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Sample records for high-throughput marker discovery

  1. High-throughput marker discovery in melon using a self-designed oligo microarray

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genetic maps constitute the basis of breeding programs for many agricultural organisms. The creation of these maps is dependent on marker discovery. Melon, among other crops, is still lagging in genomic resources, limiting the ability to discover new markers in a high-throughput fashion. One of the methods used to search for molecular markers is DNA hybridization to microarrays. Microarray hybridization of DNA from different accessions can reveal differences between them--single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs). These SFPs can be used as markers for breeding purposes, or they can be converted to conventional markers by sequencing. This method has been utilized in a few different plants to discover genetic variation, using Affymetrix arrays that exist for only a few organisms. We applied this approach with some modifications for marker discovery in melon. Results Using a custom-designed oligonucleotide microarray based on a partial EST collection of melon, we discovered 6184 putative SFPs between the parents of our mapping population. Validation by sequencing of 245 SFPs from the two parents showed a sensitivity of around 79%. Most SFPs (81%) contained single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Testing the SFPs on another mapping population of melon confirmed that many of them are conserved. Conclusion Thousands of new SFPs that can be used for genetic mapping and molecular-assisted breeding in melon were discovered using a custom-designed oligo microarray. A portion of these SFPs are conserved and can be used in different breeding populations. Although improvement of the discovery rate is still needed, this approach is applicable to many agricultural systems with limited genomic resources. PMID:20426811

  2. Gene Discovery and Molecular Marker Development, Based on High-Throughput Transcript Sequencing of Paspalum dilatatum Poir

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Andrea; Cogan, Noel O. I.; Kaur, Sukhjiwan; Drayton, Michelle; Mouradov, Aidyn; Panter, Stephen; Schrauf, Gustavo E.; Mason, John G.; Spangenberg, German C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Paspalum dilatatum Poir. (common name dallisgrass) is a native grass species of South America, with special relevance to dairy and red meat production. P. dilatatum exhibits higher forage quality than other C4 forage grasses and is tolerant to frost and water stress. This species is predominantly cultivated in an apomictic monoculture, with an inherent high risk that biotic and abiotic stresses could potentially devastate productivity. Therefore, advanced breeding strategies that characterise and use available genetic diversity, or assess germplasm collections effectively are required to deliver advanced cultivars for production systems. However, there are limited genomic resources available for this forage grass species. Results Transcriptome sequencing using second-generation sequencing platforms has been employed using pooled RNA from different tissues (stems, roots, leaves and inflorescences) at the final reproductive stage of P. dilatatum cultivar Primo. A total of 324,695 sequence reads were obtained, corresponding to c. 102 Mbp. The sequences were assembled, generating 20,169 contigs of a combined length of 9,336,138 nucleotides. The contigs were BLAST analysed against the fully sequenced grass species of Oryza sativa subsp. japonica, Brachypodium distachyon, the closely related Sorghum bicolor and foxtail millet (Setaria italica) genomes as well as against the UniRef 90 protein database allowing a comprehensive gene ontology analysis to be performed. The contigs generated from the transcript sequencing were also analysed for the presence of simple sequence repeats (SSRs). A total of 2,339 SSR motifs were identified within 1,989 contigs and corresponding primer pairs were designed. Empirical validation of a cohort of 96 SSRs was performed, with 34% being polymorphic between sexual and apomictic biotypes. Conclusions The development of genetic and genomic resources for P. dilatatum will contribute to gene discovery and expression studies

  3. Discovery of a novel neuroprotective compound, AS1219164, by high-throughput chemical screening of a newly identified apoptotic gene marker.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Takao; Muramoto, Masakazu; Okitsu, Osamu; Morikawa, Noriyuki; Kita, Yasuhiro

    2011-11-01

    We have reported that tacrolimus (FK506), an immunosuppressive drug, and diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, possess different modes of neuroprotective action. FK506 suppresses only thapsigargin-induced apoptosis in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells while diclofenac reverses tunicamycin-induced as well as thapsigargin-induced apoptosis. The aim of this study is to discover novel compounds that exert neuroprotective properties by using the transcriptional response of a newly identified gene, which was regulated by both FK506 and diclofenac, as a surrogate screening marker in high-throughput chemical screening and characterize the compounds in comparison with FK506 and diclofenac. Using a microarray with 4504 human cDNAs and quantitative RT-PCR, two genes as apoptotic markers, transmembrane protein 100 (TMEM100) and limb-bud and heart (LBH), were identified because the thapsigargin-induced elevations in their mRNA levels were reversed by both FK506 and diclofenac. A luciferase reporter assay with a TMEM100 promoter region was applied to high-throughput chemical screening. AS1219164, {3-[(E)-2-{5-[(E)-2-pyridin-4-ylvinyl]pyridin-3-yl} vinyl]aniline}, suppressed thapsigargin-induced transactivation of the TMEM100 gene and reversed thapsigargin-induced increases in TMEM100 and LBH mRNA levels in SH-SY5Y cells, similar to the effects of FK506 and diclofenac. Furthermore, AS1219164 protected against SH-SY5Y cell death induced by four apoptotic agents including thapsigargin, similar to diclofenac, but was more potent than diclofenac, while FK506 only showed protective effects against thapsigargin-induced cell death. In conclusion, a novel neuroprotecitve compound, AS1219164, was discovered by high-throughput chemical screening using a reporter assay with the TMEM100 gene promoter regulated by both FK506 and diclofenac. Reporter assay using the promoter region of a gene under pharmacological and physiological transcriptional regulation would be well suit for use

  4. Perspective: Data infrastructure for high throughput materials discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeif, E. A.; Kroenlein, K.

    2016-05-01

    Computational capability has enabled materials design to evolve from trial-and-error towards more informed methodologies that require large amounts of data. Expert-designed tools and their underlying databases facilitate modern-day high throughput computational methods. Standard data formats and communication standards increase the impact of traditional data, and applying these technologies to a high throughput experimental design provides dense, targeted materials data that are valuable for material discovery. Integrated computational materials engineering requires both experimentally and computationally derived data. Harvesting these comprehensively requires different methods of varying degrees of automation to accommodate variety and volume. Issues of data quality persist independent of type.

  5. Discovery of novel targets with high throughput RNA interference screening.

    PubMed

    Kassner, Paul D

    2008-03-01

    High throughput technologies have the potential to affect all aspects of drug discovery. Considerable attention is paid to high throughput screening (HTS) for small molecule lead compounds. The identification of the targets that enter those HTS campaigns had been driven by basic research until the advent of genomics level data acquisition such as sequencing and gene expression microarrays. Large-scale profiling approaches (e.g., microarrays, protein analysis by mass spectrometry, and metabolite profiling) can yield vast quantities of data and important information. However, these approaches usually require painstaking in silico analysis and low-throughput basic wet-lab research to identify the function of a gene and validate the gene product as a potential therapeutic drug target. Functional genomic screening offers the promise of direct identification of genes involved in phenotypes of interest. In this review, RNA interference (RNAi) mediated loss-of-function screens will be discussed and as well as their utility in target identification. Some of the genes identified in these screens should produce similar phenotypes if their gene products are antagonized with drugs. With a carefully chosen phenotype, an understanding of the biology of RNAi and appreciation of the limitations of RNAi screening, there is great potential for the discovery of new drug targets.

  6. High-throughput electronic biology: mining information for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Loging, William; Harland, Lee; Williams-Jones, Bryn

    2007-03-01

    The vast range of in silico resources that are available in life sciences research hold much promise towards aiding the drug discovery process. To fully realize this opportunity, computational scientists must consider the practical issues of data integration and identify how best to apply these resources scientifically. In this article we describe in silico approaches that are driven towards the identification of testable laboratory hypotheses; we also address common challenges in the field. We focus on flexible, high-throughput techniques, which may be initiated independently of 'wet-lab' experimentation, and which may be applied to multiple disease areas. The utility of these approaches in drug discovery highlights the contribution that in silico techniques can make and emphasizes the need for collaboration between the areas of disease research and computational science.

  7. High throughput screening for anti-Trypanosoma cruzi drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Rodríguez, Ana

    2014-12-01

    The discovery of new therapeutic options against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, stands as a fundamental need. Currently, there are only two drugs available to treat this neglected disease, which represents a major public health problem in Latin America. Both available therapies, benznidazole and nifurtimox, have significant toxic side effects and their efficacy against the life-threatening symptomatic chronic stage of the disease is variable. Thus, there is an urgent need for new, improved anti-T. cruzi drugs. With the objective to reliably accelerate the drug discovery process against Chagas disease, several advances have been made in the last few years. Availability of engineered reporter gene expressing parasites triggered the development of phenotypic in vitro assays suitable for high throughput screening (HTS) as well as the establishment of new in vivo protocols that allow faster experimental outcomes. Recently, automated high content microscopy approaches have also been used to identify new parasitic inhibitors. These in vitro and in vivo early drug discovery approaches, which hopefully will contribute to bring better anti-T. cruzi drug entities in the near future, are reviewed here.

  8. High throughput screening for drug discovery of autophagy modulators.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chih-Wen; Liu, Pei-Feng; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2012-11-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionally conserved process in cells for cleaning abnormal proteins and organelles in a lysosome dependent manner. Growing studies have shown that defects or induced autophagy contributes to many diseases including aging, neurodegeneration, pathogen infection, and cancer. However, the precise involvement of autophagy in health and disease remains controversial because the theories are built on limited assays and chemical modulators, indicating that the role of autophagy in diseases may require further verification. Many food and drug administration (FDA) approved drugs modulate autophagy signaling, suggesting that modulation of autophagy with pharmacological agonists or antagonists provides a potential therapy for autophagy-related diseases. This suggestion raises an attractive issue on drug discovery for exploring chemical modulators of autophagy. High throughput screening (HTS) is becoming a powerful tool for drug discovery that may accelerate screening specific autophagy modulators to clarify the role of autophagy in diseases. Herein, this review lays out current autophagy assays to specifically measure autophagy components such as LC3 (mammalian homologue of yeast Atg8) and Atg4. These assays are feasible or successful for HTS with certain chemical libraries, which might be informative for this intensively growing field as research tools and hopefully developing new drugs for autophagy-related diseases.

  9. Hypothesis testing in high-throughput screening for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Prummer, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Following the success of small-molecule high-throughput screening (HTS) in drug discovery, other large-scale screening techniques are currently revolutionizing the biological sciences. Powerful new statistical tools have been developed to analyze the vast amounts of data in DNA chip studies, but have not yet found their way into compound screening. In HTS, characterization of single-point hit lists is often done only in retrospect after the results of confirmation experiments are available. However, for prioritization, for optimal use of resources, for quality control, and for comparison of screens it would be extremely valuable to predict the rates of false positives and false negatives directly from the primary screening results. Making full use of the available information about compounds and controls contained in HTS results and replicated pilot runs, the Z score and from it the p value can be estimated for each measurement. Based on this consideration, we have applied the concept of p-value distribution analysis (PVDA), which was originally developed for gene expression studies, to HTS data. PVDA allowed prediction of all relevant error rates as well as the rate of true inactives, and excellent agreement with confirmation experiments was found.

  10. High-Throughput Screening Using Mass Spectrometry within Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Rohman, Mattias; Wingfield, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In order to detect a biochemical analyte with a mass spectrometer (MS) it is necessary to ionize the analyte of interest. The analyte can be ionized by a number of different mechanisms, however, one common method is electrospray ionization (ESI). Droplets of analyte are sprayed through a highly charged field, the droplets pick up charge, and this is transferred to the analyte. High levels of salt in the assay buffer will potentially steal charge from the analyte and suppress the MS signal. In order to avoid this suppression of signal, salt is often removed from the sample prior to injection into the MS. Traditional ESI MS relies on liquid chromatography (LC) to remove the salt and reduce matrix effects, however, this is a lengthy process. Here we describe the use of RapidFire™ coupled to a triple-quadrupole MS for high-throughput screening. This system uses solid-phase extraction to de-salt samples prior to injection, reducing processing time such that a sample is injected into the MS ~every 10 s.

  11. High-throughput imaging: Focusing in on drug discovery in 3D.

    PubMed

    Li, Linfeng; Zhou, Qiong; Voss, Ty C; Quick, Kevin L; LaBarbera, Daniel V

    2016-03-01

    3D organotypic culture models such as organoids and multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are becoming more widely used for drug discovery and toxicology screening. As a result, 3D culture technologies adapted for high-throughput screening formats are prevalent. While a multitude of assays have been reported and validated for high-throughput imaging (HTI) and high-content screening (HCS) for novel drug discovery and toxicology, limited HTI/HCS with large compound libraries have been reported. Nonetheless, 3D HTI instrumentation technology is advancing and this technology is now on the verge of allowing for 3D HCS of thousands of samples. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art high-throughput imaging systems, including hardware and software, and recent literature examples of 3D organotypic culture models employing this technology for drug discovery and toxicology screening.

  12. Using Mendelian inheritance to improve high-throughput SNP discovery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nancy; Van Hout, Cristopher V; Gottipati, Srikanth; Clark, Andrew G

    2014-11-01

    Restriction site-associated DNA sequencing or genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approaches allow for rapid and cost-effective discovery and genotyping of thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in multiple individuals. However, rigorous quality control practices are needed to avoid high levels of error and bias with these reduced representation methods. We developed a formal statistical framework for filtering spurious loci, using Mendelian inheritance patterns in nuclear families, that accommodates variable-quality genotype calls and missing data--both rampant issues with GBS data--and for identifying sex-linked SNPs. Simulations predict excellent performance of both the Mendelian filter and the sex-linkage assignment under a variety of conditions. We further evaluate our method by applying it to real GBS data and validating a subset of high-quality SNPs. These results demonstrate that our metric of Mendelian inheritance is a powerful quality filter for GBS loci that is complementary to standard coverage and Hardy-Weinberg filters. The described method, implemented in the software MendelChecker, will improve quality control during SNP discovery in nonmodel as well as model organisms.

  13. Cancer biomarker discovery for cholangiocarcinoma: the high-throughput approaches

    PubMed Central

    Silsirivanit, Atit; Sawanyawisuth, Kanlayanee; Riggins, Gregory J.; Wongkham, Chaisiri

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is difficult to diagnose at an early stage and most tumors are detected at late stage where surgery or other therapy is ineffective. Many advanced techniques are applied to diagnose CCA; however, most are expensive and have varying degrees of accuracy. A less invasive and simpler procedure such as serum markers would be of substantial clinical benefit for diagnosis, monitoring, and predicting outcome for CCA patients. Recent advances in “Omics” technologies offer remarkable opportunities for establishment of biomarker-related to diseases. In this review, the potential biomarkers obtained from proteomics and glycomic studies are evaluated. Several protein markers were discovered from patient specimen, using two dimensional-differential gel electrophoresis couple with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (2D-DIGE/LC-MS-MS), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI)-TOF-MS and capillary electrophoresis (CE)-MS, etc. Newly reported CCA-associated glycobiomarkers were identified using lectin-assisted, monoclonal antibody-assisted or specific-target strategies. The combination between carbohydrate binding-lectin and core protein-binding mAb significantly increased the values for detection of the glyco-biomarkers for CCA. Searching for specific and sensitive molecular markers to be used for population screening is worth being evaluated. This could lead to earlier diagnosis and improve outcome. Further investigation of those biomarker functions is also of value in order to better understand the tumor biology and use them as targets for future therapeutic agents. PMID:24616382

  14. Solar fuels photoanode materials discovery by integrating high-throughput theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qimin; Yu, Jie; Suram, Santosh K; Zhou, Lan; Shinde, Aniketa; Newhouse, Paul F; Chen, Wei; Li, Guo; Persson, Kristin A; Gregoire, John M; Neaton, Jeffrey B

    2017-03-21

    The limited number of known low-band-gap photoelectrocatalytic materials poses a significant challenge for the generation of chemical fuels from sunlight. Using high-throughput ab initio theory with experiments in an integrated workflow, we find eight ternary vanadate oxide photoanodes in the target band-gap range (1.2-2.8 eV). Detailed analysis of these vanadate compounds reveals the key role of VO4 structural motifs and electronic band-edge character in efficient photoanodes, initiating a genome for such materials and paving the way for a broadly applicable high-throughput-discovery and materials-by-design feedback loop. Considerably expanding the number of known photoelectrocatalysts for water oxidation, our study establishes ternary metal vanadates as a prolific class of photoanode materials for generation of chemical fuels from sunlight and demonstrates our high-throughput theory-experiment pipeline as a prolific approach to materials discovery.

  15. High-Throughput In Vitro Glycoside Hydrolase (HIGH) Screening for Enzyme Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Wan; Chokhawala, Harshal A.; Hess, Matthias; Dana, Craig M.; Baer, Zachary; Sczyrba, Alexander; Rubin, Edward M.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2011-09-16

    A high-throughput protein-expression and screening method (HIGH method, see picture) provides a rapid approach to the discovery of active glycoside hydrolases in environmental samples. Finally, HIGH screening combines cloning, protein expression, and enzyme hydrolysis in one pot; thus, the entire process from gene expression to activity detection requires only three hours.

  16. High-throughput strategies for the discovery and engineering of enzymes for biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Philippe; Béchet, Max; Bigan, Muriel; Caly, Delphine; Chataigné, Gabrielle; Coutte, François; Flahaut, Christophe; Heuson, Egon; Leclère, Valérie; Lecouturier, Didier; Phalip, Vincent; Ravallec, Rozenn; Dhulster, Pascal; Froidevaux, Rénato

    2017-02-01

    Innovations in novel enzyme discoveries impact upon a wide range of industries for which biocatalysis and biotransformations represent a great challenge, i.e., food industry, polymers and chemical industry. Key tools and technologies, such as bioinformatics tools to guide mutant library design, molecular biology tools to create mutants library, microfluidics/microplates, parallel miniscale bioreactors and mass spectrometry technologies to create high-throughput screening methods and experimental design tools for screening and optimization, allow to evolve the discovery, development and implementation of enzymes and whole cells in (bio)processes. These technological innovations are also accompanied by the development and implementation of clean and sustainable integrated processes to meet the growing needs of chemical, pharmaceutical, environmental and biorefinery industries. This review gives an overview of the benefits of high-throughput screening approach from the discovery and engineering of biocatalysts to cell culture for optimizing their production in integrated processes and their extraction/purification.

  17. High throughput screening of physicochemical properties and in vitro ADME profiling in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hong; Holmén, Anders G

    2009-03-01

    Current advances of new technologies with robotic automated assays combined with highly selective and sensitive LC-MS enable high-speed screening of lead series libraries in many in vitro assays. In this review, we summarize state of the art high throughput assays for screening of key physicochemical properties such as solubility, lipophilicity, pKa, drug-plasma protein binding and brain tissue binding as well as in vitro ADME profiling. We discuss two primary approaches for high throughput screening of solubility, i.e. an automated 96-well plate assay integrated with LC-MS and a rapid multi-wavelength UV plate reader. We address the advantages of newly developed miniaturized techniques for high throughput pKa screening by capillary electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry (CE-MS) with automated data analysis flow. Several new lipophilicity approaches other than octanol-water partitioning are critically reviewed, including rapid liquid chromatographic retention based approach, immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) partitioning and liposome, and potential microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) for accurate screening of LogP. We highlight the sample pooling (namely cassette dosing, all-in-one, cocktail) as an efficient approach for high throughput screening of physicochemical properties and in vitro ADME profiling with emphasis on the benefit of on-line quality control. This cassette dosing approach has been widely adapted in drug discovery for rapid screening of in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters with significantly increased capacity and dramatically reduced animal usage.

  18. Cell Surface Profiling Using High-Throughput Flow Cytometry: A Platform for Biomarker Discovery and Analysis of Cellular Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gedye, Craig A.; Hussain, Ali; Paterson, Joshua; Smrke, Alannah; Saini, Harleen; Sirskyj, Danylo; Pereira, Keira; Lobo, Nazleen; Stewart, Jocelyn; Go, Christopher; Ho, Jenny; Medrano, Mauricio; Hyatt, Elzbieta; Yuan, Julie; Lauriault, Stevan; Kondratyev, Maria; van den Beucken, Twan; Jewett, Michael; Dirks, Peter; Guidos, Cynthia J.; Danska, Jayne; Wang, Jean; Wouters, Bradly; Neel, Benjamin; Rottapel, Robert; Ailles, Laurie E.

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface proteins have a wide range of biological functions, and are often used as lineage-specific markers. Antibodies that recognize cell surface antigens are widely used as research tools, diagnostic markers, and even therapeutic agents. The ability to obtain broad cell surface protein profiles would thus be of great value in a wide range of fields. There are however currently few available methods for high-throughput analysis of large numbers of cell surface proteins. We describe here a high-throughput flow cytometry (HT-FC) platform for rapid analysis of 363 cell surface antigens. Here we demonstrate that HT-FC provides reproducible results, and use the platform to identify cell surface antigens that are influenced by common cell preparation methods. We show that multiple populations within complex samples such as primary tumors can be simultaneously analyzed by co-staining of cells with lineage-specific antibodies, allowing unprecedented depth of analysis of heterogeneous cell populations. Furthermore, standard informatics methods can be used to visualize, cluster and downsample HT-FC data to reveal novel signatures and biomarkers. We show that the cell surface profile provides sufficient molecular information to classify samples from different cancers and tissue types into biologically relevant clusters using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. Finally, we describe the identification of a candidate lineage marker and its subsequent validation. In summary, HT-FC combines the advantages of a high-throughput screen with a detection method that is sensitive, quantitative, highly reproducible, and allows in-depth analysis of heterogeneous samples. The use of commercially available antibodies means that high quality reagents are immediately available for follow-up studies. HT-FC has a wide range of applications, including biomarker discovery, molecular classification of cancers, or identification of novel lineage specific or stem cell markers. PMID:25170899

  19. High-throughput cellular microarray platforms: applications in drug discovery, toxicology and stem cell research

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tiago G.; Diogo, Maria Margarida; Clark, Douglas S.; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Cabral, Joaquim M.S.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular microarrays are powerful experimental tools for high-throughput screening of large numbers of test samples. Miniaturization increases assay throughput while reducing reagent consumption and the number of cells required, making these systems attractive for a wide range of assays in drug discovery, toxicology, stem cell research and potentially therapy. Here, we provide an overview of the emerging technologies that can be used to generate cellular microarrays, and we highlight recent significant advances in the field. This emerging and multidisciplinary approach offers new opportunities for the design and control of stem cells in tissue engineering and cellular therapies and promises to expedite drug discovery in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:19398140

  20. Engineering serendipity: High-throughput discovery of materials that resist bacterial attachment☆

    PubMed Central

    Magennis, E.P.; Hook, A.L.; Davies, M.C.; Alexander, C.; Williams, P.; Alexander, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the colonisation of materials by microorganisms is important in a wide range of industries and clinical settings. To date, the underlying mechanisms that govern the interactions of bacteria with material surfaces remain poorly understood, limiting the ab initio design and engineering of biomaterials to control bacterial attachment. Combinatorial approaches involving high-throughput screening have emerged as key tools for identifying materials to control bacterial attachment. The hundreds of different materials assessed using these methods can be carried out with the aid of computational modelling. This approach can develop an understanding of the rules used to predict bacterial attachment to surfaces of non-toxic synthetic materials. Here we outline our view on the state of this field and the challenges and opportunities in this area for the coming years. Statement of significance This opinion article on high throughput screening methods reflects one aspect of how the field of biomaterials research has developed and progressed. The piece takes the reader through key developments in biomaterials discovery, particularly focusing on need to reduce bacterial colonisation of surfaces. Such bacterial resistant surfaces are increasingly required in this age of antibiotic resistance. The influence and origin of high-throughput methods are discussed with insights into the future of biomaterials development where computational methods may drive materials development into new fertile areas of discovery. New biomaterials will exhibit responsiveness to adapt to the biological environment and promote better integration and reduced rejection or infection. PMID:26577984

  1. Transcriptome characterization and high throughput SSRs and SNPs discovery in Cucurbita pepo (Cucurbitaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cucurbita pepo belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family. The "Zucchini" types rank among the highest-valued vegetables worldwide, and other C. pepo and related Cucurbita spp., are food staples and rich sources of fat and vitamins. A broad range of genomic tools are today available for other cucurbits that have become models for the study of different metabolic processes. However, these tools are still lacking in the Cucurbita genus, thus limiting gene discovery and the process of breeding. Results We report the generation of a total of 512,751 C. pepo EST sequences, using 454 GS FLX Titanium technology. ESTs were obtained from normalized cDNA libraries (root, leaves, and flower tissue) prepared using two varieties with contrasting phenotypes for plant, flowering and fruit traits, representing the two C. pepo subspecies: subsp. pepo cv. Zucchini and subsp. ovifera cv Scallop. De novo assembling was performed to generate a collection of 49,610 Cucurbita unigenes (average length of 626 bp) that represent the first transcriptome of the species. Over 60% of the unigenes were functionally annotated and assigned to one or more Gene Ontology terms. The distributions of Cucurbita unigenes followed similar tendencies than that reported for Arabidopsis or melon, suggesting that the dataset may represent the whole Cucurbita transcriptome. About 34% unigenes were detected to have known orthologs of Arabidopsis or melon, including genes potentially involved in disease resistance, flowering and fruit quality. Furthermore, a set of 1,882 unigenes with SSR motifs and 9,043 high confidence SNPs between Zucchini and Scallop were identified, of which 3,538 SNPs met criteria for use with high throughput genotyping platforms, and 144 could be detected as CAPS. A set of markers were validated, being 80% of them polymorphic in a set of variable C. pepo and C. moschata accessions. Conclusion We present the first broad survey of gene sequences and allelic variation in C. pepo, where

  2. Open Access High Throughput Drug Discovery in the Public Domain: A Mount Everest in the Making

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Anuradha; McDonald, Peter R.; Sittampalam, Sitta; Chaguturu, Rathnam

    2013-01-01

    High throughput screening (HTS) facilitates screening large numbers of compounds against a biochemical target of interest using validated biological or biophysical assays. In recent years, a significant number of drugs in clinical trails originated from HTS campaigns, validating HTS as a bona fide mechanism for hit finding. In the current drug discovery landscape, the pharmaceutical industry is embracing open innovation strategies with academia to maximize their research capabilities and to feed their drug discovery pipeline. The goals of academic research have therefore expanded from target identification and validation to probe discovery, chemical genomics, and compound library screening. This trend is reflected in the emergence of HTS centers in the public domain over the past decade, ranging in size from modestly equipped academic screening centers to well endowed Molecular Libraries Probe Centers Network (MLPCN) centers funded by the NIH Roadmap initiative. These centers facilitate a comprehensive approach to probe discovery in academia and utilize both classical and cutting-edge assay technologies for executing primary and secondary screening campaigns. The various facets of academic HTS centers as well as their implications on technology transfer and drug discovery are discussed, and a roadmap for successful drug discovery in the public domain is presented. New lead discovery against therapeutic targets, especially those involving the rare and neglected diseases, is indeed a Mount Everestonian size task, and requires diligent implementation of pharmaceutical industry’s best practices for a successful outcome. PMID:20809896

  3. Open access high throughput drug discovery in the public domain: a Mount Everest in the making.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anuradha; McDonald, Peter R; Sittampalam, Sitta; Chaguturu, Rathnam

    2010-11-01

    High throughput screening (HTS) facilitates screening large numbers of compounds against a biochemical target of interest using validated biological or biophysical assays. In recent years, a significant number of drugs in clinical trails originated from HTS campaigns, validating HTS as a bona fide mechanism for hit finding. In the current drug discovery landscape, the pharmaceutical industry is embracing open innovation strategies with academia to maximize their research capabilities and to feed their drug discovery pipeline. The goals of academic research have therefore expanded from target identification and validation to probe discovery, chemical genomics, and compound library screening. This trend is reflected in the emergence of HTS centers in the public domain over the past decade, ranging in size from modestly equipped academic screening centers to well endowed Molecular Libraries Probe Centers Network (MLPCN) centers funded by the NIH Roadmap initiative. These centers facilitate a comprehensive approach to probe discovery in academia and utilize both classical and cutting-edge assay technologies for executing primary and secondary screening campaigns. The various facets of academic HTS centers as well as their implications on technology transfer and drug discovery are discussed, and a roadmap for successful drug discovery in the public domain is presented. New lead discovery against therapeutic targets, especially those involving the rare and neglected diseases, is indeed a Mount Everestonian size task, and requires diligent implementation of pharmaceutical industry's best practices for a successful outcome.

  4. Primary cells and stem cells in drug discovery: emerging tools for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Eglen, Richard; Reisine, Terry

    2011-04-01

    Many drug discovery screening programs employ immortalized cells, recombinantly engineered to express a defined molecular target. Several technologies are now emerging that render it feasible to employ more physiologically, and clinically relevant, cell phenotypes. Consequently, numerous approaches use primary cells, which retain many functions seen in vivo, as well as endogenously expressing the target of interest. Furthermore, stem cells, of either embryonic or adult origin, as well as those derived from differentiated cells, are now finding a place in drug discovery. Collectively, these cells are expanding the utility of authentic human cells, either as screening tools or as therapeutics, as well as providing cells derived directly from patients. Nonetheless, the growing use of phenotypically relevant cells (including primary cells or stem cells) is not without technical difficulties, particularly when their envisioned use lies in high-throughput screening (HTS) protocols. In particular, the limited availability of homogeneous primary or stem cell populations for HTS mandates that novel technologies be developed to accelerate their adoption. These technologies include detection of responses with very few cells as well as protocols to generate cell lines in abundant, homogeneous populations. In parallel, the growing use of changes in cell phenotype as the assay readout is driving greater use of high-throughput imaging techniques in screening. Taken together, the greater availability of novel primary and stem cell phenotypes as well as new detection technologies is heralding a new era of cellular screening. This convergence offers unique opportunities to identify drug candidates for disorders at which few therapeutics are presently available.

  5. Luminescent proteins from Aequorea victoria: applications in drug discovery and in high throughput analysis.

    PubMed

    Deo, S K; Daunert, S

    2001-02-01

    Recent progress in generating a vast number of drug targets through genomics and large compound libraries through combinatorial chemistry have stimulated advancements in drug discovery through the development of new high throughput screening (HTS) methods. Automation and HTS techniques are also highly desired in fields such as clinical diagnostics. Luminescence-based assays have emerged as an alternative to radiolabel-based assays in HTS as they approach the sensitivity of radioactive detection along with ease of operation, which makes them amenable to miniaturization. Luminescent proteins provide the advantage of reduced reagent and operating costs because they can be produced in unlimited amounts through the use of genetic engineering tools. In that regard, the use of two naturally occurring and recombinantly produced luminescent proteins from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, namely, aequorin and the green fluorescent protein (GFP), has attracted attention in a number of analytical applications in diverse research areas. Aequorin is naturally bioluminescent and has therefore, virtually no associated background signal, which allows its detection down to attomole levels. GFP has become the reporter of choice in a variety of applications given that it is an autofluorescent protein that does not require addition of any co-factors for fluorescence emission. Furthermore, the generation of various mutants of GFP with differing luminescent and spectral properties has spurred additional interest in this protein. In this review, we focus on the use of aequorin and GFP in the development of highly sensitive assays that find applications in drug discovery and in high throughput analysis.

  6. High-throughput screening in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic support of drug discovery.

    PubMed

    White, R E

    2000-01-01

    The application of rapid methods currently used for screening discovery drug candidates for metabolism and pharmacokinetic characteristics is discussed. General considerations are given for screening in this context, including the criteria for good screens, the use of counterscreens, the proper sequencing of screens, ambiguity in the interpretation of results, strategies for false positives and negatives, and the special difficulties encountered in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic screening. Detailed descriptions of the present status of screening are provided for absorption potential, blood-brain barrier penetration, inhibition and induction of cytochrome P450, pharmacokinetics, biotransformation, and computer modeling. Although none of the systems currently employed for drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic screening can be considered truly high-throughput, several of them are rapid enough to be a practical part of the screening paradigm for modern, fast-moving discovery programs.

  7. High-throughput approaches for the discovery and optimization of new olefin polymerization catalysts.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Vince; Bei, Xiaohong; Boussie, Thomas R; Brümmer, Oliver; Diamond, Gary M; Goh, Christopher; Hall, Keith A; Lapointe, Anne M; Leclerc, Margarete; Longmire, James M; Shoemaker, James A W; Turner, Howard; Weinberg, W Henry

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of new olefin polymerization catalysts is currently a time-intensive trial-and-error process with no guarantee of success. A fully integrated high-throughput screening workflow for the discovery of new catalysts for polyolefin production has been implemented at Symyx Technologies. The workflow includes the design of the metal-ligand libraries using custom-made computer software, automated delivery of metal precursors and ligands into the reactors using a liquid-handling robot, and a rapid primary screen that serves to assess the potential of each metalligand-activator combination as an olefin polymerization catalyst. "Hits" from the primary screen are subjected to secondary screens using a 48-cell parallel polymerization reactor. Individual polymerization reactions are monitored in real time under conditions that provide meaningful information about the performance capabilities of each catalyst. Rapid polymer characterization techniques support the primary and secondary screens. We have discovered many new and interesting catalyst classes using this technology.

  8. Strain prioritization for natural product discovery by a high-throughput real-time PCR method.

    PubMed

    Hindra; Huang, Tingting; Yang, Dong; Rudolf, Jeffrey D; Xie, Pengfei; Xie, Guangbo; Teng, Qihui; Lohman, Jeremy R; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Li-Xing; Jiang, Yi; Duan, Yanwen; Shen, Ben

    2014-10-24

    Natural products offer unmatched chemical and structural diversity compared to other small-molecule libraries, but traditional natural product discovery programs are not sustainable, demanding too much time, effort, and resources. Here we report a strain prioritization method for natural product discovery. Central to the method is the application of real-time PCR, targeting genes characteristic to the biosynthetic machinery of natural products with distinct scaffolds in a high-throughput format. The practicality and effectiveness of the method were showcased by prioritizing 1911 actinomycete strains for diterpenoid discovery. A total of 488 potential diterpenoid producers were identified, among which six were confirmed as platensimycin and platencin dual producers and one as a viguiepinol and oxaloterpin producer. While the method as described is most appropriate to prioritize strains for discovering specific natural products, variations of this method should be applicable to the discovery of other classes of natural products. Applications of genome sequencing and genome mining to the high-priority strains could essentially eliminate the chance elements from traditional discovery programs and fundamentally change how natural products are discovered.

  9. Moderate to high throughput in vitro binding kinetics for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rumin; Barbieri, Christopher M; Garcia-Calvo, Margarita; Myers, Robert W; McLaren, David; Kavana, Michael

    2016-06-01

    This review provides a concise summary for state of the art, moderate to high throughput in vitro technologies being employed to study drug-target binding kinetics. These technologies cover a wide kinetic timescale spanning up to nine orders of magnitude from milliseconds to days. Automated stopped flow measures transient and (pre)steady state kinetics from milliseconds to seconds. For seconds to hours timescale kinetics we discuss surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor, global progress curve analysis for high throughput kinetic profiling of enzyme inhibitors and activators, and filtration plate-based radioligand or fluorescent binding assays for receptor binding kinetics. Jump dilution after pre-incubation is the preferred method for very slow kinetics lasting for days. The basic principles, best practices and simulated data for these technologies are described. Finally, the application of a universal label-free technology, liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), is briefly reviewed. Select literature references are highlighted for in-depth understanding. A new reality is dawning wherein binding kinetics is an integral and routine part of mechanism of action elucidation and translational, quantitative pharmacology for drug discovery.

  10. Exploiting the Repetitive Fraction of the Wheat Genome for High-Throughput Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Discovery and Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Cubizolles, Nelly; Rey, Elodie; Choulet, Frédéric; Rimbert, Hélène; Laugier, Christel; Balfourier, François; Bordes, Jacques; Poncet, Charles; Jack, Peter; James, Chris; Gielen, Jan; Argillier, Odile; Jaubertie, Jean-Pierre; Auzanneau, Jérôme; Rohde, Antje; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Korzun, Viktor; Kollers, Sonja; Guerreiro, Laurent; Hourcade, Delphine; Robert, Olivier; Devaux, Pierre; Mastrangelo, Anna-Maria; Feuillet, Catherine; Sourdille, Pierre; Paux, Etienne

    2016-03-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) account for more than 80% of the wheat genome. Although they represent a major obstacle for genomic studies, TEs are also a source of polymorphism and consequently of molecular markers such as insertion site-based polymorphism (ISBP) markers. Insertion site-based polymorphisms have been found to be a great source of genome-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in the hexaploid wheat ( L.) genome. Here, we report on the development of a high-throughput SNP discovery approach based on sequence capture of ISBP markers. By applying this approach to the reference sequence of chromosome 3B from hexaploid wheat, we designed 39,077 SNPs that are evenly distributed along the chromosome. We demonstrate that these SNPs can be efficiently scored with the KASPar (Kompetitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction) genotyping technology. Finally, through genetic diversity and genome-wide association studies, we also demonstrate that ISBP-derived SNPs can be used in marker-assisted breeding programs.

  11. Hydrogen storage materials discovery via high throughput ball milling and gas sorption.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Kaye, Steven S; Riley, Conor; Greenberg, Doron; Galang, Daniel; Bailey, Mark S

    2012-06-11

    The lack of a high capacity hydrogen storage material is a major barrier to the implementation of the hydrogen economy. To accelerate discovery of such materials, we have developed a high-throughput workflow for screening of hydrogen storage materials in which candidate materials are synthesized and characterized via highly parallel ball mills and volumetric gas sorption instruments, respectively. The workflow was used to identify mixed imides with significantly enhanced absorption rates relative to Li2Mg(NH)2. The most promising material, 2LiNH2:MgH2 + 5 atom % LiBH4 + 0.5 atom % La, exhibits the best balance of absorption rate, capacity, and cycle-life, absorbing >4 wt % H2 in 1 h at 120 °C after 11 absorption-desorption cycles.

  12. Drug Discovery Goes Three-Dimensional: Goodbye to Flat High-Throughput Screening?

    PubMed

    Eglen, Richard M; Randle, David H

    2015-06-01

    Immortalized cells, generated from two-dimensional cell culture techniques, are widely used in compound screening, lead optimization, and drug candidate selection. However, such cells lack many characteristics of cells in vivo. This could account for the high failure rates of lead candidates in clinical evaluation. New approaches from cell biology, materials science, and bioengineering are increasing the utility of three-dimensional (3D) culture. These approaches have become more compatible with automation and, thus, provide more physiologically relevant cells for high-throughput/high-content screening, notably in oncology drug discovery. Techniques range from simple 3D spheroids, comprising one or more cell types, to complex multitissue organoids cultured in extracellular matrix gels or microfabricated chips. Furthermore, each approach can be applied to stem cells, such as induced pluripotent stem cells, thereby providing additional phenotypic relevance and the exciting potential to enable screening in disease-specific cell types.

  13. Protein Traffic Disorders: an Effective High-Throughput Fluorescence Microscopy Pipeline for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Hugo M.; Uliyakina, Inna; Awatade, Nikhil T.; Proença, Maria C.; Tischer, Christian; Sirianant, Lalida; Kunzelmann, Karl; Pepperkok, Rainer; Amaral, Margarida D.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins are essential molecules in the cell which mediate interactions with the exterior milieu, thus representing key drug targets for present pharma. Not surprisingly, protein traffic disorders include a large range of diseases sharing the common mechanism of failure in the respective protein to reach the plasma membrane. However, specific therapies for these diseases are remarkably lacking. Herein, we report a robust platform for drug discovery applied to a paradigmatic genetic disorder affecting intracellular trafficking – Cystic Fibrosis. This platform includes (i) two original respiratory epithelial cellular models incorporating an inducible double-tagged traffic reporter; (ii) a plasma membrane protein traffic assay for high-throughput microscopy screening; and (iii) open-source image analysis software to quantify plasma membrane protein traffic. By allowing direct scoring of compounds rescuing the basic traffic defect, this platform enables an effective drug development pipeline, which can be promptly adapted to any traffic disorder-associated protein and leverage therapy development efforts. PMID:25762484

  14. Large-scale discovery of induced point mutations with high-throughput TILLING.

    PubMed

    Till, Bradley J; Reynolds, Steven H; Greene, Elizabeth A; Codomo, Christine A; Enns, Linda C; Johnson, Jessica E; Burtner, Chris; Odden, Anthony R; Young, Kim; Taylor, Nicholas E; Henikoff, Jorja G; Comai, Luca; Henikoff, Steven

    2003-03-01

    TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes) is a general reverse-genetic strategy that provides an allelic series of induced point mutations in genes of interest. High-throughput TILLING allows the rapid and low-cost discovery of induced point mutations in populations of chemically mutagenized individuals. As chemical mutagenesis is widely applicable and mutation detection for TILLING is dependent only on sufficient yield of PCR products, TILLING can be applied to most organisms. We have developed TILLING as a service to the Arabidopsis community known as the Arabidopsis TILLING Project (ATP). Our goal is to rapidly deliver allelic series of ethylmethanesulfonate-induced mutations in target 1-kb loci requested by the international research community. In the first year of public operation, ATP has discovered, sequenced, and delivered >1000 mutations in >100 genes ordered by Arabidopsis researchers. The tools and methodologies described here can be adapted to create similar facilities for other organisms.

  15. Sodium channel inhibitor drug discovery using automated high throughput electrophysiology platforms.

    PubMed

    Castle, Neil; Printzenhoff, David; Zellmer, Shannon; Antonio, Brett; Wickenden, Alan; Silvia, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Voltage dependent sodium channels are widely recognized as valuable targets for the development of therapeutic interventions for neuroexcitatory disorders such as epilepsy and pain as well as cardiac arrhythmias. An ongoing challenge for sodium channel drug discovery is the ability to readily evaluate state dependent interactions, which are known to underlie inhibition by many clinically used local anesthetic, antiepileptic and antiarrhythmic sodium channel blockers. While patch-clamp electrophysiology is still considered the most effective way of measuring ion channel function and pharmacology, it does not have the throughput to be useful in early stages of drug discovery in which there is often a need to evaluate many thousands to hundreds of thousands of compounds. Fortunately over the past five years, there has been significant progress in developing much higher throughput electrophysiology platforms like the PatchXpress and IonWorks, which are now widely used in drug discovery. This review highlights the strengths and weaknesses of these two high throughput devices for use in sodium channel inhibitor drug discovery programs. Overall, the PatchXpress and IonWorks electrophysiology platforms have individual strengths that make them complementary to each other. Both platforms are capable of measuring state dependent modulation of sodium channels. IonWorks has the throughput to allow for effective screening of libraries of tens of thousands of compounds whereas the PatchXpress has more flexibility to provide quantitative voltage clamp, which is useful in structure activity evaluations for the hit-to-lead and lead optimization stages of sodium channel drug discovery.

  16. Digital One-Disc-One-Compound Method for High-Throughput Discovery of Prostate Cancer - Targeting Ligands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0312 TITLE: Digital One-Disc-One-Compound Method for High-Throughput Discovery of Prostate Cancer-Targeting... Discovery of Prostate Cancer-Targeting Ligands 5b. GRANT NUMBERW81XWH-13-1-0312 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Drs. Tingrui Pan, Kit Lam...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Combinatorial library method significantly accelerates molecular discovery and identification in many areas of biology and

  17. Mass spectrometric techniques for label-free high-throughput screening in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Roddy, Thomas P; Horvath, Christopher R; Stout, Steven J; Kenney, Kristin L; Ho, Pei-I; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Vickers, Chad; Kaushik, Virendar; Hubbard, Brian; Wang, Y Karen

    2007-11-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is an important tool for finding active compounds to initiate medicinal chemistry programs in pharmaceutical discovery research. Traditional HTS methods rely on fluorescent or radiolabeled reagents and/or coupling assays to permit quantitation of enzymatic target inhibition or activation. Mass spectrometry-based high-throughput screening (MS-HTS) is an alternative that is not susceptible to the limitations imposed by labeling and coupling enzymes. MS-HTS offers a selective and sensitive analytical method for unlabeled substrates and products. Furthermore, method development times are reduced without the need to incorporate labels or coupling assays. MS-HTS also permits screening of targets that are difficult or impossible to screen by other techniques. For example, enzymes that are challenging to purify can lead to the nonspecific detection of structurally similar components of the impure enzyme or matrix of membraneous enzymes. The high selectivity of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) enables these screens to proceed with low levels of background noise to sensitively discover interesting hits even with relatively weak activity. In this article, we describe three techniques that we have adapted for large-scale (approximately 175,000 sample) compound library screening, including four-way parallel multiplexed electrospray liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (MUX-LC/MS/MS), four-way parallel staggered gradient liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), and eight-way staggered flow injection MS/MS following 384-well plate solid-phase extraction (SPE). These methods are capable of analyzing a 384-well plate in 37 min, with typical analysis times of less than 2 h. The quality of the MS-HTS approach is demonstrated herein with screening data from two large-scale screens.

  18. Radioligand binding assays in the drug discovery process: potential pitfalls of high throughput screenings.

    PubMed

    Noël, F; Mendonça-Silva, D L; Quintas, L E

    2001-02-01

    Radioligand binding assays evaluating directly the ability of a drug to interact with a defined molecular target is part of the drug discovery process. The need for a high throughput rate in screening drugs is actually leading to simplified experimental schemes that increase the probability of false negative results. Special concern involves voltage-gated ion channel drug discovery where a great care is required in designing assays because of frequent multiplicity of (interacting) binding sites. To clearly illustrate this situation, three different assays used in the academic drug discovery program of the authors were selected because they are rich of intrinsic artifacts: (I) (20 mmol/l caffeine almost duplicated [3H]ryanodine binding (89% higher than control) to rat heart microsomes at 0.3 mumol/l free calcium but did not exert any effect when using a high (107 mumol/l) free calcium, as mostly used in ryanodine binding assays; (II) An agonist for the ionotropic glutamate receptor of the kainate type can distinctly affect [3H]kainate binding to chicken cerebellum membranes depending on its concentration: unlabelled kainic acid per se either stimulated about 30% (at 50-100 nmol/l), had no effect (at 200 nmol/l) or even progressively decreased (at 0.3-2 mumol/l) the binding of 5 nmol/l [3H]kainate, emphasizing the risk of using a single concentration for screening a drug; (III) in a classical [3H]flunitrazepam binding assay, the stimulatory effect of a GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) agonist was only observed when using extensively washed rat brain synaptosomes (10 mumol/l GABA increased flunitrazepam binding by 90%). On the other hand, the inhibitory effect of a GABA antagonist was only observed when using crude synaptosomes (10 mumol/l bicuculine reduced [3H]flunitrazepam binding by 40%). It can be concluded that carefully designed radioligand assays which can be performed in an academic laboratory are appropriate for screening a small number of drugs, especially if

  19. High Throughput Screening for the Discovery of More Efficient Catalysts for Emissions Control

    SciTech Connect

    Yaccato, Karin; Hagemeyer, Alfred; Volpe, Anthony; Weinberg, Henry

    2004-03-31

    High-throughput synthesis and screening methods have been developed for the discovery of highly active catalysts for the control of emissions from stationary and mobile sources. Low temperature CO oxidation, CO methanation, NOx abatement and the destruction of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) will be discussed. The discovery libraries for primary screening consisted of both 11x11 and 16x16 catalyst arrays on 3 inch and 4 inch quartz wafers, respectively. Catalysts were prepared by robotic liquid dispensing techniques and screened for catalytic activity in Symyx's Scanning Mass Spectrometer. The screening protocols encompassed mixed metal oxides, perovskites and supported base and noble metals. Active hits were further optimized in focus libraries using shallower compositional gradients. The ScanMS is a fast serial screening tool that uses flat wafer catalyst surfaces, local laser heating, a scanning/sniffing nozzle and a quadrupolar mass spectrometer to compare relative catalytic activities. The temperature range from 200C to 600C is accessible. Typically, 256 catalysts can be screened per day and about 100,000 experiments conducted annually.

  20. Discovery of T cell antigens by high-throughput screening of synthetic minigene libraries.

    PubMed

    Hondowicz, Brian D; Schwedhelm, Katharine V; Kas, Arnold; Tasch, Michael A; Rawlings, Crystal; Ramchurren, Nirasha; McIntosh, Martin; D'Amico, Leonard A; Sanda, Srinath; Standifer, Nathan E; Shendure, Jay; Stone, Brad

    2012-01-01

    The identification of novel T cell antigens is central to basic and translational research in autoimmunity, tumor immunology, transplant immunology, and vaccine design for infectious disease. However, current methods for T cell antigen discovery are low throughput, and fail to explore a wide range of potential antigen-receptor interactions. To overcome these limitations, we developed a method in which programmable microarrays are used to cost-effectively synthesize complex libraries of thousands of minigenes that collectively encode the content of hundreds of candidate protein targets. Minigene-derived mRNA are transfected into autologous antigen presenting cells and used to challenge complex populations of purified peripheral blood CD8+ T cells in multiplex, parallel ELISPOT assays. In this proof-of-concept study, we apply synthetic minigene screening to identify two novel pancreatic islet autoantigens targeted in a patient with Type I Diabetes. To our knowledge, this is the first successful screen of a highly complex, synthetic minigene library for identification of a T cell antigen. In principle, responses against the full protein complement of any tissue or pathogen can be assayed by this approach, suggesting that further optimization of synthetic libraries holds promise for high throughput antigen discovery.

  1. Discovery of New Compounds Active against Plasmodium falciparum by High Throughput Screening of Microbial Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Moreno, Guiomar; Cantizani, Juan; Sánchez-Carrasco, Paula; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis Miguel; Martín, Jesús; El Aouad, Noureddine; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Tormo, José Rubén; González-Menendez, Víctor; González, Ignacio; de Pedro, Nuria; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga; Vicente, Francisca; González-Pacanowska, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Due to the low structural diversity within the set of antimalarial drugs currently available in the clinic and the increasing number of cases of resistance, there is an urgent need to find new compounds with novel modes of action to treat the disease. Microbial natural products are characterized by their large diversity provided in terms of the chemical complexity of the compounds and the novelty of structures. Microbial natural products extracts have been underexplored in the search for new antiparasitic drugs and even more so in the discovery of new antimalarials. Our objective was to find new druggable natural products with antimalarial properties from the MEDINA natural products collection, one of the largest natural product libraries harboring more than 130,000 microbial extracts. In this work, we describe the optimization process and the results of a phenotypic high throughput screen (HTS) based on measurements of Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase. A subset of more than 20,000 extracts from the MEDINA microbial products collection has been explored, leading to the discovery of 3 new compounds with antimalarial activity. In addition, we report on the novel antiplasmodial activity of 4 previously described natural products.

  2. Integration of virtual and high throughput screening in lead discovery settings.

    PubMed

    Polgár, Tímea; Keseru, György M

    2011-12-01

    In the last decade mass screening strategies became the main source of leads in drug discovery settings. Although high throughput (HTS) and virtual screening (VS) realize the same concept the different nature of these lead discovery strategies (experimental vs theoretical) results that they are typically applied separately. The majority of drug leads are still identified by hit-to-lead optimization of screening hits. Structural information on the target as well as on bound ligands, however, make structure-based and ligand-based virtual screening available for the identification of alternative chemical starting points. Although, the two techniques have rarely been used together on the same target, here we review the existing prominent studies on their true integration. Various approaches have been shown to apply the combination of HTS and VS and to better use them in lead generation. Although several attempts on their integration have only been considered at a conceptual level, there are numerous applications underlining its relevance that early-stage pharmaceutical drug research could benefit from a combined approach.

  3. Predictions versus high-throughput experiments in T-cell epitope discovery: competition or synergy?

    PubMed

    Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Prediction methods as well as experimental methods for T-cell epitope discovery have developed significantly in recent years. High-throughput experimental methods have made it possible to perform full-length protein scans for epitopes restricted to a limited number of MHC alleles. The high costs and limitations regarding the number of proteins and MHC alleles that are feasibly handled by such experimental methods have made in silico prediction models of high interest. MHC binding prediction methods are today of a very high quality and can predict MHC binding peptides with high accuracy. This is possible for a large range of MHC alleles and relevant length of binding peptides. The predictions can easily be performed for complete proteomes of any size. Prediction methods are still, however, dependent on good experimental methods for validation, and should merely be used as a guide for rational epitope discovery. We expect prediction methods as well as experimental validation methods to continue to develop and that we will soon see clinical trials of products whose development has been guided by prediction methods.

  4. Forensic soil DNA analysis using high-throughput sequencing: a comparison of four molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Young, Jennifer M; Weyrich, Laura S; Cooper, Alan

    2014-11-01

    Soil analysis, such as mineralogy, geophysics, texture and colour, are commonly used in forensic casework to link a suspect to a crime scene. However, DNA analysis can also be applied to characterise the vast diversity of organisms present in soils. DNA metabarcoding and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) now offer a means to improve discrimination between forensic soil samples by identifying individual taxa and exploring non-culturable microbial species. Here, we compare the small-scale reproducibility and resolution of four molecular markers targeting different taxa (bacterial 16S rRNA, eukaryotic18S rRNA, plant trnL intron and fungal internal transcribed spacer I (ITS1) rDNA) to distinguish two sample sites. We also assess the background DNA level associated with each marker and examine the effects of filtering Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) detected in extraction blank controls. From this study, we show that non-bacterial taxa in soil, particularly fungi, can provide the greatest resolution between the sites, whereas plant markers may be problematic for forensic discrimination. ITS and 18S markers exhibit reliable amplification, and both show high discriminatory power with low background DNA levels. The 16S rRNA marker showed comparable discriminatory power post filtering; however, presented the highest level of background DNA. The discriminatory power of all markers was increased by applying OTU filtering steps, with the greatest improvement observed by the removal of any sequences detected in extraction blanks. This study demonstrates the potential use of multiple DNA markers for forensic soil analysis using HTS, and identifies some of the standardisation and evaluation steps necessary before this technique can be applied in casework.

  5. STAMP: Extensions to the STADEN sequence analysis package for high throughput interactive microsatellite marker design

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Lars; Beszteri, Bánk; Gäbler-Schwarz, Steffi; Held, Christoph; Leese, Florian; Mayer, Christoph; Pöhlmann, Kevin; Frickenhaus, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Background Microsatellites (MSs) are DNA markers with high analytical power, which are widely used in population genetics, genetic mapping, and forensic studies. Currently available software solutions for high-throughput MS design (i) have shortcomings in detecting and distinguishing imperfect and perfect MSs, (ii) lack often necessary interactive design steps, and (iii) do not allow for the development of primers for multiplex amplifications. We present a set of new tools implemented as extensions to the STADEN package, which provides the backbone functionality for flexible sequence analysis workflows. The possibility to assemble overlapping reads into unique contigs (provided by the base functionality of the STADEN package) is important to avoid developing redundant markers, a feature missing from most other similar tools. Results Our extensions to the STADEN package provide the following functionality to facilitate microsatellite (and also minisatellite) marker design: The new modules (i) integrate the state-of-the-art tandem repeat detection and analysis software PHOBOS into workflows, (ii) provide two separate repeat detection steps – with different search criteria – one for masking repetitive regions during assembly of sequencing reads and the other for designing repeat-flanking primers for MS candidate loci, (iii) incorporate the widely used primer design program PRIMER3 into STADEN workflows, enabling the interactive design and visualization of flanking primers for microsatellites, and (iv) provide the functionality to find optimal locus- and primer pair combinations for multiplex primer design. Furthermore, our extensions include a module for storing analysis results in an SQLite database, providing a transparent solution for data access from within as well as from outside of the STADEN Package. Conclusion The STADEN package is enhanced by our modules into a highly flexible, high-throughput, interactive tool for conventional and multiplex

  6. High-throughput platform for the discovery of elicitors of silent bacterial gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, bacterial genome sequences have revealed an immense reservoir of biosynthetic gene clusters, sets of contiguous genes that have the potential to produce drugs or drug-like molecules. However, the majority of these gene clusters appear to be inactive for unknown reasons prompting terms such as “cryptic” or “silent” to describe them. Because natural products have been a major source of therapeutic molecules, methods that rationally activate these silent clusters would have a profound impact on drug discovery. Herein, a new strategy is outlined for awakening silent gene clusters using small molecule elicitors. In this method, a genetic reporter construct affords a facile read-out for activation of the silent cluster of interest, while high-throughput screening of small molecule libraries provides potential inducers. This approach was applied to two cryptic gene clusters in the pathogenic model Burkholderia thailandensis. The results not only demonstrate a prominent activation of these two clusters, but also reveal that the majority of elicitors are themselves antibiotics, most in common clinical use. Antibiotics, which kill B. thailandensis at high concentrations, act as inducers of secondary metabolism at low concentrations. One of these antibiotics, trimethoprim, served as a global activator of secondary metabolism by inducing at least five biosynthetic pathways. Further application of this strategy promises to uncover the regulatory networks that activate silent gene clusters while at the same time providing access to the vast array of cryptic molecules found in bacteria. PMID:24808135

  7. High-throughput microfluidics and ultrafast optics for in vivo compound/genetic discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Christopher B.; Gilleland, Cody; Samara, Chrysanthi; Yanik, M. Fatih

    2010-02-01

    Therapeutic treatment of spinal cord injuries, brain trauma, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases will greatly benefit from the discovery of compounds that enhance neuronal regeneration following injury. We previously demonstrated the use of femtosecond laser microsurgery to induce precise and reproducible neural injury in C. elegans, and have developed microfluidic on-chip technologies that allow automated and rapid manipulation, orientation, and non-invasive immobilization of animals for sub-cellular resolution two-photon imaging and femtosecond-laser nanosurgery. These technologies include microfluidic whole-animal sorters, as well as integrated chips containing multiple addressable incubation chambers for exposure of individual animals to compounds and sub-cellular time-lapse imaging of hundreds of animals on a single chip. Our technologies can be used for a variety of highly sophisticated in vivo high-throughput compound and genetic screens, and we performed the first in vivo screen in C. elegans for compounds enhancing neuronal regrowth following femtosecond microsurgery. The compounds identified interact with a wide variety of cellular targets, such as cytoskeletal components, vesicle trafficking, and protein kinases that enhance neuronal regeneration.

  8. Fluorescence polarization assays in high-throughput screening and drug discovery: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Matthew D.; Yasgar, Adam; Peryea, Tyler; Braisted, John C.; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Coussens, Nathan P.

    2016-06-01

    The sensitivity of fluorescence polarization (FP) and fluorescence anisotropy (FA) to molecular weight changes has enabled the interrogation of diverse biological mechanisms, ranging from molecular interactions to enzymatic activity. Assays based on FP/FA technology have been widely utilized in high-throughput screening (HTS) and drug discovery due to the homogenous format, robust performance and relative insensitivity to some types of interferences, such as inner filter effects. Advancements in assay design, fluorescent probes, and technology have enabled the application of FP assays to increasingly complex biological processes. Herein we discuss different types of FP/FA assays developed for HTS, with examples to emphasize the diversity of applicable targets. Furthermore, trends in target and fluorophore selection, as well as assay type and format, are examined using annotated HTS assays within the PubChem database. Finally, practical considerations for the successful development and implementation of FP/FA assays for HTS are provided based on experience at our center and examples from the literature, including strategies for flagging interference compounds among a list of hits.

  9. High-throughput screening normalized to biological response: application to antiviral drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhara A; Patel, Anand C; Nolan, William C; Huang, Guangming; Romero, Arthur G; Charlton, Nichole; Agapov, Eugene; Zhang, Yong; Holtzman, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The process of conducting cell-based phenotypic screens can result in data sets from small libraries or portions of large libraries, making accurate hit picking from multiple data sets important for efficient drug discovery. Here, we describe a screen design and data analysis approach that allow for normalization not only between quadrants and plates but also between screens or batches in a robust, quantitative fashion, enabling hit selection from multiple data sets. We independently screened the MicroSource Spectrum and NCI Diversity Set II libraries using a cell-based phenotypic high-throughput screening (HTS) assay that uses an interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE)-driven luciferase-reporter assay to identify interferon (IFN) signal enhancers. Inclusion of a per-plate, per-quadrant IFN dose-response standard curve enabled conversion of ISRE activity to effective IFN concentrations. We identified 45 hits based on a combined z score ≥2.5 from the two libraries, and 25 of 35 available hits were validated in a compound concentration-response assay when tested using fresh compound. The results provide a basis for further analysis of chemical structure in relation to biological function. Together, the results establish an HTS method that can be extended to screening for any class of compounds that influence a quantifiable biological response for which a standard is available.

  10. High-Throughput Assay and Discovery of Small Molecules that Interrupt Malaria Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Plouffe, David M.; Wree, Melanie; Du, Alan Y.; Meister, Stephan; Li, Fengwu; Patra, Kailash; Lubar, Aristea; Okitsu, Shinji L.; Flannery, Erika L.; Kato, Nobutaka; Tanaseichuk, Olga; Comer, Eamon; Zhou, Bin; Kuhen, Kelli; Zhou, Yingyao; Leroy, Didier; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Scherer, Christina A.; Vinetz, Joseph; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Preventing transmission is an important element of malaria control. However, most of the current available methods to assay for malaria transmission blocking are relatively low throughput and cannot be applied to large chemical libraries. We have developed a high-throughput and cost-effective assay, the Saponin-lysis Sexual Stage Assay (SaLSSA), for identifying small molecules with transmission-blocking capacity. SaLSSA analysis of 13,983 unique compounds uncovered that >90% of well-characterized antimalarials, including endoperoxides and 4-aminoquinolines, as well as compounds active against asexual blood stages, lost most of their killing activity when parasites developed into metabolically quiescent stage V gametocytes. On the other hand, we identified compounds with consistent low nanomolar transmission-blocking activity, some of which showed cross-reactivity against asexual blood and liver stages. The data clearly emphasize substantial physiological differences between sexual and asexual parasites and provide a tool and starting points for the discovery and development of transmission-blocking drugs. PMID:26749441

  11. High-Throughput Assay and Discovery of Small Molecules that Interrupt Malaria Transmission.

    PubMed

    Plouffe, David M; Wree, Melanie; Du, Alan Y; Meister, Stephan; Li, Fengwu; Patra, Kailash; Lubar, Aristea; Okitsu, Shinji L; Flannery, Erika L; Kato, Nobutaka; Tanaseichuk, Olga; Comer, Eamon; Zhou, Bin; Kuhen, Kelli; Zhou, Yingyao; Leroy, Didier; Schreiber, Stuart L; Scherer, Christina A; Vinetz, Joseph; Winzeler, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-13

    Preventing transmission is an important element of malaria control. However, most of the current available methods to assay for malaria transmission blocking are relatively low throughput and cannot be applied to large chemical libraries. We have developed a high-throughput and cost-effective assay, the Saponin-lysis Sexual Stage Assay (SaLSSA), for identifying small molecules with transmission-blocking capacity. SaLSSA analysis of 13,983 unique compounds uncovered that >90% of well-characterized antimalarials, including endoperoxides and 4-aminoquinolines, as well as compounds active against asexual blood stages, lost most of their killing activity when parasites developed into metabolically quiescent stage V gametocytes. On the other hand, we identified compounds with consistent low nanomolar transmission-blocking activity, some of which showed cross-reactivity against asexual blood and liver stages. The data clearly emphasize substantial physiological differences between sexual and asexual parasites and provide a tool and starting points for the discovery and development of transmission-blocking drugs.

  12. An integrated framework for discovery and genotyping of genomic variants from high-throughput sequencing experiments.

    PubMed

    Duitama, Jorge; Quintero, Juan Camilo; Cruz, Daniel Felipe; Quintero, Constanza; Hubmann, Georg; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Thevelein, Johan M; Tohme, Joe

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies and computing capacity have produced unprecedented amounts of genomic data that have unraveled the genetics of phenotypic variability in several species. However, operating and integrating current software tools for data analysis still require important investments in highly skilled personnel. Developing accurate, efficient and user-friendly software packages for HTS data analysis will lead to a more rapid discovery of genomic elements relevant to medical, agricultural and industrial applications. We therefore developed Next-Generation Sequencing Eclipse Plug-in (NGSEP), a new software tool for integrated, efficient and user-friendly detection of single nucleotide variants (SNVs), indels and copy number variants (CNVs). NGSEP includes modules for read alignment, sorting, merging, functional annotation of variants, filtering and quality statistics. Analysis of sequencing experiments in yeast, rice and human samples shows that NGSEP has superior accuracy and efficiency, compared with currently available packages for variants detection. We also show that only a comprehensive and accurate identification of repeat regions and CNVs allows researchers to properly separate SNVs from differences between copies of repeat elements. We expect that NGSEP will become a strong support tool to empower the analysis of sequencing data in a wide range of research projects on different species.

  13. Fungal community analysis by high-throughput sequencing of amplified markers – a user's guide

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Björn D; Nilsson, R Henrik; Tedersoo, Leho; Abarenkov, Kessy; Carlsen, Tor; Kjøller, Rasmus; Kõljalg, Urmas; Pennanen, Taina; Rosendahl, Søren; Stenlid, Jan; Kauserud, Håvard

    2013-01-01

    Novel high-throughput sequencing methods outperform earlier approaches in terms of resolution and magnitude. They enable identification and relative quantification of community members and offer new insights into fungal community ecology. These methods are currently taking over as the primary tool to assess fungal communities of plant-associated endophytes, pathogens, and mycorrhizal symbionts, as well as free-living saprotrophs. Taking advantage of the collective experience of six research groups, we here review the different stages involved in fungal community analysis, from field sampling via laboratory procedures to bioinformatics and data interpretation. We discuss potential pitfalls, alternatives, and solutions. Highlighted topics are challenges involved in: obtaining representative DNA/RNA samples and replicates that encompass the targeted variation in community composition, selection of marker regions and primers, options for amplification and multiplexing, handling of sequencing errors, and taxonomic identification. Without awareness of methodological biases, limitations of markers, and bioinformatics challenges, large-scale sequencing projects risk yielding artificial results and misleading conclusions. PMID:23534863

  14. High Throughput Gene Expression Analysis Identifies Reliable Expression Markers of Human Corneal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chng, Zhenzhi; Peh, Gary S. L.; Herath, Wishva B.; Cheng, Terence Y. D.; Ang, Heng-Pei; Toh, Kah-Peng; Robson, Paul; Mehta, Jodhbir S.; Colman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Considerable interest has been generated for the development of suitable corneal endothelial graft alternatives through cell-tissue engineering, which can potentially alleviate the shortage of corneal transplant material. The advent of less invasive suture-less key-hole surgery options such as Descemet’s Stripping Endothelial Keratoplasty (DSEK) and Descemet’s Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty (DMEK), which involve transplantation of solely the endothelial layer instead of full thickness cornea, provide further impetus for the development of alternative endothelial grafts for clinical applications. A major challenge for this endeavor is the lack of specific markers for this cell type. To identify genes that reliably mark corneal endothelial cells (CECs) in vivo and in vitro, we performed RNA-sequencing on freshly isolated human CECs (from both young and old donors), CEC cultures, and corneal stroma. Gene expression of these corneal cell types was also compared to that of other human tissue types. Based on high throughput comparative gene expression analysis, we identified a panel of markers that are: i) highly expressed in CECs from both young donors and old donors; ii) expressed in CECs in vivo and in vitro; and iii) not expressed in corneal stroma keratocytes and the activated corneal stroma fibroblasts. These were SLC4A11, COL8A2 and CYYR1. The use of this panel of genes in combination reliably ascertains the identity of the CEC cell type. PMID:23844023

  15. High-throughput bubble screening method for combinatorial discovery of electrocatalysts for water splitting.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Chengxiang; Suram, Santosh K; Haber, Joel A; Guevarra, Dan W; Soedarmadji, Ed; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2014-02-10

    Combinatorial synthesis and screening for discovery of electrocatalysts has received increasing attention, particularly for energy-related technologies. High-throughput discovery strategies typically employ a fast, reliable initial screening technique that is able to identify active catalyst composition regions. Traditional electrochemical characterization via current-voltage measurements is inherently throughput-limited, as such measurements are most readily performed by serial screening. Parallel screening methods can yield much higher throughput and generally require the use of an indirect measurement of catalytic activity. In a water-splitting reaction, the change of local pH or the presence of oxygen and hydrogen in the solution can be utilized for parallel screening of active electrocatalysts. Previously reported techniques for measuring these signals typically function in a narrow pH range and are not suitable for both strong acidic and basic environments. A simple approach to screen the electrocatalytic activities by imaging the oxygen and hydrogen bubbles produced by the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is reported here. A custom built electrochemical cell was employed to record the bubble evolution during the screening, where the testing materials were subject to desired electrochemical potentials. The transient of the bubble intensity obtained from the screening was quantitatively analyzed to yield a bubble figure of merit (FOM) that represents the reaction rate. Active catalysts in a pseudoternary material library, (Ni-Fe-Co)Ox, which contains 231 unique compositions, were identified in less than one minute using the bubble screening method. An independent, serial screening method on the same material library exhibited excellent agreement with the parallel bubble screening. This general approach is highly parallel and is independent of solution pH.

