift the thermocouple rod to a position where it will not be contacted by the crucible charge when the crucible is elevated to its raised position. During pumpdown, the bellows expands downward, lowering the thermocouple rod and its support. The bellows expands downward beyond a point where downward movement of the thermocouple rod is arrested by contact with the crucible charge and to a point where the upper end of the thermocouple extends well above the thermocouple support. During subsequent melting of the charge, the thermocouple sinks into the melt to provide an accurate measurement of melt temperatures.

  10. Automatic thermocouple positioner for use in vacuum furnaces

    DOEpatents

    Mee, David K.; Stephens, Albert E.

    1981-01-01

    The invention is a simple and reliable mechanical arrangement for automatically positioning a thermocouple-carrying rod in a vacuum-furnace assembly of the kind including a casing, a furnace mounted in the casing, and a charge-containing crucible mounted in the furnace for vertical movement between a lower (loading) position and a raised (charge-melting) position. In a preferred embodiment, a welded-diaphragm metal bellows is mounted above the furnace, the upper end of the bellows being fixed against movement and the lower end of the bellows being affixed to support means for a thermocouple-carrying rod which is vertically oriented and extends freely through the furnace lid toward the mouth of the crucible. The support means and rod are mounted for relative vertical movement. Before pumpdown of the furnace, the differential pressure acting on the bellows causes it to contract and lift the thermocouple rod to a position where it will not be contacted by the crucible charge when the crucible is elevated to its raised position. During pumpdown, the bellows expands downward, lowering the thermocouple rod and its support. The bellows expands downward beyond a point where downward movement of the thermocouple rod is arrested by contact with the crucible charge and to a point where the upper end of the thermocouple extends well above the thermocouple support. During subsequent melting of the charge, the thermocouple sinks into the melt to provide an accurate measurement of melt temperatures.

  11. Measurement of heating coil temperature for e-cigarettes with a “top-coil” clearomizer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Ito, Kazuhide; Fowles, Jeff; Shusterman, Dennis; Jaques, Peter A.; Kumagai, Kazukiyo

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effect of applied power settings, coil wetness conditions, and e-liquid compositions on the coil heating temperature for e-cigarettes with a “top-coil” clearomizer, and to make associations of coil conditions with emission of toxic carbonyl compounds by combining results herein with the literature. Methods The coil temperature of a second generation e-cigarette was measured at various applied power levels, coil conditions, and e-liquid compositions, including (1) measurements by thermocouple at three e-liquid fill levels (dry, wet-through-wick, and full-wet), three coil resistances (low, standard, and high), and four voltage settings (3–6 V) for multiple coils using propylene glycol (PG) as a test liquid; (2) measurements by thermocouple at additional degrees of coil wetness for a high resistance coil using PG; and (3) measurements by both thermocouple and infrared (IR) camera for high resistance coils using PG alone and a 1:1 (wt/wt) mixture of PG and glycerol (PG/GL). Results For single point thermocouple measurements with PG, coil temperatures ranged from 322 ‒ 1008°C, 145 ‒ 334°C, and 110 ‒ 185°C under dry, wet-through-wick, and full-wet conditions, respectively, for the total of 13 replaceable coil heads. For conditions measured with both a thermocouple and an IR camera, all thermocouple measurements were between the minimum and maximum across-coil IR camera measurements and equal to 74% ‒ 115% of the across-coil mean, depending on test conditions. The IR camera showed details of the non-uniform temperature distribution across heating coils. The large temperature variations under wet-through-wick conditions may explain the large variations in formaldehyde formation rate reported in the literature for such “top-coil” clearomizers. Conclusions This study established a simple and straight-forward protocol to systematically measure e-cigarette coil heating temperature under dry, wet-through-wick, and full

  12. Seebeck Changes Due to Residual Cold-Work and Reversible Effects in Type K Bare-Wire Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, E. S.

    2017-09-01

    Type K thermocouples are the most commonly used thermocouple for industrial measurements because of their low cost, wide temperature range, and durability. As with all base-metal thermocouples, Type K is made to match a mathematical temperature-to-emf relationship and not a prescribed alloy formulation. Because different manufacturers use varying alloy formulations and manufacturing techniques, different Type K thermocouples exhibit a range of drift and hysteresis characteristics, largely due to ordering effects in the positive (K+) thermoelement. In this study, these effects are assessed in detail for temperatures below 700°C in the Type K wires from nine manufacturers. A linear gradient furnace and a high-resolution homogeneity scanner combined with the judicious use of annealing processes allow measurements that separately identify the effects of cold-work, ordering, and oxidation to be made. The results show most K+ alloys develop significant errors, but the magnitudes of the contributions of each process vary substantially between the different K+ wires. In practical applications, the measurement uncertainties achievable with Type K therefore depend not only on the wire formulation but also on the temperature, period of exposure, and, most importantly, the thermal treatments prior to use.

  13. Measuring nanowire thermal conductivity at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaomeng; Yang, Juekuan; Xiong, Yucheng; Huang, Baoling; Xu, Terry T.; Li, Deyu; Xu, Dongyan

    2018-02-01

    This work extends the micro-thermal-bridge method for thermal conductivity measurements of nanowires to high temperatures. The thermal-bridge method, based on a microfabricated device with two side-by-side suspended membranes with integrated platinum resistance heaters/thermometers, has been used to determine thermal conductivity of various nanowires/nanotubes/nanoribbons at relatively low temperatures. However, to date, thermal conductivity characterization of nanowires at temperatures above 600 K has seldom been reported presumably due to several technical difficulties including the instability of the microfabricated thermometers, radiation heat loss, and the effect of the background conductance on the measurement. Here we report on our attempt to address the aforementioned challenges and demonstrate thermal conductivity measurement of boron nanoribbons up to 740 K. To eliminate high temperature resistance instability, the device is first annealed at 1023 K for 5 min in an argon atmosphere. Two radiation shields are installed in the measurement chamber to minimize radiation heat loss from the measurement device to the surroundings; and the temperature of the device at each set point is calibrated by an additional thermocouple directly mounted on the chip carrier. The effect of the background conductance is eliminated by adopting a differential measurement scheme. With all these modifications, we successfully measured the thermal conductivity of boron nanoribbons over a wide temperature range from 27 K to 740 K. The measured thermal conductivity increases monotonically with temperature and reaches a plateau of ~2.5 W m-1 K-1 at approximately 400 K, with no clear signature of Umklapp scattering observed in the whole measurement temperature range.

  14. Precision rectifier detectors for ac resistance bridge measurements with application to temperature control systems for irradiation creep experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M. G.

    The suitability of several temperature measurement schemes for an irradiation creep experiment is examined. It is found that the specimen resistance can be used to measure and control the sample temperature if compensated for resistance drift due to radiation and annealing effects. A modified Kelvin bridge is presented that allows compensation for resistance drift by periodically checking the sample resistance at a controlled ambient temperature. A new phase-insensitive method for detecting the bridge error signals is presented. The phase-insensitive detector is formed by averaging the magnitude of two bridge voltages. Although this method is substantially less sensitive to stray reactancesmore » in the bridge than conventional phase-sensitive detectors, it is sensitive to gain stability and linearity of the rectifier circuits. Accuracy limitations of rectifier circuits are examined both theoretically and experimentally in great detail. Both hand analyses and computer simulations of rectifier errors are presented. Finally, the design of a temperature control system based on sample resistance measurement is presented. The prototype is shown to control a 316 stainless steel sample to within a 0.15/sup 0/C short term (10 sec) and a 0.03/sup 0/C long term (10 min) standard deviation at temperatures between 150 and 700/sup 0/C. The phase-insensitive detector typically contributes less than 10 ppM peak resistance measurement error (0.04/sup 0/C at 700/sup 0/C for 316 stainless steel or 0.005/sup 0/C at 150/sup 0/C for zirconium).« less

  15. PVD coating for optical applications on temperature-resistant thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munzert, Peter; Schulz, Ulrike; Kaiser, Norbert

    2004-02-01

    The performance of the high temperature resistant polymers Pleximid, APEC and Ultrason as substrate materials in plasma-assisted physical vapor deposition processes was studied and compared with well-known thermoplastics for optical applications. Different effects of UV irradiation and plasma exposure on the polymers' optical features, surface energy and adhesion properties for oxide layers, typically used for interference multilayer coatings, are shown.

  16. Fatigue crack propagation resistance of virgin and highly crosslinked, thermally treated ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Gencur, Sara J; Rimnac, Clare M; Kurtz, Steven M

    2006-03-01

    To prolong the life of total joint replacements, highly crosslinked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylenes (UHMWPEs) have been introduced to improve the wear resistance of the articulating surfaces. However, there are concerns regarding the loss of ductility and potential loss in fatigue crack propagation (FCP) resistance. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation-induced crosslinking with two different post-irradiation thermal treatments on the FCP resistance of UHMWPE. Two highly crosslinked and one virgin UHMWPE treatment groups (ram-extruded, orthopedic grade, GUR 1050) were examined. For the two highly crosslinked treatment groups, UHMWPE rods were exposed to 100 kGy and then underwent post-irradiation thermal processing either above the melt temperature or below the melt temperature (2 h-150 degrees C, 110 degrees C). Compact tension specimens were cyclically loaded to failure and the fatigue crack growth rate, da/dN, vs. cyclic stress intensity factor, DeltaK, behavior was determined and compared between groups. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine fracture surface characteristics. Crosslinking was found to decrease the ability of UHMWPE to resist crack inception and propagation under cyclic loading. The findings also suggested that annealing as a post-irradiation treatment may be somewhat less detrimental to FCP resistance of UHMWPE than remelting. Scanning electron microscopy examination of the fracture surfaces demonstrated that the virgin treatment group failed in a more ductile manner than the two highly crosslinked treatment groups.

  17. Improved performance characteristics of a high temperature superconductor bolometer using photo-thermoelectrical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaila, M. M.; Russell, G. J.

    2000-12-01

    We have designed a liquid nitrogen cooled detector where a thermoelectric feedback is combined with electrothermal feedback to produce an improvement of three orders of magnitude in the response time of the detector. We have achieved this by considering a parallel resistance combination of thermoelectric and High Temperature Superconductor (HTSC) material legs of an approximate geometry 1mm /spl times/ 2 mm /spl times/ 1micron operated at 80K. One end of this thermocouple acts as the sensitive area where the radiation is absorbed. The other end remains unexposed and stays basically at substrate temperature. It is found that micron thick films in our bolometer produce characteristics very close to those found for nanometer thick films required in semiconductor detectors and Low Temperature Superconductor (LTSC) bolometers.

  18. Numerical simulation of high-temperature thermal contact resistance and its reduction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Donghuan; Zhang, Jing

    2018-01-01

    High-temperature thermal contact resistance (TCR) plays an important role in heat-pipe-cooled thermal protection structures due to the existence of contact interface between the embedded heat pipe and the heat resistive structure, and the reduction mechanism of thermal contact resistance is of special interests in the design of such structures. The present paper proposed a finite element model of the high-temperature thermal contact resistance based on the multi-point contact model with the consideration of temperature-dependent material properties, heat radiation through the cavities at the interface and the effect of thermal interface material (TIM), and the geometry parameters of the finite element model are determined by simple surface roughness test and experimental data fitting. The experimental results of high-temperature thermal contact resistance between superalloy GH600 and C/C composite material are employed to validate the present finite element model. The effect of the crucial parameters on the thermal contact resistance with and without TIM are also investigated with the proposed finite element model.

  19. Numerical simulation of high-temperature thermal contact resistance and its reduction mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing

    2018-01-01

    High-temperature thermal contact resistance (TCR) plays an important role in heat-pipe-cooled thermal protection structures due to the existence of contact interface between the embedded heat pipe and the heat resistive structure, and the reduction mechanism of thermal contact resistance is of special interests in the design of such structures. The present paper proposed a finite element model of the high-temperature thermal contact resistance based on the multi-point contact model with the consideration of temperature-dependent material properties, heat radiation through the cavities at the interface and the effect of thermal interface material (TIM), and the geometry parameters of the finite element model are determined by simple surface roughness test and experimental data fitting. The experimental results of high-temperature thermal contact resistance between superalloy GH600 and C/C composite material are employed to validate the present finite element model. The effect of the crucial parameters on the thermal contact resistance with and without TIM are also investigated with the proposed finite element model. PMID:29547651

  20. Amorphization resistance of nano-engineered SiC under heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Kenta; Ishimaru, Manabu; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Shannon, Steven C.; Weber, William J.

    2016-09-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) with a high-density of planar defects (hereafter, 'nano-engineered SiC') and epitaxially-grown single-crystalline 3C-SiC were simultaneously irradiated with Au ions at room temperature, in order to compare their relative resistance to radiation-induced amorphization. It was found that the local threshold dose for amorphization is comparable for both samples under 2 MeV Au ion irradiation; whereas, nano-engineered SiC exhibits slightly greater radiation tolerance than single crystalline SiC under 10 MeV Au irradiation. Under 10 MeV Au ion irradiation, the dose for amorphization increased by about a factor of two in both nano-engineered and single crystal SiC due to the local increase in electronic energy loss that enhanced dynamic recovery.

  1. Amorphization resistance of nano-engineered SiC under heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, Kenta; Ishimaru, Manabu; Xue, Haizhou

    Silicon carbide (SiC) with a high-density of planar defects (hereafter, ‘nano-engineered SiC’) and epitaxially-grown single-crystalline 3C-SiC were simultaneously irradiated with Au ions at room temperature, in order to compare their relative resistance to radiation-induced amorphization. Furthermore, it was found that the local threshold dose for amorphization is comparable for both samples under 2 MeV Au ion irradiation; whereas, nano-engineered SiC exhibits slightly greater radiation tolerance than single crystalline SiC under 10 MeV Au irradiation. Under 10 MeV Au ion irradiation, the dose for amorphization increased by about a factor of two in both nano-engineered and single crystal SiC due tomore » the local increase in electronic energy loss that enhanced dynamic recovery.« less

  2. Amorphization resistance of nano-engineered SiC under heavy ion irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Imada, Kenta; Ishimaru, Manabu; Xue, Haizhou; ...

    2016-06-19

    Silicon carbide (SiC) with a high-density of planar defects (hereafter, ‘nano-engineered SiC’) and epitaxially-grown single-crystalline 3C-SiC were simultaneously irradiated with Au ions at room temperature, in order to compare their relative resistance to radiation-induced amorphization. Furthermore, it was found that the local threshold dose for amorphization is comparable for both samples under 2 MeV Au ion irradiation; whereas, nano-engineered SiC exhibits slightly greater radiation tolerance than single crystalline SiC under 10 MeV Au irradiation. Under 10 MeV Au ion irradiation, the dose for amorphization increased by about a factor of two in both nano-engineered and single crystal SiC due tomore » the local increase in electronic energy loss that enhanced dynamic recovery.« less

  3. Simple method for measuring vibration amplitude of high power airborne ultrasonic transducer: using thermo-couple.

    PubMed

    Saffar, Saber; Abdullah, Amir

    2014-03-01

    Vibration amplitude of transducer's elements is the influential parameters in the performance of high power airborne ultrasonic transducers to control the optimum vibration without material yielding. The vibration amplitude of elements of provided high power airborne transducer was determined by measuring temperature of the provided high power airborne transducer transducer's elements. The results showed that simple thermocouples can be used both to measure the vibration amplitude of transducer's element and an indicator to power transmission to the air. To verify our approach, the power transmission to the air has been investigated by other common method experimentally. The experimental results displayed good agreement with presented approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Thermocouple and infrared sensor-based measurement of temperature distribution in metal cutting.

    PubMed

    Kus, Abdil; Isik, Yahya; Cakir, M Cemal; Coşkun, Salih; Özdemir, Kadir

    2015-01-12

    In metal cutting, the magnitude of the temperature at the tool-chip interface is a function of the cutting parameters. This temperature directly affects production; therefore, increased research on the role of cutting temperatures can lead to improved machining operations. In this study, tool temperature was estimated by simultaneous temperature measurement employing both a K-type thermocouple and an infrared radiation (IR) pyrometer to measure the tool-chip interface temperature. Due to the complexity of the machining processes, the integration of different measuring techniques was necessary in order to obtain consistent temperature data. The thermal analysis results were compared via the ANSYS finite element method. Experiments were carried out in dry machining using workpiece material of AISI 4140 alloy steel that was heat treated by an induction process to a hardness of 50 HRC. A PVD TiAlN-TiN-coated WNVG 080404-IC907 carbide insert was used during the turning process. The results showed that with increasing cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut, the tool temperature increased; the cutting speed was found to be the most effective parameter in assessing the temperature rise. The heat distribution of the cutting tool, tool-chip interface and workpiece provided effective and useful data for the optimization of selected cutting parameters during orthogonal machining.

  5. In situ field measurement of leaf water potential using thermocouple psychrometers.

    PubMed

    Savage, M J; Wiebe, H H; Cass, A

    1983-11-01

    Thermocouple psychrometers are the only instruments which can measure the in situ water potential of intact leaves, and which can possibly be used to monitor leaf water potential. Unfortunately, their usefulness is limited by a number of difficulties, among them fluctuating temperatures and temperature gradients within the psychrometer, sealing of the psychrometer chamber to the leaf, shading of the leaf by the psychrometer, and resistance to water vapor diffusion by the cuticle when the stomates are closed. Using Citrus jambhiri, we have tested several psychrometer design and operational modifications and showed that in situ psychrometric measurements compared favorably with simultaneous Scholander pressure chamber measurements on neighboring leaves when the latter were corrected for the osmotic potential.

  6. Irradiation response of commercial, high-Tc superconducting tapes: Electromagnetic transport properties

    DOE PAGES

    Gapud, A. A.; Greenwood, N. T.; Alexander, J. A.; ...

    2015-07-01

    Effects of low dose irradiation on the electrical transport current properties of commercially available high-temperature superconducting, coated-conductor tapes were investigated, in view of potential applications in the irradiative environment of fusion reactors. Three different tapes, each with unique as-grown flux-pinning structures, were irradiated with Au and Ni ions at energies that provide a range of damage effects, with accumulated damage levels near that expected for conductors in a fusion reactor environment. Measurements using transport current determined the pre- and post-irradiation resistivity, critical current density, and pinning force density, yielding critical temperatures, irreversibility lines, and inferred vortex creep rates. Results showmore » that at the irradiation damage levels tested, any detriment to as-grown pre-irradiation properties is modest; indeed in one case already-superior pinning forces are enhanced, leading to higher critical currents.« less

  7. The Effect of High Pressure - High Temperature Treatment on Neutron Irradiation Induced Defects in Czochralski Silicon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    Spectra by the 830cm’ Localized Vibrational Mode (LVM) band. Upon annealing , this defect is converted to the V0 2 defect responsible for a LVM band at...887cmŕ. The purpose of this work is to study the effect of various combinations of HTHP treatment prior to irradiation on the annealing behaviour of...and stacking faults. Keywords: high temperature - high pressure treatments, annealing , neutron irradiation. 1. INTRODUCTION Oxygen is one of the two

  8. Magnetic tunnel junction thermocouple for thermoelectric power harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhnert, T.; Paz, E.; Ferreira, R.; Freitas, P. P.

    2018-05-01

    The thermoelectric power generated in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is determined as a function of the tunnel barrier thickness for a matched electric circuit. This study suggests that lower resistance area product and higher tunnel magnetoresistance will maximize the thermoelectric power output of the MTJ structures. Further, the thermoelectric behavior of a series of two MTJs, a MTJ thermocouple, is investigated as a function of its magnetic configurations. In an alternating magnetic configurations the thermovoltages cancel each other, while the magnetic contribution remains. A large array of MTJ thermocouples could amplify the magnetic thermovoltage signal significantly.

  9. New Oxide Ceramic Developed for Superior High-Temperature Wear Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Farmer, Serene C.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramics, for the most part, do not have inherently good tribological properties. For example friction coefficients in excess of 0.7 have been reported for silicon nitride sliding on silicon nitride or on bearing steel (ref. 1). High friction is always accompanied by considerable wear. Despite their inherently poor tribological properties, the high strength and high toughness of silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramics has led to their successful use in tribological applications (refs. 1 to 4). The upper temperature limit for the application of Si3N4 as wear-resistant material is limited by reaction with the tribological environment (ref. 3). Silicon nitride is known to produce a thin silicon dioxide film with easy shear capability that results in low friction and low wear in a moist environment (ref. 5). At elevated temperatures, the removal of the reaction product that acts as lubricant causes the friction coefficient to increase and, consequently, the wear performance to become poor. New materials are sought that will have wear resistance superior to that of Si3N4 at elevated temperatures and in harsh environments. A new class of oxide ceramic materials has been developed with potential for excellent high-temperature wear resistance. The new material consists of a multicomponent oxide with a two-phase microstructure, in which the wear resistance of the mixed oxide is significantly higher than that of the individual constituents. This is attributed to the strong constraining effects provided by the interlocking microstructures at different length scales, to the large aspect ratio of the phases, to the strong interphase bonding, and to the residual stresses. Fretting wear tests were conducted by rubbing the new ceramic material against boron carbide (B4C). The new ceramic material produced a wear track groove on B4C, suggesting significantly higher wear resistance for the oxide ceramic. The new material did not suffer from any microstructural degradation after the wear

  10. The Effect of Grain Size on the Radiation Response of Silicon Carbide and its Dependence on Irradiation Species and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, Laura

    In recent years the push for green energy sources has intensified, and as part of that effort accident tolerant and more efficient nuclear reactors have been designed. These reactors demand exceptional material performance, as they call for higher temperatures and doses. Silicon carbide (SiC) is a strong candidate material for many of these designs due to its low neutron cross-section, chemical stability, and high temperature resistance. The possibility of improving the radiation resistance of SiC by reducing the grain size (thus increasing the sink density) is explored in this work. In-situ electron irradiation and Kr ion irradiation was utilized to explore the radiation resistance of nanocrystalline SiC (nc-SiC), SiC nanopowders, and microcrystalline SiC. Electron irradiation simplifies the experimental results, as only isolated Frenkel pairs are produced so any observed differences are simply due to point defect interactions with the original microstructure. Kr ion irradiation simulates neutron damage, as large radiation cascades with a high concentration of point defects are produced. Kr irradiation studies found that radiation resistance decreased with particle size reduction and grain refinement (comparing nc-SiC and microcrystalline SiC). This suggests that an interface-dependent amorphization mechanism is active in SiC, suggested to be interstitial starvation. However, under electron irradiation it was found that nc-SiC had improved radiation resistance compared to single crystal SiC. This was found to be due to several factors including increased sink density and strength and the presence of stacking faults. The stacking faults were found to improve radiation response by lowering critical energy barriers. The change in radiation response between the electron and Kr ion irradiations is hypothesized to be due to either the change in ion type (potential change in amorphization mechanism) or a change in temperature (at the higher temperatures of the Kr ion

  11. HIGH-TEMPERATURE SAFETY TESTING OF IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Stempien, John D.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Reber, Edward L.

    High-Temperature Safety Testing of Irradiated AGR-1 TRISO Fuel John D. Stempien, Paul A. Demkowicz, Edward L. Reber, and Cad L. Christensen Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA Corresponding Author: john.stempien@inl.gov, +1-208-526-8410 Two new safety tests of irradiated tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel have been completed in the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). In the first test, three fuel compacts from the first Advanced Gas Reactor irradiation experiment (AGR-1) were simultaneously heated in the FACS furnace. Prior to safety testing, each compact was irradiated in the Advanced Testmore » Reactor to a burnup of approximately 15 % fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA), a fast fluence of 3×1025 n/m2 (E > 0.18 MeV), and a time-average volume-average (TAVA) irradiation temperature of about 1020 °C. In order to simulate a core-conduction cool-down event, a temperature-versus-time profile having a peak temperature of 1700 °C was programmed into the FACS furnace controllers. Gaseous fission products (i.e., Kr-85) were carried to the Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) by a helium sweep gas and captured in cold traps featuring online gamma counting. By the end of the test, a total of 3.9% of an average particle’s inventory of Kr-85 was detected in the FGMS traps. Such a low Kr-85 activity indicates that no TRISO failures (failure of all three TRISO layers) occurred during the test. If released from the compacts, condensable fission products (e.g., Ag-110m, Cs-134, Cs-137, Eu-154, Eu-155, and Sr-90) were collected on condensation plates fitted to the end of the cold finger in the FACS furnace. These condensation plates were then analyzed for fission products. In the second test, five loose UCO fuel kernels, obtained from deconsolidated particles from an irradiated AGR-1 compact, were heated in the FACS furnace to a peak temperature of 1600 °C. This test

  12. Multiwire Thermocouples in Reversing Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements are recorded for multiwire thermocouples consisting of either two or three wires of unequal diameters. Signals from the multiwire probe are recorded for a reversing gas flow with both a periodic temperature and time constant fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the multiwire thermocouple requires no compensation provided omega/omega(sub 1) less than 2.3 for two wires or omega/omega(sub 1) less than 3.6 for three wires where omega(sub 1) (= 2(pi)f) is the natural frequency of the smaller wire based on the maximum gas velocity. The latter results were possible provided Fourier transformed data from the wires were used and knowledge of the gas velocity phase angle was available.

  13. Semicircular thermocouple needle depth gauge for cryoprocedures.

    PubMed

    Pappenfort, R B

    1981-06-01

    A semicircular thermocouple needle depth gauge made of an aluminum alloy drilled with tracks at different angles to place thermocouple needles at various depths below the surface is described herein. Its shape offers definite advantages over circular jigs (templates) when doing cryoexperimentation and when used clinically. The material of which it is made is more durable than plastic. Grommets that firmly snap in place within the inner rim of the instrument permit accurate placement of liquid gas spray, cryoprobes, and other applicators directly over the thermocouple needle tips. This is of special importance when doing cryoexperiments. Furthermore, with this design, the advancing ice front and possible liquid gas runoff are more easily seen. By using both halves it is suitable for monitoring the temperature when freezing large tumors at two different sites and a different depths.

  14. Thermocouples--The Most Widely Used Temperature Sensor in Manufacturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    Researchers predict that future developments in nanotechnology will bring incredible, almost inconceivable, change to the manufacturing industry. For now, though, one of technology's most trusted tools remains very relevant: In the field of thermometry, thermocouples are a tried and true technology. As a consequence, material on thermocouples…

  15. Home-made temperature monitoring system from four-channel K-type thermocouples via internet of thing technology platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detmod, Thitaporn; Özmen, Yiǧiter; Songkaitiwong, Kittiphot; Saenyot, Khanuengchat; Locharoenrat, Kitsakorn; Lekchaum, Sarai

    2018-06-01

    This paper is aimed to design and construct the home-made temperature monitoring system from four-channel K-type thermocouples in order to improve the temperature measurement based on standard evaluation measurements guidance. The temperature monitoring system was capable to record the temperature on SD card and to display the realtime temperature on Internet of Thing Technology platform. The temperature monitoring system was tested in terms of the temperature measurement accuracy and delay response time. It was found that a standard deviation was acceptable as compared to the Instrument Society of America. The response time of the microcontroller to SD card was 2 sec faster than that of the microcontroller to Thingspeak.

  16. Frequency response in short thermocouple wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Meeks, E. L.; Ma, J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical expressions are derived for the steady state frequency response of a thermocouple wire. In particular, the effects of axial heat conduction are demonstrated for a nonuniform wire with unequal material properties and wire diameters across the junction. The amplitude ratio at low frequency omega approaches 0 agrees with the results of Scadron and Warshawsky (1952) for a steady state temperature distribution. Moreover, the frequency response for a nonuniform wire in the limit of infinite length l approaches infinity is shown to reduce to a simple expression that is analogous to the classic first order solution for a thermocouple wire with uniform properties. Theoretical expressions are also derived for the steady state frequency response of a supported thermocouple wire. In particular, the effects of axial heat conduction are demonstrated for both a supported one material wire and a two material wire with unequal material properties across the junction. For the case of a one material supported wire, an exact solution is derived which compares favorably with an approximate expression that only matches temperatures at the support junction. Moreover, for the case of a two material supported wire, an analytical expression is derived that closely correlates numerical results. Experimental measurements are made for the steady state frequency response of a supported thermocouple wire. In particular, the effects of axial heat conduction are demonstrated for both a supported one material wire (type K) and a two material wire (type T) with unequal material properties across the junction. The data for the amplitude ratio and phase angle are correlated to within 10 pct. with the theoretical predictions of Forney and Fralick (1991). This is accomplished by choosing a natural frequency omega sub n for the wire data to correlate the first order response at large gas temperature frequencies. It is found that a large bead size, however, will increase the amplitude ratio at

  17. Traceable Co-C eutectic points for thermocouple calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Jahan, F.; Ballico, M. J.

    2013-09-11

    National Measurement Institute of Australia (NMIA) has developed a miniature crucible design suitable for measurement by both thermocouples and radiation thermometry, and has established an ensemble of five Co-C eutectic-point cells based on this design. The cells in this ensemble have been individually calibrated using both ITS-90 radiation thermometry and thermocouples calibrated on the ITS-90 by the NMIA mini-coil methodology. The assigned ITS-90 temperatures obtained using these different techniques are both repeatable and consistent, despite the use of different furnaces and measurement conditions. The results demonstrate that, if individually calibrated, such cells can be practically used as part of amore » national traceability scheme for thermocouple calibration, providing a useful intermediate calibration point between Cu and Pd.« less

  18. Performance and Durability of Thin Film Thermocouple Array on a Porous Electrode.

    PubMed

    Guk, Erdogan; Ranaweera, Manoj; Venkatesan, Vijay; Kim, Jung-Sik

    2016-08-23

    Management of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) thermal gradients is vital to limit thermal expansion mismatch and thermal stress. However, owing to harsh operation conditions of SOFCs and limited available space in stack configuration, the number of techniques available to obtain temperature distribution from the cell surface is limited. The authors previously developed and studied a thermocouple array pattern to detect surface temperature distribution on an SOFC in open circuit conditions. In this study, the performance in terms of mechanical durability and oxidation state of the thin film thermoelements of the thermocouple array on the porous SOFC cathode is investigated. A thin-film multi-junction thermocouple array was sputter deposited using a magnetron sputter coater. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterisation techniques were carried out to understand characteristics of the thin film before and after temperature (20 °C-800 °C) measurement. Temperature readings from the sensor agreed well with the closely placed commercial thermocouple during heating segments. However, a sensor failure occurred at around 350 °C during the cooling segment. The SEM and XPS tests revealed cracks on the thin film thermoelements and oxidation to the film thickness direction.

  19. Performance and Durability of Thin Film Thermocouple Array on a Porous Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Guk, Erdogan; Ranaweera, Manoj; Venkatesan, Vijay; Kim, Jung-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Management of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) thermal gradients is vital to limit thermal expansion mismatch and thermal stress. However, owing to harsh operation conditions of SOFCs and limited available space in stack configuration, the number of techniques available to obtain temperature distribution from the cell surface is limited. The authors previously developed and studied a thermocouple array pattern to detect surface temperature distribution on an SOFC in open circuit conditions. In this study, the performance in terms of mechanical durability and oxidation state of the thin film thermoelements of the thermocouple array on the porous SOFC cathode is investigated. A thin-film multi-junction thermocouple array was sputter deposited using a magnetron sputter coater. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterisation techniques were carried out to understand characteristics of the thin film before and after temperature (20 °C–800 °C) measurement. Temperature readings from the sensor agreed well with the closely placed commercial thermocouple during heating segments. However, a sensor failure occurred at around 350 °C during the cooling segment. The SEM and XPS tests revealed cracks on the thin film thermoelements and oxidation to the film thickness direction. PMID:27563893

  20. Hardness of AISI type 410 martensitic steels after high temperature irradiation via nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waseem, Owais Ahmed; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Park, Byong-Guk; Maeng, Cheol-Soo; Lee, Myoung-Goo; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2017-11-01

    The hardness of irradiated AISI type 410 martensitic steel, which is utilized in structural and magnetic components of nuclear power plants, is investigated in this study. Proton irradiation of AISI type 410 martensitic steel samples was carried out by exposing the samples to 3 MeV protons up to a 1.0 × 1017 p/cm2 fluence level at a representative nuclear reactor coolant temperature of 350 °C. The assessment of deleterious effects of irradiation on the micro-structure and mechanical behavior of the AISI type 410 martensitic steel samples via transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy and cross-sectional nano-indentation showed no significant variation in the microscopic or mechanical characteristics. These results ensure the integrity of the structural and magnetic components of nuclear reactors made of AISI type 410 martensitic steel under high-temperature irradiation damage levels up to approximately 5.2 × 10-3 dpa.

  1. Thermocouples for forest fire research

    Treesearch

    Erwin H. Breuer

    1965-01-01

    Thermocouples have proved valuable in research conducted by the Fire Physics Project at the Northern Forest Fire Laboratory because they can measure several important fire variables besides flame and convection column temperatures. These include rate of spread and flame residence time. Describes a simple, rapid method of fabrication and reports useful and diverse...

