Science.gov

Sample records for high-throughput marker discovery

  1. A zebrafish high throughput screening system used for Staphylococcus epidermidis infection marker discovery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria are a major cause of biomaterial-associated infections in modern medicine. Yet there is little known about the host responses against this normally innocent bacterium in the context of infection of biomaterials. In order to better understand the factors involved in this process, a whole animal model with high throughput screening possibilities and markers for studying the host response to S. epidermidis infection are required. Results We have used a zebrafish yolk injection system to study bacterial proliferation and the host response in a time course experiment of S. epidermidis infection. By combining an automated microinjection system with complex object parametric analysis and sorting (COPAS) technology we have quantified bacterial proliferation. This system was used together with transcriptome analysis at several time points during the infection period. We show that bacterial colony forming unit (CFU) counting can be replaced by high throughput flow-based fluorescence analysis of embryos enabling high throughput readout. Comparison of the host transcriptome response to S. epidermidis and Mycobacterium marinum infection in the same system showed that M. marinum has a far stronger effect on host gene regulation than S. epidermidis. However, multiple genes responded differently to S. epidermidis infection than to M. marinum, including a cell adhesion gene linked to specific infection by staphylococci in mammals. Conclusions Our zebrafish embryo infection model allowed (i) quantitative assessment of bacterial proliferation, (ii) identification of zebrafish genes serving as markers for infection with the opportunistic pathogen S. epidermidis, and (iii) comparison of the transcriptome response of infection with S. epidermidis and with the pathogen M. marinum. As a result we have identified markers that can be used to distinguish common and specific responses to S. epidermidis. These markers enable the future integration

  2. Discovery of a large set of SNP and SSR genetic markers by high-throughput sequencing of pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Nicolaï, M; Pisani, C; Bouchet, J-P; Vuylsteke, M; Palloix, A

    2012-08-13

    Genetic markers based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are in increasing demand for genome mapping and fingerprinting of breeding populations in crop plants. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing provide the opportunity for whole-genome resequencing and identification of allelic variants by mapping the reads to a reference genome. However, for many species, such as pepper (Capsicum annuum), a reference genome sequence is not yet available. To this end, we sequenced the C. annuum cv. "Yolo Wonder" transcriptome using Roche 454 pyrosequencing and assembled de novo 23,748 isotigs and 60,370 singletons. Mapping of 10,886,425 reads obtained by the Illumina GA II sequencing of C. annuum cv. "Criollo de Morelos 334" to the "Yolo Wonder" transcriptome allowed for SNP identification. By setting a threshold value that allows selecting reliable SNPs with minimal loss of information, 11,849 reliable SNPs spread across 5919 isotigs were identified. In addition, 853 single sequence repeats were obtained. This information has been made available online.

  3. Discovery of a large set of SNP and SSR genetic markers by high-throughput sequencing of pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Nicolaï, M; Pisani, C; Bouchet, J-P; Vuylsteke, M; Palloix, A

    2012-01-01

    Genetic markers based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are in increasing demand for genome mapping and fingerprinting of breeding populations in crop plants. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing provide the opportunity for whole-genome resequencing and identification of allelic variants by mapping the reads to a reference genome. However, for many species, such as pepper (Capsicum annuum), a reference genome sequence is not yet available. To this end, we sequenced the C. annuum cv. "Yolo Wonder" transcriptome using Roche 454 pyrosequencing and assembled de novo 23,748 isotigs and 60,370 singletons. Mapping of 10,886,425 reads obtained by the Illumina GA II sequencing of C. annuum cv. "Criollo de Morelos 334" to the "Yolo Wonder" transcriptome allowed for SNP identification. By setting a threshold value that allows selecting reliable SNPs with minimal loss of information, 11,849 reliable SNPs spread across 5919 isotigs were identified. In addition, 853 single sequence repeats were obtained. This information has been made available online. PMID:22911599

  4. Gene Discovery and Molecular Marker Development, Based on High-Throughput Transcript Sequencing of Paspalum dilatatum Poir

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Andrea; Cogan, Noel O. I.; Kaur, Sukhjiwan; Drayton, Michelle; Mouradov, Aidyn; Panter, Stephen; Schrauf, Gustavo E.; Mason, John G.; Spangenberg, German C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Paspalum dilatatum Poir. (common name dallisgrass) is a native grass species of South America, with special relevance to dairy and red meat production. P. dilatatum exhibits higher forage quality than other C4 forage grasses and is tolerant to frost and water stress. This species is predominantly cultivated in an apomictic monoculture, with an inherent high risk that biotic and abiotic stresses could potentially devastate productivity. Therefore, advanced breeding strategies that characterise and use available genetic diversity, or assess germplasm collections effectively are required to deliver advanced cultivars for production systems. However, there are limited genomic resources available for this forage grass species. Results Transcriptome sequencing using second-generation sequencing platforms has been employed using pooled RNA from different tissues (stems, roots, leaves and inflorescences) at the final reproductive stage of P. dilatatum cultivar Primo. A total of 324,695 sequence reads were obtained, corresponding to c. 102 Mbp. The sequences were assembled, generating 20,169 contigs of a combined length of 9,336,138 nucleotides. The contigs were BLAST analysed against the fully sequenced grass species of Oryza sativa subsp. japonica, Brachypodium distachyon, the closely related Sorghum bicolor and foxtail millet (Setaria italica) genomes as well as against the UniRef 90 protein database allowing a comprehensive gene ontology analysis to be performed. The contigs generated from the transcript sequencing were also analysed for the presence of simple sequence repeats (SSRs). A total of 2,339 SSR motifs were identified within 1,989 contigs and corresponding primer pairs were designed. Empirical validation of a cohort of 96 SSRs was performed, with 34% being polymorphic between sexual and apomictic biotypes. Conclusions The development of genetic and genomic resources for P. dilatatum will contribute to gene discovery and expression studies

  5. C. elegans in high-throughput drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Linda P.; Luke, Cliff J.; Perlmutter, David H.; Silverman, Gary A.; Pak, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    C. elegans has proven to be a useful model organism for investigating molecular and cellular aspects of numerous human diseases. More recently, investigators have explored the use of this organism as a tool for drug discovery. Although earlier drug screens were labor-intensive and low in throughput, recent advances in high-throughput liquid workflows, imaging platforms and data analysis software have made C. elegans a viable option for automated high-throughput drug screens. This review will outline the evolution of C. elegans-based drug screening, discuss the inherent challenges of using C. elegans, and highlight recent technological advances that have paved the way for future drug screens. PMID:24333896

  6. Perspective: Data infrastructure for high throughput materials discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeif, E. A.; Kroenlein, K.

    2016-05-01

    Computational capability has enabled materials design to evolve from trial-and-error towards more informed methodologies that require large amounts of data. Expert-designed tools and their underlying databases facilitate modern-day high throughput computational methods. Standard data formats and communication standards increase the impact of traditional data, and applying these technologies to a high throughput experimental design provides dense, targeted materials data that are valuable for material discovery. Integrated computational materials engineering requires both experimentally and computationally derived data. Harvesting these comprehensively requires different methods of varying degrees of automation to accommodate variety and volume. Issues of data quality persist independent of type.

  7. High-throughput crystallography for lead discovery in drug design.

    PubMed

    Blundell, Tom L; Jhoti, Harren; Abell, Chris

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of protein targets now emerging from genomic data has the potential to accelerate drug discovery greatly. X-ray crystallography is the most widely used technique for protein structure determination, but technical challenges and time constraints have traditionally limited its use primarily to lead optimization. Here, we describe how significant advances in process automation and informatics have aided the development of high-throughput X-ray crystallography, and discuss the use of this technique for structure-based lead discovery.

  8. High-throughput virtual screening for drug discovery in parallel.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Sherman, Leticia M; Chen, Deqi

    2002-05-01

    With the influx of targets generated by genomics and proteomics initiatives, a new drug discovery paradigm is emerging. Many companies are setting up target family platforms that tackle multiple targets and therapeutic areas simultaneously. Virtual screening (VS) techniques are a fundamental component of such platforms for in silico filtering of compound collections and prioritization of chemistry and screening efforts. At the heart of these, structure-based docking and scoring methods are especially effective in identifying bioactive molecules if the structure of a target is available. As structural genomics maps the structural space of the proteome, these techniques are expected to become commonplace. In light of this, an overview of the latest developments in VS methodology is given here. In particular, emphasis is placed on those techniques adaptable to high-throughput VS in parallel drug discovery platforms. The first examples of docking across multiple targets have already appeared in the literature and will be reviewed here.

  9. High-throughput characterization for solar fuels materials discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, Slobodan; Becerra, Natalie; Cornell, Earl; Guevarra, Dan; Haber, Joel; Jin, Jian; Jones, Ryan; Kan, Kevin; Marcin, Martin; Newhouse, Paul; Soedarmadji, Edwin; Suram, Santosh; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John; High-Throughput Experimentation Team

    2014-03-01

    In this talk I will present the status of the High-Throughput Experimentation (HTE) project of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP). JCAP is an Energy Innovation Hub of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mandate to deliver a solar fuel generator based on an integrated photoelectrochemical cell (PEC). However, efficient and commercially viable catalysts or light absorbers for the PEC do not exist. The mission of HTE is to provide the accelerated discovery through combinatorial synthesis and rapid screening of material properties. The HTE pipeline also features high-throughput material characterization using x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). In this talk I present the currently operating pipeline and focus on our combinatorial XPS efforts to build the largest free database of spectra from mixed-metal oxides, nitrides, sulfides and alloys. This work was performed at Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a DOE Energy Innovation Hub, supported through the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Award No. DE-SC0004993.

  10. Polymer Microarrays for High Throughput Discovery of Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Hook, Andrew L.; Chang, Chien-Yi; Yang, Jing; Scurr, David J.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.; Atkinson, Steve; Williams, Paul; Davies, Martyn C.; Alexander, Morgan R.

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of novel biomaterials that are optimized for a specific biological application is readily achieved using polymer microarrays, which allows a combinatorial library of materials to be screened in a parallel, high throughput format1. Herein is described the formation and characterization of a polymer microarray using an on-chip photopolymerization technique 2. This involves mixing monomers at varied ratios to produce a library of monomer solutions, transferring the solution to a glass slide format using a robotic printing device and curing with UV irradiation. This format is readily amenable to many biological assays, including stem cell attachment and proliferation, cell sorting and low bacterial adhesion, allowing the ready identification of 'hit' materials that fulfill a specific biological criterion3-5. Furthermore, the use of high throughput surface characterization (HTSC) allows the biological performance to be correlated with physio-chemical properties, hence elucidating the biological-material interaction6. HTSC makes use of water contact angle (WCA) measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). In particular, ToF-SIMS provides a chemically rich analysis of the sample that can be used to correlate the cell response with a molecular moiety. In some cases, the biological performance can be predicted from the ToF-SIMS spectra, demonstrating the chemical dependence of a biological-material interaction, and informing the development of hit materials5,3. PMID:22314927

  11. High-throughput protein crystallography and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Ian; Sharff, Andrew; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff; Jhoti, Harren

    2004-10-20

    Single crystal X-ray diffraction is the technique of choice for studying the interactions of small organic molecules with proteins by determining their three-dimensional structures; however the requirement for highly purified protein and lack of process automation have traditionally limited its use in this field. Despite these shortcomings, the use of crystal structures of therapeutically relevant drug targets in pharmaceutical research has increased significantly over the last decade. The application of structure-based drug design has resulted in several marketed drugs and is now an established discipline in most pharmaceutical companies. Furthermore, the recently published full genome sequences of Homo sapiens and a number of micro-organisms have provided a plethora of new potential drug targets that could be utilised in structure-based drug design programs. In order to take maximum advantage of this explosion of information, techniques have been developed to automate and speed up the various procedures required to obtain protein crystals of suitable quality, to collect and process the raw X-ray diffraction data into usable structural information, and to use three-dimensional protein structure as a basis for drug discovery and lead optimisation. This tutorial review covers the various technologies involved in the process pipeline for high-throughput protein crystallography as it is currently being applied to drug discovery. It is aimed at synthetic and computational chemists, as well as structural biologists, in both academia and industry, who are interested in structure-based drug design.

  12. A High-Throughput Screen for Antibiotic Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Thomas C.; Dostal, Sarah M.; Griswold, Karl E.

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ultra-high-throughput screening platform enabling discovery and/or engineering of natural product antibiotics. The methodology involves creation of hydrogel-in-oil emulsions in which recombinant microorganisms are co-emulsified with bacterial pathogens; antibiotic activity is assayed by use of a fluorescent viability dye. We have successfully utilized both bulk emulsification and microfluidic technology for the generation of hydrogel microdroplets that are size-compatible with conventional flow cytometry. Hydrogel droplets are ~25 pL in volume, and can be synthesized and sorted at rates exceeding 3,000 drops/s. Using this technique, we have achieved screening throughputs exceeding 5 million clones/day. Proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate efficient selection of antibiotic-secreting yeast from a vast excess of negative controls. In addition, we have successfully used this technique to screen a metagenomic library for secreted antibiotics that kill the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Our results establish the practical utility of the screening platform, and we anticipate that the accessible nature of our methods will enable others seeking to identify and engineer the next generation of antibacterial biomolecules. PMID:23955804

  13. High-throughput flow cytometry for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Bruce S; Young, Susan M; Saunders, Matthew J; Bologa, Cristian; Oprea, Tudor I; Ye, Richard D; Prossnitz, Eric R; Graves, Steven W; Sklar, Larry A

    2007-05-01

    High-throughput flow cytometry exploits a novel many-samples/one-file approach to dramatically speed data acquisition, limit aspirated sample volume to as little as 2 μl/well and produce multisample data sets that facilitate automated analysis of samples in groups as well as individually. It has been successfully applied to both cell- and microsphere-based bioassays in 96- and 384-well formats, to screen tens-of-thousands of compounds and identify novel bioactive structures. High-content multiparametric analysis capabilities have been exploited for assay multiplexing, allowing the assessment of biologic selectivity and specificity to be an integral component of primary screens. These and other advances in the last decade have contributed to the application of flow cytometry as a uniquely powerful tool for probing biologic and chemical diversity and complex systems biology.

  14. HTMD: High-Throughput Molecular Dynamics for Molecular Discovery.

    PubMed

    Doerr, S; Harvey, M J; Noé, Frank; De Fabritiis, G

    2016-04-12

    Recent advances in molecular simulations have allowed scientists to investigate slower biological processes than ever before. Together with these advances came an explosion of data that has transformed a traditionally computing-bound into a data-bound problem. Here, we present HTMD, a programmable, extensible platform written in Python that aims to solve the data generation and analysis problem as well as increase reproducibility by providing a complete workspace for simulation-based discovery. So far, HTMD includes system building for CHARMM and AMBER force fields, projection methods, clustering, molecular simulation production, adaptive sampling, an Amazon cloud interface, Markov state models, and visualization. As a result, a single, short HTMD script can lead from a PDB structure to useful quantities such as relaxation time scales, equilibrium populations, metastable conformations, and kinetic rates. In this paper, we focus on the adaptive sampling and Markov state modeling features. PMID:26949976

  15. High throughput microscopy: from raw images to discoveries.

    PubMed

    Wollman, Roy; Stuurman, Nico

    2007-11-01

    Technological advances in automated microscopy now allow rapid acquisition of many images without human intervention, images that can be used for large-scale screens. The main challenge in such screens is the conversion of the raw images into interpretable information and hence discoveries. This post-acquisition component of image-based screens requires computational steps to identify cells, choose the cells of interest, assess their phenotype, and identify statistically significant 'hits'. Designing such an analysis pipeline requires careful consideration of the necessary hardware and software components, image analysis, statistical analysis and data presentation tools. Given the increasing availability of such hardware and software, these types of experiments have come within the reach of individual labs, heralding many interesting new ways of acquiring biological knowledge.

  16. Review article: high-throughput affinity-based technologies for small-molecule drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhengrong; Cuozzo, John

    2009-12-01

    High-throughput affinity-based technologies are rapidly growing in use as primary screening methods in drug discovery. In this review, their principles and applications are described and their impact on small-molecule drug discovery is evaluated. In general, these technologies can be divided into 2 groups: those that detect binding interactions by measuring changes to the protein target and those that detect bound compounds. Technologies detecting binding interactions by focusing on the protein have limited throughput but can reveal mechanistic information about the binding interaction; technologies detecting bound compounds have very high throughput, some even significantly higher than current high-throughput screening technologies, but offer limited information about the binding interaction. In addition, the appropriate use of affinity-based technologies is discussed. Finally, nanotechnology is predicted to generate a significant impact on the future of affinity-based technologies. PMID:19822881

  17. High-Throughput In Vitro Glycoside Hydrolase (HIGH) Screening for Enzyme Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Wan; Chokhawala, Harshal A.; Hess, Matthias; Dana, Craig M.; Baer, Zachary; Sczyrba, Alexander; Rubin, Edward M.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2011-09-16

    A high-throughput protein-expression and screening method (HIGH method, see picture) provides a rapid approach to the discovery of active glycoside hydrolases in environmental samples. Finally, HIGH screening combines cloning, protein expression, and enzyme hydrolysis in one pot; thus, the entire process from gene expression to activity detection requires only three hours.

  18. Advancing a distributed multi-scale computing framework for large-scale high-throughput discovery in materials science.

    PubMed

    Knap, J; Spear, C E; Borodin, O; Leiter, K W

    2015-10-30

    We describe the development of a large-scale high-throughput application for discovery in materials science. Our point of departure is a computational framework for distributed multi-scale computation. We augment the original framework with a specialized module whose role is to route evaluation requests needed by the high-throughput application to a collection of available computational resources. We evaluate the feasibility and performance of the resulting high-throughput computational framework by carrying out a high-throughput study of battery solvents. Our results indicate that distributed multi-scale computing, by virtue of its adaptive nature, is particularly well-suited for building high-throughput applications.

  19. A general approach for discriminative de novo motif discovery from high-throughput data

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Jan; Posch, Stefan; Grosse, Ivo; Keilwagen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    De novo motif discovery has been an important challenge of bioinformatics for the past two decades. Since the emergence of high-throughput techniques like ChIP-seq, ChIP-exo and protein-binding microarrays (PBMs), the focus of de novo motif discovery has shifted to runtime and accuracy on large data sets. For this purpose, specialized algorithms have been designed for discovering motifs in ChIP-seq or PBM data. However, none of the existing approaches work perfectly for all three high-throughput techniques. In this article, we propose Dimont, a general approach for fast and accurate de novo motif discovery from high-throughput data. We demonstrate that Dimont yields a higher number of correct motifs from ChIP-seq data than any of the specialized approaches and achieves a higher accuracy for predicting PBM intensities from probe sequence than any of the approaches specifically designed for that purpose. Dimont also reports the expected motifs for several ChIP-exo data sets. Investigating differences between in vitro and in vivo binding, we find that for most transcription factors, the motifs discovered by Dimont are in good accordance between techniques, but we also find notable exceptions. We also observe that modeling intra-motif dependencies may increase accuracy, which indicates that more complex motif models are a worthwhile field of research. PMID:24057214

  20. High-throughput screening-driven lead discovery: meeting the challenges of finding new therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Posner, Bruce A

    2005-07-01

    The pharmaceutical industry faces a number of challenges that have cumulatively led to a decline in productivity, despite increasing levels of investment in research and development. It is in this context that some researchers and business analysts are questioning the value of the high-throughput screening (HTS) paradigm for the discovery of new therapeutics. While this criticism may be premature, significant changes are occurring in HTS-driven lead discovery to address the failure of drug candidates in the clinic. This article highlights some of these changes and their potential impact.

  1. High-throughput and virtual screening: core lead discovery technologies move towards integration.

    PubMed

    Good, A C.; Krystek, S R.; Mason, J S.

    2000-12-01

    In addition to high-throughput screening (HTS), the main lead discovery technology employed by most pharmaceutical companies today is virtual screening (VS). Although the two techniques have somewhat different philosophical origins, they contain many synergies that can potentially enhance the lead discovery process. Here, we describe many of the latest developments in VS technology with particular emphasis on their potential impact on HTS in, for example, focussed screening and data mining. In addition, we highlight key issues that need to be addressed before the potential of such efforts can be fully realized.

  2. Engineering serendipity: High-throughput discovery of materials that resist bacterial attachment☆

    PubMed Central

    Magennis, E.P.; Hook, A.L.; Davies, M.C.; Alexander, C.; Williams, P.; Alexander, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the colonisation of materials by microorganisms is important in a wide range of industries and clinical settings. To date, the underlying mechanisms that govern the interactions of bacteria with material surfaces remain poorly understood, limiting the ab initio design and engineering of biomaterials to control bacterial attachment. Combinatorial approaches involving high-throughput screening have emerged as key tools for identifying materials to control bacterial attachment. The hundreds of different materials assessed using these methods can be carried out with the aid of computational modelling. This approach can develop an understanding of the rules used to predict bacterial attachment to surfaces of non-toxic synthetic materials. Here we outline our view on the state of this field and the challenges and opportunities in this area for the coming years. Statement of significance This opinion article on high throughput screening methods reflects one aspect of how the field of biomaterials research has developed and progressed. The piece takes the reader through key developments in biomaterials discovery, particularly focusing on need to reduce bacterial colonisation of surfaces. Such bacterial resistant surfaces are increasingly required in this age of antibiotic resistance. The influence and origin of high-throughput methods are discussed with insights into the future of biomaterials development where computational methods may drive materials development into new fertile areas of discovery. New biomaterials will exhibit responsiveness to adapt to the biological environment and promote better integration and reduced rejection or infection. PMID:26577984

  3. Transcriptome characterization and high throughput SSRs and SNPs discovery in Cucurbita pepo (Cucurbitaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cucurbita pepo belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family. The "Zucchini" types rank among the highest-valued vegetables worldwide, and other C. pepo and related Cucurbita spp., are food staples and rich sources of fat and vitamins. A broad range of genomic tools are today available for other cucurbits that have become models for the study of different metabolic processes. However, these tools are still lacking in the Cucurbita genus, thus limiting gene discovery and the process of breeding. Results We report the generation of a total of 512,751 C. pepo EST sequences, using 454 GS FLX Titanium technology. ESTs were obtained from normalized cDNA libraries (root, leaves, and flower tissue) prepared using two varieties with contrasting phenotypes for plant, flowering and fruit traits, representing the two C. pepo subspecies: subsp. pepo cv. Zucchini and subsp. ovifera cv Scallop. De novo assembling was performed to generate a collection of 49,610 Cucurbita unigenes (average length of 626 bp) that represent the first transcriptome of the species. Over 60% of the unigenes were functionally annotated and assigned to one or more Gene Ontology terms. The distributions of Cucurbita unigenes followed similar tendencies than that reported for Arabidopsis or melon, suggesting that the dataset may represent the whole Cucurbita transcriptome. About 34% unigenes were detected to have known orthologs of Arabidopsis or melon, including genes potentially involved in disease resistance, flowering and fruit quality. Furthermore, a set of 1,882 unigenes with SSR motifs and 9,043 high confidence SNPs between Zucchini and Scallop were identified, of which 3,538 SNPs met criteria for use with high throughput genotyping platforms, and 144 could be detected as CAPS. A set of markers were validated, being 80% of them polymorphic in a set of variable C. pepo and C. moschata accessions. Conclusion We present the first broad survey of gene sequences and allelic variation in C. pepo, where

  4. Open access high throughput drug discovery in the public domain: a Mount Everest in the making.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anuradha; McDonald, Peter R; Sittampalam, Sitta; Chaguturu, Rathnam

    2010-11-01

    High throughput screening (HTS) facilitates screening large numbers of compounds against a biochemical target of interest using validated biological or biophysical assays. In recent years, a significant number of drugs in clinical trails originated from HTS campaigns, validating HTS as a bona fide mechanism for hit finding. In the current drug discovery landscape, the pharmaceutical industry is embracing open innovation strategies with academia to maximize their research capabilities and to feed their drug discovery pipeline. The goals of academic research have therefore expanded from target identification and validation to probe discovery, chemical genomics, and compound library screening. This trend is reflected in the emergence of HTS centers in the public domain over the past decade, ranging in size from modestly equipped academic screening centers to well endowed Molecular Libraries Probe Centers Network (MLPCN) centers funded by the NIH Roadmap initiative. These centers facilitate a comprehensive approach to probe discovery in academia and utilize both classical and cutting-edge assay technologies for executing primary and secondary screening campaigns. The various facets of academic HTS centers as well as their implications on technology transfer and drug discovery are discussed, and a roadmap for successful drug discovery in the public domain is presented. New lead discovery against therapeutic targets, especially those involving the rare and neglected diseases, is indeed a Mount Everestonian size task, and requires diligent implementation of pharmaceutical industry's best practices for a successful outcome.

  5. Moderate to high throughput in vitro binding kinetics for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rumin; Barbieri, Christopher M; Garcia-Calvo, Margarita; Myers, Robert W; McLaren, David; Kavana, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This review provides a concise summary for state of the art, moderate to high throughput in vitro technologies being employed to study drug-target binding kinetics. These technologies cover a wide kinetic timescale spanning up to nine orders of magnitude from milliseconds to days. Automated stopped flow measures transient and (pre)steady state kinetics from milliseconds to seconds. For seconds to hours timescale kinetics we discuss surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor, global progress curve analysis for high throughput kinetic profiling of enzyme inhibitors and activators, and filtration plate-based radioligand or fluorescent binding assays for receptor binding kinetics. Jump dilution after pre-incubation is the preferred method for very slow kinetics lasting for days. The basic principles, best practices and simulated data for these technologies are described. Finally, the application of a universal label-free technology, liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), is briefly reviewed. Select literature references are highlighted for in-depth understanding. A new reality is dawning wherein binding kinetics is an integral and routine part of mechanism of action elucidation and translational, quantitative pharmacology for drug discovery. PMID:27100706

  6. Moderate to high throughput in vitro binding kinetics for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rumin; Barbieri, Christopher M; Garcia-Calvo, Margarita; Myers, Robert W; McLaren, David; Kavana, Michael

    2016-06-01

    This review provides a concise summary for state of the art, moderate to high throughput in vitro technologies being employed to study drug-target binding kinetics. These technologies cover a wide kinetic timescale spanning up to nine orders of magnitude from milliseconds to days. Automated stopped flow measures transient and (pre)steady state kinetics from milliseconds to seconds. For seconds to hours timescale kinetics we discuss surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor, global progress curve analysis for high throughput kinetic profiling of enzyme inhibitors and activators, and filtration plate-based radioligand or fluorescent binding assays for receptor binding kinetics. Jump dilution after pre-incubation is the preferred method for very slow kinetics lasting for days. The basic principles, best practices and simulated data for these technologies are described. Finally, the application of a universal label-free technology, liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), is briefly reviewed. Select literature references are highlighted for in-depth understanding. A new reality is dawning wherein binding kinetics is an integral and routine part of mechanism of action elucidation and translational, quantitative pharmacology for drug discovery.

  7. Accelerated Discovery of Thermoelectric Materials: Combinatorial Facility and High-Throughput Measurement of Thermoelectric Power Factor.

    PubMed

    García-Cañadas, Jorge; Adkins, Nicholas J E; McCain, Stephen; Hauptstein, Bastian; Brew, Ashley; Jarvis, David J; Min, Gao

    2016-06-13

    A series of processes have been developed to facilitate the rapid discovery of new promising thermoelectric alloys. A novel combinatorial facility where elements are wire-fed and laser-melted was designed and constructed. Different sample compositions can be achieved by feeding different element wires at specific rates. The composition of all the samples prepared was tested by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Then, their thermoelectric properties (power factor) at room temperature were screened in a specially designed new high-throughput setup. After the screening, the thermoelectric properties can be mapped with the possibility of identifying compositional trends. As a proof-of-concept, a promising thermoelectric ternary system, Al-Fe-Ti, has been identified, demonstrating the capability of this accelerated approach.

  8. Protein traffic disorders: an effective high-throughput fluorescence microscopy pipeline for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Hugo M; Uliyakina, Inna; Awatade, Nikhil T; Proença, Maria C; Tischer, Christian; Sirianant, Lalida; Kunzelmann, Karl; Pepperkok, Rainer; Amaral, Margarida D

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins are essential molecules in the cell which mediate interactions with the exterior milieu, thus representing key drug targets for present pharma. Not surprisingly, protein traffic disorders include a large range of diseases sharing the common mechanism of failure in the respective protein to reach the plasma membrane. However, specific therapies for these diseases are remarkably lacking. Herein, we report a robust platform for drug discovery applied to a paradigmatic genetic disorder affecting intracellular trafficking - Cystic Fibrosis. This platform includes (i) two original respiratory epithelial cellular models incorporating an inducible double-tagged traffic reporter; (ii) a plasma membrane protein traffic assay for high-throughput microscopy screening; and (iii) open-source image analysis software to quantify plasma membrane protein traffic. By allowing direct scoring of compounds rescuing the basic traffic defect, this platform enables an effective drug development pipeline, which can be promptly adapted to any traffic disorder-associated protein and leverage therapy development efforts.

  9. Accelerated Discovery of Thermoelectric Materials: Combinatorial Facility and High-Throughput Measurement of Thermoelectric Power Factor.

    PubMed

    García-Cañadas, Jorge; Adkins, Nicholas J E; McCain, Stephen; Hauptstein, Bastian; Brew, Ashley; Jarvis, David J; Min, Gao

    2016-06-13

    A series of processes have been developed to facilitate the rapid discovery of new promising thermoelectric alloys. A novel combinatorial facility where elements are wire-fed and laser-melted was designed and constructed. Different sample compositions can be achieved by feeding different element wires at specific rates. The composition of all the samples prepared was tested by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Then, their thermoelectric properties (power factor) at room temperature were screened in a specially designed new high-throughput setup. After the screening, the thermoelectric properties can be mapped with the possibility of identifying compositional trends. As a proof-of-concept, a promising thermoelectric ternary system, Al-Fe-Ti, has been identified, demonstrating the capability of this accelerated approach. PMID:27186664

  10. Hydrogen storage materials discovery via high throughput ball milling and gas sorption.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Kaye, Steven S; Riley, Conor; Greenberg, Doron; Galang, Daniel; Bailey, Mark S

    2012-06-11

    The lack of a high capacity hydrogen storage material is a major barrier to the implementation of the hydrogen economy. To accelerate discovery of such materials, we have developed a high-throughput workflow for screening of hydrogen storage materials in which candidate materials are synthesized and characterized via highly parallel ball mills and volumetric gas sorption instruments, respectively. The workflow was used to identify mixed imides with significantly enhanced absorption rates relative to Li2Mg(NH)2. The most promising material, 2LiNH2:MgH2 + 5 atom % LiBH4 + 0.5 atom % La, exhibits the best balance of absorption rate, capacity, and cycle-life, absorbing >4 wt % H2 in 1 h at 120 °C after 11 absorption-desorption cycles.

  11. Genomic-assisted haplotype analysis and the development of high-throughput SNP markers for salinity tolerance in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Gunvant; Do, Tuyen; Vuong, Tri D.; Valliyodan, Babu; Lee, Jeong-Dong; Chaudhary, Juhi; Shannon, J. Grover; Nguyen, Henry T.

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a limiting factor of crop yield. The soybean is sensitive to soil salinity, and a dominant gene, Glyma03g32900 is primarily responsible for salt-tolerance. The identification of high throughput and robust markers as well as the deployment of salt-tolerant cultivars are effective approaches to minimize yield loss under saline conditions. We utilized high quality (15x) whole-genome resequencing (WGRS) on 106 diverse soybean lines and identified three major structural variants and allelic variation in the promoter and genic regions of the GmCHX1 gene. The discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with structural variants facilitated the design of six KASPar assays. Additionally, haplotype analysis and pedigree tracking of 93 U.S. ancestral lines were performed using publically available WGRS datasets. Identified SNP markers were validated, and a strong correlation was observed between the genotype and salt treatment phenotype (leaf scorch, chlorophyll content and Na+ accumulation) using a panel of 104 soybean lines and, an interspecific bi-parental population (F8) from PI483463 x Hutcheson. These markers precisely identified salt-tolerant/sensitive genotypes (>91%), and different structural-variants (>98%). These SNP assays, supported by accurate phenotyping, haplotype analyses and pedigree tracking information, will accelerate marker-assisted selection programs to enhance the development of salt-tolerant soybean cultivars. PMID:26781337

  12. Two different high throughput sequencing approaches identify thousands of de novo genomic markers for the genetically depleted Bornean elephant.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reeta; Goossens, Benoit; Kun-Rodrigues, Célia; Teixeira, Tatiana; Othman, Nurzhafarina; Boone, Jason Q; Jue, Nathaniel K; Obergfell, Craig; O'Neill, Rachel J; Chikhi, Lounès

    2012-01-01

    High throughput sequencing technologies are being applied to an increasing number of model species with a high-quality reference genome. The application and analyses of whole-genome sequence data in non-model species with no prior genomic information are currently under way. Recent sequencing technologies provide new opportunities for gathering genomic data in natural populations, laying the empirical foundation for future research in the field of conservation and population genomics. Here we present the case study of the Bornean elephant, which is the most endangered subspecies of Asian elephant and exhibits very low genetic diversity. We used two different sequencing platforms, the Roche 454 FLX (shotgun) and Illumina, GAIIx (Restriction site associated DNA, RAD) to evaluate the feasibility of the two methodologies for the discovery of de novo markers (single nucleotide polymorphism, SNPs and microsatellites) using low coverage data. Approximately, 6,683 (shotgun) and 14,724 (RAD) SNPs were detected within our elephant sequence dataset. Genotyping of a representative sample of 194 SNPs resulted in a SNP validation rate of ~83 to 94% and 17% of the loci were polymorphic with a low diversity (H(o)=0.057). Different numbers of microsatellites were identified through shotgun (27,226) and RAD (868) techniques. Out of all di-, tri-, and tetra-microsatellite loci, 1,706 loci had sufficient flanking regions (shotgun) while only 7 were found with RAD. All microsatellites were monomorphic in the Bornean but polymorphic in another elephant subspecies. Despite using different sample sizes, and the well known differences in the two platforms used regarding sequence length and throughput, the two approaches showed high validation rate. The approaches used here for marker development in a threatened species demonstrate the utility of high throughput sequencing technologies as a starting point for the development of genomic tools in a non-model species and in particular for a

  13. Minimum entropy decomposition: Unsupervised oligotyping for sensitive partitioning of high-throughput marker gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Eren, A Murat; Morrison, Hilary G; Lescault, Pamela J; Reveillaud, Julie; Vineis, Joseph H; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular microbial ecology investigations often employ large marker gene datasets, for example, ribosomal RNAs, to represent the occurrence of single-cell genomes in microbial communities. Massively parallel DNA sequencing technologies enable extensive surveys of marker gene libraries that sometimes include nearly identical sequences. Computational approaches that rely on pairwise sequence alignments for similarity assessment and de novo clustering with de facto similarity thresholds to partition high-throughput sequencing datasets constrain fine-scale resolution descriptions of microbial communities. Minimum Entropy Decomposition (MED) provides a computationally efficient means to partition marker gene datasets into ‘MED nodes', which represent homogeneous operational taxonomic units. By employing Shannon entropy, MED uses only the information-rich nucleotide positions across reads and iteratively partitions large datasets while omitting stochastic variation. When applied to analyses of microbiomes from two deep-sea cryptic sponges Hexadella dedritifera and Hexadella cf. dedritifera, MED resolved a key Gammaproteobacteria cluster into multiple MED nodes that are specific to different sponges, and revealed that these closely related sympatric sponge species maintain distinct microbial communities. MED analysis of a previously published human oral microbiome dataset also revealed that taxa separated by less than 1% sequence variation distributed to distinct niches in the oral cavity. The information theory-guided decomposition process behind the MED algorithm enables sensitive discrimination of closely related organisms in marker gene amplicon datasets without relying on extensive computational heuristics and user supervision. PMID:25325381

  14. Forensic soil DNA analysis using high-throughput sequencing: a comparison of four molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Young, Jennifer M; Weyrich, Laura S; Cooper, Alan

    2014-11-01

    Soil analysis, such as mineralogy, geophysics, texture and colour, are commonly used in forensic casework to link a suspect to a crime scene. However, DNA analysis can also be applied to characterise the vast diversity of organisms present in soils. DNA metabarcoding and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) now offer a means to improve discrimination between forensic soil samples by identifying individual taxa and exploring non-culturable microbial species. Here, we compare the small-scale reproducibility and resolution of four molecular markers targeting different taxa (bacterial 16S rRNA, eukaryotic18S rRNA, plant trnL intron and fungal internal transcribed spacer I (ITS1) rDNA) to distinguish two sample sites. We also assess the background DNA level associated with each marker and examine the effects of filtering Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) detected in extraction blank controls. From this study, we show that non-bacterial taxa in soil, particularly fungi, can provide the greatest resolution between the sites, whereas plant markers may be problematic for forensic discrimination. ITS and 18S markers exhibit reliable amplification, and both show high discriminatory power with low background DNA levels. The 16S rRNA marker showed comparable discriminatory power post filtering; however, presented the highest level of background DNA. The discriminatory power of all markers was increased by applying OTU filtering steps, with the greatest improvement observed by the removal of any sequences detected in extraction blanks. This study demonstrates the potential use of multiple DNA markers for forensic soil analysis using HTS, and identifies some of the standardisation and evaluation steps necessary before this technique can be applied in casework.

  15. High-throughput DNA methylation datasets for evaluating false discovery rate methodologies.

    PubMed

    Asomaning, N; Archer, K J

    2012-06-01

    When analyzing high-throughput genomic data, the multiple comparison problem is most often addressed through estimation of the false discovery rate (FDR), using methods such as the Benjamini & Hochberg, Benjamini & Yekutieli, the q-value method, or in controlling the family-wise error rate (FWER) using Holm's step down method. To date, research studies that have compared various FDR/FWER methodologies have made use of limited simulation studies and/or have applied the methods to one or more microarray gene expression dataset(s). However, for microarray datasets the veracity of each null hypothesis tested is unknown so that an objective evaluation of performance cannot be rendered for application data. Due to the role of methylation in X-chromosome inactivation, we postulate that high-throughput methylation datasets may provide an appropriate forum for assessing the performance of commonly used FDR methodologies. These datasets preserve the complex correlation structure between probes, offering an advantage over simulated datasets. Using several methylation datasets, commonly used FDR methods including the q-value, Benjamini & Hochberg, and Benjamini & Yekutieli procedures as well as Holm's step down method were applied to identify CpG sites that are differentially methylated when comparing healthy males to healthy females. The methods were compared with respect to their ability to identify CpG sites located on sex chromosomes as significant, by reporting the sensitivity, specificity, and observed FDR. These datasets are useful for characterizing the performance of multiple comparison procedures, and may find further utility in other tasks such as comparing variable selection capabilities of classification methods and evaluating the performance of meta-analytic methods for microarray data.

  16. Discovery of New Compounds Active against Plasmodium falciparum by High Throughput Screening of Microbial Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Moreno, Guiomar; Cantizani, Juan; Sánchez-Carrasco, Paula; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis Miguel; Martín, Jesús; el Aouad, Noureddine; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Tormo, José Rubén; González-Menendez, Víctor; González, Ignacio; de Pedro, Nuria; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga; Vicente, Francisca; González-Pacanowska, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Due to the low structural diversity within the set of antimalarial drugs currently available in the clinic and the increasing number of cases of resistance, there is an urgent need to find new compounds with novel modes of action to treat the disease. Microbial natural products are characterized by their large diversity provided in terms of the chemical complexity of the compounds and the novelty of structures. Microbial natural products extracts have been underexplored in the search for new antiparasitic drugs and even more so in the discovery of new antimalarials. Our objective was to find new druggable natural products with antimalarial properties from the MEDINA natural products collection, one of the largest natural product libraries harboring more than 130,000 microbial extracts. In this work, we describe the optimization process and the results of a phenotypic high throughput screen (HTS) based on measurements of Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase. A subset of more than 20,000 extracts from the MEDINA microbial products collection has been explored, leading to the discovery of 3 new compounds with antimalarial activity. In addition, we report on the novel antiplasmodial activity of 4 previously described natural products. PMID:26735308

  17. High Throughput Screening for the Discovery of More Efficient Catalysts for Emissions Control

    SciTech Connect

    Yaccato, Karin; Hagemeyer, Alfred; Volpe, Anthony; Weinberg, Henry

    2004-03-31

    High-throughput synthesis and screening methods have been developed for the discovery of highly active catalysts for the control of emissions from stationary and mobile sources. Low temperature CO oxidation, CO methanation, NOx abatement and the destruction of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) will be discussed. The discovery libraries for primary screening consisted of both 11x11 and 16x16 catalyst arrays on 3 inch and 4 inch quartz wafers, respectively. Catalysts were prepared by robotic liquid dispensing techniques and screened for catalytic activity in Symyx's Scanning Mass Spectrometer. The screening protocols encompassed mixed metal oxides, perovskites and supported base and noble metals. Active hits were further optimized in focus libraries using shallower compositional gradients. The ScanMS is a fast serial screening tool that uses flat wafer catalyst surfaces, local laser heating, a scanning/sniffing nozzle and a quadrupolar mass spectrometer to compare relative catalytic activities. The temperature range from 200C to 600C is accessible. Typically, 256 catalysts can be screened per day and about 100,000 experiments conducted annually.

  18. Discovery of microRNAs of the stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) by High-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tuckow, Alexander P; Temeyer, Kevin B; Olafson, Pia U; Pérez de Léon, Adalberto A

    2013-07-01

    The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), is a serious ectoparasite affecting animal production and health of both animals and humans. Stable fly control relies largely on chemical insecticides; however, the development of insecticide resistance as well as environmental considerations requires continued discovery research to develop novel control technologies. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short noncoding RNAs that have been shown to be important regulators of gene expression across a wide variety of organisms, and may provide an innovative approach with regard to development of safer more targeted control technologies. The current study reports discovery ad initial comparative analysis of 88 presumptive miRNA sequences from the stable fly, obtained using high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs. The majority of stable fly miRNAs were 22-23 nt in length. Many miRNAs were arthropod specific, and several mature miRNA sequences showed greater sequence identity to miRNAs from other blood-feeding dipterans such as mosquitoes rather than to Drosophilids. This initial step in characterizing the stable fly microRNAome provides a basis for further analyses of life stage-specific and tissue-specific expression to elucidate their functional roles in stable fly biology.

  19. Predictions versus high-throughput experiments in T-cell epitope discovery: competition or synergy?

    PubMed Central

    Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Prediction methods as well as experimental methods for T-cell epitope discovery have developed significantly in recent years. High-throughput experimental methods have made it possible to perform full-length protein scans for epitopes restricted to a limited number of MHC alleles. The high costs and limitations regarding the number of proteins and MHC alleles that are feasibly handled by such experimental methods have made in silico prediction models of high interest. MHC binding prediction methods are today of a very high quality and can predict MHC binding peptides with high accuracy. This is possible for a large range of MHC alleles and relevant length of binding peptides. The predictions can easily be performed for complete proteomes of any size. Prediction methods are still, however, dependent on good experimental methods for validation, and should merely be used as a guide for rational epitope discovery. We expect prediction methods as well as experimental validation methods to continue to develop and that we will soon see clinical trials of products whose development has been guided by prediction methods. PMID:22149708

  20. Fungal community analysis by high-throughput sequencing of amplified markers – a user's guide

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Björn D; Nilsson, R Henrik; Tedersoo, Leho; Abarenkov, Kessy; Carlsen, Tor; Kjøller, Rasmus; Kõljalg, Urmas; Pennanen, Taina; Rosendahl, Søren; Stenlid, Jan; Kauserud, Håvard

    2013-01-01

    Novel high-throughput sequencing methods outperform earlier approaches in terms of resolution and magnitude. They enable identification and relative quantification of community members and offer new insights into fungal community ecology. These methods are currently taking over as the primary tool to assess fungal communities of plant-associated endophytes, pathogens, and mycorrhizal symbionts, as well as free-living saprotrophs. Taking advantage of the collective experience of six research groups, we here review the different stages involved in fungal community analysis, from field sampling via laboratory procedures to bioinformatics and data interpretation. We discuss potential pitfalls, alternatives, and solutions. Highlighted topics are challenges involved in: obtaining representative DNA/RNA samples and replicates that encompass the targeted variation in community composition, selection of marker regions and primers, options for amplification and multiplexing, handling of sequencing errors, and taxonomic identification. Without awareness of methodological biases, limitations of markers, and bioinformatics challenges, large-scale sequencing projects risk yielding artificial results and misleading conclusions. PMID:23534863

  1. Fungal community analysis by high-throughput sequencing of amplified markers--a user's guide.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Björn D; Nilsson, R Henrik; Tedersoo, Leho; Abarenkov, Kessy; Carlsen, Tor; Kjøller, Rasmus; Kõljalg, Urmas; Pennanen, Taina; Rosendahl, Søren; Stenlid, Jan; Kauserud, Håvard

    2013-07-01

    Novel high-throughput sequencing methods outperform earlier approaches in terms of resolution and magnitude. They enable identification and relative quantification of community members and offer new insights into fungal community ecology. These methods are currently taking over as the primary tool to assess fungal communities of plant-associated endophytes, pathogens, and mycorrhizal symbionts, as well as free-living saprotrophs. Taking advantage of the collective experience of six research groups, we here review the different stages involved in fungal community analysis, from field sampling via laboratory procedures to bioinformatics and data interpretation. We discuss potential pitfalls, alternatives, and solutions. Highlighted topics are challenges involved in: obtaining representative DNA/RNA samples and replicates that encompass the targeted variation in community composition, selection of marker regions and primers, options for amplification and multiplexing, handling of sequencing errors, and taxonomic identification. Without awareness of methodological biases, limitations of markers, and bioinformatics challenges, large-scale sequencing projects risk yielding artificial results and misleading conclusions. PMID:23534863

  2. Natural Product Libraries to Accelerate the High Throughput Discovery of Therapeutic Leads±

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tyler A.; Sohn, Johann; Inman, Wayne D.; Estee, Samarkand A.; Loveridge, Steven T.; Vervoort, Helene C.; Tenney, Karen; Liu, Junke; Ang, Kenny Kean-Hooi; Ratnam, Joseline; Bray, Walter M.; Gassner, Nadine C.; Shen, Young Y.; Lokey, R. Scott; McKerrow, James H.; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Nukanto, Arif; Kanti, Atit; Julistiono, Heddy; Kardono, Leonardus B. S.; Bjeldanes, Leonard F.; Crews, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    A high throughput (HT) paradigm generating LC-MS-UV-ELSD based natural product libraries to discover compounds with new bioactivities and or molecular structures is presented. To validate this methodology an extract of the Indo Pacific marine sponge Cacospongia mycofijiensis was evaluated using assays involving cytoskeletal profiling, tumor cell lines, and parasites. Twelve known compounds were identified including the latrunculins (1–4, 10), fijianolides (5, 8–9), mycothiazole (11), the aignopsanes (6–7) and sacrotride A (13). Compounds 1–4, 5, 8–11 exhibited bioactivity not previously reported against the parasite T. brucei, while 11 showed selectivity for lymphoma (U937) tumor cell lines. Four new compounds were also discovered including: aignopsanoic acid B (13), apo latrunculin T (14), 20-methoxy-fijianolide A (15) and aignopsane ketal (16). Compounds 13 and 16 represent important derivatives of the aignopsane class, 14 exhibited inhibition of T. brucei without disrupting microfilament assembly and 15 demonstrated modest microtubule stabilizing effects. The use of removable well plate libraries to avoid false positives from extracts enriched with only 1–2 major metabolites is also discussed. Overall, these results highlight the advantages of applying modern methods in natural products-based research to accelerate the HT discovery of therapeutic leads and or new molecular structures using LC-MS-UV-ELSD based libraries. PMID:22129061

  3. High-Throughput Assay and Discovery of Small Molecules that Interrupt Malaria Transmission.

    PubMed

    Plouffe, David M; Wree, Melanie; Du, Alan Y; Meister, Stephan; Li, Fengwu; Patra, Kailash; Lubar, Aristea; Okitsu, Shinji L; Flannery, Erika L; Kato, Nobutaka; Tanaseichuk, Olga; Comer, Eamon; Zhou, Bin; Kuhen, Kelli; Zhou, Yingyao; Leroy, Didier; Schreiber, Stuart L; Scherer, Christina A; Vinetz, Joseph; Winzeler, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-13

    Preventing transmission is an important element of malaria control. However, most of the current available methods to assay for malaria transmission blocking are relatively low throughput and cannot be applied to large chemical libraries. We have developed a high-throughput and cost-effective assay, the Saponin-lysis Sexual Stage Assay (SaLSSA), for identifying small molecules with transmission-blocking capacity. SaLSSA analysis of 13,983 unique compounds uncovered that >90% of well-characterized antimalarials, including endoperoxides and 4-aminoquinolines, as well as compounds active against asexual blood stages, lost most of their killing activity when parasites developed into metabolically quiescent stage V gametocytes. On the other hand, we identified compounds with consistent low nanomolar transmission-blocking activity, some of which showed cross-reactivity against asexual blood and liver stages. The data clearly emphasize substantial physiological differences between sexual and asexual parasites and provide a tool and starting points for the discovery and development of transmission-blocking drugs.

  4. An integrated framework for discovery and genotyping of genomic variants from high-throughput sequencing experiments.

    PubMed

    Duitama, Jorge; Quintero, Juan Camilo; Cruz, Daniel Felipe; Quintero, Constanza; Hubmann, Georg; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Thevelein, Johan M; Tohme, Joe

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies and computing capacity have produced unprecedented amounts of genomic data that have unraveled the genetics of phenotypic variability in several species. However, operating and integrating current software tools for data analysis still require important investments in highly skilled personnel. Developing accurate, efficient and user-friendly software packages for HTS data analysis will lead to a more rapid discovery of genomic elements relevant to medical, agricultural and industrial applications. We therefore developed Next-Generation Sequencing Eclipse Plug-in (NGSEP), a new software tool for integrated, efficient and user-friendly detection of single nucleotide variants (SNVs), indels and copy number variants (CNVs). NGSEP includes modules for read alignment, sorting, merging, functional annotation of variants, filtering and quality statistics. Analysis of sequencing experiments in yeast, rice and human samples shows that NGSEP has superior accuracy and efficiency, compared with currently available packages for variants detection. We also show that only a comprehensive and accurate identification of repeat regions and CNVs allows researchers to properly separate SNVs from differences between copies of repeat elements. We expect that NGSEP will become a strong support tool to empower the analysis of sequencing data in a wide range of research projects on different species. PMID:24413664

  5. An integrated framework for discovery and genotyping of genomic variants from high-throughput sequencing experiments

    PubMed Central

    Duitama, Jorge; Quintero, Juan Camilo; Cruz, Daniel Felipe; Quintero, Constanza; Hubmann, Georg; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R.; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Thevelein, Johan M.; Tohme, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies and computing capacity have produced unprecedented amounts of genomic data that have unraveled the genetics of phenotypic variability in several species. However, operating and integrating current software tools for data analysis still require important investments in highly skilled personnel. Developing accurate, efficient and user-friendly software packages for HTS data analysis will lead to a more rapid discovery of genomic elements relevant to medical, agricultural and industrial applications. We therefore developed Next-Generation Sequencing Eclipse Plug-in (NGSEP), a new software tool for integrated, efficient and user-friendly detection of single nucleotide variants (SNVs), indels and copy number variants (CNVs). NGSEP includes modules for read alignment, sorting, merging, functional annotation of variants, filtering and quality statistics. Analysis of sequencing experiments in yeast, rice and human samples shows that NGSEP has superior accuracy and efficiency, compared with currently available packages for variants detection. We also show that only a comprehensive and accurate identification of repeat regions and CNVs allows researchers to properly separate SNVs from differences between copies of repeat elements. We expect that NGSEP will become a strong support tool to empower the analysis of sequencing data in a wide range of research projects on different species. PMID:24413664

  6. Fluorescence polarization assays in high-throughput screening and drug discovery: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Matthew D.; Yasgar, Adam; Peryea, Tyler; Braisted, John C.; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Coussens, Nathan P.

    2016-06-01

    The sensitivity of fluorescence polarization (FP) and fluorescence anisotropy (FA) to molecular weight changes has enabled the interrogation of diverse biological mechanisms, ranging from molecular interactions to enzymatic activity. Assays based on FP/FA technology have been widely utilized in high-throughput screening (HTS) and drug discovery due to the homogenous format, robust performance and relative insensitivity to some types of interferences, such as inner filter effects. Advancements in assay design, fluorescent probes, and technology have enabled the application of FP assays to increasingly complex biological processes. Herein we discuss different types of FP/FA assays developed for HTS, with examples to emphasize the diversity of applicable targets. Furthermore, trends in target and fluorophore selection, as well as assay type and format, are examined using annotated HTS assays within the PubChem database. Finally, practical considerations for the successful development and implementation of FP/FA assays for HTS are provided based on experience at our center and examples from the literature, including strategies for flagging interference compounds among a list of hits.

  7. An integrated framework for discovery and genotyping of genomic variants from high-throughput sequencing experiments.

    PubMed

    Duitama, Jorge; Quintero, Juan Camilo; Cruz, Daniel Felipe; Quintero, Constanza; Hubmann, Georg; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Thevelein, Johan M; Tohme, Joe

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies and computing capacity have produced unprecedented amounts of genomic data that have unraveled the genetics of phenotypic variability in several species. However, operating and integrating current software tools for data analysis still require important investments in highly skilled personnel. Developing accurate, efficient and user-friendly software packages for HTS data analysis will lead to a more rapid discovery of genomic elements relevant to medical, agricultural and industrial applications. We therefore developed Next-Generation Sequencing Eclipse Plug-in (NGSEP), a new software tool for integrated, efficient and user-friendly detection of single nucleotide variants (SNVs), indels and copy number variants (CNVs). NGSEP includes modules for read alignment, sorting, merging, functional annotation of variants, filtering and quality statistics. Analysis of sequencing experiments in yeast, rice and human samples shows that NGSEP has superior accuracy and efficiency, compared with currently available packages for variants detection. We also show that only a comprehensive and accurate identification of repeat regions and CNVs allows researchers to properly separate SNVs from differences between copies of repeat elements. We expect that NGSEP will become a strong support tool to empower the analysis of sequencing data in a wide range of research projects on different species.

  8. High-throughput microfluidics and ultrafast optics for in vivo compound/genetic discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Christopher B.; Gilleland, Cody; Samara, Chrysanthi; Yanik, M. Fatih

    2010-02-01

    Therapeutic treatment of spinal cord injuries, brain trauma, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases will greatly benefit from the discovery of compounds that enhance neuronal regeneration following injury. We previously demonstrated the use of femtosecond laser microsurgery to induce precise and reproducible neural injury in C. elegans, and have developed microfluidic on-chip technologies that allow automated and rapid manipulation, orientation, and non-invasive immobilization of animals for sub-cellular resolution two-photon imaging and femtosecond-laser nanosurgery. These technologies include microfluidic whole-animal sorters, as well as integrated chips containing multiple addressable incubation chambers for exposure of individual animals to compounds and sub-cellular time-lapse imaging of hundreds of animals on a single chip. Our technologies can be used for a variety of highly sophisticated in vivo high-throughput compound and genetic screens, and we performed the first in vivo screen in C. elegans for compounds enhancing neuronal regrowth following femtosecond microsurgery. The compounds identified interact with a wide variety of cellular targets, such as cytoskeletal components, vesicle trafficking, and protein kinases that enhance neuronal regeneration.

  9. High-Throughput Assay and Discovery of Small Molecules that Interrupt Malaria Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Plouffe, David M.; Wree, Melanie; Du, Alan Y.; Meister, Stephan; Li, Fengwu; Patra, Kailash; Lubar, Aristea; Okitsu, Shinji L.; Flannery, Erika L.; Kato, Nobutaka; Tanaseichuk, Olga; Comer, Eamon; Zhou, Bin; Kuhen, Kelli; Zhou, Yingyao; Leroy, Didier; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Scherer, Christina A.; Vinetz, Joseph; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Preventing transmission is an important element of malaria control. However, most of the current available methods to assay for malaria transmission blocking are relatively low throughput and cannot be applied to large chemical libraries. We have developed a high-throughput and cost-effective assay, the Saponin-lysis Sexual Stage Assay (SaLSSA), for identifying small molecules with transmission-blocking capacity. SaLSSA analysis of 13,983 unique compounds uncovered that >90% of well-characterized antimalarials, including endoperoxides and 4-aminoquinolines, as well as compounds active against asexual blood stages, lost most of their killing activity when parasites developed into metabolically quiescent stage V gametocytes. On the other hand, we identified compounds with consistent low nanomolar transmission-blocking activity, some of which showed cross-reactivity against asexual blood and liver stages. The data clearly emphasize substantial physiological differences between sexual and asexual parasites and provide a tool and starting points for the discovery and development of transmission-blocking drugs. PMID:26749441

  10. High-throughput platform for the discovery of elicitors of silent bacterial gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R

    2014-05-20

    Over the past decade, bacterial genome sequences have revealed an immense reservoir of biosynthetic gene clusters, sets of contiguous genes that have the potential to produce drugs or drug-like molecules. However, the majority of these gene clusters appear to be inactive for unknown reasons prompting terms such as "cryptic" or "silent" to describe them. Because natural products have been a major source of therapeutic molecules, methods that rationally activate these silent clusters would have a profound impact on drug discovery. Herein, a new strategy is outlined for awakening silent gene clusters using small molecule elicitors. In this method, a genetic reporter construct affords a facile read-out for activation of the silent cluster of interest, while high-throughput screening of small molecule libraries provides potential inducers. This approach was applied to two cryptic gene clusters in the pathogenic model Burkholderia thailandensis. The results not only demonstrate a prominent activation of these two clusters, but also reveal that the majority of elicitors are themselves antibiotics, most in common clinical use. Antibiotics, which kill B. thailandensis at high concentrations, act as inducers of secondary metabolism at low concentrations. One of these antibiotics, trimethoprim, served as a global activator of secondary metabolism by inducing at least five biosynthetic pathways. Further application of this strategy promises to uncover the regulatory networks that activate silent gene clusters while at the same time providing access to the vast array of cryptic molecules found in bacteria.

  11. Discovery of Regulators of Receptor Internalization with High-Throughput Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Phillip H.; Fisher, Gregory W.; Simons, Peter C.; Strouse, J. Jacob; Foutz, Terry; Waggoner, Alan S.; Jarvik, Jonathan; Sklar, Larry A.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a platform combining fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) technology with high-throughput flow cytometry to detect real-time protein trafficking to and from the plasma membrane in living cells. The hybrid platform facilitates drug discovery for trafficking receptors such as G protein-coupled receptors and was validated with the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) system. When a chemical library containing ∼1200 off-patent drugs was screened against cells expressing FAP-tagged β2ARs, all 33 known β2AR-active ligands in the library were successfully identified, together with a number of compounds that might regulate receptor internalization in a nontraditional manner. Results indicated that the platform identified ligands of target proteins regardless of the associated signaling pathway; therefore, this approach presents opportunities to search for biased receptor modulators and is suitable for screening of multiplexed targets for improved efficiency. The results revealed that ligands may be biased with respect to the rate or duration of receptor internalization and that receptor internalization may be independent of activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. PMID:22767611

  12. Discovery of Novel NOx Catalysts for CIDI Applications by High-throughput Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Blint, Richard J.

    2007-12-31

    DOE project DE-PS26-00NT40758 has developed very active, lean exhaust, NOx reduction catalysts that have been tested on the discovery system, laboratory reactors and engine dynamometer systems. The goal of this project is the development of effective, affordable NOx reduction catalysts for lean combustion engines in the US light duty vehicle market which can meet Tier II emission standards with hydrocarbons based reductants for reducing NOx. General Motors (prime contractor) along with subcontractors BASF (Engelhard) (a catalytic converter developer) and ACCELRYS (an informatics supplier) carried out this project which began in August of 2002. BASF (Engelhard) has run over 16,000 tests of 6100 possible catalytic materials on a high throughput discovery system suitable for automotive catalytic materials. Accelrys developed a new database informatics system which allowed material tracking and data mining. A program catalyst was identified and evaluated at all levels of the program. Dynamometer evaluations of the program catalyst both with and without additives show 92% NOx conversions on the HWFET, 76% on the US06, 60% on the cold FTP and 65% on the Set 13 heavy duty test using diesel fuel. Conversions of over 92% on the heavy duty FTP using ethanol as a second fluid reductant have been measured. These can be competitive with both of the alternative lean NOx reduction technologies presently in the market. Conversions of about 80% were measured on the EUDC for lean gasoline applications without using active dosing to adjust the C:N ratio for optimum NOx reduction at all points in the certification cycle. A feasibility analysis has been completed and demonstrates the advantages and disadvantages of the technology using these materials compared with other potential technologies. The teaming agreements among the partners contain no obstacles to commercialization of new technologies to any potential catalyst customers.

  13. High-throughput SNP discovery and genotyping for constructing a saturated linkage map of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Gaur, Rashmi; Azam, Sarwar; Jeena, Ganga; Khan, Aamir Waseem; Choudhary, Shalu; Jain, Mukesh; Yadav, Gitanjali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2012-10-01

    The present study reports the large-scale discovery of genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in chickpea, identified mainly through the next generation sequencing of two genotypes, i.e. Cicer arietinum ICC4958 and its wild progenitor C. reticulatum PI489777, parents of an inter-specific reference mapping population of chickpea. Development and validation of a high-throughput SNP genotyping assay based on Illumina's GoldenGate Genotyping Technology and its application in building a high-resolution genetic linkage map of chickpea is described for the first time. In this study, 1022 SNPs were identified, of which 768 high-confidence SNPs were selected for designing the custom Oligo Pool All (CpOPA-I) for genotyping. Of these, 697 SNPs could be successfully used for genotyping, demonstrating a high success rate of 90.75%. Genotyping data of the 697 SNPs were compiled along with those of 368 co-dominant markers mapped in an earlier study, and a saturated genetic linkage map of chickpea was constructed. One thousand and sixty-three markers were mapped onto eight linkage groups spanning 1808.7 cM (centiMorgans) with an average inter-marker distance of 1.70 cM, thereby representing one of the most advanced maps of chickpea. The map was used for the synteny analysis of chickpea, which revealed a higher degree of synteny with the phylogenetically close Medicago than with soybean. The first set of validated SNPs and map resources developed in this study will not only facilitate QTL mapping, genome-wide association analysis and comparative mapping in legumes but also help anchor scaffolds arising out of the whole-genome sequencing of chickpea.

  14. Combinatorial synthesis with high throughput discovery of protein-resistant membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gu, Minghao; Vegas, Arturo J; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert S; Kilduff, James E; Belfort, Georges

    2013-08-01

    Using combinatorial methods, we synthesized a series of new vinyl amide monomers and graft-polymerized them to light-sensitive poly(ether sulfone) (PES) porous films for protein resistance. To increase the discovery rate and statistical confidence, we developed high throughput surface modification methods (HTP) that allow synthesis, screening and selection of desirable monomers from a large library in a relatively short time (days). A series of amide monomers were synthesized by amidation of methacryloyl chloride with amines and grafted onto commercial poly(ether sulfone) (PES) membranes using irradiation from atmospheric pressure plasma (APP). The modified PES membrane surfaces were then tested and screened for static protein adhesion using HTP. Hydroxyl amide monomers N-(3-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (A3), N-(4-hydroxybutyl)methacrylamide (A4), and N-(4-hydroxybutyl)methacrylamide (A6), ethylene glycol (EG) monomer N-(3-methoxypropyl)methacrylamide (A7), and N-(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)-N-methylmethacrylamide (A8), and N-(2-(diethylamino)ethyl)-N-methylmethacrylamide (A9) all terminated with tertiary amines and were shown to have protein resistance. The PES membranes modified with these monomers exhibited both low protein adhesion (i.e. membrane plugging or fouling) and high flux. Their performance is comparable with previously identified best performing PEG and zwitterionic monomers, i.e. the so-called gold-standard for protein resistance. Combining a Hansen solubility parameter (HSP) analysis of the amide monomers and the HTP filtration results, we conclude that monomer solubility in water correlates with protein-resistant surfaces, presumably through its effects on surface-water interactions. PMID:23706542

  15. Functional Metagenomics: Construction and High-Throughput Screening of Fosmid Libraries for Discovery of Novel Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ufarté, Lisa; Bozonnet, Sophie; Laville, Elisabeth; Cecchini, Davide A; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Jacquiod, Samuel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Simonet, Pascal; Franqueville, Laure; Veronese, Gabrielle Potocki

    2016-01-01

    Activity-based metagenomics is one of the most efficient approaches to boost the discovery of novel biocatalysts from the huge reservoir of uncultivated bacteria. In this chapter, we describe a highly generic procedure of metagenomic library construction and high-throughput screening for carbohydrate-active enzymes. Applicable to any bacterial ecosystem, it enables the swift identification of functional enzymes that are highly efficient, alone or acting in synergy, to break down polysaccharides and oligosaccharides.

  16. High throughput technologies for the functional discovery of mammalian enhancers: new approaches for understanding transcriptional regulatory network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    Completion of the human and mouse genomes has inspired new initiatives to obtain a global understanding of the functional regulatory networks governing gene expression. Enhancers are primary regulatory DNA elements determining precise spatio- and temporal gene expression patterns, but the observation that they can function at any distance from the gene(s) they regulate has made their genome-wide characterization challenging. Since traditional, single reporter approaches would be unable to accomplish this enormous task, high throughput technologies for mapping chromatin features associated with enhancers have emerged as an effective surrogate for enhancer discovery. However, the last few years have witnessed the development of several new innovative approaches that can effectively screen for and discover enhancers based on their functional activation of transcription using massively parallel reporter systems. In addition to their application for genome annotation, these new high throughput functional approaches open new and exciting avenues for modeling gene regulatory networks.

  17. A Multiplex High-Throughput Gene Expression Assay to Simultaneously Detect Disease and Functional Markers in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Marc; Corneo, Barbara; Davis, Janine; Wan, Qin; Miyagishima, Kiyoharu Joshua; King, Rebecca; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Marugan, Juan; Sharma, Ruchi; Shure, Michael; Temple, Sally; Miller, Sheldon

    2014-01-01

    There is continuing interest in the development of lineage-specific cells from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for use in cell therapies and drug discovery. Although in most cases differentiated cells show features of the desired lineage, they retain fetal gene expression and do not fully mature into “adult-like” cells. Such cells may not serve as an effective therapy because, once implanted, immature cells pose the risk of uncontrolled growth. Therefore, there is a need to optimize lineage-specific stem cell differentiation protocols to produce cells that no longer express fetal genes and have attained “adult-like” phenotypes. Toward that goal, it is critical to develop assays that simultaneously measure cell function and disease markers in high-throughput format. Here, we use a multiplex high-throughput gene expression assay that simultaneously detects endogenous expression of multiple developmental, functional, and disease markers in iPS cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We optimized protocols to differentiate iPS cell-derived RPE that was then grown in 96- and 384-well plates. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate differential expression of eight genes in iPS cells, iPS cell-derived RPE at two different differentiation stages, and primary human RPE using this multiplex assay. The data obtained from the multiplex gene expression assay are significantly correlated with standard quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-based measurements, confirming the ability of this high-throughput assay to measure relevant gene expression changes. This assay provides the basis to screen for compounds that improve RPE function and maturation and target disease pathways, thus providing the basis for effective treatments of several retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:24873859

  18. High-Throughput, Motility-Based Sorter for Microswimmers and Gene Discovery Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Raizen, David; Bau, Haim

    2015-11-01

    Animal motility varies with genotype, disease progression, aging, and environmental conditions. In many studies, it is desirable to carry out high throughput motility-based sorting to isolate rare animals for, among other things, forward genetic screens to identify genetic pathways that regulate phenotypes of interest. Many commonly used screening processes are labor-intensive, lack sensitivity, and require extensive investigator training. Here, we describe a sensitive, high throughput, automated, motility-based method for sorting nematodes. Our method was implemented in a simple microfluidic device capable of sorting many thousands of animals per hour per module, and is amenable to parallelism. The device successfully enriched for known C. elegans motility mutants. Furthermore, using this device, we isolated low-abundance mutants capable of suppressing the somnogenic effects of the flp-13 gene, which regulates sleep-like quiescence in C. elegans. Subsequent genomic sequencing led to the identification of a flp-13-suppressor gene. This research was supported, in part, by NIH NIA Grant 5R03AG042690-02.