  16. High throughput screening in duchenne muscular dystrophy: from drug discovery to functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Gintjee, Thomas J J; Magh, Alvin S H; Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-11-14

    Centers for the screening of biologically active compounds and genomic libraries are becoming common in the academic setting and have enabled researchers devoted to developing strategies for the treatment of diseases or interested in studying a biological phenomenon to have unprecedented access to libraries that, until few years ago, were accessible only by pharmaceutical companies. As a result, new drugs and genetic targets have now been identified for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most prominent of the neuromuscular disorders affecting children. Although the work is still at an early stage, the results obtained to date are encouraging and demonstrate the importance that these centers may have in advancing therapeutic strategies for DMD as well as other diseases. This review will provide a summary of the status and progress made toward the development of a cure for this disorder and implementing high-throughput screening (HTS) technologies as the main source of discovery. As more academic institutions are gaining access to HTS as a valuable discovery tool, the identification of new biologically active molecules is likely to grow larger. In addition, the presence in the academic setting of experts in different aspects of the disease will offer the opportunity to develop novel assays capable of identifying new targets to be pursued as potential therapeutic options. These assays will represent an excellent source to be used by pharmaceutical companies for the screening of larger libraries providing the opportunity to establish strong collaborations between the private and academic sectors and maximizing the chances of bringing into the clinic new drugs for the treatment of DMD.

  17. Discovery of Novel NOx Catalysts for CIDI Applications by High-throughput Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Blint, Richard J.

    2007-12-31

    DOE project DE-PS26-00NT40758 has developed very active, lean exhaust, NOx reduction catalysts that have been tested on the discovery system, laboratory reactors and engine dynamometer systems. The goal of this project is the development of effective, affordable NOx reduction catalysts for lean combustion engines in the US light duty vehicle market which can meet Tier II emission standards with hydrocarbons based reductants for reducing NOx. General Motors (prime contractor) along with subcontractors BASF (Engelhard) (a catalytic converter developer) and ACCELRYS (an informatics supplier) carried out this project which began in August of 2002. BASF (Engelhard) has run over 16,000 tests of 6100 possible catalytic materials on a high throughput discovery system suitable for automotive catalytic materials. Accelrys developed a new database informatics system which allowed material tracking and data mining. A program catalyst was identified and evaluated at all levels of the program. Dynamometer evaluations of the program catalyst both with and without additives show 92% NOx conversions on the HWFET, 76% on the US06, 60% on the cold FTP and 65% on the Set 13 heavy duty test using diesel fuel. Conversions of over 92% on the heavy duty FTP using ethanol as a second fluid reductant have been measured. These can be competitive with both of the alternative lean NOx reduction technologies presently in the market. Conversions of about 80% were measured on the EUDC for lean gasoline applications without using active dosing to adjust the C:N ratio for optimum NOx reduction at all points in the certification cycle. A feasibility analysis has been completed and demonstrates the advantages and disadvantages of the technology using these materials compared with other potential technologies. The teaming agreements among the partners contain no obstacles to commercialization of new technologies to any potential catalyst customers.

  18. Development and Validation of a High Throughput System for Discovery of Antigens for Autoantibody Detection

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Isabel K.; Allen, Jared; Murray, Andrea; Parsy-Kowalska, Celine B.; Healey, Graham F.; Chapman, Caroline J.; Sewell, Herbert F.; Robertson, John F. R.

    2012-01-01

    An assay employing a panel of tumor-associated antigens has been validated and is available commercially (EarlyCDT®-Lung) to aid the early detection of lung cancer by measurement of serum autoantibodies. The high throughput (HTP) strategy described herein was pursued to identify new antigens to add to the EarlyCDT-Lung panel and to assist in the development of new panels for other cancers. Two ligation-independent cloning vectors were designed and synthesized, producing fusion proteins suitable for the autoantibody ELISA. We developed an abridged HTP version of the validated autoantibody ELISA, determining that results reflected the performance of the EarlyCDT assay, by comparing results on both formats. Once validated this HTP ELISA was utilized to screen multiple fusion proteins prepared on small-scale, by a HTP expression screen. We determined whether the assay performance for these HTP protein batches was an accurate reflection of the performance of R&D or commercial batches. A HTP discovery platform for the identification and optimal production of tumor- associated antigens which detects autoantibodies has been developed and validated. The most favorable conditions for the exposure of immunogenic epitopes were assessed to produce discriminatory proteins for use in a commercial ELISA. This process is rapid and cost-effective compared to standard cloning and screening technologies and enables rapid advancement in the field of autoantibody assay discovery. This approach will significantly reduce timescale and costs for developing similar panels of autoantibody assays for the detection of other cancer types with the ultimate aim of improved overall survival due to early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22815807

  19. High Throughput Screening in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: From Drug Discovery to Functional Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Gintjee, Thomas J.J.; Magh, Alvin S.H.; Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Centers for the screening of biologically active compounds and genomic libraries are becoming common in the academic setting and have enabled researchers devoted to developing strategies for the treatment of diseases or interested in studying a biological phenomenon to have unprecedented access to libraries that, until few years ago, were accessible only by pharmaceutical companies. As a result, new drugs and genetic targets have now been identified for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most prominent of the neuromuscular disorders affecting children. Although the work is still at an early stage, the results obtained to date are encouraging and demonstrate the importance that these centers may have in advancing therapeutic strategies for DMD as well as other diseases. This review will provide a summary of the status and progress made toward the development of a cure for this disorder and implementing high-throughput screening (HTS) technologies as the main source of discovery. As more academic institutions are gaining access to HTS as a valuable discovery tool, the identification of new biologically active molecules is likely to grow larger. In addition, the presence in the academic setting of experts in different aspects of the disease will offer the opportunity to develop novel assays capable of identifying new targets to be pursued as potential therapeutic options. These assays will represent an excellent source to be used by pharmaceutical companies for the screening of larger libraries providing the opportunity to establish strong collaborations between the private and academic sectors and maximizing the chances of bringing into the clinic new drugs for the treatment of DMD. PMID:25405319

  20. Application of high-throughput affinity-selection mass spectrometry for screening of chemical compound libraries in lead discovery.

    PubMed

    Zehender, Hartmut; Mayr, Lorenz M

    2007-02-01

    High-throughput screening of chemical libraries for compounds that interfere with a particular molecular target is among the most powerful methodologies applied in lead discovery at present. In this review, the authors describe a label-free, homogeneous, affinity-selection-based technology developed at Novartis, termed SpeedScreen, which is compared with similar technologies used for high-throughput screening in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. The focus at present of SpeedScreen is twofold: first, this technology is applied to orphan genomic targets and to those targets that are non-tractable by a functional assay; second, this technology is applied complementary to the well-established traditional methodologies for the screening of molecular targets. In summary, the authors discuss the value of affinity-selection-based high-throughput screening as a complementary technology to the common functional screening platforms and the benefits as well as the limitations of this new technology are outlined.

  1. High-throughput SNP discovery and genotyping for constructing a saturated linkage map of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Gaur, Rashmi; Azam, Sarwar; Jeena, Ganga; Khan, Aamir Waseem; Choudhary, Shalu; Jain, Mukesh; Yadav, Gitanjali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2012-10-01

    The present study reports the large-scale discovery of genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in chickpea, identified mainly through the next generation sequencing of two genotypes, i.e. Cicer arietinum ICC4958 and its wild progenitor C. reticulatum PI489777, parents of an inter-specific reference mapping population of chickpea. Development and validation of a high-throughput SNP genotyping assay based on Illumina's GoldenGate Genotyping Technology and its application in building a high-resolution genetic linkage map of chickpea is described for the first time. In this study, 1022 SNPs were identified, of which 768 high-confidence SNPs were selected for designing the custom Oligo Pool All (CpOPA-I) for genotyping. Of these, 697 SNPs could be successfully used for genotyping, demonstrating a high success rate of 90.75%. Genotyping data of the 697 SNPs were compiled along with those of 368 co-dominant markers mapped in an earlier study, and a saturated genetic linkage map of chickpea was constructed. One thousand and sixty-three markers were mapped onto eight linkage groups spanning 1808.7 cM (centiMorgans) with an average inter-marker distance of 1.70 cM, thereby representing one of the most advanced maps of chickpea. The map was used for the synteny analysis of chickpea, which revealed a higher degree of synteny with the phylogenetically close Medicago than with soybean. The first set of validated SNPs and map resources developed in this study will not only facilitate QTL mapping, genome-wide association analysis and comparative mapping in legumes but also help anchor scaffolds arising out of the whole-genome sequencing of chickpea.

  2. Combinatorial synthesis with high throughput discovery of protein-resistant membrane surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Minghao; Vegas, Arturo J.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Langer, Robert S.; Kilduff, James E.; Belfort, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Using combinatorial methods, we synthesized a series of new vinyl amide monomers and graft-polymerized them to light-sensitive poly(ether sulfone) (PES) porous films for protein resistance. To increase the discovery rate and statistical confidence, we developed high throughput surface modification methods (HTP) that allow synthesis, screening and selection of desirable monomers from a large library in a relatively short time (days). A series of amide monomers were synthesized by amidation of methacryloyl chloride with amines and grafted onto commercial poly(ether sulfone) (PES) membranes using irradiation from atmospheric pressure plasma (APP). The modified PES membrane surfaces were then tested and screened for static protein adhesion using HTP. Hydroxyl amide monomers N-(3-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (A3), N-(4-hydroxybutyl)methacrylamide (A4), and N-(4-hydroxybutyl) methacrylamide (A6), ethylene glycol (EG) monomer N-(3-methoxypropyl)methacrylamide (A7), and N-(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)-N-methylmethacrylamide (A8), and N-(2-(diethylamino)ethyl)-N-methylmethacrylamide (A9) all terminated with tertiary amines and were shown to have protein resistance. The PES membranes modified with these monomers exhibited both low protein adhesion (i.e. membrane plugging or fouling) and high flux. Their performance is comparable with previously identified best performing PEG and zwitterionic monomers, i.e. the so-called gold-standard for protein resistance. Combining a Hansen solubility parameter (HSP) analysis of the amide monomers and the HTP filtration results, we conclude that monomer solubility in water correlates with protein-resistant surfaces, presumably through its effects on surface–water interactions. PMID:23706542

  3. Functional Metagenomics: Construction and High-Throughput Screening of Fosmid Libraries for Discovery of Novel Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ufarté, Lisa; Bozonnet, Sophie; Laville, Elisabeth; Cecchini, Davide A; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Jacquiod, Samuel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Simonet, Pascal; Franqueville, Laure; Veronese, Gabrielle Potocki

    2016-01-01

    Activity-based metagenomics is one of the most efficient approaches to boost the discovery of novel biocatalysts from the huge reservoir of uncultivated bacteria. In this chapter, we describe a highly generic procedure of metagenomic library construction and high-throughput screening for carbohydrate-active enzymes. Applicable to any bacterial ecosystem, it enables the swift identification of functional enzymes that are highly efficient, alone or acting in synergy, to break down polysaccharides and oligosaccharides.

  4. A novel imaging-based high-throughput screening approach to anti-angiogenic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Evensen, Lasse; Micklem, David R; Link, Wolfgang; Lorens, James B

    2010-01-01

    The successful progression to the clinic of angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer treatment has spurred interest in developing new classes of anti-angiogenic compounds. The resulting surge in available candidate therapeutics highlights the need for robust, high-throughput angiogenesis screening systems that adequately capture the complexity of new vessel formation while providing quantitative evaluation of the potency of these agents. Available in vitro angiogenesis assays are either cumbersome, impeding adaptation to high-throughput screening formats, or inadequately model the complex multistep process of new vessel formation. We therefore developed an organotypic endothelial-mural cell co-culture assay system that reflects several facets of angiogenesis while remaining compatible with high-throughput/high-content image screening. Co-culture of primary human endothelial cells (EC) and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) results in assembly of a network of tubular endothelial structures enveloped with vascular basement membrane proteins, thus, comprising the three main components of blood vessels. Initially, EC are dependent on vSMC-derived VEGF and sensitive to clinical anti-angiogenic therapeutics. A subsequent phenotypic VEGF-switch renders EC networks resistant to anti-VEGF therapeutics, demarcating a mature vascular phenotype. Conversely, mature EC networks remain sensitive to vascular disrupting agents. Therefore, candidate anti-angiogenic compounds can be interrogated for their relative potency on immature and mature networks and classified as either vascular normalizing or vascular disrupting agents. Here, we demonstrate that the EC-vSMC co-culture assay represents a robust high-content imaging high-throughput screening system for identification of novel anti-angiogenic agents. A pilot high-throughput screening campaign was used to define informative imaging parameters and develop a follow-up dose-response scheme for hit characterization. High-throughput

  5. What Is High-Throughput Virtual Screening? A Perspective from Organic Materials Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O.; Suh, Changwon; Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Aguilera-Iparraguirre, Jorge; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-07-01

    A philosophy for defining what constitutes a virtual high-throughput screen is discussed, and the choices that influence decisions at each stage of the computational funnel are investigated, including an in-depth discussion of the generation of molecular libraries. Additionally, we provide advice on the storing, analysis, and visualization of data on the basis of extensive experience in our research group.

  6. High-Throughput, Motility-Based Sorter for Microswimmers and Gene Discovery Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Raizen, David; Bau, Haim

    2015-11-01

    Animal motility varies with genotype, disease progression, aging, and environmental conditions. In many studies, it is desirable to carry out high throughput motility-based sorting to isolate rare animals for, among other things, forward genetic screens to identify genetic pathways that regulate phenotypes of interest. Many commonly used screening processes are labor-intensive, lack sensitivity, and require extensive investigator training. Here, we describe a sensitive, high throughput, automated, motility-based method for sorting nematodes. Our method was implemented in a simple microfluidic device capable of sorting many thousands of animals per hour per module, and is amenable to parallelism. The device successfully enriched for known C. elegans motility mutants. Furthermore, using this device, we isolated low-abundance mutants capable of suppressing the somnogenic effects of the flp-13 gene, which regulates sleep-like quiescence in C. elegans. Subsequent genomic sequencing led to the identification of a flp-13-suppressor gene. This research was supported, in part, by NIH NIA Grant 5R03AG042690-02.

  7. A Multiplex High-Throughput Gene Expression Assay to Simultaneously Detect Disease and Functional Markers in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Marc; Corneo, Barbara; Davis, Janine; Wan, Qin; Miyagishima, Kiyoharu Joshua; King, Rebecca; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Marugan, Juan; Sharma, Ruchi; Shure, Michael; Temple, Sally; Miller, Sheldon

    2014-01-01

    There is continuing interest in the development of lineage-specific cells from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for use in cell therapies and drug discovery. Although in most cases differentiated cells show features of the desired lineage, they retain fetal gene expression and do not fully mature into “adult-like” cells. Such cells may not serve as an effective therapy because, once implanted, immature cells pose the risk of uncontrolled growth. Therefore, there is a need to optimize lineage-specific stem cell differentiation protocols to produce cells that no longer express fetal genes and have attained “adult-like” phenotypes. Toward that goal, it is critical to develop assays that simultaneously measure cell function and disease markers in high-throughput format. Here, we use a multiplex high-throughput gene expression assay that simultaneously detects endogenous expression of multiple developmental, functional, and disease markers in iPS cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We optimized protocols to differentiate iPS cell-derived RPE that was then grown in 96- and 384-well plates. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate differential expression of eight genes in iPS cells, iPS cell-derived RPE at two different differentiation stages, and primary human RPE using this multiplex assay. The data obtained from the multiplex gene expression assay are significantly correlated with standard quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-based measurements, confirming the ability of this high-throughput assay to measure relevant gene expression changes. This assay provides the basis to screen for compounds that improve RPE function and maturation and target disease pathways, thus providing the basis for effective treatments of several retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:24873859

  8. High-Throughput Screening Platform for the Discovery of New Immunomodulator Molecules from Natural Product Extract Libraries.

    PubMed

    Pérez Del Palacio, José; Díaz, Caridad; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Annang, Frederick; Martín, Jesús; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; González-Menéndez, Víctor; de Pedro, Nuria; Tormo, José R; Algieri, Francesca; Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Rodríguez-Cabezas, M Elena; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga; Vicente, Francisca; Gálvez, Julio

    2016-07-01

    It is widely accepted that central nervous system inflammation and systemic inflammation play a significant role in the progression of chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, neurotropic viral infections, stroke, paraneoplastic disorders, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. Therefore, it seems reasonable to propose that the use of anti-inflammatory drugs might diminish the cumulative effects of inflammation. Indeed, some epidemiological studies suggest that sustained use of anti-inflammatory drugs may prevent or slow down the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the anti-inflammatory drugs and biologics used clinically have the disadvantage of causing side effects and a high cost of treatment. Alternatively, natural products offer great potential for the identification and development of bioactive lead compounds into drugs for treating inflammatory diseases with an improved safety profile. In this work, we present a validated high-throughput screening approach in 96-well plate format for the discovery of new molecules with anti-inflammatory/immunomodulatory activity. The in vitro models are based on the quantitation of nitrite levels in RAW264.7 murine macrophages and interleukin-8 in Caco-2 cells. We have used this platform in a pilot project to screen a subset of 5976 noncytotoxic crude microbial extracts from the MEDINA microbial natural product collection. To our knowledge, this is the first report on an high-throughput screening of microbial natural product extracts for the discovery of immunomodulators.

  9. Internal standard capillary electrophoresis as a high-throughput method for pKa determination in drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Cabot, Joan M; Fuguet, Elisabet; Rosés, Martí

    2014-10-13

    A novel high-throughput method for determining acidity constants (pKa) by capillary electrophoresis (CE) is developed. The method, based on the use of an internal standard (IS-CE), is implemented as a routine method for accurate experimental pKa determination of drugs undergoing physicochemical measurements in drug discovery laboratories. Just two electropherograms at 2 different pH values are needed to calculate an acidity constant. Several ISs can be used in the same buffer and run to enhance precision. With 3 ISs, for example, the pKa of the test compound (TC) can be obtained in triplicate in less than 3 min of electrophoresis. It has been demonstrated that the IS-CE method eliminates some systematic errors, maintaining, or even increasing the precision of the results compared with other methods. Furthermore, pH buffer instability during electrophoretic runs is not a problem in the IS-CE method. It is also proved that after 16 h of electroseparation using the same buffer vial, pH may change by around one unit; but the pKa calculated by the IS-CE method remains constant. Thus, IS-CE is a powerful high-throughput method for pKa determination in drug discovery and development.

  10. A high throughput solubility assay for drug discovery using microscale shake-flask and rapid UHPLC-UV-CLND quantification.

    PubMed

    Lin, Baiwei; Pease, Joseph H

    2016-04-15

    The rapid determination of key physical properties of lead compounds is essential to the drug discovery process. Solubility is one of the most important properties since good solubility is needed not only for obtaining reliable in vitro and in vivo assay results in early discovery but also to ensure sufficient concentration of the drug being in circulation to get the desired therapeutic exposure at the target of interest. In order for medicinal chemists to tune solubility of lead compounds, a rapid assay is needed to provide solubility data that is accurate and predictive so that it can be reliably used for designing the next generation of compounds with improved properties. To ensure speed and data quality, we developed a high throughput solubility assay that utilizes a single calibration UHPLC-UV-CLND method and a 24h shake-flask format for rapid quantification. A set of 46 model compounds was used to demonstrate that the method is accurate, reproducible and predictive. Here we present development of the assay, including evaluation of quantification method, filtration membranes, equilibrium times, DMSO concentrations, and buffer conditions. A comparison of thermodynamic solubility results to our high throughput 24h shake-flask solubility assay results is also discussed.

  11. Discovery of novel TAOK2 inhibitor scaffolds from high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Piala, Alexander T; Akella, Radha; Potts, Malia B; Dudics-Giagnocavo, Stephanie A; He, Haixia; Wei, Shuguang; White, Michael A; Posner, Bruce A; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J

    2016-08-15

    The MAP3K (Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase) TAOK2 (Thousand-And-One Kinase 2) is an activator of p38 MAP kinase cascade that is up-regulated in response to environmental stresses. A synthetic lethal screen performed using a NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) cell line, and a second screen identifying potential modulators of autophagy have implicated TAOK2 as a potential cancer therapeutic target. Using a 200,000 compound high throughput screen, we identified three specific small molecule compounds that inhibit the kinase activity of TAOK2. These compounds also showed inhibition of autophagy. Based on SAR (structure-activity relationship) studies, we have predicted the modifications on the reactive groups for the three compounds.

  12. Discovery in Genetic Skin Disease: The Impact of High Throughput Genetic Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Maruthappu, Thiviyani; Scott, Claire A.; Kelsell, David P.

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has seen considerable advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of skin disease, as a consequence of high throughput sequencing technologies including next generation sequencing and whole exome sequencing. We have now determined the genes underlying several monogenic diseases, such as harlequin ichthyosis, Olmsted syndrome, and exfoliative ichthyosis, which have provided unique insights into the structure and function of the skin. In addition, through genome wide association studies we now have an understanding of how low penetrance variants contribute to inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis, and how they contribute to underlying pathophysiological disease processes. In this review we discuss strategies used to unravel the genes underlying both monogenic and complex trait skin diseases in the last 10 years and the implications on mechanistic studies, diagnostics, and therapeutics. PMID:25093584

  13. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity by high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Franková, Lenka; Defries, Andrew; Cutler, Sean R; Fry, Stephen C

    2015-09-01

    Small molecules (xenobiotics) that inhibit cell-wall-localised enzymes are valuable for elucidating the enzymes' biological roles. We applied a high-throughput fluorescent dot-blot screen to search for inhibitors of Petroselinum xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity in vitro. Of 4216 xenobiotics tested, with cellulose-bound xyloglucan as donor-substrate, 18 inhibited XET activity and 18 promoted it (especially anthraquinones and flavonoids). No compounds promoted XET in quantitative assays with (cellulose-free) soluble xyloglucan as substrate, suggesting that promotion was dependent on enzyme-cellulose interactions. With cellulose-free xyloglucan as substrate, we found 22 XET-inhibitors - especially compounds that generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) e.g., riboflavin (IC50 29 μM), retinoic acid, eosin (IC50 27 μM) and erythrosin (IC50 36 μM). The riboflavin effect was light-dependent, supporting (1)O2 involvement. Other inhibitors included tannins, sulphydryl reagents and triphenylmethanes. Some inhibitors (vulpinic acid and brilliant blue G) were relatively specific to XET, affecting only two or three, respectively, of nine other wall-enzyme activities tested; others [e.g. (-)-epigallocatechin gallate and riboflavin] were non-specific. In vivo, out of eight XET-inhibitors bioassayed, erythrosin (1 μM) inhibited cell expansion in Rosa and Zea cell-suspension cultures, and 40 μM mycophenolic acid and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibited Zea culture growth. Our work showcases a general high-throughput strategy for discovering wall-enzyme inhibitors, some being plant growth inhibitors potentially valuable as physiological tools or herbicide leads.

  14. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity by high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Chormova, Dimitra; Franková, Lenka; Defries, Andrew; Cutler, Sean R.; Fry, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Small molecules (xenobiotics) that inhibit cell-wall-localised enzymes are valuable for elucidating the enzymes’ biological roles. We applied a high-throughput fluorescent dot-blot screen to search for inhibitors of Petroselinum xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity in vitro. Of 4216 xenobiotics tested, with cellulose-bound xyloglucan as donor-substrate, 18 inhibited XET activity and 18 promoted it (especially anthraquinones and flavonoids). No compounds promoted XET in quantitative assays with (cellulose-free) soluble xyloglucan as substrate, suggesting that promotion was dependent on enzyme–cellulose interactions. With cellulose-free xyloglucan as substrate, we found 22 XET-inhibitors – especially compounds that generate singlet oxygen (1O2) e.g., riboflavin (IC50 29 μM), retinoic acid, eosin (IC50 27 μM) and erythrosin (IC50 36 μM). The riboflavin effect was light-dependent, supporting 1O2 involvement. Other inhibitors included tannins, sulphydryl reagents and triphenylmethanes. Some inhibitors (vulpinic acid and brilliant blue G) were relatively specific to XET, affecting only two or three, respectively, of nine other wall-enzyme activities tested; others [e.g. (−)-epigallocatechin gallate and riboflavin] were non-specific. In vivo, out of eight XET-inhibitors bioassayed, erythrosin (1 μM) inhibited cell expansion in Rosa and Zea cell-suspension cultures, and 40 μM mycophenolic acid and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibited Zea culture growth. Our work showcases a general high-throughput strategy for discovering wall-enzyme inhibitors, some being plant growth inhibitors potentially valuable as physiological tools or herbicide leads. PMID:26093490

  15. Microfluidic droplet-based PCR instrumentation for high-throughput gene expression profiling and biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Christopher J.; Dalton, Tara M.

    2015-01-01

    PCR is a common and often indispensable technique used in medical and biological research labs for a variety of applications. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) has become a definitive technique for quantitating differences in gene expression levels between samples. Yet, in spite of this importance, reliable methods to quantitate nucleic acid amounts in a higher throughput remain elusive. In the following paper, a unique design to quantify gene expression levels at the nanoscale in a continuous flow system is presented. Fully automated, high-throughput, low volume amplification of deoxynucleotides (DNA) in a droplet based microfluidic system is described. Unlike some conventional qPCR instrumentation that use integrated fluidic circuits or plate arrays, the instrument performs qPCR in a continuous, micro-droplet flowing process with droplet generation, distinctive reagent mixing, thermal cycling and optical detection platforms all combined on one complete instrument. Detailed experimental profiling of reactions of less than 300 nl total volume is achieved using the platform demonstrating the dynamic range to be 4 order logs and consistent instrument sensitivity. Furthermore, reduced pipetting steps by as much as 90% and a unique degree of hands-free automation makes the analytical possibilities for this instrumentation far reaching. In conclusion, a discussion of the first demonstrations of this approach to perform novel, continuous high-throughput biological screens is presented. The results generated from the instrument, when compared with commercial instrumentation, demonstrate the instrument reliability and robustness to carry out further studies of clinical significance with added throughput and economic benefits. PMID:27077035

  16. Discovery of a Novel General Anesthetic Chemotype Using High-throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    McKinstry-Wu, Andrew R.; Bu, Weiming; Rai, Ganesha; Lea, Wendy A.; Weiser, Brian P.; Liang, David F.; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Maloney, David J.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The development of novel anesthetics has historically been a process of combined serendipity and empiricism, with most recent new anesthetics developed via modification of existing anesthetic structures. Methods Using a novel high-throughput screen employing the fluorescent anesthetic 1-aminoanthracene (1-AMA) and apoferritin as a surrogate for on-pathway anesthetic protein target(s), we screened a 350,000 compound library for competition with 1-AMA-apoferritin binding. Hit compounds meeting structural criteria had their binding affinities for apoferritin quantified with isothermal titration calorimetry and were tested for γ-aminobutyric acid type A-receptor binding using a flunitrazepam binding assay. Chemotypes with a strong presence in the top 700 and exhibiting activity via isothermal titration calorimetry were selected for medicinal chemistry optimization including testing for anesthetic potency and toxicity in an in vivo Xenopus laevis tadpole assay. Compounds with low toxicity and high potency were tested for anesthetic potency in mice. Results From an initial chemical library of over 350,000 compounds, we identified 2,600 compounds that potently inhibited 1-AMA binding to apoferritin. A subset of compounds chosen by structural criteria (700) was successfully reconfirmed using the initial assay. Based upon a strong presence in both the initial and secondary screens the 6-phenylpyridazin-3(2H)-one chemotype was assessed for anesthetic activity in tadpoles. Medicinal chemistry efforts identified four compounds with high potency and low toxicity in tadpoles, two were found to be effective novel anesthetics in mice. Conclusions We demonstrate the first use of a high-throughput screen to successfully identify a novel anesthetic chemotype and show mammalian anesthetic activity for members of that chemotype. PMID:25603205

  17. High throughput fluorescence imaging approaches for drug discovery using in vitro and in vivo three-dimensional models

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Natalia J.; Titus, Steven A.; Wagner, Amanda K.; Simeonov, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Introduction High-resolution microscopy using fluorescent probes is a powerful tool to investigate individual cell structure and function, cell subpopulations, and mechanisms underlying cellular responses to drugs. Additionally, responses to drugs more closely resemble those seen in vivo when cells are physically connected in 3D systems (either 3D cell cultures or whole organisms), as opposed to traditional monolayer cultures. Combined, the use of imaging-based 3D models in the early stages of drug development has the potential to generate biologically relevant data that will increase the likelihood of success for drug candidates in human studies. Areas covered The authors discuss current methods for the culturing of cells in 3D as well as approaches for the imaging of whole-animal models and 3D cultures that are amenable to high throughput settings and could be implemented to support drug discovery campaigns. Furthermore, they provide critical considerations when discussing imaging these 3D systems for high throughput chemical screenings. Expert opinion Despite widespread understanding of the limitations imposed by the 2D versus the 3D cellular paradigm, imaging-based drug screening of 3D cellular models is still limited, with only a few screens found in the literature. Image acquisition in high throughput, accurate interpretation of fluorescent signal, and uptake of staining reagents can be challenging, as the samples are in essence large aggregates of cells. The authors recognize these shortcomings that need to be overcome before the field can accelerate the utilization of these technologies in large-scale chemical screens. PMID:26394277

  18. High-Throughput Luciferase-Based Assay for the Discovery of Therapeutics That Prevent Malaria

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In order to identify the most attractive starting points for drugs that can be used to prevent malaria, a diverse chemical space comprising tens of thousands to millions of small molecules may need to be examined. Achieving this throughput necessitates the development of efficient ultra-high-throughput screening methods. Here, we report the development and evaluation of a luciferase-based phenotypic screen of malaria exoerythrocytic-stage parasites optimized for a 1536-well format. This assay uses the exoerythrocytic stage of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, and a human hepatoma cell line. We use this assay to evaluate several biased and unbiased compound libraries, including two small sets of molecules (400 and 89 compounds, respectively) with known activity against malaria erythrocytic-stage parasites and a set of 9886 diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS)-derived compounds. Of the compounds screened, we obtain hit rates of 12–13 and 0.6% in preselected and naïve libraries, respectively, and identify 52 compounds with exoerythrocytic-stage activity less than 1 μM and having minimal host cell toxicity. Our data demonstrate the ability of this method to identify compounds known to have causal prophylactic activity in both human and animal models of malaria, as well as novel compounds, including some exclusively active against parasite exoerythrocytic stages. PMID:27275010

  19. High-throughput cell-cycle imaging opens new doors for discovery.

    PubMed

    Kuwada, Nathan J; Traxler, Beth; Wiggins, Paul A

    2015-11-01

    During the life of a cell, numerous essential cellular processes must be coordinated both spatially and temporally, from DNA replication and chromosome segregation to gene expression and cytokinesis. In order to analyze these inherently dynamic and cell-cycle-dependent processes, it is essential to observe the dynamic localization of the cellular machinery throughout the entire cell cycle. Although some coarse features of cell-cycle dynamics can be captured in snapshot imaging, where cellular size or morphology can be used as a proxy for cell-cycle phase, the inherently stochastic nature of ultrastructures in the cell makes the direct visualization of subcellular dynamics an essential tool to differentiate between structural differences that are the result of biologically relevant dynamics versus cell-to-cell variation. With these goals in mind, we have developed a unique high-throughput imaging approach, and have recently applied this to characterize the cell-cycle localization of nearly every protein in the bacterial cell (Kuwada in Mol Microbiol, 95(1), 64-79, 2015). This approach combines large-format sample preparation with automated image capture, processing, and analysis to quantitatively characterize proteome localization of tens of thousands of complete cell cycles.

  20. A novel high-throughput screening assay for discovery of molecules that increase cellular tetrahydrobiopterin.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Du, Yuhong; Chen, Wei; Fu, Haian; Harrison, David G

    2011-09-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) is an essential cofactor for the nitric oxide (NO) synthases and the aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Insufficient BH(4) has been implicated in various cardiovascular and neurological disorders. GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH-1) is the rate-limiting enzyme for de novo biosynthesis of BH(4). The authors have recently shown that the interaction of GTPCH-1 with GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) inhibits endothelial GTPCH-1 enzyme activity, BH(4) levels, and NO production. They propose that agents that disrupt the GTPCH-1/GFRP interaction can increase cellular GTPCH-1 activity, BH(4) levels, and NO production. They developed and optimized a novel time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assay to monitor the interaction of GTPCH-1 and GFRP. This assay is highly sensitive and stable and has a signal-to-background ratio (S/B) greater than 12 and a Z' factor greater than 0.8. This assay was used in an ultra-high-throughput screening (uHTS) format to screen the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds. Using independent protein-protein interaction and cellular activity assays, the authors identified compounds that disrupt GTPCH-1/GFRP binding and increase endothelial cell biopterin levels. Thus, this TR-FRET assay could be applied in future uHTS of additional libraries to search for molecules that increase GTPCH-1 activity and BH(4) levels.

  1. Adaptation of high-throughput screening in drug discovery-toxicological screening tests.

    PubMed

    Szymański, Paweł; Markowicz, Magdalena; Mikiciuk-Olasik, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is one of the newest techniques used in drug design and may be applied in biological and chemical sciences. This method, due to utilization of robots, detectors and software that regulate the whole process, enables a series of analyses of chemical compounds to be conducted in a short time and the affinity of biological structures which is often related to toxicity to be defined. Since 2008 we have implemented the automation of this technique and as a consequence, the possibility to examine 100,000 compounds per day. The HTS method is more frequently utilized in conjunction with analytical techniques such as NMR or coupled methods e.g., LC-MS/MS. Series of studies enable the establishment of the rate of affinity for targets or the level of toxicity. Moreover, researches are conducted concerning conjugation of nanoparticles with drugs and the determination of the toxicity of such structures. For these purposes there are frequently used cell lines. Due to the miniaturization of all systems, it is possible to examine the compound's toxicity having only 1-3 mg of this compound. Determination of cytotoxicity in this way leads to a significant decrease in the expenditure and to a reduction in the length of the study.

  2. Automatic classification and pattern discovery in high-throughput protein crystallization trials.

    PubMed

    Cumbaa, Christian; Jurisica, Igor

    2005-01-01

    Conceptually, protein crystallization can be divided into two phases search and optimization. Robotic protein crystallization screening can speed up the search phase, and has a potential to increase process quality. Automated image classification helps to increase throughput and consistently generate objective results. Although the classification accuracy can always be improved, our image analysis system can classify images from 1,536-well plates with high classification accuracy (85%) and ROC score (0.87), as evaluated on 127 human-classified protein screens containing 5,600 crystal images and 189,472 non-crystal images. Data mining can integrate results from high-throughput screens with information about crystallizing conditions, intrinsic protein properties, and results from crystallization optimization. We apply association mining, a data mining approach that identifies frequently occurring patterns among variables and their values. This approach segregates proteins into groups based on how they react in a broad range of conditions, and clusters cocktails to reflect their potential to achieve crystallization. These results may lead to crystallization screen optimization, and reveal associations between protein properties and crystallization conditions. We also postulate that past experience may lead us to the identification of initial conditions favorable to crystallization for novel proteins.

  3. Targeted Biomarker Discovery by High Throughput Glycosylation Profiling of Human Plasma Alpha1-Antitrypsin and Immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. Renee; Koeleman, Carolien A. M.; Uh, Hae-Won; Stam, Jord C.; van Heemst, Diana; Maier, Andrea B.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Deelder, André M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Protein N-glycosylation patterns are known to show vast genetic as well as physiological and pathological variation and represent a large pool of potential biomarkers. Large-scale studies are needed for the identification and validation of biomarkers, and the analytical techniques required have recently been developed. Such methods have up to now mainly been applied to complex mixtures of glycoproteins in biofluids (e.g. plasma). Here, we analyzed N-glycosylation profiles of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) enriched fractions by 96-well microtitration plate based high-throughput immuno-affinity capturing and N-glycan analysis using multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CGE-LIF). Human plasma samples were from the Leiden Longevity Study comprising 2415 participants of different chronological and biological ages. Glycosylation patterns of AAT enriched fractions were found to be associated with chronological (calendar) age and they differed between females and males. Moreover, several glycans in the AAT enriched fraction were associated with physiological parameters marking cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Pronounced differences were found between males and females in the glycosylation profiles of IgA enriched fractions. Our results demonstrate that large-scale immuno-affinity capturing of proteins from human plasma using a bead-based method combined with high-throughput N-glycan analysis is a powerful tool for the discovery of glycosylation-based biomarker candidates. PMID:24039863

  4. Discovery of potent KIFC1 inhibitors using a method of integrated high-throughput synthesis and screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Lamb, Michelle L; Zhang, Tao; Hennessy, Edward J; Grewal, Gurmit; Sha, Li; Zambrowski, Mark; Block, Michael H; Dowling, James E; Su, Nancy; Wu, Jiaquan; Deegan, Tracy; Mikule, Keith; Wang, Wenxian; Kaspera, Rüdiger; Chuaqui, Claudio; Chen, Huawei

    2014-12-11

    KIFC1 (HSET), a member of the kinesin-14 family of motor proteins, plays an essential role in centrosomal bundling in cancer cells, but its function is not required for normal diploid cell division. To explore the potential of KIFC1 as a therapeutic target for human cancers, a series of potent KIFC1 inhibitors featuring a phenylalanine scaffold was developed from hits identified through high-throughput screening (HTS). Optimization of the initial hits combined both design-synthesis-test cycles and an integrated high-throughput synthesis and biochemical screening method. An important aspect of this integrated method was the utilization of DMSO stock solutions of compounds registered in the corporate compound collection as synthetic reactants. Using this method, over 1500 compounds selected for structural diversity were quickly assembled in assay-ready 384-well plates and were directly tested after the necessary dilutions. Our efforts led to the discovery of a potent KIFC1 inhibitor, AZ82, which demonstrated the desired centrosome declustering mode of action in cell studies.

  5. Discovery of bile salt hydrolase inhibitors using an efficient high-throughput screening system.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katie; Zeng, Ximin; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The global trend of restricting the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGP) in animal production necessitates the need to develop valid alternatives to maintain productivity and sustainability of food animals. Previous studies suggest inhibition of bile salt hydrolase (BSH), an intestinal bacteria-produced enzyme that exerts negative impact on host fat digestion and utilization, is a promising approach to promote animal growth performance. To achieve the long term goal of developing novel alternatives to AGPs, in this study, a rapid and convenient high-throughput screening (HTS) system was developed and successfully used for identification of BSH inhibitors. With the aid of a high-purity BSH from a chicken Lactobacillus salivarius strain, we optimized various screening conditions (e.g. BSH concentration, reaction buffer pH, incubation temperature and length, substrate type and concentration) and establish a precipitation-based screening approach to identify BSH inhibitors using 96-well or 384-well microplates. A pilot HTS was performed using a small compound library comprised of 2,240 biologically active and structurally diverse compounds. Among the 107 hits, several promising and potent BSH inhibitors (e.g. riboflavin and phenethyl caffeate) were selected and validated by standard BSH activity assay. Interestingly, the HTS also identified a panel of antibiotics as BSH inhibitor; in particular, various tetracycline antibiotics and roxarsone, the widely used AGP, have been demonstrated to display potent inhibitory effect on BSH. Together, this study developed an efficient HTS system and identified several BSH inhibitors with potential as alternatives to AGP. In addition, the findings from this study also suggest a new mode of action of AGP for promoting animal growth.

  6. Discovery of Bile Salt Hydrolase Inhibitors Using an Efficient High-Throughput Screening System

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katie; Zeng, Ximin; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The global trend of restricting the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGP) in animal production necessitates the need to develop valid alternatives to maintain productivity and sustainability of food animals. Previous studies suggest inhibition of bile salt hydrolase (BSH), an intestinal bacteria-produced enzyme that exerts negative impact on host fat digestion and utilization, is a promising approach to promote animal growth performance. To achieve the long term goal of developing novel alternatives to AGPs, in this study, a rapid and convenient high-throughput screening (HTS) system was developed and successfully used for identification of BSH inhibitors. With the aid of a high-purity BSH from a chicken Lactobacillus salivarius strain, we optimized various screening conditions (e.g. BSH concentration, reaction buffer pH, incubation temperature and length, substrate type and concentration) and establish a precipitation-based screening approach to identify BSH inhibitors using 96-well or 384-well microplates. A pilot HTS was performed using a small compound library comprised of 2,240 biologically active and structurally diverse compounds. Among the 107 hits, several promising and potent BSH inhibitors (e.g. riboflavin and phenethyl caffeate) were selected and validated by standard BSH activity assay. Interestingly, the HTS also identified a panel of antibiotics as BSH inhibitor; in particular, various tetracycline antibiotics and roxarsone, the widely used AGP, have been demonstrated to display potent inhibitory effect on BSH. Together, this study developed an efficient HTS system and identified several BSH inhibitors with potential as alternatives to AGP. In addition, the findings from this study also suggest a new mode of action of AGP for promoting animal growth. PMID:24454844

  7. High-Throughput Excipient Discovery Enables Oral Delivery of Poorly Soluble Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric excipients are crucial ingredients in modern pills, increasing the therapeutic bioavailability, safety, stability, and accessibility of lifesaving products to combat diseases in developed and developing countries worldwide. Because many early-pipeline drugs are clinically intractable due to hydrophobicity and crystallinity, new solubilizing excipients can reposition successful and even failed compounds to more effective and inexpensive oral formulations. With assistance from high-throughput controlled polymerization and screening tools, we employed a strategic, molecular evolution approach to systematically modulate designer excipients based on the cyclic imide chemical groups of an important (yet relatively insoluble) drug phenytoin. In these acrylamide- and methacrylate-containing polymers, a synthon approach was employed: one monomer served as a precipitation inhibitor for phenytoin recrystallization, while the comonomer provided hydrophilicity. Systems that maintained drug supersaturation in amorphous solid dispersions were identified with molecular-level understanding of noncovalent interactions using NOESY and DOSY NMR spectroscopy. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (poly(NIPAm-co-DMA)) at 70 mol % NIPAm exhibited the highest drug solubilization, in which phenytoin associated with inhibiting NIPAm units only with lowered diffusivity in solution. In vitro dissolution tests of select spray-dried dispersions corroborated the screening trends between polymer chemical composition and solubilization performance, where the best NIPAm/DMA polymer elevated the mean area-under-the-dissolution-curve by 21 times its crystalline state at 10 wt % drug loading. When administered to rats for pharmacokinetic evaluation, the same leading poly(NIPAm-co-DMA) formulation tripled the oral bioavailability compared to a leading commercial excipient, HPMCAS, and translated to a remarkable 23-fold improvement over crystalline phenytoin. PMID:27800558

  8. Materials Design and Discovery with High-Throughput Density Functional Theory: The Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saal, James E.; Kirklin, Scott; Aykol, Muratahan; Meredig, Bryce; Wolverton, C.

    2013-11-01

    High-throughput density functional theory (HT DFT) is fast becoming a powerful tool for accelerating materials design and discovery by the amassing tens and even hundreds of thousands of DFT calculations in large databases. Complex materials problems can be approached much more efficiently and broadly through the sheer quantity of structures and chemistries available in such databases. Our HT DFT database, the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD), contains over 200,000 DFT calculated crystal structures and will be freely available for public use at http://oqmd.org. In this review, we describe the OQMD and its use in five materials problems, spanning a wide range of applications and materials types: (I) Li-air battery combination catalyst/electrodes, (II) Li-ion battery anodes, (III) Li-ion battery cathode coatings reactive with HF, (IV) Mg-alloy long-period stacking ordered (LPSO) strengthening precipitates, and (V) training a machine learning model to predict new stable ternary compounds.

  9. A High Throughput, 384-Well, Semi-Automated, Hepatocyte Intrinsic Clearance Assay for Screening New Molecular Entities in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Heinle, Lance; Peterkin, Vincent; de Morais, Sonia M; Jenkins, Gary J; Badagnani, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput, semi-automated clearance screening assay in hepatocytes was developed allowing a scientist to generate data for 96 compounds in one week. The 384-well format assay utilizes a Thermo Multidrop Combi and an optimized LC-MS/MS method. The previously reported LCMS/ MS method reduced the analytical run time by 3-fold, down to 1.2 min injection-to-injection. The Multidrop was able to deliver hepatocytes to 384-well plates with minimal viability loss. Comparison of results from the new 384-well and historical 24-well assays yielded a correlation of 0.95. In addition, results obtained for 25 marketed drugs with various metabolism pathways had a correlation of 0.75 when compared with literature values. Precision was maintained in the new format as 8 compounds tested in ≥39 independent experiments had coefficients of variation ≤21%. The ability to predict in vivo clearances using the new stability assay format was also investigated using 22 marketed drugs and 26 AbbVie compounds. Correction of intrinsic clearance values with binding to hepatocytes (in vitro data) and plasma (in vivo data) resulted in a higher in vitro to in vivo correlation when comparing 22 marketed compounds in human (0.80 vs 0.35) and 26 AbbVie Discovery compounds in rat (0.56 vs 0.17), demonstrating the importance of correcting for binding in clearance studies. This newly developed high throughput, semi-automated clearance assay allows for rapid screening of Discovery compounds to enable Structure Activity Relationship (SAR) analysis based on high quality hepatocyte stability data in sufficient quantity and quality to drive the next round of compound synthesis.

  10. High-Throughput Nano-Biofilm Microarray for Antifungal Drug Discovery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-25

    antifungal drugs against the highly protective structured popula- tion of C. albicans. We have fabricated a cellular microarray sys- tem consisting of...is a robust and effi- cient tool for accelerating the drug discovery process: (i) combinatorial screening against a collection of 28 antifungal com... against the NCI challenge set small-molecule library identified three heretofore-unknown hits. This cell-based microarray platform allows for

  11. Precision multidimensional assay for high-throughput microRNA drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Haefliger, Benjamin; Prochazka, Laura; Angelici, Bartolomeo; Benenson, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Development of drug discovery assays that combine high content with throughput is challenging. Information-processing gene networks can address this challenge by integrating multiple potential targets of drug candidates' activities into a small number of informative readouts, reporting simultaneously on specific and non-specific effects. Here we show a family of networks implementing this concept in a cell-based drug discovery assay for miRNA drug targets. The networks comprise multiple modules reporting on specific effects towards an intended miRNA target, together with non-specific effects on gene expression, off-target miRNAs and RNA interference pathway. We validate the assays using known perturbations of on- and off-target miRNAs, and evaluate an ∼700 compound library in an automated screen with a follow-up on specific and non-specific hits. We further customize and validate assays for additional drug targets and non-specific inputs. Our study offers a novel framework for precision drug discovery assays applicable to diverse target families. PMID:26880188

  12. High-Throughput Discovery of Chloroplast and Mitochondrial DNA Polymorphisms in Brassicaceae Species by ORG-EcoTILLING

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chang-Li; Wang, Guang-Yong; Wang, Jian-Bo; Yan, Gui-Xin; Chen, Bi-Yun; Xu, Kun; Li, Jun; Gao, Gui-Zhen; Wu, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Bo; Liu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Background Information on polymorphic DNA in organelle genomes is essential for evolutionary and ecological studies. However, it is challenging to perform high-throughput investigations of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms. In recent years, EcoTILLING stands out as one of the most universal, low-cost, and high-throughput reverse genetic methods, and the identification of natural genetic variants can provide much information about gene function, association mapping and linkage disequilibrium analysis and species evolution. Until now, no report exists on whether this method is applicable to organelle genomes and to what extent it can be used. Methodology/Principal Findings To address this problem, we adapted the CEL I-based heteroduplex cleavage strategy used in Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING) for the discovery of nucleotide polymorphisms in organelle genomes. To assess the applicability and accuracy of this technology, designated ORG-EcoTILLING, at different taxonomic levels, we sampled two sets of taxa representing accessions from the Brassicaceae with three chloroplast genes (accD, matK and rbcL) and one mitochondrial gene (atp6). The method successfully detected nine, six and one mutation sites in the accD, matK and rbcL genes, respectively, in 96 Brassica accessions. These mutations were confirmed by DNA sequencing, with 100% accuracy at both inter- and intraspecific levels. We also detected 44 putative mutations in accD in 91 accessions from 45 species and 29 genera of seven tribes. Compared with DNA sequencing results, the false negative rate was 36%. However, 17 SNPs detected in atp6 were completely identical to the sequencing results. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that ORG-EcoTILLING is a powerful and cost-effective alternative method for high-throughput genome-wide assessment of inter- and intraspecific chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms. It will play an important role in evolutionary and

  13. Leveraging family-specific signatures for AMP discovery and high-throughput annotation

    PubMed Central

    Waghu, Faiza Hanif; Barai, Ram Shankar; Idicula-Thomas, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are diverse, biologically active, essential components of the innate immune system. As compared to conventional antibiotics, AMPs exhibit broad spectrum antimicrobial activity, reduced toxicity and reduced microbial resistance. They are widely researched for their therapeutic potential, especially against multi-drug resistant pathogens. AMPs are known to have family-specific sequence composition, which can be mined for their discovery and rational design. Here, we present a detailed family-based study on AMP families. The study involved the use of sequence signatures represented by patterns and hidden Markov models (HMMs) present in experimentally studied AMPs to identify novel AMPs. Along with AMPs, peptides hitherto lacking antimicrobial annotation were also retrieved and wet-lab studies on randomly selected sequences proved their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. CAMPSign, a webserver has been created for researchers to effortlessly exploit the use of AMP family signatures for identification of AMPs. The webserver is available online at www.campsign.bicnirrh.res.in. In this work, we demonstrate an optimised and experimentally validated protocol along with a freely available webserver that uses family-based sequence signatures for accelerated discovery of novel AMPs. PMID:27089856

  14. Malaria vaccines: high-throughput tools for antigens discovery with potential for their development.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Nora; Vallejo, Andrés; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates

    2013-04-01

    Malaria is a disease induced by parasites of the Plasmodium genus, which are transmitted by Anopheles mosquitoes and represents a great socio-economic burden Worldwide. Plasmodium vivax is the second species of malaria Worldwide, but it is the most prevalent in Latin America and other regions of the planet. It is currently considered that vaccines represent a cost-effective strategy for controlling transmissible diseases and could complement other malaria control measures; however, the chemical and immunological complexity of the parasite has hindered development of effective vaccines. Recent availability of several genomes of Plasmodium species, as well as bioinformatic tools are allowing the selection of large numbers of proteins and analysis of their immune potential. Herein, we review recently developed strategies for discovery of novel antigens with potential for malaria vaccine development.

  15. Fine QTL mapping of mandarin (Citrus reticulata) fruit characters using high-throughput SNP markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seedlessness, flavor, and color are top priorities for mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco) cultivar improvement. Given long juvenility, large tree size, and high breeding cost, marker-assisted selection (MAS) may be an expeditious and economical approach to these challenges. The objectives of this s...

  16. Association mapping of resistance to leaf rust in emmer wheat using high throughput SNP markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum L. subsp. dicoccum) is known to be a useful source of genes for many desirable characters for improvement of modern cultivated wheat. Recently, a panel of 181 emmer wheat accessions has been genotyped with wheat 9K SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) markers and exte...

  17. An in vivo platform for rapid high-throughput antitubercular drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Kevin; Cosma, Christine L; Troll, Mark A; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2012-07-26

    Treatment of tuberculosis, like other infectious diseases, is increasingly hindered by the emergence of drug resistance. Drug discovery efforts would be facilitated by facile screening tools that incorporate the complexities of human disease. Mycobacterium marinum-infected zebrafish larvae recapitulate key aspects of tuberculosis pathogenesis and drug treatment. Here, we develop a model for rapid in vivo drug screening using fluorescence-based methods for serial quantitative assessment of drug efficacy and toxicity. We provide proof-of-concept that both traditional bacterial-targeting antitubercular drugs and newly identified host-targeting drugs would be discovered through the use of this model. We demonstrate the model's utility for the identification of synergistic combinations of antibacterial drugs and demonstrate synergy between bacterial- and host-targeting compounds. Thus, the platform can be used to identify new antibacterial agents and entirely new classes of drugs that thwart infection by targeting host pathways. The methods developed here should be widely applicable to small-molecule screens for other infectious and noninfectious diseases.

  18. Development and Validation of High-Resolution Melting Markers Derived from Rysto STS Markers for High-Throughput Marker-Assisted Selection of Potato Carrying Rysto.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xianzhou; Sutherland, Darcy; Dickison, Virginia; Singh, Mathuresh; Murphy, Agnes M; De Koeyer, David

    2016-11-01

    Sequence analysis of the chromosome region harboring the sequence-tagged site (STS) markers YES3-3A and YES3-3B for Rysto, a gene responsible for extreme resistance to Potato virus Y (PVY) in potato, was performed in tetraploid potato 'Barbara' (Rrrr) and 'AC Chaleur' (rrrr) as well as their progeny selections. Three and two sequence variants were identified in Barbara resistant (R) selections and AC Chaleur susceptible (S) selections, respectively. Further analysis indicates that the variant with a 21-nucleotide (nt) deletion is likely the chromosome copy harboring the STS markers. Two primer pairs, one targeting the region containing a 20-nt deletion and the other targeting the region anchoring the YES3-3A reverse primer, were designed. As anticipated, pair one produced two visible fragments in Barbara-R bulk and one visible fragment in AC Chaleur-S bulk; pair two produced one visible fragment in all samples. When subjected to high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis, two distinct melting profiles for R and S samples were observed. Analysis of 147 progeny of Barbara × AC Chaleur revealed 72 and 75 progeny with R and S melting profiles, respectively, which was consistent with YES3-3A and YES3-3B assays and phenotyping analysis, thus demonstrating the potential of HRM profiles as novel molecular markers for Rysto. The efficacy of the newly developed HRM markers for high-throughput marker-assisted selection for Rysto-conferred resistance to PVY was validated further with three populations involving Barbara as the R parent.

  19. Novel SNP Discovery in African Buffalo, Syncerus caffer, using high-throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    le Roex, Nikki; Noyes, Harry; Brass, Andrew; Bradley, Daniel G; Kemp, Steven J; Kay, Suzanne; van Helden, Paul D; Hoal, Eileen G

    2012-01-01

    The African buffalo, Syncerus caffer, is one of the most abundant and ecologically important species of megafauna in the savannah ecosystem. It is an important prey species, as well as a host for a vast array of nematodes, pathogens and infectious diseases, such as bovine tuberculosis and corridor disease. Large-scale SNP discovery in this species would greatly facilitate further research into the area of host genetics and disease susceptibility, as well as provide a wealth of sequence information for other conservation and genomics studies. We sequenced pools of Cape buffalo DNA from a total of 9 animals, on an ABI SOLiD4 sequencer. The resulting short reads were mapped to the UMD3.1 Bos taurus genome assembly using both BWA and Bowtie software packages. A mean depth of 2.7× coverage over the mapped regions was obtained. Btau4 gene annotation was added to all SNPs identified within gene regions. Bowtie and BWA identified a maximum of 2,222,665 and 276,847 SNPs within the buffalo respectively, depending on analysis method. A panel of 173 SNPs was validated by fluorescent genotyping in 87 individuals. 27 SNPs failed to amplify, and of the remaining 146 SNPs, 43-54% of the Bowtie SNPs and 57-58% of the BWA SNPs were confirmed as polymorphic. dN/dS ratios found no evidence of positive selection, and although there were genes that appeared to be under negative selection, these were more likely to be slowly evolving house-keeping genes.

  20. High-Throughput Analysis of Plasma Hybrid Markers for Early Detection of Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rho, Jung-hyun; Lampe, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers for the early detection of cancer in the general population have to perform with high sensitivity and specificity in order to prevent the costs associated with over-diagnosis. There are only a few current tissue or blood markers that are recommended for generalized cancer screening. Despite the recognition that combinations of multiple biomarkers will likely improve their utility, biomarker panels are usually limited to a single class of molecules. Tissues and body fluids including plasma and serum contain not only proteins, DNA and microRNAs that are differentially expressed in cancers but further cancer specific information might be gleaned by comparing different classes of biomolecules. For example, the level of a certain microRNA might be related to the level of a particular protein in a cancer specific manner. Proteins might have cancer-specific post-translational modifications (e.g., phosphorylation or glycosylation) or lead to the generation of autoantibodies. Most currently approved biomarkers are glycoproteins. Autoantibodies can be produced as a host’s early surveillance response to cancer-specific proteins in pre-symptomatic and pre-diagnostic stages of cancer. Thus, measurement of the level of a protein, the level of its glycosylation or phosphorylation and whether autoantibodies are produced to it can yield multi-dimensional information on each protein. We consider specific proteins that show consistent cancer-specific changes in two or three of these measurements to be “hybrid markers”. We hypothesize these markers will suffer less variation between different individuals since one component can act to “standardize” the other measurement. As a proof of principle, a 180 plasma sample set consisting of 120 cases (60 colon cancers and 60 adenomas) and 60 controls were analyzed using our high-density antibody array for changes in their protein, IgG-complex and sialyl-Lewis A (SLeA) modified proteins. At p < 0.05, expression changes in

  1. High-throughput screening for developability during early-stage antibody discovery using self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuqi; Caffry, Isabelle; Wu, Jiemin; Geng, Steven B; Jain, Tushar; Sun, Tingwan; Reid, Felicia; Cao, Yuan; Estep, Patricia; Yu, Yao; Vásquez, Maximiliano; Tessier, Peter M; Xu, Yingda

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to a particular molecular target is now regarded a routine exercise. However, the successful development of mAbs that (1) express well, (2) elicit a desirable biological effect upon binding, and (3) remain soluble and display low viscosity at high concentrations is often far more challenging. Therefore, high throughput screening assays that assess self-association and aggregation early in the selection process are likely to yield mAbs with superior biophysical properties. Here, we report an improved version of affinity-capture self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy (AC-SINS) that is capable of screening large panels of antibodies for their propensity to self-associate. AC-SINS is based on concentrating mAbs from dilute solutions around gold nanoparticles pre-coated with polyclonal capture (e.g., anti-Fc) antibodies. Interactions between immobilized mAbs lead to reduced inter-particle distances and increased plasmon wavelengths (wavelengths of maximum absorbance), which can be readily measured by optical means. This method is attractive because it is compatible with dilute and unpurified mAb solutions that are typical during early antibody discovery. In addition, we have improved multiple aspects of this assay for increased throughput and reproducibility. A data set comprising over 400 mAbs suggests that our modified assay yields self-interaction measurements that are well-correlated with other lower throughput assays such as cross-interaction chromatography. We expect that the simplicity and throughput of our improved AC-SINS method will lead to improved selection of mAbs with excellent biophysical properties during early antibody discovery.

  2. ARQiv-HTS, a versatile whole-organism screening platform enabling in vivo drug discovery at high-throughput rates.

    PubMed

    White, David T; Eroglu, Arife Unal; Wang, Guohua; Zhang, Liyun; Sengupta, Sumitra; Ding, Ding; Rajpurohit, Surendra K; Walker, Steven L; Ji, Hongkai; Qian, Jiang; Mumm, Jeff S

    2016-12-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as an important model for whole-organism small-molecule screening. However, most zebrafish-based chemical screens have achieved only mid-throughput rates. Here we describe a versatile whole-organism drug discovery platform that can achieve true high-throughput screening (HTS) capacities. This system combines our automated reporter quantification in vivo (ARQiv) system with customized robotics, and is termed 'ARQiv-HTS'. We detail the process of establishing and implementing ARQiv-HTS: (i) assay design and optimization, (ii) calculation of sample size and hit criteria, (iii) large-scale egg production, (iv) automated compound titration, (v) dispensing of embryos into microtiter plates, and (vi) reporter quantification. We also outline what we see as best practice strategies for leveraging the power of ARQiv-HTS for zebrafish-based drug discovery, and address technical challenges of applying zebrafish to large-scale chemical screens. Finally, we provide a detailed protocol for a recently completed inaugural ARQiv-HTS effort, which involved the identification of compounds that elevate insulin reporter activity. Compounds that increased the number of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells represent potential new therapeutics for diabetic patients. For this effort, individual screening sessions took 1 week to conclude, and sessions were performed iteratively approximately every other day to increase throughput. At the conclusion of the screen, more than a half million drug-treated larvae had been evaluated. Beyond this initial example, however, the ARQiv-HTS platform is adaptable to almost any reporter-based assay designed to evaluate the effects of chemical compounds in living small-animal models. ARQiv-HTS thus enables large-scale whole-organism drug discovery for a variety of model species and from numerous disease-oriented perspectives.

  3. Generation and evaluation of mammalian secreted and membrane protein expression libraries for high-throughput target discovery.

    PubMed

    Panavas, Tadas; Lu, Jin; Liu, Xuesong; Winkis, Ann-Marie; Powers, Gordon; Naso, Michael F; Amegadzie, Bernard

    2011-09-01

    Expressed protein libraries are becoming a critical tool for new target discovery in the pharmaceutical industry. In order to get the most meaningful and comprehensive results from protein library screens, it is essential to have library proteins in their native conformation with proper post-translation modifications. This goal is achieved by expressing untagged human proteins in a human cell background. We optimized the transfection and cell culture conditions to maximize protein expression in a 96-well format so that the expression levels were comparable with the levels observed in shake flasks. For detection purposes, we engineered a 'tag after stop codon' system. Depending on the expression conditions, it was possible to express either native or tagged proteins from the same expression vector set. We created a human secretion protein library of 1432 candidates and a small plasma membrane protein set of about 500 candidates. Utilizing the optimized expression conditions, we expressed and analyzed both libraries by SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. Two thirds of secreted proteins could be detected by Western-blot analyses; almost half of them were visible on Coomassie stained gels. In this paper, we describe protein expression libraries that can be easily produced in mammalian expression systems in a 96-well format, with one protein expressed per well. The libraries and methods described allow for the development of robust, high-throughput functional screens designed to assay for protein specific functions associated with a relevant disease-specific activity.

  4. A High-Throughput Screening Platform of Microbial Natural Products for the Discovery of Molecules with Antibiofilm Properties against Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Paytubi, Sonia; de La Cruz, Mercedes; Tormo, Jose R.; Martín, Jesús; González, Ignacio; González-Menendez, Victor; Genilloud, Olga; Reyes, Fernando; Vicente, Francisca; Madrid, Cristina; Balsalobre, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    In this report, we describe a High-Throughput Screening (HTS) to identify compounds that inhibit biofilm formation or cause the disintegration of an already formed biofilm using the Salmonella Enteritidis 3934 strain. Initially, we developed a new methodology for growing Salmonella biofilms suitable for HTS platforms. The biomass associated with biofilm at the solid-liquid interface was quantified by staining both with resazurin and crystal violet, to detect living cells and total biofilm mass, respectively. For a pilot project, a subset of 1120 extracts from the Fundación MEDINA's collection was examined to identify molecules with antibiofilm activity. This is the first validated HTS assay of microbial natural product extracts which allows for the detection of four types of activities which are not mutually exclusive: inhibition of biofilm formation, detachment of the preformed biofilm and antimicrobial activity against planktonic cells or biofilm embedded cells. Currently, several extracts have been selected for further fractionation and purification of the active compounds. In one of the natural extracts patulin has been identified as a potent molecule with antimicrobial activity against both, planktonic cells and cells within the biofilm. These findings provide a proof of concept that the developed HTS can lead to the discovery of new natural compounds with antibiofilm activity against Salmonella and its possible use as an alternative to antimicrobial therapies and traditional disinfectants. PMID:28303128

  5. A new approach to drug discovery: high-throughput screening of microbial natural extracts against Aspergillus fumigatus using resazurin.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Maria Cândida; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Cantizani, Juan; Moreno, Catalina; Tormo, José R; Mellado, Emilia; De Lucas, J Ramón; Asensio, Francisco; Valiante, Vito; Brakhage, Axel A; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Genilloud, Olga; Vicente, Francisca

    2012-04-01

    Natural products are an inexhaustible source for drug discovery. However, the validation and selection of primary screening assays are vital to guarantee a selection of extracts or molecules with relevant pharmacological action and worthy of following up. The assay must be rapid, simple, easy to implement, and produce quick results and preferably at a low cost. In this work, we developed and validated a colorimetric microtiter assay using the resazurin viability dye. The parameters of the resazurin method for high-throughput screening (HTS) using natural extracts against Aspergillus fumigatus were optimized and set up. The extracts plus RPMI-1640 modified medium containing the spores and 0.002% resazurin were added per well. The fluorescence was read after 24 to 30 h of incubation. The resazurin proved to be as suitable as Alamar Blue for determining the minimal inhibitory concentration of different antifungals against A. fumigatus and effective to analyze fungicidal and fungistatic compounds. An HTS of 12 000 microbial extracts was carried out against two A. fumigatus strains, and 2.7% of the extracts displayed antifungal activity. Our group has been the first to use this methodology for screening a collection of natural extracts to identify compounds with antifungal activity against the medically important human pathogen A. fumigatus.

  6. A simple, robust enzymatic-based high-throughput screening method for antimicrobial peptides discovery against Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thirumalai, Muthukumaresan Kuppuswamy; Roy, Arpita; Sanikommu, Suma; Arockiaraj, Jesu; Pasupuleti, Mukesh

    2014-05-01

    The indiscriminate usage of antibiotics has created a major problem in the form of antibiotic resistance. Even though new antimicrobial drug discovery programs have been in place from the last two decades, still we are unsuccessful in identifying novel molecules that have a potential to become new therapeutic agents for the treatment of microbial infections. A major problem in most screening studies is the requirement of high-throughput techniques. Given this, we present here an enzyme-based robust method for screening antimicrobial agent's active against Escherichia coli. This method is based upon the ability of the intracellular innate enzyme to cleave o-nitrophenyl β-d-galactopyranoside (non-chromogenic) to o-nitrophenolate (ONP) (chromogenic) upon the membrane damage or disruption. In comparison with the other currently available methods, we believe that our method provides an opportunity for real-time monitoring of the antimicrobial agents action by measuring the ONP generation in a user-friendly manner. Even though this method can be applied to other strain, our experience shows that one has to be careful especially when the pigments or metabolites present in the bacteria have the same wavelength absorbance.