  2. Investigation of factors affecting the heater wire method of calibrating fine wire thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshock, E. G.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical investigation was made of a transient method of calibrating fine wire thermocouples. The system consisted of a 10 mil diameter standard thermocouple (Pt, Pt-13% Rh) and an 0.8 mil diameter chromel-alumel thermocouple attached to a 20 mil diameter electrically heated platinum wire. The calibration procedure consisted of electrically heating the wire to approximately 2500 F within about a seven-second period in an environment approximating atmospheric conditions at 120,000 feet. Rapid periodic readout of the standard and fine wire thermocouple signals permitted a comparison of the two temperature indications. An analysis was performed which indicated that the temperature distortion at the heater wire produced by the thermocouple junctions appears to be of negligible magnitude. Consequently, the calibration technique appears to be basically sound, although several practical changes which appear desirable are presented and discussed. Additional investigation is warranted to evaluate radiation effects and transient response characteristics.

  3. High level gamma radiation effects on Cernox™ cryogenic temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, S. S.

    2017-12-01

    Cryogenic temperature sensors are used in high energy particle colliders to monitor the temperatures of superconducting magnets, superconducting RF cavities, and cryogen infrastructure. While not intentional, these components are irradiated by leakage radiation during operation of the collider. A common type of cryogenic thermometer used in these applications is the Cernox™ resistance thermometer (CxRT) manufactured by Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. This work examines the radiation-induced calibration offsets on CxRT models CX-1050-SD-HT and CX-1080-SD-HT resulting from exposure to very high levels of gamma radiation. Samples from two different wafers of each of the two models tested were subjected to a gamma radiation dose ranging from 10 kGy to 5 MGy. Data were analysed in terms of the temperature-equivalent resistance change between pre- and post-irradiation calibrations. The data show that the resistance of these devices decreased following irradiation resulting in positive temperature offsets across the 1.4 K to 330 K temperature range. Variations in response were observed between wafers of the same CxRT model. Overall, the offsets increased with increasing temperature and increasing gamma radiation dose. At 1.8 K, the average offset increased from 0 mK to +13 mK as total dose increased from 10 kGy to 5 MGy. At 4.2 K, the average offset increased from +4 mK to +33 mK as total dose increased from 10 kGy to 5 MGy. Equivalent temperature offset data are presented over the 1.4 K to 330 K temperature range by CxRT model, wafer, and total gamma dose.

  4. Thermocouple and Infrared Sensor-Based Measurement of Temperature Distribution in Metal Cutting

    PubMed Central

    Kus, Abdil; Isik, Yahya; Cakir, M. Cemal; Coşkun, Salih; Özdemir, Kadir

    2015-01-01

    In metal cutting, the magnitude of the temperature at the tool-chip interface is a function of the cutting parameters. This temperature directly affects production; therefore, increased research on the role of cutting temperatures can lead to improved machining operations. In this study, tool temperature was estimated by simultaneous temperature measurement employing both a K-type thermocouple and an infrared radiation (IR) pyrometer to measure the tool-chip interface temperature. Due to the complexity of the machining processes, the integration of different measuring techniques was necessary in order to obtain consistent temperature data. The thermal analysis results were compared via the ANSYS finite element method. Experiments were carried out in dry machining using workpiece material of AISI 4140 alloy steel that was heat treated by an induction process to a hardness of 50 HRC. A PVD TiAlN-TiN-coated WNVG 080404-IC907 carbide insert was used during the turning process. The results showed that with increasing cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut, the tool temperature increased; the cutting speed was found to be the most effective parameter in assessing the temperature rise. The heat distribution of the cutting tool, tool-chip interface and workpiece provided effective and useful data for the optimization of selected cutting parameters during orthogonal machining. PMID:25587976

  5. An extremely simple thermocouple made of a single layer of metal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haixiao; Sun, Weiqiang; Xu, Shengyong

    2012-06-26

    A novel temperature sensor consisting of a single layer of metal (Ni, Pd, W, or Pt) is constructed. Its configuration challenges a long-established concept and may lead to development of a new category of devices. Reliable two-dimensional mapping of local temperatures is demonstrated using an array of these sensors. These single-metal thermocouples (SMTCs) can be readily applied on flexible substrates or at high temperatures. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Dependence of defect introduction on temperature and resistivity and some long-term annealing effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucker, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    The effort reported here represents data of lithium properties in bulk-silicon samples before and after irradiation for analytical information required to characterize the interactions of lithium with radiation-induced defects in silicon. A model of the damage and recovery mechanisms in irradiated-lithium-containing solar cells is developed based on making measurements of the Hall coefficient and resistivity of samples irradiated by 1-MeV electrons. Experiments on bulk samples included Hall coefficient and resistivity measurements taken as a function of: (1) bombardment temperature, (2) resistivity, (3) fluence, (4) oxygen concentration, and (5) annealing time at temperatures from 300 to 373 K.

  7. In Situ Field Measurement of Leaf Water Potential Using Thermocouple Psychrometers 1

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Michael J.; Wiebe, Herman H.; Cass, Alfred

    1983-01-01

    Thermocouple psychrometers are the only instruments which can measure the in situ water potential of intact leaves, and which can possibly be used to monitor leaf water potential. Unfortunately, their usefulness is limited by a number of difficulties, among them fluctuating temperatures and temperature gradients within the psychrometer, sealing of the psychrometer chamber to the leaf, shading of the leaf by the psychrometer, and resistance to water vapor diffusion by the cuticle when the stomates are closed. Using Citrus jambhiri, we have tested several psychrometer design and operational modifications and showed that in situ psychrometric measurements compared favorably with simultaneous Scholander pressure chamber measurements on neighboring leaves when the latter were corrected for the osmotic potential. PMID:16663267

  8. High-temperature long-lasting stability assessment of a single-crystal diamond detector under high-flux neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilotti, R.; Angelone, M.; Marinelli, M.; Milani, E.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Verona, C.; Prestopino, G.; Montereali, R. M.; Vincenti, M. A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Scherillo, A.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2016-11-01

    An innovative diamond detector layout is presented that is designed to operate at high temperature under intense neutron and gamma fluxes. It is made of a 500 μm “electronic grade” diamond film with 100 nm thick Ag metal contacts deposited onto each surface of the film by means of thermal evaporation. A 2 μ \\text{m} thick layer of 6LiF has been deposited on top of one of the two Ag contacts to make the detector sensitive to thermal neutrons. The device was tested at the ISIS spallation neutron source (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK) using the INES beam line. The detector was continuously irradiated for 100 hours in vacuum (p = 10-5 \\text{mbar}) , exposed to a neutron flux of about 106 n cm-2 s-1 at a temperature T =150 ^\\circ \\text{C} . The aim of this experiment was to study the time dependence of the diamond detector performance while operating at high temperature under irradiation, providing a first experimental proof of reliable continuous operation for 100 hours at high temperature in a harsh environment.

  9. Diamond structure recovery during ion irradiation at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deslandes, Alec; Guenette, Mathew C.; Belay, Kidane; Elliman, Robert G.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Thomsen, Lars; Riley, Daniel P.; Lumpkin, Gregory R.

    2015-12-01

    CVD diamond is irradiated by 5 MeV carbon ions, with each sample held at a different temperature (300-873 K) during irradiations. The defect structures resulting from the irradiations are evident as vacancy, interstitial and amorphous carbon signals in Raman spectra. The observed variation of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) and peak position of the diamond peak suggests that disorder in the diamond lattice is reduced for high temperature irradiations. The dumbbell interstitial signal is reduced for irradiations at 873 K, which suggests this defect is unstable at these temperatures and that interstitials have migrated to crystal surfaces. Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy results indicate that damage to the diamond structure at the surface has occurred for room temperature irradiations, however, this structure is at least partially recovered for irradiations performed at 473 K and above. The results suggest that, in a high temperature irradiation environment such as a nuclear fusion device, in situ annealing of radiation-created defects can maintain the diamond structure and prolong the lifetime of diamond components.

  10. Effect of irradiation temperature on microstructural changes in self-ion irradiated austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Ko, Eunsol; Lim, Sangyeob; Kwon, Junhyun; Shin, Chansun

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the microstructural and hardness changes in austenitic stainless steel after Fe ion irradiation at 400, 300, and 200 °C using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nanoindentation. The size of the Frank loops increased and the density decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) was detected across high-angle grain boundaries, and the degree of RIS increases with increasing irradiation temperature. Ni-Si clusters were observed using high-resolution TEM in the sample irradiated at 400 °C. The results of this work are compared with the literature data of self-ion and proton irradiation at comparable temperatures and damage levels on stainless steels with a similar material composition with this study. Despite the differences in dose rate, alloy composition and incident ion energy, the irradiation temperature dependence of RIS and the size and density of radiation defects followed the same trends, and were very comparable in magnitude.

  11. Grafting of styrene into pre-irradiated fluoropolymer films: Influence of base material and irradiation temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappan, Uwe; Geißler, Uwe; Gohs, Uwe; Uhlmann, Steffi

    2010-10-01

    In this study, the influence of irradiation temperature on mechanical properties of three fluoropolymers and on grafting of styrene into the polymers by the pre-irradiation method was investigated. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the irradiated polymers regarding trapped radical species and changes in the chemical structure, respectively. For poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoropropyl vinyl ether) (PFA) the irradiation temperature was found to be an important factor for tensile strength and elongation at break of the pre-irradiated film. No strong effect of irradiation temperature on the mechanical properties was noticed for poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-ethylene) (ETFE); however the yield of grafting drops at high irradiation temperatures. Finally, mechanical properties of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) were found to be dramatically altered, even if the film was irradiated at elevated temperature.

  12. Experimental system for in-situ measurement of temperature rise in animal tissue under exposure to acoustic radiation force impulse.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Naotaka; Ishiguro, Yasunao; Sasanuma, Hideki; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki; Akiyama, Iwaki

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) has recently been used for tissue elasticity measurement and imaging. On the other hand, it is predicted that a rise in temperature occurs. In-situ measurement of temperature rise in animal experiments is important, yet measurement using thermocouples has some problems such as position mismatch of the temperature measuring junction of the thermocouple and the focal point of ultrasound. Therefore, an in-situ measurement system for solving the above problems was developed in this study. The developed system is composed mainly of an ultrasound irradiation unit including a custom-made focused transducer with a through hole for inserting a thin-wire thermocouple, and a temperature measurement unit including the thermocouple. The feasibility of the developed system was evaluated by means of experiments using a tissue-mimicking material (TMM), a TMM containing a bone model or a chicken bone, and an extracted porcine liver. The similarity between the experimental results and the results of simulation using a finite element method (FEM) implied the reasonableness of in-situ temperature rise measured by the developed system. The developed system will become a useful tool for measuring in-situ temperature rise in animal experiments and obtaining findings with respect to the relationship between ultrasound irradiation conditions and in-situ temperature rise.

  13. Thermocouple Calibration and Accuracy in a Materials Testing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, B. A.; Nathal, M. V.; Keller, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    A consolidation of information has been provided that can be used to define procedures for enhancing and maintaining accuracy in temperature measurements in materials testing laboratories. These studies were restricted to type R and K thermocouples (TCs) tested in air. Thermocouple accuracies, as influenced by calibration methods, thermocouple stability, and manufacturer's tolerances were all quantified in terms of statistical confidence intervals. By calibrating specific TCs the benefits in accuracy can be as great as 6 C or 5X better compared to relying on manufacturer's tolerances. The results emphasize strict reliance on the defined testing protocol and on the need to establish recalibration frequencies in order to maintain these levels of accuracy.

  14. Temperature distribution in target tumor tissue and photothermal tissue destruction during laser immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Austin; Hasanjee, Aamr; Pettitt, Alex; Silk, Kegan; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.; Zhou, Feifan

    2016-03-01

    Laser Immunotherapy is a novel cancer treatment modality that has seen much success in treating many different types of cancer, both in animal studies and in clinical trials. The treatment consists of the synergistic interaction between photothermal laser irradiation and the local injection of an immunoadjuvant. As a result of the therapy, the host immune system launches a systemic antitumor response. The photothermal effect induced by the laser irradiation has multiple effects at different temperature elevations which are all required for optimal response. Therefore, determining the temperature distribution in the target tumor during the laser irradiation in laser immunotherapy is crucial to facilitate the treatment of cancers. To investigate the temperature distribution in the target tumor, female Wistar Furth rats were injected with metastatic mammary tumor cells and, upon sufficient tumor growth, underwent laser irradiation and were monitored using thermocouples connected to locally-inserted needle probes and infrared thermography. From the study, we determined that the maximum central tumor temperature was higher for tumors of less volume. Additionally, we determined that the temperature near the edge of the tumor as measured with a thermocouple had a strong correlation with the maximum temperature value in the infrared camera measurement.

  15. AGR-1 Thermocouple Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Einerson

    2012-05-01

    This report documents an effort to analyze measured and simulated data obtained in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel irradiation test program conducted in the INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) R&D program. The work follows up on a previous study (Pham and Einerson, 2010), in which statistical analysis methods were applied for AGR-1 thermocouple data qualification. The present work exercises the idea that, while recognizing uncertainties inherent in physics and thermal simulations of the AGR-1 test, results of the numerical simulations can be used in combination with the statistical analysis methods tomore » further improve qualification of measured data. Additionally, the combined analysis of measured and simulation data can generate insights about simulation model uncertainty that can be useful for model improvement. This report also describes an experimental control procedure to maintain fuel target temperature in the future AGR tests using regression relationships that include simulation results. The report is organized into four chapters. Chapter 1 introduces the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification program, AGR-1 test configuration and test procedure, overview of AGR-1 measured data, and overview of physics and thermal simulation, including modeling assumptions and uncertainties. A brief summary of statistical analysis methods developed in (Pham and Einerson 2010) for AGR-1 measured data qualification within NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) is also included for completeness. Chapters 2-3 describe and discuss cases, in which the combined use of experimental and simulation data is realized. A set of issues associated with measurement and modeling uncertainties resulted from the combined analysis are identified. This includes demonstration that such a combined analysis led to important insights for reducing uncertainty in presentation of AGR-1 measured data (Chapter 2) and interpretation of

  16. High Strength and Wear Resistant Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a new high strength and wear resistant aluminum cast alloy invented by NASA-MSFC for high temperature applications will be presented. Developed to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low-exhaust emission, the novel NASA 398 aluminum-silicon alloy offers dramatic improvement in tensile and fatigue strengths at elevated temperatures (500 F-800 F), enabling new pistons to utilize less material, which can lead to reducing part weight and cost as well as improving performance. NASA 398 alloy also offers greater wear resistance, surface hardness, dimensional stability, and lower thermal expansion compared to conventional aluminum alloys for several commercial and automotive applications. The new alloy can be produced economically using permanent steel molds from conventional gravity casting or sand casting. The technology was developed to stimulate the development of commercial aluminum casting products from NASA-developed technology by offering companies the opportunity to license this technology.

  17. Nitrogen Can Alleviate the Inhibition of Photosynthesis Caused by High Temperature Stress under Both Steady-State and Flecked Irradiance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guanjun; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Wei, Xinghai; Peng, Shaobing; Li, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen is one of the most important elements for plants and is closely related to photosynthesis. High temperature stress significantly inhibits photosynthesis under both steady-state and flecked irradiance. However, it is not known whether nitrogen can affect the decrease in photosynthesis caused by high temperature, especially under flecked irradiance. In the present study, a pot experiment was conducted under two nitrogen (N) supplies with rice plants, and the steady-state and dynamic photosynthesis rates were measured under 28 and 40°C. High temperature significantly increased leaf hydraulic conductance ( K leaf ) under high N supply (HN) but not under low N supply (LN). The increased K leaf maintained a constant leaf water potential (Ψ leaf ) and steady-state stomatal conductance ( g s,sat ) under HN, while the Ψ leaf and g s,sat significantly decreased under high temperature in LN conditions. This resulted in a more severe decrease in steady-state photosynthesis ( A sat ) under high temperature in the LN conditions. After shifting from low to high light, high temperature significantly delayed the recovery of photosynthesis, which resulted in more carbon loss under flecked irradiance. These effects were obtained under HN to a lesser extent than under LN supply. Therefore, it is concluded that nitrogen can alleviate the inhibition of photosynthesis caused by high temperature stress under both steady-state and flecked irradiance.

  18. A Multiple-range Self-balancing Thermocouple Potentiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshawsky, I; Estrin, M

    1951-01-01

    A multiple-range potentiometer circuit is described that provides automatic measurement of temperatures or temperature differences with any one of several thermocouple-material pairs. Techniques of automatic reference junction compensation, span adjustment, and zero suppression are described that permit rapid selection of range and wire material, without the necessity for restandardization, by setting of two external tap switches.

  19. A computer-controlled apparatus for Seebeck inhomogeneity testing of sheathed thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.; Bauserman, Willard A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Mineral-insulated metal-sheathed (MIMS) thermocouple assemblies are used throughout industry and research facilities as a method of temperature measurement where requirements for either harsh environmental conditions exist, or where rigidity of the measurement probe is required. Seebeck inhomogeneity is the abnormal variation of the Seebeck coefficient from point to point in a material. It is not disclosed in conventional calibration. A standardized method of measuring thermoelectric inhomogeneity along the thermocouple probe length is not available. Therefore, calibration for sheathed probes normally does not include testing of probe inhomogeneity. The measurement accuracy would be severely impacted if significant inhomogeneity and a temperature gradient were present in the same region of the probe. A computer-controlled system for determining inhomogeneities was designed, fabricated, and tested. This system provides an accurate method for the identification of the location of inhomogeneity along the length of a sheathed thermocouple and for the quantification of the inhomogeneity. This paper will discuss the apparatus and procedure used to perform these tests and will present data showing tests performed on sheathed thermocouple probes.

  20. An intelligent instrument for measuring exhaust temperature of marine engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Nan-Qi; Su, Hua; Liu, Jun

    2006-12-01

    Exhaust temperature of the marine engine is commonly measured through thermocouple. Measure deviation will occur after using the thermocouple for some time due to nonlinearity of thermocouple itself, high temperature and chemical corrosion of measure point. Frequent replacement of thermocouple will increase the operating cost. This paper designs a new intelligent instrument for solving the above-mentioned problems of the marine engine temperature measurement, which combines the conventional thermocouple temperature measurement technology and SCM(single chip microcomputer). The reading of the thermocouple is simple and precise and the calibration can be made automatically and manually.

  1. Assessment of tungsten/rhenium thermocouples with metal-carbon eutectic fixed points up to 1500°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, M.

    2013-09-01

    Four Type A thermocouples and two Type C thermocouples were calibrated at the Au fixed point and Co-C and Pd-C eutectic fixed points. The thermocouples were exposed to 1330 °C for a total of 100 hours. The maximum drift due to the exposure was found to be 4.8 °C. The fixed-point calibration EMF of these thermocouples deviated by less than 0.86% from the temperature specified by the standards ASTM E230-2003 for Type C and GOSTR 8.585-2001 for Type A. The length of one of Type A thermocouples A52 is longer than the others by 150mm. Making use of this provision it was possible to place annealed part of A52 to the temperature gradient part of calibration arrangement every time. Therefore observed aging effect was as low as 0.5 °C compared to the other thermocouples.

  2. Design and development of a micro-thermocouple sensor for determining temperature and relative humidity patterns within an airstream.

    PubMed

    Eisner, A D; Martonen, T B

    1989-11-01

    This paper describes the production and calibration of a miniature psychrometer treated with a specially developed porous coating. The investigation was conducted to determine localized patterns of rapidly changing temperature and relative humidity in dynamic flowing gas environments (e.g., with particular attention to future applications to the human respiratory system). The technique involved the use of dry miniature thermocouples and wetted miniature thermocouples coated with boron nitride to act as a wicking material. A precision humidity generator was developed for calibrating the psychrometer. It was found that, in most cases, the measured and expected (i.e., theoretically predicted) relative humidity agreed to within 0.5 to 1.0 percent relative humidity. Procedures that would decrease this discrepancy even further were pinpointed, and advantages of using the miniature psychrometer were assessed.

  3. Construction of a Cr3C2-C Peritectic Point Cell for Thermocouple Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Hideki; Deuze, Thierry; Morice, Ronan; Ridoux, Pascal; Filtz, Jean-Remy

    The melting points of Cr3C2-C peritectic (1826°C) and Cr7C3-Cr3C2 eutectic (1742°C) alloys as materials for high-temperature fixed point cells are investigated for the use of thermocouple calibration. Pretests are performed to establish a suitable procedure for constructing contact thermometry cells based on such chromium-carbon mixtures. Two cells are constructed following two different possible procedures. The above two melting points are successfully observed for one of these cells using tungsten-rhenium alloy thermocouples.

  4. Experimental design and analysis for irradiation of SiC/SiC composite tubes under a prototypic high heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Christian M.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; McDuffee, Joel L.; Deck, Christian P.; Katoh, Yutai; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to design an irradiation vehicle for testing silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composite cladding materials under conditions representative of a light water reactor in order to validate thermo-mechanical models of stress states in these materials due to irradiation swelling and differential thermal expansion. The design allows for a constant tube outer surface temperature in the range of 300-350 °C under a representative high heat flux (∼0.66 MW/m2) during one cycle of irradiation in an un-instrumented ;rabbit; capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. An engineered aluminum foil was developed to absorb the expansion of the cladding tubes, due to irradiation swelling, without changing the thermal resistance of the gap between the cladding and irradiation capsule. Finite-element analyses of the capsule were performed, and the models used to calculate thermal contact resistance were validated by out-of-pile testing and post-irradiation examination of the foils and passive SiC thermometry. Six irradiated cladding tubes (both monoliths and composites) were irradiated and subsequently disassembled in a hot cell. The calculated temperatures of passive SiC thermometry inside the capsules showed good agreement with temperatures measured post-irradiation, with two calculated temperatures falling within 10 °C of experimental measurements. The success of this design could lead to new opportunities for irradiation applications with materials that suffer from irradiation swelling, creep, or other dimensional changes that can affect the specimen temperature during irradiation.

  5. Experimental design and analysis for irradiation of SiC/SiC composite tubes under a prototypic high heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, Christian M.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; McDuffee, Joel L.

    The purpose of this work is to design an irradiation vehicle for testing silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composite cladding materials under conditions representative of a light water reactor in order to validate thermo-mechanical models of stress states in these materials due to irradiation swelling and differential thermal expansion. The design allows for a constant tube outer surface temperature in the range of 300–350 °C under a representative high heat flux (~0.66 MW/m 2) during one cycle of irradiation in an un-instrumented “rabbit” capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. An engineered aluminum foil was developed to absorb themore » expansion of the cladding tubes, due to irradiation swelling, without changing the thermal resistance of the gap between the cladding and irradiation capsule. Finite-element analyses of the capsule were performed, and the models used to calculate thermal contact resistance were validated by out-of-pile testing and post-irradiation examination of the foils and passive SiC thermometry. Six irradiated cladding tubes (both monoliths and composites) were irradiated and subsequently disassembled in a hot cell. The calculated temperatures of passive SiC thermometry inside the capsules showed good agreement with temperatures measured post-irradiation, with two calculated temperatures falling within 10 °C of experimental measurements. Furthermore, the success of this design could lead to new opportunities for irradiation applications with materials that suffer from irradiation swelling, creep, or other dimensional changes that can affect the specimen temperature during irradiation.« less

  6. Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Weed Instrument Inc. produces a line of thermocouples - temperature sensors - for a variety of industrial and research uses. One of the company's newer products is a thermocouple specially designed for high accuracy at extreme temperatures above 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Development of sensor brought substantial increases in Weed Instrument sales and employment.

  7. Self-calibration of a W/Re thermocouple using a miniature Ru-C (1954 °C) eutectic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ongrai, O.; University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey; National Institute of Metrology, Klong 5, Klong Luang, Pathumthani

    2013-09-11

    Previous successful investigations of miniature cobalt-carbon (Co-C, 1324 °C) and palladium-carbon (Pd-C, 1492 °C) high temperature fixed-point cells for thermocouple self-calibration have been reported [1-2]. In the present work, we describe a series of measurements of a miniature ruthenium-carbon (Ru-C) eutectic cell (melting point 1954 °C) to evaluate the repeatability and stability of a W/Re thermocouple (type C) by means of in-situ calibration. A miniature Ru-C eutectic fixed-point cell with outside diameter 14 mm and length 30 mm was fabricated to be used as a self-calibrating device. The performance of the miniature Ru-C cell and the type C thermocouple ismore » presented, including characterization of the stability, repeatability, thermal environment influence, ITS-90 temperature realization and measurement uncertainty.« less

  8. High temperature arc-track resistant aerospace insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorogy, William

    1994-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: high temperature aerospace insulation; Foster-Miller approach to develop a 300 C rated, arc-track resistant aerospace insulation; advantages and disadvantages of key structural features; summary goals and achievements of the phase 1 program; performance goals for selected materials; materials under evaluation; molecular structures of candidate polymers; candidate polymer properties; film properties; and a detailed program plan.

  9. Hybrid thermocouple development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvey, L. P.; Krebs, T. R.; Lee, E.

    1971-01-01

    The design and development of a hybrid thermocouple, having a segmented SiGe-PbTe n-leg encapsulated within a hollow cylindrical p-SiGe leg, is described. Hybrid couple efficiency is calculated to be 10% to 15% better than that of a all-SiGe couple. A preliminary design of a planar RTG, employing hybrid couples and a water heat pipe radiator, is described as an example of a possible system application. Hybrid couples, fabricated initially, were characterized by higher than predicted resistance and, in some cases, bond separations. Couples made later in the program, using improved fabrication techniques, exhibited normal resistances, both as-fabricated and after 700 hours of testing. Two flat-plate sections of the reference design thermoelectric converter were fabricated and delivered to NASA Lewis for testing and evaluation.

  10. High-Temperature Extensometry and PdCr Temperature-Compensated Wire Resistance Strain Gages Compared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A detailed experimental evaluation is underway at the NASA Lewis Research Center to compare and contrast the performance of the PdCr/Pt dual-element temperature-compensated wire resistance strain gage with that of conventional high-temperature extensometry. The advanced PdCr gage, developed by researchers at Lewis, exhibits desirable properties and a relatively small and repeatable apparent strain to 800 C. This gage represents a significant advance in technology because existing commercial resistance strain gages are not reliable for quasi-static strain measurements above approximately 400 C. Various thermal and mechanical loading spectra are being applied by a high-temperature thermomechanical uniaxial testing system to evaluate the two strain-measurement systems. This is being done not only to compare and contrast the two strain sensors, but also to investigate the applicability of the PdCr strain gage to the coupon-level specimen testing environment typically employed when the high-temperature mechanical behavior of structural materials is characterized. Strain measurement capabilities to 800 C are being investigated with a nickel-base superalloy, Inconel 100 (IN 100), substrate material and application to TMC's is being examined with the model system, SCS-6/Ti-15-3. Furthermore, two gage application techniques are being investigated in the comparison study: namely, flame-sprayed and spot welding.

  11. Method for collecting thermocouple data via secured shell over a wireless local area network in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, F.; DeMallie, I.; Florence, L.; Kashinski, D. O.

    2015-03-01

    This manuscript addresses the design, hardware details, construction, and programming of an apparatus allowing an experimenter to monitor and record high-temperature thermocouple measurements of dynamic systems in real time. The apparatus uses wireless network technology to bridge the gap between a dynamic (moving) sample frame and the static laboratory frame. Our design is a custom solution applied to samples that rotate through large angular displacements where hard-wired and typical slip-ring solutions are not practical because of noise considerations. The apparatus consists of a Raspberry PI mini-Linux computer, an Arduino micro-controller, an Ocean Controls thermocouple multiplexer shield, and k-type thermocouples.

  12. Method for collecting thermocouple data via secured shell over a wireless local area network in real time.

    PubMed

    Arnold, F; DeMallie, I; Florence, L; Kashinski, D O

    2015-03-01

    This manuscript addresses the design, hardware details, construction, and programming of an apparatus allowing an experimenter to monitor and record high-temperature thermocouple measurements of dynamic systems in real time. The apparatus uses wireless network technology to bridge the gap between a dynamic (moving) sample frame and the static laboratory frame. Our design is a custom solution applied to samples that rotate through large angular displacements where hard-wired and typical slip-ring solutions are not practical because of noise considerations. The apparatus consists of a Raspberry PI mini-Linux computer, an Arduino micro-controller, an Ocean Controls thermocouple multiplexer shield, and k-type thermocouples.

  13. Thermal effects in tissues induced by interstitial irradiation of near infrared laser with a cylindrical diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Kelvin; Johsi, Chet; Figueroa, Daniel; Goddard, Jessica; Li, Xiaosong; Towner, Rheal A.; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Liu, Hong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT), using non-invasive laser irradiation, has resulted in promising outcomes in the treatment of late-stage cancer patients. However, the tissue absorption of laser light limits the clinical applications of LIT in patients with dark skin, or with deep tumors. The present study is designed to investigate the thermal effects of interstitial irradiation using an 805-nm laser with a cylindrical diffuser, in order to overcome the limitations of the non-invasive mode of treatment. Cow liver and rat tumors were irradiated using interstitial fiber. The temperature increase was monitored by thermocouples that were inserted into the tissue at different sites around the cylinder fiber. Three-dimensional temperature distribution in target tissues during and after interstitial laser irradiation was also determined by Proton Resonance Frequency. The preliminary results showed that the output power of laser and the optical parameters of the target tissue determined the light distribution in the tissue. The temperature distributions varied in the tissue according to the locations relative to the active tip of the cylindrical diffuser. The temperature increase is strongly related to the laser power and irradiation time. Our results using thermocouples and optical sensors indicated that the PRF method is reliable and accurate for temperature determination. Although the inhomogeneous biological tissues could result in temperature fluctuation, the temperature trend still can be reliable enough for the guidance of interstitial irradiation. While this study provides temperature profiles in tumor tissue during interstitial irradiation, the biological effects of the irradiation remain unclear. Future studies will be needed, particularly in combination with the application of immunostimulant for inducing tumor-specific immune responses in the treatment of metastatic tumors.

  14. Effects of high-energy proton irradiation on the superconducting properties of Fe(Se,Te) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylva, G.; Bellingeri, E.; Ferdeghini, C.; Martinelli, A.; Pallecchi, I.; Pellegrino, L.; Putti, M.; Ghigo, G.; Gozzelino, L.; Torsello, D.; Grimaldi, G.; Leo, A.; Nigro, A.; Braccini, V.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we explore the effects of 3.5 MeV proton irradiation on Fe(Se,Te) thin films grown on CaF2. In particular, we carry out an experimental investigation with different irradiation fluences up to 7.30 · 1016 cm‑2 and different proton implantation depths, in order to clarify whether and to what extent the critical current is enhanced or suppressed, what are the effects of irradiation on the critical temperature, resistivity, and critical magnetic fields, and finally what is the role played by the substrate in this context. We find that the effect of irradiation on superconducting properties is generally small compared to the case of other iron-based superconductors. The irradiation effect is more evident on the critical current density Jc, while it is minor on the transition temperature Tc, normal state resistivity ρ, and on the upper critical field Hc2 up to the highest fluences explored in this work. In more detail, our analysis shows that when protons implant in the substrate far from the superconducting film, the critical current can be enhanced up to 50% of the pristine value at 7 T and 12 K; meanwhile, there is no appreciable effect on critical temperature and critical fields together with a slight decrease in resistivity. On the contrary, when the implantation layer is closer to the film–substrate interface, both critical current and temperature show a decrease accompanied by an enhancement of the resistivity and lattice strain. This result evidences that possible modifications induced by irradiation in the substrate may affect the superconducting properties of the film via lattice strain. The robustness of the Fe(Se,Te) system to irradiation-induced damage makes it a promising compound for the fabrication of magnets in high-energy accelerators.

  15. High-Sensitivity Temperature Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leadstone, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a method of measuring small temperature differences that amount to a .01K, using an arrangement of a copper-constantan thermocouple, a microamplifier and a galvanometer, as an indirect way of measuring heat energy. (GA)

  16. Low temperature neutron irradiation effects on microstructure and tensile properties of molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Meimei; Eldrup, M.; Byun, Thak Sang

    2008-01-01

    Polycrystalline molybdenum was irradiated in the hydraulic tube facility at the High Flux Isotope Reactor to doses ranging from 7.2 x 10{sup -5} to 0.28 dpa at {approx} 80 C. As-irradiated microstructure was characterized by room-temperature electrical resistivity measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). Tensile tests were carried out between -50 and 100 C over the strain rate range 1 x 10{sup -5} to 1 x 10{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Fractography was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the deformation microstructure was examined by TEM after tensile testing. Irradiation-induced defects became visible by TEM atmore » {approx}0.001 dpa. Both their density and mean size increased with increasing dose. Submicroscopic three-dimensional cavities were detected by PAS even at {approx}0.0001 dpa. The cavity density increased with increasing dose, while their mean size and size distribution was relatively insensitive to neutron dose. It is suggested that the formation of visible dislocation loops was predominantly a nucleation and growth process, while in-cascade vacancy clustering may be significant in Mo. Neutron irradiation reduced the temperature and strain rate dependence of the yield stress, leading to radiation softening in Mo at lower doses. Irradiation had practically no influence on the magnitude and the temperature and strain rate dependence of the plastic instability stress.« less

  17. Structural modifications induced by ion irradiation and temperature in boron carbide B4C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, G.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Djourelov, N.; Miro, S.; Baillet, J.; Pradeilles, N.; Rapaud, O.; Maître, A.; Gosset, D.