  19. High-throughput microsomal stability assay for screening new chemical entities in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Fonsi, Massimiliano; Orsale, Maria V; Monteagudo, Edith

    2008-10-01

    In this work, the authors present a novel, robotic, automated protocol for assessing a metabolic stability protocol assembled on a Hamilton platform and a new strategy for pooling samples (cassette analysis). To increase the high throughput of the liquid chromatography (LC) step, fast chromatography and automated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analytical methods were also developed, and a rapid data analysis system was generated that converts peak areas obtained by LC/MS/MS in intrinsic clearance values. All of the steps of the microsomal stability assay were carefully studied and optimized. Standard errors and confidence intervals of the measured clearances were also automatically generated in the process to allow an immediate evaluation of the significance of observed values. Methods based on pooling analysis of 2 and 4 different analytes were compared with a standard method without pooling. A simple statistical treatment was used to show their equivalence. The different protocols developed were analyzed in terms of the best compromise between accuracy and high-throughput capabilities.

  20. High-Throughput Screening Platform for the Discovery of New Immunomodulator Molecules from Natural Product Extract Libraries.

    PubMed

    Pérez Del Palacio, José; Díaz, Caridad; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Annang, Frederick; Martín, Jesús; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; González-Menéndez, Víctor; de Pedro, Nuria; Tormo, José R; Algieri, Francesca; Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Rodríguez-Cabezas, M Elena; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga; Vicente, Francisca; Gálvez, Julio

    2016-07-01

    It is widely accepted that central nervous system inflammation and systemic inflammation play a significant role in the progression of chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, neurotropic viral infections, stroke, paraneoplastic disorders, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. Therefore, it seems reasonable to propose that the use of anti-inflammatory drugs might diminish the cumulative effects of inflammation. Indeed, some epidemiological studies suggest that sustained use of anti-inflammatory drugs may prevent or slow down the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the anti-inflammatory drugs and biologics used clinically have the disadvantage of causing side effects and a high cost of treatment. Alternatively, natural products offer great potential for the identification and development of bioactive lead compounds into drugs for treating inflammatory diseases with an improved safety profile. In this work, we present a validated high-throughput screening approach in 96-well plate format for the discovery of new molecules with anti-inflammatory/immunomodulatory activity. The in vitro models are based on the quantitation of nitrite levels in RAW264.7 murine macrophages and interleukin-8 in Caco-2 cells. We have used this platform in a pilot project to screen a subset of 5976 noncytotoxic crude microbial extracts from the MEDINA microbial natural product collection. To our knowledge, this is the first report on an high-throughput screening of microbial natural product extracts for the discovery of immunomodulators. PMID:26962874

  1. A high throughput solubility assay for drug discovery using microscale shake-flask and rapid UHPLC-UV-CLND quantification.

    PubMed

    Lin, Baiwei; Pease, Joseph H

    2016-04-15

    The rapid determination of key physical properties of lead compounds is essential to the drug discovery process. Solubility is one of the most important properties since good solubility is needed not only for obtaining reliable in vitro and in vivo assay results in early discovery but also to ensure sufficient concentration of the drug being in circulation to get the desired therapeutic exposure at the target of interest. In order for medicinal chemists to tune solubility of lead compounds, a rapid assay is needed to provide solubility data that is accurate and predictive so that it can be reliably used for designing the next generation of compounds with improved properties. To ensure speed and data quality, we developed a high throughput solubility assay that utilizes a single calibration UHPLC-UV-CLND method and a 24h shake-flask format for rapid quantification. A set of 46 model compounds was used to demonstrate that the method is accurate, reproducible and predictive. Here we present development of the assay, including evaluation of quantification method, filtration membranes, equilibrium times, DMSO concentrations, and buffer conditions. A comparison of thermodynamic solubility results to our high throughput 24h shake-flask solubility assay results is also discussed.

  2. Internal standard capillary electrophoresis as a high-throughput method for pKa determination in drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Cabot, Joan M; Fuguet, Elisabet; Rosés, Martí

    2014-10-13

    A novel high-throughput method for determining acidity constants (pKa) by capillary electrophoresis (CE) is developed. The method, based on the use of an internal standard (IS-CE), is implemented as a routine method for accurate experimental pKa determination of drugs undergoing physicochemical measurements in drug discovery laboratories. Just two electropherograms at 2 different pH values are needed to calculate an acidity constant. Several ISs can be used in the same buffer and run to enhance precision. With 3 ISs, for example, the pKa of the test compound (TC) can be obtained in triplicate in less than 3 min of electrophoresis. It has been demonstrated that the IS-CE method eliminates some systematic errors, maintaining, or even increasing the precision of the results compared with other methods. Furthermore, pH buffer instability during electrophoretic runs is not a problem in the IS-CE method. It is also proved that after 16 h of electroseparation using the same buffer vial, pH may change by around one unit; but the pKa calculated by the IS-CE method remains constant. Thus, IS-CE is a powerful high-throughput method for pKa determination in drug discovery and development.

  3. High-Throughput Screening Platform for the Discovery of New Immunomodulator Molecules from Natural Product Extract Libraries.

    PubMed

    Pérez Del Palacio, José; Díaz, Caridad; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Annang, Frederick; Martín, Jesús; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; González-Menéndez, Víctor; de Pedro, Nuria; Tormo, José R; Algieri, Francesca; Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Rodríguez-Cabezas, M Elena; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga; Vicente, Francisca; Gálvez, Julio

    2016-07-01

    It is widely accepted that central nervous system inflammation and systemic inflammation play a significant role in the progression of chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, neurotropic viral infections, stroke, paraneoplastic disorders, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. Therefore, it seems reasonable to propose that the use of anti-inflammatory drugs might diminish the cumulative effects of inflammation. Indeed, some epidemiological studies suggest that sustained use of anti-inflammatory drugs may prevent or slow down the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the anti-inflammatory drugs and biologics used clinically have the disadvantage of causing side effects and a high cost of treatment. Alternatively, natural products offer great potential for the identification and development of bioactive lead compounds into drugs for treating inflammatory diseases with an improved safety profile. In this work, we present a validated high-throughput screening approach in 96-well plate format for the discovery of new molecules with anti-inflammatory/immunomodulatory activity. The in vitro models are based on the quantitation of nitrite levels in RAW264.7 murine macrophages and interleukin-8 in Caco-2 cells. We have used this platform in a pilot project to screen a subset of 5976 noncytotoxic crude microbial extracts from the MEDINA microbial natural product collection. To our knowledge, this is the first report on an high-throughput screening of microbial natural product extracts for the discovery of immunomodulators.

  4. Discovery in Genetic Skin Disease: The Impact of High Throughput Genetic Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Maruthappu, Thiviyani; Scott, Claire A.; Kelsell, David P.

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has seen considerable advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of skin disease, as a consequence of high throughput sequencing technologies including next generation sequencing and whole exome sequencing. We have now determined the genes underlying several monogenic diseases, such as harlequin ichthyosis, Olmsted syndrome, and exfoliative ichthyosis, which have provided unique insights into the structure and function of the skin. In addition, through genome wide association studies we now have an understanding of how low penetrance variants contribute to inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis, and how they contribute to underlying pathophysiological disease processes. In this review we discuss strategies used to unravel the genes underlying both monogenic and complex trait skin diseases in the last 10 years and the implications on mechanistic studies, diagnostics, and therapeutics. PMID:25093584

  5. Accelerating the Discovery of Biologically Active Small Molecules Using a High-Throughput Yeast Halo Assay#

    PubMed Central

    Gassner, Nadine C.; Tamble, Craig M.; Bock, Jonathan E.; Cotton, Naomi; White, Kimberly N.; Tenney, Karen; St. Onge, Robert P.; Proctor, Michael J.; Giaever, Guri; Davis, Ronald W.; Crews, Phillip; Holman, Theodore R.; Lokey, R. Scott

    2008-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a powerful model system for the study of basic eukaryotic cell biology, has been used increasingly as a screening tool for the identification of bioactive small molecules. We have developed a novel yeast toxicity screen that is easily automated and compatible with high-throughput screening robotics. The new screen is quantitative and allows inhibitory potencies to be determined, since the diffusion of the sample provides a concentration gradient and a corresponding toxicity halo. The efficacy of this new screen was illustrated by testing materials including 3,104 compounds from the NCI libraries, 167 marine sponge crude extracts, and 149 crude marine-derived fungal extracts. There were 46 active compounds among the NCI set. One very active extract was selected for bioactivity-guided fractionation resulting in the identification of crambescidin 800 as a potent antifungal agent. PMID:17291044

  6. 3D printed high-throughput hydrothermal reactionware for discovery, optimization, and scale-up.

    PubMed

    Kitson, Philip J; Marshall, Ross J; Long, Deliang; Forgan, Ross S; Cronin, Leroy

    2014-11-17

    3D printing techniques allow the laboratory-scale design and production of reactionware tailored to specific experimental requirements. To increase the range and versatility of reactionware devices, sealed, monolithic reactors suitable for use in hydrothermal synthesis have been digitally designed and realized. The fabrication process allows the introduction of reaction mixtures directly into the reactors during the production, and also enables the manufacture of devices of varying scales and geometries unavailable in traditional equipment. The utility of these devices is shown by the use of 3D printed, high-throughput array reactors to discover two new coordination polymers, optimize the synthesis of one of these, and scale-up its synthesis using larger reactors produced on the same 3D printer. Reactors were also used to produce phase-pure samples of coordination polymers MIL-96 and HKUST-1, in yields comparable to synthesis in traditional apparatus. PMID:25079230

  7. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity by high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Chormova, Dimitra; Franková, Lenka; Defries, Andrew; Cutler, Sean R.; Fry, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Small molecules (xenobiotics) that inhibit cell-wall-localised enzymes are valuable for elucidating the enzymes’ biological roles. We applied a high-throughput fluorescent dot-blot screen to search for inhibitors of Petroselinum xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity in vitro. Of 4216 xenobiotics tested, with cellulose-bound xyloglucan as donor-substrate, 18 inhibited XET activity and 18 promoted it (especially anthraquinones and flavonoids). No compounds promoted XET in quantitative assays with (cellulose-free) soluble xyloglucan as substrate, suggesting that promotion was dependent on enzyme–cellulose interactions. With cellulose-free xyloglucan as substrate, we found 22 XET-inhibitors – especially compounds that generate singlet oxygen (1O2) e.g., riboflavin (IC50 29 μM), retinoic acid, eosin (IC50 27 μM) and erythrosin (IC50 36 μM). The riboflavin effect was light-dependent, supporting 1O2 involvement. Other inhibitors included tannins, sulphydryl reagents and triphenylmethanes. Some inhibitors (vulpinic acid and brilliant blue G) were relatively specific to XET, affecting only two or three, respectively, of nine other wall-enzyme activities tested; others [e.g. (−)-epigallocatechin gallate and riboflavin] were non-specific. In vivo, out of eight XET-inhibitors bioassayed, erythrosin (1 μM) inhibited cell expansion in Rosa and Zea cell-suspension cultures, and 40 μM mycophenolic acid and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibited Zea culture growth. Our work showcases a general high-throughput strategy for discovering wall-enzyme inhibitors, some being plant growth inhibitors potentially valuable as physiological tools or herbicide leads. PMID:26093490

  8. Microfluidic droplet-based PCR instrumentation for high-throughput gene expression profiling and biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Christopher J; Dalton, Tara M

    2015-06-01

    PCR is a common and often indispensable technique used in medical and biological research labs for a variety of applications. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) has become a definitive technique for quantitating differences in gene expression levels between samples. Yet, in spite of this importance, reliable methods to quantitate nucleic acid amounts in a higher throughput remain elusive. In the following paper, a unique design to quantify gene expression levels at the nanoscale in a continuous flow system is presented. Fully automated, high-throughput, low volume amplification of deoxynucleotides (DNA) in a droplet based microfluidic system is described. Unlike some conventional qPCR instrumentation that use integrated fluidic circuits or plate arrays, the instrument performs qPCR in a continuous, micro-droplet flowing process with droplet generation, distinctive reagent mixing, thermal cycling and optical detection platforms all combined on one complete instrument. Detailed experimental profiling of reactions of less than 300 nl total volume is achieved using the platform demonstrating the dynamic range to be 4 order logs and consistent instrument sensitivity. Furthermore, reduced pipetting steps by as much as 90% and a unique degree of hands-free automation makes the analytical possibilities for this instrumentation far reaching. In conclusion, a discussion of the first demonstrations of this approach to perform novel, continuous high-throughput biological screens is presented. The results generated from the instrument, when compared with commercial instrumentation, demonstrate the instrument reliability and robustness to carry out further studies of clinical significance with added throughput and economic benefits. PMID:27077035

  9. Microfluidic droplet-based PCR instrumentation for high-throughput gene expression profiling and biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Christopher J.; Dalton, Tara M.

    2015-01-01

    PCR is a common and often indispensable technique used in medical and biological research labs for a variety of applications. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) has become a definitive technique for quantitating differences in gene expression levels between samples. Yet, in spite of this importance, reliable methods to quantitate nucleic acid amounts in a higher throughput remain elusive. In the following paper, a unique design to quantify gene expression levels at the nanoscale in a continuous flow system is presented. Fully automated, high-throughput, low volume amplification of deoxynucleotides (DNA) in a droplet based microfluidic system is described. Unlike some conventional qPCR instrumentation that use integrated fluidic circuits or plate arrays, the instrument performs qPCR in a continuous, micro-droplet flowing process with droplet generation, distinctive reagent mixing, thermal cycling and optical detection platforms all combined on one complete instrument. Detailed experimental profiling of reactions of less than 300 nl total volume is achieved using the platform demonstrating the dynamic range to be 4 order logs and consistent instrument sensitivity. Furthermore, reduced pipetting steps by as much as 90% and a unique degree of hands-free automation makes the analytical possibilities for this instrumentation far reaching. In conclusion, a discussion of the first demonstrations of this approach to perform novel, continuous high-throughput biological screens is presented. The results generated from the instrument, when compared with commercial instrumentation, demonstrate the instrument reliability and robustness to carry out further studies of clinical significance with added throughput and economic benefits. PMID:27077035

  10. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity by high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Franková, Lenka; Defries, Andrew; Cutler, Sean R; Fry, Stephen C

    2015-09-01

    Small molecules (xenobiotics) that inhibit cell-wall-localised enzymes are valuable for elucidating the enzymes' biological roles. We applied a high-throughput fluorescent dot-blot screen to search for inhibitors of Petroselinum xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity in vitro. Of 4216 xenobiotics tested, with cellulose-bound xyloglucan as donor-substrate, 18 inhibited XET activity and 18 promoted it (especially anthraquinones and flavonoids). No compounds promoted XET in quantitative assays with (cellulose-free) soluble xyloglucan as substrate, suggesting that promotion was dependent on enzyme-cellulose interactions. With cellulose-free xyloglucan as substrate, we found 22 XET-inhibitors - especially compounds that generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) e.g., riboflavin (IC50 29 μM), retinoic acid, eosin (IC50 27 μM) and erythrosin (IC50 36 μM). The riboflavin effect was light-dependent, supporting (1)O2 involvement. Other inhibitors included tannins, sulphydryl reagents and triphenylmethanes. Some inhibitors (vulpinic acid and brilliant blue G) were relatively specific to XET, affecting only two or three, respectively, of nine other wall-enzyme activities tested; others [e.g. (-)-epigallocatechin gallate and riboflavin] were non-specific. In vivo, out of eight XET-inhibitors bioassayed, erythrosin (1 μM) inhibited cell expansion in Rosa and Zea cell-suspension cultures, and 40 μM mycophenolic acid and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibited Zea culture growth. Our work showcases a general high-throughput strategy for discovering wall-enzyme inhibitors, some being plant growth inhibitors potentially valuable as physiological tools or herbicide leads. PMID:26093490

  11. A High-throughput O-Glycopeptide Discovery Platform for Seromic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Blixt, Ola; Cló, Emiliano; Nudelman, Aaron S.; Sørensen, Kasper Kildegaard; Clausen, Thomas; Wandall, Hans H.; Livingston, Philip O.; Clausen, Henrik; Jensen, Knud J.

    2010-01-01

    Biomarker microarrays are becoming valuable tools for serological screening of disease-associated autoantibodies. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as glycosylation extend the range of protein function, and a variety of glycosylated proteins are known to be altered in disease progression. Here, we have developed a synthetic screening microarray platform for facile display of O-glycosylated peptides (O-PTMs). By introducing a capping step during chemical solid-phase glycopeptide synthesis, selective enrichment of N-terminal glycopeptide end products were achieved on an amine-reactive hydrogel coated microarray glass surface, allowing high-throughput display of large numbers of glycopeptides. Utilizing a repertoire of recombinant glycosyltransferases enabled further diversification of the array libraries in-situ and display of a new level of potential biomarker candidates for serological screening. As proof-of-concept we have demonstrated that MUC1 glycopeptides could be assembled and used to detect autoantibodies in vaccine induced disease free breast cancer patients and in patients, with confirmed disease at time of diagnosis. PMID:20726594

  12. High-Throughput Luciferase-Based Assay for the Discovery of Therapeutics That Prevent Malaria

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In order to identify the most attractive starting points for drugs that can be used to prevent malaria, a diverse chemical space comprising tens of thousands to millions of small molecules may need to be examined. Achieving this throughput necessitates the development of efficient ultra-high-throughput screening methods. Here, we report the development and evaluation of a luciferase-based phenotypic screen of malaria exoerythrocytic-stage parasites optimized for a 1536-well format. This assay uses the exoerythrocytic stage of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, and a human hepatoma cell line. We use this assay to evaluate several biased and unbiased compound libraries, including two small sets of molecules (400 and 89 compounds, respectively) with known activity against malaria erythrocytic-stage parasites and a set of 9886 diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS)-derived compounds. Of the compounds screened, we obtain hit rates of 12–13 and 0.6% in preselected and naïve libraries, respectively, and identify 52 compounds with exoerythrocytic-stage activity less than 1 μM and having minimal host cell toxicity. Our data demonstrate the ability of this method to identify compounds known to have causal prophylactic activity in both human and animal models of malaria, as well as novel compounds, including some exclusively active against parasite exoerythrocytic stages. PMID:27275010

  13. Targeted Biomarker Discovery by High Throughput Glycosylation Profiling of Human Plasma Alpha1-Antitrypsin and Immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. Renee; Koeleman, Carolien A. M.; Uh, Hae-Won; Stam, Jord C.; van Heemst, Diana; Maier, Andrea B.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Deelder, André M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Protein N-glycosylation patterns are known to show vast genetic as well as physiological and pathological variation and represent a large pool of potential biomarkers. Large-scale studies are needed for the identification and validation of biomarkers, and the analytical techniques required have recently been developed. Such methods have up to now mainly been applied to complex mixtures of glycoproteins in biofluids (e.g. plasma). Here, we analyzed N-glycosylation profiles of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) enriched fractions by 96-well microtitration plate based high-throughput immuno-affinity capturing and N-glycan analysis using multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CGE-LIF). Human plasma samples were from the Leiden Longevity Study comprising 2415 participants of different chronological and biological ages. Glycosylation patterns of AAT enriched fractions were found to be associated with chronological (calendar) age and they differed between females and males. Moreover, several glycans in the AAT enriched fraction were associated with physiological parameters marking cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Pronounced differences were found between males and females in the glycosylation profiles of IgA enriched fractions. Our results demonstrate that large-scale immuno-affinity capturing of proteins from human plasma using a bead-based method combined with high-throughput N-glycan analysis is a powerful tool for the discovery of glycosylation-based biomarker candidates. PMID:24039863

  14. Discovery of potent KIFC1 inhibitors using a method of integrated high-throughput synthesis and screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Lamb, Michelle L; Zhang, Tao; Hennessy, Edward J; Grewal, Gurmit; Sha, Li; Zambrowski, Mark; Block, Michael H; Dowling, James E; Su, Nancy; Wu, Jiaquan; Deegan, Tracy; Mikule, Keith; Wang, Wenxian; Kaspera, Rüdiger; Chuaqui, Claudio; Chen, Huawei

    2014-12-11

    KIFC1 (HSET), a member of the kinesin-14 family of motor proteins, plays an essential role in centrosomal bundling in cancer cells, but its function is not required for normal diploid cell division. To explore the potential of KIFC1 as a therapeutic target for human cancers, a series of potent KIFC1 inhibitors featuring a phenylalanine scaffold was developed from hits identified through high-throughput screening (HTS). Optimization of the initial hits combined both design-synthesis-test cycles and an integrated high-throughput synthesis and biochemical screening method. An important aspect of this integrated method was the utilization of DMSO stock solutions of compounds registered in the corporate compound collection as synthetic reactants. Using this method, over 1500 compounds selected for structural diversity were quickly assembled in assay-ready 384-well plates and were directly tested after the necessary dilutions. Our efforts led to the discovery of a potent KIFC1 inhibitor, AZ82, which demonstrated the desired centrosome declustering mode of action in cell studies.

  15. Discovery of potent KIFC1 inhibitors using a method of integrated high-throughput synthesis and screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Lamb, Michelle L; Zhang, Tao; Hennessy, Edward J; Grewal, Gurmit; Sha, Li; Zambrowski, Mark; Block, Michael H; Dowling, James E; Su, Nancy; Wu, Jiaquan; Deegan, Tracy; Mikule, Keith; Wang, Wenxian; Kaspera, Rüdiger; Chuaqui, Claudio; Chen, Huawei

    2014-12-11

    KIFC1 (HSET), a member of the kinesin-14 family of motor proteins, plays an essential role in centrosomal bundling in cancer cells, but its function is not required for normal diploid cell division. To explore the potential of KIFC1 as a therapeutic target for human cancers, a series of potent KIFC1 inhibitors featuring a phenylalanine scaffold was developed from hits identified through high-throughput screening (HTS). Optimization of the initial hits combined both design-synthesis-test cycles and an integrated high-throughput synthesis and biochemical screening method. An important aspect of this integrated method was the utilization of DMSO stock solutions of compounds registered in the corporate compound collection as synthetic reactants. Using this method, over 1500 compounds selected for structural diversity were quickly assembled in assay-ready 384-well plates and were directly tested after the necessary dilutions. Our efforts led to the discovery of a potent KIFC1 inhibitor, AZ82, which demonstrated the desired centrosome declustering mode of action in cell studies. PMID:25458601

  16. High-Throughput Excipient Discovery Enables Oral Delivery of Poorly Soluble Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric excipients are crucial ingredients in modern pills, increasing the therapeutic bioavailability, safety, stability, and accessibility of lifesaving products to combat diseases in developed and developing countries worldwide. Because many early-pipeline drugs are clinically intractable due to hydrophobicity and crystallinity, new solubilizing excipients can reposition successful and even failed compounds to more effective and inexpensive oral formulations. With assistance from high-throughput controlled polymerization and screening tools, we employed a strategic, molecular evolution approach to systematically modulate designer excipients based on the cyclic imide chemical groups of an important (yet relatively insoluble) drug phenytoin. In these acrylamide- and methacrylate-containing polymers, a synthon approach was employed: one monomer served as a precipitation inhibitor for phenytoin recrystallization, while the comonomer provided hydrophilicity. Systems that maintained drug supersaturation in amorphous solid dispersions were identified with molecular-level understanding of noncovalent interactions using NOESY and DOSY NMR spectroscopy. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (poly(NIPAm-co-DMA)) at 70 mol % NIPAm exhibited the highest drug solubilization, in which phenytoin associated with inhibiting NIPAm units only with lowered diffusivity in solution. In vitro dissolution tests of select spray-dried dispersions corroborated the screening trends between polymer chemical composition and solubilization performance, where the best NIPAm/DMA polymer elevated the mean area-under-the-dissolution-curve by 21 times its crystalline state at 10 wt % drug loading. When administered to rats for pharmacokinetic evaluation, the same leading poly(NIPAm-co-DMA) formulation tripled the oral bioavailability compared to a leading commercial excipient, HPMCAS, and translated to a remarkable 23-fold improvement over crystalline phenytoin. PMID:27800558

  17. Discovery of bile salt hydrolase inhibitors using an efficient high-throughput screening system.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katie; Zeng, Ximin; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The global trend of restricting the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGP) in animal production necessitates the need to develop valid alternatives to maintain productivity and sustainability of food animals. Previous studies suggest inhibition of bile salt hydrolase (BSH), an intestinal bacteria-produced enzyme that exerts negative impact on host fat digestion and utilization, is a promising approach to promote animal growth performance. To achieve the long term goal of developing novel alternatives to AGPs, in this study, a rapid and convenient high-throughput screening (HTS) system was developed and successfully used for identification of BSH inhibitors. With the aid of a high-purity BSH from a chicken Lactobacillus salivarius strain, we optimized various screening conditions (e.g. BSH concentration, reaction buffer pH, incubation temperature and length, substrate type and concentration) and establish a precipitation-based screening approach to identify BSH inhibitors using 96-well or 384-well microplates. A pilot HTS was performed using a small compound library comprised of 2,240 biologically active and structurally diverse compounds. Among the 107 hits, several promising and potent BSH inhibitors (e.g. riboflavin and phenethyl caffeate) were selected and validated by standard BSH activity assay. Interestingly, the HTS also identified a panel of antibiotics as BSH inhibitor; in particular, various tetracycline antibiotics and roxarsone, the widely used AGP, have been demonstrated to display potent inhibitory effect on BSH. Together, this study developed an efficient HTS system and identified several BSH inhibitors with potential as alternatives to AGP. In addition, the findings from this study also suggest a new mode of action of AGP for promoting animal growth. PMID:24454844

  18. Discovery of Bile Salt Hydrolase Inhibitors Using an Efficient High-Throughput Screening System

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katie; Zeng, Ximin; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The global trend of restricting the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGP) in animal production necessitates the need to develop valid alternatives to maintain productivity and sustainability of food animals. Previous studies suggest inhibition of bile salt hydrolase (BSH), an intestinal bacteria-produced enzyme that exerts negative impact on host fat digestion and utilization, is a promising approach to promote animal growth performance. To achieve the long term goal of developing novel alternatives to AGPs, in this study, a rapid and convenient high-throughput screening (HTS) system was developed and successfully used for identification of BSH inhibitors. With the aid of a high-purity BSH from a chicken Lactobacillus salivarius strain, we optimized various screening conditions (e.g. BSH concentration, reaction buffer pH, incubation temperature and length, substrate type and concentration) and establish a precipitation-based screening approach to identify BSH inhibitors using 96-well or 384-well microplates. A pilot HTS was performed using a small compound library comprised of 2,240 biologically active and structurally diverse compounds. Among the 107 hits, several promising and potent BSH inhibitors (e.g. riboflavin and phenethyl caffeate) were selected and validated by standard BSH activity assay. Interestingly, the HTS also identified a panel of antibiotics as BSH inhibitor; in particular, various tetracycline antibiotics and roxarsone, the widely used AGP, have been demonstrated to display potent inhibitory effect on BSH. Together, this study developed an efficient HTS system and identified several BSH inhibitors with potential as alternatives to AGP. In addition, the findings from this study also suggest a new mode of action of AGP for promoting animal growth. PMID:24454844

  19. Discovery of microRNA regulatory networks by integrating multidimensional high-throughput data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of approximately 22 nt that regulate the expression of a large fraction of genes by targeting messenger RNAs (mRNAs). However, determining the biologically significant targets of miRNAs is an ongoing challenge. In this chapter, we describe how to identify miRNA-target interactions and miRNA regulatory networks from high-throughput deep sequencing, CLIP-Seq (HITS-CLIP, PAR-CLIP) and degradome sequencing data using starBase platforms. In starBase, several web-based and stand-alone computational tools were developed to discover Argonaute (Ago) binding and cleavage sites, miRNA-target interactions, perform enrichment analysis of miRNA target genes in Gene Ontology (GO) categories and biological pathways, and identify combinatorial effects between Ago and other RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Investigating target pathways of miRNAs in human CLIP-Seq data, we found that many cancer-associated miRNAs modulate cancer pathways. Performing an enrichment analysis of genes targeted by highly expressed miRNAs in the mouse brain showed that many miRNAs are involved in cancer-associated MAPK signaling and glioma pathways, as well as neuron-associated neurotrophin signaling and axon guidance pathways. Moreover, thousands of combinatorial binding sites between Ago and RBPs were identified from CLIP-Seq data suggesting RBPs and miRNAs coordinately regulate mRNA transcripts. As a means of comprehensively integrating CLIP-Seq and Degradome-Seq data, the starBase platform is expected to identify clinically relevant miRNA-target regulatory relationships, and reveal multi-dimensional post-transcriptional regulatory networks involving miRNAs and RBPs. starBase is available at http://starbase.sysu.edu.cn/ . PMID:23377977

  20. Precision multidimensional assay for high-throughput microRNA drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Haefliger, Benjamin; Prochazka, Laura; Angelici, Bartolomeo; Benenson, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Development of drug discovery assays that combine high content with throughput is challenging. Information-processing gene networks can address this challenge by integrating multiple potential targets of drug candidates' activities into a small number of informative readouts, reporting simultaneously on specific and non-specific effects. Here we show a family of networks implementing this concept in a cell-based drug discovery assay for miRNA drug targets. The networks comprise multiple modules reporting on specific effects towards an intended miRNA target, together with non-specific effects on gene expression, off-target miRNAs and RNA interference pathway. We validate the assays using known perturbations of on- and off-target miRNAs, and evaluate an ∼700 compound library in an automated screen with a follow-up on specific and non-specific hits. We further customize and validate assays for additional drug targets and non-specific inputs. Our study offers a novel framework for precision drug discovery assays applicable to diverse target families. PMID:26880188

  1. Precision multidimensional assay for high-throughput microRNA drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Haefliger, Benjamin; Prochazka, Laura; Angelici, Bartolomeo; Benenson, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Development of drug discovery assays that combine high content with throughput is challenging. Information-processing gene networks can address this challenge by integrating multiple potential targets of drug candidates' activities into a small number of informative readouts, reporting simultaneously on specific and non-specific effects. Here we show a family of networks implementing this concept in a cell-based drug discovery assay for miRNA drug targets. The networks comprise multiple modules reporting on specific effects towards an intended miRNA target, together with non-specific effects on gene expression, off-target miRNAs and RNA interference pathway. We validate the assays using known perturbations of on- and off-target miRNAs, and evaluate an ∼700 compound library in an automated screen with a follow-up on specific and non-specific hits. We further customize and validate assays for additional drug targets and non-specific inputs. Our study offers a novel framework for precision drug discovery assays applicable to diverse target families.

  2. Precision multidimensional assay for high-throughput microRNA drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Haefliger, Benjamin; Prochazka, Laura; Angelici, Bartolomeo; Benenson, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Development of drug discovery assays that combine high content with throughput is challenging. Information-processing gene networks can address this challenge by integrating multiple potential targets of drug candidates' activities into a small number of informative readouts, reporting simultaneously on specific and non-specific effects. Here we show a family of networks implementing this concept in a cell-based drug discovery assay for miRNA drug targets. The networks comprise multiple modules reporting on specific effects towards an intended miRNA target, together with non-specific effects on gene expression, off-target miRNAs and RNA interference pathway. We validate the assays using known perturbations of on- and off-target miRNAs, and evaluate an ∼700 compound library in an automated screen with a follow-up on specific and non-specific hits. We further customize and validate assays for additional drug targets and non-specific inputs. Our study offers a novel framework for precision drug discovery assays applicable to diverse target families. PMID:26880188

  3. High-throughput novel microsatellite marker of faba bean via next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is an important food legume crop, grown for human consumption globally including in China, Turkey, Egypt and Ethiopia. Although genetic gain has been made through conventional selection and breeding efforts, this could be substantially improved through the application of molecular methods. For this, a set of reliable molecular markers representative of the entire genome is required. Results A library with 125,559 putative SSR sequences was constructed and characterized for repeat type and length from a mixed genome of 247 spring and winter sown faba bean genotypes using 454 sequencing. A suit of 28,503 primer pair sequences were designed and 150 were randomly selected for validation. Of these, 94 produced reproducible amplicons that were polymorphic among 32 faba bean genotypes selected from diverse geographical locations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 8, the expected heterozygocities ranged from 0.0000 to 1.0000, and the observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.0908 to 0.8410. The validation by UPGMA cluster analysis of 32 genotypes based on Nei's genetic distance, showed high quality and effectiveness of those novel SSR markers developed via next generation sequencing technology. Conclusions Large scale SSR marker development was successfully achieved using next generation sequencing of the V. faba genome. These novel markers are valuable for constructing genetic linkage maps, future QTL mapping, and marker-assisted trait selection in faba bean breeding efforts. PMID:23137291

  4. iRFP is a sensitive marker for cell number and tumor growth in high-throughput systems.

    PubMed

    Hock, Andreas K; Lee, Pearl; Maddocks, Oliver Dk; Mason, Susan M; Blyth, Karen; Vousden, Karen H

    2014-01-01

    GFP and luciferase are used extensively as markers both in vitro and in vivo although both have limitations. The utility of GFP fluorescence is restricted by high background signal and poor tissue penetrance. Luciferase throughput is limited in vitro by the requirement for cell lysis, while in vivo, luciferase readout is complicated by the need for substrate injection and the dependence on endogenous ATP. Here we show that near-infrared fluorescent protein in combination with widely available near-infrared scanners overcomes these obstacles and allows for the accurate determination of cell number in vitro and tumor growth in vivo in a high-throughput manner and at negligible per-well costs. This system represents a significant advance in tracking cell proliferation in tissue culture as well as in animals, with widespread applications in cell biology. PMID:24200967

  5. High-Throughput Discovery of Chloroplast and Mitochondrial DNA Polymorphisms in Brassicaceae Species by ORG-EcoTILLING

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chang-Li; Wang, Guang-Yong; Wang, Jian-Bo; Yan, Gui-Xin; Chen, Bi-Yun; Xu, Kun; Li, Jun; Gao, Gui-Zhen; Wu, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Bo; Liu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Background Information on polymorphic DNA in organelle genomes is essential for evolutionary and ecological studies. However, it is challenging to perform high-throughput investigations of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms. In recent years, EcoTILLING stands out as one of the most universal, low-cost, and high-throughput reverse genetic methods, and the identification of natural genetic variants can provide much information about gene function, association mapping and linkage disequilibrium analysis and species evolution. Until now, no report exists on whether this method is applicable to organelle genomes and to what extent it can be used. Methodology/Principal Findings To address this problem, we adapted the CEL I-based heteroduplex cleavage strategy used in Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING) for the discovery of nucleotide polymorphisms in organelle genomes. To assess the applicability and accuracy of this technology, designated ORG-EcoTILLING, at different taxonomic levels, we sampled two sets of taxa representing accessions from the Brassicaceae with three chloroplast genes (accD, matK and rbcL) and one mitochondrial gene (atp6). The method successfully detected nine, six and one mutation sites in the accD, matK and rbcL genes, respectively, in 96 Brassica accessions. These mutations were confirmed by DNA sequencing, with 100% accuracy at both inter- and intraspecific levels. We also detected 44 putative mutations in accD in 91 accessions from 45 species and 29 genera of seven tribes. Compared with DNA sequencing results, the false negative rate was 36%. However, 17 SNPs detected in atp6 were completely identical to the sequencing results. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that ORG-EcoTILLING is a powerful and cost-effective alternative method for high-throughput genome-wide assessment of inter- and intraspecific chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms. It will play an important role in evolutionary and

  6. Polymorphism discovery and allele frequency estimation using high-throughput DNA sequencing of target-enriched pooled DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The central role of the somatotrophic axis in animal post-natal growth, development and fertility is well established. Therefore, the identification of genetic variants affecting quantitative traits within this axis is an attractive goal. However, large sample numbers are a pre-requisite for the identification of genetic variants underlying complex traits and although technologies are improving rapidly, high-throughput sequencing of large numbers of complete individual genomes remains prohibitively expensive. Therefore using a pooled DNA approach coupled with target enrichment and high-throughput sequencing, the aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms and estimate allele frequency differences across 83 candidate genes of the somatotrophic axis, in 150 Holstein-Friesian dairy bulls divided into two groups divergent for genetic merit for fertility. Results In total, 4,135 SNPs and 893 indels were identified during the resequencing of the 83 candidate genes. Nineteen percent (n = 952) of variants were located within 5' and 3' UTRs. Seventy-two percent (n = 3,612) were intronic and 9% (n = 464) were exonic, including 65 indels and 236 SNPs resulting in non-synonymous substitutions (NSS). Significant (P < 0.01) mean allele frequency differentials between the low and high fertility groups were observed for 720 SNPs (58 NSS). Allele frequencies for 43 of the SNPs were also determined by genotyping the 150 individual animals (Sequenom® MassARRAY). No significant differences (P > 0.1) were observed between the two methods for any of the 43 SNPs across both pools (i.e., 86 tests in total). Conclusions The results of the current study support previous findings of the use of DNA sample pooling and high-throughput sequencing as a viable strategy for polymorphism discovery and allele frequency estimation. Using this approach we have characterised the genetic variation within genes of the somatotrophic axis and related pathways, central to mammalian post

  7. Leveraging family-specific signatures for AMP discovery and high-throughput annotation

    PubMed Central

    Waghu, Faiza Hanif; Barai, Ram Shankar; Idicula-Thomas, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are diverse, biologically active, essential components of the innate immune system. As compared to conventional antibiotics, AMPs exhibit broad spectrum antimicrobial activity, reduced toxicity and reduced microbial resistance. They are widely researched for their therapeutic potential, especially against multi-drug resistant pathogens. AMPs are known to have family-specific sequence composition, which can be mined for their discovery and rational design. Here, we present a detailed family-based study on AMP families. The study involved the use of sequence signatures represented by patterns and hidden Markov models (HMMs) present in experimentally studied AMPs to identify novel AMPs. Along with AMPs, peptides hitherto lacking antimicrobial annotation were also retrieved and wet-lab studies on randomly selected sequences proved their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. CAMPSign, a webserver has been created for researchers to effortlessly exploit the use of AMP family signatures for identification of AMPs. The webserver is available online at www.campsign.bicnirrh.res.in. In this work, we demonstrate an optimised and experimentally validated protocol along with a freely available webserver that uses family-based sequence signatures for accelerated discovery of novel AMPs. PMID:27089856

  8. Association mapping of resistance to leaf rust in emmer wheat using high throughput SNP markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum L. subsp. dicoccum) is known to be a useful source of genes for many desirable characters for improvement of modern cultivated wheat. Recently, a panel of 181 emmer wheat accessions has been genotyped with wheat 9K SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) markers and exte...

  9. Fine QTL mapping of mandarin (Citrus reticulata) fruit characters using high-throughput SNP markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seedlessness, flavor, and color are top priorities for mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco) cultivar improvement. Given long juvenility, large tree size, and high breeding cost, marker-assisted selection (MAS) may be an expeditious and economical approach to these challenges. The objectives of this s...

  10. Malaria vaccines: high-throughput tools for antigens discovery with potential for their development.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Nora; Vallejo, Andrés; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates

    2013-04-01

    Malaria is a disease induced by parasites of the Plasmodium genus, which are transmitted by Anopheles mosquitoes and represents a great socio-economic burden Worldwide. Plasmodium vivax is the second species of malaria Worldwide, but it is the most prevalent in Latin America and other regions of the planet. It is currently considered that vaccines represent a cost-effective strategy for controlling transmissible diseases and could complement other malaria control measures; however, the chemical and immunological complexity of the parasite has hindered development of effective vaccines. Recent availability of several genomes of Plasmodium species, as well as bioinformatic tools are allowing the selection of large numbers of proteins and analysis of their immune potential. Herein, we review recently developed strategies for discovery of novel antigens with potential for malaria vaccine development.

  11. Predicting High-Throughput Screening Results With Scalable Literature-Based Discovery Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, T; Widdows, D; Stephan, C; Zinner, R; Kim, J; Rindflesch, T; Davies, P

    2014-01-01

    The identification of new therapeutic uses for existing agents has been proposed as a means to mitigate the escalating cost of drug development. A common approach to such repurposing involves screening libraries of agents for activities against cell lines. In silico methods using knowledge from the biomedical literature have been proposed to constrain the costs of screening by identifying agents that are likely to be effective a priori. However, results obtained with these methods are seldom evaluated empirically. Conversely, screening experiments have been criticized for their inability to reveal the biological basis of their results. In this paper, we evaluate the ability of a scalable literature-based approach, discovery-by-analogy, to identify a small number of active agents within a large library screened for activity against prostate cancer cells. The methods used permit retrieval of the knowledge used to infer their predictions, providing a plausible biological basis for predicted activity. PMID:25295575

  12. Predicting high-throughput screening results with scalable literature-based discovery methods.

    PubMed

    Cohen, T; Widdows, D; Stephan, C; Zinner, R; Kim, J; Rindflesch, T; Davies, P

    2014-10-08

    The identification of new therapeutic uses for existing agents has been proposed as a means to mitigate the escalating cost of drug development. A common approach to such repurposing involves screening libraries of agents for activities against cell lines. In silico methods using knowledge from the biomedical literature have been proposed to constrain the costs of screening by identifying agents that are likely to be effective a priori. However, results obtained with these methods are seldom evaluated empirically. Conversely, screening experiments have been criticized for their inability to reveal the biological basis of their results. In this paper, we evaluate the ability of a scalable literature-based approach, discovery-by-analogy, to identify a small number of active agents within a large library screened for activity against prostate cancer cells. The methods used permit retrieval of the knowledge used to infer their predictions, providing a plausible biological basis for predicted activity.

  13. SLAF-seq: an efficient method of large-scale de novo SNP discovery and genotyping using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaowen; Liu, Dongyuan; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Li, Wenbin; Liu, Hui; Hong, Weiguo; Jiang, Chuanbei; Guan, Ning; Ma, Chouxian; Zeng, Huaping; Xu, Chunhua; Song, Jun; Huang, Long; Wang, Chunmei; Shi, Junjie; Wang, Rui; Zheng, Xianhu; Lu, Cuiyun; Wang, Xiaowu; Zheng, Hongkun

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale genotyping plays an important role in genetic association studies. It has provided new opportunities for gene discovery, especially when combined with high-throughput sequencing technologies. Here, we report an efficient solution for large-scale genotyping. We call it specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq). SLAF-seq technology has several distinguishing characteristics: i) deep sequencing to ensure genotyping accuracy; ii) reduced representation strategy to reduce sequencing costs; iii) pre-designed reduced representation scheme to optimize marker efficiency; and iv) double barcode system for large populations. In this study, we tested the efficiency of SLAF-seq on rice and soybean data. Both sets of results showed strong consistency between predicted and practical SLAFs and considerable genotyping accuracy. We also report the highest density genetic map yet created for any organism without a reference genome sequence, common carp in this case, using SLAF-seq data. We detected 50,530 high-quality SLAFs with 13,291 SNPs genotyped in 211 individual carp. The genetic map contained 5,885 markers with 0.68 cM intervals on average. A comparative genomics study between common carp genetic map and zebrafish genome sequence map showed high-quality SLAF-seq genotyping results. SLAF-seq provides a high-resolution strategy for large-scale genotyping and can be generally applicable to various species and populations.

  14. SNP discovery in European anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus, L) by high-throughput transcriptome and genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Montes, Iratxe; Conklin, Darrell; Albaina, Aitor; Creer, Simon; Carvalho, Gary R; Santos, María; Estonba, Andone

    2013-01-01

    Increased throughput in sequencing technologies has facilitated the acquisition of detailed genomic information in non-model species. The focus of this research was to discover and validate SNPs derived from the European anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) transcriptome, a species with no available reference genome, using next generation sequencing technologies. A cDNA library was constructed from four tissues of ten fish individuals corresponding to three populations of E. encrasicolus, and Roche 454 GS FLX Titanium sequencing yielded 19,367 contigs. Additionally, the European anchovy genome was sequenced for the same ten individuals using an Illumina HiSeq2000. Using a computational pipeline for combining transcriptome and genome information, a total of 18,994 SNPs met the necessary minor allele frequency and depth filters. A series of further stringent filters were applied to identify those SNPs likely to succeed in genotyping assays, and for filtering of those in potential duplicated genome regions. A novel method for detecting potential intron-exon boundaries in areas of putative SNPs has also been applied in silico to improve genotyping success. In all, 2,317 filtered putative transcriptome SNPs suitable for genotyping primer design were identified. From those, a subset of 530 were selected, with the genotyping results showing the highest reported conversion and validation rates (91.3% and 83.2%, respectively) reported to date for a non-model species. This study represents a promising strategy to discover genotypable SNPs in the exome of non-model organisms. The genomic resource generated for E. encrasicolus, both in terms of sequences and novel markers, will be informative for research into this species with applications including traceability studies, population genetic analyses and aquaculture.

  15. High-throughput screening for developability during early-stage antibody discovery using self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuqi; Caffry, Isabelle; Wu, Jiemin; Geng, Steven B; Jain, Tushar; Sun, Tingwan; Reid, Felicia; Cao, Yuan; Estep, Patricia; Yu, Yao; Vásquez, Maximiliano; Tessier, Peter M; Xu, Yingda

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to a particular molecular target is now regarded a routine exercise. However, the successful development of mAbs that (1) express well, (2) elicit a desirable biological effect upon binding, and (3) remain soluble and display low viscosity at high concentrations is often far more challenging. Therefore, high throughput screening assays that assess self-association and aggregation early in the selection process are likely to yield mAbs with superior biophysical properties. Here, we report an improved version of affinity-capture self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy (AC-SINS) that is capable of screening large panels of antibodies for their propensity to self-associate. AC-SINS is based on concentrating mAbs from dilute solutions around gold nanoparticles pre-coated with polyclonal capture (e.g., anti-Fc) antibodies. Interactions between immobilized mAbs lead to reduced inter-particle distances and increased plasmon wavelengths (wavelengths of maximum absorbance), which can be readily measured by optical means. This method is attractive because it is compatible with dilute and unpurified mAb solutions that are typical during early antibody discovery. In addition, we have improved multiple aspects of this assay for increased throughput and reproducibility. A data set comprising over 400 mAbs suggests that our modified assay yields self-interaction measurements that are well-correlated with other lower throughput assays such as cross-interaction chromatography. We expect that the simplicity and throughput of our improved AC-SINS method will lead to improved selection of mAbs with excellent biophysical properties during early antibody discovery.

  16. A simple, robust enzymatic-based high-throughput screening method for antimicrobial peptides discovery against Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thirumalai, Muthukumaresan Kuppuswamy; Roy, Arpita; Sanikommu, Suma; Arockiaraj, Jesu; Pasupuleti, Mukesh

    2014-05-01

    The indiscriminate usage of antibiotics has created a major problem in the form of antibiotic resistance. Even though new antimicrobial drug discovery programs have been in place from the last two decades, still we are unsuccessful in identifying novel molecules that have a potential to become new therapeutic agents for the treatment of microbial infections. A major problem in most screening studies is the requirement of high-throughput techniques. Given this, we present here an enzyme-based robust method for screening antimicrobial agent's active against Escherichia coli. This method is based upon the ability of the intracellular innate enzyme to cleave o-nitrophenyl β-d-galactopyranoside (non-chromogenic) to o-nitrophenolate (ONP) (chromogenic) upon the membrane damage or disruption. In comparison with the other currently available methods, we believe that our method provides an opportunity for real-time monitoring of the antimicrobial agents action by measuring the ONP generation in a user-friendly manner. Even though this method can be applied to other strain, our experience shows that one has to be careful especially when the pigments or metabolites present in the bacteria have the same wavelength absorbance.

  17. Structure-based discovery of the first non-covalent inhibitors of Leishmania major tryparedoxin peroxidase by high throughput docking

    PubMed Central

    Brindisi, Margherita; Brogi, Simone; Relitti, Nicola; Vallone, Alessandra; Butini, Stefania; Gemma, Sandra; Novellino, Ettore; Colotti, Gianni; Angiulli, Gabriella; Di Chiaro, Francesco; Fiorillo, Annarita; Ilari, Andrea; Campiani, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected vector-born disease caused by a protozoan of the genus Leishmania and affecting more than 1.300.000 people worldwide. The couple tryparedoxin/tryparedoxin peroxidase is essential for parasite survival in the host since it neutralizes the hydrogen peroxide produced by macrophages during the infection. Herein we report a study aimed at discovering the first class of compounds able to non-covalently inhibit tryparedoxin peroxidase. We have solved the high-resolution structure of Tryparedoxin peroxidase I from Leishmania major (LmTXNPx) in the reduced state and in fully folded conformation. A first series of compounds able to inhibit LmTXNPx was identified by means of the high throughput docking technique. The inhibitory activity of these compounds was validated by a Horseradish peroxidase-based enzymatic assay and their affinity for LmTXNPx calculated by surface plasmon resonance experiments. On the basis of these results, the analysis of the enzyme-inhibitor docked models allowed us to rationally design and synthesize a series of N,N-disubstituted 3-aminomethyl quinolones. These compounds showed an inhibitory potency against LmTXNPx in the micromolar range. Among them, compound 12 represents the first non-covalent LmTXNPx inhibitor reported to date and could pave the way to the discovery of a new class of drugs against leishmaniasis. PMID:25951439

  18. A high-throughput lab-on-a-chip interface for zebrafish embryo tests in drug discovery and ecotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feng; Akagi, Jin; Hall, Chris J.; Crosier, Kathryn E.; Crosier, Philip S.; Delaage, Pierre; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2013-12-01

    Drug discovery screenings performed on zebrafish embryos mirror with a high level of accuracy. The tests usually performed on mammalian animal models, and the fish embryo toxicity assay (FET) is one of the most promising alternative approaches to acute ecotoxicity testing with adult fish. Notwithstanding this, conventional methods utilising 96-well microtiter plates and manual dispensing of fish embryos are very time-consuming. They rely on laborious and iterative manual pipetting that is a main source of analytical errors and low throughput. In this work, we present development of a miniaturised and high-throughput Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) platform for automation of FET assays. The 3D high-density LOC array was fabricated in poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining while the off-chip interfaces were fabricated using additive manufacturing processes (FDM and SLA). The system's design facilitates rapid loading and immobilization of a large number of embryos in predefined clusters of traps during continuous microperfusion of drugs/toxins. It has been conceptually designed to seamlessly interface with both upright and inverted fluorescent imaging systems and also to directly interface with conventional microtiter plate readers that accept 96-well plates. We also present proof-of-concept interfacing with a high-speed imaging cytometer Plate RUNNER HD® capable of multispectral image acquisition with resolution of up to 8192 x 8192 pixels and depth of field of about 40 μm. Furthermore, we developed a miniaturized and self-contained analytical device interfaced with a miniaturized USB microscope. This system modification is capable of performing rapid imaging of multiple embryos at a low resolution for drug toxicity analysis.

  19. High-throughput SNP discovery in the rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) genome by next-generation semiconductor-based sequencing.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, F; Schiavo, G; Scotti, E; Ribani, A; Martelli, P L; Casadio, R; Fontanesi, L

    2014-04-01

    The European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is a domesticated species with one of the broadest ranges of economic and scientific applications and fields of investigation. Rabbit genome information and assembly are available (oryCun2.0), but so far few studies have investigated its variability, and massive discovery of polymorphisms has not been published yet for this species. Here, we sequenced two reduced representation libraries (RRLs) to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the rabbit genome. Genomic DNA of 10 rabbits belonging to different breeds was pooled and digested with two restriction enzymes (HaeIII and RsaI) to create two RRLs which were sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. The two RRLs produced 2 917 879 and 4 046 871 reads, for a total of 280.51 Mb (248.49 Mb with quality >20) and 417.28 Mb (360.89 Mb with quality >20) respectively of sequenced DNA. About 90% and 91% respectively of the obtained reads were mapped on the rabbit genome, covering a total of 15.82% of the oryCun2.0 genome version. The mapping and ad hoc filtering procedures allowed to reliably call 62 491 SNPs. SNPs in a few genomic regions were validated by Sanger sequencing. The Variant Effect Predictor Web tool was used to map SNPs on the current version of the rabbit genome. The obtained results will be useful for many applied and basic research programs for this species and will contribute to the development of cost-effective solutions for high-throughput SNP genotyping in the rabbit. PMID:24444082

  20. Integration of Cot Analysis, DNA Cloning, and High-Throughput Sequencing Facilitates Genome Characterization and Gene Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Daniel G.; Schulze, Stefan R.; Sciara, Erica B.; Lee, Scott A.; Bowers, John E.; Nagel, Alexander; Jiang, Ning; Tibbitts, Deanne C.; Wessler, Susan R.; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2002-01-01

    Cot-based sequence discovery represents a powerful means by which both low-copy and repetitive sequences can be selectively and efficiently fractionated, cloned, and characterized. Based upon the results of a Cot analysis, hydroxyapatite chromatography was used to fractionate sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) genomic DNA into highly repetitive (HR), moderately repetitive (MR), and single/low-copy (SL) sequence components that were consequently cloned to produce HRCot, MRCot, and SLCot genomic libraries. Filter hybridization (blotting) and sequence analysis both show that the HRCot library is enriched in sequences traditionally found in high-copy number (e.g., retroelements, rDNA, centromeric repeats), the SLCot library is enriched in low-copy sequences (e.g., genes and “nonrepetitive ESTs”), and the MRCot library contains sequences of moderate redundancy. The Cot analysis suggests that the sorghum genome is approximately 700 Mb (in agreement with previous estimates) and that HR, MR, and SL components comprise 15%, 41%, and 24% of sorghum DNA, respectively. Unlike previously described techniques to sequence the low-copy components of genomes, sequencing of Cot components is independent of expression and methylation patterns that vary widely among DNA elements, developmental stages, and taxa. High-throughput sequencing of Cot clones may be a means of “capturing” the sequence complexity of eukaryotic genomes at unprecedented efficiency. [Online supplementary material is available at www.genome.org. The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank under accession nos. AZ921847-AZ923007. Reagents, samples, and unpublished information freely provided by H. Ma and J. Messing.] PMID:11997346

  1. An economical and effective high-throughput DNA extraction protocol for molecular marker analysis in honey bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extraction of DNA from tissue samples can be expensive both in time and monetary resources and can often require handling and disposal of hazardous chemicals. We have developed a high throughput protocol for extracting DNA from honey bees that is of a high enough quality and quantity to enable hundr...

  2. A high throughput transformation system allows the regeneration of marker-free plum plants (Prunus domestica L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high-throughput transformation system previously developed in our laboratory was used for the regeneration of transgenic plum plants without the use of antibiotic selection. The system was first tested with two experimental constructs, pGA482GGi and pCAMBIAgfp94(35S), that contain selective marke...

  3. High throughput genome-specific and gene-specific molecular markers for erucic acid genes in Brassica napus (L.) for marker-assisted selection in plant breeding.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mukhlesur; Sun, Zudong; McVetty, Peter B E; Li, Genyi

    2008-10-01

    A single base change in the Bn-FAE1.1 gene in the A genome and a two-base deletion in the Bn-FAE1.2 gene in the C genome produce the nearly zero content of erucic acid observed in canola. A BAC clone anchoring Bn-FAE1.1 from a B. rapa BAC library and a BAC clone anchoring Bn-FAE1.2 from a B. oleracea BAC library were used in this research. After sequencing the gene flanking regions, it was found that the dissimilarity of the flanking sequences of these two FAE1 homologs facilitated the design of genome-specific primers that could amplify the corresponding genome in allotetraploid B. napus. The two-base deletion in the C genome gene was detected as a sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker. To increase the throughput, one genome-specific primer was labeled with four fluorescence dyes and combined with 20 different primers to produce PCR products with different fragment sizes. Eventually, a super pool of 80 samples was detected simultaneously. This dramatically reduces the cost of marker detection. The single base change in the Bn-FAE1.1 gene was detected as single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) marker with an ABI SNaPshot kit. A multiplexing primer set was designed by adding a polyT to the 5' primer end to increase SNP detection throughput through sample pooling. Furthermore, the Bn-FAE1.1 and Bn-FAE1.2 were integrated into the N8 and N13 linkage groups of our previously reported high-density sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) map, respectively. There were 124 SRAP markers in a N8 bin in which the Bn-FAE1.1 gene-specific SCAR marker was located and 46 SRAP markers in a N13 bin into which the Bn-FAE1.2 SNP marker was integrated. These three kinds of high throughput molecular markers have been successfully implemented in our canola/rapeseed breeding programs.

  4. Strategies and applications of combinatorial methods and high throughput screening to the discovery of non-noble metal catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricker, Maureen L.; Sachtler, J. W. Adriaan; Gillespie, Ralph D.; McGonegal, Charles P.; Vega, Honorio; Bem, Dave S.; Holmgren, Jennifer S.

    2004-02-01

    The integrated End-to-End™ combinatorial process for catalyst preparation and screening, with emphasis on its capability to vary both process and compositional parameters will be demonstrated. Additionally, each step of the combinatorial screening process has been validated against results from traditional screening methods. The greatest challenge of all has been the adherence to the core concepts of the combinatorial approach. Catalyst libraries have been made and tested for naphthalene dehydrogenation chemistry. The preparation of these libraries has included the application of high throughput techniques for: metal impregnation; catalyst finishing; catalyst screening. The catalyst screening system has been used to find a non-noble metal catalyst system that can replace Pt in dehydrogenation applications in the petroleum industry. A proprietary catalytic composition was developed for the dehydrogenation of methylcyclohexane (MCH) to toluene starting with four non-noble metals of different proportions and four different supports (alumina, titania, zirconia and silica) prepared in different ways and applying a statistical design of experiments. These data demonstrate that all steps of catalyst preparation and screening are performed in a rapid, useful, high throughput manner. Data will be presented from the catalyst screening efforts will demonstrate that optimized metal composition is dependent on the support type.

  5. Target-dependent enrichment of virions determines the reduction of high-throughput sequencing in virus discovery.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Randi Holm; Mollerup, Sarah; Mourier, Tobias; Hansen, Thomas Arn; Fridholm, Helena; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Willerslev, Eske; Hansen, Anders Johannes; Vinner, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections cause many different diseases stemming both from well-characterized viral pathogens but also from emerging viruses, and the search for novel viruses continues to be of great importance. High-throughput sequencing is an important technology for this purpose. However, viral nucleic acids often constitute a minute proportion of the total genetic material in a sample from infected tissue. Techniques to enrich viral targets in high-throughput sequencing have been reported, but the sensitivity of such methods is not well established. This study compares different library preparation techniques targeting both DNA and RNA with and without virion enrichment. By optimizing the selection of intact virus particles, both by physical and enzymatic approaches, we assessed the effectiveness of the specific enrichment of viral sequences as compared to non-enriched sample preparations by selectively looking for and counting read sequences obtained from shotgun sequencing. Using shotgun sequencing of total DNA or RNA, viral targets were detected at concentrations corresponding to the predicted level, providing a foundation for estimating the effectiveness of virion enrichment. Virion enrichment typically produced a 1000-fold increase in the proportion of DNA virus sequences. For RNA virions the gain was less pronounced with a maximum 13-fold increase. This enrichment varied between the different sample concentrations, with no clear trend. Despite that less sequencing was required to identify target sequences, it was not evident from our data that a lower detection level was achieved by virion enrichment compared to shotgun sequencing.

  6. The development and implementation of high-throughput tools for discovery and characterization of proton exchange membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Keith Gregory

    The need for sustainable energy use has motivated the exploration of renewable alternative fuels and fuel conversion technology on a global scale. Fuel cells, which convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiency and low emissions, provide a promising strategy for achieving energy sustainability. The current progress in fuel cell commercialization is mainly in portable and stationary applications, but fuel cell technology for transportation applications, which make up a substantial portion of the global energy market, have seen little commercial success. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have high potential for addressing the future energy needs of the transportation energy sector. However, one of the prevailing limitations of the PEMFC is the availability of high-performance, cost-effective electrolyte materials. These materials may be realized in the near future by developing multifunctional polymer blends targeted at specific performance capabilities. Since the number of available polymer combinations and numerous processing variations provide an almost infinite source of PEMFC membrane candidates, efficient methods of discovering high-performance PEM materials are necessary. Combinatorial methods meet these needs using gradient or discrete techniques to capture process variations such as annealing temperature, thickness, and chemical composition into a single polymer sample that serves as a library of materials. To characterize these heterogeneous samples for fuel cell performance, specific high-throughput measurement techniques are necessary. In this work, a high-throughput mass transport assay (HT-MTA) has been developed to characterize water flux and permeability at multiple sample locations in parallel. The functionality of HT-MTA was evaluated using standard NafionRTM films and a model semi-interpenetrated polymer network with commercial polyvinylidine fluoride as the host matrix for a proprietary polyelectrolyte

  7. Microwave-Accelerated Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence (MAMEF) with silver colloids in 96-well plates: Application to ultra fast and sensitive immunoassays, High Throughput Screening and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Kadir; Holley, Patrick; Geddes, Chris D

    2006-05-30

    Fluorescence detection is the basis of most assays used in drug discovery and High Throughput Screening (HTS) today. In all of these assays, assay rapidity and sensitivity is a primary concern, the sensitivity determined by both the quantum yield of the fluorophores and efficiency of the detection system, while rapidity is determined by the physical and biophysical parameters of temperature, concentration, assay bioaffinity, etc. In this paper we describe a platform technology that promises to fundamentally address these two physical constraints of sensitivity and rapidity. By combining the use of Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence (MEF), a near-field effect that can significantly enhance fluorescence signatures, with low power microwave heating, we can significantly increase the sensitivity of surface assays as well as >95% kinetically complete the assay within a few seconds. In addition, the metallic nanostructures used to facilitate MEF appear to be preferentially heated as compared to the surface assay fluid, advantageously localizing the MEF and heating around the nanostructures. To demonstrate proof of principle, a 96-well plate has been functionalized with silver nanostructures, and a model protein avidin-biotin assay studied. In our findings, a greater than 5-fold fluorescence enhancement coupled with a approximately 90-fold increase in assay kinetics was observed, but with no assay washing steps needed due to the silver-enhanced evanescent field mode of excitation. These findings promise to strongly facilitate high throughput fluorescence-based processes, such as in biology, drug discovery and general compound screening.

  8. The University of Kansas High-Throughput Screening laboratory. Part I: meeting drug-discovery needs in the heartland of America with entrepreneurial flair.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Peter R; Roy, Anuradha; Chaguturu, Rathnam

    2011-05-01

    The University of Kansas High-Throughput Screening (KU HTS) core is a state-of-the-art drug-discovery facility with an entrepreneurial open-service policy, which provides centralized resources supporting public- and private-sector research initiatives. The KU HTS core applies pharmaceutical industry project-management principles in an academic setting by bringing together multidisciplinary teams to fill critical scientific and technology gaps, using an experienced team of industry-trained researchers and project managers. The KU HTS proactively engages in supporting grant applications for extramural funding, intellectual-property management and technology transfer. The KU HTS staff further provides educational opportunities for the KU faculty and students to learn cutting-edge technologies in drug-discovery platforms through seminars, workshops, internships and course teaching. This is the first instalment of a two-part contribution from the KU HTS laboratory. PMID:21644824

  9. Using iterative cluster merging with improved gap statistics to perform online phenotype discovery in the context of high-throughput RNAi screens

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zheng; Zhou, Xiaobo; Bakal, Chris; Li, Fuhai; Sun, Youxian; Perrimon, Norbert; Wong, Stephen TC

    2008-01-01

    Background The recent emergence of high-throughput automated image acquisition technologies has forever changed how cell biologists collect and analyze data. Historically, the interpretation of cellular phenotypes in different experimental conditions has been dependent upon the expert opinions of well-trained biologists. Such qualitative analysis is particularly effective in detecting subtle, but important, deviations in phenotypes. However, while the rapid and continuing development of automated microscope-based technologies now facilitates the acquisition of trillions of cells in thousands of diverse experimental conditions, such as in the context of RNA interference (RNAi) or small-molecule screens, the massive size of these datasets precludes human analysis. Thus, the development of automated methods which aim to identify novel and biological relevant phenotypes online is one of the major challenges in high-throughput image-based screening. Ideally, phenotype discovery methods should be designed to utilize prior/existing information and tackle three challenging tasks, i.e. restoring pre-defined biological meaningful phenotypes, differentiating novel phenotypes from known ones and clarifying novel phenotypes from each other. Arbitrarily extracted information causes biased analysis, while combining the complete existing datasets with each new image is intractable in high-throughput screens. Results Here we present the design and implementation of a novel and robust online phenotype discovery method with broad applicability that can be used in diverse experimental contexts, especially high-throughput RNAi screens. This method features phenotype modelling and iterative cluster merging using improved gap statistics. A Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) is employed to estimate the distribution of each existing phenotype, and then used as reference distribution in gap statistics. This method is broadly applicable to a number of different types of image-based datasets

  10. Discovery of J chain in African lungfish (Protopterus dolloi, Sarcopterygii) using high throughput transcriptome sequencing: implications in mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Tacchi, Luca; Larragoite, Erin; Salinas, Irene

    2013-01-01

    J chain is a small polypeptide responsible for immunoglobulin (Ig) polymerization and transport of Igs across mucosal surfaces in higher vertebrates. We identified a J chain in dipnoid fish, the African lungfish (Protopterus dolloi) by high throughput sequencing of the transcriptome. P. dolloi J chain is 161 aa long and contains six of the eight Cys residues present in mammalian J chain. Phylogenetic studies place the lungfish J chain closer to tetrapod J chain than to the coelacanth or nurse shark sequences. J chain expression occurs in all P. dolloi immune tissues examined and it increases in the gut and kidney in response to an experimental bacterial infection. Double fluorescent in-situ hybridization shows that 88.5% of IgM⁺ cells in the gut co-express J chain, a significantly higher percentage than in the pre-pyloric spleen. Importantly, J chain expression is not restricted to the B-cell compartment since gut epithelial cells also express J chain. These results improve our current view of J chain from a phylogenetic perspective.

  11. High-throughput discovery of mutations in tef semi-dwarfing genes by next-generation sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qihui; Smith, Shavannor M; Ayele, Mulu; Yang, Lixing; Jogi, Ansuya; Chaluvadi, Srinivasa R; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2012-11-01

    Tef (Eragrostis tef) is a major cereal crop in Ethiopia. Lodging is the primary constraint to increasing productivity in this allotetraploid species, accounting for losses of ∼15-45% in yield each year. As a first step toward identifying semi-dwarf varieties that might have improved lodging resistance, an ∼6× fosmid library was constructed and used to identify both homeologues of the dw3 semi-dwarfing gene of Sorghum bicolor. An EMS mutagenized population, consisting of ∼21,210 tef plants, was planted and leaf materials were collected into 23 superpools. Two dwarfing candidate genes, homeologues of dw3 of sorghum and rht1 of wheat, were sequenced directly from each superpool with 454 technology, and 120 candidate mutations were identified. Out of 10 candidates tested, six independent mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing, including two predicted detrimental mutations in both dw3 homeologues with a potential to improve lodging resistance in tef through further breeding. This study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing can identify potentially valuable mutations in under-studied plant species like tef and has provided mutant lines that can now be combined and tested in breeding programs for improved lodging resistance.

  12. High-throughput screening for modulators of ACVR1 transcription: discovery of potential therapeutics for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

    PubMed

    Cappato, Serena; Tonachini, Laura; Giacopelli, Francesca; Tirone, Mario; Galietta, Luis J V; Sormani, Martina; Giovenzana, Anna; Spinelli, Antonello E; Canciani, Barbara; Brunelli, Silvia; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Bocciardi, Renata

    2016-06-01

    The ACVR1 gene encodes a type I receptor of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Activating mutations in ACVR1 are responsible for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a rare disease characterized by congenital toe malformation and progressive heterotopic endochondral ossification leading to severe and cumulative disability. Until now, no therapy has been available to prevent soft-tissue swelling (flare-ups) that trigger the ossification process. With the aim of finding a new therapeutic strategy for FOP, we developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to identify inhibitors of ACVR1 gene expression among drugs already approved for the therapy of other diseases. The screening, based on an ACVR1 promoter assay, was followed by an in vitro and in vivo test to validate and characterize candidate molecules. Among compounds that modulate the ACVR1 promoter activity, we selected the one showing the highest inhibitory effect, dipyridamole, a drug that is currently used as a platelet anti-aggregant. The inhibitory effect was detectable on ACVR1 gene expression, on the whole Smad-dependent BMP signaling pathway, and on chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation processes by in vitro cellular assays. Moreover, dipyridamole reduced the process of heterotopic bone formation in vivo Our drug repositioning strategy has led to the identification of dipyridamole as a possible therapeutic tool for the treatment of FOP. Furthermore, our study has also defined a pipeline of assays that will be useful for the evaluation of other pharmacological inhibitors of heterotopic ossification.