  7. Structure-based discovery of the first non-covalent inhibitors of Leishmania major tryparedoxin peroxidase by high throughput docking

    PubMed Central

    Brindisi, Margherita; Brogi, Simone; Relitti, Nicola; Vallone, Alessandra; Butini, Stefania; Gemma, Sandra; Novellino, Ettore; Colotti, Gianni; Angiulli, Gabriella; Di Chiaro, Francesco; Fiorillo, Annarita; Ilari, Andrea; Campiani, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected vector-born disease caused by a protozoan of the genus Leishmania and affecting more than 1.300.000 people worldwide. The couple tryparedoxin/tryparedoxin peroxidase is essential for parasite survival in the host since it neutralizes the hydrogen peroxide produced by macrophages during the infection. Herein we report a study aimed at discovering the first class of compounds able to non-covalently inhibit tryparedoxin peroxidase. We have solved the high-resolution structure of Tryparedoxin peroxidase I from Leishmania major (LmTXNPx) in the reduced state and in fully folded conformation. A first series of compounds able to inhibit LmTXNPx was identified by means of the high throughput docking technique. The inhibitory activity of these compounds was validated by a Horseradish peroxidase-based enzymatic assay and their affinity for LmTXNPx calculated by surface plasmon resonance experiments. On the basis of these results, the analysis of the enzyme-inhibitor docked models allowed us to rationally design and synthesize a series of N,N-disubstituted 3-aminomethyl quinolones. These compounds showed an inhibitory potency against LmTXNPx in the micromolar range. Among them, compound 12 represents the first non-covalent LmTXNPx inhibitor reported to date and could pave the way to the discovery of a new class of drugs against leishmaniasis. PMID:25951439

  8. A High-Throughput Screening Platform of Microbial Natural Products for the Discovery of Molecules with Antibiofilm Properties against Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Paytubi, Sonia; de La Cruz, Mercedes; Tormo, Jose R; Martín, Jesús; González, Ignacio; González-Menendez, Victor; Genilloud, Olga; Reyes, Fernando; Vicente, Francisca; Madrid, Cristina; Balsalobre, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    In this report, we describe a High-Throughput Screening (HTS) to identify compounds that inhibit biofilm formation or cause the disintegration of an already formed biofilm using the Salmonella Enteritidis 3934 strain. Initially, we developed a new methodology for growing Salmonella biofilms suitable for HTS platforms. The biomass associated with biofilm at the solid-liquid interface was quantified by staining both with resazurin and crystal violet, to detect living cells and total biofilm mass, respectively. For a pilot project, a subset of 1120 extracts from the Fundación MEDINA's collection was examined to identify molecules with antibiofilm activity. This is the first validated HTS assay of microbial natural product extracts which allows for the detection of four types of activities which are not mutually exclusive: inhibition of biofilm formation, detachment of the preformed biofilm and antimicrobial activity against planktonic cells or biofilm embedded cells. Currently, several extracts have been selected for further fractionation and purification of the active compounds. In one of the natural extracts patulin has been identified as a potent molecule with antimicrobial activity against both, planktonic cells and cells within the biofilm. These findings provide a proof of concept that the developed HTS can lead to the discovery of new natural compounds with antibiofilm activity against Salmonella and its possible use as an alternative to antimicrobial therapies and traditional disinfectants.

  9. Development of a high-throughput three-dimensional invasion assay for anti-cancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Evensen, Nikki A; Li, Jian; Yang, Jie; Yu, Xiaojun; Sampson, Nicole S; Zucker, Stanley; Cao, Jian

    2013-01-01

    The lack of three-dimensional (3-D) high-throughput (HT) screening assays designed to identify anti-cancer invasion drugs is a major hurdle in reducing cancer-related mortality, with the key challenge being assay standardization. Presented is the development of a novel 3-D invasion assay with HT potential that involves surrounding cell-collagen spheres within collagen to create a 3-D environment through which cells can invade. Standardization was achieved by designing a tooled 96-well plate to create a precisely designated location for the cell-collagen spheres and by using dialdehyde dextran to inhibit collagen contraction, maintaining uniform size and shape. This permits automated readout for determination of the effect of inhibitory compounds on cancer cell invasion. Sensitivity was demonstrated by the ability to distinguish varying levels of invasiveness of cancer cell lines, and robustness was determined by calculating the Z-factor. A Z-factor of 0.65 was obtained by comparing the effects of DMSO and anti-β1-integrin antibody, an inhibitory reagent, on the invasion of Du145 cancer cells, suggesting this novel assay is suitable for large scale drug discovery. As proof of principle, the NCI Diversity Compound Library was screened against human invasive cancer cells. Nine compounds exhibiting high potency and low toxicity were identified, including DX-52-1, a compound previously reported to inhibit cell migration, a critical determinant of cancer invasion. The results indicate that this innovative HT platform is a simple, precise, and easy to replicate 3-D invasion assay for anti-cancer drug discovery.

  10. Development of a High-Throughput Three-Dimensional Invasion Assay for Anti-Cancer Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Evensen, Nikki A.; Li, Jian; Yang, Jie; Yu, Xiaojun; Sampson, Nicole S.; Zucker, Stanley; Cao, Jian

    2013-01-01

    The lack of three-dimensional (3-D) high-throughput (HT) screening assays designed to identify anti-cancer invasion drugs is a major hurdle in reducing cancer-related mortality, with the key challenge being assay standardization. Presented is the development of a novel 3-D invasion assay with HT potential that involves surrounding cell-collagen spheres within collagen to create a 3-D environment through which cells can invade. Standardization was achieved by designing a tooled 96-well plate to create a precisely designated location for the cell-collagen spheres and by using dialdehyde dextran to inhibit collagen contraction, maintaining uniform size and shape. This permits automated readout for determination of the effect of inhibitory compounds on cancer cell invasion. Sensitivity was demonstrated by the ability to distinguish varying levels of invasiveness of cancer cell lines, and robustness was determined by calculating the Z-factor. A Z-factor of 0.65 was obtained by comparing the effects of DMSO and anti-β1-integrin antibody, an inhibitory reagent, on the invasion of Du145 cancer cells, suggesting this novel assay is suitable for large scale drug discovery. As proof of principle, the NCI Diversity Compound Library was screened against human invasive cancer cells. Nine compounds exhibiting high potency and low toxicity were identified, including DX-52-1, a compound previously reported to inhibit cell migration, a critical determinant of cancer invasion. The results indicate that this innovative HT platform is a simple, precise, and easy to replicate 3-D invasion assay for anti-cancer drug discovery. PMID:24349367

  11. A high-throughput lab-on-a-chip interface for zebrafish embryo tests in drug discovery and ecotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feng; Akagi, Jin; Hall, Chris J.; Crosier, Kathryn E.; Crosier, Philip S.; Delaage, Pierre; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2013-12-01

    Drug discovery screenings performed on zebrafish embryos mirror with a high level of accuracy. The tests usually performed on mammalian animal models, and the fish embryo toxicity assay (FET) is one of the most promising alternative approaches to acute ecotoxicity testing with adult fish. Notwithstanding this, conventional methods utilising 96-well microtiter plates and manual dispensing of fish embryos are very time-consuming. They rely on laborious and iterative manual pipetting that is a main source of analytical errors and low throughput. In this work, we present development of a miniaturised and high-throughput Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) platform for automation of FET assays. The 3D high-density LOC array was fabricated in poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining while the off-chip interfaces were fabricated using additive manufacturing processes (FDM and SLA). The system's design facilitates rapid loading and immobilization of a large number of embryos in predefined clusters of traps during continuous microperfusion of drugs/toxins. It has been conceptually designed to seamlessly interface with both upright and inverted fluorescent imaging systems and also to directly interface with conventional microtiter plate readers that accept 96-well plates. We also present proof-of-concept interfacing with a high-speed imaging cytometer Plate RUNNER HD® capable of multispectral image acquisition with resolution of up to 8192 x 8192 pixels and depth of field of about 40 μm. Furthermore, we developed a miniaturized and self-contained analytical device interfaced with a miniaturized USB microscope. This system modification is capable of performing rapid imaging of multiple embryos at a low resolution for drug toxicity analysis.

  12. High-Throughput Sequence Analysis of Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) Transcriptome Using 454-Pyrosequencing for the Discovery of Antiviral Immune Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pereiro, Patricia; Balseiro, Pablo; Romero, Alejandro; Dios, Sonia; Forn-Cuni, Gabriel; Fuste, Berta; Planas, Josep V.; Beltran, Sergi; Novoa, Beatriz; Figueras, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Background Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) is an important aquacultural resource both in Europe and Asia. However, there is little information on gene sequences available in public databases. Currently, one of the main problems affecting the culture of this flatfish is mortality due to several pathogens, especially viral diseases which are not treatable. In order to identify new genes involved in immune defense, we conducted 454-pyrosequencing of the turbot transcriptome after different immune stimulations. Methodology/Principal Findings Turbot were injected with viral stimuli to increase the expression level of immune-related genes. High-throughput deep sequencing using 454-pyrosequencing technology yielded 915,256 high-quality reads. These sequences were assembled into 55,404 contigs that were subjected to annotation steps. Intriguingly, 55.16% of the deduced protein was not significantly similar to any sequences in the databases used for the annotation and only 0.85% of the BLASTx top-hits matched S. maximus protein sequences. This relatively low level of annotation is possibly due to the limited information for this specie and other flatfish in the database. These results suggest the identification of a large number of new genes in turbot and in fish in general. A more detailed analysis showed the presence of putative members of several innate and specific immune pathways. Conclusions/Significance To our knowledge, this study is the first transcriptome analysis using 454-pyrosequencing for turbot. Previously, there were only 12,471 EST and less of 1,500 nucleotide sequences for S. maximus in NCBI database. Our results provide a rich source of data (55,404 contigs and 181,845 singletons) for discovering and identifying new genes, which will serve as a basis for microarray construction, gene expression characterization and for identification of genetic markers to be used in several applications. Immune stimulation in turbot was very effective, obtaining an

  13. High-performance mass spectrometry as a drug discovery tool: a high-throughput screening assay to identify RNA-binding ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannes-Lowery, Kristin A.; Drader, Jared J.; Griffey, Richard H.; Hofstadler, Steven A.

    2001-04-01

    Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) is increasingly being used as a drug discovery tool. We describe the development of a parallel high-throughput screening (HTS) strategy to identify small molecules that bind RNA targets using FTMS as an alternative to classical high-throughput biological screening methods for combinatorial libraries. The Multitarget Affinity/Specificity Screening (MASS) assay takes advantage of the "intrinsic mass" label of each compound and target RNA by employing high resolution, high precision mass measurements. The ability to analyze complex mixtures allows large compound libraries to be screened in the presence of multiple RNA targets simultaneously. The identity of the small molecule(s) which bind, the RNA target to which it binds, the compound-specific binding affinity and the location of the binding site on the RNA can be determined in one set of rapid experiments. The MASS technology detects complexes with dissociation constants of < 5 mM, with high sensitivity.

  14. An economical and effective high-throughput DNA extraction protocol for molecular marker analysis in honey bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extraction of DNA from tissue samples can be expensive both in time and monetary resources and can often require handling and disposal of hazardous chemicals. We have developed a high throughput protocol for extracting DNA from honey bees that is of a high enough quality and quantity to enable hundr...

  15. The University of Kansas High-Throughput Screening Laboratory. Part II: enabling collaborative drug-discovery partnerships through cutting-edge screening technology.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Peter R; Roy, Anuradha; Chaguturu, Rathnam

    2011-07-01

    The University of Kansas High-Throughput Screening (KU HTS) core is a state-of-the-art drug-discovery facility with an entrepreneurial open-service policy, which provides centralized resources supporting public- and private-sector research initiatives. The KU HTS core was established in 2002 at the University of Kansas with support from an NIH grant and the state of Kansas. It collaborates with investigators from national and international academic, nonprofit and pharmaceutical organizations in executing HTS-ready assay development and screening of chemical libraries for target validation, probe selection, hit identification and lead optimization. This is part two of a contribution from the KU HTS laboratory.

  16. High-Throughput 3D Tumor Spheroid Screening Method for Cancer Drug Discovery Using Celigo Image Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kessel, Sarah; Cribbes, Scott; Déry, Olivier; Kuksin, Dmitry; Sincoff, Eric; Qiu, Jean; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2016-06-01

    Oncologists have investigated the effect of protein or chemical-based compounds on cancer cells to identify potential drug candidates. Traditionally, the growth inhibitory and cytotoxic effects of the drugs are first measured in 2D in vitro models, and then further tested in 3D xenograft in vivo models. Although the drug candidates can demonstrate promising inhibitory or cytotoxicity results in a 2D environment, similar effects may not be observed under a 3D environment. In this work, we developed an image-based high-throughput screening method for 3D tumor spheroids using the Celigo image cytometer. First, optimal seeding density for tumor spheroid formation was determined by investigating the cell seeding density of U87MG, a human glioblastoma cell line. Next, the dose-response effects of 17-AAG with respect to spheroid size and viability were measured to determine the IC50 value. Finally, the developed high-throughput method was used to measure the dose response of four drugs (17-AAG, paclitaxel, TMZ, and doxorubicin) with respect to the spheroid size and viability. Each experiment was performed simultaneously in the 2D model for comparison. This detection method allowed for a more efficient process to identify highly qualified drug candidates, which may reduce the overall time required to bring a drug to clinical trial.

  17. Strategies and applications of combinatorial methods and high throughput screening to the discovery of non-noble metal catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricker, Maureen L.; Sachtler, J. W. Adriaan; Gillespie, Ralph D.; McGonegal, Charles P.; Vega, Honorio; Bem, Dave S.; Holmgren, Jennifer S.

    2004-02-01

    The integrated End-to-End™ combinatorial process for catalyst preparation and screening, with emphasis on its capability to vary both process and compositional parameters will be demonstrated. Additionally, each step of the combinatorial screening process has been validated against results from traditional screening methods. The greatest challenge of all has been the adherence to the core concepts of the combinatorial approach. Catalyst libraries have been made and tested for naphthalene dehydrogenation chemistry. The preparation of these libraries has included the application of high throughput techniques for: metal impregnation; catalyst finishing; catalyst screening. The catalyst screening system has been used to find a non-noble metal catalyst system that can replace Pt in dehydrogenation applications in the petroleum industry. A proprietary catalytic composition was developed for the dehydrogenation of methylcyclohexane (MCH) to toluene starting with four non-noble metals of different proportions and four different supports (alumina, titania, zirconia and silica) prepared in different ways and applying a statistical design of experiments. These data demonstrate that all steps of catalyst preparation and screening are performed in a rapid, useful, high throughput manner. Data will be presented from the catalyst screening efforts will demonstrate that optimized metal composition is dependent on the support type.

  18. The development and implementation of high-throughput tools for discovery and characterization of proton exchange membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Keith Gregory

    The need for sustainable energy use has motivated the exploration of renewable alternative fuels and fuel conversion technology on a global scale. Fuel cells, which convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiency and low emissions, provide a promising strategy for achieving energy sustainability. The current progress in fuel cell commercialization is mainly in portable and stationary applications, but fuel cell technology for transportation applications, which make up a substantial portion of the global energy market, have seen little commercial success. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have high potential for addressing the future energy needs of the transportation energy sector. However, one of the prevailing limitations of the PEMFC is the availability of high-performance, cost-effective electrolyte materials. These materials may be realized in the near future by developing multifunctional polymer blends targeted at specific performance capabilities. Since the number of available polymer combinations and numerous processing variations provide an almost infinite source of PEMFC membrane candidates, efficient methods of discovering high-performance PEM materials are necessary. Combinatorial methods meet these needs using gradient or discrete techniques to capture process variations such as annealing temperature, thickness, and chemical composition into a single polymer sample that serves as a library of materials. To characterize these heterogeneous samples for fuel cell performance, specific high-throughput measurement techniques are necessary. In this work, a high-throughput mass transport assay (HT-MTA) has been developed to characterize water flux and permeability at multiple sample locations in parallel. The functionality of HT-MTA was evaluated using standard NafionRTM films and a model semi-interpenetrated polymer network with commercial polyvinylidine fluoride as the host matrix for a proprietary polyelectrolyte

  19. A review of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for high-throughput drug discovery, cardiotoxicity screening, and publication standards.

    PubMed

    Mordwinkin, Nicholas M; Burridge, Paul W; Wu, Joseph C

    2013-02-01

    Drug attrition rates have increased in past years, resulting in growing costs for the pharmaceutical industry and consumers. The reasons for this include the lack of in vitro models that correlate with clinical results and poor preclinical toxicity screening assays. The in vitro production of human cardiac progenitor cells and cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells provides an amenable source of cells for applications in drug discovery, disease modeling, regenerative medicine, and cardiotoxicity screening. In addition, the ability to derive human-induced pluripotent stem cells from somatic tissues, combined with current high-throughput screening and pharmacogenomics, may help realize the use of these cells to fulfill the potential of personalized medicine. In this review, we discuss the use of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for drug discovery and cardiotoxicity screening, as well as current hurdles that must be overcome for wider clinical applications of this promising approach.

  20. Overview on the current status on virtual high-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches in multi-target anticancer drug discovery; Part II.

    PubMed

    Geromichalos, George D; Alifieris, Constantinos E; Geromichalou, Elena G; Trafalis, Dimitrios T

    2016-01-01

    Conventional drug design embraces the "one gene, one drug, one disease" philosophy. Nowadays, new generation of anticancer drugs, able to inhibit more than one pathway, is believed to play a major role in contemporary anticancer drug research. In this way, polypharmacology, focusing on multi-target drugs, has emerged as a new paradigm in drug discovery. A number of recent successful drugs have in part or in whole emerged from a structure-based research approach. Many advances including crystallography and informatics are behind these successes. In this part II we will review the role and methodology of ligand-, structure- and fragment-based computer-aided drug design computer aided drug desing (CADD), virtual high throughput screening (vHTS), de novo drug design, fragment-based design and structure-based molecular docking, homology modeling, combinatorial chemistry and library design, pharmacophore model chemistry and informatics in modern drug discovery.

  1. The University of Kansas High-Throughput Screening laboratory. Part I: meeting drug-discovery needs in the heartland of America with entrepreneurial flair.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Peter R; Roy, Anuradha; Chaguturu, Rathnam

    2011-05-01

    The University of Kansas High-Throughput Screening (KU HTS) core is a state-of-the-art drug-discovery facility with an entrepreneurial open-service policy, which provides centralized resources supporting public- and private-sector research initiatives. The KU HTS core applies pharmaceutical industry project-management principles in an academic setting by bringing together multidisciplinary teams to fill critical scientific and technology gaps, using an experienced team of industry-trained researchers and project managers. The KU HTS proactively engages in supporting grant applications for extramural funding, intellectual-property management and technology transfer. The KU HTS staff further provides educational opportunities for the KU faculty and students to learn cutting-edge technologies in drug-discovery platforms through seminars, workshops, internships and course teaching. This is the first instalment of a two-part contribution from the KU HTS laboratory.

  2. Overview on the current status of virtual high-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches in multi-target anticancer drug discovery; Part I.

    PubMed

    Geromichalos, George D; Alifieris, Constantinos E; Geromichalou, Elena G; Trafalis, Dimitrios T

    2016-01-01

    Conventional drug design embraces the "one gene, one drug, one disease" philosophy. Nowadays, new generation of anti- cancer drugs, able to inhibit more than one pathway, is believed to play a major role in contemporary anticancer drug research. In this way, polypharmacology, focusing on multi-target drugs, has emerged as a new paradigm in drug discovery. A number of recent successful drugs have in part or in whole emerged from a structure-based research approach. Many advances including crystallography and informatics are behind these successes. Increasing insight into the genetics and molecular biology of cancer has resulted in the identification of an increasing number of potential molecular targets, for anticancer drug discovery and development. These targets can be approached through exploitation of emerging structural biology, "rational" drug design, screening of chemical libraries, or a combination of these methods. The result is the rapid discovery of new anticancer drugs. In this article we discuss the application of molecular modeling, molecular docking and virtual high-throughput screening to multi-targeted anticancer drug discovery. Efforts have been made to employ in silico methods for facilitating the search and design of selective multi-target agents. These computer aided molecular design methods have shown promising potential in facilitating drug discovery directed at selective multiple targets and is expected to contribute to intelligent lead anticancer drugs.

  3. High Throughput Discovery of Solar Fuels Photoanodes in the CuO-V 2 O 5 System

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Lan; Yan, Qimin; Shinde, Aniketa; ...

    2015-08-26

    Solar photoelectrochemical generation of fuel is a promising energy technology yet the lack of an efficient, robust photoanode remains a primary materials challenge in the development and deployment of solar fuels generators. Metal oxides comprise the most promising class of photoanode materials, but no known material meets the demanding requirements of low band gap energy, photoelectrocatalysis of the oxygen evolution reaction, and stability under highly oxidizing conditions. Here, we report the identification of new photoelectroactive materials through a strategic combination of combinatorial materials synthesis, high-throughput photoelectrochemistry, optical spectroscopy, and detailed electronic structure calculations. We identify 4 photoelectrocatalyst phases - α-Cu2V2O7,more » β-Cu2V2O7, γ-Cu3V2O8, and Cu11V6O26 - with band gap energy at or below 2 eV. The photoelectrochemical properties and 30-minute stability of these copper vanadate phases are demonstrated in 3 different aqueous electrolytes (pH 7, pH 9, and pH 13), with select combinations of phase and electrolyte exhibiting unprecedented photoelectrocatalytic stability for metal oxides with sub-2 eV band gap. Through integration of experimental and theoretical techniques, we determine new structure-property relationships and establish CuO-V2O5 as the most prominent composition system for OER photoelectrocatalysts, providing crucial information for materials genomes initiatives and paving the way for continued development of solar fuels photoanodes.« less

  4. High-throughput screening for modulators of ACVR1 transcription: discovery of potential therapeutics for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva

    PubMed Central

    Cappato, Serena; Tonachini, Laura; Giacopelli, Francesca; Tirone, Mario; Galietta, Luis J. V.; Sormani, Martina; Giovenzana, Anna; Spinelli, Antonello E.; Canciani, Barbara; Brunelli, Silvia; Ravazzolo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ACVR1 gene encodes a type I receptor of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Activating mutations in ACVR1 are responsible for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a rare disease characterized by congenital toe malformation and progressive heterotopic endochondral ossification leading to severe and cumulative disability. Until now, no therapy has been available to prevent soft-tissue swelling (flare-ups) that trigger the ossification process. With the aim of finding a new therapeutic strategy for FOP, we developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to identify inhibitors of ACVR1 gene expression among drugs already approved for the therapy of other diseases. The screening, based on an ACVR1 promoter assay, was followed by an in vitro and in vivo test to validate and characterize candidate molecules. Among compounds that modulate the ACVR1 promoter activity, we selected the one showing the highest inhibitory effect, dipyridamole, a drug that is currently used as a platelet anti-aggregant. The inhibitory effect was detectable on ACVR1 gene expression, on the whole Smad-dependent BMP signaling pathway, and on chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation processes by in vitro cellular assays. Moreover, dipyridamole reduced the process of heterotopic bone formation in vivo. Our drug repositioning strategy has led to the identification of dipyridamole as a possible therapeutic tool for the treatment of FOP. Furthermore, our study has also defined a pipeline of assays that will be useful for the evaluation of other pharmacological inhibitors of heterotopic ossification. PMID:27125279

  5. Discovery of J chain in African lungfish (Protopterus dolloi, Sarcopterygii) using high throughput transcriptome sequencing: implications in mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Tacchi, Luca; Larragoite, Erin; Salinas, Irene

    2013-01-01

    J chain is a small polypeptide responsible for immunoglobulin (Ig) polymerization and transport of Igs across mucosal surfaces in higher vertebrates. We identified a J chain in dipnoid fish, the African lungfish (Protopterus dolloi) by high throughput sequencing of the transcriptome. P. dolloi J chain is 161 aa long and contains six of the eight Cys residues present in mammalian J chain. Phylogenetic studies place the lungfish J chain closer to tetrapod J chain than to the coelacanth or nurse shark sequences. J chain expression occurs in all P. dolloi immune tissues examined and it increases in the gut and kidney in response to an experimental bacterial infection. Double fluorescent in-situ hybridization shows that 88.5% of IgM⁺ cells in the gut co-express J chain, a significantly higher percentage than in the pre-pyloric spleen. Importantly, J chain expression is not restricted to the B-cell compartment since gut epithelial cells also express J chain. These results improve our current view of J chain from a phylogenetic perspective.

  6. High-throughput screening for modulators of ACVR1 transcription: discovery of potential therapeutics for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

    PubMed

    Cappato, Serena; Tonachini, Laura; Giacopelli, Francesca; Tirone, Mario; Galietta, Luis J V; Sormani, Martina; Giovenzana, Anna; Spinelli, Antonello E; Canciani, Barbara; Brunelli, Silvia; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Bocciardi, Renata

    2016-06-01

    The ACVR1 gene encodes a type I receptor of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Activating mutations in ACVR1 are responsible for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a rare disease characterized by congenital toe malformation and progressive heterotopic endochondral ossification leading to severe and cumulative disability. Until now, no therapy has been available to prevent soft-tissue swelling (flare-ups) that trigger the ossification process. With the aim of finding a new therapeutic strategy for FOP, we developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to identify inhibitors of ACVR1 gene expression among drugs already approved for the therapy of other diseases. The screening, based on an ACVR1 promoter assay, was followed by an in vitro and in vivo test to validate and characterize candidate molecules. Among compounds that modulate the ACVR1 promoter activity, we selected the one showing the highest inhibitory effect, dipyridamole, a drug that is currently used as a platelet anti-aggregant. The inhibitory effect was detectable on ACVR1 gene expression, on the whole Smad-dependent BMP signaling pathway, and on chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation processes by in vitro cellular assays. Moreover, dipyridamole reduced the process of heterotopic bone formation in vivo Our drug repositioning strategy has led to the identification of dipyridamole as a possible therapeutic tool for the treatment of FOP. Furthermore, our study has also defined a pipeline of assays that will be useful for the evaluation of other pharmacological inhibitors of heterotopic ossification.

  7. Discovery of novel BRD4 inhibitors by high-throughput screening, crystallography, and cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongya; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Zhifeng; Xie, Yiqian; Jiang, Hao; Chen, Limin; Ding, Hong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Hualiang; Zheng, Mingyue; Luo, Cheng

    2017-03-09

    As an epigenetic reader, BRD4 regulates the transcription of important downstream genes that are essential for the survival of tumor cells. Small molecular inhibitors targeting the first bromodomain of BRD4 (BRD4-BD1) have showed promising potentials in the therapies of BRD4-related cancers. Through AlphaScreen-based high-throughput screening assay, a novel small molecular inhibitor was identified, and named DCBD-005, which inhibited the binding between BRD4-BD1 and acetylated lysines with an IC50 value of 0.81±0.03μM. The compound DCBD-005 effectively inhibited the viability, caused cell cycle arrest, and induced apoptosis in human leukemia MV4-11 cells. Moreover, the crystal structure of compound DCBD-005 with the BRD4-BD1 was determined at 1.72Å resolution, which revealed the binding mechanism of the leading compound, and also provided solid basis for further structure-based optimization. These results indicated that this novel BRD4-BD1 inhibitor DCBD-005 is promising to be developed into a drug candidate in the treatment of BRD4-related diseases.

  8. Discovery of CREBBP Bromodomain Inhibitors by High-Throughput Docking and Hit Optimization Guided by Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Unzue, Andrea; Dong, Jing; Spiliotopoulos, Dimitrios; Nevado, Cristina; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2016-02-25

    We have identified two chemotypes of CREBBP bromodomain ligands by fragment-based high-throughput docking. Only 17 molecules from the original library of two-million compounds were tested in vitro. Optimization of the two low-micromolar hits, the 4-acylpyrrole 1 and acylbenzene 9, was driven by molecular dynamics results which suggested improvement of the polar interactions with the Arg1173 side chain at the rim of the binding site. The synthesis of only two derivatives of 1 yielded the 4-acylpyrrole 6 which shows a single-digit micromolar affinity for the CREBBP bromodomain and a ligand efficiency of 0.34 kcal/mol per non-hydrogen atom. Optimization of the acylbenzene hit 9 resulted in a series of derivatives with nanomolar potencies, good ligand efficiency and selectivity (see Unzue, A.; Xu, M.; Dong, J.; Wiedmer, L.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Caflisch, A.; Nevado, C.Fragment-Based Design of Selective Nanomolar Ligands of the CREBBP Bromodomain. J. Med. Chem. 2015, DOI: 10.1021/acs.jmedchem.5b00172). The in silico predicted binding mode of the acylbenzene derivative 10 was validated by solving the structure of the complex with the CREBBP bromodomain.

  9. Discovery of structurally-diverse inhibitor scaffolds by high-throughput screening of a fragment library with dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Linsky, Thomas W; Fast, Walter

    2012-09-15

    Potent and selective inhibitors of the enzyme dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) are useful as molecular probes to better understand cellular regulation of nitric oxide. Inhibitors are also potential therapeutic agents for treatment of pathological states associated with the inappropriate overproduction of nitric oxide, such as septic shock, selected types of cancer, and other conditions. Inhibitors with structures dissimilar to substrate may overcome limitations inherent to substrate analogs. Therefore, to identify structurally-diverse inhibitor scaffolds, high-throughput screening (HTS) of a 4000-member library of fragment-sized molecules was completed using the Pseudomonas aeruginosa DDAH and human DDAH-1 isoforms. Use of a substrate concentration equal to its K(M) value during the primary screen allowed for the detection of inhibitors with different modes of inhibition. A series of validation tests were designed and implemented in the identification of four inhibitors of human DDAH-1 that were unknown prior to the screen. Two inhibitors share a 4-halopyridine scaffold and act as quiescent affinity labels that selectively and covalently modify the active-site Cys residue. Two inhibitors are benzimidazole-like compounds that reversibly and competitively inhibit human DDAH-1 with Ligand Efficiency values ≥0.3 kcal/mol/heavy (non-hydrogen) atom, indicating their suitability for further development. Both inhibitor scaffolds have available sites to derivatize for further optimization. Therefore, use of this fragment-based HTS approach is demonstrated to successfully identify two novel scaffolds for development of DDAH-1 inhibitors.

  10. High-throughput discovery of mutations in tef semi-dwarfing genes by next-generation sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qihui; Smith, Shavannor M; Ayele, Mulu; Yang, Lixing; Jogi, Ansuya; Chaluvadi, Srinivasa R; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2012-11-01

    Tef (Eragrostis tef) is a major cereal crop in Ethiopia. Lodging is the primary constraint to increasing productivity in this allotetraploid species, accounting for losses of ∼15-45% in yield each year. As a first step toward identifying semi-dwarf varieties that might have improved lodging resistance, an ∼6× fosmid library was constructed and used to identify both homeologues of the dw3 semi-dwarfing gene of Sorghum bicolor. An EMS mutagenized population, consisting of ∼21,210 tef plants, was planted and leaf materials were collected into 23 superpools. Two dwarfing candidate genes, homeologues of dw3 of sorghum and rht1 of wheat, were sequenced directly from each superpool with 454 technology, and 120 candidate mutations were identified. Out of 10 candidates tested, six independent mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing, including two predicted detrimental mutations in both dw3 homeologues with a potential to improve lodging resistance in tef through further breeding. This study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing can identify potentially valuable mutations in under-studied plant species like tef and has provided mutant lines that can now be combined and tested in breeding programs for improved lodging resistance.

  11. Turbocharged molecular discovery of OLED emitters: from high-throughput quantum simulation to highly efficient TADF devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Aguilera-Iparraguirre, Jorge; Hirzel, Timothy D.; Ha, Dong-Gwang; Einzinger, Markus; Wu, Tony; Baldo, Marc A.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán.

    2016-09-01

    Discovering new OLED emitters requires many experiments to synthesize candidates and test performance in devices. Large scale computer simulation can greatly speed this search process but the problem remains challenging enough that brute force application of massive computing power is not enough to successfully identify novel structures. We report a successful High Throughput Virtual Screening study that leveraged a range of methods to optimize the search process. The generation of candidate structures was constrained to contain combinatorial explosion. Simulations were tuned to the specific problem and calibrated with experimental results. Experimentalists and theorists actively collaborated such that experimental feedback was regularly utilized to update and shape the computational search. Supervised machine learning methods prioritized candidate structures prior to quantum chemistry simulation to prevent wasting compute on likely poor performers. With this combination of techniques, each multiplying the strength of the search, this effort managed to navigate an area of molecular space and identify hundreds of promising OLED candidate structures. An experimentally validated selection of this set shows emitters with external quantum efficiencies as high as 22%.

  12. Discovery of Novel Perovskites for Solar Thermochemical Water Splitting from High-Throughput First-Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, Antoine; Wolverton, Chris

    Among the several possible routes of hydrogen synthesis, thermochemical water splitting (TWS) cycles is a promising method for large scale production of hydrogen. The choice of metal oxide used in a TWS cycle is critical since it governs the rate and efficiency of the gas splitting process. In this work, we present a high-throughput density functional theory (HT-DFT) study of ABO3 perovskite compounds to screen for thermodynamically favorable two-step thermochemical water splitting materials. We demonstrate the use of two screens, based on thermodynamic stability and oxygen vacancy formation energy, on 5,329 different compositions to predict 139 stable potential candidate materials for water splitting applications. Several of these compounds have not been experimentally explored yet and present promising avenues for further research. Additionally, the large dataset of compounds and stability in our possession allowed us to revisit the structural maps for perovskites. This study shows the benefit of using first-principles calculations to efficiently screen an exhaustively large number of compounds at once. It provides a baseline for further studies involving more detailed exploration of a restricted number of those compounds.

  13. Discovery of novel inhibitors of human S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase based on in silico high-throughput screening and a non-radioactive enzymatic assay.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chenzeng; Wang, Yanlin; Tan, Xiao; Sun, Lidan; Liu, Sen

    2015-06-01

    Natural polyamines are small polycationic molecules essential for cell growth and development, and elevated level of polyamines is positively correlated with various cancers. As a rate-limiting enzyme of the polyamine biosynthetic pathway, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) has been an attractive drug target. In this report, we present the discovery of novel human AdoMetDC (hAdoMetDC) inhibitors by coupling computational and experimental tools. We constructed a reasonable computational structure model of hAdoMetDC that is compatible with general protocols for high-throughput drug screening, and used this model in in silico screening of hAdoMetDC inhibitors against a large compound library using a battery of computational tools. We also established and validated a simple, economic, and non-radioactive enzymatic assay, which can be adapted for experimental high-throughput screening of hAdoMetDC inhibitors. Finally, we obtained an hAdoMetDC inhibitor lead with a novel scaffold. This study provides both new tools and a new lead for the developing of novel hAdoMetDC inhibitors.

  14. High-throughput sequencing discovery of conserved and novel microRNAs in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis).

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengde; Li, Libin; Liu, Lifeng; Li, Huayin; Zhang, Yihui; Yao, Yingyin; Ni, Zhongfu; Gao, Jianwei

    2012-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 21-24 nucleotide non-coding RNAs that down-regulate gene expression by cleaving or inhibiting the translation of target gene transcripts. miRNAs have been extensively analyzed in a few model plant species such as Arabidopsis, rice and Populus, and partially investigated in other non-model plant species. However, only a few conserved miRNAs have been identified in Chinese cabbage, a common and economically important crop in Asia. To identify novel and conserved miRNAs in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis) we constructed a small RNA library. Using high-throughput Solexa sequencing to identify microRNAs we found 11,210 unique sequences belonging to 321 conserved miRNA families and 228 novel miRNAs. We ran a Blast search with these sequences against the Chinese cabbage mRNA database and found 2,308 and 736 potential target genes for 221 conserved and 125 novel miRNAs, respectively. The BlastX search against the Arabidopsis genome and GO analysis suggested most of the targets were involved in plant growth, metabolism, development and stress response. This study provides the first large scale-cloning and characterization of Chinese cabbage miRNAs and their potential targets. These miRNAs add to the growing database of new miRNAs, prompt further study on Chinese cabbage miRNA regulation mechanisms, and help toward a greater understanding of the important roles of miRNAs in Chinese cabbage.

  15. A virtual high-throughput screening approach to the discovery of novel inhibitors of the bacterial leucine transporter, LeuT.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Katie J; Gotfryd, Kamil; Billesbølle, Christian B; Loland, Claus J; Gether, Ulrik; Fishwick, Colin W G; Johnson, A Peter

    2013-03-01

    Membrane proteins are intrinsically involved in both human and pathogen physiology, and are the target of 60% of all marketed drugs. During the past decade, advances in the studies of membrane proteins using X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy and NMR-based techniques led to the elucidation of over 250 unique membrane protein crystal structures. The aim of the European Drug Initiative for Channels and Transporter (EDICT) project is to use the structures of clinically significant membrane proteins for the development of lead molecules. One of the approaches used to achieve this is a virtual high-throughput screening (vHTS) technique initially developed for soluble proteins. This paper describes application of this technique to the discovery of inhibitors of the leucine transporter (LeuT), a member of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family.

  16. Taxonomic analysis of the microbial community in stored sugar beets using high-throughput sequencing of different marker genes.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Sebastian; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas; Varrelmann, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Post-harvest colonization of sugar beets accompanied by rot development is a serious problem due to sugar losses and negative impact on processing quality. Studies on the microbial community associated with rot development and factors shaping their structure are missing. Therefore, high-throughput sequencing was applied to describe the influence of environment, plant genotype and storage temperature (8°C and 20°C) on three different communities in stored sugar beets, namely fungi (internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2), Fusarium spp. (elongation factor-1α gene fragment) and oomycetes (internal transcribed spacers 1). The composition of the fungal community changed during storage mostly influenced by the storage temperature followed by a weak environmental effect. Botrytis cinerea was the prevalent species at 8°C whereas members of the fungal genera Fusarium and Penicillium became dominant at 20°C. This shift was independent of the plant genotype. Species richness within the genus Fusarium also increased during storage at both temperatures whereas the oomycetes community did not change. Moreover, oomycetes species were absent after storage at 20°C. The results of the present study clearly show that rot development during sugar beet storage is associated with pathogens well known as causal agents of post-harvest diseases in many other crops.

  17. Semi-automated high-throughput fluorescent intercalator displacement-based discovery of cytotoxic DNA binding agents from a large compound library.

    PubMed

    Glass, Lateca S; Bapat, Aditi; Kelley, Mark R; Georgiadis, Millie M; Long, Eric C

    2010-03-01

    High-throughput fluorescent intercalator displacement (HT-FID) was adapted to the semi-automated screening of a commercial compound library containing 60,000 molecules resulting in the discovery of cytotoxic DNA-targeted agents. Although commercial libraries are routinely screened in drug discovery efforts, the DNA binding potential of the compounds they contain has largely been overlooked. HT-FID led to the rapid identification of a number of compounds for which DNA binding properties were validated through demonstration of concentration-dependent DNA binding and increased thermal melting of A/T- or G/C-rich DNA sequences. Selected compounds were assayed further for cell proliferation inhibition in glioblastoma cells. Seven distinct compounds emerged from this screening procedure that represent structures unknown previously to be capable of targeting DNA leading to cell death. These agents may represent structures worthy of further modification to optimally explore their potential as cytotoxic anti-cancer agents. In addition, the general screening strategy described may find broader impact toward the rapid discovery of DNA targeted agents with biological activity.

  18. Performance comparison of genetic markers for high-throughput sequencing-based biodiversity assessment in complex communities.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Aibin; Bailey, Sarah A; Heath, Daniel D; Macisaac, Hugh J

    2014-09-01

    Metabarcode surveys of DNA extracted from environmental samples are increasingly popular for biodiversity assessment in natural communities. Such surveys rely heavily on robust genetic markers. Therefore, analysis of PCR efficiency and subsequent biodiversity estimation for different types of genetic markers and their corresponding primers is important. Here, we test the PCR efficiency and biodiversity recovery potential of three commonly used genetic markers - nuclear small subunit ribosomal DNA (18S), mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S ribosomal RNA (mt16S) - using 454 pyrosequencing of a zooplankton community collected from Hamilton Harbour, Ontario. We found that biodiversity detection power and PCR efficiency varied widely among these markers. All tested primers for COI failed to provide high-quality PCR products for pyrosequencing, but newly designed primers for 18S and 16S passed all tests. Furthermore, multiple analyses based on large-scale pyrosequencing (i.e. 1/2 PicoTiter plate for each marker) showed that primers for 18S recover more (38 orders) groups than 16S (10 orders) across all taxa, and four vs. two orders and nine vs. six families for Crustacea. Our results showed that 18S, using newly designed primers, is an efficient and powerful tool for profiling biodiversity in largely unexplored communities, especially when amplification difficulties exist for mitochondrial markers such as COI. Universal primers for higher resolution markers such as COI are still needed to address the possible low resolution of 18S for species-level identification.

  19. Digital One-Disc-One-Compound Method for High-Throughput Discovery of Prostate Cancer-Targeting Ligands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    countries. Up to now, chemotherapy is still the main treatment modality in prostate cancers10-11, however the efficacy of the therapy is limited...by severe toxic side effects induced by anticancer drugs on healthy tissues. Targeted chemotherapy which can be achieved by attaching a ligand for...peptide library targeted to α6 integrin receptors will be constructed by ODOC method with the aim of discovery of new ligand for targeted chemotherapy

  20. Development of novel microsatellite markers for the BBCC Oryza genome (Poaceae) using high-throughput sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caihong; Liu, Xiaojiao; Peng, Suotang; Xu, Qun; Yuan, Xiaoping; Feng, Yue; Yu, Hanyong; Wang, Yiping; Wei, Xinghua

    2014-01-01

    Wild species of Oryza are extremely valuable sources of genetic material that can be used to broaden the genetic background of cultivated rice, and to increase its resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses. Until recently, there was no sequence information for the BBCC Oryza genome; therefore, no special markers had been developed for this genome type. The lack of suitable markers made it difficult to search for valuable genes in the BBCC genome. The aim of this study was to develop microsatellite markers for the BBCC genome. We obtained 13,991 SSR-containing sequences and designed 14,508 primer pairs. The most abundant was hexanuclelotide (31.39%), followed by trinucleotide (27.67%) and dinucleotide (19.04%). 600 markers were selected for validation in 23 accessions of Oryza species with the BBCC genome. A set of 495 markers produced clear amplified fragments of the expected sizes. The average number of alleles per locus (Na) was 2.5, ranging from 1 to 9. The genetic diversity per locus (He) ranged from 0 to 0.844 with a mean of 0.333. The mean polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0.290, and ranged from 0 to 0.825. Of the 495 markers, 12 were only found in the BB genome, 173 were unique to the CC genome, and 198 were also present in the AA genome. These microsatellite markers could be used to evaluate the phylogenetic relationships among different Oryza genomes, and to construct a genetic linkage map for locating and identifying valuable genes in the BBCC genome, and would also for marker-assisted breeding programs that included accessions with the AA genome, especially Oryza sativa.

  1. Discovery of precursor and mature microRNAs and their putative gene targets using high-throughput sequencing in pineapple (Ananas comosus var. comosus).

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Noor Hydayaty Md; Ong, Wen Dee; Redwan, Raimi Mohamed; Latip, Mariam Abd; Kumar, S Vijay

    2015-10-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, endogenous non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression, resulting in the silencing of target mRNA transcripts through mRNA cleavage or translational inhibition. MiRNAs play significant roles in various biological and physiological processes in plants. However, the miRNA-mediated gene regulatory network in pineapple, the model tropical non-climacteric fruit, remains largely unexplored. Here, we report a complete list of pineapple mature miRNAs obtained from high-throughput small RNA sequencing and precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs) obtained from ESTs. Two small RNA libraries were constructed from pineapple fruits and leaves, respectively, using Illumina's Solexa technology. Sequence similarity analysis using miRBase revealed 579,179 reads homologous to 153 miRNAs from 41 miRNA families. In addition, a pineapple fruit transcriptome library consisting of approximately 30,000 EST contigs constructed using Solexa sequencing was used for the discovery of pre-miRNAs. In all, four pre-miRNAs were identified (MIR156, MIR399, MIR444 and MIR2673). Furthermore, the same pineapple transcriptome was used to dissect the function of the miRNAs in pineapple by predicting their putative targets in conjunction with their regulatory networks. In total, 23 metabolic pathways were found to be regulated by miRNAs in pineapple. The use of high-throughput sequencing in pineapples to unveil the presence of miRNAs and their regulatory pathways provides insight into the repertoire of miRNA regulation used exclusively in this non-climacteric model plant.

  2. High-Throughput Ligand Discovery Reveals a Sitewise Gradient of Diversity in Broadly Evolved Hydrophilic Fibronectin Domains

    PubMed Central

    Woldring, Daniel R.; Holec, Patrick V.; Zhou, Hong; Hackel, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    Discovering new binding function via a combinatorial library in small protein scaffolds requires balance between appropriate mutations to introduce favorable intermolecular interactions while maintaining intramolecular integrity. Sitewise constraints exist in a non-spatial gradient from diverse to conserved in evolved antibody repertoires; yet non-antibody scaffolds generally do not implement this strategy in combinatorial libraries. Despite the fact that biased amino acid distributions, typically elevated in tyrosine, serine, and glycine, have gained wider use in synthetic scaffolds, these distributions are still predominantly applied uniformly to diversified sites. While select sites in fibronectin domains and DARPins have shown benefit from sitewise designs, they have not been deeply evaluated. Inspired by this disparity between diversity distributions in natural libraries and synthetic scaffold libraries, we hypothesized that binders resulting from discovery and evolution would exhibit a non-spatial, sitewise gradient of amino acid diversity. To identify sitewise diversities consistent with efficient evolution in the context of a hydrophilic fibronectin domain, >105 binders to six targets were evolved and sequenced. Evolutionarily favorable amino acid distributions at 25 sites reveal Shannon entropies (range: 0.3–3.9; median: 2.1; standard deviation: 1.1) supporting the diversity gradient hypothesis. Sitewise constraints in evolved sequences are consistent with complementarity, stability, and consensus biases. Implementation of sitewise constrained diversity enables direct selection of nanomolar affinity binders validating an efficient strategy to balance inter- and intra-molecular interaction demands at each site. PMID:26383268

  3. A fully integrated high-throughput screening methodology for the discovery of new polyolefin catalysts: discovery of a new class of high temperature single-site group (IV) copolymerization catalysts.

    PubMed

    Boussie, Thomas R; Diamond, Gary M; Goh, Christopher; Hall, Keith A; LaPointe, Anne M; Leclerc, Margarete; Lund, Cheryl; Murphy, Vince; Shoemaker, James A W; Tracht, Ursula; Turner, Howard; Zhang, Jessica; Uno, Tetsuo; Rosen, Robert K; Stevens, James C

    2003-04-09

    For the first time, new catalysts for olefin polymerization have been discovered through the application of fully integrated high-throughput primary and secondary screening techniques supported by rapid polymer characterization methods. Microscale 1-octene primary screening polymerization experiments combining arrays of ligands with reactive metal complexes M(CH(2)Ph)(4) (M = Zr, Hf) and multiple activation conditions represent a new high-throughput technique for discovering novel group (IV) polymerization catalysts. The primary screening methods described here have been validated using a commercially relevant polyolefin catalyst, and implemented rapidly to discover the new amide-ether based hafnium catalyst [eta(2)-(N,O)[bond](2-MeO[bond]C(6)H(4))(2,4,6-Me(3)C(6)H(2))N]Hf(CH(2)Ph)(3) (1), which is capable of polymerizing 1-octene to high conversion. The molecular structure of 1 has been determined by X-ray diffraction. Larger scale secondary screening experiments performed on a focused 96-member amine-ether library demonstrated the versatile high temperature ethylene-1-octene copolymerization capabilities of this catalyst class, and led to significant performance improvements over the initial primary screening discovery. Conventional one gallon batch reactor copolymerizations performed using selected amide-ether hafnium compounds confirmed the performance features of this new catalyst class, serving to fully validate the experimental results from the high-throughput approaches described herein.

  4. Efficient method for high-throughput virtual screening based on flexible docking: discovery of novel acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Miho Yamada; Itai, Akiko

    2004-09-23

    A method of easily finding ligands, with a variety of core structures, for a given target macromolecule would greatly contribute to the rapid identification of novel lead compounds for drug development. We have developed an efficient method for discovering ligand candidates from a number of flexible compounds included in databases, when the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the drug target is available. The method, named ADAM&EVE, makes use of our automated docking method ADAM, which has already been reported. Like ADAM, ADAM&EVE takes account of the flexibility of each molecule in databases, by exploring the conformational space fully and continuously. Database screening has been made much faster than with ADAM through the tuning of parameters, so that computational screening of several hundred thousand compounds is possible in a practical time. Promising ligand candidates can be selected according to various criteria based on the docking results and characteristics of compounds. Furthermore, we have developed a new tool, EVE-MAKE, for automatically preparing the additional compound data necessary for flexible docking calculation, prior to 3D database screening. Among several successful cases of lead discovery by ADAM&EVE, the finding of novel acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors is presented here. We performed a virtual screening of about 160 000 commercially available compounds against the X-ray crystallographic structure of AChE. Among 114 compounds that could be purchased and assayed, 35 molecules with various core structures showed inhibitory activities with IC(50) values less than 100 microM. Thirteen compounds had IC(50) values between 0.5 and 10 microM, and almost all their core structures are very different from those of known inhibitors. The results demonstrate the effectiveness and validity of the ADAM&EVE approach and provide a starting point for development of novel drugs to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  5. High-throughput metabolic stability studies in drug discovery by orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight (OATOF) with analogue-to-digital signal capture (ADC).

    PubMed

    Temesi, David G; Martin, Scott; Smith, Robin; Jones, Christopher; Middleton, Brian

    2010-06-30

    Screening assays capable of performing quantitative analysis on hundreds of compounds per week are used to measure metabolic stability during early drug discovery. Modern orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight (OATOF) mass spectrometers equipped with analogue-to-digital signal capture (ADC) now offer performance levels suitable for many applications normally supported by triple quadruple instruments operated in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. Herein the merits of MRM and OATOF with ADC detection are compared for more than 1000 compounds screened in rat and/or cryopreserved human hepatocytes over a period of 3 months. Statistical comparison of a structurally diverse subset indicated good agreement for the two detection methods. The overall success rate was higher using OATOF detection and data acquisition time was reduced by around 20%. Targeted metabolites of diazepam were detected in samples from a CLint determination performed at 1 microM. Data acquisition by positive and negative ion mode switching can be achieved on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) peak widths as narrow as 0.2 min (at base), thus enabling a more comprehensive first pass analysis with fast HPLC gradients. Unfortunately, most existing OATOF instruments lack the software tools necessary to rapidly convert the huge amounts of raw data into quantified results. Software with functionality similar to open access triple quadrupole systems is needed for OATOF to truly compete in a high-throughput screening environment.

  6. High-throughput screening platform for natural product-based drug discovery against 3 neglected tropical diseases: human African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Annang, F; Pérez-Moreno, G; García-Hernández, R; Cordon-Obras, C; Martín, J; Tormo, J R; Rodríguez, L; de Pedro, N; Gómez-Pérez, V; Valente, M; Reyes, F; Genilloud, O; Vicente, F; Castanys, S; Ruiz-Pérez, L M; Navarro, M; Gamarro, F; González-Pacanowska, D

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease are 3 neglected tropical diseases for which current therapeutic interventions are inadequate or toxic. There is an urgent need to find new lead compounds against these diseases. Most drug discovery strategies rely on high-throughput screening (HTS) of synthetic chemical libraries using phenotypic and target-based approaches. Combinatorial chemistry libraries contain hundreds of thousands of compounds; however, they lack the structural diversity required to find entirely novel chemotypes. Natural products, in contrast, are a highly underexplored pool of unique chemical diversity that can serve as excellent templates for the synthesis of novel, biologically active molecules. We report here a validated HTS platform for the screening of microbial extracts against the 3 diseases. We have used this platform in a pilot project to screen a subset (5976) of microbial extracts from the MEDINA Natural Products library. Tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry showed that 48 extracts contain potentially new compounds that are currently undergoing de-replication for future isolation and characterization. Known active components included actinomycin D, bafilomycin B1, chromomycin A3, echinomycin, hygrolidin, and nonactins, among others. The report here is, to our knowledge, the first HTS of microbial natural product extracts against the above-mentioned kinetoplastid parasites.

  7. High-throughput genotyping of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) utilising diversity arrays technology (DArT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Implementation of molecular methods in hop breeding is dependent on the availability of sizeable numbers of polymorphic markers and a comprehensive understanding of genetic variation. Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) is a high-throughput cost-effective method for the discovery of large numbers of...

  8. Discovery of a 29-gene panel in peripheral blood mononuclear cells for the detection of colorectal cancer and adenomas using high throughput real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Ciarloni, Laura; Hosseinian, Sahar; Monnier-Benoit, Sylvain; Imaizumi, Natsuko; Dorta, Gian; Ruegg, Curzio

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in developed countries. Early detection of CRC leads to decreased CRC mortality. A blood-based CRC screening test is highly desirable due to limited invasiveness and high acceptance rate among patients compared to currently used fecal occult blood testing and colonoscopy. Here we describe the discovery and validation of a 29-gene panel in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) for the detection of CRC and adenomatous polyps (AP). Blood samples were prospectively collected from a multicenter, case-control clinical study. First, we profiled 93 samples with 667 candidate and 3 reference genes by high throughput real-time PCR (OpenArray system). After analysis, 160 genes were retained and tested again on 51 additional samples. Low expressed and unstable genes were discarded resulting in a final dataset of 144 samples profiled with 140 genes. To define which genes, alone or in combinations had the highest potential to discriminate AP and/or CRC from controls, data were analyzed by a combination of univariate and multivariate methods. A list of 29 potentially discriminant genes was compiled and evaluated for its predictive accuracy by penalized logistic regression and bootstrap. This method discriminated AP >1cm and CRC from controls with a sensitivity of 59% and 75%, respectively, with 91% specificity. The behavior of the 29-gene panel was validated with a LightCycler 480 real-time PCR platform, commonly adopted by clinical laboratories. In this work we identified a 29-gene panel expressed in PBMC that can be used for developing a novel minimally-invasive test for accurate detection of AP and CRC using a standard real-time PCR platform.

  9. High performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) as a high-throughput screening tool in drug discovery to study drug-plasma protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Vuignier, Karine; Guillarme, Davy; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Schappler, Julie

    2013-02-23

    Drug-plasma protein binding is an important parameter that, together with other physicochemical properties such as lipophilicity and pK(a), greatly influences drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME). Therefore, it is important for pharmaceutical companies to develop a rapid screening assay to examine plasma protein binding during the early stages of the drug discovery process. Human serum albumin (HSA) and α(1)-acid glycoprotein (AGP) are the most important plasma proteins that are capable of binding drugs. In this work, an automated and high-throughput (<3 min/compound) strategy was developed using high performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) with commercial HSA and AGP columns to evaluate drug-plasma protein interactions for drug screening. A generic gradient was used throughout the study to separate drugs that were weakly and tightly bound to HSA and AGP. To accelerate the analysis time, the system was calibrated in a single run by pooling reference compounds without overloading the column. For both HSA and AGP studies, the developed methods were successfully transferred from HPAC-UV to HPAC-MS with single quadrupole MS detection and ammonium acetate, pH 7.0 as a volatile mobile phase. The MS detection enhanced the sensitivity, selectivity, and throughput of the method by pooling unknown compounds. For HSA analyses, the binding percentages obtained using HPAC were well correlated with the binding percentages from the literature. This method was also able to rank compounds based on their affinity for HSA. Concerning the AGP analyses, the quality of the correlation between the binding percentages obtained in HPAC and those from the literature was weaker. However, the method was able to classify compounds into weak, medium, and strong binders and rank compounds based on their affinity for AGP.

  10. Discovery of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of VEGF Expression in Tumor Cells Using a Cell-Based High Throughput Screening Platform

    PubMed Central

    Weetall, Marla; Bombard, Jenelle; Qi, Hongyan; Arasu, Tamil; Lennox, William; Hedrick, Jean; Sheedy, Josephine; Risher, Nicole; Brooks, Peter C.; Trifillis, Panayiota; Trotta, Christopher; Moon, Young-Choon; Babiak, John; Almstead, Neil G.; Colacino, Joseph M.; Davis, Thomas W.; Peltz, Stuart W.

    2016-01-01

    Current anti-VEGF (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A) therapies to treat various cancers indiscriminately block VEGF function in the patient resulting in the global loss of VEGF signaling which has been linked to dose-limiting toxicities as well as treatment failures due to acquired resistance. Accumulating evidence suggests that this resistance is at least partially due to increased production of compensatory tumor angiogenic factors/cytokines. VEGF protein production is differentially controlled depending on whether cells are in the normal “homeostatic” state or in a stressed state, such as hypoxia, by post-transcriptional regulation imparted by elements in the 5’ and 3’ untranslated regions (UTR) of the VEGF mRNA. Using the Gene Expression Modulation by Small molecules (GEMS™) phenotypic assay system, we performed a high throughput screen to identify low molecular weight compounds that target the VEGF mRNA UTR-mediated regulation of stress-induced VEGF production in tumor cells. We identified a number of compounds that potently and selectively reduce endogenous VEGF production under hypoxia in HeLa cells. Medicinal chemistry efforts improved the potency and pharmaceutical properties of one series of compounds resulting in the discovery of PTC-510 which inhibits hypoxia-induced VEGF expression in HeLa cells at low nanomolar concentration. In mouse xenograft studies, oral administration of PTC-510 results in marked reduction of intratumor VEGF production and single agent control of tumor growth without any evident toxicity. Here, we show that selective suppression of stress-induced VEGF production within tumor cells effectively controls tumor growth. Therefore, this approach may minimize the liabilities of current global anti-VEGF therapies. PMID:27992500

  11. Development of a differential scanning fluorimetry based high throughput screening assay for the discovery of affinity binders against an anthrax protein.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Fiona J; Greenwood, Gemma K; Birchall, Kristian; Chen, Beining

    2010-09-05

    The anthrax protein protective antigen (PA) is responsible for cell-surface recognition and aids the delivery of the toxic anthrax enzymes into host cells. By targeting PA and preventing it from binding to host cells, it is hoped that the delivery of toxins into the cell will be inhibited. The current assay reported for PA is a low throughput functional assay. Here, the high throughput screening method using differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) was developed and optimized to screen a number of libraries from various sources including a selection of FDA-approved drugs as well as hits selected by a virtual screening campaign. DSF is a rapid technique that uses fluorescence to monitor the thermal unfolding of proteins using a standard QPCR instrument. A positive shift in the calculated melting temperature (Tm), of the protein in the presence of a compound, relative to the Tm of the unbound protein, indicates that stabilization of the protein by ligand binding may have occurred. Optimization of the melting assay showed SYPRO Orange to be an ideal dye as a marker and lead to the reduction of DMSO concentration to <1% (v/v) in the final assay. The final assay volume was minimized to 25 L with 5 g protein per well of 96-well plate. In addition, a buffer, salt and additive screen lead to the selection of 10 mM HEPES-NaOH pH 7.5, 100 mM NaCl as the assay buffer. This method has been shown here to be useful as a primary method for the detection of small-molecule PA ligands, giving a hit rate of approximately 7%. These ligands can then be studied further using PA functional assays to confirm their biological activities before being selected as lead compounds for the treatment of anthrax.

  12. Probe molecules (PrM) approach in adverse outcome pathway (AOP) based high throughput screening (HTS): in vivo discovery for developing in vitro target methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efficient and accurate adverse outcome pathway (AOP) based high-throughput screening (HTS) methods use a systems biology based approach to computationally model in vitro cellular and molecular data for rapid chemical prioritization; however, not all HTS assays are grounded by rel...

  13. Lead discovery for mammalian elongation of long chain fatty acids family 6 using a combination of high-throughput fluorescent-based assay and RapidFire mass spectrometry assay.

    PubMed

    Takamiya, Mari; Sakurai, Masaaki; Teranishi, Fumie; Ikeda, Tomoko; Kamiyama, Tsutomu; Asai, Akira

    2016-11-25

    A high-throughput RapidFire mass spectrometry assay is described for elongation of very long-chain fatty acids family 6 (Elovl6). Elovl6 is a microsomal enzyme that regulates the elongation of C12-16 saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Elovl6 may be a new therapeutic target for fat metabolism disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. To identify new Elovl6 inhibitors, we developed a high-throughput fluorescence screening assay in 1536-well format. However, a number of false positives caused by fluorescent interference have been identified. To pick up the real active compounds among the primary hits from the fluorescence assay, we developed a RapidFire mass spectrometry assay and a conventional radioisotope assay. These assays have the advantage of detecting the main products directly without using fluorescent-labeled substrates. As a result, 276 compounds (30%) of the primary hits (921 compounds) in a fluorescence ultra-high-throughput screening method were identified as common active compounds in these two assays. It is concluded that both methods are very effective to eliminate false positives. Compared with the radioisotope method using an expensive (14)C-labeled substrate, the RapidFire mass spectrometry method using unlabeled substrates is a high-accuracy, high-throughput method. In addition, some of the hit compounds selected from the screening inhibited cellular fatty acid elongation in HEK293 cells expressing Elovl6 transiently. This result suggests that these compounds may be promising lead candidates for therapeutic drugs. Ultra-high-throughput fluorescence screening followed by a RapidFire mass spectrometry assay was a suitable strategy for lead discovery against Elovl6.

  14. Applying a high-throughput fluorescence polarization assay for the discovery of chemical probes blocking La:RNA interactions in vitro and in cells

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Venkatesh; Rodriguez, Reycel; Smith, Charles D.

    2017-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein La is overexpressed in a number of tumor tissues and is thought to support tumorigenesis by binding to and facilitating the expression of mRNAs encoding tumor-promoting and anti-apoptotic factors. Hence, small molecules able to block the binding of La to specific RNAs could have a therapeutic impact by reducing the expression of tumor-promoting and anti-apoptotic factors. Toward this novel therapeutic strategy, we aimed to develop a high-throughput fluorescence polarization assay to screen small compound libraries for molecules blocking the binding of La to an RNA element derived from cyclin D1 mRNA. Herein, we make use of a robust fluorescence polarization assay and the validation of primary hits by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. We showed recently that La protects cells against cisplatin treatment by stimulating the protein synthesis of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl2. Here, we show by RNA immunoprecipitation experiments that one small compound specifically impairs the association of La with Bcl2 mRNA in cells and sensitizes cells for cipslatin-induced cell death. In summary, we report the application of a high-throughput fluorescence polarization assay to identify small compounds that impair the binding of La to target RNAs in vitro and in cells. PMID:28291789

  15. Structure-based tailoring of compound libraries for high-throughput screening: discovery of novel EphB4 kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Peter; Kipouros, Catherine Berset; Huang, Danzhi; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2008-10-01

    High-throughput docking is a computational tool frequently used to discover small-molecule inhibitors of enzymes or receptors of known three-dimensional structure. Because of the large number of molecules in chemical libraries, automatic procedures to prune multimillion compound collections are useful for high-throughput docking and necessary for in vitro screening. Here, we propose an anchor-based library tailoring approach (termed ALTA) to focus a chemical library by docking and prioritizing molecular fragments according to their binding energy which includes continuum electrostatics solvation. In principle, ALTA does not require prior knowledge of known inhibitors, but receptor-based pharmacophore information (hydrogen bonds with the hinge region) is additionally used here to identify molecules with optimal anchor fragments for the ATP-binding site of the EphB4 receptor tyrosine kinase. The 21,418 molecules of the focused library (from an initial collection of about 730,000) are docked into EphB4 and ranked by force-field-based energy including electrostatic solvation. Among the 43 compounds tested in vitro, eight molecules originating from two different anchors show low-micromolar activity in a fluorescence-based enzymatic assay. Four of them are active in a cell-based assay and are potential anti-angiogenic compounds.

  16. Applying a high-throughput fluorescence polarization assay for the discovery of chemical probes blocking La:RNA interactions in vitro and in cells.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Gunhild; Fedarovich, Alena; Kota, Venkatesh; Rodriguez, Reycel; Smith, Charles D; Heise, Tilman

    2017-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein La is overexpressed in a number of tumor tissues and is thought to support tumorigenesis by binding to and facilitating the expression of mRNAs encoding tumor-promoting and anti-apoptotic factors. Hence, small molecules able to block the binding of La to specific RNAs could have a therapeutic impact by reducing the expression of tumor-promoting and anti-apoptotic factors. Toward this novel therapeutic strategy, we aimed to develop a high-throughput fluorescence polarization assay to screen small compound libraries for molecules blocking the binding of La to an RNA element derived from cyclin D1 mRNA. Herein, we make use of a robust fluorescence polarization assay and the validation of primary hits by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. We showed recently that La protects cells against cisplatin treatment by stimulating the protein synthesis of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl2. Here, we show by RNA immunoprecipitation experiments that one small compound specifically impairs the association of La with Bcl2 mRNA in cells and sensitizes cells for cipslatin-induced cell death. In summary, we report the application of a high-throughput fluorescence polarization assay to identify small compounds that impair the binding of La to target RNAs in vitro and in cells.

  17. Snake venom: From fieldwork to the clinic: Recent insights into snake biology, together with new technology allowing high-throughput screening of venom, bring new hope for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Vonk, Freek J; Jackson, Kate; Doley, Robin; Madaras, Frank; Mirtschin, Peter J; Vidal, Nicolas

    2011-04-01

    Snake venoms are recognized here as a grossly under-explored resource in pharmacological prospecting. Discoveries in snake systematics demonstrate that former taxonomic bias in research has led to the neglect of thousands of species of potential medical use. Recent discoveries reveal an unexpectedly vast degree of variation in venom composition among snakes, from different species down to litter mates. The molecular mechanisms underlying this diversity are only beginning to be understood. However, the enormous potential that this resource represents for pharmacological prospecting is clear. New high-throughput screening systems offer greatly increased speed and efficiency in identifying and extracting therapeutically useful molecules. At the same time a global biodiversity crisis is threatening the very snake populations on which hopes for new venom-derived medications depend. Biomedical researchers, pharmacologists, clinicians, herpetologists, and conservation biologists must combine their efforts if the full potential of snake venom-derived medications is to be realized.

  18. MIPHENO: Data normalization for high throughput metabolic analysis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput methodologies such as microarrays, mass spectrometry and plate-based small molecule screens are increasingly used to facilitate discoveries from gene function to drug candidate identification. These large-scale experiments are typically carried out over the course...

  19. High-throughput proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesley, Scott A.; Nasoff, Marc; Kreusch, Andreas; Spraggon, Glen

    2001-04-01

    Proteomics has become a major focus as researchers attempt to understand the vast amount of genomic information. Protein complexity makes identifying and understanding gene function inherently difficult. The challenge of studying proteins in a global way is driving the development of new technologies for systematic and comprehensive analysis of protein structure and function. We are addressing this challenge through instrumentation and approaches to rapidly express, purify, crystallize, and mutate large numbers of human gene products. Our approach applies the principles of HTS technologies commonly used in pharmaceutical development. Genes are cloned, expressed, and purified in parallel to achieve a throughput potential of hundreds per day. Our instrumentation allows us to produce tens of milligrams of protein from 96 separate clones simultaneously. Purified protein is used for several applications including a high-throughput crystallographic screening approach for structure determination using automated image analysis. To further understand protein function, we are integrating a mutagenesis and screening approach. By combining these key technologies, we hope to provide a fundamental basis for understanding gene function at the protein level.