    2015-12-01

    Already used as neutron absorber in the current French nuclear reactors, boron carbide (B4C) is also considered in the future Sodium Fast Reactors of the next generation (Gen IV). Due to severe irradiation conditions occurring in these reactors, it is of primary importance that this material presents a high structural resistance under irradiation, both in the ballistic and electronic damage regimes. Previous works have shown an important structural resistance of boron carbide even at high neutron fluences. Nevertheless, the structural modification mechanisms due to irradiation are not well understood. Therefore the aim of this paper is to study structural modifications induced in B4C samples in different damage regimes. The boron carbide pellets were shaped and sintered by using spark plasma sintering method. They were then irradiated in several conditions at room temperature or 800 °C, either by favoring the creation of ballistic damage (between 1 and 3 dpa), or by favoring the electronic excitations using 100 MeV swift iodine ions (Se ≈ 15 keV/nm). Ex situ micro-Raman spectroscopy and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation technique with variable energy slow positrons were coupled to follow the evolution of the B4C structure under irradiation.

  18. Status of FeCrAl ODS Irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Howard, Richard H.

    2016-08-19

    FeCrAl oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are an attractive sub-set alloy class of the more global FeCrAl material class for nuclear applications due to their high-temperature steam oxidation resistance and hypothesized enhanced radiation tolerance. A need currently exists to determine the radiation tolerance of these newly developed alloys. To address this need, a preliminary study was conducted using the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to irradiate an early generation FeCrAl ODS alloy, 125YF. Preliminary post-irradiation examination (PIE) on these irradiated specimens have shown good radiation tolerance at elevated temperatures (≥330°C) but possible radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement at irradiations of 200°C tomore » a damage level of 1.9 displacement per atom (dpa). Building on this experience, a new series of irradiations are currently being conceptualized. This irradiation series called the FCAD irradiation program will irradiate the latest generation FeCrAl ODS and FeCr ODS alloys to significantly higher doses. These experiments will provide the necessary information to determine the mechanical performance of irradiated FeCrAl ODS alloys at light water reactor and fast reactor conditions.« less

  19. Ultralight, Recoverable, and High-Temperature-Resistant SiC Nanowire Aerogel.

    PubMed

    Su, Lei; Wang, Hongjie; Niu, Min; Fan, Xingyu; Ma, Mingbo; Shi, Zhongqi; Guo, Sheng-Wu

    2018-04-24

    Ultralight ceramic aerogels with the property combination of recoverable compressibility and excellent high-temperature stability are attractive for use in harsh environments. However, conventional ceramic aerogels are usually constructed by oxide ceramic nanoparticles, and their practical applications have always been limited by the brittle nature of ceramics and volume shrinkage at high temperature. Silicon carbide (SiC) nanowire offers the integrated properties of elasticity and flexibility of one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials and superior high-temperature thermal and chemical stability of SiC ceramics, which makes it a promising building block for compressible ceramic nanowire aerogels (NWAs). Here, we report the fabrication and properties of a highly porous three-dimensional (3D) SiC NWA assembled by a large number of interweaving 3C-SiC nanowires of 20-50 nm diameter and tens to hundreds of micrometers in length. The SiC NWA possesses ultralow density (∼5 mg cm -3 ), excellent mechanical properties of large recoverable compression strain (>70%) and fatigue resistance, refractory property, oxidation and high-temperature resistance, and thermal insulating property (0.026 W m -1 K -1 at room temperature in N 2 ). When used as absorbents, the SiC NWAs exhibit an adsorption selectivity of low-viscosity organic solvents with high absorption capacity (130-237 g g -1 ). The successful fabrication of such an attractive material may provide promising perspectives to the design and fabrication of other compressible and multifunctional ceramic NWAs.

  20. Halogen effect for improving high temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-50Al by anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Min-Hua; Wu, Lian-Kui; Cao, Hua-Zhen; Lin, Jun-Pin; Zheng, Guo-Qu

    2017-06-01

    The high temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-50Al was significantly improved via halogen effect which was achieved by anodizing in an ethylene glycol solution containing with fluorine ion. The anodized Ti-50Al with holes and micro-cracks could be self-repaired during oxidation at 1000 °C. The thickness of the oxide scale increases with the prolonging of oxidation time. On the basis of halogen effect for improving the high temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-50Al by anodization, only fluorine addition into the electrolyte can effectively improve the high temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-50Al.

  1. Temperature Effects of Ultraviolet Irradiation on Material Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyuki; Ishizawa, Junichiro

    Ultraviolet rays (UV) cause organic materials to deteriorate. UV irradiation ground testing is therefore important to understand the “adequate lifetime assessment” and the “end-of-life (EOL) characteristic” of materials used in space. In previous experiments, high temperatures were found to accelerate the UV degradation of cross-linked ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (X-ETFE). This causes concern of potentially similar effects in other materials. In this study, we evaluated UV degradation at high temperatures and subsequently determined materials usable in space that had shown accelerated degradation due to UV irradiation at high temperatures.

  2. Implications of using thermocouple thermometry in 27 MHz capacitively coupled interstitial hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Crezee, J; van der Koijk, J F; Kaatee, R S; Lagendijk, J J

    1997-04-01

    The 27 MHz Multi Electrode Current Source (MECS) interstitial hyperthermia system uses segmented electrodes, 10-20 mm long, to steer the 3D power deposition. This power control at a scale of 1-2 cm requires detailed and accurate temperature feedback data. To this end seven-point thermocouples are integrated into the probes. The aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility and reliability of integrated thermometry in the 27 MHz MECS system, with special attention to the interference between electrode and thermometry and its effect on system performance. We investigated the impact of a seven-sensor thermocouple probe (outer diameter 150 microns) on the apparent impedance and power output of a 20 mm dual electrode (O.D. 1.5 mm) in a polyethylene catheter in a muscle equivalent medium (sigma 1 = 0.6 S m-1). The cross coupling between electrode and thermocouple was found to be small (1-2 pF) and to cause no problems in the dual-electrode mode, and only minimal problems in the single-electrode mode. Power loss into the thermometry system can be prevented using simple filters. The temperature readings are reliable and representative of the actual tissue temperature around the electrode. Self-heating effects, occurring in some catheter materials, are eliminated by sampling the temperature after a short power-off interval. We conclude that integrated thermocouple thermometry is compatible with 27 MHz capacitively coupled interstitial hyperthermia. The performance of the system is not affected and the temperatures measured are a reliable indication of the maximum tissue temperatures.

  3. The High Temperature Resistivity of Ba2YCu3O7-x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xingkui, Zhang; Shining, Zhu; Hao, Wang; Shiyuan, Zhang; Su, Ye; Ningshen, Zhou; Ziran, Xu

    The high temperature resistivity (ρ), thermogravimetry (TG) and derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) have been used to characterize superconductor Ba2YCu3O7-x (BYCO) in O2, air and N2. The resistivity is linear from room temperature to 350°C and then deviate from linearity with oxygen evolution, the derivative of resistivity dρ/dT increases abruptly near orthorhombic to tetragonal phase transition. These phenomena can give good explanations for a two-band Drude model.

  4. Measurement of high-dynamic temperature field using high-speed quadriwave lateral shearing interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Bo-chuan; Wang, Jian-li; Yao, Kai-nan; Chen, Tao

    2018-03-01

    An approach to measure a high-dynamic two-dimensional (2D) temperature field using a high-speed quadriwave lateral shearing interferometer (QWLSI) is proposed. The detailed theoretical derivation to express the wavefront reconstruct principle of the proposed method is presented. The comparison experiment with thermocouples shows that the temperature field measurement using QWLSI has a precision of ±0.5 °C. An experiment for measuring the highdynamic temperature field generated by an electrical heater is carried out. A 200 frame rate temperature field video with 512 × 512 resolution is obtained finally. Experimental results show that the temperature field measurement system using a QWLSI has the advantage of high sensitivity and high resolution.

  5. Cobra Probes Containing Replaceable Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John; Redding, Adam

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the basic design of cobra probes provides for relatively easy replacement of broken thermocouples. Cobra probes are standard tube-type pressure probes that may also contain thermocouples and that are routinely used in wind tunnels and aeronautical hardware. They are so named because in side views, they resemble a cobra poised to attack. Heretofore, there has been no easy way to replace a broken thermocouple in a cobra probe: instead, it has been necessary to break the probe apart and then rebuild it, typically at a cost between $2,000 and $4,000 (2004 prices). The modified design makes it possible to replace the thermocouple, in minimal time and at relatively low cost, by inserting new thermocouple wire in a tube.

  6. Introducing Temperature Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIldowie, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Ignoring the interpretive problems of temperature measurement deprives students of a beneficial, positive educational experience. Suggests experimenting with different thermometers including a copper resistance thermometer, a thermistor, a thermocouple, and a constant-volume air thermometer. Provides guidance for the classroom discussion of…

  7. Development of Creep-Resistant and Oxidation-Resistant Austenitic Stainless Steels for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziasz, Philip J.

    2018-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are cost-effective materials for high-temperature applications if they have the oxidation and creep resistance to withstand prolonged exposure at such conditions. Since 1990, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed advanced austenitic stainless steels with creep resistance comparable to Ni-based superalloy 617 at 800-900°C based on specially designed "engineered microstructures" utilizing a microstructure/composition database derived from about 20 years of radiation effect data on steels. The wrought high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened (HT-UPS) steels with outstanding creep resistance at 700-800°C were developed for supercritical boiler and superheater tubing for fossil power plants in the early 1990s, the cast CF8C-Plus steels were developed in 1999-2001 for land-based gas turbine casing and diesel engine exhaust manifold and turbocharger applications at 700-900°C, and, in 2015-2017, new Al-modified cast stainless steels with oxidation and creep resistance capabilities up to 950-1000°C were developed for automotive exhaust manifold and turbocharger applications. This article reviews and summarizes their development and their properties and applications.

  8. Comparison of IR thermography and thermocouple measurement of heat loss from rabbit pinna.

    PubMed

    Mohler, F S; Heath, J E

    1988-02-01

    The temperature of the pinnae of male New Zealand White rabbits was measured by use of infrared thermography. At ambient temperatures of 15, 20, and 25 degrees C, the average pinna temperatures were 23.0, 28.7, and 36.2 degrees C, respectively. From these temperatures, average heat loss from the total pinna surface area was calculated to be 2.8, 3.3, and 4.4 W, respectively. Preoptic temperature changes also affect the vasomotor state of the rabbit. At an ambient temperature of 20 degrees C, cooling the preoptic area of the rabbit by approximately 1 degree C resulted in an average pinna temperature of 26.5 degrees C and a heat loss of 2.4 W. Heating the preoptic area by approximately 1 degree C resulted in an average pinna temperature of 33.5 degrees C and a heat loss of 5.4 W. Finally, pinna temperatures were measured by use of a thermocouple and infrared thermography simultaneously. When the pinnae were vasodilated, the thermocouple measurements were consistently higher than the pinna surface temperatures measured thermographically. When the pinnae were vasoconstricted, the thermocouple measurements were consistently lower than the pinna surface temperatures measured thermographically. The discrepancy between the two methods of measurement is discussed.

  9. Thermal property change of MOX and UO2 irradiated up to high burnup of 74 GWd/t

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Nobuo; Akiyama, Hidetoshi; Miura, Hiromichi; Baba, Toshikazu; Kamimura, Katsuichiro; Kurematsu, Shigeru; Kosaka, Yuji; Yoshino, Aya; Kitagawa, Takaaki

    2013-09-01

    Thermal property is important because it controls fuel behavior under irradiation. The thermal property change at high burnup of more than 70 GWd/t is examined. Two kinds of MOX fuel rods, which were fabricated by MIMAS and SBR methods, and one referenced UO2 fuel rod were used in the experiment. These rods were taken from the pre-irradiated rods (IFA 609/626, of which irradiation test were carried out by Japanese PWR group) and re-fabricated and re-irradiated in HBWR as IFA 702 by JNES. The specification of fuel corresponds to that of 17 × 17 PWR type fuel and the axially averaged linear heat rates (LHR) of MOX rods are 25 kW/m (BOL of IFA 702) and 20 kW/m (EOL of IFA 702). The axial peak burnups achieved are about 74 GWd/t for both of MOX and UO2. Centerline temperature and plenum gas pressure were measured in situ during irradiation. The measured centerline temperature is plotted against LHR at the position where thermocouples are fixed. The slopes of MOX are corresponded to each other, but that of UO2 is higher than those of MOX. This implies that the thermal conductivity of MOX is higher than that of UO2 at high burnup under the condition that the pellet-cladding gap is closed during irradiation. Gap closure is confirmed by the metallography of the postirradiation examinations. It is understood that thermal conductivity of MOX is lower than that of UO2 before irradiation since phonon scattering with plutonium in MOX becomes remarkable. A phonon scattering with plutonium decreases in MOX when burnup proceeds. Thus, thermal conductivity of MOX becomes close to that of UO2. A reverse phenomenon is observed at high burnup region. The phonon scattering with fission products such as Nd and Zr causes a degradation of thermal conductivity of burnt fuel. It might be speculated that this scattering effect causes the phenomenon and the mechanism is discussed here.

  10. An Innovative Flow-Measuring Device: Thermocouple Boundary Layer Rake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Martin, Lisa C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    An innovative flow-measuring device, a thermocouple boundary layer rake, was developed. The sensor detects the flow by using a thin-film thermocouple (TC) array to measure the temperature difference across a heater strip. The heater and TC arrays are microfabricated on a constant-thickness quartz strut with low heat conductivity. The device can measure the velocity profile well into the boundary layer, about 65 gm from the surface, which is almost four times closer to the surface than has been possible with the previously used total pressure tube.

  11. Effects of temperature on the irradiation responses of Al 0.1 CoCrFeNi high entropy alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tengfei; Xia, Songqin; Guo, Wei

    Structural damage and chemical segregation in Al 0.1CoCrFeNi high entropy alloy irradiated at elevated temperatures are studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Irradiation-induced defects include dislocation loops, long dislocations and stacking-fault tetrahedra, but no voids can be observed. Furthermore, as irradiation temperature increases, defect density is decreased but defect size is increased, which is induced by increasing defect mobility. Finally, APT characterization reveals that ion irradiation at elevated temperatures can induce an enrichment of Ni and Co as well as a depletion of Fe and Cr at defect clusters, mainly including dislocation loops and longmore » dislocations.« less

  12. Effects of temperature on the irradiation responses of Al 0.1 CoCrFeNi high entropy alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Tengfei; Xia, Songqin; Guo, Wei; ...

    2017-09-29

    Structural damage and chemical segregation in Al 0.1CoCrFeNi high entropy alloy irradiated at elevated temperatures are studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Irradiation-induced defects include dislocation loops, long dislocations and stacking-fault tetrahedra, but no voids can be observed. Furthermore, as irradiation temperature increases, defect density is decreased but defect size is increased, which is induced by increasing defect mobility. Finally, APT characterization reveals that ion irradiation at elevated temperatures can induce an enrichment of Ni and Co as well as a depletion of Fe and Cr at defect clusters, mainly including dislocation loops and longmore » dislocations.« less

  13. Drug resistance following irradiation of RIF-1 tumors: Influence of the interval between irradiation and drug treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hopwood, L.E.; Davies, B.M.; Moulder, J.E.

    1990-09-01

    RIF-1 tumors contain a small number of cells (1 to 100 per 10(6) cells) that are resistant to 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, or adriamycin. The frequency of drug-resistant cells among individual untreated tumors is highly variable. Radiation, delivered in vivo at doses of 3 to 12 Gy, increases the frequency of methotrexate- and 5-fluorouracil-resistant cells, but not the frequency of adriamycin-resistant cells. The magnitude of induction of 5-fluorouracil and methotrexate resistance shows a complex dependence on the radiation dose and on the interval between irradiation and assessment of drug resistance. For a dose of 3 Gy, induced 5-fluorouracil and methotrexate resistance ismore » seen only after an interval of 5 to 7 days, whereas for a dose of 12 Gy, high levels of induced resistance are observed 1 to 3 days after irradiation. The maximum absolute risk for induction of resistance is 4 per 10(4) cells per Gy for methotrexate, and 3 per 10(6) cells per Gy for 5-fluorouracil. These results indicate that tumor hypoxia may play a role in the increased levels of drug resistance seen after irradiation, and that both genetic and environmental factors may influence radiation-induction of drug resistance. These studies provide essential data for models of the development of tumor drug resistance, and imply that some of the drug resistance seen when chemotherapy follows radiotherapy may be caused by radiation-induced drug resistance.« less

  14. Spring loaded thermocouple module

    DOEpatents

    McKelvey, T.E.; Guarnieri, J.J.

    1984-03-13

    A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

  15. Spring loaded thermocouple module

    DOEpatents

    McKelvey, Thomas E.; Guarnieri, Joseph J.

    1985-01-01

    A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

  16. Setup for irradiation and characterization of materials and Si particle detectors at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Väyrynen, S.; Pusa, P.; Sane, P.; Tikkanen, P.; Räisänen, J.; Kuitunen, K.; Tuomisto, F.; Härkönen, J.; Kassamakov, I.; Tuominen, E.; Tuovinen, E.

    2007-03-01

    A novel facility for proton irradiation with sample cryocooling has been developed at the Accelerator Laboratory of Helsinki University (equipped with a 5 MV tandem accelerator). The setup enables unique experiments to be carried out within the temperature range of 10-300 K. The setup has been constructed for "on-line" studies of vacancies with positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) including the option for optical ionization of the vacancies, and for current-voltage ( IV) measurements of irradiated silicon particle detectors. The setup is described in detail and typical performance characteristics are provided. The facility functionality was tested by performing PAS experiments with high-resistivity silicon and by IV measurements for two types of irradiated silicon particle detectors.

  17. Printed organic conductive polymers thermocouples in textile and smart clothing applications.

    PubMed

    Seeberg, Trine M; Røyset, Arne; Jahren, Susannah; Strisland, Frode

    2011-01-01

    This work reports on an experimental investigation of the potential of using selected commercially available organic conductive polymers as active ingredients in thermocouples printed on textiles. Poly(3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(4 styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and polyaniline (PANI) were screen printed onto woven cotton textile. The influence of multiple thermocycles between 235 K (-38 °C) and 350 K (+77 °C) on resistivity and thermoelectric properties was examined. The Seebeck coefficients of PEDOT:PSS and PANI were found to be about +18 μV/K and +15 uV/K, respectively, when "metal-polymer" thermocouples were realized by combining the polymer with copper. When "polymer-polymer" thermocouples were formed by combining PEDOT:PSS and PANI, a thermoelectric voltage of about +10 μV/K was observed. A challenge recognized in the experiments is that the generated voltage exhibited drift and fluctuations.

  18. Correlation of thermocouple data with voiding function after prostate cryoablation.

    PubMed

    Levy, David A

    2010-02-01

    To identify possible correlations of thermocouple recorded data with altered postoperative voiding function after prostate cryosurgery. A retrospective analysis of the records of 58 patients treated with prostate cryoablation from October 2005 through April 2009 was conducted. Multivariate analysis of patient age, presenting prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, clinical T stage, prostate volume, maximum low temperature thermocouple recordings, history of radiation and or hormonal therapy, were studied as possible correlative factors for altered postoperative voiding function. Of 58 patients, 22 (37.9%) manifested postcryoablation urgency and frequency (n = 13) requiring medical therapy or retention (n = 9). On multivariate analysis, age (P = .037) and an external sphincter temperature < or = 23 degrees C (P = .012) were associated with voiding frequency, urgency, or retention (odds ratio = 6.26, 95% CI: 1.62-24.16), whereas anterior rectal wall temperature (Denon) was weakly associated (P = .079). Thermocouple data provide an objective means of assessing cryosurgical outcomes. This is the first report of a correlation of such data to post-treatment voiding function. A total of 37.9% of patients experienced urgency and/or frequency or urinary retention after cryoablation of the prostate for localized disease. Older age and external sphincter temperature < or = 23 degrees C were statistically significant predictors of these events. The data suggest that limiting the degree of freezing at the external sphincter may decrease procedure related morbidity. Further study is warranted to better delineate temperature-related data on treatment outcomes. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The study on the electrical resistivity of Cu/V multilayer films subjected to helium (He) ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. P.; Xu, C.; Fu, E. G.; Du, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Wang, X. J.; Qiu, Y. H.

    2018-05-01

    Sputtering-deposited Cu/V multilayer films with the individual layer thickness varying from 2.5 nm to 100 nm were irradiated by 1 MeV helium (He) ion at the fluence of 6 ×1016 ions ·cm-2 at room temperature. The resistivity of Cu/V multilayer films after ion irradiation was evaluated as a function of individual layer thickness at 300 K and compared with their resistivity before ion irradiation. The results show that the resistivity change before and after ion irradiation is largely determined by the interface structure, grain boundary and radiation induced defects. A model amended based on the model used in describing the resistivity of as-deposited Cu/V multilayer films was proposed to describe the resistivity of ion irradiated Cu/V multilayer films by considering the point defects induced by ion irradiation, the effect of interface absorption on defects and the effect of interface microstructure in the multilayer films.

  20. Technical note: unsafe rectal temperature measurements due to delayed warming of the thermocouple by using a condom. An issue concerning the estimation of the postmortem interval by using Henßge's nomogram.

    PubMed

    Krap, Tristan; Meurs, Joris; Boertjes, Janine; Duijst, Wilma

    2016-03-01

    In some cases, in the Netherlands, an additional layer is being added to the thermocouple, used to measure the rectal temperature in medicolegal death investigations. Because of this deviation from the standard method, questions arose regarding the accuracy and precision of the measured temperature. Therefore, a cooling experiment was carried out on a round body made of agar with an average thermal conductivity of 0.454 W/(m °C) while measuring the temperature with and without an additional layer around the thermocouple for three different starting temperatures: 36, 30, and 27 °C. The results show a significant difference between the measured values for the first 5 min when comparing with and without the additional layer. Further, a decrease in precision is present within the first minutes when using an additional layer. Therefore, it is concluded that it is best to measure the rectal temperature without an additional layer around the thermocouple and caution should be taken when measuring with an additional layer.

  1. Recent advances in the characterization of high temperature industrial materials

    SciTech Connect

    Meadowcroft, D.B.; Tomkings, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reviews several techniques under development or recently commercialized which aid the characterization of high temperature plant components when carrying out lifetime predictions. Temperature measurements are frequently limited because of the limited lifetime and cost of thermocouples in aggressive environments and three alternative methods of assessing the ``average effective`` temperature of a component being evaluated by the authors are described steam side oxide thickness (specifically for ferritic superheater tubes), copper gold diffusion couples (``PETIT``), and the measurement of ferrite in duplex steels (``FEROPLUG``). Advances are described which have been made recently in the measurement techniques available for making plantmore » measurements on components to reduce the time needed for significant values of wastage rates to be established. In addition on-line high, temperature corrosion monitors are coming available which allow wastage rates to be assessed over periods of hours or days. These involve electrical resistance or electrochemical techniques. Finally the use of thin layer activation by a radioactive isotope is highlighted which enables the wastage of components to be assessed remotely without direct contact. Whilst available for a long time for laboratory and pilot plant studies, the authors are actively concerned with introducing the technique into operational boiler plant.« less

  2. Formation of austenite in high Cr ferritic/martensitic steels by high fluence neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Faulkner, R. G.; Morgan, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    High Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are leading candidates for structural components of future fusion reactors and new generation fission reactors due to their excellent swelling resistance and thermal properties. A commercial grade 12%CrMoVNb ferritic/martensitic stainless steel in the form of parent plate and off-normal weld materials was fast neutron irradiated up to 33 dpa (1.1 × 10 -6 dpa/s) at 400 °C and 28 dpa (1.7 × 10 -6 dpa/s) at 465 °C, respectively. TEM investigation shows that the fully martensitic weld metal transformed to a duplex austenite/ferrite structure due to high fluence neutron irradiation, the austenite was heavily voided (˜15 vol.%) and the ferrite was relatively void-free; whilst no austenite phases were detected in plate steel. Thermodynamic and phase equilibria software MTDATA has been employed for the first time to investigate neutron irradiation-induced phase transformations. The neutron irradiation effect is introduced by adding additional Gibbs free energy into the system. This additional energy is produced by high energy neutron irradiation and can be estimated from the increased dislocation loop density caused by irradiation. Modelling results show that neutron irradiation reduces the ferrite/austenite transformation temperature, especially for high Ni weld metal. The calculated results exhibit good agreement with experimental observation.

  3. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    DOE PAGES

    Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hunn, John D.; Ploger, Scott A.; ...

    2015-10-23

    The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.6% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of 110mAg from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that itmore » was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocarbon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1 × 10 –4 to 5 × 10 –4 for 154Eu and 8 × 10 –7 to 3 × 10 –5 for 90Sr. The average 134Cs fractional release from compacts was <3 × 10 –6 when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98 × 10 5 in the experiment experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving 134Cs fractional release in two capsules to approximately 10 –5. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into the nature and causes of SiC coating failure in high-quality TRISO fuel. In general, changes in coating morphology were found to be dominated by the behavior of the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), and infrequently observed SiC layer damage was usually related to cracks in the IPyC. Palladium attack of the SiC layer was relatively minor, except for the particles that released cesium during irradiation, where SiC corrosion was found adjacent to IPyC cracks. In conclusion, palladium

  4. Improving oxidation resistance and thermal insulation of thermal barrier coatings by intense pulsed electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xianxiu; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Cunxia; Wang, Younian; Dong, Chuang

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, intense pulsed electron beam was used for the irradiation treatment of 6-8% Y2O3-stablized ZrO2 thermal barrier coating prepared by electron beam-physical vapor deposition to achieve the "sealing" of columnar crystals, thus improving their thermal insulation properties and high temperature oxidation resistance. The electron beam parameters used were: pulse duration 200 μs, electron voltage 15 kV, energy density 3, 5, 8, 15, 20 J/cm2, and pulsed numbers 30. 1050 °C cyclic oxidation and static oxidation experiments were used for the research on oxidation resistance of the coatings. When the energy density of the electron beam was larger than 8 J/cm2, ZrO2 ceramic coating surface was fully re-melted and became smooth, dense and shiny. The coating changed into a smooth polycrystalline structure, thus achieving the "sealing" effect of the columnar crystals. After irradiations with the energy density of 8-15 J/cm2, the thermally grown oxide coating thickness decreased significantly in comparison with non-irradiated coatings, showing that the re-melted coating improved the oxidation resistance of the coatings. The results of thermal diffusivity test by laser flash method showed that the thermal diffusion rate of the irradiated coating was lower than that of the coating without irradiation treatment, and the thermal insulation performance of irradiated coating was improved.

  5. New Experimental Setup for High-Pressure High-Temperature Gigahertz Ultrasonic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, A. P.; Kantor, I. Y.; Dubrovinsky, L. S.; Jacobsen, S. D.

    2005-12-01

    The only direct information about Earth's interior comes from seismological observations of sound wave velocities. In order to create compositional and mineralogical model from seismological data knowledge of the elastic properties and crystal chemistry of minerals is necessary. Gigahertz ultrasonic interferometry (GUI) is a relatively new tool used to measure single-crystal compressional and shear-wave travel times, which are converted to sound velocities and elastic moduli for direct application to problems in geophysics. Although possibility of simultaneous high-pressure and high-temperature GUI measurements in diamond anvil cell was demonstrated before up to temperature of 250°C, in situ pressure measurements were not possible. We developed new experimental setup for simultaneous GUI and pressure determination using a ruby fluorescence gouge. A diamond anvil cell is equipped with a miniature internal resistive heater with thermocouple fixed at a very small distance from the sample chamber. DAC is mounted at the rotating stage with 5 degrees of freedom (XYZ and two tilting degrees), that can be fixed in three different positions: on top of a P-buffer rod for compressional wave velocities measurement, on top of S-buffer rod for shear wave velocities measurement and under the microscope, equipped with laser and portable high-resolution spectrometer for ruby fluorescence measurement. DAC under high temperature could be moved between these three positions, and independent pressure, temperature, S and P wave velocities measurements could be done simultaneously at each data point. In addition to single-crystal elasticity measurements, ability of GUI for elasticity measurements of liquids was demonstrated. Compressional wave velocities in liquid argon were measured at high pressures and temperatures, showing the ability of GUI for studies equation of state of a liquid.

  6. Experimental investigation of transient temperature characteristic in high power fiber laser cutting of a thick steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phi Long, Nguyen; Matsunaga, Yukihiro; Hanari, Toshihide; Yamada, Tomonori; Muramatsu, Toshiharu

    2016-10-01

    Experiment of temperature measurement was performed to investigate the transient temperature characteristics of molten metal during laser cutting. The aim of this study was to establish a method for measuring the surface temperature variation near the molten pool correlated with changes in cutting parameters. The relationship between temperature inside the kerf cut and characteristic of the cut surface was investigated by using thermography and thermocouples. Results show strong correlations between the transient temperatures and the thermal image for different cutting conditions. In addition, two-color thermometer has been used to obtain radiation intensity emitted from the irradiating zone as a function of operating conditions. Experiments have shown that one can detect the cutting quality by characterization of the surface temperature during laser cutting process.

  7. Laser Cladding of Ni, Nb, and Mg Alloys for Improved Environmental Resistance at High Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    v*LASER CLADDING OF NI , Nb AND Mg ALLOYS < FOR 7IMPR-OVED ENVIIONM ENTAL I RESISTANCE AT HIGH TEMPERATURE Final Report for Research Conducted through...resistance at high temperature. Major emphasis has been on Ni -Cr-Al-Hf system. Microstructural evolution and oxidation properties of Ni and Nb alloys ...metastable crystalline and amorphous structure on a) the high temperature oxidation properties of laser clad Ni and Nb alloys , and b) the corrosion

  8. Microstructure and high-temperature oxidation resistance of TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coatings on Ti6Al4V alloy surface by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Liu, Hongxi; Wang, Chuanqi; Zeng, Weihua; Jiang, Yehua

    2010-11-01

    A high-temperature oxidation resistant TiN embedded in Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coating was fabricated on titanium alloy Ti6Al4V surface by 6kW transverse-flow CO2 laser apparatus. The composition, morphology and microstructure of the laser clad TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coating were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). In order to evaluate the high-temperature oxidation resistance of the composite coatings and the titanium alloy substrate, isothermal oxidation test was performed in a conventional high-temperature resistance furnace at 600°C and 800°C respectively. The result shows that the laser clad intermetallic composite coating has a rapidly solidified fine microstructure consisting of TiN primary phase (granular-like, flake-like, and dendrites), and uniformly distributed in the Ti3Al matrix. It indicates that a physical and chemical reaction between the Ti powder and AlN powder occurred completely under the laser irradiation. In addition, the microhardness of the TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coating is 844HV0.2, 3.4 times higher than that of the titanium alloy substrate. The high-temperature oxidation resistance test reveals that TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coating results in the better modification of high-temperature oxidation behavior than the titanium substrate. The excellent high-temperature oxidation resistance of the laser cladding layer is attributed to the formation of the reinforced phase TiN and Al2O3, TiO2 hybrid oxide. Therefore, the laser cladding TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coating is anticipated to be a promising oxidation resistance surface modification technique for Ti6Al4V alloy.

  9. Temperature-responsive release of cortisol from its binding globulin: a protein thermocouple.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Angus; Henley, David; Carrell, Robin; Zhou, Aiwu; Clarke, Anthony; Lightman, Stafford

    2010-10-01

    Only 5% of circulating cortisol is active and unbound to carrier proteins. Because cortisol levels vary rapidly due to the pulsatile nature of cortisol secretion, the dynamics of cortisol binding are critical determinants of tissue levels of free cortisol and consequent hormonal signaling. The major glucocorticoid carrier protein is corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), a member of the serpin family that undergoes conformational changes to bind and release hormones. This mechanism has been noted to be temperature responsive, and we have now investigated the effects of temperature on the binding of human CBG to both cortisol and progesterone. Recombinant human CBG was synthesized and used for binding studies with cortisol and progesterone between 34 and 43 C. Binding was monitored by recording the change in intrinsic protein fluorescence. Binding of the steroids to the other major carrier, serum albumin, was measured in a similar manner. There was no effect of temperature on the interaction between human serum albumin and either cortisol or progesterone. The association of both cortisol and progesterone with CBG is more than three orders of magnitude greater than that with HSA, and this interaction was extremely responsive to changes in temperature. The affinity of both cortisol and progesterone for CBG drops approximately 16-fold as temperature increases from 35 to 42 C. This study clearly shows that even within the clinically relevant range of temperatures found in humans, CBG acts as a protein thermocouple that is exquisitely sensitive to temperature change and will release cortisol in response to fever or external sources of heat. This has major implications for our understanding of cortisol regulation in febrile patients.