  13. High-throughput screening for modulators of ACVR1 transcription: discovery of potential therapeutics for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva

    PubMed Central

    Cappato, Serena; Tonachini, Laura; Giacopelli, Francesca; Tirone, Mario; Galietta, Luis J. V.; Sormani, Martina; Giovenzana, Anna; Spinelli, Antonello E.; Canciani, Barbara; Brunelli, Silvia; Ravazzolo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ACVR1 gene encodes a type I receptor of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Activating mutations in ACVR1 are responsible for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a rare disease characterized by congenital toe malformation and progressive heterotopic endochondral ossification leading to severe and cumulative disability. Until now, no therapy has been available to prevent soft-tissue swelling (flare-ups) that trigger the ossification process. With the aim of finding a new therapeutic strategy for FOP, we developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to identify inhibitors of ACVR1 gene expression among drugs already approved for the therapy of other diseases. The screening, based on an ACVR1 promoter assay, was followed by an in vitro and in vivo test to validate and characterize candidate molecules. Among compounds that modulate the ACVR1 promoter activity, we selected the one showing the highest inhibitory effect, dipyridamole, a drug that is currently used as a platelet anti-aggregant. The inhibitory effect was detectable on ACVR1 gene expression, on the whole Smad-dependent BMP signaling pathway, and on chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation processes by in vitro cellular assays. Moreover, dipyridamole reduced the process of heterotopic bone formation in vivo. Our drug repositioning strategy has led to the identification of dipyridamole as a possible therapeutic tool for the treatment of FOP. Furthermore, our study has also defined a pipeline of assays that will be useful for the evaluation of other pharmacological inhibitors of heterotopic ossification. PMID:27125279

  14. Discovery of J Chain in African Lungfish (Protopterus dolloi, Sarcopterygii) Using High Throughput Transcriptome Sequencing: Implications in Mucosal Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tacchi, Luca; Larragoite, Erin; Salinas, Irene

    2013-01-01

    J chain is a small polypeptide responsible for immunoglobulin (Ig) polymerization and transport of Igs across mucosal surfaces in higher vertebrates. We identified a J chain in dipnoid fish, the African lungfish (Protopterus dolloi) by high throughput sequencing of the transcriptome. P. dolloi J chain is 161 aa long and contains six of the eight Cys residues present in mammalian J chain. Phylogenetic studies place the lungfish J chain closer to tetrapod J chain than to the coelacanth or nurse shark sequences. J chain expression occurs in all P. dolloi immune tissues examined and it increases in the gut and kidney in response to an experimental bacterial infection. Double fluorescent in-situ hybridization shows that 88.5% of IgM+ cells in the gut co-express J chain, a significantly higher percentage than in the pre-pyloric spleen. Importantly, J chain expression is not restricted to the B-cell compartment since gut epithelial cells also express J chain. These results improve our current view of J chain from a phylogenetic perspective. PMID:23967082

  15. High-throughput sequencing discovery of conserved and novel microRNAs in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis).

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengde; Li, Libin; Liu, Lifeng; Li, Huayin; Zhang, Yihui; Yao, Yingyin; Ni, Zhongfu; Gao, Jianwei

    2012-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 21-24 nucleotide non-coding RNAs that down-regulate gene expression by cleaving or inhibiting the translation of target gene transcripts. miRNAs have been extensively analyzed in a few model plant species such as Arabidopsis, rice and Populus, and partially investigated in other non-model plant species. However, only a few conserved miRNAs have been identified in Chinese cabbage, a common and economically important crop in Asia. To identify novel and conserved miRNAs in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis) we constructed a small RNA library. Using high-throughput Solexa sequencing to identify microRNAs we found 11,210 unique sequences belonging to 321 conserved miRNA families and 228 novel miRNAs. We ran a Blast search with these sequences against the Chinese cabbage mRNA database and found 2,308 and 736 potential target genes for 221 conserved and 125 novel miRNAs, respectively. The BlastX search against the Arabidopsis genome and GO analysis suggested most of the targets were involved in plant growth, metabolism, development and stress response. This study provides the first large scale-cloning and characterization of Chinese cabbage miRNAs and their potential targets. These miRNAs add to the growing database of new miRNAs, prompt further study on Chinese cabbage miRNA regulation mechanisms, and help toward a greater understanding of the important roles of miRNAs in Chinese cabbage.

  16. Taxonomic analysis of the microbial community in stored sugar beets using high-throughput sequencing of different marker genes.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Sebastian; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas; Varrelmann, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Post-harvest colonization of sugar beets accompanied by rot development is a serious problem due to sugar losses and negative impact on processing quality. Studies on the microbial community associated with rot development and factors shaping their structure are missing. Therefore, high-throughput sequencing was applied to describe the influence of environment, plant genotype and storage temperature (8°C and 20°C) on three different communities in stored sugar beets, namely fungi (internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2), Fusarium spp. (elongation factor-1α gene fragment) and oomycetes (internal transcribed spacers 1). The composition of the fungal community changed during storage mostly influenced by the storage temperature followed by a weak environmental effect. Botrytis cinerea was the prevalent species at 8°C whereas members of the fungal genera Fusarium and Penicillium became dominant at 20°C. This shift was independent of the plant genotype. Species richness within the genus Fusarium also increased during storage at both temperatures whereas the oomycetes community did not change. Moreover, oomycetes species were absent after storage at 20°C. The results of the present study clearly show that rot development during sugar beet storage is associated with pathogens well known as causal agents of post-harvest diseases in many other crops.

  17. Evaluation of novel high-throughput embryonic stem cell tests with new molecular markers for screening embryotoxic chemicals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Noriyuki; Ando, Satoshi; Yamashita, Norihisa; Horie, Nobuyuki; Saito, Koichi

    2011-12-01

    The embryonic stem cell test (EST) is a validated in vitro alternative test for prediction of embryotoxicity with inhibition of cardiomyocyte differentiation under the microscope as beating areas at day 10 as an endpoint. However, improvements are necessary for regulatory acceptance and application to high-throughput screening. We have previously reported that heart and neural crest derivatives expressed transcript 1 (Hand1), a transcription factor essential for mammalian heart development, and cardiomyopathy associated 1 (Cmya1), an intercalated disk protein implicated in cardiac morphogenesis, are quantitative and objective molecular endpoints for predicting embryotoxicity, detected at day 6 when mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells differentiate into cardiomyocytes. In established stable transgenic ES cells with Hand1 or Cmya1 promoters upstream of luciferase reporter gene, changes in each gene expression were found to be coincident with those in luciferase activities during cardiomyocyte differentiation, suggesting that monitoring might be possible by chemiluminescent determination. In our novel EST, differentiation toxicity and cytotoxicity of test chemicals were here analyzed using ES cells and 3T3 fibroblasts by this approach in 96-microwell plates. Extensive investigations were performed to explore predictive power and validity by comparing a set of 24 well-known test chemicals. The novel EST offers high predictability and accuracy with a reduced test duration and manpower compared with the original EST protocol, thus providing a new rapid and sensitive in vitro method for screening embryotoxicants.

  18. Taxonomic analysis of the microbial community in stored sugar beets using high-throughput sequencing of different marker genes.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Sebastian; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas; Varrelmann, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Post-harvest colonization of sugar beets accompanied by rot development is a serious problem due to sugar losses and negative impact on processing quality. Studies on the microbial community associated with rot development and factors shaping their structure are missing. Therefore, high-throughput sequencing was applied to describe the influence of environment, plant genotype and storage temperature (8°C and 20°C) on three different communities in stored sugar beets, namely fungi (internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2), Fusarium spp. (elongation factor-1α gene fragment) and oomycetes (internal transcribed spacers 1). The composition of the fungal community changed during storage mostly influenced by the storage temperature followed by a weak environmental effect. Botrytis cinerea was the prevalent species at 8°C whereas members of the fungal genera Fusarium and Penicillium became dominant at 20°C. This shift was independent of the plant genotype. Species richness within the genus Fusarium also increased during storage at both temperatures whereas the oomycetes community did not change. Moreover, oomycetes species were absent after storage at 20°C. The results of the present study clearly show that rot development during sugar beet storage is associated with pathogens well known as causal agents of post-harvest diseases in many other crops. PMID:26738557

  19. Arrays of 3D double-network hydrogels for the high-throughput discovery of materials with enhanced physical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Cairnan; Venturato, Andrea; Callanan, Anthony; Lilienkampf, Annamaria; Bradley, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic hydrogels are attractive biomaterials due to their similarity to natural tissues and their chemical tunability, which can impart abilities to respond to environmental cues, e.g. temperature, pH and light. The mechanical properties of hydrogels can be enhanced by the generation of a double-network. Here, we report the development of an array platform that allows the macroscopic synthesis of up to 80 single- and double-network hydrogels on a single microscope slide. This new platform allows for the screening of hydrogels as 3D features in a high-throughput format with the added dimension of significant control over the compressive and tensile properties of the materials, thus widening their potential application. The platform is adaptable to allow different hydrogels to be generated, with the potential ability to tune and alter the first and second network, and represents an exciting tool in material and biomaterial discovery. PMID:26712601

  20. High throughput discovery of thermo-responsive materials using water contact angle measurements and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hook, Andrew L; Scurr, David J; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Williams, Paul; Davies, Martyn; Alexander, Morgan

    2013-01-01

    Switchable materials that alter their chemical or physical properties in response to external stimuli allow for temporal control of material-biological interactions, thus, are of interest for many biomaterial applications. Our interest is the discovery of new materials suitable to the specific requirements of certain biological systems. A high throughput methodology has been developed to screen a library of polymers for thermo-responsiveness, which has resulted in the identification of novel switchable materials. To elucidate the mechanism by which the materials switch, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry has been employed to analyse the top 2 nm of the polymer samples at different temperatures. The surface enrichment of certain molecular fragments has been identified by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis at different temperatures, suggesting an altered molecular conformation. In one example, a switch between an extended and collapsed conformation is inferred. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The University of Kansas High-Throughput Screening Laboratory. Part II: enabling collaborative drug-discovery partnerships through cutting-edge screening technology

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Peter R; Roy, Anuradha; Chaguturu, Rathnam

    2011-01-01

    The University of Kansas High-Throughput Screening (KU HTS) core is a state-of-the-art drug-discovery facility with an entrepreneurial open-service policy, which provides centralized resources supporting public- and private-sector research initiatives. The KU HTS core was established in 2002 at the University of Kansas with support from an NIH grant and the state of Kansas. It collaborates with investigators from national and international academic, nonprofit and pharmaceutical organizations in executing HTS-ready assay development and screening of chemical libraries for target validation, probe selection, hit identification and lead optimization. This is part two of a contribution from the KU HTS laboratory. PMID:21806374

  2. Performance comparison of genetic markers for high-throughput sequencing-based biodiversity assessment in complex communities.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Aibin; Bailey, Sarah A; Heath, Daniel D; Macisaac, Hugh J

    2014-09-01

    Metabarcode surveys of DNA extracted from environmental samples are increasingly popular for biodiversity assessment in natural communities. Such surveys rely heavily on robust genetic markers. Therefore, analysis of PCR efficiency and subsequent biodiversity estimation for different types of genetic markers and their corresponding primers is important. Here, we test the PCR efficiency and biodiversity recovery potential of three commonly used genetic markers - nuclear small subunit ribosomal DNA (18S), mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S ribosomal RNA (mt16S) - using 454 pyrosequencing of a zooplankton community collected from Hamilton Harbour, Ontario. We found that biodiversity detection power and PCR efficiency varied widely among these markers. All tested primers for COI failed to provide high-quality PCR products for pyrosequencing, but newly designed primers for 18S and 16S passed all tests. Furthermore, multiple analyses based on large-scale pyrosequencing (i.e. 1/2 PicoTiter plate for each marker) showed that primers for 18S recover more (38 orders) groups than 16S (10 orders) across all taxa, and four vs. two orders and nine vs. six families for Crustacea. Our results showed that 18S, using newly designed primers, is an efficient and powerful tool for profiling biodiversity in largely unexplored communities, especially when amplification difficulties exist for mitochondrial markers such as COI. Universal primers for higher resolution markers such as COI are still needed to address the possible low resolution of 18S for species-level identification.

  3. High throughput screening informatics.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xuefeng Bruce

    2008-03-01

    High throughput screening (HTS), an industrial effort to leverage developments in the areas of modern robotics, data analysis and control software, liquid handling devices, and sensitive detectors, has played a pivotal role in the drug discovery process, allowing researchers to efficiently screen millions of compounds to identify tractable small molecule modulators of a given biological process or disease state and advance them into high quality leads. As HTS throughput has significantly increased the volume, complexity, and information content of datasets, lead discovery research demands a clear corporate strategy for scientific computing and subsequent establishment of robust enterprise-wide (usually global) informatics platforms, which enable complicated HTS work flows, facilitate HTS data mining, and drive effective decision-making. The purpose of this review is, from the data analysis and handling perspective, to examine key elements in HTS operations and some essential data-related activities supporting or interfacing the screening process, and outline properties that various enabling software should have. Additionally, some general advice for corporate managers with system procurement responsibilities is offered.

  4. Discovery of precursor and mature microRNAs and their putative gene targets using high-throughput sequencing in pineapple (Ananas comosus var. comosus).

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Noor Hydayaty Md; Ong, Wen Dee; Redwan, Raimi Mohamed; Latip, Mariam Abd; Kumar, S Vijay

    2015-10-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, endogenous non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression, resulting in the silencing of target mRNA transcripts through mRNA cleavage or translational inhibition. MiRNAs play significant roles in various biological and physiological processes in plants. However, the miRNA-mediated gene regulatory network in pineapple, the model tropical non-climacteric fruit, remains largely unexplored. Here, we report a complete list of pineapple mature miRNAs obtained from high-throughput small RNA sequencing and precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs) obtained from ESTs. Two small RNA libraries were constructed from pineapple fruits and leaves, respectively, using Illumina's Solexa technology. Sequence similarity analysis using miRBase revealed 579,179 reads homologous to 153 miRNAs from 41 miRNA families. In addition, a pineapple fruit transcriptome library consisting of approximately 30,000 EST contigs constructed using Solexa sequencing was used for the discovery of pre-miRNAs. In all, four pre-miRNAs were identified (MIR156, MIR399, MIR444 and MIR2673). Furthermore, the same pineapple transcriptome was used to dissect the function of the miRNAs in pineapple by predicting their putative targets in conjunction with their regulatory networks. In total, 23 metabolic pathways were found to be regulated by miRNAs in pineapple. The use of high-throughput sequencing in pineapples to unveil the presence of miRNAs and their regulatory pathways provides insight into the repertoire of miRNA regulation used exclusively in this non-climacteric model plant.

  5. A high-throughput SNP marker system for parental polymorphism screening, and diversity analysis in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Blair, Matthew W; Cortés, Andrés J; Penmetsa, R Varma; Farmer, Andrew; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Cook, Doug R

    2013-02-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection has become a marker system of choice, because of the high abundance of source polymorphisms and the ease with which allele calls are automated. Various technologies exist for the evaluation of SNP loci and previously we validated two medium throughput technologies. In this study, our goal was to utilize a 768 feature, Illumina GoldenGate assay for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) developed from conserved legume gene sequences and to use the new technology for (1) the evaluation of parental polymorphisms in a mini-core set of common bean accessions and (2) the analysis of genetic diversity in the crop. A total of 736 SNPs were scored on 236 diverse common bean genotypes with the GoldenGate array. Missing data and heterozygosity levels were low and 94 % of the SNPs were scorable. With the evaluation of the parental polymorphism genotypes, we estimated the utility of the SNP markers in mapping for inter-genepool and intra-genepool populations, the latter being of lower polymorphism than the former. When we performed the diversity analysis with the diverse genotypes, we found Illumina GoldenGate SNPs to provide equivalent evaluations as previous gene-based SNP markers, but less fine-distinctions than with previous microsatellite marker analysis. We did find, however, that the gene-based SNPs in the GoldenGate array had some utility in race structure analysis despite the low polymorphism. Furthermore the SNPs detected high heterozygosity in wild accessions which was probably a reflection of ascertainment bias. The Illumina SNPs were shown to be effective in distinguishing between the genepools, and therefore were most useful in saturation of inter-genepool genetic maps. The implications of these results for breeding in common bean are discussed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the GoldenGate system for SNP detection.

  6. High-Throughput Ligand Discovery Reveals a Sitewise Gradient of Diversity in Broadly Evolved Hydrophilic Fibronectin Domains

    PubMed Central

    Woldring, Daniel R.; Holec, Patrick V.; Zhou, Hong; Hackel, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    Discovering new binding function via a combinatorial library in small protein scaffolds requires balance between appropriate mutations to introduce favorable intermolecular interactions while maintaining intramolecular integrity. Sitewise constraints exist in a non-spatial gradient from diverse to conserved in evolved antibody repertoires; yet non-antibody scaffolds generally do not implement this strategy in combinatorial libraries. Despite the fact that biased amino acid distributions, typically elevated in tyrosine, serine, and glycine, have gained wider use in synthetic scaffolds, these distributions are still predominantly applied uniformly to diversified sites. While select sites in fibronectin domains and DARPins have shown benefit from sitewise designs, they have not been deeply evaluated. Inspired by this disparity between diversity distributions in natural libraries and synthetic scaffold libraries, we hypothesized that binders resulting from discovery and evolution would exhibit a non-spatial, sitewise gradient of amino acid diversity. To identify sitewise diversities consistent with efficient evolution in the context of a hydrophilic fibronectin domain, >105 binders to six targets were evolved and sequenced. Evolutionarily favorable amino acid distributions at 25 sites reveal Shannon entropies (range: 0.3–3.9; median: 2.1; standard deviation: 1.1) supporting the diversity gradient hypothesis. Sitewise constraints in evolved sequences are consistent with complementarity, stability, and consensus biases. Implementation of sitewise constrained diversity enables direct selection of nanomolar affinity binders validating an efficient strategy to balance inter- and intra-molecular interaction demands at each site. PMID:26383268

  7. A fully integrated high-throughput screening methodology for the discovery of new polyolefin catalysts: discovery of a new class of high temperature single-site group (IV) copolymerization catalysts.

    PubMed

    Boussie, Thomas R; Diamond, Gary M; Goh, Christopher; Hall, Keith A; LaPointe, Anne M; Leclerc, Margarete; Lund, Cheryl; Murphy, Vince; Shoemaker, James A W; Tracht, Ursula; Turner, Howard; Zhang, Jessica; Uno, Tetsuo; Rosen, Robert K; Stevens, James C

    2003-04-01

    For the first time, new catalysts for olefin polymerization have been discovered through the application of fully integrated high-throughput primary and secondary screening techniques supported by rapid polymer characterization methods. Microscale 1-octene primary screening polymerization experiments combining arrays of ligands with reactive metal complexes M(CH(2)Ph)(4) (M = Zr, Hf) and multiple activation conditions represent a new high-throughput technique for discovering novel group (IV) polymerization catalysts. The primary screening methods described here have been validated using a commercially relevant polyolefin catalyst, and implemented rapidly to discover the new amide-ether based hafnium catalyst [eta(2)-(N,O)[bond](2-MeO[bond]C(6)H(4))(2,4,6-Me(3)C(6)H(2))N]Hf(CH(2)Ph)(3) (1), which is capable of polymerizing 1-octene to high conversion. The molecular structure of 1 has been determined by X-ray diffraction. Larger scale secondary screening experiments performed on a focused 96-member amine-ether library demonstrated the versatile high temperature ethylene-1-octene copolymerization capabilities of this catalyst class, and led to significant performance improvements over the initial primary screening discovery. Conventional one gallon batch reactor copolymerizations performed using selected amide-ether hafnium compounds confirmed the performance features of this new catalyst class, serving to fully validate the experimental results from the high-throughput approaches described herein.

  8. The genetic diversity and evolution of field pea (Pisum) studied by high throughput retrotransposon based insertion polymorphism (RBIP) marker analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genetic diversity of crop species is the result of natural selection on the wild progenitor and human intervention by ancient and modern farmers and breeders. The genomes of modern cultivars, old cultivated landraces, ecotypes and wild relatives reflect the effects of these forces and provide insights into germplasm structural diversity, the geographical dimension to species diversity and the process of domestication of wild organisms. This issue is also of great practical importance for crop improvement because wild germplasm represents a rich potential source of useful under-exploited alleles or allele combinations. The aim of the present study was to analyse a major Pisum germplasm collection to gain a broad understanding of the diversity and evolution of Pisum and provide a new rational framework for designing germplasm core collections of the genus. Results 3020 Pisum germplasm samples from the John Innes Pisum germplasm collection were genotyped for 45 retrotransposon based insertion polymorphism (RBIP) markers by the Tagged Array Marker (TAM) method. The data set was stored in a purpose-built Germinate relational database and analysed by both principal coordinate analysis and a nested application of the Structure program which yielded substantially similar but complementary views of the diversity of the genus Pisum. Structure revealed three Groups (1-3) corresponding approximately to landrace, cultivar and wild Pisum respectively, which were resolved by nested Structure analysis into 14 Sub-Groups, many of which correlate with taxonomic sub-divisions of Pisum, domestication related phenotypic traits and/or restricted geographical locations. Genetic distances calculated between these Sub-Groups are broadly supported by principal coordinate analysis and these, together with the trait and geographical data, were used to infer a detailed model for the domestication of Pisum. Conclusions These data provide a clear picture of the major distinct gene

  9. High-throughput screening platform for natural product-based drug discovery against 3 neglected tropical diseases: human African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Annang, F; Pérez-Moreno, G; García-Hernández, R; Cordon-Obras, C; Martín, J; Tormo, J R; Rodríguez, L; de Pedro, N; Gómez-Pérez, V; Valente, M; Reyes, F; Genilloud, O; Vicente, F; Castanys, S; Ruiz-Pérez, L M; Navarro, M; Gamarro, F; González-Pacanowska, D

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease are 3 neglected tropical diseases for which current therapeutic interventions are inadequate or toxic. There is an urgent need to find new lead compounds against these diseases. Most drug discovery strategies rely on high-throughput screening (HTS) of synthetic chemical libraries using phenotypic and target-based approaches. Combinatorial chemistry libraries contain hundreds of thousands of compounds; however, they lack the structural diversity required to find entirely novel chemotypes. Natural products, in contrast, are a highly underexplored pool of unique chemical diversity that can serve as excellent templates for the synthesis of novel, biologically active molecules. We report here a validated HTS platform for the screening of microbial extracts against the 3 diseases. We have used this platform in a pilot project to screen a subset (5976) of microbial extracts from the MEDINA Natural Products library. Tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry showed that 48 extracts contain potentially new compounds that are currently undergoing de-replication for future isolation and characterization. Known active components included actinomycin D, bafilomycin B1, chromomycin A3, echinomycin, hygrolidin, and nonactins, among others. The report here is, to our knowledge, the first HTS of microbial natural product extracts against the above-mentioned kinetoplastid parasites.

  10. Towards High-throughput Immunomics for Infectious Diseases: Use of Next-generation Peptide Microarrays for Rapid Discovery and Mapping of Antigenic Determinants.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Santiago J; Nielsen, Morten; Schafer-Nielsen, Claus; Mucci, Juan; Altcheh, Jaime; Balouz, Virginia; Tekiel, Valeria; Frasch, Alberto C; Campetella, Oscar; Buscaglia, Carlos A; Agüero, Fernán

    2015-07-01

    Complete characterization of antibody specificities associated to natural infections is expected to provide a rich source of serologic biomarkers with potential applications in molecular diagnosis, follow-up of chemotherapeutic treatments, and prioritization of targets for vaccine development. Here, we developed a highly-multiplexed platform based on next-generation high-density peptide microarrays to map these specificities in Chagas Disease, an exemplar of a human infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. We designed a high-density peptide microarray containing more than 175,000 overlapping 15 mer peptides derived from T. cruzi proteins. Peptides were synthesized in situ on microarray slides, spanning the complete length of 457 parasite proteins with fully overlapped 15 mers (1 residue shift). Screening of these slides with antibodies purified from infected patients and healthy donors demonstrated both a high technical reproducibility as well as epitope mapping consistency when compared with earlier low-throughput technologies. Using a conservative signal threshold to classify positive (reactive) peptides we identified 2,031 disease-specific peptides and 97 novel parasite antigens, effectively doubling the number of known antigens and providing a 10-fold increase in the number of fine mapped antigenic determinants for this disease. Finally, further analysis of the chip data showed that optimizing the amount of sequence overlap of displayed peptides can increase the protein space covered in a single chip by at least ∼ threefold without sacrificing sensitivity. In conclusion, we show the power of high-density peptide chips for the discovery of pathogen-specific linear B-cell epitopes from clinical samples, thus setting the stage for high-throughput biomarker discovery screenings and proteome-wide studies of immune responses against pathogens.

  11. High-throughput genotyping of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) utilising diversity arrays technology (DArT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Implementation of molecular methods in hop breeding is dependent on the availability of sizeable numbers of polymorphic markers and a comprehensive understanding of genetic variation. Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) is a high-throughput cost-effective method for the discovery of large numbers of...

  12. Novel Tools for Conservation Genomics: Comparing Two High-Throughput Approaches for SNP Discovery in the Transcriptome of the European Hake

    PubMed Central

    Milano, Ilaria; Babbucci, Massimiliano; Panitz, Frank; Ogden, Rob; Nielsen, Rasmus O.; Taylor, Martin I.; Helyar, Sarah J.; Carvalho, Gary R.; Espiñeira, Montserrat; Atanassova, Miroslava; Tinti, Fausto; Maes, Gregory E.; Patarnello, Tomaso; Bargelloni, Luca

    2011-01-01

    The growing accessibility to genomic resources using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has revolutionized the application of molecular genetic tools to ecology and evolutionary studies in non-model organisms. Here we present the case study of the European hake (Merluccius merluccius), one of the most important demersal resources of European fisheries. Two sequencing platforms, the Roche 454 FLX (454) and the Illumina Genome Analyzer (GAII), were used for Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) discovery in the hake muscle transcriptome. De novo transcriptome assembly into unique contigs, annotation, and in silico SNP detection were carried out in parallel for 454 and GAII sequence data. High-throughput genotyping using the Illumina GoldenGate assay was performed for validating 1,536 putative SNPs. Validation results were analysed to compare the performances of 454 and GAII methods and to evaluate the role of several variables (e.g. sequencing depth, intron-exon structure, sequence quality and annotation). Despite well-known differences in sequence length and throughput, the two approaches showed similar assay conversion rates (approximately 43%) and percentages of polymorphic loci (67.5% and 63.3% for GAII and 454, respectively). Both NGS platforms therefore demonstrated to be suitable for large scale identification of SNPs in transcribed regions of non-model species, although the lack of a reference genome profoundly affects the genotyping success rate. The overall efficiency, however, can be improved using strict quality and filtering criteria for SNP selection (sequence quality, intron-exon structure, target region score). PMID:22132191

  13. Probe molecules (PrM) approach in adverse outcome pathway (AOP) based high throughput screening (HTS): in vivo discovery for developing in vitro target methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efficient and accurate adverse outcome pathway (AOP) based high-throughput screening (HTS) methods use a systems biology based approach to computationally model in vitro cellular and molecular data for rapid chemical prioritization; however, not all HTS assays are grounded by rel...

  14. High throughput continuous cryopump

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A cryocondensation pump with a unique regeneration mechanism that allows continuous operation has been constructed and tested. The pump features a device referred to as the ''Snail'' which removes the cryofrost layer as it is moved over the pumping surfaces. A forepump pumps the sublimed gas generated inside the Snail. The compression ratio of the pump is the ratio of the cryopump speed to the leakage conductance of the Snail. Deuterium had been pumped continuously at 30 torr.L/s at a speed of 2000 L/s and a compression ratio of 100. The pump, being all metal sealed and free of lubricating fluids, has many potential applications where untraclean high throughput pumping is desirable. Since the pump regenerates on a time scale of 60 seconds, the inventory in the pump is minimized - an important consideration when pumping radioactive materials such as tritium. Test data and a videotape of the Snail removing the cryofrost will be shown.

  15. High-Throughput Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaorui; Wu, Si; Stenoien, David L.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2014-06-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based high-throughput proteomics is the core technique for large-scale protein characterization. Due to the extreme complexity of proteomes, sophisticated separation techniques and advanced MS instrumentation have been developed to extend coverage and enhance dynamic range and sensitivity. In this review, we discuss the separation and prefractionation techniques applied for large-scale analysis in both bottom-up (i.e., peptide-level) and top-down (i.e., protein-level) proteomics. Different approaches for quantifying peptides or intact proteins, including label-free and stable-isotope-labeling strategies, are also discussed. In addition, we present a brief overview of different types of mass analyzers and fragmentation techniques as well as selected emerging techniques.

  16. High-throughput proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesley, Scott A.; Nasoff, Marc; Kreusch, Andreas; Spraggon, Glen

    2001-04-01

    Proteomics has become a major focus as researchers attempt to understand the vast amount of genomic information. Protein complexity makes identifying and understanding gene function inherently difficult. The challenge of studying proteins in a global way is driving the development of new technologies for systematic and comprehensive analysis of protein structure and function. We are addressing this challenge through instrumentation and approaches to rapidly express, purify, crystallize, and mutate large numbers of human gene products. Our approach applies the principles of HTS technologies commonly used in pharmaceutical development. Genes are cloned, expressed, and purified in parallel to achieve a throughput potential of hundreds per day. Our instrumentation allows us to produce tens of milligrams of protein from 96 separate clones simultaneously. Purified protein is used for several applications including a high-throughput crystallographic screening approach for structure determination using automated image analysis. To further understand protein function, we are integrating a mutagenesis and screening approach. By combining these key technologies, we hope to provide a fundamental basis for understanding gene function at the protein level.

  17. High throughput optical scanner

    DOEpatents

    Basiji, David A.; van den Engh, Gerrit J.

    2001-01-01

    A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

  18. MIPHENO: Data normalization for high throughput metabolic analysis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput methodologies such as microarrays, mass spectrometry and plate-based small molecule screens are increasingly used to facilitate discoveries from gene function to drug candidate identification. These large-scale experiments are typically carried out over the course...

  19. High throughput growth and characterization of thin film materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Samuel S.

    2013-09-01

    It usually takes more than 10 years for a new material from initial research to its first commercial application. Therefore, accelerating the pace of discovery of new materials is critical to tackling challenges in areas ranging from clean energy to national security. As discovery of new materials has not kept pace with the product design cycles in many sectors of industry, there is a pressing need to develop and utilize high throughput screening and discovery technologies for the growth and characterization of new materials. This article presents two distinctive types of high throughput thin film material growth approaches, along with a number of high throughput characterization techniques, established in the author's group. These approaches include a second-generation "discrete" combinatorial semiconductor discovery technology that enables the creation of arrays of individually separated thin film semiconductor materials of different compositions, and a "continuous" high throughput thin film material screening technology that enables the realization of ternary alloy libraries with continuously varying elemental ratios.

  20. Discovery and molecular characterization of a new cryptovirus dsRNA genome from Japanese persimmon through conventional cloning and high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Morelli, M; Chiumenti, M; De Stradis, A; La Notte, P; Minafra, A

    2015-02-01

    Through the application of next generation sequencing, in synergy with conventional cloning of DOP-PCR fragments, two double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules of about 1.5 kbp in size were isolated from leaf tissue of a Japanese persimmon (accession SSPI) from Apulia (southern Italy) showing veinlets necrosis. High-throughput sequencing allowed whole genome sequence assembly, yielding a 1,577 and a 1,491 bp contigs identified as dsRNA-1 and dsRNA-2 of a previously undescribed virus, provisionally named as Persimmon cryptic virus (PeCV). In silico analysis showed that both dsRNA fragments were monocistronic and comprised the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and the capsid protein (CP) genes, respectively. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed a close relationship of these dsRNAs with those of cryptoviruses described in woody and herbaceous hosts, recently gathered in genus Deltapartitivirus. Virus-specific primers for RT-PCR, designed in the CP cistron, detected viral RNAs also in symptomless persimmon trees sampled from the same geographical area of SSPI, thus proving that PeCV infection may be fairly common and presumably latent.

  1. Probe molecule (PrM) approach in adverse outcome pathway (AOP) based high-throughput screening (HTS): in vivo discovery for developing in vitro target methods.

    PubMed

    Angrish, Michelle M; Madden, Michael C; Pleil, Joachim D

    2015-04-20

    Efficient and accurate adverse outcome pathway (AOP) based high-throughput screening (HTS) methods use a systems biology based approach to computationally model in vitro cellular and molecular data for rapid chemical prioritization; however, not all HTS assays are grounded by relevant in vivo exposure data. The challenge is to develop HTS assays with unambiguous quantitative links between in vitro responses and corresponding in vivo effects, which is complicated by metabolically insufficient systems, in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE), cross-species comparisons, and other inherent issues correlating IVIVE findings. This article introduces the concept of ultrasensitive gas phase probe molecules (PrMs) to help bridge the current HTS assay IVIVE gap. The PrM concept assesses metabolic pathways that have already been well-defined from intact human or mammalian models. Specifically, the idea is to introduce a gas phase probe molecule into a system, observe normal steady state, add chemicals of interest, and quantitatively measure (from headspace gas) effects on PrM metabolism that can be directly linked back to a well-defined and corresponding in vivo effect. As an example, we developed the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and differential equations to estimate methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) metabolism to tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) via cytochrome (CYP) 2A6 in the liver from human empirical data. Because MTBE metabolic pathways are well characterized from in vivo data, we can use it as a PrM to explore direct and indirect chemical effects on CYP pathways. The PrM concept could be easily applied to in vitro and alternative models of disease and phenotype, and even test for volatile chemicals while avoiding liquid handling robotics. Furthermore, a PrM can be designed for any chemical with known empirical human exposure data and used to assess chemicals for which no information exists. Herein, we propose an elegant gas phase probe molecule-based approach to in

  2. High-throughput killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genotyping by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry with discovery of novel alleles.

    PubMed

    Houtchens, Kathleen A; Nichols, Robert J; Ladner, Martha B; Boal, Hannah E; Sollars, Cristina; Geraghty, Daniel E; Davis, Lee M; Parham, Peter; Trachtenberg, Elizabeth A

    2007-07-01

    The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) interact with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I ligands to regulate the functions of natural killer cells and T cells. Like human leukocyte antigens class I, human KIR are highly variable and correlated with infection, autoimmunity, pregnancy syndromes, and transplantation outcome. Limiting the scope of KIR analysis is the low resolution, sensitivity, and speed of the established methods of KIR typing. In this study, we describe a first-generation single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based method for typing the 17 human KIR genes and pseudogenes that uses analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. It is a high-throughput method that requires minute amounts of genomic DNA for discrimination of KIR genes with some allelic resolution. A study of 233 individuals shows that the results obtained by the SNP-based KIR/MALDI-TOF method are consistent with those obtained with the established sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe or sequence-specific polymerase chain reaction methods. The added sensitivity of the KIR/MALDI-TOF method allowed putative novel alleles of the KIR2DL1, KIR3DL1, KIR2DS5, and KIR2DL5 genes to be identified. Sequencing the KIR2DL5 variant proved it was a newly discovered allele, one that appears associated with Hispanic and Native American populations. This KIR/MALDI-TOF method of KIR typing should facilitate population and disease-association studies that improve knowledge of the immunological functions of KIR-MHC class I interactions.

  3. Genome-wide generation and use of informative intron-spanning and intron-length polymorphism markers for high-throughput genetic analysis in rice

    PubMed Central

    Badoni, Saurabh; Das, Sweta; Sayal, Yogesh K.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Singh, Ashok K.; Rao, Atmakuri R.; Agarwal, Pinky; Parida, Swarup K.; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.

    2016-01-01

    We developed genome-wide 84634 ISM (intron-spanning marker) and 16510 InDel-fragment length polymorphism-based ILP (intron-length polymorphism) markers from genes physically mapped on 12 rice chromosomes. These genic markers revealed much higher amplification-efficiency (80%) and polymorphic-potential (66%) among rice accessions even by a cost-effective agarose gel-based assay. A wider level of functional molecular diversity (17–79%) and well-defined precise admixed genetic structure was assayed by 3052 genome-wide markers in a structured population of indica, japonica, aromatic and wild rice. Six major grain weight QTLs (11.9–21.6% phenotypic variation explained) were mapped on five rice chromosomes of a high-density (inter-marker distance: 0.98 cM) genetic linkage map (IR 64 x Sonasal) anchored with 2785 known/candidate gene-derived ISM and ILP markers. The designing of multiple ISM and ILP markers (2 to 4 markers/gene) in an individual gene will broaden the user-preference to select suitable primer combination for efficient assaying of functional allelic variation/diversity and realistic estimation of differential gene expression profiles among rice accessions. The genomic information generated in our study is made publicly accessible through a user-friendly web-resource, “Oryza ISM-ILP marker” database. The known/candidate gene-derived ISM and ILP markers can be enormously deployed to identify functionally relevant trait-associated molecular tags by optimal-resource expenses, leading towards genomics-assisted crop improvement in rice. PMID:27032371

  4. Seven novel modulators of the analgesic target NaV 1.7 uncovered using a high-throughput venom-based discovery approach

    PubMed Central

    Klint, Julie K; Smith, Jennifer J; Vetter, Irina; Rupasinghe, Darshani B; Er, Sing Yan; Senff, Sebastian; Herzig, Volker; Mobli, Mehdi; Lewis, Richard J; Bosmans, Frank; King, Glenn F

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Chronic pain is a serious worldwide health issue, with current analgesics having limited efficacy and dose-limiting side effects. Humans with loss-of-function mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 (hNaV1.7) are indifferent to pain, making hNaV1.7 a promising target for analgesic development. Since spider venoms are replete with NaV channel modulators, we examined their potential as a source of hNaV1.7 inhibitors. Experimental Approach We developed a high-throughput fluorescent-based assay to screen spider venoms against hNaV1.7 and isolate ‘hit’ peptides. To examine the binding site of these peptides, we constructed a panel of chimeric channels in which the S3b-S4 paddle motif from each voltage sensor domain of hNaV1.7 was transplanted into the homotetrameric KV2.1 channel. Key Results We screened 205 spider venoms and found that 40% contain at least one inhibitor of hNaV1.7. By deconvoluting ‘hit’ venoms, we discovered seven novel members of the NaSpTx family 1. One of these peptides, Hd1a (peptide μ-TRTX-Hd1a from venom of the spider Haplopelma doriae), inhibited hNaV1.7 with a high level of selectivity over all other subtypes, except hNaV1.1. We showed that Hd1a is a gating modifier that inhibits hNaV1.7 by interacting with the S3b-S4 paddle motif in channel domain II. The structure of Hd1a, determined using heteronuclear NMR, contains an inhibitor cystine knot motif that is likely to confer high levels of chemical, thermal and biological stability. Conclusion and Implications Our data indicate that spider venoms are a rich natural source of hNaV1.7 inhibitors that might be useful leads for the development of novel analgesics. PMID:25754331

  5. Network medicine and high throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert E; Tran, Kevin; Vocque, Ralph H

    2013-09-01

    A new paradigm is emerging in modern drug discovery. It is a fusion of traditional and modern medicine, phenotypic and targeted drug discovery, or systems and reductionist thinking. This is exemplified by using a combination of network medicine and high throughput screening. It blends the use of physiologically relevant biological systems with the high throughput and statistical robustness of modern assay technologies. The basic principles of network theory and tools of network medicine are described. Scale-free networks and their organizing principles are discussed. They are emergent properties of living, autopoietic systems. This includes networks of people who do high throughput screening (HTS), and microscopic networks of ions, metabolites, DNA, RNA, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, bacteria, fungi, human cells and tissues. Databases have been constructed based on the metabolome, genome, transcriptome, proteome, lipidome, glycocode, virome, bacteriome and many others. Modern HTS can be used to examine the interactions of many parts of the complex human network. High content screening (HCS) can look at perturbations that occur when test compounds are added to single cells. Allo-network drugs can have effects far beyond a single protein and can be transmitted to other cells. Interactions and hidden connections can be revealed, with the goal of developing new drugs that have few, if any harmful side effects and are effective against multi-drug resistant cancer cells or bacteria.

  6. High-Throughput SNP Discovery through Deep Resequencing of a Reduced Representation Library to Anchor and Orient Scaffolds in the Soybean Whole Genome Sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soybean Consensus Map 4.0 facilitated the anchoring of 95.6% of the soybean whole genome sequence developed by the Joint Genome Institute, Department of Energy but only properly oriented 66% of the sequence scaffolds. To find additional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for additiona...

  7. High-throughput protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Stevens, R C

    2000-10-01

    The combinatorial chemistry industry has made major advances in the handling and mixing of small volumes, and in the development of robust liquid-handling systems. In addition, developments have been made in the area of material handling for the high-throughput drug screening and combinatorial chemistry fields. Lastly, improvements in beamline optics at synchrotron sources have enabled the use of flash-frozen micron-sized (10-50 microm) crystals. The combination of these and other recent advances will make high-throughput protein crystallography possible. Further advances in high-throughput methods of protein crystallography will require application of the above developments and the accumulation of success/failure data in a more systematic manner. Major changes in crystallography technology will emerge based on the data collected by first-generation high-throughput systems.

  8. High-Throughput Development of SSR Markers from Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Based on Next Generation Sequencing of a Purified Chinese Commercial Variety.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Fang, Li; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Hu, Jinguo; Bao, Shiying; Hao, Junjie; Li, Ling; He, Yuhua; Jiang, Junye; Wang, Fang; Tian, Shufang; Zong, Xuxiao

    2015-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important food legume globally, and is the plant species that J.G. Mendel used to lay the foundation of modern genetics. However, genomics resources of pea are limited comparing to other crop species. Application of marker assisted selection (MAS) in pea breeding has lagged behind many other crops. Development of a large number of novel and reliable SSR (simple sequence repeat) or microsatellite markers will help both basic and applied genomics research of this crop. The Illumina HiSeq 2500 System was used to uncover 8,899 putative SSR containing sequences, and 3,275 non-redundant primers were designed to amplify these SSRs. Among the 1,644 SSRs that were randomly selected for primer validation, 841 yielded reliable amplifications of detectable polymorphisms among 24 genotypes of cultivated pea (Pisum sativum L.) and wild relatives (P. fulvum Sm.) originated from diverse geographical locations. The dataset indicated that the allele number per locus ranged from 2 to 10, and that the polymorphism information content (PIC) ranged from 0.08 to 0.82 with an average of 0.38. These 1,644 novel SSR markers were also tested for polymorphism between genotypes G0003973 and G0005527. Finally, 33 polymorphic SSR markers were anchored on the genetic linkage map of G0003973 × G0005527 F2 population.

  9. High-throughput development of SSR markers from pea (Pisum sativum L.) based on next generation sequencing of a purified Chinese commercial variety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important food legume globally, and is the plant species that J.G. Mendel used to lay the foundation of modern genetics. However, genomics resources of pea are limited comparing to other crop species. Application of marker assisted selection (MAS) in pea breeding has lag...

  10. Automated High Throughput Drug Target Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Rupp, B

    2005-02-18

    The molecular structures of drug target proteins and receptors form the basis for 'rational' or structure guided drug design. The majority of target structures are experimentally determined by protein X-ray crystallography, which as evolved into a highly automated, high throughput drug discovery and screening tool. Process automation has accelerated tasks from parallel protein expression, fully automated crystallization, and rapid data collection to highly efficient structure determination methods. A thoroughly designed automation technology platform supported by a powerful informatics infrastructure forms the basis for optimal workflow implementation and the data mining and analysis tools to generate new leads from experimental protein drug target structures.

  11. High-throughput sequencing of Bacillus anthracis in France: investigating genome diversity and population structure using whole-genome SNP discovery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are ideal signatures for subtyping monomorphic pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis. Here we report the use of next-generation sequencing technology to investigate the historical, geographic and genetic diversity of Bacillus anthracis in France. 122 strains isolated over a 60-years period throughout the country were whole-genome sequenced and comparative analyses were carried out with a focus on SNPs discovery to discriminate regional sub-groups of strains. Results A total of 1581 chromosomal SNPs precisely establish the phylogenetic relationships existing between the French strains. Phylogeography patterns within the three canSNP sub-lineages present in France (i.e. B.Br.CNEVA, A.Br.011/009 and A.Br.001/002) were observed. One of the more remarkable findings was the identification of a variety of genotypes within the A.Br.011/009 sub-group that are persisting in the different regions of France. The 560 SNPs defining the A.Br.011/009- affiliated French strains split the Trans-Eurasian sub-group into six distinct branches without any intermediate nodes. Distinct sub-branches, with some geographic clustering, were resolved. The 345 SNPs defining the major B.Br CNEVA sub-lineage clustered three main phylogeographic clades, the Alps, the Pyrenees, and the Massif Central, with a small Saône-et-Loire sub-cluster nested within the latter group. The French strains affiliated to the minor A.Br.001/002 group were characterized by 226 SNPs. All recent isolates collected from the Doubs department were closely related. Identification of SNPs from whole-genome sequences facilitates high-resolution strain tracking and provides the level of discrimination required for outbreak investigations. Eight diagnostic SNPs, representative of the main French-specific phylogeographic clusters, were therefore selected and developed into high-resolution melting SNP discriminative assays. Conclusions This work has established one of the most

  12. Emerging concepts in biomarker discovery; the US-Japan Workshop on Immunological Molecular Markers in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Hideaki; Sato, Marimo; Thurin, Magdalena; Wang, Ena; Butterfield, Lisa H; Disis, Mary L; Fox, Bernard A; Lee, Peter P; Khleif, Samir N; Wigginton, Jon M; Ambs, Stefan; Akutsu, Yasunori; Chaussabel, Damien; Doki, Yuichiro; Eremin, Oleg; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Imai, Kohzoh; Jacobson, James; Jinushi, Masahisa; Kanamoto, Akira; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed; Kato, Kazunori; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kirkwood, John M; Kleen, Thomas O; Lehmann, Paul V; Liotta, Lance; Lotze, Michael T; Maio, Michele; Malyguine, Anatoli; Masucci, Giuseppe; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Mayrand-Chung, Shawmarie; Nakamura, Kiminori; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Palucka, A Karolina; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Pos, Zoltan; Ribas, Antoni; Rivoltini, Licia; Sato, Noriyuki; Shiku, Hiroshi; Slingluff, Craig L; Streicher, Howard; Stroncek, David F; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Toyota, Minoru; Wada, Hisashi; Wu, Xifeng; Wulfkuhle, Julia; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Zeskind, Benjamin; Zhao, Yingdong; Zocca, Mai-Britt; Marincola, Francesco M

    2009-06-17

    might be added to the list of known entities applicable in immunotherapy trials. The need for a systematic approach to biomarker discovery that takes advantage of powerful high-throughput technologies was recognized; it was clear from the current state of the science that immunotherapy is still in a discovery phase and only a few of the current biomarkers warrant extensive validation. It was, finally, clear that, while current technologies have almost limitless potential, inadequate study design, limited standardization and cross-validation among laboratories and suboptimal comparability of data remain major road blocks. The institution of an interactive consortium for high throughput molecular monitoring of clinical trials with voluntary participation might provide cost-effective solutions.

  13. Emerging concepts in biomarker discovery; The US-Japan workshop on immunological molecular markers in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Hideaki; Sato, Marimo; Thurin, Magdalena; Wang, Ena; Butterfield, Lisa H; Disis, Mary L; Fox, Bernard A; Lee, Peter P; Khleif, Samir N; Wigginton, Jon M; Ambs, Stefan; Akutsu, Yasunori; Chaussabel, Damien; Doki, Yuichiro; Eremin, Oleg; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Imai, Kohzoh; Jacobson, James; Jinushi, Masahisa; Kanamoto, Akira; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed; Kato, Kazunori; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kirkwood, John M; Kleen, Thomas O; Lehmann, Paul V; Liotta, Lance; Lotze, Michael T; Maio, Michele; Malyguine, Anatoli; Masucci, Giuseppe; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Mayrand-Chung, Shawmarie; Nakamura, Kiminori; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Palucka, A Karolina; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Pos, Zoltan; Ribas, Antoni; Rivoltini, Licia; Sato, Noriyuki; Shiku, Hiroshi; Slingluff, Craig L; Streicher, Howard; Stroncek, David F; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Toyota, Minoru; Wada, Hisashi; Wu, Xifeng; Wulfkuhle, Julia; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Zeskind, Benjamin; Zhao, Yingdong; Zocca, Mai-Britt; Marincola, Francesco M

    2009-01-01

    might be added to the list of known entities applicable in immunotherapy trials. The need for a systematic approach to biomarker discovery that takes advantage of powerful high-throughput technologies was recognized; it was clear from the current state of the science that immunotherapy is still in a discovery phase and only a few of the current biomarkers warrant extensive validation. It was, finally, clear that, while current technologies have almost limitless potential, inadequate study design, limited standardization and cross-validation among laboratories and suboptimal comparability of data remain major road blocks. The institution of an interactive consortium for high throughput molecular monitoring of clinical trials with voluntary participation might provide cost-effective solutions. PMID:19534815

  14. The synergy between combinatorial chemistry and high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Diller, David J

    2008-05-01

    Despite the initial promise of combinatorial chemistry, particularly large library combinatorial chemistry, to greatly accelerate drug discovery, this approach has not been fully utilized as a means to build the compound collections of pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. This review highlights some of the strengths of large library combinatorial chemistry as a means of generating molecules for lead discovery, such as providing rich and robust structure-activity relationships around each hit series. The challenges and concepts emerging from traditional high-throughput screening and fragment-based drug design, how these methods influence the design of large combinatorial libraries and the interpretation of the ensuing high-throughput screening data are also highlighted.

  15. High-throughput continuous cryopump

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A cryopump with a unique method of regeneration which allows continuous operation at high throughput has been constructed and tested. Deuterium was pumped continuously at a throughput of 30 Torr.L/s at a speed of 2000 L/s and a compression ratio of 200. Argon was pumped at a throughput of 60 Torr.L/s at a speed of 1275 L/s. To produce continuous operation of the pump, a method of regeneration that does not thermally cycle the pump is employed. A small chamber (the ''snail'') passes over the pumping surface and removes the frost from it either by mechanical action with a scraper or by local heating. The material removed is topologically in a secondary vacuum system with low conductance into the primary vacuum; thus, the exhaust can be pumped at pressures up to an effective compression ratio determined by the ratio of the pumping speed to the leakage conductance of the snail. The pump, which is all-metal-sealed and dry and which regenerates every 60 s, would be an ideal system for pumping tritium. Potential fusion applications are for mpmp limiters, for repeating pneumatic pellet injection lines, and for the centrifuge pellet injector spin tank, all of which will require pumping tritium at high throughput. Industrial applications requiring ultraclean pumping of corrosive gases at high throughput, such as the reactive ion etch semiconductor process, may also be feasible.

  16. SNP marker discovery in koala TLR genes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Frankham, Greta J; Johnson, Rebecca N; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter; O'Meally, Denis; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in the early defence against invading pathogens, yet our understanding of TLRs in marsupial immunity is limited. Here, we describe the characterisation of nine TLRs from a koala immune tissue transcriptome and one TLR from a draft sequence of the koala genome and the subsequent development of an assay to study genetic diversity in these genes. We surveyed genetic diversity in 20 koalas from New South Wales, Australia and showed that one gene, TLR10 is monomorphic, while the other nine TLR genes have between two and 12 alleles. 40 SNPs (16 non-synonymous) were identified across the ten TLR genes. These markers provide a springboard to future studies on innate immunity in the koala, a species under threat from two major infectious diseases.

  17. SNP marker discovery in koala TLR genes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Frankham, Greta J; Johnson, Rebecca N; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter; O'Meally, Denis; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in the early defence against invading pathogens, yet our understanding of TLRs in marsupial immunity is limited. Here, we describe the characterisation of nine TLRs from a koala immune tissue transcriptome and one TLR from a draft sequence of the koala genome and the subsequent development of an assay to study genetic diversity in these genes. We surveyed genetic diversity in 20 koalas from New South Wales, Australia and showed that one gene, TLR10 is monomorphic, while the other nine TLR genes have between two and 12 alleles. 40 SNPs (16 non-synonymous) were identified across the ten TLR genes. These markers provide a springboard to future studies on innate immunity in the koala, a species under threat from two major infectious diseases. PMID:25799012

  18. High Throughput Optimization of Stem Cell Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Mei, Ying; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells have great potential as cell sources for regenerative medicine due to both their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity. Despite advances in the field of stem cell biology, major challenges remain before stem cells can be widely used for therapeutic purposes. One challenge is to develop reproducible methods to control stem cell growth and differentiation. The niche in which stem cells reside is a complex, multi-factorial environment. In contrast to using cells alone, biomaterials can provide initial structural support, and allow cells to adhere, proliferate and differentiate in a three-dimensional environment. Researchers have incorporated signals into the biomaterials that can promote desired cell functions in a spatially and temporally controlled manner. Despite progress in biomaterial design and methods to modulate cellular behavior, many of the complex signal networks that regulate cell-material interactions remain unclear. Due to the vast numbers of material properties to be explored and the complexity of cell-surface interactions, it is often difficult to optimize stem cell microenvironments using conventional, iterative approaches. To address these challenges, high throughput screening of combinatorial libraries has emerged as a novel approach to achieve rapid screening with reduced materials and costs. In this review, we discuss recent research in the area of high throughput approaches for characterization and optimization of cellular interactions with their microenvironments. In contrast to conventional approaches, screening combinatorial libraries can result in the discovery of unexpected material solutions to these complex problems. PMID:19601753

  19. High-throughput glycoanalytical technology for systems glycobiology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Telford, Jayne E; Knezevic, Ana; Rudd, Pauline M

    2010-10-01

    The development of glycoanalytical HPLC-based high-throughput technology has greatly enhanced the study of glycobiology, facilitating the discovery of disease-related solutions and providing an informative view of glycosylation and its relationship with other biological disciplines in a systems biology approach.

  20. Construction and Analysis of High-Density Linkage Map Using High-Throughput Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Liu, Hui; Zeng, Huaping; Deng, Dejing; Xin, Huaigen; Song, Jun; Xu, Chunhua; Sun, Xiaowen; Hou, Xilin; Wang, Xiaowu; Zheng, Hongkun

    2014-01-01

    Linkage maps enable the study of important biological questions. The construction of high-density linkage maps appears more feasible since the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS), which eases SNP discovery and high-throughput genotyping of large population. However, the marker number explosion and genotyping errors from NGS data challenge the computational efficiency and linkage map quality of linkage study methods. Here we report the HighMap method for constructing high-density linkage maps from NGS data. HighMap employs an iterative ordering and error correction strategy based on a k-nearest neighbor algorithm and a Monte Carlo multipoint maximum likelihood algorithm. Simulation study shows HighMap can create a linkage map with three times as many markers as ordering-only methods while offering more accurate marker orders and stable genetic distances. Using HighMap, we constructed a common carp linkage map with 10,004 markers. The singleton rate was less than one-ninth of that generated by JoinMap4.1. Its total map distance was 5,908 cM, consistent with reports on low-density maps. HighMap is an efficient method for constructing high-density, high-quality linkage maps from high-throughput population NGS data. It will facilitate genome assembling, comparative genomic analysis, and QTL studies. HighMap is available at http://highmap.biomarker.com.cn/. PMID:24905985

  1. High throughput protein production screening

    DOEpatents

    Beernink, Peter T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Segelke, Brent W.

    2009-09-08

    Methods, compositions, and kits for the cell-free production and analysis of proteins are provided. The invention allows for the production of proteins from prokaryotic sequences or eukaryotic sequences, including human cDNAs using PCR and IVT methods and detecting the proteins through fluorescence or immunoblot techniques. This invention can be used to identify optimized PCR and WT conditions, codon usages and mutations. The methods are readily automated and can be used for high throughput analysis of protein expression levels, interactions, and functional states.

  2. High-Throughput Sequencing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Jason A.; Spacek, Damek; Snyder, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The human genome sequence has profoundly altered our understanding of biology, human diversity and disease. The path from the first draft sequence to our nascent era of personal genomes and genomic medicine has been made possible only because of the extraordinary advancements in DNA sequencing technologies over the past ten years. Here, we discuss commonly used high-throughput sequencing platforms, the growing array of sequencing assays developed around them as well as the challenges facing current sequencing platforms and their clinical application. PMID:26000844

  3. High throughput assays for analyzing transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianqiang; Jiang, Xin; Yaoi, Takuro

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors are a group of proteins that modulate the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations in transcription factor function are associated with many human diseases, and therefore these proteins are attractive potential drug targets. A key issue in the development of such therapeutics is the generation of effective tools that can be used for high throughput discovery of the critical transcription factors involved in human diseases, and the measurement of their activities in a variety of disease or compound-treated samples. Here, a number of innovative arrays and 96-well format assays for profiling and measuring the activities of transcription factors will be discussed. PMID:16834538

  4. High-throughput screening to identify inhibitors of lysine demethylases.

    PubMed

    Gale, Molly; Yan, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Lysine demethylases (KDMs) are epigenetic regulators whose dysfunction is implicated in the pathology of many human diseases including various types of cancer, inflammation and X-linked intellectual disability. Particular demethylases have been identified as promising therapeutic targets, and tremendous efforts are being devoted toward developing suitable small-molecule inhibitors for clinical and research use. Several High-throughput screening strategies have been developed to screen for small-molecule inhibitors of KDMs, each with advantages and disadvantages in terms of time, cost, effort, reliability and sensitivity. In this Special Report, we review and evaluate the High-throughput screening methods utilized for discovery of novel small-molecule KDM inhibitors.

  5. High-throughput screening for modulators of cellular contractile force†

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Young; Zhou, Enhua H.; Tambe, Dhananjay; Chen, Bohao; Lavoie, Tera; Dowell, Maria; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J.; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Burger, Stephanie; Frykenberg, Matthew; Butler, James P.; Stamer, W. Daniel; Johnson, Mark; Solway, Julian; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    When cellular contractile forces are central to pathophysiology, these forces comprise a logical target of therapy. Nevertheless, existing high-throughput screens are limited to upstream signalling intermediates with poorly defined relationships to such a physiological endpoint. Using cellular force as the target, here we report a new screening technology and demonstrate its applications using human airway smooth muscle cells in the context of asthma and Schlemm's canal endothelial cells in the context of glaucoma. This approach identified several drug candidates for both asthma and glaucoma. We attained rates of 1000 compounds per screening day, thus establishing a force-based cellular platform for high-throughput drug discovery. PMID:25953078

  6. De Novo Transcriptome Assembly of the Chinese Swamp Buffalo by RNA Sequencing and SSR Marker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xingrong; Zhu, Peng; Duan, Anqin; Tan, Zhengzhun; Huang, Jian; Li, Hui; Chen, Mingtan; Liang, Xianwei

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese swamp buffalo (Bubalis bubalis) is vital to the lives of small farmers and has tremendous economic importance. However, a lack of genomic information has hampered research on augmenting marker assisted breeding programs in this species. Thus, a high-throughput transcriptomic sequencing of B. bubalis was conducted to generate transcriptomic sequence dataset for gene discovery and molecular marker development. Illumina paired-end sequencing generated a total of 54,109,173 raw reads. After trimming, de novo assembly was performed, which yielded 86,017 unigenes, with an average length of 972.41 bp, an N50 of 1,505 bp, and an average GC content of 49.92%. A total of 62,337 unigenes were successfully annotated. Among the annotated unigenes, 27,025 (43.35%) and 23,232 (37.27%) unigenes showed significant similarity to known proteins in NCBI non-redundant protein and Swiss-Prot databases (E-value < 1.0E-5), respectively. Of these annotated unigenes, 14,439 and 15,813 unigenes were assigned to the Gene Ontology (GO) categories and EuKaryotic Ortholog Group (KOG) cluster, respectively. In addition, a total of 14,167 unigenes were assigned to 331 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. Furthermore, 17,401 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified as potential molecular markers. One hundred and fifteen primer pairs were randomly selected for amplification to detect polymorphisms. The results revealed that 110 primer pairs (95.65%) yielded PCR amplicons and 69 primer pairs (60.00%) presented polymorphisms in 35 individual buffaloes. A phylogenetic analysis showed that the five swamp buffalo populations were clustered together, whereas two river buffalo breeds clustered separately. In the present study, the Illumina RNA-seq technology was utilized to perform transcriptome analysis and SSR marker discovery in the swamp buffalo without using a reference genome. Our findings will enrich the current SSR markers resources and help spearhead molecular

  7. Ovarian cancer biomarkers: current state and future implications from high-throughput technologies.

    PubMed

    Leung, Felix; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Kulasingam, Vathany

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecological malignancy worldwide and survival rates have remained unchanged in spite of medical advancements. Much research has been dedicated to the identification of novel biomarkers for this deadly disease, yet it has not been until recently that a few serum-based tests have been added to carbohydrate antigen 125 as Food and Drug Administration-approved tests for ovarian cancer. This lack of success in identifying clinically relevant biomarkers has been largely attributed to poor study design and bias leading to false discoveries or identification of second-tier biomarkers. Fortunately, a better understanding of the guidelines used to assess the clinical utility of a biomarker and the various phases of biomarker development will aid in avoiding such biases. As well, advances in high-throughput technologies have caused a renewed interest in biomarker discovery for ovarian cancer using alternative strategies such as targeted sequencing and proteomics. In this chapter, we will review the current state of ovarian cancer biomarker research with a focus on diagnostic serum markers. Furthermore, we will examine the standard practice guidelines' criteria for acceptance of a biomarker into the clinic as well as emerging high-throughput approaches to the discovery of novel ovarian cancer biomarkers.

  8. High-throughput genotyping of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) utilising diversity arrays technology (DArT).

    PubMed

    Howard, E L; Whittock, S P; Jakše, J; Carling, J; Matthews, P D; Probasco, G; Henning, J A; Darby, P; Cerenak, A; Javornik, B; Kilian, A; Koutoulis, A

    2011-05-01

    Implementation of molecular methods in hop (Humulus lupulus L.) breeding is dependent on the availability of sizeable numbers of polymorphic markers and a comprehensive understanding of genetic variation. However, use of molecular marker technology is limited due to expense, time inefficiency, laborious methodology and dependence on DNA sequence information. Diversity arrays technology (DArT) is a high-throughput cost-effective method for the discovery of large numbers of quality polymorphic markers without reliance on DNA sequence information. This study is the first to utilise DArT for hop genotyping, identifying 730 polymorphic markers from 92 hop accessions. The marker quality was high and similar to the quality of DArT markers previously generated for other species; although percentage polymorphism and polymorphism information content (PIC) were lower than in previous studies deploying other marker systems in hop. Genetic relationships in hop illustrated by DArT in this study coincide with knowledge generated using alternate methods. Several statistical analyses separated the hop accessions into genetically differentiated North American and European groupings, with hybrids between the two groups clearly distinguishable. Levels of genetic diversity were similar in the North American and European groups, but higher in the hybrid group. The markers produced from this time and cost-efficient genotyping tool will be a valuable resource for numerous applications in hop breeding and genetics studies, such as mapping, marker-assisted selection, genetic identity testing, guidance in the maintenance of genetic diversity and the directed breeding of superior cultivars. PMID:21243330

  9. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. PMID:27294925

  10. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-06-09

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery.

  11. High-throughput screening to identify inhibitors of lysine demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Molly; Yan, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Lysine demethylases (KDMs) are epigenetic regulators whose dysfunction is implicated in the pathology of many human diseases including various types of cancer, inflammation and X-linked intellectual disability. Particular demethylases have been identified as promising therapeutic targets, and tremendous efforts are being devoted toward developing suitable small-molecule inhibitors for clinical and research use. Several high-throughput screening strategies have been developed to screen for small-molecule inhibitors of KDMs, each with advantages and disadvantages in terms of time, cost, effort, reliability and sensitivity. In this Special Report, we review and evaluate the high-throughput screening methods utilized for discovery of novel small-molecule KDM inhibitors. PMID:25687466

  12. Direct assembling methodologies for high-throughput bioscreening

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Dévora, Jorge I.; Shi, Zhi-dong; Xu, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few decades, high-throughput (HT) bioscreening, a technique that allows rapid screening of biochemical compound libraries against biological targets, has been widely used in drug discovery, stem cell research, development of new biomaterials, and genomics research. To achieve these ambitions, scaffold-free (or direct) assembly of biological entities of interest has become critical. Appropriate assembling methodologies are required to build an efficient HT bioscreening platform. The development of contact and non-contact assembling systems as a practical solution has been driven by a variety of essential attributes of the bioscreening system, such as miniaturization, high throughput, and high precision. The present article reviews recent progress on these assembling technologies utilized for the construction of HT bioscreening platforms. PMID:22021162

  13. High-throughput theoretical design of lithium battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Gang, Ling; Jian, Gao; Rui-Juan, Xiao; Li-Quan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The rapid evolution of high-throughput theoretical design schemes to discover new lithium battery materials is reviewed, including high-capacity cathodes, low-strain cathodes, anodes, solid state electrolytes, and electrolyte additives. With the development of efficient theoretical methods and inexpensive computers, high-throughput theoretical calculations have played an increasingly important role in the discovery of new materials. With the help of automatic simulation flow, many types of materials can be screened, optimized and designed from a structural database according to specific search criteria. In advanced cell technology, new materials for next generation lithium batteries are of great significance to achieve performance, and some representative criteria are: higher energy density, better safety, and faster charge/discharge speed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11234013 and 51172274) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA034201).

  14. Discovery of Potent 17β-Hydroxywithanolides for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer by High-Throughput Screening of a Natural Products Library for Androgen-Induced Gene Expression Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ya-Ming; Liu, Manping X; Grunow, Nathan; Wijeratne, E M Kithsiri; Paine-Murrieta, Gillian; Felder, Stephen; Kris, Richard M; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie

    2015-09-10

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the second most prevalent cancer among men in Western societies, and those who develop metastatic castration-resistant PC (CRPC) invariably succumb to the disease. The need for effective treatments for CRPC is a pressing concern, especially due to limited durable responses with currently employed therapies. Here, we demonstrate the successful application of a high-throughput gene-expression profiling assay directly targeting genes of the androgen receptor pathway to screen a natural products library leading to the identification of 17β-hydroxywithanolides 1-5, of which physachenolide D (5) exhibited potent and selective in vitro activity against two PC cell lines, LNCaP and PC-3. Epoxidation of 5 afforded physachenolide C (6) with higher potency and stability. Structure-activity relationships for withanolides as potential anti-PC agents are presented together with in vivo efficacy studies on compound 6, suggesting that 17β-hydroxywithanolides are promising candidates for further development as CRPC therapeutics.

  15. High throughput and miniaturised systems for biodegradability assessments.

    PubMed

    Cregut, Mickael; Jouanneau, Sulivan; Brillet, François; Durand, Marie-José; Sweetlove, Cyril; Chenèble, Jean-Charles; L'Haridon, Jacques; Thouand, Gérald

    2014-01-01

    The society demands safer products with a better ecological profile. Regulatory criteria have been developed to prevent risks for human health and the environment, for example, within the framework of the European regulation REACH (Regulation (EC) No 1907, 2006). This has driven industry to consider the development of high throughput screening methodologies for assessing chemical biodegradability. These new screening methodologies must be scalable for miniaturisation, reproducible and as reliable as existing procedures for enhanced biodegradability assessment. Here, we evaluate two alternative systems that can be scaled for high throughput screening and conveniently miniaturised to limit costs in comparison with traditional testing. These systems are based on two dyes as follows: an invasive fluorescent dyes that serves as a cellular activity marker (a resazurin-like dye reagent) and a noninvasive fluorescent oxygen optosensor dye (an optical sensor). The advantages and limitations of these platforms for biodegradability assessment are presented. Our results confirm the feasibility of these systems for evaluating and screening chemicals for ready biodegradability. The optosensor is a miniaturised version of a component already used in traditional ready biodegradability testing, whereas the resazurin dye offers an interesting new screening mechanism for chemical concentrations greater than 10 mg/l that are not amenable to traditional closed bottle tests. The use of these approaches allows generalisation of high throughput screening methodologies to meet the need of developing new compounds with a favourable ecological profile and also assessment for regulatory purpose.