  20. High throughput optical scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Basiji, David A.; van den Engh, Gerrit J.

    2001-01-01

    A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

  1. Probe molecule (PrM) approach in adverse outcome pathway (AOP) based high-throughput screening (HTS): in vivo discovery for developing in vitro target methods.

    PubMed

    Angrish, Michelle M; Madden, Michael C; Pleil, Joachim D

    2015-04-20

    Efficient and accurate adverse outcome pathway (AOP) based high-throughput screening (HTS) methods use a systems biology based approach to computationally model in vitro cellular and molecular data for rapid chemical prioritization; however, not all HTS assays are grounded by relevant in vivo exposure data. The challenge is to develop HTS assays with unambiguous quantitative links between in vitro responses and corresponding in vivo effects, which is complicated by metabolically insufficient systems, in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE), cross-species comparisons, and other inherent issues correlating IVIVE findings. This article introduces the concept of ultrasensitive gas phase probe molecules (PrMs) to help bridge the current HTS assay IVIVE gap. The PrM concept assesses metabolic pathways that have already been well-defined from intact human or mammalian models. Specifically, the idea is to introduce a gas phase probe molecule into a system, observe normal steady state, add chemicals of interest, and quantitatively measure (from headspace gas) effects on PrM metabolism that can be directly linked back to a well-defined and corresponding in vivo effect. As an example, we developed the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and differential equations to estimate methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) metabolism to tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) via cytochrome (CYP) 2A6 in the liver from human empirical data. Because MTBE metabolic pathways are well characterized from in vivo data, we can use it as a PrM to explore direct and indirect chemical effects on CYP pathways. The PrM concept could be easily applied to in vitro and alternative models of disease and phenotype, and even test for volatile chemicals while avoiding liquid handling robotics. Furthermore, a PrM can be designed for any chemical with known empirical human exposure data and used to assess chemicals for which no information exists. Herein, we propose an elegant gas phase probe molecule-based approach to in

  2. Discovery of high affinity ligands for β2-adrenergic receptor through pharmacophore-based high-throughput virtual screening and docking.

    PubMed

    Yakar, Ruya; Akten, Ebru Demet

    2014-09-01

    Novel high affinity compounds for human β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) were searched among the clean drug-like subset of ZINC database consisting of 9,928,465 molecules that satisfy the Lipinski's rule of five. The screening protocol consisted of a high-throughput pharmacophore screening followed by an extensive amount of docking and rescoring. The pharmacophore model was composed of key features shared by all five inactive states of β2-AR in complex with inverse agonists and antagonists. To test the discriminatory power of the pharmacophore model, a small-scale screening was initially performed on a database consisting of 117 compounds of which 53 antagonists were taken as active inhibitors and 64 agonists as inactive inhibitors. Accordingly, 7.3% of the ZINC database subset (729,413 compounds) satisfied the pharmacophore requirements, along with 44 antagonists and 17 agonists. Afterwards, all these hit compounds were docked to the inactive apo form of the receptor using various docking and scoring protocols. Following each docking experiment, the best pose was further evaluated based on the existence of key residues for antagonist binding in its vicinity. After final evaluations based on the human intestinal absorption (HIA) and the blood brain barrier (BBB) penetration properties, 62 hit compounds have been clustered based on their structural similarity and as a result four scaffolds were revealed. Two of these scaffolds were also observed in three high affinity compounds with experimentally known Ki values. Moreover, novel chemical compounds with distinct structures have been determined as potential β2-AR drug candidates.

  3. Discovery of secondary metabolites in an extractive liquid-surface immobilization system and its application to high-throughput interfacial screening of antibiotic-producing fungi.

    PubMed

    Oda, Shinobu; Kameda, Arisa; Okanan, Masanori; Sakakibara, Yusuke; Ohashi, Shinichi

    2015-11-01

    An extractive liquid-surface immobilization (Ext-LSI) system, which consists of a hydrophobic organic solvent (an upper phase), a fungal cell-ballooned microsphere layer (a middle phase) and a liquid medium (a lower phase), is a unique interfacial cultivation system for fungi. The fungal cells growing at the interface between the organic and aqueous phases efficiently produce hydrophobic metabolites, which are continuously extracted into the organic phase, and/or hydrophilic metabolites that migrate into the aqueous phase without carbon catabolite repression and product and/or feed-back inhibitions. Application of the system to fermentation of Penicillium multicolor IAM 7153 and Trichoderma atroviride AG2755-5NM398 afforded remarkably different profiles of secondary metabolites in the organic phase compared with those in an aqueous phase in traditional submerged cultivation (SmC). Various hydrophobic metabolites exhibiting unique UV-visible spectra were accumulated into the organic phase. The system was applied to a novel interfacial screening system of antibiotic-producing fungi. Compared with the SmC, the interfacial cultivation system exhibited some interesting and important advantages, such as the higher accumulation of hydrophobic secondary metabolites, the lack of requirement for shaking and troublesome solvent extraction, and the small scale of the vessels (medium, 5 ml; dimethylsilicone oil, 1 ml), as well as the significantly different metabolite profiles. The interfacial screening system yielded a high incidence of antimicrobial activity, with 21.9% of the fungi tested exhibiting antifungal activity against Pichia anomala NBRC 10213. This novel interfacial high-throughput screening approach has the potential to discover new biologically active secondary metabolites even from strains previously found to be unproductive.

  4. High Throughput Discovery of Solar Fuels Photoanodes in the CuO-V 2 O 5 System

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Lan; Yan, Qimin; Shinde, Aniketa; Guevarra, Dan; Newhouse, Paul F.; Becerra-Stasiewicz, Natalie; Chatman, Shawn M.; Haber, Joel A.; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Gregoire, John M.

    2015-08-26

    Solar photoelectrochemical generation of fuel is a promising energy technology yet the lack of an efficient, robust photoanode remains a primary materials challenge in the development and deployment of solar fuels generators. Metal oxides comprise the most promising class of photoanode materials, but no known material meets the demanding requirements of low band gap energy, photoelectrocatalysis of the oxygen evolution reaction, and stability under highly oxidizing conditions. Here, we report the identification of new photoelectroactive materials through a strategic combination of combinatorial materials synthesis, high-throughput photoelectrochemistry, optical spectroscopy, and detailed electronic structure calculations. We identify 4 photoelectrocatalyst phases - α-Cu2V2O7, β-Cu2V2O7, γ-Cu3V2O8, and Cu11V6O26 - with band gap energy at or below 2 eV. The photoelectrochemical properties and 30-minute stability of these copper vanadate phases are demonstrated in 3 different aqueous electrolytes (pH 7, pH 9, and pH 13), with select combinations of phase and electrolyte exhibiting unprecedented photoelectrocatalytic stability for metal oxides with sub-2 eV band gap. Through integration of experimental and theoretical techniques, we determine new structure-property relationships and establish CuO-V2O5 as the most prominent composition system for OER photoelectrocatalysts, providing crucial information for materials genomes initiatives and paving the way for continued development of solar fuels photoanodes.

  5. Seven novel modulators of the analgesic target NaV 1.7 uncovered using a high-throughput venom-based discovery approach

    PubMed Central

    Klint, Julie K; Smith, Jennifer J; Vetter, Irina; Rupasinghe, Darshani B; Er, Sing Yan; Senff, Sebastian; Herzig, Volker; Mobli, Mehdi; Lewis, Richard J; Bosmans, Frank; King, Glenn F

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Chronic pain is a serious worldwide health issue, with current analgesics having limited efficacy and dose-limiting side effects. Humans with loss-of-function mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 (hNaV1.7) are indifferent to pain, making hNaV1.7 a promising target for analgesic development. Since spider venoms are replete with NaV channel modulators, we examined their potential as a source of hNaV1.7 inhibitors. Experimental Approach We developed a high-throughput fluorescent-based assay to screen spider venoms against hNaV1.7 and isolate ‘hit’ peptides. To examine the binding site of these peptides, we constructed a panel of chimeric channels in which the S3b-S4 paddle motif from each voltage sensor domain of hNaV1.7 was transplanted into the homotetrameric KV2.1 channel. Key Results We screened 205 spider venoms and found that 40% contain at least one inhibitor of hNaV1.7. By deconvoluting ‘hit’ venoms, we discovered seven novel members of the NaSpTx family 1. One of these peptides, Hd1a (peptide μ-TRTX-Hd1a from venom of the spider Haplopelma doriae), inhibited hNaV1.7 with a high level of selectivity over all other subtypes, except hNaV1.1. We showed that Hd1a is a gating modifier that inhibits hNaV1.7 by interacting with the S3b-S4 paddle motif in channel domain II. The structure of Hd1a, determined using heteronuclear NMR, contains an inhibitor cystine knot motif that is likely to confer high levels of chemical, thermal and biological stability. Conclusion and Implications Our data indicate that spider venoms are a rich natural source of hNaV1.7 inhibitors that might be useful leads for the development of novel analgesics. PMID:25754331

  6. Development of COS-SNP and HRM markers for high-throughput and reliable haplotype-based detection of Lr14a in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.).

    PubMed

    Terracciano, Irma; Maccaferri, Marco; Bassi, Filippo; Mantovani, Paola; Sanguineti, Maria C; Salvi, Silvio; Simková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Massi, Andrea; Ammar, Karim; Kolmer, James; Tuberosa, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    Leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks. & Henn.) is a major disease affecting durum wheat production. The Lr14a-resistant gene present in the durum wheat cv. Creso and its derivative cv. Colosseo is one of the best characterized leaf-rust resistance sources deployed in durum wheat breeding. Lr14a has been mapped close to the simple sequence repeat markers gwm146, gwm344 and wmc10 in the distal portion of the chromosome arm 7BL, a gene-dense region. The objectives of this study were: (1) to enrich the Lr14a region with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and high-resolution melting (HRM)-based markers developed from conserved ortholog set (COS) genes and from sequenced Diversity Array Technology (DArT(®)) markers; (2) to further investigate the gene content and colinearity of this region with the Brachypodium and rice genomes. Ten new COS-SNP and five HRM markers were mapped within an 8.0 cM interval spanning Lr14a. Two HRM markers pinpointed the locus in an interval of <1.0 cM and eight COS-SNPs were mapped 2.1-4.1 cM distal to Lr14a. Each marker was tested for its capacity to predict the state of Lr14a alleles (in particular, Lr14-Creso associated to resistance) in a panel of durum wheat elite germplasm including 164 accessions. Two of the most informative markers were converted into KASPar(®) markers. Single assay markers ubw14 and wPt-4038-HRM designed for agarose gel electrophoresis/KASPar(®) assays and high-resolution melting analysis, respectively, as well as the double-marker combinations ubw14/ubw18, ubw14/ubw35 and wPt-4038-HRM-ubw35 will be useful for germplasm haplotyping and for molecular-assisted breeding.

  7. Genome-wide generation and use of informative intron-spanning and intron-length polymorphism markers for high-throughput genetic analysis in rice

    PubMed Central

    Badoni, Saurabh; Das, Sweta; Sayal, Yogesh K.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Singh, Ashok K.; Rao, Atmakuri R.; Agarwal, Pinky; Parida, Swarup K.; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.

    2016-01-01

    We developed genome-wide 84634 ISM (intron-spanning marker) and 16510 InDel-fragment length polymorphism-based ILP (intron-length polymorphism) markers from genes physically mapped on 12 rice chromosomes. These genic markers revealed much higher amplification-efficiency (80%) and polymorphic-potential (66%) among rice accessions even by a cost-effective agarose gel-based assay. A wider level of functional molecular diversity (17–79%) and well-defined precise admixed genetic structure was assayed by 3052 genome-wide markers in a structured population of indica, japonica, aromatic and wild rice. Six major grain weight QTLs (11.9–21.6% phenotypic variation explained) were mapped on five rice chromosomes of a high-density (inter-marker distance: 0.98 cM) genetic linkage map (IR 64 x Sonasal) anchored with 2785 known/candidate gene-derived ISM and ILP markers. The designing of multiple ISM and ILP markers (2 to 4 markers/gene) in an individual gene will broaden the user-preference to select suitable primer combination for efficient assaying of functional allelic variation/diversity and realistic estimation of differential gene expression profiles among rice accessions. The genomic information generated in our study is made publicly accessible through a user-friendly web-resource, “Oryza ISM-ILP marker” database. The known/candidate gene-derived ISM and ILP markers can be enormously deployed to identify functionally relevant trait-associated molecular tags by optimal-resource expenses, leading towards genomics-assisted crop improvement in rice. PMID:27032371

  8. Applications of ambient mass spectrometry in high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Ping; Feng, Bao-Sheng; Yang, Jian-Wang; Chang, Cui-Lan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Hu-Wei

    2013-06-07

    The development of rapid screening and identification techniques is of great importance for drug discovery, doping control, forensic identification, food safety and quality control. Ambient mass spectrometry (AMS) allows rapid and direct analysis of various samples in open air with little sample preparation. Recently, its applications in high-throughput screening have been in rapid progress. During the past decade, various ambient ionization techniques have been developed and applied in high-throughput screening. This review discusses typical applications of AMS, including DESI (desorption electrospray ionization), DART (direct analysis in real time), EESI (extractive electrospray ionization), etc., in high-throughput screening (HTS).

  9. Development of a Low-cost and High-throughput Polyacrylamide Gel System for Peanut Genotyping with Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Markers.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditionally, peanut cultivar development has been dominated by conventional breeding methods, which have greatly increased yield and will continue to play an important role in peanut genetic improvement. Applications of MAS (marker-assisted selection) in plant breeding have been shown to increase ...

  10. Development of a Low-cost and High-throughput Polyacrylamide Gel System for Peanut Genotyping with Simple Sequence repeat (SSR) Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditionally, peanut cultivar development has been dominated by conventional breeding methods, which have greatly increased yield and will continue to play an important role in peanut genetic improvement. Applications of MAS (marker-assisted selection) in plant breeding have been shown to increase ...

  11. High-throughput development of SSR markers from pea (Pisum sativum L.) based on next generation sequencing of a purified Chinese commercial variety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important food legume globally, and is the plant species that J.G. Mendel used to lay the foundation of modern genetics. However, genomics resources of pea are limited comparing to other crop species. Application of marker assisted selection (MAS) in pea breeding has lag...

  12. High-Throughput Development of SSR Markers from Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Based on Next Generation Sequencing of a Purified Chinese Commercial Variety

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Hu, Jinguo; Bao, Shiying; Hao, Junjie; Li, Ling; He, Yuhua; Jiang, Junye; Wang, Fang; Tian, Shufang; Zong, Xuxiao

    2015-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important food legume globally, and is the plant species that J.G. Mendel used to lay the foundation of modern genetics. However, genomics resources of pea are limited comparing to other crop species. Application of marker assisted selection (MAS) in pea breeding has lagged behind many other crops. Development of a large number of novel and reliable SSR (simple sequence repeat) or microsatellite markers will help both basic and applied genomics research of this crop. The Illumina HiSeq 2500 System was used to uncover 8,899 putative SSR containing sequences, and 3,275 non-redundant primers were designed to amplify these SSRs. Among the 1,644 SSRs that were randomly selected for primer validation, 841 yielded reliable amplifications of detectable polymorphisms among 24 genotypes of cultivated pea (Pisum sativum L.) and wild relatives (P. fulvum Sm.) originated from diverse geographical locations. The dataset indicated that the allele number per locus ranged from 2 to 10, and that the polymorphism information content (PIC) ranged from 0.08 to 0.82 with an average of 0.38. These 1,644 novel SSR markers were also tested for polymorphism between genotypes G0003973 and G0005527. Finally, 33 polymorphic SSR markers were anchored on the genetic linkage map of G0003973 × G0005527 F2 population. PMID:26440522

  13. Telomerase as a prognostic marker in breast cancer: high-throughput tissue microarray analysis of hTERT and hTR.

    PubMed

    Poremba, Christopher; Heine, Bernhard; Diallo, Raihanatou; Heinecke, Achim; Wai, Daniel; Schaefer, Karl-Ludwig; Braun, Yvonne; Schuck, Andreas; Lanvers, Claudia; Bànkfalvi, Agnes; Kneif, Sören; Torhorst, Joachim; Zuber, Markus; Köchli, Ossi R; Mross, Frank; Dieterich, Holger; Sauter, Guido; Stein, Harald; Fogt, Franz; Boecker, Werner

    2002-10-01

    Telomerase activity (TA) has been shown to correlate with poor clinical outcome in various tumour entities, indicating that tumours expressing this enzyme may be more aggressive and that TA may be a useful prognostic marker. For breast cancer, however, TA is a controversial prognostic marker; whereas some studies suggest an association between TA and disease outcome, others do not find this association. This study used tissue microarrays (breast carcinoma prognosis arrays) containing 611 samples (each 0.6 mm in diameter) from the tumour centre of paraffin-embedded breast carcinomas to analyse the catalytic subunit of telomerase, human telomerase reverse-transcriptase (hTERT), and the internal RNA component (hTR), which are the core components of the telomerase holoenzyme complex. hTERT protein expression was obtained by immunohistochemistry (human anti-telomerase antibody Ab-2, Calbiochem), and hTR RNA was measured by radioactive in situ hybridization. hTERT and hTR expression were determined semi-quantitatively and graded (scores 1-4). Clinical data, such as histological subtype, pT stage, tumour diameter, pN stage, BRE grade, tumour-specific survival (in months), patient's age and others, were available for statistical analysis. A statistically significant correlation was found between tumour-specific survival (overall survival) and hTERT expression (p < 0.0001) or hTR expression (p = 0.00110). Tumours with higher scores (scores 3, 4) for hTR and/or hTERT were associated with a worse prognosis. In multivariate analysis, hTERT expression was an independent prognostic factor. Previous studies, focusing on analysis of TA in smaller numbers of fresh-frozen breast carcinomas by the TRAP assay, gave controversial results with respect to TA as a prognostic marker. Using tissue microarrays from 611 breast carcinomas, this study has demonstrated that increased expression levels of the telomerase core components, hTERT and hTR, are associated with lower overall survival

  14. Automated High Throughput Drug Target Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Rupp, B

    2005-02-18

    The molecular structures of drug target proteins and receptors form the basis for 'rational' or structure guided drug design. The majority of target structures are experimentally determined by protein X-ray crystallography, which as evolved into a highly automated, high throughput drug discovery and screening tool. Process automation has accelerated tasks from parallel protein expression, fully automated crystallization, and rapid data collection to highly efficient structure determination methods. A thoroughly designed automation technology platform supported by a powerful informatics infrastructure forms the basis for optimal workflow implementation and the data mining and analysis tools to generate new leads from experimental protein drug target structures.

  15. Emerging concepts in biomarker discovery; the US-Japan Workshop on Immunological Molecular Markers in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Hideaki; Sato, Marimo; Thurin, Magdalena; Wang, Ena; Butterfield, Lisa H; Disis, Mary L; Fox, Bernard A; Lee, Peter P; Khleif, Samir N; Wigginton, Jon M; Ambs, Stefan; Akutsu, Yasunori; Chaussabel, Damien; Doki, Yuichiro; Eremin, Oleg; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Imai, Kohzoh; Jacobson, James; Jinushi, Masahisa; Kanamoto, Akira; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed; Kato, Kazunori; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kirkwood, John M; Kleen, Thomas O; Lehmann, Paul V; Liotta, Lance; Lotze, Michael T; Maio, Michele; Malyguine, Anatoli; Masucci, Giuseppe; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Mayrand-Chung, Shawmarie; Nakamura, Kiminori; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Palucka, A Karolina; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Pos, Zoltan; Ribas, Antoni; Rivoltini, Licia; Sato, Noriyuki; Shiku, Hiroshi; Slingluff, Craig L; Streicher, Howard; Stroncek, David F; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Toyota, Minoru; Wada, Hisashi; Wu, Xifeng; Wulfkuhle, Julia; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Zeskind, Benjamin; Zhao, Yingdong; Zocca, Mai-Britt; Marincola, Francesco M

    2009-06-17

    might be added to the list of known entities applicable in immunotherapy trials. The need for a systematic approach to biomarker discovery that takes advantage of powerful high-throughput technologies was recognized; it was clear from the current state of the science that immunotherapy is still in a discovery phase and only a few of the current biomarkers warrant extensive validation. It was, finally, clear that, while current technologies have almost limitless potential, inadequate study design, limited standardization and cross-validation among laboratories and suboptimal comparability of data remain major road blocks. The institution of an interactive consortium for high throughput molecular monitoring of clinical trials with voluntary participation might provide cost-effective solutions.

  16. Emerging concepts in biomarker discovery; The US-Japan workshop on immunological molecular markers in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Hideaki; Sato, Marimo; Thurin, Magdalena; Wang, Ena; Butterfield, Lisa H; Disis, Mary L; Fox, Bernard A; Lee, Peter P; Khleif, Samir N; Wigginton, Jon M; Ambs, Stefan; Akutsu, Yasunori; Chaussabel, Damien; Doki, Yuichiro; Eremin, Oleg; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Imai, Kohzoh; Jacobson, James; Jinushi, Masahisa; Kanamoto, Akira; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed; Kato, Kazunori; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kirkwood, John M; Kleen, Thomas O; Lehmann, Paul V; Liotta, Lance; Lotze, Michael T; Maio, Michele; Malyguine, Anatoli; Masucci, Giuseppe; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Mayrand-Chung, Shawmarie; Nakamura, Kiminori; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Palucka, A Karolina; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Pos, Zoltan; Ribas, Antoni; Rivoltini, Licia; Sato, Noriyuki; Shiku, Hiroshi; Slingluff, Craig L; Streicher, Howard; Stroncek, David F; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Toyota, Minoru; Wada, Hisashi; Wu, Xifeng; Wulfkuhle, Julia; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Zeskind, Benjamin; Zhao, Yingdong; Zocca, Mai-Britt; Marincola, Francesco M

    2009-01-01

    might be added to the list of known entities applicable in immunotherapy trials. The need for a systematic approach to biomarker discovery that takes advantage of powerful high-throughput technologies was recognized; it was clear from the current state of the science that immunotherapy is still in a discovery phase and only a few of the current biomarkers warrant extensive validation. It was, finally, clear that, while current technologies have almost limitless potential, inadequate study design, limited standardization and cross-validation among laboratories and suboptimal comparability of data remain major road blocks. The institution of an interactive consortium for high throughput molecular monitoring of clinical trials with voluntary participation might provide cost-effective solutions. PMID:19534815

  17. Development and Validation of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) Markers from Two Transcriptome 454-Runs of Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) Using High-Throughput Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Vera, Manuel; Alvarez-Dios, Jose-Antonio; Fernandez, Carlos; Bouza, Carmen; Vilas, Roman; Martinez, Paulino

    2013-03-12

    The turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) is a commercially valuable flatfish and one of the most promising aquaculture species in Europe. Two transcriptome 454-pyrosequencing runs were used in order to detect Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to immune response and gonad differentiation. A total of 866 true SNPs were detected in 140 different contigs representing 262,093 bp as a whole. Only one true SNP was analyzed in each contig. One hundred and thirteen SNPs out of the 140 analyzed were feasible (genotyped), while Ш were polymorphic in a wild population. Transition/transversion ratio (1.354) was similar to that observed in other fish studies. Unbiased gene diversity (He) estimates ranged from 0.060 to 0.510 (mean = 0.351), minimum allele frequency (MAF) from 0.030 to 0.500 (mean = 0.259) and all loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction. A large number of SNPs (49) were located in the coding region, 33 representing synonymous and 16 non-synonymous changes. Most SNP-containing genes were related to immune response and gonad differentiation processes, and could be candidates for functional changes leading to phenotypic changes. These markers will be useful for population screening to look for adaptive variation in wild and domestic turbot.

  18. Development and Validation of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) Markers from Two Transcriptome 454-Runs of Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) Using High-Throughput Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Vera, Manuel; Alvarez-Dios, Jose-Antonio; Fernandez, Carlos; Bouza, Carmen; Vilas, Roman; Martinez, Paulino

    2013-01-01

    The turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) is a commercially valuable flatfish and one of the most promising aquaculture species in Europe. Two transcriptome 454-pyrosequencing runs were used in order to detect Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to immune response and gonad differentiation. A total of 866 true SNPs were detected in 140 different contigs representing 262,093 bp as a whole. Only one true SNP was analyzed in each contig. One hundred and thirteen SNPs out of the 140 analyzed were feasible (genotyped), while III were polymorphic in a wild population. Transition/transversion ratio (1.354) was similar to that observed in other fish studies. Unbiased gene diversity (He) estimates ranged from 0.060 to 0.510 (mean = 0.351), minimum allele frequency (MAF) from 0.030 to 0.500 (mean = 0.259) and all loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction. A large number of SNPs (49) were located in the coding region, 33 representing synonymous and 16 non-synonymous changes. Most SNP-containing genes were related to immune response and gonad differentiation processes, and could be candidates for functional changes leading to phenotypic changes. These markers will be useful for population screening to look for adaptive variation in wild and domestic turbot. PMID:23481633

  19. Novel potential ALL low-risk markers revealed by gene expression profiling with new high-throughput SSH-CCS-PCR.

    PubMed

    Qiu, J; Gunaratne, P; Peterson, L E; Khurana, D; Walsham, N; Loulseged, H; Karni, R J; Roussel, E; Gibbs, R A; Margolin, J F; Gingras, M C

    2003-09-01

    The current systems of risk grouping in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) fail to predict therapeutic success in 10-35% of patients. To identify better predictive markers of clinical behavior in ALL, we have developed an integrated approach for gene expression profiling that couples suppression subtractive hybridization, concatenated cDNA sequencing, and reverse transcriptase real-time quantitative PCR. Using this approach, a total of 600 differentially expressed genes were identified between t(4;11) ALL and pre-B ALL with no determinant chromosomal translocation. The expression of 67 genes was analyzed in different cytogenetic ALL subgroups and B lymphocytes isolated from healthy donors. Three genes, BACH1, TP53BPL, and H2B/S, were consistently expressed as a significant cluster associated with the low-risk ALL subgroups. A total of 42 genes were differentially expressed in ALL vs normal B lymphocytes, with no specific association with any particular ALL subgroups. The remaining 22 genes were part of a specific expression profile associated with the hyperdiploid, t(12;21), or t(4;11) subgroups. Using an unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis, the discriminating power of these specific expression profiles allowed the clustering of patients according to their subgroups. These genes could help to understand the difference in treatment response and become therapeutical targets to improve ALL clinical outcomes.

  20. Toward High-Throughput Genotyping: Dynamic and Automatic Software for Manipulating Large-Scale Genotype Data Using Fluorescently Labeled Dinucleotide Markers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Long; Deng, Hongyi; Lai, Dong-Bing; Xu, Fuhua; Chen, Jian; Gao, Guimin; Recker, Robert R.; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2001-01-01

    To efficiently manipulate large amounts of genotype data generated with fluorescently labeled dinucleotide markers, we developed a Microsoft Access database management system, named GenoDB. GenoDB offers several advantages. First, it accommodates the dynamic nature of the accumulations of genotype data during the genotyping process; some data need to be confirmed or replaced by repeat lab procedures. By using GenoDB, the raw genotype data can be imported easily and continuously and incorporated into the database during the genotyping process that may continue over an extended period of time in large projects. Second, almost all of the procedures are automatic, including autocomparison of the raw data read by different technicians from the same gel, autoadjustment among the allele fragment-size data from cross-runs or cross-platforms, autobinning of alleles, and autocompilation of genotype data for suitable programs to perform inheritance check in pedigrees. Third, GenoDB provides functions to track electrophoresis gel files to locate gel or sample sources for any resultant genotype data, which is extremely helpful for double-checking consistency of raw and final data and for directing repeat experiments. In addition, the user-friendly graphic interface of GenoDB renders processing of large amounts of data much less labor-intensive. Furthermore, GenoDB has built-in mechanisms to detect some genotyping errors and to assess the quality of genotype data that then are summarized in the statistic reports automatically generated by GenoDB. The GenoDB can easily handle >500,000 genotype data entries, a number more than sufficient for typical whole-genome linkage studies. The modules and programs we developed for the GenoDB can be extended to other database platforms, such as Microsoft SQL server, if the capability to handle still greater quantities of genotype data simultaneously is desired. PMID:11435414

  1. SNP marker discovery in koala TLR genes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Frankham, Greta J; Johnson, Rebecca N; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter; O'Meally, Denis; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in the early defence against invading pathogens, yet our understanding of TLRs in marsupial immunity is limited. Here, we describe the characterisation of nine TLRs from a koala immune tissue transcriptome and one TLR from a draft sequence of the koala genome and the subsequent development of an assay to study genetic diversity in these genes. We surveyed genetic diversity in 20 koalas from New South Wales, Australia and showed that one gene, TLR10 is monomorphic, while the other nine TLR genes have between two and 12 alleles. 40 SNPs (16 non-synonymous) were identified across the ten TLR genes. These markers provide a springboard to future studies on innate immunity in the koala, a species under threat from two major infectious diseases.

  2. Origin and evolution of high throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, D A; Williams, J A

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the origin and evolution of high throughput screening (HTS) through the experience of an individual pharmaceutical company, revealing some of the mysteries of the early stages of drug discovery to the wider pharmacology audience. HTS in this company (Pfizer, Groton, USA) had its origin in natural products screening in 1986, by substituting fermentation broths with dimethyl sulphoxide solutions of synthetic compounds, using 96-well plates and reduced assay volumes of 50-100μl. A nominal 30mM source compound concentration provided high μM assay concentrations. Starting at 800 compounds each week, the process reached a steady state of 7200 compounds per week by 1989. Screening in the Applied Biotechnology and Screening Group was centralized with screens operating in lock-step to maximize efficiency. Initial screens were full files run in triplicate. Autoradiography and image analysis were introduced for 125I receptor ligand screens. Reverse transcriptase (RT) coupled with quantitative PCR and multiplexing addressed several targets in a single assay. By 1992 HTS produced ‘hits' as starting matter for approximately 40% of the Discovery portfolio. In 1995, the HTS methodology was expanded to include ADMET targets. ADME targets required each compound to be physically detected leading to the development of automated high throughput LC-MS. In 1996, 90 compounds/week were screened in microsomal, protein binding and serum stability assays. Subsequently, the mutagenic Ames assay was adapted to a 96-well plate liquid assay and novel algorithms permitted automated image analysis of the micronucleus assay. By 1999 ADME HTS was fully integrated into the discovery cycle. PMID:17603542

  3. High throughput protein production screening

    DOEpatents

    Beernink, Peter T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Segelke, Brent W.

    2009-09-08

    Methods, compositions, and kits for the cell-free production and analysis of proteins are provided. The invention allows for the production of proteins from prokaryotic sequences or eukaryotic sequences, including human cDNAs using PCR and IVT methods and detecting the proteins through fluorescence or immunoblot techniques. This invention can be used to identify optimized PCR and WT conditions, codon usages and mutations. The methods are readily automated and can be used for high throughput analysis of protein expression levels, interactions, and functional states.

  4. High-Throughput Sequencing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Jason A.; Spacek, Damek; Snyder, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The human genome sequence has profoundly altered our understanding of biology, human diversity and disease. The path from the first draft sequence to our nascent era of personal genomes and genomic medicine has been made possible only because of the extraordinary advancements in DNA sequencing technologies over the past ten years. Here, we discuss commonly used high-throughput sequencing platforms, the growing array of sequencing assays developed around them as well as the challenges facing current sequencing platforms and their clinical application. PMID:26000844

  5. High-throughput screening for modulators of cellular contractile force†

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Young; Zhou, Enhua H.; Tambe, Dhananjay; Chen, Bohao; Lavoie, Tera; Dowell, Maria; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J.; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Burger, Stephanie; Frykenberg, Matthew; Butler, James P.; Stamer, W. Daniel; Johnson, Mark; Solway, Julian; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    When cellular contractile forces are central to pathophysiology, these forces comprise a logical target of therapy. Nevertheless, existing high-throughput screens are limited to upstream signalling intermediates with poorly defined relationships to such a physiological endpoint. Using cellular force as the target, here we report a new screening technology and demonstrate its applications using human airway smooth muscle cells in the context of asthma and Schlemm's canal endothelial cells in the context of glaucoma. This approach identified several drug candidates for both asthma and glaucoma. We attained rates of 1000 compounds per screening day, thus establishing a force-based cellular platform for high-throughput drug discovery. PMID:25953078

  6. De Novo Transcriptome Assembly of the Chinese Swamp Buffalo by RNA Sequencing and SSR Marker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xingrong; Zhu, Peng; Duan, Anqin; Tan, Zhengzhun; Huang, Jian; Li, Hui; Chen, Mingtan; Liang, Xianwei

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese swamp buffalo (Bubalis bubalis) is vital to the lives of small farmers and has tremendous economic importance. However, a lack of genomic information has hampered research on augmenting marker assisted breeding programs in this species. Thus, a high-throughput transcriptomic sequencing of B. bubalis was conducted to generate transcriptomic sequence dataset for gene discovery and molecular marker development. Illumina paired-end sequencing generated a total of 54,109,173 raw reads. After trimming, de novo assembly was performed, which yielded 86,017 unigenes, with an average length of 972.41 bp, an N50 of 1,505 bp, and an average GC content of 49.92%. A total of 62,337 unigenes were successfully annotated. Among the annotated unigenes, 27,025 (43.35%) and 23,232 (37.27%) unigenes showed significant similarity to known proteins in NCBI non-redundant protein and Swiss-Prot databases (E-value < 1.0E-5), respectively. Of these annotated unigenes, 14,439 and 15,813 unigenes were assigned to the Gene Ontology (GO) categories and EuKaryotic Ortholog Group (KOG) cluster, respectively. In addition, a total of 14,167 unigenes were assigned to 331 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. Furthermore, 17,401 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified as potential molecular markers. One hundred and fifteen primer pairs were randomly selected for amplification to detect polymorphisms. The results revealed that 110 primer pairs (95.65%) yielded PCR amplicons and 69 primer pairs (60.00%) presented polymorphisms in 35 individual buffaloes. A phylogenetic analysis showed that the five swamp buffalo populations were clustered together, whereas two river buffalo breeds clustered separately. In the present study, the Illumina RNA-seq technology was utilized to perform transcriptome analysis and SSR marker discovery in the swamp buffalo without using a reference genome. Our findings will enrich the current SSR markers resources and help spearhead molecular

  7. High-throughput genotyping of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) utilising diversity arrays technology (DArT).

    PubMed

    Howard, E L; Whittock, S P; Jakše, J; Carling, J; Matthews, P D; Probasco, G; Henning, J A; Darby, P; Cerenak, A; Javornik, B; Kilian, A; Koutoulis, A

    2011-05-01

    Implementation of molecular methods in hop (Humulus lupulus L.) breeding is dependent on the availability of sizeable numbers of polymorphic markers and a comprehensive understanding of genetic variation. However, use of molecular marker technology is limited due to expense, time inefficiency, laborious methodology and dependence on DNA sequence information. Diversity arrays technology (DArT) is a high-throughput cost-effective method for the discovery of large numbers of quality polymorphic markers without reliance on DNA sequence information. This study is the first to utilise DArT for hop genotyping, identifying 730 polymorphic markers from 92 hop accessions. The marker quality was high and similar to the quality of DArT markers previously generated for other species; although percentage polymorphism and polymorphism information content (PIC) were lower than in previous studies deploying other marker systems in hop. Genetic relationships in hop illustrated by DArT in this study coincide with knowledge generated using alternate methods. Several statistical analyses separated the hop accessions into genetically differentiated North American and European groupings, with hybrids between the two groups clearly distinguishable. Levels of genetic diversity were similar in the North American and European groups, but higher in the hybrid group. The markers produced from this time and cost-efficient genotyping tool will be a valuable resource for numerous applications in hop breeding and genetics studies, such as mapping, marker-assisted selection, genetic identity testing, guidance in the maintenance of genetic diversity and the directed breeding of superior cultivars.

  8. High-throughput electrophysiology with Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Papke, Roger L.; Smith-Maxwell, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-clamp techniques are typically used to study the plasma membrane proteins, such as ion channels and transporters that control bioelectrical signals. Many of these proteins have been cloned and can now be studied as potential targets for drug development. The two approaches most commonly used for heterologous expression of cloned ion channels and transporters involve either transfection of the genes into small cells grown in tissue culture or the injection of the genetic material into larger cells. The standard large cells used for the expression of cloned cDNA or synthetic RNA are the egg progenitor cells (oocytes) of the African frog, Xenopus laevis. Until recently, cellular electrophysiology was performed manually, one cell at a time by a single operator. However, methods of high-throughput electrophysiology have been developed which are automated and permit data acquisition and analysis from multiple cells in parallel. These methods are breaking a bottleneck in drug discovery, useful in some cases for primary screening as well as for thorough characterization of new drugs. Increasing throughput of high-quality functional data greatly augments the efficiency of academic research and pharmaceutical drug development. Some examples of studies that benefit most from high-throughput electrophysiology include pharmaceutical screening of targeted compound libraries, secondary screening of identified compounds for subtype selectivity, screening mutants of ligand-gated channels for changes in receptor function, scanning mutagenesis of protein segments, and mutant-cycle analysis. We describe here the main features and potential applications of OpusXpress, an efficient commercially available system for automated recording from Xenopus oocytes. We show some types of data that have been gathered by this system and review realized and potential applications. PMID:19149490

  9. High-throughput RAD-SNP genotyping for characterization of sugar beet genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-throughput SNP genotyping provides a rapid way of developing resourceful set of markers for delineating the genetic architecture and for effective species discrimination. In the presented research, we demonstrate a set of 192 SNPs for effective genotyping in sugar beet using high-throughput mar...

  10. High Throughput Plasma Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujovic, Selman; Foster, John

    2016-10-01

    The troublesome emergence of new classes of micro-pollutants, such as pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors, poses challenges for conventional water treatment systems. In an effort to address these contaminants and to support water reuse in drought stricken regions, new technologies must be introduced. The interaction of water with plasma rapidly mineralizes organics by inducing advanced oxidation in addition to other chemical, physical and radiative processes. The primary barrier to the implementation of plasma-based water treatment is process volume scale up. In this work, we investigate a potentially scalable, high throughput plasma water reactor that utilizes a packed bed dielectric barrier-like geometry to maximize the plasma-water interface. Here, the water serves as the dielectric medium. High-speed imaging and emission spectroscopy are used to characterize the reactor discharges. Changes in methylene blue concentration and basic water parameters are mapped as a function of plasma treatment time. Experimental results are compared to electrostatic and plasma chemistry computations, which will provide insight into the reactor's operation so that efficiency can be assessed. Supported by NSF (CBET 1336375).

  11. Upscaling of hiPS Cell-Derived Neurons for High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Traub, Stefanie; Stahl, Heiko; Rosenbrock, Holger; Simon, Eric; Heilker, Ralf

    2017-03-01

    The advent of human-induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell-derived neurons promised to provide better model cells for drug discovery in the context of the central nervous system. This work demonstrates both the upscaling of cellular expansion and the acceleration of neuronal differentiation to accommodate the immense material needs of a high-throughput screening (HTS) approach. Using GRowth factor-driven expansion and INhibition of NotCH (GRINCH) during maturation, the derived cells are here referred to as GRINCH neurons. GRINCH cells displayed neuronal markers, and their functional activity could be demonstrated by electrophysiological recordings. In an application of GRINCH neurons, the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-mediated activation of tropomyosin receptor kinase (TrkB) was investigated as a promising drug target to treat synaptic dysfunctions. To assess the phosphorylation of endogenous TrkB in the GRINCH cells, the highly sensitive amplified luminescent proximity homogeneous assay LISA (AlphaLISA) format was established as a primary screen. A high-throughput reverse transcription (RT)-PCR format was employed as a secondary assay to analyze TrkB-mediated downstream target gene expression. In summary, an optimized differentiation protocol, highly efficient cell upscaling, and advanced assay miniaturization, combined with increased detection sensitivity, pave the way for a new generation of predictive cell-based drug discovery.

  12. A System for Performing High Throughput Assays of Synaptic Function

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Chris M.; Sivula, Michael; Levenson, Jonathan M.; Rose, David M.; Li, Bing; Sirianni, Ana C.; Xia, Eva; Ryan, Timothy A.; Gerber, David J.; Cottrell, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Unbiased, high-throughput screening has proven invaluable for dissecting complex biological processes. Application of this general approach to synaptic function would have a major impact on neuroscience research and drug discovery. However, existing techniques for studying synaptic physiology are labor intensive and low-throughput. Here, we describe a new high-throughput technology for performing assays of synaptic function in primary neurons cultured in microtiter plates. We show that this system can perform 96 synaptic vesicle cycling assays in parallel with high sensitivity, precision, uniformity, and reproducibility and can detect modulators of presynaptic function. By screening libraries of pharmacologically defined compounds on rat forebrain cultures, we have used this system to identify novel effects of compounds on specific aspects of presynaptic function. As a system for unbiased compound as well as genomic screening, this technology has significant applications for basic neuroscience research and for the discovery of novel, mechanism-based treatments for central nervous system disorders. PMID:21998743

  13. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-06-09

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery.

  14. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. PMID:27294925

  15. The Utilization of Formalin Fixed-Paraffin-Embedded Specimens in High Throughput Genomic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pan

    2017-01-01

    High throughput genomic assays empower us to study the entire human genome in short time with reasonable cost. Formalin fixed-paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue processing remains the most economical approach for longitudinal tissue specimen storage. Therefore, the ability to apply high throughput genomic applications to FFPE specimens can expand clinical assays and discovery. Many studies have measured the accuracy and repeatability of data generated from FFPE specimens using high throughput genomic assays. Together, these studies demonstrate feasibility and provide crucial guidance for future studies using FFPE specimens. Here, we summarize the findings of these studies and discuss the limitations of high throughput data generated from FFPE specimens across several platforms that include microarray, high throughput sequencing, and NanoString. PMID:28246590

  16. Fluorescent biosensors for high throughput screening of protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Van, Thi Nhu Ngoc; Morris, May C

    2014-02-01

    High throughput screening assays aim to identify small molecules that interfere with protein function, activity, or conformation, which can serve as effective tools for chemical biology studies of targets involved in physiological processes or pathways of interest or disease models, as well as templates for development of therapeutics in medicinal chemistry. Fluorescent biosensors constitute attractive and powerful tools for drug discovery programs, from high throughput screening assays, to postscreen characterization of hits, optimization of lead compounds, and preclinical evaluation of candidate drugs. They provide a means of screening for inhibitors that selectively target enzymatic activity, conformation, and/or function in vitro. Moreover, fluorescent biosensors constitute useful tools for cell- and image-based, multiplex and multiparametric, high-content screening. Application of fluorescence-based sensors to screen large and complex libraries of compounds in vitro, in cell-based formats or whole organisms requires several levels of optimization to establish robust and reproducible assays. In this review, we describe the different fluorescent biosensor technologies which have been applied to high throughput screens, and discuss the prerequisite criteria underlying their successful application. Special emphasis is placed on protein kinase biosensors, since these enzymes constitute one of the most important classes of therapeutic targets in drug discovery.

  17. High-throughput theoretical design of lithium battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Gang, Ling; Jian, Gao; Rui-Juan, Xiao; Li-Quan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The rapid evolution of high-throughput theoretical design schemes to discover new lithium battery materials is reviewed, including high-capacity cathodes, low-strain cathodes, anodes, solid state electrolytes, and electrolyte additives. With the development of efficient theoretical methods and inexpensive computers, high-throughput theoretical calculations have played an increasingly important role in the discovery of new materials. With the help of automatic simulation flow, many types of materials can be screened, optimized and designed from a structural database according to specific search criteria. In advanced cell technology, new materials for next generation lithium batteries are of great significance to achieve performance, and some representative criteria are: higher energy density, better safety, and faster charge/discharge speed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11234013 and 51172274) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA034201).

  18. Direct assembling methodologies for high-throughput bioscreening

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Dévora, Jorge I.; Shi, Zhi-dong; Xu, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few decades, high-throughput (HT) bioscreening, a technique that allows rapid screening of biochemical compound libraries against biological targets, has been widely used in drug discovery, stem cell research, development of new biomaterials, and genomics research. To achieve these ambitions, scaffold-free (or direct) assembly of biological entities of interest has become critical. Appropriate assembling methodologies are required to build an efficient HT bioscreening platform. The development of contact and non-contact assembling systems as a practical solution has been driven by a variety of essential attributes of the bioscreening system, such as miniaturization, high throughput, and high precision. The present article reviews recent progress on these assembling technologies utilized for the construction of HT bioscreening platforms. PMID:22021162

  19. Semiautomated Alignment of High-Throughput Metabolite Profiles with Chemometric Tools

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zi-dan; Liang, Yi-zeng; Chau, Foo-tim; Chan, Hoi-yan

    2017-01-01

    The rapid increase in the use of metabolite profiling/fingerprinting techniques to resolve complicated issues in metabolomics has stimulated demand for data processing techniques, such as alignment, to extract detailed information. In this study, a new and automated method was developed to correct the retention time shift of high-dimensional and high-throughput data sets. Information from the target chromatographic profiles was used to determine the standard profile as a reference for alignment. A novel, piecewise data partition strategy was applied for the determination of the target components in the standard profile as markers for alignment. An automated target search (ATS) method was proposed to find the exact retention times of the selected targets in other profiles for alignment. The linear interpolation technique (LIT) was employed to align the profiles prior to pattern recognition, comprehensive comparison analysis, and other data processing steps. In total, 94 metabolite profiles of ginseng were studied, including the most volatile secondary metabolites. The method used in this article could be an essential step in the extraction of information from high-throughput data acquired in the study of systems biology, metabolomics, and biomarker discovery. PMID:28168083

  20. [Current applications of high-throughput DNA sequencing technology in antibody drug research].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Liu, Qi-Gang; Wang, Ming-Rong

    2012-03-01

    Since the publication of a high-throughput DNA sequencing technology based on PCR reaction was carried out in oil emulsions in 2005, high-throughput DNA sequencing platforms have been evolved to a robust technology in sequencing genomes and diverse DNA libraries. Antibody libraries with vast numbers of members currently serve as a foundation of discovering novel antibody drugs, and high-throughput DNA sequencing technology makes it possible to rapidly identify functional antibody variants with desired properties. Herein we present a review of current applications of high-throughput DNA sequencing technology in the analysis of antibody library diversity, sequencing of CDR3 regions, identification of potent antibodies based on sequence frequency, discovery of functional genes, and combination with various display technologies, so as to provide an alternative approach of discovery and development of antibody drugs.

  1. Discriminative motif analysis of high-throughput dataset

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zizhen; MacQuarrie, Kyle L.; Fong, Abraham P.; Tapscott, Stephen J.; Ruzzo, Walter L.; Gentleman, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: High-throughput ChIP-seq studies typically identify thousands of peaks for a single transcription factor (TF). It is common for traditional motif discovery tools to predict motifs that are statistically significant against a naïve background distribution but are of questionable biological relevance. Results: We describe a simple yet effective algorithm for discovering differential motifs between two sequence datasets that is effective in eliminating systematic biases and scalable to large datasets. Tested on 207 ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets, our method identifies correct motifs in 78% of the datasets with known motifs, demonstrating improvement in both accuracy and efficiency compared with DREME, another state-of-art discriminative motif discovery tool. More interestingly, on the remaining more challenging datasets, we identify common technical or biological factors that compromise the motif search results and use advanced features of our tool to control for these factors. We also present case studies demonstrating the ability of our method to detect single base pair differences in DNA specificity of two similar TFs. Lastly, we demonstrate discovery of key TF motifs involved in tissue specification by examination of high-throughput DNase accessibility data. Availability: The motifRG package is publically available via the bioconductor repository. Contact: yzizhen@fhcrc.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24162561

  2. discomark: nuclear marker discovery from orthologous sequences using draft genome data.

    PubMed

    Rutschmann, Sereina; Detering, Harald; Simon, Sabrina; Fredslund, Jakob; Monaghan, Michael T

    2017-03-01

    High-throughput sequencing has laid the foundation for fast and cost-effective development of phylogenetic markers. Here we present the program discomark, which streamlines the development of nuclear DNA (nDNA) markers from whole-genome (or whole-transcriptome) sequencing data, combining local alignment, alignment trimming, reference mapping and primer design based on multiple sequence alignments to design primer pairs from input orthologous sequences. To demonstrate the suitability of discomark, we designed markers for two groups of species, one consisting of closely related species and one group of distantly related species. For the closely related members of the species complex of Cloeon dipterum s.l. (Insecta, Ephemeroptera), the program discovered a total of 78 markers. Among these, we selected eight markers for amplification and Sanger sequencing. The exon sequence alignments (2526 base pairs) were used to reconstruct a well-supported phylogeny and to infer clearly structured haplotype networks. For the distantly related species, we designed primers for the insect order Ephemeroptera, using available genomic data from four sequenced species. We developed primer pairs for 23 markers that are designed to amplify across several families. The discomark program will enhance the development of new nDNA markers by providing a streamlined, automated approach to perform genome-scale scans for phylogenetic markers. The program is written in Python, released under a public licence (GNU GPL version 2), and together with a manual and example data set available at: https://github.com/hdetering/discomark.

  3. Image-Based 384-Well High-Throughput Screening Method for the Discovery of Skyllamycins A to C as Biofilm Inhibitors and Inducers of Biofilm Detachment in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Gabriel; Cheng, Andrew T.; Peach, Kelly C.; Bray, Walter M.; Bernan, Valerie S.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2014-01-01

    To date, most antibiotics have primarily been developed to target bacteria in the planktonic state. However, biofilm formation allows bacteria to develop tolerance to antibiotics and provides a mechanism to evade innate immune systems. Therefore, there is a significant need to identify small molecules to prevent biofilm formation and, more importantly, to disperse or eradicate preattached biofilms, which are a major source of bacterial persistence in nosocomial infections. We now present a modular high-throughput 384-well image-based screening platform to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm inhibitors and dispersal agents. Biofilm coverage measurements were accomplished using non-z-stack epifluorescence microscopy to image a constitutively expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged strain of P. aeruginosa and quantified using an automated image analysis script. Using the redox-sensitive dye XTT, bacterial cellular metabolic activity was measured in conjunction with biofilm coverage to differentiate between classical antibiotics and nonantibiotic biofilm inhibitors/dispersers. By measuring biofilm coverage and cellular activity, this screen identifies compounds that eradicate biofilms through mechanisms that are disparate from traditional antibiotic-mediated biofilm clearance. Screening of 312 natural-product prefractions identified the cyclic depsipeptide natural products skyllamycins B and C as nonantibiotic biofilm inhibitors with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 30 and 60 μM, respectively. Codosing experiments of skyllamycin B and azithromycin, an antibiotic unable to clear preattached biofilms, demonstrated that, in combination, these compounds were able to eliminate surface-associated biofilms and depress cellular metabolic activity. The skyllamycins represent the first known class of cyclic depsipeptide biofilm inhibitors/dispersers. PMID:24295976

  4. Image-based 384-well high-throughput screening method for the discovery of skyllamycins A to C as biofilm inhibitors and inducers of biofilm detachment in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Gabriel; Cheng, Andrew T; Peach, Kelly C; Bray, Walter M; Bernan, Valerie S; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Linington, Roger G

    2014-01-01

    To date, most antibiotics have primarily been developed to target bacteria in the planktonic state. However, biofilm formation allows bacteria to develop tolerance to antibiotics and provides a mechanism to evade innate immune systems. Therefore, there is a significant need to identify small molecules to prevent biofilm formation and, more importantly, to disperse or eradicate preattached biofilms, which are a major source of bacterial persistence in nosocomial infections. We now present a modular high-throughput 384-well image-based screening platform to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm inhibitors and dispersal agents. Biofilm coverage measurements were accomplished using non-z-stack epifluorescence microscopy to image a constitutively expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged strain of P. aeruginosa and quantified using an automated image analysis script. Using the redox-sensitive dye XTT, bacterial cellular metabolic activity was measured in conjunction with biofilm coverage to differentiate between classical antibiotics and nonantibiotic biofilm inhibitors/dispersers. By measuring biofilm coverage and cellular activity, this screen identifies compounds that eradicate biofilms through mechanisms that are disparate from traditional antibiotic-mediated biofilm clearance. Screening of 312 natural-product prefractions identified the cyclic depsipeptide natural products skyllamycins B and C as nonantibiotic biofilm inhibitors with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 30 and 60 μM, respectively. Codosing experiments of skyllamycin B and azithromycin, an antibiotic unable to clear preattached biofilms, demonstrated that, in combination, these compounds were able to eliminate surface-associated biofilms and depress cellular metabolic activity. The skyllamycins represent the first known class of cyclic depsipeptide biofilm inhibitors/dispersers.

  5. High-Throughput Industrial Coatings Research at The Dow Chemical Company.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tzu-Chi; Malvadkar, Niranjan A; Drumright, Ray; Cesaretti, Richard; Bishop, Matthew T

    2016-09-12

    At The Dow Chemical Company, high-throughput research is an active area for developing new industrial coatings products. Using the principles of automation (i.e., using robotic instruments), parallel processing (i.e., prepare, process, and evaluate samples in parallel), and miniaturization (i.e., reduce sample size), high-throughput tools for synthesizing, formulating, and applying coating compositions have been developed at Dow. In addition, high-throughput workflows for measuring various coating properties, such as cure speed, hardness development, scratch resistance, impact toughness, resin compatibility, pot-life, surface defects, among others have also been developed in-house. These workflows correlate well with the traditional coatings tests, but they do not necessarily mimic those tests. The use of such high-throughput workflows in combination with smart experimental designs allows accelerated discovery and commercialization.

  6. High-throughput computing in the sciences.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Mark; Grimshaw, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    While it is true that the modern computer is many orders of magnitude faster than that of yesteryear; this tremendous growth in CPU clock rates is now over. Unfortunately, however, the growth in demand for computational power has not abated; whereas researchers a decade ago could simply wait for computers to get faster, today the only solution to the growing need for more powerful computational resource lies in the exploitation of parallelism. Software parallelization falls generally into two broad categories--"true parallel" and high-throughput computing. This chapter focuses on the latter of these two types of parallelism. With high-throughput computing, users can run many copies of their software at the same time across many different computers. This technique for achieving parallelism is powerful in its ability to provide high degrees of parallelism, yet simple in its conceptual implementation. This chapter covers various patterns of high-throughput computing usage and the skills and techniques necessary to take full advantage of them. By utilizing numerous examples and sample codes and scripts, we hope to provide the reader not only with a deeper understanding of the principles behind high-throughput computing, but also with a set of tools and references that will prove invaluable as she explores software parallelism with her own software applications and research.

  7. Combined Measurement of 6 Fat-Soluble Vitamins and 26 Water-Soluble Functional Vitamin Markers and Amino Acids in 50 μL of Serum or Plasma by High-Throughput Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Midttun, Øivind; McCann, Adrian; Aarseth, Ove; Krokeide, Marit; Kvalheim, Gry; Meyer, Klaus; Ueland, Per M

    2016-11-01

    Targeted metabolic profiling characterized by complementary platforms, multiplexing and low volume consumption are increasingly used for studies using biobank material. Using liquid-liquid extraction, we developed a sample workup suitable for quantification of 6 fat- and 26 water-soluble biomarkers. 50 μL of serum/plasma was mixed with dithioerythritol, ethanol, and isooctane/chloroform. The organic layer was used for analysis of the fat-soluble vitamins all-trans retinol (A), 25-hydroxyvitamin D2, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, α-tocopherol (E), γ-tocopherol (E), and phylloquinone (K1) by LC-MS/MS. The remaining aqueous fraction was mixed with ethanol, water, pyridine, and methylchloroformate (in toluene) to derivatize the water-soluble biomarkers. The resulting toluene layer was used for GC-MS/MS analysis of alanine, α-ketoglutarate, asparagine, aspartic acid, cystathionine, total cysteine, glutamic acid, glutamine, glycine, histidine, total homocysteine, isoleucine, kynurenine, leucine, lysine, methionine, methylmalonic acid, ornithine, phenylalanine, proline, sarcosine, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, and valine. Isotope-labeled internal standards were used for all analytes. Chromatographic run times for the LC-MS/MS and GC-MS/MS were 4.5 and 11 min, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) for the low-concentration analytes (25-hydroxyvitamin D2, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, and phylloquinone) were 25, 17, and 0.33 nM, respectively, while all other analytes demonstrated sensitivity significantly lower than endogenous concentrations. Recoveries ranged from 85.5-109.9% and within- and between-day coefficients of variance (CVs) were 0.7-9.4% and 1.1-17.5%, respectively. This low-volume, high-throughput multianalyte assay is currently in use in our laboratory for quantification of 32 serum/plasma biomarkers in epidemiological studies.

  8. Implementation of an Automated High-Throughput Plasmid DNA Production Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Billeci, Karen; Suh, Christopher; Di Ioia, Tina; Singh, Lovejit; Abraham, Ryan; Baldwin, Anne; Monteclaro, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    Biologics sample management facilities are often responsible for a diversity of large-molecule reagent types, such as DNA, RNAi, and protein libraries. Historically, the management of large molecules was dispersed into multiple laboratories. As methodologies to support pathway discovery, antibody discovery, and protein production have become high throughput, the implementation of automation and centralized inventory management tools has become important. To this end, to improve sample tracking, throughput, and accuracy, we have implemented a module-based automation system integrated into inventory management software using multiple platforms (Hamilton, Hudson, Dynamic Devices, and Brooks). Here we describe the implementation of these systems with a focus on high-throughput plasmid DNA production management.

  9. High-throughput gene mapping in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Swan, Kathryn A; Curtis, Damian E; McKusick, Kathleen B; Voinov, Alexander V; Mapa, Felipa A; Cancilla, Michael R

    2002-07-01

    Positional cloning of mutations in model genetic systems is a powerful method for the identification of targets of medical and agricultural importance. To facilitate the high-throughput mapping of mutations in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have identified a further 9602 putative new single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between two C. elegans strains, Bristol N2 and the Hawaiian mapping strain CB4856, by sequencing inserts from a CB4856 genomic DNA library and using an informatics pipeline to compare sequences with the canonical N2 genomic sequence. When combined with data from other laboratories, our marker set of 17,189 SNPs provides even coverage of the complete worm genome. To date, we have confirmed >1099 evenly spaced SNPs (one every 91 +/- 56 kb) across the six chromosomes and validated the utility of our SNP marker set and new fluorescence polarization-based genotyping methods for systematic and high-throughput identification of genes in C. elegans by cloning several proprietary genes. We illustrate our approach by recombination mapping and confirmation of the mutation in the cloned gene, dpy-18.

  10. New DArT markers for oat provide enhanced map coverage and global germplasm characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Genomic discovery in oat and its application to oat improvement have been hindered by a lack of genetic markers common to different genetic maps, and by the difficulty of conducting whole-genome analysis using high-throughput markers. This study was intended to develop, characterize, and ...

  11. Microfabricated high-throughput electronic particle detector.

    PubMed

    Wood, D K; Requa, M V; Cleland, A N

    2007-10-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and use of a radio frequency reflectometer integrated with a microfluidic system, applied to the very high-throughput measurement of micron-scale particles, passing in a microfluidic channel through the sensor region. The device operates as a microfabricated Coulter counter [U.S. Patent No. 2656508 (1953)], similar to a design we have described previously, but here with significantly improved electrode geometry as well as including electronic tuning of the reflectometer; the two improvements yielding an improvement by more than a factor of 10 in the signal to noise and in the diametric discrimination of single particles. We demonstrate the high-throughput discrimination of polystyrene beads with diameters in the 4-10 microm range, achieving diametric resolutions comparable to the intrinsic spread of diameters in the bead distribution, at rates in excess of 15 x 10(6) beads/h.

  12. High-throughput TILLING for functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Till, Bradley J; Colbert, Trenton; Tompa, Rachel; Enns, Linda C; Codomo, Christine A; Johnson, Jessica E; Reynolds, Steven H; Henikoff, Jorja G; Greene, Elizabeth A; Steine, Michael N; Comai, Luca; Henikoff, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Targeting-induced local lesions in genomes (TILLING) is a general strategy for identifying induced point mutations that can be applied to almost any organism. Here, we describe the basic methodology for high-throughput TILLING. Gene segments are amplified using fluorescently tagged primers, and products are denatured and reannealed to form heteroduplexes between the mutated sequence and its wild-type counterpart. These heteroduplexes are substrates for cleavage by the endonuclease CEL I. Following cleavage, products are analyzed on denaturing polyacrylamide gels using the LI-COR DNA analyzer system. High-throughput TILLING has been adopted by the Arabidopsis TILLING Project (ATP) to provide allelic series of point mutations for the general Arabidopsis community.

  13. High-throughput TILLING for Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Till, Bradley J; Colbert, Trenton; Codomo, Christine; Enns, Linda; Johnson, Jessica; Reynolds, Steven H; Henikoff, Jorja G; Greene, Elizabeth A; Steine, Michael N; Comai, Luca; Henikoff, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Targeting induced local lesions in genomes (TILLING) is a general strategy for identifying induced point mutations that can be applied to almost any organism. In this chapter, we describe the basic methodology for high-throughput TILLING. Gene segments are amplified using fluorescently tagged primers, and products are denatured and reannealed to form heteroduplexes between the mutated sequence and its wild-type counterpart. These heteroduplexes are substrates for cleavage by the endonuclease CEL I. Following cleavage, products are analyzed on denaturing polyacrylamide gels using the LI-COR DNA analyzer system. High-throughput TILLING has been adopted by the Arabidopsis TILLING Project (ATP) to provide allelic series of point mutations for the general Arabidopsis community.

  14. Microfluidics for cell-based high throughput screening platforms - A review.

    PubMed

    Du, Guansheng; Fang, Qun; den Toonder, Jaap M J

    2016-01-15

    In the last decades, the basic techniques of microfluidics for the study of cells such as cell culture, cell separation, and cell lysis, have been well developed. Based on cell handling techniques, microfluidics has been widely applied in the field of PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction), immunoassays, organ-on-chip, stem cell research, and analysis and identification of circulating tumor cells. As a major step in drug discovery, high-throughput screening allows rapid analysis of thousands of chemical, biochemical, genetic or pharmacological tests in parallel. In this review, we summarize the application of microfluidics in cell-based high throughput screening. The screening methods mentioned in this paper include approaches using the perfusion flow mode, the droplet mode, and the microarray mode. We also discuss the future development of microfluidic based high throughput screening platform for drug discovery.

  15. High-throughput in vivo vertebrate screening

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Martin, Carlos; Chang, Tsung-Yao; Koo, Bryan Kyo; Gilleland, Cody L.; Wasserman, Steven C.; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a high-throughput platform for cellular-resolution in vivo pharmaceutical and genetic screens on zebrafish larvae. The system automatically loads animals from reservoirs or multiwell plates, and positions and orients them for high-speed confocal imaging and laser manipulation of both superficial and deep organs within 19 seconds without damage. We show small-scale test screening of retinal axon guidance mutants and neuronal regeneration assays in combination with femtosecond laser microsurgery. PMID:20639868

  16. Next Generation Characterisation of Cereal Genomes for Marker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Visendi, Paul; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David

    2013-01-01

    Cereal crops form the bulk of the world’s food sources, and thus their importance cannot be understated. Crop breeding programs increasingly rely on high-resolution molecular genetic markers to accelerate the breeding process. The development of these markers is hampered by the complexity of some of the major cereal crop genomes, as well as the time and cost required. In this review, we address current and future methods available for the characterisation of cereal genomes, with an emphasis on faster and more cost effective approaches for genome sequencing and the development of markers for trait association and marker assisted selection (MAS) in crop breeding programs. PMID:24833229

  17. Controlling high-throughput manufacturing at the nano-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Khershed P.

    2013-09-01

    Interest in nano-scale manufacturing research and development is growing. The reason is to accelerate the translation of discoveries and inventions of nanoscience and nanotechnology into products that would benefit industry, economy and society. Ongoing research in nanomanufacturing is focused primarily on developing novel nanofabrication techniques for a variety of applications—materials, energy, electronics, photonics, biomedical, etc. Our goal is to foster the development of high-throughput methods of fabricating nano-enabled products. Large-area parallel processing and highspeed continuous processing are high-throughput means for mass production. An example of large-area processing is step-and-repeat nanoimprinting, by which nanostructures are reproduced again and again over a large area, such as a 12 in wafer. Roll-to-roll processing is an example of continuous processing, by which it is possible to print and imprint multi-level nanostructures and nanodevices on a moving flexible substrate. The big pay-off is high-volume production and low unit cost. However, the anticipated cost benefits can only be realized if the increased production rate is accompanied by high yields of high quality products. To ensure product quality, we need to design and construct manufacturing systems such that the processes can be closely monitored and controlled. One approach is to bring cyber-physical systems (CPS) concepts to nanomanufacturing. CPS involves the control of a physical system such as manufacturing through modeling, computation, communication and control. Such a closely coupled system will involve in-situ metrology and closed-loop control of the physical processes guided by physics-based models and driven by appropriate instrumentation, sensing and actuation. This paper will discuss these ideas in the context of controlling high-throughput manufacturing at the nano-scale.

  18. High-throughput neuro-imaging informatics.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael I; Faria, Andreia V; Oishi, Kenichi; Mori, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes neuroinformatics technologies at 1 mm anatomical scale based on high-throughput 3D functional and structural imaging technologies of the human brain. The core is an abstract pipeline for converting functional and structural imagery into their high-dimensional neuroinformatic representation index containing O(1000-10,000) discriminating dimensions. The pipeline is based on advanced image analysis coupled to digital knowledge representations in the form of dense atlases of the human brain at gross anatomical scale. We demonstrate the integration of these high-dimensional representations with machine learning methods, which have become the mainstay of other fields of science including genomics as well as social networks. Such high-throughput facilities have the potential to alter the way medical images are stored and utilized in radiological workflows. The neuroinformatics pipeline is used to examine cross-sectional and personalized analyses of neuropsychiatric illnesses in clinical applications as well as longitudinal studies. We demonstrate the use of high-throughput machine learning methods for supporting (i) cross-sectional image analysis to evaluate the health status of individual subjects with respect to the population data, (ii) integration of image and personal medical record non-image information for diagnosis and prognosis.