  10. Irradiation experiment on ZrC-coated fuel particles for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Minato, Kazuo; Ogawa, Toru; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2000-06-01

    The ZrC coating layer is a candidate to replace the SiC coating layer of the Triso-coated fuel particle. To compare the irradiation performance of the ZrC Triso-coated fuel particles with that of the normal Triso-coated fuel particles at high temperatures, a capsule irradiation experiment was performed, where both types of the coated fuel particles were irradiated under identical conditions. The burnup was 4.5% FIMA and the irradiation temperature was 1,400 to 1,650 C. The postirradiation measurement of the through-coating failure fractions of both types of coated fuel particles revealed better irradiation performance of the ZrC Triso-coated fuel particles. The opticalmore » microscopy and electron probe microanalysis on the polished cross section of the ZrC Triso-coated fuel particles revealed no interaction of palladium with the ZrC coating layer nor accumulation of palladium at the inner surface of the ZrC coating layer, whereas severe corrosion of the SiC coating layer was observed in the normal Triso-coated fuel particles. Although no corrosion of the ZrC coating layer was observed, additional evaluations need to be made of this layer's ability to satisfactorily retain the fission product palladium.« less

  11. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Abadlia, L; Gasser, F; Khalouk, K; Mayoufi, M; Gasser, J G

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.

  12. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: Application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Abadlia, L.; Mayoufi, M.; Gasser, F.

    2014-09-15

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in thismore » paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.« less

  13. Heat penetration and thermocouple location in home canning.

    PubMed

    Etzel, Mark R; Willmore, Paola; Ingham, Barbara H

    2015-01-01

    We processed applesauce, tomato juice, and cranberries in pint jars in a boiling water canner to test thermal processing theories against home canning of high-acid foods. For each product, thermocouples were placed at various heights in the jar. Values for f h (heating), f cl (cooling), and F 82.2°C (lethality) were determined for each thermocouple location, and did not depend substantially on thermocouple location in accordance with heat transfer theory. There was a cold spot in the jar, but the cold spot during heating became the hot spot during cooling. During heating, the geometric center was the last to heat, and remained coldest the longest, but during coooling, it was also the last to cool, and remained hottest the longest. The net effect was that calculated lethality in home canning was not affected by thermocouple location. Most of the lethality during home canning occurred during air cooling, making cooling of home canned foods of great importance. Calculated lethality was far greater than the required 5-log reduction of spores in tomato juice and vegetative cells in cranberries, suggesting a wide margin of safety for approved home-canning processes for high-acid foods.

  14. Heat penetration and thermocouple location in home canning

    PubMed Central

    Etzel, Mark R; Willmore, Paola; Ingham, Barbara H

    2015-01-01

    We processed applesauce, tomato juice, and cranberries in pint jars in a boiling water canner to test thermal processing theories against home canning of high-acid foods. For each product, thermocouples were placed at various heights in the jar. Values for fh (heating), fcl (cooling), and F82.2°C (lethality) were determined for each thermocouple location, and did not depend substantially on thermocouple location in accordance with heat transfer theory. There was a cold spot in the jar, but the cold spot during heating became the hot spot during cooling. During heating, the geometric center was the last to heat, and remained coldest the longest, but during coooling, it was also the last to cool, and remained hottest the longest. The net effect was that calculated lethality in home canning was not affected by thermocouple location. Most of the lethality during home canning occurred during air cooling, making cooling of home canned foods of great importance. Calculated lethality was far greater than the required 5-log reduction of spores in tomato juice and vegetative cells in cranberries, suggesting a wide margin of safety for approved home-canning processes for high-acid foods. PMID:25649758

  15. A Challenge to Improve High-Temperature Platinum Resistance Thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Widiatmo, J. V.; Harada, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Yamazawa, K.

    2017-05-01

    High-temperature standard platinum resistance thermometers (HTSPRTs) are used to interpolate the international temperature scale of 1990 (ITS-90), especially for temperatures between the aluminum and the silver points. For this, long-term stability of the HTSPRT is essential. CHINO R800-3L type SPRT, which has a nominal resistance at the triple point of water (TPW) around 0.25 Ω , is the one developed earlier for the interpolation of the ITS-90 at this temperature range. Further development to this previous model has been carried out for the purpose of improving the thermal stability. The improvement was focused on reducing the effect coming from the difference in thermal expansion between platinum wire and the quartz frame on which the platinum wire is installed. New HTSPRTs were made by CHINO Corporation. Some series of tests were carried out at CHINO and at NMIJ. Initial tests after the HTSPRT fabrication were done at CHINO, where thermal cycles between 500°C and 980°C were applied to the HTSPRTs to see change in the resistances at the TPW (R_{TPW}) and at the gallium point (R_{Ga}). Repeated resistance measurements at the silver point (R_{Ag}) were performed after completing the thermal cycling test. Before and after every measurement at silver point, R_{TPW} was measured, while before and after every two silver point realization R_{Ga} were measured. After completing this test, the HTSPRTs were transported to NMIJ, where the same repeated measurements at the silver point were done at NMIJ. These were then repeated at CHINO and at NMIJ upon repeated transportation among the institutes, to evaluate some effect due to transportation. This paper reports the details of the above-mentioned tests, the results and the analysis.

  16. Frequency response of a supported thermocouple wire: Effects of axial conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Meeks, E. L.; Fralick, G. C.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical expressions are derived for the steady-state frequency response of a supported thermocouple wire. In particular, the effects of axial heat conduction are demonstrated for both a supported one material wire and a two material wire with unequal material properties across the junction. For the case of a one material supported wire, an exact solution is derived which compares favorably with an approximate expression that only matches temperatures at the support junction. Moreover, for the case of a two material supported wire, an analytical expression is derived that closely correlates numerical results. Experimental data were taken with a type K supported thermocouple. The test thermocouple was constructed with dimensions to demonstrate the effects of axial heat conduction assuming constant physical properties across the junction.

  17. High-temperature superconducting nano-meanders made by ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, P.; Feuillet-Palma, C.; Jouan, A.; Couëdo, F.; Bourlet, N.; Géron, E.; Malnou, M.; Méchin, L.; Sharafiev, A.; Lesueur, J.; Bergeal, N.

    2018-01-01

    In this article, we report on the fabrication of very long {{YBa}}2{{Cu}}3{{{O}}}7 nanowires in a meander shape patterned in a {{CeO}}2-capped thin film by high-energy oxygen ion irradiation. DC and RF characterizations outline the good superconducting properties of the nanowires whose geometry approaches the one used in single photon detectors. Their inductance, which mainly sets the maximum speed of these devices, has been measured on a wide range of temperature by mean of a resonant method. The extracted values are in agreement with the ones calculated from the geometry of the meanders and from the known London penetration depth in {{YBa}}2{{Cu}}3{{{O}}}7 thin films.

  18. Effect of high fluence neutron irradiation on transport properties of thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Leonard, K. J.

    2017-07-01

    Thermoelectric materials were subjected to high fluence neutron irradiation in order to understand the effect of radiation damage on transport properties. This study is relevant to the NASA Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) program in which thermoelectric elements are exposed to radiation over a long period of time in space missions. Selected n-type and p-type bismuth telluride materials were irradiated at the High Flux Isotope Reactor with a neutron fluence of 1.3 × 1018 n/cm2 (E > 0.1 MeV). The increase in the Seebeck coefficient in the n-type material was partially off-set by an increase in electrical resistivity, making the power factor higher at lower temperatures. For the p-type materials, although the Seebeck coefficient was not affected by irradiation, electrical resistivity decreased slightly. The figure of merit, zT, showed a clear drop in the 300-400 K range for the p-type material and an increase for the n-type material. Considering that the p-type and n-type materials are connected in series in a module, the overall irradiation damages at the device level were limited. These results, at neutron fluences exceeding a typical space mission, are significant to ensure that the radiation damage to thermoelectrics does not affect the performance of RTGs.

  19. Fe, Co, Ni: Electrical Resistivity Along their Melting Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silber, R. E.; Ezenwa, I.; Secco, R.; Yong, W.

    2017-12-01

    Electrical resistivity of Fe, Co, and Ni was measured at pressures up to 11 GPa and temperatures into their liquid states in multi-anvil and cubic-anvil presses. Two thermocouples placed at opposite ends of the wire sample served as T probes as well as 4-wire resistance electrodes in a switched circuit. A polarity switch was also used to remove any bias associated with current flow and voltage measurement using thermocouple legs. Post experimental examination of recovered and sectioned samples was done using electron microprobe analyses to check for diffusion in our samples. The observed large jumps in resistivity at the high P melting T of each metal is consistent with its known P,T phase diagram and with post-run compositional analyses. The electrical resistivity behavior in these late transition metals as a function of increasing P and T shows expected trends consistent with 1atm data. Within the error of measurement, the resistivity values at the melting T at high P of Co and Ni appear to mimic their 1 atm value suggesting constant resistivity along the melting boundary. For liquid Fe, resistivity decreases along the melting boundary up to the triple point at 5.2 GPa, and then is nearly constant at higher pressures. The results are compared to prediction by Stacey and Loper (PEPI, 2007).

  20. RNA-Seq analysis reveals insight into enhanced rice Xa7-mediated bacterial blight resistance at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Stephen P; Liu, Hongxia; Argueso, Cristiana T; Pereira, Andy; Vera Cruz, Casiana; Verdier, Valerie; Leach, Jan E

    2017-01-01

    Plant disease is a major challenge to agriculture worldwide, and it is exacerbated by abiotic environmental factors. During some plant-pathogen interactions, heat stress allows pathogens to overcome host resistance, a phenomenon which could severely impact crop productivity considering the global warming trends associated with climate change. Despite the importance of this phenomenon, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. To better understand host plant responses during simultaneous heat and pathogen stress, we conducted a transcriptomics experiment for rice plants (cultivar IRBB61) containing Xa7, a bacterial blight disease resistance (R) gene, that were infected with Xanthomonas oryzae, the bacterial blight pathogen of rice, during high temperature stress. Xa7-mediated resistance is unusual relative to resistance mediated by other R genes in that it functions better at high temperatures. Using RNA-Seq technology, we identified 8,499 differentially expressed genes as temperature responsive in rice cultivar IRBB61 experiencing susceptible and resistant interactions across three time points. Notably, genes in the plant hormone abscisic acid biosynthesis and response pathways were up-regulated by high temperature in both mock-treated plants and plants experiencing a susceptible interaction and were suppressed by high temperature in plants exhibiting Xa7-mediated resistance. Genes responsive to salicylic acid, an important plant hormone for disease resistance, were down-regulated by high temperature during both the susceptible and resistant interactions, suggesting that enhanced Xa7-mediated resistance at high temperature is not dependent on salicylic acid signaling. A DNA sequence motif similar to known abscisic acid-responsive cis-regulatory elements was identified in the promoter region upstream of genes up-regulated in susceptible but down-regulated in resistant interactions. The results of our study suggest that the plant hormone abscisic

  1. RNA-Seq analysis reveals insight into enhanced rice Xa7-mediated bacterial blight resistance at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Argueso, Cristiana T.; Pereira, Andy; Vera Cruz, Casiana; Verdier, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Plant disease is a major challenge to agriculture worldwide, and it is exacerbated by abiotic environmental factors. During some plant-pathogen interactions, heat stress allows pathogens to overcome host resistance, a phenomenon which could severely impact crop productivity considering the global warming trends associated with climate change. Despite the importance of this phenomenon, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. To better understand host plant responses during simultaneous heat and pathogen stress, we conducted a transcriptomics experiment for rice plants (cultivar IRBB61) containing Xa7, a bacterial blight disease resistance (R) gene, that were infected with Xanthomonas oryzae, the bacterial blight pathogen of rice, during high temperature stress. Xa7-mediated resistance is unusual relative to resistance mediated by other R genes in that it functions better at high temperatures. Using RNA-Seq technology, we identified 8,499 differentially expressed genes as temperature responsive in rice cultivar IRBB61 experiencing susceptible and resistant interactions across three time points. Notably, genes in the plant hormone abscisic acid biosynthesis and response pathways were up-regulated by high temperature in both mock-treated plants and plants experiencing a susceptible interaction and were suppressed by high temperature in plants exhibiting Xa7-mediated resistance. Genes responsive to salicylic acid, an important plant hormone for disease resistance, were down-regulated by high temperature during both the susceptible and resistant interactions, suggesting that enhanced Xa7-mediated resistance at high temperature is not dependent on salicylic acid signaling. A DNA sequence motif similar to known abscisic acid-responsive cis-regulatory elements was identified in the promoter region upstream of genes up-regulated in susceptible but down-regulated in resistant interactions. The results of our study suggest that the plant hormone abscisic

  2. High temperature strain measurement with a resistance strain gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Fichtel, ED; Mcdaniel, Amos

    1993-01-01

    A PdCr based electrical resistance strain gage was demonstrated in the laboratory to be a viable sensor candidate for static strain measurement at high temperatures. However, difficulties were encountered while transferring the sensor to field applications. This paper is therefore prepared for recognition and resolution of the problems likely to be encountered with PdCr strain gages in field applications. Errors caused by the measurement system, installation technique and lead wire attachment are discussed. The limitations and some considerations related to the temperature compensation technique used for this gage are also addressed.

  3. High reliability sheathed, beryllia insulated, tungsten-rhenium alloy thermocouple assemblies; their fabrication and EMF stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, G. W.; Hurst, W. S.; Scroger, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    Tantalum sheathed, BeO insulated, W-3% Re/W-25% Re thermocouple assemblies were fabricated and their emf drift determined during 2059 hours of exposure at 2073 K in a gaseous helium environment. The sheathed thermocouple assemblies were constructed from aged thermoelements, specially heat-treated BeO insulators, and specially cleaned and etched tantalum sheaths. Their thermal emf drifts ranged from the equivalent of only -0.3 to -0.8 K drift per 1000 hours of exposure at 2073 K. No evidence of any gross chemical attack or degradation of the component materials was found. The emf drift and material behavior of some unsheathed, BeO insulated, W-3% Re/W-25% Re thermocouples at 2250 and 2400 K were also determined. Unsheathed thermocouples tested in an argon environment at 2250 K for 1100 hours and at 2400 K for 307 hours exhibited changes in thermal emf that typically ranged from the equivalent of a few degrees K to as much as +11 K. Post-test examinations of these thermocouples revealed some undesirable material degradation and interaction which included erosion of the BeO insulators and contamination of the thermoelements by tantalum from the tantalum blackbody enclosure in which the thermocouples were contained.

  4. Development of Creep-Resistant, Alumina-Forming Ferrous Alloys for High-Temperature Structural Use

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan

    This paper overviews recent advances in developing novel alloy design concepts of creep-resistant, alumina-forming Fe-base alloys, including both ferritic and austenitic steels, for high-temperature structural applications in fossil-fired power generation systems. Protective, external alumina-scales offer improved oxidation resistance compared to chromia-scales in steam-containing environments at elevated temperatures. Alloy design utilizes computational thermodynamic tools with compositional guidelines based on experimental results accumulated in the last decade, along with design and control of the second-phase precipitates to maximize high-temperature strengths. The alloys developed to date, including ferritic (Fe-Cr-Al-Nb-W base) and austenitic (Fe-Cr-Ni-Al-Nb base) alloys, successfully incorporated the balanced properties of steam/water vapor-oxidationmore » and/or ash-corrosion resistance and improved creep strength. Development of cast alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys is also in progress with successful improvement of higher temperature capability targeting up to ~1100°C. Current alloy design approach and developmental efforts with guidance of computational tools were found to be beneficial for further development of the new heat resistant steel alloys for various extreme environments.« less

  5. Adhesive-Bonded Tab Attaches Thermocouples to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, C. F.

    1982-01-01

    Mechanical strength of titanium-alloy structures that support thermocouples is preserved by first spotwelding thermocouples to titanium tabs and then attaching tabs to titanium with a thermosetting adhesive. In contrast to spot welding, a technique previously used for thermocouples, fatigue strength of the titanium is unaffected by adhesive bonding. Technique is also gentler than soldering or attaching thermocouples with a tap screw.

  6. Oxidation resistant iron and nickel alloys for high temperature use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, V. L.; Misra, S. K.; Wheaton, H. L.

    1970-01-01

    Iron-base and nickel-base alloys exhibit good oxidation resistance and improved ductility with addition of small amounts of yttrium, tantalum /or hafnium/, and thorium. They can be used in applications above the operating temperatures of the superalloys, if high strength materials are not required.

  7. Thermocouples calibration and analysis of the influence of the length of the sensor coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, M.; Ramírez, R.; López, R.; Vaca, M.; Morales, J.; Terres, H.; Lizardi, A.; Chávez, S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design and construction of a lab prototype, with a much lower cost compared to the ones commercially sold, enabling the manufacture of thermocouples which are then calibrated to verify their functionality and acceptance. We also analyze the influence of the external insulation over the wires, to determine whether it influences temperature measurement. The tested lengths ranged from 0.00 m up to 0.030 m. The thermocouple was compared against the behavior of a thermocouple of the same type that was purchased with a commercial supplier. The obtained measurement showed less than 1 °C difference in some points. This makes the built thermocouple reliable, since the standard allows a difference of up to 2.2 °C.

  8. Mounting a thermocouple of type E onto a Cu single crystal for use in a magnetically sensitive environment below 77 K

    SciTech Connect

    Potzuweit, Alexander; Schaffner, Anuschka; Jänsch, Heinz Julius, E-mail: heinz.jaensch@physik.uni-marburg.de

    2014-09-01

    Type E thermocouples show magnetic effects at liquid nitrogen temperature and below. This may cause trouble in experiments that are sensitive to magnetic stray fields like nuclear magnetic resonance, photoemission or high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. Here, a solution for the temperature measurement of a single crystal is presented. The authors weld a copper rod onto the back side of the single crystal, thereby relocating the sensitive sample from the thermocouple attachment position. They show that it is possible to measure the crystal temperature at the end of the rod while significantly reducing the ferromagnetic influence due to themore » increased distance.« less

  9. Investigation of Sintering Temperature on Attrition Resistance of Highly Porous Diatomite Based Material

    SciTech Connect

    Garderen, Noemie van; Clemens, Frank J.; Scharf, Dagobert

    2010-05-30

    Highly porous diatomite based granulates with a diameter of 500 mum have been produced by an extrusion method. In order to investigate the relation between microstructure, phase composition and attrition resistance of the final product, the granulates were sintered between 800 and 1300 deg. C. Mean pore size of the granulates was evaluated by Hg-porosimetry. An increase of the pore size is observed in the range of 3.6 nm to 40 mum with increasing sintering temperature. Higher mean pore radii of 1.6 mum and 5.7 mum obtained by sintering at 800 and 1300 deg. C respectively. X-ray diffraction shows thatmore » mullite phase appears at 1100 deg. C due to the presence of clay. At 1100 deg. C diatomite (amorphous silicate) started to transform into alpha-cristobalite. Attrition resistance was determined by evaluating the amount of ground material passed through a sieve with a predefined mesh size. It was observed that a material sintered at high temperature leads to an increase of attrition resistance due to the decrease of total porosities and phase transformation. Due to the reason that attrition resistance significantly increased by sintering the granulates at higher temperature, a so called attrition resistance index was determined in order to compare all the different attrition resistance values. This attrition resistance index was determined by using the exponential component of the equation obtained from attrition resistance curves. It permits comparison of the attrition behaviour without a time influence.« less

  10. Effect of γ-irradiation on the temperature coefficient of surface resistivity of two-dimensional island platinum films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishay, A. G.; El-Gamal, S.

    2011-05-01

    Three sets (A, B and C) of two-dimensional island platinum films (2D-I(Pt)Fs) were prepared via the thermal evaporation technique, where the substrates are corning 7059 glass slides. The mass thickness ( d m) of the films of different sets is 5, 10 and 20 Å, respectively. The Pt films were exposed to γ-rays from 137Cs (0.662 MeV) radiation source of dose rate 0.5 Gy/min. and the different doses are 100, 200, 300, 500 and 700 Gy. The dependence of the surface resistivity ( ρ) on temperature over the range of 100-300 K was undertaken at different d m and doses then the temperature coefficient of surface resistivity ( α) was deduced. It was found that; (i) for particular d m and T, the absolute value of α decreases as the dose increases (ii) for particular dose and T, the absolute value of α decreases as d m increases (iii) for particular dose and d m, the absolute value of α decreases as T increases. Qualitative interpretation for the results was offered on the ground that the electrons transfer among islands takes place by the activated tunneling mechanism and the γ-irradiation has changed the shape of islands from spherical to prolate spheroid.

  11. Microstructure chemistry and mechanical properties of Ni-based superalloy Rene N4 under irradiation at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, C.; Kirk, M.; Li, M.; ...

    2015-06-14

    Nickel superalloys with cubic L12 structured γ' (Ni 3(Al, Ti)) precipitates exhibit high strength at high temperatures and excellent corrosion resistance when exposed to water. Unlike prior studies on irradiation damage of other Ni-based superalloys, our study on Rene N4 involves much larger γ' precipitates, ~450 nm in size, a size regime where the irradiation-induced disordering and dissolution kinetics and the corresponding mechanical property evolution are unknown. Under heavy ion irradiation at room temperature, the submicron-sized γ' precipitates were fully disordered at ~0.3 dpa and only later partially dissolved after 75 dpa irradiation. Nanoindentation experiments indicate that the mechanical propertiesmore » of the alloy change significantly, with a dramatic decrease in hardness, with irradiation dose. Three contributions to the change in hardness were examined: defect clusters, disordering and dissolution. Moreover, the generation of defect clusters in the matrix and precipitates slightly increased the indentation hardness, while disordering of the submicron-sized γ' precipitates resulted in a dramatic decrease in the total hardness, which decreased further during the early stages of the intermixing between γ' precipitates and matrix (<18 dpa). As a result, controlling the long-range-ordering and chemical intermixing can be used to tailor the mechanical properties of Ni-based superalloys under irradiation.« less

  12. High-Precision Temperature Control of a Crystal Growth Furnace at 1,500 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, Ch.; Hess, A.; Croell, A.; Breuer, D.; Sauermann, H.

    2012-01-01

    For crystal growth of semiconductor materials a short-term temperature stability of 0.1 C at 1500 C is one of the essential parameters to be addressed for achieving high-quality crystals. Hence, for temperature monitoring and control with high precision in a floating zone furnace two sets of thermo-sensors, type B thermocouples and optical fibre thermometers, have been implemented and successfully operated in the furnace for more than 2000 h. The optical fibre thermometers consist of an optical system made of sapphire (two fibres plus a prism in between for deflection) and transmit the infra-red radiation of the heater to the outside of the hot core of the furnace for pyrometric temperature measurement. A dedicated control algorithm has been set up which controlled the power settings to the individual heaters. Both sensor types showed no degradation after this period and yielded a short-term stability at 1200 C of 0.05 C (optical fibre thermometers), respectively 0.08 C (thermocouples).

  13. Frequency response of a thermocouple wire: Effects of axial conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical expressions are derived for the steady-state frequency response of a thermocouple wire. In particular, the effects of axial heat conduction are demonstrated for both a uniform thermocouple wire and a nonuniform wire with unequal material properties and wire diameters across the junction. For the case of a uniform wire, the amplitude ratio and phase angle compare favorably with the series solution of Scadron and Warshawsky (1952) except near the ends of the wire. For the case of a non-uniform wire, the amplitude ratio at low frequency omega yields 0 agrees with the results of Scadron and Warshawsky for a steady-state temperature distribution. Moreover, the frequency response for a non-uniform wire in the limit of infinite length l yields infinity is shown to reduce to a simple expression that is analogous to the classic first order solution for a thermocouple wire with uniform properties.

  14. High Temperature Resistant Organopolysiloxane Coating for Protecting and Repairing Rigid Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Ceramics are protected from high temperature degradation, including high temperature, oxidative, aeroconvective degradation by a high temperature and oxidation resistant coating of a room temperature curing, hydrolyzed and partially condensed liquid polyorganosiloxane to the surface of the ceramic. The liquid polyorganosiloxane is formed by the hydrolysis and partial condensation of an alkyltrialkoxysilane with water or a mixture of an alkyltrialkoxysilane and a dialkyldialkoxysilane with water. The liquid polyorganosiloxane cures at room temperature on the surface of the ceramic to form a hard, protective, solid coating which forms a high temperature environment, and is also used as an adhesive for adhering a repair plug in major damage to the ceramic. This has been found useful for protecting and repairing porous, rigid ceramics of a type used on reentry space vehicles.

  15. Mathematical simulation of thermocouple characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouellail, A. A.; Kostina, M. A.; Bortalevich, S. I.; Loginov, E. L.; Shinyakov, Y. A.; Sukhorukov, M. P.

    2018-03-01

    Within this article, the investigation of the electrical characteristics of two thermocouples in parallel connection was mathematically simulated for further research of the effect of multi-point contact between the sensing thermocouple electrodes and the inspected sample in thermoelectric inspection devices.

  16. Innovative Instrumentation and Analysis of the Temperature Measurement for High Temperature Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Seong W. Lee

    The project entitled, ''Innovative Instrumentation and Analysis of the Temperature Measurement for High Temperature Gasification'', was successfully completed by the Principal Investigator, Dr. S. Lee and his research team in the Center for Advanced Energy Systems and Environmental Control Technologies at Morgan State University. The major results and outcomes were presented in semi-annual progress reports and annual project review meetings/presentations. Specifically, the literature survey including the gasifier temperature measurement, the ultrasonic application in cleaning application, and spray coating process and the gasifier simulator (cold model) testing has been successfully conducted during the first year. The results show that four factorsmore » (blower voltage, ultrasonic application, injection time intervals, particle weight) were considered as significant factors that affect the temperature measurement. Then the gasifier simulator (hot model) design and the fabrication as well as the systematic tests on hot model were completed to test the significant factors on temperature measurement in the second year. The advanced Industrial analytic methods such as statistics-based experimental design, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression methods were applied in the hot model tests. The results show that operational parameters (i.e. air flow rate, water flow rate, fine dust particle amount, ammonia addition) presented significant impact on the temperature measurement inside the gasifier simulator. The experimental design and ANOVA are very efficient way to design and analyze the experiments. The results show that the air flow rate and fine dust particle amount are statistically significant to the temperature measurement. The regression model provided the functional relation between the temperature and these factors with substantial accuracy. In the last year of the project period, the ultrasonic and subsonic cleaning methods and coating materials were

  17. Some Effects of Exposure to Exhaust-gas Streams on Emittance and Thermoelectric Power of Bare-wire Platinum Rhodium - Platinum Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glawe, George E; Shepard, Charles E

    1954-01-01

    Thermocouples were exposed to exhaust gases from the combustion of propane, 72-octane gasoline, and JP-4 fuel. Exposure increased the emissivity of the thermocouple wire, which increased its radiation error. Two methods are presented for determining the emittance of the wires. The emissivity of a clean platinum rhodium-platinum thermocouple was approximately 0.2 in the temperature range investigated, while the emittance of an exposed thermocouple coated with exhaust residue was about 0.5. The exposure caused negligible change in the thermoelectric power of the thermocouples.

  18. High temperature chemically resistant polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    High temperature chemically resistant, non-aqueous polymer concrete composites consist of about 12 to 20% by weight of a water-insoluble polymer binder. The binder is polymerized in situ from a liquid vinyl-type monomer or mixture of vinyl containing monomers such as triallylcyanurate, styrene, acrylonitrile, acrylamide, methacrylamide, methyl-methacrylate, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate and divinyl benzene. About 5 to 40% by weight of a reactive inorganic filler selected from the group consisting of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate and mixtures containing less than 2% free lime, and about 48 to 83% by weight of silica sand/ and a free radical initiator such as di-tert-butyl peroxide, azobisisobutyronitrile, benzoyl peroxide, lauryl peroxide, other orgaic peroxides and combinations to initiate polymerization of the monomer in the presence of the inorganic filers are used.

  19. A Miniature Stem Thermocouple Hygrometer 1

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Burlyn E.

    1977-01-01

    An unprotected chromel-constantan thermocouple was mounted in a cavity (4 × 2 × 1 mm) with rounded corners in a chrome-plated brass block (10 × 6 × 4 mm). When installed against a soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) xylem face, sealed with caulking gum, and insulated with polyurethane foam and aluminum foil, even rapidly changing stem water potentials could be followed accurately. Temperature gradients can be a problem. PMID:16660155

  20. A setup for measuring the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical resistivity of bulk thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Xiong, Yucheng; Zhang, Wenhua; Xu, Dongyan

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a setup for measuring the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical resistivity of bulk thermoelectric materials. The sample holder was designed to have a compact structure and can be directly mounted in a standard cryostat system for temperature-dependent measurements. For the Seebeck coefficient measurement, a thin bar-shaped sample is mounted bridging two copper bases; and two ceramic heaters are used to generate a temperature gradient along the sample. Two type T thermocouples are used to determine both temperature and voltage differences between two widely separated points on the sample. The thermocouple junction is flattened into a disk and pressed onto the sample surface by using a spring load. The flexible fixation method we adopted not only simplifies the sample mounting process but also prevents thermal contact deterioration due to the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between the sample and other parts. With certain modifications, the sample holder can also be used for four-probe electrical resistivity measurements. High temperature measurements are essential for thermoelectric power generation. The experimental system we developed is capable of measuring the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical resistivity of bulk thermoelectric materials in a wide temperature range from 80 to 500 K, which can be further extended to even higher temperatures. Measurements on two standard materials, constantan and nickel, confirmed the accuracy and the reliability of the system.

  1. A calibration model for screen-caged Peltier thermocouple psychrometers

    Treesearch

    Ray W. Brown; Dale L. Bartos

    1982-01-01

    A calibration model for screen-caged Peltier thermocouple psychrometers was developed that applies to a water potential range of 0 to-80 bars, over a temperature range of 0° to 40° C, and for cooling times of 15 to 60 seconds. In addition, the model corrects for the effects of temperature gradients over zero-offsets from -60 to + 60 microvolts. Complete details of...

  2. Niobium-aluminum base alloys having improved, high temperature oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G. (Inventor); Stephens, Joseph R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A niobium-aluminum base alloy having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures and consisting essentially of 48%-52% niobium, 36%-42% aluminum, 4%-10% chromium, 0%-2%, more preferably 1%-2%, silicon and/or tungsten with tungsten being preferred, and 0.1%-2.0% of a rare earth selected from the group consisting of yttrium, ytterbium and erbium. Parabolic oxidation rates, k.sub.p, at 1200.degree. C. range from about 0.006 to 0.032 (mg/cm.sup.2).sup.2 /hr. The new alloys also exhibit excellent cyclic oxidation resistance.

  3. Novel experimental design for high pressure-high temperature electrical resistance measurements in a "Paris-Edinburgh" large volume press.

    PubMed

    Matityahu, Shlomi; Emuna, Moran; Yahel, Eyal; Makov, Guy; Greenberg, Yaron

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel experimental design for high sensitivity measurements of the electrical resistance of samples at high pressures (0-6 GPa) and high temperatures (300-1000 K) in a "Paris-Edinburgh" type large volume press. Uniquely, the electrical measurements are carried out directly on a small sample, thus greatly increasing the sensitivity of the measurement. The sensitivity to even minor changes in electrical resistance can be used to clearly identify phase transitions in material samples. Electrical resistance measurements are relatively simple and rapid to execute and the efficacy of the present experimental design is demonstrated by measuring the electrical resistance of Pb, Sn, and Bi across a wide domain of temperature-pressure phase space and employing it to identify the loci of phase transitions. Based on these results, the phase diagrams of these elements are reconstructed to high accuracy and found to be in excellent agreement with previous studies. In particular, by mapping the locations of several well-studied reference points in the phase diagram of Sn and Bi, it is demonstrated that a standard calibration exists for the temperature and pressure, thus eliminating the need for direct or indirect temperature and pressure measurements. The present technique will allow simple and accurate mapping of phase diagrams under extreme conditions and may be of particular importance in advancing studies of liquid state anomalies.

  4. Development of advanced high-temperature heat flux sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Strange, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    Various configurations of high temperature, heat flux sensors were studied to determine their suitability for use in experimental combustor liners of advanced aircraft gas turbine engines. It was determined that embedded thermocouple sensors, laminated sensors, and Gardon gauge sensors, were the most viable candidates. Sensors of all three types were fabricated, calibrated, and endurance tested. All three types of sensors met the fabricability survivability, and accuracy requirements established for their application.

  5. Effect of high fluence neutron irradiation on transport properties of thermoelectrics

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, H.; Leonard, K. J.