  16. High-throughput phenotyping of plant shoots.

    PubMed

    Berger, Bettina; de Regt, Bas; Tester, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Advances in automated plant handling and image acquisition now make it possible to use digital imaging for the high-throughput phenotyping of plants. Various traits can be extracted from individual images. However, the potential of this technology lies in the acquisition of time series. Since whole shoot imaging is nondestructive, plants can now be monitored throughout their lifecycle, and dynamic traits such as plant growth and development can be captured and quantified. The technique is applicable to a wide range of plants and research areas and makes high-throughput screens possible, reducing the time and labor needed for the phenotypic characterization of plants.

  17. Technological advances in high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bailing; Li, Songjun; Hu, Jie

    2004-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is the process of testing a large number of diverse chemical structures against disease targets to identify 'hits'. Compared to traditional drug screening methods, HTS is characterized by its simplicity, rapidness, low cost, and high efficiency, taking the ligand-target interactions as the principle, as well as leading to a higher information harvest. As a multidisciplinary field, HTS involves an automated operation-platform, highly sensitive testing system, specific screening model (in vitro), an abundant components library, and a data acquisition and processing system. Various technologies, especially the novel technologies such as fluorescence, nuclear-magnetic resonance, affinity chromatography, surface plasmon resonance, and DNA microarray, are now available, and the screening of more than 100,000 samples per day is already possible. Fluorescence-based assays include the scintillation proximity assay, time-resolved energy transfer, fluorescence anisotropy, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy. Fluorescence-based techniques are likely to be among the most important detection approaches used for HTS due to their high sensitivity and amenability to automation, giving the industry-wide drive to simplify, miniaturize, and speed up assays. The application of NMR technology to HTS is another recent trend in drug research. One advantage afforded by NMR technology is that it can provide direct information on the affinity of the screening compounds and the binding location of protein. The structure-activity relationship acquired from NMR analysis can sharpen the library design, which will be very important in furnishing HTS with well-defined drug candidates. Affinity chromatography used for library screening will provide the information on the fundamental processes of drug action, such as absorption, distribution, excretion, and receptor activation; also the eluting curve can give directly the

  18. High-Throughput Industrial Coatings Research at The Dow Chemical Company.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tzu-Chi; Malvadkar, Niranjan A; Drumright, Ray; Cesaretti, Richard; Bishop, Matthew T

    2016-09-12

    At The Dow Chemical Company, high-throughput research is an active area for developing new industrial coatings products. Using the principles of automation (i.e., using robotic instruments), parallel processing (i.e., prepare, process, and evaluate samples in parallel), and miniaturization (i.e., reduce sample size), high-throughput tools for synthesizing, formulating, and applying coating compositions have been developed at Dow. In addition, high-throughput workflows for measuring various coating properties, such as cure speed, hardness development, scratch resistance, impact toughness, resin compatibility, pot-life, surface defects, among others have also been developed in-house. These workflows correlate well with the traditional coatings tests, but they do not necessarily mimic those tests. The use of such high-throughput workflows in combination with smart experimental designs allows accelerated discovery and commercialization.

  19. High-Throughput Industrial Coatings Research at The Dow Chemical Company.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tzu-Chi; Malvadkar, Niranjan A; Drumright, Ray; Cesaretti, Richard; Bishop, Matthew T

    2016-09-12

    At The Dow Chemical Company, high-throughput research is an active area for developing new industrial coatings products. Using the principles of automation (i.e., using robotic instruments), parallel processing (i.e., prepare, process, and evaluate samples in parallel), and miniaturization (i.e., reduce sample size), high-throughput tools for synthesizing, formulating, and applying coating compositions have been developed at Dow. In addition, high-throughput workflows for measuring various coating properties, such as cure speed, hardness development, scratch resistance, impact toughness, resin compatibility, pot-life, surface defects, among others have also been developed in-house. These workflows correlate well with the traditional coatings tests, but they do not necessarily mimic those tests. The use of such high-throughput workflows in combination with smart experimental designs allows accelerated discovery and commercialization. PMID:27440008

  20. High-throughput siRNA-based functional target validation.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong; Bernal, Alejandro; Amato, Frank A; Pinhasov, Albert; Kauffman, Jack; Brenneman, Douglas E; Derian, Claudia K; Andrade-Gordon, Patricia; Plata-Salamán, Carlos R; Ilyin, Sergey E

    2004-06-01

    The drug discovery process pursued by major pharmaceutical companies for many years starts with target identification followed by high-throughput screening (HTS) with the goal of identifying lead compounds. To accomplish this goal, significant resources are invested into automation of the screening process or HTS. Robotic systems capable of handling thousands of data points per day are implemented across the pharmaceutical sector. Many of these systems are amenable to handling cell-based screening protocols as well. On the other hand, as companies strive to develop innovative products based on novel mechanisms of action(s), one of the current bottlenecks of the industry is the target validation process. Traditionally, bioinformatics and HTS groups operate separately at different stages of the drug discovery process. The authors describe the convergence and integration of HTS and bioinformatics to perform high-throughput target functional identification and validation. As an example of this approach, they initiated a project with a functional cell-based screen for a biological process of interest using libraries of small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules. In this protocol, siRNAs function as potent gene-specific inhibitors. siRNA-mediated knockdown of the target genes is confirmed by TaqMan analysis, and genes with impacts on biological functions of interest are selected for further analysis. Once the genes are confirmed and further validated, they may be used for HTS to yield lead compounds.

  1. High-throughput human metabolism and toxicity analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moo-Yeal; Dordick, Jonathan S

    2006-12-01

    Poor drug candidate safety profiles are often identified late in the drug development process, manifesting themselves in the preclinical and clinical phases and significantly contributing to the high cost and low yield of drug discovery. As a result, new tools are needed to accelerate the assessment of drug candidate toxicity and human metabolism earlier in the drug development process, from primary drug candidate screening to lead optimization. Although high-throughput screens exist for much of the discovery phase of drug development, translating such screening techniques into platforms that can accurately mimic the human in vivo response and predict the impact of drug candidates on human toxicology has proven difficult. Nevertheless, some success has been achieved in recent years, which may ultimately yield widespread acceptance in the pharmaceutical industry.

  2. Viral detection by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Nakaya, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    We applied a high-throughput sequencing platform, Ion PGM, for viral detection in fecal samples from adult cows collected in Hokkaido, Japan. Random RT-PCR was performed to amplify RNA extracted from 0.25 ml of fecal specimens (N = 8), and more than 5 μg of cDNA was synthesized. Unbiased high-throughput sequencing using the 318 v2 semiconductor chip of these eight samples yielded 57-580 K (average: 270 K, after data analysis) reads in a single run. As a result, viral genome sequences were detected in each specimen. In addition to bacteriophage, mammal- and insect-derived viruses, partial genome sequences of plant, algal, and protozoal viruses were detected. Thus, this metagenomic analysis of fecal specimens could be useful to comprehensively understand viral populations of the intestine and food sources in animals. PMID:25287501

  3. Microfabricated high-throughput electronic particle detector.

    PubMed

    Wood, D K; Requa, M V; Cleland, A N

    2007-10-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and use of a radio frequency reflectometer integrated with a microfluidic system, applied to the very high-throughput measurement of micron-scale particles, passing in a microfluidic channel through the sensor region. The device operates as a microfabricated Coulter counter [U.S. Patent No. 2656508 (1953)], similar to a design we have described previously, but here with significantly improved electrode geometry as well as including electronic tuning of the reflectometer; the two improvements yielding an improvement by more than a factor of 10 in the signal to noise and in the diametric discrimination of single particles. We demonstrate the high-throughput discrimination of polystyrene beads with diameters in the 4-10 microm range, achieving diametric resolutions comparable to the intrinsic spread of diameters in the bead distribution, at rates in excess of 15 x 10(6) beads/h.

  4. Viral detection by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Nakaya, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    We applied a high-throughput sequencing platform, Ion PGM, for viral detection in fecal samples from adult cows collected in Hokkaido, Japan. Random RT-PCR was performed to amplify RNA extracted from 0.25 ml of fecal specimens (N = 8), and more than 5 μg of cDNA was synthesized. Unbiased high-throughput sequencing using the 318 v2 semiconductor chip of these eight samples yielded 57-580 K (average: 270 K, after data analysis) reads in a single run. As a result, viral genome sequences were detected in each specimen. In addition to bacteriophage, mammal- and insect-derived viruses, partial genome sequences of plant, algal, and protozoal viruses were detected. Thus, this metagenomic analysis of fecal specimens could be useful to comprehensively understand viral populations of the intestine and food sources in animals.

  5. High throughput network for multiprocessor interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raatikainen, Pertti; Zidbeck, Juha

    1993-05-01

    Multiprocessor architectures are needed to support modern broadband applications, since traditional bus structures are not capable of providing high throughput. New bus structures are needed, especially in the area of network components and terminals. A study to find an efficient and cost effective interconnection topology for the future high speed products is presented. The most common bus topologies are introduced, and their characteristics are estimated to decide which one of them offers best performance and lowest implementation cost. The ring topology is chosen to be studied in more detail. Four competing bus access schemes for the high throughput ring are introduced as well as simulation models for each of them. Using transfer delay and throughput results, as well as keeping the implementation point of view in mind, the best candidate is selected to be studied and experimented in the succeeding research project.

  6. High-throughput neuro-imaging informatics

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michael I.; Faria, Andreia V.; Oishi, Kenichi; Mori, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes neuroinformatics technologies at 1 mm anatomical scale based on high-throughput 3D functional and structural imaging technologies of the human brain. The core is an abstract pipeline for converting functional and structural imagery into their high-dimensional neuroinformatic representation index containing O(1000–10,000) discriminating dimensions. The pipeline is based on advanced image analysis coupled to digital knowledge representations in the form of dense atlases of the human brain at gross anatomical scale. We demonstrate the integration of these high-dimensional representations with machine learning methods, which have become the mainstay of other fields of science including genomics as well as social networks. Such high-throughput facilities have the potential to alter the way medical images are stored and utilized in radiological workflows. The neuroinformatics pipeline is used to examine cross-sectional and personalized analyses of neuropsychiatric illnesses in clinical applications as well as longitudinal studies. We demonstrate the use of high-throughput machine learning methods for supporting (i) cross-sectional image analysis to evaluate the health status of individual subjects with respect to the population data, (ii) integration of image and personal medical record non-image information for diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:24381556

  7. Microfluidics for cell-based high throughput screening platforms - A review.

    PubMed

    Du, Guansheng; Fang, Qun; den Toonder, Jaap M J

    2016-01-15

    In the last decades, the basic techniques of microfluidics for the study of cells such as cell culture, cell separation, and cell lysis, have been well developed. Based on cell handling techniques, microfluidics has been widely applied in the field of PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction), immunoassays, organ-on-chip, stem cell research, and analysis and identification of circulating tumor cells. As a major step in drug discovery, high-throughput screening allows rapid analysis of thousands of chemical, biochemical, genetic or pharmacological tests in parallel. In this review, we summarize the application of microfluidics in cell-based high throughput screening. The screening methods mentioned in this paper include approaches using the perfusion flow mode, the droplet mode, and the microarray mode. We also discuss the future development of microfluidic based high throughput screening platform for drug discovery.

  8. Image-based high-throughput screening for inhibitors of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Evensen, Lasse; Link, Wolfgang; Lorens, James B

    2013-01-01

    Automated multicolor fluorescence microscopy facilitates high-throughput quantitation of cellular parameters of complex, organotypic systems. In vitro co-cultured vascular cells form capillary-like networks that model facets of angiogenesis, making it an attractive alternative for anti-angiogenic drug discovery. We have adapted this angiogenesis assay system to a high-throughput format to enable automated image-based high-throughput screening of live primary human vascular cell co-cultures with chemical libraries for anti-angiogenic drug discovery. Protocols are described for setup of a fluorescence-based co-culture assay, live cell image acquisition, image analysis of morphological parameters, and screening data handling. PMID:23027002

  9. Controlling high-throughput manufacturing at the nano-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Khershed P.

    2013-09-01

    Interest in nano-scale manufacturing research and development is growing. The reason is to accelerate the translation of discoveries and inventions of nanoscience and nanotechnology into products that would benefit industry, economy and society. Ongoing research in nanomanufacturing is focused primarily on developing novel nanofabrication techniques for a variety of applications—materials, energy, electronics, photonics, biomedical, etc. Our goal is to foster the development of high-throughput methods of fabricating nano-enabled products. Large-area parallel processing and highspeed continuous processing are high-throughput means for mass production. An example of large-area processing is step-and-repeat nanoimprinting, by which nanostructures are reproduced again and again over a large area, such as a 12 in wafer. Roll-to-roll processing is an example of continuous processing, by which it is possible to print and imprint multi-level nanostructures and nanodevices on a moving flexible substrate. The big pay-off is high-volume production and low unit cost. However, the anticipated cost benefits can only be realized if the increased production rate is accompanied by high yields of high quality products. To ensure product quality, we need to design and construct manufacturing systems such that the processes can be closely monitored and controlled. One approach is to bring cyber-physical systems (CPS) concepts to nanomanufacturing. CPS involves the control of a physical system such as manufacturing through modeling, computation, communication and control. Such a closely coupled system will involve in-situ metrology and closed-loop control of the physical processes guided by physics-based models and driven by appropriate instrumentation, sensing and actuation. This paper will discuss these ideas in the context of controlling high-throughput manufacturing at the nano-scale.

  10. IRAS: High-Throughput Identification of Novel Alternative Splicing Regulators.

    PubMed

    Zheng, S

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a fundamental regulatory process of gene expression. Defects in alternative splicing can lead to various diseases, and modification of disease-causing splicing events presents great therapeutic promise. Splicing outcome is commonly affected by extracellular stimuli and signaling cascades that converge on RNA-binding splicing regulators. These trans-acting factors recognize cis-elements in pre-mRNA transcripts to affect spliceosome assembly and splice site choices. Identification of these splicing regulators and/or upstream modulators has been difficult and traditionally done by piecemeal. High-throughput screening strategies to find multiple regulators of exon splicing have great potential to accelerate the discovery process, but typically confront low sensitivity and low specificity of screening assays. Here we describe a unique screening strategy, IRAS (identifying regulators of alternative splicing), using a pair of dual-output minigene reporters to allow for sensitive detection of exon splicing changes. Each dual-output reporter produces green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) fluorescent signals to assay the two spliced isoforms exclusively. The two complementary minigene reporters alter GFP/RFP output ratios in the opposite direction in response to splicing change. Applying IRAS in cell-based high-throughput screens allows sensitive and specific identification of splicing regulators and modulators for any alternative exons of interest. In comparison to previous high-throughput screening methods, IRAS substantially enhances the specificity of the screening assay. This strategy significantly eliminates false positives without sacrificing sensitive identification of true regulators of splicing. PMID:27241759

  11. Lessons from high-throughput protein crystallization screening: 10 years of practical experience

    PubMed Central

    JR, Luft; EH, Snell; GT, DeTitta

    2011-01-01

    Introduction X-ray crystallography provides the majority of our structural biological knowledge at a molecular level and in terms of pharmaceutical design is a valuable tool to accelerate discovery. It is the premier technique in the field, but its usefulness is significantly limited by the need to grow well-diffracting crystals. It is for this reason that high-throughput crystallization has become a key technology that has matured over the past 10 years through the field of structural genomics. Areas covered The authors describe their experiences in high-throughput crystallization screening in the context of structural genomics and the general biomedical community. They focus on the lessons learnt from the operation of a high-throughput crystallization screening laboratory, which to date has screened over 12,500 biological macromolecules. They also describe the approaches taken to maximize the success while minimizing the effort. Through this, the authors hope that the reader will gain an insight into the efficient design of a laboratory and protocols to accomplish high-throughput crystallization on a single-, multiuser-laboratory or industrial scale. Expert Opinion High-throughput crystallization screening is readily available but, despite the power of the crystallographic technique, getting crystals is still not a solved problem. High-throughput approaches can help when used skillfully; however, they still require human input in the detailed analysis and interpretation of results to be more successful. PMID:22646073

  12. Human transcriptome array for high-throughput clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weihong; Seok, Junhee; Mindrinos, Michael N; Schweitzer, Anthony C; Jiang, Hui; Wilhelmy, Julie; Clark, Tyson A; Kapur, Karen; Xing, Yi; Faham, Malek; Storey, John D; Moldawer, Lyle L; Maier, Ronald V; Tompkins, Ronald G; Wong, Wing Hung; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong

    2011-03-01

    A 6.9 million-feature oligonucleotide array of the human transcriptome [Glue Grant human transcriptome (GG-H array)] has been developed for high-throughput and cost-effective analyses in clinical studies. This array allows comprehensive examination of gene expression and genome-wide identification of alternative splicing as well as detection of coding SNPs and noncoding transcripts. The performance of the array was examined and compared with mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) results over multiple independent replicates of liver and muscle samples. Compared with RNA-Seq of 46 million uniquely mappable reads per replicate, the GG-H array is highly reproducible in estimating gene and exon abundance. Although both platforms detect similar expression changes at the gene level, the GG-H array is more sensitive at the exon level. Deeper sequencing is required to adequately cover low-abundance transcripts. The array has been implemented in a multicenter clinical program and has generated high-quality, reproducible data. Considering the clinical trial requirements of cost, sample availability, and throughput, the GG-H array has a wide range of applications. An emerging approach for large-scale clinical genomic studies is to first use RNA-Seq to the sufficient depth for the discovery of transcriptome elements relevant to the disease process followed by high-throughput and reliable screening of these elements on thousands of patient samples using custom-designed arrays.

  13. Human transcriptome array for high-throughput clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weihong; Seok, Junhee; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Schweitzer, Anthony C.; Jiang, Hui; Wilhelmy, Julie; Clark, Tyson A.; Kapur, Karen; Xing, Yi; Faham, Malek; Storey, John D.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Maier, Ronald V.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Wong, Wing Hung; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Toner, Mehmet; Warren, H. Shaw; Schoenfeld, David A.; Rahme, Laurence; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Hayden, Douglas; Mason, Philip; Fagan, Shawn; Yu, Yong-Ming; Cobb, J. Perren; Remick, Daniel G.; Mannick, John A.; Lederer, James A.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; West, Michael A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Smith, Richard; Camp, David G.; Qian, Weijun; Tibshirani, Rob; Lowry, Stephen; Calvano, Steven; Chaudry, Irshad; Cohen, Mitchell; Moore, Ernest E.; Johnson, Jeffrey; Baker, Henry V.; Efron, Philip A.; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Ochoa, Juan B.; Sperry, Jason L.; Miller-Graziano, Carol L.; De, Asit K.; Bankey, Paul E.; Herndon, David N.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Minei, Joseph P.; Arnoldo, Brett D.; Hunt, John L.; Horton, Jureta; Cobb, J. Perren; Brownstein, Bernard; Freeman, Bradley; Nathens, Avery B.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Gibran, Nicole; Klein, Matthew; O'Keefe, Grant

    2011-01-01

    A 6.9 million-feature oligonucleotide array of the human transcriptome [Glue Grant human transcriptome (GG-H array)] has been developed for high-throughput and cost-effective analyses in clinical studies. This array allows comprehensive examination of gene expression and genome-wide identification of alternative splicing as well as detection of coding SNPs and noncoding transcripts. The performance of the array was examined and compared with mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) results over multiple independent replicates of liver and muscle samples. Compared with RNA-Seq of 46 million uniquely mappable reads per replicate, the GG-H array is highly reproducible in estimating gene and exon abundance. Although both platforms detect similar expression changes at the gene level, the GG-H array is more sensitive at the exon level. Deeper sequencing is required to adequately cover low-abundance transcripts. The array has been implemented in a multicenter clinical program and has generated high-quality, reproducible data. Considering the clinical trial requirements of cost, sample availability, and throughput, the GG-H array has a wide range of applications. An emerging approach for large-scale clinical genomic studies is to first use RNA-Seq to the sufficient depth for the discovery of transcriptome elements relevant to the disease process followed by high-throughput and reliable screening of these elements on thousands of patient samples using custom-designed arrays. PMID:21317363

  14. High throughput instruments, methods, and informatics for systems biology.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Cowie, Jim R.; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Wylie, Brian Neil; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Aragon, Anthony D.; Keenan, Michael Robert; Boyack, Kevin W.; Thomas, Edward Victor; Werner-Washburne, Margaret C.; Mosquera-Caro, Monica P.; Martinez, M. Juanita; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Willman, Cheryl L.

    2003-12-01

    High throughput instruments and analysis techniques are required in order to make good use of the genomic sequences that have recently become available for many species, including humans. These instruments and methods must work with tens of thousands of genes simultaneously, and must be able to identify the small subsets of those genes that are implicated in the observed phenotypes, or, for instance, in responses to therapies. Microarrays represent one such high throughput method, which continue to find increasingly broad application. This project has improved microarray technology in several important areas. First, we developed the hyperspectral scanner, which has discovered and diagnosed numerous flaws in techniques broadly employed by microarray researchers. Second, we used a series of statistically designed experiments to identify and correct errors in our microarray data to dramatically improve the accuracy, precision, and repeatability of the microarray gene expression data. Third, our research developed new informatics techniques to identify genes with significantly different expression levels. Finally, natural language processing techniques were applied to improve our ability to make use of online literature annotating the important genes. In combination, this research has improved the reliability and precision of laboratory methods and instruments, while also enabling substantially faster analysis and discovery.

  15. A quantitative high throughput assay for identifying gametocytocidal compounds.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takeshi Q; Dehdashti, Seameen J; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; McKew, John C; Zheng, Wei; Williamson, Kim C

    2013-03-01

    Current antimalarial drug treatment does not effectively kill mature Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes, the parasite stage responsible for malaria transmission from human to human via a mosquito. Consequently, following standard therapy malaria can still be transmitted for over a week after the clearance of asexual parasites. A new generation of malaria drugs with gametocytocidal properties, or a gametocytocidal drug that could be used in combinational therapy with currently available antimalarials, is needed to control the spread of the disease and facilitate eradication efforts. We have developed a 1536-well gametocyte viability assay for the high throughput screening of large compound collections to identify novel compounds with gametocytocidal activity. The signal-to-basal ratio and Z'-factor for this assay were 3.2-fold and 0.68, respectively. The IC(50) value of epoxomicin, the positive control compound, was 1.42±0.09 nM that is comparable to previously reported values. This miniaturized assay significantly reduces the number of gametocytes required for the AlamarBlue viability assay, and enables high throughput screening for lead discovery efforts. Additionally, the screen does not require a specialized parasite line, gametocytes from any strain, including field isolates, can be tested. A pilot screen utilizing the commercially available LOPAC library, consisting of 1280 known compounds, revealed two selective gametocytocidal compounds having 54- and 7.8-fold gametocytocidal selectivity in comparison to their cell cytotoxicity effect against the mammalian SH-SY5Y cell line.

  16. A Quantitative High Throughput Assay for Identifying Gametocytocidal Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takeshi Q.; Dehdashti, Seameen J.; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; McKew, John C.; Zheng, Wei; Williamson, Kim C.

    2013-01-01

    Current antimalarial drug treatment does not effectively kill mature Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes, the parasite stage responsible for malaria transmission from human to human via a mosquito. Consequently, following standard therapy malaria can still be transmitted for over a week after the clearance of asexual parasites. A new generation of malaria drugs with gametocytocidal properties, or a gametocytocidal drug that could be used in combinational therapy with currently available antimalarials, is needed to control the spread of the disease and facilitate eradication efforts. We have developed a 1,536-well gametocyte viability assay for the high throughput screening of large compound collections to identify novel compounds with gametocytocidal activity. The signal-to-basal ratio and Z′-factor for this assay were 3.2-fold and 0.68, respectively. The IC50 value of epoxomicin, the positive control compound, was 1.42 ± 0.09 nM that is comparable to previously reported values. This miniaturized assay significantly reduces the number of gametocytes required for the alamarBlue viability assay, and enables high throughput screening for lead discovery efforts. Additionally, the screen does not require a specialized parasite line, gametocytes from any strain, including field isolates, can be tested. A pilot screen utilizing the commercially available LOPAC library, consisting of 1,280 known compounds, revealed two selective gametocytocidal compounds having 54 and 7.8-fold gametocytocidal selectivity in comparison to their cell cytotoxicity effect against the mammalian SH-SY5Y cell line. PMID:23454872

  17. High-throughput screening with micro-x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.

    2005-06-15

    Micro-x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) is a useful characterization tool for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries. Due to the increasing threat of use of chemical warfare (CW) agents both in military actions and against civilians by terrorist extremists, there is a strong push to improve existing methods and develop means for the detection of a broad spectrum of CW agents in a minimal amount of time to increase national security. This paper describes a combinatorial high-throughput screening technique for CW receptor discovery to aid in sensor development. MXRF can screen materials for elemental composition at the mesoscale level (tens to hundreds of micrometers). The key aspect of this work is the use of commercial MXRF instrumentation coupled with the inherent heteroatom elements within the target molecules of the combinatorial reaction to provide rapid and specific identification of lead species. The method is demonstrated by screening an 11-mer oligopeptide library for selective binding of the degradation products of the nerve agent VX. The identified oligopeptides can be used as selective molecular receptors for sensor development. The MXRF screening method is nondestructive, requires minimal sample preparation or special tags for analysis, and the screening time depends on the desired sensitivity.

  18. A high throughput mechanical screening device for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Hou, Chieh; Meloni, Gregory R; Cosgrove, Brian D; Dodge, George R; Mauck, Robert L

    2014-06-27

    Articular cartilage enables efficient and near-frictionless load transmission, but suffers from poor inherent healing capacity. As such, cartilage tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking both compositional and mechanical properties of native tissue in order to provide effective repair materials for the treatment of damaged or degenerated joint surfaces. However, given the large number design parameters available (e.g. cell sources, scaffold designs, and growth factors), it is difficult to conduct combinatorial experiments of engineered cartilage. This is particularly exacerbated when mechanical properties are a primary outcome, given the long time required for testing of individual samples. High throughput screening is utilized widely in the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly and cost-effectively assess the effects of thousands of compounds for therapeutic discovery. Here we adapted this approach to develop a high throughput mechanical screening (HTMS) system capable of measuring the mechanical properties of up to 48 materials simultaneously. The HTMS device was validated by testing various biomaterials and engineered cartilage constructs and by comparing the HTMS results to those derived from conventional single sample compression tests. Further evaluation showed that the HTMS system was capable of distinguishing and identifying 'hits', or factors that influence the degree of tissue maturation. Future iterations of this device will focus on reducing data variability, increasing force sensitivity and range, as well as scaling-up to even larger (96-well) formats. This HTMS device provides a novel tool for cartilage tissue engineering, freeing experimental design from the limitations of mechanical testing throughput.

  19. Structuring intuition with theory: The high-throughput way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornari, Marco

    2015-03-01

    First principles methodologies have grown in accuracy and applicability to the point where large databases can be built, shared, and analyzed with the goal of predicting novel compositions, optimizing functional properties, and discovering unexpected relationships between the data. In order to be useful to a large community of users, data should be standardized, validated, and distributed. In addition, tools to easily manage large datasets should be made available to effectively lead to materials development. Within the AFLOW consortium we have developed a simple frame to expand, validate, and mine data repositories: the MTFrame. Our minimalistic approach complement AFLOW and other existing high-throughput infrastructures and aims to integrate data generation with data analysis. We present few examples from our work on materials for energy conversion. Our intent s to pinpoint the usefulness of high-throughput methodologies to guide the discovery process by quantitatively structuring the scientific intuition. This work was supported by ONR-MURI under Contract N00014-13-1-0635 and the Duke University Center for Materials Genomics.

  20. High-throughput sequencing to decipher the genetic heterogeneity of deafness

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Identifying genes causing non-syndromic hearing loss has been challenging using traditional approaches. We describe the impact that high-throughput sequencing approaches are having in discovery of genes related to hearing loss and the implications for clinical diagnosis. PMID:22647651

  1. High Throughput Screening For Hazard and Risk of Environmental Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput toxicity testing provides detailed mechanistic information on the concentration response of environmental contaminants in numerous potential toxicity pathways. High throughput screening (HTS) has several key advantages: (1) expense orders of magnitude less than an...

  2. Discovery of 4-aryl-4H-chromenes as a new series of apoptosis inducers using a cell- and caspase-based high-throughput screening assay. 1. Structure-activity relationships of the 4-aryl group.

    PubMed

    Kemnitzer, William; Drewe, John; Jiang, Songchun; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Jianghong; Jia, Shaojuan; Herich, John; Labreque, Denis; Storer, Richard; Meerovitch, Karen; Bouffard, David; Rej, Rabindra; Denis, Real; Blais, Charles; Lamothe, Serge; Attardo, Giorgio; Gourdeau, Henriette; Tseng, Ben; Kasibhatla, Shailaja; Cai, Sui Xiong

    2004-12-01

    By applying a novel cell- and caspase-based HTS assay, 2-amino-3-cyano-7-(dimethylamino)-4-(3-methoxy-4,5-methylenedioxyphenyl)-4H-chromene (1a) has been identified as a potent apoptosis inducer. Compound 1a was found to induce nuclear fragmentation and PARP cleavage, as well as to arrest cells at the G(2)/M stage and to induce apoptosis as determined by the flow cytometry analysis assay in multiple human cell lines (e.g. Jurkat, T47D). Through structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies of the 4-aryl group, a 4- and 7-fold increase in potency was obtained from the screening hit 1a to the lead compounds 2-amino-4-(3-bromo-4,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-cyano-7-(dimethylamino)-4H-chromene (1c) and 2-amino-3-cyano-7-(dimethylamino)-4-(5-methyl-3-pyridyl)-4H-chromene (4e), with an EC(50) of 19 and 11 nM in the caspase activation assay in T47D breast cancer cells, respectively. The 2-amino-4-aryl-3-cyano-7-(dimethylamino)-4H-chromenes also were found to be highly active in the growth inhibition MTT assay, with GI(50) values in the low nanomolar range for compound 1c. Significantly, compound 1c was found to have a GI(50) value of 2 nM in the paclitaxel resistant, p-glycoprotein overexpressed, MES-SA/DX5 tumor cells. Functionally, compound 1c was found to be a potent inhibitor of tubulin polymerization and to effectively inhibit the binding of colchicine to tubulin. These results confirm that the cell-based caspase activation assay is a powerful tool for the discovery of potent apoptosis inducers and suggest that the 4-aryl-4H-chromenes have the potential to be developed into future anticancer agents.

  3. High throughput chemical munitions treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Haroldsen, Brent L.; Stofleth, Jerome H.; Didlake, Jr., John E.; Wu, Benjamin C-P

    2011-11-01

    A new High-Throughput Explosive Destruction System is disclosed. The new system is comprised of two side-by-side detonation containment vessels each comprising first and second halves that feed into a single agent treatment vessel. Both detonation containment vessels further comprise a surrounding ventilation facility. Moreover, the detonation containment vessels are designed to separate into two half-shells, wherein one shell can be moved axially away from the fixed, second half for ease of access and loading. The vessels are closed by means of a surrounding, clam-shell type locking seal mechanisms.

  4. High throughput screening technologies for ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai-bo; Li, Min; Wang, Wei-ping; Wang, Xiao-liang

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are involved in a variety of fundamental physiological processes, and their malfunction causes numerous human diseases. Therefore, ion channels represent a class of attractive drug targets and a class of important off-targets for in vitro pharmacological profiling. In the past decades, the rapid progress in developing functional assays and instrumentation has enabled high throughput screening (HTS) campaigns on an expanding list of channel types. Chronologically, HTS methods for ion channels include the ligand binding assay, flux-based assay, fluorescence-based assay, and automated electrophysiological assay. In this review we summarize the current HTS technologies for different ion channel classes and their applications. PMID:26657056

  5. Clustering of High Throughput Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Pirim, Harun; Ekşioğlu, Burak; Perkins, Andy; Yüceer, Çetin

    2012-01-01

    High throughput biological data need to be processed, analyzed, and interpreted to address problems in life sciences. Bioinformatics, computational biology, and systems biology deal with biological problems using computational methods. Clustering is one of the methods used to gain insight into biological processes, particularly at the genomics level. Clearly, clustering can be used in many areas of biological data analysis. However, this paper presents a review of the current clustering algorithms designed especially for analyzing gene expression data. It is also intended to introduce one of the main problems in bioinformatics - clustering gene expression data - to the operations research community. PMID:23144527

  6. High-throughput screening approaches for investigating drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S A

    2001-01-01

    1. High-throughput screening approaches have been adopted throughout the pharmaceutical industry to aid in the rapid discovery of new chemical entities. Because it is now well recognized that the selection of a robust candidate requires a balance of potency, safety and pharmacokinetics, the role of drug metabolism departments has widened from their traditional one of supporting drug development to include the screening of compounds during the discovery process. To put drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic (DMPK) studies in context, the evolving role of DMPK screening in the drug discovery strategy of pharmaceutical companies will be discussed and a generalized approach will be presented. 2. With the increasing numbers of compounds requiring screening, DMPK optimization methods have had to be adapted for high throughput. There have been many developments in this field over the past decade and this review will focus on the high-throughput DMPK screening methodologies used today and in the recent past. 3. In vitro and in silico (computer-based) methods have proven most amenable to high-throughput approaches and these will firm the bulk of the review, but some advances with in vivo methods will also be discussed. As there has been a vast increase in published material on the topic of high-throughput DMPK methodologies in the past 10 years, it would be impossible to cover every method in detail, so this review will concentrate on the key areas and refer the reader to other, more detailed reviews wherever possible. 4. Most high-throughput methods would not be possible without the enabling technologies of computing, automation, new sample preparation technologies, and highly sensitive and selective detection systems, and these will also be reviewed. 5. The advantages and disadvantages of the screening methods will be presented, in particular the issue of handling the false-positives and -negatives that arise. 6. In concluding the review, future developments in this field

  7. Discovery of Genome-Wide Microsatellite Markers in Scombridae: A Pilot Study on Albacore Tuna.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Natacha; Duthoy, Stéphanie; Destombes, Antoine; Bodin, Nathalie; West, Wendy; Puech, Alexis; Bourjea, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in sequencing technologies and bioinformatics analysis provide a greater amount of DNA sequencing reads at a low cost. Microsatellites are the markers of choice for a variety of population genetic studies, and high quality markers can be discovered in non-model organisms, such as tuna, with these recent developments. Here, we use a high-throughput method to isolate microsatellite markers in albacore tuna, Thunnus alalunga, based on coupling multiplex enrichment and next-generation sequencing on 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing. The crucial minimum number of polymorphic markers to infer evolutionary and ecological processes for this species has been described for the first time. We provide 1670 microsatellite design primer pairs, and technical and molecular genetics selection resulting in 43 polymorphic microsatellite markers. On this panel, we characterized 34 random and selectively neutral markers («neutral») and 9 «non-neutral» markers. The variability of «neutral» markers was screened with 136 individuals of albacore tuna from southwest Indian Ocean (42), northwest Indian Ocean (31), South Africa (31), and southeast Atlantic Ocean (32). Power analysis demonstrated that the panel of genetic markers can be applied in diversity and population genetics studies. Global genetic diversity for albacore was high with a mean number of alleles at 16.94; observed heterozygosity 66% and expected heterozygosity 77%. The number of individuals was insufficient to provide accurate results on differentiation. Of the 9 «non-neutral» markers, 3 were linked to a sequence of known function. The one is located to a sequence having an immunity function (ThuAla-Tcell-01) and the other to a sequence having energy allocation function (ThuAla-Hki-01). These two markers were genotyped on the 136 individuals and presented different diversity levels. ThuAla-Tcell-01 has a high number of alleles (20), heterozygosity (87-90%), and assignment index. ThuAla-Hki-01

  8. Discovery of Genome-Wide Microsatellite Markers in Scombridae: A Pilot Study on Albacore Tuna

    PubMed Central

    Nikolic, Natacha; Duthoy, Stéphanie; Destombes, Antoine; Bodin, Nathalie; West, Wendy; Puech, Alexis; Bourjea, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in sequencing technologies and bioinformatics analysis provide a greater amount of DNA sequencing reads at a low cost. Microsatellites are the markers of choice for a variety of population genetic studies, and high quality markers can be discovered in non-model organisms, such as tuna, with these recent developments. Here, we use a high-throughput method to isolate microsatellite markers in albacore tuna, Thunnus alalunga, based on coupling multiplex enrichment and next-generation sequencing on 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing. The crucial minimum number of polymorphic markers to infer evolutionary and ecological processes for this species has been described for the first time. We provide 1670 microsatellite design primer pairs, and technical and molecular genetics selection resulting in 43 polymorphic microsatellite markers. On this panel, we characterized 34 random and selectively neutral markers («neutral») and 9 «non-neutral» markers. The variability of «neutral» markers was screened with 136 individuals of albacore tuna from southwest Indian Ocean (42), northwest Indian Ocean (31), South Africa (31), and southeast Atlantic Ocean (32). Power analysis demonstrated that the panel of genetic markers can be applied in diversity and population genetics studies. Global genetic diversity for albacore was high with a mean number of alleles at 16.94; observed heterozygosity 66% and expected heterozygosity 77%. The number of individuals was insufficient to provide accurate results on differentiation. Of the 9 «non-neutral» markers, 3 were linked to a sequence of known function. The one is located to a sequence having an immunity function (ThuAla-Tcell-01) and the other to a sequence having energy allocation function (ThuAla-Hki-01). These two markers were genotyped on the 136 individuals and presented different diversity levels. ThuAla-Tcell-01 has a high number of alleles (20), heterozygosity (87–90%), and assignment index. ThuAla-Hki-01

  9. Discovery of Genome-Wide Microsatellite Markers in Scombridae: A Pilot Study on Albacore Tuna.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Natacha; Duthoy, Stéphanie; Destombes, Antoine; Bodin, Nathalie; West, Wendy; Puech, Alexis; Bourjea, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in sequencing technologies and bioinformatics analysis provide a greater amount of DNA sequencing reads at a low cost. Microsatellites are the markers of choice for a variety of population genetic studies, and high quality markers can be discovered in non-model organisms, such as tuna, with these recent developments. Here, we use a high-throughput method to isolate microsatellite markers in albacore tuna, Thunnus alalunga, based on coupling multiplex enrichment and next-generation sequencing on 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing. The crucial minimum number of polymorphic markers to infer evolutionary and ecological processes for this species has been described for the first time. We provide 1670 microsatellite design primer pairs, and technical and molecular genetics selection resulting in 43 polymorphic microsatellite markers. On this panel, we characterized 34 random and selectively neutral markers («neutral») and 9 «non-neutral» markers. The variability of «neutral» markers was screened with 136 individuals of albacore tuna from southwest Indian Ocean (42), northwest Indian Ocean (31), South Africa (31), and southeast Atlantic Ocean (32). Power analysis demonstrated that the panel of genetic markers can be applied in diversity and population genetics studies. Global genetic diversity for albacore was high with a mean number of alleles at 16.94; observed heterozygosity 66% and expected heterozygosity 77%. The number of individuals was insufficient to provide accurate results on differentiation. Of the 9 «non-neutral» markers, 3 were linked to a sequence of known function. The one is located to a sequence having an immunity function (ThuAla-Tcell-01) and the other to a sequence having energy allocation function (ThuAla-Hki-01). These two markers were genotyped on the 136 individuals and presented different diversity levels. ThuAla-Tcell-01 has a high number of alleles (20), heterozygosity (87-90%), and assignment index. ThuAla-Hki-01

  10. Automated, high-throughput IgG-antibody glycoprofiling platform.

    PubMed

    Stöckmann, Henning; Adamczyk, Barbara; Hayes, Jerrard; Rudd, Pauline M

    2013-09-17

    One of today's key challenges is the ability to decode the functions of complex carbohydrates in various biological contexts. To generate high-quality glycomics data in a high-throughput fashion, we developed a robotized and low-cost N-glycan analysis platform for glycoprofiling of immunoglobulin G antibodies (IgG), which are central players of the immune system and of vital importance in the biopharmaceutical industry. The key features include (a) rapid IgG affinity purification and sample concentration, (b) protein denaturation and glycan release on a multiwell filtration device, (c) glycan purification on solid-supported hydrazide, and (d) glycan quantification by ultra performance liquid chromatography. The sample preparation workflow was automated using a robotic liquid-handling workstation, allowing the preparation of 96 samples (or multiples thereof) in 22 h with excellent reproducibility and, thus, should greatly facilitate biomarker discovery and glycosylation monitoring of therapeutic IgGs.

  11. Predicting Novel Bulk Metallic Glasses via High- Throughput Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perim, E.; Lee, D.; Liu, Y.; Toher, C.; Gong, P.; Li, Y.; Simmons, W. N.; Levy, O.; Vlassak, J.; Schroers, J.; Curtarolo, S.

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are materials which may combine key properties from crystalline metals, such as high hardness, with others typically presented by plastics, such as easy processability. However, the cost of the known BMGs poses a significant obstacle for the development of applications, which has lead to a long search for novel, economically viable, BMGs. The emergence of high-throughput DFT calculations, such as the library provided by the AFLOWLIB consortium, has provided new tools for materials discovery. We have used this data to develop a new glass forming descriptor combining structural factors with thermodynamics in order to quickly screen through a large number of alloy systems in the AFLOWLIB database, identifying the most promising systems and the optimal compositions for glass formation. National Science Foundation (DMR-1436151, DMR-1435820, DMR-1436268).

  12. Microfluidic cell chips for high-throughput drug screening.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chun-Wei; Ahmed, Ah Rezwanuddin; Dereli-Korkut, Zeynep; Wang, Sihong

    2016-05-01

    The current state of screening methods for drug discovery is still riddled with several inefficiencies. Although some widely used high-throughput screening platforms may enhance the drug screening process, their cost and oversimplification of cell-drug interactions pose a translational difficulty. Microfluidic cell-chips resolve many issues found in conventional HTS technology, providing benefits such as reduced sample quantity and integration of 3D cell culture physically more representative of the physiological/pathological microenvironment. In this review, we introduce the advantages of microfluidic devices in drug screening, and outline the critical factors which influence device design, highlighting recent innovations and advances in the field including a summary of commercialization efforts on microfluidic cell chips. Future perspectives of microfluidic cell devices are also provided based on considerations of present technological limitations and translational barriers. PMID:27071838

  13. Economic consequences of high throughput maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, John G.; Govindaraju, Lakshmi

    2005-11-01

    Many people in the semiconductor industry bemoan the high costs of masks and view mask cost as one of the significant barriers to bringing new chip designs to market. All that is needed is a viable maskless technology and the problem will go away. Numerous sites around the world are working on maskless lithography but inevitably, the question asked is "Wouldn't a one wafer per hour maskless tool make a really good mask writer?" Of course, the answer is yes, the hesitation you hear in the answer isn't based on technology concerns, it's financial. The industry needs maskless lithography because mask costs are too high. Mask costs are too high because mask pattern generators (PG's) are slow and expensive. If mask PG's become much faster, mask costs go down, the maskless market goes away and the PG supplier is faced with an even smaller tool demand from the mask shops. Technical success becomes financial suicide - or does it? In this paper we will present the results of a model that examines some of the consequences of introducing high throughput maskless pattern generation. Specific features in the model include tool throughput for masks and wafers, market segmentation by node for masks and wafers and mask cost as an entry barrier to new chip designs. How does the availability of low cost masks and maskless tools affect the industries tool makeup and what is the ultimate potential market for high throughput maskless pattern generators?

  14. Preliminary High-Throughput Metagenome Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Dusheyko, Serge; Furman, Craig; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank

    2007-03-26

    Metagenome data sets present a qualitatively different assembly problem than traditional single-organism whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly. The unique aspects of such projects include the presence of a potentially large number of distinct organisms and their representation in the data set at widely different fractions. In addition, multiple closely related strains could be present, which would be difficult to assemble separately. Failure to take these issues into account can result in poor assemblies that either jumble together different strains or which fail to yield useful results. The DOE Joint Genome Institute has sequenced a number of metagenomic projects and plans to considerably increase this number in the coming year. As a result, the JGI has a need for high-throughput tools and techniques for handling metagenome projects. We present the techniques developed to handle metagenome assemblies in a high-throughput environment. This includes a streamlined assembly wrapper, based on the JGI?s in-house WGS assembler, Jazz. It also includes the selection of sensible defaults targeted for metagenome data sets, as well as quality control automation for cleaning up the raw results. While analysis is ongoing, we will discuss preliminary assessments of the quality of the assembly results (http://fames.jgi-psf.org).

  15. Discovery of Infection Associated Metabolic Markers in Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Lamour, Sabrina D; Gomez-Romero, Maria; Vorkas, Panagiotis A; Alibu, Vincent P; Saric, Jasmina; Holmes, Elaine; Sternberg, Jeremy M

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) remains a major neglected tropical disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. As clinical symptoms are usually non-specific, new diagnostic and prognostic markers are urgently needed to enhance the number of identified cases and optimise treatment. This is particularly important for disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, where indirect immunodiagnostic approaches have to date been unsuccessful. We have conducted global metabolic profiling of plasma from T.b.rhodesiense HAT patients and endemic controls, using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ultra-performance liquid chromatography, coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and identified differences in the lipid, amino acid and metabolite profiles. Altogether 16 significantly disease discriminatory metabolite markers were found using NMR, and a further 37 lipid markers via UPLC-MS. These included significantly higher levels of phenylalanine, formate, creatinine, N-acetylated glycoprotein and triglycerides in patients relative to controls. HAT patients also displayed lower concentrations of histidine, sphingomyelins, lysophosphatidylcholines, and several polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines. While the disease metabolite profile was partially consistent with previous data published in experimental rodent infection, we also found unique lipid and amino acid profile markers highlighting subtle but important differences between the host response to trypanosome infections between animal models and natural human infections. Our results demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiling in the identification of novel diagnostic biomarkers and the elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms in this disease.

  16. Discovery of Infection Associated Metabolic Markers in Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Lamour, Sabrina D.; Gomez-Romero, Maria; Vorkas, Panagiotis A.; Alibu, Vincent P.; Saric, Jasmina; Holmes, Elaine; Sternberg, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) remains a major neglected tropical disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. As clinical symptoms are usually non-specific, new diagnostic and prognostic markers are urgently needed to enhance the number of identified cases and optimise treatment. This is particularly important for disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, where indirect immunodiagnostic approaches have to date been unsuccessful. We have conducted global metabolic profiling of plasma from T.b.rhodesiense HAT patients and endemic controls, using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ultra-performance liquid chromatography, coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and identified differences in the lipid, amino acid and metabolite profiles. Altogether 16 significantly disease discriminatory metabolite markers were found using NMR, and a further 37 lipid markers via UPLC-MS. These included significantly higher levels of phenylalanine, formate, creatinine, N-acetylated glycoprotein and triglycerides in patients relative to controls. HAT patients also displayed lower concentrations of histidine, sphingomyelins, lysophosphatidylcholines, and several polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines. While the disease metabolite profile was partially consistent with previous data published in experimental rodent infection, we also found unique lipid and amino acid profile markers highlighting subtle but important differences between the host response to trypanosome infections between animal models and natural human infections. Our results demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiling in the identification of novel diagnostic biomarkers and the elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms in this disease. PMID:26505639

  17. Transcriptome analysis of Capsicum annuum varieties Mandarin and Blackcluster: assembly, annotation and molecular marker discovery.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yul-Kyun; Tripathi, Swati; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Cho, Young-Il; Lee, Hye-Eun; Kim, Do-Sun; Woo, Jong-Gyu; Cho, Myeong-Cheoul

    2014-01-10

    Next generation sequencing technologies have proven to be a rapid and cost-effective means to assemble and characterize gene content and identify molecular markers in various organisms. Pepper (Capsicum annuum L., Solanaceae) is a major staple vegetable crop, which is economically important and has worldwide distribution. High-throughput transcriptome profiling of two pepper cultivars, Mandarin and Blackcluster, using 454 GS-FLX pyrosequencing yielded 279,221 and 316,357 sequenced reads with a total 120.44 and 142.54Mb of sequence data (average read length of 431 and 450 nucleotides). These reads resulted from 17,525 and 16,341 'isogroups' and were assembled into 19,388 and 18,057 isotigs, and 22,217 and 13,153 singletons for both the cultivars, respectively. Assembled sequences were annotated functionally based on homology to genes in multiple public databases. Detailed sequence variant analysis identified a total of 9701 and 12,741 potential SNPs which eventually resulted in 1025 and 1059 genotype specific SNPs, for both the varieties, respectively, after examining SNP frequency distribution for each mapped unigenes. These markers for pepper will be highly valuable for marker-assisted breeding and other genetic studies. PMID:24125952

  18. High-Throughput Analysis of Enzyme Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoxin

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) techniques have been applied to many research fields nowadays. Robot microarray printing technique and automation microtiter handling technique allows HTS performing in both heterogeneous and homogeneous formats, with minimal sample required for each assay element. In this dissertation, new HTS techniques for enzyme activity analysis were developed. First, patterns of immobilized enzyme on nylon screen were detected by multiplexed capillary system. The imaging resolution is limited by the outer diameter of the capillaries. In order to get finer images, capillaries with smaller outer diameters can be used to form the imaging probe. Application of capillary electrophoresis allows separation of the product from the substrate in the reaction mixture, so that the product doesn't have to have different optical properties with the substrate. UV absorption detection allows almost universal detection for organic molecules. Thus, no modifications of either the substrate or the product molecules are necessary. This technique has the potential to be used in screening of local distribution variations of specific bio-molecules in a tissue or in screening of multiple immobilized catalysts. Another high-throughput screening technique is developed by directly monitoring the light intensity of the immobilized-catalyst surface using a scientific charge-coupled device (CCD). Briefly, the surface of enzyme microarray is focused onto a scientific CCD using an objective lens. By carefully choosing the detection wavelength, generation of product on an enzyme spot can be seen by the CCD. Analyzing the light intensity change over time on an enzyme spot can give information of reaction rate. The same microarray can be used for many times. Thus, high-throughput kinetic studies of hundreds of catalytic reactions are made possible. At last, we studied the fluorescence emission spectra of ADP and obtained the detection limits for ADP under three different

  19. Utilizing Existing Clinical and Population Biospecimen Resources for Discovery or Validation of Markers for Early Cancer Detection

    Cancer.gov

    Utilizing Existing Clinical and Population Biospecimen Resources for Discovery or Validation of Markers for Early Cancer Detection, a 2013 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  20. High Throughput Screening Tools for Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong-Ng, W.; Yan, Y.; Otani, M.; Martin, J.; Talley, K. R.; Barron, S.; Carroll, D. L.; Hewitt, C.; Joress, H.; Thomas, E. L.; Green, M. L.; Tang, X. F.

    2015-06-01

    A suite of complementary high-throughput screening systems for combinatorial films was developed at National Institute of Standards and Technology to facilitate the search for efficient thermoelectric materials. These custom-designed capabilities include a facility for combinatorial thin film synthesis and a suite of tools for screening the Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistance (electrical resistivity), and thermal effusivity (thermal conductivity) of these films. The Seebeck coefficient and resistance are measured via custom-built automated apparatus at both ambient and high temperatures. Thermal effusivity is measured using a frequency domain thermoreflectance technique. This paper will discuss applications using these tools on representative thermoelectric materials, including combinatorial composition-spread films, conventional films, single crystals, and ribbons.

  1. A high-throughput neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampfl, Anton; Noakes, Terry; Bartsch, Friedl; Bertinshaw, Joel; Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica; Nateghi, Ebrahim; Raeside, Tyler; Yethiraj, Mohana; Danilkin, Sergey; Kearley, Gordon

    2010-03-01

    A cross-disciplinary high-throughput neutron spectrometer is currently under construction at OPAL, ANSTO's open pool light-water research reactor. The spectrometer is based on the design of a Be-filter spectrometer (FANS) that is operating at the National Institute of Standards research reactor in the USA. The ANSTO filter-spectrometer will be switched in and out with another neutron spectrometer, the triple-axis spectrometer, Taipan. Thus two distinct types of neutron spectrometers will be accessible: one specialised to perform phonon dispersion analysis and the other, the filter-spectrometer, designed specifically to measure vibrational density of states. A summary of the design will be given along with a detailed ray-tracing analysis. Some preliminary results will be presented from the spectrometer.

  2. High-Throughput Nonlinear Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    So, Peter T.C.; Yew, Elijah Y.S.; Rowlands, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution microscopy methods based on different nonlinear optical (NLO) contrast mechanisms are finding numerous applications in biology and medicine. While the basic implementations of these microscopy methods are relatively mature, an important direction of continuing technological innovation lies in improving the throughput of these systems. Throughput improvement is expected to be important for studying fast kinetic processes, for enabling clinical diagnosis and treatment, and for extending the field of image informatics. This review will provide an overview of the fundamental limitations on NLO microscopy throughput. We will further cover several important classes of high-throughput NLO microscope designs with discussions on their strengths and weaknesses and their key biomedical applications. Finally, this review will close with a perspective of potential future technological improvements in this field. PMID:24359736

  3. High-throughput cellular RNA device engineering.

    PubMed

    Townshend, Brent; Kennedy, Andrew B; Xiang, Joy S; Smolke, Christina D

    2015-10-01

    Methods for rapidly assessing sequence-structure-function landscapes and developing conditional gene-regulatory devices are critical to our ability to manipulate and interface with biology. We describe a framework for engineering RNA devices from preexisting aptamers that exhibit ligand-responsive ribozyme tertiary interactions. Our methodology utilizes cell sorting, high-throughput sequencing and statistical data analyses to enable parallel measurements of the activities of hundreds of thousands of sequences from RNA device libraries in the absence and presence of ligands. Our tertiary-interaction RNA devices performed better in terms of gene silencing, activation ratio and ligand sensitivity than optimized RNA devices that rely on secondary-structure changes. We applied our method to build biosensors for diverse ligands and determine consensus sequences that enable ligand-responsive tertiary interactions. These methods advance our ability to develop broadly applicable genetic tools and to elucidate the underlying sequence-structure-function relationships that empower rational design of complex biomolecules. PMID:26258292

  4. High-Throughput Methods for Electron Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, David L.; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Gonen, Tamir; Engel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins play a tremendously important role in cell physiology and serve as a target for an increasing number of drugs. Structural information is key to understanding their function and for developing new strategies for combating disease. However, the complex physical chemistry associated with membrane proteins has made them more difficult to study than their soluble cousins. Electron crystallography has historically been a successful method for solving membrane protein structures and has the advantage of providing the natural environment of a lipid membrane. Specifically, when membrane proteins form two-dimensional arrays within a lipid bilayer, images and diffraction can be recorded by electron microscopy. The corresponding data can be combined to produce a three-dimensional reconstruction which, under favorable conditions, can extend to atomic resolution. Like X-ray crystallography, the quality of the structures are very much dependent on the order and size of the crystals. However, unlike X-ray crystallography, high-throughput methods for screening crystallization trials for electron crystallography are not in general use. In this chapter, we describe two alternative and potentially complementary methods for high-throughput screening of membrane protein crystallization within the lipid bilayer. The first method relies on the conventional use of dialysis for removing detergent and thus reconstituting the bilayer; an array of dialysis wells in the standard 96-well format allows the use of a liquid-handling robot and greatly increases throughput. The second method relies on detergent complexation by cyclodextrin; a specialized pipetting robot has been designed not only to titrate cyclodextrin, but to use light scattering to monitor the reconstitution process. In addition, the use of liquid-handling robots for making negatively stained grids and methods for automatically imaging samples in the electron microscope are described. PMID:23132066

  5. High-throughput methods for electron crystallography.

    PubMed

    Stokes, David L; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Gonen, Tamir; Engel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins play a tremendously important role in cell physiology and serve as a target for an increasing number of drugs. Structural information is key to understanding their function and for developing new strategies for combating disease. However, the complex physical chemistry associated with membrane proteins has made them more difficult to study than their soluble cousins. Electron crystallography has historically been a successful method for solving membrane protein structures and has the advantage of providing a native lipid environment for these proteins. Specifically, when membrane proteins form two-dimensional arrays within a lipid bilayer, electron microscopy can be used to collect images and diffraction and the corresponding data can be combined to produce a three-dimensional reconstruction, which under favorable conditions can extend to atomic resolution. Like X-ray crystallography, the quality of the structures are very much dependent on the order and size of the crystals. However, unlike X-ray crystallography, high-throughput methods for screening crystallization trials for electron crystallography are not in general use. In this chapter, we describe two alternative methods for high-throughput screening of membrane protein crystallization within the lipid bilayer. The first method relies on the conventional use of dialysis for removing detergent and thus reconstituting the bilayer; an array of dialysis wells in the standard 96-well format allows the use of a liquid-handling robot and greatly increases throughput. The second method relies on titration of cyclodextrin as a chelating agent for detergent; a specialized pipetting robot has been designed not only to add cyclodextrin in a systematic way, but to use light scattering to monitor the reconstitution process. In addition, the use of liquid-handling robots for making negatively stained grids and methods for automatically imaging samples in the electron microscope are described.

  6. High-Throughput Sequencing of Plasma MicroRNA in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Brenu, Ekua W.; Ashton, Kevin J.; Batovska, Jana; Staines, Donald R.; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya M.

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are known to regulate many biological processes and their dysregulation has been associated with a variety of diseases including Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME). The recent discovery of stable and reproducible miRNA in plasma has raised the possibility that circulating miRNAs may serve as novel diagnostic markers. The objective of this study was to determine the role of plasma miRNA in CFS/ME. Results Using Illumina high-throughput sequencing we identified 19 miRNAs that were differentially expressed in the plasma of CFS/ME patients in comparison to non-fatigued controls. Following RT-qPCR analysis, we were able to confirm the significant up-regulation of three miRNAs (hsa-miR-127-3p, hsa-miR-142-5p and hsa-miR-143-3p) in the CFS/ME patients. Conclusion Our study is the first to identify circulating miRNAs from CFS/ME patients and also to confirm three differentially expressed circulating miRNAs in CFS/ME patients, providing a basis for further study to find useful CFS/ME biomarkers. PMID:25238588

  7. A High-Throughput Screen for Alpha Particle Radiation Protectants

    PubMed Central

    Seideman, Jonathan H.; Shum, David; Djaballah, Hakim

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Alpha-particle-emitting elements are of increasing importance as environmental and occupational carcinogens, toxic components of radiation dispersal devices and accidents, and potent therapeutics in oncology. Alpha particle radiation differs from radiations of lower linear energy transfer in that it predominantly damages DNA via direct action. Because of this, radical scavengers effective for other radiations have had only limited effect in mitigating alpha particle toxicity. We describe here a simple assay and a pilot screen of 3,119 compounds in a high-throughput screen (HTS), using the alpha-particle-emitting isotope, 225Ac, for the discovery of compounds that might protect mammalian cells from alpha particles through novel mechanisms. The assay, which monitored the viability of a myeloid leukemic cell line upon alpha particle exposure, was robust and reproducible, yielding a Z' factor of 0.66 and a signal-to-noise ratio of nearly 10 to 1. Surprisingly, 1 compound emerged from this screen, epoxy-4,5-α-dihydroxysantonin (EDHS), that showed considerable protective activity. While the value of EDHS remains to be determined, its discovery is a proof of concept and validation of the utility of this HTS methodology. Further application of the described assay could yield compounds useful in minimizing the toxicity and carcinogenesis associated with alpha particle exposure. PMID:20658946

  8. High-throughput screening in academia: the Harvard experience.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ross L

    2003-12-01

    To identify small-molecule modulators of biologic systems, academic scientists are beginning to use high-throughput screening (HTS) approaches that have traditionally been used only in industry. The HTS laboratories that are being established in universities, while differing in details of staffing, equipment, and size, have all been created to attain 1 or more of 3 principal goals: drug discovery, chemical genetics, or training. This article will examine the role that these activities play in 4 HTS laboratories that have been created within the academic community of Harvard Medical School and its affiliated institutions. First, the 3 activities will be defined with special attention paid to describing the impact they are having on how academic biologic science is conducted today. Next, the histories and operations of the 4 Harvard laboratories are reviewed. In the course of these summaries, emphasis is placed on understanding the motivational role that the 3 activities initially played in the creation of the 4 Harvard facilities and the roles that the activities continue to play in their day-to-day operations. Finally, several concerns are identified that must be attended to for the successful establishment and operation of an academic biologic science that has yet to be fully determined. HTS has the ability to provide the tools to test previously untestable hypotheses and can thereby allow the discovery of the unanticipated and the truly novel.

  9. Discovery and Characterization of Proteins Associated with Aflatoxin-Resistance: Evaluating Their Potential as Breeding Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host resistance has become a viable approach to eliminating aflatoxin contamination of maize since the discovery of several maize lines with natural resistance. However, to derive commercial benefit from this resistance and develop lines that can aid growers, markers need to be identified to facilit...

  10. Discovery and Validation of Hypermethylated Markers for Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiufeng; Li, Guodong; Dang, Shuwei; Zhou, Yuhui; Zeng, Kai; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most prevalent malignant tumors worldwide. Screening and early diagnosis are critical for the clinical management of this disease. DNA methylation changes have been regarded as promising biomarkers for CRC diagnosis. Here, we map DNA methylation profiling on CRC in six CRCs and paired normal samples using a 450 K bead array. Further analysis confirms the methylation status of candidates in two data sets from the Gene Expression Omnibus. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are calculated to determine the diagnostic performances. We identify 1549 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) showing differences in methylation between CRC and normal tissue. Two genes (ADD2 and AKR1B1), related to the DMRs, are selected for further validation. ROC curves show that the areas under the curves of ADD2 and AKR1B1 are higher than that of SEPT9, which has been clinically used as a screening biomarker of CRC. Our data suggests that aberrant DNA methylation of ADD2 and AKR1B1 could be potential screening markers of CRC. PMID:27493446

  11. Discovery and Validation of Hypermethylated Markers for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most prevalent malignant tumors worldwide. Screening and early diagnosis are critical for the clinical management of this disease. DNA methylation changes have been regarded as promising biomarkers for CRC diagnosis. Here, we map DNA methylation profiling on CRC in six CRCs and paired normal samples using a 450 K bead array. Further analysis confirms the methylation status of candidates in two data sets from the Gene Expression Omnibus. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are calculated to determine the diagnostic performances. We identify 1549 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) showing differences in methylation between CRC and normal tissue. Two genes (ADD2 and AKR1B1), related to the DMRs, are selected for further validation. ROC curves show that the areas under the curves of ADD2 and AKR1B1 are higher than that of SEPT9, which has been clinically used as a screening biomarker of CRC. Our data suggests that aberrant DNA methylation of ADD2 and AKR1B1 could be potential screening markers of CRC. PMID:27493446

  12. Data Analysis for High-Throughput RNAi Screening.

    PubMed

    Azorsa, David O; Turnidge, Megan A; Arora, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput RNA interference (HT-RNAi) screening is an effective technology to help identify important genes and pathways involved in a biological process. Analysis of high-throughput RNAi screening data is a critical part of this technology, and many analysis methods have been described. Here, we summarize the workflow and types of analyses commonly used in high-throughput RNAi screening. PMID:27581298

  13. High Throughput Screening and Selection Methods for Directed Enzyme Evolution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Successful evolutionary enzyme engineering requires a high throughput screening or selection method, which considerably increases the chance of obtaining desired properties and reduces the time and cost. In this review, a series of high throughput screening and selection methods are illustrated with significant and recent examples. These high throughput strategies are also discussed with an emphasis on compatibility with phenotypic analysis during directed enzyme evolution. Lastly, certain limitations of current methods, as well as future developments, are briefly summarized. PMID:26074668

  14. High throughput sample processing and automated scoring.

    PubMed

    Brunborg, Gunnar; Jackson, Petra; Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Dahl, Hildegunn; Azqueta, Amaya; Collins, Andrew R; Gutzkow, Kristine B

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a sensitive and versatile method for assessing DNA damage in cells. In the traditional version of the assay, there are many manual steps involved and few samples can be treated in one experiment. High throughput (HT) modifications have been developed during recent years, and they are reviewed and discussed. These modifications include accelerated scoring of comets; other important elements that have been studied and adapted to HT are cultivation and manipulation of cells or tissues before and after exposure, and freezing of treated samples until comet analysis and scoring. HT methods save time and money but they are useful also for other reasons: large-scale experiments may be performed which are otherwise not practicable (e.g., analysis of many organs from exposed animals, and human biomonitoring studies), and automation gives more uniform sample treatment and less dependence on operator performance. The HT modifications now available vary largely in their versatility, capacity, complexity, and costs. The bottleneck for further increase of throughput appears to be the scoring. PMID:25389434

  15. High-Throughput Enzyme Kinetics Using Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Lu; Edward S. Yeung

    2007-11-01

    We report a microanalytical method to study enzyme kinetics. The technique involves immobilizing horseradish peroxidase on a poly-L-lysine (PLL)- coated glass slide in a microarray format, followed by applying substrate solution onto the enzyme microarray. Enzyme molecules are immobilized on the PLL-coated glass slide through electrostatic interactions, and no further modification of the enzyme or glass slide is needed. In situ detection of the products generated on the enzyme spots is made possible by monitoring the light intensity of each spot using a scientific-grade charged-coupled device (CCD). Reactions of substrate solutions of various types and concentrations can be carried out sequentially on one enzyme microarray. To account for the loss of enzyme from washing in between runs, a standard substrate solution is used for calibration. Substantially reduced amounts of substrate solution are consumed for each reaction on each enzyme spot. The Michaelis constant K{sub m} obtained by using this method is comparable to the result for homogeneous solutions. Absorbance detection allows universal monitoring, and no chemical modification of the substrate is needed. High-throughput studies of native enzyme kinetics for multiple enzymes are therefore possible in a simple, rapid, and low-cost manner.

  16. Orthogonal NGS for High Throughput Clinical Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Chennagiri, Niru; White, Eric J; Frieden, Alexander; Lopez, Edgardo; Lieber, Daniel S; Nikiforov, Anastasia; Ross, Tristen; Batorsky, Rebecca; Hansen, Sherry; Lip, Va; Luquette, Lovelace J; Mauceli, Evan; Margulies, David; Milos, Patrice M; Napolitano, Nichole; Nizzari, Marcia M; Yu, Timothy; Thompson, John F

    2016-04-19

    Next generation sequencing is a transformative technology for discovering and diagnosing genetic disorders. However, high-throughput sequencing remains error-prone, necessitating variant confirmation in order to meet the exacting demands of clinical diagnostic sequencing. To address this, we devised an orthogonal, dual platform approach employing complementary target capture and sequencing chemistries to improve speed and accuracy of variant calls at a genomic scale. We combined DNA selection by bait-based hybridization followed by Illumina NextSeq reversible terminator sequencing with DNA selection by amplification followed by Ion Proton semiconductor sequencing. This approach yields genomic scale orthogonal confirmation of ~95% of exome variants. Overall variant sensitivity improves as each method covers thousands of coding exons missed by the other. We conclude that orthogonal NGS offers improvements in variant calling sensitivity when two platforms are used, better specificity for variants identified on both platforms, and greatly reduces the time and expense of Sanger follow-up, thus enabling physicians to act on genomic results more quickly.