  19. High-throughput neuro-imaging informatics

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michael I.; Faria, Andreia V.; Oishi, Kenichi; Mori, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes neuroinformatics technologies at 1 mm anatomical scale based on high-throughput 3D functional and structural imaging technologies of the human brain. The core is an abstract pipeline for converting functional and structural imagery into their high-dimensional neuroinformatic representation index containing O(1000–10,000) discriminating dimensions. The pipeline is based on advanced image analysis coupled to digital knowledge representations in the form of dense atlases of the human brain at gross anatomical scale. We demonstrate the integration of these high-dimensional representations with machine learning methods, which have become the mainstay of other fields of science including genomics as well as social networks. Such high-throughput facilities have the potential to alter the way medical images are stored and utilized in radiological workflows. The neuroinformatics pipeline is used to examine cross-sectional and personalized analyses of neuropsychiatric illnesses in clinical applications as well as longitudinal studies. We demonstrate the use of high-throughput machine learning methods for supporting (i) cross-sectional image analysis to evaluate the health status of individual subjects with respect to the population data, (ii) integration of image and personal medical record non-image information for diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:24381556

  20. A high throughput mechanical screening device for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Hou, Chieh; Meloni, Gregory R; Cosgrove, Brian D; Dodge, George R; Mauck, Robert L

    2014-06-27

    Articular cartilage enables efficient and near-frictionless load transmission, but suffers from poor inherent healing capacity. As such, cartilage tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking both compositional and mechanical properties of native tissue in order to provide effective repair materials for the treatment of damaged or degenerated joint surfaces. However, given the large number design parameters available (e.g. cell sources, scaffold designs, and growth factors), it is difficult to conduct combinatorial experiments of engineered cartilage. This is particularly exacerbated when mechanical properties are a primary outcome, given the long time required for testing of individual samples. High throughput screening is utilized widely in the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly and cost-effectively assess the effects of thousands of compounds for therapeutic discovery. Here we adapted this approach to develop a high throughput mechanical screening (HTMS) system capable of measuring the mechanical properties of up to 48 materials simultaneously. The HTMS device was validated by testing various biomaterials and engineered cartilage constructs and by comparing the HTMS results to those derived from conventional single sample compression tests. Further evaluation showed that the HTMS system was capable of distinguishing and identifying 'hits', or factors that influence the degree of tissue maturation. Future iterations of this device will focus on reducing data variability, increasing force sensitivity and range, as well as scaling-up to even larger (96-well) formats. This HTMS device provides a novel tool for cartilage tissue engineering, freeing experimental design from the limitations of mechanical testing throughput.

  1. Structuring intuition with theory: The high-throughput way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornari, Marco

    2015-03-01

    First principles methodologies have grown in accuracy and applicability to the point where large databases can be built, shared, and analyzed with the goal of predicting novel compositions, optimizing functional properties, and discovering unexpected relationships between the data. In order to be useful to a large community of users, data should be standardized, validated, and distributed. In addition, tools to easily manage large datasets should be made available to effectively lead to materials development. Within the AFLOW consortium we have developed a simple frame to expand, validate, and mine data repositories: the MTFrame. Our minimalistic approach complement AFLOW and other existing high-throughput infrastructures and aims to integrate data generation with data analysis. We present few examples from our work on materials for energy conversion. Our intent s to pinpoint the usefulness of high-throughput methodologies to guide the discovery process by quantitatively structuring the scientific intuition. This work was supported by ONR-MURI under Contract N00014-13-1-0635 and the Duke University Center for Materials Genomics.

  2. A High Throughput Mechanical Screening Device for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Hou, Chieh; Meloni, Greg R.; Cosgrove, Brian D.; Dodge, George R.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage enables efficient and near-frictionless load transmission, but suffers from poor inherent healing capacity. As such, cartilage tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking both compositional and mechanical properties of native tissue in order to provide effective repair materials for the treatment of damaged or degenerated joint surfaces. However, given the large number design parameters available (e.g. cell sources, scaffold designs, and growth factors), it is difficult to conduct combinatorial experiments of engineered cartilage. This is particularly exacerbated when mechanical properties are a primary outcome given the long time required for testing of individual samples. High throughput screening is utilized widely in the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly and cost-effectively assess the effects of thousands of compounds for therapeutic discovery. Here we adapted this approach to develop a high throughput mechanical screening (HTMS) system capable of measuring the mechanical properties of up to 48 materials simultaneously. The HTMS device was validated by testing various biomaterials and engineered cartilage constructs and by comparing the HTMS results to those derived from conventional single sample compression tests. Further evaluation showed that the HTMS system was capable of distinguishing and identifying ‘hits’, or factors that influence the degree of tissue maturation. Future iterations of this device will focus on reducing data variability, increasing force sensitivity and range, as well as scaling-up to even larger (96-well) formats. This HTMS device provides a novel tool for cartilage tissue engineering, freeing experimental design from the limitations of mechanical testing throughput. PMID:24275442

  3. High-throughput screening with micro-x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.

    2005-06-15

    Micro-x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) is a useful characterization tool for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries. Due to the increasing threat of use of chemical warfare (CW) agents both in military actions and against civilians by terrorist extremists, there is a strong push to improve existing methods and develop means for the detection of a broad spectrum of CW agents in a minimal amount of time to increase national security. This paper describes a combinatorial high-throughput screening technique for CW receptor discovery to aid in sensor development. MXRF can screen materials for elemental composition at the mesoscale level (tens to hundreds of micrometers). The key aspect of this work is the use of commercial MXRF instrumentation coupled with the inherent heteroatom elements within the target molecules of the combinatorial reaction to provide rapid and specific identification of lead species. The method is demonstrated by screening an 11-mer oligopeptide library for selective binding of the degradation products of the nerve agent VX. The identified oligopeptides can be used as selective molecular receptors for sensor development. The MXRF screening method is nondestructive, requires minimal sample preparation or special tags for analysis, and the screening time depends on the desired sensitivity.

  4. High-throughput screening with micro-x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.

    2005-06-01

    Micro-x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) is a useful characterization tool for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries. Due to the increasing threat of use of chemical warfare (CW) agents both in military actions and against civilians by terrorist extremists, there is a strong push to improve existing methods and develop means for the detection of a broad spectrum of CW agents in a minimal amount of time to increase national security. This paper describes a combinatorial high-throughput screening technique for CW receptor discovery to aid in sensor development. MXRF can screen materials for elemental composition at the mesoscale level (tens to hundreds of micrometers). The key aspect of this work is the use of commercial MXRF instrumentation coupled with the inherent heteroatom elements within the target molecules of the combinatorial reaction to provide rapid and specific identification of lead species. The method is demonstrated by screening an 11-mer oligopeptide library for selective binding of the degradation products of the nerve agent VX. The identified oligopeptides can be used as selective molecular receptors for sensor development. The MXRF screening method is nondestructive, requires minimal sample preparation or special tags for analysis, and the screening time depends on the desired sensitivity.

  5. Image quantification of high-throughput tissue microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiahua; Dong, Junyu; Zhou, Huiyu

    2006-03-01

    Tissue microarray (TMA) technology allows rapid visualization of molecular targets in thousands of tissue specimens at a time and provides valuable information on expression of proteins within tissues at a cellular and sub-cellular level. TMA technology overcomes the bottleneck of traditional tissue analysis and allows it to catch up with the rapid advances in lead discovery. Studies using TMA on immunohistochemistry (IHC) can produce a large amount of images for interpretation within a very short time. Manual interpretation does not allow accurate quantitative analysis of staining to be undertaken. Automatic image capture and analysis has been shown to be superior to manual interpretation. The aims of this work is to develop a truly high-throughput and fully automated image capture and analysis system. We develop a robust colour segmentation algorithm using hue-saturation-intensity (HSI) colour space to provide quantification of signal intensity and partitioning of staining on high-throughput TMA. Initial segmentation results and quantification data have been achieved on 16,000 TMA colour images over 23 different tissue types.

  6. High-throughput fragment screening by affinity LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Duong-Thi, Minh-Dao; Bergström, Maria; Fex, Tomas; Isaksson, Roland; Ohlson, Sten

    2013-02-01

    Fragment screening, an emerging approach for hit finding in drug discovery, has recently been proven effective by its first approved drug, vemurafenib, for cancer treatment. Techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, surface plasmon resonance, and isothemal titration calorimetry, with their own pros and cons, have been employed for screening fragment libraries. As an alternative approach, screening based on high-performance liquid chromatography separation has been developed. In this work, we present weak affinity LC/MS as a method to screen fragments under high-throughput conditions. Affinity-based capillary columns with immobilized thrombin were used to screen a collection of 590 compounds from a fragment library. The collection was divided into 11 mixtures (each containing 35 to 65 fragments) and screened by MS detection. The primary screening was performed in <4 h (corresponding to >3500 fragments per day). Thirty hits were defined, which subsequently entered a secondary screening using an active site-blocked thrombin column for confirmation of specificity. One hit showed selective binding to thrombin with an estimated dissociation constant (K (D)) in the 0.1 mM range. This study shows that affinity LC/MS is characterized by high throughput, ease of operation, and low consumption of target and fragments, and therefore it promises to be a valuable method for fragment screening.

  7. A High-Throughput Cidality Screen for Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Parvinder; Ghosh, Anirban; Krishnamurthy, Ramya Vadageri; Bhattacharjee, Deepa Gagwani; Achar, Vijayashree; Datta, Santanu; Narayanan, Shridhar; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) aerosols is a major threat to tuberculosis (TB) researchers, even in bio-safety level-3 (BSL-3) facilities. Automation and high-throughput screens (HTS) in BSL3 facilities are essential for minimizing manual aerosol-generating interventions and facilitating TB research. In the present study, we report the development and validation of a high-throughput, 24-well ‘spot-assay’ for selecting bactericidal compounds against Mtb. The bactericidal screen concept was first validated in the fast-growing surrogate Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) and subsequently confirmed in Mtb using the following reference anti-tubercular drugs: rifampicin, isoniazid, ofloxacin and ethambutol (RIOE, acting on different targets). The potential use of the spot-assay to select bactericidal compounds from a large library was confirmed by screening on Mtb, with parallel plating by the conventional gold standard method (correlation, r2 = 0.808). An automated spot-assay further enabled an MBC90 determination on resistant and sensitive Mtb clinical isolates. The implementation of the spot-assay in kinetic screens to enumerate residual Mtb after either genetic silencing (anti-sense RNA, AS-RNA) or chemical inhibition corroborated its ability to detect cidality. This relatively simple, economical and quantitative HTS considerably minimized the bio-hazard risk and enabled the selection of novel vulnerable Mtb targets and mycobactericidal compounds. Thus, spot-assays have great potential to impact the TB drug discovery process. PMID:25693161

  8. High throughput instruments, methods, and informatics for systems biology.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Cowie, Jim R.; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Wylie, Brian Neil; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Aragon, Anthony D.; Keenan, Michael Robert; Boyack, Kevin W.; Thomas, Edward Victor; Werner-Washburne, Margaret C.; Mosquera-Caro, Monica P.; Martinez, M. Juanita; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Willman, Cheryl L.

    2003-12-01

    High throughput instruments and analysis techniques are required in order to make good use of the genomic sequences that have recently become available for many species, including humans. These instruments and methods must work with tens of thousands of genes simultaneously, and must be able to identify the small subsets of those genes that are implicated in the observed phenotypes, or, for instance, in responses to therapies. Microarrays represent one such high throughput method, which continue to find increasingly broad application. This project has improved microarray technology in several important areas. First, we developed the hyperspectral scanner, which has discovered and diagnosed numerous flaws in techniques broadly employed by microarray researchers. Second, we used a series of statistically designed experiments to identify and correct errors in our microarray data to dramatically improve the accuracy, precision, and repeatability of the microarray gene expression data. Third, our research developed new informatics techniques to identify genes with significantly different expression levels. Finally, natural language processing techniques were applied to improve our ability to make use of online literature annotating the important genes. In combination, this research has improved the reliability and precision of laboratory methods and instruments, while also enabling substantially faster analysis and discovery.

  9. High-throughput sequencing to decipher the genetic heterogeneity of deafness

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Identifying genes causing non-syndromic hearing loss has been challenging using traditional approaches. We describe the impact that high-throughput sequencing approaches are having in discovery of genes related to hearing loss and the implications for clinical diagnosis. PMID:22647651

  10. AFLOWLIB.ORG: a Distributed Materials Properties Repository from High-throughput Ab initio Calculations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-15

    919 660 8963 Abstract Empirical databases of crystal structures and thermodynamic properties are fundamental tools for materials research. Recent...for structure discovery and optimization, including uncovering of unsuspected compounds, metastable structures and correlations between various...diagrams, electronic structure and magnetic properties, gen- erated by the high-throughput framework A. This continuously updated compilation currently

  11. High Throughput Screening For Hazard and Risk of Environmental Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput toxicity testing provides detailed mechanistic information on the concentration response of environmental contaminants in numerous potential toxicity pathways. High throughput screening (HTS) has several key advantages: (1) expense orders of magnitude less than an...

  12. High throughput, quantitative analysis of human osteoclast differentiation and activity.

    PubMed

    Diepenhorst, Natalie A; Nowell, Cameron J; Rueda, Patricia; Henriksen, Kim; Pierce, Tracie; Cook, Anna E; Pastoureau, Philippe; Sabatini, Massimo; Charman, William N; Christopoulos, Arthur; Summers, Roger J; Sexton, Patrick M; Langmead, Christopher J

    2017-02-15

    Osteoclasts are multinuclear cells that degrade bone under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Osteoclasts are therefore a major target of osteoporosis therapeutics aimed at preserving bone. Consequently, analytical methods for osteoclast activity are useful for the development of novel biomarkers and/or pharmacological agents for the treatment of osteoporosis. The nucleation state of an osteoclast is indicative of its maturation and activity. To date, activity is routinely measured at the population level with only approximate consideration of the nucleation state (an 'osteoclast population' is typically defined as cells with ≥3 nuclei). Using a fluorescent substrate for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), a routinely used marker of osteoclast activity, we developed a multi-labelled imaging method for quantitative measurement of osteoclast TRAP activity at the single cell level. Automated image analysis enables interrogation of large osteoclast populations in a high throughput manner using open source software. Using this methodology, we investigated the effects of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANK-L) on osteoclast maturation and activity and demonstrated that TRAP activity directly correlates with osteoclast maturity (i.e. nuclei number). This method can be applied to high throughput screening of osteoclast-targeting compounds to determine changes in maturation and activity.

  13. Clustering of High Throughput Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Pirim, Harun; Ekşioğlu, Burak; Perkins, Andy; Yüceer, Çetin

    2012-01-01

    High throughput biological data need to be processed, analyzed, and interpreted to address problems in life sciences. Bioinformatics, computational biology, and systems biology deal with biological problems using computational methods. Clustering is one of the methods used to gain insight into biological processes, particularly at the genomics level. Clearly, clustering can be used in many areas of biological data analysis. However, this paper presents a review of the current clustering algorithms designed especially for analyzing gene expression data. It is also intended to introduce one of the main problems in bioinformatics - clustering gene expression data - to the operations research community. PMID:23144527

  14. High throughput chemical munitions treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Haroldsen, Brent L [Manteca, CA; Stofleth, Jerome H [Albuquerque, NM; Didlake, Jr., John E.; Wu, Benjamin C-P [San Ramon, CA

    2011-11-01

    A new High-Throughput Explosive Destruction System is disclosed. The new system is comprised of two side-by-side detonation containment vessels each comprising first and second halves that feed into a single agent treatment vessel. Both detonation containment vessels further comprise a surrounding ventilation facility. Moreover, the detonation containment vessels are designed to separate into two half-shells, wherein one shell can be moved axially away from the fixed, second half for ease of access and loading. The vessels are closed by means of a surrounding, clam-shell type locking seal mechanisms.

  15. High throughput screening technologies for ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai-bo; Li, Min; Wang, Wei-ping; Wang, Xiao-liang

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are involved in a variety of fundamental physiological processes, and their malfunction causes numerous human diseases. Therefore, ion channels represent a class of attractive drug targets and a class of important off-targets for in vitro pharmacological profiling. In the past decades, the rapid progress in developing functional assays and instrumentation has enabled high throughput screening (HTS) campaigns on an expanding list of channel types. Chronologically, HTS methods for ion channels include the ligand binding assay, flux-based assay, fluorescence-based assay, and automated electrophysiological assay. In this review we summarize the current HTS technologies for different ion channel classes and their applications. PMID:26657056

  16. Microfluidic cell chips for high-throughput drug screening.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chun-Wei; Ahmed, Ah Rezwanuddin; Dereli-Korkut, Zeynep; Wang, Sihong

    2016-05-01

    The current state of screening methods for drug discovery is still riddled with several inefficiencies. Although some widely used high-throughput screening platforms may enhance the drug screening process, their cost and oversimplification of cell-drug interactions pose a translational difficulty. Microfluidic cell-chips resolve many issues found in conventional HTS technology, providing benefits such as reduced sample quantity and integration of 3D cell culture physically more representative of the physiological/pathological microenvironment. In this review, we introduce the advantages of microfluidic devices in drug screening, and outline the critical factors which influence device design, highlighting recent innovations and advances in the field including a summary of commercialization efforts on microfluidic cell chips. Future perspectives of microfluidic cell devices are also provided based on considerations of present technological limitations and translational barriers.

  17. Predicting Novel Bulk Metallic Glasses via High- Throughput Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perim, E.; Lee, D.; Liu, Y.; Toher, C.; Gong, P.; Li, Y.; Simmons, W. N.; Levy, O.; Vlassak, J.; Schroers, J.; Curtarolo, S.

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are materials which may combine key properties from crystalline metals, such as high hardness, with others typically presented by plastics, such as easy processability. However, the cost of the known BMGs poses a significant obstacle for the development of applications, which has lead to a long search for novel, economically viable, BMGs. The emergence of high-throughput DFT calculations, such as the library provided by the AFLOWLIB consortium, has provided new tools for materials discovery. We have used this data to develop a new glass forming descriptor combining structural factors with thermodynamics in order to quickly screen through a large number of alloy systems in the AFLOWLIB database, identifying the most promising systems and the optimal compositions for glass formation. National Science Foundation (DMR-1436151, DMR-1435820, DMR-1436268).

  18. Automated, high-throughput IgG-antibody glycoprofiling platform.

    PubMed

    Stöckmann, Henning; Adamczyk, Barbara; Hayes, Jerrard; Rudd, Pauline M

    2013-09-17

    One of today's key challenges is the ability to decode the functions of complex carbohydrates in various biological contexts. To generate high-quality glycomics data in a high-throughput fashion, we developed a robotized and low-cost N-glycan analysis platform for glycoprofiling of immunoglobulin G antibodies (IgG), which are central players of the immune system and of vital importance in the biopharmaceutical industry. The key features include (a) rapid IgG affinity purification and sample concentration, (b) protein denaturation and glycan release on a multiwell filtration device, (c) glycan purification on solid-supported hydrazide, and (d) glycan quantification by ultra performance liquid chromatography. The sample preparation workflow was automated using a robotic liquid-handling workstation, allowing the preparation of 96 samples (or multiples thereof) in 22 h with excellent reproducibility and, thus, should greatly facilitate biomarker discovery and glycosylation monitoring of therapeutic IgGs.

  19. Preliminary High-Throughput Metagenome Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Dusheyko, Serge; Furman, Craig; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank

    2007-03-26

    Metagenome data sets present a qualitatively different assembly problem than traditional single-organism whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly. The unique aspects of such projects include the presence of a potentially large number of distinct organisms and their representation in the data set at widely different fractions. In addition, multiple closely related strains could be present, which would be difficult to assemble separately. Failure to take these issues into account can result in poor assemblies that either jumble together different strains or which fail to yield useful results. The DOE Joint Genome Institute has sequenced a number of metagenomic projects and plans to considerably increase this number in the coming year. As a result, the JGI has a need for high-throughput tools and techniques for handling metagenome projects. We present the techniques developed to handle metagenome assemblies in a high-throughput environment. This includes a streamlined assembly wrapper, based on the JGI?s in-house WGS assembler, Jazz. It also includes the selection of sensible defaults targeted for metagenome data sets, as well as quality control automation for cleaning up the raw results. While analysis is ongoing, we will discuss preliminary assessments of the quality of the assembly results (http://fames.jgi-psf.org).

  20. Economic consequences of high throughput maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, John G.; Govindaraju, Lakshmi

    2005-11-01

    Many people in the semiconductor industry bemoan the high costs of masks and view mask cost as one of the significant barriers to bringing new chip designs to market. All that is needed is a viable maskless technology and the problem will go away. Numerous sites around the world are working on maskless lithography but inevitably, the question asked is "Wouldn't a one wafer per hour maskless tool make a really good mask writer?" Of course, the answer is yes, the hesitation you hear in the answer isn't based on technology concerns, it's financial. The industry needs maskless lithography because mask costs are too high. Mask costs are too high because mask pattern generators (PG's) are slow and expensive. If mask PG's become much faster, mask costs go down, the maskless market goes away and the PG supplier is faced with an even smaller tool demand from the mask shops. Technical success becomes financial suicide - or does it? In this paper we will present the results of a model that examines some of the consequences of introducing high throughput maskless pattern generation. Specific features in the model include tool throughput for masks and wafers, market segmentation by node for masks and wafers and mask cost as an entry barrier to new chip designs. How does the availability of low cost masks and maskless tools affect the industries tool makeup and what is the ultimate potential market for high throughput maskless pattern generators?

  1. Discovery of Infection Associated Metabolic Markers in Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Lamour, Sabrina D.; Gomez-Romero, Maria; Vorkas, Panagiotis A.; Alibu, Vincent P.; Saric, Jasmina; Holmes, Elaine; Sternberg, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) remains a major neglected tropical disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. As clinical symptoms are usually non-specific, new diagnostic and prognostic markers are urgently needed to enhance the number of identified cases and optimise treatment. This is particularly important for disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, where indirect immunodiagnostic approaches have to date been unsuccessful. We have conducted global metabolic profiling of plasma from T.b.rhodesiense HAT patients and endemic controls, using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ultra-performance liquid chromatography, coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and identified differences in the lipid, amino acid and metabolite profiles. Altogether 16 significantly disease discriminatory metabolite markers were found using NMR, and a further 37 lipid markers via UPLC-MS. These included significantly higher levels of phenylalanine, formate, creatinine, N-acetylated glycoprotein and triglycerides in patients relative to controls. HAT patients also displayed lower concentrations of histidine, sphingomyelins, lysophosphatidylcholines, and several polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines. While the disease metabolite profile was partially consistent with previous data published in experimental rodent infection, we also found unique lipid and amino acid profile markers highlighting subtle but important differences between the host response to trypanosome infections between animal models and natural human infections. Our results demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiling in the identification of novel diagnostic biomarkers and the elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms in this disease. PMID:26505639

  2. Discovery of Infection Associated Metabolic Markers in Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Lamour, Sabrina D; Gomez-Romero, Maria; Vorkas, Panagiotis A; Alibu, Vincent P; Saric, Jasmina; Holmes, Elaine; Sternberg, Jeremy M

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) remains a major neglected tropical disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. As clinical symptoms are usually non-specific, new diagnostic and prognostic markers are urgently needed to enhance the number of identified cases and optimise treatment. This is particularly important for disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, where indirect immunodiagnostic approaches have to date been unsuccessful. We have conducted global metabolic profiling of plasma from T.b.rhodesiense HAT patients and endemic controls, using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ultra-performance liquid chromatography, coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and identified differences in the lipid, amino acid and metabolite profiles. Altogether 16 significantly disease discriminatory metabolite markers were found using NMR, and a further 37 lipid markers via UPLC-MS. These included significantly higher levels of phenylalanine, formate, creatinine, N-acetylated glycoprotein and triglycerides in patients relative to controls. HAT patients also displayed lower concentrations of histidine, sphingomyelins, lysophosphatidylcholines, and several polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines. While the disease metabolite profile was partially consistent with previous data published in experimental rodent infection, we also found unique lipid and amino acid profile markers highlighting subtle but important differences between the host response to trypanosome infections between animal models and natural human infections. Our results demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiling in the identification of novel diagnostic biomarkers and the elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms in this disease.

  3. High-Throughput Analysis of Enzyme Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoxin

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) techniques have been applied to many research fields nowadays. Robot microarray printing technique and automation microtiter handling technique allows HTS performing in both heterogeneous and homogeneous formats, with minimal sample required for each assay element. In this dissertation, new HTS techniques for enzyme activity analysis were developed. First, patterns of immobilized enzyme on nylon screen were detected by multiplexed capillary system. The imaging resolution is limited by the outer diameter of the capillaries. In order to get finer images, capillaries with smaller outer diameters can be used to form the imaging probe. Application of capillary electrophoresis allows separation of the product from the substrate in the reaction mixture, so that the product doesn't have to have different optical properties with the substrate. UV absorption detection allows almost universal detection for organic molecules. Thus, no modifications of either the substrate or the product molecules are necessary. This technique has the potential to be used in screening of local distribution variations of specific bio-molecules in a tissue or in screening of multiple immobilized catalysts. Another high-throughput screening technique is developed by directly monitoring the light intensity of the immobilized-catalyst surface using a scientific charge-coupled device (CCD). Briefly, the surface of enzyme microarray is focused onto a scientific CCD using an objective lens. By carefully choosing the detection wavelength, generation of product on an enzyme spot can be seen by the CCD. Analyzing the light intensity change over time on an enzyme spot can give information of reaction rate. The same microarray can be used for many times. Thus, high-throughput kinetic studies of hundreds of catalytic reactions are made possible. At last, we studied the fluorescence emission spectra of ADP and obtained the detection limits for ADP under three different

  4. Utilizing Existing Clinical and Population Biospecimen Resources for Discovery or Validation of Markers for Early Cancer Detection

    Cancer.gov

    Utilizing Existing Clinical and Population Biospecimen Resources for Discovery or Validation of Markers for Early Cancer Detection, a 2013 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  5. A high-throughput neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampfl, Anton; Noakes, Terry; Bartsch, Friedl; Bertinshaw, Joel; Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica; Nateghi, Ebrahim; Raeside, Tyler; Yethiraj, Mohana; Danilkin, Sergey; Kearley, Gordon

    2010-03-01

    A cross-disciplinary high-throughput neutron spectrometer is currently under construction at OPAL, ANSTO's open pool light-water research reactor. The spectrometer is based on the design of a Be-filter spectrometer (FANS) that is operating at the National Institute of Standards research reactor in the USA. The ANSTO filter-spectrometer will be switched in and out with another neutron spectrometer, the triple-axis spectrometer, Taipan. Thus two distinct types of neutron spectrometers will be accessible: one specialised to perform phonon dispersion analysis and the other, the filter-spectrometer, designed specifically to measure vibrational density of states. A summary of the design will be given along with a detailed ray-tracing analysis. Some preliminary results will be presented from the spectrometer.

  6. A high-throughput radiometric kinase assay

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant kinase signaling has been implicated in a number of diseases. While kinases have become attractive drug targets, only a small fraction of human protein kinases have validated inhibitors. Screening libraries of compounds against a kinase or kinases of interest is routinely performed during kinase inhibitor development to identify promising scaffolds for a particular target and to identify kinase targets for compounds of interest. Screening of more focused compound libraries may also be conducted in the later stages of inhibitor development to improve potency and optimize selectivity. The dot blot kinase assay is a robust, high-throughput kinase assay that can be used to screen a number of small molecule compounds against one kinase of interest or several kinases. Here, a protocol for a dot blot kinase assay used for measuring insulin receptor kinase activity is presented. This protocol can be readily adapted for use with other protein kinases. PMID:26501904

  7. Sequential stopping for high-throughput experiments.

    PubMed

    Rossell, David; Müller, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In high-throughput experiments, the sample size is typically chosen informally. Most formal sample-size calculations depend critically on prior knowledge. We propose a sequential strategy that, by updating knowledge when new data are available, depends less critically on prior assumptions. Experiments are stopped or continued based on the potential benefits in obtaining additional data. The underlying decision-theoretic framework guarantees the design to proceed in a coherent fashion. We propose intuitively appealing, easy-to-implement utility functions. As in most sequential design problems, an exact solution is prohibitive. We propose a simulation-based approximation that uses decision boundaries. We apply the method to RNA-seq, microarray, and reverse-phase protein array studies and show its potential advantages. The approach has been added to the Bioconductor package gaga.

  8. High-throughput discovery of novel developmental phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Mary E; Flenniken, Ann M; Ji, Xiao; Teboul, Lydia; Wong, Michael D; White, Jacqueline K; Meehan, Terrence F; Weninger, Wolfgang J; Westerberg, Henrik; Adissu, Hibret; Baker, Candice N; Bower, Lynette; Brown, James M; Caddle, L Brianna; Chiani, Francesco; Clary, Dave; Cleak, James; Daly, Mark J; Denegre, James M; Doe, Brendan; Dolan, Mary E; Edie, Sarah M; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Galli, Antonella; Gambadoro, Alessia; Gallegos, Juan; Guo, Shiying; Horner, Neil R; Hsu, Chih-Wei; Johnson, Sara J; Kalaga, Sowmya; Keith, Lance C; Lanoue, Louise; Lawson, Thomas N; Lek, Monkol; Mark, Manuel; Marschall, Susan; Mason, Jeremy; McElwee, Melissa L; Newbigging, Susan; Nutter, Lauryl M J; Peterson, Kevin A; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Rowland, Douglas J; Ryder, Edward; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Seavitt, John R; Selloum, Mohammed; Szoke-Kovacs, Zsombor; Tamura, Masaru; Trainor, Amanda G; Tudose, Ilinca; Wakana, Shigeharu; Warren, Jonathan; Wendling, Olivia; West, David B; Wong, Leeyean; Yoshiki, Atsushi; MacArthur, Daniel G; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Gao, Xiang; Flicek, Paul; Bradley, Allan; Skarnes, William C; Justice, Monica J; Parkinson, Helen E; Moore, Mark; Wells, Sara; Braun, Robert E; Svenson, Karen L; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Herault, Yann; Mohun, Tim; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Henkelman, R Mark; Brown, Steve D M; Adams, David J; Lloyd, K C Kent; McKerlie, Colin; Beaudet, Arthur L; Bućan, Maja; Murray, Stephen A

    2016-09-22

    Approximately one-third of all mammalian genes are essential for life. Phenotypes resulting from knockouts of these genes in mice have provided tremendous insight into gene function and congenital disorders. As part of the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium effort to generate and phenotypically characterize 5,000 knockout mouse lines, here we identify 410 lethal genes during the production of the first 1,751 unique gene knockouts. Using a standardized phenotyping platform that incorporates high-resolution 3D imaging, we identify phenotypes at multiple time points for previously uncharacterized genes and additional phenotypes for genes with previously reported mutant phenotypes. Unexpectedly, our analysis reveals that incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity are common even on a defined genetic background. In addition, we show that human disease genes are enriched for essential genes, thus providing a dataset that facilitates the prioritization and validation of mutations identified in clinical sequencing efforts.

  9. Combinatorial and High Throughput Discovery of High Temperature Piezoelectric Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-10

    new proposed compounds based on our work nearly doubles the known candidate piezoelectric ferroelectric perovskites . Unlike most computational...potential new high temperature ferroelectric piezoelectric perovskite compounds. Our predictions of the Curie temperature (Tc) ranging from 700C...1100C are the highest reported in either experimental or theoretical studies and the number of new proposed compounds based on our work nearly doubles

  10. High-throughput discovery of novel developmental phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Mary E.; Flenniken, Ann M.; Ji, Xiao; Teboul, Lydia; Wong, Michael D.; White, Jacqueline K.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Weninger, Wolfgang J.; Westerberg, Henrik; Adissu, Hibret; Baker, Candice N.; Bower, Lynette; Brown, James M.; Caddle, L. Brianna; Chiani, Francesco; Clary, Dave; Cleak, James; Daly, Mark J.; Denegre, James M.; Doe, Brendan; Dolan, Mary E.; Edie, Sarah M.; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Galli, Antonella; Gambadoro, Alessia; Gallegos, Juan; Guo, Shiying; Horner, Neil R.; Hsu, Chih-wei; Johnson, Sara J.; Kalaga, Sowmya; Keith, Lance C.; Lanoue, Louise; Lawson, Thomas N.; Lek, Monkol; Mark, Manuel; Marschall, Susan; Mason, Jeremy; McElwee, Melissa L.; Newbigging, Susan; Nutter, Lauryl M.J.; Peterson, Kevin A.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Rowland, Douglas J.; Ryder, Edward; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Seavitt, John R.; Selloum, Mohammed; Szoke-Kovacs, Zsombor; Tamura, Masaru; Trainor, Amanda G; Tudose, Ilinca; Wakana, Shigeharu; Warren, Jonathan; Wendling, Olivia; West, David B.; Wong, Leeyean; Yoshiki, Atsushi; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P.; Gao, Xiang; Flicek, Paul; Bradley, Allan; Skarnes, William C.; Justice, Monica J.; Parkinson, Helen E.; Moore, Mark; Wells, Sara; Braun, Robert E.; Svenson, Karen L.; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Herault, Yann; Mohun, Tim; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Henkelman, R. Mark; Brown, Steve D.M.; Adams, David J.; Lloyd, K.C. Kent; McKerlie, Colin; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Bucan, Maja; Murray, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately one third of all mammalian genes are essential for life. Phenotypes resulting from mouse knockouts of these genes have provided tremendous insight into gene function and congenital disorders. As part of the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium effort to generate and phenotypically characterize 5000 knockout mouse lines, we have identified 410 lethal genes during the production of the first 1751 unique gene knockouts. Using a standardised phenotyping platform that incorporates high-resolution 3D imaging, we identified novel phenotypes at multiple time points for previously uncharacterized genes and additional phenotypes for genes with previously reported mutant phenotypes. Unexpectedly, our analysis reveals that incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity are common even on a defined genetic background. In addition, we show that human disease genes are enriched for essential genes identified in our screen, thus providing a novel dataset that facilitates prioritization and validation of mutations identified in clinical sequencing efforts. PMID:27626380

  11. AFLOW: An Automatic Framework for High-throughput Materials Discovery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-14

    Society for Metals, Materials Park, OH, 1990. [25] P. Villars , M. Berndt, K. Brandenburg, K. Cenzual, J. Daams, F. Hulliger, T. Massalski, H. Okamoto...Conden. Matt. 21 (2009) 395502. [30] J. K. Nørskov, T. Bligaard, J. Rossmeisl, C. H. Christensen, Nat. Chem. 1 (2009) 37. [31] P. Villars , in: J. H...A. Pople, J. Chem. Phys. 106 (1997) 1063. [78] G. Kresse, A. Gil , P. Sautet, Phys. Rev. B 68 (2003) 073401. [79] M. Shishkin, M.Marsman, G. Kresse

  12. High-Throughput Methods for Electron Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, David L.; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Gonen, Tamir; Engel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins play a tremendously important role in cell physiology and serve as a target for an increasing number of drugs. Structural information is key to understanding their function and for developing new strategies for combating disease. However, the complex physical chemistry associated with membrane proteins has made them more difficult to study than their soluble cousins. Electron crystallography has historically been a successful method for solving membrane protein structures and has the advantage of providing the natural environment of a lipid membrane. Specifically, when membrane proteins form two-dimensional arrays within a lipid bilayer, images and diffraction can be recorded by electron microscopy. The corresponding data can be combined to produce a three-dimensional reconstruction which, under favorable conditions, can extend to atomic resolution. Like X-ray crystallography, the quality of the structures are very much dependent on the order and size of the crystals. However, unlike X-ray crystallography, high-throughput methods for screening crystallization trials for electron crystallography are not in general use. In this chapter, we describe two alternative and potentially complementary methods for high-throughput screening of membrane protein crystallization within the lipid bilayer. The first method relies on the conventional use of dialysis for removing detergent and thus reconstituting the bilayer; an array of dialysis wells in the standard 96-well format allows the use of a liquid-handling robot and greatly increases throughput. The second method relies on detergent complexation by cyclodextrin; a specialized pipetting robot has been designed not only to titrate cyclodextrin, but to use light scattering to monitor the reconstitution process. In addition, the use of liquid-handling robots for making negatively stained grids and methods for automatically imaging samples in the electron microscope are described. PMID:23132066

  13. High-throughput identification of protein localization dependency networks.

    PubMed

    Christen, Beat; Fero, Michael J; Hillson, Nathan J; Bowman, Grant; Hong, Sun-Hae; Shapiro, Lucy; McAdams, Harley H

    2010-03-09

    Bacterial cells are highly organized with many protein complexes and DNA loci dynamically positioned to distinct subcellular sites over the course of a cell cycle. Such dynamic protein localization is essential for polar organelle development, establishment of asymmetry, and chromosome replication during the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle. We used a fluorescence microscopy screen optimized for high-throughput to find strains with anomalous temporal or spatial protein localization patterns in transposon-generated mutant libraries. Automated image acquisition and analysis allowed us to identify genes that affect the localization of two polar cell cycle histidine kinases, PleC and DivJ, and the pole-specific pili protein CpaE, each tagged with a different fluorescent marker in a single strain. Four metrics characterizing the observed localization patterns of each of the three labeled proteins were extracted for hundreds of cell images from each of 854 mapped mutant strains. Using cluster analysis of the resulting set of 12-element vectors for each of these strains, we identified 52 strains with mutations that affected the localization pattern of the three tagged proteins. This information, combined with quantitative localization data from epitasis experiments, also identified all previously known proteins affecting such localization. These studies provide insights into factors affecting the PleC/DivJ localization network and into regulatory links between the localization of the pili assembly protein CpaE and the kinase localization pathway. Our high-throughput screening methodology can be adapted readily to any sequenced bacterial species, opening the potential for databases of localization regulatory networks across species, and investigation of localization network phylogenies.

  14. Discovery and Validation of Hypermethylated Markers for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most prevalent malignant tumors worldwide. Screening and early diagnosis are critical for the clinical management of this disease. DNA methylation changes have been regarded as promising biomarkers for CRC diagnosis. Here, we map DNA methylation profiling on CRC in six CRCs and paired normal samples using a 450 K bead array. Further analysis confirms the methylation status of candidates in two data sets from the Gene Expression Omnibus. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are calculated to determine the diagnostic performances. We identify 1549 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) showing differences in methylation between CRC and normal tissue. Two genes (ADD2 and AKR1B1), related to the DMRs, are selected for further validation. ROC curves show that the areas under the curves of ADD2 and AKR1B1 are higher than that of SEPT9, which has been clinically used as a screening biomarker of CRC. Our data suggests that aberrant DNA methylation of ADD2 and AKR1B1 could be potential screening markers of CRC. PMID:27493446

  15. AOPs and Biomarkers: Bridging High Throughput Screening ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As high throughput screening (HTS) plays a larger role in toxicity testing, camputational toxicology has emerged as a critical component in interpreting the large volume of data produced. Computational models designed to quantify potential adverse effects based on HTS data will benefit from additional data sources that connect the magnitude of perturbation from the in vitro system to a level of concern at the organism or population level. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) concept provides an ideal framework for combining these complementary data. Recent international efforts under the auspices of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) have resulted in an AOP wiki designed to house formal descriptions of AOPs suitable for use in regulatory decision making. Recent efforts have built upon this to include an ontology describing the AOP with linkages to biological pathways, physiological terminology, and taxonomic applicability domains. Incorporation of an AOP network tool developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers also allows consideration of cumulative risk from chemical and non-chemical stressors. Biomarkers are an important complement to formal AOP descriptions, particularly when dealing with susceptible subpopulations or lifestages in human health risk assessment. To address the issue of nonchemical stressors than may modify effects of criteria air pollutants, a novel method was used to integrate blood gene expression data with hema

  16. High-Throughput Enzyme Kinetics Using Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Lu; Edward S. Yeung

    2007-11-01

    We report a microanalytical method to study enzyme kinetics. The technique involves immobilizing horseradish peroxidase on a poly-L-lysine (PLL)- coated glass slide in a microarray format, followed by applying substrate solution onto the enzyme microarray. Enzyme molecules are immobilized on the PLL-coated glass slide through electrostatic interactions, and no further modification of the enzyme or glass slide is needed. In situ detection of the products generated on the enzyme spots is made possible by monitoring the light intensity of each spot using a scientific-grade charged-coupled device (CCD). Reactions of substrate solutions of various types and concentrations can be carried out sequentially on one enzyme microarray. To account for the loss of enzyme from washing in between runs, a standard substrate solution is used for calibration. Substantially reduced amounts of substrate solution are consumed for each reaction on each enzyme spot. The Michaelis constant K{sub m} obtained by using this method is comparable to the result for homogeneous solutions. Absorbance detection allows universal monitoring, and no chemical modification of the substrate is needed. High-throughput studies of native enzyme kinetics for multiple enzymes are therefore possible in a simple, rapid, and low-cost manner.

  17. New High Throughput Methods to Estimate Chemical ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has made many recent advances in high throughput bioactivity testing. However, concurrent advances in rapid, quantitative prediction of human and ecological exposures have been lacking, despite the clear importance of both measures for a risk-based approach to prioritizing and screening chemicals. A recent report by the National Research Council of the National Academies, Exposure Science in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy (NRC 2012) laid out a number of applications in chemical evaluation of both toxicity and risk in critical need of quantitative exposure predictions, including screening and prioritization of chemicals for targeted toxicity testing, focused exposure assessments or monitoring studies, and quantification of population vulnerability. Despite these significant needs, for the majority of chemicals (e.g. non-pesticide environmental compounds) there are no or limited estimates of exposure. For example, exposure estimates exist for only 7% of the ToxCast Phase II chemical list. In addition, the data required for generating exposure estimates for large numbers of chemicals is severely lacking (Egeghy et al. 2012). This SAP reviewed the use of EPA's ExpoCast model to rapidly estimate potential chemical exposures for prioritization and screening purposes. The focus was on bounded chemical exposure values for people and the environment for the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) Universe of Chemicals. In addition to exposure, the SAP

  18. High-throughput screening of solid-state catalyst libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkan, Selim M.

    1998-07-01

    Combinatorial synthesis methods allow the rapid preparation and processing of large libraries of solid-state materials. The use of these methods, together with the appropriate screening techniques, has recently led to the discovery of materials with promising superconducting, magnetoresistive, luminescent and dielectric properties. Solid-state catalysts, which play an increasingly important role in the chemical and oil industries, represent another class of material amenable to combinatorial synthesis. Yet typically, catalyst discovery still involves inefficient trial-and-error processes, because catalytic activity is inherently difficult to screen. In contrast to superconductivity, magnetoresistivity and dielectric properties, which can be tested by contact probes, or luminescence, which can be observed directly, the assessment of catalytic activity requires the unambiguous detection of a specific product molecule above a small catalyst site on a large library. Screening by in situ infrared thermography and microprobe sampling mass spectrometry, have been suggested, but the first method, while probing activity, provides no information on reaction products, whereas the second is difficult to implement because it requires the transport of minute gas samples from each library site to the detection system. Here I describe the use of laser-induced resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization for sensitive, selective and high-throughput screening of a library of solid-state catalysts that activate the dehydrogenation of cyclohexane to benzene. I show that benzene, the product molecule, can be selectively photoionized in the vicinity of the catalytic sites, and that the detection of the resultant photoions by an array of microelectrodes provides information on the activity of individual sites. Adaptation of this technique for the screening of other catalytic reactions and larger libraries with smaller site size seems feasible, thus opening up the possibility of exploiting

  19. Predicting Response to Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Using High-Throughput Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Geeleher, Paul; Loboda, Andrey; Lenkala, Divya; Wang, Fan; LaCroix, Bonnie; Karovic, Sanja; Wang, Jacqueline; Nebozhyn, Michael; Chisamore, Michael; Hardwick, James; Maitland, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many disparate biomarkers have been proposed as predictors of response to histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDI); however, all have failed when applied clinically. Rather than this being entirely an issue of reproducibility, response to the HDI vorinostat may be determined by the additive effect of multiple molecular factors, many of which have previously been demonstrated. Methods: We conducted a large-scale gene expression analysis using the Cancer Genome Project for discovery and generated another large independent cancer cell line dataset across different cancers for validation. We compared different approaches in terms of how accurately vorinostat response can be predicted on an independent out-of-batch set of samples and applied the polygenic marker prediction principles in a clinical trial. Results: Using machine learning, the small effects that aggregate, resulting in sensitivity or resistance, can be recovered from gene expression data in a large panel of cancer cell lines. This approach can predict vorinostat response accurately, whereas single gene or pathway markers cannot. Our analyses recapitulated and contextualized many previous findings and suggest an important role for processes such as chromatin remodeling, autophagy, and apoptosis. As a proof of concept, we also discovered a novel causative role for CHD4, a helicase involved in the histone deacetylase complex that is associated with poor clinical outcome. As a clinical validation, we demonstrated that a common dose-limiting toxicity of vorinostat, thrombocytopenia, can be predicted (r = 0.55, P = .004) several days before it is detected clinically. Conclusion: Our work suggests a paradigm shift from single-gene/pathway evaluation to simultaneously evaluating multiple independent high-throughput gene expression datasets, which can be easily extended to other investigational compounds where similar issues are hampering clinical adoption. PMID:26296641

  20. Applications of high throughput (combinatorial) methodologies to electronic, magnetic, optical, and energy-related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Martin L.; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Hattrick-Simpers, Jason R.

    2013-06-01

    High throughput (combinatorial) materials science methodology is a relatively new research paradigm that offers the promise of rapid and efficient materials screening, optimization, and discovery. The paradigm started in the pharmaceutical industry but was rapidly adopted to accelerate materials research in a wide variety of areas. High throughput experiments are characterized by synthesis of a "library" sample that contains the materials variation of interest (typically composition), and rapid and localized measurement schemes that result in massive data sets. Because the data are collected at the same time on the same "library" sample, they can be highly uniform with respect to fixed processing parameters. This article critically reviews the literature pertaining to applications of combinatorial materials science for electronic, magnetic, optical, and energy-related materials. It is expected that high throughput methodologies will facilitate commercialization of novel materials for these critically important applications. Despite the overwhelming evidence presented in this paper that high throughput studies can effectively inform commercial practice, in our perception, it remains an underutilized research and development tool. Part of this perception may be due to the inaccessibility of proprietary industrial research and development practices, but clearly the initial cost and availability of high throughput laboratory equipment plays a role. Combinatorial materials science has traditionally been focused on materials discovery, screening, and optimization to combat the extremely high cost and long development times for new materials and their introduction into commerce. Going forward, combinatorial materials science will also be driven by other needs such as materials substitution and experimental verification of materials properties predicted by modeling and simulation, which have recently received much attention with the advent of the Materials Genome

  1. A Primer on High-Throughput Computing for Genomic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Lin; Beissinger, Timothy M.; Bauck, Stewart; Woodward, Brent; Rosa, Guilherme J. M.; Weigel, Kent A.; Gatti, Natalia de Leon; Gianola, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput computing (HTC) uses computer clusters to solve advanced computational problems, with the goal of accomplishing high-throughput over relatively long periods of time. In genomic selection, for example, a set of markers covering the entire genome is used to train a model based on known data, and the resulting model is used to predict the genetic merit of selection candidates. Sophisticated models are very computationally demanding and, with several traits to be evaluated sequentially, computing time is long, and output is low. In this paper, we present scenarios and basic principles of how HTC can be used in genomic selection, implemented using various techniques from simple batch processing to pipelining in distributed computer clusters. Various scripting languages, such as shell scripting, Perl, and R, are also very useful to devise pipelines. By pipelining, we can reduce total computing time and consequently increase throughput. In comparison to the traditional data processing pipeline residing on the central processors, performing general-purpose computation on a graphics processing unit provide a new-generation approach to massive parallel computing in genomic selection. While the concept of HTC may still be new to many researchers in animal breeding, plant breeding, and genetics, HTC infrastructures have already been built in many institutions, such as the University of Wisconsin–Madison, which can be leveraged for genomic selection, in terms of central processing unit capacity, network connectivity, storage availability, and middleware connectivity. Exploring existing HTC infrastructures as well as general-purpose computing environments will further expand our capability to meet increasing computing demands posed by unprecedented genomic data that we have today. We anticipate that HTC will impact genomic selection via better statistical models, faster solutions, and more competitive products (e.g., from design of marker panels to realized

  2. A primer on high-throughput computing for genomic selection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Lin; Beissinger, Timothy M; Bauck, Stewart; Woodward, Brent; Rosa, Guilherme J M; Weigel, Kent A; Gatti, Natalia de Leon; Gianola, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput computing (HTC) uses computer clusters to solve advanced computational problems, with the goal of accomplishing high-throughput over relatively long periods of time. In genomic selection, for example, a set of markers covering the entire genome is used to train a model based on known data, and the resulting model is used to predict the genetic merit of selection candidates. Sophisticated models are very computationally demanding and, with several traits to be evaluated sequentially, computing time is long, and output is low. In this paper, we present scenarios and basic principles of how HTC can be used in genomic selection, implemented using various techniques from simple batch processing to pipelining in distributed computer clusters. Various scripting languages, such as shell scripting, Perl, and R, are also very useful to devise pipelines. By pipelining, we can reduce total computing time and consequently increase throughput. In comparison to the traditional data processing pipeline residing on the central processors, performing general-purpose computation on a graphics processing unit provide a new-generation approach to massive parallel computing in genomic selection. While the concept of HTC may still be new to many researchers in animal breeding, plant breeding, and genetics, HTC infrastructures have already been built in many institutions, such as the University of Wisconsin-Madison, which can be leveraged for genomic selection, in terms of central processing unit capacity, network connectivity, storage availability, and middleware connectivity. Exploring existing HTC infrastructures as well as general-purpose computing environments will further expand our capability to meet increasing computing demands posed by unprecedented genomic data that we have today. We anticipate that HTC will impact genomic selection via better statistical models, faster solutions, and more competitive products (e.g., from design of marker panels to realized

  3. High Throughput Profiling of Molecular Shapes in Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Peter R.; Thomas, Sajesh P.; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-02-01

    Molecular shape is important in both crystallisation and supramolecular assembly, yet its role is not completely understood. We present a computationally efficient scheme to describe and classify the molecular shapes in crystals. The method involves rotation invariant description of Hirshfeld surfaces in terms of of spherical harmonic functions. Hirshfeld surfaces represent the boundaries of a molecule in the crystalline environment, and are widely used to visualise and interpret crystalline interactions. The spherical harmonic description of molecular shapes are compared and classified by means of principal component analysis and cluster analysis. When applied to a series of metals, the method results in a clear classification based on their lattice type. When applied to around 300 crystal structures comprising of series of substituted benzenes, naphthalenes and phenylbenzamide it shows the capacity to classify structures based on chemical scaffolds, chemical isosterism, and conformational similarity. The computational efficiency of the method is demonstrated with an application to over 14 thousand crystal structures. High throughput screening of molecular shapes and interaction surfaces in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) using this method has direct applications in drug discovery, supramolecular chemistry and materials design.

  4. High-throughput mass spectrometric cytochrome P450 inhibition screening.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kheng B; Ozbal, Can C; Kassel, Daniel B

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a high-throughput assay to support rapid evaluation of drug discovery compounds for possible drug-drug interaction (DDI). Each compound is evaluated for its DDI potential by incubating over a range of eight concentrations and against a panel of six cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes: 1A2, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4. The method utilizes automated liquid handling for sample preparation, and online solid-phase extraction/tandem mass spectrometry (SPE/MS/MS) for sample analyses. The system is capable of generating two 96-well assay plates in 30 min, and completes the data acquisition and analysis of both plates in about 30 min. Many laboratories that perform the CYP inhibition screening automate only part of the processes leaving a throughput bottleneck within the workflow. The protocols described in this chapter are aimed to streamline the entire process from assay to data acquisition and processing by incorporating automation and utilizing high-precision instrument to maximize throughput and minimize bottleneck.

  5. Comprehensive analysis of high-throughput screening data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyse, Stephan

    2002-06-01

    High-Throughput Screening (HTS) data in its entirety is a valuable raw material for the drug-discovery process. It provides the most compete information about the biological activity of a company's compounds. However, its quantity, complexity and heterogeneity require novel, sophisticated approaches in data analysis. At GeneData, we are developing methods for large-scale, synoptical mining of screening data in a five-step analysis: (1) Quality Assurance: Checking data for experimental artifacts and eliminating low quality data. (2) Biological Profiling: Clustering and ranking of compounds based on their biological activity, taking into account specific characteristics of HTS data. (3) Rule-based Classification: Applying user-defined rules to biological and chemical properties, and providing hypotheses on the biological mode-of-action of compounds. (4) Joint Biological-Chemical Analysis: Associating chemical compound data to HTS data, providing hypotheses for structure- activity relationships. (5) integration with Genomic and Gene Expression Data: Linking into other components of GeneData's bioinformatics platform, and assessing the compounds' modes-of-action, toxicity, and metabolic properties. These analyses address issues that are crucial for a correct interpretation and full exploitation of screening data. They lead to a sound rating of assays and compounds at an early state of the lead-finding process.

  6. High-throughput measurements of the optical redox ratio using a commercial microplate reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Taylor M.; Shah, Amy T.; Walsh, Alex J.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for accurate, high-throughput, functional measures to gauge the efficacy of potential drugs in living cells. As an early marker of drug response in cells, cellular metabolism provides an attractive platform for high-throughput drug testing. Optical techniques can noninvasively monitor NADH and FAD, two autofluorescent metabolic coenzymes. The autofluorescent redox ratio, defined as the autofluorescence intensity of NADH divided by that of FAD, quantifies relative rates of cellular glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. However, current microscopy methods for redox ratio quantification are time-intensive and low-throughput, limiting their practicality in drug screening. Alternatively, high-throughput commercial microplate readers quickly measure fluorescence intensities for hundreds of wells. This study found that a commercial microplate reader can differentiate the receptor status of breast cancer cell lines (p<0.05) based on redox ratio measurements without extrinsic contrast agents. Furthermore, microplate reader redox ratio measurements resolve response (p<0.05) and lack of response (p>0.05) in cell lines that are responsive and nonresponsive, respectively, to the breast cancer drug trastuzumab. These studies indicate that the microplate readers can be used to measure the redox ratio in a high-throughput manner and are sensitive enough to detect differences in cellular metabolism that are consistent with microscopy results.

  7. High-throughput measurements of the optical redox ratio using a commercial microplate reader

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Taylor M.; Shah, Amy T.; Walsh, Alex J.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. There is a need for accurate, high-throughput, functional measures to gauge the efficacy of potential drugs in living cells. As an early marker of drug response in cells, cellular metabolism provides an attractive platform for high-throughput drug testing. Optical techniques can noninvasively monitor NADH and FAD, two autofluorescent metabolic coenzymes. The autofluorescent redox ratio, defined as the autofluorescence intensity of NADH divided by that of FAD, quantifies relative rates of cellular glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. However, current microscopy methods for redox ratio quantification are time-intensive and low-throughput, limiting their practicality in drug screening. Alternatively, high-throughput commercial microplate readers quickly measure fluorescence intensities for hundreds of wells. This study found that a commercial microplate reader can differentiate the receptor status of breast cancer cell lines (p<0.05) based on redox ratio measurements without extrinsic contrast agents. Furthermore, microplate reader redox ratio measurements resolve response (p<0.05) and lack of response (p>0.05) in cell lines that are responsive and nonresponsive, respectively, to the breast cancer drug trastuzumab. These studies indicate that the microplate readers can be used to measure the redox ratio in a high-throughput manner and are sensitive enough to detect differences in cellular metabolism that are consistent with microscopy results. PMID:25634108

  8. Automatic Dendritic Length Quantification for High Throughput Screening of Mature Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Smafield, Timothy; Pasupuleti, Venkat; Sharma, Kamal; Huganir, Richard L.; Ye, Bing

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput automated fluorescent imaging and screening are important for studying neuronal development, functions, and pathogenesis. An automatic approach of analyzing images acquired in automated fashion, and quantifying dendritic characteristics is critical for making such screens high-throughput. However, automatic and effective algorithms and tools, especially for the images of mature mammalian neurons with complex arbors, have been lacking. Here, we present algorithms and a tool for quantifying dendritic length that is fundamental for analyzing growth of neuronal network. We employ a divide-and-conquer framework that tackles the challenges of high-throughput images of neurons and enables the integration of multiple automatic algorithms. Within this framework, we developed algorithms that adapt to local properties to detect faint branches. We also developed a path search that can preserve the curvature change to accurately measure dendritic length with arbor branches and turns. In addition, we proposed an ensemble strategy of three estimation algorithms to further improve the overall efficacy. We tested our tool on images for cultured mouse hippocampal neurons immunostained with a dendritic marker for high-throughput screen. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed method when comparing the accuracy with previous methods. The software has been implemented as an ImageJ plugin and available for use. PMID:25854493

  9. Silicon microphysiometer for high-throughput drug screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, Katarina; Baert, Christiaan; Puers, Bob; Sansen, Willy; Simaels, Jeannine; Van Driessche, Veerle; Hermans, Lou; Mertens, Robert P.

    1999-06-01

    We report on a micromachined silicon chip that is capable of providing a high-throughput functional assay based on calorimetry. A prototype twin microcalorimeter based on the Seebeck effect has been fabricated by IC technology and micromachined postprocessing techniques. A biocompatible liquid rubber membrane supports two identical 0.5 X 2 cm2 measurement chambers, situated at the cold and hot junction of a 666-junction aluminum/p+-polysilicon thermopile. The chambers can house up to 106 eukaryotic cells cultured to confluence. The advantage of the device over microcalorimeters on the market, is the integration of the measurement channels on chip, rendering microvolume reaction vessels, ranging from 10 to 600 (mu) l, in the closest possible contact with the thermopile sensor (no springs are needed). Power and temperature sensitivity of the sensor are 23 V/W and 130 mV/K, respectively. The small thermal inertia of the microchannels results in the short response time of 70 s, when filled with 50 (mu) l of water. Biological experiments were done with cultured kidney cells of Xenopus laevis (A6). The thermal equilibration time of the device is 45 min. Stimulation of transport mechanisms by reducing bath osmolality by 50% increased metabolism by 20%. Our results show that it is feasible to apply this large-area, small- volume whole-cell biosensor for drug discovery, where the binding assays that are commonly used to provide high- throughput need to be complemented with a functional assay. Solutions are brought onto the sensor by a simple pipette, making the use of an industrial microtiterplate dispenser feasible on a nx96-array of the microcalorimeter biosensor. Such an array of biosensors has been designed based on a new set of requirements as set forth by people in the field as this project moved on. The results obtained from the prototype large-area sensor were used to obtain an accurate model of the calorimeter, checked for by the simulation software ANSYS. At

  10. High Throughput Screening for Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv

    PubMed Central

    ANANTHAN, SUBRAMANIAM; FAALEOLEA, ELLEN R.; GOLDMAN, ROBERT C.; HOBRATH, JUDITH V.; KWONG, CECIL D.; LAUGHON, BARBARA E.; MADDRY, JOSEPH A.; MEHTA, ALKA; RASMUSSEN, LYNN; REYNOLDS, ROBERT C.; SECRIST, JOHN A.; SHINDO, NICE; SHOWE, DUSTIN N.; SOSA, MELINDA I.; SULING, WILLIAM J.; WHITE, E. LUCILE

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY There is an urgent need for the discovery and development of new antitubercular agents that target new biochemical pathways and treat drug resistant forms of the disease. One approach to addressing this need is through high throughput screening of medicinally relevant libraries against the whole bacterium in order to discover a variety of new, active scaffolds that will stimulate new biological research and drug discovery. Through the Tuberculosis Antimicrobial Acquisition and Coordinating Facility (www.taacf.org), a large, medicinally relevant chemical library was screened against M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv. The screening methods and a medicinal chemistry analysis of the results are reported herein. PMID:19758845

  11. QTL mapping using high-throughput sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in plants dates to the 1980’s, but earlier studies were often hindered by the expense and time required to identify large numbers of polymorphic genetic markers that differentiated the parental genotypes and then to genotype them on large segregating mapping po...

  12. High-throughput synchrotron X-ray diffraction for combinatorial phase mapping.

    PubMed

    Gregoire, J M; Van Campen, D G; Miller, C E; Jones, R J R; Suram, S K; Mehta, A

    2014-11-01

    Discovery of new materials drives the deployment of new technologies. Complex technological requirements demand precisely tailored material functionalities, and materials scientists are driven to search for these new materials in compositionally complex and often non-equilibrium spaces containing three, four or more elements. The phase behavior of these high-order composition spaces is mostly unknown and unexplored. High-throughput methods can offer strategies for efficiently searching complex and multi-dimensional material genomes for these much needed new materials and can also suggest a processing pathway for synthesizing them. However, high-throughput structural characterization is still relatively under-developed for rapid material discovery. Here, a synchrotron X-ray diffraction and fluorescence experiment for rapid measurement of both X-ray powder patterns and compositions for an array of samples in a material library is presented. The experiment is capable of measuring more than 5000 samples per day, as demonstrated by the acquisition of high-quality powder patterns in a bismuth-vanadium-iron oxide composition library. A detailed discussion of the scattering geometry and its ability to be tailored for different material systems is provided, with specific attention given to the characterization of fiber textured thin films. The described prototype facility is capable of meeting the structural characterization needs for the first generation of high-throughput material genomic searches.

  13. Microfluidic-Enabled Print-to-Screen Platform for High-Throughput Screening of Combinatorial Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuzhe; Li, Jiannan; Xiao, Wenwu; Xiao, Kai; Lee, Joyce; Bhardwaj, Urvashi; Zhu, Zijie; Digiglio, Philip; Yang, Gaomai; Lam, Kit S; Pan, Tingrui

    2015-10-20

    Since the 1960s, combination chemotherapy has been widely utilized as a standard method to treat cancer. However, because of the potentially enormous number of drug candidates and combinations, conventional identification methods of the effective drug combinations are usually associated with significantly high operational costs, low throughput screening, laborious and time-consuming procedures, and ethical concerns. In this paper, we present a low-cost, high-efficiency microfluidic print-to-screen (P2S) platform, which integrates combinatorial screening with biomolecular printing for high-throughput screening of anticancer drug combinations. This P2S platform provides several distinct advantages and features, including automatic combinatorial printing, high-throughput parallel drug screening, modular disposable cartridge, and biocompatibility, which can potentially speed up the entire discovery cycle of potent drug combinations. Microfluidic impact printing utilizing plug-and-play microfluidic cartridges is experimentally characterized with controllable droplet volume and accurate positioning. Furthermore, the combinatorial print-to-screen assay is demonstrated in a proof-of-concept biological experiment which can identify the positive hits among the entire drug combination library in a parallel and rapid manner. Overall, this microfluidic print-to-screen platform offers a simple, low-cost, high-efficiency solution for high-throughput large-scale combinatorial screening and can be applicable for various emerging applications in drug cocktail discovery.

  14. Adapting Cell-Based Assays to the High Throughput Screening Platform: Problems Encountered and Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Clinton B; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile

    2008-06-01

    In recent years, cell-based phenotypic assays have emerged as an effective and robust addition to the array of assay technologies available for drug discovery in the high throughput screening arena. Previously, biochemical target-based assays have been the technology of choice. With the emergence of stem cells as a basis for a new screening technology, it is important to keep in mind the lessons that have been learned from the adaptation of existing stable cell lines onto the high throughput screening drug discovery platform, with special consideration being given to assay miniaturization, liquid handling complications and instrument-introduced artifacts. We present an overview of the problems encountered with the implementation of multiple cell-based assays at the High Throughput Screening Center at Southern Research Institute as well as empirically defined effective solutions to these problems. These include examples of artifacts induced by temperature differences throughout the screening campaign, cell plating conditions including the effect of room temperature incubation on assay consistency, DMSO carry-over, and incubator induced artifacts.

  15. Increasing the delivery of next generation therapeutics from high throughput screening libraries.

    PubMed

    Wigglesworth, Mark J; Murray, David C; Blackett, Carolyn J; Kossenjans, Michael; Nissink, J Willem M

    2015-06-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has historically relied on high throughput screening as a cornerstone to identify chemical equity for drug discovery projects. However, with pharmaceutical companies moving through a phase of diminished returns and alternative hit identification strategies proving successful, it is more important than ever to understand how this approach can be used more effectively to increase the delivery of next generation therapeutics from high throughput screening libraries. There is a wide literature that describes HTS and fragment based screening approaches which offer clear direction on the process for these two distinct activities. However, few people have considered how best to identify medium to low molecular weight compounds from large diversity screening sets and increase downstream success.

  16. High-throughput screening of small molecule libraries using SAMDI mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Scholle, Michael D; Eisenberg, Adam H; Mrksich, Milan

    2011-07-11

    High-throughput screening is a common strategy used to identify compounds that modulate biochemical activities, but many approaches depend on cumbersome fluorescent reporters or antibodies and often produce false-positive hits. The development of "label-free" assays addresses many of these limitations, but current approaches still lack the throughput needed for applications in drug discovery. This paper describes a high-throughput, label-free assay that combines self-assembled monolayers with mass spectrometry, in a technique called SAMDI, as a tool for screening libraries of 100,000 compounds in one day. This method is fast, has high discrimination, and is amenable to a broad range of chemical and biological applications.

  17. Organic chemistry. Nanomole-scale high-throughput chemistry for the synthesis of complex molecules.

    PubMed

    Buitrago Santanilla, Alexander; Regalado, Erik L; Pereira, Tony; Shevlin, Michael; Bateman, Kevin; Campeau, Louis-Charles; Schneeweis, Jonathan; Berritt, Simon; Shi, Zhi-Cai; Nantermet, Philippe; Liu, Yong; Helmy, Roy; Welch, Christopher J; Vachal, Petr; Davies, Ian W; Cernak, Tim; Dreher, Spencer D

    2015-01-02

    At the forefront of new synthetic endeavors, such as drug discovery or natural product synthesis, large quantities of material are rarely available and timelines are tight. A miniaturized automation platform enabling high-throughput experimentation for synthetic route scouting to identify conditions for preparative reaction scale-up would be a transformative advance. Because automated, miniaturized chemistry is difficult to carry out in the presence of solids or volatile organic solvents, most of the synthetic "toolkit" cannot be readily miniaturized. Using palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions as a test case, we developed automation-friendly reactions to run in dimethyl sulfoxide at room temperature. This advance enabled us to couple the robotics used in biotechnology with emerging mass spectrometry-based high-throughput analysis techniques. More than 1500 chemistry experiments were carried out in less than a day, using as little as 0.02 milligrams of material per reaction.

  18. High-Throughput Quantification of Bioactive Lipids by MALDI Mass Spectrometry: Application to Prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Joseph D.; Reyzer, Michelle L.; Latham, Joey C.; Weaver, C. David; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis and quantification of analytes in biological systems is a critical component of metabolomic investigations of cell function. The most widely used methods employ chromatographic separation followed by mass spectrometric analysis, which requires significant time for sample preparation and sequential chromatography. We introduce a novel high-throughput, separation-free methodology based on MALDI mass spectrometry that allows for the parallel analysis of targeted metabolomes. Proof-of-concept is demonstrated by analysis of prostaglandins and glyceryl prostaglandins. Derivatization to incorporate a charged moiety into ketone-containing prostaglandins dramatically increases the signal-to-noise ratio relative to underivatized samples. This resulted in an increased dynamic range (15 fmol – 2000 fmol on plate) and improved linearity (r2= 0.99). The method was adapted for high-throughput screening methods for enzymology and drug discovery. Application to cellular metabolomics was also demonstrated. PMID:21770391

  19. High-Throughput Protein Production (HTPP): a review of enabling technologies to expedite protein production.

    PubMed

    Koehn, Jim; Hunt, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant protein production plays a crucial role in the drug discovery process, contributing to several key stages of the pathway. These include exploratory research, target validation, high-throughput screening (HTS), selectivity screens, and structural biology studies. Therefore the quick and rapid production of high-quality recombinant proteins is a critical component of the successful development of therapeutic small molecule inhibitors. This chapter will therefore attempt to provide an overview of some of the current "best-in-class" cloning, expression, and purification strategies currently available that enhance protein production capabilities and enable greater throughput. As such the chapter should also enable a reader with limited understanding of the high-throughput protein production (HTPP) process with the necessary information to set up and equip a laboratory for multiparallel protein production.

