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Sample records for high-throughput screening assays

  1. Enzyme assay design for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kevin P; Scott, John E

    2009-01-01

    Enzymes continue to be a major drug target class for the pharmaceutical industry with high-throughput screening the approach of choice for identifying initial active chemical compounds. The development of fluorescent- or absorbance-based readouts typically remains the formats of choice for enzyme screens and a wealth of experience from both industry and academia has led to a comprehensive set of standardized assay development and validation guidelines for enzyme assays. In this chapter, we generalize approaches to developing, validating, and troubleshooting assays that should be applicable in both industrial and academic settings. Real-life examples of various enzyme classes including kinases, proteases, transferases, and phosphatases are used to illustrate assay development approaches and solutions. Practical examples are given for how to deal with low-purity enzyme targets, compound interference, and identification of activators. Assay acceptance criteria and a number of assay notes on pitfalls to avoid should provide pointers on how to develop a suitable enzymatic assay applicable for HTS.

  2. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays

    PubMed Central

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Rodionov, Valentin; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare. PMID:26658480

  3. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    PubMed

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Rodionov, Valentin; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  4. Analysis of High Throughput Screening Assays using Cluster Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Minya; Hayashi, Tomoko; Cottam, Howard; Mulvaney, Joseph; Arkin, Michelle; Corr, Maripat; Carson, Dennis; Messer, Karen

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe implementation and evaluation of a cluster-based enrichment strategy to call hits from a high-throughput screen (HTS), using a typical cell-based assay of 160,000 chemical compounds. Our focus is on statistical properties of the prospective design choices throughout the analysis, including how to choose the number of clusters for optimal power, the choice of test statistic, the significance thresholds for clusters and the activity threshold for candidate hits, how to rank selected hits for carry-forward to the confirmation screen, and how to identify confirmed hits in a data-driven manner. While previously the literature has focused on choice of test statistic or chemical descriptors, our studies suggest cluster size is the more important design choice. We recommend clusters be ranked by enrichment odds ratio, not p-value. Our conceptually simple test statistic is seen to identify the same set of hits as more complex scoring methods proposed in the literature. We prospectively confirm that such a cluster-based approach can outperform the naive top X approach, and estimate that we improved confirmation rates by about 31.5%, from 813 using the Top X approach to 1187 using our cluster-based method. PMID:22763983

  5. Analysis of high-throughput screening assays using cluster enrichment.

    PubMed

    Pu, Minya; Hayashi, Tomoko; Cottam, Howard; Mulvaney, Joseph; Arkin, Michelle; Corr, Maripat; Carson, Dennis; Messer, Karen

    2012-12-30

    In this paper, we describe the implementation and evaluation of a cluster-based enrichment strategy to call hits from a high-throughput screen using a typical cell-based assay of 160,000 chemical compounds. Our focus is on statistical properties of the prospective design choices throughout the analysis, including how to choose the number of clusters for optimal power, the choice of test statistic, the significance thresholds for clusters and the activity threshold for candidate hits, how to rank selected hits for carry-forward to the confirmation screen, and how to identify confirmed hits in a data-driven manner. Whereas previously the literature has focused on choice of test statistic or chemical descriptors, our studies suggest that cluster size is the more important design choice. We recommend clusters to be ranked by enrichment odds ratio, not by p-value. Our conceptually simple test statistic is seen to identify the same set of hits as more complex scoring methods proposed in the literature do. We prospectively confirm that such a cluster-based approach can outperform the naive top X approach and estimate that we improved confirmation rates by about 31.5% from 813 using the top X approach to 1187 using our cluster-based method. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. A rapid transglutaminase assay for high-throughput screening applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Wei; Tsai, Yu-Hui

    2006-10-01

    Transglutaminases (TGs) are widely distributed enzymes that catalyze posttranslational modification of proteins by Ca(2+)-dependent cross-linking reactions. The family members of TGs participate in many significant processes of biological functions such as tissue regeneration, cell differentiation, apoptosis, and certain pathologies. A novel technique for TG activity assay was developed in this study. It was based on the rapid capturing, fluorescence quenching, and fast separation of the unreacted fluorescent molecules from the macromolecular product with magnetic dextran-coated charcoal. As few as 3 ng of guinea pig liver transglutaminase (gpTG) could be detected by the method; activities of 96 TG samples could be measured within an hour. The K(m) of gpTG determined by this method for monodansylcadaverine (dansyl-CAD) and N, N-dimethylcasein was 14 and 5 muM, respectively. A typical competitive inhibition pattern of cystamine on dansyl-CAD for gpTG activity was also demonstrated. The application of this technique is not limited to the use of dansyl-CAD as the fluorescent substrate of TG; other small fluor-labeled TG substrates may substitute dansyl-CAD. Finally, this method is rapid, highly sensitive, and inexpensive. It is suitable not only for high-throughput screening of enzymes or enzyme inhibitors but also for enzyme kinetic analysis.