  17. High-throughput rod-induced electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dezhi; Xiao, Zhiming; Teh, Kwok Siong; Han, Zhibin; Luo, Guoxi; Shi, Chuan; Sun, Daoheng; Zhao, Jinbao; Lin, Liwei

    2016-09-01

    A high throughput electrospinning process, directly from flat polymer solution surfaces induced by a moving insulating rod, has been proposed and demonstrated. Different rods made of either phenolic resin or paper with a diameter of 1–3 cm and a resistance of about 100–500 MΩ, has been successfully utilized in the process. The rod is placed approximately 10 mm above the flat polymer solution surface with a moving speed of 0.005–0.4 m s‑1 this causes the solution to generate multiple liquid jets under an applied voltage of 15–60 kV for the tip-less electrospinning process. The local electric field induced by the rod can boost electrohydrodynamic instability in order to generate Taylor cones and liquid jets. Experimentally, it is found that a large rod diameter and a small solution-to-rod distance can enhance the local electrical field to reduce the magnitude of the applied voltage. In the prototype setup with poly (ethylene oxide) polymer solution, an area of 5 cm  ×  10 cm and under an applied voltage of 60 kV, the maximum throughput of nanofibers is recorded to be approximately144 g m‑2 h‑1.

  18. Orthogonal NGS for High Throughput Clinical Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Chennagiri, Niru; White, Eric J.; Frieden, Alexander; Lopez, Edgardo; Lieber, Daniel S.; Nikiforov, Anastasia; Ross, Tristen; Batorsky, Rebecca; Hansen, Sherry; Lip, Va; Luquette, Lovelace J.; Mauceli, Evan; Margulies, David; Milos, Patrice M.; Napolitano, Nichole; Nizzari, Marcia M.; Yu, Timothy; Thompson, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing is a transformative technology for discovering and diagnosing genetic disorders. However, high-throughput sequencing remains error-prone, necessitating variant confirmation in order to meet the exacting demands of clinical diagnostic sequencing. To address this, we devised an orthogonal, dual platform approach employing complementary target capture and sequencing chemistries to improve speed and accuracy of variant calls at a genomic scale. We combined DNA selection by bait-based hybridization followed by Illumina NextSeq reversible terminator sequencing with DNA selection by amplification followed by Ion Proton semiconductor sequencing. This approach yields genomic scale orthogonal confirmation of ~95% of exome variants. Overall variant sensitivity improves as each method covers thousands of coding exons missed by the other. We conclude that orthogonal NGS offers improvements in variant calling sensitivity when two platforms are used, better specificity for variants identified on both platforms, and greatly reduces the time and expense of Sanger follow-up, thus enabling physicians to act on genomic results more quickly. PMID:27090146

  19. High-throughput rod-induced electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dezhi; Xiao, Zhiming; Teh, Kwok Siong; Han, Zhibin; Luo, Guoxi; Shi, Chuan; Sun, Daoheng; Zhao, Jinbao; Lin, Liwei

    2016-09-01

    A high throughput electrospinning process, directly from flat polymer solution surfaces induced by a moving insulating rod, has been proposed and demonstrated. Different rods made of either phenolic resin or paper with a diameter of 1-3 cm and a resistance of about 100-500 MΩ, has been successfully utilized in the process. The rod is placed approximately 10 mm above the flat polymer solution surface with a moving speed of 0.005-0.4 m s-1 this causes the solution to generate multiple liquid jets under an applied voltage of 15-60 kV for the tip-less electrospinning process. The local electric field induced by the rod can boost electrohydrodynamic instability in order to generate Taylor cones and liquid jets. Experimentally, it is found that a large rod diameter and a small solution-to-rod distance can enhance the local electrical field to reduce the magnitude of the applied voltage. In the prototype setup with poly (ethylene oxide) polymer solution, an area of 5 cm  ×  10 cm and under an applied voltage of 60 kV, the maximum throughput of nanofibers is recorded to be approximately144 g m-2 h-1.

  20. High-Throughput Screening in Primary Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Punita; Ando, D. Michael; Daub, Aaron; Kaye, Julia A.; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Despite years of incremental progress in our understanding of diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), there are still no disease-modifying therapeutics. The discrepancy between the number of lead compounds and approved drugs may partially be a result of the methods used to generate the leads and highlights the need for new technology to obtain more detailed and physiologically relevant information on cellular processes in normal and diseased states. Our high-throughput screening (HTS) system in a primary neuron model can help address this unmet need. HTS allows scientists to assay thousands of conditions in a short period of time which can reveal completely new aspects of biology and identify potential therapeutics in the span of a few months when conventional methods could take years or fail all together. HTS in primary neurons combines the advantages of HTS with the biological relevance of intact, fully differentiated neurons which can capture the critical cellular events or homeostatic states that make neurons uniquely susceptible to disease-associated proteins. We detail methodologies of our primary neuron HTS assay workflow from sample preparation to data reporting. We also discuss our adaptation of our HTS system into high-content screening (HCS), a type of HTS that uses multichannel fluorescence images to capture biological events in situ, and is uniquely suited to study dynamical processes in living cells. PMID:22341232

  1. Turning tumor-promoting copper into an anti-cancer weapon via high-throughput chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Jiao, P; Qi, M; Frezza, M; Dou, Q P; Yan, B

    2010-01-01

    Copper is an essential element for multiple biological processes. Its concentration is elevated to a very high level in cancer tissues for promoting cancer development through processes such as angiogenesis. Organic chelators of copper can passively reduce cellular copper and serve the role as inhibitors of angiogenesis. However, they can also actively attack cellular targets such as proteasome, which plays a critical role in cancer development and survival. The discovery of such molecules initially relied on a step by step synthesis followed by biological assays. Today high-throughput chemistry and high-throughput screening have significantly expedited the copper-binding molecules discovery to turn "cancer-promoting" copper into anti-cancer agents.

  2. Turning Tumor-Promoting Copper into an Anti-Cancer Weapon via High-Throughput Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, F.; Jiao, P.; Qi, M.; Frezza, M.; Dou, Q.P.; Yan, B.

    2013-01-01

    Copper is an essential element for multiple biological processes. Its concentration is elevated to a very high level in cancer tissues for promoting cancer development through processes such as angiogenesis. Organic chelators of copper can passively reduce cellular copper and serve the role as inhibitors of angiogenesis. However, they can also actively attack cellular targets such as proteasome, which plays a critical role in cancer development and survival. The discovery of such molecules initially relied on a step by step synthesis followed by biological assays. Today high-throughput chemistry and high-throughput screening have significantly expedited the copper-binding molecules discovery to turn “cancer-promoting” copper into anti-cancer agents. PMID:20586723

  3. A high-throughput-compatible assay to measure the degradation of endogenous Huntingtin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Lu, Ming-xing; Cui, Xiao-tian; Yang, He-qing; Yu, Shen-liang; Zhu, Jian-bin; Sun, Xiao-li; Lu, Boxun

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The accumulation of disease-causing proteins is a common hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders. Measuring the degradation of such proteins using high-throughput-compatible assays is highly desired for the identification of genetic and chemical modulators of degradation. For example, Huntington's disease (HD) is an incurable hereditary neurodegenerative disorder caused by the cytotoxicity of mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT). The high-throughput measurement of mHTT degradation is important in HD drug discovery and research. Existing methods for such purposes have limitations due to their dependence on protein tags or pan protein synthesis inhibitors. Here, we report a high-throughput-compatible pulse-chase method (CH-chase) for the measurement of endogenous tag-free huntingtin protein (HTT) degradation based on Click chemistry and Homogeneous Time Resolved Fluorescence (HTRF) technologies. Methods: The pulsed-labeled proteins were conjugated with biotin using the click reaction strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC), and the chase signals were calculated by measuring the reduction percentage of the HTT HTRF signals after pull-down with streptavidin beads. Results: We validated that the signals were within the linear detection range and were HTT-specific. We successfully measured the degradation of endogenous HTT in a high-throughput-compatible format using 96-well plates. The predicted changes of HTT degradation by known modifiers were observed, which confirmed that the assay is suitable for the identification of HTT degradation modifiers. Conclusion: We have established the first high-throughput-compatible assay capable of measuring endogenous, tag-free HTT degradation, providing a valuable tool for HD research and drug discovery. The method could be applied to other proteins and can facilitate research on other neurodegenerative disorders and proteinopathies. PMID:27264314

  4. Applications of high throughput (combinatorial) methodologies to electronic, magnetic, optical, and energy-related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Martin L.; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Hattrick-Simpers, Jason R.

    2013-06-01

    High throughput (combinatorial) materials science methodology is a relatively new research paradigm that offers the promise of rapid and efficient materials screening, optimization, and discovery. The paradigm started in the pharmaceutical industry but was rapidly adopted to accelerate materials research in a wide variety of areas. High throughput experiments are characterized by synthesis of a "library" sample that contains the materials variation of interest (typically composition), and rapid and localized measurement schemes that result in massive data sets. Because the data are collected at the same time on the same "library" sample, they can be highly uniform with respect to fixed processing parameters. This article critically reviews the literature pertaining to applications of combinatorial materials science for electronic, magnetic, optical, and energy-related materials. It is expected that high throughput methodologies will facilitate commercialization of novel materials for these critically important applications. Despite the overwhelming evidence presented in this paper that high throughput studies can effectively inform commercial practice, in our perception, it remains an underutilized research and development tool. Part of this perception may be due to the inaccessibility of proprietary industrial research and development practices, but clearly the initial cost and availability of high throughput laboratory equipment plays a role. Combinatorial materials science has traditionally been focused on materials discovery, screening, and optimization to combat the extremely high cost and long development times for new materials and their introduction into commerce. Going forward, combinatorial materials science will also be driven by other needs such as materials substitution and experimental verification of materials properties predicted by modeling and simulation, which have recently received much attention with the advent of the Materials Genome

  5. Development of a High-Throughput Functional Screen Using Nanowell-Assisted Cell Patterning.

    PubMed

    Ozkumur, Ayca Yalcin; Goods, Brittany A; Love, J Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Living-cell-based screens can facilitate lead discovery of functional therapeutics of interest. A versatile and scalable method is reported that uses dense arrays of nanowells for imparting defined patterns on monolayers of cells. It is shown that this approach can coordinate a multi-component biological assay by designing and implementing a high-throughput, functional nanoliter-scale neutralization assay to identify neutralizing antibodies against HIV.

  6. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    We have shown that by covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or equal to 1%, of a macromolecule with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification, and the presence of the probe at low concentrations does not affect the X-ray data quality or the crystallization behavior. The presence of the trace fluorescent label gives a number of advantages when used with high throughput crystallizations. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less bright precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries as the protein or protein structures is all that shows up. Fluorescence intensity is a faster search parameter, whether visually or by automated methods, than looking for crystalline features. We are now testing the use of high fluorescence intensity regions, in the absence of clear crystalline features or "hits", as a means for determining potential lead conditions. A working hypothesis is that kinetics leading to non-structured phases may overwhelm and trap more slowly formed ordered assemblies, which subsequently show up as regions of brighter fluorescence intensity. Preliminary experiments with test proteins have resulted in the extraction of a number of crystallization conditions from screening outcomes based solely on the presence of bright fluorescent regions. Subsequent experiments will test this approach using a wider

  7. A primer on high-throughput computing for genomic selection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Lin; Beissinger, Timothy M; Bauck, Stewart; Woodward, Brent; Rosa, Guilherme J M; Weigel, Kent A; Gatti, Natalia de Leon; Gianola, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput computing (HTC) uses computer clusters to solve advanced computational problems, with the goal of accomplishing high-throughput over relatively long periods of time. In genomic selection, for example, a set of markers covering the entire genome is used to train a model based on known data, and the resulting model is used to predict the genetic merit of selection candidates. Sophisticated models are very computationally demanding and, with several traits to be evaluated sequentially, computing time is long, and output is low. In this paper, we present scenarios and basic principles of how HTC can be used in genomic selection, implemented using various techniques from simple batch processing to pipelining in distributed computer clusters. Various scripting languages, such as shell scripting, Perl, and R, are also very useful to devise pipelines. By pipelining, we can reduce total computing time and consequently increase throughput. In comparison to the traditional data processing pipeline residing on the central processors, performing general-purpose computation on a graphics processing unit provide a new-generation approach to massive parallel computing in genomic selection. While the concept of HTC may still be new to many researchers in animal breeding, plant breeding, and genetics, HTC infrastructures have already been built in many institutions, such as the University of Wisconsin-Madison, which can be leveraged for genomic selection, in terms of central processing unit capacity, network connectivity, storage availability, and middleware connectivity. Exploring existing HTC infrastructures as well as general-purpose computing environments will further expand our capability to meet increasing computing demands posed by unprecedented genomic data that we have today. We anticipate that HTC will impact genomic selection via better statistical models, faster solutions, and more competitive products (e.g., from design of marker panels to realized

  8. A Primer on High-Throughput Computing for Genomic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Lin; Beissinger, Timothy M.; Bauck, Stewart; Woodward, Brent; Rosa, Guilherme J. M.; Weigel, Kent A.; Gatti, Natalia de Leon; Gianola, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput computing (HTC) uses computer clusters to solve advanced computational problems, with the goal of accomplishing high-throughput over relatively long periods of time. In genomic selection, for example, a set of markers covering the entire genome is used to train a model based on known data, and the resulting model is used to predict the genetic merit of selection candidates. Sophisticated models are very computationally demanding and, with several traits to be evaluated sequentially, computing time is long, and output is low. In this paper, we present scenarios and basic principles of how HTC can be used in genomic selection, implemented using various techniques from simple batch processing to pipelining in distributed computer clusters. Various scripting languages, such as shell scripting, Perl, and R, are also very useful to devise pipelines. By pipelining, we can reduce total computing time and consequently increase throughput. In comparison to the traditional data processing pipeline residing on the central processors, performing general-purpose computation on a graphics processing unit provide a new-generation approach to massive parallel computing in genomic selection. While the concept of HTC may still be new to many researchers in animal breeding, plant breeding, and genetics, HTC infrastructures have already been built in many institutions, such as the University of Wisconsin–Madison, which can be leveraged for genomic selection, in terms of central processing unit capacity, network connectivity, storage availability, and middleware connectivity. Exploring existing HTC infrastructures as well as general-purpose computing environments will further expand our capability to meet increasing computing demands posed by unprecedented genomic data that we have today. We anticipate that HTC will impact genomic selection via better statistical models, faster solutions, and more competitive products (e.g., from design of marker panels to realized

  9. High-Throughput Baculovirus Expression System for Membrane Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Kalathur, Ravi C; Panganiban, Marinela; Bruni, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The ease of use, robustness, cost-effectiveness, and posttranslational machinery make baculovirus expression system a popular choice for production of eukaryotic membrane proteins. This system can be readily adapted for high-throughput operations. This chapter outlines the techniques and procedures for cloning, transfection, small-scale production, and purification of membrane protein samples in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27485337

  10. New DNA Methylation Markers for Pancreatic Cancer: Discovery, Tissue Validation, and Pilot Testing in Pancreatic Juice

    PubMed Central

    Kisiel, John B.; Raimondo, Massimo; Taylor, William R.; Yab, Tracy C.; Mahoney, Douglas W.; Sun, Zhifu; Middha, Sumit; Baheti, Saurabh; Zou, Hongzhi; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Boardman, Lisa A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Ahlquist, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Discriminant markers for pancreatic cancer detection are needed. We sought to identify and validate methylated DNA markers for pancreatic cancer using next-generation sequencing unbiased by known targets. Experimental Design At a referral center, we conducted four sequential case-control studies: discovery, technical validation, biological validation, and clinical piloting. Candidate markers were identified using variance inflated logistic regression on reduced-representation bisulfite DNA sequencing results from matched pancreatic cancers, benign pancreas, and normal colon tissues. Markers were validated technically on replicate discovery study DNA and biologically on independent, matched, blinded tissues by methylation specific PCR. Clinical testing of 6 methylation candidates and mutant KRAS was performed on secretin-stimulated pancreatic juice samples from 61 pancreatic cancer patients, 22 with chronic pancreatitis and 19 with normal pancreas on endoscopic ultrasound. Areas under receiver operating characteristics curves (AUC) for markers were calculated. Results Sequencing identified >500 differentially hyper-methylated regions. On independent tissues, AUC on 19 selected markers ranged between 0.73 – 0.97. Pancreatic juice AUC values for CD1D, KCNK12, CLEC11A, NDRG4, IKZF1, PKRCB and KRAS were 0.92*, 0.88, 0.85, 0.85, 0.84, 0.83 and 0.75, respectively, for pancreatic cancer compared to normal pancreas and 0.92*, 0.73, 0.76, 0.85*, 0.73, 0.77 and 0.62 for pancreatic cancer compared to chronic pancreatitis (*p=0.001 vs KRAS). Conclusion We identified and validated novel DNA methylation markers strongly associated with pancreatic cancer. On pilot testing in pancreatic juice, best markers (especially CD1D) highly discriminated pancreatic cases from controls. PMID:26023084

  11. Virtual high throughput screening in new lead identification.

    PubMed

    Badrinarayan, Preethi; Sastry, G Narahari

    2011-12-01

    Drug discovery continues to be one of the greatest contemporary challenges and rational application of modelling approaches is the first important step to obtain lead compounds, which can be optimised further. Virtual high throughput screening (VHTS) is one of the efficient approaches to obtain lead structures for a given target. Strategic application of different screening filters like pharmacophore mapping, shape-based, ligand-based, molecular similarity etc., in combination with other drug design protocols provide invaluable insights in lead identification and optimization. Screening of large databases using these computational methods provides potential lead compounds, thus triggering a meaningful interplay between computations and experiments. In this review, we present a critical account on the relevance of molecular modelling approaches in general, lead optimization and virtual screening methods in particular for new lead identification. The importance of developing reliable scoring functions for non-bonded interactions has been highlighted, as it is an extremely important measure for the reliability of scoring function. The lead optimization and new lead design has also been illustrated with examples. The importance of employing a combination of general and target specific screening protocols has also been highlighted. PMID:21843146

  12. Multiplexing a high-throughput liability assay to leverage efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Herbst, John; Anthony, Monique; Stewart, Jeremy; Connors, David; Chen, Taosheng; Banks, Martyn; Petrillo, Edward W; Agler, Michele

    2009-06-01

    In order to identify potential cytochrome P-450 3A4 (drug-metabolizing enzyme) inducers at an early stage of the drug discovery process, a cell-based transactivation high-throughput luciferase reporter assay for the human pregnane X receptor (PXR) in HepG2 cells has been implemented and multiplexed with a viability end point for data interpretation, as part of a Lead Profiling portfolio of assays. As a routine part of Lead Profiling operations, assays are periodically evaluated for utility as well as for potential improvements in technology or process. We used a recent evaluation of our PXR-transactivation assay as a model for the application of Lean Thinking-based process analysis to lab-bench assay optimization and automation. This resulted in the development of a 384-well multiplexed homogeneous assay simultaneously detecting PXR transactivation and HepG2 cell cytotoxicity. In order to multiplex fluorescent and luminescent read-outs, modifications to each assay were necessary, which included optimization of multiple assay parameters such as cell density, plate type, and reagent concentrations. Subsequently, a set of compounds including known cytotoxic compounds and PXR inducers were used to validate the multiplexed assay. Results from the multiplexed assay correlate well with those from the singleplexed assay formats measuring PXR transactivation and viability separately. Implementation of the multiplexed assay for routine compound profiling provides improved data quality, sample conservation, cost savings, and resource efficiencies.

  13. High Throughput Profiling of Molecular Shapes in Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Peter R.; Thomas, Sajesh P.; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-02-01

    Molecular shape is important in both crystallisation and supramolecular assembly, yet its role is not completely understood. We present a computationally efficient scheme to describe and classify the molecular shapes in crystals. The method involves rotation invariant description of Hirshfeld surfaces in terms of of spherical harmonic functions. Hirshfeld surfaces represent the boundaries of a molecule in the crystalline environment, and are widely used to visualise and interpret crystalline interactions. The spherical harmonic description of molecular shapes are compared and classified by means of principal component analysis and cluster analysis. When applied to a series of metals, the method results in a clear classification based on their lattice type. When applied to around 300 crystal structures comprising of series of substituted benzenes, naphthalenes and phenylbenzamide it shows the capacity to classify structures based on chemical scaffolds, chemical isosterism, and conformational similarity. The computational efficiency of the method is demonstrated with an application to over 14 thousand crystal structures. High throughput screening of molecular shapes and interaction surfaces in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) using this method has direct applications in drug discovery, supramolecular chemistry and materials design.

  14. Measuring intracellular calcium fluxes in high throughput mode.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Chris; Smith, Fiona; Williams, Christine; Marcos, Sandra; Liu, Zhen Han; Hayter, Paul; Ciaramella, Giuseppe; Keighley, Wilma; Gribbon, Phil; Sewing, Andreas

    2003-06-01

    The measurement of intracellular calcium fluxes in real time is widely applied within the pharmaceutical industry to measure the activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRhyp;s), either for pharmacological characterisation or to screen for new surrogate ligands. Initially restricted to G(q) coupled GPCRs, the introduction of promiscuous and chimeric G-proteins has further widened the application of these assays. The development of new calcium sensitive dyes and assays has provided sensitive, homogeneous assays which can be readily applied to high throughput screening (HTS). In this paper we describe the full automation of this assay type using a fluorometric imaging plate reader (FLIPR ) integrated into a Beckman/Sagian system to establish a simple robotic system that is well suited for the current medium throughput screening in this area of lead discovery. Using a recently completed HTS we discuss important determinants for FLIPR based screening, highlight some limitations of the current approach, and look at the requirements for future automated systems capable of keeping up with expanding compound files.

  15. Comprehensive analysis of high-throughput screening data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyse, Stephan

    2002-06-01

    High-Throughput Screening (HTS) data in its entirety is a valuable raw material for the drug-discovery process. It provides the most compete information about the biological activity of a company's compounds. However, its quantity, complexity and heterogeneity require novel, sophisticated approaches in data analysis. At GeneData, we are developing methods for large-scale, synoptical mining of screening data in a five-step analysis: (1) Quality Assurance: Checking data for experimental artifacts and eliminating low quality data. (2) Biological Profiling: Clustering and ranking of compounds based on their biological activity, taking into account specific characteristics of HTS data. (3) Rule-based Classification: Applying user-defined rules to biological and chemical properties, and providing hypotheses on the biological mode-of-action of compounds. (4) Joint Biological-Chemical Analysis: Associating chemical compound data to HTS data, providing hypotheses for structure- activity relationships. (5) integration with Genomic and Gene Expression Data: Linking into other components of GeneData's bioinformatics platform, and assessing the compounds' modes-of-action, toxicity, and metabolic properties. These analyses address issues that are crucial for a correct interpretation and full exploitation of screening data. They lead to a sound rating of assays and compounds at an early state of the lead-finding process.

  16. High Throughput Profiling of Molecular Shapes in Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Spackman, Peter R.; Thomas, Sajesh P.; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular shape is important in both crystallisation and supramolecular assembly, yet its role is not completely understood. We present a computationally efficient scheme to describe and classify the molecular shapes in crystals. The method involves rotation invariant description of Hirshfeld surfaces in terms of of spherical harmonic functions. Hirshfeld surfaces represent the boundaries of a molecule in the crystalline environment, and are widely used to visualise and interpret crystalline interactions. The spherical harmonic description of molecular shapes are compared and classified by means of principal component analysis and cluster analysis. When applied to a series of metals, the method results in a clear classification based on their lattice type. When applied to around 300 crystal structures comprising of series of substituted benzenes, naphthalenes and phenylbenzamide it shows the capacity to classify structures based on chemical scaffolds, chemical isosterism, and conformational similarity. The computational efficiency of the method is demonstrated with an application to over 14 thousand crystal structures. High throughput screening of molecular shapes and interaction surfaces in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) using this method has direct applications in drug discovery, supramolecular chemistry and materials design. PMID:26908351

  17. High-throughput screening technologies for drug glucuronidation profiling.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, Olga; Finel, Moshe; Trubetskoy, Vladimir

    2008-08-01

    A significant number of endogenous and exogenous compounds, including many therapeutic agents, are metabolized in humans via glucuronidation, catalysed by uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). The study of the UGTs is a growing field of research, with constantly accumulated and updated information regarding UGT structure, purification, substrate specificity and inhibition, including clinically relevant drug interactions. Development of reliable UGT assays for the assessment of individual isoform substrate specificity and for the discovery of novel isoform-specific substrates and inhibitors is crucial for understanding the function and regulation of the UGT enzyme family and its clinical and pharmacological relevance. High-throughput screening (HTS) is a powerful technology used to search for novel substrates and inhibitors for a wide variety of targets. However, application of HTS in the context of UGTs is complicated because of the poor stability, low levels of expression, low affinity and broad substrate specificity of the enzymes, combined with difficulties in obtaining individual UGT isoforms in purified format, and insufficient information regarding isoform-specific substrates and inhibitors. This review examines the current status of HTS assays used in the search for novel UGT substrates and inhibitors, emphasizing advancements and challenges in HTS technologies for drug glucuronidation profiling, and discusses possible avenues for future advancement of the field.

  18. High Throughput Profiling of Molecular Shapes in Crystals.

    PubMed

    Spackman, Peter R; Thomas, Sajesh P; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular shape is important in both crystallisation and supramolecular assembly, yet its role is not completely understood. We present a computationally efficient scheme to describe and classify the molecular shapes in crystals. The method involves rotation invariant description of Hirshfeld surfaces in terms of of spherical harmonic functions. Hirshfeld surfaces represent the boundaries of a molecule in the crystalline environment, and are widely used to visualise and interpret crystalline interactions. The spherical harmonic description of molecular shapes are compared and classified by means of principal component analysis and cluster analysis. When applied to a series of metals, the method results in a clear classification based on their lattice type. When applied to around 300 crystal structures comprising of series of substituted benzenes, naphthalenes and phenylbenzamide it shows the capacity to classify structures based on chemical scaffolds, chemical isosterism, and conformational similarity. The computational efficiency of the method is demonstrated with an application to over 14 thousand crystal structures. High throughput screening of molecular shapes and interaction surfaces in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) using this method has direct applications in drug discovery, supramolecular chemistry and materials design. PMID:26908351

  19. Automatic Dendritic Length Quantification for High Throughput Screening of Mature Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Smafield, Timothy; Pasupuleti, Venkat; Sharma, Kamal; Huganir, Richard L.; Ye, Bing

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput automated fluorescent imaging and screening are important for studying neuronal development, functions, and pathogenesis. An automatic approach of analyzing images acquired in automated fashion, and quantifying dendritic characteristics is critical for making such screens high-throughput. However, automatic and effective algorithms and tools, especially for the images of mature mammalian neurons with complex arbors, have been lacking. Here, we present algorithms and a tool for quantifying dendritic length that is fundamental for analyzing growth of neuronal network. We employ a divide-and-conquer framework that tackles the challenges of high-throughput images of neurons and enables the integration of multiple automatic algorithms. Within this framework, we developed algorithms that adapt to local properties to detect faint branches. We also developed a path search that can preserve the curvature change to accurately measure dendritic length with arbor branches and turns. In addition, we proposed an ensemble strategy of three estimation algorithms to further improve the overall efficacy. We tested our tool on images for cultured mouse hippocampal neurons immunostained with a dendritic marker for high-throughput screen. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed method when comparing the accuracy with previous methods. The software has been implemented as an ImageJ plugin and available for use. PMID:25854493

  20. High-throughput measurements of the optical redox ratio using a commercial microplate reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Taylor M.; Shah, Amy T.; Walsh, Alex J.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for accurate, high-throughput, functional measures to gauge the efficacy of potential drugs in living cells. As an early marker of drug response in cells, cellular metabolism provides an attractive platform for high-throughput drug testing. Optical techniques can noninvasively monitor NADH and FAD, two autofluorescent metabolic coenzymes. The autofluorescent redox ratio, defined as the autofluorescence intensity of NADH divided by that of FAD, quantifies relative rates of cellular glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. However, current microscopy methods for redox ratio quantification are time-intensive and low-throughput, limiting their practicality in drug screening. Alternatively, high-throughput commercial microplate readers quickly measure fluorescence intensities for hundreds of wells. This study found that a commercial microplate reader can differentiate the receptor status of breast cancer cell lines (p<0.05) based on redox ratio measurements without extrinsic contrast agents. Furthermore, microplate reader redox ratio measurements resolve response (p<0.05) and lack of response (p>0.05) in cell lines that are responsive and nonresponsive, respectively, to the breast cancer drug trastuzumab. These studies indicate that the microplate readers can be used to measure the redox ratio in a high-throughput manner and are sensitive enough to detect differences in cellular metabolism that are consistent with microscopy results.

  1. High throughput combinatorial screening of semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Samuel S.

    2011-11-01

    This article provides an overview of an advanced combinatorial material discovery platform developed recently for screening semiconductor materials with properties that may have applications ranging from radiation detectors to solar cells. Semiconductor thin-film libraries, each consisting of 256 materials of different composition arranged into a 16×16 matrix, were fabricated using laser-assisted evaporation process along with a combinatorial mechanism to achieve variations. The composition and microstructure of individual materials on each thin-film library were characterized with an integrated scanning micro-beam x-ray fluorescence and diffraction system, while the band gaps were determined by scanning optical reflection and transmission of the libraries. An ultrafast ultraviolet photon-induced charge probe was devised to measure the mobility and lifetime of individual thin-film materials on semiconductor libraries. Selected results on the discovery of semiconductors with desired band gaps and transport properties are illustrated.

  2. High Throughput Screening for Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv

    PubMed Central

    ANANTHAN, SUBRAMANIAM; FAALEOLEA, ELLEN R.; GOLDMAN, ROBERT C.; HOBRATH, JUDITH V.; KWONG, CECIL D.; LAUGHON, BARBARA E.; MADDRY, JOSEPH A.; MEHTA, ALKA; RASMUSSEN, LYNN; REYNOLDS, ROBERT C.; SECRIST, JOHN A.; SHINDO, NICE; SHOWE, DUSTIN N.; SOSA, MELINDA I.; SULING, WILLIAM J.; WHITE, E. LUCILE

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY There is an urgent need for the discovery and development of new antitubercular agents that target new biochemical pathways and treat drug resistant forms of the disease. One approach to addressing this need is through high throughput screening of medicinally relevant libraries against the whole bacterium in order to discover a variety of new, active scaffolds that will stimulate new biological research and drug discovery. Through the Tuberculosis Antimicrobial Acquisition and Coordinating Facility (www.taacf.org), a large, medicinally relevant chemical library was screened against M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv. The screening methods and a medicinal chemistry analysis of the results are reported herein. PMID:19758845

  3. The Autism Sequencing Consortium: Large scale, high throughput sequencing in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Buxbaum, J. D.; Daly, M. J.; Devlin, B.; Lehner, T.; Roeder, K.; State, M. W.

    2013-01-01

    Research during the past decade has seen significant progress toward a model for the genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), with gene discovery accelerating as the characterization of genomic variation has become increasingly comprehensive. At the same time this research has highlighted ongoing challenges. Here we address the enormous impact of high throughput sequencing (HTS) on ASD gene discovery, outline a consensus view for leveraging this technology, and describe a large multi-site collaboration developed to accomplish these goals. Similar approaches could prove effective for severe neurodevelopmental disorders more broadly. PMID:23259942

  4. High-throughput sequencing approach uncovers the miRNome of peritoneal endometriotic lesions and adjacent healthy tissues.

    PubMed

    Saare, Merli; Rekker, Kadri; Laisk-Podar, Triin; Sõritsa, Deniss; Roost, Anne Mari; Simm, Jaak; Velthut-Meikas, Agne; Samuel, Külli; Metsalu, Tauno; Karro, Helle; Sõritsa, Andrei; Salumets, Andres; Peters, Maire

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating data have shown the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in endometriosis pathogenesis. In this study, we used a novel approach to determine the endometriotic lesion-specific miRNAs by high-throughput small RNA sequencing of paired samples of peritoneal endometriotic lesions and matched healthy surrounding tissues together with eutopic endometria of the same patients. We found five miRNAs specific to epithelial cells--miR-34c, miR-449a, miR-200a, miR-200b and miR-141 showing significantly higher expression in peritoneal endometriotic lesions compared to healthy peritoneal tissues. We also determined the expression levels of miR-200 family target genes E-cadherin, ZEB1 and ZEB2 and found that the expression level of E-cadherin was significantly higher in endometriotic lesions compared to healthy tissues. Further evaluation verified that studied miRNAs could be used as diagnostic markers for confirming the presence of endometrial cells in endometriotic lesion biopsy samples. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the miRNA profile of peritoneal endometriotic lesion biopsies is largely masked by the surrounding peritoneal tissue, challenging the discovery of an accurate lesion-specific miRNA profile. Taken together, our findings indicate that only particular miRNAs with a significantly higher expression in endometriotic cells can be detected from lesion biopsies, and can serve as diagnostic markers for endometriosis.

  5. Microfluidic-Enabled Print-to-Screen Platform for High-Throughput Screening of Combinatorial Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuzhe; Li, Jiannan; Xiao, Wenwu; Xiao, Kai; Lee, Joyce; Bhardwaj, Urvashi; Zhu, Zijie; Digiglio, Philip; Yang, Gaomai; Lam, Kit S; Pan, Tingrui

    2015-10-20

    Since the 1960s, combination chemotherapy has been widely utilized as a standard method to treat cancer. However, because of the potentially enormous number of drug candidates and combinations, conventional identification methods of the effective drug combinations are usually associated with significantly high operational costs, low throughput screening, laborious and time-consuming procedures, and ethical concerns. In this paper, we present a low-cost, high-efficiency microfluidic print-to-screen (P2S) platform, which integrates combinatorial screening with biomolecular printing for high-throughput screening of anticancer drug combinations. This P2S platform provides several distinct advantages and features, including automatic combinatorial printing, high-throughput parallel drug screening, modular disposable cartridge, and biocompatibility, which can potentially speed up the entire discovery cycle of potent drug combinations. Microfluidic impact printing utilizing plug-and-play microfluidic cartridges is experimentally characterized with controllable droplet volume and accurate positioning. Furthermore, the combinatorial print-to-screen assay is demonstrated in a proof-of-concept biological experiment which can identify the positive hits among the entire drug combination library in a parallel and rapid manner. Overall, this microfluidic print-to-screen platform offers a simple, low-cost, high-efficiency solution for high-throughput large-scale combinatorial screening and can be applicable for various emerging applications in drug cocktail discovery. PMID:26334956

  6. Bioinformatics of Cancer ncRNA in High Throughput Sequencing: Present State and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Natasha Andressa Nogueira; Ferreira, Carlos Gil; Passetti, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    The numerous genome sequencing projects produced unprecedented amount of data providing significant information to the discovery of novel non-coding RNA (ncRNA). Several ncRNAs have been described to control gene expression and display important role during cell differentiation and homeostasis. In the last decade, high throughput methods in conjunction with approaches in bioinformatics have been used to identify, classify, and evaluate the expression of hundreds of ncRNA in normal and pathological states, such as cancer. Patient outcomes have been already associated with differential expression of ncRNAs in normal and tumoral tissues, providing new insights in the development of innovative therapeutic strategies in oncology. In this review, we present and discuss bioinformatics advances in the development of computational approaches to analyze and discover ncRNA data in oncology using high throughput sequencing technologies. PMID:23251139

  7. Evaluation of high-throughput assays for in vitro drug susceptibility testing of Tritrichomonas foetus trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Bader, Chris; Jesudoss Chelladurai, Jeba; Thompson, Kylie; Hall, Cindy; Carlson, Steve A; Brewer, Matthew T

    2016-06-15

    Tritrichomonas foetus is a sexually transmitted protozoan parasite that causes abortions in cattle and results in severe economic losses. In the United States, there are no safe and effective treatments for this parasite and infected animals are typically culled. In order to expedite drug discovery efforts, we investigated in vitro trophozoite killing assays amenable to high-throughput screening in 96 well plate formats. We evaluated the reduction of resorufin, incorporation of propidium iodide, and a luminescence-based ATP detection assay. Of these methods, reduction of resorufin was found to be the most reliable predictor of trophozoite concentrations. We further validated this method by conducting dose-response experiments suitable for calculation of EC50 values for two established compounds with known activity against trophozoites in vitro, namely, metronidazole and ronidazole. Our results demonstrate that the resorufin method is suitable for high-throughput screening and could be used to enhance efforts targeting new treatments for bovine trichomoniasis. PMID:27198774

  8. Miniature high-throughput chemosensing of yield, ee, and absolute configuration from crude reaction mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Keith W.; Zhang, Peng; Wolf, Christian

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput experimentation (HTE) has emerged as a widely used technology that accelerates discovery and optimization processes with parallel small-scale reaction setups. A high-throughput screening (HTS) method capable of comprehensive analysis of crude asymmetric reaction mixtures (eliminating product derivatization or isolation) would provide transformative impact by matching the pace of HTE. We report how spontaneous in situ construction of stereodynamic metal probes from readily available, inexpensive starting materials can be applied to chiroptical chemosensing of the total amount, enantiomeric excess (ee), and absolute configuration of a wide variety of amines, diamines, amino alcohols, amino acids, carboxylic acids, α-hydroxy acids, and diols. This advance and HTS potential are highlighted with the analysis of 1 mg of crude reaction mixtures of a catalytic asymmetric reaction. This operationally simple assay uses a robust mix-and-measure protocol, is amenable to microscale platforms and automation, and provides critical time efficiency and sustainability advantages over traditional serial methods. PMID:26933684

  9. Life in the fast lane: high-throughput chemistry for lead generation and optimisation.

    PubMed

    Hunter, D

    2001-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has come under increasing pressure due to regulatory restrictions on the marketing and pricing of drugs, competition, and the escalating costs of developing new drugs. These forces can be addressed by the identification of novel targets, reductions in the development time of new drugs, and increased productivity. Emphasis has been placed on identifying and validating new targets and on lead generation: the response from industry has been very evident in genomics and high throughput screening, where new technologies have been applied, usually coupled with a high degree of automation. The combination of numerous new potential biological targets and the ability to screen large numbers of compounds against many of these targets has generated the need for large diverse compound collections. To address this requirement, high-throughput chemistry has become an integral part of the drug discovery process.

  10. High-throughput approaches for evaluating absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties of lead compounds.

    PubMed

    Tarbit, M H; Berman, J

    1998-06-01

    Combinatorial chemistry methods and high-throughput screening for leads in industrial drug discovery have generated a potential bottleneck in the optimisation processes that seek to align potency with good pharmacokinetics in order to produce good medicines. This has resulted in the need for higher throughput methods of screening for absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties. Significant progress has been made in throughput of in vivo pharmacokinetic studies, with the introduction of cassette, or multiple-in-one, protocols. In this technique, typically up to ten compounds are administered in one dose and analysed concomitantly on the mass spectrometer. High-throughput methods in in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion are less well-developed as yet, and current approaches comprise automation of well-established methods for absorption using cell lines and metabolism using liver microsomes.

  11. High-Throughput Quantification of Bioactive Lipids by MALDI Mass Spectrometry: Application to Prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Joseph D.; Reyzer, Michelle L.; Latham, Joey C.; Weaver, C. David; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis and quantification of analytes in biological systems is a critical component of metabolomic investigations of cell function. The most widely used methods employ chromatographic separation followed by mass spectrometric analysis, which requires significant time for sample preparation and sequential chromatography. We introduce a novel high-throughput, separation-free methodology based on MALDI mass spectrometry that allows for the parallel analysis of targeted metabolomes. Proof-of-concept is demonstrated by analysis of prostaglandins and glyceryl prostaglandins. Derivatization to incorporate a charged moiety into ketone-containing prostaglandins dramatically increases the signal-to-noise ratio relative to underivatized samples. This resulted in an increased dynamic range (15 fmol – 2000 fmol on plate) and improved linearity (r2= 0.99). The method was adapted for high-throughput screening methods for enzymology and drug discovery. Application to cellular metabolomics was also demonstrated. PMID:21770391

  12. High-throughput synthesis and screening of photon absorbers and photocatalysts for solar fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, Slobodan; Marcin, Martin; Lin, Sean; Jin, Jian

    2012-02-01

    Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis is a D.O.E. Energy Innovation Hub conceived to develop solar fuel cell technologies by bringing together the critical mass of scientist and engineers nationwide. The High-Throughput Experimentation group at JCAP is developing pipelines for accelerated discovery of new materials - photon absorbers, photoelectrochemical and electrochemical catalysts - using combinatorial approaches (ink-jet, sol-gel, physical vapor deposition). Thin films of semiconducting metal-oxides, sulfides, nitrides and phosphides are synthesized and screened in high-throughput according to their optical and photoelectrochemical properties, as well as structure and phase. Vast libraries of materials and data are generated and made available to inside and outside research groups. Here we present data on binary, ternary and quaternary metal-oxide systems prepared by the ink-jet technology. The systems include tungsten-based photo-absorbers and nickel-iron-based catalysts for water splitting.

  13. High-Throughput Sequencing in Mitochondrial DNA Research

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fei; Samuels, David C.; Clark, Travis; Guo, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing, also known as high-throughput sequencing, has greatly enhanced researchers’ ability to conduct biomedical research on all levels. Mitochondrial research has also benefitted greatly from high-throughput sequencing; sequencing technology now allows for screening of all 16569 base pairs of the mitochondrial genome simultaneously for SNPs and low level heteroplasmy and, in some cases, the estimation of mitochondrial DNA copy number. It is important to realize the full potential of high-throughput sequencing for the advancement of mitochondrial research. To this end, we review how high-throughput sequencing has impacted mitochondrial research in the categories of SNPs, low level heteroplasmy, copy number, and structural variants. We also discuss the different types of mitochondrial DNA sequencing and their pros and cons. Based on previous studies conducted by various groups, we provide strategies for processing mitochondrial DNA sequencing data, including assembly, variant calling, and quality control. PMID:24859348

  14. High-Throughput Pharmacokinetics for Environmental Chemicals (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput screening (HTS) promises to allow prioritization of thousands of environmental chemicals with little or no in vivo information. For bioactivity identified by HTS, toxicokinetic (TK) models are essential to predict exposure thresholds below which no significant bio...

  15. High-throughput sequencing in mitochondrial DNA research.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Samuels, David C; Clark, Travis; Guo, Yan

    2014-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing, also known as high-throughput sequencing, has greatly enhanced researchers' ability to conduct biomedical research on all levels. Mitochondrial research has also benefitted greatly from high-throughput sequencing; sequencing technology now allows for screening of all 16,569 base pairs of the mitochondrial genome simultaneously for SNPs and low level heteroplasmy and, in some cases, the estimation of mitochondrial DNA copy number. It is important to realize the full potential of high-throughput sequencing for the advancement of mitochondrial research. To this end, we review how high-throughput sequencing has impacted mitochondrial research in the categories of SNPs, low level heteroplasmy, copy number, and structural variants. We also discuss the different types of mitochondrial DNA sequencing and their pros and cons. Based on previous studies conducted by various groups, we provide strategies for processing mitochondrial DNA sequencing data, including assembly, variant calling, and quality control.

  16. AOPs & Biomarkers: Bridging High Throughput Screening and Regulatory Decision Making.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As high throughput screening (HTS) approaches play a larger role in toxicity testing, computational toxicology has emerged as a critical component in interpreting the large volume of data produced. Computational models for this purpose are becoming increasingly more sophisticated...

  17. Development of A High Throughput Method Incorporating Traditional Analytical Devices

    PubMed Central

    White, C. C.; Embree, E.; Byrd, W. E; Patel, A. R.

    2004-01-01

    A high-throughput (high throughput is the ability to process large numbers of samples) and companion informatics system has been developed and implemented. High throughput is defined as the ability to autonomously evaluate large numbers of samples, while an informatics system provides the software control of the physical devices, in addition to the organization and storage of the generated electronic data. This high throughput system includes both an ultra-violet and visible light spectrometer (UV-Vis) and a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) integrated with a multi sample positioning table. This method is designed to quantify changes in polymeric materials occurring from controlled temperature, humidity and high flux UV exposures. The integration of the software control of these analytical instruments within a single computer system is presented. Challenges in enhancing the system to include additional analytical devices are discussed. PMID:27366626

  18. HIGH THROUGHPUT ASSESSMENTS OF CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput approaches for quantifying chemical hazard, exposure, and sustainability have the potential to dramatically impact the pace and nature of risk assessments. Integrated evaluation strategies developed at the US EPA incorporate inherency,bioactivity,bioavailability, ...

  19. Evaluating Rapid Models for High-Throughput Exposure Forecasting (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput exposure screening models can provide quantitative predictions for thousands of chemicals; however these predictions must be systematically evaluated for predictive ability. Without the capability to make quantitative, albeit uncertain, forecasts of exposure, the ...

  20. Development of an efficient transformation method by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and high throughput spray assay to identify transgenic plants for woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) using NPTII selection.

    PubMed

    Pantazis, Christopher J; Fisk, Sarah; Mills, Kerri; Flinn, Barry S; Shulaev, Vladimir; Veilleux, Richard E; Dan, Yinghui

    2013-03-01

    KEY MESSAGE : We developed an efficient Agrobacterium -mediated transformation method using an Ac/Ds transposon tagging construct for F. vesca and high throughput paromomycin spray assay to identify its transformants for strawberry functional genomics. Genomic resources for Rosaceae species are now readily available, including the Fragaria vesca genome, EST sequences, markers, linkage maps, and physical maps. The Rosaceae Genomic Executive Committee has promoted strawberry as a translational genomics model due to its unique biological features and transformability for fruit trait improvement. Our overall research goal is to use functional genomic and metabolic approaches to pursue high throughput gene discovery in the diploid woodland strawberry. F. vesca offers several advantages of a fleshy fruit typical of most fruit crops, short life cycle (seed to seed in 12-16 weeks), small genome size (206 Mbb/C), small plant size, self-compatibility, and many seeds per plant. We have developed an efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated strawberry transformation method using kanamycin selection, and high throughput paromomycin spray assay to efficiently identify transgenic strawberry plants. Using our kanamycin transformation method, we were able to produce up to 98 independent kanamycin resistant insertional mutant lines using a T-DNA construct carrying an Ac/Ds transposon Launchpad system from a single transformation experiment involving inoculation of 22 leaf explants of F. vesca accession 551572 within approx. 11 weeks (from inoculation to soil). Transgenic plants with 1-2 copies of a transgene were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Using our paromomycin spray assay, transgenic F. vesca plants were rapidly identified within 10 days after spraying.

  1. A versatile toolkit for high throughput functional genomics with Trichoderma reesei

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Andre; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Collett, James R.; Baker, Scott E.; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P.; Schmoll, Monika

    2012-01-02

    The ascomycete fungus, Trichoderma reesei (anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina), represents a biotechnological workhorse and is currently one of the most proficient cellulase producers. While strain improvement was traditionally accomplished by random mutagenesis, a detailed understanding of cellulase regulation can only be gained using recombinant technologies. RESULTS: Aiming at high efficiency and high throughput methods, we present here a construction kit for gene knock out in T. reesei. We provide a primer database for gene deletion using the pyr4, amdS and hph selection markers. For high throughput generation of gene knock outs, we constructed vectors using yeast mediated recombination and then transformed a T. reesei strain deficient in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) by spore electroporation. This NHEJ-defect was subsequently removed by crossing of mutants with a sexually competent strain derived from the parental strain, QM9414.CONCLUSIONS:Using this strategy and the materials provided, high throughput gene deletion in T. reesei becomes feasible. Moreover, with the application of sexual development, the NHEJ-defect can be removed efficiently and without the need for additional selection markers. The same advantages apply for the construction of multiple mutants by crossing of strains with different gene deletions, which is now possible with considerably less hands-on time and minimal screening effort compared to a transformation approach. Consequently this toolkit can considerably boost research towards efficient exploitation of the resources of T. reesei for cellulase expression and hence second generation biofuel production.

  2. Applications of Biophysics in High-Throughput Screening Hit Validation.

    PubMed

    Genick, Christine Clougherty; Barlier, Danielle; Monna, Dominique; Brunner, Reto; Bé, Céline; Scheufler, Clemens; Ottl, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    For approximately a decade, biophysical methods have been used to validate positive hits selected from high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns with the goal to verify binding interactions using label-free assays. By applying label-free readouts, screen artifacts created by compound interference and fluorescence are discovered, enabling further characterization of the hits for their target specificity and selectivity. The use of several biophysical methods to extract this type of high-content information is required to prevent the promotion of false positives to the next level of hit validation and to select the best candidates for further chemical optimization. The typical technologies applied in this arena include dynamic light scattering, turbidometry, resonance waveguide, surface plasmon resonance, differential scanning fluorimetry, mass spectrometry, and others. Each technology can provide different types of information to enable the characterization of the binding interaction. Thus, these technologies can be incorporated in a hit-validation strategy not only according to the profile of chemical matter that is desired by the medicinal chemists, but also in a manner that is in agreement with the target protein's amenability to the screening format. Here, we present the results of screening strategies using biophysics with the objective to evaluate the approaches, discuss the advantages and challenges, and summarize the benefits in reference to lead discovery. In summary, the biophysics screens presented here demonstrated various hit rates from a list of ~2000 preselected, IC50-validated hits from HTS (an IC50 is the inhibitor concentration at which 50% inhibition of activity is observed). There are several lessons learned from these biophysical screens, which will be discussed in this article.

  3. Roadmap and standard operating procedures for biobanking and discovery of neurochemical markers in ALS.

    PubMed

    Otto, Markus; Bowser, Robert; Turner, Martin; Berry, James; Brettschneider, Johannes; Connor, James; Costa, Júlia; Cudkowicz, Merit; Glass, Jonathan; Jahn, Olaf; Lehnert, Stefan; Malaspina, Andrea; Parnetti, Lucilla; Petzold, Axel; Shaw, Pamela; Sherman, Alexander; Steinacker, Petra; Süssmuth, Sigurd; Teunissen, Charlotte; Tumani, Hayrettin; Wuolikainen, Anna; Ludolph, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Despite major advances in deciphering the neuropathological hallmarks of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), validated neurochemical biomarkers for monitoring disease activity, earlier diagnosis, defining prognosis and unlocking key pathophysiological pathways are lacking. Although several candidate biomarkers exist, translation into clinical application is hindered by small sample numbers, especially longitudinal, for independent verification. This review considers the potential routes to the discovery of neurochemical markers in ALS, and provides a consensus statement on standard operating procedures that will facilitate multicenter collaboration, validation and ultimately clinical translation. PMID:22214350

  4. High-throughput Protein Purification and Quality Assessment for Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngchang; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Eschenfeldt, William H.; Li, Hui; Maltseva, Natalia; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Gu, Minyi; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Wu, Ruiying; An, Hao; Chhor, Gekleng; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate goal of structural biology is to understand the structural basis of proteins in cellular processes. In structural biology, the most critical issue is the availability of high-quality samples. “Structural biology-grade” proteins must be generated in the quantity and quality suitable for structure determination using X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The purification procedures must reproducibly yield homogeneous proteins or their derivatives containing marker atom(s) in milligram quantities. The choice of protein purification and handling procedures plays a critical role in obtaining high-quality protein samples. With structural genomics emphasizing a genome-based approach in understanding protein structure and function, a number of unique structures covering most of the protein folding space have been determined and new technologies with high efficiency have been developed. At the Midwest Center for Structural Genomics (MCSG), we have developed semi-automated protocols for high-throughput parallel protein expression and purification. A protein, expressed as a fusion with a cleavable affinity tag, is purified in two consecutive immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) steps: (i) the first step is an IMAC coupled with buffer-exchange, or size exclusion chromatography (IMAC-I), followed by the cleavage of the affinity tag using the highly specific Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease; [1] the second step is IMAC and buffer exchange (IMAC-II) to remove the cleaved tag and tagged TEV protease. These protocols have been implemented on multidimensional chromatography workstations and, as we have shown, many proteins can be successfully produced in large-scale. All methods and protocols used for purification, some developed by MCSG, others adopted and integrated into the MCSG purification pipeline and more recently the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID) purification pipeline, are

  5. Anchored hybrid enrichment for massively high-throughput phylogenomics.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, Alan R; Emme, Sandra A; Lemmon, Emily Moriarty

    2012-10-01

    The field of phylogenetics is on the cusp of a major revolution, enabled by new methods of data collection that leverage both genomic resources and recent advances in DNA sequencing. Previous phylogenetic work has required labor-intensive marker development coupled with single-locus polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing on clade-by-clade and locus-by-locus basis. Here, we present a new, cost-efficient, and rapid approach to obtaining data from hundreds of loci for potentially hundreds of individuals for deep and shallow phylogenetic studies. Specifically, we designed probes for target enrichment of >500 loci in highly conserved anchor regions of vertebrate genomes (flanked by less conserved regions) from five model species and tested enrichment efficiency in nonmodel species up to 508 million years divergent from the nearest model. We found that hybrid enrichment using conserved probes (anchored enrichment) can recover a large number of unlinked loci that are useful at a diversity of phylogenetic timescales. This new approach has the potential not only to expedite resolution of deep-scale portions of the Tree of Life but also to greatly accelerate resolution of the large number of shallow clades that remain unresolved. The combination of low cost (~1% of the cost of traditional Sanger sequencing and ~3.5% of the cost of high-throughput amplicon sequencing for projects on the scale of 500 loci × 100 individuals) and rapid data collection (~2 weeks of laboratory time) are expected to make this approach tractable even for researchers working on systems with limited or nonexistent genomic resources. PMID:22605266

  6. A versatile high throughput screening system for the simultaneous identification of anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective compounds.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Elizabeth; Krautwald, Martina; Maczurek, Annette E; Stuchbury, Grant; Fromm, Phillip; Steele, Megan; Schulz, Oliver; Garcia, Obdulio Benavente; Castillo, Julian; Körner, Heinrich; Münch, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    In many chronic neurodegenerative diseases including Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD), microglial activation is suggested to be involved in pathogenesis or disease progression. Activated microglia secrete a variety of cytokines, including interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor as well as reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). ROS and RNS contribute to alterations in neuronal glucose uptake, inhibition of mitochondrial enzymes, a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, impaired axonal transport, and synaptic signaling. In addition, ROS act as signaling molecules in pro-inflammatory redox-active signal transduction pathways. To establish a high throughput screening system for anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective compounds, we have constructed an "Enhanced Green Fluorescent protein" (EGFP) expressing neuronal cell line and set up a murine microglia/neuron co-culture system with these EGFP expressing neuronal cells. We show that microglia activation leads to neuronal cell death, which can be conveniently measured by loss of neuronal EGFP fluorescence. Moreover, we used this system to test selected polyphenolic compounds for their ability to downregulate inflammatory markers and to protect neurons against microglial insult. We suggest that this system might allow accelerated drug discovery for the treatment of inflammation-mediated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20110593

  7. Optical microplates for high-throughput screening of photosynthesis in lipid-producing algae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meng; Mertiri, Taulant; Holland, Thomas; Basu, Amar S

    2012-10-21

    It is well known that biological systems respond to chemical signals as well as physical stimuli. The workhorses of high throughput screening, microplates and pipetting robots, are well suited for screening chemical stimuli; however, there are fewer options for screening physical stimuli, particularly those which involve temporal patterns. This paper presents an optical microplate for photonic high-throughput screening. The system provides addressable intensity and temporal control of LED light emission in each well, and operates on standard black-wall clear-bottom 96-well microplates, which prevent light spillover. Light intensity can be controlled to 7-bit resolution (128 levels), with a maximum intensity of 120 mE cm(-2). The temporal resolution, useful for studying dynamics of light-driven bioprocesses, can be as low as 10 μs. The microplate is used for high-throughput studies of light-dependent growth rates and photosynthetic efficiency in the model organism Dunaliella tertiolecta, a lipid-producing algae of interest in 2(nd) generation biofuels. By conducting 96 experiments in parallel, photoirradiance studies, which would require 2 years using conventional tools, can be completed in <2 weeks. In a 12 day culture, algal growth rates increase with total photon flux, as expected. Interestingly, the lipid production efficiency, defined as lipid production per unit photon flux per capita, increases nearly 5 fold at low light intensity (constant light) and at low duty cycle (pulsed light). High throughput protocols enabled by this system are conducive to systematic studies and discovery in the fields of photobiology and photochemistry.

  8. An industrial perspective on utilizing functional ion channel assays for high throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Worley, Jennings F; Main, Martin J

    2002-01-01

    The ability to apply large-scale screening formats to measures of ion channel function offers immense opportunities for drug discovery and academic research. Technologies have been developed over the last several years that now provide the ability to screen large numbers of compounds and natural products on ion channel function to find novel drugs. Application of these technologies has vastly improved the capabilities of ion channel drug discovery and provides an avenue to accelerate discoveries of ion channel biology. These advances have largely arisen from the development and application of instruments and reporters of membrane potential and ion movements in cells used to measure functional activity of ion channels. This article endeavors to describe the practical applications of these technologies in developing, validating, and implementing high throughput screening assay formats to different types of ion channels.

  9. Statistical Methods for Analysis of High-Throughput RNA Interference Screens

    PubMed Central

    Birmingham, Amanda; Selfors, Laura M.; Forster, Thorsten; Wrobel, David; Kennedy, Caleb J.; Shanks, Emma; Santoyo-Lopez, Javier; Dunican, Dara J.; Long, Aideen; Kelleher, Dermot; Smith, Queta; Beijersbergen, Roderick L.; Ghazal, Peter; Shamu, Caroline E.

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become a powerful technique for reverse genetics and drug discovery and, in both of these areas, large-scale high-throughput RNAi screens are commonly performed. The statistical techniques used to analyze these screens are frequently borrowed directly from small-molecule screening; however small-molecule and RNAi data characteristics differ in meaningful ways. We examine the similarities and differences between RNAi and small-molecule screens, highlighting particular characteristics of RNAi screen data that must be addressed during analysis. Additionally, we provide guidance on selection of analysis techniques in the context of a sample workflow. PMID:19644458

  10. Transfection microarrays for high-throughput phenotypic screening of genes involved in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Onuki-Nagasaki, Reiko; Nagasaki, Akira; Hakamada, Kazumi; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Fujita, Satoshi; Miyake, Masato; Miyake, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration is important in several biological phenomena, such as cancer metastasis. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in cell migration might facilitate the discovery of antimetastatic drugs. However, screening of genes by the current methods can be complicated by factors related to cell stimulation, for example, abolition of contact inhibition and the release inflammatory cytokines from wounded cells during examinations of wound healing in vitro. To overcome these problems and identify genes involved in cell migration, in this chapter we describe the use of transfection microarrays for high-throughput phenotypic screening. PMID:20387151

  11. Automated sample preparation and LC-MS for high-throughput ADME quantification.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Desmond

    2002-01-01

    Bioanalytical groups in the pharmaceutical industry provide quantitative data to support all stages of drug discovery. The increased use of 96-well plates and robotic liquid handling systems, the availability of robust triple quadruple mass spectrometers, and developments in chromatographic and samples preparation techniques, have all increased the rate at which this data can be generated. This review describes currently used methods and emerging technologies for automation of high-throughput quantitative bioanalysis. The focus is on recent applications of sample preparation and chromatography techniques compatible with detection by triple quadruple mass spectrometers.

  12. Inkjet printing for high-throughput cell patterning.

    PubMed

    Roth, E A; Xu, T; Das, M; Gregory, C; Hickman, J J; Boland, T

    2004-08-01

    The adaptation of inkjet printing technology to the complex fields of tissue engineering and biomaterial development presents the potential to increase progress in these emerging technologies through the implementation of this high-throughput capability via automated processes to enable precise control and repeatability. In this paper, a method of applying high-throughput inkjet printing to control cellular attachment and proliferation by precise, automated deposition of collagen is presented. The results indicate that commercial inkjet printing technology can be used to create viable cellular patterns with a resolution of 350 microm through the deposition of biologically active proteins. This method demonstrates a combination of off-the-shelf inkjet printing and biomaterials and has potential to be adapted to tissue engineering and colony patterning applications. Adapting this method into the three-dimensional construction of cellular structures for eventual high-throughput tissue engineering using a bottom-up approach is possible.

  13. Combinatorial and high-throughput screening approaches for strain engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenshan; Jiang, Rongrong

    2015-03-01

    Microbes have long been used in the industry to produce valuable biochemicals. Combinatorial engineering approaches, new strain engineering tools derived from inverse metabolic engineering, have started to attract attention in recent years, including genome shuffling, error-prone DNA polymerase, global transcription machinery engineering (gTME), random knockout/overexpression libraries, ribosome engineering, multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE), customized optimization of metabolic pathways by combinatorial transcriptional engineering (COMPACTER), and library construction of "tunable intergenic regions" (TIGR). Since combinatorial approaches and high-throughput screening methods are fundamentally interconnected, color/fluorescence-based, growth-based, and biosensor-based high-throughput screening methods have been reviewed. We believe that with the help of metabolic engineering tools and new combinatorial approaches, plus effective high-throughput screening methods, researchers will be able to achieve better results on improving microorganism performance under stress or enhancing biochemical yield.

  14. The high throughput biomedicine unit at the institute for molecular medicine Finland: high throughput screening meets precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Pietiainen, Vilja; Saarela, Jani; von Schantz, Carina; Turunen, Laura; Ostling, Paivi; Wennerberg, Krister

    2014-05-01

    The High Throughput Biomedicine (HTB) unit at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM was established in 2010 to serve as a national and international academic screening unit providing access to state of the art instrumentation for chemical and RNAi-based high throughput screening. The initial focus of the unit was multiwell plate based chemical screening and high content microarray-based siRNA screening. However, over the first four years of operation, the unit has moved to a more flexible service platform where both chemical and siRNA screening is performed at different scales primarily in multiwell plate-based assays with a wide range of readout possibilities with a focus on ultraminiaturization to allow for affordable screening for the academic users. In addition to high throughput screening, the equipment of the unit is also used to support miniaturized, multiplexed and high throughput applications for other types of research such as genomics, sequencing and biobanking operations. Importantly, with the translational research goals at FIMM, an increasing part of the operations at the HTB unit is being focused on high throughput systems biological platforms for functional profiling of patient cells in personalized and precision medicine projects.

  15. Insights to transcriptional networks by using high throughput RNAi strategies

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Jaakko

    2010-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful method to unravel the role of a given gene in eukaryotic cells. The development of high throughput assay platforms such as fluorescence plate readers and high throughput microscopy has allowed the design of genome wide RNAi screens to systemically discern members of regulatory networks around various cellular processes. Here we summarize the different strategies employed in RNAi screens to reveal regulators of transcriptional networks. We focus our discussion in experimental approaches designed to uncover regulatory interactions modulating transcription factor activity. PMID:19952073

  16. Advances in high throughput DNA sequence data compression.

    PubMed

    Sardaraz, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad; Ikram, Ataul Aziz

    2016-06-01

    Advances in high throughput sequencing technologies and reduction in cost of sequencing have led to exponential growth in high throughput DNA sequence data. This growth has posed challenges such as storage, retrieval, and transmission of sequencing data. Data compression is used to cope with these challenges. Various methods have been developed to compress genomic and sequencing data. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of compression methods for genome and reads compression. Algorithms are categorized as referential or reference free. Experimental results and comparative analysis of various methods for data compression are presented. Finally, key challenges and research directions in DNA sequence data compression are highlighted. PMID:26846812

  17. CHALLENGES IN SECONDARY ANALYSIS OF HIGH THROUGHPUT SCREENING DATA

    PubMed Central

    BLUCHER, AURORA S.; MCWEENEY, SHANNON K.

    2014-01-01

    Repurposing an existing drug for an alternative use is not only a cost effective method of development, but also a faster process due to the drug's previous clinical testing and established pharmokinetic profiles. A potentially rich resource for computational drug repositioning approaches is publically available high throughput screening data, available in databases such as PubChem Bioassay and ChemBank. We examine statistical and computational considerations for secondary analysis of publicly available high throughput screening (HTS) data with respect to metadata, data quality, and completeness. We discuss developing methods and best practices that can help to ameliorate these issues. PMID:24297539

  18. High-throughput acoustic separation of platelets from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuchao; Wu, Mengxi; Ren, Liqiang; Liu, Jiayang; Whitley, Pamela H; Wang, Lin; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-09-21

    Platelets contain growth factors which are important in biomedical and clinical applications. In this work, we present an acoustic separation device for high-throughput, non-invasive platelet isolation. In particular, we separated platelets from whole blood at a 10 mL min(-1) throughput, which is three orders of magnitude greater than that of existing acoustic-based platelet separation techniques. Without sample dilution, we observed more than 80% RBC/WBC removal and platelet recovery. High throughput, high separation efficiency, and biocompatibility make this device useful for many clinical applications. PMID:27477388

  19. High-throughput acoustic separation of platelets from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuchao; Wu, Mengxi; Ren, Liqiang; Liu, Jiayang; Whitley, Pamela H; Wang, Lin; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-09-21

    Platelets contain growth factors which are important in biomedical and clinical applications. In this work, we present an acoustic separation device for high-throughput, non-invasive platelet isolation. In particular, we separated platelets from whole blood at a 10 mL min(-1) throughput, which is three orders of magnitude greater than that of existing acoustic-based platelet separation techniques. Without sample dilution, we observed more than 80% RBC/WBC removal and platelet recovery. High throughput, high separation efficiency, and biocompatibility make this device useful for many clinical applications.

  20. Screening and synthesis: high throughput technologies applied to parasitology.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R E; Westwood, N J

    2004-01-01

    High throughput technologies continue to develop in response to the challenges set by the genome projects. This article discusses how the techniques of both high throughput screening (HTS) and synthesis can influence research in parasitology. Examples of the use of targeted and phenotype-based HTS using unbiased compound collections are provided. The important issue of identifying the protein target(s) of bioactive compounds is discussed from the synthetic chemist's perspective. This article concludes by reviewing recent examples of successful target identification studies in parasitology.

  1. Substrate independent ATPase activity may complicate high throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Tuntland, Micheal L; Fung, L W-M

    2016-10-01

    Inorganic phosphate release, [Pi], is often measured in an enzymatic reaction in a high throughput setting. Based on the published mechanism, we designed a protocol for our screening for inhibitors of SAICAR synthetase (PurC), and we found a gradual increase in [Pi] in positive control samples over the course of the day. Further investigation indicated that hydrolysis of ATP catalyzed by PurC, rather than substrate-related phosphate release, was responsible for a partial contribution to the signals in the control samples. Thus substrate-independent ATPase activity may complicate high throughput screening. PMID:27430931

  2. High-throughput screening, predictive modeling and computational embryology - Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to chemical profiling to address sensitivity and specificity of molecular targets, biological pathways, cellular and developmental processes. EPA’s ToxCast project is testing 960 uniq...

  3. Accounting For Uncertainty in The Application Of High Throughput Datasets

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of high throughput screening (HTS) datasets will need to adequately account for uncertainties in the data generation process and propagate these uncertainties through to ultimate use. Uncertainty arises at multiple levels in the construction of predictors using in vitro ...

  4. High Throughput Assays and Exposure Science (ISES annual meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput screening (HTS) data characterizing chemical-induced biological activity has been generated for thousands of environmentally-relevant chemicals by the US inter-agency Tox21 and the US EPA ToxCast programs. For a limited set of chemicals, bioactive concentrations r...

  5. High Throughput Exposure Estimation Using NHANES Data (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the ExpoCast project, high throughput (HT) exposure models enable rapid screening of large numbers of chemicals for exposure potential. Evaluation of these models requires empirical exposure data and due to the paucity of human metabolism/exposure data such evaluations includ...

  6. New High Throughput Methods to Estimate Chemical Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has made many recent advances in high throughput bioactivity testing. However, concurrent advances in rapid, quantitative prediction of human and ecological exposures have been lacking, despite the clear importance of both measures for a risk-based approach to prioritizing an...

  7. Environmental Impact on Vascular Development Predicted by High Throughput Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding health risks to embryonic development from exposure to environmental chemicals is a significant challenge given the diverse chemical landscape and paucity of data for most of these compounds. High throughput screening (HTS) in EPA’s ToxCastTM project provides vast d...

  8. High-throughput production of two disulphide-bridge toxins.

    PubMed

    Upert, Grégory; Mourier, Gilles; Pastor, Alexandra; Verdenaud, Marion; Alili, Doria; Servent, Denis; Gilles, Nicolas

    2014-08-01

    A quick and efficient production method compatible with high-throughput screening was developed using 36 toxins belonging to four different families of two disulphide-bridge toxins. Final toxins were characterized using HPLC co-elution, CD and pharmacological studies.