  20. Miniature high-throughput chemosensing of yield, ee, and absolute configuration from crude reaction mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Keith W.; Zhang, Peng; Wolf, Christian

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput experimentation (HTE) has emerged as a widely used technology that accelerates discovery and optimization processes with parallel small-scale reaction setups. A high-throughput screening (HTS) method capable of comprehensive analysis of crude asymmetric reaction mixtures (eliminating product derivatization or isolation) would provide transformative impact by matching the pace of HTE. We report how spontaneous in situ construction of stereodynamic metal probes from readily available, inexpensive starting materials can be applied to chiroptical chemosensing of the total amount, enantiomeric excess (ee), and absolute configuration of a wide variety of amines, diamines, amino alcohols, amino acids, carboxylic acids, α-hydroxy acids, and diols. This advance and HTS potential are highlighted with the analysis of 1 mg of crude reaction mixtures of a catalytic asymmetric reaction. This operationally simple assay uses a robust mix-and-measure protocol, is amenable to microscale platforms and automation, and provides critical time efficiency and sustainability advantages over traditional serial methods. PMID:26933684

  1. High-throughput synthesis and screening of photon absorbers and photocatalysts for solar fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, Slobodan; Marcin, Martin; Lin, Sean; Jin, Jian

    2012-02-01

    Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis is a D.O.E. Energy Innovation Hub conceived to develop solar fuel cell technologies by bringing together the critical mass of scientist and engineers nationwide. The High-Throughput Experimentation group at JCAP is developing pipelines for accelerated discovery of new materials - photon absorbers, photoelectrochemical and electrochemical catalysts - using combinatorial approaches (ink-jet, sol-gel, physical vapor deposition). Thin films of semiconducting metal-oxides, sulfides, nitrides and phosphides are synthesized and screened in high-throughput according to their optical and photoelectrochemical properties, as well as structure and phase. Vast libraries of materials and data are generated and made available to inside and outside research groups. Here we present data on binary, ternary and quaternary metal-oxide systems prepared by the ink-jet technology. The systems include tungsten-based photo-absorbers and nickel-iron-based catalysts for water splitting.

  2. High-throughput, high-sensitivity analysis of gene expression in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kris, Richard Martin; Felder, Stephen; Deyholos, Michael; Lambert, Georgina M; Hinton, James; Botros, Ihab; Martel, Ralph; Seligmann, Bruce; Galbraith, David W

    2007-07-01

    High-throughput gene expression analysis of genes expressed during salt stress was performed using a novel multiplexed quantitative nuclease protection assay that involves customized DNA microarrays printed within the individual wells of 96-well plates. The levels of expression of the transcripts from 16 different genes were quantified within crude homogenates prepared from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants also grown in a 96-well plate format. Examples are provided of the high degree of reproducibility of quantitative dose-response data and of the sensitivity of detection of changes in gene expression within limiting amounts of tissue. The lack of requirement for RNA purification renders the assay particularly suited for high-throughput gene expression analysis and for the discovery of novel chemical compounds that specifically modulate the expression of endogenous target genes.

  3. Development of A High Throughput Method Incorporating Traditional Analytical Devices

    PubMed Central

    White, C. C.; Embree, E.; Byrd, W. E; Patel, A. R.

    2004-01-01

    A high-throughput (high throughput is the ability to process large numbers of samples) and companion informatics system has been developed and implemented. High throughput is defined as the ability to autonomously evaluate large numbers of samples, while an informatics system provides the software control of the physical devices, in addition to the organization and storage of the generated electronic data. This high throughput system includes both an ultra-violet and visible light spectrometer (UV-Vis) and a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) integrated with a multi sample positioning table. This method is designed to quantify changes in polymeric materials occurring from controlled temperature, humidity and high flux UV exposures. The integration of the software control of these analytical instruments within a single computer system is presented. Challenges in enhancing the system to include additional analytical devices are discussed. PMID:27366626

  4. Evaluating Rapid Models for High-Throughput Exposure Forecasting (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput exposure screening models can provide quantitative predictions for thousands of chemicals; however these predictions must be systematically evaluated for predictive ability. Without the capability to make quantitative, albeit uncertain, forecasts of exposure, the ...

  5. AOPs & Biomarkers: Bridging High Throughput Screening and Regulatory Decision Making.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As high throughput screening (HTS) approaches play a larger role in toxicity testing, computational toxicology has emerged as a critical component in interpreting the large volume of data produced. Computational models for this purpose are becoming increasingly more sophisticated...

  6. High-Throughput Pharmacokinetics for Environmental Chemicals (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput screening (HTS) promises to allow prioritization of thousands of environmental chemicals with little or no in vivo information. For bioactivity identified by HTS, toxicokinetic (TK) models are essential to predict exposure thresholds below which no significant bio...

  7. HIGH THROUGHPUT ASSESSMENTS OF CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput approaches for quantifying chemical hazard, exposure, and sustainability have the potential to dramatically impact the pace and nature of risk assessments. Integrated evaluation strategies developed at the US EPA incorporate inherency,bioactivity,bioavailability, ...

  8. Development of an efficient transformation method by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and high throughput spray assay to identify transgenic plants for woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) using NPTII selection.

    PubMed

    Pantazis, Christopher J; Fisk, Sarah; Mills, Kerri; Flinn, Barry S; Shulaev, Vladimir; Veilleux, Richard E; Dan, Yinghui

    2013-03-01

    KEY MESSAGE : We developed an efficient Agrobacterium -mediated transformation method using an Ac/Ds transposon tagging construct for F. vesca and high throughput paromomycin spray assay to identify its transformants for strawberry functional genomics. Genomic resources for Rosaceae species are now readily available, including the Fragaria vesca genome, EST sequences, markers, linkage maps, and physical maps. The Rosaceae Genomic Executive Committee has promoted strawberry as a translational genomics model due to its unique biological features and transformability for fruit trait improvement. Our overall research goal is to use functional genomic and metabolic approaches to pursue high throughput gene discovery in the diploid woodland strawberry. F. vesca offers several advantages of a fleshy fruit typical of most fruit crops, short life cycle (seed to seed in 12-16 weeks), small genome size (206 Mbb/C), small plant size, self-compatibility, and many seeds per plant. We have developed an efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated strawberry transformation method using kanamycin selection, and high throughput paromomycin spray assay to efficiently identify transgenic strawberry plants. Using our kanamycin transformation method, we were able to produce up to 98 independent kanamycin resistant insertional mutant lines using a T-DNA construct carrying an Ac/Ds transposon Launchpad system from a single transformation experiment involving inoculation of 22 leaf explants of F. vesca accession 551572 within approx. 11 weeks (from inoculation to soil). Transgenic plants with 1-2 copies of a transgene were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Using our paromomycin spray assay, transgenic F. vesca plants were rapidly identified within 10 days after spraying.

  9. A versatile toolkit for high throughput functional genomics with Trichoderma reesei

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Andre; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Collett, James R.; Baker, Scott E.; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P.; Schmoll, Monika

    2012-01-02

    The ascomycete fungus, Trichoderma reesei (anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina), represents a biotechnological workhorse and is currently one of the most proficient cellulase producers. While strain improvement was traditionally accomplished by random mutagenesis, a detailed understanding of cellulase regulation can only be gained using recombinant technologies. RESULTS: Aiming at high efficiency and high throughput methods, we present here a construction kit for gene knock out in T. reesei. We provide a primer database for gene deletion using the pyr4, amdS and hph selection markers. For high throughput generation of gene knock outs, we constructed vectors using yeast mediated recombination and then transformed a T. reesei strain deficient in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) by spore electroporation. This NHEJ-defect was subsequently removed by crossing of mutants with a sexually competent strain derived from the parental strain, QM9414.CONCLUSIONS:Using this strategy and the materials provided, high throughput gene deletion in T. reesei becomes feasible. Moreover, with the application of sexual development, the NHEJ-defect can be removed efficiently and without the need for additional selection markers. The same advantages apply for the construction of multiple mutants by crossing of strains with different gene deletions, which is now possible with considerably less hands-on time and minimal screening effort compared to a transformation approach. Consequently this toolkit can considerably boost research towards efficient exploitation of the resources of T. reesei for cellulase expression and hence second generation biofuel production.

  10. Applications of Biophysics in High-Throughput Screening Hit Validation.

    PubMed

    Genick, Christine Clougherty; Barlier, Danielle; Monna, Dominique; Brunner, Reto; Bé, Céline; Scheufler, Clemens; Ottl, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    For approximately a decade, biophysical methods have been used to validate positive hits selected from high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns with the goal to verify binding interactions using label-free assays. By applying label-free readouts, screen artifacts created by compound interference and fluorescence are discovered, enabling further characterization of the hits for their target specificity and selectivity. The use of several biophysical methods to extract this type of high-content information is required to prevent the promotion of false positives to the next level of hit validation and to select the best candidates for further chemical optimization. The typical technologies applied in this arena include dynamic light scattering, turbidometry, resonance waveguide, surface plasmon resonance, differential scanning fluorimetry, mass spectrometry, and others. Each technology can provide different types of information to enable the characterization of the binding interaction. Thus, these technologies can be incorporated in a hit-validation strategy not only according to the profile of chemical matter that is desired by the medicinal chemists, but also in a manner that is in agreement with the target protein's amenability to the screening format. Here, we present the results of screening strategies using biophysics with the objective to evaluate the approaches, discuss the advantages and challenges, and summarize the benefits in reference to lead discovery. In summary, the biophysics screens presented here demonstrated various hit rates from a list of ~2000 preselected, IC50-validated hits from HTS (an IC50 is the inhibitor concentration at which 50% inhibition of activity is observed). There are several lessons learned from these biophysical screens, which will be discussed in this article.

  11. Roadmap and standard operating procedures for biobanking and discovery of neurochemical markers in ALS.

    PubMed

    Otto, Markus; Bowser, Robert; Turner, Martin; Berry, James; Brettschneider, Johannes; Connor, James; Costa, Júlia; Cudkowicz, Merit; Glass, Jonathan; Jahn, Olaf; Lehnert, Stefan; Malaspina, Andrea; Parnetti, Lucilla; Petzold, Axel; Shaw, Pamela; Sherman, Alexander; Steinacker, Petra; Süssmuth, Sigurd; Teunissen, Charlotte; Tumani, Hayrettin; Wuolikainen, Anna; Ludolph, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Despite major advances in deciphering the neuropathological hallmarks of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), validated neurochemical biomarkers for monitoring disease activity, earlier diagnosis, defining prognosis and unlocking key pathophysiological pathways are lacking. Although several candidate biomarkers exist, translation into clinical application is hindered by small sample numbers, especially longitudinal, for independent verification. This review considers the potential routes to the discovery of neurochemical markers in ALS, and provides a consensus statement on standard operating procedures that will facilitate multicenter collaboration, validation and ultimately clinical translation.

  12. High Throughput Danio Rerio Energy Expenditure Assay.

    PubMed

    Williams, Savannah Y; Renquist, Benjamin J

    2016-01-27

    Zebrafish are an important model organism with inherent advantages that have the potential to make zebrafish a widely applied model for the study of energy homeostasis and obesity. The small size of zebrafish allows for assays on embryos to be conducted in a 96- or 384-well plate format, Morpholino and CRISPR based technologies promote ease of genetic manipulation, and drug treatment by bath application is viable. Moreover, zebrafish are ideal for forward genetic screens allowing for novel gene discovery. Given the relative novelty of zebrafish as a model for obesity, it is necessary to develop tools that fully exploit these benefits. Herein, we describe a method to measure energy expenditure in thousands of embryonic zebrafish simultaneously. We have developed a whole animal microplate platform in which we use 96-well plates to isolate individual fish and we assess cumulative NADH2 production using the commercially available cell culture viability reagent alamarBlue. In poikilotherms the relationship between NADH2 production and energy expenditure is tightly linked. This energy expenditure assay creates the potential to rapidly screen pharmacological or genetic manipulations that directly alter energy expenditure or alter the response to an applied drug (e.g. insulin sensitizers).

  13. Development of an Easy and High-Throughput Cell Assay System with a Culture Chip and an Assay Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Kanako; Kaji, Noritada; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tokeshi, Manabu; Baba, Yoshinobu

    High throughput cell assay is significantly important in drug screening, assessment of toxicity etc. Cell assay with a microchip is one of the candidates for high throughput cell assay. However, reported cell assay system with the microchip requires expensive apparatus for refluxing medium and investigation of optimum experimental condition for steady data. For an inexpensive, easy and high throughput cell assay, we introduce a new cell assay system combined with a culture chip and an assay chip made of poly(dimethyl siloxane). Cell culture chips enabled cell to proliferate along the microchannel without refluxing medium and permitted to prepare cell patterning easily. Also, assay chips formed concentration gradient inside the chip and allowed the cell assay with different concentrations of drug at the same time. Thus, our developed cell assay system can overcome the problems of the present cell assay and would promote the drug discovery, assessment of toxicity etc.

  14. High-throughput Protein Purification and Quality Assessment for Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngchang; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Eschenfeldt, William H.; Li, Hui; Maltseva, Natalia; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Gu, Minyi; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Wu, Ruiying; An, Hao; Chhor, Gekleng; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate goal of structural biology is to understand the structural basis of proteins in cellular processes. In structural biology, the most critical issue is the availability of high-quality samples. “Structural biology-grade” proteins must be generated in the quantity and quality suitable for structure determination using X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The purification procedures must reproducibly yield homogeneous proteins or their derivatives containing marker atom(s) in milligram quantities. The choice of protein purification and handling procedures plays a critical role in obtaining high-quality protein samples. With structural genomics emphasizing a genome-based approach in understanding protein structure and function, a number of unique structures covering most of the protein folding space have been determined and new technologies with high efficiency have been developed. At the Midwest Center for Structural Genomics (MCSG), we have developed semi-automated protocols for high-throughput parallel protein expression and purification. A protein, expressed as a fusion with a cleavable affinity tag, is purified in two consecutive immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) steps: (i) the first step is an IMAC coupled with buffer-exchange, or size exclusion chromatography (IMAC-I), followed by the cleavage of the affinity tag using the highly specific Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease; [1] the second step is IMAC and buffer exchange (IMAC-II) to remove the cleaved tag and tagged TEV protease. These protocols have been implemented on multidimensional chromatography workstations and, as we have shown, many proteins can be successfully produced in large-scale. All methods and protocols used for purification, some developed by MCSG, others adopted and integrated into the MCSG purification pipeline and more recently the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID) purification pipeline, are

  15. Development of a High-Throughput Assay for Identifying Inhibitors of TBK1 and IKKε

    PubMed Central

    Hutti, Jessica E.; Porter, Melissa A.; Cheely, Adam W.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wang, Xiaodong; Kireev, Dmitri; Baldwin, Albert S.; Janzen, William P.

    2012-01-01

    IKKε and TBK1 are noncanonical IKK family members which regulate inflammatory signaling pathways and also play important roles in oncogenesis. However, few inhibitors of these kinases have been identified. While the substrate specificity of IKKε has recently been described, the substrate specificity of TBK1 is unknown, hindering the development of high-throughput screening technologies for inhibitor identification. Here, we describe the optimal substrate phosphorylation motif for TBK1, and show that it is identical to the phosphorylation motif previously described for IKKε. This information enabled the design of an optimal TBK1/IKKε substrate peptide amenable to high-throughput screening and we assayed a 6,006 compound library that included 4,727 kinase-focused compounds to discover in vitro inhibitors of TBK1 and IKKε. 227 compounds in this library inhibited TBK1 at a concentration of 10 µM, while 57 compounds inhibited IKKε. Together, these data describe a new high-throughput screening assay which will facilitate the discovery of small molecule TBK1/IKKε inhibitors possessing therapeutic potential for both inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:22859992

  16. Development of a high-throughput assay for identifying inhibitors of TBK1 and IKKε.

    PubMed

    Hutti, Jessica E; Porter, Melissa A; Cheely, Adam W; Cantley, Lewis C; Wang, Xiaodong; Kireev, Dmitri; Baldwin, Albert S; Janzen, William P

    2012-01-01

    IKKε and TBK1 are noncanonical IKK family members which regulate inflammatory signaling pathways and also play important roles in oncogenesis. However, few inhibitors of these kinases have been identified. While the substrate specificity of IKKε has recently been described, the substrate specificity of TBK1 is unknown, hindering the development of high-throughput screening technologies for inhibitor identification. Here, we describe the optimal substrate phosphorylation motif for TBK1, and show that it is identical to the phosphorylation motif previously described for IKKε. This information enabled the design of an optimal TBK1/IKKε substrate peptide amenable to high-throughput screening and we assayed a 6,006 compound library that included 4,727 kinase-focused compounds to discover in vitro inhibitors of TBK1 and IKKε. 227 compounds in this library inhibited TBK1 at a concentration of 10 µM, while 57 compounds inhibited IKKε. Together, these data describe a new high-throughput screening assay which will facilitate the discovery of small molecule TBK1/IKKε inhibitors possessing therapeutic potential for both inflammatory diseases and cancer.

  17. Identification of differentially expressed peptides in high-throughput proteomics data.

    PubMed

    van Ooijen, Michiel P; Jong, Victor L; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Heck, Albert J R; Andeweg, Arno C; Binai, Nadine A; van den Ham, Henk-Jan

    2017-03-23

    With the advent of high-throughput proteomics, the type and amount of data pose a significant challenge to statistical approaches used to validate current quantitative analysis. Whereas many studies focus on the analysis at the protein level, the analysis of peptide-level data provides insight into changes at the sub-protein level, including splice variants, isoforms and a range of post-translational modifications. Statistical evaluation of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry peptide-based label-free differential data is most commonly performed using a t-test or analysis of variance, often after the application of data imputation to reduce the number of missing values. In high-throughput proteomics, statistical analysis methods and imputation techniques are difficult to evaluate, given the lack of gold standard data sets. Here, we use experimental and resampled data to evaluate the performance of four statistical analysis methods and the added value of imputation, for different numbers of biological replicates. We find that three or four replicates are the minimum requirement for high-throughput data analysis and confident assignment of significant changes. Data imputation does increase sensitivity in some cases, but leads to a much higher actual false discovery rate. Additionally, we find that empirical Bayes method (limma) achieves the highest sensitivity, and we thus recommend its use for performing differential expression analysis at the peptide level.

  18. Experimental Design for Combinatorial and High Throughput Materials Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawse, James N.

    2002-12-01

    In the past decade, combinatorial and high throughput experimental methods have revolutionized the pharmaceutical industry, allowing researchers to conduct more experiments in a week than was previously possible in a year. Now high throughput experimentation is rapidly spreading from its origins in the pharmaceutical world to larger industrial research establishments such as GE and DuPont, and even to smaller companies and universities. Consequently, researchers need to know the kinds of problems, desired outcomes, and appropriate patterns for these new strategies. Editor James Cawse's far-reaching study identifies and applies, with specific examples, these important new principles and techniques. Experimental Design for Combinatorial and High Throughput Materials Development progresses from methods that are now standard, such as gradient arrays, to mathematical developments that are breaking new ground. The former will be particularly useful to researchers entering the field, while the latter should inspire and challenge advanced practitioners. The book's contents are contributed by leading researchers in their respective fields. Chapters include: -High Throughput Synthetic Approaches for the Investigation of Inorganic Phase Space -Combinatorial Mapping of Polymer Blends Phase Behavior -Split-Plot Designs -Artificial Neural Networks in Catalyst Development -The Monte Carlo Approach to Library Design and Redesign This book also contains over 200 useful charts and drawings. Industrial chemists, chemical engineers, materials scientists, and physicists working in combinatorial and high throughput chemistry will find James Cawse's study to be an invaluable resource.

  19. High-throughput development of amphiphile self-assembly materials: fast-tracking synthesis, characterization, formulation, application, and understanding.

    PubMed

    Mulet, Xavier; Conn, Charlotte E; Fong, Celesta; Kennedy, Danielle F; Moghaddam, Minoo J; Drummond, Calum J

    2013-07-16

    Amphiphile self-assembly materials, which contain both a hydrophilic and a hydrophobic domain, have great potential in high-throughput and combinatorial approaches to discovery and development. However, the materials chemistry community has not embraced these ideas to anywhere near the extent that the medicinal chemistry community has. While this situation is beginning to change, extracting the full potential of high-throughput approaches in the development of self-assembling materials will require further development in the synthesis, characterization, formulation, and application domains. One of the key factors that make small molecule amphiphiles prospective building blocks for next generation multifunctional materials is their ability to self-assemble into complex nanostructures through low-energy transformations. Scientists can potentially tune, control, and functionalize these structures, but only after establishing their inherent properties. Because both robotic materials handling and customized rapid characterization equipment are increasingly available, high-throughput solutions are now attainable. These address traditional development bottlenecks associated with self-assembling amphiphile materials, such as their structural characterization and the assessment of end-use functional performance. A high-throughput methodology can help streamline materials development workflows, in accord with existing high-throughput discovery pipelines such as those used by the pharmaceutical industry in drug discovery. Chemists have identified several areas that are amenable to a high-throughput approach for amphiphile self-assembly materials development. These allow an exploration of not only a large potential chemical, compositional, and structural space, but also material properties, formulation, and application variables. These areas of development include materials synthesis and preparation, formulation, characterization, and screening performance for the desired end

  20. Ice-cap. A high-throughput method for capturing plant tissue samples for genotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Krysan, Patrick

    2004-07-01

    High-throughput genotype screening is rapidly becoming a standard research tool in the post-genomic era. A major bottleneck currently exists, however, that limits the utility of this approach in the plant sciences. The rate-limiting step in current high-throughput pipelines is that tissue samples from living plants must be collected manually, one plant at a time. In this article I describe a novel method for harvesting tissue samples from living seedlings that eliminates this bottleneck. The method has been named Ice-Cap to reflect the fact that ice is used to capture the tissue samples. The planting of seeds, growth of seedlings, and harvesting of tissue are all performed in a 96-well format. I demonstrate the utility of this system by using tissue harvested by Ice-Cap to genotype a population of Arabidopsis seedlings that is segregating a previously characterized mutation. Because the harvesting of tissue is performed in a nondestructive manner, plants with the desired genotype can be transferred to soil and grown to maturity. I also show that Ice-Cap can be used to analyze genomic DNA from rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings. It is expected that this method will be applicable to high-throughput screening with many different plant species, making it a useful technology for performing marker assisted selection.

  1. Combinatorial and high-throughput screening approaches for strain engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenshan; Jiang, Rongrong

    2015-03-01

    Microbes have long been used in the industry to produce valuable biochemicals. Combinatorial engineering approaches, new strain engineering tools derived from inverse metabolic engineering, have started to attract attention in recent years, including genome shuffling, error-prone DNA polymerase, global transcription machinery engineering (gTME), random knockout/overexpression libraries, ribosome engineering, multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE), customized optimization of metabolic pathways by combinatorial transcriptional engineering (COMPACTER), and library construction of "tunable intergenic regions" (TIGR). Since combinatorial approaches and high-throughput screening methods are fundamentally interconnected, color/fluorescence-based, growth-based, and biosensor-based high-throughput screening methods have been reviewed. We believe that with the help of metabolic engineering tools and new combinatorial approaches, plus effective high-throughput screening methods, researchers will be able to achieve better results on improving microorganism performance under stress or enhancing biochemical yield.

  2. The high throughput biomedicine unit at the institute for molecular medicine Finland: high throughput screening meets precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Pietiainen, Vilja; Saarela, Jani; von Schantz, Carina; Turunen, Laura; Ostling, Paivi; Wennerberg, Krister

    2014-05-01

    The High Throughput Biomedicine (HTB) unit at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM was established in 2010 to serve as a national and international academic screening unit providing access to state of the art instrumentation for chemical and RNAi-based high throughput screening. The initial focus of the unit was multiwell plate based chemical screening and high content microarray-based siRNA screening. However, over the first four years of operation, the unit has moved to a more flexible service platform where both chemical and siRNA screening is performed at different scales primarily in multiwell plate-based assays with a wide range of readout possibilities with a focus on ultraminiaturization to allow for affordable screening for the academic users. In addition to high throughput screening, the equipment of the unit is also used to support miniaturized, multiplexed and high throughput applications for other types of research such as genomics, sequencing and biobanking operations. Importantly, with the translational research goals at FIMM, an increasing part of the operations at the HTB unit is being focused on high throughput systems biological platforms for functional profiling of patient cells in personalized and precision medicine projects.

  3. Screening and synthesis: high throughput technologies applied to parasitology.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R E; Westwood, N J

    2004-01-01

    High throughput technologies continue to develop in response to the challenges set by the genome projects. This article discusses how the techniques of both high throughput screening (HTS) and synthesis can influence research in parasitology. Examples of the use of targeted and phenotype-based HTS using unbiased compound collections are provided. The important issue of identifying the protein target(s) of bioactive compounds is discussed from the synthetic chemist's perspective. This article concludes by reviewing recent examples of successful target identification studies in parasitology.

  4. Advances in high throughput DNA sequence data compression.

    PubMed

    Sardaraz, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad; Ikram, Ataul Aziz

    2016-06-01

    Advances in high throughput sequencing technologies and reduction in cost of sequencing have led to exponential growth in high throughput DNA sequence data. This growth has posed challenges such as storage, retrieval, and transmission of sequencing data. Data compression is used to cope with these challenges. Various methods have been developed to compress genomic and sequencing data. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of compression methods for genome and reads compression. Algorithms are categorized as referential or reference free. Experimental results and comparative analysis of various methods for data compression are presented. Finally, key challenges and research directions in DNA sequence data compression are highlighted.

  5. Droplet microfluidics for high-throughput biological assays.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mira T; Rotem, Assaf; Heyman, John A; Weitz, David A

    2012-06-21

    Droplet microfluidics offers significant advantages for performing high-throughput screens and sensitive assays. Droplets allow sample volumes to be significantly reduced, leading to concomitant reductions in cost. Manipulation and measurement at kilohertz speeds enable up to 10(8) samples to be screened in one day. Compartmentalization in droplets increases assay sensitivity by increasing the effective concentration of rare species and decreasing the time required to reach detection thresholds. Droplet microfluidics combines these powerful features to enable currently inaccessible high-throughput screening applications, including single-cell and single-molecule assays.

  6. Implementation of high throughput experimentation techniques for kinetic reaction testing.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Anton J

    2012-02-01

    Successful implementation of High throughput Experimentation (EE) tools has resulted in their increased acceptance as essential tools in chemical, petrochemical and polymer R&D laboratories. This article provides a number of concrete examples of EE systems, which have been designed and successfully implemented in studies, which focus on deriving reaction kinetic data. The implementation of high throughput EE tools for performing kinetic studies of both catalytic and non-catalytic systems results in a significantly faster acquisition of high-quality kinetic modeling data, required to quantitatively predict the behavior of complex, multistep reactions.

  7. Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Microarray for High-Throughput Studies of Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tiago G.; Kwon, Seok-Joon; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Lee, Moo-Yeal; Diogo, Maria Margarida; Clark, Douglas S.; Cabral, Joaquim M.S.

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a novel three-dimensional (3D) cellular microarray platform to enable the rapid and efficient tracking of stem cell fate and quantification of specific stem cell markers. This platform consists of a miniaturized 3D cell culture array on a functionalized glass slide for spatially addressable high-throughput screening. A microarray spotter was used to deposit cells onto a modified glass surface to yield an array consisting of cells encapsulated in alginate gel spots with volumes as low as 60 nL. A method based on an immunofluorescence technique scaled down to function on a cellular microarray was also used to quantify specific cell marker protein levels in situ. Our results revealed that this platform is suitable for studying the expansion of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as they retain their pluripotent and undifferentiated state. We also examined neural commitment of mouse ES cells on the microarray and observed the generation of neuroectodermal precursor cells characterized by expression of the neural marker Sox-1, whose levels were also measured in situ using a GFP reporter system. In addition, the high-throughput capacity of the platform was tested using a dual-slide system that allowed rapid screening of the effects of tretinoin and fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4) on the pluripotency of mouse ES cells. This high-throughput platform is a powerful new tool for investigating cellular mechanisms involved in stem cell expansion and differentiation and provides the basis for rapid identification of signals and conditions that can be used to direct cellular responses. PMID:20069558

  8. New High Throughput Methods to Estimate Chemical Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has made many recent advances in high throughput bioactivity testing. However, concurrent advances in rapid, quantitative prediction of human and ecological exposures have been lacking, despite the clear importance of both measures for a risk-based approach to prioritizing an...

  9. High-throughput screening, predictive modeling and computational embryology - Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to chemical profiling to address sensitivity and specificity of molecular targets, biological pathways, cellular and developmental processes. EPA’s ToxCast project is testing 960 uniq...

  10. High Throughput Exposure Estimation Using NHANES Data (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the ExpoCast project, high throughput (HT) exposure models enable rapid screening of large numbers of chemicals for exposure potential. Evaluation of these models requires empirical exposure data and due to the paucity of human metabolism/exposure data such evaluations includ...

  11. Environmental Impact on Vascular Development Predicted by High Throughput Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding health risks to embryonic development from exposure to environmental chemicals is a significant challenge given the diverse chemical landscape and paucity of data for most of these compounds. High throughput screening (HTS) in EPA’s ToxCastTM project provides vast d...

  12. Fully Bayesian Analysis of High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput metabolomic assays that allow simultaneous targeted screening of hundreds of metabolites have recently become available in kit form. Such assays provide a window into understanding changes to biochemical pathways due to chemical exposure or disease, and are usefu...

  13. Evaluating and Refining High Throughput Tools for Toxicokinetics

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster summarizes efforts of the Chemical Safety for Sustainability's Rapid Exposure and Dosimetry (RED) team to facilitate the development and refinement of toxicokinetics (TK) tools to be used in conjunction with the high throughput toxicity testing data generated as a par...

  14. High-throughput screening, predictive modeling and computational embryology

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to profile thousands of chemical compounds for biological activity and potential toxicity. EPA’s ToxCast™ project, and the broader Tox21 consortium, in addition to projects worldwide,...

  15. Accounting For Uncertainty in The Application Of High Throughput Datasets

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of high throughput screening (HTS) datasets will need to adequately account for uncertainties in the data generation process and propagate these uncertainties through to ultimate use. Uncertainty arises at multiple levels in the construction of predictors using in vitro ...

  16. High Throughput Assays and Exposure Science (ISES annual meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput screening (HTS) data characterizing chemical-induced biological activity has been generated for thousands of environmentally-relevant chemicals by the US inter-agency Tox21 and the US EPA ToxCast programs. For a limited set of chemicals, bioactive concentrations r...

  17. High-throughput approaches to unravel hepatitis C virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Colpitts, Che C; El-Saghire, Hussein; Pochet, Nathalie; Schuster, Catherine; Baumert, Thomas F

    2016-06-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a major global health burden, with more than 130 million individuals chronically infected and at risk for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The recent clinical licensing of direct-acting antivirals enables viral cure. However, limited access to therapy and treatment failure in patient subgroups warrants a continuing effort to develop complementary antiviral strategies. Furthermore, once fibrosis is established, curing HCV infection does not eliminate the risk for HCC. High-throughput approaches and screens have enabled the investigation of virus-host interactions on a genome-wide scale. Gain- and loss-of-function screens have identified essential host-dependency factors in the HCV viral life cycle, such as host cell entry factors or regulatory factors for viral replication and assembly. Network analyses of systems-scale data sets provided a comprehensive view of the cellular state following HCV infection, thus improving our understanding of the virus-induced responses of the target cell. Interactome, metabolomics and gene expression studies identified dysregulated cellular processes potentially contributing to HCV pathogenesis and HCC. Drug screens using chemical libraries led to the discovery of novel antivirals. Here, we review the contribution of high-throughput approaches for the investigation of virus-host interactions, viral pathogenesis and drug discovery.

  18. Novel Acoustic Loading of a Mass Spectrometer: Toward Next-Generation High-Throughput MS Screening.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Ian; Stearns, Rick; Pringle, Steven; Wingfield, Jonathan; Datwani, Sammy; Hall, Eric; Ghislain, Luke; Majlof, Lars; Bachman, Martin

    2016-02-01

    High-throughput, direct measurement of substrate-to-product conversion by label-free detection, without the need for engineered substrates or secondary assays, could be considered the "holy grail" of drug discovery screening. Mass spectrometry (MS) has the potential to be part of this ultimate screening solution, but is constrained by the limitations of existing MS sample introduction modes that cannot meet the throughput requirements of high-throughput screening (HTS). Here we report data from a prototype system (Echo-MS) that uses acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) to transfer femtoliter-scale droplets in a rapid, precise, and accurate fashion directly into the MS. The acoustic source can load samples into the MS from a microtiter plate at a rate of up to three samples per second. The resulting MS signal displays a very sharp attack profile and ions are detected within 50 ms of activation of the acoustic transducer. Additionally, we show that the system is capable of generating multiply charged ion species from simple peptides and large proteins. The combination of high speed and low sample volume has significant potential within not only drug discovery, but also other areas of the industry.

  19. Biomarkers Discovery for Colorectal Cancer: A Review on Tumor Endothelial Markers as Perspective Candidates

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world. The early detection of CRC, during the promotion/progression stages, is an enormous challenge for a successful outcome and remains a fundamental problem in clinical approach. Despite the continuous advancement in diagnostic and therapeutic methods, there is a need for discovery of sensitive and specific, noninvasive biomarkers. Tumor endothelial markers (TEMs) are associated with tumor-specific angiogenesis and are potentially useful to discriminate between tumor and normal endothelium. The most promising TEMs for oncogenic signaling in CRC appeared to be the TEM1, TEM5, TEM7, and TEM8. Overexpression of TEMs especially TEM1, TEM7, and TEM8 in colorectal tumor tissue compared to healthy tissue suggests their role in tumor blood vessels formation. Thus TEMs appear to be perspective candidates for early detection, monitoring, and treatment of CRC patients. This review provides an update on recent data on tumor endothelial markers and their possible use as biomarkers for screening, diagnosis, and therapy of colorectal cancer patients. PMID:27965519

  20. ESTs from a wild Arachis species for gene discovery and marker development

    PubMed Central

    Proite, Karina; Leal-Bertioli, Soraya CM; Bertioli, David J; Moretzsohn, Márcio C; da Silva, Felipe R; Martins, Natalia F; Guimarães, Patrícia M

    2007-01-01

    Background Due to its origin, peanut has a very narrow genetic background. Wild relatives can be a source of genetic variability for cultivated peanut. In this study, the transcriptome of the wild species Arachis stenosperma accession V10309 was analyzed. Results ESTs were produced from four cDNA libraries of RNAs extracted from leaves and roots of A. stenosperma. Randomly selected cDNA clones were sequenced to generate 8,785 ESTs, of which 6,264 (71.3%) had high quality, with 3,500 clusters: 963 contigs and 2537 singlets. Only 55.9% matched homologous sequences of known genes. ESTs were classified into 23 different categories according to putative protein functions. Numerous sequences related to disease resistance, drought tolerance and human health were identified. Two hundred and six microsatellites were found and markers have been developed for 188 of these. The microsatellite profile was analyzed and compared to other transcribed and genomic sequence data. Conclusion This is, to date, the first report on the analysis of transcriptome of a wild relative of peanut. The ESTs produced in this study are a valuable resource for gene discovery, the characterization of new wild alleles, and for marker development. The ESTs were released in the [GenBank:EH041934 to EH048197]. PMID:17302987

  1. BioProspecting: novel marker discovery obtained by mining the bibleome.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Peter L; Tuttle, Mark S; Trusko, Brett E; Brown, Steven H

    2009-02-05

    BioProspecting is a novel approach that enabled our team to mine data related to genetic markers from the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) utilizing SNOMED CT and the Human Gene Onotology (HUGO). The Biomedical Informatics Research Collaborative was able to link genes and disorders using the Multi-threaded Clinical Vocabulary Server (MCVS) and natural language processing engine, whose output creates an ontology-network using the semantic encodings of the literature that is organized by these two terminologies. We identified relationships between (genes or proteins) and (diseases or drugs) as linked by metabolic functions and identified potentially novel functional relationships between, for example, genes and diseases (e.g. Article #1 ([Gene - IL27] = > {Enzyme - Dipeptidyl Carboxypeptidase 1}) and Article #2 ({Enzyme - Dipeptidyl Carboxypeptidase 1} < = [Disorder - Type II DM]) showing a metabolic link between IL27 and Type II DM). In this manuscript we describe our method for developing the database and its content as well as its potential to assist in the discovery of novel markers and drugs.

  2. Data mining approaches to high-throughput crystal structure and compound prediction.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Geoffroy

    2014-01-01

    Predicting unknown inorganic compounds and their crystal structure is a critical step of high-throughput computational materials design and discovery. One way to achieve efficient compound prediction is to use data mining or machine learning methods. In this chapter we present a few algorithms for data mining compound prediction and their applications to different materials discovery problems. In particular, the patterns or correlations governing phase stability for experimental or computational inorganic compound databases are statistically learned and used to build probabilistic or regression models to identify novel compounds and their crystal structures. The stability of those compound candidates is then assessed using ab initio techniques. Finally, we report a few cases where data mining driven computational predictions were experimentally confirmed through inorganic synthesis.

  3. Transcriptome Analysis of the Tadpole Shrimp (Triops longicaudatus) by Illumina Paired-End Sequencing: Assembly, Annotation, and Marker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Jiyeon; Kang, Se Won; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Park, So Young; Hwang, Hee Ju; Chung, Jong Min; Song, Dae Kwon; Noh, Mi Young; Park, Seung-Hwan; Jeon, Gwang Joo; Kong, Hong Sik; Kim, Soonok; Hwang, Ui Wook; Park, Hong Seog; Han, Yeon Soo; Lee, Yong Seok

    2016-01-01

    The tadpole shrimp (Triops longicaudatus) is an aquatic crustacean that helps control pest populations. It inhabits freshwater ponds and pools and has been described as a living fossil. T. longicaudatus was officially declared an endangered species South Korea in 2005; however, through subsequent protection and conservation management, it was removed from the endangered species list in 2012. The limited number of available genetic resources on T. longicaudatus makes it difficult to obtain valuable genetic information for marker-aided selection programs. In this study, whole-transcriptome sequencing of T. longicaudatus generated 39.74 GB of clean data and a total of 269,822 contigs using the Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. After clustering, a total of 208,813 unigenes with an N50 length of 1089 bp were generated. A total of 95,105 unigenes were successfully annotated against Protostome (PANM), Unigene, Eukaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG), Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases using BLASTX with a cut-off of 1E−5. A total of 57,731 unigenes were assigned to GO terms, and 7247 unigenes were mapped to 129 KEGG pathways. Furthermore, 1595 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected from the unigenes with 1387 potential SSR markers. This is the first report of high-throughput transcriptome analysis of T. longicaudatus, and it provides valuable insights for genetic research and molecular-assisted breeding of this important species. PMID:27918468

  4. Discovery and SAR of muscarinic receptor subtype 1 (M1) allosteric activators from a molecular libraries high throughput screen. Part 1: 2,5-dibenzyl-2H-pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3(5H)-ones as positive allosteric modulators.

    PubMed

    Han, Changho; Chatterjee, Arindam; Noetzel, Meredith J; Panarese, Joseph D; Smith, Emery; Chase, Peter; Hodder, Peter; Niswender, Colleen; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W; Stauffer, Shaun R

    2015-01-15

    Results from a 2012 high-throughput screen of the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR) against the human muscarinic receptor subtype 1 (M1) for positive allosteric modulators is reported. A content-rich screen utilizing an intracellular calcium mobilization triple-addition protocol allowed for assessment of all three modes of pharmacology at M1, including agonist, positive allosteric modulator, and antagonist activities in a single screening platform. We disclose a dibenzyl-2H-pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3(5H)-one hit (DBPQ, CID 915409) and examine N-benzyl pharmacophore/SAR relationships versus previously reported quinolin-3(5H)-ones and isatins, including ML137. SAR and consideration of recently reported crystal structures, homology modeling, and structure-function relationships using point mutations suggests a shared binding mode orientation at the putative common allosteric binding site directed by the pendant N-benzyl substructure.

  5. High-throughput SNP-genotyping analysis of the relationships among Ponto-Caspian sturgeon species

    PubMed Central

    Rastorguev, Sergey M; Nedoluzhko, Artem V; Mazur, Alexander M; Gruzdeva, Natalia M; Volkov, Alexander A; Barmintseva, Anna E; Mugue, Nikolai S; Prokhortchouk, Egor B

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Legally certified sturgeon fisheries require population protection and conservation methods, including DNA tests to identify the source of valuable sturgeon roe. However, the available genetic data are insufficient to distinguish between different sturgeon populations, and are even unable to distinguish between some species. We performed high-throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-genotyping analysis on different populations of Russian (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii), Persian (A. persicus), and Siberian (A. baerii) sturgeon species from the Caspian Sea region (Volga and Ural Rivers), the Azov Sea, and two Siberian rivers. We found that Russian sturgeons from the Volga and Ural Rivers were essentially indistinguishable, but they differed from Russian sturgeons in the Azov Sea, and from Persian and Siberian sturgeons. We identified eight SNPs that were sufficient to distinguish these sturgeon populations with 80% confidence, and allowed the development of markers to distinguish sturgeon species. Finally, on the basis of our SNP data, we propose that the A. baerii-like mitochondrial DNA found in some Russian sturgeons from the Caspian Sea arose via an introgression event during the Pleistocene glaciation. In the present study, the high-throughput genotyping analysis of several sturgeon populations was performed. SNP markers for species identification were defined. The possible explanation of the baerii-like mitotype presence in some Russian sturgeons in the Caspian Sea was suggested. PMID:24567827

  6. High-throughput SNP-genotyping analysis of the relationships among Ponto-Caspian sturgeon species.

    PubMed

    Rastorguev, Sergey M; Nedoluzhko, Artem V; Mazur, Alexander M; Gruzdeva, Natalia M; Volkov, Alexander A; Barmintseva, Anna E; Mugue, Nikolai S; Prokhortchouk, Egor B

    2013-08-01

    Legally certified sturgeon fisheries require population protection and conservation methods, including DNA tests to identify the source of valuable sturgeon roe. However, the available genetic data are insufficient to distinguish between different sturgeon populations, and are even unable to distinguish between some species. We performed high-throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-genotyping analysis on different populations of Russian (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii), Persian (A. persicus), and Siberian (A. baerii) sturgeon species from the Caspian Sea region (Volga and Ural Rivers), the Azov Sea, and two Siberian rivers. We found that Russian sturgeons from the Volga and Ural Rivers were essentially indistinguishable, but they differed from Russian sturgeons in the Azov Sea, and from Persian and Siberian sturgeons. We identified eight SNPs that were sufficient to distinguish these sturgeon populations with 80% confidence, and allowed the development of markers to distinguish sturgeon species. Finally, on the basis of our SNP data, we propose that the A. baerii-like mitochondrial DNA found in some Russian sturgeons from the Caspian Sea arose via an introgression event during the Pleistocene glaciation. In the present study, the high-throughput genotyping analysis of several sturgeon populations was performed. SNP markers for species identification were defined. The possible explanation of the baerii-like mitotype presence in some Russian sturgeons in the Caspian Sea was suggested.

  7. Restriction site associated DNA (RAD) for de novo sequencing and marker discovery in sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis Fab. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    PubMed

    Pavinato, V A C; Margarido, G R A; Wijeratne, A J; Wijeratne, S; Meulia, T; Souza, A P; Michel, A P; Zucchi, M I

    2016-08-30

    We present the development of a genomic library using RADseq (restriction site associated DNA sequencing) protocol for marker discovery that can be applied on evolutionary studies of the sugarcane borer Diatraea saccharalis, an important South American insect pest. A RADtag protocol combined with Illumina paired-end sequencing allowed de novo discovery of 12 811 SNPs and a high-quality assembly of 122.8M paired-end reads from six individuals, representing 40 Gb of sequencing data. Approximately 1.7 Mb of the sugarcane borer genome distributed over 5289 minicontigs were obtained upon assembly of second reads from first reads RADtag loci where at least one SNP was discovered and genotyped. Minicontig lengths ranged from 200 to 611 bp and were used for functional annotation and microsatellite discovery. These markers will be used in future studies to understand gene flow and adaptation to host plants and control tactics.

  8. High-Throughput Phenotypic Screening of Human Astrocytes to Identify Compounds That Protect Against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Nasir; Shah, Sonia; Zhao, Jean; Class, Bradley; Aguisanda, Francis; Southall, Noel; Xia, Menghang; McKew, John C.; Rao, Mahendra

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes are the predominant cell type in the nervous system and play a significant role in maintaining neuronal health and homeostasis. Recently, astrocyte dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Astrocytes are thus an attractive new target for drug discovery for neurological disorders. Using astrocytes differentiated from human embryonic stem cells, we have developed an assay to identify compounds that protect against oxidative stress, a condition associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. This phenotypic oxidative stress assay has been optimized for high-throughput screening in a 1,536-well plate format. From a screen of approximately 4,100 bioactive tool compounds and approved drugs, we identified a set of 22 that acutely protect human astrocytes from the consequences of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. Nine of these compounds were also found to be protective of induced pluripotent stem cell-differentiated astrocytes in a related assay. These compounds are thought to confer protection through hormesis, activating stress-response pathways and preconditioning astrocytes to handle subsequent exposure to hydrogen peroxide. In fact, four of these compounds were found to activate the antioxidant response element/nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 pathway, a protective pathway induced by toxic insults. Our results demonstrate the relevancy and utility of using astrocytes differentiated from human stem cells as a disease model for drug discovery and development. Significance Astrocytes play a key role in neurological diseases. Drug discovery efforts that target astrocytes can identify novel therapeutics. Human astrocytes are difficult to obtain and thus are challenging to use for high-throughput screening, which requires large numbers of cells. Using human embryonic stem cell

  9. High-throughput patterning of photonic structures with tunable periodicity

    PubMed Central

    Kempa, Thomas J.; Bediako, D. Kwabena; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Park, Hong-Gyu; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    A patterning method termed “RIPPLE” (reactive interface patterning promoted by lithographic electrochemistry) is applied to the fabrication of arrays of dielectric and metallic optical elements. This method uses cyclic voltammetry to impart patterns onto the working electrode of a standard three-electrode electrochemical setup. Using this technique and a template stripping process, periodic arrays of Ag circular Bragg gratings are patterned in a high-throughput fashion over large substrate areas. By varying the scan rate of the cyclically applied voltage ramps, the periodicity of the gratings can be tuned in situ over micrometer and submicrometer length scales. Characterization of the periodic arrays of periodic gratings identified point-like and annular scattering modes at different planes above the structured surface. Facile, reliable, and rapid patterning techniques like RIPPLE may enable the high-throughput and low-cost fabrication of photonic elements and metasurfaces for energy conversion and sensing applications. PMID:25870280

  10. Spotsizer: High-throughput quantitative analysis of microbial growth

    PubMed Central

    Jeffares, Daniel C.; Arzhaeva, Yulia; Bähler, Jürg

    2017-01-01

    Microbial colony growth can serve as a useful readout in assays for studying complex genetic interactions or the effects of chemical compounds. Although computational tools for acquiring quantitative measurements of microbial colonies have been developed, their utility can be compromised by inflexible input image requirements, non-trivial installation procedures, or complicated operation. Here, we present the Spotsizer software tool for automated colony size measurements in images of robotically arrayed microbial colonies. Spotsizer features a convenient graphical user interface (GUI), has both single-image and batch-processing capabilities, and works with multiple input image formats and different colony grid types. We demonstrate how Spotsizer can be used for high-throughput quantitative analysis of fission yeast growth. The user-friendly Spotsizer tool provides rapid, accurate, and robust quantitative analyses of microbial growth in a high-throughput format. Spotsizer is freely available at https://data.csiro.au/dap/landingpage?pid=csiro:15330 under a proprietary CSIRO license. PMID:27712582

  11. A high-throughput multiplex method adapted for GMO detection.

    PubMed

    Chaouachi, Maher; Chupeau, Gaëlle; Berard, Aurélie; McKhann, Heather; Romaniuk, Marcel; Giancola, Sandra; Laval, Valérie; Bertheau, Yves; Brunel, Dominique

    2008-12-24

    A high-throughput multiplex assay for the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMO) was developed on the basis of the existing SNPlex method designed for SNP genotyping. This SNPlex assay allows the simultaneous detection of up to 48 short DNA sequences (approximately 70 bp; "signature sequences") from taxa endogenous reference genes, from GMO constructions, screening targets, construct-specific, and event-specific targets, and finally from donor organisms. This assay avoids certain shortcomings of multiplex PCR-based methods already in widespread use for GMO detection. The assay demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity. The results suggest that this assay is reliable, flexible, and cost- and time-effective for high-throughput GMO detection.

  12. High-throughput screening in the C. elegans nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kinser, Holly E; Pincus, Zachary

    2016-06-03

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is widely used as a model organism in the field of neurobiology. The wiring of the C. elegans nervous system has been entirely mapped, and the animal's optical transparency allows for in vivo observation of neuronal activity. The nematode is also small in size, self-fertilizing, and inexpensive to cultivate and maintain, greatly lending to its utility as a whole-animal model for high-throughput screening (HTS) in the nervous system. However, the use of this organism in large-scale screens presents unique technical challenges, including reversible immobilization of the animal, parallel single-animal culture and containment, automation of laser surgery, and high-throughput image acquisition and phenotyping. These obstacles require significant modification of existing techniques and the creation of new C. elegans-based HTS platforms. In this review, we outline these challenges in detail and survey the novel technologies and methods that have been developed to address them.

  13. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Krunic, Susanne Langgaard; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers the potential for rapidly analysing resistant and slowly digested dietary starches. PMID:27468930

  14. Spotsizer: High-throughput quantitative analysis of microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Leanne; Převorovský, Martin; Rallis, Charalampos; Jeffares, Daniel C; Arzhaeva, Yulia; Bähler, Jürg

    2016-10-01

    Microbial colony growth can serve as a useful readout in assays for studying complex genetic interactions or the effects of chemical compounds. Although computational tools for acquiring quantitative measurements of microbial colonies have been developed, their utility can be compromised by inflexible input image requirements, non-trivial installation procedures, or complicated operation. Here, we present the Spotsizer software tool for automated colony size measurements in images of robotically arrayed microbial colonies. Spotsizer features a convenient graphical user interface (GUI), has both single-image and batch-processing capabilities, and works with multiple input image formats and different colony grid types. We demonstrate how Spotsizer can be used for high-throughput quantitative analysis of fission yeast growth. The user-friendly Spotsizer tool provides rapid, accurate, and robust quantitative analyses of microbial growth in a high-throughput format. Spotsizer is freely available at https://data.csiro.au/dap/landingpage?pid=csiro:15330 under a proprietary CSIRO license.

  15. Sensitivity study of reliable, high-throughput resolution metricsfor photoresists

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Christopher N.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2007-07-30

    The resolution of chemically amplified resists is becoming an increasing concern, especially for lithography in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) regime. Large-scale screening and performance-based down-selection is currently underway to identify resist platforms that can support shrinking feature sizes. Resist screening efforts, however, are hampered by the absence of reliable resolution metrics that can objectively quantify resist resolution in a high-throughput fashion. Here we examine two high-throughput metrics for resist resolution determination. After summarizing their details and justifying their utility, we characterize the sensitivity of both metrics to two of the main experimental uncertainties associated with lithographic exposure tools, namely: limited focus control and limited knowledge of optical aberrations. For an implementation at EUV wavelengths, we report aberration and focus limited error bars in extracted resolution of {approx} 1.25 nm RMS for both metrics making them attractive candidates for future screening and down-selection efforts.

  16. High-throughput evaluation of synthetic metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Klesmith, Justin R.; Whitehead, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    A central challenge in the field of metabolic engineering is the efficient identification of a metabolic pathway genotype that maximizes specific productivity over a robust range of process conditions. Here we review current methods for optimizing specific productivity of metabolic pathways in living cells. New tools for library generation, computational analysis of pathway sequence-flux space, and high-throughput screening and selection techniques are discussed. PMID:27453919

  17. A Functional High-Throughput Assay of Myelination in Vitro

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells , hydrogels, 3D culture, electrophysiology, high-throughput assay 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...clear that four of the seven human astrocyte cell lines (HA #1, 2, 3, and 7) show very large amounts of neuronal differentiation when using epigenetic...derived.   5    Fig. 1: Spontaneous differentiation toward neuronal lineage of iPS cells derived from human astrocytes. Left: phase contrast

  18. Rapid Methods for High-Throughput Detection of Sulfoxides▿

    PubMed Central

    Shainsky, Janna; Derry, Netta-Lee; Leichtmann-Bardoogo, Yael; Wood, Thomas K.; Fishman, Ayelet

    2009-01-01

    Enantiopure sulfoxides are prevalent in drugs and are useful chiral auxiliaries in organic synthesis. The biocatalytic enantioselective oxidation of prochiral sulfides is a direct and economical approach for the synthesis of optically pure sulfoxides. The selection of suitable biocatalysts requires rapid and reliable high-throughput screening methods. Here we present four different methods for detecting sulfoxides produced via whole-cell biocatalysis, three of which were exploited for high-throughput screening. Fluorescence detection based on the acid activation of omeprazole was utilized for high-throughput screening of mutant libraries of toluene monooxygenases, but no active variants have been discovered yet. The second method is based on the reduction of sulfoxides to sulfides, with the coupled release and measurement of iodine. The availability of solvent-resistant microtiter plates enabled us to modify the method to a high-throughput format. The third method, selective inhibition of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase, was used to rapidly screen highly active and/or enantioselective variants at position V106 of toluene ortho-monooxygenase in a saturation mutagenesis library, using methyl-p-tolyl sulfide as the substrate. A success rate of 89% (i.e., 11% false positives) was obtained, and two new mutants were selected. The fourth method is based on the colorimetric detection of adrenochrome, a back-titration procedure which measures the concentration of the periodate-sensitive sulfide. Due to low sensitivity during whole-cell screening, this method was found to be useful only for determining the presence or absence of sulfoxide in the reaction. The methods described in the present work are simple and inexpensive and do not require special equipment. PMID:19465532

  19. A fully automated robotic system for high throughput fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Hartmut F; Rieth, Jochen

    2007-03-01

    High throughput robotic systems have been used since the 1990s to carry out biochemical assays in microtiter plates. However, before the application of such systems in industrial fermentation process development, some important specific demands should be taken into account. These are sufficient oxygen supply, optimal growth temperature, minimized sample evaporation, avoidance of contaminations, and simple but reliable process monitoring. A fully automated solution where all these aspects have been taken into account is presented.

  20. Generating barcoded libraries for multiplex high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Michael; Stiller, Mathias; Meyer, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Molecular barcoding is an essential tool to use the high throughput of next generation sequencing platforms optimally in studies involving more than one sample. Various barcoding strategies allow for the incorporation of short recognition sequences (barcodes) into sequencing libraries, either by ligation or polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Here, we present two approaches optimized for generating barcoded sequencing libraries from low copy number extracts and amplification products typical of ancient DNA studies.

  1. OptoDyCE: Automated system for high-throughput all-optical dynamic cardiac electrophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Ambrosi, Christina M.; Williams, John C.; Bien, Harold; Entcheva, Emilia

    2016-02-01

    In the last two decades, <30% of drugs withdrawals from the market were due to cardiac toxicity, where unintended interactions with ion channels disrupt the heart's normal electrical function. Consequently, all new drugs must undergo preclinical testing for cardiac liability, adding to an already expensive and lengthy process. Recognition that proarrhythmic effects often result from drug action on multiple ion channels demonstrates a need for integrative and comprehensive measurements. Additionally, patient-specific therapies relying on emerging technologies employing stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes (e.g. induced pluripotent stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes, iPSC-CMs) require better screening methods to become practical. However, a high-throughput, cost-effective approach for cellular cardiac electrophysiology has not been feasible. Optical techniques for manipulation and recording provide a contactless means of dynamic, high-throughput testing of cells and tissues. Here, we consider the requirements for all-optical electrophysiology for drug testing, and we implement and validate OptoDyCE, a fully automated system for all-optical cardiac electrophysiology. We demonstrate the high-throughput capabilities using multicellular samples in 96-well format by combining optogenetic actuation with simultaneous fast high-resolution optical sensing of voltage or intracellular calcium. The system can also be implemented using iPSC-CMs and other cell-types by delivery of optogenetic drivers, or through the modular use of dedicated light-sensitive somatic cells in conjunction with non-modified cells. OptoDyCE provides a truly modular and dynamic screening system, capable of fully-automated acquisition of high-content information integral for improved discovery and development of new drugs and biologics, as well as providing a means of better understanding of electrical disturbances in the heart.

  2. FLASH assembly of TALENs for high-throughput genome editing.

    PubMed

    Reyon, Deepak; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A; Sander, Jeffry D; Joung, J Keith

    2012-05-01

    Engineered transcription activator–like effector nucleases (TALENs) have shown promise as facile and broadly applicable genome editing tools. However, no publicly available high-throughput method for constructing TALENs has been published, and large-scale assessments of the success rate and targeting range of the technology remain lacking. Here we describe the fast ligation-based automatable solid-phase high-throughput (FLASH) system, a rapid and cost-effective method for large-scale assembly of TALENs. We tested 48 FLASH-assembled TALEN pairs in a human cell–based EGFP reporter system and found that all 48 possessed efficient gene-modification activities. We also used FLASH to assemble TALENs for 96 endogenous human genes implicated in cancer and/or epigenetic regulation and found that 84 pairs were able to efficiently introduce targeted alterations. Our results establish the robustness of TALEN technology and demonstrate that FLASH facilitates high-throughput genome editing at a scale not currently possible with other genome modification technologies.

  3. Novel High-throughput Approach for Purification of Infectious Virions

    PubMed Central

    James, Kevin T.; Cooney, Brad; Agopsowicz, Kate; Trevors, Mary Ann; Mohamed, Adil; Stoltz, Don; Hitt, Mary; Shmulevitz, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are extensively studied as pathogens and exploited as molecular tools and therapeutic agents. Existing methods to purify viruses such as gradient ultracentrifugation or chromatography have limitations, for example demand for technical expertise or specialized equipment, high time consumption, and restricted capacity. Our laboratory explores mutations in oncolytic reovirus that could improve oncolytic activity, and makes routine use of numerous virus variants, genome reassortants, and reverse engineered mutants. Our research pace was limited by the lack of high-throughput virus purification methods that efficiently remove confounding cellular contaminants such as cytokines and proteases. To overcome this shortcoming, we evaluated a commercially available resin (Capto Core 700) that captures molecules smaller than 700 kDa. Capto. Core 700 chromatography produced virion purity and infectivity indistinguishable from CsCl density gradient ultracentrifugation as determined by electron microscopy, gel electrophoresis analysis and plaque titration. Capto Core 700 resin was then effectively adapted to a rapid in-slurry pull-out approach for high-throughput purification of reovirus and adenovirus. The in-slurry purification approach offered substantially increased virus purity over crude cell lysates, media, or high-spin preparations and would be especially useful for high-throughput virus screening applications where density gradient ultracentrifugation is not feasible. PMID:27827454

  4. MEGARes: an antimicrobial resistance database for high throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lakin, Steven M.; Dean, Chris; Noyes, Noelle R.; Dettenwanger, Adam; Ross, Anne Spencer; Doster, Enrique; Rovira, Pablo; Abdo, Zaid; Jones, Kenneth L.; Ruiz, Jaime; Belk, Keith E.; Morley, Paul S.; Boucher, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has become an imminent concern for public health. As methods for detection and characterization of antimicrobial resistance move from targeted culture and polymerase chain reaction to high throughput metagenomics, appropriate resources for the analysis of large-scale data are required. Currently, antimicrobial resistance databases are tailored to smaller-scale, functional profiling of genes using highly descriptive annotations. Such characteristics do not facilitate the analysis of large-scale, ecological sequence datasets such as those produced with the use of metagenomics for surveillance. In order to overcome these limitations, we present MEGARes (https://megares.meglab.org), a hand-curated antimicrobial resistance database and annotation structure that provides a foundation for the development of high throughput acyclical classifiers and hierarchical statistical analysis of big data. MEGARes can be browsed as a stand-alone resource through the website or can be easily integrated into sequence analysis pipelines through download. Also via the website, we provide documentation for AmrPlusPlus, a user-friendly Galaxy pipeline for the analysis of high throughput sequencing data that is pre-packaged for use with the MEGARes database. PMID:27899569

  5. NCBI GEO: archive for high-throughput functional genomic data.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Tanya; Troup, Dennis B; Wilhite, Stephen E; Ledoux, Pierre; Rudnev, Dmitry; Evangelista, Carlos; Kim, Irene F; Soboleva, Alexandra; Tomashevsky, Maxim; Marshall, Kimberly A; Phillippy, Katherine H; Sherman, Patti M; Muertter, Rolf N; Edgar, Ron

    2009-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is the largest public repository for high-throughput gene expression data. Additionally, GEO hosts other categories of high-throughput functional genomic data, including those that examine genome copy number variations, chromatin structure, methylation status and transcription factor binding. These data are generated by the research community using high-throughput technologies like microarrays and, more recently, next-generation sequencing. The database has a flexible infrastructure that can capture fully annotated raw and processed data, enabling compliance with major community-derived scientific reporting standards such as 'Minimum Information About a Microarray Experiment' (MIAME). In addition to serving as a centralized data storage hub, GEO offers many tools and features that allow users to effectively explore, analyze and download expression data from both gene-centric and experiment-centric perspectives. This article summarizes the GEO repository structure, content and operating procedures, as well as recently introduced data mining features. GEO is freely accessible at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/.

  6. A microdroplet dilutor for high-throughput screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xize; Gielen, Fabrice; Edel, Joshua B.; Demello, Andrew J.

    2011-06-01

    Pipetting and dilution are universal processes used in chemical and biological laboratories to assay and experiment. In microfluidics such operations are equally in demand, but difficult to implement. Recently, droplet-based microfluidics has emerged as an exciting new platform for high-throughput experimentation. However, it is challenging to vary the concentration of droplets rapidly and controllably. To this end, we developed a dilution module for high-throughput screening using droplet-based microfluidics. Briefly, a nanolitre-sized sample droplet of defined concentration is trapped within a microfluidic chamber. Through a process of droplet merging, mixing and re-splitting, this droplet is combined with a series of smaller buffer droplets to generate a sequence of output droplets that define a digital concentration gradient. Importantly, the formed droplets can be merged with other reagent droplets to enable rapid chemical and biological screens. As a proof of concept, we used the dilutor to perform a high-throughput homogeneous DNA-binding assay using only nanolitres of sample.

  7. A microdroplet dilutor for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xize; Gielen, Fabrice; Edel, Joshua B; deMello, Andrew J

    2011-06-01

    Pipetting and dilution are universal processes used in chemical and biological laboratories to assay and experiment. In microfluidics such operations are equally in demand, but difficult to implement. Recently, droplet-based microfluidics has emerged as an exciting new platform for high-throughput experimentation. However, it is challenging to vary the concentration of droplets rapidly and controllably. To this end, we developed a dilution module for high-throughput screening using droplet-based microfluidics. Briefly, a nanolitre-sized sample droplet of defined concentration is trapped within a microfluidic chamber. Through a process of droplet merging, mixing and re-splitting, this droplet is combined with a series of smaller buffer droplets to generate a sequence of output droplets that define a digital concentration gradient. Importantly, the formed droplets can be merged with other reagent droplets to enable rapid chemical and biological screens. As a proof of concept, we used the dilutor to perform a high-throughput homogeneous DNA-binding assay using only nanolitres of sample.

  8. High-Throughput Intracellular Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic human pathogen that causes a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Notably, in the human host, the organism is believed to replicate solely within an intracellular compartment, predominantly within pulmonary macrophages. Consequently, successful therapy is predicated on antimicrobials penetrating into this intracellular growth niche. However, standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods test solely for extracellular growth inhibition. Here, we make use of a high-throughput assay to characterize intracellular growth inhibition activity of known antimicrobials. For select antimicrobials, high-resolution dose-response analysis was then performed to characterize and compare activity levels in both macrophage infection and axenic growth assays. Results support the superiority of several classes of nonpolar antimicrobials in abrogating intracellular growth. Importantly, our assay results show excellent correlations with prior clinical observations of antimicrobial efficacy. Furthermore, we also show the applicability of high-throughput automation to two- and three-dimensional synergy testing. High-resolution isocontour isobolograms provide in vitro support for specific combination antimicrobial therapy. Taken together, findings suggest that high-throughput screening technology may be successfully applied to identify and characterize antimicrobials that target bacterial pathogens that make use of an intracellular growth niche. PMID:26392509

  9. High throughput biotechnology in traditional fermented food industry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Xu, Rong-man; Song, Jia; Wang, Wei-min

    2010-11-01

    Traditional fermented food is not only the staple food for most of developing countries but also the key healthy food for developed countries. As the healthy function of these foods are gradually discovered, more and more high throughput biotechnologies are being used to promote the old and new industry. As a result, the microflora, manufacturing processes and product healthy function of these foods were pushed forward either in the respect of profundity or extensiveness nowadays. The application and progress of the high throughput biotechnologies into traditional fermented food industries were different from each other, which was reviewed and detailed by the catalogues of fermented milk products (yogurt, cheese), fermented sausages, fermented vegetables (kimchi, sauerkraut), fermented cereals (sourdough) and fermented beans (tempeh, natto). Given the further promotion by high throughput biotechnologies, the middle and/or down-stream process of traditional fermented foods would be optimized and the process of industrialization of local traditional fermented food having many functional factors but in small quantity would be accelerated. The article presents some promising patents on traditional fermented food industry.

  10. High-Throughput Toxicity Testing: New Strategies for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In recent years, the food industry has made progress in improving safety testing methods focused on microbial contaminants in order to promote food safety. However, food industry toxicologists must also assess the safety of food-relevant chemicals including pesticides, direct additives, and food contact substances. With the rapidly growing use of new food additives, as well as innovation in food contact substance development, an interest in exploring the use of high-throughput chemical safety testing approaches has emerged. Currently, the field of toxicology is undergoing a paradigm shift in how chemical hazards can be evaluated. Since there are tens of thousands of chemicals in use, many of which have little to no hazard information and there are limited resources (namely time and money) for testing these chemicals, it is necessary to prioritize which chemicals require further safety testing to better protect human health. Advances in biochemistry and computational toxicology have paved the way for animal-free (in vitro) high-throughput screening which can characterize chemical interactions with highly specific biological processes. Screening approaches are not novel; in fact, quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) methods that incorporate dose-response evaluation have been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry. For toxicological evaluation and prioritization, it is the throughput as well as the cost- and time-efficient nature of qHTS that makes it

  11. MEGARes: an antimicrobial resistance database for high throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lakin, Steven M; Dean, Chris; Noyes, Noelle R; Dettenwanger, Adam; Ross, Anne Spencer; Doster, Enrique; Rovira, Pablo; Abdo, Zaid; Jones, Kenneth L; Ruiz, Jaime; Belk, Keith E; Morley, Paul S; Boucher, Christina

    2017-01-04

    Antimicrobial resistance has become an imminent concern for public health. As methods for detection and characterization of antimicrobial resistance move from targeted culture and polymerase chain reaction to high throughput metagenomics, appropriate resources for the analysis of large-scale data are required. Currently, antimicrobial resistance databases are tailored to smaller-scale, functional profiling of genes using highly descriptive annotations. Such characteristics do not facilitate the analysis of large-scale, ecological sequence datasets such as those produced with the use of metagenomics for surveillance. In order to overcome these limitations, we present MEGARes (https://megares.meglab.org), a hand-curated antimicrobial resistance database and annotation structure that provides a foundation for the development of high throughput acyclical classifiers and hierarchical statistical analysis of big data. MEGARes can be browsed as a stand-alone resource through the website or can be easily integrated into sequence analysis pipelines through download. Also via the website, we provide documentation for AmrPlusPlus, a user-friendly Galaxy pipeline for the analysis of high throughput sequencing data that is pre-packaged for use with the MEGARes database.