  7. A Colloidal Stability Assay Suitable for High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Carla; Ali, M Monsur; Yang, Songtao; Dong, Xiaofei; Pelton, Robert H

    2016-03-01

    A library of 32 polystyrene copolymer latexes, with diameters ranging between 53 and 387 nm, was used to develop and demonstrate a high-throughput assay using a 96-well microplate platform to measure critical coagulation concentrations, a measure of colloidal stability. The most robust assay involved an automated centrifugation-decantation step to remove latex aggregates before absorbance measurements, eliminating aggregate interference with optical measurements made through the base of the multiwell plates. For smaller nanoparticles (diameter <150 nm), the centrifugation-decantation step was not required as the interference was less than with larger particles. Parallel measurements with a ChemiDoc MP plate scanner gave indications of aggregation; however, the results were less sensitive than the absorbance measurements.

  8. Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays DE DeGroot, RS Thomas, and SO SimmonsNational Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC USAThe EPA’s ToxCast program utilizes a wide variety of high-throughput s...

  9. A High-Throughput Screening Assay to Detect ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In support of the Endocrine Disruption Screening Program (EDSP21), the US EPA ToxCast program is developing assays to enable screening for chemicals that may disrupt thyroid hormone synthesis. Thyroperoxidase (TPO) is critical for TH synthesis and is a known target of thyroid-disrupting chemicals that adversely impact neurodevelopment. The AUR-TPO assay was recently developed to screen >1,900 ToxCast chemicals for potential TPO inhibition activity. Parallel assays were used to determine which AUR-TPO actives were more selective for TPO inhibition. Additionally, the TPO inhibition activities of 150 chemicals were compared between the AUR-TPO assay and an orthogonal peroxidase oxidation assay using guaiacol as substrate to confirm putative TPO inhibition profiles. Bioactivity results from the AUR-TPO assay were used to identify chemical substructures associated with in vitro TPO inhibition. Substructure profiles were generated for each chemical in the ToxCast test set using the publicly-available ToxPrint 2.0 chemotypes. Chemotypes enriched among the putative TPO inhibitors were identified using a cumulative hypergeometric probability (p < 0.01). Of the total 729 chemotypes evaluated, 44 were overrepresented among TPO inhibitors. Another 24 chemotypes were found to be significantly underrepresented among AUR-TPO actives. Examination of these chemotypes revealed four basic pharmacophores that accounted for 70% of the ToxCast chemicals active in the AUR-TPO assay:

  10. Design and Implementation of High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    PubMed

    Powell, David J; Hertzberg, Robert P; Macarrόn, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    HTS remains at the core of the drug discovery process, and so it is critical to design and implement HTS assays in a comprehensive fashion involving scientists from the disciplines of biology, chemistry, engineering, and informatics. This requires careful consideration of many options and variables, starting with the choice of screening strategy and ending with the discovery of lead compounds. At every step in this process, there are decisions to be made that can greatly impact the outcome of the HTS effort, to the point of making it a success or a failure. Although specific guidelines should be established to ensure that the screening assay reaches an acceptable level of quality, many choices require pragmatism and the ability to compromise opposing forces.

  11. ToxCast Workflow: High-throughput screening assay data processing, analysis and management (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA’s ToxCast program is generating data in high-throughput screening (HTS) and high-content screening (HCS) assays for thousands of environmental chemicals, for use in developing predictive toxicity models. Currently the ToxCast screening program includes over 1800 unique c...

  12. ToxCast Workflow: High-throughput screening assay data processing, analysis and management (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA’s ToxCast program is generating data in high-throughput screening (HTS) and high-content screening (HCS) assays for thousands of environmental chemicals, for use in developing predictive toxicity models. Currently the ToxCast screening program includes over 1800 unique c...

  13. 20170913 - Retrofit Strategies for Incorporating Xenobiotic Metabolism into High Throughput Screening Assays (EMGS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA’s ToxCast program is designed to assess chemical perturbations of molecular and cellular endpoints using a variety of high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. However, existing HTS assays have limited or no xenobiotic metabolism which could lead to a mischaracteri...