  9. High-Throughput Screening for Streptomyces Antibiotic Biosynthesis Activators

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Wang, Yemin; Guo, Hang; Xu, Min; Deng, Zixin

    2012-01-01

    A genomic cosmid library of Streptomyces clavuligerus was constructed and transferred efficiently by conjugation to Streptomyces lividans, and 12 distinct groups of overlapping cosmid clones that activated the silent actinorhodin biosynthesis gene cluster were identified. This generally applicable high-throughput screening procedure greatly facilitates the identification of antibiotic biosynthesis activators. PMID:22504805

  10. High-Throughput Sequencing and Rare Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Makrythanasis, P.; Antonarakis, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing has drastically changed the research of genes responsible for genetic disorders and is now gradually introduced as an additional genetic diagnostic testing in clinical practice. The current debates on the emerging technical, medical and ethical issues as well as the potential optimum use of the available technology are discussed. PMID:23293577

  11. High-throughput screening, predictive modeling and computational embryology

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to profile thousands of chemical compounds for biological activity and potential toxicity. EPA’s ToxCast™ project, and the broader Tox21 consortium, in addition to projects worldwide,...

  12. Fully Bayesian Analysis of High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput metabolomic assays that allow simultaneous targeted screening of hundreds of metabolites have recently become available in kit form. Such assays provide a window into understanding changes to biochemical pathways due to chemical exposure or disease, and are usefu...

  13. Novel Acoustic Loading of a Mass Spectrometer: Toward Next-Generation High-Throughput MS Screening.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Ian; Stearns, Rick; Pringle, Steven; Wingfield, Jonathan; Datwani, Sammy; Hall, Eric; Ghislain, Luke; Majlof, Lars; Bachman, Martin

    2016-02-01

    High-throughput, direct measurement of substrate-to-product conversion by label-free detection, without the need for engineered substrates or secondary assays, could be considered the "holy grail" of drug discovery screening. Mass spectrometry (MS) has the potential to be part of this ultimate screening solution, but is constrained by the limitations of existing MS sample introduction modes that cannot meet the throughput requirements of high-throughput screening (HTS). Here we report data from a prototype system (Echo-MS) that uses acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) to transfer femtoliter-scale droplets in a rapid, precise, and accurate fashion directly into the MS. The acoustic source can load samples into the MS from a microtiter plate at a rate of up to three samples per second. The resulting MS signal displays a very sharp attack profile and ions are detected within 50 ms of activation of the acoustic transducer. Additionally, we show that the system is capable of generating multiply charged ion species from simple peptides and large proteins. The combination of high speed and low sample volume has significant potential within not only drug discovery, but also other areas of the industry. PMID:26721821

  14. High-throughput screening and small animal models, where are we?

    PubMed Central

    Giacomotto, Jean; Ségalat, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Current high-throughput screening methods for drug discovery rely on the existence of targets. Moreover, most of the hits generated during screenings turn out to be invalid after further testing in animal models. To by-pass these limitations, efforts are now being made to screen chemical libraries on whole animals. One of the most commonly used animal model in biology is the murine model Mus musculus. However, its cost limit its use in large-scale therapeutic screening. In contrast, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and the fish Danio rerio are gaining momentum as screening tools. These organisms combine genetic amenability, low cost and culture conditions that are compatible with large-scale screens. Their main advantage is to allow high-throughput screening in a whole-animal context. Moreover, their use is not dependent on the prior identification of a target and permits the selection of compounds with an improved safety profile. This review surveys the versatility of these animal models for drug discovery and discuss the options available at this day. PMID:20423335

  15. Current trends in virtual high throughput screening using ligand-based and structure-based methods.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, Nagamani; Das, Sourav

    2011-12-01

    High throughput in silico methods have offered the tantalizing potential to drastically accelerate the drug discovery process. Yet despite significant efforts expended by academia, national labs and industry over the years, many of these methods have not lived up to their initial promise of reducing the time and costs associated with the drug discovery enterprise, a process that can typically take over a decade and cost hundreds of millions of dollars from conception to final approval and marketing of a drug. Nevertheless structure-based modeling has become a mainstay of computational biology and medicinal chemistry, helping to leverage our knowledge of the biological target and the chemistry of protein-ligand interactions. While ligand-based methods utilize the chemistry of molecules that are known to bind to the biological target, structure-based drug design methods rely on knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the target, as obtained through crystallographic, spectroscopic or bioinformatics techniques. Here we review recent developments in the methodology and applications of structure-based and ligand-based methods and target-based chemogenomics in Virtual High Throughput Screening (VHTS), highlighting some case studies of recent applications, as well as current research in further development of these methods. The limitations of these approaches will also be discussed, to give the reader an indication of what might be expected in years to come. PMID:21843144

  16. Novel Acoustic Loading of a Mass Spectrometer: Toward Next-Generation High-Throughput MS Screening.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Ian; Stearns, Rick; Pringle, Steven; Wingfield, Jonathan; Datwani, Sammy; Hall, Eric; Ghislain, Luke; Majlof, Lars; Bachman, Martin

    2016-02-01

    High-throughput, direct measurement of substrate-to-product conversion by label-free detection, without the need for engineered substrates or secondary assays, could be considered the "holy grail" of drug discovery screening. Mass spectrometry (MS) has the potential to be part of this ultimate screening solution, but is constrained by the limitations of existing MS sample introduction modes that cannot meet the throughput requirements of high-throughput screening (HTS). Here we report data from a prototype system (Echo-MS) that uses acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) to transfer femtoliter-scale droplets in a rapid, precise, and accurate fashion directly into the MS. The acoustic source can load samples into the MS from a microtiter plate at a rate of up to three samples per second. The resulting MS signal displays a very sharp attack profile and ions are detected within 50 ms of activation of the acoustic transducer. Additionally, we show that the system is capable of generating multiply charged ion species from simple peptides and large proteins. The combination of high speed and low sample volume has significant potential within not only drug discovery, but also other areas of the industry.

  17. Discovery and characterization of proteins associated with aflatoxin-resistance: evaluating their potential as breeding markers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert L; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Warburton, Marilyn; Luo, Meng; Menkir, Abebe; Fakhoury, Ahmad; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2010-04-01

    Host resistance has become a viable approach to eliminating aflatoxin contamination of maize since the discovery of several maize lines with natural resistance. However, to derive commercial benefit from this resistance and develop lines that can aid growers, markers need to be identified to facilitate the transfer of resistance into commercially useful genetic backgrounds without transfer of unwanted traits. To accomplish this, research efforts have focused on the identification of kernel resistance-associated proteins (RAPs) including the employment of comparative proteomics to investigate closely-related maize lines that vary in aflatoxin accumulation. RAPs have been identified and several further characterized through physiological and biochemical investigations to determine their causal role in resistance and, therefore, their suitability as breeding markers. Three RAPs, a 14 kDa trypsin inhibitor, pathogenesis-related protein 10 and glyoxalase I are being investigated using RNAi gene silencing and plant transformation. Several resistant lines have been subjected to QTL mapping to identify loci associated with the aflatoxin-resistance phenotype. Results of proteome and characterization studies are discussed. PMID:22069617

  18. Discovery and Characterization of Proteins Associated with Aflatoxin-Resistance: Evaluating Their Potential as Breeding Markers

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert L.; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Warburton, Marilyn; Luo, Meng; Menkir, Abebe; Fakhoury, Ahmad; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Host resistance has become a viable approach to eliminating aflatoxin contamination of maize since the discovery of several maize lines with natural resistance. However, to derive commercial benefit from this resistance and develop lines that can aid growers, markers need to be identified to facilitate the transfer of resistance into commercially useful genetic backgrounds without transfer of unwanted traits. To accomplish this, research efforts have focused on the identification of kernel resistance-associated proteins (RAPs) including the employment of comparative proteomics to investigate closely-related maize lines that vary in aflatoxin accumulation. RAPs have been identified and several further characterized through physiological and biochemical investigations to determine their causal role in resistance and, therefore, their suitability as breeding markers. Three RAPs, a 14 kDa trypsin inhibitor, pathogenesis-related protein 10 and glyoxalase I are being investigated using RNAi gene silencing and plant transformation. Several resistant lines have been subjected to QTL mapping to identify loci associated with the aflatoxin-resistance phenotype. Results of proteome and characterization studies are discussed. PMID:22069617

  19. Data mining approaches to high-throughput crystal structure and compound prediction.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Geoffroy

    2014-01-01

    Predicting unknown inorganic compounds and their crystal structure is a critical step of high-throughput computational materials design and discovery. One way to achieve efficient compound prediction is to use data mining or machine learning methods. In this chapter we present a few algorithms for data mining compound prediction and their applications to different materials discovery problems. In particular, the patterns or correlations governing phase stability for experimental or computational inorganic compound databases are statistically learned and used to build probabilistic or regression models to identify novel compounds and their crystal structures. The stability of those compound candidates is then assessed using ab initio techniques. Finally, we report a few cases where data mining driven computational predictions were experimentally confirmed through inorganic synthesis.

  20. Discovery and SAR of muscarinic receptor subtype 1 (M1) allosteric activators from a molecular libraries high throughput screen. Part I: 2,5-dibenzyl-2H-pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3(5H)-ones as positive allosteric modulators

    PubMed Central

    Han, Changho; Chatterjee, Arindam; Noetzel, Meredith J.; Panarese, Joseph D.; Niswender, Colleen; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.; Stauffer, Shaun R.

    2014-01-01

    Results from a 2012 high-throughput screen of the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR) against the human muscarinic receptor subtype 1 (M1) for positive allosteric modulators is reported. A content-rich screen utilizing an intracellular calcium mobilization triple-addition protocol allowed for assessment of all three modes of pharmacology at M1, including agonist, positive allosteric modulator, and antagonist activities in a single screening platform. We disclose a dibenzyl-2H-pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3(5H)-one hit (DBPQ, CID 915409) and examine N-benzyl pharmacophore/SAR relationships versus previously reported quinolin-3(5H)-ones and isatins, including ML137. SAR and consideration of recently reported crystal structures, homology modeling, and structure-function relationships using point mutations suggests a shared binding mode orientation at the putative common allosteric binding site directed by the pendant N-benzyl substructure. PMID:25435150

  1. High-throughput SNP-genotyping analysis of the relationships among Ponto-Caspian sturgeon species

    PubMed Central

    Rastorguev, Sergey M; Nedoluzhko, Artem V; Mazur, Alexander M; Gruzdeva, Natalia M; Volkov, Alexander A; Barmintseva, Anna E; Mugue, Nikolai S; Prokhortchouk, Egor B

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Legally certified sturgeon fisheries require population protection and conservation methods, including DNA tests to identify the source of valuable sturgeon roe. However, the available genetic data are insufficient to distinguish between different sturgeon populations, and are even unable to distinguish between some species. We performed high-throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-genotyping analysis on different populations of Russian (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii), Persian (A. persicus), and Siberian (A. baerii) sturgeon species from the Caspian Sea region (Volga and Ural Rivers), the Azov Sea, and two Siberian rivers. We found that Russian sturgeons from the Volga and Ural Rivers were essentially indistinguishable, but they differed from Russian sturgeons in the Azov Sea, and from Persian and Siberian sturgeons. We identified eight SNPs that were sufficient to distinguish these sturgeon populations with 80% confidence, and allowed the development of markers to distinguish sturgeon species. Finally, on the basis of our SNP data, we propose that the A. baerii-like mitochondrial DNA found in some Russian sturgeons from the Caspian Sea arose via an introgression event during the Pleistocene glaciation. In the present study, the high-throughput genotyping analysis of several sturgeon populations was performed. SNP markers for species identification were defined. The possible explanation of the baerii-like mitotype presence in some Russian sturgeons in the Caspian Sea was suggested. PMID:24567827

  2. Multiple column high-throughput e-beam inspection (EBI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, David K.; Monahan, Kevin M.; Liu, Enden D.; Tran, Cong; Prescop, Ted

    2012-03-01

    Single-column e-beam systems are used in production for the detection of electrical defects, but are too slow to be used for the detection of small physical defects, and can't meet future inspection requirements. This paper presents a multiplecolumn e-beam technology for high throughput wafer inspection. Multibeam has developed all-electrostatic columns for high-resolution imaging. The elimination of magnetic coils enables the columns to be small; e-beam deflection is faster in the absence of magnetic hysteresis. Multiple miniaturecolumns are assembled in an array. An array of 100 columns covers the entire surface of a 300mm wafer, affording simultaneous cross-wafer sampling. Column performance simulations and system architecture are presented. Also provided are examples of high throughput, more efficient, multiple-column wafer inspection.

  3. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays.

    PubMed

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Krunic, Susanne Langgaard; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers the potential for rapidly analysing resistant and slowly digested dietary starches. PMID:27468930

  4. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Krunic, Susanne Langgaard; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers the potential for rapidly analysing resistant and slowly digested dietary starches. PMID:27468930

  5. Portable thermo-powered high-throughput visual electrochemiluminescence sensor.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Xiong, Meng; Zhang, Jia-dong; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2013-12-17

    This paper describes a portable thermo-powered high-throughput visual electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor for the first time. This sensor is composed of a tiny power supply device based on thermal-electrical conversion and a facile prepared array electrode. The ECL detection could be conducted with thermo-power, which is easily accessible. For example, hot water, a bonfire, or a lighted candle enables the detection to be conducted. And the assay can be directly monitored by the naked eye semiquantitatively or smart phones quantitatively. Combined with transparent electrode and array microreactors, a portable high-throughput sensor was achieved. The portable device, avoiding the use of an electrochemical workstation to generate potential and a photomultiplier tube to receive the signal, is not only a valuable addition for traditional methods but also a suitable device for field operation or point-of-care testing. PMID:24215560

  6. A high-throughput microRNA expression profiling system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanwen; Mastriano, Stephen; Lu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    As small noncoding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate diverse biological functions, including physiological and pathological processes. The expression and deregulation of miRNA levels contain rich information with diagnostic and prognostic relevance and can reflect pharmacological responses. The increasing interest in miRNA-related research demands global miRNA expression profiling on large numbers of samples. We describe here a robust protocol that supports high-throughput sample labeling and detection on hundreds of samples simultaneously. This method employs 96-well-based miRNA capturing from total RNA samples and on-site biochemical reactions, coupled with bead-based detection in 96-well format for hundreds of miRNAs per sample. With low-cost, high-throughput, high detection specificity, and flexibility to profile both small and large numbers of samples, this protocol can be adapted in a wide range of laboratory settings. PMID:25030917

  7. High-throughput titration of luciferase-expressing recombinant viruses.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Vanessa; Krishnan, Ramya; Davis, Colin; Batenchuk, Cory; Le Boeuf, Fabrice; Abdelbary, Hesham; Diallo, Jean-Simon

    2014-01-01

    Standard plaque assays to determine infectious viral titers can be time consuming, are not amenable to a high volume of samples, and cannot be done with viruses that do not form plaques. As an alternative to plaque assays, we have developed a high-throughput titration method that allows for the simultaneous titration of a high volume of samples in a single day. This approach involves infection of the samples with a Firefly luciferase tagged virus, transfer of the infected samples onto an appropriate permissive cell line, subsequent addition of luciferin, reading of plates in order to obtain luminescence readings, and finally the conversion from luminescence to viral titers. The assessment of cytotoxicity using a metabolic viability dye can be easily incorporated in the workflow in parallel and provide valuable information in the context of a drug screen. This technique provides a reliable, high-throughput method to determine viral titers as an alternative to a standard plaque assay.

  8. A high-throughput label-free nanoparticle analyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraikin, Jean-Luc; Teesalu, Tambet; McKenney, Christopher M.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Cleland, Andrew N.

    2011-05-01

    Synthetic nanoparticles and genetically modified viruses are used in a range of applications, but high-throughput analytical tools for the physical characterization of these objects are needed. Here we present a microfluidic analyser that detects individual nanoparticles and characterizes complex, unlabelled nanoparticle suspensions. We demonstrate the detection, concentration analysis and sizing of individual synthetic nanoparticles in a multicomponent mixture with sufficient throughput to analyse 500,000 particles per second. We also report the rapid size and titre analysis of unlabelled bacteriophage T7 in both salt solution and mouse blood plasma, using just ~1 × 10-6 l of analyte. Unexpectedly, in the native blood plasma we discover a large background of naturally occurring nanoparticles with a power-law size distribution. The high-throughput detection capability, scalable fabrication and simple electronics of this instrument make it well suited for diverse applications.

  9. High-throughput patterning of photonic structures with tunable periodicity

    PubMed Central

    Kempa, Thomas J.; Bediako, D. Kwabena; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Park, Hong-Gyu; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    A patterning method termed “RIPPLE” (reactive interface patterning promoted by lithographic electrochemistry) is applied to the fabrication of arrays of dielectric and metallic optical elements. This method uses cyclic voltammetry to impart patterns onto the working electrode of a standard three-electrode electrochemical setup. Using this technique and a template stripping process, periodic arrays of Ag circular Bragg gratings are patterned in a high-throughput fashion over large substrate areas. By varying the scan rate of the cyclically applied voltage ramps, the periodicity of the gratings can be tuned in situ over micrometer and submicrometer length scales. Characterization of the periodic arrays of periodic gratings identified point-like and annular scattering modes at different planes above the structured surface. Facile, reliable, and rapid patterning techniques like RIPPLE may enable the high-throughput and low-cost fabrication of photonic elements and metasurfaces for energy conversion and sensing applications. PMID:25870280

  10. A high-throughput multiplex method adapted for GMO detection.

    PubMed

    Chaouachi, Maher; Chupeau, Gaëlle; Berard, Aurélie; McKhann, Heather; Romaniuk, Marcel; Giancola, Sandra; Laval, Valérie; Bertheau, Yves; Brunel, Dominique

    2008-12-24

    A high-throughput multiplex assay for the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMO) was developed on the basis of the existing SNPlex method designed for SNP genotyping. This SNPlex assay allows the simultaneous detection of up to 48 short DNA sequences (approximately 70 bp; "signature sequences") from taxa endogenous reference genes, from GMO constructions, screening targets, construct-specific, and event-specific targets, and finally from donor organisms. This assay avoids certain shortcomings of multiplex PCR-based methods already in widespread use for GMO detection. The assay demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity. The results suggest that this assay is reliable, flexible, and cost- and time-effective for high-throughput GMO detection.

  11. High Throughput siRNA Screening Using Reverse Transfection.

    PubMed

    von Schantz, Carina; Saarela, Jani

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a commonly used technique to knockdown gene function. Here, we describe a high throughput screening method for siRNA mediated gene silencing of the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 using reverse transfection. Furthermore, we describe the setup for two separate methods for detecting viable and dead cells using either homogenous assays or image-based analysis. PMID:27581282

  12. A fully automated robotic system for high throughput fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Hartmut F; Rieth, Jochen

    2007-03-01

    High throughput robotic systems have been used since the 1990s to carry out biochemical assays in microtiter plates. However, before the application of such systems in industrial fermentation process development, some important specific demands should be taken into account. These are sufficient oxygen supply, optimal growth temperature, minimized sample evaporation, avoidance of contaminations, and simple but reliable process monitoring. A fully automated solution where all these aspects have been taken into account is presented.

  13. High-throughput evaluation of synthetic metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Klesmith, Justin R.; Whitehead, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    A central challenge in the field of metabolic engineering is the efficient identification of a metabolic pathway genotype that maximizes specific productivity over a robust range of process conditions. Here we review current methods for optimizing specific productivity of metabolic pathways in living cells. New tools for library generation, computational analysis of pathway sequence-flux space, and high-throughput screening and selection techniques are discussed. PMID:27453919

  14. High-Throughput Intracellular Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic human pathogen that causes a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Notably, in the human host, the organism is believed to replicate solely within an intracellular compartment, predominantly within pulmonary macrophages. Consequently, successful therapy is predicated on antimicrobials penetrating into this intracellular growth niche. However, standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods test solely for extracellular growth inhibition. Here, we make use of a high-throughput assay to characterize intracellular growth inhibition activity of known antimicrobials. For select antimicrobials, high-resolution dose-response analysis was then performed to characterize and compare activity levels in both macrophage infection and axenic growth assays. Results support the superiority of several classes of nonpolar antimicrobials in abrogating intracellular growth. Importantly, our assay results show excellent correlations with prior clinical observations of antimicrobial efficacy. Furthermore, we also show the applicability of high-throughput automation to two- and three-dimensional synergy testing. High-resolution isocontour isobolograms provide in vitro support for specific combination antimicrobial therapy. Taken together, findings suggest that high-throughput screening technology may be successfully applied to identify and characterize antimicrobials that target bacterial pathogens that make use of an intracellular growth niche. PMID:26392509

  15. THINK Back: KNowledge-based Interpretation of High Throughput data.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Fernando; Ma, Jun; Sartor, Maureen A; Michailidis, George; Jagadish, Hosagrahar V

    2012-01-01

    Results of high throughput experiments can be challenging to interpret. Current approaches have relied on bulk processing the set of expression levels, in conjunction with easily obtained external evidence, such as co-occurrence. While such techniques can be used to reason probabilistically, they are not designed to shed light on what any individual gene, or a network of genes acting together, may be doing. Our belief is that today we have the information extraction ability and the computational power to perform more sophisticated analyses that consider the individual situation of each gene. The use of such techniques should lead to qualitatively superior results. The specific aim of this project is to develop computational techniques to generate a small number of biologically meaningful hypotheses based on observed results from high throughput microarray experiments, gene sequences, and next-generation sequences. Through the use of relevant known biomedical knowledge, as represented in published literature and public databases, we can generate meaningful hypotheses that will aide biologists to interpret their experimental data. We are currently developing novel approaches that exploit the rich information encapsulated in biological pathway graphs. Our methods perform a thorough and rigorous analysis of biological pathways, using complex factors such as the topology of the pathway graph and the frequency in which genes appear on different pathways, to provide more meaningful hypotheses to describe the biological phenomena captured by high throughput experiments, when compared to other existing methods that only consider partial information captured by biological pathways. PMID:22536867

  16. THINK Back: KNowledge-based Interpretation of High Throughput data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Results of high throughput experiments can be challenging to interpret. Current approaches have relied on bulk processing the set of expression levels, in conjunction with easily obtained external evidence, such as co-occurrence. While such techniques can be used to reason probabilistically, they are not designed to shed light on what any individual gene, or a network of genes acting together, may be doing. Our belief is that today we have the information extraction ability and the computational power to perform more sophisticated analyses that consider the individual situation of each gene. The use of such techniques should lead to qualitatively superior results. The specific aim of this project is to develop computational techniques to generate a small number of biologically meaningful hypotheses based on observed results from high throughput microarray experiments, gene sequences, and next-generation sequences. Through the use of relevant known biomedical knowledge, as represented in published literature and public databases, we can generate meaningful hypotheses that will aide biologists to interpret their experimental data. We are currently developing novel approaches that exploit the rich information encapsulated in biological pathway graphs. Our methods perform a thorough and rigorous analysis of biological pathways, using complex factors such as the topology of the pathway graph and the frequency in which genes appear on different pathways, to provide more meaningful hypotheses to describe the biological phenomena captured by high throughput experiments, when compared to other existing methods that only consider partial information captured by biological pathways. PMID:22536867

  17. Promises and Pitfalls of High-Throughput Biological Assays.

    PubMed

    Finak, Greg; Gottardo, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses some of the pitfalls encountered when performing biomedical research involving high-throughput "omics" data and presents some strategies and guidelines that researchers should follow when undertaking such studies. We discuss common errors in experimental design and data analysis that lead to irreproducible and non-replicable research and provide some guidelines to avoid these common mistakes so that researchers may have confidence in study outcomes, even if the results are negative. We discuss the importance of ranking and prespecifying hypotheses, performing power analysis, careful experimental design, and preplanning of statistical analyses in order to avoid the "fishing expedition" data analysis strategy, which is doomed to fail. The impact of multiple testing on false-positive rates is discussed, particularly in the context of the analysis of high-throughput data, and methods to correct for it are presented, as well as approaches to detect and correct for experimental biases and batch effects, which often plague high-throughput assays. We highlight the importance of sharing data and analysis code to facilitate reproducibility and present tools and software that are appropriate for this purpose. PMID:27115636

  18. THINK Back: KNowledge-based Interpretation of High Throughput data.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Fernando; Ma, Jun; Sartor, Maureen A; Michailidis, George; Jagadish, Hosagrahar V

    2012-03-13

    Results of high throughput experiments can be challenging to interpret. Current approaches have relied on bulk processing the set of expression levels, in conjunction with easily obtained external evidence, such as co-occurrence. While such techniques can be used to reason probabilistically, they are not designed to shed light on what any individual gene, or a network of genes acting together, may be doing. Our belief is that today we have the information extraction ability and the computational power to perform more sophisticated analyses that consider the individual situation of each gene. The use of such techniques should lead to qualitatively superior results. The specific aim of this project is to develop computational techniques to generate a small number of biologically meaningful hypotheses based on observed results from high throughput microarray experiments, gene sequences, and next-generation sequences. Through the use of relevant known biomedical knowledge, as represented in published literature and public databases, we can generate meaningful hypotheses that will aide biologists to interpret their experimental data. We are currently developing novel approaches that exploit the rich information encapsulated in biological pathway graphs. Our methods perform a thorough and rigorous analysis of biological pathways, using complex factors such as the topology of the pathway graph and the frequency in which genes appear on different pathways, to provide more meaningful hypotheses to describe the biological phenomena captured by high throughput experiments, when compared to other existing methods that only consider partial information captured by biological pathways.

  19. NCBI GEO: archive for high-throughput functional genomic data.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Tanya; Troup, Dennis B; Wilhite, Stephen E; Ledoux, Pierre; Rudnev, Dmitry; Evangelista, Carlos; Kim, Irene F; Soboleva, Alexandra; Tomashevsky, Maxim; Marshall, Kimberly A; Phillippy, Katherine H; Sherman, Patti M; Muertter, Rolf N; Edgar, Ron

    2009-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is the largest public repository for high-throughput gene expression data. Additionally, GEO hosts other categories of high-throughput functional genomic data, including those that examine genome copy number variations, chromatin structure, methylation status and transcription factor binding. These data are generated by the research community using high-throughput technologies like microarrays and, more recently, next-generation sequencing. The database has a flexible infrastructure that can capture fully annotated raw and processed data, enabling compliance with major community-derived scientific reporting standards such as 'Minimum Information About a Microarray Experiment' (MIAME). In addition to serving as a centralized data storage hub, GEO offers many tools and features that allow users to effectively explore, analyze and download expression data from both gene-centric and experiment-centric perspectives. This article summarizes the GEO repository structure, content and operating procedures, as well as recently introduced data mining features. GEO is freely accessible at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/.

  20. High-Throughput Optical Sensing Immunoassays on Smartphone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ju; Sun, Rongrong; Vasile, Tina; Chang, Yu-Chung; Li, Lei

    2016-08-16

    We present an optical sensing platform on a smartphone for high-throughput screening immunoassays. For the first time, a designed microprism array is utilized to achieve a one-time screening of 64 samples. To demonstrate the capability and the reliability of this optical sensing platform on smartphone, human interleukin 6 (IL-6) protein and six types of plant viruses are immunoassayed. The ability of quantification is shown by a sigmoidal dose-response curve fitting to analyze IL-6 protein. The accuracy in measuring the concentrations of IL-6 protein achieves 99.1%. On the other hand, to validate on-field immunoassays by our device, a total of 1030 samples are assayed using three immunoassay methods to detect six types of plant viruses. The accuracy is up to 96.2-99.9%; in addition, there is a high degree of agreement with lab instruments. The total cost for this high-throughput optical screening platform is ∼$50 USD. The reading time is only 2 s for 64 samples. The size is just as big as a portable hard drive. Our optical sensing platform on the smartphone offers a route toward in situ high-throughput screening immunoassays for viruses, pathogens, biomarkers, and toxins by decentralizing laboratory tests. With this mobile point-of-care optical platform, the spread of disease can be timely stopped within a very short turnaround time. PMID:27434250

  1. Condor-COPASI: high-throughput computing for biochemical networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mathematical modelling has become a standard technique to improve our understanding of complex biological systems. As models become larger and more complex, simulations and analyses require increasing amounts of computational power. Clusters of computers in a high-throughput computing environment can help to provide the resources required for computationally expensive model analysis. However, exploiting such a system can be difficult for users without the necessary expertise. Results We present Condor-COPASI, a server-based software tool that integrates COPASI, a biological pathway simulation tool, with Condor, a high-throughput computing environment. Condor-COPASI provides a web-based interface, which makes it extremely easy for a user to run a number of model simulation and analysis tasks in parallel. Tasks are transparently split into smaller parts, and submitted for execution on a Condor pool. Result output is presented to the user in a number of formats, including tables and interactive graphical displays. Conclusions Condor-COPASI can effectively use a Condor high-throughput computing environment to provide significant gains in performance for a number of model simulation and analysis tasks. Condor-COPASI is free, open source software, released under the Artistic License 2.0, and is suitable for use by any institution with access to a Condor pool. Source code is freely available for download at http://code.google.com/p/condor-copasi/, along with full instructions on deployment and usage. PMID:22834945

  2. Computational approaches to phenotyping: high-throughput phenomics.

    PubMed

    Lussier, Yves A; Liu, Yang

    2007-01-01

    The recent completion of the Human Genome Project has made possible a high-throughput "systems approach" for accelerating the elucidation of molecular underpinnings of human diseases, and subsequent derivation of molecular-based strategies to more effectively prevent, diagnose, and treat these diseases. Although altered phenotypes are among the most reliable manifestations of altered gene functions, research using systematic analysis of phenotype relationships to study human biology is still in its infancy. This article focuses on the emerging field of high-throughput phenotyping (HTP) phenomics research, which aims to capitalize on novel high-throughput computation and informatics technology developments to derive genomewide molecular networks of genotype-phenotype associations, or "phenomic associations." The HTP phenomics research field faces the challenge of technological research and development to generate novel tools in computation and informatics that will allow researchers to amass, access, integrate, organize, and manage phenotypic databases across species and enable genomewide analysis to associate phenotypic information with genomic data at different scales of biology. Key state-of-the-art technological advancements critical for HTP phenomics research are covered in this review. In particular, we highlight the power of computational approaches to conduct large-scale phenomics studies.

  3. OptoDyCE: Automated system for high-throughput all-optical dynamic cardiac electrophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Ambrosi, Christina M.; Williams, John C.; Bien, Harold; Entcheva, Emilia

    2016-02-01

    In the last two decades, <30% of drugs withdrawals from the market were due to cardiac toxicity, where unintended interactions with ion channels disrupt the heart's normal electrical function. Consequently, all new drugs must undergo preclinical testing for cardiac liability, adding to an already expensive and lengthy process. Recognition that proarrhythmic effects often result from drug action on multiple ion channels demonstrates a need for integrative and comprehensive measurements. Additionally, patient-specific therapies relying on emerging technologies employing stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes (e.g. induced pluripotent stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes, iPSC-CMs) require better screening methods to become practical. However, a high-throughput, cost-effective approach for cellular cardiac electrophysiology has not been feasible. Optical techniques for manipulation and recording provide a contactless means of dynamic, high-throughput testing of cells and tissues. Here, we consider the requirements for all-optical electrophysiology for drug testing, and we implement and validate OptoDyCE, a fully automated system for all-optical cardiac electrophysiology. We demonstrate the high-throughput capabilities using multicellular samples in 96-well format by combining optogenetic actuation with simultaneous fast high-resolution optical sensing of voltage or intracellular calcium. The system can also be implemented using iPSC-CMs and other cell-types by delivery of optogenetic drivers, or through the modular use of dedicated light-sensitive somatic cells in conjunction with non-modified cells. OptoDyCE provides a truly modular and dynamic screening system, capable of fully-automated acquisition of high-content information integral for improved discovery and development of new drugs and biologics, as well as providing a means of better understanding of electrical disturbances in the heart.

  4. SNP marker discovery, linkage map construction and identification of QTLs for enhanced salinity tolerance in field pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Field pea (Pisum sativum L.) is a self-pollinating, diploid, cool-season food legume. Crop production is constrained by multiple biotic and abiotic stress factors, including salinity, that cause reduced growth and yield. Recent advances in genomics have permitted the development of low-cost high-throughput genotyping systems, allowing the construction of saturated genetic linkage maps for identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with traits of interest. Genetic markers in close linkage with the relevant genomic regions may then be implemented in varietal improvement programs. Results In this study, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were developed and used to generate comprehensive linkage maps for field pea. From a set of 36,188 variant nucleotide positions detected through in silico analysis, 768 were selected for genotyping of a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population. A total of 705 SNPs (91.7%) successfully detected segregating polymorphisms. In addition to SNPs, genomic and EST-derived simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were assigned to the genetic map in order to obtain an evenly distributed genome-wide coverage. Sequences associated with the mapped molecular markers were used for comparative genomic analysis with other legume species. Higher levels of conserved synteny were observed with the genomes of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. and chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) than with soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.), Lotus japonicus L. and pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan [L.] Millsp.). Parents and RIL progeny were screened at the seedling growth stage for responses to salinity stress, imposed by addition of NaCl in the watering solution at a concentration of 18 dS m-1. Salinity-induced symptoms showed normal distribution, and the severity of the symptoms increased over time. QTLs for salinity tolerance were identified on linkage groups Ps III and VII, with flanking SNP markers suitable for

  5. High-throughput detection method for influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Bartoszek, Allison E; Moran, Thomas M; Gorski, Jack; Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Navidad, Jose F; Thakar, Monica S; Malarkannan, Subramaniam

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus is a respiratory pathogen that causes a high degree of morbidity and mortality every year in multiple parts of the world. Therefore, precise diagnosis of the infecting strain and rapid high-throughput screening of vast numbers of clinical samples is paramount to control the spread of pandemic infections. Current clinical diagnoses of influenza infections are based on serologic testing, polymerase chain reaction, direct specimen immunofluorescence and cell culture (1,2). Here, we report the development of a novel diagnostic technique used to detect live influenza viruses. We used the mouse-adapted human A/PR/8/34 (PR8, H1N1) virus (3) to test the efficacy of this technique using MDCK cells (4). MDCK cells (10(4) or 5 x 10(3) per well) were cultured in 96- or 384-well plates, infected with PR8 and viral proteins were detected using anti-M2 followed by an IR dye-conjugated secondary antibody. M2 (5) and hemagglutinin (1) are two major marker proteins used in many different diagnostic assays. Employing IR-dye-conjugated secondary antibodies minimized the autofluorescence associated with other fluorescent dyes. The use of anti-M2 antibody allowed us to use the antigen-specific fluorescence intensity as a direct metric of viral quantity. To enumerate the fluorescence intensity, we used the LI-COR Odyssey-based IR scanner. This system uses two channel laser-based IR detections to identify fluorophores and differentiate them from background noise. The first channel excites at 680 nm and emits at 700 nm to help quantify the background. The second channel detects fluorophores that excite at 780 nm and emit at 800 nm. Scanning of PR8-infected MDCK cells in the IR scanner indicated a viral titer-dependent bright fluorescence. A positive correlation of fluorescence intensity to virus titer starting from 10(2)-10(5) PFU could be consistently observed. Minimal but detectable positivity consistently seen with 10(2)-10(3) PFU PR8 viral titers demonstrated the high

  6. Scaling and automation of a high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chip.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Heng; Chen, Yu-Chih; Brien, Riley; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-10-01

    Recent research suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are the key subpopulation for tumor relapse and metastasis. Due to cancer plasticity in surface antigen and enzymatic activity markers, functional tumorsphere assays are promising alternatives for CSC identification. To reliably quantify rare CSCs (1-5%), thousands of single-cell suspension cultures are required. While microfluidics is a powerful tool in handling single cells, previous works provide limited throughput and lack automatic data analysis capability required for high-throughput studies. In this study, we present the scaling and automation of high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chips, facilitating the tracking of up to ∼10 000 cells on a chip with ∼76.5% capture rate. The presented cell capture scheme guarantees sampling a representative population from the bulk cells. To analyze thousands of single-cells with a variety of fluorescent intensities, a highly adaptable analysis program was developed for cell/sphere counting and size measurement. Using a Pluronic® F108 (poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)) coating on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a suspension culture environment was created to test a controversial hypothesis: whether larger or smaller cells are more stem-like defined by the capability to form single-cell-derived spheres. Different cell lines showed different correlations between sphere formation rate and initial cell size, suggesting heterogeneity in pathway regulation among breast cancer cell lines. More interestingly, by monitoring hundreds of spheres, we identified heterogeneity in sphere growth dynamics, indicating the cellular heterogeneity even within CSCs. These preliminary results highlight the power of unprecedented high-throughput and automation in CSC studies.

  7. Scaling and automation of a high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chip.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Heng; Chen, Yu-Chih; Brien, Riley; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-10-01

    Recent research suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are the key subpopulation for tumor relapse and metastasis. Due to cancer plasticity in surface antigen and enzymatic activity markers, functional tumorsphere assays are promising alternatives for CSC identification. To reliably quantify rare CSCs (1-5%), thousands of single-cell suspension cultures are required. While microfluidics is a powerful tool in handling single cells, previous works provide limited throughput and lack automatic data analysis capability required for high-throughput studies. In this study, we present the scaling and automation of high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chips, facilitating the tracking of up to ∼10 000 cells on a chip with ∼76.5% capture rate. The presented cell capture scheme guarantees sampling a representative population from the bulk cells. To analyze thousands of single-cells with a variety of fluorescent intensities, a highly adaptable analysis program was developed for cell/sphere counting and size measurement. Using a Pluronic® F108 (poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)) coating on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a suspension culture environment was created to test a controversial hypothesis: whether larger or smaller cells are more stem-like defined by the capability to form single-cell-derived spheres. Different cell lines showed different correlations between sphere formation rate and initial cell size, suggesting heterogeneity in pathway regulation among breast cancer cell lines. More interestingly, by monitoring hundreds of spheres, we identified heterogeneity in sphere growth dynamics, indicating the cellular heterogeneity even within CSCs. These preliminary results highlight the power of unprecedented high-throughput and automation in CSC studies. PMID:27510097

  8. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  9. Characterization of ESTs from black locust for gene discovery and marker development.

    PubMed

    Wang, J X; Lu, C; Yuan, C Q; Cui, B B; Qiu, Q D; Sun, P; Hu, R Y; Wu, D C; Sun, Y H; Li, Y

    2015-01-01

    Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) is an ecologically and economically important species. However, it has relatively underdeveloped genomic resources, and this limits gene discovery and marker-assisted selective breeding. In the present study, we obtained large-scale transcriptome data using a next-generation sequencing platform to compensate for the lack of black locust genomic information. Increasing the amount of transcriptome data for black locust will provide a valuable resource for multi-gene phylogenetic analyses and will facilitate research on the mechanisms whereby conserved genes and functions are maintained in the face of species divergence. We sequenced the black locust transcriptome from a cDNA library of multiple tissues and individuals on an Illumina platform, and this produced 108,229,352 clean sequence reads. The high-quality overlapping expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were assembled into 36,533 unigenes, and 4781 simple sequence repeats were characterized. A large collection of high-quality ESTs was obtained, de novo assembled, and characterized. Our results markedly expand the previous transcript catalogues of black locust and can gradually be applied to black locust breeding programs. Furthermore, our data will facilitate future research on the comparative genomics of black locust and related species. PMID:26505419

  10. Morphometric Analysis for High-Throughput Assay of Cellular Response at the Biomaterial Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehgal, Amit; Washburn, Newell R.; Kennedy, Scott; Karim, Alamgir; Amis, Eric J.

    2003-03-01

    Growth and expression of anchorage dependent mammalian cells is mediated by cell shape. Quantitative description of cell shape may therefore be potentially applicable as an important metric of cellular "health" on biomaterials. We have developed high-throughput test methods that correlate a systematic variation of surface properties of biomaterials to cell response. Test substrates ranging from gradients in crystallinity of polycaprolactone, to microtemplated MIMICS were used provide a range of biochemical, topographical and mechanosensory cues for guidance of cell growth and function. Cytomorphological response to this array of test stimuli was investigated by techniques ranging from rapid automated optical and fluorescence microscopy, to programmable atomic force microscopy. Rigorous moments analysis procedures were developed to generate areal distributional metrics from optical images, and cytoplasmic mass distributional metrics from the 3D AFM data. These analyses led to the discovery that the radius of gyration (Rg) of cells, was sharply defined for entire cell populations, and changed sensitively with the topography and the chemistry of the biomaterial. The analyses as applied to an ensemble of cells, provide quantitative statistical distributions of shape functionals as descriptors of cell response to libraries of substrate material properties. This would allow for development of tissue specific empirical models from in-vitro high-throughput "test-chips", a crucial design input for biomaterials in tissue-engineered implants and biomedical devices.

  11. High-throughput screening of filamentous fungi using nanoliter-range droplet-based microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Beneyton, Thomas; Wijaya, I. Putu Mahendra; Postros, Prexilia; Najah, Majdi; Leblond, Pascal; Couvent, Angélique; Mayot, Estelle; Griffiths, Andrew D.; Drevelle, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are an extremely important source of industrial enzymes because of their capacity to secrete large quantities of proteins. Currently, functional screening of fungi is associated with low throughput and high costs, which severely limits the discovery of novel enzymatic activities and better production strains. Here, we describe a nanoliter-range droplet-based microfluidic system specially adapted for the high-throughput sceening (HTS) of large filamentous fungi libraries for secreted enzyme activities. The platform allowed (i) compartmentalization of single spores in ~10 nl droplets, (ii) germination and mycelium growth and (iii) high-throughput sorting of fungi based on enzymatic activity. A 104 clone UV-mutated library of Aspergillus niger was screened based on α-amylase activity in just 90 minutes. Active clones were enriched 196-fold after a single round of microfluidic HTS. The platform is a powerful tool for the development of new production strains with low cost, space and time footprint and should bring enormous benefit for improving the viability of biotechnological processes. PMID:27270141

  12. High-throughput determination of mode of inhibition in lead identification and optimization.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Wynn, Richard; Hollis, Gregory; Liao, Boshan; Margulis, Alexander; Reid, Brian G; Klabe, Ronald; Liu, Phillip C C; Becker-Pasha, Mary; Rupar, Mark; Burn, Timothy C; McCall, Dale E; Li, Yanlong

    2007-03-01

    After finishing the primary high-throughput screening, the screening team is often faced with thousands of hits to be evaluated further. Effective filtering of these hits is crucial in identifying leads. Mode of inhibition (MOI) study is extremely useful in validating whether the observed compound activity is specific to the biological target. In this article, the authors describe a high-throughput MOI determination method for evaluating thousands of compounds using an existing screening infrastructure. Based on enzyme or receptor kinetics theory, the authors developed the method by measuring the ratio of IC(50) or percent inhibition at 2 carefully chosen substrate or ligand concentrations to define an inhibitor as competitive, uncompetitive, or noncompetitive. This not only facilitates binning of HTS hits according to their MOI but also greatly expands HTS utility in support of the medicinal chemistry team's lead optimization practice. Three case studies are presented to demonstrate how the method was applied successfully in 3 discovery programs targeting either an enzyme or a G-protein-coupled receptor.

  13. High-throughput Screening of Carbohydrate-degrading Enzymes Using Novel Insoluble Chromogenic Substrate Assay Kits.

    PubMed

    Schückel, Julia; Kračun, Stjepan Krešimir; Willats, William G T

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates active enzymes (CAZymes) have multiple roles in vivo and are widely used for industrial processing in the biofuel, textile, detergent, paper and food industries. A deeper understanding of CAZymes is important from both fundamental biology and industrial standpoints. Vast numbers of CAZymes exist in nature (especially in microorganisms) and hundreds of thousands have been cataloged and described in the carbohydrate active enzyme database (CAZy). However, the rate of discovery of putative enzymes has outstripped our ability to biochemically characterize their activities. One reason for this is that advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing, together with associated bioinformatics tools allow for rapid identification of candidate CAZymes, but technology for determining an enzyme's biochemical characteristics has advanced more slowly. To address this technology gap, a novel high-throughput assay kit based on insoluble chromogenic substrates is described here. Two distinct substrate types were produced: Chromogenic Polymer Hydrogel (CPH) substrates (made from purified polysaccharides and proteins) and Insoluble Chromogenic Biomass (ICB) substrates (made from complex biomass materials). Both CPH and ICB substrates are provided in a 96-well high-throughput assay system. The CPH substrates can be made in four different colors, enabling them to be mixed together and thus increasing assay throughput. The protocol describes a 96-well plate assay and illustrates how this assay can be used for screening the activities of enzymes, enzyme cocktails, and broths. PMID:27684747

  14. New Compound Sets Identified from High Throughput Phenotypic Screening Against Three Kinetoplastid Parasites: An Open Resource

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Imanol; Pilar Manzano, M.; Cantizani, Juan; Kessler, Albane; Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Bardera, Ana I.; Alvarez, Emilio; Colmenarejo, Gonzalo; Cotillo, Ignacio; Roquero, Irene; de Dios-Anton, Francisco; Barroso, Vanessa; Rodriguez, Ana; Gray, David W.; Navarro, Miguel; Kumar, Vinod; Sherstnev, Alexander; Drewry, David H.; Brown, James R.; Fiandor, Jose M.; Julio Martin, J.

    2015-01-01

    Using whole-cell phenotypic assays, the GlaxoSmithKline high-throughput screening (HTS) diversity set of 1.8 million compounds was screened against the three kinetoplastids most relevant to human disease, i.e. Leishmania donovani, Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei. Secondary confirmatory and orthogonal intracellular anti-parasiticidal assays were conducted, and the potential for non-specific cytotoxicity determined. Hit compounds were chemically clustered and triaged for desirable physicochemical properties. The hypothetical biological target space covered by these diversity sets was investigated through bioinformatics methodologies. Consequently, three anti-kinetoplastid chemical boxes of ~200 compounds each were assembled. Functional analyses of these compounds suggest a wide array of potential modes of action against kinetoplastid kinases, proteases and cytochromes as well as potential host–pathogen targets. This is the first published parallel high throughput screening of a pharma compound collection against kinetoplastids. The compound sets are provided as an open resource for future lead discovery programs, and to address important research questions. PMID:25740547

  15. Characterizing ncRNAs in Human Pathogenic Protists Using High-Throughput Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Lesley Joan

    2011-01-01

    ncRNAs are key genes in many human diseases including cancer and viral infection, as well as providing critical functions in pathogenic organisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses, and protists. Until now the identification and characterization of ncRNAs associated with disease has been slow or inaccurate requiring many years of testing to understand complicated RNA and protein gene relationships. High-throughput sequencing now offers the opportunity to characterize miRNAs, siRNAs, small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), and long ncRNAs on a genomic scale, making it faster and easier to clarify how these ncRNAs contribute to the disease state. However, this technology is still relatively new, and ncRNA discovery is not an application of high priority for streamlined bioinformatics. Here we summarize background concepts and practical approaches for ncRNA analysis using high-throughput sequencing, and how it relates to understanding human disease. As a case study, we focus on the parasitic protists Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis, where large evolutionary distance has meant difficulties in comparing ncRNAs with those from model eukaryotes. A combination of biological, computational, and sequencing approaches has enabled easier classification of ncRNA classes such as snoRNAs, but has also aided the identification of novel classes. It is hoped that a higher level of understanding of ncRNA expression and interaction may aid in the development of less harsh treatment for protist-based diseases. PMID:22303390

  16. High-throughput screening of filamentous fungi using nanoliter-range droplet-based microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneyton, Thomas; Wijaya, I. Putu Mahendra; Postros, Prexilia; Najah, Majdi; Leblond, Pascal; Couvent, Angélique; Mayot, Estelle; Griffiths, Andrew D.; Drevelle, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    Filamentous fungi are an extremely important source of industrial enzymes because of their capacity to secrete large quantities of proteins. Currently, functional screening of fungi is associated with low throughput and high costs, which severely limits the discovery of novel enzymatic activities and better production strains. Here, we describe a nanoliter-range droplet-based microfluidic system specially adapted for the high-throughput sceening (HTS) of large filamentous fungi libraries for secreted enzyme activities. The platform allowed (i) compartmentalization of single spores in ~10 nl droplets, (ii) germination and mycelium growth and (iii) high-throughput sorting of fungi based on enzymatic activity. A 104 clone UV-mutated library of Aspergillus niger was screened based on α-amylase activity in just 90 minutes. Active clones were enriched 196-fold after a single round of microfluidic HTS. The platform is a powerful tool for the development of new production strains with low cost, space and time footprint and should bring enormous benefit for improving the viability of biotechnological processes.

  17. A High-Throughput Screen Identifies a New Natural Product with Broad-Spectrum Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ymele-Leki, Patrick; Cao, Shugeng; Sharp, Jared; Lambert, Kathleen G.; McAdam, Alexander J.; Husson, Robert N.; Tamayo, Giselle; Clardy, Jon; Watnick, Paula I.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the inexorable invasion of our hospitals and communities by drug-resistant bacteria, there is a pressing need for novel antibacterial agents. Here we report the development of a sensitive and robust but low-tech and inexpensive high-throughput metabolic screen for novel antibiotics. This screen is based on a colorimetric assay of pH that identifies inhibitors of bacterial sugar fermentation. After validation of the method, we screened over 39,000 crude extracts derived from organisms that grow in the diverse ecosystems of Costa Rica and identified 49 with reproducible antibacterial effects. An extract from an endophytic fungus was further characterized, and this led to the discovery of three novel natural products. One of these, which we named mirandamycin, has broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio cholerae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This demonstrates the power of simple high throughput screens for rapid identification of new antibacterial agents from environmental samples. PMID:22359585

  18. Engineering a Brain Cancer Chip for High-throughput Drug Screening.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yantao; Nguyen, Duong Thanh; Akay, Yasemin; Xu, Feng; Akay, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant of all human primary brain cancers, in which drug treatment is still one of the most effective treatments. However, existing drug discovery and development methods rely on the use of conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, which have been proven to be poor representatives of native physiology. Here, we developed a novel three-dimensional (3D) brain cancer chip composed of photo-polymerizable poly(ethylene) glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel for drug screening. This chip can be produced after a few seconds of photolithography and requires no silicon wafer, replica molding, and plasma bonding like microfluidic devices made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). We then cultured glioblastoma cells (U87), which formed 3D brain cancer tissues on the chip, and used the GBM chip to perform combinatorial treatment of Pitavastatin and Irinotecan. The results indicate that this chip is capable of high-throughput GBM cancer spheroids formation, multiple-simultaneous drug administration, and a massive parallel testing of drug response. Our approach is easily reproducible, and this chip has the potential to be a powerful platform in cases such as high-throughput drug screening and prolonged drug release. The chip is also commercially promising for other clinical applications, including 3D cell culture and micro-scale tissue engineering. PMID:27151082

  19. Engineering a Brain Cancer Chip for High-throughput Drug Screening.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yantao; Nguyen, Duong Thanh; Akay, Yasemin; Xu, Feng; Akay, Metin

    2016-05-06

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant of all human primary brain cancers, in which drug treatment is still one of the most effective treatments. However, existing drug discovery and development methods rely on the use of conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, which have been proven to be poor representatives of native physiology. Here, we developed a novel three-dimensional (3D) brain cancer chip composed of photo-polymerizable poly(ethylene) glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel for drug screening. This chip can be produced after a few seconds of photolithography and requires no silicon wafer, replica molding, and plasma bonding like microfluidic devices made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). We then cultured glioblastoma cells (U87), which formed 3D brain cancer tissues on the chip, and used the GBM chip to perform combinatorial treatment of Pitavastatin and Irinotecan. The results indicate that this chip is capable of high-throughput GBM cancer spheroids formation, multiple-simultaneous drug administration, and a massive parallel testing of drug response. Our approach is easily reproducible, and this chip has the potential to be a powerful platform in cases such as high-throughput drug screening and prolonged drug release. The chip is also commercially promising for other clinical applications, including 3D cell culture and micro-scale tissue engineering.

  20. Engineering a Brain Cancer Chip for High-throughput Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yantao; Nguyen, Duong Thanh; Akay, Yasemin; Xu, Feng; Akay, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant of all human primary brain cancers, in which drug treatment is still one of the most effective treatments. However, existing drug discovery and development methods rely on the use of conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, which have been proven to be poor representatives of native physiology. Here, we developed a novel three-dimensional (3D) brain cancer chip composed of photo-polymerizable poly(ethylene) glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel for drug screening. This chip can be produced after a few seconds of photolithography and requires no silicon wafer, replica molding, and plasma bonding like microfluidic devices made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). We then cultured glioblastoma cells (U87), which formed 3D brain cancer tissues on the chip, and used the GBM chip to perform combinatorial treatment of Pitavastatin and Irinotecan. The results indicate that this chip is capable of high-throughput GBM cancer spheroids formation, multiple-simultaneous drug administration, and a massive parallel testing of drug response. Our approach is easily reproducible, and this chip has the potential to be a powerful platform in cases such as high-throughput drug screening and prolonged drug release. The chip is also commercially promising for other clinical applications, including 3D cell culture and micro-scale tissue engineering. PMID:27151082

  1. A quantitative high-throughput in vitro splicing assay identifies inhibitors of spliceosome catalysis.

    PubMed

    Berg, Michael G; Wan, Lili; Younis, Ihab; Diem, Michael D; Soo, Michael; Wang, Congli; Dreyfuss, Gideon

    2012-04-01

    Despite intensive research, there are very few reagents with which to modulate and dissect the mRNA splicing pathway. Here, we describe a novel approach to identify such tools, based on detection of the exon junction complex (EJC), a unique molecular signature that splicing leaves on mRNAs. We developed a high-throughput, splicing-dependent EJC immunoprecipitation (EJIPT) assay to quantitate mRNAs spliced from biotin-tagged pre-mRNAs in cell extracts, using antibodies to EJC components Y14 and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4aIII (eIF4AIII). Deploying EJIPT we performed high-throughput screening (HTS) in conjunction with secondary assays to identify splicing inhibitors. We describe the identification of 1,4-naphthoquinones and 1,4-heterocyclic quinones with known anticancer activity as potent and selective splicing inhibitors. Interestingly, and unlike previously described small molecules, most of which target early steps, our inhibitors represented by the benzothiazole-4,7-dione, BN82685, block the second of two trans-esterification reactions in splicing, preventing the release of intron lariat and ligation of exons. We show that BN82685 inhibits activated spliceosomes' elaborate structural rearrangements that are required for second-step catalysis, allowing definition of spliceosomes stalled in midcatalysis. EJIPT provides a platform for characterization and discovery of splicing and EJC modulators. PMID:22252314

  2. Crystal Symmetry Algorithms in a High-Throughput Framework for Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Richard

    The high-throughput framework AFLOW that has been developed and used successfully over the last decade is improved to include fully-integrated software for crystallographic symmetry characterization. The standards used in the symmetry algorithms conform with the conventions and prescriptions given in the International Tables of Crystallography (ITC). A standard cell choice with standard origin is selected, and the space group, point group, Bravais lattice, crystal system, lattice system, and representative symmetry operations are determined. Following the conventions of the ITC, the Wyckoff sites are also determined and their labels and site symmetry are provided. The symmetry code makes no assumptions on the input cell orientation, origin, or reduction and has been integrated in the AFLOW high-throughput framework for materials discovery by adding to the existing code base and making use of existing classes and functions. The software is written in object-oriented C++ for flexibility and reuse. A performance analysis and examination of the algorithms scaling with cell size and symmetry is also reported.

  3. Characterizing ncRNAs in Human Pathogenic Protists Using High-Throughput Sequencing Technology.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lesley Joan

    2011-01-01

    ncRNAs are key genes in many human diseases including cancer and viral infection, as well as providing critical functions in pathogenic organisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses, and protists. Until now the identification and characterization of ncRNAs associated with disease has been slow or inaccurate requiring many years of testing to understand complicated RNA and protein gene relationships. High-throughput sequencing now offers the opportunity to characterize miRNAs, siRNAs, small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), and long ncRNAs on a genomic scale, making it faster and easier to clarify how these ncRNAs contribute to the disease state. However, this technology is still relatively new, and ncRNA discovery is not an application of high priority for streamlined bioinformatics. Here we summarize background concepts and practical approaches for ncRNA analysis using high-throughput sequencing, and how it relates to understanding human disease. As a case study, we focus on the parasitic protists Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis, where large evolutionary distance has meant difficulties in comparing ncRNAs with those from model eukaryotes. A combination of biological, computational, and sequencing approaches has enabled easier classification of ncRNA classes such as snoRNAs, but has also aided the identification of novel classes. It is hoped that a higher level of understanding of ncRNA expression and interaction may aid in the development of less harsh treatment for protist-based diseases.

  4. High-throughput screening of filamentous fungi using nanoliter-range droplet-based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Beneyton, Thomas; Wijaya, I Putu Mahendra; Postros, Prexilia; Najah, Majdi; Leblond, Pascal; Couvent, Angélique; Mayot, Estelle; Griffiths, Andrew D; Drevelle, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are an extremely important source of industrial enzymes because of their capacity to secrete large quantities of proteins. Currently, functional screening of fungi is associated with low throughput and high costs, which severely limits the discovery of novel enzymatic activities and better production strains. Here, we describe a nanoliter-range droplet-based microfluidic system specially adapted for the high-throughput sceening (HTS) of large filamentous fungi libraries for secreted enzyme activities. The platform allowed (i) compartmentalization of single spores in ~10 nl droplets, (ii) germination and mycelium growth and (iii) high-throughput sorting of fungi based on enzymatic activity. A 10(4) clone UV-mutated library of Aspergillus niger was screened based on α-amylase activity in just 90 minutes. Active clones were enriched 196-fold after a single round of microfluidic HTS. The platform is a powerful tool for the development of new production strains with low cost, space and time footprint and should bring enormous benefit for improving the viability of biotechnological processes. PMID:27270141

  5. High throughput sequencing methods for microbiome profiling: application to food animal systems.

    PubMed

    Highlander, Sarah K

    2012-06-01

    Analysis of microbial communities using high throughput sequencing methods began in the mid 2000s permitting the production of 1000s to 10,000s of sequence reads per sample and megabases of data per sequence run. This then unprecedented depth of sequencing allowed, for the first time, the discovery of the 'rare biosphere' in environmental samples. The technology was quickly applied to studies in several human subjects. Perhaps these early studies served as a reminder that though the microbes that inhabit mammals are known to outnumber host cells by an order of magnitude or more, most of these are unknown members of our second genome, or microbiome (as coined by Joshua Lederberg), because of our inability to culture them. High throughput methods for microbial 16S ribosomal RNA gene and whole genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing have now begun to reveal the composition and identity of archaeal, bacterial and viral communities at many sites, in and on the human body. Surveys of the microbiota of food production animals have been published in the past few years and future studies should benefit from protocols and tools developed from large-scale human microbiome studies. Nevertheless, production animal-related resources, such as improved host genome assemblies and increased numbers and diversity of host-specific microbial reference genome sequences, will be needed to permit meaningful and robust analysis of 16S rDNA and WGS sequence data.

  6. False positives complicate ancient pathogen identifications using high-throughput shotgun sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Identification of historic pathogens is challenging since false positives and negatives are a serious risk. Environmental non-pathogenic contaminants are ubiquitous. Furthermore, public genetic databases contain limited information regarding these species. High-throughput sequencing may help reliably detect and identify historic pathogens. Results We shotgun-sequenced 8 16th-century Mixtec individuals from the site of Teposcolula Yucundaa (Oaxaca, Mexico) who are reported to have died from the huey cocoliztli (‘Great Pestilence’ in Nahautl), an unknown disease that decimated native Mexican populations during the Spanish colonial period, in order to identify the pathogen. Comparison of these sequences with those deriving from the surrounding soil and from 4 precontact individuals from the site found a wide variety of contaminant organisms that confounded analyses. Without the comparative sequence data from the precontact individuals and soil, false positives for Yersinia pestis and rickettsiosis could have been reported. Conclusions False positives and negatives remain problematic in ancient DNA analyses despite the application of high-throughput sequencing. Our results suggest that several studies claiming the discovery of ancient pathogens may need further verification. Additionally, true single molecule sequencing’s short read lengths, inability to sequence through DNA lesions, and limited ancient-DNA-specific technical development hinder its application to palaeopathology. PMID:24568097

  7. A BSL-4 High-Throughput Screen Identifies Sulfonamide Inhibitors of Nipah Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tigabu, Bersabeh; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E. Lucile; Tower, Nichole; Saeed, Mohammad; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nipah virus is a biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) pathogen that causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans. To identify novel small molecules that target Nipah virus replication as potential therapeutics, Southern Research Institute and Galveston National Laboratory jointly developed an automated high-throughput screening platform that is capable of testing 10,000 compounds per day within BSL-4 biocontainment. Using this platform, we screened a 10,080-compound library using a cell-based, high-throughput screen for compounds that inhibited the virus-induced cytopathic effect. From this pilot effort, 23 compounds were identified with EC50 values ranging from 3.9 to 20.0 μM and selectivities >10. Three sulfonamide compounds with EC50 values <12 μM were further characterized for their point of intervention in the viral replication cycle and for broad antiviral efficacy. Development of HTS capability under BSL-4 containment changes the paradigm for drug discovery for highly pathogenic agents because this platform can be readily modified to identify prophylactic and postexposure therapeutic candidates against other BSL-4 pathogens, particularly Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa viruses. PMID:24735442

  8. Combinatorial Synthesis of and high-throughput protein release from polymer film and nanoparticle libraries.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Latrisha K; Chavez-Santoscoy, Ana V; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2012-09-06

    antigenicity; in vitro cellular toxicity, cytokine production, surface marker expression, adhesion, proliferation and differentiation; and in vivo biodistribution and mucoadhesion(1-11). The combinatorial method developed herein enables high-throughput polymer synthesis and fabrication of protein-loaded nanoparticle and film libraries, which can, in turn, be screened in vitro and in vivo for optimization of biomaterial performance.

  9. Label-free high-throughput microRNA expression profiling from total RNA

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Demin; Zheng, Ke-xiao; Shen, Ye; Cao, Rong; Jiang, Li; Lu, Zhuoxuan; Yan, Xiyun; Li, Jiong

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key biological regulators and promising disease markers whose detection technologies hold great potentials in advancing fundamental research and medical diagnostics. Currently, miRNAs in biological samples have to be labeled before being applied to most high-throughput assays. Although effective, these labeling-based approaches are usually labor-intensive, time-consuming and liable to bias. Besides, the cross-hybridization of co-existing miRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs) is not adequately addressed in most assays that use total RNA as input. Here, we present a hybridization-triggered fluorescence strategy for label-free, microarray-based high-throughput miRNA expression profiling. The total RNA is directly applied to the microarray with a short fluorophore-linked oligonucleotide Universal Tag which can be selectively captured by the target-bound probes via base-stacking effects. This Stacking-Hybridized Universal Tag (SHUT) assay has been successfully used to analyze as little as 100 ng total RNA from human tissues, and found to be highly specific to homogenous miRNAs. Superb discrimination toward single-base mismatch at the 5′ or 3′ end has been demonstrated. Importantly, the pre-miRNAs generated negligible signals, validating the direct use of total RNA. PMID:21976734

  10. FX cloning: a simple and robust high-throughput cloning method for protein expression.

    PubMed

    Geertsma, Eric R

    2014-01-01

    The immense amount of gene sequences available nowadays allows scientist to screen broadly for extraordinary proteins. Reliable cloning tools that allow the parallel processing of many targets are vital for the success of this strategy. The FX cloning procedure detailed here is such a straightforward and efficient tool. It is dedicated to the cloning of open reading frames (ORFs) with the final aim of expressing the corresponding proteins. FX cloning combines attractive features of established high-throughput cloning methods that were thus far not unified in one single method. It facilitates the subcloning of a sequence-verified ORF to a variety of expression vectors, but is sufficiently versatile to accept PCR products as well. Moreover, the common, but undesirable feature of extending target ORFs with long cloning-related sequences is avoided. It leads to the addition of only one amino acid to each side of the protein. As a consequence, only one primer pair or PCR product suffices to generate expression vectors for both N- and C-terminal translational fusions. FX cloning is highly efficient and economical in its use. The method is suited for high-throughput cloning projects and also for everyday cloning of single targets. FX cloning is based on the use of type IIS restriction enzymes and negative selection markers. The full procedure takes place in one pot in less than 3 h and does not require intermediate purification steps nor extensive handling. The method has proven to be very robust and suitable for all common expression systems.

  11. MassCode Liquid Arrays as a Tool for Multiplexed High-Throughput Genetic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Gregory S.; Khine, Htet; Zhou, Tina T.; Ryan, Daniel E.; Brand, Tony; McBride, Mary T.; Killeen, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Multiplexed detection assays that analyze a modest number of nucleic acid targets over large sample sets are emerging as the preferred testing approach in such applications as routine pathogen typing, outbreak monitoring, and diagnostics. However, very few DNA testing platforms have proven to offer a solution for mid-plexed analysis that is high-throughput, sensitive, and with a low cost per test. In this work, an enhanced genotyping method based on MassCode technology was devised and integrated as part of a high-throughput mid-plexing analytical system that facilitates robust qualitative differential detection of DNA targets. Samples are first analyzed using MassCode PCR (MC-PCR) performed with an array of primer sets encoded with unique mass tags. Lambda exonuclease and an array of MassCode probes are then contacted with MC-PCR products for further interrogation and target sequences are specifically identified. Primer and probe hybridizations occur in homogeneous solution, a clear advantage over micro- or nanoparticle suspension arrays. The two cognate tags coupled to resultant MassCode hybrids are detected in an automated process using a benchtop single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The prospective value of using MassCode probe arrays for multiplexed bioanalysis was demonstrated after developing a 14plex proof of concept assay designed to subtype a select panel of Salmonella enterica serogroups and serovars. This MassCode system is very flexible and test panels can be customized to include more, less, or different markers. PMID:21544191

  12. High-throughput sorting of mosquito larvae for laboratory studies and for future vector control interventions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mosquito transgenesis offers new promises for the genetic control of vector-borne infectious diseases such as malaria and dengue fever. Genetic control strategies require the release of large number of male mosquitoes into field populations, whether they are based on the use of sterile males (sterile insect technique, SIT) or on introducing genetic traits conferring refractoriness to disease transmission (population replacement). However, the current absence of high-throughput techniques for sorting different mosquito populations impairs the application of these control measures. Methods A method was developed to generate large mosquito populations of the desired sex and genotype. This method combines flow cytometry and the use of Anopheles gambiae transgenic lines that differentially express fluorescent markers in males and females. Results Fluorescence-assisted sorting allowed single-step isolation of homozygous transgenic mosquitoes from a mixed population. This method was also used to select wild-type males only with high efficiency and accuracy, a highly desirable tool for genetic control strategies where the release of transgenic individuals may be problematic. Importantly, sorted males showed normal mating ability compared to their unsorted brothers. Conclusions The developed method will greatly facilitate both laboratory studies of mosquito vectorial capacity requiring high-throughput approaches and future field interventions in the fight against infectious disease vectors. PMID:22929810

  13. Non-destructive high-throughput DNA extraction and genotyping methods for cotton seeds and seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuting; Hoegenauer, Kevin A; Maeda, Andrea B V; Wang, Fei; Stelly, David M; Nichols, Robert L; Jones, Don C

    2015-05-01

    Extensive use of targeted PCR-based genotyping is precluded for many plant research laboratories by the cost and time required for DNA extraction. Using cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) as a model for plants with medium-sized seeds, we report here manual procedures for inexpensive non-destructive high-throughput extraction of DNA suitable for PCR-based genotyping of large numbers of individual seeds and seedlings. By sampling only small amounts of cotyledon tissue of ungerminated seed or young seedlings, damage is minimized, and viability is not discernibly affected. The yield of DNA from each seed or seedling is typically sufficient for 1000 or 500 PCR reactions, respectively. For seeds, the tissue sampling procedure relies on a modified 96-well plate that is used subsequently for seed storage. For seeds and seedlings, the DNA is extracted in a strongly basic DNA buffer that is later neutralized and diluted. Extracts can be used directly for high-throughput PCR-based genotyping. Any laboratory can thus extract DNA from thousands of individual seeds/seedlings per person-day at a very modest cost for consumables (~$0.05 per sample). Being non-destructive, our approach enables a wide variety of time- and resource-saving applications, such as marker-assisted selection (MAS), before planting, transplanting, and flowering.