  12. SNP marker discovery, linkage map construction and identification of QTLs for enhanced salinity tolerance in field pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Field pea (Pisum sativum L.) is a self-pollinating, diploid, cool-season food legume. Crop production is constrained by multiple biotic and abiotic stress factors, including salinity, that cause reduced growth and yield. Recent advances in genomics have permitted the development of low-cost high-throughput genotyping systems, allowing the construction of saturated genetic linkage maps for identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with traits of interest. Genetic markers in close linkage with the relevant genomic regions may then be implemented in varietal improvement programs. Results In this study, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were developed and used to generate comprehensive linkage maps for field pea. From a set of 36,188 variant nucleotide positions detected through in silico analysis, 768 were selected for genotyping of a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population. A total of 705 SNPs (91.7%) successfully detected segregating polymorphisms. In addition to SNPs, genomic and EST-derived simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were assigned to the genetic map in order to obtain an evenly distributed genome-wide coverage. Sequences associated with the mapped molecular markers were used for comparative genomic analysis with other legume species. Higher levels of conserved synteny were observed with the genomes of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. and chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) than with soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.), Lotus japonicus L. and pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan [L.] Millsp.). Parents and RIL progeny were screened at the seedling growth stage for responses to salinity stress, imposed by addition of NaCl in the watering solution at a concentration of 18 dS m-1. Salinity-induced symptoms showed normal distribution, and the severity of the symptoms increased over time. QTLs for salinity tolerance were identified on linkage groups Ps III and VII, with flanking SNP markers suitable for

  13. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  14. Scaling and automation of a high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chip.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Heng; Chen, Yu-Chih; Brien, Riley; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-10-07

    Recent research suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are the key subpopulation for tumor relapse and metastasis. Due to cancer plasticity in surface antigen and enzymatic activity markers, functional tumorsphere assays are promising alternatives for CSC identification. To reliably quantify rare CSCs (1-5%), thousands of single-cell suspension cultures are required. While microfluidics is a powerful tool in handling single cells, previous works provide limited throughput and lack automatic data analysis capability required for high-throughput studies. In this study, we present the scaling and automation of high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chips, facilitating the tracking of up to ∼10 000 cells on a chip with ∼76.5% capture rate. The presented cell capture scheme guarantees sampling a representative population from the bulk cells. To analyze thousands of single-cells with a variety of fluorescent intensities, a highly adaptable analysis program was developed for cell/sphere counting and size measurement. Using a Pluronic® F108 (poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)) coating on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a suspension culture environment was created to test a controversial hypothesis: whether larger or smaller cells are more stem-like defined by the capability to form single-cell-derived spheres. Different cell lines showed different correlations between sphere formation rate and initial cell size, suggesting heterogeneity in pathway regulation among breast cancer cell lines. More interestingly, by monitoring hundreds of spheres, we identified heterogeneity in sphere growth dynamics, indicating the cellular heterogeneity even within CSCs. These preliminary results highlight the power of unprecedented high-throughput and automation in CSC studies.

  15. Discovery of putative oocyte quality markers by comparative ExacTag proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Michael D.; Manandhar, Gaurishankar; Spate, Lee; Sutovsky, Miriam; Zimmerman, Shawn; Sachdev, Shrikesh C.; Hannink, Mark; Prather, Randall S.; Sutovsky, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Identification of the biomarkers of oocyte quality, and developmental and reprogramming potential is of importance to assisted reproductive technology in humans and animals. Experimental design PerkinElmer ExacTag™ Kit was used to label differentially proteins in pig oocyte extracts (oocyte proteome) and pig oocyte-conditioned in vitro maturation media (oocyte secretome) obtained with high- and low-quality oocytes. Results We identified 16 major proteins in the oocyte proteome that were expressed differentially in high- versus low-quality oocytes. More abundant proteins in the high-quality oocyte proteome included kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (an adaptor for ubiquitin-ligase CUL3), nuclear export factor CRM1 and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated protein kinase. Dystrophin (DMD) was more abundant in low-quality oocytes. In the secretome, we identified 110 proteins, including DMD and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, two proteins implicated in muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis, respectively. Monoubiquitin was identified in the low-quality-oocyte secretome. Conclusions and clinical implications A direct, quantitative proteomic analysis of small oocyte protein samples can identify potential markers of oocyte quality without the need for a large amount of total protein. This approach will be applied to discovery of non-invasive biomarkers of oocyte quality in assisted human reproduction and in large animal embryo transfer programs. PMID:21137054

  16. High-throughput screening of filamentous fungi using nanoliter-range droplet-based microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneyton, Thomas; Wijaya, I. Putu Mahendra; Postros, Prexilia; Najah, Majdi; Leblond, Pascal; Couvent, Angélique; Mayot, Estelle; Griffiths, Andrew D.; Drevelle, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    Filamentous fungi are an extremely important source of industrial enzymes because of their capacity to secrete large quantities of proteins. Currently, functional screening of fungi is associated with low throughput and high costs, which severely limits the discovery of novel enzymatic activities and better production strains. Here, we describe a nanoliter-range droplet-based microfluidic system specially adapted for the high-throughput sceening (HTS) of large filamentous fungi libraries for secreted enzyme activities. The platform allowed (i) compartmentalization of single spores in ~10 nl droplets, (ii) germination and mycelium growth and (iii) high-throughput sorting of fungi based on enzymatic activity. A 104 clone UV-mutated library of Aspergillus niger was screened based on α-amylase activity in just 90 minutes. Active clones were enriched 196-fold after a single round of microfluidic HTS. The platform is a powerful tool for the development of new production strains with low cost, space and time footprint and should bring enormous benefit for improving the viability of biotechnological processes.

  17. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay for DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Adam B; Eakin, Ann E; Walkup, Grant K; Rivin, Olga

    2011-06-01

    DNA ligase is the enzyme that catalyzes the formation of the backbone phosphodiester bond between the 5'-PO(4) and 3'-OH of adjacent DNA nucleotides at single-stranded nicks. These nicks occur between Okazaki fragments during replication of the lagging strand of the DNA as well as during DNA repair and recombination. As essential enzymes for DNA replication, the NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases of pathogenic bacteria are potential targets for the development of antibacterial drugs. For the purposes of drug discovery, a high-throughput assay for DNA ligase activity is invaluable. This article describes a straightforward, fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based DNA ligase assay that is well suited for high-throughput screening for DNA ligase inhibitors as well as for use in enzyme kinetics studies. Its use is demonstrated for measurement of the steady-state kinetic constants of Haemophilus influenzae NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase and for measurement of the potency of an inhibitor of this enzyme.

  18. AMBIENT: Active Modules for Bipartite Networks - using high-throughput transcriptomic data to dissect metabolic response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the continued proliferation of high-throughput biological experiments, there is a pressing need for tools to integrate the data produced in ways that produce biologically meaningful conclusions. Many microarray studies have analysed transcriptomic data from a pathway perspective, for instance by testing for KEGG pathway enrichment in sets of upregulated genes. However, the increasing availability of species-specific metabolic models provides the opportunity to analyse these data in a more objective, system-wide manner. Results Here we introduce ambient (Active Modules for Bipartite Networks), a simulated annealing approach to the discovery of metabolic subnetworks (modules) that are significantly affected by a given genetic or environmental change. The metabolic modules returned by ambient are connected parts of the bipartite network that change coherently between conditions, providing a more detailed view of metabolic changes than standard approaches based on pathway enrichment. Conclusions ambient is an effective and flexible tool for the analysis of high-throughput data in a metabolic context. The same approach can be applied to any system in which reactions (or metabolites) can be assigned a score based on some biological observation, without the limitation of predefined pathways. A Python implementation of ambient is available at http://www.theosysbio.bio.ic.ac.uk/ambient. PMID:23531303

  19. Engineering a Brain Cancer Chip for High-throughput Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yantao; Nguyen, Duong Thanh; Akay, Yasemin; Xu, Feng; Akay, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant of all human primary brain cancers, in which drug treatment is still one of the most effective treatments. However, existing drug discovery and development methods rely on the use of conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, which have been proven to be poor representatives of native physiology. Here, we developed a novel three-dimensional (3D) brain cancer chip composed of photo-polymerizable poly(ethylene) glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel for drug screening. This chip can be produced after a few seconds of photolithography and requires no silicon wafer, replica molding, and plasma bonding like microfluidic devices made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). We then cultured glioblastoma cells (U87), which formed 3D brain cancer tissues on the chip, and used the GBM chip to perform combinatorial treatment of Pitavastatin and Irinotecan. The results indicate that this chip is capable of high-throughput GBM cancer spheroids formation, multiple-simultaneous drug administration, and a massive parallel testing of drug response. Our approach is easily reproducible, and this chip has the potential to be a powerful platform in cases such as high-throughput drug screening and prolonged drug release. The chip is also commercially promising for other clinical applications, including 3D cell culture and micro-scale tissue engineering. PMID:27151082

  20. High-throughput Screening of Carbohydrate-degrading Enzymes Using Novel Insoluble Chromogenic Substrate Assay Kits

    PubMed Central

    Willats, William G. T.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates active enzymes (CAZymes) have multiple roles in vivo and are widely used for industrial processing in the biofuel, textile, detergent, paper and food industries. A deeper understanding of CAZymes is important from both fundamental biology and industrial standpoints. Vast numbers of CAZymes exist in nature (especially in microorganisms) and hundreds of thousands have been cataloged and described in the carbohydrate active enzyme database (CAZy). However, the rate of discovery of putative enzymes has outstripped our ability to biochemically characterize their activities. One reason for this is that advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing, together with associated bioinformatics tools allow for rapid identification of candidate CAZymes, but technology for determining an enzyme's biochemical characteristics has advanced more slowly. To address this technology gap, a novel high-throughput assay kit based on insoluble chromogenic substrates is described here. Two distinct substrate types were produced: Chromogenic Polymer Hydrogel (CPH) substrates (made from purified polysaccharides and proteins) and Insoluble Chromogenic Biomass (ICB) substrates (made from complex biomass materials). Both CPH and ICB substrates are provided in a 96-well high-throughput assay system. The CPH substrates can be made in four different colors, enabling them to be mixed together and thus increasing assay throughput. The protocol describes a 96-well plate assay and illustrates how this assay can be used for screening the activities of enzymes, enzyme cocktails, and broths. PMID:27684747

  1. Crystal Symmetry Algorithms in a High-Throughput Framework for Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Richard

    The high-throughput framework AFLOW that has been developed and used successfully over the last decade is improved to include fully-integrated software for crystallographic symmetry characterization. The standards used in the symmetry algorithms conform with the conventions and prescriptions given in the International Tables of Crystallography (ITC). A standard cell choice with standard origin is selected, and the space group, point group, Bravais lattice, crystal system, lattice system, and representative symmetry operations are determined. Following the conventions of the ITC, the Wyckoff sites are also determined and their labels and site symmetry are provided. The symmetry code makes no assumptions on the input cell orientation, origin, or reduction and has been integrated in the AFLOW high-throughput framework for materials discovery by adding to the existing code base and making use of existing classes and functions. The software is written in object-oriented C++ for flexibility and reuse. A performance analysis and examination of the algorithms scaling with cell size and symmetry is also reported.

  2. A High-Throughput Screen Identifies a New Natural Product with Broad-Spectrum Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ymele-Leki, Patrick; Cao, Shugeng; Sharp, Jared; Lambert, Kathleen G.; McAdam, Alexander J.; Husson, Robert N.; Tamayo, Giselle; Clardy, Jon; Watnick, Paula I.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the inexorable invasion of our hospitals and communities by drug-resistant bacteria, there is a pressing need for novel antibacterial agents. Here we report the development of a sensitive and robust but low-tech and inexpensive high-throughput metabolic screen for novel antibiotics. This screen is based on a colorimetric assay of pH that identifies inhibitors of bacterial sugar fermentation. After validation of the method, we screened over 39,000 crude extracts derived from organisms that grow in the diverse ecosystems of Costa Rica and identified 49 with reproducible antibacterial effects. An extract from an endophytic fungus was further characterized, and this led to the discovery of three novel natural products. One of these, which we named mirandamycin, has broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio cholerae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This demonstrates the power of simple high throughput screens for rapid identification of new antibacterial agents from environmental samples. PMID:22359585

  3. A grid algorithm for high throughput fitting of dose-response curve data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhong; Jadhav, Ajit; Southal, Noel; Huang, Ruili; Nguyen, Dac-Trung

    2010-10-21

    We describe a novel algorithm, Grid algorithm, and the corresponding computer program for high throughput fitting of dose-response curves that are described by the four-parameter symmetric logistic dose-response model. The Grid algorithm searches through all points in a grid of four dimensions (parameters) and finds the optimum one that corresponds to the best fit. Using simulated dose-response curves, we examined the Grid program's performance in reproducing the actual values that were used to generate the simulated data and compared it with the DRC package for the language and environment R and the XLfit add-in for Microsoft Excel. The Grid program was robust and consistently recovered the actual values for both complete and partial curves with or without noise. Both DRC and XLfit performed well on data without noise, but they were sensitive to and their performance degraded rapidly with increasing noise. The Grid program is automated and scalable to millions of dose-response curves, and it is able to process 100,000 dose-response curves from high throughput screening experiment per CPU hour. The Grid program has the potential of greatly increasing the productivity of large-scale dose-response data analysis and early drug discovery processes, and it is also applicable to many other curve fitting problems in chemical, biological, and medical sciences.

  4. High-throughput pKa screening and prediction amenable for ADME profiling.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hong; Ulander, Johan

    2006-02-01

    Recent technological advances have made it possible for several new pK(a) assays to be used in drug screening. In this review, a critical overview is provided of current new methodologies for high-throughput screening and prediction of pK(a). Typical applications of using pK(a )constants and charge state for absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) profiling and quantitative structure-activity relationship modelling complements the methodological comparisons and discussions. The experimental methods discussed include high-throughput screening of pK(a) by multiplexed capillary with ultraviolet absorbance detection on a 96-capillary format instrument, capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (CEMS) based on sample pooling, determination of pK(a) by pH gradient high-performance liquid chromatography, and measurement of pK(a) by a mixed-buffer liner pH gradient system. Comparisons of the different experimental assays are made with emphasis on the newly developed CEMS method. The current status and recent progress in computational approaches to pK(a) prediction are also discussed. In particular, the accuracy limits of simple fragment-based approaches as well as quantum mechanical methods are addressed. Examples of pK(a) prediction from in-house drug candidates as well as commercially available drug molecules are shown and an outline is provided for how drug discovery companies can integrate experiments with computational approaches for increased applications for ADME profiling.

  5. Advances in the application of high-throughput sequencing in invertebrate virology.

    PubMed

    van Aerle, R; Santos, E M

    2017-02-27

    Over the last decade, advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have revolutionised biological research, making it possible for DNA/RNA sequencing of any organism of interest to be undertaken. Sequencing approaches are now routinely used in the detection and characterisation of (novel) viruses, investigation of host-pathogen interactions, and effective development of disease treatment strategies. For the sequencing and identification of viruses of interest, metagenomics approaches using infected host tissue are frequently used, as it is not always possible to culture and isolate these pathogens. High-throughput sequencing can also be used to investigate host-pathogen interactions by investigating (temporal) transcriptomic responses of both the host and virus, potentially leading to the discovery of novel opportunities for treatment and drug targets. In addition, viruses in environmental samples (e.g. water or soil samples) can be identified using eDNA/metagenomics approaches. The promise that recent developments in sequencing brings to the field of invertebrate virology are not devoid of technical challenges, including the need for better laboratory and bioinformatics strategies to sequence and assemble virus genomes within complex tissue or environmental samples, and the difficulties associated with the annotation of the large number of novel viruses being discovered.

  6. Characterizing ncRNAs in Human Pathogenic Protists Using High-Throughput Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Lesley Joan

    2011-01-01

    ncRNAs are key genes in many human diseases including cancer and viral infection, as well as providing critical functions in pathogenic organisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses, and protists. Until now the identification and characterization of ncRNAs associated with disease has been slow or inaccurate requiring many years of testing to understand complicated RNA and protein gene relationships. High-throughput sequencing now offers the opportunity to characterize miRNAs, siRNAs, small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), and long ncRNAs on a genomic scale, making it faster and easier to clarify how these ncRNAs contribute to the disease state. However, this technology is still relatively new, and ncRNA discovery is not an application of high priority for streamlined bioinformatics. Here we summarize background concepts and practical approaches for ncRNA analysis using high-throughput sequencing, and how it relates to understanding human disease. As a case study, we focus on the parasitic protists Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis, where large evolutionary distance has meant difficulties in comparing ncRNAs with those from model eukaryotes. A combination of biological, computational, and sequencing approaches has enabled easier classification of ncRNA classes such as snoRNAs, but has also aided the identification of novel classes. It is hoped that a higher level of understanding of ncRNA expression and interaction may aid in the development of less harsh treatment for protist-based diseases. PMID:22303390

  7. A BSL-4 high-throughput screen identifies sulfonamide inhibitors of Nipah virus.

    PubMed

    Tigabu, Bersabeh; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile; Tower, Nichole; Saeed, Mohammad; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W; Noah, James W

    2014-04-01

    Nipah virus is a biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) pathogen that causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans. To identify novel small molecules that target Nipah virus replication as potential therapeutics, Southern Research Institute and Galveston National Laboratory jointly developed an automated high-throughput screening platform that is capable of testing 10,000 compounds per day within BSL-4 biocontainment. Using this platform, we screened a 10,080-compound library using a cell-based, high-throughput screen for compounds that inhibited the virus-induced cytopathic effect. From this pilot effort, 23 compounds were identified with EC50 values ranging from 3.9 to 20.0 μM and selectivities >10. Three sulfonamide compounds with EC50 values <12 μM were further characterized for their point of intervention in the viral replication cycle and for broad antiviral efficacy. Development of HTS capability under BSL-4 containment changes the paradigm for drug discovery for highly pathogenic agents because this platform can be readily modified to identify prophylactic and postexposure therapeutic candidates against other BSL-4 pathogens, particularly Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa viruses.

  8. High-throughput screening of viral entry inhibitors using pseudotyped virus.

    PubMed

    Basu, Arnab; Mills, Debra M; Bowlin, Terry L

    2010-12-01

    Virus entry into a host cell is an attractive target for therapy because propagation of virus can be blocked at an early stage, minimizing chances for the virus to acquire drug resistance. Anti-infective drug discovery for BSL-4 viruses like Ebola or Lassa hemorrhagic fever virus presents challenges due to the requirement for a BSL-4 laboratory containment facility. Pseudotyped viruses provide a surrogate model in which the native envelope glycoprotein of a BSL-2 level virus (e.g., vesicular stomatitis virus) is replaced with envelope glycoprotein of a foreign BSL-4 virus (e.g., Ebola virus). Because the envelope glycoprotein determines interaction of virus with its cellular receptors, pseudotyped viruses can mimic the viral entry process of the original virus. Moreover, they are competent for only a single cycle of infection, and therefore can be used in BSL-2 facilities. Pseudotyped viruses have been used in high-throughput screening of entry inhibitors for a number of BSL-4 level viruses. This unit includes protocols for preparing pseudotyped viruses using lentiviral vectors and use of pseudotyped viruses for high-throughput screening of viral entry inhibitors.

  9. High-throughput screening of filamentous fungi using nanoliter-range droplet-based microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Beneyton, Thomas; Wijaya, I. Putu Mahendra; Postros, Prexilia; Najah, Majdi; Leblond, Pascal; Couvent, Angélique; Mayot, Estelle; Griffiths, Andrew D.; Drevelle, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are an extremely important source of industrial enzymes because of their capacity to secrete large quantities of proteins. Currently, functional screening of fungi is associated with low throughput and high costs, which severely limits the discovery of novel enzymatic activities and better production strains. Here, we describe a nanoliter-range droplet-based microfluidic system specially adapted for the high-throughput sceening (HTS) of large filamentous fungi libraries for secreted enzyme activities. The platform allowed (i) compartmentalization of single spores in ~10 nl droplets, (ii) germination and mycelium growth and (iii) high-throughput sorting of fungi based on enzymatic activity. A 104 clone UV-mutated library of Aspergillus niger was screened based on α-amylase activity in just 90 minutes. Active clones were enriched 196-fold after a single round of microfluidic HTS. The platform is a powerful tool for the development of new production strains with low cost, space and time footprint and should bring enormous benefit for improving the viability of biotechnological processes. PMID:27270141

  10. False positives complicate ancient pathogen identifications using high-throughput shotgun sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Identification of historic pathogens is challenging since false positives and negatives are a serious risk. Environmental non-pathogenic contaminants are ubiquitous. Furthermore, public genetic databases contain limited information regarding these species. High-throughput sequencing may help reliably detect and identify historic pathogens. Results We shotgun-sequenced 8 16th-century Mixtec individuals from the site of Teposcolula Yucundaa (Oaxaca, Mexico) who are reported to have died from the huey cocoliztli (‘Great Pestilence’ in Nahautl), an unknown disease that decimated native Mexican populations during the Spanish colonial period, in order to identify the pathogen. Comparison of these sequences with those deriving from the surrounding soil and from 4 precontact individuals from the site found a wide variety of contaminant organisms that confounded analyses. Without the comparative sequence data from the precontact individuals and soil, false positives for Yersinia pestis and rickettsiosis could have been reported. Conclusions False positives and negatives remain problematic in ancient DNA analyses despite the application of high-throughput sequencing. Our results suggest that several studies claiming the discovery of ancient pathogens may need further verification. Additionally, true single molecule sequencing’s short read lengths, inability to sequence through DNA lesions, and limited ancient-DNA-specific technical development hinder its application to palaeopathology. PMID:24568097

  11. RAS - Screens & Assays - Drug Discovery

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Drug Discovery group aims to develop assays that will reveal aspects of RAS biology upon which cancer cells depend. Successful assay formats are made available for high-throughput screening programs to yield potentially effective drug compounds.

  12. Transcriptomics of In Vitro Immune-Stimulated Hemocytes from the Manila Clam Ruditapes philippinarum Using High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Rebeca; Balseiro, Pablo; Planas, Josep V.; Fuste, Berta; Beltran, Sergi; Novoa, Beatriz; Figueras, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Background The Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) is a worldwide cultured bivalve species with important commercial value. Diseases affecting this species can result in large economic losses. Because knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of the immune response in bivalves, especially clams, is scarce and fragmentary, we sequenced RNA from immune-stimulated R. philippinarum hemocytes by 454-pyrosequencing to identify genes involved in their immune defense against infectious diseases. Methodology and Principal Findings High-throughput deep sequencing of R. philippinarum using 454 pyrosequencing technology yielded 974,976 high-quality reads with an average read length of 250 bp. The reads were assembled into 51,265 contigs and the 44.7% of the translated nucleotide sequences into protein were annotated successfully. The 35 most frequently found contigs included a large number of immune-related genes, and a more detailed analysis showed the presence of putative members of several immune pathways and processes like the apoptosis, the toll like signaling pathway and the complement cascade. We have found sequences from molecules never described in bivalves before, especially in the complement pathway where almost all the components are present. Conclusions This study represents the first transcriptome analysis using 454-pyrosequencing conducted on R. philippinarum focused on its immune system. Our results will provide a rich source of data to discover and identify new genes, which will serve as a basis for microarray construction and the study of gene expression as well as for the identification of genetic markers. The discovery of new immune sequences was very productive and resulted in a large variety of contigs that may play a role in the defense mechanisms of Ruditapes philippinarum. PMID:22536348

  13. Multilayer polymer microchip capillary array electrophoresis devices with integrated on-chip labeling for high-throughput protein analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ming; Wang, Qingsong; Patterson, James E.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2011-01-01

    It is desirable to have inexpensive, high-throughput systems that integrate multiple sample analysis processes and procedures, for applications in biology, chemical analysis, drug discovery, and disease screening. In this paper, we demonstrate multilayer polymer microfluidic devices with integrated on-chip labeling and parallel electrophoretic separation of up to 8 samples. Microchannels were distributed in two different layers and connected through interlayer through-holes in the middle layer. A single set of electrophoresis reservoirs and one fluorescent label reservoir address parallel analysis units for up to 8 samples. Individual proteins and a mixture of cancer biomarkers have been successfully labeled on-chip and separated in parallel with this system. A detection limit of 600 ng/mL was obtained for heat shock protein 90. Our integrated on-chip labeling microdevices show great potential for low-cost, simplified, rapid and high-throughput analysis. PMID:21449615

  14. Multilayer polymer microchip capillary array electrophoresis devices with integrated on-chip labeling for high-throughput protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ming; Wang, Qingsong; Patterson, James E; Woolley, Adam T

    2011-05-01

    It is desirable to have inexpensive, high-throughput systems that integrate multiple sample analysis processes and procedures, for applications in biology, chemical analysis, drug discovery, and disease screening. In this paper, we demonstrate multilayer polymer microfluidic devices with integrated on-chip labeling and parallel electrophoretic separation of up to eight samples. Microchannels were distributed in two different layers and connected through interlayer through-holes in the middle layer. A single set of electrophoresis reservoirs and one fluorescent label reservoir address parallel analysis units for up to eight samples. Individual proteins and a mixture of cancer biomarkers have been successfully labeled on-chip and separated in parallel with this system. A detection limit of 600 ng/mL was obtained for heat shock protein 90. Our integrated on-chip labeling microdevices show great potential for low-cost, simplified, rapid, and high-throughput analysis.

  15. Review of high-throughput techniques for detecting solid phase Transformation from material libraries produced by combinatorial methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2005-01-01

    High-throughput measurement techniques are reviewed for solid phase transformation from materials produced by combinatorial methods, which are highly efficient concepts to fabricate large variety of material libraries with different compositional gradients on a single wafer. Combinatorial methods hold high potential for reducing the time and costs associated with the development of new materials, as compared to time-consuming and labor-intensive conventional methods that test large batches of material, one- composition at a time. These high-throughput techniques can be automated to rapidly capture and analyze data, using the entire material library on a single wafer, thereby accelerating the pace of materials discovery and knowledge generation for solid phase transformations. The review covers experimental techniques that are applicable to inorganic materials such as shape memory alloys, graded materials, metal hydrides, ferric materials, semiconductors and industrial alloys.

  16. Combinatorial Synthesis of and high-throughput protein release from polymer film and nanoparticle libraries.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Latrisha K; Chavez-Santoscoy, Ana V; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2012-09-06

    antigenicity; in vitro cellular toxicity, cytokine production, surface marker expression, adhesion, proliferation and differentiation; and in vivo biodistribution and mucoadhesion(1-11). The combinatorial method developed herein enables high-throughput polymer synthesis and fabrication of protein-loaded nanoparticle and film libraries, which can, in turn, be screened in vitro and in vivo for optimization of biomaterial performance.

  17. High-Throughput Construction of Intron-Containing Hairpin RNA Vectors for RNAi in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Pu; Shen, Wentao; Gao, XinZheng; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng; Duan, Jun

    2012-01-01

    With the wide use of double-stranded RNA interference (RNAi) for the analysis of gene function in plants, a high-throughput system for making hairpin RNA (hpRNA) constructs is in great demand. Here, we describe a novel restriction-ligation approach that provides a simple but efficient construction of intron-containing hpRNA (ihpRNA) vectors. The system takes advantage of the type IIs restriction enzyme BsaI and our new plant RNAi vector pRNAi-GG based on the Golden Gate (GG) cloning. This method requires only a single PCR product of the gene of interest flanked with BsaI recognition sequence, which can then be cloned into pRNAi-GG at both sense and antisense orientations simultaneously to form ihpRNA construct. The process, completed in one tube with one restriction-ligation step, produced a recombinant ihpRNA with high efficiency and zero background. We demonstrate the utility of the ihpRNA constructs generated with pRNAi-GG vector for the effective silencing of various individual endogenous and exogenous marker genes as well as two genes simultaneously. This method provides a novel and high-throughput platform for large-scale analysis of plant functional genomics. PMID:22675447

  18. Non-destructive high-throughput DNA extraction and genotyping methods for cotton seeds and seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuting; Hoegenauer, Kevin A; Maeda, Andrea B V; Wang, Fei; Stelly, David M; Nichols, Robert L; Jones, Don C

    2015-05-01

    Extensive use of targeted PCR-based genotyping is precluded for many plant research laboratories by the cost and time required for DNA extraction. Using cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) as a model for plants with medium-sized seeds, we report here manual procedures for inexpensive non-destructive high-throughput extraction of DNA suitable for PCR-based genotyping of large numbers of individual seeds and seedlings. By sampling only small amounts of cotyledon tissue of ungerminated seed or young seedlings, damage is minimized, and viability is not discernibly affected. The yield of DNA from each seed or seedling is typically sufficient for 1000 or 500 PCR reactions, respectively. For seeds, the tissue sampling procedure relies on a modified 96-well plate that is used subsequently for seed storage. For seeds and seedlings, the DNA is extracted in a strongly basic DNA buffer that is later neutralized and diluted. Extracts can be used directly for high-throughput PCR-based genotyping. Any laboratory can thus extract DNA from thousands of individual seeds/seedlings per person-day at a very modest cost for consumables (~$0.05 per sample). Being non-destructive, our approach enables a wide variety of time- and resource-saving applications, such as marker-assisted selection (MAS), before planting, transplanting, and flowering.

  19. Cell-based screening using high-throughput flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Black, Christopher B; Duensing, Thomas D; Trinkle, Linda S; Dunlay, R Terry

    2011-02-01

    This review describes the use of high-throughput flow cytometry for performing multiplexed cell-based and bead-based screens. With the many advances in cell-based analysis and screening, flow cytometry has historically been underutilized as a screening tool largely due to the limitations in handling large numbers of samples. However, there has been a resurgence in the use of flow cytometry due to a combination of innovations around instrumentation and a growing need for cell-based and bead-based applications. The HTFC™ Screening System (IntelliCyt Corporation, Albuquerque, NM) is a novel flow cytometry-based screening platform that incorporates a fast sample-loading technology, HyperCyt®, with a two-laser, six-parameter flow cytometer and powerful data analysis capabilities. The system is capable of running multiplexed screening assays at speeds of up to 40 wells per minute, enabling the processing of a 96- and 384-well plates in as little as 3 and 12 min, respectively. Embedded in the system is HyperView®, a data analysis software package that allows rapid identification of hits from multiplexed high-throughput flow cytometry screening campaigns. In addition, the software is incorporated into a server-based data management platform that enables seamless data accessibility and collaboration across multiple sites. High-throughput flow cytometry using the HyperCyt technology has been applied to numerous assay areas and screening campaigns, including efflux transporters, whole cell and receptor binding assays, functional G-protein-coupled receptor screening, in vitro toxicology, and antibody screening.

  20. Application of single nucleotide polymorphism markers to chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta: discovery, genotyping and linkage phase resolution.

    PubMed

    Garvin, M R; Gharrett, A J

    2010-12-01

    This study describes (1) the application of new methods to the discovery of informative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta, (2) a method to resolve the linkage phase of closely linked SNPs and (3) a method to inexpensively genotype them. Finally, it demonstrates that these SNPs provide information that discriminates among O. keta populations from different geographical regions of the northern Pacific Ocean. These informative markers can be used in conjunction with mixed-stock analysis to learn about the spatial and temporal marine distributions of O. keta and the factors that influence the distributions.

  1. High-Throughput Sequencing: A Roadmap Toward Community Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Poisot, Timothée; Péquin, Bérangère; Gravel, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing is becoming increasingly important in microbial ecology, yet it is surprisingly under-used to generate or test biogeographic hypotheses. In this contribution, we highlight how adding these methods to the ecologist toolbox will allow the detection of new patterns, and will help our understanding of the structure and dynamics of diversity. Starting with a review of ecological questions that can be addressed, we move on to the technical and analytical issues that will benefit from an increased collaboration between different disciplines. PMID:23610649

  2. Genomic outlier detection in high-throughput data analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debashis

    2013-01-01

    In the analysis of high-throughput data, a very common goal is the detection of genes or of differential expression between two groups or classes. A recent finding from the scientific literature in prostate cancer demonstrates that by searching for a different pattern of differential expression, new candidate oncogenes might be found. In this chapter, we discuss the statistical problem, termed oncogene outlier detection, and discuss a variety of proposals to this problem. A statistical model in the multiclass situation is described; links with multiple testing concepts are established. Some new nonparametric procedures are described and compared to existing methods using simulation studies.

  3. Extended length microchannels for high density high throughput electrophoresis systems

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2000-01-01

    High throughput electrophoresis systems which provide extended well-to-read distances on smaller substrates, thus compacting the overall systems. The electrophoresis systems utilize a high density array of microchannels for electrophoresis analysis with extended read lengths. The microchannel geometry can be used individually or in conjunction to increase the effective length of a separation channel while minimally impacting the packing density of channels. One embodiment uses sinusoidal microchannels, while another embodiment uses plural microchannels interconnected by a via. The extended channel systems can be applied to virtually any type of channel confined chromatography.

  4. A High-Throughput Strategy for Dissecting Mammalian Genetic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Stockman, Victoria B.; Ghamsari, Lila; Lasso, Gorka; Honig, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive delineation of complex cellular networks requires high-throughput interrogation of genetic interactions. To address this challenge, we describe the development of a multiplex combinatorial strategy to assess pairwise genetic interactions using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing and next-generation sequencing. We characterize the performance of combinatorial genome editing and analysis using different promoter and gRNA designs and identified regions of the chimeric RNA that are compatible with next-generation sequencing preparation and quantification. This approach is an important step towards elucidating genetic networks relevant to human diseases and the development of more efficient Cas9-based therapeutics. PMID:27936040

  5. Adaptive Sampling for High Throughput Data Using Similarity Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskaya, V.; Sales, A. P.

    2015-05-06

    The need for adaptive sampling arises in the context of high throughput data because the rates of data arrival are many orders of magnitude larger than the rates at which they can be analyzed. A very fast decision must therefore be made regarding the value of each incoming observation and its inclusion in the analysis. In this report we discuss one approach to adaptive sampling, based on the new data point’s similarity to the other data points being considered for inclusion. We present preliminary results for one real and one synthetic data set.

  6. Orchestrating high-throughput genomic analysis with Bioconductor

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Wolfgang; Carey, Vincent J.; Gentleman, Robert; Anders, Simon; Carlson, Marc; Carvalho, Benilton S.; Bravo, Hector Corrada; Davis, Sean; Gatto, Laurent; Girke, Thomas; Gottardo, Raphael; Hahne, Florian; Hansen, Kasper D.; Irizarry, Rafael A.; Lawrence, Michael; Love, Michael I.; MacDonald, James; Obenchain, Valerie; Oleś, Andrzej K.; Pagès, Hervé; Reyes, Alejandro; Shannon, Paul; Smyth, Gordon K.; Tenenbaum, Dan; Waldron, Levi; Morgan, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Bioconductor is an open-source, open-development software project for the analysis and comprehension of high-throughput data in genomics and molecular biology. The project aims to enable interdisciplinary research, collaboration and rapid development of scientific software. Based on the statistical programming language R, Bioconductor comprises 934 interoperable packages contributed by a large, diverse community of scientists. Packages cover a range of bioinformatic and statistical applications. They undergo formal initial review and continuous automated testing. We present an overview for prospective users and contributors. PMID:25633503

  7. High throughput computing: a solution for scientific analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, M.

    2011-01-01

    handle job failures due to hardware, software, or network interruptions (obviating the need to manually resubmit the job after each stoppage); be affordable; and most importantly, allow us to complete very large, complex analyses that otherwise would not even be possible. In short, we envisioned a job-management system that would take advantage of unused FORT CPUs within a local area network (LAN) to effectively distribute and run highly complex analytical processes. What we found was a solution that uses High Throughput Computing (HTC) and High Performance Computing (HPC) systems to do exactly that (Figure 1).

  8. Live Cell Optical Sensing for High Throughput Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ye

    Live cell optical sensing employs label-free optical biosensors to non-invasively measure stimulus-induced dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) in live cells within the sensing volume of the biosensor. The resultant DMR signal is an integrated cellular response, and reflects cell signaling mediated through the cellular target(s) with which the stimulus intervenes. This article describes the uses of live cell optical sensing for probing cell biology and ligand pharmacology, with an emphasis of resonant waveguide grating biosensor cellular assays for high throughput applications.

  9. SSFinder: high throughput CRISPR-Cas target sites prediction tool.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Sharma, Shailesh

    2014-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system facilitates targeted genome editing in organisms. Despite high demand of this system, finding a reliable tool for the determination of specific target sites in large genomic data remained challenging. Here, we report SSFinder, a python script to perform high throughput detection of specific target sites in large nucleotide datasets. The SSFinder is a user-friendly tool, compatible with Windows, Mac OS, and Linux operating systems, and freely available online.

  10. High-throughput expression in microplate format in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Holz, Caterina; Lang, Christine

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a high-throughput technology that allows parallel expression, purification, and analysis of large numbers of cloned cDNAs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The technology is based on a vector for intracellular protein expression under control of the inducible CUP1 promoter, where the gene products are fused to specific peptide sequences. These N-terminal and C-terminal epitope tags allow the immunological identification and purification of the gene products independent of the protein produced. By introducing the method of recombinational cloning we avoid time-consuming re-cloning steps and enable the easy switching between different expression vectors and host systems.

  11. Analysis of High-Throughput ELISA Microarray Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-02-23

    Our research group develops analytical methods and software for the high-throughput analysis of quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays. ELISA microarrays differ from DNA microarrays in several fundamental aspects and most algorithms for analysis of DNA microarray data are not applicable to ELISA microarrays. In this review, we provide an overview of the steps involved in ELISA microarray data analysis and how the statistically sound algorithms we have developed provide an integrated software suite to address the needs of each data-processing step. The algorithms discussed are available in a set of open-source software tools (http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT).

  12. Developing soluble polymers for high-throughput synthetic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Spanka, Carsten; Wentworth, Paul; Janda, Kim D

    2002-05-01

    Soluble polymers have emerged as viable alternatives to resin supports across the broad spectrum of high-throughput organic chemistry. As the application of these supports become more widespread, issues such as broad-spectrum solubility and loading are becoming limiting factors and therefore new polymers are required to overcome such limitations. This article details the approach made within our group to new soluble polymer supports and specifically focuses on parallel libraries of block copolymers, de novo poly(styrene-co-chloromethylstyrene), PEG- stealth stars, and substituted poly(norbornylene)s.

  13. Computational Proteomics: High-throughput Analysis for Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, William R.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2007-01-03

    High-throughput (HTP) proteomics is a rapidly developing field that offers the global profiling of proteins from a biological system. The HTP technological advances are fueling a revolution in biology, enabling analyses at the scales of entire systems (e.g., whole cells, tumors, or environmental communities). However, simply identifying the proteins in a cell is insufficient for understanding the underlying complexity and operating mechanisms of the overall system. Systems level investigations are relying more and more on computational analyses, especially in the field of proteomics generating large-scale global data.

  14. High-throughput quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Arany, Zoltan P

    2008-07-01

    Recent technical advances in quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) have allowed for extensive miniaturization, thereby rendering the technique amenable to high-throughput assays. Large numbers of different nucleic acids can now rapidly be measured quantitatively. Many investigations can benefit from this approach, including determination of gene expression in hundreds of samples, determination of hundreds of genes in a few samples, or even quantification of nucleic acids other than mRNA. A simple technique is described here to quantify 1880 transcripts of choice from any number of starting RNA samples.

  15. An integrated in vitro and in vivo high throughput screen identifies treatment leads for ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Jennifer M.; Shelat, Anang A.; Carcaboso, Angel Montero; Kranenburg, Tanya A.; Arnold, Alexander; Boulos, Nidal; Wright, Karen; Johnson, Robert A.; Poppleton, Helen; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M.; Feau, Clementine; Phoenix, Timothy; Gibson, Paul; Zhu, Liqin; Tong, Yiai; Eden, Chris; Ellison, David W.; Priebe, Waldemar; Koul, Dimpy; Yung, W. K. Alfred; Gajjar, Amar; Stewart, Clinton F.; Guy, R. Kip; Gilbertson, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Using a mouse model of ependymoma—a chemoresistant brain tumor—we combined multi-cell high-throughput screening (HTS), kinome-wide binding assays, and in vivo efficacy studies, to identify potential treatments with predicted toxicity against neural stem cells (NSC). We identified kinases within the insulin signaling pathway and centrosome cycle as regulators of ependymoma cell proliferation, and their corresponding inhibitors as potential therapies. FDA approved drugs not currently used to treat ependymoma were also identified that posses selective toxicity against ependymoma cells relative to normal NSCs both in vitro and in vivo e.g., 5-fluoruracil. Our comprehensive approach advances understanding of the biology and treatment of ependymoma including the discovery of several treatment leads for immediate clinical translation. PMID:21907928

  16. Resonant waveguide grating imagers for single cell analysis and high throughput screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ye

    2015-08-01

    Resonant waveguide grating (RWG) systems illuminate an array of diffractive nanograting waveguide structures in microtiter plate to establish evanescent wave for measuring tiny changes in local refractive index arising from the dynamic mass redistribution of living cells upon stimulation. Whole-plate RWG imager enables high-throughput profiling and screening of drugs. Microfluidics RWG imager not only manifests distinct receptor signaling waves, but also differentiates long-acting agonism and antagonism. Spatially resolved RWG imager allows for single cell analysis including receptor signaling heterogeneity and the invasion of cancer cells in a spheroidal structure through 3-dimensional extracellular matrix. High frequency RWG imager permits real-time detection of drug-induced cardiotoxicity. The wide coverage in target, pathway, assay, and cell phenotype has made RWG systems powerful tool in both basic research and early drug discovery process.

  17. High throughput solution of Boltzmann transport equation: phonons, thermal conductivity and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plata, Jose; Nath, Pinku; Usanmaz, Demet; Toher, Cormac; Fornari, Marco; Buongiorno Nardelli, Marco; Curtarolo, Stefano

    Quantatively accurate predictions of the lattice thermal conductivity have important implications for key technologies ranging from thermoelectrics to thermal barrier coatings. Of the many approaches with varying computational costs and accuracy, which have been developed in the last years, the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is the only approach that guarantees accurate predictions of this property. We have implemented this methodology in the AFLOW high throughput materials science framework, which enables us to compute these anharmonic force constants and solve BTE to obtain the lattice thermal conductivity and related properties automatically in a single step. This technique can be combined with less expensive methodologies previously implemented in AFLOW to create an efficient and fast framework to accelerate the discovery of materials with interesting thermal properties.

  18. Droplet-based microfluidics platform for ultra-high-throughput bioprospecting of cellulolytic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Najah, Majdi; Calbrix, Raphaël; Mahendra-Wijaya, I Putu; Beneyton, Thomas; Griffiths, Andrew D; Drevelle, Antoine

    2014-12-18

    Discovery of microorganisms producing enzymes that can efficiently hydrolyze cellulosic biomass is of great importance for biofuel production. To date, however, only a miniscule fraction of natural biodiversity has been tested because of the relatively low throughput of screening systems and their limitation to screening only culturable microorganisms. Here, we describe an ultra-high-throughput droplet-based microfluidic system that allowed the screening of over 100,000 cells in less than 20 min. Uncultured bacteria from a wheat stubble field were screened directly by compartmentalization of single bacteria in 20 pl droplets containing a fluorogenic cellobiohydrolase substrate. Sorting of droplets based on cellobiohydrolase activity resulted in a bacterial population with 17- and 7-fold higher cellobiohydrolase and endogluconase activity, respectively, and very different taxonomic diversity than when selected for growth on medium containing starch and carboxymethylcellulose as carbon source.

  19. Field-based high throughput phenotyping rapidly identifies genomic regions controlling yield components in rice

    PubMed Central

    Tanger, Paul; Klassen, Stephen; Mojica, Julius P.; Lovell, John T.; Moyers, Brook T.; Baraoidan, Marietta; Naredo, Maria Elizabeth B.; McNally, Kenneth L.; Poland, Jesse; Bush, Daniel R.; Leung, Hei; Leach, Jan E.; McKay, John K.

    2017-01-01

    To ensure food security in the face of population growth, decreasing water and land for agriculture, and increasing climate variability, crop yields must increase faster than the current rates. Increased yields will require implementing novel approaches in genetic discovery and breeding. Here we demonstrate the potential of field-based high throughput phenotyping (HTP) on a large recombinant population of rice to identify genetic variation underlying important traits. We find that detecting quantitative trait loci (QTL) with HTP phenotyping is as accurate and effective as traditional labor-intensive measures of flowering time, height, biomass, grain yield, and harvest index. Genetic mapping in this population, derived from a cross of an modern cultivar (IR64) with a landrace (Aswina), identified four alleles with negative effect on grain yield that are fixed in IR64, demonstrating the potential for HTP of large populations as a strategy for the second green revolution. PMID:28220807

  20. A universal homogeneous assay for high-throughput determination of binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Felix; Ayaz, Pelin; Fernández-Montalván, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for assay technologies that enable accurate, cost-effective, and high-throughput measurements of drug-target association and dissociation rates. Here we introduce a universal homogeneous kinetic probe competition assay (kPCA) that meets these requirements. The time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer (TR-FRET) procedure combines the versatility of radioligand binding assays with the advantages of homogeneous nonradioactive techniques while approaching the time resolution of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and related biosensors. We show application of kPCA for three important target classes: enzymes, protein-protein interactions, and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This method is capable of supporting early stages of drug discovery with large amounts of kinetic information.

  1. Bioluminescence-Based High-Throughput Screen Identifies Pharmacological Agents That Target Neurotransmitter Signaling in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Improgo, Ma. Reina D.; Johnson, Christopher W.; Tapper, Andrew R.; Gardner, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Frontline treatment of small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) relies heavily on chemotherapeutic agents and radiation therapy. Though SCLC patients respond well to initial cycles of chemotherapy, they eventually develop resistance. Identification of novel therapies against SCLC is therefore imperative. Methods and Findings We have designed a bioluminescence-based cell viability assay for high-throughput screening of anti-SCLC agents. The assay was first validated via standard pharmacological agents and RNA interference using two human SCLC cell lines. We then utilized the assay in a high-throughput screen using the LOPAC1280 compound library. The screening identified several drugs that target classic cancer signaling pathways as well as neuroendocrine markers in SCLC. In particular, perturbation of dopaminergic and serotonergic signaling inhibits SCLC cell viability. Conclusions The convergence of our pharmacological data with key SCLC pathway components reiterates the importance of neurotransmitter signaling in SCLC etiology and points to possible leads for drug development. PMID:21931655

  2. High-throughput technology for novel SO2 oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loskyll, Jonas; Stoewe, Klaus; Maier, Wilhelm F.

    2011-10-01

    We review the state of the art and explain the need for better SO2 oxidation catalysts for the production of sulfuric acid. A high-throughput technology has been developed for the study of potential catalysts in the oxidation of SO2 to SO3. High-throughput methods are reviewed and the problems encountered with their adaptation to the corrosive conditions of SO2 oxidation are described. We show that while emissivity-corrected infrared thermography (ecIRT) can be used for primary screening, it is prone to errors because of the large variations in the emissivity of the catalyst surface. UV-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometry was selected instead as a reliable analysis method of monitoring the SO2 conversion. Installing plain sugar absorbents at reactor outlets proved valuable for the detection and quantitative removal of SO3 from the product gas before the UV-Vis analysis. We also overview some elements used for prescreening and those remaining after the screening of the first catalyst generations.

  3. A Microchip for High-throughput Axon Growth Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Jeong, Sehoon; Koo, Chiwan; Han, Arum; Park, Jaewon

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently known that not only the presence of inhibitory molecules associated with myelin but also the reduced growth capability of the axons limit mature central nervous system (CNS) axonal regeneration after injury. Conventional axon growth studies are typically conducted using multi-well cell culture plates that are very challenging to investigate localized effects of drugs and limited to low throughput. Unfortunately, there is currently no other in vitro tools that allow investigating localized axonal responses to biomolecules in high-throughput for screening potential drugs that might promote axonal growth. We have developed a compartmentalized neuron culture platform enabling localized biomolecular treatments in parallel to axons that are physically and fluidically isolated from their neuronal somata. The 24 axon compartments in the developed platform are designed to perform four sets of six different localized biomolecular treatments simultaneously on a single device. In addition, the novel microfluidic configuration allows culture medium of 24 axon compartments to be replenished altogether by a single aspiration process, making high-throughput drug screening a reality. PMID:27928514

  4. Computational analysis of high-throughput flow cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J Paul; Rajwa, Bartek; Patsekin, Valery; Davisson, Vincent Jo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Flow cytometry has been around for over 40 years, but only recently has the opportunity arisen to move into the high-throughput domain. The technology is now available and is highly competitive with imaging tools under the right conditions. Flow cytometry has, however, been a technology that has focused on its unique ability to study single cells and appropriate analytical tools are readily available to handle this traditional role of the technology. Areas covered Expansion of flow cytometry to a high-throughput (HT) and high-content technology requires both advances in hardware and analytical tools. The historical perspective of flow cytometry operation as well as how the field has changed and what the key changes have been discussed. The authors provide a background and compelling arguments for moving toward HT flow, where there are many innovative opportunities. With alternative approaches now available for flow cytometry, there will be a considerable number of new applications. These opportunities show strong capability for drug screening and functional studies with cells in suspension. Expert opinion There is no doubt that HT flow is a rich technology awaiting acceptance by the pharmaceutical community. It can provide a powerful phenotypic analytical toolset that has the capacity to change many current approaches to HT screening. The previous restrictions on the technology, based on its reduced capacity for sample throughput, are no longer a major issue. Overcoming this barrier has transformed a mature technology into one that can focus on systems biology questions not previously considered possible. PMID:22708834

  5. A medium or high throughput protein refolding assay.

    PubMed

    Cowieson, Nathan P; Wensley, Beth; Robin, Gautier; Guncar, Gregor; Forwood, Jade; Hume, David A; Kobe, Bostjan; Martin, Jennifer L

    2008-01-01

    Expression of insoluble protein in E. coli is a major bottleneck of high throughput structural biology projects. Refolding proteins into native conformations from inclusion bodies could significantly increase the number of protein targets that can be taken on to structural studies. This chapter presents a simple assay for screening insoluble protein targets and identifying those that are most amenable to refolding. The assay is based on the observation that when proteins are refolded while bound to metal affinity resin, misfolded proteins are generally not eluted by imidazole. This difference is exploited here to distinguish between folded and misfolded proteins. Two implementations of the assay are described. The assay fits well into a standard high throughput structural biology pipeline, because it begins with the inclusion body preparations that are a byproduct of small-scale, automated expression and purification trials and does not require additional facilities. Two formats of the assay are described, a manual assay that is useful for screening small numbers of targets, and an automated implementation that is useful for large numbers of targets.

  6. High-throughput technology for novel SO2 oxidation catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Loskyll, Jonas; Stoewe, Klaus; Maier, Wilhelm F

    2011-01-01

    We review the state of the art and explain the need for better SO2 oxidation catalysts for the production of sulfuric acid. A high-throughput technology has been developed for the study of potential catalysts in the oxidation of SO2 to SO3. High-throughput methods are reviewed and the problems encountered with their adaptation to the corrosive conditions of SO2 oxidation are described. We show that while emissivity-corrected infrared thermography (ecIRT) can be used for primary screening, it is prone to errors because of the large variations in the emissivity of the catalyst surface. UV-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometry was selected instead as a reliable analysis method of monitoring the SO2 conversion. Installing plain sugar absorbents at reactor outlets proved valuable for the detection and quantitative removal of SO3 from the product gas before the UV-Vis analysis. We also overview some elements used for prescreening and those remaining after the screening of the first catalyst generations. PMID:27877427

  7. Compression of Structured High-Throughput Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Campagne, Fabien; Dorff, Kevin C.; Chambwe, Nyasha; Robinson, James T.; Mesirov, Jill P.

    2013-01-01

    Large biological datasets are being produced at a rapid pace and create substantial storage challenges, particularly in the domain of high-throughput sequencing (HTS). Most approaches currently used to store HTS data are either unable to quickly adapt to the requirements of new sequencing or analysis methods (because they do not support schema evolution), or fail to provide state of the art compression of the datasets. We have devised new approaches to store HTS data that support seamless data schema evolution and compress datasets substantially better than existing approaches. Building on these new approaches, we discuss and demonstrate how a multi-tier data organization can dramatically reduce the storage, computational and network burden of collecting, analyzing, and archiving large sequencing datasets. For instance, we show that spliced RNA-Seq alignments can be stored in less than 4% the size of a BAM file with perfect data fidelity. Compared to the previous compression state of the art, these methods reduce dataset size more than 40% when storing exome, gene expression or DNA methylation datasets. The approaches have been integrated in a comprehensive suite of software tools (http://goby.campagnelab.org) that support common analyses for a range of high-throughput sequencing assays. PMID:24260313

  8. Iterative ACORN as a high throughput tool in structural genomics.

    PubMed

    Selvanayagam, S; Velmurugan, D; Yamane, T

    2006-08-01

    High throughput macromolecular structure determination is very essential in structural genomics as the available number of sequence information far exceeds the number of available 3D structures. ACORN, a freely available resource in the CCP4 suite of programs is a comprehensive and efficient program for phasing in the determination of protein structures, when atomic resolution data are available. ACORN with the automatic model-building program ARP/wARP and refinement program REFMAC is a suitable combination for the high throughput structural genomics. ACORN can also be run with secondary structural elements like helices and sheets as inputs with high resolution data. In situations, where ACORN phasing is not sufficient for building the protein model, the fragments (incomplete model/dummy atoms) can again be used as a starting input. Iterative ACORN is proved to work efficiently in the subsequent model building stages in congerin (PDB-ID: lis3) and catalase (PDB-ID: 1gwe) for which models are available.

  9. Benchmarking Procedures for High-Throughput Context Specific Reconstruction Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Maria P.; Pfau, Thomas; Sauter, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in high-throughput data acquisition has shifted the focus from data generation to processing and understanding of how to integrate collected information. Context specific reconstruction based on generic genome scale models like ReconX or HMR has the potential to become a diagnostic and treatment tool tailored to the analysis of specific individuals. The respective computational algorithms require a high level of predictive power, robustness and sensitivity. Although multiple context specific reconstruction algorithms were published in the last 10 years, only a fraction of them is suitable for model building based on human high-throughput data. Beside other reasons, this might be due to problems arising from the limitation to only one metabolic target function or arbitrary thresholding. This review describes and analyses common validation methods used for testing model building algorithms. Two major methods can be distinguished: consistency testing and comparison based testing. The first is concerned with robustness against noise, e.g., missing data due to the impossibility to distinguish between the signal and the background of non-specific binding of probes in a microarray experiment, and whether distinct sets of input expressed genes corresponding to i.e., different tissues yield distinct models. The latter covers methods comparing sets of functionalities, comparison with existing networks or additional databases. We test those methods on several available algorithms and deduce properties of these algorithms that can be compared with future developments. The set of tests performed, can therefore serve as a benchmarking procedure for future algorithms. PMID:26834640

  10. High throughput SNP detection system based on magnetic nanoparticles separation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Jia, Yingying; Ma, Man; Li, Zhiyang; Liu, Hongna; Li, Song; Deng, Yan; Zhang, Liming; Lu, Zhuoxuan; Wang, Wei; He, Nongyue

    2013-02-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was one-base variations in DNA sequence that can often be helpful to find genes associations for hereditary disease, communicable disease and so on. We developed a high throughput SNP detection system based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) separation and dual-color hybridization or single base extension. This system includes a magnetic separation unit for sample separation, three high precision robot arms for pipetting and microtiter plate transferring respectively, an accurate temperature control unit for PCR and DNA hybridization and a high accurate and sensitive optical signal detection unit for fluorescence detection. The cyclooxygenase-2 gene promoter region--65G > C polymorphism locus SNP genotyping experiment for 48 samples from the northern Jiangsu area has been done to verify that if this system can simplify manual operation of the researchers, save time and improve efficiency in SNP genotyping experiments. It can realize sample preparation, target sequence amplification, signal detection and data analysis automatically and can be used in clinical molecule diagnosis and high throughput fluorescence immunological detection and so on.

  11. High-throughput screening to enhance oncolytic virus immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Allan, KJ; Stojdl, David F; Swift, SL

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens can rapidly scan and capture large amounts of information across multiple biological parameters. Although many screens have been designed to uncover potential new therapeutic targets capable of crippling viruses that cause disease, there have been relatively few directed at improving the efficacy of viruses that are used to treat disease. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are biotherapeutic agents with an inherent specificity for treating malignant disease. Certain OV platforms – including those based on herpes simplex virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus – have shown success against solid tumors in advanced clinical trials. Yet, many of these OVs have only undergone minimal engineering to solidify tumor specificity, with few extra modifications to manipulate additional factors. Several aspects of the interaction between an OV and a tumor-bearing host have clear value as targets to improve therapeutic outcomes. At the virus level, these include delivery to the tumor, infectivity, productivity, oncolysis, bystander killing, spread, and persistence. At the host level, these include engaging the immune system and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review the chemical- and genome-based high-throughput screens that have been performed to manipulate such parameters during OV infection and analyze their impact on therapeutic efficacy. We further explore emerging themes that represent key areas of focus for future research. PMID:27579293

  12. Plant chip for high-throughput phenotyping of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huawei; Xu, Zhen; Aluru, Maneesha R; Dong, Liang

    2014-04-07

    We report on the development of a vertical and transparent microfluidic chip for high-throughput phenotyping of Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Multiple Arabidopsis seeds can be germinated and grown hydroponically over more than two weeks in the chip, thus enabling large-scale and quantitative monitoring of plant phenotypes. The novel vertical arrangement of this microfluidic device not only allows for normal gravitropic growth of the plants but also, more importantly, makes it convenient to continuously monitor phenotypic changes in plants at the whole organismal level, including seed germination and root and shoot growth (hypocotyls, cotyledons, and leaves), as well as at the cellular level. We also developed a hydrodynamic trapping method to automatically place single seeds into seed holding sites of the device and to avoid potential damage to seeds that might occur during manual loading. We demonstrated general utility of this microfluidic device by showing clear visible phenotypes of the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis, and we also showed changes occurring during plant-pathogen interactions at different developmental stages. Arabidopsis plants grown in the device maintained normal morphological and physiological behaviour, and distinct phenotypic variations consistent with a priori data were observed via high-resolution images taken in real time. Moreover, the timeline for different developmental stages for plants grown in this device was highly comparable to growth using a conventional agar plate method. This prototype plant chip technology is expected to lead to the establishment of a powerful experimental and cost-effective framework for high-throughput and precise plant phenotyping.

  13. Genotype-Frequency Estimation from High-Throughput Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Maruki, Takahiro; Lynch, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Rapidly improving high-throughput sequencing technologies provide unprecedented opportunities for carrying out population-genomic studies with various organisms. To take full advantage of these methods, it is essential to correctly estimate allele and genotype frequencies, and here we present a maximum-likelihood method that accomplishes these tasks. The proposed method fully accounts for uncertainties resulting from sequencing errors and biparental chromosome sampling and yields essentially unbiased estimates with minimal sampling variances with moderately high depths of coverage regardless of a mating system and structure of the population. Moreover, we have developed statistical tests for examining the significance of polymorphisms and their genotypic deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. We examine the performance of the proposed method by computer simulations and apply it to low-coverage human data generated by high-throughput sequencing. The results show that the proposed method improves our ability to carry out population-genomic analyses in important ways. The software package of the proposed method is freely available from https://github.com/Takahiro-Maruki/Package-GFE.

  14. Evaluation of a high throughput starch analysis optimised for wood.

    PubMed

    Bellasio, Chandra; Fini, Alessio; Ferrini, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Starch is the most important long-term reserve in trees, and the analysis of starch is therefore useful source of physiological information. Currently published protocols for wood starch analysis impose several limitations, such as long procedures and a neutralization step. The high-throughput standard protocols for starch analysis in food and feed represent a valuable alternative. However, they have not been optimised or tested with woody samples. These have particular chemical and structural characteristics, including the presence of interfering secondary metabolites, low reactivity of starch, and low starch content. In this study, a standard method for starch analysis used for food and feed (AOAC standard method 996.11) was optimised to improve precision and accuracy for the analysis of starch in wood. Key modifications were introduced in the digestion conditions and in the glucose assay. The optimised protocol was then evaluated through 430 starch analyses of standards at known starch content, matrix polysaccharides, and wood collected from three organs (roots, twigs, mature wood) of four species (coniferous and flowering plants). The optimised protocol proved to be remarkably precise and accurate (3%), suitable for a high throughput routine analysis (35 samples a day) of specimens with a starch content between 40 mg and 21 µg. Samples may include lignified organs of coniferous and flowering plants and non-lignified organs, such as leaves, fruits and rhizomes.

  15. Piezo-thermal Probe Array for High Throughput Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gaitas, Angelo; French, Paddy

    2012-01-01

    Microcantilevers are used in a number of applications including atomic-force microscopy (AFM). In this work, deflection-sensing elements along with heating elements are integrated onto micromachined cantilever arrays to increase sensitivity, and reduce complexity and cost. An array of probes with 5–10 nm gold ultrathin film sensors on silicon substrates for high throughput scanning probe microscopy is developed. The deflection sensitivity is 0.2 ppm/nm. Plots of the change in resistance of the sensing element with displacement are used to calibrate the probes and determine probe contact with the substrate. Topographical scans demonstrate high throughput and nanometer resolution. The heating elements are calibrated and the thermal coefficient of resistance (TCR) is 655 ppm/K. The melting temperature of a material is measured by locally heating the material with the heating element of the cantilever while monitoring the bending with the deflection sensing element. The melting point value measured with this method is in close agreement with the reported value in literature. PMID:23641125

  16. High resolution hyperspectral imaging with a high throughput virtual slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooding, Edward A.; Gunn, Thomas; Cenko, Andrew T.; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) device users often require both high spectral resolution, on the order of 1 nm, and high light-gathering power. A wide entrance slit assures reasonable étendue but degrades spectral resolution. Spectrometers built using High Throughput Virtual Slit™ (HTVS) technology optimize both parameters simultaneously. Two remote sensing use cases that require high spectral resolution are discussed. First, detection of atmospheric gases with intrinsically narrow absorption lines, such as hydrocarbon vapors or combustion exhaust gases such as NOx and CO2. Detecting exhaust gas species with high precision has become increasingly important in the light of recent events in the automobile industry. Second, distinguishing reflected daylight from emission spectra in the visible and NIR (VNIR) regions is most easily accomplished using the Fraunhofer absorption lines in solar spectra. While ground reflectance spectral features in the VNIR are generally quite broad, the Fraunhofer lines are narrow and provide a signature of intrinsic vs. extrinsic illumination. The High Throughput Virtual Slit enables higher spectral resolution than is achievable with conventional spectrometers by manipulating the beam profile in pupil space. By reshaping the instrument pupil with reflective optics, HTVS-equipped instruments create a tall, narrow image profile at the exit focal plane, typically delivering 5X or better the spectral resolution achievable with a conventional design.

  17. LSGermOPA, a custom OPA of 384 EST-derived SNPs for high-throughput lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) germplasm fingerprinting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We assessed the genetic diversity and population structure among 148 cultivated lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) accessions using the high-throughput GoldenGate assay and 384 EST (Expressed Sequence Tag)-derived SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) markers. A custom OPA (Oligo Pool All), LSGermOPA was fo...

  18. High-throughput microsatellite isolation through 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing of enriched DNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Malausa, Thibaut; Gilles, André; Meglécz, Emese; Blanquart, Hélène; Duthoy, Stéphanie; Costedoat, Caroline; Dubut, Vincent; Pech, Nicolas; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe; Délye, Christophe; Feau, Nicolas; Frey, Pascal; Gauthier, Philippe; Guillemaud, Thomas; Hazard, Laurent; Le Corre, Valérie; Lung-Escarmant, Brigitte; Malé, Pierre-Jean G; Ferreira, Stéphanie; Martin, Jean-François

    2011-07-01

    Microsatellites (or SSRs: simple sequence repeats) are among the most frequently used DNA markers in many areas of research. The use of microsatellite markers is limited by the difficulties involved in their de novo isolation from species for which no genomic resources are available. We describe here a high-throughput method for isolating microsatellite markers based on coupling multiplex microsatellite enrichment and next-generation sequencing on 454 GS-FLX Titanium platforms. The procedure was calibrated on a model species (Apis mellifera) and validated on 13 other species from various taxonomic groups (animals, plants and fungi), including taxa for which severe difficulties were previously encountered using traditional methods. We obtained from 11,497 to 34,483 sequences depending on the species and the number of detected microsatellite loci ranged from 199 to 5791. We thus demonstrated that this procedure can be readily and successfully applied to a large variety of taxonomic groups, at much lower cost than would have been possible with traditional protocols. This method is expected to speed up the acquisition of high-quality genetic markers for nonmodel organisms.

  19. Salinity tolerance loci revealed in rice using high-throughput non-invasive phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tamimi, Nadia; Brien, Chris; Oakey, Helena; Berger, Bettina; Saade, Stephanie; Ho, Yung Shwen; Schmöckel, Sandra M.; Tester, Mark; Negrão, Sónia

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput phenotyping produces multiple measurements over time, which require new methods of analyses that are flexible in their quantification of plant growth and transpiration, yet are computationally economic. Here we develop such analyses and apply this to a rice population genotyped with a 700k SNP high-density array. Two rice diversity panels, indica and aus, containing a total of 553 genotypes, are phenotyped in waterlogged conditions. Using cubic smoothing splines to estimate plant growth and transpiration, we identify four time intervals that characterize the early responses of rice to salinity. Relative growth rate, transpiration rate and transpiration use efficiency (TUE) are analysed using a new association model that takes into account the interaction between treatment (control and salt) and genetic marker. This model allows the identification of previously undetected loci affecting TUE on chromosome 11, providing insights into the early responses of rice to salinity, in particular into the effects of salinity on plant growth and transpiration. PMID:27853175

  20. High-Throughput Sequencing-Based Immune Repertoire Study during Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dongni; Chen, Cuicui; Seely, Eric John; Chen, Shujing; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity of the adaptive immune response is based on the enormous diversity of T and B cell antigen-specific receptors. The immune repertoire, the collection of T and B cells with functional diversity in the circulatory system at any given time, is dynamic and reflects the essence of immune selectivity. In this article, we review the recent advances in immune repertoire study of infectious diseases, which were achieved by traditional techniques and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) techniques. HTS techniques enable the determination of complementary regions of lymphocyte receptors with unprecedented efficiency and scale. This progress in methodology enhances the understanding of immunologic changes during pathogen challenge and also provides a basis for further development of novel diagnostic markers, immunotherapies, and vaccines. PMID:27630639

  1. Adapting High-Throughput Screening Methods and Assays for Biocontainment Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Tigabu, Bersabeh; White, E. Lucile; Bostwick, Robert; Tower, Nichole; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W.; Noah, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract High-throughput screening (HTS) has been integrated into the drug discovery process, and multiple assay formats have been widely used in many different disease areas but with limited focus on infectious agents. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of HTS campaigns using infectious wild-type pathogens rather than surrogates or biochemical pathogen-derived targets. Concurrently, enhanced emerging pathogen surveillance and increased human mobility have resulted in an increase in the emergence and dissemination of infectious human pathogens with serious public health, economic, and social implications at global levels. Adapting the HTS drug discovery process to biocontainment laboratories to develop new drugs for these previously uncharacterized and highly pathogenic agents is now feasible, but HTS at higher biosafety levels (BSL) presents a number of unique challenges. HTS has been conducted with multiple bacterial and viral pathogens at both BSL-2 and BSL-3, and pilot screens have recently been extended to BSL-4 environments for both Nipah and Ebola viruses. These recent successful efforts demonstrate that HTS can be safely conducted at the highest levels of biological containment. This review outlines the specific issues that must be considered in the execution of an HTS drug discovery program for high-containment pathogens. We present an overview of the requirements for HTS in high-level biocontainment laboratories. PMID:25710545

  2. Adapting high-throughput screening methods and assays for biocontainment laboratories.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Tigabu, Bersabeh; White, E Lucile; Bostwick, Robert; Tower, Nichole; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W; Noah, James W

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has been integrated into the drug discovery process, and multiple assay formats have been widely used in many different disease areas but with limited focus on infectious agents. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of HTS campaigns using infectious wild-type pathogens rather than surrogates or biochemical pathogen-derived targets. Concurrently, enhanced emerging pathogen surveillance and increased human mobility have resulted in an increase in the emergence and dissemination of infectious human pathogens with serious public health, economic, and social implications at global levels. Adapting the HTS drug discovery process to biocontainment laboratories to develop new drugs for these previously uncharacterized and highly pathogenic agents is now feasible, but HTS at higher biosafety levels (BSL) presents a number of unique challenges. HTS has been conducted with multiple bacterial and viral pathogens at both BSL-2 and BSL-3, and pilot screens have recently been extended to BSL-4 environments for both Nipah and Ebola viruses. These recent successful efforts demonstrate that HTS can be safely conducted at the highest levels of biological containment. This review outlines the specific issues that must be considered in the execution of an HTS drug discovery program for high-containment pathogens. We present an overview of the requirements for HTS in high-level biocontainment laboratories.