  14. Development of a thyroperoxidase inhibition assay for high-throughput screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTPS) assays to detect inhibitors of thyroperoxidase (TPO), the enzymatic catalyst for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, are not currently available. Herein we describe the development of a HTPS TPO inhibition assay. Rat thyroid microsomes and a fluores...

  15. Development of a thyroperoxidase inhibition assay for high-throughput screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTPS) assays to detect inhibitors of thyroperoxidase (TPO), the enzymatic catalyst for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, are not currently available. Herein we describe the development of a HTPS TPO inhibition assay. Rat thyroid microsomes and a fluores...

  16. Inhibition of self-splicing group I intron RNA: high-throughput screening assays.

    PubMed Central

    Mei, H Y; Cui, M; Sutton, S T; Truong, H N; Chung, F Z; Czarnik, A W

    1996-01-01

    High-throughput screening assays have been developed to rapidly identify small molecule inhibitors targeting catalytic group I introns. Biochemical reactions catalyzed by a self-splicing group I intron derived from Pneumocystis carinii or from bacteriophage T4 have been investigated. In vitro biochemical assays amenable to high-throughput screening have been established. Small molecules that inhibit the functions of group I introns have been identified. These inhibitors should be useful in better understanding ribozyme catalysis or in therapeutic intervention of group I intron-containing microorganisms. PMID:9016680

  17. Rapid 2,2'-bicinchoninic-based xylanase assay compatible with high throughput screening

    Treesearch

    William R. Kenealy; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2003-01-01

    High-throughput screening requires simple assays that give reliable quantitative results. A microplate assay was developed for reducing sugar analysis that uses a 2,2'-bicinchoninic-based protein reagent. Endo-1,4-â-D-xylanase activity against oat spelt xylan was detected at activities of 0.002 to 0.011 IU ml−1. The assay is linear for sugar...

  18. A High-Throughput Screening Assay for NKCC1 Cotransporter Using Nonradioactive Rubidium Flux Technology.

    PubMed

    Gill, Sikander; Gill, Rajwant; Wen, Yang; Enderle, Thilo; Roth, Doris; Liang, Dong

    A high-throughput screening (HTS) assay was developed for cotransporter, NKCC1, which is a potential target for the treatment of diverse disorders. This nonradioactive rubidium flux assay coupled with ion channel reader series provides a working screen for this target expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell line. An eightfold window of detection was achieved with the optimized assay. This new functional assay offered a robust working model for NKCC1 in determining reliable and concordant rank orders of the test compounds supporting its sensitivity and specificity. The robustness of manual assay indicated by Z' of 0.9 qualified its amenability to automation. The Z' of 0.7 was displayed by automated assay employed in high-throughput screening of compound libraries against this target. Being electrically neutral, the NKCC1 screening is difficult to achieve by both manual and automated electrophysiological techniques. These techniques, although considered gold standard, suffer from their inherent problems of being too slow to be in high-throughput format and with high running costs. In addition to being a functional assay for NKCC1, it is nontoxic as compared with thallium flux assay, which is prone to generate high number of false-positive/false-negative rates because of its innate fluorescence issues.

  19. High-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus helicase inhibitors using fluorescence-quenching phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Hidenori; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Fujita, Osamu; Matsuda, Yasuyoshi; Miyata, Ryo; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Noda, Naohiro

    2009-02-20

    We have developed a novel high-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) helicase inhibitors using the fluorescence-quenching phenomenon via photoinduced electron transfer between fluorescent dyes and guanine bases. We prepared double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with a 5'-fluorescent-dye (BODIPY FL)-labeled strand hybridized with a complementary strand, the 3'-end of which has guanine bases. When dsDNA is unwound by helicase, the dye emits fluorescence owing to its release from the guanine bases. Our results demonstrate that this assay is suitable for quantitative assay of HCV NS3 helicase activity and useful for high-throughput screening for inhibitors. Furthermore, we applied this assay to the screening for NS3 helicase inhibitors from cell extracts of microorganisms, and found several cell extracts containing potential inhibitors.