    2017-07-25

    Thermoelectric materials were subjected to high fluence neutron irradiation in order to understand the effect of radiation damage on transport properties. This paper is relevant to the NASA Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) program in which thermoelectric elements are exposed to radiation over a long period of time in space missions. Selected n-type and p-type bismuth telluride materials were irradiated at the High Flux Isotope Reactor with a neutron fluence of 1.3 × 10 18 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). The increase in the Seebeck coefficient in the n-type material was partially off-set by an increase in electrical resistivity, makingmore » the power factor higher at lower temperatures. For the p-type materials, although the Seebeck coefficient was not affected by irradiation, electrical resistivity decreased slightly. The figure of merit, zT, showed a clear drop in the 300–400 K range for the p-type material and an increase for the n-type material. Considering that the p-type and n-type materials are connected in series in a module, the overall irradiation damages at the device level were limited. Finally, these results, at neutron fluences exceeding a typical space mission, are significant to ensure that the radiation damage to thermoelectrics does not affect the performance of RTGs.« less

  6. Effect of high fluence neutron irradiation on transport properties of thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Leonard, K. J.

    Thermoelectric materials were subjected to high fluence neutron irradiation in order to understand the effect of radiation damage on transport properties. This paper is relevant to the NASA Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) program in which thermoelectric elements are exposed to radiation over a long period of time in space missions. Selected n-type and p-type bismuth telluride materials were irradiated at the High Flux Isotope Reactor with a neutron fluence of 1.3 × 10 18 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). The increase in the Seebeck coefficient in the n-type material was partially off-set by an increase in electrical resistivity, makingmore » the power factor higher at lower temperatures. For the p-type materials, although the Seebeck coefficient was not affected by irradiation, electrical resistivity decreased slightly. The figure of merit, zT, showed a clear drop in the 300–400 K range for the p-type material and an increase for the n-type material. Considering that the p-type and n-type materials are connected in series in a module, the overall irradiation damages at the device level were limited. Finally, these results, at neutron fluences exceeding a typical space mission, are significant to ensure that the radiation damage to thermoelectrics does not affect the performance of RTGs.« less

  7. High-dose neutron irradiation embrittlement of RAFM steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaganidze, E.; Schneider, H.-C.; Dafferner, B.; Aktaa, J.

    2006-09-01

    Neutron irradiation-induced embrittlement of the reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel EUROFER97 was studied under different heat treatment conditions. Irradiation was performed in the Petten High Flux Reactor within the HFR Phase-IIb (SPICE) irradiation project up to 16.3 dpa and at different irradiation temperatures (250-450 °C). Several reference RAFM steels (F82H-mod, OPTIFER-Ia, GA3X and MANET-I) were also irradiated at selected temperatures. The impact properties were investigated by instrumented Charpy-V tests with subsize specimens. Embrittlement and hardening of as-delivered EUROFER97 steel are comparable to those of reference steels. Heat treatment of EUROFER97 at a higher austenitizing temperature substantially improves the embrittlement behaviour at low irradiation temperatures. Analysis of embrittlement in terms of the parameter C = ΔDBTT/Δ σ indicates hardening-dominated embrittlement at irradiation temperatures below 350 °C with 0.17 ⩽ C ⩽ 0.53 °C/MPa. Scattering of C at irradiation temperatures above 400 °C indicates no hardening embrittlement.

  8. Modified ferritic iron alloys with improved high-temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    An alloy modification program was conducted in which the compositions of two existing Fe-Cr-Al alloys (Armco 18SR and GE-1541) were changed to achieve either improved high-temperature strength or improved fabricability. Only modifications of Armco 18SR were successful in achieving increased strength without loss of fabricability or oxidation resistance. The best modified alloy, designated NASA-18T, had twice the rupture strength of Armco 18SR at 800 and 1000 C. The NASA-18T alloy also had better oxidation resistance than Armco 18SR and comparable fabricability. The nominal composition of NASA-18T is Fe-18Cr-2Al-1Si-1.25Ta. All attempted modifications of the GE-1541 alloy were unsuccessful in terms of achieving better fabricability without sacrificing high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance.

  9. Effect of high-dose irradiation on quality characteristics of ready-to-eat broiler breast fillets stored at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Baptista, R F; Teixeira, C E; Lemos, M; Monteiro, M L G; Vital, H C; Mársico, E T; Júnior, C A Conte; Mano, S B

    2014-10-01

    The effect of high-dose irradiation on the physical, chemical, and bacteriological parameters of ready-to-eat vacuum-packed broiler breast meat after 430 d of storage at room temperature was investigated. Ready-to-eat broiler breast fillets were immersed in brine with garlic powder and then drained, grilled, and vacuum-packed (primary packaging). The high-dose irradiation used was approximately 48 kGy. The treatments were designated as A (irradiated samples stored at room temperature), B (irradiated samples stored at -25°C), and C (nonirradiated samples stored at -25°C). All samples were packaged in polyethylene bags containing aluminum to exclude light (secondary packaging). Proximate composition, pH, 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), and heterotrophic aerobic mesophilic bacteria were analyzed during 430 d of storage. Results were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and the Tukey test. Linear regression was used to analyze the correlation between the results for each parameter and storage time of the different treatments. The gamma radiation caused slight changes (P < 0.05) in the moisture and fat content, regardless of storage temperature. After storage d 110, TBARS values remained stable (P > 0.05) in all the treatments. The preservation methods used were effective in maintaining the mesophilic counts below the detection level during the entire storage period. We concluded that, among the treatments studied, high-dose irradiation with storage at room temperature showed potential for the preservation of ready-to-eat products made from poultry meat, to provide foods safe for consumption. ©2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  10. High temperature homogenization improves impact toughness of vitamin E-diffused, irradiated UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Oral, Ebru; O'Brien, Caitlin; Doshi, Brinda; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2017-06-01

    Diffusion of vitamin E into radiation cross-linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is used to increase stability against oxidation of total joint implant components. The dispersion of vitamin E throughout implant preforms has been optimized by a two-step process of doping and homogenization. Both of these steps are performed below the peak melting point of the cross-linked polymer (<140°C) to avoid loss of crystallinity and strength. Recently, it was discovered that the exposure of UHMWPE to elevated temperatures, around 300°C, for a limited amount of time in nitrogen, could improve the toughness without sacrificing wear resistance. We hypothesized that high temperature homogenization of antioxidant-doped, radiation cross-linked UHMWPE could improve its toughness. We found that homogenization at 300°C for 8 h resulted in an increase in the impact toughness (74 kJ/m 2 compared to 67 kJ/m 2 ), the ultimate tensile strength (50 MPa compared to 43 MPa) and elongation at break (271% compared to 236%). The high temperature treatment did not compromise the wear resistance or the oxidative stability as measured by oxidation induction time. In addition, the desired homogeneity was achieved at a much shorter duration (8 h compared to >240 h) by using high temperature homogenization. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1343-1347, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. High temperature irradiation induced creep in Ag nanopillars measured via in situ transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jawaharram, Gowtham Sriram; Price, Patrick M.; Barr, Christopher M.

    Irradiation induced creep (IIC) rates are measured in compression on Ag nanopillar (square) beams in the sink-limited regime. The IIC rate increases linearly with stress at lower stresses, i.e. below ≈2/3 the high temperature yield stress and parabolically with pillar width, L, for L less than ≈300 nm. Here, the data are obtained by combining in situ transmission electron imaging with simultaneous ion irradiation, laser heating, and nanopillar compression. Results in the larger width regime are consistent with prior literature.

  12. High temperature irradiation induced creep in Ag nanopillars measured via in situ transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Jawaharram, Gowtham Sriram; Price, Patrick M.; Barr, Christopher M.; ...

    2018-01-30

    Irradiation induced creep (IIC) rates are measured in compression on Ag nanopillar (square) beams in the sink-limited regime. The IIC rate increases linearly with stress at lower stresses, i.e. below ≈2/3 the high temperature yield stress and parabolically with pillar width, L, for L less than ≈300 nm. Here, the data are obtained by combining in situ transmission electron imaging with simultaneous ion irradiation, laser heating, and nanopillar compression. Results in the larger width regime are consistent with prior literature.

  13. Method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Thermos, Anthony Constantine; Rahal, Fadi Elias

    2002-01-01

    A thermocouple assembly includes a thermocouple; a plurality of lead wires extending from the thermocouple; an insulating jacket extending along and enclosing the plurality of leads; and at least one internally sealed area within the insulating jacket to prevent fluid leakage along and within the insulating jacket. The invention also provides a method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple including the steps of a) attaching a plurality of lead wires to a thermocouple; b) adding a heat sensitive pseudo-wire to extend along the plurality of lead wires; c) enclosing the lead wires and pseudo-wire inside an insulating jacket; d) locally heating axially spaced portions of the insulating jacket to a temperature which melts the pseudo-wire and fuses it with an interior surface of the jacket.

  14. New high-temperature flame-resistant resin matrix for RP/C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The processing parameters of graphite composites utilizing graphite fabric and epoxy or other advanced thermoset and thermoplastic resins as matrices are discussed. The evaluated properties include anaerobic char yield, limiting oxygen index, smoke evolution, moisture absorption, and high-temperature mechanical properties. It is shown that graphite composites having the highest char yield exhibit optimum fire-resistant properties.

  15. High-temperature adult-plant resistance, the key for sustainable control of stripe rust

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance expresses when plants grow old and the weather becomes warm. This non-race specific and durable type of resistance has been used successfully in control of wheat stripe rust in the U.S. since early 1960s. This article describes practical procedures f...

  16. Highly stable, extremely high-temperature, nonvolatile memory based on resistance switching in polycrystalline Pt nanogaps

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroya; Shinomura, Yuma; Kashiwabara, Shota; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Naitoh, Yasuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Highly stable, nonvolatile, high-temperature memory based on resistance switching was realized using a polycrystalline platinum (Pt) nanogap. The operating temperature of the memory can be drastically increased by the presence of a sharp-edged Pt crystal facet in the nanogap. A short distance between the facet edges maintains the nanogap shape at high temperature, and the sharp shape of the nanogap densifies the electric field to maintain a stable current flow due to field migration. Even at 873 K, which is a significantly higher temperature than feasible for conventional semiconductor memory, the nonvolatility of the proposed memory allows stable ON and OFF currents, with fluctuations of less than or equal to 10%, to be maintained for longer than eight hours. An advantage of this nanogap scheme for high-temperature memory is its secure operation achieved through the assembly and disassembly of a Pt needle in a high electric field. PMID:27725705

  17. Thermocouple psychrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andraski, Brian J.; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Dane, Jacob H.; Topp, G. Clarke

    2002-01-01

    Thermocouple psychrometry is a technique that infers the water potential of the liquid phase of a sample from measurements within the vapor phase that is in equilibrium with the sample. The theoretical relation between water potential of the liquid phase and relative humidity of the vapor phase is given by the Kelvin equation Ψ = energy/volume = (RT/Vw) ln(p/po) [3.2.3–1]where ψ is water potential (sum of matric and osmotic potential, MPa), R is the universal gas constant (8.314 × 10-6 MJ mol-1 K-1), T is temperature (K), Vw is molar volume of water (1.8 × 10-5 m3 mol-1), and p/po is relative humidity expressed as a fraction where p is actual vapor pressure of air in equilibrium with the liquid phase (MPa) and po is saturation vapor pressure (MPa) at T.

  18. Viability of Cladosporium herbarum spores under 157 nm laser and vacuum ultraviolet irradiation, low temperature (10 K) and vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantopoulou, E., E-mail: esarant@eie.gr; Stefi, A.; Kollia, Z.

    Ultraviolet photons can damage microorganisms, which rarely survive prolonged irradiation. In addition to the need for intact DNA, cell viability is directly linked to the functionality of the cell wall and membrane. In this work, Cladosporium herbarum spore monolayers exhibit high viability (7%) when exposed to 157 nm laser irradiation (412 kJm⁻²) or vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation (110–180 nm) under standard pressure and temperature in a nitrogen atmosphere. Spore viability can be determined by atomic-force microscopy, nano-indentation, mass, μ-Raman and attenuated reflectance Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopies and DNA electrophoresis. Vacuum ultraviolet photons cause molecular damage to the cell wall, but radiation resistance inmore » spores arises from the activation of a photon-triggered signaling reaction, expressed via the exudation of intracellular substances, which, in combination with the low penetration depth of vacuum-ultraviolet photons, shields DNA from radiation. Resistance to phototoxicity under standard conditions was assessed, as was resistance to additional environmental stresses, including exposure in a vacuum, under different rates of change of pressure during pumping time and low (10 K) temperatures. Vacuum conditions were far more destructive to spores than vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation, and UV-B photons were two orders of magnitude more damaging than vacuum-ultraviolet photons. The viability of irradiated spores was also enhanced at 10 K. This work, in addition to contributing to the photonic control of the viability of microorganisms exposed under extreme conditions, including decontamination of biological warfare agents, outlines the basis for identifying bio-signaling in vivo using physical methodologies.« less

  19. Achieving ultra-high temperatures with a resistive emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Tom; Franks, Greg; Holmes, Nicholas; LaVeigne, Joe; Matis, Greg; McHugh, Steve; Norton, Dennis; Vengel, Tony; Lannon, John; Goodwin, Scott

    2016-05-01

    The rapid development of very-large format infrared detector arrays has challenged the IR scene projector community to also develop larger-format infrared emitter arrays to support the testing of systems incorporating these detectors. In addition to larger formats, many scene projector users require much higher simulated temperatures than can be generated with current technology in order to fully evaluate the performance of their systems and associated processing algorithms. Under the Ultra High Temperature (UHT) development program, Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. (SBIR) is developing a new infrared scene projector architecture capable of producing both very large format (>1024 x 1024) resistive emitter arrays and improved emitter pixel technology capable of simulating very high apparent temperatures. During earlier phases of the program, SBIR demonstrated materials with MWIR apparent temperatures in excess of 1400 K. New emitter materials have subsequently been selected to produce pixels that achieve even higher apparent temperatures. Test results from pixels fabricated using the new material set will be presented and discussed. A 'scalable' Read In Integrated Circuit (RIIC) is also being developed under the same UHT program to drive the high temperature pixels. This RIIC will utilize through-silicon via (TSV) and Quilt Packaging (QP) technologies to allow seamless tiling of multiple chips to fabricate very large arrays, and thus overcome the yield limitations inherent in large-scale integrated circuits. Results of design verification testing of the completed RIIC will be presented and discussed.

  20. Multispectral pyrometry for surface temperature measurement of oxidized Zircaloy claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvry, B.; Cheymol, G.; Ramiandrisoa, L.; Javaudin, B.; Gallou, C.; Maskrot, H.; Horny, N.; Duvaut, T.; Destouches, C.; Ferry, L.; Gonnier, C.

    2017-06-01

    Non-contact temperature measurement in a nuclear reactor is still a huge challenge because of the numerous constraints to consider, such as the high temperature, the steam atmosphere, and irradiation. A device is currently developed at CEA to study the nuclear fuel claddings behavior during a Loss-of-Coolant Accident. As a first step of development, we designed and tested an optical pyrometry procedure to measure the surface temperature of nuclear fuel claddings without any contact, under air, in the temperature range 700-850 °C. The temperature of Zircaloy-4 cladding samples was retrieved at various temperature levels. We used Multispectral Radiation Thermometry with the hypothesis of a constant emissivity profile in the spectral ranges 1-1.3 μm and 1.45-1.6 μm. To allow for comparisons, a reference temperature was provided by a thermocouple welded on the cladding surface. Because of thermal losses induced by the presence of the thermocouple, a heat transfer simulation was also performed to estimate the bias. We found a good agreement between the pyrometry measurement and the temperature reference, validating the constant emissivity profile hypothesis used in the MRT estimation. The expanded measurement uncertainty (k = 2) of the temperature obtained by the pyrometry method was ±4 °C, for temperatures between 700 and 850 °C. Emissivity values, between 0.86 and 0.91 were obtained.

  1. Evidence of a temperature transition for denuded zone formation in nanocrystalline Fe under He irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    El-Atwani, Osman; Nathaniel II, James E.; Leff, Asher C.; ...

    2016-10-18

    Nanocrystalline materials are radiation-tolerant materials’ candidates due to their high defect sink density. Here, nanocrystalline iron films were irradiated with 10 keV helium ions in situ in a transmission electron microscope at elevated temperatures. Grain-size-dependent bubble density changes and denuded zone occurrence were observed at 700 K, but not at 573 K. This transition, attributed to increased helium–vacancy migration at elevated temperatures, suggests that nanocrystalline microstructures are more resistant to swelling at 700 K due to decreased bubble density. Finally, denuded zone formation had no correlation with grain size and misorientation angle under the conditions studied.

  2. CT-guided thermocouple placement for hyperthermia treatment.

    PubMed

    Banerian, K G; Roberts, J L; Borrego, J C; Martinez, A

    1990-05-01

    There is a well-documented synergistic cytotoxic effect when heat is combined with ionizing radiation. An integral component of hyperthermia treatments is the placement of thermocouple probes used for thermal dosimetry. With the surge in interest in the clinical use of hyperthermia, our department is performing an increasing number of thermocouple placements under computed tomographic (CT) guidance. We describe our technique for CT-guided thermocouple placement with two different systems: a trocar introduction system and a peel-away needle introduction system. We discuss the rationale for thermocouple placement, our early experience with this technique, and some potential complications.

  3. Combination of all-stage and high-temperature adult-plant resistance QTL confers high-level, durable resistance to stripe rust in winter wheat cultivar Madsen.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Wang, M N; Feng, J Y; See, D R; Chao, S M; Chen, X M

    2018-05-24

    Wheat cultivar Madsen has a new gene on the short arm of chromosome 1A and two QTL for all-stage resistance and three QTL for high-temperature adult-plant resistance that in combination confer high-level, durable resistance to stripe rust. Wheat cultivar Madsen has maintained a high-level resistance to stripe rust over 30 years. To map quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying the high-level, durable resistance, 156 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) developed from cross Avocet S × Madsen were phenotyped with selected races of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici in the greenhouse seedling tests, and in naturally infected fields during 2015-2017. The RILs were genotyped by SSR and SNP markers from genotyping by sequencing and the 90 K wheat SNP chip. Three QTL for all-stage resistance were mapped on chromosomes 1AS, 1BS and 2AS, and two QTL for high-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance were mapped on 3BS and 6BS. The most effective QTL on 2AS, explaining 8.97-23.10% of the phenotypic variation in seedling tests and 8.60-71.23% in field tests, contained Yr17 for all-stage resistance and an additional gene for HTAP resistance. The 6BS QTL, detected in all field tests, was identified as Yr78. The 1AS QTL, conferring all-stage resistance, was identified as a new gene, which explained 20.45 and 30.23% of variation in resistance to races PSTv-37 and PSTv-40, respectively, and contributed significantly to field resistance at Pullman in 2015-2017, but was not detected at Mount Vernon. The interactions among QTL were mostly additive, and RILs with all five QTL had the highest level of resistance in the field, similar to Madsen. Genotyping 148 US Pacific Northwest wheat cultivars with markers for the 1AS, 2AS and 6BS QTL validated the genes and markers, and indicated their usefulness for marker-assisted selection.

  4. Micro-thermocouple probe for measurement of cellular thermal responses.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Kakuta, N; Mabuchi, K; Yamada, Y

    2005-01-01

    We have produced micro-thermocouple probes for the measurement of cellular thermal responses. Cells generate heat with their metabolisms and more heat with reactions to a certain physical or chemical stimulation. Therefore, the analysis of the cellular thermal responses would provide new physiological information. However, a real-time thermal measurement technique on a target of a single cell has not been established. In this study, glass micropipettes, which are widely used in bioengineering and medicine, are used for the base of the thermocouple probes. Using microfabrication techniques, the junction of two different metal films is formed at the micropipette tip with a diameter of 1 μm. This probe can inject a chemical substance into a cell and to detect its subsequent temperature changes simultaneously.

  5. Body temperature and resistance to evaporative water loss in tropical Australian frogs.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Christopher R; Christian, Keith A; Betts, Gregory; Tracy, C Richard

    2008-06-01

    Although the skin of most amphibians measured to date offers no resistance to evaporative water loss (EWL), some species, primarily arboreal frogs, produce skin secretions that increase resistance to EWL. At high air temperatures, it may be advantageous for amphibians to increase EWL as a means to decrease body temperature. In Australian hylid frogs, most species do not decrease their resistance at high air temperature, but some species with moderate resistance (at moderate air temperatures) gradually decrease resistance with increasing air temperature, and some species with high resistance (at moderate air temperatures) abruptly decrease resistance at high air temperatures. Lower skin resistance at high air temperatures decreases the time to desiccation, but the lower body temperatures allow the species to avoid their critical thermal maximum (CT(Max)) body temperatures. The body temperatures of species with low to moderate resistances to EWL that do not adjust resistance at high air temperatures do not warm to their CT(Max), although for some species, this is because they have high CT(Max) values. As has been reported previously for resistance to EWL generally, the response pattern of change of EWL at high air temperatures has apparently evolved independently among Australian hylids. The mechanisms involved in causing resistance and changes in resistance are unknown.

  6. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Kenneth R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4-5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  7. Influence of the irradiation temperature on the dosimetric and high temperature TL peaks of Al2O3:C.

    PubMed

    Molnar, G; Benabdesselam, M; Borossay, J; Iacconi, P; Lapraz, D; Akselrod, M

    2002-01-01

    The TL glow curves of Al2O3:C crystals have been investigated as a function of the irradiation temperature. The nature of the observed TL peaks has been studied by optical annealing. The filling of traps was found strongly dependent on the irradiation temperature in the case of UV exposure, which has been explained by the temperature dependence of the photoionisation of F centres. This latter phenomenon could have a part in the luminescence quenching and UV bleaching of F centres.

  8. Accurate temperature measurement by temperature field analysis in diamond anvil cell for thermal transport study of matter under high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Donghui; Ji, Tingting; Qin, Tianru; Wang, Jia; Liu, Cailong; Jiao, Hui; Zhao, Lin; Han, Yonghao; Gao, Chunxiao

    2018-02-01

    The study on the thermal transport properties of matter under high pressure is important but is hard to fulfill in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) because the accurate measurement of the temperature gradient within the sample of DAC is very difficult. In most cases, the sample temperature can be read accurately from the thermocouples that are directly attached to the lateral edges of diamond anvils because both the sample and diamond anvils can be uniformly heated up to a given temperature. But for the thermal transport property studies in DAC, an artificial temperature distribution along the compression axis is a prerequisite. Obviously, the temperature of the top or bottom surface of the sample cannot be substituted by that of diamond anvils although diamond anvils can be considered as a good medium for heat conduction. With temperature field simulation by finite element analysis, it is found that big measurement errors can occur and are fatal to the correct analysis of thermal transport properties of materials. Thus, a method of combining both the four-thermocouple configuration and temperature field analysis is presented for the accurate temperature distribution measurement in DAC, which is based on the single-function relationship between temperature distribution and sample thermal conductivity.

  9. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, K.R.

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4 to 5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  10. High Strength and Wear Resistant Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Chen, Po Shou

    2003-01-01

    Originally developed by NASA as high performance piston alloys to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low exhaust emission, the novel NASA alloys now offer dramatic increase in tensile strength for many other applications at elevated temperatures from 450 F (232 C) to about 750 F (400 C). It is an ideal low cost material for cast automotive components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. It can be very economically produced from conventional permanent mold, sand casting or investment casting, with silicon content ranging from 6% to 18%. At high silicon levels, the alloy exhibits excellent thermal growth stability, surface hardness and wear resistant properties.

  11. Theoretical Study of the Conditions of Maximum Manifestation of the Error Due to Inhomogeneity of Thermocouple Legs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhigang; Song, Wenguang; Kochan, Orest; Mykyichuk, Mykola; Jun, Su

    2017-07-01

    The method of theoretical analysis of temperature ranges for the maximum manifestation of the error due to acquired thermoelectric inhomogeneity of thermocouple legs is proposed in this paper. The drift function of the reference function of a type K thermocouples in a ceramic insulation, that consisted of 1.2 mm diameter thermoelements after their exposure to 800°C for 10 000 h in an oxidizing atmosphere (air), is analyzed. The method takes into account various operating conditions to determine the optimal conditions for studying inhomogeneous thermocouples. The method can be applied for other types of thermocouples when taking into account their specific characteristics and the conditions that they have been exposed to.

  12. Influence of ultraviolet irradiation on data retention characteristics in resistive random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, K.; Ohmi, K.; Tottori University Electronic Display Research Center, 101 Minami4-chome, Koyama-cho, Tottori-shi, Tottori 680-8551

    With increasing density of memory devices, the issue of generating soft errors by cosmic rays is becoming more and more serious. Therefore, the irradiation resistance of resistance random access memory (ReRAM) to cosmic radiation has to be elucidated for practical use. In this paper, we investigated the data retention characteristics of ReRAM against ultraviolet irradiation with a Pt/NiO/ITO structure. Soft errors were confirmed to be caused by ultraviolet irradiation in both low- and high-resistance states. An analysis of the wavelength dependence of light irradiation on data retention characteristics suggested that electronic excitation from the valence to the conduction band andmore » to the energy level generated due to the introduction of oxygen vacancies caused the errors. Based on a statistically estimated soft error rates, the errors were suggested to be caused by the cohesion and dispersion of oxygen vacancies owing to the generation of electron-hole pairs and valence changes by the ultraviolet irradiation.« less

  13. Thermal Scanning of Dental Pulp Chamber by Thermocouple System and Infrared Camera during Photo Curing of Resin Composites.

    PubMed

    Hamze, Faeze; Ganjalikhan Nasab, Seyed Abdolreza; Eskandarizadeh, Ali; Shahravan, Arash; Akhavan Fard, Fatemeh; Sinaee, Neda

    2018-01-01

    Due to thermal hazard during composite restorations, this study was designed to scan the pulp temperature by thermocouple and infrared camera during photo polymerizing different composites. A mesio-occlso-distal (MOD) cavity was prepared in an extracted tooth and the K-type thermocouple was fixed in its pulp chamber. Subsequently, 1 mm increment of each composites were inserted (four composite types were incorporated) and photo polymerized employing either LED or QTH systems for 60 sec while the temperature was recorded with 10 sec intervals. Ultimately, the same tooth was hemisected bucco-lingually and the amalgam was removed. The same composite curing procedure was repeated while the thermogram was recorded using an infrared camera. Thereafter, the data was analyzed by repeated measured ANOVA followed by Tukey's HSD Post Hoc test for multiple comparisons ( α =0.05). The pulp temperature was significantly increased (repeated measures) during photo polymerization ( P =0.000) while there was no significant difference among the results recorded by thermocouple comparing to infrared camera ( P >0.05). Moreover, different composite materials and LCUs lead to similar outcomes ( P >0.05). Although various composites have significant different chemical compositions, they lead to similar pulp thermal changes. Moreover, both the infrared camera and the thermocouple would record parallel results of dental pulp temperature.

  14. Temperature modeling of laser-irradiated azo-polymer thin films.

    PubMed

    Yager, Kevin G; Barrett, Christopher J

    2004-01-08

    Azobenzene polymer thin films exhibit reversible surface mass transport when irradiated with a light intensity and/or polarization gradient, although the exact mechanism remains unknown. In order to address the role of thermal effects in the surface relief grating formation process peculiar to azo polymers, a cellular automaton simulation was developed to model heat flow in thin films undergoing laser irradiation. Typical irradiation intensities of 50 mW/cm2 resulted in film temperature rises on the order of 5 K, confirmed experimentally. The temperature gradient between the light maxima and minima was found, however, to stabilize at only 10(-4) K within 2 micros. These results indicate that thermal effects play a negligible role during inscription, for films of any thickness. Experiments monitoring surface relief grating formation on substrates of different thermal conductivity confirm that inscription is insensitive to film temperature. Further simulations suggest that high-intensity pulsed irradiation leads to destructive temperatures and sample ablation, not to reversible optical mass transport. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics

  15. Improved Blackbody Temperature Sensors for a Vacuum Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jeff; Coppens, Chris; O'Dell, J. Scott; McKechnie, Timothy N.; Schofield, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Some improvements have been made in the design and fabrication of blackbody sensors (BBSs) used to measure the temperature of a heater core in a vacuum furnace. Each BBS consists of a ring of thermally conductive, high-melting-temperature material with two tantalum-sheathed thermocouples attached at diametrically opposite points. The name "blackbody sensor" reflects the basic principle of operation. Heat is transferred between the ring and the furnace heater core primarily by blackbody radiation, heat is conducted through the ring to the thermocouples, and the temperature of the ring (and, hence, the temperature of the heater core) is measured by use of the thermocouples. Two main requirements have guided the development of these BBSs: (1) The rings should have as high an emissivity as possible in order to maximize the heat-transfer rate and thereby maximize temperature-monitoring performance and (2) the thermocouples must be joined to the rings in such a way as to ensure long-term, reliable intimate thermal contact. The problem of fabricating a BBS to satisfy these requirements is complicated by an application-specific prohibition against overheating and thereby damaging nearby instrumentation leads through the use of conventional furnace brazing or any other technique that involves heating the entire BBS and its surroundings. The problem is further complicated by another application-specific prohibition against damaging the thin tantalum thermocouple sheaths through the use of conventional welding to join the thermocouples to the ring. The first BBS rings were made of graphite. The tantalum-sheathed thermocouples were attached to the graphite rings by use of high-temperature graphite cements. The ring/thermocouple bonds thus formed were found to be weak and unreliable, and so graphite rings and graphite cements were abandoned. Now, each BBS ring is made from one of two materials: either tantalum or a molybdenum/titanium/zirconium alloy. The tantalum

  16. A Silicon Carbide Wireless Temperature Sensing System for High Temperature Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an extreme environment-capable temperature sensing system based on state-of-art silicon carbide (SiC) wireless electronics is presented. In conjunction with a Pt-Pb thermocouple, the SiC wireless sensor suite is operable at 450 °C while under centrifugal load greater than 1,000 g. This SiC wireless temperature sensing system is designed to be non-intrusively embedded inside the gas turbine generators, acquiring the temperature information of critical components such as turbine blades, and wirelessly transmitting the information to the receiver located outside the turbine engine. A prototype system was developed and verified up to 450 °C through high temperature lab testing. The combination of the extreme temperature SiC wireless telemetry technology and integrated harsh environment sensors will allow for condition-based in-situ maintenance of power generators and aircraft turbines in field operation, and can be applied in many other industries requiring extreme environment monitoring and maintenance. PMID:23377189

  17. Evaluation of Disinfection Techniques for, and Their Effects on, Rectal Thermocouple Catheters1

    PubMed Central

    Maher, J. T.; Rogers, M. R.; Peterson, D. W.