  14. A Highly Sensitive, High-Throughput Assay for the Detection of Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hager, Karl; Hosono, Seiyu; Wise, Anastasia; Li, Peining; Rinder, Henry M.; Gruen, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Turner syndrome (TS) occurs when an X-chromosome is completely or partially deleted or when X-chromosomal mosaicism is present. Girls with TS benefit from early diagnosis and treatment with GH; however, many girls with TS are not detected until after 10 yr of age, resulting in delayed evaluation and treatment. Methods: We developed a high-throughput test for TS, based on a quantitative method of genotyping to detect X-chromosome abnormalities. This test uses pyrosequencing to quantitate relative allele strength (RAS) from single-nucleotide polymorphisms using 18 informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms markers that span the X-chromosome and one marker for the detection of Y-chromosome material. Results: Cutoff ranges for heterozygous, homozygous, or out-of-range RAS values were established from a cohort of 496 males and females. Positive TS scoring criteria were defined as the presence of homozygosity for all 18 markers or the presence of at least one out-of-range RAS value. To determine the validity of this rapid test for TS detection, we undertook a large-scale study using DNA from 132 females without TS and 74 females with TS for whom karyotypes were available. TS was identified with 96.0% sensitivity and 97.0% specificity in this cohort. We also tested buccal swab DNA from a group of 19 females without TS and 69 females with TS. In this group, TS was identified with 97.1% sensitivity and 84.2% specificity. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the validity of a high-throughput, pyrosequencing based test for the accurate detection of TS, providing a potential alternative to karyotype testing. PMID:21177792

  15. Review of high-throughput techniques for detecting solid phase Transformation from material libraries produced by combinatorial methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2005-01-01

    High-throughput measurement techniques are reviewed for solid phase transformation from materials produced by combinatorial methods, which are highly efficient concepts to fabricate large variety of material libraries with different compositional gradients on a single wafer. Combinatorial methods hold high potential for reducing the time and costs associated with the development of new materials, as compared to time-consuming and labor-intensive conventional methods that test large batches of material, one- composition at a time. These high-throughput techniques can be automated to rapidly capture and analyze data, using the entire material library on a single wafer, thereby accelerating the pace of materials discovery and knowledge generation for solid phase transformations. The review covers experimental techniques that are applicable to inorganic materials such as shape memory alloys, graded materials, metal hydrides, ferric materials, semiconductors and industrial alloys.

  16. High-throughput measurements of biochemical responses using the plate::vision multimode 96 minilens array reader.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Sen; Mark, David; Gandenberger, Frank Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    The plate::vision is a high-throughput multimode reader capable of reading absorbance, fluorescence, fluorescence polarization, time-resolved fluorescence, and luminescence. Its performance has been shown to be quite comparable with other readers. When the reader is integrated into the plate::explorer, an ultrahigh-throughput screening system with event-driven software and parallel plate-handling devices, it becomes possible to run complicated assays with kinetic readouts in high-density microtiter plate formats for high-throughput screening. For the past 5 years, we have used the plate::vision and the plate::explorer to run screens and have generated more than 30 million data points. Their throughput, performance, and robustness have speeded up our drug discovery process greatly.

  17. Multilayer polymer microchip capillary array electrophoresis devices with integrated on-chip labeling for high-throughput protein analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ming; Wang, Qingsong; Patterson, James E.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2011-01-01

    It is desirable to have inexpensive, high-throughput systems that integrate multiple sample analysis processes and procedures, for applications in biology, chemical analysis, drug discovery, and disease screening. In this paper, we demonstrate multilayer polymer microfluidic devices with integrated on-chip labeling and parallel electrophoretic separation of up to 8 samples. Microchannels were distributed in two different layers and connected through interlayer through-holes in the middle layer. A single set of electrophoresis reservoirs and one fluorescent label reservoir address parallel analysis units for up to 8 samples. Individual proteins and a mixture of cancer biomarkers have been successfully labeled on-chip and separated in parallel with this system. A detection limit of 600 ng/mL was obtained for heat shock protein 90. Our integrated on-chip labeling microdevices show great potential for low-cost, simplified, rapid and high-throughput analysis. PMID:21449615

  18. RAS - Screens & Assays - Drug Discovery

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Drug Discovery group aims to develop assays that will reveal aspects of RAS biology upon which cancer cells depend. Successful assay formats are made available for high-throughput screening programs to yield potentially effective drug compounds.

  19. Developing High-Throughput HIV Incidence Assay with Pyrosequencing Platform

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Yong; Goeken, Nolan; Lee, Hyo Jin; Bolan, Robert; Dubé, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence is an important measure for monitoring the epidemic and evaluating the efficacy of intervention and prevention trials. This study developed a high-throughput, single-measure incidence assay by implementing a pyrosequencing platform. We devised a signal-masking bioinformatics pipeline, which yielded a process error rate of 5.8 × 10−4 per base. The pipeline was then applied to analyze 18,434 envelope gene segments (HXB2 7212 to 7601) obtained from 12 incident and 24 chronic patients who had documented HIV-negative and/or -positive tests. The pyrosequencing data were cross-checked by using the single-genome-amplification (SGA) method to independently obtain 302 sequences from 13 patients. Using two genomic biomarkers that probe for the presence of similar sequences, the pyrosequencing platform correctly classified all 12 incident subjects (100% sensitivity) and 23 of 24 chronic subjects (96% specificity). One misclassified subject's chronic infection was correctly classified by conducting the same analysis with SGA data. The biomarkers were statistically associated across the two platforms, suggesting the assay's reproducibility and robustness. Sampling simulations showed that the biomarkers were tolerant of sequencing errors and template resampling, two factors most likely to affect the accuracy of pyrosequencing results. We observed comparable biomarker scores between AIDS and non-AIDS chronic patients (multivariate analysis of variance [MANOVA], P = 0.12), indicating that the stage of HIV disease itself does not affect the classification scheme. The high-throughput genomic HIV incidence marks a significant step toward determining incidence from a single measure in cross-sectional surveys. IMPORTANCE Annual HIV incidence, the number of newly infected individuals within a year, is the key measure of monitoring the epidemic's rise and decline. Developing reliable assays differentiating recent from chronic

  20. High-throughput sequencing: a roadmap toward community ecology.

    PubMed

    Poisot, Timothée; Péquin, Bérangère; Gravel, Dominique

    2013-04-01

    High-throughput sequencing is becoming increasingly important in microbial ecology, yet it is surprisingly under-used to generate or test biogeographic hypotheses. In this contribution, we highlight how adding these methods to the ecologist toolbox will allow the detection of new patterns, and will help our understanding of the structure and dynamics of diversity. Starting with a review of ecological questions that can be addressed, we move on to the technical and analytical issues that will benefit from an increased collaboration between different disciplines. PMID:23610649

  1. Adaptive Sampling for High Throughput Data Using Similarity Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskaya, V.; Sales, A. P.

    2015-05-06

    The need for adaptive sampling arises in the context of high throughput data because the rates of data arrival are many orders of magnitude larger than the rates at which they can be analyzed. A very fast decision must therefore be made regarding the value of each incoming observation and its inclusion in the analysis. In this report we discuss one approach to adaptive sampling, based on the new data point’s similarity to the other data points being considered for inclusion. We present preliminary results for one real and one synthetic data set.

  2. Live Cell Optical Sensing for High Throughput Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ye

    Live cell optical sensing employs label-free optical biosensors to non-invasively measure stimulus-induced dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) in live cells within the sensing volume of the biosensor. The resultant DMR signal is an integrated cellular response, and reflects cell signaling mediated through the cellular target(s) with which the stimulus intervenes. This article describes the uses of live cell optical sensing for probing cell biology and ligand pharmacology, with an emphasis of resonant waveguide grating biosensor cellular assays for high throughput applications.

  3. SSFinder: high throughput CRISPR-Cas target sites prediction tool.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Sharma, Shailesh

    2014-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system facilitates targeted genome editing in organisms. Despite high demand of this system, finding a reliable tool for the determination of specific target sites in large genomic data remained challenging. Here, we report SSFinder, a python script to perform high throughput detection of specific target sites in large nucleotide datasets. The SSFinder is a user-friendly tool, compatible with Windows, Mac OS, and Linux operating systems, and freely available online. PMID:25089276

  4. Orchestrating high-throughput genomic analysis with Bioconductor.

    PubMed

    Huber, Wolfgang; Carey, Vincent J; Gentleman, Robert; Anders, Simon; Carlson, Marc; Carvalho, Benilton S; Bravo, Hector Corrada; Davis, Sean; Gatto, Laurent; Girke, Thomas; Gottardo, Raphael; Hahne, Florian; Hansen, Kasper D; Irizarry, Rafael A; Lawrence, Michael; Love, Michael I; MacDonald, James; Obenchain, Valerie; Oleś, Andrzej K; Pagès, Hervé; Reyes, Alejandro; Shannon, Paul; Smyth, Gordon K; Tenenbaum, Dan; Waldron, Levi; Morgan, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Bioconductor is an open-source, open-development software project for the analysis and comprehension of high-throughput data in genomics and molecular biology. The project aims to enable interdisciplinary research, collaboration and rapid development of scientific software. Based on the statistical programming language R, Bioconductor comprises 934 interoperable packages contributed by a large, diverse community of scientists. Packages cover a range of bioinformatic and statistical applications. They undergo formal initial review and continuous automated testing. We present an overview for prospective users and contributors. PMID:25633503

  5. Analysis of High-Throughput ELISA Microarray Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-02-23

    Our research group develops analytical methods and software for the high-throughput analysis of quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays. ELISA microarrays differ from DNA microarrays in several fundamental aspects and most algorithms for analysis of DNA microarray data are not applicable to ELISA microarrays. In this review, we provide an overview of the steps involved in ELISA microarray data analysis and how the statistically sound algorithms we have developed provide an integrated software suite to address the needs of each data-processing step. The algorithms discussed are available in a set of open-source software tools (http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT).

  6. Computational Proteomics: High-throughput Analysis for Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, William R.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2007-01-03

    High-throughput (HTP) proteomics is a rapidly developing field that offers the global profiling of proteins from a biological system. The HTP technological advances are fueling a revolution in biology, enabling analyses at the scales of entire systems (e.g., whole cells, tumors, or environmental communities). However, simply identifying the proteins in a cell is insufficient for understanding the underlying complexity and operating mechanisms of the overall system. Systems level investigations are relying more and more on computational analyses, especially in the field of proteomics generating large-scale global data.

  7. High throughput computing: a solution for scientific analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, M.

    2011-01-01

    handle job failures due to hardware, software, or network interruptions (obviating the need to manually resubmit the job after each stoppage); be affordable; and most importantly, allow us to complete very large, complex analyses that otherwise would not even be possible. In short, we envisioned a job-management system that would take advantage of unused FORT CPUs within a local area network (LAN) to effectively distribute and run highly complex analytical processes. What we found was a solution that uses High Throughput Computing (HTC) and High Performance Computing (HPC) systems to do exactly that (Figure 1).

  8. High-throughput DNA sequencing: a genomic data manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Huang, G M

    1999-01-01

    The progress trends in automated DNA sequencing operation are reviewed. Technological development in sequencing instruments, enzymatic chemistry and robotic stations has resulted in ever-increasing capacity of sequence data production. This progress leads to a higher demand on laboratory information management and data quality assessment. High-throughput laboratories face the challenge of organizational management, as well as technology management. Engineering principles of process control should be adopted in this biological data manufacturing procedure. While various systems attempt to provide solutions to automate different parts of, or even the entire process, new technical advances will continue to change the paradigm and provide new challenges.

  9. Orchestrating high-throughput genomic analysis with Bioconductor

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Wolfgang; Carey, Vincent J.; Gentleman, Robert; Anders, Simon; Carlson, Marc; Carvalho, Benilton S.; Bravo, Hector Corrada; Davis, Sean; Gatto, Laurent; Girke, Thomas; Gottardo, Raphael; Hahne, Florian; Hansen, Kasper D.; Irizarry, Rafael A.; Lawrence, Michael; Love, Michael I.; MacDonald, James; Obenchain, Valerie; Oleś, Andrzej K.; Pagès, Hervé; Reyes, Alejandro; Shannon, Paul; Smyth, Gordon K.; Tenenbaum, Dan; Waldron, Levi; Morgan, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Bioconductor is an open-source, open-development software project for the analysis and comprehension of high-throughput data in genomics and molecular biology. The project aims to enable interdisciplinary research, collaboration and rapid development of scientific software. Based on the statistical programming language R, Bioconductor comprises 934 interoperable packages contributed by a large, diverse community of scientists. Packages cover a range of bioinformatic and statistical applications. They undergo formal initial review and continuous automated testing. We present an overview for prospective users and contributors. PMID:25633503

  10. Extended length microchannels for high density high throughput electrophoresis systems

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2000-01-01

    High throughput electrophoresis systems which provide extended well-to-read distances on smaller substrates, thus compacting the overall systems. The electrophoresis systems utilize a high density array of microchannels for electrophoresis analysis with extended read lengths. The microchannel geometry can be used individually or in conjunction to increase the effective length of a separation channel while minimally impacting the packing density of channels. One embodiment uses sinusoidal microchannels, while another embodiment uses plural microchannels interconnected by a via. The extended channel systems can be applied to virtually any type of channel confined chromatography.

  11. Towards A Fully Automated High-Throughput Phototransfection System

    PubMed Central

    Cappelleri, David J.; Halasz, Adam; Sul, Jai-Yoon; Kim, Tae Kyung; Eberwine, James; Kumar, Vijay

    2010-01-01

    We have designed and implemented a framework for creating a fully automated high-throughput phototransfection system. Integrated image processing, laser target position calculation, and stage movements show a throughput increase of > 23X over the current manual phototransfection method while the potential for even greater throughput improvements (> 110X) is described. A software tool for automated off-line single cell morphological measurements, as well as real-time image segmentation analysis, has also been constructed and shown to be able quantify changes in the cell before and after the process, successfully characterizing them, using metrics such as cell perimeter, area, major and minor axis length, and eccentricity values. PMID:20706617

  12. Miniaturization of High-Throughput Epigenetic Methyltransferase Assays with Acoustic Liquid Handling.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Bonnie; Lesnick, John; Wang, Jing; Tang, Nga; Peters, Carl

    2016-02-01

    Epigenetics continues to emerge as an important target class for drug discovery and cancer research. As programs scale to evaluate many new targets related to epigenetic expression, new tools and techniques are required to enable efficient and reproducible high-throughput epigenetic screening. Assay miniaturization increases screening throughput and reduces operating costs. Echo liquid handlers can transfer compounds, samples, reagents, and beads in submicroliter volumes to high-density assay formats using only acoustic energy-no contact or tips required. This eliminates tip costs and reduces the risk of reagent carryover. In this study, we demonstrate the miniaturization of a methyltransferase assay using Echo liquid handlers and two different assay technologies: AlphaLISA from PerkinElmer and EPIgeneous HTRF from Cisbio.

  13. Droplet-based microfluidics platform for ultra-high-throughput bioprospecting of cellulolytic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Najah, Majdi; Calbrix, Raphaël; Mahendra-Wijaya, I Putu; Beneyton, Thomas; Griffiths, Andrew D; Drevelle, Antoine

    2014-12-18

    Discovery of microorganisms producing enzymes that can efficiently hydrolyze cellulosic biomass is of great importance for biofuel production. To date, however, only a miniscule fraction of natural biodiversity has been tested because of the relatively low throughput of screening systems and their limitation to screening only culturable microorganisms. Here, we describe an ultra-high-throughput droplet-based microfluidic system that allowed the screening of over 100,000 cells in less than 20 min. Uncultured bacteria from a wheat stubble field were screened directly by compartmentalization of single bacteria in 20 pl droplets containing a fluorogenic cellobiohydrolase substrate. Sorting of droplets based on cellobiohydrolase activity resulted in a bacterial population with 17- and 7-fold higher cellobiohydrolase and endogluconase activity, respectively, and very different taxonomic diversity than when selected for growth on medium containing starch and carboxymethylcellulose as carbon source. PMID:25525991

  14. Surface modification of thermoplastics--towards the plastic biochip for high throughput screening devices.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Quijada, Gerardo A; Peytavi, Régis; Nantel, André; Roy, Emmanuel; Bergeron, Michel G; Dumoulin, Michel M; Veres, Teodor

    2007-07-01

    Microarrays have become one of the most convenient tools for high throughput screening, supporting major advances in genomics and proteomics. Other important applications can be found in medical diagnostics, detection of biothreats, drug discovery, etc. Integration of microarrays with microfluidic devices can be highly advantageous in terms of portability, shorter analysis time and lower consumption of expensive biological analytes. Since fabrication of microfluidic devices using traditional materials such as glass is rather expensive, there is great interest in employing polymeric materials as a low cost alternative that is suitable for mass production. A number of commercially available plastic materials were reviewed for this purpose and poly(methylmethacrylate) Zeonor 1060R and Zeonex E48R were identified as promising candidates, for which methods for surface modification and covalent immobilization of DNA oligonucleotides were developed. In addition, we present proof-of-concept plastic-based microarrays with and without integration with microfluidics.

  15. Preclinical drug metabolism in the age of high-throughput screening: an industrial perspective.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A D

    1997-11-01

    With the advent of genomics, combinatorial paradigms and high-throughput screen (HTS)-based pharmacological testing, the number of compounds flowing through the discovery pipeline is likely to escalate. At the same time, with increased knowledge of the human drug-metabolizing enzymes and the availability of in vitro absorption-metabolism (AM) models, Preclinical Drug Metabolism is poised to meet the challenges of HTS. In order to be successful, however, a rational HTS strategy (vs. serendipitous HTS) has to be employed. Such a strategy is based on automation, validation and integration of in vitro AM models and database management (AVID). A generalized strategy for rational (AVID-based) HTS in Preclinical Drug Metabolism is described briefly.

  16. Droplet-based microfluidics platform for ultra-high-throughput bioprospecting of cellulolytic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Najah, Majdi; Calbrix, Raphaël; Mahendra-Wijaya, I Putu; Beneyton, Thomas; Griffiths, Andrew D; Drevelle, Antoine

    2014-12-18

    Discovery of microorganisms producing enzymes that can efficiently hydrolyze cellulosic biomass is of great importance for biofuel production. To date, however, only a miniscule fraction of natural biodiversity has been tested because of the relatively low throughput of screening systems and their limitation to screening only culturable microorganisms. Here, we describe an ultra-high-throughput droplet-based microfluidic system that allowed the screening of over 100,000 cells in less than 20 min. Uncultured bacteria from a wheat stubble field were screened directly by compartmentalization of single bacteria in 20 pl droplets containing a fluorogenic cellobiohydrolase substrate. Sorting of droplets based on cellobiohydrolase activity resulted in a bacterial population with 17- and 7-fold higher cellobiohydrolase and endogluconase activity, respectively, and very different taxonomic diversity than when selected for growth on medium containing starch and carboxymethylcellulose as carbon source.

  17. Resonant waveguide grating imagers for single cell analysis and high throughput screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ye

    2015-08-01

    Resonant waveguide grating (RWG) systems illuminate an array of diffractive nanograting waveguide structures in microtiter plate to establish evanescent wave for measuring tiny changes in local refractive index arising from the dynamic mass redistribution of living cells upon stimulation. Whole-plate RWG imager enables high-throughput profiling and screening of drugs. Microfluidics RWG imager not only manifests distinct receptor signaling waves, but also differentiates long-acting agonism and antagonism. Spatially resolved RWG imager allows for single cell analysis including receptor signaling heterogeneity and the invasion of cancer cells in a spheroidal structure through 3-dimensional extracellular matrix. High frequency RWG imager permits real-time detection of drug-induced cardiotoxicity. The wide coverage in target, pathway, assay, and cell phenotype has made RWG systems powerful tool in both basic research and early drug discovery process.

  18. NETTAB 2014: From high-throughput structural bioinformatics to integrative systems biology.

    PubMed

    Romano, Paolo; Cordero, Francesca

    2016-03-02

    The fourteenth NETTAB workshop, NETTAB 2014, was devoted to a range of disciplines going from structural bioinformatics, to proteomics and to integrative systems biology. The topics of the workshop were centred around bioinformatics methods, tools, applications, and perspectives for models, standards and management of high-throughput biological data, structural bioinformatics, functional proteomics, mass spectrometry, drug discovery, and systems biology.43 scientific contributions were presented at NETTAB 2014, including keynote, special guest and tutorial talks, oral communications, and posters. Full papers from some of the best contributions presented at the workshop were later submitted to a special Call for this Supplement.Here, we provide an overview of the workshop and introduce manuscripts that have been accepted for publication in this Supplement.

  19. High-throughput proteomics: a new tool for quality and safety in fishery products.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Sara; Mullen, William; Cristobal, Susana

    2014-03-01

    In order to cope with the increasing demand for fishery products, sensitive technological tools are required to ensure high quality and wholesomeness and to monitor their production process in a sustainable manner while complying with the strict standards imposed by regulatory authorities. Proteomics may assist the industry as it allows an unbiased approach in the discovery of biomarkers that could be used to increase our understanding of different biological, physiological and ecological aspects that may be advantageous in optimizing quality and safety in aquatic species. The aim of this review is to highlight the potential of cost-effective high-throughput technologies, such as those offered by proteomics using "on-line" mass spectrometry to improve the efficiency of the industry in identifying biomarkers relevant for safe high quality products.

  20. High-throughput mAb expression and purification platform based on transient CHO.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Gavin C; Hougland, Maria D; Rajendra, Yashas

    2015-01-01

    A high-cell-density transient transfection system was recently developed in our laboratory based on a CHO-GS-KO cell line. This method yields monoclonal antibody titers up to 350 mg/L from a simple 7-day process, in volumes ranging from 2 mL to 2 L. By performing transfections in 24-deep-well plates, a large number of mAbs can be expressed simultaneously. We coupled this new high-throughput transfection process to a semiautomated protein A purification process. Using a Biomek FX(p) liquid handling robot, up to 72 unique mAbs can be simultaneously purified. Our primary goal was to obtain >0.25 mg of purified mAb at a concentration of >0.5 mg/mL, without any concentration or buffer-exchange steps. We optimized both the batch-binding and the batch elution steps. The length of the batch-binding step was important to minimize mAb losses in the flowthrough fraction. The elution step proved to be challenging to simultaneously maximize protein recovery and protein concentration. We designed a variable volume elution strategy based on the average supernatant titer. Finally, we present two case studies. In the first study, we produced 56 affinity maturation mAb variants at an average yield of 0.33 ± 0.05 mg (average concentration of 0.65 ± 0.10 mg/mL). In a second study, we produced 42 unique mAbs, from an early-stage discovery effort, at an average yield of 0.79 ± 0.31 mg (average concentration of 1.59 ± 0.63 mg/mL). The combination of parallel high-yielding transient transfection and semiautomated high-throughput protein A purification represents a valuable mAb drug discovery tool. PMID:25403790

  1. High-throughput screening to enhance oncolytic virus immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Allan, K J; Stojdl, David F; Swift, S L

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens can rapidly scan and capture large amounts of information across multiple biological parameters. Although many screens have been designed to uncover potential new therapeutic targets capable of crippling viruses that cause disease, there have been relatively few directed at improving the efficacy of viruses that are used to treat disease. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are biotherapeutic agents with an inherent specificity for treating malignant disease. Certain OV platforms - including those based on herpes simplex virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus - have shown success against solid tumors in advanced clinical trials. Yet, many of these OVs have only undergone minimal engineering to solidify tumor specificity, with few extra modifications to manipulate additional factors. Several aspects of the interaction between an OV and a tumor-bearing host have clear value as targets to improve therapeutic outcomes. At the virus level, these include delivery to the tumor, infectivity, productivity, oncolysis, bystander killing, spread, and persistence. At the host level, these include engaging the immune system and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review the chemical- and genome-based high-throughput screens that have been performed to manipulate such parameters during OV infection and analyze their impact on therapeutic efficacy. We further explore emerging themes that represent key areas of focus for future research. PMID:27579293

  2. Fluorescent foci quantitation for high-throughput analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ledesma-Fernández, Elena; Thorpe, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    A number of cellular proteins localize to discrete foci within cells, for example DNA repair proteins, microtubule organizing centers, P bodies or kinetochores. It is often possible to measure the fluorescence emission from tagged proteins within these foci as a surrogate for the concentration of that specific protein. We wished to develop tools that would allow quantitation of fluorescence foci intensities in high-throughput studies. As proof of principle we have examined the kinetochore, a large multi-subunit complex that is critical for the accurate segregation of chromosomes during cell division. Kinetochore perturbations lead to aneuploidy, which is a hallmark of cancer cells. Hence, understanding kinetochore homeostasis and regulation are important for a global understanding of cell division and genome integrity. The 16 budding yeast kinetochores colocalize within the nucleus to form a single focus. Here we have created a set of freely-available tools to allow high-throughput quantitation of kinetochore foci fluorescence. We use this ‘FociQuant’ tool to compare methods of kinetochore quantitation and we show proof of principle that FociQuant can be used to identify changes in kinetochore protein levels in a mutant that affects kinetochore function. This analysis can be applied to any protein that forms discrete foci in cells. PMID:26290880

  3. Benchmarking Procedures for High-Throughput Context Specific Reconstruction Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Maria P.; Pfau, Thomas; Sauter, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in high-throughput data acquisition has shifted the focus from data generation to processing and understanding of how to integrate collected information. Context specific reconstruction based on generic genome scale models like ReconX or HMR has the potential to become a diagnostic and treatment tool tailored to the analysis of specific individuals. The respective computational algorithms require a high level of predictive power, robustness and sensitivity. Although multiple context specific reconstruction algorithms were published in the last 10 years, only a fraction of them is suitable for model building based on human high-throughput data. Beside other reasons, this might be due to problems arising from the limitation to only one metabolic target function or arbitrary thresholding. This review describes and analyses common validation methods used for testing model building algorithms. Two major methods can be distinguished: consistency testing and comparison based testing. The first is concerned with robustness against noise, e.g., missing data due to the impossibility to distinguish between the signal and the background of non-specific binding of probes in a microarray experiment, and whether distinct sets of input expressed genes corresponding to i.e., different tissues yield distinct models. The latter covers methods comparing sets of functionalities, comparison with existing networks or additional databases. We test those methods on several available algorithms and deduce properties of these algorithms that can be compared with future developments. The set of tests performed, can therefore serve as a benchmarking procedure for future algorithms. PMID:26834640

  4. High-throughput GPU-based LDPC decoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yang-Lang; Chang, Cheng-Chun; Huang, Min-Yu; Huang, Bormin

    2010-08-01

    Low-density parity-check (LDPC) code is a linear block code known to approach the Shannon limit via the iterative sum-product algorithm. LDPC codes have been adopted in most current communication systems such as DVB-S2, WiMAX, WI-FI and 10GBASE-T. LDPC for the needs of reliable and flexible communication links for a wide variety of communication standards and configurations have inspired the demand for high-performance and flexibility computing. Accordingly, finding a fast and reconfigurable developing platform for designing the high-throughput LDPC decoder has become important especially for rapidly changing communication standards and configurations. In this paper, a new graphic-processing-unit (GPU) LDPC decoding platform with the asynchronous data transfer is proposed to realize this practical implementation. Experimental results showed that the proposed GPU-based decoder achieved 271x speedup compared to its CPU-based counterpart. It can serve as a high-throughput LDPC decoder.

  5. High-Throughput Characterization of Vapor-Deposited Organic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, Shakeel S.

    Glasses are non-equilibrium materials which on short timescales behave like solids, and on long timescales betray their liquid-like structure. The most common way of preparing a glass is to cool the liquid faster than it can structurally rearrange. Until recently, most preparation schemes for a glass were considered to result in materials with undifferentiable structure and properties. This thesis utilizes a particular preparation method, physical vapor deposition, in order to prepare glasses of organic molecules with properties otherwise considered to be unobtainable. The glasses are characterized using spectroscopic ellipsometry, both as a dilatometric technique and as a reporter of molecular packing. The results reported here develop ellipsometry as a dilatometric technique on a pair of model glass formers, alpha,alpha,beta-trisnaphthylbenzene and indomethacin. It is found that the molecular orientation, as measured by birefringence, can be tuned by changing the substrate temperature during the deposition. In order to efficiently characterize the properties of vapor-deposited indomethacin as a function of substrate temperature, a high-throughput method is developed to capture the entire interesting range of substrate temperatures in just a few experiments. This high-throughput method is then leveraged to describe molecular mobility in vapor-deposited indomethacin. It is also used to demonstrate that the behavior of organic semiconducting molecules agrees with indomethacin quantitatively, and this agreement has implications for emerging technologies such as light-emitting diodes, photovoltaics and thin-film transistors made from organic molecules.

  6. Prospective, high-throughput molecular profiling of human gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Tracy T.; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Borger, Darrell; Stiles, Charles D.; Wang, Daphne L.; Curry, William T.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Ligon, Keith L.; Ellisen, Leif; Louis, David N.; Iafrate, A. John

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas consist of multiple histologic and molecular subtypes with different clinical phenotypes and responsiveness to treatment. However, enrollment criteria for clinical trials still largely do not take into account these underlying molecular differences. We have incorporated a high-throughput tumor genotyping program based on the ABI SNaPshot platform as well as other molecular diagnostic tests into the standard evaluation of glioma patients in order to assess whether prospective molecular profiling would allow rational patient selection onto clinical trials. From 218 gliomas we prospectively collected SNaPshot genotyping data on 68 mutated loci from 15 key cancer genes along with data from clinical assays for gene amplification (EGFR, PDGFRA, MET), 1p/19q co-deletion and MGMT promoter methylation. SNaPshot mutations and focal gene amplifications were detected in 38.5 and 47.1 % of glioblastomas, respectively. Genetic alterations in EGFR, IDH1 and PIK3CA closely matched frequencies reported in recent studies. In addition, we identified events that are rare in gliomas although are known driver mutations in other cancer types, such as mutations of AKT1, BRAF and KRAS. Patients with genetic alterations that activate signaling pathways were enrolled onto genetically selective clinical trials for malignant glioma as well as for other solid cancers. High-throughput molecular profiling incorporated into the routine clinical evaluation of glioma patients may enable the rational selection of patients for targeted therapy clinical trials and thereby improve the likelihood that such trials succeed. PMID:22821383

  7. Benchmarking Procedures for High-Throughput Context Specific Reconstruction Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Maria P; Pfau, Thomas; Sauter, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in high-throughput data acquisition has shifted the focus from data generation to processing and understanding of how to integrate collected information. Context specific reconstruction based on generic genome scale models like ReconX or HMR has the potential to become a diagnostic and treatment tool tailored to the analysis of specific individuals. The respective computational algorithms require a high level of predictive power, robustness and sensitivity. Although multiple context specific reconstruction algorithms were published in the last 10 years, only a fraction of them is suitable for model building based on human high-throughput data. Beside other reasons, this might be due to problems arising from the limitation to only one metabolic target function or arbitrary thresholding. This review describes and analyses common validation methods used for testing model building algorithms. Two major methods can be distinguished: consistency testing and comparison based testing. The first is concerned with robustness against noise, e.g., missing data due to the impossibility to distinguish between the signal and the background of non-specific binding of probes in a microarray experiment, and whether distinct sets of input expressed genes corresponding to i.e., different tissues yield distinct models. The latter covers methods comparing sets of functionalities, comparison with existing networks or additional databases. We test those methods on several available algorithms and deduce properties of these algorithms that can be compared with future developments. The set of tests performed, can therefore serve as a benchmarking procedure for future algorithms.

  8. High resolution hyperspectral imaging with a high throughput virtual slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooding, Edward A.; Gunn, Thomas; Cenko, Andrew T.; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) device users often require both high spectral resolution, on the order of 1 nm, and high light-gathering power. A wide entrance slit assures reasonable étendue but degrades spectral resolution. Spectrometers built using High Throughput Virtual Slit™ (HTVS) technology optimize both parameters simultaneously. Two remote sensing use cases that require high spectral resolution are discussed. First, detection of atmospheric gases with intrinsically narrow absorption lines, such as hydrocarbon vapors or combustion exhaust gases such as NOx and CO2. Detecting exhaust gas species with high precision has become increasingly important in the light of recent events in the automobile industry. Second, distinguishing reflected daylight from emission spectra in the visible and NIR (VNIR) regions is most easily accomplished using the Fraunhofer absorption lines in solar spectra. While ground reflectance spectral features in the VNIR are generally quite broad, the Fraunhofer lines are narrow and provide a signature of intrinsic vs. extrinsic illumination. The High Throughput Virtual Slit enables higher spectral resolution than is achievable with conventional spectrometers by manipulating the beam profile in pupil space. By reshaping the instrument pupil with reflective optics, HTVS-equipped instruments create a tall, narrow image profile at the exit focal plane, typically delivering 5X or better the spectral resolution achievable with a conventional design.

  9. Advances, practice, and clinical perspectives in high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Park, S-J; Saito-Adachi, M; Komiyama, Y; Nakai, K

    2016-07-01

    Remarkable advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have fundamentally changed our understanding of the genetic and epigenetic molecular bases underlying human health and diseases. As these technologies continue to revolutionize molecular biology leading to fresh perspectives, it is imperative to thoroughly consider the enormous excitement surrounding the technologies by highlighting the characteristics of platforms and their global trends as well as potential benefits and limitations. To date, with a variety of platforms, the technologies provide an impressive range of applications, including sequencing of whole genomes and transcriptomes, identifying of genome modifications, and profiling of protein interactions. Because these applications produce a flood of data, simultaneous development of bioinformatics tools is required to efficiently deal with the big data and to comprehensively analyze them. This review covers the major achievements and performances of the high-throughput sequencing and further summarizes the characteristics of their applications along with introducing applicable bioinformatics tools. Moreover, a step-by-step procedure for a practical transcriptome analysis is described employing an analytical pipeline. Clinical perspectives with special consideration to human oral health and diseases are also covered. PMID:26602181

  10. High-throughput screening to enhance oncolytic virus immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Allan, KJ; Stojdl, David F; Swift, SL

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens can rapidly scan and capture large amounts of information across multiple biological parameters. Although many screens have been designed to uncover potential new therapeutic targets capable of crippling viruses that cause disease, there have been relatively few directed at improving the efficacy of viruses that are used to treat disease. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are biotherapeutic agents with an inherent specificity for treating malignant disease. Certain OV platforms – including those based on herpes simplex virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus – have shown success against solid tumors in advanced clinical trials. Yet, many of these OVs have only undergone minimal engineering to solidify tumor specificity, with few extra modifications to manipulate additional factors. Several aspects of the interaction between an OV and a tumor-bearing host have clear value as targets to improve therapeutic outcomes. At the virus level, these include delivery to the tumor, infectivity, productivity, oncolysis, bystander killing, spread, and persistence. At the host level, these include engaging the immune system and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review the chemical- and genome-based high-throughput screens that have been performed to manipulate such parameters during OV infection and analyze their impact on therapeutic efficacy. We further explore emerging themes that represent key areas of focus for future research. PMID:27579293

  11. Computational analysis of high-throughput flow cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J Paul; Rajwa, Bartek; Patsekin, Valery; Davisson, Vincent Jo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Flow cytometry has been around for over 40 years, but only recently has the opportunity arisen to move into the high-throughput domain. The technology is now available and is highly competitive with imaging tools under the right conditions. Flow cytometry has, however, been a technology that has focused on its unique ability to study single cells and appropriate analytical tools are readily available to handle this traditional role of the technology. Areas covered Expansion of flow cytometry to a high-throughput (HT) and high-content technology requires both advances in hardware and analytical tools. The historical perspective of flow cytometry operation as well as how the field has changed and what the key changes have been discussed. The authors provide a background and compelling arguments for moving toward HT flow, where there are many innovative opportunities. With alternative approaches now available for flow cytometry, there will be a considerable number of new applications. These opportunities show strong capability for drug screening and functional studies with cells in suspension. Expert opinion There is no doubt that HT flow is a rich technology awaiting acceptance by the pharmaceutical community. It can provide a powerful phenotypic analytical toolset that has the capacity to change many current approaches to HT screening. The previous restrictions on the technology, based on its reduced capacity for sample throughput, are no longer a major issue. Overcoming this barrier has transformed a mature technology into one that can focus on systems biology questions not previously considered possible. PMID:22708834

  12. Evaluation of a High Throughput Starch Analysis Optimised for Wood

    PubMed Central

    Bellasio, Chandra; Fini, Alessio; Ferrini, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Starch is the most important long-term reserve in trees, and the analysis of starch is therefore useful source of physiological information. Currently published protocols for wood starch analysis impose several limitations, such as long procedures and a neutralization step. The high-throughput standard protocols for starch analysis in food and feed represent a valuable alternative. However, they have not been optimised or tested with woody samples. These have particular chemical and structural characteristics, including the presence of interfering secondary metabolites, low reactivity of starch, and low starch content. In this study, a standard method for starch analysis used for food and feed (AOAC standard method 996.11) was optimised to improve precision and accuracy for the analysis of starch in wood. Key modifications were introduced in the digestion conditions and in the glucose assay. The optimised protocol was then evaluated through 430 starch analyses of standards at known starch content, matrix polysaccharides, and wood collected from three organs (roots, twigs, mature wood) of four species (coniferous and flowering plants). The optimised protocol proved to be remarkably precise and accurate (3%), suitable for a high throughput routine analysis (35 samples a day) of specimens with a starch content between 40 mg and 21 µg. Samples may include lignified organs of coniferous and flowering plants and non-lignified organs, such as leaves, fruits and rhizomes. PMID:24523863

  13. High-Throughput Screening Uncovers Novel Botulinum Neurotoxin Inhibitor Chemotypes.

    PubMed

    Bompiani, Kristin M; Caglič, Dejan; Krutein, Michelle C; Benoni, Galit; Hrones, Morgan; Lairson, Luke L; Bian, Haiyan; Smith, Garry R; Dickerson, Tobin J

    2016-08-01

    Botulism is caused by potent and specific bacterial neurotoxins that infect host neurons and block neurotransmitter release. Treatment for botulism is limited to administration of an antitoxin within a short time window, before the toxin enters neurons. Alternatively, current botulism drug development targets the toxin light chain, which is a zinc-dependent metalloprotease that is delivered into neurons and mediates long-term pathology. Several groups have identified inhibitory small molecules, peptides, or aptamers, although no molecule has advanced to the clinic due to a lack of efficacy in advanced models. Here we used a homogeneous high-throughput enzyme assay to screen three libraries of drug-like small molecules for new chemotypes that modulate recombinant botulinum neurotoxin light chain activity. High-throughput screening of 97088 compounds identified numerous small molecules that activate or inhibit metalloprotease activity. We describe four major classes of inhibitory compounds identified, detail their structure-activity relationships, and assess their relative inhibitory potency. A previously unreported chemotype in any context of enzyme inhibition is described with potent submicromolar inhibition (Ki = 200-300 nM). Additional detailed kinetic analyses and cellular cytotoxicity assays indicate the best compound from this series is a competitive inhibitor with cytotoxicity values around 4-5 μM. Given the potency and drug-like character of these lead compounds, further studies, including cellular activity assays and DMPK analysis, are justified. PMID:27314875

  14. High-Throughput Sequencing-Based Immune Repertoire Study during Infectious Disease.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dongni; Chen, Cuicui; Seely, Eric John; Chen, Shujing; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity of the adaptive immune response is based on the enormous diversity of T and B cell antigen-specific receptors. The immune repertoire, the collection of T and B cells with functional diversity in the circulatory system at any given time, is dynamic and reflects the essence of immune selectivity. In this article, we review the recent advances in immune repertoire study of infectious diseases, which were achieved by traditional techniques and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) techniques. HTS techniques enable the determination of complementary regions of lymphocyte receptors with unprecedented efficiency and scale. This progress in methodology enhances the understanding of immunologic changes during pathogen challenge and also provides a basis for further development of novel diagnostic markers, immunotherapies, and vaccines. PMID:27630639

  15. High-Throughput Sequencing-Based Immune Repertoire Study during Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dongni; Chen, Cuicui; Seely, Eric John; Chen, Shujing; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity of the adaptive immune response is based on the enormous diversity of T and B cell antigen-specific receptors. The immune repertoire, the collection of T and B cells with functional diversity in the circulatory system at any given time, is dynamic and reflects the essence of immune selectivity. In this article, we review the recent advances in immune repertoire study of infectious diseases, which were achieved by traditional techniques and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) techniques. HTS techniques enable the determination of complementary regions of lymphocyte receptors with unprecedented efficiency and scale. This progress in methodology enhances the understanding of immunologic changes during pathogen challenge and also provides a basis for further development of novel diagnostic markers, immunotherapies, and vaccines.

  16. High-Throughput Sequencing-Based Immune Repertoire Study during Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dongni; Chen, Cuicui; Seely, Eric John; Chen, Shujing; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity of the adaptive immune response is based on the enormous diversity of T and B cell antigen-specific receptors. The immune repertoire, the collection of T and B cells with functional diversity in the circulatory system at any given time, is dynamic and reflects the essence of immune selectivity. In this article, we review the recent advances in immune repertoire study of infectious diseases, which were achieved by traditional techniques and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) techniques. HTS techniques enable the determination of complementary regions of lymphocyte receptors with unprecedented efficiency and scale. This progress in methodology enhances the understanding of immunologic changes during pathogen challenge and also provides a basis for further development of novel diagnostic markers, immunotherapies, and vaccines. PMID:27630639

  17. BatchPrimer3: A high throughput web application for PCR and sequencing primer design

    PubMed Central

    You, Frank M; Huo, Naxin; Gu, Yong Qiang; Luo, Ming-cheng; Ma, Yaqin; Hane, Dave; Lazo, Gerard R; Dvorak, Jan; Anderson, Olin D

    2008-01-01

    Background Microsatellite (simple sequence repeat – SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers are two types of important genetic markers useful in genetic mapping and genotyping. Often, large-scale genomic research projects require high-throughput computer-assisted primer design. Numerous such web-based or standard-alone programs for PCR primer design are available but vary in quality and functionality. In particular, most programs lack batch primer design capability. Such a high-throughput software tool for designing SSR flanking primers and SNP genotyping primers is increasingly demanded. Results A new web primer design program, BatchPrimer3, is developed based on Primer3. BatchPrimer3 adopted the Primer3 core program as a major primer design engine to choose the best primer pairs. A new score-based primer picking module is incorporated into BatchPrimer3 and used to pick position-restricted primers. BatchPrimer3 v1.0 implements several types of primer designs including generic primers, SSR primers together with SSR detection, and SNP genotyping primers (including single-base extension primers, allele-specific primers, and tetra-primers for tetra-primer ARMS PCR), as well as DNA sequencing primers. DNA sequences in FASTA format can be batch read into the program. The basic information of input sequences, as a reference of parameter setting of primer design, can be obtained by pre-analysis of sequences. The input sequences can be pre-processed and masked to exclude and/or include specific regions, or set targets for different primer design purposes as in Primer3Web and primer3Plus. A tab-delimited or Excel-formatted primer output also greatly facilitates the subsequent primer-ordering process. Thousands of primers, including wheat conserved intron-flanking primers, wheat genome-specific SNP genotyping primers, and Brachypodium SSR flanking primers in several genome projects have been designed using the program and validated in several laboratories

  18. Adapting High-Throughput Screening Methods and Assays for Biocontainment Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Tigabu, Bersabeh; White, E. Lucile; Bostwick, Robert; Tower, Nichole; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W.; Noah, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract High-throughput screening (HTS) has been integrated into the drug discovery process, and multiple assay formats have been widely used in many different disease areas but with limited focus on infectious agents. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of HTS campaigns using infectious wild-type pathogens rather than surrogates or biochemical pathogen-derived targets. Concurrently, enhanced emerging pathogen surveillance and increased human mobility have resulted in an increase in the emergence and dissemination of infectious human pathogens with serious public health, economic, and social implications at global levels. Adapting the HTS drug discovery process to biocontainment laboratories to develop new drugs for these previously uncharacterized and highly pathogenic agents is now feasible, but HTS at higher biosafety levels (BSL) presents a number of unique challenges. HTS has been conducted with multiple bacterial and viral pathogens at both BSL-2 and BSL-3, and pilot screens have recently been extended to BSL-4 environments for both Nipah and Ebola viruses. These recent successful efforts demonstrate that HTS can be safely conducted at the highest levels of biological containment. This review outlines the specific issues that must be considered in the execution of an HTS drug discovery program for high-containment pathogens. We present an overview of the requirements for HTS in high-level biocontainment laboratories. PMID:25710545

  19. Adapting high-throughput screening methods and assays for biocontainment laboratories.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Tigabu, Bersabeh; White, E Lucile; Bostwick, Robert; Tower, Nichole; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W; Noah, James W

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has been integrated into the drug discovery process, and multiple assay formats have been widely used in many different disease areas but with limited focus on infectious agents. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of HTS campaigns using infectious wild-type pathogens rather than surrogates or biochemical pathogen-derived targets. Concurrently, enhanced emerging pathogen surveillance and increased human mobility have resulted in an increase in the emergence and dissemination of infectious human pathogens with serious public health, economic, and social implications at global levels. Adapting the HTS drug discovery process to biocontainment laboratories to develop new drugs for these previously uncharacterized and highly pathogenic agents is now feasible, but HTS at higher biosafety levels (BSL) presents a number of unique challenges. HTS has been conducted with multiple bacterial and viral pathogens at both BSL-2 and BSL-3, and pilot screens have recently been extended to BSL-4 environments for both Nipah and Ebola viruses. These recent successful efforts demonstrate that HTS can be safely conducted at the highest levels of biological containment. This review outlines the specific issues that must be considered in the execution of an HTS drug discovery program for high-containment pathogens. We present an overview of the requirements for HTS in high-level biocontainment laboratories. PMID:25710545

  20. High-throughput microcavitation bubble induced cellular mechanotransduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Jonathan Lee

    inhibitor to IP 3 induced Ca2+ release. This capability opens the development of a high-throughput screening platform for molecules that modulate cellular mechanotransduction. We have applied this approach to screen the effects of a small set of small molecules, in a 96-well plate in less than an hour. These detailed studies offer a basis for the design, development, and implementation of a novel high-throughput mechanotransduction assay to rapidly screen the effect of small molecules on cellular mechanotransduction at high throughput.

  1. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Su

    2001-05-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sub 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

  2. Development and Implementation of a High-Throughput Compound Screening Assay for Targeting Disrupted ER Calcium Homeostasis in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Honarnejad, Kamran; Daschner, Alexander; Giese, Armin; Zall, Andrea; Schmidt, Boris; Szybinska, Aleksandra; Kuznicki, Jacek; Herms, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Disrupted intracellular calcium homeostasis is believed to occur early in the cascade of events leading to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Particularly familial AD mutations linked to Presenilins result in exaggerated agonist-evoked calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here we report the development of a fully automated high-throughput calcium imaging assay utilizing a genetically-encoded FRET-based calcium indicator at single cell resolution for compound screening. The established high-throughput screening assay offers several advantages over conventional high-throughput calcium imaging technologies. We employed this assay for drug discovery in AD by screening compound libraries consisting of over 20,000 small molecules followed by structure-activity-relationship analysis. This led to the identification of Bepridil, a calcium channel antagonist drug in addition to four further lead structures capable of normalizing the potentiated FAD-PS1-induced calcium release from ER. Interestingly, it has recently been reported that Bepridil can reduce Aβ production by lowering BACE1 activity. Indeed, we also detected lowered Aβ, increased sAPPα and decreased sAPPβ fragment levels upon Bepridil treatment. The latter findings suggest that Bepridil may provide a multifactorial therapeutic modality for AD by simultaneously addressing multiple aspects of the disease. PMID:24260442

  3. Chemically diverse polymer microarrays and high throughput surface characterisation: a method for discovery of materials for stem cell culture† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4bm00054d Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Celiz, A. D.; Smith, J. G. W.; Patel, A. K.; Langer, R.; Anderson, D. G.; Barrett, D. A.; Young, L. E.; Davies, M. C.; Denning, C.

    2014-01-01

    Materials discovery provides the opportunity to identify novel materials that are tailored to complex biological environments by using combinatorial mixing of monomers to form large libraries of polymers as micro arrays. The materials discovery approach is predicated on the use of the largest chemical diversity possible, yet previous studies into human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) response to polymer microarrays have been limited to 20 or so different monomer identities in each study. Here we show that it is possible to print and assess cell adhesion of 141 different monomers in a microarray format. This provides access to the largest chemical space to date, allowing us to meet the regenerative medicine challenge to provide scalable synthetic culture ware. This study identifies new materials suitable for hPSC expansion that could not have been predicted from previous knowledge of cell-material interactions. PMID:25328672

  4. Chemically diverse polymer microarrays and high throughput surface characterisation: a method for discovery of materials for stem cell culture†Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4bm00054dClick here for additional data file.

    PubMed

    Celiz, A D; Smith, J G W; Patel, A K; Langer, R; Anderson, D G; Barrett, D A; Young, L E; Davies, M C; Denning, C; Alexander, M R

    2014-11-30

    Materials discovery provides the opportunity to identify novel materials that are tailored to complex biological environments by using combinatorial mixing of monomers to form large libraries of polymers as micro arrays. The materials discovery approach is predicated on the use of the largest chemical diversity possible, yet previous studies into human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) response to polymer microarrays have been limited to 20 or so different monomer identities in each study. Here we show that it is possible to print and assess cell adhesion of 141 different monomers in a microarray format. This provides access to the largest chemical space to date, allowing us to meet the regenerative medicine challenge to provide scalable synthetic culture ware. This study identifies new materials suitable for hPSC expansion that could not have been predicted from previous knowledge of cell-material interactions.

  5. High Throughput Screening Method to Explore Protein Interactions with Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Irem; Fatih, Warda; Svensson, Anja; Radu, Dennis; Linse, Sara; Cabaleiro Lago, Celia; Lundqvist, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of biological macromolecules with nanoparticles underlie a wide variety of current and future applications in the fields of biotechnology, medicine and bioremediation. The same interactions are also responsible for mediating potential biohazards of nanomaterials. Some applications require that proteins adsorb to the nanomaterial and that the protein resists or undergoes structural rearrangements. This article presents a screening method for detecting nanoparticle-protein partners and conformational changes on time scales ranging from milliseconds to days. Mobile fluorophores are used as reporters to study the interaction between proteins and nanoparticles in a high-throughput manner in multi-well format. Furthermore, the screening method may reveal changes in colloidal stability of nanomaterials depending on the physicochemical conditions. PMID:26313757

  6. Design of a High-Throughput Plasma-Processing System

    SciTech Connect

    Darkazalli, Ghazi; Matthei, Keith; Ruby, Douglas S.

    1999-07-20

    Sandia National Laboratories has demonstrated significant performance gains in crystalline silicon solar cell technology through the use of plasma-processing for the deposition of silicon nitride by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD), plasma-hydrogenation of the nitride layer, and reactive-ion etching of the silicon surface prior to the deposition to decrease the reflectivity of the surface. One of the major problems of implementing plasma processing into a cell production line is the batch configuration and/or low throughput of the systems currently available. This report describes the concept of a new in-line plasma processing system that could meet the industrial requirements for a high-throughput and cost effective solution for mass production of solar cells.

  7. A high-throughput screening for phosphatases using specific substrates.

    PubMed

    Senn, Alejandro M; Wolosiuk, Ricardo A

    2005-04-01

    A high-throughput screening was developed for the detection of phosphatase activity in bacterial colonies. Unlike other methods, the current procedure can be applied to any phosphatase because it uses physiological substrates and detects the compelled product of all phosphatase reactions, that is, orthophosphate. In this method, substrates diffuse from a filter paper across a nitrocellulose membrane to bacterial colonies situated on the opposite face, and then reaction products flow back to the paper. Finally, a colorimetric reagent discloses the presence of orthophosphate in the filter paper. We validated the performance of this assay with several substrates and experimental conditions and with different phosphatases, including a library of randomly mutagenized rapeseed chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. This procedure could be extended to other enzymatic activities provided that an appropriate detection of reaction products is available.

  8. Proteomics equipped with multiplexing toward ultra high throughput.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Sik

    2015-01-01

    MS-based quantitative proteomics is a powerful technology to study virtually almost all biological and clinical samples. Although it has been known to be a high-throughput method, an MS analysis of a higher number of samples remains to be challenging practically and economically. In this issue, the use of multiplexing strategy for quantitative analysis of proteomes and phosphoproteomes has been demonstrated by Paulo et al. (Proteomics 2015, 15, 462-473) to better understand in vivo effects of two small molecule inhibitors on a mouse model. Within the short period of drug treatment, it has been found that the protein alteration is minimal in three tissues tested, whereas the phosphorylation level was widely altered. PMID:25522341

  9. High-throughput rheology in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furst, Eric; Schultz, Kelly; Han, Hyejin; Kim, Chongyoup

    2011-11-01

    High-throughput rheological measurements in a microfluidic device are demonstrated. A series of microrheology samples is generated as droplets in an immiscible spacer fluid using a microfluidic T-junction. The compositions of the sample droplets are continuously varied over a wide range. Rheology measurements are made in each droplet using multiple particle tracking microrheology. We review critical design and operating parameters, including the droplet size, flow rates and rapid fabrication methods. Validation experiments are performed by measuring the solution viscosity of glycerine and the biopolymer heparin as a function of concentration. Finally, an analysis of droplet mixing is performed in order to optimize the device performance. Overall, the combination of microrheology with microfluidics maximizes the number of rheological measurements while simultaneously minimizing the sample preparation time and amount of material, and should be particularly suited to the characterization of scarce or expensive materials. We acknowledge financial support from the NSF (CBET-0730292).

  10. Machine Learning for High-Throughput Stress Phenotyping in Plants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arti; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Singh, Asheesh Kumar; Sarkar, Soumik

    2016-02-01

    Advances in automated and high-throughput imaging technologies have resulted in a deluge of high-resolution images and sensor data of plants. However, extracting patterns and features from this large corpus of data requires the use of machine learning (ML) tools to enable data assimilation and feature identification for stress phenotyping. Four stages of the decision cycle in plant stress phenotyping and plant breeding activities where different ML approaches can be deployed are (i) identification, (ii) classification, (iii) quantification, and (iv) prediction (ICQP). We provide here a comprehensive overview and user-friendly taxonomy of ML tools to enable the plant community to correctly and easily apply the appropriate ML tools and best-practice guidelines for various biotic and abiotic stress traits.

  11. Interactive Visual Analysis of High Throughput Text Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad A; Potok, Thomas E; Patton, Robert M; Goodall, John R; Maness, Christopher S; Senter, James K; Potok, Thomas E

    2012-01-01

    The scale, velocity, and dynamic nature of large scale social media systems like Twitter demand a new set of visual analytics techniques that support near real-time situational awareness. Social media systems are credited with escalating social protest during recent large scale riots. Virtual communities form rapidly in these online systems, and they occasionally foster violence and unrest which is conveyed in the users language. Techniques for analyzing broad trends over these networks or reconstructing conversations within small groups have been demonstrated in recent years, but state-of- the-art tools are inadequate at supporting near real-time analysis of these high throughput streams of unstructured information. In this paper, we present an adaptive system to discover and interactively explore these virtual networks, as well as detect sentiment, highlight change, and discover spatio- temporal patterns.

  12. Learning robust cell signalling models from high throughput proteomic data

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Mitchell; Broom, Bradley M.; Subramanian, Devika

    2015-01-01

    We propose a framework for learning robust Bayesian network models of cell signalling from high-throughput proteomic data. We show that model averaging using Bayesian bootstrap resampling generates more robust structures than procedures that learn structures using all of the data. We also develop an algorithm for ranking the importance of network features using bootstrap resample data. We apply our algorithms to derive the T-cell signalling network from the flow cytometry data of Sachs et al. (2005). Our learning algorithm has identified, with high confidence, several new crosstalk mechanisms in the T-cell signalling network. Many of them have already been confirmed experimentally in the recent literature and six new crosstalk mechanisms await experimental validation. PMID:19525198

  13. Numerical techniques for high-throughput reflectance interference biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevenler, Derin; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a robust and rapid computational method for processing the raw spectral data collected from thin film optical interference biosensors. We have applied this method to Interference Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS) measurements and observed a 10,000 fold improvement in processing time, unlocking a variety of clinical and scientific applications. Interference biosensors have advantages over similar technologies in certain applications, for example highly multiplexed measurements of molecular kinetics. However, processing raw IRIS data into useful measurements has been prohibitively time consuming for high-throughput studies. Here we describe the implementation of a lookup table (LUT) technique that provides accurate results in far less time than naive methods. We also discuss an additional benefit that the LUT method can be used with a wider range of interference layer thickness and experimental configurations that are incompatible with methods that require fitting the spectral response.

  14. Quantitative High-Throughput Luciferase Screening in Identifying CAR Modulators.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Caitlin; Zhao, Jinghua; Wang, Hongbing; Xia, Menghang

    2016-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is responsible for the transcription of multiple drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. There are two possible methods of activation for CAR, direct ligand binding and a ligand-independent method, which makes this a unique nuclear receptor. Both of these mechanisms require translocation of CAR from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. Interestingly, CAR is constitutively active in immortalized cell lines due to the basal nuclear location of this receptor. This creates an important challenge in most in vitro assay models because immortalized cells cannot be used without inhibiting the high basal activity. In this book chapter, we go into detail of how to perform quantitative high-throughput screens to identify hCAR1 modulators through the employment of a double stable cell line. Using this line, we are able to identify activators, as well as deactivators, of the challenging nuclear receptor, CAR. PMID:27518621

  15. Multiple-injection high-throughput gas chromatography analysis.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Wes; Wang, Heather; Welch, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Multiple-injection techniques have been shown to be a simple way to perform high-throughput analysis where the entire experiment resides in a single chromatogram, simplifying the data analysis and interpretation. In this study, multiple-injection techniques are applied to gas chromatography with flame ionization detection and mass detection to significantly increase sample throughput. The unique issues of implementing a traditional "Fast" injection mode of multiple-injection techniques with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are discussed. Stacked injections are also discussed as means to increase the throughput of longer methods where mass detection is unable to distinguish between analytes of the same mass and longer retentions are required to resolve components of interest. Multiple-injection techniques are shown to increase instrument throughput by up to 70% and to simplify data analysis, allowing hits in multiple parallel experiments to be identified easily. PMID:27292909

  16. UAV-based high-throughput phenotyping in legume crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Sindhuja; Khot, Lav R.; Quirós, Juan; Vandemark, George J.; McGee, Rebecca J.

    2016-05-01

    In plant breeding, one of the biggest obstacles in genetic improvement is the lack of proven rapid methods for measuring plant responses in field conditions. Therefore, the major objective of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing high-throughput remote sensing technology for rapid measurement of phenotyping traits in legume crops. The plant responses of several chickpea and peas varieties to the environment were assessed with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) integrated with multispectral imaging sensors. Our preliminary assessment showed that the vegetation indices are strongly correlated (p<0.05) with seed yield of legume crops. Results endorse the potential of UAS-based sensing technology to rapidly measure those phenotyping traits.

  17. High Throughput Screening Method to Explore Protein Interactions with Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Irem; Fatih, Warda; Svensson, Anja; Radu, Dennis; Linse, Sara; Cabaleiro Lago, Celia; Lundqvist, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of biological macromolecules with nanoparticles underlie a wide variety of current and future applications in the fields of biotechnology, medicine and bioremediation. The same interactions are also responsible for mediating potential biohazards of nanomaterials. Some applications require that proteins adsorb to the nanomaterial and that the protein resists or undergoes structural rearrangements. This article presents a screening method for detecting nanoparticle-protein partners and conformational changes on time scales ranging from milliseconds to days. Mobile fluorophores are used as reporters to study the interaction between proteins and nanoparticles in a high-throughput manner in multi-well format. Furthermore, the screening method may reveal changes in colloidal stability of nanomaterials depending on the physicochemical conditions. PMID:26313757

  18. High-throughput process development for biopharmaceutical drug substances.

    PubMed

    Bhambure, Rahul; Kumar, Kaushal; Rathore, Anurag S

    2011-03-01

    Quality by Design (QbD) is gaining industry acceptance as an approach towards development and commercialization of biotechnology therapeutic products that are expressed via microbial or mammalian cell lines. In QbD, the process is designed and controlled to deliver specified quality attributes consistently. To acquire the enhanced understanding that is necessary to achieve the above, however, requires more extensive experimentation to establish the design space for the process and the product. With biotechnology companies operating under ever-increasing pressure towards lowering the cost of manufacturing, the use of high-throughput tools has emerged as a necessary enabler of QbD in a time- and resource-constrained environment. We review this topic for those in academia and industry that are engaged in drug substance process development.

  19. Estimating Protistan Diversity Using High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sarah K; Liu, Zhenfeng; Lie, Alle A Y; Countway, Peter D; Kim, Diane Y; Jones, Adriane C; Gast, Rebecca J; Cary, S Craig; Sherr, Evelyn B; Sherr, Barry F; Caron, David A

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing hypervariable regions from the 18S rRNA gene is commonly employed to characterize protistan biodiversity, yet there are concerns that short reads do not provide the same taxonomic resolution as full-length sequences. A total of 7,432 full-length sequences were used to perform an in silico analysis of how sequences of various lengths and target regions impact downstream ecological interpretations. Sequences that were longer than 400 nucleotides and included the V4 hypervariable region generated results similar to those derived from full-length 18S rRNA gene sequences. Present high-throughput sequencing capabilities are approaching protistan diversity estimation comparable to whole gene sequences.

  20. Multifunctional encoded particles for high-throughput biomolecule analysis.

    PubMed

    Pregibon, Daniel C; Toner, Mehmet; Doyle, Patrick S

    2007-03-01

    High-throughput screening for genetic analysis, combinatorial chemistry, and clinical diagnostics benefits from multiplexing, which allows for the simultaneous assay of several analytes but necessitates an encoding scheme for molecular identification. Current approaches for multiplexed analysis involve complicated or expensive processes for encoding, functionalizing, or decoding active substrates (particles or surfaces) and often yield a very limited number of analyte-specific codes. We present a method based on continuous-flow lithography that combines particle synthesis and encoding and probe incorporation into a single process to generate multifunctional particles bearing over a million unique codes. By using such particles, we demonstrate a multiplexed, single-fluorescence detection of DNA oligomers with encoded particle libraries that can be scanned rapidly in a flow-through microfluidic channel. Furthermore, we demonstrate with high specificity the same multiplexed detection using individual multiprobe particles.

  1. High-throughput determination of RNA structure by proximity ligation.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Vijay; Qiu, Ruolan; Shendure, Jay

    2015-09-01

    We present an unbiased method to globally resolve RNA structures through pairwise contact measurements between interacting regions. RNA proximity ligation (RPL) uses proximity ligation of native RNA followed by deep sequencing to yield chimeric reads with ligation junctions in the vicinity of structurally proximate bases. We apply RPL in both baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and human cells and generate contact probability maps for ribosomal and other abundant RNAs, including yeast snoRNAs, the RNA subunit of the signal recognition particle and the yeast U2 spliceosomal RNA homolog. RPL measurements correlate with established secondary structures for these RNA molecules, including stem-loop structures and long-range pseudoknots. We anticipate that RPL will complement the current repertoire of computational and experimental approaches in enabling the high-throughput determination of secondary and tertiary RNA structures. PMID:26237516

  2. High-Throughput Sequencing of Complete Mitochondrial Genomes.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Andrew George; Hopkins, Kevin Peter; Waeschenbach, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has revolutionized mitogenomics, turning a cottage industry into a high throughput process. This chapter outlines methodologies used to sequence, assemble, and annotate mitogenomes of non-model organisms using Illumina sequencing technology, utilizing either long-range PCR amplicons or gDNA as starting template. Instructions are given on how to extract DNA, conduct long-range PCR amplifications, generate short Sanger barcode tag sequences, prepare equimolar sample pools, construct and assess quality library preparations, assemble Illumina reads using either seeded reference mapping or de novo assembly, and annotate mitogenomes in the absence of an automated pipeline. Notes and recommendations, derived from our own experience, are given throughout this chapter. PMID:27460369

  3. A Colloidal Stability Assay Suitable for High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Carla; Ali, M Monsur; Yang, Songtao; Dong, Xiaofei; Pelton, Robert H

    2016-03-01

    A library of 32 polystyrene copolymer latexes, with diameters ranging between 53 and 387 nm, was used to develop and demonstrate a high-throughput assay using a 96-well microplate platform to measure critical coagulation concentrations, a measure of colloidal stability. The most robust assay involved an automated centrifugation-decantation step to remove latex aggregates before absorbance measurements, eliminating aggregate interference with optical measurements made through the base of the multiwell plates. For smaller nanoparticles (diameter <150 nm), the centrifugation-decantation step was not required as the interference was less than with larger particles. Parallel measurements with a ChemiDoc MP plate scanner gave indications of aggregation; however, the results were less sensitive than the absorbance measurements. PMID:26857643

  4. High-throughput ab-initio dilute solute diffusion database

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Henry; Mayeshiba, Tam; Morgan, Dane

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate automated generation of diffusion databases from high-throughput density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A total of more than 230 dilute solute diffusion systems in Mg, Al, Cu, Ni, Pd, and Pt host lattices have been determined using multi-frequency diffusion models. We apply a correction method for solute diffusion in alloys using experimental and simulated values of host self-diffusivity. We find good agreement with experimental solute diffusion data, obtaining a weighted activation barrier RMS error of 0.176 eV when excluding magnetic solutes in non-magnetic alloys. The compiled database is the largest collection of consistently calculated ab-initio solute diffusion data in the world. PMID:27434308

  5. Printing Proteins as Microarrays for High-Throughput Function Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacBeath, Gavin; Schreiber, Stuart L.

    2000-09-01

    Systematic efforts are currently under way to construct defined sets of cloned genes for high-throughput expression and purification of recombinant proteins. To facilitate subsequent studies of protein function, we have developed miniaturized assays that accommodate extremely low sample volumes and enable the rapid, simultaneous processing of thousands of proteins. A high-precision robot designed to manufacture complementary DNA microarrays was used to spot proteins onto chemically derivatized glass slides at extremely high spatial densities. The proteins attached covalently to the slide surface yet retained their ability to interact specifically with other proteins, or with small molecules, in solution. Three applications for protein microarrays were demonstrated: screening for protein-protein interactions, identifying the substrates of protein kinases, and identifying the protein targets of small molecules.

  6. Statistically invalid classification of high throughput gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Barbash, Shahar; Soreq, Hermona

    2013-01-01

    Classification analysis based on high throughput data is a common feature in neuroscience and other fields of science, with a rapidly increasing impact on both basic biology and disease-related studies. The outcome of such classifications often serves to delineate novel biochemical mechanisms in health and disease states, identify new targets for therapeutic interference, and develop innovative diagnostic approaches. Given the importance of this type of studies, we screened 111 recently-published high-impact manuscripts involving classification analysis of gene expression, and found that 58 of them (53%) based their conclusions on a statistically invalid method which can lead to bias in a statistical sense (lower true classification accuracy then the reported classification accuracy). In this report we characterize the potential methodological error and its scope, investigate how it is influenced by different experimental parameters, and describe statistically valid methods for avoiding such classification mistakes.

  7. A robust robotic high-throughput antibody purification platform.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Peter M; Abdo, Michael; Butcher, Rebecca E; Yap, Min-Yin; Scotney, Pierre D; Ramunno, Melanie L; Martin-Roussety, Genevieve; Owczarek, Catherine; Hardy, Matthew P; Chen, Chao-Guang; Fabri, Louis J

    2016-07-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become the fastest growing segment in the drug market with annual sales of more than 40 billion US$ in 2013. The selection of lead candidate molecules involves the generation of large repertoires of antibodies from which to choose a final therapeutic candidate. Improvements in the ability to rapidly produce and purify many antibodies in sufficient quantities reduces the lead time for selection which ultimately impacts on the speed with which an antibody may transition through the research stage and into product development. Miniaturization and automation of chromatography using micro columns (RoboColumns(®) from Atoll GmbH) coupled to an automated liquid handling instrument (ALH; Freedom EVO(®) from Tecan) has been a successful approach to establish high throughput process development platforms. Recent advances in transient gene expression (TGE) using the high-titre Expi293F™ system have enabled recombinant mAb titres of greater than 500mg/L. These relatively high protein titres reduce the volume required to generate several milligrams of individual antibodies for initial biochemical and biological downstream assays, making TGE in the Expi293F™ system ideally suited to high throughput chromatography on an ALH. The present publication describes a novel platform for purifying Expi293F™-expressed recombinant mAbs directly from cell-free culture supernatant on a Perkin Elmer JANUS-VariSpan ALH equipped with a plate shuttle device. The purification platform allows automated 2-step purification (Protein A-desalting/size exclusion chromatography) of several hundred mAbs per week. The new robotic method can purify mAbs with high recovery (>90%) at sub-milligram level with yields of up to 2mg from 4mL of cell-free culture supernatant.