  20. Adapting Cell-Based Assays to the High Throughput Screening Platform: Problems Encountered and Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Clinton B; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile

    2008-06-01

    In recent years, cell-based phenotypic assays have emerged as an effective and robust addition to the array of assay technologies available for drug discovery in the high throughput screening arena. Previously, biochemical target-based assays have been the technology of choice. With the emergence of stem cells as a basis for a new screening technology, it is important to keep in mind the lessons that have been learned from the adaptation of existing stable cell lines onto the high throughput screening drug discovery platform, with special consideration being given to assay miniaturization, liquid handling complications and instrument-introduced artifacts. We present an overview of the problems encountered with the implementation of multiple cell-based assays at the High Throughput Screening Center at Southern Research Institute as well as empirically defined effective solutions to these problems. These include examples of artifacts induced by temperature differences throughout the screening campaign, cell plating conditions including the effect of room temperature incubation on assay consistency, DMSO carry-over, and incubator induced artifacts.

  1. Two High Throughput Screen Assays for Measurement of TNF-α in THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leister, Kristin P; Huang, Ruili; Goodwin, Bonnie L; Chen, Andrew; Austin, Christopher P; Xia, Menghang

    2011-01-01

    Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), a secreted cytokine, plays an important role in inflammatory diseases and immune disorders, and is a potential target for drug development. The traditional assays for detecting TNF-α, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radioimmunoassay, are not suitable for the large size compound screens. Both assays suffer from a complicated protocol, multiple plate wash steps and/or excessive radioactive waste. A simple and quick measurement of TNF-α production in a cell based assay is needed for high throughput screening to identify the lead compounds from the compound library. We have developed and optimized two homogeneous TNF-α assays using the HTRF (homogeneous time resolved fluorescence) and AlphaLISA assay formats. We have validated the HTRF based TNF-α assay in a 1536-well plate format by screening a library of 1280 pharmacologically active compounds. The active compounds identified from the screen were confirmed in the AlphaLISA TNF-α assay using a bead-based technology. These compounds were also confirmed in a traditional ELISA assay. From this study, several beta adrenergic agonists have been identified as TNF-α inhibitors. We also identified several novel inhibitors of TNF-α, such as BTO-1, CCG-2046, ellipticine, and PD 169316. The results demonstrated that both homogeneous TNF-α assays are robust and suitable for high throughput screening. PMID:21643507

  2. A rapid enzymatic assay for high-throughput screening of adenosine-producing strains

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Huina; Zu, Xin; Zheng, Ping; Zhang, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a major local regulator of tissue function and industrially useful as precursor for the production of medicinal nucleoside substances. High-throughput screening of adenosine overproducers is important for industrial microorganism breeding. An enzymatic assay of adenosine was developed by combined adenosine deaminase (ADA) with indophenol method. The ADA catalyzes the cleavage of adenosine to inosine and NH3, the latter can be accurately determined by indophenol method. The assay system was optimized to deliver a good performance and could tolerate the addition of inorganic salts and many nutrition components to the assay mixtures. Adenosine could be accurately determined by this assay using 96-well microplates. Spike and recovery tests showed that this assay can accurately and reproducibly determine increases in adenosine in fermentation broth without any pretreatment to remove proteins and potentially interfering low-molecular-weight molecules. This assay was also applied to high-throughput screening for high adenosine-producing strains. The high selectivity and accuracy of the ADA assay provides rapid and high-throughput analysis of adenosine in large numbers of samples. PMID:25580842

  3. Label-free high-throughput assays to screen and characterize novel lactate dehydrogenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vanderporten, Erica; Frick, Lauren; Turincio, Rebecca; Thana, Peter; Lamarr, William; Liu, Yichin

    2013-10-15

    Catalytic turnover of pyruvate to lactate by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is critical in maintaining an intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD⁺) pool for continuous fueling of the glycolytic pathway. In this article, we describe two label-free high-throughput assays (a kinetic assay detecting the intrinsic reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence and a mass spectrometric assay monitoring the conversion of pyruvate to lactate) that were designed to effectively identify LDH inhibitors, characterize their different mechanisms of action, and minimize potential false positives from a small molecule compound library screen. Using a fluorescence kinetic image-based reader capable of detecting NADH fluorescence in the ultra-high-throughput screening (uHTS) work flow, the enzyme activity was measured as the rate of NADH conversion to NAD⁺. Interference with NADH fluorescence by library compounds was readily identified during the primary screen. The mass spectrometric assay quantitated the lactate and pyruvate levels simultaneously. The multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometric method accurately detected each of the two small organic acid molecules in the reaction mixture. With robust Z' scores of more than 0.7, these two high-throughput assays for LDH are both label free and complementary to each other in the HTS workflow by monitoring the activities of the compounds on each half of the LDH redox reaction.