    1961-01-01

    The antibacterial activities of an iodophor (Wescodyne G), a quaternary ammonium compound (Roccal), and an iodine tincture as agents for the cold disinfection of rectal catheters contaminated in vitro were determined. Following thorough cleaning with an alcoholic solution of soft soap, each of the three disinfectants tested showed satisfactory results (100% kill) in 5 min against the enteric test bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhosa) as well as a test species of the genus Pseudomonas, among the bacteria most resistant to surface-active agents. An aqueous solution of Wescodyne G containing 75 ppm available iodine was used both as a wiping solution and for subsequent disinfection of rectal catheters contaminated in vivo. Total bacterial destruction was found to follow a 60-min soak preceded by the wiping procedure. Rectal catheters subjected to prolonged immersion in each of the test disinfectants were found to be essentially unaffected, retaining their initial calibrations within a permissible tolerance. Neither Roccal nor Wescodyne G solutions were found to measurably attack bare thermocouples. Alcoholic iodine 0.5% did, however, exert a deteriorating effect on bare thermocouples in a short time, as measured by change in resistance characteristics. The results of this study have led to the recommendation that Wescodyne G containing 75 ppm available iodine be used in standing operating procedures for the initial cleaning and subsequent disinfection of rectal thermocouple catheters. Images Fig. 1 PMID:13765378

  18. High-Temperature Extensometry and PdCr Temperature-Compensated Wire Resistance Strain Gages Compared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A detailed experimental evaluation is underway at the NASA Lewis Research Center to compare and contrast the performance of the PdCr/Pt dual-element temperature-compensated wire resistance strain gage with that of conventional high-temperature extensometry. The advanced PdCr gage, developed by researchers at Lewis, exhibits desirable properties and a relatively small and repeatable apparent strain to 800 C. This gage represents a significant advance in technology because existing commercial resistance strain gages are not reliable for quasi-static strain measurements above approx. 400 C. Various thermal and mechanical loading spectra are being applied by a high-temperature thermomechanical uniaxial testing system to evaluate the two strain-measurement systems. This is being done not only to compare and contrast the two strain sensors, but also to investigate the applicability of the PdCr strain gage to the coupon-level specimen testing environment typically employed when the high-temperature mechanical behavior of structural materials is characterized. Strain measurement capabilities to 800 C are being investigated with a nickel-base superalloy, Inconel 100 (IN 100), substrate material and application to TMC's is being examined with the model system, SCS-6/Ti-15-3. Furthermore, two gage application techniques are being investigated in the comparison study: namely, flame-sprayed and spot welding. The apparent strain responses of both the weldable and flame-sprayed PdCr wire strain gages were found to be cyclically repeatable on both IN 100 and SCS-6/Ti-15-3 [0]_8. In general, each gage exhibited some uniqueness with respect to apparent strain behavior. Gages mounted on the IN 100 specimens tended to show a repeatable apparent strain within the first few cycles, because the thermal response of IN 100 was stable. This was not the case, however, for the TMC specimens, which typically required several thermal cycles to stabilize the thermal strain response. Thus

  19. Study on process and characterization of high-temperature resistance polyimide composite

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Ling-Ying; Zhao, Wei-Dong; Liu, Han-Yang

    2016-05-18

    A novel polyimide composite with upper-use temperature of 420°C was prepared by autoclave process. The thermogravimetic analysis and rheological properties of uncured polyimide resin powders were analyzed. The influences of process parameters and post-treatment process on the properties of composites were also investigated. The morphologies of polyimide composites after shear fracture were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The high-temperature resistance of composite was characterized by dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer (DMTA). Results showed that the imidization reaction mainly occurred in the temperature range of 100°C~220°C, and the largest weight loss rate appearing at 145°C indicated a drastic imidization reaction occurred.more » The melt viscosity of polyimide resin decreased with increasing the temperature between 220°C ∼305°C, and then increased with the increase of temperature due to the molecular crosslinking reactions. The fiber volume contents and void contents could be effectively controlled by applying the pressure step by step. The fiber volume content was sensitive to the initial pressure (P{sub i}) during the imidization. The second-stage pressure (P{sub 2}) and the temperature for applying the P{sub 2} (T{sub 2}) during the imidization had a great effect on the void content of composite. Good mechanical properties and interfacial adhesion of polyimide composite could obtain by optimized process. The post-treatment process can obviously increase the high-temperature resistance of polyimide composite. The polyimide composite treated at 420°C exhibited good retention of mechanical properties at 420°C and had a glass transition temperature (Tg) of 456°C. The retentions of flexible strength, flexible modulus and short beam shear strength of polyimide composite at 420°C were 65%, 84% and 62% respectively.« less

  20. INNOVATIVE INSTRUMENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE GASIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Seong W. Lee

    2004-10-01

    The systematic tests of the gasifier simulator on the clean thermocouple were completed in this reporting period. Within the systematic tests on the clean thermocouple, five (5) factors were considered as the experimental parameters including air flow rate, water flow rate, fine dust particle amount, ammonia addition and high/low frequency device (electric motor). The fractional factorial design method was used in the experiment design with sixteen (16) data sets of readings. Analysis of Variances (ANOVA) was applied to the results from systematic tests. The ANOVA results show that the un-balanced motor vibration frequency did not have the significant impact onmore » the temperature changes in the gasifier simulator. For the fine dust particles testing, the amount of fine dust particles has significant impact to the temperature measurements in the gasifier simulator. The effects of the air and water on the temperature measurements show the same results as reported in the previous report. The ammonia concentration was included as an experimental parameter for the reducing environment in this reporting period. The ammonia concentration does not seem to be a significant factor on the temperature changes. The linear regression analysis was applied to the temperature reading with five (5) factors. The accuracy of the linear regression is relatively low, which is less than 10% accuracy. Nonlinear regression was also conducted to the temperature reading with the same factors. Since the experiments were designed in two (2) levels, the nonlinear regression is not very effective with the dataset (16 readings). An extra central point test was conducted. With the data of the center point testing, the accuracy of the nonlinear regression is much better than the linear regression.« less

  1. Theory and performance of plated thermocouples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesko, R. N.; Ash, R. L.; Cupschalk, S. G.; Germain, E. F.

    1972-01-01

    A theory has been developed to describe the performance of thermocouples which have been formed by electroplating portions of one thermoelectric material with another. The electroplated leg of the thermocouple was modeled as a collection of infinitesimally small homogeneous thermocouples connected in series. Experiments were performed using several combinations of Constantan wire sizes and copper plating thicknesses. A transient method was used to develop the thermoelectric calibrations, and the theory was found to be in quite good agreement with the experiments. In addition, data gathered in a Soviet experiment were also found to be in close agreement with the theory.

  2. High-temperature Friction and Wear Resistance of Ni-Co-SiC Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fang; Sun, Wan-chang; Jia, Zong-wei; Liu, Xiao-jia; Dong, Ya-ru

    2018-05-01

    Ni-Co alloy and SiC micro-particles were co-deposited on 45 steel by electrodeposition for high temperature performance. The high temperature tribological characteristics were studied by use of a ball-on-disk method. The micrographs and phase structure of the Ni-Co-SiC composite coatings after high-temperature friction were observed by using a field emission scanning electron microscope(FESEM). The results reveal that the Ni-Co-SiC composite coating presents better wear resistance and lower friction coefficient at high temperature in comparison with that of Ni-Co coating and 45 steel substrate. The embedded SiC particles could strengthen the alloy coating by dispersion strengthening effect and changing the friction mechanism from adhesive wear to abrasive wear.

  3. Real-time measurements of temperature, pressure and moisture profiles in High-Performance Concrete exposed to high temperatures during neutron radiography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Toropovs, N., E-mail: nikolajs.toropovs@rtu.lv; Riga Technical University, Institute of Materials and Structures, Riga; Lo Monte, F.

    2015-02-15

    High-Performance Concrete (HPC) is particularly prone to explosive spalling when exposed to high temperature. Although the exact causes that lead to spalling are still being debated, moisture transport during heating plays an important role in all proposed mechanisms. In this study, slabs made of high-performance, low water-to-binder ratio mortars with addition of superabsorbent polymers (SAP) and polypropylene fibers (PP) were heated from one side on a temperature-controlled plate up to 550 °C. A combination of measurements was performed simultaneously on the same sample: moisture profiles via neutron radiography, temperature profiles with embedded thermocouples and pore pressure evolution with embedded pressuremore » sensors. Spalling occurred in the sample with SAP, where sharp profiles of moisture and temperature were observed. No spalling occurred when PP-fibers were introduced in addition to SAP. The experimental procedure described here is essential for developing and verifying numerical models and studying measures against fire spalling risk in HPC.« less

  4. Irradiation of Frozen Solutions of Ferrous Sulphate as Dosimeter for Low Temperature Irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Mejorada, G.; Frias, D.

    2006-09-01

    A theoretical model is presented for the evaluation of the energy transferred during the interaction of high energy radiation with icy bodies. Numerical simulations of the chemical reaction system reproduce the behavior of the icy systems (frozen solution of iron salts) after its interaction with the gamma radiation. Simulation experiments of extraterrestrial bodies are useful for space research, where low temperature dosimetry is necessary, especially in trips with humans or in the International Space Station (ISS) where humans are exposed to high radiation doses. The results showed that theoretical model applied for the irradiated system for different doses (from 10 to 2500Gy) and at different temperature (from 77 to 298 °K). The system under study was frozen solutions of iron salts and were analyzed (after Melting) by UV-spectroscopy. The systems were irradiates with gamma radiation. It is also shown that the response of the system is a function of the temperature and it was linear with as a function of dose.

  5. Steady-state low thermal resistance characterization apparatus: The bulk thermal tester

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, Brian R.; Kolly, Manuel; Blasakis, Nicolas

    The reliability of microelectronic devices is largely dependent on electronic packaging, which includes heat removal. The appropriate packaging design therefore necessitates precise knowledge of the relevant material properties, including thermal resistance and thermal conductivity. Thin materials and high conductivity layers make their thermal characterization challenging. A steady state measurement technique is presented and evaluated with the purpose to characterize samples with a thermal resistance below 100 mm{sup 2} K/W. It is based on the heat flow meter bar approach made up by two copper blocks and relies exclusively on temperature measurements from thermocouples. The importance of thermocouple calibration is emphasizedmore » in order to obtain accurate temperature readings. An in depth error analysis, based on Gaussian error propagation, is carried out. An error sensitivity analysis highlights the importance of the precise knowledge of the thermal interface materials required for the measurements. Reference measurements on Mo samples reveal a measurement uncertainty in the range of 5% and most accurate measurements are obtained at high heat fluxes. Measurement techniques for homogeneous bulk samples, layered materials, and protruding cavity samples are discussed. Ultimately, a comprehensive overview of a steady state thermal characterization technique is provided, evaluating the accuracy of sample measurements with thermal resistances well below state of the art setups. Accurate characterization of materials used in heat removal applications, such as electronic packaging, will enable more efficient designs and ultimately contribute to energy savings.« less

  6. Nanoscale assembly of high-temperature oxidation-resistant nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao

    2010-02-01

    Structural considerations for designing a high-temperature oxidation-resistant metallic material are proposed, based on the dependence of the material structure on a promotion of the development of a protective scale of chromia or alumina. The material should have numerous sites on its surface for nucleating the protective oxides at the onset of oxidation and abundant grain boundaries in deeper areas for simultaneously supplying sufficient flux of the protective-oxide-forming elements toward the surface for a rapid linkage of the oxide nuclei through their lateral growth. Based on these considerations, we fabricated, using an electrochemical deposition method, novel nanocomposites which have a nanocrystalline metal matrix containing Cr and/or Al nanoparticles dispersed at the nano length scale. The validity of the design considerations is verified by comparing the high-temperature oxidation of a typical Ni-Cr nanocomposite system with two types of conventional Ni-Cr materials having similar or higher Cr content but different structure: one is a composite having a nanocrystalline Ni matrix containing Cr microparticles dispersed at the microscale and the other are micron-grained Ni-Cr alloys with the Cr distribution at the atomic length scale.

  7. Nanoscale assembly of high-temperature oxidation-resistant nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiao

    2010-02-01

    Structural considerations for designing a high-temperature oxidation-resistant metallic material are proposed, based on the dependence of the material structure on a promotion of the development of a protective scale of chromia or alumina. The material should have numerous sites on its surface for nucleating the protective oxides at the onset of oxidation and abundant grain boundaries in deeper areas for simultaneously supplying sufficient flux of the protective-oxide-forming elements toward the surface for a rapid linkage of the oxide nuclei through their lateral growth. Based on these considerations, we fabricated, using an electrochemical deposition method, novel nanocomposites which have a nanocrystalline metal matrix containing Cr and/or Al nanoparticles dispersed at the nano length scale. The validity of the design considerations is verified by comparing the high-temperature oxidation of a typical Ni-Cr nanocomposite system with two types of conventional Ni-Cr materials having similar or higher Cr content but different structure: one is a composite having a nanocrystalline Ni matrix containing Cr microparticles dispersed at the microscale and the other are micron-grained Ni-Cr alloys with the Cr distribution at the atomic length scale.

  8. Assessment of Titanium Aluminide Alloys for High-Temperature Nuclear Structural Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hanliang; Wei, Tao; Carr, David; Harrison, Robert; Edwards, Lyndon; Hoffelner, Wolfgang; Seo, Dongyi; Maruyama, Kouichi

    2012-12-01

    Titanium aluminide (TiAl) alloys exhibit high specific strength, low density, good oxidation, corrosion, and creep resistance at elevated temperatures, making them good candidate materials for aerospace and automotive applications. TiAl alloys also show excellent radiation resistance and low neutron activation, and they can be developed to have various microstructures, allowing different combinations of properties for various extreme environments. Hence, TiAl alloys may be used in advanced nuclear systems as high-temperature structural materials. Moreover, TiAl alloys are good materials to be used for fundamental studies on microstructural effects on irradiation behavior of advanced nuclear structural materials. This article reviews the microstructure, creep, radiation, and oxidation properties of TiAl alloys in comparison with other nuclear structural materials to assess the potential of TiAl alloys as candidate structural materials for future nuclear applications.

  9. Nonequilibrium segregation and phase instability in alloy films during elevated-temperature irradiation in a high-voltage electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, N. Q.; Okamoto, P. R.

    1984-05-01

    The effects of defect-production rate gradients, caused by the radial nonuniformity in the electron flux distribution, on solute segregation and phase stability in alloy films undergoing high-voltage electron-microscope (HVEM) irradiation at high temperatures are assessed. Two-dimensional (axially symmetric) compositional redistributions were calculated, taking into account both axial and transverse radial defect fluxes. It was found that when highly focused beams were employed radiation-induced segregation consisted of two stages: dominant axial segregation at the film surfaces at short irradiation times and competitive radial segregation at longer times. The average alloy composition within the irradiated region could differ greatly from that irradiated with a uniform beam, because of the additional atom transport from or to the region surrounding the irradiated zone under the influence of radial fluxes. Damage-rate gradient effects must be taken into account when interpreting in-situ HVEM observations of segregation-induced phase instabilities. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental observations of the temporal and spatial dependence of segregation-induced precipitation in thin films of Ni-Al, Ni-Ge and Ni-Si solid solutions.

  10. Copper modified austenitic stainless steel alloys with improved high temperature creep resistance

    DOEpatents

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1987-04-28

    An improved austenitic stainless steel that incorporates copper into a base Fe-Ni-Cr alloy having minor alloying substituents of Mo, Mn, Si, T, Nb, V, C, N, P, B which exhibits significant improvement in high temperature creep resistance over previous steels. 3 figs.

  11. Thermogravimetric Study of Oxidation-Resistant Alloys for High-Temperature Solar Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, Rene I.; Stein, Wes; Marvig, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Three special alloys likely to be suitable for high-temperature solar receivers were studied for their resistance to oxidation up to a temperature of 1050°C in dry atmospheres of CO2 and air. The alloys were Haynes HR160, Hastelloy X, and Haynes 230, all nickel-based alloys with greater than 20% chromium content. The oxidation rate of specimens cut from sample master alloys was followed by thermogravimetry by continuously monitoring the weight change with a microbalance for a test duration of 10 h. The corrosion resistance was deduced from the total weight increase of the specimens and the morphology of the oxide scale. The surface oxide layer formed (scale) was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and in all cases was found to be chromia. Oxidation was analyzed by means of parabolic rate law, albeit in some instances linear breakaway corrosion was also observed. For the temperature range investigated, all alloys corroded more in CO2 than in air due to the formation of a stronger and more protective oxide scale in the presence of air. At 1000°C, the most resistant alloy to corrosion in CO2 was Haynes 230. Alloy Haynes HR160 was the most oxidized alloy at 1000°C in both CO2 and air. Hastelloy X oxidized to a similar extent in CO2 at both 900°C and 1000°C, but in air, it resisted oxidation better at 1000°C than either at 900°C or 1000°C.

  12. Heat-Flux Sensor For Hot Engine Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Walter S.; Barrows, Richard F.; Smith, Floyd A.; Koch, John

    1989-01-01

    Heat-flux sensor includes buried wire thermocouple and thin-film surface thermocouple, made of platinum and platinum with 13 percent rhodium. Sensor intended for use in ceramic-insulated, low-heat-rejection diesel engine at temperatures of about 1,000 K. Thermocouple junction resists environment in cylinder of advanced high-temperature diesel engine created by depositing overlapping films of Pt and 0.87 Pt/0.13 Rh on iron plug. Plug also contains internal thermocouple.

  13. Thermal Scanning of Dental Pulp Chamber by Thermocouple System and Infrared Camera during Photo Curing of Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Hamze, Faeze; Ganjalikhan Nasab, Seyed Abdolreza; Eskandarizadeh, Ali; Shahravan, Arash; Akhavan Fard, Fatemeh; Sinaee, Neda

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Due to thermal hazard during composite restorations, this study was designed to scan the pulp temperature by thermocouple and infrared camera during photo polymerizing different composites. Methods and Materials: A mesio-occlso-distal (MOD) cavity was prepared in an extracted tooth and the K-type thermocouple was fixed in its pulp chamber. Subsequently, 1 mm increment of each composites were inserted (four composite types were incorporated) and photo polymerized employing either LED or QTH systems for 60 sec while the temperature was recorded with 10 sec intervals. Ultimately, the same tooth was hemisected bucco-lingually and the amalgam was removed. The same composite curing procedure was repeated while the thermogram was recorded using an infrared camera. Thereafter, the data was analyzed by repeated measured ANOVA followed by Tukey’s HSD Post Hoc test for multiple comparisons (α=0.05). Results: The pulp temperature was significantly increased (repeated measures) during photo polymerization (P=0.000) while there was no significant difference among the results recorded by thermocouple comparing to infrared camera (P>0.05). Moreover, different composite materials and LCUs lead to similar outcomes (P>0.05). Conclusion: Although various composites have significant different chemical compositions, they lead to similar pulp thermal changes. Moreover, both the infrared camera and the thermocouple would record parallel results of dental pulp temperature. PMID:29707014

  14. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Ramirez, A.L.; Chesnut, D.A.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-09-13

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations. 1 fig.

  15. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Daily, William D.

    1994-01-01

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations.

  16. Dynamical theory of responsivity and response time of a high temperature superconductor photo-thermoelectrical bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaila, M. M.

    2002-11-01

    Dynamical theory of responsivity and response time for an high temperature superconductor (HTSC) photo-thermoelectrical bolometer is analysed in this paper. There is a thermoelectric feedback (TEF) due to the heat transfer from the sensitive area (HTSC-BiSb thermojunction) towards the cold junction of the thermocouple. This is in addition to the normal electrothermal feedback (ETF) between the detector and the substrate, in a photoelectrical bolometer. The two legs of the thermocouple are connected in a parallel geometry configuration. It is seen that TEF can be used in combination with the ETF to enhance responsivity and response time of the detector.

  17. Design, Qualification and Integration Testing of the High-Temperature Resistance Temperature Device for Stirling Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Jack; Hill, Dennis H.; Elisii, Remo; White, Jonathan R.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), developed from 2006 to 2013 under the joint sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to provide a high-efficiency power system for future deep space missions, employed Sunpower Incorporated's Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs) with operating temperature up to 840 C. High-temperature operation was made possible by advanced heater head materials developed to increase reliability and thermal-to-mechanical conversion efficiency. During a mission, it is desirable to monitor the Stirling hot-end temperature as a measure of convertor health status and assist in making appropriate operating parameter adjustments to maintain the desired hot-end temperature as the radioisotope fuel decays. To facilitate these operations, a Resistance Temperature Device (RTD) that is capable of high-temperature, continuous long-life service was designed, developed and qualified for use in the ASRG. A thermal bridge was also implemented to reduce the RTD temperature exposure while still allowing an accurate projection of the ASC hot-end temperature. NASA integrated two flight-design RTDs on the ASCs and assembled into the high-fidelity Engineering Unit, the ASRG EU2, at Glenn Research Center (GRC) for extended operation and system characterization. This paper presents the design implementation and qualification of the RTD, and its performance characteristics and calibration in the ASRG EU2 testing.

  18. Microstructure and properties of laser-clad high-temperature wear-resistant alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongqiang

    1999-02-01

    A 2-kW CO 2 laser with a powder feeder was used to produce alloy coatings with high temperature-wear resistance on the surface of steel substrates. To analyze the microstructure and microchemical composition of the laser-clad layers, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis system was employed. X-ray diffraction techniques were applied to characterize the phases formed during the cladding process. The results show that the microstructure of the cladding alloy consists mainly of many dispersed particles (W 2C, (W,Ti)C 1- x, WC), a lamellar eutectic carbide M 12C, and an (f.c.c) matrix. Hardness tested at room and high temperature showed that the laser-clad zone has a moderate room temperature hardness and relatively higher elevated temperature hardness. The application of the laser-clad layer to a hot tool was very successful, and its operational life span was prolonged 1 to 4 times.

  19. Investigation of the storage and release of oxygen in a Cu-Pt element of a high-temperature microcombustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaji, Z.; Sturesson, P.; Hjort, K.; Klintberg, L.; Thornell, G.

    2014-11-01

    A miniature combustor for converting organic samples into CO2 with application in carbon isotopic measurements has been manufactured and evaluated. The combustor was made of High-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (HTCC) alumina green tapes. The device has a built-in screen printed heater and a temperature sensor made of platinum, co-sintered with the ceramic. A copper oxide oxygen supply was added to the combustor after sintering by in-situ electroplating of copper on the heater pattern followed by thermal oxidation. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used to study electroplating, oxidation and the oxide reduction processes. The temperature sensor was calibrated by use of a thermocouple. It demonstrates a temperature coefficient resistance of 4.66×10-3/°C between 32 and 660 °C. The heat characterization was done up to 1000 °C by using IR thermography, and the results were compared with the data from the temperature sensor. Combustion of starch confirmed the feasibility of using copper oxide as the source of oxygen of combustion.

  20. Measurement of the high-temperature Seebeck coefficient of thin films by means of an epitaxially regrown thermometric reference material.

    PubMed

    Ramu, Ashok T; Mages, Phillip; Zhang, Chong; Imamura, Jeffrey T; Bowers, John E

    2012-09-01

    The Seebeck coefficient of a typical thermoelectric material, silicon-doped InGaAs lattice-matched to InP, is measured over a temperature range from 300 K to 550 K. By depositing and patterning a thermometric reference bar of silicon-doped InP adjacent to a bar of the material under test, temperature differences are measured directly. This is in contrast to conventional two-thermocouple techniques that subtract two large temperatures to yield a small temperature difference, a procedure prone to errors. The proposed technique retains the simple instrumentation of two-thermocouple techniques while eliminating the critical dependence of the latter on good thermal contact. The repeatability of the proposed technique is demonstrated to be ±2.6% over three temperature sweeps, while the repeatability of two-thermocouple measurements is about ±5%. The improved repeatability is significant for reliable reporting of the ZT figure of merit, which is proportional to the square of the Seebeck coefficient. The accuracy of the proposed technique depends on the accuracy with which the high-temperature Seebeck coefficient of the reference material may be computed or measured. In this work, the Seebeck coefficient of the reference material, n+ InP, is computed by rigorous solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed technique can be systematically improved by scaling, and the method is easily extensible to other material systems currently being investigated for high thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency.

  1. Fission product release and microstructure changes of irradiated MOX fuel at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colle, J.-Y.; Hiernaut, J.-P.; Wiss, T.; Beneš, O.; Thiele, H.; Papaioannou, D.; Rondinella, V. V.; Sasahara, A.; Sonoda, T.; Konings, R. J. M.

    2013-11-01

    burnups correspond reasonably well with measurement of Walker et al. [11]. All those data are shown Fig. 2.Fragments of 2-8 mg were chosen for the experiments. Since these specimens are small compared to the drilled sample size and were taken randomly, the precise radial position could not be determined, in particular the specimens of sample type, A and B could be from close radial locations.Specimens from each drilled sample type were annealed up to complete vaporisation (˜2600 K) at a speed of about 10 K min-1 in a Knudsen effusion mass spectrometer (KEMS) described previously [13,14]. In addition to helium and to the FGs all the species present in the vapour between 83 and 300 a.m.u. were measured during the heating. Additionally, the 85Kr isotope was analysed in a cold trap by β and γ counting. The long-lived fission gas isotopes correspond to masses 131, 132, 134 and 136 for Xe and 83, 84, 85 and 86 for Kr. The absolute quantities of gas released from specimens of sample types A and B were also determined using the in-house built Q-GAMES (Quantitative gas measurement system), described in detail in [15].For each of the samples, fragments were also annealed and measured in the KEMS up to specific temperatures corresponding to different stages of the FGs or He release. These fragments were subsequently analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Philips XL40) [16] in order to investigate the relationship between structural changes, burn-up, irradiation temperature and fission products release. SEM observations were also done on the samples before the KEMS experiments and the fracture surface appearance of the samples is shown in Fig. 3, revealing the presence of the high burnup structure (HBS) in the Pu-rich agglomerates.A summary of the 12 samples analysed by KEMS, SEM and Q-GAMES is given in Table 1. At 1300 K no clear change potentially related to gas release appears in the UM and PA. At 1450 K a beginning of grain boundaries opening can be observed as well as

  2. Impact of the nanostructuration on the corrosion resistance and hardness of irradiated 316 austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hug, E.; Prasath Babu, R.; Monnet, I.; Etienne, A.; Moisy, F.; Pralong, V.; Enikeev, N.; Abramova, M.; Sauvage, X.; Radiguet, B.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of grain size and irradiation defects on the mechanical behavior and the corrosion resistance of a 316 stainless steel have been investigated. Nanostructured samples were obtained by severe plastic deformation using high pressure torsion. Both coarse grain and nanostructured samples were irradiated with 10 MeV 56Fe5+ ions. Microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Surface mechanical properties were evaluated thanks to hardness measurements and the corrosion resistance was studied in chloride environment. Nanostructuration by high pressure torsion followed by annealing leads to enrichment in chromium at grain boundaries. However, irradiation of nanostructured samples implies a chromium depletion of the same order than depicted in coarse grain specimens but without metallurgical damage like segregated dislocation loops or clusters. Potentiodynamic polarization tests highlight a definitive deterioration of the corrosion resistance of coarse grain steel with irradiation. Downsizing the grain to a few hundred of nanometers enhances the corrosion resistance of irradiated samples, despite the fact that the hardness of nanocrystalline austenitic steel is only weakly affected by irradiation. These new experimental results are discussed in the basis of couplings between mechanical and electrical properties of the passivated layer thanks to impedance spectroscopy measurements, hardness properties of the surfaces and local microstructure evolutions.

  3. Resistive switching characteristics of solution-processed Al-Zn-Sn-O films annealed by microwave irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Wan; Baek, Il-Jin; Cho, Won-Ju

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we employed microwave irradiation (MWI) at low temperature in the fabrication of solution-processed AlZnSnO (AZTO) resistive random access memory (ReRAM) devices with a structure of Ti/AZTO/Pt and compared the memory characteristics with the conventional thermal annealing (CTA) process. Typical bipolar resistance switching (BRS) behavior was observed in AZTO ReRAM devices treated with as-deposited (as-dep), CTA and MWI. In the low resistance state, the Ohmic conduction mechanism describes the dominant conduction of these devices. On the other hand, the trap-controlled space charge limited conduction (SCLC) mechanism predominates in the high resistance state. The AZTO ReRAM devices processed with MWI showed larger memory windows, uniform distribution of resistance state and operating voltage, stable DC durability (>103 cycles) and stable retention characteristics (>104 s). In addition, the AZTO ReRAM devices treated with MWI exhibited multistage storage characteristics by modulating the amplitude of the reset bias, and eight distinct resistance levels were obtained with stable retention capability.

  4. Measurement of In Vitro Single Cell Temperature by Novel Thermocouple Nanoprobe in Acute Lung Injury Models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing; Chen, Qiuhua; Tian, Wenjuan; Wang, Jianqing; Cheng, Lu; Lu, Jun; Chen, Mingqi; Pei, Yinhao; Li, Can; Chen, Gong; Gu, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Energy metabolism may alter pattern differences in acute lung injury (ALI) as one of the causes but the detailed features at single-cellular level remain unclear. Changes in intercellular temperature and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration within the single cell may help to understand the role of energy metabolism in causing ALI. ALI in vitro models were established by treating mice lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydrochloric acid (HCl) and cobalt chloride (CoCl2, respectively. 100 nm micro thermocouple probe (TMP) was inserted into the cytosol by micromanipulation system and thermoelectric readings were recorded to calculate the intracellular temperature based on standard curve. The total ATP contents for the MLE-12 cells were evaluated at different time intervals after treatments. A significant increase of intracellular temperature was observed after 10 or 20 μg/L LPS and HCl treatments. The HCl increased the temperature in a dose-dependent manner. On the contrary, H2O2 induced a significant decline of intracellular temperature after treatment. No significant difference in intracellular temperature was observed after CoCl2 exposure. The intracellular ATP levels decreased in a time-dependent manner after treatment with H2O2 and HCl, while the LPS and CoCl2 had no significant effect on ATP levels. The intracellular temperature responses varied in different ALI models. The concentration of ATP in the MLE-12 cells played part in the intracellular temperature changes. No direct correlation was observed between the intracellular temperature and concentration of ATP in the MLE-12 cells.

  5. Pressure Measurement Based on Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, K.

    2010-12-01

    Measuring gas pressures reliably in a harsh radiation environment was confirmed to be tricky during operation of the liquid spallation target of MEGAPIE at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Severe drift of calibration and the loss of a sensor were experienced. At the same time, the only instrumentation that worked flawlessly in the system were thermocouples. Motivated by this experience, a novel pressure sensor for application in high radiation fields has been developed, which is based on temperature measurement. The new sensor takes advantage of the fact that the thermal conductivity over a mechanical joint exhibits a strong dependence on the contact pressure. In the novel sensor heating is applied at one point and temperatures are measured at different specific locations of the pressure gage; in particular, the temperatures on the two sides of a mechanical contact are monitored. From the observed temperature distribution the gas pressure can be derived. By choosing specific mechanical details in the lay-out, it is possible to tailor the useful measurement range. In addition to yielding pressure values, the new sensor concept admits for obtaining a measure for the accuracy of the result. This is done by continuous self monitoring of the device. The health status and based thereupon the plausibility of the indicated pressure value can be deducted by comparing sensed temperatures to expectation values for any given heating power. Malfunctioning of the pressure gage is reliably detected from the diverse readings of only one device; this can be seen as providing internal redundancy while at the same time immunity to common mode failure. After some analytical and finite element studies to verify the concept in principle, a first prototype of such a novel pressure sensor has been built at PSI. Initial measurement campaigns demonstrated the correct operation of the device as anticipated. Further potential for optimization, like designing a gage for high temperature

  6. Recent status and improvement of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature service

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Tavassoli, A. -A. F.; ...

    2016-07-26

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels, candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, have achieved technological maturity after about three decades of research and development. The recent status of a few developmental aspects of current RAFM steels, such as aging resistance, plate thickness effects, fracture toughness, and fatigue, is updated in this paper, together with ongoing efforts to develop next-generation RAFM steels for superior high-temperature performance. Additionally, to thermomechanical treatments, including nonstandard heat treatment, alloy chemistry refinements and modifications have demonstrated some improvements in high-temperature performance. Castable nanostructured alloys (CNAs) were developed by significantly increasing the amount of nanoscale MX (M = V/Ta/Ti,more » X = C/N) precipitates and reducing coarse M 23C 6 (M = Cr). Preliminary results showed promising improvement in creep resistance and Charpy impact toughness. We present and compare limited low-dose neutron irradiation results for one of the CNAs and China low activation martensitic with data for F82H and Eurofer97 irradiated up to ~70 displacements per atom at ~300–325 °C.« less

  7. Burst annealing of high temperature GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brothers, P. R.; Horne, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    One of the major limitations of solar cells in space power systems is their vulnerability to radiation damage. One solution to this problem is to periodically heat the cells to anneal the radiation damage. Annealing was demonstrated with silicon cells. The obstacle to annealing of GaAs cells was their susceptibility to thermal damage at the temperatures required to completely anneal the radiation damage. GaAs cells with high temperature contacts and encapsulation were developed. The cells tested are designed for concentrator use at 30 suns AMO. The circular active area is 2.5 mm in diameter for an area of 0.05 sq cm. Typical one sun AMO efficiency of these cells is over 18 percent. The cells were demonstrated to be resistant to damage after thermal excursions in excess of 600 C. This high temperature tolerance should allow these cells to survive the annealing of radiation damage. A limited set of experiments were devised to investigate the feasibility of annealing these high temperature cells. The effect of repeated cycles of electron and proton irradiation was tested. The damage mechanisms were analyzed. Limitations in annealing recovery suggested improvements in cell design for more complete recovery. These preliminary experiments also indicate the need for further study to isolate damage mechanisms. The primary objective of the experiments was to demonstrate and quantify the annealing behavior of high temperature GaAs cells. Secondary objectives were to measure the radiation degradation and to determine the effect of repeated irradiation and anneal cycles.

  8. Tile Surface Thermocouple Measurement Challenges from the Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Berger, Karen; Anderson, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Hypersonic entry flight testing motivated by efforts seeking to characterize boundary layer transition on the Space Shuttle Orbiters have identified challenges in our ability to acquire high quality quantitative surface temperature measurements versus time. Five missions near the end of the Space Shuttle Program implemented a tile surface protuberance as a boundary layer trip together with tile surface thermocouples to capture temperature measurements during entry. Similar engineering implementations of these measurements on Discovery and Endeavor demonstrated unexpected measurement voltage response during the high heating portion of the entry trajectory. An assessment has been performed to characterize possible causes of the issues experienced during STS-119, STS-128, STS-131, STS-133 and STS-134 as well as similar issues encountered during other orbiter entries.

  9. Resistance thermometer has linear resistance-temperature coefficient at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzyk, W.

    1966-01-01

    Resistance thermometer incorporating a germanium resistance element with a platinum resistance element in a wheatstone bridge circuit has a linear temperature-resistance coefficient over a range from approximately minus 140 deg C to approximately minus 253 deg C.