  3. The Impact of Genotyping-by-Sequencing Pipelines on SNP Discovery and Identification of Markers Associated with Verticillium Wilt Resistance in Autotetraploid Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Long-Xi; Zheng, Ping; Bhamidimarri, Suresh; Liu, Xiang-Ping; Main, Dorie

    2017-01-01

    Verticillium wilt (VW) of alfalfa is a soilborne disease causing severe yield loss in alfalfa. To identify molecular markers associated with VW resistance, we used an integrated framework of genome-wide association study (GWAS) with high-throughput genotyping by sequencing (GBS) to identify loci associated with VW resistance in an F1 full-sib alfalfa population. Phenotyping was performed using manual inoculation of the pathogen to cloned plants of each individual and disease severity was scored using a standard scale. Genotyping was done by GBS, followed by genotype calling using three bioinformatics pipelines including the TASSEL-GBS pipeline (TASSEL), the Universal Network Enabled Analysis Kit (UNEAK), and the haplotype-based FreeBayes pipeline (FreeBayes). The resulting numbers of SNPs, marker density, minor allele frequency (MAF) and heterozygosity were compared among the pipelines. The TASSEL pipeline generated more markers with the highest density and MAF, whereas the highest heterozygosity was obtained by the UNEAK pipeline. The FreeBayes pipeline generated tetraploid genotypes, with the least number of markers. SNP markers generated from each pipeline were used independently for marker-trait association. Markers significantly associated with VW resistance identified by each pipeline were compared. Similar marker loci were found on chromosomes 5, 6, and 7, whereas different loci on chromosome 1, 2, 3, and 4 were identified by different pipelines. Most significant markers were located on chromosome 6 and they were identified by all three pipelines. Of those identified, several loci were linked to known genes whose functions are involved in the plants’ resistance to pathogens. Further investigation on these loci and their linked genes would provide insight into understanding molecular mechanisms of VW resistance in alfalfa. Functional markers closely linked to the resistance loci would be useful for MAS to improve alfalfa cultivars with enhanced resistance

  4. The Impact of Genotyping-by-Sequencing Pipelines on SNP Discovery and Identification of Markers Associated with Verticillium Wilt Resistance in Autotetraploid Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Yu, Long-Xi; Zheng, Ping; Bhamidimarri, Suresh; Liu, Xiang-Ping; Main, Dorie

    2017-01-01

    Verticillium wilt (VW) of alfalfa is a soilborne disease causing severe yield loss in alfalfa. To identify molecular markers associated with VW resistance, we used an integrated framework of genome-wide association study (GWAS) with high-throughput genotyping by sequencing (GBS) to identify loci associated with VW resistance in an F1 full-sib alfalfa population. Phenotyping was performed using manual inoculation of the pathogen to cloned plants of each individual and disease severity was scored using a standard scale. Genotyping was done by GBS, followed by genotype calling using three bioinformatics pipelines including the TASSEL-GBS pipeline (TASSEL), the Universal Network Enabled Analysis Kit (UNEAK), and the haplotype-based FreeBayes pipeline (FreeBayes). The resulting numbers of SNPs, marker density, minor allele frequency (MAF) and heterozygosity were compared among the pipelines. The TASSEL pipeline generated more markers with the highest density and MAF, whereas the highest heterozygosity was obtained by the UNEAK pipeline. The FreeBayes pipeline generated tetraploid genotypes, with the least number of markers. SNP markers generated from each pipeline were used independently for marker-trait association. Markers significantly associated with VW resistance identified by each pipeline were compared. Similar marker loci were found on chromosomes 5, 6, and 7, whereas different loci on chromosome 1, 2, 3, and 4 were identified by different pipelines. Most significant markers were located on chromosome 6 and they were identified by all three pipelines. Of those identified, several loci were linked to known genes whose functions are involved in the plants' resistance to pathogens. Further investigation on these loci and their linked genes would provide insight into understanding molecular mechanisms of VW resistance in alfalfa. Functional markers closely linked to the resistance loci would be useful for MAS to improve alfalfa cultivars with enhanced resistance to

  5. GlycoExtractor: a web-based interface for high throughput processing of HPLC-glycan data.

    PubMed

    Artemenko, Natalia V; Campbell, Matthew P; Rudd, Pauline M

    2010-04-05

    Recently, an automated high-throughput HPLC platform has been developed that can be used to fully sequence and quantify low concentrations of N-linked sugars released from glycoproteins, supported by an experimental database (GlycoBase) and analytical tools (autoGU). However, commercial packages that support the operation of HPLC instruments and data storage lack platforms for the extraction of large volumes of data. The lack of resources and agreed formats in glycomics is now a major limiting factor that restricts the development of bioinformatic tools and automated workflows for high-throughput HPLC data analysis. GlycoExtractor is a web-based tool that interfaces with a commercial HPLC database/software solution to facilitate the extraction of large volumes of processed glycan profile data (peak number, peak areas, and glucose unit values). The tool allows the user to export a series of sample sets to a set of file formats (XML, JSON, and CSV) rather than a collection of disconnected files. This approach not only reduces the amount of manual refinement required to export data into a suitable format for data analysis but also opens the field to new approaches for high-throughput data interpretation and storage, including biomarker discovery and validation and monitoring of online bioprocessing conditions for next generation biotherapeutics.

  6. Novel inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis GuaB2 identified by a target based high-throughput phenotypic screen

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jonathan A. G.; Mugumbate, Grace; Del Peral, Laura Vela-Glez; Jankute, Monika; Abrahams, Katherine A.; Jervis, Peter; Jackenkroll, Stefan; Perez, Arancha; Alemparte, Carlos; Esquivias, Jorge; Lelièvre, Joël; Ramon, Fernando; Barros, David; Ballell, Lluis; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput phenotypic screens have re-emerged as screening tools in antibiotic discovery. The advent of such technologies has rapidly accelerated the identification of ‘hit’ compounds. A pre-requisite to medicinal chemistry optimisation programmes required to improve the drug-like properties of a ‘hit’ molecule is identification of its mode of action. Herein, we have combined phenotypic screening with a biased target-specific screen. The inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) protein GuaB2 has been identified as a drugable target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, however previously identified compounds lack the desired characteristics necessary for further development into lead-like molecules. This study has identified 7 new chemical series from a high-throughput resistance-based phenotypic screen using Mycobacterium bovis BCG over-expressing GuaB2. Hit compounds were identified in a single shot high-throughput screen, validated by dose response and subjected to further biochemical analysis. The compounds were also assessed using molecular docking experiments, providing a platform for their further optimisation using medicinal chemistry. This work demonstrates the versatility and potential of GuaB2 as an anti-tubercular drug target. PMID:27982051

  7. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hui

    2001-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm2 for 40-μm wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

  8. Transcriptome Analysis of the Oriental River Prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense Using 454 Pyrosequencing for Discovery of Genes and Markers

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Keyi; Qiu, Gaofeng; Feng, Jianbin; Li, Jiale

    2012-01-01

    Background The oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is an economically and nutritionally important species of the Palaemonidae family of decapod crustaceans. To date, the sequencing of its whole genome is unavailable as a non-model organism. Transcriptomic information is also scarce for this species. In this study, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing to produce the first comprehensive expressed sequence tag (EST) dataset for M. nipponense using high-throughput sequencing technologies. Methodology and Principal Findings Total RNA was isolated from eyestalk, gill, heart, ovary, testis, hepatopancreas, muscle, and embryos at the cleavage, gastrula, nauplius and zoea stages. Equal quantities of RNA from each tissue and stage were pooled to construct a cDNA library. Using 454 pyrosequencing technology, we generated a total of 984,204 high quality reads (338.59Mb) with an average length of 344 bp. Clustering and assembly of these reads produced a non-redundant set of 81,411 unique sequences, comprising 42,551 contigs and 38,860 singletons. All of the unique sequences were involved in the molecular function (30,425), cellular component (44,112) and biological process (67,679) categories by GO analysis. Potential genes and their functions were predicted by KEGG pathway mapping and COG analysis. Based on our sequence analysis and published literature, many putative genes involved in sex determination, including DMRT1, FTZ-F1, FOXL2, FEM1 and other potentially important candidate genes, were identified for the first time in this prawn. Furthermore, 6,689 SSRs and 18,107 high-confidence SNPs were identified in this EST dataset. Conclusions The transcriptome provides an invaluable new data for a functional genomics resource and future biological research in M. nipponense. The molecular markers identified in this study will provide a material basis for future genetic linkage and quantitative trait loci analyses, and will be essential for accelerating

  9. Chemically diverse polymer microarrays and high throughput surface characterisation: a method for discovery of materials for stem cell culture† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4bm00054d Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Celiz, A. D.; Smith, J. G. W.; Patel, A. K.; Langer, R.; Anderson, D. G.; Barrett, D. A.; Young, L. E.; Davies, M. C.; Denning, C.

    2014-01-01

    Materials discovery provides the opportunity to identify novel materials that are tailored to complex biological environments by using combinatorial mixing of monomers to form large libraries of polymers as micro arrays. The materials discovery approach is predicated on the use of the largest chemical diversity possible, yet previous studies into human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) response to polymer microarrays have been limited to 20 or so different monomer identities in each study. Here we show that it is possible to print and assess cell adhesion of 141 different monomers in a microarray format. This provides access to the largest chemical space to date, allowing us to meet the regenerative medicine challenge to provide scalable synthetic culture ware. This study identifies new materials suitable for hPSC expansion that could not have been predicted from previous knowledge of cell-material interactions. PMID:25328672

  10. Native mass spectrometry: towards high-throughput structural proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kondrat, Frances D L; Struwe, Weston B; Benesch, Justin L P

    2015-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) has become a sensitive method for structural proteomics, allowing practitioners to gain insight into protein self-assembly, including stoichiometry and three-dimensional architecture, as well as complementary thermodynamic and kinetic aspects. Although MS is typically performed in vacuum, a body of literature has described how native solution-state structure is largely retained on the timescale of the experiment. Native MS offers the benefit that it requires substantially smaller quantities of a sample than traditional structural techniques such as NMR and X-ray crystallography, and is therefore well suited to high-throughput studies. Here we first describe the native MS approach and outline the structural proteomic data that it can deliver. We then provide practical details of experiments to examine the structural and dynamic properties of protein assemblies, highlighting potential pitfalls as well as principles of best practice.

  11. Interactive Visual Analysis of High Throughput Text Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad A; Potok, Thomas E; Patton, Robert M; Goodall, John R; Maness, Christopher S; Senter, James K; Potok, Thomas E

    2012-01-01

    The scale, velocity, and dynamic nature of large scale social media systems like Twitter demand a new set of visual analytics techniques that support near real-time situational awareness. Social media systems are credited with escalating social protest during recent large scale riots. Virtual communities form rapidly in these online systems, and they occasionally foster violence and unrest which is conveyed in the users language. Techniques for analyzing broad trends over these networks or reconstructing conversations within small groups have been demonstrated in recent years, but state-of- the-art tools are inadequate at supporting near real-time analysis of these high throughput streams of unstructured information. In this paper, we present an adaptive system to discover and interactively explore these virtual networks, as well as detect sentiment, highlight change, and discover spatio- temporal patterns.

  12. Quantitative High-throughput Luciferase Screening in Identifying CAR Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Caitlin; Zhao, Jinghua; Wang, Hongbing; Xia, Menghang

    2017-01-01

    Summary The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is responsible for the transcription of multiple drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. There are two possible methods of activation for CAR, direct ligand binding and a ligand-independent method, which makes this a unique nuclear receptor. Both of these mechanisms require translocation of CAR from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. Interestingly, CAR is constitutively active in immortalized cell lines due to the basal nuclear location of this receptor. This creates an important challenge in most in vitro assay models because immortalized cells cannot be used without inhibiting the basal activity. In this book chapter, we go into detail of how to perform quantitative high-throughput screens to identify hCAR1 modulators through the employment of a double stable cell line. Using this line, we are able to identify activators, as well as deactivators, of the challenging nuclear receptor, CAR. PMID:27518621

  13. High-throughput drawing and testing of metallic glass nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Molla; Kumar, Golden

    2017-03-02

    Thermoplastic embossing of metallic glasses promises direct imprinting of metal nanostructures using templates. However, embossing high-aspect-ratio nanostructures faces unworkable flow resistance due to friction and non-wetting conditions at the template interface. Herein, we show that these inherent challenges of embossing can be reversed by thermoplastic drawing using templates. The flow resistance not only remains independent of wetting but also decreases with increasing feature aspect-ratio. Arrays of assembled nanotips, nanowires, and nanotubes with aspect-ratios exceeding 1000 can be produced through controlled elongation and fracture of metallic glass structures. In contrast to embossing, the drawing approach generates two sets of nanostructures upon final fracture; one set remains anchored to the metallic glass substrate while the second set is assembled on the template. This method can be readily adapted for high-throughput fabrication and testing of nanoscale tensile specimens, enabling rapid screening of size-effects in mechanical behavior.

  14. Single-platelet nanomechanics measured by high-throughput cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, David R.; Qiu, Yongzhi; Fay, Meredith E.; Tennenbaum, Michael; Chester, Daniel; Cuadrado, Jonas; Sakurai, Yumiko; Baek, Jong; Tran, Reginald; Ciciliano, Jordan C.; Ahn, Byungwook; Mannino, Robert G.; Bunting, Silvia T.; Bennett, Carolyn; Briones, Michael; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Smith, Michael L.; Brown, Ashley C.; Sulchek, Todd; Lam, Wilbur A.

    2016-10-01

    Haemostasis occurs at sites of vascular injury, where flowing blood forms a clot, a dynamic and heterogeneous fibrin-based biomaterial. Paramount in the clot's capability to stem haemorrhage are its changing mechanical properties, the major drivers of which are the contractile forces exerted by platelets against the fibrin scaffold. However, how platelets transduce microenvironmental cues to mediate contraction and alter clot mechanics is unknown. This is clinically relevant, as overly softened and stiffened clots are associated with bleeding and thrombotic disorders. Here, we report a high-throughput hydrogel-based platelet-contraction cytometer that quantifies single-platelet contraction forces in different clot microenvironments. We also show that platelets, via the Rho/ROCK pathway, synergistically couple mechanical and biochemical inputs to mediate contraction. Moreover, highly contractile platelet subpopulations present in healthy controls are conspicuously absent in a subset of patients with undiagnosed bleeding disorders, and therefore may function as a clinical diagnostic biophysical biomarker.

  15. Towards high throughput screening of nanoparticle flotation collectors.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Carla; Yang, Songtao; Pelton, Robert H

    2015-12-15

    To function as flotation collectors for mineral processing, polymeric nanoparticles require a delicate balance of surface properties to give mineral-specific deposition and colloidal stability in high ionic strength alkaline media, while remaining sufficiently hydrophobic to promote flotation. Combinatorial nanoparticle surface modification, in conjunction with high throughput screening, is a promising approach for nanoparticle development. However, efficient automated screening assays are required to reject ineffective particles without having to undergo time consuming flotation testing. Herein we demonstrate that determining critical coagulation concentrations of sodium carbonate in combination with measuring the advancing water contact angle of nanoparticle-saturated glass surfaces can be used to screen ineffective nanoparticles. Finally, none of our first nanoparticle library based on poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEG-methacrylate) were effective flotation collectors because the nanoparticles were too hydrophilic.

  16. A Colloidal Stability Assay Suitable for High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Carla; Ali, M Monsur; Yang, Songtao; Dong, Xiaofei; Pelton, Robert H

    2016-03-01

    A library of 32 polystyrene copolymer latexes, with diameters ranging between 53 and 387 nm, was used to develop and demonstrate a high-throughput assay using a 96-well microplate platform to measure critical coagulation concentrations, a measure of colloidal stability. The most robust assay involved an automated centrifugation-decantation step to remove latex aggregates before absorbance measurements, eliminating aggregate interference with optical measurements made through the base of the multiwell plates. For smaller nanoparticles (diameter <150 nm), the centrifugation-decantation step was not required as the interference was less than with larger particles. Parallel measurements with a ChemiDoc MP plate scanner gave indications of aggregation; however, the results were less sensitive than the absorbance measurements.

  17. High-throughput plastic microlenses fabricated using microinjection molding techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appasamy, Sreeram; Li, Weizhuo; Lee, Se Hwan; Boyd, Joseph T.; Ahn, Chong H.

    2005-12-01

    A novel fabrication scheme to develop high-throughput plastic microlenses using injection-molding techniques is realized. The initial microlens mold is fabricated using the well-known reflow technique. The reflow process is optimized to obtain reliable and repeatable microlens patterns. The master mold insert for the injection-molding process is fabricated using metal electroforming. The electroplating process is optimized for obtaining a low stress electroform. Two new plastic materials, cyclo olefin copolymer (COC) and Poly IR 2 are introduced in this work for fabricating microlenses. The plastic microlenses have been characterized for their focal lengths that range from 200 µm to 1.9 mm. This technique enables high-volume production of plastic microlenses with cycle times for a single chip being of the order of 60 s.

  18. Resolving postglacial phylogeography using high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Kevin J.; Merz, Clayton R.; Catchen, Julian M.; Hohenlohe, Paul A.; Cresko, William A.; Bradshaw, William E.; Holzapfel, Christina M.

    2010-01-01

    The distinction between model and nonmodel organisms is becoming increasingly blurred. High-throughput, second-generation sequencing approaches are being applied to organisms based on their interesting ecological, physiological, developmental, or evolutionary properties and not on the depth of genetic information available for them. Here, we illustrate this point using a low-cost, efficient technique to determine the fine-scale phylogenetic relationships among recently diverged populations in a species. This application of restriction site-associated DNA tags (RAD tags) reveals previously unresolved genetic structure and direction of evolution in the pitcher plant mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii, from a southern Appalachian Mountain refugium following recession of the Laurentide Ice Sheet at 22,000–19,000 B.P. The RAD tag method can be used to identify detailed patterns of phylogeography in any organism regardless of existing genomic data, and, more broadly, to identify incipient speciation and genome-wide variation in natural populations in general. PMID:20798348

  19. High throughput x-ray optics: an overview.

    PubMed

    Gorenstein, P

    1988-04-15

    Several x-ray astronomy missions of the 1990s will contain focusing telescopes with significantly more collecting power than the Einstein Observatory. There is increasing emphasis on spectroscopy. ESA's XMM with 10(4) cm(2) of effective area will be the largest. A high throughput facility with over 10(5) cm(2) of effective area and 20-sec of arc angular resolution is needed ultimately for various scientific studies such as high resolution spectroscopic observations of QSOs. At least one of the following techniques currently being developed for fabricating x-ray telescopes including automated figuring of flats as parabolic reflectors, replication of cylindrical shells, and the alignment of thin lacquer-coated conical foils is likely to permit the construction of modular arrays of telescopes with the area and angular resolution required.

  20. UAV-based high-throughput phenotyping in legume crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Sindhuja; Khot, Lav R.; Quirós, Juan; Vandemark, George J.; McGee, Rebecca J.

    2016-05-01

    In plant breeding, one of the biggest obstacles in genetic improvement is the lack of proven rapid methods for measuring plant responses in field conditions. Therefore, the major objective of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing high-throughput remote sensing technology for rapid measurement of phenotyping traits in legume crops. The plant responses of several chickpea and peas varieties to the environment were assessed with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) integrated with multispectral imaging sensors. Our preliminary assessment showed that the vegetation indices are strongly correlated (p<0.05) with seed yield of legume crops. Results endorse the potential of UAS-based sensing technology to rapidly measure those phenotyping traits.

  1. Machine Learning for High-Throughput Stress Phenotyping in Plants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arti; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Singh, Asheesh Kumar; Sarkar, Soumik

    2016-02-01

    Advances in automated and high-throughput imaging technologies have resulted in a deluge of high-resolution images and sensor data of plants. However, extracting patterns and features from this large corpus of data requires the use of machine learning (ML) tools to enable data assimilation and feature identification for stress phenotyping. Four stages of the decision cycle in plant stress phenotyping and plant breeding activities where different ML approaches can be deployed are (i) identification, (ii) classification, (iii) quantification, and (iv) prediction (ICQP). We provide here a comprehensive overview and user-friendly taxonomy of ML tools to enable the plant community to correctly and easily apply the appropriate ML tools and best-practice guidelines for various biotic and abiotic stress traits.

  2. Muscle plasticity and high throughput gene expression studies.

    PubMed

    Reggiani, Carlo; Kronnie, Geertruuy Te

    2004-01-01

    Changes in gene expression are known to contribute to muscle plasticity. Until recently most studies have described differences of one or few genes at a time, in the last few years, however, the development of new technology of high throughput mRNA expression analysis has allowed the study of a large part if not all transcripts in the same experiment. Knowledge on any muscle adaptive response has already gained from the application of this novel approach, but the most important new findings have come from studies on muscle atrophy. A new and unexpected groups of genes, which increase their expression during atrophy and are, therefore, designated as atrogins, have been discovered. In spite of the impressive power of the new technology many problems are still to be resolved to optimize the experimental design and to extract all information which are provided by the outcome of the global mRNA assessment.

  3. Macromolecular Crystallography conventional and high-throughput methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, Stephen R.; Smith, David W.; D'Amico, Kevin L.; Koss, John W.; Morisco, Laura L.; Burley, Stephen K.

    2007-09-27

    High-throughput data collection requires the seamless interoperation of various hardware components. User-supplied descriptions of protein crystals must also be directly linked with the diffraction data. Such linkages can be achieved efficiently with computer databases. A database that tracks production of the protein samples, crystallization, and diffraction from the resultant crystals serves as the glue that holds the entire gene-to-structure process together. This chapter begins by discussing data collection processes and hardware. It then illustrates how a well-constructed database ensures information flow through the steps of data acquisition. Such a database allows synchrotron beamline measurements to be directly and efficiently integrated into the process of protein crystallographic structure determination.

  4. Numerical techniques for high-throughput reflectance interference biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevenler, Derin; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a robust and rapid computational method for processing the raw spectral data collected from thin film optical interference biosensors. We have applied this method to Interference Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS) measurements and observed a 10,000 fold improvement in processing time, unlocking a variety of clinical and scientific applications. Interference biosensors have advantages over similar technologies in certain applications, for example highly multiplexed measurements of molecular kinetics. However, processing raw IRIS data into useful measurements has been prohibitively time consuming for high-throughput studies. Here we describe the implementation of a lookup table (LUT) technique that provides accurate results in far less time than naive methods. We also discuss an additional benefit that the LUT method can be used with a wider range of interference layer thickness and experimental configurations that are incompatible with methods that require fitting the spectral response.

  5. Microfluidics for High-Throughput Quantitative Studies of Early Development.

    PubMed

    Levario, Thomas J; Lim, Bomyi; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Lu, Hang

    2016-07-11

    Developmental biology has traditionally relied on qualitative analyses; recently, however, as in other fields of biology, researchers have become increasingly interested in acquiring quantitative knowledge about embryogenesis. Advances in fluorescence microscopy are enabling high-content imaging in live specimens. At the same time, microfluidics and automation technologies are increasing experimental throughput for studies of multicellular models of development. Furthermore, computer vision methods for processing and analyzing bioimage data are now leading the way toward quantitative biology. Here, we review advances in the areas of fluorescence microscopy, microfluidics, and data analysis that are instrumental to performing high-content, high-throughput studies in biology and specifically in development. We discuss a case study of how these techniques have allowed quantitative analysis and modeling of pattern formation in the Drosophila embryo.

  6. Microgradient-heaters as tools for high-throughput experimentation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Robert; Hamann, Sven; Ehmann, Michael; Thienhaus, Sigurd; Jaeger, Stefanie; Thiede, Tobias; Devi, Anjana; Fischer, Roland A; Ludwig, Alfred

    2012-10-08

    A microgradient-heater (MGH) was developed, and its feasibility as a tool for high-throughput materials science experimentation was tested. The MGH is derived from microhot plate (MHP) systems and allows combinatorial thermal processing on the micronano scale. The temperature gradient is adjustable by the substrate material. For an Au-coated MGH membrane a temperature drop from 605 to 100 °C was measured over a distance of 965 μm, resulting in an average temperature change of 0.52 K/μm. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate the feasibility of MGHs on the example of a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The achieved results show discontinuous changes in surface morphology within a continuous TiO2 film. Furthermore the MGH can be used to get insights into the energetic relations of film growth processes, giving it the potential for microcalorimetry measurements.

  7. Multifunctional encoded particles for high-throughput biomolecule analysis.

    PubMed

    Pregibon, Daniel C; Toner, Mehmet; Doyle, Patrick S

    2007-03-09

    High-throughput screening for genetic analysis, combinatorial chemistry, and clinical diagnostics benefits from multiplexing, which allows for the simultaneous assay of several analytes but necessitates an encoding scheme for molecular identification. Current approaches for multiplexed analysis involve complicated or expensive processes for encoding, functionalizing, or decoding active substrates (particles or surfaces) and often yield a very limited number of analyte-specific codes. We present a method based on continuous-flow lithography that combines particle synthesis and encoding and probe incorporation into a single process to generate multifunctional particles bearing over a million unique codes. By using such particles, we demonstrate a multiplexed, single-fluorescence detection of DNA oligomers with encoded particle libraries that can be scanned rapidly in a flow-through microfluidic channel. Furthermore, we demonstrate with high specificity the same multiplexed detection using individual multiprobe particles.

  8. High throughput sequencing reveals a novel fabavirus infecting sweet cherry.

    PubMed

    Villamor, D E V; Pillai, S S; Eastwell, K C

    2017-03-01

    The genus Fabavirus currently consists of five species represented by viruses that infect a wide range of hosts but none reported from temperate climate fruit trees. A virus with genomic features resembling fabaviruses (tentatively named Prunus virus F, PrVF) was revealed by high throughput sequencing of extracts from a sweet cherry tree (Prunus avium). PrVF was subsequently shown to be graft transmissible and further identified in three other non-symptomatic Prunus spp. from different geographical locations. Two genetic variants of RNA1 and RNA2 coexisted in the same samples. RNA1 consisted of 6,165 and 6,163 nucleotides, and RNA2 consisted of 3,622 and 3,468 nucleotides.

  9. High-throughput sequencing in veterinary infection biology and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Belák, S; Karlsson, O E; Leijon, M; Granberg, F

    2013-12-01

    Sequencing methods have improved rapidly since the first versions of the Sanger techniques, facilitating the development of very powerful tools for detecting and identifying various pathogens, such as viruses, bacteria and other microbes. The ongoing development of high-throughput sequencing (HTS; also known as next-generation sequencing) technologies has resulted in a dramatic reduction in DNA sequencing costs, making the technology more accessible to the average laboratory. In this White Paper of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Collaborating Centre for the Biotechnology-based Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases in Veterinary Medicine (Uppsala, Sweden), several approaches and examples of HTS are summarised, and their diagnostic applicability is briefly discussed. Selected future aspects of HTS are outlined, including the need for bioinformatic resources, with a focus on improving the diagnosis and control of infectious diseases in veterinary medicine.

  10. High-throughput ab-initio dilute solute diffusion database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Henry; Mayeshiba, Tam; Morgan, Dane

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate automated generation of diffusion databases from high-throughput density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A total of more than 230 dilute solute diffusion systems in Mg, Al, Cu, Ni, Pd, and Pt host lattices have been determined using multi-frequency diffusion models. We apply a correction method for solute diffusion in alloys using experimental and simulated values of host self-diffusivity. We find good agreement with experimental solute diffusion data, obtaining a weighted activation barrier RMS error of 0.176 eV when excluding magnetic solutes in non-magnetic alloys. The compiled database is the largest collection of consistently calculated ab-initio solute diffusion data in the world.

  11. EDITORIAL: Combinatorial and High-Throughput Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyrailo, Radislav A.; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2005-01-01

    The success of combinatorial and high-throughput methodologies relies greatly on the availability of various characterization tools with new and improved capabilities [1]. Indeed, how useful can a combinatorial library of 250, 400, 25 000 or 2 000 000 compounds be [2-5] if one is unable to characterize its properties of interest fairly quickly? How useful can a set of thousands of spectra or chromatograms be if one is unable to analyse them in a timely manner? For these reasons, the development of new approaches for materials characterization is one of the most active areas in combinatorial materials science. The importance of this aspect of research in the field has been discussed in numerous conferences including the Pittsburgh Conferences, the American Chemical Society Meetings, the American Physical Society Meetings, the Materials Research Society Symposia and various Gordon Research Conferences. Naturally, the development of new measurement instrumentation attracts the attention not only of practitioners of combinatorial materials science but also of those who design new software for data manipulation and mining. Experimental designs of combinatorial libraries are pursued with available and realistic synthetic and characterization capabilities in mind. It is becoming increasingly critical to link the design of new equipment for high-throughput parallel materials synthesis with integrated measurement tools in order to enhance the efficacy of the overall experimental strategy. We have received an overwhelming response to our proposal and call for papers for this Special Issue on Combinatorial Materials Science. The papers in this issue of Measurement Science and Technology are a very timely collection that captures the state of modern combinatorial materials science. They demonstrate the significant advances that are taking place in the field. In some cases, characterization tools are now being operated in the factory mode. At the same time, major challenges

  12. A robust robotic high-throughput antibody purification platform.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Peter M; Abdo, Michael; Butcher, Rebecca E; Yap, Min-Yin; Scotney, Pierre D; Ramunno, Melanie L; Martin-Roussety, Genevieve; Owczarek, Catherine; Hardy, Matthew P; Chen, Chao-Guang; Fabri, Louis J

    2016-07-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become the fastest growing segment in the drug market with annual sales of more than 40 billion US$ in 2013. The selection of lead candidate molecules involves the generation of large repertoires of antibodies from which to choose a final therapeutic candidate. Improvements in the ability to rapidly produce and purify many antibodies in sufficient quantities reduces the lead time for selection which ultimately impacts on the speed with which an antibody may transition through the research stage and into product development. Miniaturization and automation of chromatography using micro columns (RoboColumns(®) from Atoll GmbH) coupled to an automated liquid handling instrument (ALH; Freedom EVO(®) from Tecan) has been a successful approach to establish high throughput process development platforms. Recent advances in transient gene expression (TGE) using the high-titre Expi293F™ system have enabled recombinant mAb titres of greater than 500mg/L. These relatively high protein titres reduce the volume required to generate several milligrams of individual antibodies for initial biochemical and biological downstream assays, making TGE in the Expi293F™ system ideally suited to high throughput chromatography on an ALH. The present publication describes a novel platform for purifying Expi293F™-expressed recombinant mAbs directly from cell-free culture supernatant on a Perkin Elmer JANUS-VariSpan ALH equipped with a plate shuttle device. The purification platform allows automated 2-step purification (Protein A-desalting/size exclusion chromatography) of several hundred mAbs per week. The new robotic method can purify mAbs with high recovery (>90%) at sub-milligram level with yields of up to 2mg from 4mL of cell-free culture supernatant.

  13. Label-free high-throughput screening via mass spectrometry: a single cystathionine quantitative method for multiple applications.

    PubMed

    Holt, Tom G; Choi, Bernard K; Geoghagen, Neil S; Jensen, Kristian K; Luo, Qi; LaMarr, William A; Makara, Gergely M; Malkowitz, Lorraine; Ozbal, Can C; Xiong, Yusheng; Dufresne, Claude; Luo, Ming-Juan

    2009-10-01

    Label-free mass spectrometric (MS) technologies are particularly useful for enzyme assay design for drug discovery screens. MS permits the selective detection of enzyme substrates or products in a wide range of biological matrices without need for derivatization, labeling, or capture technologies. As part of a cardiovascular drug discovery effort aimed at finding modulators of cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS), we used the RapidFire((R)) label-free high-throughput MS (HTMS) technology to develop a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for CBS activity. The in vitro assay used HTMS to quantify the unlabeled product of the CBS reaction, cystathionine. Cystathionine HTMS analyses were carried out with a throughput of 7 s per sample and quantitation over a linear range of 80-10,000 nM. A compound library of 25,559 samples (or 80 384-well plates) was screened as singlets using the HTMS assay in a period of 8 days. With a hit rate of 0.32%, the actives showed a 90% confirmation rate. The in vitro assay was applied to secondary screens in more complex matrices with no additional analytical development. Our results show that the HTMS method was useful for screening samples containing serum, for cell-based assays, and for liver explants. The novel extension of the in vitro analytical method, without modification, to secondary assays resulted in a significant and advantageous economy of development time for the drug discovery project.

  14. High-throughput sequencing allows the identification of binding molecules isolated from DNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Mannocci, Luca; Zhang, Yixin; Scheuermann, Jörg; Leimbacher, Markus; De Bellis, Gianluca; Rizzi, Ermanno; Dumelin, Christoph; Melkko, Samu; Neri, Dario

    2008-11-18

    DNA encoding facilitates the construction and screening of large chemical libraries. Here, we describe general strategies for the stepwise coupling of coding DNA fragments to nascent organic molecules throughout individual reaction steps as well as the first implementation of high-throughput sequencing for the identification and relative quantification of the library members. The methodology was exemplified in the construction of a DNA-encoded chemical library containing 4,000 compounds and in the discovery of binders to streptavidin, matrix metalloproteinase 3, and polyclonal human IgG.

  15. Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mestre, Neville

    2010-01-01

    All common fractions can be written in decimal form. In this Discovery article, the author suggests that teachers ask their students to calculate the decimals by actually doing the divisions themselves, and later on they can use a calculator to check their answers. This article presents a lesson based on the research of Bolt (1982).

  16. Recent advances in candidate-gene and whole-genome approaches to the discovery of anthelmintic resistance markers and the description of drug/receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Kotze, Andrew C; Hunt, Peter W; Skuce, Philip; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Martin, Richard J; Sager, Heinz; Krücken, Jürgen; Hodgkinson, Jane; Lespine, Anne; Jex, Aaron R; Gilleard, John S; Beech, Robin N; Wolstenholme, Adrian J; Demeler, Janina; Robertson, Alan P; Charvet, Claude L; Neveu, Cedric; Kaminsky, Ronald; Rufener, Lucien; Alberich, Melanie; Menez, Cecile; Prichard, Roger K

    2014-12-01

    Anthelmintic resistance has a great impact on livestock production systems worldwide, is an emerging concern in companion animal medicine, and represents a threat to our ongoing ability to control human soil-transmitted helminths. The Consortium for Anthelmintic Resistance and Susceptibility (CARS) provides a forum for scientists to meet and discuss the latest developments in the search for molecular markers of anthelmintic resistance. Such markers are important for detecting drug resistant worm populations, and indicating the likely impact of the resistance on drug efficacy. The molecular basis of resistance is also important for understanding how anthelmintics work, and how drug resistant populations arise. Changes to target receptors, drug efflux and other biological processes can be involved. This paper reports on the CARS group meeting held in August 2013 in Perth, Australia. The latest knowledge on the development of molecular markers for resistance to each of the principal classes of anthelmintics is reviewed. The molecular basis of resistance is best understood for the benzimidazole group of compounds, and we examine recent work to translate this knowledge into useful diagnostics for field use. We examine recent candidate-gene and whole-genome approaches to understanding anthelmintic resistance and identify markers. We also look at drug transporters in terms of providing both useful markers for resistance, as well as opportunities to overcome resistance through the targeting of the transporters themselves with inhibitors. Finally, we describe the tools available for the application of the newest high-throughput sequencing technologies to the study of anthelmintic resistance.

  17. An integrated bioanalytical platform for supporting high-throughput serum protein binding screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Shou, Wilson Z; Vath, Marianne; Kieltyka, Kasia; Maloney, Jennifer; Elvebak, Larry; Stewart, Jeremy; Herbst, John; Weller, Harold N

    2010-12-30

    Quantification of small molecules using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer has become a common practice in bioanalytical support of in vitro adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) screening. The bioanalysis process involves primarily three indispensable steps: MS/MS optimization for a large number of new chemical compounds undergoing various screening assays in early drug discovery, high-throughput sample analysis with LC/MS/MS for those chemically diverse compounds using the optimized MS/MS conditions, and post-acquisition data review and reporting. To improve overall efficiency of ADME bioanalysis, an integrated system was proposed featuring an automated and unattended MS/MS optimization, a staggered parallel LC/MS/MS for high-throughput sample analysis, and a sophisticated software tool for LC/MS/MS raw data review as well as biological data calculation and reporting. The integrated platform has been used in bioanalytical support of a serum protein binding screening assay with high speed, high capacity, and good robustness. In this new platform, a unique sample dilution scheme was also introduced. With this dilution design, the total number of analytical samples was reduced; therefore, the total operation time was reduced and the overall throughput was further improved. The performance of the protein binding screening assay was monitored with two controls representing high and low binding properties and an acceptable inter-assay consistency was achieved. This platform has been successfully used for the determination of serum protein binding in multiple species for more than 4000 compounds.

  18. Development of high-throughput SNP-based genotyping in Acacia auriculiformis x A. mangium hybrids using short-read transcriptome data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Next Generation Sequencing has provided comprehensive, affordable and high-throughput DNA sequences for Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) discovery in Acacia auriculiformis and Acacia mangium. Like other non-model species, SNP detection and genotyping in Acacia are challenging due to lack of genome sequences. The main objective of this study is to develop the first high-throughput SNP genotyping assay for linkage map construction of A. auriculiformis x A. mangium hybrids. Results We identified a total of 37,786 putative SNPs by aligning short read transcriptome data from four parents of two Acacia hybrid mapping populations using Bowtie against 7,839 de novo transcriptome contigs. Given a set of 10 validated SNPs from two lignin genes, our in silico SNP detection approach is highly accurate (100%) compared to the traditional in vitro approach (44%). Further validation of 96 SNPs using Illumina GoldenGate Assay gave an overall assay success rate of 89.6% and conversion rate of 37.5%. We explored possible factors lowering assay success rate by predicting exon-intron boundaries and paralogous genes of Acacia contigs using Medicago truncatula genome as reference. This assessment revealed that presence of exon-intron boundary is the main cause (50%) of assay failure. Subsequent SNPs filtering and improved assay design resulted in assay success and conversion rate of 92.4% and 57.4%, respectively based on 768 SNPs genotyping. Analysis of clustering patterns revealed that 27.6% of the assays were not reproducible and flanking sequence might play a role in determining cluster compression. In addition, we identified a total of 258 and 319 polymorphic SNPs in A. auriculiformis and A. mangium natural germplasms, respectively. Conclusion We have successfully discovered a large number of SNP markers in A. auriculiformis x A. mangium hybrids using next generation transcriptome sequencing. By using a reference genome from the most closely related species, we

  19. Development of a Framework for High-Throughput Calculations and its Application to Energy Storage Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirklin, Scott

    From a historical perspective, the progress of humanity has been measured by the materials that mankind has been able to use. Looking forward, future technological developments will continue to hinge on the development of materials with precisely tailored properties and performance. In pursuit of this goal, this thesis presents a framework for the high-throughput handling of first principles materials modeling. This framework takes the form of the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD - www.oqmd.org), a repository of crystal structures, computed materials properties, and a host of tools for data storage, retrieval, and analysis. At present, the OQMD contains over 300,000 materials, and over 1.3 million completed density functional theory calculations. We set forth to demonstrate the usefulness of the OQMD for materials discovery by using it to search for materials for three applications: 1) conversion reaction anode materials for Li-ion batteries, 2) electrode materials for a novel hybrid Li-ion/Li-O2 battery chemistry, and 3) precipitation strengtheners for a suite of structural metals. In each of these materials discovery projects, we first determine the scope of relevant materials to consider, then develop a set of screens based on DFT calculable bulk materials properties, implement the specified filters, and finally consider the apparent advantages and disadvantages of the predicted materials.

  20. Bis-Benzimidazole Hits against Naegleria fowleri Discovered with New High-Throughput Screens

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Christopher A.; Colon, Beatrice L.; Alp, Mehmet; Göker, Hakan; Boykin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a pathogenic free-living amoeba (FLA) that causes an acute fatal disease known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The major problem for infections with any pathogenic FLA is a lack of effective therapeutics, since PAM has a case mortality rate approaching 99%. Clearly, new drugs that are potent and have rapid onset of action are needed to enhance the treatment regimens for PAM. Diamidines have demonstrated potency against multiple pathogens, including FLA, and are known to cross the blood-brain barrier to cure other protozoan diseases of the central nervous system. Therefore, amidino derivatives serve as an important chemotype for discovery of new drugs. In this study, we validated two new in vitro assays suitable for medium- or high-throughput drug discovery and used these for N. fowleri. We next screened over 150 amidino derivatives of multiple structural classes and identified two hit series with nM potency that are suitable for further lead optimization as new drugs for this neglected disease. These include both mono- and diamidino derivatives, with the most potent compound (DB173) having a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 177 nM. Similarly, we identified 10 additional analogues with IC50s of <1 μM, with many of these having reasonable selectivity indices. The most potent hits were >500 times more potent than pentamidine. In summary, the mono- and diamidino derivatives offer potential for lead optimization to develop new drugs to treat central nervous system infections with N. fowleri. PMID:25605363

  1. A Systematic Approach to Identify Biased Agonists of the Apelin Receptor through High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    McAnally, Danielle; Siddiquee, Khandaker; Sharir, Haleli; Qi, Feng; Phatak, Sharangdhar; Li, Jian-Liang; Berg, Eric; Fishman, Jordan; Smith, Layton

    2017-03-01

    Biased agonists are defined by their ability to selectively activate distinct signaling pathways of a receptor, and they hold enormous promise for the development of novel drugs that specifically elicit only the desired therapeutic response and avoid potential adverse effects. Unfortunately, most high-throughput screening (HTS) assays are designed to detect signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) downstream of either G protein or β-arrestin-mediated signaling but not both. A comprehensive drug discovery program seeking biased agonists must employ assays that report on the activity of each compound at multiple discrete pathways, particularly for HTS campaigns. Here, we report a systematic approach to the identification of biased agonists of human apelin receptor (APJ). We synthesized 448 modified versions of apelin and screened them against a cascade of cell-based assays, including intracellular cAMP and β-arrestin recruitment to APJ, simultaneously. The screen yielded potent and highly selective APJ agonists. Representative hits displaying preferential signaling via either G-protein or β-arrestin were subjected to a battery of confirmation assays. These biased agonists will be useful as tools to probe the function and pharmacology of APJ and provide proof of concept of our systematic approach to the discovery of biased ligands. This approach is likely universally applicable to the search for biased agonists of GPCRs.

  2. High throughput physiological screening of iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes for drug development.

    PubMed

    Del Álamo, Juan C; Lemons, Derek; Serrano, Ricardo; Savchenko, Alex; Cerignoli, Fabio; Bodmer, Rolf; Mercola, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac drug discovery is hampered by the reliance on non-human animal and cellular models with inadequate throughput and physiological fidelity to accurately identify new targets and test novel therapeutic strategies. Similarly, adverse drug effects on the heart are challenging to model, contributing to costly failure of drugs during development and even after market launch. Human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiac tissue represents a potentially powerful means to model aspects of heart physiology relevant to disease and adverse drug effects, providing both the human context and throughput needed to improve the efficiency of drug development. Here we review emerging technologies for high throughput measurements of cardiomyocyte physiology, and comment on the promises and challenges of using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to model disease and introduce the human context into early stages of drug discovery. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  3. The essential roles of chemistry in high-throughput screening triage

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Walters, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that academic high-throughput screening (HTS) and virtual HTS triage suffers from a lack of scientists trained in the art and science of early drug discovery chemistry. Many recent publications report the discovery of compounds by screening that are most likely artifacts or promiscuous bioactive compounds, and these results are not placed into the context of previous studies. For HTS to be most successful, it is our contention that there must exist an early partnership between biologists and medicinal chemists. Their combined skill sets are necessary to design robust assays and efficient workflows that will weed out assay artifacts, false positives, promiscuous bioactive compounds and intractable screening hits, efforts that ultimately give projects a better chance at identifying truly useful chemical matter. Expertise in medicinal chemistry, cheminformatics and purification sciences (analytical chemistry) can enhance the post-HTS triage process by quickly removing these problematic chemotypes from consideration, while simultaneously prioritizing the more promising chemical matter for follow-up testing. It is only when biologists and chemists collaborate effectively that HTS can manifest its full promise. PMID:25163000

  4. WholePathwayScope: a comprehensive pathway-based analysis tool for high-throughput data

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ming; Horton, Jay D; Cohen, Jonathan C; Hobbs, Helen H; Stephens, Robert M

    2006-01-01

    Background Analysis of High Throughput (HTP) Data such as microarray and proteomics data has provided a powerful methodology to study patterns of gene regulation at genome scale. A major unresolved problem in the post-genomic era is to assemble the large amounts of data generated into a meaningful biological context. We have developed a comprehensive software tool, WholePathwayScope (WPS), for deriving biological insights from analysis of HTP data. Result WPS extracts gene lists with shared biological themes through color cue templates. WPS statistically evaluates global functional category enrichment of gene lists and pathway-level pattern enrichment of data. WPS incorporates well-known biological pathways from KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) and Biocarta, GO (Gene Ontology) terms as well as user-defined pathways or relevant gene clusters or groups, and explores gene-term relationships within the derived gene-term association networks (GTANs). WPS simultaneously compares multiple datasets within biological contexts either as pathways or as association networks. WPS also integrates Genetic Association Database and Partial MedGene Database for disease-association information. We have used this program to analyze and compare microarray and proteomics datasets derived from a variety of biological systems. Application examples demonstrated the capacity of WPS to significantly facilitate the analysis of HTP data for integrative discovery. Conclusion This tool represents a pathway-based platform for discovery integration to maximize analysis power. The tool is freely available at . PMID:16423281

  5. Bis-benzimidazole hits against Naegleria fowleri discovered with new high-throughput screens.

    PubMed

    Rice, Christopher A; Colon, Beatrice L; Alp, Mehmet; Göker, Hakan; Boykin, David W; Kyle, Dennis E

    2015-04-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a pathogenic free-living amoeba (FLA) that causes an acute fatal disease known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The major problem for infections with any pathogenic FLA is a lack of effective therapeutics, since PAM has a case mortality rate approaching 99%. Clearly, new drugs that are potent and have rapid onset of action are needed to enhance the treatment regimens for PAM. Diamidines have demonstrated potency against multiple pathogens, including FLA, and are known to cross the blood-brain barrier to cure other protozoan diseases of the central nervous system. Therefore, amidino derivatives serve as an important chemotype for discovery of new drugs. In this study, we validated two new in vitro assays suitable for medium- or high-throughput drug discovery and used these for N. fowleri. We next screened over 150 amidino derivatives of multiple structural classes and identified two hit series with nM potency that are suitable for further lead optimization as new drugs for this neglected disease. These include both mono- and diamidino derivatives, with the most potent compound (DB173) having a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 177 nM. Similarly, we identified 10 additional analogues with IC50s of <1 μM, with many of these having reasonable selectivity indices. The most potent hits were >500 times more potent than pentamidine. In summary, the mono- and diamidino derivatives offer potential for lead optimization to develop new drugs to treat central nervous system infections with N. fowleri.

  6. Public availability of a genotyped, segregating population may foster marker assisted breeding (MAB) and quantitative trait loci (QTL) discovery: An example using strawberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much of the cost associated with marker discovery for marker assisted breeding (MAB) can be eliminated if a diverse, segregating population is generated, genotyped and made available to the global breeding community. Herein, we present an example of a hybrid, wild-derived family of the octoploid str...

  7. Cell-based assays in practice: cell markers from autofluorescent proteins of the GFP-family.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Michael; Kredel, Simone; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Heilker, Ralf

    2008-09-01

    The more recently discovered anthozoan fluorescent proteins (FPs) and the classic Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (avGFP) as well as their derivatives have become versatile tools as live cell markers in fluorescence microscopy. In this review, we show the use of these FPs in drug discovery assays. Assay examples are given for the application of FPs in multiplexed imaging, as photosensitizers, as fluorescent timers, as pulse-chase labels and for robotically integrated compound testing. The development of fast microscopic imaging devices has enabled the application of automated fluorescence microscopy combined with image analysis to pharmaceutical high throughput drug discovery assays, generally referred to as High Content Screening (HCS).

  8. High-throughput process development: I. Process chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Anurag S; Bhambure, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Chromatographic separation serves as "a workhorse" for downstream process development and plays a key role in removal of product-related, host cell-related, and process-related impurities. Complex and poorly characterized raw materials and feed material, low feed concentration, product instability, and poor mechanistic understanding of the processes are some of the critical challenges that are faced during development of a chromatographic step. Traditional process development is performed as trial-and-error-based evaluation and often leads to a suboptimal process. High-throughput process development (HTPD) platform involves an integration of miniaturization, automation, and parallelization and provides a systematic approach for time- and resource-efficient chromatography process development. Creation of such platforms requires integration of mechanistic knowledge of the process with various statistical tools for data analysis. The relevance of such a platform is high in view of the constraints with respect to time and resources that the biopharma industry faces today. This protocol describes the steps involved in performing HTPD of process chromatography step. It described operation of a commercially available device (PreDictor™ plates from GE Healthcare). This device is available in 96-well format with 2 or 6 μL well size. We also discuss the challenges that one faces when performing such experiments as well as possible solutions to alleviate them. Besides describing the operation of the device, the protocol also presents an approach for statistical analysis of the data that is gathered from such a platform. A case study involving use of the protocol for examining ion-exchange chromatography of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF), a therapeutic product, is briefly discussed. This is intended to demonstrate the usefulness of this protocol in generating data that is representative of the data obtained at the traditional lab scale. The agreement in the

  9. High throughput optoelectronic smart pixel systems using diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Hao

    1999-12-01

    Recent developments in digital video, multimedia technology and data networks have greatly increased the demand for high bandwidth communication channels and high throughput data processing. Electronics is particularly suited for switching, amplification and logic functions, while optics is more suitable for interconnections and communications with lower energy and crosstalk. In this research, we present the design, testing, integration and demonstration of several optoelectronic smart pixel devices and system architectures. These systems integrate electronic switching/processing capability with parallel optical interconnections to provide high throughput network communication and pipeline data processing. The Smart Pixel Array Cellular Logic processor (SPARCL) is designed in 0.8 m m CMOS and hybrid integrated with Multiple-Quantum-Well (MQW) devices for pipeline image processing. The Smart Pixel Network Interface (SAPIENT) is designed in 0.6 m m GaAs and monolithically integrated with LEDs to implement a highly parallel optical interconnection network. The Translucent Smart Pixel Array (TRANSPAR) design is implemented in two different versions. The first version, TRANSPAR-MQW, is designed in 0.5 m m CMOS and flip-chip integrated with MQW devices to provide 2-D pipeline processing and translucent networking using the Carrier- Sense-MultipleAccess/Collision-Detection (CSMA/CD) protocol. The other version, TRANSPAR-VM, is designed in 1.2 m m CMOS and discretely integrated with VCSEL-MSM (Vertical-Cavity-Surface- Emitting-Laser and Metal-Semiconductor-Metal detectors) chips and driver/receiver chips on a printed circuit board. The TRANSPAR-VM provides an option of using the token ring network protocol in addition to the embedded functions of TRANSPAR-MQW. These optoelectronic smart pixel systems also require micro-optics devices to provide high resolution, high quality optical interconnections and external source arrays. In this research, we describe an innovative

  10. Parallel tools in HEVC for high-throughput processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Minhua; Sze, Vivienne; Budagavi, Madhukar

    2012-10-01

    HEVC (High Efficiency Video Coding) is the next-generation video coding standard being jointly developed by the ITU-T VCEG and ISO/IEC MPEG JCT-VC team. In addition to the high coding efficiency, which is expected to provide 50% more bit-rate reduction when compared to H.264/AVC, HEVC has built-in parallel processing tools to address bitrate, pixel-rate and motion estimation (ME) throughput requirements. This paper describes how CABAC, which is also used in H.264/AVC, has been redesigned for improved throughput, and how parallel merge/skip and tiles, which are new tools introduced for HEVC, enable high-throughput processing. CABAC has data dependencies which make it difficult to parallelize and thus limit its throughput. The prediction error/residual, represented as quantized transform coefficients, accounts for the majority of the CABAC workload. Various improvements have been made to the context selection and scans in transform coefficient coding that enable CABAC in HEVC to potentially achieve higher throughput and increased coding gains relative to H.264/AVC. The merge/skip mode is a coding efficiency enhancement tool in HEVC; the parallel merge/skip breaks dependency between the regular and merge/skip ME, which provides flexibility for high throughput and high efficiency HEVC encoder designs. For ultra high definition (UHD) video, such as 4kx2k and 8kx4k resolutions, low-latency and real-time processing may be beyond the capability of a single core codec. Tiles are an effective tool which enables pixel-rate balancing among the cores to achieve parallel processing with a throughput scalable implementation of multi-core UHD video codec. With the evenly divided tiles, a multi-core video codec can be realized by simply replicating single core codec and adding a tile boundary processing core on top of that. These tools illustrate that accounting for implementation cost when designing video coding algorithms can enable higher processing speed and reduce

  11. Exploring the Transcriptome Landscape of Pomegranate Fruit Peel for Natural Product Biosynthetic Gene and SSR Marker Discovery(F).

    PubMed

    Ono, Nadia Nicole; Britton, Monica Therese; Fass, Joseph Nathaniel; Nicolet, Charles Meyer; Lin, Dawei; Tian, Li

    2011-10-01

    Pomegranate fruit peel is rich in bioactive plant natural products, such as hydrolyzable tannins and anthocyanins. Despite their documented roles in human nutrition and fruit quality, genes involved in natural product biosynthesis have not been cloned from pomegranate and very little sequence information is available on pomegranate in the public domain. Shotgun transcriptome sequencing of pomegranate fruit peel cDNA was performed using RNA-Seq on the Illumina Genome Analyzer platform. Over 100 million raw sequence reads were obtained and assembled into 9,839 transcriptome assemblies (TAs) (>200 bp). Candidate genes for hydrolyzable tannin, anthocyanin, flavonoid, terpenoid and fatty acid biosynthesis and/or regulation were identified. Three lipid transfer proteins were obtained that may contribute to the previously reported IgE reactivity of pomegranate fruit extracts. In addition, 115 SSR markers were identified from the pomegranate fruit peel transcriptome and primers were designed for 77 SSR markers. The pomegranate fruit peel transcriptome set provides a valuable platform for natural product biosynthetic gene and SSR marker discovery in pomegranate. This work also demonstrates that next-generation transcriptome sequencing is an economical and effective approach for investigating natural product biosynthesis, identifying genes controlling important agronomic traits, and discovering molecular markers in non-model specialty crop species.

  12. HighSSR: high-throughput SSR characterization and locus development from next-gen sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Churbanov, Alexander; Ryan, Rachael; Hasan, Nabeeh; Bailey, Donovan; Chen, Haofeng; Milligan, Brook; Houde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Microsatellites are among the most useful genetic markers in population biology. High-throughput sequencing of microsatellite-enriched libraries dramatically expedites the traditional process of screening recombinant libraries for microsatellite markers. However, sorting through millions of reads to distill high-quality polymorphic markers requires special algorithms tailored to tolerate sequencing errors in locus reconstruction, distinguish paralogous loci, rarify raw reads originating from the same amplicon and sort out various artificial fragments resulting from recombination or concatenation of auxiliary adapters. Existing programs warrant improvement. Results: We describe a microsatellite prediction framework named HighSSR for microsatellite genotyping based on high-throughput sequencing. We demonstrate the utility of HighSSR in comparison to Roche gsAssembler on two Roche 454 GS FLX runs. The majority of the HighSSR-assembled loci were reliably mapped against model organism reference genomes. HighSSR demultiplexes pooled libraries, assesses locus polymorphism and implements Primer3 for the design of PCR primers flanking polymorphic microsatellite loci. As sequencing costs drop and permit the analysis of all project samples on next-generation platforms, this framework can also be used for direct simple sequence repeats genotyping. Availability: http://code.google.com/p/highssr/ Contact: alexander@big.ac.cn Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22954626

  13. Generating information-rich high-throughput experimental materials genomes using functional clustering via multitree genetic programming and information theory.

    PubMed

    Suram, Santosh K; Haber, Joel A; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2015-04-13

    High-throughput experimental methodologies are capable of synthesizing, screening and characterizing vast arrays of combinatorial material libraries at a very rapid rate. These methodologies strategically employ tiered screening wherein the number of compositions screened decreases as the complexity, and very often the scientific information obtained from a screening experiment, increases. The algorithm used for down-selection of samples from higher throughput screening experiment to a lower throughput screening experiment is vital in achieving information-rich experimental materials genomes. The fundamental science of material discovery lies in the establishment of composition-structure-property relationships, motivating the development of advanced down-selection algorithms which consider the information value of the selected compositions, as opposed to simply selecting the best performing compositions from a high throughput experiment. Identification of property fields (composition regions with distinct composition-property relationships) in high throughput data enables down-selection algorithms to employ advanced selection strategies, such as the selection of representative compositions from each field or selection of compositions that span the composition space of the highest performing field. Such strategies would greatly enhance the generation of data-driven discoveries. We introduce an informatics-based clustering of composition-property functional relationships using a combination of information theory and multitree genetic programming concepts for identification of property fields in a composition library. We demonstrate our approach using a complex synthetic composition-property map for a 5 at. % step ternary library consisting of four distinct property fields and finally explore the application of this methodology for capturing relationships between composition and catalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction for 5429 catalyst compositions in a

  14. A rapid transglutaminase assay for high-throughput screening applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Wei; Tsai, Yu-Hui

    2006-10-01

    Transglutaminases (TGs) are widely distributed enzymes that catalyze posttranslational modification of proteins by Ca(2+)-dependent cross-linking reactions. The family members of TGs participate in many significant processes of biological functions such as tissue regeneration, cell differentiation, apoptosis, and certain pathologies. A novel technique for TG activity assay was developed in this study. It was based on the rapid capturing, fluorescence quenching, and fast separation of the unreacted fluorescent molecules from the macromolecular product with magnetic dextran-coated charcoal. As few as 3 ng of guinea pig liver transglutaminase (gpTG) could be detected by the method; activities of 96 TG samples could be measured within an hour. The K(m) of gpTG determined by this method for monodansylcadaverine (dansyl-CAD) and N, N-dimethylcasein was 14 and 5 muM, respectively. A typical competitive inhibition pattern of cystamine on dansyl-CAD for gpTG activity was also demonstrated. The application of this technique is not limited to the use of dansyl-CAD as the fluorescent substrate of TG; other small fluor-labeled TG substrates may substitute dansyl-CAD. Finally, this method is rapid, highly sensitive, and inexpensive. It is suitable not only for high-throughput screening of enzymes or enzyme inhibitors but also for enzyme kinetic analysis.

  15. Probabilistic Assessment of High-Throughput Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Robin E.; Mechitov, Kirill; Sim, Sung-Han; Spencer, Billie F.; Song, Junho

    2016-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) using wireless smart sensors (WSS) has the potential to provide rich information on the state of a structure. However, because of their distributed nature, maintaining highly robust and reliable networks can be challenging. Assessing WSS network communication quality before and after finalizing a deployment is critical to achieve a successful WSS network for SHM purposes. Early studies on WSS network reliability mostly used temporal signal indicators, composed of a smaller number of packets, to assess the network reliability. However, because the WSS networks for SHM purpose often require high data throughput, i.e., a larger number of packets are delivered within the communication, such an approach is not sufficient. Instead, in this study, a model that can assess, probabilistically, the long-term performance of the network is proposed. The proposed model is based on readily-available measured data sets that represent communication quality during high-throughput data transfer. Then, an empirical limit-state function is determined, which is further used to estimate the probability of network communication failure. Monte Carlo simulation is adopted in this paper and applied to a small and a full-bridge wireless networks. By performing the proposed analysis in complex sensor networks, an optimized sensor topology can be achieved. PMID:27258270

  16. High Throughput, Continuous, Mass Production of Photovoltaic Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt Barth

    2008-02-06

    AVA Solar has developed a very low cost solar photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing process and has demonstrated the significant economic and commercial potential of this technology. This I & I Category 3 project provided significant assistance toward accomplishing these milestones. The original goals of this project were to design, construct and test a production prototype system, fabricate PV modules and test the module performance. The original module manufacturing costs in the proposal were estimated at $2/Watt. The objectives of this project have been exceeded. An advanced processing line was designed, fabricated and installed. Using this automated, high throughput system, high efficiency devices and fully encapsulated modules were manufactured. AVA Solar has obtained 2 rounds of private equity funding, expand to 50 people and initiated the development of a large scale factory for 100+ megawatts of annual production. Modules will be manufactured at an industry leading cost which will enable AVA Solar's modules to produce power that is cost-competitive with traditional energy resources. With low manufacturing costs and the ability to scale manufacturing, AVA Solar has been contacted by some of the largest customers in the PV industry to negotiate long-term supply contracts. The current market for PV has continued to grow at 40%+ per year for nearly a decade and is projected to reach $40-$60 Billion by 2012. Currently, a crystalline silicon raw material supply shortage is limiting growth and raising costs. Our process does not use silicon, eliminating these limitations.

  17. High Throughput Sequencing: An Overview of Sequencing Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ambardar, Sheetal; Gupta, Rikita; Trakroo, Deepika; Lal, Rup; Vakhlu, Jyoti

    2016-12-01

    In the present century sequencing is to the DNA science, what gel electrophoresis was to it in the last century. From 1977 to 2016 three generation of the sequencing technologies of various types have been developed. Second and third generation sequencing technologies referred commonly to as next generation sequencing technology, has evolved significantly with increase in sequencing speed, decrease in sequencing cost, since its inception in 2004. GS FLX by 454 Life Sciences/Roche diagnostics, Genome Analyzer, HiSeq, MiSeq and NextSeq by Illumina, Inc., SOLiD by ABI, Ion Torrent by Life Technologies are various type of the sequencing platforms available for second generation sequencing. The platforms available for the third generation sequencing are Helicos™ Genetic Analysis System by SeqLL, LLC, SMRT Sequencing by Pacific Biosciences, Nanopore sequencing by Oxford Nanopore's, Complete Genomics by Beijing Genomics Institute and GnuBIO by BioRad, to name few. The present article is an overview of the principle and the sequencing chemistry of these high throughput sequencing technologies along with brief comparison of various types of sequencing platforms available.

  18. A High-Throughput Yeast Halo Assay for Bioactive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bray, Walter; Lokey, R Scott

    2016-09-01

    When a disk of filter paper is impregnated with a cytotoxic or cytostatic drug and added to solid medium seeded with yeast, a visible clear zone forms around the disk whose size depends on the concentration and potency of the drug. This is the traditional "halo" assay and provides a convenient, if low-throughput, read-out of biological activity that has been the mainstay of antifungal and antibiotic testing for decades. Here, we describe a protocol for a high-throughput version of the halo assay, which uses an array of 384 pins to deliver ∼200 nL of stock solutions from compound plates onto single-well plates seeded with yeast. Using a plate reader in the absorbance mode, the resulting halos can be quantified and the data archived in the form of flat files that can be connected to compound databases with standard software. This assay has the convenience associated with the visual readout of the traditional halo assay but uses far less material and can be automated to screen thousands of compounds per day.

  19. RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Using High-throughput SHAPE

    PubMed Central

    Purzycka, Katarzyna J.; Rausch, Jason W.; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the function of RNA involved in biological processes requires a thorough knowledge of RNA structure. Toward this end, the methodology dubbed "high-throughput selective 2' hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension", or SHAPE, allows prediction of RNA secondary structure with single nucleotide resolution. This approach utilizes chemical probing agents that preferentially acylate single stranded or flexible regions of RNA in aqueous solution. Sites of chemical modification are detected by reverse transcription of the modified RNA, and the products of this reaction are fractionated by automated capillary electrophoresis (CE). Since reverse transcriptase pauses at those RNA nucleotides modified by the SHAPE reagents, the resulting cDNA library indirectly maps those ribonucleotides that are single stranded in the context of the folded RNA. Using ShapeFinder software, the electropherograms produced by automated CE are processed and converted into nucleotide reactivity tables that are themselves converted into pseudo-energy constraints used in the RNAStructure (v5.3) prediction algorithm. The two-dimensional RNA structures obtained by combining SHAPE probing with in silico RNA secondary structure prediction have been found to be far more accurate than structures obtained using either method alone. PMID:23748604

  20. High Throughput Multispectral Image Processing with Applications in Food Science

    PubMed Central

    Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Nychas, George-John

    2015-01-01

    Recently, machine vision is gaining attention in food science as well as in food industry concerning food quality assessment and monitoring. Into the framework of implementation of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) in the food industry, image processing can be used not only in estimation and even prediction of food quality but also in detection of adulteration. Towards these applications on food science, we present here a novel methodology for automated image analysis of several kinds of food products e.g. meat, vanilla crème and table olives, so as to increase objectivity, data reproducibility, low cost information extraction and faster quality assessment, without human intervention. Image processing’s outcome will be propagated to the downstream analysis. The developed multispectral image processing method is based on unsupervised machine learning approach (Gaussian Mixture Models) and a novel unsupervised scheme of spectral band selection for segmentation process optimization. Through the evaluation we prove its efficiency and robustness against the currently available semi-manual software, showing that the developed method is a high throughput approach appropriate for massive data extraction from food samples. PMID:26466349

  1. Translational informatics: enabling high-throughput research paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Embi, Peter J.; Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    A common thread throughout the clinical and translational research domains is the need to collect, manage, integrate, analyze, and disseminate large-scale, heterogeneous biomedical data sets. However, well-established and broadly adopted theoretical and practical frameworks and models intended to address such needs are conspicuously absent in the published literature or other reputable knowledge sources. Instead, the development and execution of multidisciplinary, clinical, or translational studies are significantly limited by the propagation of “silos” of both data and expertise. Mot