  8. High-throughput insect cell protein expression applications.

    PubMed

    Buchs, Mirjam; Kim, Ernie; Pouliquen, Yann; Sachs, Michael; Geisse, Sabine; Mahnke, Marion; Hunt, Ian

    2009-01-01

    The Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS) is one of the most efficient systems for production of recombinant proteins and consequently its application is wide-spread in industry as well as in academia. Since the early 1970s, when the first stable insect cell lines were established and the infectivity of bacu-lovirus in an in vitro culture system was demonstrated (1, 2), virtually thousands of reports have been published on the successful expression of proteins using this system as well as on method improvement. However, despite its popularity the system is labor intensive and time consuming. Moreover, adaptation of the system to multi-parallel (high-throughput) expression is much more difficult to achieve than with E. coli due to its far more complex nature. However, recent years have seen the development of strategies that have greatly enhanced the stream-lining and speed of baculovirus protein expression for increased throughput via use of automation and miniaturization. This chapter therefore tries to collate these developments in a series of protocols (which are modifications to standard procedure plus several new approaches) that will allow the user to expedite the speed and throughput of baculovirus-mediated protein expression and facilitate true multi-parallel, high-throughput protein expression profiling in insect cells. In addition we also provide a series of optimized protocols for small and large-scale transient insect cell expression that allow for both the rapid analysis of multiple constructs and the concomitant scale-up of those selected for on-going analysis. Since this approach is independent of viral propagation, the timelines for this approach are markedly shorter and offer a significant advantage over standard bacu-lovirus expression approach strategies in the context of HT applications.

  9. A rapid, inexpensive high throughput screen method for neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Yeyeodu, Susan T; Witherspoon, Sam M; Gilyazova, Nailya; Ibeanu, Gordon C

    2010-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth assays are the most common phenotypic screen to assess chemical effects on neuronal cells. Current automated assays involve expensive equipment, lengthy sample preparation and handling, costly reagents and slow rates of data acquisition and analysis. We have developed a high throughput screen (HTS) for neurite outgrowth using a robust neuronal cell model coupled to fast and inexpensive visualization methods, reduced data volume and rapid data analysis. Neuroscreen-1 (NS-1) cell, a subclone of PC12, possessing rapid growth and enhanced sensitivity to NGF was used as a model neuron. This method reduces preparation time by using cells expressing GFP or native cells stained with HCS CellMask(™) Red in a multiplexed 30 min fixation and staining step. A 2x2 camera binning process reduced both image data files and analysis times by 75% and 60% respectively, compared to current protocols. In addition, eliminating autofocus steps during montage generation reduced data collection time. Pharmacological profiles for stimulation and inhibition of neurite outgrowth by NGF and SU6656 were comparable to current standard method utilizing immunofluorescence detection of tubulin. Potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth by members of a 1,120-member Prestwick compound library as assayed using this method identified six molecules, including etoposide, isoflupredone acetate, fludrocortisone acetate, thioguanosine, oxyphenbutazone and gibberellic acid, that more than doubled the neurite mass primed by 2 ng/ml NGF. This simple procedure represents an important routine approach in high throughput screening of large chemical libraries using the neurite outgrowth phenotype as a measure of the effects of chemical molecules on neuronal cells. PMID:21347208

  10. Detection of Intracellular Granularity Induction in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines by Small Molecules Using the HyperCyt® High-Throughput Flow Cytometry System

    PubMed Central

    HAYNES, MARK K.; STROUSE, J. JACOB; WALLER, ANNA; LEITAO, ANDREI; CURPAN, RAMONA F.; BOLOGA, CRISTIAN; OPREA, TUDOR I.; PROSSNITZ, ERIC R.; EDWARDS, BRUCE S.; SKLAR, LARRY A.; THOMPSON, TODD A.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of death among men due to the limited number of treatment strategies available for advanced disease. Discovery of effective chemotherapeutics involves the identification of agents that inhibit cancer cell growth. Increases in intracellular granularity have been observed during physiological processes that include senescence, apoptosis, and autophagy, making this phenotypic change a useful marker for identifying small molecules that induce cellular growth arrest or death. In this regard, epithelial-derived cancer cell lines appear uniquely susceptible to increased intracellular granularity following exposure to chemotherapeutics. We have established a novel flow cytometry approach that detects increases in side light scatter in response to morphological changes associated with intracellular granularity in the androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-independent PC3 human prostate cancer cell lines. A cell-based assay was developed to screen for small molecule inducers of intracellular granularity using the HyperCyt® high-throughput flow cytometry platform. Validation was performed using the Prestwick Chemical Library, where known modulators of LNCaP intracellular granularity, such as testosterone, were identified. Nonandrogenic inducers of granularity were also detected. A further screen of ~25,000 small molecules led to the identification of a class of aryl-oxazoles that increased intracellular granularity in both cell lines, often leading to cell death. The most potent agents exhibited submicromolar efficacy in LNCaP and PC3 cells. PMID:19470718

  11. Detection of intracellular granularity induction in prostate cancer cell lines by small molecules using the HyperCyt high-throughput flow cytometry system.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Mark K; Strouse, J Jacob; Waller, Anna; Leitao, Andrei; Curpan, Ramona F; Bologa, Cristian; Oprea, Tudor I; Prossnitz, Eric R; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A; Thompson, Todd A

    2009-07-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of death among men due to the limited number of treatment strategies available for advanced disease. Discovery of effective chemotherapeutics involves the identification of agents that inhibit cancer cell growth. Increases in intracellular granularity have been observed during physiological processes that include senescence, apoptosis, and autophagy, making this phenotypic change a useful marker for identifying small molecules that induce cellular growth arrest or death. In this regard, epithelial-derived cancer cell lines appear uniquely susceptible to increased intracellular granularity following exposure to chemotherapeutics. We have established a novel flow cytometry approach that detects increases in side light scatter in response to morphological changes associated with intracellular granularity in the androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-independent PC3 human prostate cancer cell lines. A cell-based assay was developed to screen for small molecule inducers of intracellular granularity using the HyperCyt high-throughput flow cytometry platform. Validation was performed using the Prestwick Chemical Library, where known modulators of LNCaP intracellular granularity, such as testosterone, were identified. Nonandrogenic inducers of granularity were also detected. A further screen of approximately 25,000 small molecules led to the identification of a class of aryl-oxazoles that increased intracellular granularity in both cell lines, often leading to cell death. The most potent agents exhibited submicromolar efficacy in LNCaP and PC3 cells. PMID:19470718

  12. Recent advances in candidate-gene and whole-genome approaches to the discovery of anthelmintic resistance markers and the description of drug/receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kotze, Andrew C.; Hunt, Peter W.; Skuce, Philip; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Martin, Richard J.; Sager, Heinz; Krücken, Jürgen; Hodgkinson, Jane; Lespine, Anne; Jex, Aaron R.; Gilleard, John S.; Beech, Robin N.; Wolstenholme, Adrian J.; Demeler, Janina; Robertson, Alan P.; Charvet, Claude L.; Neveu, Cedric; Kaminsky, Ronald; Rufener, Lucien; Alberich, Melanie; Menez, Cecile; Prichard, Roger K.

    2014-01-01

    Anthelmintic resistance has a great impact on livestock production systems worldwide, is an emerging concern in companion animal medicine, and represents a threat to our ongoing ability to control human soil-transmitted helminths. The Consortium for Anthelmintic Resistance and Susceptibility (CARS) provides a forum for scientists to meet and discuss the latest developments in the search for molecular markers of anthelmintic resistance. Such markers are important for detecting drug resistant worm populations, and indicating the likely impact of the resistance on drug efficacy. The molecular basis of resistance is also important for understanding how anthelmintics work, and how drug resistant populations arise. Changes to target receptors, drug efflux and other biological processes can be involved. This paper reports on the CARS group meeting held in August 2013 in Perth, Australia. The latest knowledge on the development of molecular markers for resistance to each of the principal classes of anthelmintics is reviewed. The molecular basis of resistance is best understood for the benzimidazole group of compounds, and we examine recent work to translate this knowledge into useful diagnostics for field use. We examine recent candidate-gene and whole-genome approaches to understanding anthelmintic resistance and identify markers. We also look at drug transporters in terms of providing both useful markers for resistance, as well as opportunities to overcome resistance through the targeting of the transporters themselves with inhibitors. Finally, we describe the tools available for the application of the newest high-throughput sequencing technologies to the study of anthelmintic resistance. PMID:25516826

  13. Label-free high-throughput screening via mass spectrometry: a single cystathionine quantitative method for multiple applications.

    PubMed

    Holt, Tom G; Choi, Bernard K; Geoghagen, Neil S; Jensen, Kristian K; Luo, Qi; LaMarr, William A; Makara, Gergely M; Malkowitz, Lorraine; Ozbal, Can C; Xiong, Yusheng; Dufresne, Claude; Luo, Ming-Juan

    2009-10-01

    Label-free mass spectrometric (MS) technologies are particularly useful for enzyme assay design for drug discovery screens. MS permits the selective detection of enzyme substrates or products in a wide range of biological matrices without need for derivatization, labeling, or capture technologies. As part of a cardiovascular drug discovery effort aimed at finding modulators of cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS), we used the RapidFire((R)) label-free high-throughput MS (HTMS) technology to develop a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for CBS activity. The in vitro assay used HTMS to quantify the unlabeled product of the CBS reaction, cystathionine. Cystathionine HTMS analyses were carried out with a throughput of 7 s per sample and quantitation over a linear range of 80-10,000 nM. A compound library of 25,559 samples (or 80 384-well plates) was screened as singlets using the HTMS assay in a period of 8 days. With a hit rate of 0.32%, the actives showed a 90% confirmation rate. The in vitro assay was applied to secondary screens in more complex matrices with no additional analytical development. Our results show that the HTMS method was useful for screening samples containing serum, for cell-based assays, and for liver explants. The novel extension of the in vitro analytical method, without modification, to secondary assays resulted in a significant and advantageous economy of development time for the drug discovery project.

  14. High Resolution Discovery Proteomics Reveals Candidate Disease Progression Markers of Alzheimer’s Disease in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anita Y. H.; Song, Qinghua; Liaw, Andy; Wiener, Matt; Paweletz, Cloud P.; Seeburger, Jeffrey L.; Li, Jenny; Meng, Fanyu; Deyanova, Ekaterina G.; Mazur, Matthew T.; Settlage, Robert E.; Zhao, Xuemei; Southwick, Katie; Du, Yi; Holder, Dan; Sachs, Jeffrey R.; Laterza, Omar F.; Dallob, Aimee; Chappell, Derek L.; Snyder, Karen; Modur, Vijay; King, Elizabeth; Joachim, Catharine; Bondarenko, Andrey Y.; Shearman, Mark; Soper, Keith A.; Smith, A. David; Potter, William Z.; Koblan, Ken S.; Sachs, Alan B.

    2015-01-01

    Disease modifying treatments for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) constitute a major goal in medicine. Current trends suggest that biomarkers reflective of AD neuropathology and modifiable by treatment would provide supportive evidence for disease modification. Nevertheless, a lack of quantitative tools to assess disease modifying treatment effects remains a major hurdle. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biochemical markers such as total tau, p-tau and Ab42 are well established markers of AD; however, global quantitative biochemical changes in CSF in AD disease progression remain largely uncharacterized. Here we applied a high resolution open discovery platform, dMS, to profile a cross-sectional cohort of lumbar CSF from post-mortem diagnosed AD patients versus those from non-AD/non-demented (control) patients. Multiple markers were identified to be statistically significant in the cohort tested. We selected two markers SME-1 (p<0.0001) and SME-2 (p = 0.0004) for evaluation in a second independent longitudinal cohort of human CSF from post-mortem diagnosed AD patients and age-matched and case-matched control patients. In cohort-2, SME-1, identified as neuronal secretory protein VGF, and SME-2, identified as neuronal pentraxin receptor-1 (NPTXR), in AD were 21% (p = 0.039) and 17% (p = 0.026) lower, at baseline, respectively, than in controls. Linear mixed model analysis in the longitudinal cohort estimate a decrease in the levels of VGF and NPTXR at the rate of 10.9% and 6.9% per year in the AD patients, whereas both markers increased in controls. Because these markers are detected by mass spectrometry without the need for antibody reagents, targeted MS based assays provide a clear translation path for evaluating selected AD disease-progression markers with high analytical precision in the clinic. PMID:26270474

  15. A high-throughput panel for identifying clinically relevant mutation profiles in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Dutton-Regester, Ken; Irwin, Darryl; Hunt, Priscilla; Aoude, Lauren G; Tembe, Varsha; Pupo, Gulietta M; Lanagan, Cathy; Carter, Candace D; O'Connor, Linda; O'Rourke, Michael; Scolyer, Richard A; Mann, Graham J; Schmidt, Christopher W; Herington, Adrian; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2012-04-01

    Success with molecular-based targeted drugs in the treatment of cancer has ignited extensive research efforts within the field of personalized therapeutics. However, successful application of such therapies is dependent on the presence or absence of mutations within the patient's tumor that can confer clinical efficacy or drug resistance. Building on these findings, we developed a high-throughput mutation panel for the identification of frequently occurring and clinically relevant mutations in melanoma. An extensive literature search and interrogation of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database identified more than 1,000 melanoma mutations. Applying a filtering strategy to focus on mutations amenable to the development of targeted drugs, we initially screened 120 known mutations in 271 samples using the Sequenom MassARRAY system. A total of 252 mutations were detected in 17 genes, the highest frequency occurred in BRAF (n = 154, 57%), NRAS (n = 55, 20%), CDK4 (n = 8, 3%), PTK2B (n = 7, 2.5%), and ERBB4 (n = 5, 2%). Based on this initial discovery screen, a total of 46 assays interrogating 39 mutations in 20 genes were designed to develop a melanoma-specific panel. These assays were distributed in multiplexes over 8 wells using strict assay design parameters optimized for sensitive mutation detection. The final melanoma-specific mutation panel is a cost effective, sensitive, high-throughput approach for identifying mutations of clinical relevance to molecular-based therapeutics for the treatment of melanoma. When used in a clinical research setting, the panel may rapidly and accurately identify potentially effective treatment strategies using novel or existing molecularly targeted drugs. PMID:22383533

  16. Is Caenorhabditis elegans the Magic Bullet for Anthelminthic Drug Discovery?

    PubMed

    Keiser, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    Recent advances in handling and readout have facilitated high-throughput screens with Caenorhabditis elegans. A new study demonstrates that C. elegans is a useful tool in high-throughput anthelminthic drug discovery. Despite challenges, drug discovery using C. elegans offers opportunities that might lead the way to novel anthelminthic drugs.

  17. Public availability of a genotyped, segregating population may foster marker assisted breeding (MAB) and quantitative trait loci (QTL) discovery: An example using strawberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much of the cost associated with marker discovery for marker assisted breeding (MAB) can be eliminated if a diverse, segregating population is generated, genotyped and made available to the global breeding community. Herein, we present an example of a hybrid, wild-derived family of the octoploid str...

  18. SNP Discovery Using Next Generation Transcriptomic Sequencing.

    PubMed

    De Wit, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, I will guide the user through methods to find new SNP markers from expressed sequence (RNA-Seq) data, focusing on the sample preparation and also on the bioinformatic analyses needed to sort through the immense flood of data from high-throughput sequencing machines. The general steps included are as follows: sample preparation, sequencing, quality control of data, assembly, mapping, SNP discovery, filtering, validation. The first few steps are traditional laboratory protocols, whereas steps following the sequencing are of bioinformatic nature. The bioinformatics described herein are by no means exhaustive, rather they serve as one example of a simple way of analyzing high-throughput sequence data to find SNP markers. Ideally, one would like to run through this protocol several times with a new dataset, while varying software parameters slightly, in order to determine the robustness of the results. The final validation step, although not described in much detail here, is also quite critical as that will be the final test of the accuracy of the assumptions made in silico.There is a plethora of downstream applications of a SNP dataset, not covered in this chapter. For an example of a more thorough protocol also including differential gene expression and functional enrichment analyses, BLAST annotation and downstream applications of SNP markers, a good starting point could be the "Simple Fool's Guide to population genomics via RNA-Seq," which is available at http://sfg.stanford.edu . PMID:27460371

  19. Bis-benzimidazole hits against Naegleria fowleri discovered with new high-throughput screens.

    PubMed

    Rice, Christopher A; Colon, Beatrice L; Alp, Mehmet; Göker, Hakan; Boykin, David W; Kyle, Dennis E

    2015-04-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a pathogenic free-living amoeba (FLA) that causes an acute fatal disease known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The major problem for infections with any pathogenic FLA is a lack of effective therapeutics, since PAM has a case mortality rate approaching 99%. Clearly, new drugs that are potent and have rapid onset of action are needed to enhance the treatment regimens for PAM. Diamidines have demonstrated potency against multiple pathogens, including FLA, and are known to cross the blood-brain barrier to cure other protozoan diseases of the central nervous system. Therefore, amidino derivatives serve as an important chemotype for discovery of new drugs. In this study, we validated two new in vitro assays suitable for medium- or high-throughput drug discovery and used these for N. fowleri. We next screened over 150 amidino derivatives of multiple structural classes and identified two hit series with nM potency that are suitable for further lead optimization as new drugs for this neglected disease. These include both mono- and diamidino derivatives, with the most potent compound (DB173) having a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 177 nM. Similarly, we identified 10 additional analogues with IC50s of <1 μM, with many of these having reasonable selectivity indices. The most potent hits were >500 times more potent than pentamidine. In summary, the mono- and diamidino derivatives offer potential for lead optimization to develop new drugs to treat central nervous system infections with N. fowleri. PMID:25605363

  20. Benchmarking Ligand-Based Virtual High-Throughput Screening with the PubChem Database

    PubMed Central

    Butkiewicz, Mariusz; Lowe, Edward W.; Mueller, Ralf; Mendenhall, Jeffrey L.; Teixeira, Pedro L.; Weaver, C. David; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    With the rapidly increasing availability of High-Throughput Screening (HTS) data in the public domain, such as the PubChem database, methods for ligand-based computer-aided drug discovery (LB-CADD) have the potential to accelerate and reduce the cost of probe development and drug discovery efforts in academia. We assemble nine data sets from realistic HTS campaigns representing major families of drug target proteins for benchmarking LB-CADD methods. Each data set is public domain through PubChem and carefully collated through confirmation screens validating active compounds. These data sets provide the foundation for benchmarking a new cheminformatics framework BCL::ChemInfo, which is freely available for non-commercial use. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models are built using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Support Vector Machines (SVMs), Decision Trees (DTs), and Kohonen networks (KNs). Problem-specific descriptor optimization protocols are assessed including Sequential Feature Forward Selection (SFFS) and various information content measures. Measures of predictive power and confidence are evaluated through cross-validation, and a consensus prediction scheme is tested that combines orthogonal machine learning algorithms into a single predictor. Enrichments ranging from 15 to 101 for a TPR cutoff of 25% are observed. PMID:23299552

  1. Development of a Framework for High-Throughput Calculations and its Application to Energy Storage Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirklin, Scott

    From a historical perspective, the progress of humanity has been measured by the materials that mankind has been able to use. Looking forward, future technological developments will continue to hinge on the development of materials with precisely tailored properties and performance. In pursuit of this goal, this thesis presents a framework for the high-throughput handling of first principles materials modeling. This framework takes the form of the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD - www.oqmd.org), a repository of crystal structures, computed materials properties, and a host of tools for data storage, retrieval, and analysis. At present, the OQMD contains over 300,000 materials, and over 1.3 million completed density functional theory calculations. We set forth to demonstrate the usefulness of the OQMD for materials discovery by using it to search for materials for three applications: 1) conversion reaction anode materials for Li-ion batteries, 2) electrode materials for a novel hybrid Li-ion/Li-O2 battery chemistry, and 3) precipitation strengtheners for a suite of structural metals. In each of these materials discovery projects, we first determine the scope of relevant materials to consider, then develop a set of screens based on DFT calculable bulk materials properties, implement the specified filters, and finally consider the apparent advantages and disadvantages of the predicted materials.

  2. The essential roles of chemistry in high-throughput screening triage

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Walters, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that academic high-throughput screening (HTS) and virtual HTS triage suffers from a lack of scientists trained in the art and science of early drug discovery chemistry. Many recent publications report the discovery of compounds by screening that are most likely artifacts or promiscuous bioactive compounds, and these results are not placed into the context of previous studies. For HTS to be most successful, it is our contention that there must exist an early partnership between biologists and medicinal chemists. Their combined skill sets are necessary to design robust assays and efficient workflows that will weed out assay artifacts, false positives, promiscuous bioactive compounds and intractable screening hits, efforts that ultimately give projects a better chance at identifying truly useful chemical matter. Expertise in medicinal chemistry, cheminformatics and purification sciences (analytical chemistry) can enhance the post-HTS triage process by quickly removing these problematic chemotypes from consideration, while simultaneously prioritizing the more promising chemical matter for follow-up testing. It is only when biologists and chemists collaborate effectively that HTS can manifest its full promise. PMID:25163000

  3. Bis-Benzimidazole Hits against Naegleria fowleri Discovered with New High-Throughput Screens

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Christopher A.; Colon, Beatrice L.; Alp, Mehmet; Göker, Hakan; Boykin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a pathogenic free-living amoeba (FLA) that causes an acute fatal disease known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The major problem for infections with any pathogenic FLA is a lack of effective therapeutics, since PAM has a case mortality rate approaching 99%. Clearly, new drugs that are potent and have rapid onset of action are needed to enhance the treatment regimens for PAM. Diamidines have demonstrated potency against multiple pathogens, including FLA, and are known to cross the blood-brain barrier to cure other protozoan diseases of the central nervous system. Therefore, amidino derivatives serve as an important chemotype for discovery of new drugs. In this study, we validated two new in vitro assays suitable for medium- or high-throughput drug discovery and used these for N. fowleri. We next screened over 150 amidino derivatives of multiple structural classes and identified two hit series with nM potency that are suitable for further lead optimization as new drugs for this neglected disease. These include both mono- and diamidino derivatives, with the most potent compound (DB173) having a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 177 nM. Similarly, we identified 10 additional analogues with IC50s of <1 μM, with many of these having reasonable selectivity indices. The most potent hits were >500 times more potent than pentamidine. In summary, the mono- and diamidino derivatives offer potential for lead optimization to develop new drugs to treat central nervous system infections with N. fowleri. PMID:25605363

  4. Bis-benzimidazole hits against Naegleria fowleri discovered with new high-throughput screens.

    PubMed

    Rice, Christopher A; Colon, Beatrice L; Alp, Mehmet; Göker, Hakan; Boykin, David W; Kyle, Dennis E

    2015-04-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a pathogenic free-living amoeba (FLA) that causes an acute fatal disease known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The major problem for infections with any pathogenic FLA is a lack of effective therapeutics, since PAM has a case mortality rate approaching 99%. Clearly, new drugs that are potent and have rapid onset of action are needed to enhance the treatment regimens for PAM. Diamidines have demonstrated potency against multiple pathogens, including FLA, and are known to cross the blood-brain barrier to cure other protozoan diseases of the central nervous system. Therefore, amidino derivatives serve as an important chemotype for discovery of new drugs. In this study, we validated two new in vitro assays suitable for medium- or high-throughput drug discovery and used these for N. fowleri. We next screened over 150 amidino derivatives of multiple structural classes and identified two hit series with nM potency that are suitable for further lead optimization as new drugs for this neglected disease. These include both mono- and diamidino derivatives, with the most potent compound (DB173) having a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 177 nM. Similarly, we identified 10 additional analogues with IC50s of <1 μM, with many of these having reasonable selectivity indices. The most potent hits were >500 times more potent than pentamidine. In summary, the mono- and diamidino derivatives offer potential for lead optimization to develop new drugs to treat central nervous system infections with N. fowleri.

  5. The essential roles of chemistry in high-throughput screening triage.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Walters, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    It is increasingly clear that academic high-throughput screening (HTS) and virtual HTS triage suffers from a lack of scientists trained in the art and science of early drug discovery chemistry. Many recent publications report the discovery of compounds by screening that are most likely artifacts or promiscuous bioactive compounds, and these results are not placed into the context of previous studies. For HTS to be most successful, it is our contention that there must exist an early partnership between biologists and medicinal chemists. Their combined skill sets are necessary to design robust assays and efficient workflows that will weed out assay artifacts, false positives, promiscuous bioactive compounds and intractable screening hits, efforts that ultimately give projects a better chance at identifying truly useful chemical matter. Expertise in medicinal chemistry, cheminformatics and purification sciences (analytical chemistry) can enhance the post-HTS triage process by quickly removing these problematic chemotypes from consideration, while simultaneously prioritizing the more promising chemical matter for follow-up testing. It is only when biologists and chemists collaborate effectively that HTS can manifest its full promise.

  6. Benchmarking ligand-based virtual High-Throughput Screening with the PubChem database.

    PubMed

    Butkiewicz, Mariusz; Lowe, Edward W; Mueller, Ralf; Mendenhall, Jeffrey L; Teixeira, Pedro L; Weaver, C David; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    With the rapidly increasing availability of High-Throughput Screening (HTS) data in the public domain, such as the PubChem database, methods for ligand-based computer-aided drug discovery (LB-CADD) have the potential to accelerate and reduce the cost of probe development and drug discovery efforts in academia. We assemble nine data sets from realistic HTS campaigns representing major families of drug target proteins for benchmarking LB-CADD methods. Each data set is public domain through PubChem and carefully collated through confirmation screens validating active compounds. These data sets provide the foundation for benchmarking a new cheminformatics framework BCL::ChemInfo, which is freely available for non-commercial use. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models are built using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Support Vector Machines (SVMs), Decision Trees (DTs), and Kohonen networks (KNs). Problem-specific descriptor optimization protocols are assessed including Sequential Feature Forward Selection (SFFS) and various information content measures. Measures of predictive power and confidence are evaluated through cross-validation, and a consensus prediction scheme is tested that combines orthogonal machine learning algorithms into a single predictor. Enrichments ranging from 15 to 101 for a TPR cutoff of 25% are observed. PMID:23299552

  7. SINA: Accurate high-throughput multiple sequence alignment of ribosomal RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Pruesse, Elmar; Peplies, Jörg; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: In the analysis of homologous sequences, computation of multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) has become a bottleneck. This is especially troublesome for marker genes like the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) where already millions of sequences are publicly available and individual studies can easily produce hundreds of thousands of new sequences. Methods have been developed to cope with such numbers, but further improvements are needed to meet accuracy requirements. Results: In this study, we present the SILVA Incremental Aligner (SINA) used to align the rRNA gene databases provided by the SILVA ribosomal RNA project. SINA uses a combination of k-mer searching and partial order alignment (POA) to maintain very high alignment accuracy while satisfying high throughput performance demands. SINA was evaluated in comparison with the commonly used high throughput MSA programs PyNAST and mothur. The three BRAliBase III benchmark MSAs could be reproduced with 99.3, 97.6 and 96.1 accuracy. A larger benchmark MSA comprising 38 772 sequences could be reproduced with 98.9 and 99.3% accuracy using reference MSAs comprising 1000 and 5000 sequences. SINA was able to achieve higher accuracy than PyNAST and mothur in all performed benchmarks. Availability: Alignment of up to 500 sequences using the latest SILVA SSU/LSU Ref datasets as reference MSA is offered at http://www.arb-silva.de/aligner. This page also links to Linux binaries, user manual and tutorial. SINA is made available under a personal use license. Contact: epruesse@mpi-bremen.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22556368

  8. High-throughput process development: I. Process chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Anurag S; Bhambure, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Chromatographic separation serves as "a workhorse" for downstream process development and plays a key role in removal of product-related, host cell-related, and process-related impurities. Complex and poorly characterized raw materials and feed material, low feed concentration, product instability, and poor mechanistic understanding of the processes are some of the critical challenges that are faced during development of a chromatographic step. Traditional process development is performed as trial-and-error-based evaluation and often leads to a suboptimal process. High-throughput process development (HTPD) platform involves an integration of miniaturization, automation, and parallelization and provides a systematic approach for time- and resource-efficient chromatography process development. Creation of such platforms requires integration of mechanistic knowledge of the process with various statistical tools for data analysis. The relevance of such a platform is high in view of the constraints with respect to time and resources that the biopharma industry faces today. This protocol describes the steps involved in performing HTPD of process chromatography step. It described operation of a commercially available device (PreDictor™ plates from GE Healthcare). This device is available in 96-well format with 2 or 6 μL well size. We also discuss the challenges that one faces when performing such experiments as well as possible solutions to alleviate them. Besides describing the operation of the device, the protocol also presents an approach for statistical analysis of the data that is gathered from such a platform. A case study involving use of the protocol for examining ion-exchange chromatography of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF), a therapeutic product, is briefly discussed. This is intended to demonstrate the usefulness of this protocol in generating data that is representative of the data obtained at the traditional lab scale. The agreement in the

  9. High throughput optoelectronic smart pixel systems using diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Hao

    1999-12-01

    Recent developments in digital video, multimedia technology and data networks have greatly increased the demand for high bandwidth communication channels and high throughput data processing. Electronics is particularly suited for switching, amplification and logic functions, while optics is more suitable for interconnections and communications with lower energy and crosstalk. In this research, we present the design, testing, integration and demonstration of several optoelectronic smart pixel devices and system architectures. These systems integrate electronic switching/processing capability with parallel optical interconnections to provide high throughput network communication and pipeline data processing. The Smart Pixel Array Cellular Logic processor (SPARCL) is designed in 0.8 m m CMOS and hybrid integrated with Multiple-Quantum-Well (MQW) devices for pipeline image processing. The Smart Pixel Network Interface (SAPIENT) is designed in 0.6 m m GaAs and monolithically integrated with LEDs to implement a highly parallel optical interconnection network. The Translucent Smart Pixel Array (TRANSPAR) design is implemented in two different versions. The first version, TRANSPAR-MQW, is designed in 0.5 m m CMOS and flip-chip integrated with MQW devices to provide 2-D pipeline processing and translucent networking using the Carrier- Sense-MultipleAccess/Collision-Detection (CSMA/CD) protocol. The other version, TRANSPAR-VM, is designed in 1.2 m m CMOS and discretely integrated with VCSEL-MSM (Vertical-Cavity-Surface- Emitting-Laser and Metal-Semiconductor-Metal detectors) chips and driver/receiver chips on a printed circuit board. The TRANSPAR-VM provides an option of using the token ring network protocol in addition to the embedded functions of TRANSPAR-MQW. These optoelectronic smart pixel systems also require micro-optics devices to provide high resolution, high quality optical interconnections and external source arrays. In this research, we describe an innovative

  10. Generating information-rich high-throughput experimental materials genomes using functional clustering via multitree genetic programming and information theory.

    PubMed

    Suram, Santosh K; Haber, Joel A; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2015-04-13

    High-throughput experimental methodologies are capable of synthesizing, screening and characterizing vast arrays of combinatorial material libraries at a very rapid rate. These methodologies strategically employ tiered screening wherein the number of compositions screened decreases as the complexity, and very often the scientific information obtained from a screening experiment, increases. The algorithm used for down-selection of samples from higher throughput screening experiment to a lower throughput screening experiment is vital in achieving information-rich experimental materials genomes. The fundamental science of material discovery lies in the establishment of composition-structure-property relationships, motivating the development of advanced down-selection algorithms which consider the information value of the selected compositions, as opposed to simply selecting the best performing compositions from a high throughput experiment. Identification of property fields (composition regions with distinct composition-property relationships) in high throughput data enables down-selection algorithms to employ advanced selection strategies, such as the selection of representative compositions from each field or selection of compositions that span the composition space of the highest performing field. Such strategies would greatly enhance the generation of data-driven discoveries. We introduce an informatics-based clustering of composition-property functional relationships using a combination of information theory and multitree genetic programming concepts for identification of property fields in a composition library. We demonstrate our approach using a complex synthetic composition-property map for a 5 at. % step ternary library consisting of four distinct property fields and finally explore the application of this methodology for capturing relationships between composition and catalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction for 5429 catalyst compositions in a

  11. Adaptation to high throughput batch chromatography enhances multivariate screening.

    PubMed

    Barker, Gregory A; Calzada, Joseph; Herzer, Sibylle; Rieble, Siegfried

    2015-09-01

    High throughput process development offers unique approaches to explore complex process design spaces with relatively low material consumption. Batch chromatography is one technique that can be used to screen chromatographic conditions in a 96-well plate. Typical batch chromatography workflows examine variations in buffer conditions or comparison of multiple resins in a given process, as opposed to the assessment of protein loading conditions in combination with other factors. A modification to the batch chromatography paradigm is described here where experimental planning, programming, and a staggered loading approach increase the multivariate space that can be explored with a liquid handling system. The iterative batch chromatography (IBC) approach is described, which treats every well in a 96-well plate as an individual experiment, wherein protein loading conditions can be varied alongside other factors such as wash and elution buffer conditions. As all of these factors are explored in the same experiment, the interactions between them are characterized and the number of follow-up confirmatory experiments is reduced. This in turn improves statistical power and throughput. Two examples of the IBC method are shown and the impact of the load conditions are assessed in combination with the other factors explored.

  12. High Throughput Interrogation of Behavioral Transitions in C. elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mochi; Shaevitz, Joshua; Leifer, Andrew

    We present a high-throughput method to probe transformations from neural activity to behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans to better understand how organisms change behavioral states. We optogenetically deliver white-noise stimuli to target sensory or inter neurons while simultaneously recording the movement of a population of worms. Using all the postural movement data collected, we computationally classify stereotyped behaviors in C. elegans by clustering based on the spectral properties of the instantaneous posture. (Berman et al., 2014) Transitions between these behavioral clusters indicate discrete behavioral changes. To study the neural correlates dictating these transitions, we perform model-driven experiments and employ Linear-Nonlinear-Poisson cascades that take the white-noise stimulus as the input. The parameters of these models are fitted by reverse-correlation from our measurements. The parameterized models of behavioral transitions predict the worm's response to novel stimuli and reveal the internal computations the animal makes before carrying out behavioral decisions. Preliminary results are shown that describe the neural-behavioral transformation between neural activity in mechanosensory neurons and reversal behavior.

  13. Translational informatics: enabling high-throughput research paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Embi, Peter J.; Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    A common thread throughout the clinical and translational research domains is the need to collect, manage, integrate, analyze, and disseminate large-scale, heterogeneous biomedical data sets. However, well-established and broadly adopted theoretical and practical frameworks and models intended to address such needs are conspicuously absent in the published literature or other reputable knowledge sources. Instead, the development and execution of multidisciplinary, clinical, or translational studies are significantly limited by the propagation of “silos” of both data and expertise. Motivated by this fundamental challenge, we report upon the current state and evolution of biomedical informatics as it pertains to the conduct of high-throughput clinical and translational research and will present both a conceptual and practical framework for the design and execution of informatics-enabled studies. The objective of presenting such findings and constructs is to provide the clinical and translational research community with a common frame of reference for discussing and expanding upon such models and methodologies. PMID:19737991

  14. High-Throughput, Data-Rich Cellular RNA Device Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Townshend, Brent; Kennedy, Andrew B.; Xiang, Joy S.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2015-01-01

    Methods for rapidly assessing sequence-structure-function landscapes and developing conditional gene-regulatory devices are critical to our ability to manipulate and interface with biology. We describe a framework for engineering RNA devices from preexisting aptamers that exhibit ligand-responsive ribozyme tertiary interactions. Our methodology utilizes cell sorting, high-throughput sequencing, and statistical data analyses to enable parallel measurements of the activities of hundreds of thousands of sequences from RNA device libraries in the absence and presence of ligands. Our tertiary interaction RNA devices exhibit improved performance in terms of gene silencing, activation ratio, and ligand sensitivity as compared to optimized RNA devices that rely on secondary structure changes. We apply our method to building biosensors for diverse ligands and determine consensus sequences that enable ligand-responsive tertiary interactions. These methods advance our ability to develop broadly applicable genetic tools and to elucidate understanding of the underlying sequence-structure-function relationships that empower rational design of complex biomolecules. PMID:26258292

  15. High-Throughput Screening Based Identification of Paramyxovirus Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jeong-Jeong; Chawla, Dhruv; Paal, Tanja; Ndungu, Maina; Du, Yuhong; Kurtkaya, Serdar; Sun, Aiming; Snyder, James P; Plemper, Richard K

    2008-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses are negative strand non-segmented RNA viruses. Several members of this family constitute major human pathogens that, collectively, are responsible for major morbidity and mortality worldwide. In an effort to ultimately develop novel therapeutics against measles virus (MV), a prominent member of the paramyxovirus family, we report a high-throughput screening protocol that allows hit identification using non-recombinant primary MV strains as targets. Implementation of the assay has yielded 60 hit candidates from a 137,500-entry library. Counterscreening and generation of dose-response curves narrows this pool to 35 compounds with active concentrations ≤15.3 μM against the MV-Alaska strain and specificity indices ranging from 36 to >500. Library mining for structural analogs of several confirmed hits combined with re-testing of identified candidates reveals a low false-negative rate and, thus, a high accuracy of primary hit identification. Eleven of the confirmed hits were found to interfere with the viral entry machinery, while the remaining 24 compounds target post-entry steps of the viral life cycle. Activity testing against selected members of the paramyxovirus family reveals three patterns of activity: 1) exclusively MV-specific blockers; 2) inhibitors of MV and related viruses of the same genus; 3) broader-range inhibitors with activity against a different paramyxovirinae genus. Representatives of the last class may open avenues for the development of broad-range paramyxovirus inhibitors through hit-to-lead chemistry. PMID:18626114

  16. High-Throughput, Multi-Image Cryohistology of Mineralized Tissues.

    PubMed

    Dyment, Nathaniel A; Jiang, Xi; Chen, Li; Hong, Seung-Hyun; Adams, Douglas J; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl; Shin, Dong-Guk; Rowe, David W

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for efficient phenotyping and histopathology of a variety of tissues. This phenotyping need is evident with the ambitious projects to disrupt every gene in the mouse genome. The research community needs rapid and inexpensive means to phenotype tissues via histology. Histological analyses of skeletal tissues are often time consuming and semi-quantitative at best, regularly requiring subjective interpretation of slides from trained individuals. Here, we present a cryohistological paradigm for efficient and inexpensive phenotyping of mineralized tissues. First, we present a novel method of tape-stabilized cryosectioning that preserves the morphology of mineralized tissues. These sections are then adhered rigidly to glass slides and imaged repeatedly over several rounds of staining. The resultant images are then aligned either manually or via computer software to yield composite stacks of several layered images. The protocol allows for co-localization of numerous molecular signals to specific cells within a given section. In addition, these fluorescent signals can be quantified objectively via computer software. This protocol overcomes many of the shortcomings associated with histology of mineralized tissues and can serve as a platform for high-throughput, high-content phenotyping of musculoskeletal tissues moving forward. PMID:27684089

  17. BOOGIE: Predicting Blood Groups from High Throughput Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Giollo, Manuel; Minervini, Giovanni; Scalzotto, Marta; Leonardi, Emanuela; Ferrari, Carlo; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, we have witnessed an incredible growth in the amount of available genotype data due to high throughput sequencing (HTS) techniques. This information may be used to predict phenotypes of medical relevance, and pave the way towards personalized medicine. Blood phenotypes (e.g. ABO and Rh) are a purely genetic trait that has been extensively studied for decades, with currently over thirty known blood groups. Given the public availability of blood group data, it is of interest to predict these phenotypes from HTS data which may translate into more accurate blood typing in clinical practice. Here we propose BOOGIE, a fast predictor for the inference of blood groups from single nucleotide variant (SNV) databases. We focus on the prediction of thirty blood groups ranging from the well known ABO and Rh, to the less studied Junior or Diego. BOOGIE correctly predicted the blood group with 94% accuracy for the Personal Genome Project whole genome profiles where good quality SNV annotation was available. Additionally, our tool produces a high quality haplotype phase, which is of interest in the context of ethnicity-specific polymorphisms or traits. The versatility and simplicity of the analysis make it easily interpretable and allow easy extension of the protocol towards other phenotypes. BOOGIE can be downloaded from URL http://protein.bio.unipd.it/download/. PMID:25893845

  18. Advances in High Throughput Screening of Biomass Recalcitrance (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, G. B.; Decker, S. R.; Tucker, M. P.; Law, C.; Doeppke, C.; Sykes, R. W.; Davis, M. F.; Ziebell, A.

    2012-06-01

    This was a poster displayed at the Symposium. Advances on previous high throughput screening of biomass recalcitrance methods have resulted in improved conversion and replicate precision. Changes in plate reactor metallurgy, improved preparation of control biomass, species-specific pretreatment conditions, and enzymatic hydrolysis parameters have reduced overall coefficients of variation to an average of 6% for sample replicates. These method changes have improved plate-to-plate variation of control biomass recalcitrance and improved confidence in sugar release differences between samples. With smaller errors plant researchers can have a higher degree of assurance more low recalcitrance candidates can be identified. Significant changes in plate reactor, control biomass preparation, pretreatment conditions and enzyme have significantly reduced sample and control replicate variability. Reactor plate metallurgy significantly impacts sugar release aluminum leaching into reaction during pretreatment degrades sugars and inhibits enzyme activity. Removal of starch and extractives significantly decreases control biomass variability. New enzyme formulations give more consistent and higher conversion levels, however required re-optimization for switchgrass. Pretreatment time and temperature (severity) should be adjusted to specific biomass types i.e. woody vs. herbaceous. Desalting of enzyme preps to remove low molecular weight stabilizers and improved conversion levels likely due to water activity impacts on enzyme structure and substrate interactions not attempted here due to need to continually desalt and validate precise enzyme concentration and activity.

  19. Achieving High Throughput for Data Transfer over ATM Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marjory J.; Townsend, Jeffrey N.

    1996-01-01

    File-transfer rates for ftp are often reported to be relatively slow, compared to the raw bandwidth available in emerging gigabit networks. While a major bottleneck is disk I/O, protocol issues impact performance as well. Ftp was developed and optimized for use over the TCP/IP protocol stack of the Internet. However, TCP has been shown to run inefficiently over ATM. In an effort to maximize network throughput, data-transfer protocols can be developed to run over UDP or directly over IP, rather than over TCP. If error-free transmission is required, techniques for achieving reliable transmission can be included as part of the transfer protocol. However, selected image-processing applications can tolerate a low level of errors in images that are transmitted over a network. In this paper we report on experimental work to develop a high-throughput protocol for unreliable data transfer over ATM networks. We attempt to maximize throughput by keeping the communications pipe full, but still keep packet loss under five percent. We use the Bay Area Gigabit Network Testbed as our experimental platform.

  20. High-Throughput Preparation of New Photoactive Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Conterosito, Eleonora; Benesperi, Iacopo; Toson, Valentina; Saccone, Davide; Barbero, Nadia; Palin, Luca; Barolo, Claudia; Gianotti, Valentina; Milanesio, Marco

    2016-06-01

    New low-cost photoactive hybrid materials based on organic luminescent molecules inserted into hydrotalcite (layered double hydroxides; LDH) were produced, which exploit the high-throughput liquid-assisted grinding (LAG) method. These materials are conceived for applications in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) as a co-absorbers and in silicon photovoltaic (PV) panels to improve their efficiency as they are able to emit where PV modules show the maximum efficiency. A molecule that shows a large Stokes' shift was designed, synthesized, and intercalated into LDH. Two dyes already used in DSSCs were also intercalated to produce two new nanocomposites. LDH intercalation allows the stability of organic dyes to be improved and their direct use in polymer melt blending. The prepared nanocomposites absorb sunlight from UV to visible and emit from blue to near-IR and thus can be exploited for light-energy management. Finally one nanocomposite was dispersed by melt blending into a poly(methyl methacrylate)-block-poly(n-butyl acrylate) copolymer to obtain a photoactive film.

  1. High-throughput measurements of hydrogel tissue construct mechanics.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Juan Pablo; Legant, Wesley; Lam, Vy; Cayemberg, Amy; Elson, Elliot; Wakatsuki, Tetsuro

    2009-06-01

    Engineered tissues represent a natural environment for studying cell physiology, mechanics, and function. Cellular interactions with the extracellular matrix proteins are important determinants of cell physiology and tissue mechanics. Dysregulation of these parameters can result in diseases such as cardiac fibrosis and atherosclerosis. In this report we present a novel system to produce hydrogel tissue constructs (HTCs) and to characterize their mechanical properties. HTCs are grown in custom chambers and a robotic system is used to indent them and measure the resulting forces. Force measurements are then used to estimate HTC pretension (cellular contractility). Pretension was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by cytochalasin D (CD) treatment; the highest concentration (2microM) resulted in 10-fold decrease. On the other hand, treatment with fetal bovine serum (20%) resulted in approximately threefold increase in pretension. Excellent repeatability and precision were observed in measurements from replicate HTCs. The coefficient of statistical variance of quantified pretension ranged from 7% to 15% (n=4). Due to the small size (4x4x0.8mm) of the HTCs, this system of profiling HTC mechanics can readily be used in high-throughput applications. In particular, it can be used for screening chemical libraries in search of drugs that can alter tissue mechanics.

  2. Probabilistic Assessment of High-Throughput Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Robin E; Mechitov, Kirill; Sim, Sung-Han; Spencer, Billie F; Song, Junho

    2016-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) using wireless smart sensors (WSS) has the potential to provide rich information on the state of a structure. However, because of their distributed nature, maintaining highly robust and reliable networks can be challenging. Assessing WSS network communication quality before and after finalizing a deployment is critical to achieve a successful WSS network for SHM purposes. Early studies on WSS network reliability mostly used temporal signal indicators, composed of a smaller number of packets, to assess the network reliability. However, because the WSS networks for SHM purpose often require high data throughput, i.e., a larger number of packets are delivered within the communication, such an approach is not sufficient. Instead, in this study, a model that can assess, probabilistically, the long-term performance of the network is proposed. The proposed model is based on readily-available measured data sets that represent communication quality during high-throughput data transfer. Then, an empirical limit-state function is determined, which is further used to estimate the probability of network communication failure. Monte Carlo simulation is adopted in this paper and applied to a small and a full-bridge wireless networks. By performing the proposed analysis in complex sensor networks, an optimized sensor topology can be achieved. PMID:27258270

  3. A microfluidic, high throughput protein crystal growth method for microgravity.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, Carl W; Gerdts, Cory; Johnson, Michael D; Webb, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The attenuation of sedimentation and convection in microgravity can sometimes decrease irregularities formed during macromolecular crystal growth. Current terrestrial protein crystal growth (PCG) capabilities are very different than those used during the Shuttle era and that are currently on the International Space Station (ISS). The focus of this experiment was to demonstrate the use of a commercial off-the-shelf, high throughput, PCG method in microgravity. Using Protein BioSolutions' microfluidic Plug Maker™/CrystalCard™ system, we tested the ability to grow crystals of the regulator of glucose metabolism and adipogenesis: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (apo-hPPAR-γ LBD), as well as several PCG standards. Overall, we sent 25 CrystalCards™ to the ISS, containing ~10,000 individual microgravity PCG experiments in a 3U NanoRacks NanoLab (1U = 10(3) cm.). After 70 days on the ISS, our samples were returned with 16 of 25 (64%) microgravity cards having crystals, compared to 12 of 25 (48%) of the ground controls. Encouragingly, there were more apo-hPPAR-γ LBD crystals in the microgravity PCG cards than the 1g controls. These positive results hope to introduce the use of the PCG standard of low sample volume and large experimental density to the microgravity environment and provide new opportunities for macromolecular samples that may crystallize poorly in standard laboratories. PMID:24278480

  4. Probabilistic Assessment of High-Throughput Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Robin E.; Mechitov, Kirill; Sim, Sung-Han; Spencer, Billie F.; Song, Junho

    2016-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) using wireless smart sensors (WSS) has the potential to provide rich information on the state of a structure. However, because of their distributed nature, maintaining highly robust and reliable networks can be challenging. Assessing WSS network communication quality before and after finalizing a deployment is critical to achieve a successful WSS network for SHM purposes. Early studies on WSS network reliability mostly used temporal signal indicators, composed of a smaller number of packets, to assess the network reliability. However, because the WSS networks for SHM purpose often require high data throughput, i.e., a larger number of packets are delivered within the communication, such an approach is not sufficient. Instead, in this study, a model that can assess, probabilistically, the long-term performance of the network is proposed. The proposed model is based on readily-available measured data sets that represent communication quality during high-throughput data transfer. Then, an empirical limit-state function is determined, which is further used to estimate the probability of network communication failure. Monte Carlo simulation is adopted in this paper and applied to a small and a full-bridge wireless networks. By performing the proposed analysis in complex sensor networks, an optimized sensor topology can be achieved. PMID:27258270

  5. High throughput virus plaque quantitation using a flatbed scanner.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kate; Kloess, Johannes; Qian, Chen; Bell, Donald; Hay, Alan; Lin, Yi Pu; Gu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The plaque assay is a standard technique for measuring influenza virus infectivity and inhibition of virus replication. Counting plaque numbers and quantifying virus infection of cells in multiwell plates quickly, accurately and automatically remain a challenge. Visual inspection relies upon experience, is subjective, often time consuming, and has less reproducibility than automated methods. In this paper, a simple, high throughput imaging-based alternative is proposed which uses a flatbed scanner and image processing software to quantify the infected cell population and plaque formation. Quantitation results were evaluated with reference to visual counting and achieved better than 80% agreement. The method was shown to be particularly advantageous in titration of the number of plaques and infected cells when influenza viruses produce a heterogeneous population of small plaques. It was also shown to be insensitive to the densities of plaques in determination of neutralization titres and IC(50)s of drug susceptibility. In comparison to other available techniques, this approach is cost-effective, relatively accurate, and readily available.

  6. A Microfluidic, High Throughput Protein Crystal Growth Method for Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers Jr, Carl W.; Gerdts, Cory; Johnson, Michael D.; Webb, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The attenuation of sedimentation and convection in microgravity can sometimes decrease irregularities formed during macromolecular crystal growth. Current terrestrial protein crystal growth (PCG) capabilities are very different than those used during the Shuttle era and that are currently on the International Space Station (ISS). The focus of this experiment was to demonstrate the use of a commercial off-the-shelf, high throughput, PCG method in microgravity. Using Protein BioSolutions’ microfluidic Plug Maker™/CrystalCard™ system, we tested the ability to grow crystals of the regulator of glucose metabolism and adipogenesis: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (apo-hPPAR-γ LBD), as well as several PCG standards. Overall, we sent 25 CrystalCards™ to the ISS, containing ~10,000 individual microgravity PCG experiments in a 3U NanoRacks NanoLab (1U = 103 cm.). After 70 days on the ISS, our samples were returned with 16 of 25 (64%) microgravity cards having crystals, compared to 12 of 25 (48%) of the ground controls. Encouragingly, there were more apo-hPPAR-γ LBD crystals in the microgravity PCG cards than the 1g controls. These positive results hope to introduce the use of the PCG standard of low sample volume and large experimental density to the microgravity environment and provide new opportunities for macromolecular samples that may crystallize poorly in standard laboratories. PMID:24278480

  7. High Throughput Multispectral Image Processing with Applications in Food Science.

    PubMed

    Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Nychas, George-John

    2015-01-01

    Recently, machine vision is gaining attention in food science as well as in food industry concerning food quality assessment and monitoring. Into the framework of implementation of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) in the food industry, image processing can be used not only in estimation and even prediction of food quality but also in detection of adulteration. Towards these applications on food science, we present here a novel methodology for automated image analysis of several kinds of food products e.g. meat, vanilla crème and table olives, so as to increase objectivity, data reproducibility, low cost information extraction and faster quality assessment, without human intervention. Image processing's outcome will be propagated to the downstream analysis. The developed multispectral image processing method is based on unsupervised machine learning approach (Gaussian Mixture Models) and a novel unsupervised scheme of spectral band selection for segmentation process optimization. Through the evaluation we prove its efficiency and robustness against the currently available semi-manual software, showing that the developed method is a high throughput approach appropriate for massive data extraction from food samples. PMID:26466349

  8. High-throughput multiparameter analysis of individual mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyue; Zhu, Shaobin; Yang, Lingling; Zheng, Yan; Gao, Min; Wang, Shuo; Zeng, Jin-zhang; Yan, Xiaomei

    2012-08-01

    Mitochondria are one of the most important organelles responsible for cellular energy metabolism and apoptosis regulation. However, single-mitochondrion analysis is challenging, because of their small sizes and the low content of organelle constituents. Here, we report the development of a sensitive and versatile platform for high-throughput multiparameter analysis of individual mitochondria. Employing specific fluorescent staining with a laboratory-built high-sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM), we demonstrate the simultaneous detection of side scatter, cardiolipin, and mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) of a single mitochondrion. Simultaneous measurements of side scatter, porin, and cytochrome c of individual mitochondria are reported for the first time. Correlation analysis among multiple attributes on an organelle-by-organelle basis could provide a more definitive assessment of the purity, structure integrity, and apoptosis-related proteins of isolated mitochondria than bulk measurement. This work represents a significant advancement in single-mitochondrion analysis. We believe that the HSFCM holds great potential for studying apoptotic signal transduction pathways at the single-mitochondrion level.

  9. High Throughput, Continuous, Mass Production of Photovoltaic Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt Barth

    2008-02-06

    AVA Solar has developed a very low cost solar photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing process and has demonstrated the significant economic and commercial potential of this technology. This I & I Category 3 project provided significant assistance toward accomplishing these milestones. The original goals of this project were to design, construct and test a production prototype system, fabricate PV modules and test the module performance. The original module manufacturing costs in the proposal were estimated at $2/Watt. The objectives of this project have been exceeded. An advanced processing line was designed, fabricated and installed. Using this automated, high throughput system, high efficiency devices and fully encapsulated modules were manufactured. AVA Solar has obtained 2 rounds of private equity funding, expand to 50 people and initiated the development of a large scale factory for 100+ megawatts of annual production. Modules will be manufactured at an industry leading cost which will enable AVA Solar's modules to produce power that is cost-competitive with traditional energy resources. With low manufacturing costs and the ability to scale manufacturing, AVA Solar has been contacted by some of the largest customers in the PV industry to negotiate long-term supply contracts. The current market for PV has continued to grow at 40%+ per year for nearly a decade and is projected to reach $40-$60 Billion by 2012. Currently, a crystalline silicon raw material supply shortage is limiting growth and raising costs. Our process does not use silicon, eliminating these limitations.

  10. High Throughput Multispectral Image Processing with Applications in Food Science.

    PubMed

    Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Nychas, George-John

    2015-01-01

    Recently, machine vision is gaining attention in food science as well as in food industry concerning food quality assessment and monitoring. Into the framework of implementation of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) in the food industry, image processing can be used not only in estimation and even prediction of food quality but also in detection of adulteration. Towards these applications on food science, we present here a novel methodology for automated image analysis of several kinds of food products e.g. meat, vanilla crème and table olives, so as to increase objectivity, data reproducibility, low cost information extraction and faster quality assessment, without human intervention. Image processing's outcome will be propagated to the downstream analysis. The developed multispectral image processing method is based on unsupervised machine learning approach (Gaussian Mixture Models) and a novel unsupervised scheme of spectral band selection for segmentation process optimization. Through the evaluation we prove its efficiency and robustness against the currently available semi-manual software, showing that the developed method is a high throughput approach appropriate for massive data extraction from food samples.

  11. Probabilistic Assessment of High-Throughput Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Robin E; Mechitov, Kirill; Sim, Sung-Han; Spencer, Billie F; Song, Junho

    2016-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) using wireless smart sensors (WSS) has the potential to provide rich information on the state of a structure. However, because of their distributed nature, maintaining highly robust and reliable networks can be challenging. Assessing WSS network communication quality before and after finalizing a deployment is critical to achieve a successful WSS network for SHM purposes. Early studies on WSS network reliability mostly used temporal signal indicators, composed of a smaller number of packets, to assess the network reliability. However, because the WSS networks for SHM purpose often require high data throughput, i.e., a larger number of packets are delivered within the communication, such an approach is not sufficient. Instead, in this study, a model that can assess, probabilistically, the long-term performance of the network is proposed. The proposed model is based on readily-available measured data sets that represent communication quality during high-throughput data transfer. Then, an empirical limit-state function is determined, which is further used to estimate the probability of network communication failure. Monte Carlo simulation is adopted in this paper and applied to a small and a full-bridge wireless networks. By performing the proposed analysis in complex sensor networks, an optimized sensor topology can be achieved.

  12. High-throughput optical screening of cellular mechanotransduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Jonathan L.; Luo, Justin C.; Ma, Huan; Botvinick, Elliot; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-09-01

    We introduce an optical platform for rapid, high-throughput screening of exogenous molecules that affect cellular mechanotransduction. Our method initiates mechanotransduction in adherent cells using single laser-microbeam generated microcavitation bubbles without requiring flow chambers or microfluidics. These microcavitation bubbles expose adherent cells to a microtsunami, a transient microscale burst of hydrodynamic shear stress, which stimulates cells over areas approaching 1 mm2. We demonstrate microtsunami-initiated mechanosignalling in primary human endothelial cells. This observed signalling is consistent with G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation, resulting in Ca2+ release by the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, we demonstrate the dose-dependent modulation of microtsunami-induced Ca2+ signalling by introducing a known inhibitor to this pathway. The imaging of Ca2+ signalling and its modulation by exogenous molecules demonstrates the capacity to initiate and assess cellular mechanosignalling in real time. We utilize this capability to screen the effects of a set of small molecules on cellular mechanotransduction in 96-well plates using standard imaging cytometry.

  13. High-throughput charge exchange recombination spectroscopy system on MAST

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, N. J.; Carolan, P. G.; McCone, J.; Walsh, M. J.; Wisse, M.

    2006-10-15

    A major upgrade to the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy system on MAST has recently been implemented. The new system consists of a high-throughput spectrometer coupled to a total of 224 spatial channels, including toroidal and poloidal views of both neutral heating beams on MAST. Radial resolution is {approx}1 cm, comparable to the ion Larmor radius. The toroidal views are configured with 64 channels per beam, while the poloidal views have 32 channels per beam. Background channels for both poloidal and toroidal views are also provided. A large transmission grating is at the heart of the new spectrometer, with high quality single lens reflex lenses providing excellent imaging performance and permitting the full exploitation of the available etendue of the camera sensor. The charge-coupled device camera chosen has four-tap readout at a maximum aggregate speed of 8.8 MHz, and it is capable of reading out the full set of 224 channels in less than 4 ms. The system normally operates at 529 nm, viewing the C{sup 5+} emission line, but can operate at any wavelength in the range of 400-700 nm. Results from operating the system on MAST are shown, including impurity ion temperature and velocity profiles. The system's excellent spatial resolution is ideal for the study of transport barrier phenomena on MAST, an activity which has already been advanced significantly by data from the new diagnostic.

  14. Surface free energy activated high-throughput cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinru; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Tao; Jiang, Zeyi; Zhang, Xinxin; Zuo, Yi Y

    2014-09-16

    Cell sorting is an important screening process in microbiology, biotechnology, and clinical research. Existing methods are mainly based on single-cell analysis as in flow cytometric and microfluidic cell sorters. Here we report a label-free bulk method for sorting cells by differentiating their characteristic surface free energies (SFEs). We demonstrated the feasibility of this method by sorting model binary cell mixtures of various bacterial species, including Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028, and Escherichia coli DH5α. This method can effectively separate 10(10) bacterial cells within 30 min. Individual bacterial species can be sorted with up to 96% efficiency, and the cell viability ratio can be as high as 99%. In addition to its capacity of sorting evenly mixed bacterial cells, we demonstrated the feasibility of this method in selecting and enriching cells of minor populations in the mixture (presenting at only 1% in quantity) to a purity as high as 99%. This SFE-activated method may be used as a stand-alone method for quickly sorting a large quantity of bacterial cells or as a prescreening tool for microbial discrimination. Given its advantages of label-free, high-throughput, low cost, and simplicity, this SFE-activated cell sorting method has potential in various applications of sorting cells and abiotic particles. PMID:25184988

  15. High-Throughput FRET Assay Yields Allosteric SERCA Activators

    PubMed Central

    Cornea, Razvan L.; Lockamy, Elizabeth L.; Gruber, Simon J.; Muretta, Joseph M.; Jin, Dongzhu; Chen, Jiqiu; Dahl, Russell; Bartfai, Tamas; Zsebo, Krisztina M.; Gillispie, Gregory D.; Thomas, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we performed a high-throughput screen (HTS) in a reconstituted membrane system, seeking compounds that reverse inhibition of sarco-/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) by its endogenous regulator, phospholamban (PLB). Such compounds have long been sought to correct aberrant Ca2+ regulation in heart failure. Donor-SERCA was reconstituted in phospholipid membranes with or without acceptor-PLB, and FRET was measured in a steady-state fluorescence microplate reader. A 20,000-compound library was tested in duplicate. Compounds that decreased FRET by more than three standard deviations were considered hits. From 43 primary hits (0.2%), 31 (72%) were found to be false positives upon more thorough testing. The remaining 12 hits were tested in assays of Ca-ATPase activity, and six of these activated SERCA significantly, by as much as 60%, and several also enhanced cardiomyocyte contractility. These compounds directly activated SERCA from heart and other tissues. These results validate our FRET approach and set the stage for medicinal chemistry and pre-clinical testing. We were concerned about the high rate of false positives, resulting from the low precision of steady-state fluorescence. Preliminary studies with a novel fluorescence lifetime plate reader show 20-fold higher precision. This instrument can dramatically increase the quality of future HT. PMID:22923787

  16. High-throughput screening in the diagnostics industry.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S; Howell, S

    2002-08-01

    The diagnostics industry is constantly under pressure to bring innovation quicker to market and so the impetus to speed up product-development cycle times becomes greater. There are a number of steps in the product-development cycle where the application of high-throughput screening can help. In the case of lateral-flow immuno-diagnostics the selection of antibody reagents is paramount. In particular, rapid identification of antibody pairs that are able to 'sandwich' around the target antigen is required. One screen that has been applied successfully is the use of surface plasmon resonance biosensors like Biacore. Using such a system one can evaluate over 400 antibody pairings in under 5 days. Conventional approaches to screen this number of antibody pairs would take many months. Other automated screening systems like DELFIA can be used in processing the vast amount of tests required for clinical trials. In addition, the use of robotics to automate routine product testing can be used to shorten the product-development cycle.

  17. High-throughput optical screening of cellular mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Jonathan L.; Luo, Justin C.; Ma, Huan; Botvinick, Elliot; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-01-01

    We introduce an optical platform for rapid, high-throughput screening of exogenous molecules that affect cellular mechanotransduction. Our method initiates mechanotransduction in adherent cells using single laser-microbeam generated micro-cavitation bubbles (μCBs) without requiring flow chambers or microfluidics. These μCBs expose adherent cells to a microTsunami, a transient microscale burst of hydrodynamic shear stress, which stimulates cells over areas approaching 1mm2. We demonstrate microTsunami-initiated mechanosignalling in primary human endothelial cells. This observed signalling is consistent with G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation resulting in Ca2+ release by the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, we demonstrate the dose-dependent modulation of microTsunami-induced Ca2+ signalling by introducing a known inhibitor to this pathway. The imaging of Ca2+ signalling, and its modulation by exogenous molecules, demonstrates the capacity to initiate and assess cellular mechanosignalling in real-time. We utilize this capability to screen the effects of a set of small molecules on cellular mechanotransduction in 96-well plates using standard imaging cytometry. PMID:25309621

  18. Towards Prebiotic Catalytic Amyloids Using High Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Michael P.; Torbeev, Vladimir; Zelenay, Viviane; Sobol, Alexander; Greenwald, Jason; Riek, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes are capable of directing complex stereospecific transformations and of accelerating reaction rates many orders of magnitude. As even the simplest known enzymes comprise thousands of atoms, the question arises as to how such exquisite catalysts evolved. A logical predecessor would be shorter peptides, but they lack the defined structure and size that are apparently necessary for enzyme functions. However, some very short peptides are able to assemble into amyloids, thereby forming a well-defined tertiary structure called the cross-β-sheet, which bestows unique properties upon the peptides. We have hypothesized that amyloids could have been the catalytically active precursor to modern enzymes. To test this hypothesis, we designed an amyloid peptide library that could be screened for catalytic activity. Our approach, amenable to high-throughput methodologies, allowed us to find several peptides and peptide mixtures that form amyloids with esterase activity. These results indicate that amyloids, with their stability in a wide range of conditions and their potential as catalysts with low sequence specificity, would indeed be fitting precursors to modern enzymes. Furthermore, our approach can be efficiently expanded upon in library size, screening conditions, and target activity to yield novel amyloid catalysts with potential applications in aqueous-organic mixtures, at high temperature and in other extreme conditions that could be advantageous for industrial applications. PMID:26650386

  19. High-Throughput Preparation of New Photoactive Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Conterosito, Eleonora; Benesperi, Iacopo; Toson, Valentina; Saccone, Davide; Barbero, Nadia; Palin, Luca; Barolo, Claudia; Gianotti, Valentina; Milanesio, Marco

    2016-06-01

    New low-cost photoactive hybrid materials based on organic luminescent molecules inserted into hydrotalcite (layered double hydroxides; LDH) were produced, which exploit the high-throughput liquid-assisted grinding (LAG) method. These materials are conceived for applications in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) as a co-absorbers and in silicon photovoltaic (PV) panels to improve their efficiency as they are able to emit where PV modules show the maximum efficiency. A molecule that shows a large Stokes' shift was designed, synthesized, and intercalated into LDH. Two dyes already used in DSSCs were also intercalated to produce two new nanocomposites. LDH intercalation allows the stability of organic dyes to be improved and their direct use in polymer melt blending. The prepared nanocomposites absorb sunlight from UV to visible and emit from blue to near-IR and thus can be exploited for light-energy management. Finally one nanocomposite was dispersed by melt blending into a poly(methyl methacrylate)-block-poly(n-butyl acrylate) copolymer to obtain a photoactive film. PMID:27137753

  20. Salmonella serotype determination utilizing high-throughput genome sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaokang; Yin, Yanlong; Jones, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L; Dinsmore, Blake A; Fitzgerald, Collette; Fields, Patricia I; Deng, Xiangyu

    2015-05-01

    Serotyping forms the basis of national and international surveillance networks for Salmonella, one of the most prevalent foodborne pathogens worldwide (1-3). Public health microbiology is currently being transformed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS), which opens the door to serotype determination using WGS data. SeqSero (www.denglab.info/SeqSero) is a novel Web-based tool for determining Salmonella serotypes using high-throughput genome sequencing data. SeqSero is based on curated databases of Salmonella serotype determinants (rfb gene cluster, fliC and fljB alleles) and is predicted to determine serotype rapidly and accurately for nearly the full spectrum of Salmonella serotypes (more than 2,300 serotypes), from both raw sequencing reads and genome assemblies. The performance of SeqSero was evaluated by testing (i) raw reads from genomes of 308 Salmonella isolates of known serotype; (ii) raw reads from genomes of 3,306 Salmonella isolates sequenced and made publicly available by GenomeTrakr, a U.S. national monitoring network operated by the Food and Drug Administration; and (iii) 354 other publicly available draft or complete Salmonella genomes. We also demonstrated Salmonella serotype determination from raw sequencing reads of fecal metagenomes from mice orally infected with this pathogen. SeqSero can help to maintain the well-established utility of Salmonella serotyping when integrated into a platform of WGS-based pathogen subtyping and characterization.