  10. Inhibition of EGFR nuclear shuttling decreases irradiation resistance in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong; Zhu, Zijie; Lu, Longtao

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of mortality in women worldwide. The resistance to irradiation at the advanced stage is the main reason for the poor prognosis and high mortality. This work aims to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the radio-resistance. In this study, we determined the pEGFR-T654 and pDNA-PK-T2609 expression level changes in irradiated HeLa cells treated with T654 peptide, a nuclear localization signal (NLS) inhibitor, to inhibit EGFR nuclear transport. Cell viability, cell cycle and migratory capacity were analyzed. Xenograft animal model was used to evaluate the effect of EGFR nuclear transport inhibition on the tumor growth in vivo. The enhanced translocation of nuclear EGFR in the irradiated HeLa cells correlated with the increasing level of pEGFR-T654 and pDNA-PK-T2609. Inhibition of EGFR nuclear translocation by NLS peptide inhibitor attenuated DNA damage repair in the irradiated HeLa cells, decreased cell viability and promoted cell death through arrest at G0 phase. NLS peptide inhibitor impaired the migratory capacity of irradiated HeLa cells, and negatively affected tumorigenesis in xenograft mice. This work puts forward a potential molecular mechanism of the irradiation resistance in cervical cancer cells, providing a promising direction towards an efficient therapy of cervical cancer.

  11. Synergies Between ' and Cavity Formation in HT-9 Following High Dose Neutron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Parish, Chad M.; Saleh, Tarik A.

    Candidate cladding materials for advanced nuclear power reactors including fast reactor designs require materials capable of withstanding high dose neutron irradiation at elevated temperatures. One candidate material, HT-9, through various research programs have demonstrated the ability to withstand significant swelling and other radiation-induced degradation mechanisms in the high dose regime (>50 displacements per atom, dpa) at elevated temperatures (>300 C). Here, high efficiency multi-dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) acquisition with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and modeling technique is used to probe the microstructural features that contribute to the exceptional swelling resistance of HT-9. In particular, themore » synergies between ' and fine-scale and moderate-scale cavity formation is investigated.« less

  12. STATUS OF TRISO FUEL IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR SUPPORTING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR DESIGNS

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, Michael; Petti, D. A.; Palmer, Joe

    2016-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experimentsmore » are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and completed in October 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this experiment was to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment was significantly different from the first two experiments, though the

  13. A Review of In Situ Observations of Crystallization and Growth in High Temperature Oxide Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhanjun; Sohn, Il

    2018-05-01

    This review summarizes the significant results of high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and single hot thermocouple technology (SHTT) and its application in observing the crystallization and growth in high-temperature oxide melts from iron- and steel-making slags to continuous casting mold fluxes. Using in situ observations of CLSM and SHTT images of high-temperature molten oxides with time, temperature, and composition, the crystallization behavior, including crystal morphology, crystallization temperature, initial nucleation and growth rate, could be obtained. The broad range of applications using in situ observations during crystallization have provided a wealth of opportunities in pyrometallurgy and is provided in this review.

  14. Thermocouple Rakes for Measuring Boundary Layer Flows Extremely Close to Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Martin, Lisa C.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    Of vital interest to aerodynamic researchers is precise knowledge of the flow velocity profile next to the surface. This information is needed for turbulence model development and the calculation of viscous shear force. Though many instruments can determine the flow velocity profile near the surface, none of them can make measurements closer than approximately 0.01 in. from the surface. The thermocouple boundary-layer rake can measure much closer to the surface than conventional instruments can, such as a total pressure boundary layer rake, hot wire, or hot film. By embedding the sensors (thermocouples) in the region where the velocity is equivalent to the velocity ahead of a constant thickness strut, the boundary-layer flow profile can be obtained. The present device fabricated at the NASA Glenn Research Center microsystem clean room has a heater made of platinum and thermocouples made of platinum and gold. Equal numbers of thermocouples are placed both upstream and downstream of the heater, so that the voltage generated by each pair at the same distance from the surface is indicative of the difference in temperature between the upstream and downstream thermocouple locations. This voltage differential is a function of the flow velocity, and like the conventional total pressure rake, it can provide the velocity profile. In order to measure flow extremely close to the surface, the strut is made of fused quartz with extremely low heat conductivity. A large size thermocouple boundary layer rake is shown in the following photo. The latest medium size sensors already provide smooth velocity profiles well into the boundary layer, as close as 0.0025 in. from the surface. This is about 4 times closer to the surface than the previously used total pressure rakes. This device also has the advantage of providing the flow profile of separated flow and also it is possible to measure simultaneous turbulence levels within the boundary layer.

  15. An in vitro investigation of the temperature rises produced in dentine by Nd:YAG laser light with and without water cooling.

    PubMed

    Gow, A M; McDonald, A V; Pearson, G J; Setchell, D J

    1999-01-01

    Infrared lasers are reported to have thermal side effects which may damage pulp tissue. This study investigated the thermal effects of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Prepared, extracted teeth were measured prior to irradiation. Temperature was recorded using a thermocouple/data logging system. Laser irradiation was carried out with or without water spray for an exposure time of ten seconds. Results indicated that dry irradiation produced unacceptable temperature rises with dentine thicknesses used. Wet irradiation produced a significantly lower temperature rise. It was concluded that the Nd:YAG laser produced thermal effects which could potentially cause pulpal trauma. A water coolant was effective in reducing these thermal effects, but the temperature rise achieved whilst using water coolant may still cause pulpal damage.

  16. High carotenoids content can enhance resistance of selected Pinctada fucata families to high temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zihao; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Baosuo; Li, Haimei; Fan, Sigang; Yu, Dahui

    2017-02-01

    Carotenoids are a class of natural antioxidants widely found in aquatic, and they have significant effects on the growth, survival, and immunity of these organisms. To investigate the mechanisms of carotenoids in high temperature resistance, we observed the immune response of selected pearl oyster Pinctada fucata (Akoya pearl oyster) families with different carotenoids contents to high temperature stress. The results indicated that the survival rate (SR) of P. fucata decreased significantly with increase in temperature from 26 °C to 34 °C and with the decrease of total carotenoids content (TCC); when the TCC was higher, the SR tended to be higher. TCC and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) decreased significantly at 30 °C with increasing stress time. Correlation analysis indicated that TAC was positively and linearly correlated with TCC, and SR was S-type correlated with TCC and TAC. Immune analysis indicated that levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in selected families (with higher TCC) under temperature stress (at 30 °C) were generally significantly lower than in the control group (with lowest TCC) and from 0 to 96 h, the levels of each of these substances varied significantly. Levels of SOD, CAT, and MDA within each family first rose from 0 to 3 h, then decreased to their lowest point after 24 h, and then rose again to their highest levels at 96 h. When TCC was higher, the levels of SOD, CAT, and MDA tended to be lower. These findings indicated that carotenoids play an important role in improving survival rates of P. fucata under high temperature stress by enhancing animals' antioxidant system, and could serve as an index for breeding stress-resistant lines in selective breeding practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Design of a constant tension thermocouple rake suitable for flame studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, Sandeep; Miller, David L.

    1993-01-01

    An improved, spring-loaded thermocouple rake, suitable for studying flame structure, has been designed. This design keeps the thermocouple under tension thereby ensuring that the thermocouple does not droop due to the thermal expansion of the sensing wire when inserted in the flame. The present design allows the usage of thermocouple wire as small as 0.0508 mm and relative ease in changing thermocouple wire.

  18. Abscisic Acid Deficiency Antagonizes High-Temperature Inhibition of Disease Resistance through Enhancing Nuclear Accumulation of Resistance Proteins SNC1 and RPS4 in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Mang, Hyung-Gon; Qian, Weiqiang; Zhu, Ying; Qian, Jun; Kang, Hong-Gu; Klessig, Daniel F.; Hua, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Plant defense responses to pathogens are influenced by abiotic factors, including temperature. Elevated temperatures often inhibit the activities of disease resistance proteins and the defense responses they mediate. A mutant screen with an Arabidopsis thaliana temperature-sensitive autoimmune mutant bonzai1 revealed that the abscisic acid (ABA)–deficient mutant aba2 enhances resistance mediated by the resistance (R) gene SUPPRESSOR OF npr1-1 CONSTITUTIVE1 (SNC1) at high temperature. ABA deficiency promoted nuclear accumulation of SNC1, which was essential for it to function at low and high temperatures. Furthermore, the effect of ABA deficiency on SNC1 protein accumulation is independent of salicylic acid, whose effects are often antagonized by ABA. ABA deficiency also promotes the activity and nuclear localization of R protein RESISTANCE TO PSEUDOMONAS SYRINGAE4 at higher temperature, suggesting that the effect of ABA on R protein localization and nuclear activity is rather broad. By contrast, mutations that confer ABA insensitivity did not promote defense responses at high temperature, suggesting either tissue specificity of ABA signaling or a role of ABA in defense regulation independent of the core ABA signaling machinery. Taken together, this study reveals a new intersection between ABA and disease resistance through R protein localization and provides further evidence of antagonism between abiotic and biotic responses. PMID:22454454

  19. Germanium resistance thermometer calibration at superfluid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    The rapid increase in resistance of high purity semi-conducting germanium with decreasing temperature in the superfluid helium range of temperatures makes this material highly adaptable as a very sensitive thermometer. Also, a germanium thermometer exhibits a highly reproducible resistance versus temperature characteristic curve upon cycling between liquid helium temperatures and room temperature. These two factors combine to make germanium thermometers ideally suited for measuring temperatures in many cryogenic studies at superfluid helium temperatures. One disadvantage, however, is the relatively high cost of calibrated germanium thermometers. In space helium cryogenic systems, many such thermometers are often required, leading to a high cost for calibrated thermometers. The construction of a thermometer calibration cryostat and probe which will allow for calibrating six germanium thermometers at one time, thus effecting substantial savings in the purchase of thermometers is considered.

  20. Preliminary Low Temperature Electron Irradiation of Triple Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2007-01-01

    For many years extending solar power missions far from the sun has been a challenge not only due to the rapid falloff in solar intensity (intensity varies as inverse square of solar distance) but also because some of the solar cells in an array may exhibit a LILT (low intensity low temperature) degradation that reduces array performance. Recent LILT tests performed on commercial triple junction solar cells have shown that high performance can be obtained at solar distances as great as approx. 5 AU1. As a result, their use for missions going far from the sun has become very attractive. One additional question that remains is whether the radiation damage experienced by solar cells under low temperature conditions will be more severe than when measured during room temperature radiation tests where thermal annealing may take place. This is especially pertinent to missions such as the New Frontiers mission Juno, which will experience cell irradiation from the trapped electron environment at Jupiter. Recent testing2 has shown that low temperature proton irradiation (10 MeV) produces cell degradation results similar to room temperature irradiations and that thermal annealing does not play a factor. Although it is suggestive to propose the same would be observed for low temperature electron irradiations, this has not been verified. JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature. A fluence of 1E15 1MeV electrons was

  1. Development of autoclavable polyimides. [fabrication procedures of high temperature resistant/fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orell, M. K.; Sheppard, C. H.; Vaughan, R. W.; Jones, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A poly(Diels-Alder) (PDA) resin approach was investigated as a means to achieve autoclavability of high temperature resistant resin/fiber composites under mild fabrication procedures. Low void content Type A-S graphite reinforced composites were autoclave fabricated from a PDA resin/fiber prepared from an acetone:methanol:dioxane varnish. Autoclave conditions were 477K (400F) and 0.7 MN/sq m (100 psi) for up to two hours duration. After postcure at temperatures up to 589K (600F), the composites demonstrated high initial mechanical properties at temperatures up to 561K (550F). The results from isothermal aging studies in air for 1000 hours indicated potential for long-term ( 1000 hours) use at 533K (500F) and shorter-term (up to 1000 hours) at 561K (550F).

  2. Temperature evaluation of dental implant surface irradiated with high-power diode laser.

    PubMed

    Rios, F G; Viana, E R; Ribeiro, G M; González, J C; Abelenda, A; Peruzzo, D C

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of peri-implantitis and the absence of a standard approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface have led to searches for effective therapies. Since the source of diode lasers is portable, has reduced cost, and does not cause damage to the titanium surface of the implant, high-power diode lasers have been used for this purpose. The effect of laser irradiation on the implants is the elevation of the temperature surface. If this elevation exceeds 47 °C, the bone tissue is irreversibly damaged, so for a safety therapy, the laser parameters should be controlled. In this study, a diode laser of GaAsAl was used to irradiate titanium dental implants, for powers 1.32 to 2.64 W (real) or 2.00 to 4.00 W (nominal), in continuous/pulsed mode DC/AC, with exposure time of 5/10 s, with/without air flow for cooling. The elevation of the temperature was monitored in real time in two positions: cervical and apical. The best results for decontamination using a 968-nm diode laser were obtained for a power of 1.65 and 1.98 W (real) for 10 s, in DC or AC mode, with an air flow of 2.5 l/min. In our perspective in this article, we determine a suggested approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface using a 968-nm diode laser.

  3. Corrosion resistant positive electrode for high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Otto, Neil C.; Warner, Barry T.; Smaga, John A.; Battles, James E.

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion rate of low carbon steel within a positive electrode of a high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell that includes FeS as active material is substantially reduced by incorporating therein finely divided iron powder in stoichiometric excess to the amount required to form FeS in the fully charged electrode. The cell typically includes an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal as negative electrode active material and a molten metal halide salt as electrolyte. The excess iron permits use of inexpensive carbon steel alloys that are substantially free of the costly corrosion resistant elements chromium, nickel and molybdenum while avoiding shorten cell life resulting from high corrosion rates.

  4. Corrosion resistant positive electrode for high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Otto, N.C.; Warner, B.T.; Smaga, J.A.; Battles, J.E.

    1982-07-07

    The corrosion rate of low carbon steel within a positive electrode of a high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell that includes FeS as active material is substantially reduced by incorporating therein finely divided iron powder in stoichiometric excess to the amount required to form FeS in the fully charged electrode. The cell typically includes an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal as negative electrode active material and a molten metal halide salt as electrolyte. The excess iron permits use of inexpensive carbon steel alloys that are substantially free of the costly corrosion resistant elements chromium, nickel and molybdenum while avoiding shorten cell life resulting from high corrosion rates.

  5. NEET Enhanced Micro-Pocket Fission Detector for High Temperature Reactors - FY16 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Troy; Reichenberger, Michael; Stevenson, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    A collaboration between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the Kansas State University (KSU), and the French Atomic Energy Agency, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, (CEA), has been initiated by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) program for developing and testing High Temperature Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (HT MPFD), which are compact fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package for temperatures up to 800 °C. The MPFD technology utilizes a small, multi-purpose, robust, in-core fission chambers and thermocouple. As discussed within this report,more » the small size, variable sensitivity, and increased accuracy of the MPFD technology represent a revolutionary improvement over current methods used to support irradiations in US Material Test Reactors (MTRs). Previous research conducted through NEET ASI1-3 has shown that the MPFD technology could be made robust and was successfully tested in a reactor core. This new project will further the MPFD technology for higher temperature regimes and other reactor applications by developing a HT MPFD suitable for temperatures up to 800 °C. This report summarizes the research progress for year two of this three year project. Highlights from research accomplishments include: • Continuation of a joint collaboration between INL, KSU, and CEA. Note that CEA is participating at their own expense because of interest in this unique new sensor. • An updated parallel wire HT MPFD design was developed. • Program support for HT MPFD deployments was given to Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) and Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) irradiation test programs. • Quality approved materials for HT MPFD construction were procured by irradiation test programs for upcoming deployments. • KSU improved and performed electrical contact and fissile material plating.

  6. Thermocouple for heating and cooling of memory metal actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A semiconductor thermocouple unit is provided for heating and cooling memory metal actuators. The semiconductor thermocouple unit is mounted adjacent to a memory metal actuator and has a heat sink attached to it. A flexible thermally conductive element extends between the semiconductor thermocouple and the actuator and serves as a heat transfer medium during heating and cooling operations.

  7. Electrical conductivity of In2O3 and Ga2O3 after low temperature ion irradiation; implications for instrinsic defect formation and charge neutrality level.

    PubMed

    Vines, L; Bhoodoo, C; von Wenckstern, H; Grundmann, M

    2017-12-13

    The evolution of sheet resistance of n-type In 2 O 3 and Ga 2 O 3 exposed to bombardment with MeV 12 C and 28 Si ions at 35 K is studied in situ. While the sheet resistance of Ga 2 O 3 increased by more than eight orders of magnitude as a result of ion irradiation, In 2 O 3 showed a more complex defect evolution and became more conductive when irradiated at the highest doses. Heating up to room temperature reduced the sheet resistivity somewhat, but Ga 2 O 3 remained highly resistive, while In 2 O 3 showed a lower resistance than as deposited samples. Thermal admittance spectroscopy and deep level transient spectroscopy did not reveal new defect levels for irradiation up to [Formula: see text] cm -2 . A model where larger defect complexes preferentially produce donor like defects in In 2 O 3 is proposed, and may reveal a microscopic view of a charge neutrality level within the conduction band, as previously proposed.

  8. Electrical conductivity of In2O3 and Ga2O3 after low temperature ion irradiation; implications for instrinsic defect formation and charge neutrality level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vines, L.; Bhoodoo, C.; von Wenckstern, H.; Grundmann, M.

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of sheet resistance of n-type In2O3 and Ga2O3 exposed to bombardment with MeV 12C and 28Si ions at 35 K is studied in situ. While the sheet resistance of Ga2O3 increased by more than eight orders of magnitude as a result of ion irradiation, In2O3 showed a more complex defect evolution and became more conductive when irradiated at the highest doses. Heating up to room temperature reduced the sheet resistivity somewhat, but Ga2O3 remained highly resistive, while In2O3 showed a lower resistance than as deposited samples. Thermal admittance spectroscopy and deep level transient spectroscopy did not reveal new defect levels for irradiation up to 2 × 1012 cm-2. A model where larger defect complexes preferentially produce donor like defects in In2O3 is proposed, and may reveal a microscopic view of a charge neutrality level within the conduction band, as previously proposed.

  9. Low-Temperature Ionizing Radiation Resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans and Antarctic Dry Valley Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartnell, Lewis R.; Hunter, Stephanie J.; Lovell, Keith V.; Coates, Andrew J.; Ward, John M.

    2010-09-01

    The high flux of cosmic rays onto the unshielded surface of Mars poses a significant hazard to the survival of martian microbial life. Here, we determined the survival responses of several bacterial strains to ionizing radiation exposure while frozen at a low temperature characteristic of the martian near-subsurface. Novel psychrotolerant bacterial strains were isolated from the Antarctic Dry Valleys, an environmental analogue of the martian surface, and identified by 16S rRNA gene phylogeny as representatives of Brevundimonas, Rhodococcus, and Pseudomonas genera. These isolates, in addition to the known radioresistant extremophile Deinococcus radiodurans, were exposed to gamma rays while frozen on dry ice (-79°C). We found D. radiodurans to exhibit far greater radiation resistance when irradiated at -79°C than was observed in similar studies performed at higher temperatures. This greater radiation resistance has important implications for the estimation of potential survival times of microorganisms near the martian surface. Furthermore, the most radiation resistant of these Dry Valley isolates, Brevundimonas sp. MV.7, was found to show 99% 16S rRNA gene similarity to contaminant bacteria discovered in clean rooms at both Kennedy and Johnson Space Centers and so is of prime concern to efforts in the planetary protection of Mars from our lander probes. Results from this experimental irradiation, combined with previous radiation modeling, indicate that Brevundimonas sp. MV.7 emplaced only 30 cm deep in martian dust could survive the cosmic radiation for up to 100,000 years before suffering 106 population reduction.

  10. Use of a soft sensor for the fast estimation of dried cake resistance during a freeze-drying cycle.

    PubMed

    Bosca, Serena; Barresi, Antonello A; Fissore, Davide

    2013-07-15

    This paper deals with the determination of dried cake resistance in a freeze-drying process using the Smart Soft Sensor, a process analytical technology recently proposed by the authors to monitor the primary drying stage of a freeze-drying process. This sensor uses the measurement of product temperature, a mathematical model of the process, and the Kalman filter algorithm to estimate the residual amount of ice in the vial as a function of time, as well as the coefficient of heat transfer between the shelf and the product and the resistance of the dried cake to vapor flow. It does not require expensive (additional) hardware in a freeze-dryer, provided that thermocouples are available. At first, the effect of the insertion of the thermocouple in a vial on the structure of the product is investigated by means of experimental tests, comparing both sublimation rate and cake structure in vials with and without thermocouple. This is required to assess that the temperature measured by the thermocouple is the same of the product in the non-monitored vials, at least in a non-GMP environment, or when controlled nucleation methods are used. Then, results about cake resistance obtained in an extended experimental campaign with aqueous solutions containing different excipients (sucrose, mannitol and polyvinylpyrrolidone), processed in various operating conditions, are presented, with the goal to point out the accuracy of the proposed methodology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Quasipermanent magnets of high temperature superconductor - Temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, In-Gann; Liu, Jianxiong; Ren, Yanru; Weinstein, Roy; Kozlowski, Gregory; Oberly, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    We report on persistent field in quasi-permanent magnets of high temperature superconductors. Magnets composed of irradiated Y(1+)Ba2Cu3O7 trapped field Bt = 1.52 T at 77 K and 1.9 T at lower temperature. However, the activation magnet limited Bt at lower temperature. We present data on Jc(H,T) for unirradiated materials, and calculate Bt at various T. Based upon data at 65 K, we calculate Bt in unirradiated single grains at 20 K and find that 5.2 T will be trapped for grain diameter d about 1.2 cm, and 7.9 T for d = 2.3 cm. Irradiated grains will trap four times these values.

  12. Chemical coloring on stainless steel by ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zuohui; Xue, Yongqiang; Ju, Hongbin

    2018-01-01

    To solve the problems of high temperature and non-uniformity of coloring on stainless steel, a new chemical coloring process, applying ultrasonic irradiation to the traditional chemical coloring process, was developed in this paper. The effects of ultrasonic frequency and power density (sound intensity) on chemical coloring on stainless steel were studied. The uniformity of morphology and colors was observed with the help of polarizing microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy (XPS), meanwhile, the wear resistance and the corrosion resistance were investigated, and the effect mechanism of ultrasonic irradiation on chemical coloring was discussed. These results show that in the process of chemical coloring on stainless steel by ultrasonic irradiation, the film composition is the same as the traditional chemical coloring, and this method can significantly enhance the uniformity, the wear and corrosion resistances of the color film and accelerate the coloring rate which makes the coloring temperature reduced to 40°C. The effects of ultrasonic irradiation on the chemical coloring can be attributed to the coloring rate accelerated and the coloring temperature reduced by thermal-effect, the uniformity of coloring film improved by dispersion-effect, and the wear and corrosion resistances of coloring film enhanced by cavitation-effect. Ultrasonic irradiation not only has an extensive application prospect for chemical coloring on stainless steel but also provides an valuable reference for other chemical coloring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel High Temperature and Radiation Resistant Infrared Glasses and Optical Fibers for Sensing in Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ballato, John

    One binary and three series of ternary non-oxide pure sulfide glasses compositions were investigated with the goal of synthesizing new glasses that exhibit high glass transition (Tg) and crystallization (Tc) temperatures, infrared transparency, and reliable glass formability. The binary glass series consisted of Ges 2 and La 2S 3 and the three glass series in the x(nBaS + mLa2S3) + (1-2x)GeS2 ternary system have BaS:La2S3 modifier ratios of 1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 with . With these glasses, new insights were realized as to how ionic glasses form and how glass modifiers affect both structure and glass formability. All synthesized compositionsmore » were characterized by Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies and differential thermal analysis (DTA) to better understand the fundamental structure, optical, and thermal characteristics of the glasses. After a range of these glasses were synthesized, optimal compositions were formed into glass disks and subjected to gamma irradiation. Glass disks were characterized both before and after irradiation by microscope imaging, measuring the refractive index, density, and UV-VIS-IR transmission spectra. The final total dose the samples were subjected to was ~2.5 MGy. Ternary samples showed a less than 0.4% change in density and refractive index and minimal change in transmission window. The glasses also resisted cracking as seen in microscope images. Overall, many glass compositions were developed that possess operating temperatures above 500 °C, where conventional chalcogenide glasses such as As2S3 and have T gs from ~200-300 °C, and these glasses have a greater than Tc – Tg values larger than 100 °C and this shows that these glasses have good thermal stability of Tg such that they can be fabricated into optical fibers and as such can be considered candidates for high temperature infrared fiber optics. Initial fiber fabrication efforts showed that selected glasses could be drawn but larger samples would be needed for further

  14. Measuring Thermal Diffusivity Of A High-Tc Superconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Charles E.; Oh, Gloria; Leidecker, Henning

    1992-01-01

    Technique for measuring thermal diffusivity of superconductor of high critical temperature based on Angstrom's temperature-wave method. Peltier junction generates temperature oscillations, which propagate with attenuation up specimen. Thermal diffusivity of specimen calculated from distance between thermocouples and amplitudes and phases of oscillatory components of thermocouple readings.

  15. High Temperature Thermographic Phosphor Coatings Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goedeke, Shawn; Allison, S. W.; Beshears, D. L.; Bencic, T.; Cates, M. R.; Hollerman, W. A.; Guidry, R.

    2003-01-01

    For many years, phosphor thermometry has been used for non-contact temperature measurements. A large number of applications have been associated with high temperatures, especially for aerospace systems where blackbody radiation backgrounds are large and in challenging environments, such as vibration, rotation, flame, or noise. These environments restrict the use of more common thermocouples or infrared thermometric techniques. In particular, temperature measurements inside jet turbines, rocket engines, or similar devices are especially amenable to phosphor techniques. Often the fluorescent materials are used as powders, either suspended in binders and applied like paint or applied as high-temperature sprays. Thin coatings that are less than 50 m thick are used on the surfaces of interest. These coatings will quickly assume the same temperature as the surface to which they are applied. The temperature dependence of fluorescent materials is a function of the base matrix atoms and a small quantity of added activator or dopant ions. Often for high temperature applications, the selected materials are refractory and include rare earth ions. Phosphors like Y3Al5O12 (YAG) doped with Eu, Dy, or Tm, Y2O3 doped with Eu, or similar rare earth compounds, will survive high temperatures and can be configured to emit light that changes rapidly in lifetime and intensity. For example, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently observed fluorescence from YAG:Dy and YAG:Tm at temperatures above 1400 C. One of the biggest challenges is to locate a binder material that can withstand tremendous variations in temperature in an adverse aerospace environment. This poster will provide an overview into our attempt to utilize phosphors for thermometry purposes. Emphasis will be placed on the use of selected binder materials that can withstand high temperatures. This research was completed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland

  16. Method for bonding thin film thermocouples to ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Kreider, Kenneth G.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for adhering a thin film metal thermocouple to a ceramic substrate used in an environment up to 700 degrees Centigrade, such as at a cylinder of an internal combustion engine. The method includes the steps of: depositing a thin layer of a reactive metal on a clean ceramic substrate; and depositing thin layers of platinum and a platinum-10% rhodium alloy forming the respective legs of the thermocouple on the reactive metal layer. The reactive metal layer serves as a bond coat between the thin noble metal thermocouple layers and the ceramic substrate. The thin layers of noble metal are in the range of 1-4 micrometers thick. Preferably, the ceramic substrate is selected from the group consisting of alumina and partially stabilized zirconia. Preferably, the thin layer of reactive metal is in the range of 0.015-0.030 micrometers (15-30 nanometers) thick. The preferred reactive metal is chromium. Other reactive metals may be titanium or zirconium. The thin layer of reactive metal may be deposited by sputtering in ultra high purity argon in a vacuum of approximately 2 milliTorr (0.3 Pascals).

  17. Implications of solar irradiance variability upon long-term changes in the Earth's atmospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III

    1992-01-01

    From 1979 through 1987, it is believed that variability in the incoming solar energy played a significant role in changing the Earth's climate. Using high-precision spacecraft radiometric measurements, the incoming total solar irradiance (total amount of solar power per unit area) and the Earth's mean, global atmospheric temperatures were found to vary in phase with each other. The observed irradiance and temperature changes appeared to be correlated with the 11-year cycle of solar magnetic activity. During the period from 1979 through 1985, both the irradiance and temperature decreased. From 1985 to 1987, they increased. The irradiance changed approximately 0.1 percent, while the temperature varied as much as 0.6 C. During the 1979-1987 period, the temperatures were forecasted to rise linearly because of the anthropogenic build-up of carbon dioxide and the hypothesized 'global warming', 'greenhouse effect', scenarios. Contrary to these scenarios, the temperatures were found to vary in a periodic manner in phase with the solar irradiance changes. The observed correlations between irradiance and temperature variabilily suggest that the mean, global temperature of the Earth may decline between 1990 and 1997 as solar magnetic activity decreases.

  18. The Influence of Heat Treatment on the Electrical Characteristics of Semi-Insulating SiC Layers Obtained by Irradiating n-SiC with High-Energy Argon Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, P. A.; Potapov, A. S.; Kudoyarov, M. F.; Kozlovskii, M. A.; Samsonova, T. P.

    2018-03-01

    Irradiation of crystalline n-type silicon carbide ( n-SiC) with high-energy (53-MeV) argon ions was used to create near-surface semi-insulating ( i-SiC) layers. The influence of subsequent heat treatment on the electrical characteristics of i-SiC layers has been studied. The most high-ohmic ion-irradiated i-SiC layers with room-temperature resistivity of no less than 1.6 × 1013 Ω cm were obtained upon the heat treatment at 600°C, whereas the resistivity of such layers heat-treated at 230°C was about 5 × 107 Ω cm.

  19. Minimizing material damage using low temperature irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, E.; Hasanain, F.; Winters, M.

    2012-08-01

    Scientific advancements in healthcare driven both by technological breakthroughs and an aging and increasingly obese population have lead to a changing medical device market. Complex products and devices are being developed to meet the demands of leading edge medical procedures. Specialized materials in these medical devices, including pharmaceuticals and biologics as well as exotic polymers present a challenge for radiation sterilization as many of these components cannot withstand conventional irradiation methods. The irradiation of materials at dry ice temperatures has emerged as a technique that can be used to decrease the radiation sensitivity of materials. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of low temperature irradiation on a variety of polymer materials, and over a range of temperatures from 0 °C down to -80 °C. The effectiveness of microbial kill is also investigated under each of these conditions. The results of the study show that the effect of low temperature irradiation is material dependent and can alter the balance between crosslinking and chain scission of the polymer. Low temperatures also increase the dose required to achieve an equivalent microbiological kill, therefore dose setting exercises must be performed under the environmental conditions of use.

  20. Effect of Atomic Hydrogen on Preparation of Highly Moisture-Resistive SiNx Films at Low Substrate Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heya, Akira; Niki, Toshikazu; Takano, Masahiro; Yonezawa, Yasuto; Minamikawa, Toshiharu; Muroi, Susumu; Minami, Shigehira; Izumi, Akira; Masuda, Atsushi; Umemoto, Hironobu; Matsumura, Hideki

    2004-12-01

    Highly moisture-resistive SiNx films on a Si substrate are obtained at substrate temperatures of 80°C by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD) using a source gas with H2. Atomic hydrogen effected the selective etching of a weak-bond regions and an increase in atomic density induced by the energy of the surface reaction. It is concluded that Cat-CVD using H2 is a promising candidate for the fabrication of highly moisture-resistive SiNx films at low temperatures.

  1. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and strain using four connecting wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Allen R., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new signal-conditioning technique for measuring strain and temperature which uses fewer connecting wires than conventional techniques. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and strain has been achieved by using thermocouple wire to connect strain gages to signal conditioning. This signal conditioning uses a new method for demultiplexing sampled analog signals and the Anderson current loop circuit. Theory is presented along with data to confirm that strain gage resistance change is sensed without appreciable error because of thermoelectric effects. Furthermore, temperature is sensed without appreciable error because of voltage drops caused by strain gage excitation current flowing through the gage resistance.

  2. High temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  3. Noninvasive assessment of aorta-coronary saphenous vein bypass graft patency using thermocouple.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Y; Watanabe, T; Endo, M; Hayashi, H

    1978-03-01

    Noninvasive monitoring of patency of aorta-coronary bypass grafts can be achieved with reasonable accuracy using the thermocouple. This method is consisted of attaching the thermocouple to the surface of grafted vein during surgery and judging the patency by rapid injection of iced solution into peripheral vein. Patient grafted vein will show the thermal change after injecting iced solution. On the contrary, occluded graft will show no thermal change. As this thermal curve is a thermodilution curve by a single injection and is measured from the outside of the vessel, thermal change depends on the temperature and the quantity of the injected solution, cardiac output, body temperature, and loss of indicator temperature along the way to the thermocouple. When the grafted vein is patent, the same thermal curves are recorded regardless of the amount of the flow, and zero flow resulted in disappearance of curve. Initially, the method was evaluated in dogs and the appropriateness was verified. Subsequently, this method was applied to 16 vein grafts of 12 patients undergoing aorta-coronary bypass surgery. Ten or 15 ml of iced solution was injected through inferior vena cava or antecubital vein and the thermal change of the grafted vein was recorded for 1-4 weeks after the operation. Fourteen grafted veins were judged to be patent and 2 were occluded. The comparison of the results by this method with coronary angiography undergone at 4 weeks after the operation showed no false positive case but 1 false negative case. This extravascular observation of the thermodilution curve is a convenient method for judging whether vein graft is patent or not.

  4. Temperature Dependence of Attenuation of Coplanar Waveguide on 4H High Resistivity SIC Through 540C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, G. E.; Schwartz, Z.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Downey, A. N.; Freeman, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    For the first time, the temperature and frequency dependence of the attenuation of a Coplanar Waveguide (CPW) on 4H, High Resistivity Sic substrate is reported. The low frequency attenuation increases by 2 dB/cm at 500 C and the high frequency attenuation increases by 3.3 dB/cm at 500 C compared to room temperature.

  5. System for improving measurement accuracy of transducer by measuring transducer temperature and resistance change using thermoelectric voltages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Karl F. (Inventor); Parker, Allen R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A constant current loop measuring system measures a property including the temperature of a sensor responsive to an external condition being measured. The measuring system includes thermocouple conductors connected to the sensor, sensing first and second induced voltages responsive to the external condition. In addition, the measuring system includes a current generator and reverser generating a constant current, and supplying the constant current to the thermocouple conductors in forward and reverse directions generating first and second measured voltages, and a determining unit receiving the first and second measured voltages from the current generator and reverser, and determining the temperature of the sensor responsive to the first and second measured voltages.

  6. 'Incremental thermocouple probe' for testing insulation erosion on a rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Reginald J.

    1993-01-01

    An incremental thermocouple probe was developed to measure insulation erosion during a solid rocket motor firing. The probe's new and unique design is described along with its theory of operation. Data from an actual firing are reported which show that the probe's performance greatly exceeded predictions and present technology as a temperature measurement device and as an event gage.

  7. Semi-interpenetrating polymer network for tougher and more microcracking resistant high temperature polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention is a semi-interpenetrating polymer network which includes a high performance thermosetting polyimide having a nadic end group acting as a crosslinking site and a high performance linear thermoplastic polyimide. An improved high temperature matrix resin is provided which is capable of performing at 316 C in air for several hundreds of hours. This resin has significantly improved toughness and microcracking resistance, excellent processability and mechanical performance, and cost effectiveness.

  8. Low Temperature Diffusion Transformations in Fe-Ni-Ti Alloys During Deformation and Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagaradze, Victor; Shabashov, Valery; Kataeva, Natalya; Kozlov, Kirill; Arbuzov, Vadim; Danilov, Sergey; Ustyugov, Yury

    2018-03-01

    The deformation-induced dissolution of Ni3Ti intermetallics in the matrix of austenitic alloys of Fe-36Ni-3Ti type was revealed in the course of their cascade-forming neutron irradiation and cold deformation at low temperatures via employment of Mössbauer method. The anomalous deformation-related dissolution of the intermetallics has been explained by the migration of deformation-induced interstitial atoms from the particles into a matrix in the stress field of moving dislocations. When rising the deformation temperature, this process is substituted for by the intermetallics precipitation accelerated by point defects. A calculation of diffusion processes has shown the possibility of the realization of the low-temperature diffusion of interstitial atoms in configurations of the crowdions and dumbbell pairs at 77-173 K. The existence of interstitial atoms in the Fe-36Ni alloy irradiated by electrons or deformed at 77 K was substantiated in the experiments of the electrical resistivity measurements.

  9. Intrapulpal temperatures during pulsed Nd:YAG laser treatment of dentin, in vitro.

    PubMed

    White, J M; Fagan, M C; Goodis, H E

    1994-03-01

    Lasers are being used for soft tissue removal, caries removal, and treatment of root surface sensitivity. One concern for laser safety is that the heat produced at the irradiated root surface may diffuse to the pulp causing irreversible pulpal damage. To test this heat diffusion, copper-constantan thermocouples were inserted into the radicular pulp canals of extracted teeth. Simulating direct exposure which might occur during gingival excision, superficial caries removal, and modification of the dentin surface for treatment of root surface sensitivity, a 2 mm2 area of the external root surface was uniformly irradiated with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser using a 320 microns diameter fiber optic contact probe. Power was varied from 0.3 to 3.0 W with frequencies of 10 and 20 Hz. Temperature changes during cavity preparations using a high speed handpiece with air coolant were also recorded. Repeated measures ANOVA (P < or = 0.05) indicated that intrapulpal temperatures increased as a function of power, frequency, and time. Intrapulpal temperatures decreased as remaining dentin thickness (0.2 to 2.0 mm) increased for each laser parameter. Irradiation of dentin using a Nd:YAG pulsed laser, within the treatment times, powers, and frequencies with adequate remaining dentin thickness, as outlined in this paper, should not cause devitalizing intrapulpal temperature rises.

  10. Effects of temperature during the irradiation of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia; Camargo-Raya, Claudia; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Uribe, Roberto M; Ramos-Bernal, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    Calcium carbonate received gamma irradiation at different doses (0-309kGy) and temperature regimes (77-298K) to study the effects of irradiation temperature. The changes were followed by EPR spectroscopy. We observed the formation of a composite EPR spectrum, even at low radiation doses and temperature. There was a strong effect on the evaluation of the radicals formed as a function of irradiation temperature, probably due to the diffusion in the frozen powder and the recombination of some radicals at room temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fabrication of thermal-resistant gratings for high-temperature measurements using geometric phase analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Liu, Z; Xie, H; Ma, K; Wu, L

    2016-12-01

    Grating fabrication techniques are crucial to the success of grating-based deformation measurement methods because the quality of the grating will directly affect the measurement results. Deformation measurements at high temperatures entail heating and, perhaps, oxidize the grating. The contrast of the grating lines may change during the heating process. Thus, the thermal-resistant capability of the grating becomes a point of great concern before taking measurements. This study proposes a method that combines a laser-engraving technique with the processes of particle spraying and sintering for fabricating thermal-resistant gratings. The grating fabrication technique is introduced and discussed in detail. A numerical simulation with a geometric phase analysis (GPA) is performed for a homogeneous deformation case. Then, the selection scheme of the grating pitch is suggested. The validity of the proposed technique is verified by fabricating a thermal-resistant grating on a ZrO 2 specimen and measuring its thermal strain at high temperatures (up to 1300 °C). Images of the grating before and after deformation are used to obtain the thermal-strain field by GPA and to compare the results with well-established reference data. The experimental results indicate that this proposed technique is feasible and will offer good prospects for further applications.

  12. High-temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  13. Infrared thermography and thermocouple mapping of radiofrequency renal ablation to assess treatment adequacy and ablation margins.

    PubMed

    Ogan, Kenneth; Roberts, William W; Wilhelm, David M; Bonnell, Leonard; Leiner, Dennis; Lindberg, Guy; Kavoussi, Louis R; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A

    2003-07-01

    The primary disadvantage of renal tumor RF ablation is the inability to monitor the intraoperative propagation of the RF lesion with real-time imaging. We sought to assess whether adequately lethal temperatures are obtained at the margins of the intended ablation zone using laparoscopic thermography to monitor radiofrequency (RF) lesions in real time, thermocouple measurements, and histopathologic evaluation. Renal RF lesions were created under direct laparoscopic vision in the upper (1 cm diameter) and lower (2 cm) poles of the right kidney in 5 female pigs. The RF lesions were produced with the RITA generator and probe, set at 105 degrees C for 5-minute ablations. During RF treatment, a laparoscopic infrared (IR) camera measured the surface parenchymal temperatures, as did multiple thermocouples. The pigs were then either immediately killed (n = 3) or allowed to live for 2 weeks (n = 2). The kidneys were removed to correlate the temperature measurements with histologic analysis of the ablated lesion. Using a threshold temperature of greater than 70 degrees C for visual "temperature" color change, the IR camera identified the region of pathologic necrosis of the renal parenchyma during RF ablation. Thermocouple measurements demonstrated that the temperatures at the intended ablation radius reached 77.5 degrees C at the renal surface and 83.7 degrees C centrally, and temperatures 5 mm beyond the set radius reached 52.6 degrees C at the surface and 47.7 degrees C centrally. The average diameter of the gross lesion on the surface of the kidney measured 17.1 mm and 22.4 mm for 1-cm and 2-cm ablations, respectively. These surface measurements correlated with an average diameter of 16.1 mm and 15.9 mm (1-cm and 2-cm ablations, respectively) as measured with the IR camera. All cells within these ablation zones were nonviable by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide diaphorase analysis. The average depth of the lesions measured 19 mm (1-cm ablation) and 25 mm (2-cm ablation

  14. Complexity and Challenges in Noncontact High Temperature Measurements in Microwave-Assisted Catalytic Reactors

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The complexity and challenges in noncontact temperature measurements inside microwave-heated catalytic reactors are presented in this paper. A custom-designed microwave cavity has been used to focus the microwave field on the catalyst and enable monitoring of the temperature field in 2D. A methodology to study the temperature distribution in the catalytic bed by using a thermal camera in combination with a thermocouple for a heterogeneous catalytic reaction (methane dry reforming) under microwave heating has been demonstrated. The effects of various variables that affect the accuracy of temperature recordings are discussed in detail. The necessity of having at least one contact sensor, such as a thermocouple, or some other microwave transparent sensor, is recommended to keep track of the temperature changes occurring in the catalytic bed during the reaction under microwave heating. PMID:29170599

  15. Mechanisms of radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steel at irradiation temperatures of (50-400)°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshova, E. A.; Gurovich, B. A.; Bukina, Z. V.; Frolov, A. S.; Maltsev, D. A.; Krikun, E. V.; Zhurko, D. A.; Zhuchkov, G. M.

    2017-07-01

    This work summarizes and analyzes our recent research results on the effect of irradiation temperature within the range of (50-400)°C on microstructure and properties of 15Kh2NMFAA class 1 steel (VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) base metal). The paper considers the influence of accelerated irradiation with different temperature up to different fluences on the carbide and irradiation-induced phases, radiation defects, yield strength changes and critical brittleness temperature shift (ΔTK) as well as on changes of the fraction of brittle intergranular fracture and segregation processes in the steel. Low temperature irradiation resulted solely in formation of radiation defects - dislocation loops of high number density, the latter increased with increase in irradiation temperature while their size decreased. In this regard high embrittlement rate observed at low temperature irradiation is only due to the hardening mechanism of radiation embrittlement. Accelerated irradiation at VVER-1000 RPV operating temperature (∼300 °C) caused formation of radiation-induced precipitates and dislocation loops, as well as some increase in phosphorus grain boundary segregation. The observed ΔTK shift being within the regulatory curve for VVER-1000 RPV base metal is due to both hardening and non-hardening mechanisms of radiation embrittlement. Irradiation at elevated temperature caused more intense phosphorus grain boundary segregation, but no formation of radiation-induced precipitates or dislocation loops in contrast to irradiation at 300 °C. Carbide transformations observed only after irradiation at 400 °C caused increase in yield strength and, along with a contribution of the non-hardening mechanism, resulted in the lowest ΔTK shift in the studied range of irradiation temperature and fluence.

  16. The Combined Use of a Gas-Controlled Heat Pipe and a Copper Point to Improve the Calibration of Thermocouples up to 1100 ˚C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrua, M.; Iacomini, L.; Battuello, M.

    2008-10-01

    The calibration of platinum-based thermocouples from 420 °C to 1,100 ˚C is currently carried out at INRIM making use of two different apparatus: for temperatures below 930 ˚C, a potassium gas-controlled heat pipe (GCHP) is used, whereas a metal-block furnace is adopted for higher temperatures. The standard uncertainty of the reference temperature obtained in the lower temperature range is almost one order of magnitude better than in the higher temperature range. A sealed copper cell was investigated to see if it could be used to calibrate thermocouples above 930 ˚C with a lower uncertainty than our current procedures allowed. The cell was characterized with Type S and Pt/Pd thermocouples and with an HTPRT. The freezing plateaux were flat within 0.01 ˚C and lasted up to 1 h with a repeatability of 0.02 ˚C. The temperature of the cell was determined with a standard uncertainty of 0.04 ˚C. Hence, the copper cell was found to be superior to the comparator furnace for the calibration of platinum-based thermocouples because of the significant decrease in the uncertainty that it provides. An analysis was also carried out on the calibration of Pt/Pd thermocouples, and it was found that the combined use of the potassium GCHP and the Cu fixed-point cell is adequate to exploit the potential of these sensors in the range from 420 °C to 1,084 °C. A comparison with a fixed-point calibration was also made which gave rise to agreement within 0.07 ˚C between the two approaches.

  17. NEET Enhanced Micro Pocket Fission Detector for High Temperature Reactors - FY15 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Troy; McGregor, Douglas; Ugorowski, Phil

    2015-09-01

    A new project, that is a collaboration between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the Kansas State University (KSU), and the French Atomic Energy Agency, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, (CEA), has been initiated by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) program for developing and testing High Temperature Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (HT MPFD), which are compact fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package for temperatures up to 800 °C. The MPFD technology utilizes a small, multi-purpose, robust, in-core parallel plate fission chambermore » and thermocouple. As discussed within this report, the small size, variable sensitivity, and increased accuracy of the MPFD technology represent a revolutionary improvement over current methods used to support irradiations in US Material Test Reactors (MTRs). Previous research conducted through NEET ASI1-3 has shown that the MPFD technology could be made robust and was successfully tested in a reactor core. This new project will further the MPFD technology for higher temperature regimes and other reactor applications by developing a HT MPFD suitable for temperatures up to 800 °C. This report summarizes the research progress for year one of this three year project. Highlights from research accomplishments include: A joint collaboration was initiated between INL, KSU, and CEA. Note that CEA is participating at their own expense because of interest in this unique new sensor. An updated HT MPFD design was developed. New high temperature-compatible materials for HT MPFD construction were procured. Construction methods to support the new design were evaluated at INL. Laboratory evaluations of HT MPFD were initiated. Electrical contact and fissile material plating has been performed at KSU. Updated detector electronics are undergoing evaluations at KSU. A

  18. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Phillippi, R.M.

    1991-12-03

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device. 4 figures.

  19. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Phillippi, R. Michael

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device.

  20. Low-temperature TCT characterization of heavily proton irradiated p-type magnetic Czochralski silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härkönen, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Luukka, P.; Kassamakov, I.; Autioniemi, M.; Tuominen, E.; Sane, P.; Pusa, P.; Räisänen, J.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Li, Z.

    2007-12-01

    n +/p -/p + pad detectors processed at the Microelectronics Center of Helsinki University of Technology on boron-doped p-type high-resistivity magnetic Czochralski (MCz-Si) silicon substrates have been investigated by the transient current technique (TCT) measurements between 100 and 240 K. The detectors were irradiated by 9 MeV protons at the Accelerator Laboratory of University of Helsinki up to 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence of 2×10 15 n/cm 2. In some of the detectors the thermal donors (TD) were introduced by intentional heat treatment at 430 °C. Hole trapping time constants and full depletion voltage values were extracted from the TCT data. We observed that hole trapping times in the order of 10 ns were found in heavily (above 1×10 15 n eq/cm 2) irradiated samples. These detectors could be fully depleted below 500 V in the temperature range of 140-180 K.

  1. High-temperature-resistant distributed Bragg reflector fiber laser written in Er/Yb co-doped fiber.

    PubMed

    Guan, Bai-Ou; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Hong-Jun; Chen, Da; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2008-03-03

    We present a high-temperature-resistant distributed Bragg reflector fiber laser photowritten in Er/Yb codoped phosphosilicate fiber that is capable of long-term operation at 500 degrees C. Highly saturated Bragg gratings are directly inscribed into the Er/Yb fiber without hydrogen loading by using a 193 nm excimer laser and phase mask method. After annealing at elevated temperature, the remained gratings are strong enough for laser oscillation. The laser operates in robust single mode with output power more than 1 dBm and signal-to-noise ratio better than 70 dB over the entire temperature range from room temperature to 500 degrees C.

  2. INFLUENCE OF INTRAMUSCULAR FAT LEVEL ON ORGANOLEPTIC, PHYSICAL, AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF IRRADIATED PORK. I. HIGH-TEMPERATURE SHORT-TIME PRE-IRRADIATION HEAT TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, R.W.; Weckel, K.G.; Evans, G.W.

    1964-02-01

    The influence of intramuscular fat (degree of marbling) on characteristics of precooked and irradiated pork muscle was studied. Loins were selected and categorized into three marbling levels by visual appraisal. A relatively high temperature (325 deg F) and short time (2 hr) heat treatment was used for enzyme inactivation. Samples were packed under vacuum in rigid containers and irradiated to 4.5 Mrad with gamma radiation. Irradiated and frozen control samples were evaluated up to 2l0 days later. Degree of marbling had no apparent influence on organoleptic properties of either irradiated or frozen control longissimus dorsi muscle samples. Frozen control samplesmore » were preferred in general appearance, flavor, and over-all acceptability by panelists. Irradiated samples were preferred in texture qualities. Storage time was not a major factor in organoleptic acceptability; however, acceptability of irradiated samples declined between 150 and 210 days of storage. Hunter color attributes were not affected by marbling level. L, a/sub L/ hue, and saturation were increased by radiation treatment. Mechanical tenderness values were decreased due to higher marbling level and radiation treatment. Expressible-moisture values were lowered by radiation treatment and increased with storage time. Iodine numbers were decreased by radiation. Degree of marbling did not affect thiobarbituric acid values but they were significantly lower for irradiated samples. pH values increased with higher levels of intramuscular fat, were significantly higher in irradiated samples than controls, and tended to increase steadily with advancing storage time. (BBB)« less

  3. Recovery behavior of high purity cubic SiC polycrystals by post-irradiation annealing up to 1673 K after low temperature neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Mohd Idzat; Yamazaki, Saishun; Yoshida, Katsumi; Yano, Toyohiko

    2015-10-01

    Two kinds of high purity cubic (β) SiC polycrystals, PureBeta-SiC and CVD-SiC, were irradiated in the BR2 reactor (Belgium) up to a fluence of 2.0-2.5 × 1024 (E > 0.1 MeV) at 333-363 K. Changes in macroscopic lengths were examined by post-irradiation thermal annealing using a precision dilatometer up to 1673 K with a step-heating method. The specimen was held at each temperature step for 6 h and the change in length of the specimen was recorded during each isothermal annealing step from 373 K to 1673 K with 50 K increments. The recovery curves were analyzed with the first order model, and rate constants at each annealing step were obtained. Recovery of defects, induced by neutron irradiation in high purity β-SiC, has four stages of different activation energies. At 373-573 K, the activation energy of PureBeta-SiC and CVD-SiC was in the range of 0.17-0.24 eV and 0.12-0.14 eV; 0.002-0.04 eV and 0.006-0.04 eV at 723-923 K; 0.20-0.27 eV and 0.26-0.31 eV at 923-1223 K; and 1.37-1.38 eV and 1.26-1.29 eV at 1323-1523 K, respectively. Below ∼1223 K the recombination occurred possibly for closely positioned C and Si Frenkel pairs, and no long range migration is deemed essential. Nearly three-fourths of recovery, induced by neutron irradiation, occur by this mechanism. In addition, at 1323-1523 K, recombination of slightly separated C Frenkel pairs and more long-range migration of Si interstitials may have occurred for PureBeta-SiC and CVD-SiC specimens. Migration of both vacancies may be restricted up to ∼1523 K. Comparing to hexagonal α-SiC, high purity β-SiC recovered more quickly in the lower annealing temperature range of less than 873 K, in particular less than 573 K.

  4. In Situ Irradiation and Measurement of Triple Junction Solar Cells at Low Intensity, Low Temperature (LILT) Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R.D.; Imaizumi, M.; Walters, R.J.; Lorentzen, J.R.; Messenger, S.R.; Tischler, J.G.; Ohshima, T.; Sato, S.; Sharps, P.R.; Fatemi, N.S.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of triple junction InGaP/(In)GaAs/Ge space solar cells was studied following high energy electron irradiation at low temperature. Cell characterization was carried out in situ at the irradiation temperature while using low intensity illumination, and, as such, these conditions reflect those found for deep space, solar powered missions that are far from the sun. Cell characterization consisted of I-V measurements and quantum efficiency measurements. The low temperature irradiations caused substantial degradation that differs in some ways from that seen after room temperature irradiations. The short circuit current degrades more at low temperature while the open circuit voltage degrades more at room temperature. A room temperature anneal after the low temperature irradiation produced a substantial recovery in the degradation. Following irradiation at both temperatures and an extended room temperature anneal, quantum efficiency measurement suggests that the bulk of the remaining damage is in the (In)GaAs sub-cell

  5. Experimental investigations of an AC pulse heating method for vehicular high power lithium-ion batteries at subzero temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiangong; Sun, Zechang; Wei, Xuezhe; Dai, Haifeng; Gu, Weijun

    2017-11-01

    Effect of the AC (alternating current) pulse heating method on battery SoH (state of health) for large laminated power lithium-ion batteries at low temperature is investigated experimentally. Firstly, excitation current frequencies, amplitudes, and voltage limitations on cell temperature evolution are studied. High current amplitudes facilitate the heat accumulation and temperature rise. Low frequency region serves as a good innovation to heat the battery because of the large impedance. Wide voltage limitations also enjoy better temperature evolution owing to the less current modulation, but the temperature difference originated from various voltage limitations attenuates due to the decrement of impedance resulting from the temperature rise. Experiments with the thermocouple-embedded cell manifest good temperature homogeneity between the battery surface and interior during the AC heating process. Secondly, the cell capacity, Direct Current resistance and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy are all calibrated to assess the battery SoH after the hundreds of AC pulse heating cycles. Also, all cells are disassembled to investigate the battery internal morphology with the employment of Scanning Electron Microscope and Energy-Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy techniques. The results indicate that the AC heating method does not aggravate the cell degradation even in the low frequency range (0.5 Hz) under the normal voltage protection limitation.

  6. Electroless plating Cu-Co-P polyalloy on UV/ozonolysis irradiated polyethylene terephthalate film and its corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lei; Bi, Siyi; Zhao, Hang; Xu, Yumeng; Mu, Yuhang; Lu, Yinxiang

    2017-05-01

    High corrosion resistant Cu-Co-P coatings were firstly prepared on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate by electroless plating in combination with UV/ozonolysis irradiation under optimized cobalt sulfate heptahydrate concentration, pH value, plating temperature and time. The copper polyalloy/PET composite can be obtained in three steps, namely: (i) the generation of oxygen-containing functionalities (carboxylic groups) onto PET surface through UV irradiation combined with ozone, (ii) Cu seeding catalysts were obtained after being immersed into cupric citrate and NaBH4 solutions subsequently, and (iii) Cu-Co-P polyalloy metallization using electroless plating bath. Attenuated total reflection fourier transformation infrared spectrometer (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle measurement and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) were utilized to track the surface changes during the whole process. The electroless plating conditions were optimized by an orthogonal experiment (L9(3)4) for Cu-Co-P coating as follows: CoSO4·7H2O addition of 0.08 M, pH value, plating temperature and time were set on 10.0, 35 °C and 25 min, respectively. Under the optimal conditions, copper polyalloy possessed high adhesive strength and the lowest surface resistance (8.06 Ω/sq), while maintaining reliability even after over 1000 times of bending and mechanical stress. The results of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements showed that Cu-Co-P layer formed on PET surface was imparted with fine uniformity and high compactness. Electrochemical test revealed the optimized Cu-Co-P coatings exhibited high corrosion resistance in NaCl, NaOH and HCl solutions, respectively. The excellent electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE >99.999% at frequency ranging from 30 MHz to 1000 MHz) of copper polyalloy/PET composites was confirmed by the spectrum analyzer. Therefore, this copper polyalloy will

  7. Resistive switching behavior in oxygen ion irradiated TiO2-x films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, A.; Saini, C. P.; Sarkar, P. K.; Bhattacharjee, G.; Bhattacharya, G.; Srivastava, S.; Satpati, B.; Kanjilal, D.; Ghosh, S. K.; Dhar, S.; Kanjilal, A.

    2018-02-01

    The room temperature resistive switching behavior in 50 keV O+-ion irradiated TiO2-x layers at an ion fluence of 5  ×  1016 ions cm-2 is reported. A clear transformation from columnar to layered polycrystalline films is revealed by transmission electron microscopy with increasing ion fluence, while the complementary electron energy loss spectroscopy suggests an evolution of oxygen vacancy (OV) in TiO2-x matrix. This is further verified by determining electron density with the help of x-ray reflectivity. Both local and device current-voltage measurements illustrate that the ion-beam induced OVs play a key role in bistable resistive switching mechanism.

  8. Theory of magnetothermoelectric phenomena in high-mobility two-dimensional electron systems under microwave irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raichev, O. E.

    2015-06-01

    The response of two-dimensional electron gas to a temperature gradient in perpendicular magnetic field under steady-state microwave irradiation is studied theoretically. The electric currents induced by the temperature gradient and the thermopower coefficients are calculated taking into account both diffusive and phonon-drag mechanisms. The modification of thermopower by microwaves takes place because of Landau quantization of the electron energy spectrum and is governed by the microscopic mechanisms which are similar to those responsible for microwave-induced oscillations of electrical resistivity. The magnetic-field dependence of microwave-induced corrections to phonon-drag thermopower is determined by mixing of phonon resonance frequencies with radiation frequency, which leads to interference oscillations. The transverse thermopower is modified by microwave irradiation much stronger than the longitudinal one. Apart from showing prominent microwave-induced oscillations as a function of magnetic field, the transverse thermopower appears to be highly sensitive to the direction of linear polarization of microwave radiation.

  9. Gas Evolution from Insulating Materials for Superconducting Coil of Iter by Gamma Ray Irradiation at Liquid Nitrogen Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idesaki, A.; Koizumi, N.; Sugimoto, M.; Morishita, N.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, K.

    2008-03-01

    A laminated material composed of glass cloth/polyimide film/epoxy resin will be used as an insulating material for superconducting coil of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). In order to keep safe and stable operation of the superconducting coil system, it is indispensable to evaluate radiation resistance of the material, because the material is exposed to severe environments such as high radiation field and low temperature of 4 K. Especially, it is important to estimate the amount of gases evolved from the insulating material by irradiation, because the gases affect on the purifying system of liquid helium in the superconducting coil system. In this work, the gas evolution from the laminated material by gamma ray irradiation at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) was investigated, and the difference of gas evolution behavior due to difference of composition in the epoxy resin was discussed. It was found that the main gases evolved from the laminated material by the irradiation were hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, and that the amount of gases evolved from the epoxy resin containing cyanate ester was about 60% less than that from the epoxy resin containing tetraglycidyl-diaminophenylmethane (TGDDM).

  10. The metallurgy of high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Purushothaman, S.

    1976-01-01

    Nickel-base, cobalt-base, and high nickel and chromium iron-base alloys are dissected, and their microstructural and chemical components are assessed with respect to the various functions expected of high temperature structural materials. These functions include the maintenance of mechanical integrity over the strain-rate spectrum from creep resistance through fatigue crack growth resistance, and such alloy stability expectations as microstructural coarsening resistance, phase instability resistance and oxidation and corrosion resistance. Special attention will be given to the perennial conflict and trade-off between strength, ductility and corrosion and oxidation resistance. The newest developments in the constitution of high temperature alloys will also be discussed, including aspects relating to materials conservation.

  11. Heat flux measurements on ceramics with thin film thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond; Anderson, Robert C.; Liebert, Curt H.

    1993-01-01

    Two methods were devised to measure heat flux through a thick ceramic using thin film thermocouples. The thermocouples were deposited on the front and back face of a flat ceramic substrate. The heat flux was applied to the front surface of the ceramic using an arc lamp Heat Flux Calibration Facility. Silicon nitride and mullite ceramics were used; two thicknesses of each material was tested, with ceramic temperatures to 1500 C. Heat flux ranged from 0.05-2.5 MW/m2(sup 2). One method for heat flux determination used an approximation technique to calculate instantaneous values of heat flux vs time; the other method used an extrapolation technique to determine the steady state heat flux from a record of transient data. Neither method measures heat flux in real time but the techniques may easily be adapted for quasi-real time measurement. In cases where a significant portion of the transient heat flux data is available, the calculated transient heat flux is seen to approach the extrapolated steady state heat flux value as expected.

  12. An Integrated-Circuit Temperature Sensor for Calorimetry and Differential Temperature Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muyskens, Mark

    1997-07-01

    Our application of an integrated-circuit (IC) temperature sensor which is easy-to-use, inexpensive, rugged, easily computer-interfacable and has good precision is described. The design, based on the National Semiconductor LM35 IC chip, avoids some of the difficulties associated with conventional sensors (thermocouples, thermistors, and platinum resistance thermometers) and a previously described IC sensor. The sensor can be used with a variety of data-acquisition systems. Applications range from general chemistry to physical chemistry, particularly where computer interfaced, digital temperature measurement is desired. Included is a detailed description of our current design with suggestions for improvement and a performance evaluation of the precision in differential measurement and the time constant for responding to temperature change.

  13. A concept of wireless and passive very-high temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolay, P.; Matloub, R.; Bardong, J.; Mazzalai, A.; Muralt, P.

    2017-05-01

    There is a need for sensors capable operating at temperatures above 1000 °C. We describe an innovative sensor that might achieve this goal. The sensor comprises two main elements: a thermocouple and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) strain sensor. The cold junction of the thermocouple is electrically connected to a highly piezoelectric thin layer, deposited on top of a SAW substrate. In operation, the voltage generated by the temperature gradient between the hot (>1000 °C) and cold junction (<350 °C) generates a strain field in the layer, which is mechanically transmitted to the substrate. This modifies the SAW propagation conditions and therefore the sensors' radiofrequency response. The change depends on the applied voltage and thus on the hot junction temperature. As SAW devices are passive elements that can be remotely interrogated, it becomes possible to infer the hot junction temperature from the radiofrequency response, i.e., to remotely read temperatures above 1000 °C, without embedded electronics. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of this concept, using AlN layers deposited on Y-Z Lithium Niobate (LN). The achieved sensitivity of 80 Hz/V at 400 MHz is constant over a wide voltage range. Numerical simulations were performed to compute the main properties of the demonstrators and suggest optimization strategies. Improvements are expected from the use of stronger piezoelectric layers, such as AlScN or Pb(Ti,Zr)O3 (PZT), which could increase the sensitivity by factors of 3 and 20, as estimated from their transverse piezoelectric coefficients. As a first step in this direction, thin PZT layers have been deposited on Y-Z LN.

  14. Laser-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound heating in an in vivo small animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2016-11-01

    The enhanced heating effect during the combination of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and low-optical-fluence laser illumination was investigated by using an in vivo murine animal model. The thighs of murine animals were synergistically irradiated by HIFU and pulsed nano-second laser light. The temperature increases in the target region were measured by a thermocouple under different HIFU pressures, which were 6.2, 7.9, and 9.8 MPa, in combination with 20 mJ/cm2 laser exposures at 532 nm wavelength. In comparison with conventional laser therapies, the laser fluence used here is at least one order of magnitude lower. The results showed that laser illumination could enhance temperature during HIFU applications. Additionally, cavitation activity was enhanced when laser and HIFU irradiation were concurrently used. Further, a theoretical simulation showed that the inertial cavitation threshold was indeed decreased when laser and HIFU irradiation were utilized concurrently.

  15. Development of Surface Eroding Thermocouples in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jun; Donovan, David; Watkins, Jon; Wang, Huiqian; Rudakov, Dmitry; Murphy, Christopher; Unterberg, Ezekial; Thomas, Dan; Boivin, Rejean

    2017-10-01

    The Surface Eroding Thermocouple (SETC) is a specialized diagnostic for characterizing the surface temperature evolution with a high temporal resolution ( 1ms) which is especially useful in areas unobservable by line-of-sight diagnostics (e.g. IR cameras). Recently, SETCs were tested in DiMES and successfully acquired temperature signals during strike point sweeps on the lower divertor shelf. We observed that the SETCs have a sub-10 ms time response and is sufficient to resolve ELM heat pulses. Preliminary analysis shows heat fluxes measured by SETCs and IR camera agree within 20%. Comparison of SETCs, calorimeters and Langmuir probe also show good agreement. We plan to implement an array of SETCs embedded in the tiles forming the new DIII-D small angle slot (SAS) divertor. Strategies to improve the SNR of these SETCs through testing in DiMES before the final installation will be discussed. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-SC0016318 (UTK), DE-AC05-00OR22725 (ORNL), DE-FG02-07ER54917 (UCSD), DE-FC02-04ER54698 (GA), DE-AC04-94AL85000 (SNL).

  16. Temperature, stress, and annealing effects on the luminescence from electron-irradiated silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. E.; Johnson, E. S.; Compton, W. D.; Noonan, J. R.; Streetman, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    Low-temperature photoluminescence spectra are presented for Si crystals which have been irradiated with high-energy electrons