  4. Identification of inhibitors of a bacterial sigma factor using a new high-throughput screening assay.

    PubMed

    El-Mowafi, S A; Sineva, E; Alumasa, J N; Nicoloff, H; Tomsho, J W; Ades, S E; Keiler, K C

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are formidable pathogens because their cell envelope presents an adaptable barrier to environmental and host-mediated challenges. The stress response pathway controlled by the alternative sigma factor σ(E) is critical for maintenance of the cell envelope. Because σ(E) is required for the virulence or viability of several Gram-negative pathogens, it might be a useful target for antibiotic development. To determine if small molecules can inhibit the σ(E) pathway, and to permit high-throughput screening for antibiotic lead compounds, a σ(E) activity assay that is compatible with high-throughput screening was developed and validated. The screen employs a biological assay with positive readout. An Escherichia coli strain was engineered to express yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) under negative regulation by the σ(E) pathway, such that inhibitors of the pathway increase the production of YFP. To validate the screen, the reporter strain was used to identify σ(E) pathway inhibitors from a library of cyclic peptides. Biochemical characterization of one of the inhibitory cyclic peptides showed that it binds σ(E), inhibits RNA polymerase holoenzyme formation, and inhibits σ(E)-dependent transcription in vitro. These results demonstrate that alternative sigma factors can be inhibited by small molecules and enable high-throughput screening for inhibitors of the σ(E) pathway.

  5. TR-FRET-Based High-Throughput Screening Assay for Identification of UBC13 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Madiraju, Charitha; Welsh, Kate; Cuddy, Michael P.; Godoi, Paulo; Pass, Ian; Ngo, Tram; Vasile, Stefan; Sergienko, Eduard A.; Diaz, Paul; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C.

    2014-01-01

    UBC13 is a non-canonical Ubiquitin Conjugating Enzyme (E2) that has been implicated in a variety of cellular signaling processes due to its ability to catalyze formation of Lysine 63-linked polyubiquitin chains on various substrates. In particular, UBC13 is required for signaling by a variety of receptors important in immune regulation, making it a candidate target for inflammatory diseases. UBC13 is also critical for double-strand DNA repair, and thus a potential radiosensitizer and chemosensitizer target for oncology. We developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for UBC13 based on the method of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET). The TR-FRET assay combines fluorochrome (Fl)-conjugated ubiquitin (fluorescence acceptor) with terbium (Tb)-conjugated ubiquitin (fluorescence donor), such that the assembly of mixed chains of Fl- and Tb-ubiquitin creates a robust TR-FRET signal. We defined conditions for optimized performance of the TR-FRET assay in both 384 and 1536-well formats. Chemical library screens (total 456,865 compounds) were conducted in high-throughput mode using various compound collections, affording superb Z' scores (typically > 0.7) and thus validating the performance of the assays. Altogether, the HTS assays described here are suitable for large-scale, automated screening of chemical libraries in search of compounds with inhibitory activity against UBC13. PMID:22034497

  6. Optimization of Fluorescence Assay of Cellular Manganese Status for High Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kevin K.; Aboud, Asad A.; Patel, Devin K.; Aschner, Michael; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2013-01-01

    The advent of high throughput screening (HTS) technology permits identification of compounds that influence various cellular phenotypes. However, screening for small molecule chemical modifiers of neurotoxicants has been limited by the scalability of existing phenotyping assays. Furthermore, the adaptation of existing cellular assays to HTS format requires substantial modification of experimental parameters and analysis methodology to meet the necessary statistical requirements. Here we describe the successful optimization of the Cellular Fura-2 Manganese Extraction Assay (CFMEA) for HTS. By optimizing cellular density, manganese (Mn) exposure conditions, and extraction parameters, the sensitivity and dynamic range of the fura-2 Mn response was enhanced to permit detection of positive and negative modulators of cellular manganese status. Finally, we quantify and report strategies to control sources of intra-and inter-plate variability by batch level and plate-geometric level analysis. Our goal is to enable HTS with the CFMEA to identify novel modulators of Mn transport. PMID:23169769

  7. High-throughput Screening of Carbohydrate-degrading Enzymes Using Novel Insoluble Chromogenic Substrate Assay Kits

    PubMed Central

    Willats, William G. T.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates active enzymes (CAZymes) have multiple roles in vivo and are widely used for industrial processing in the biofuel, textile, detergent, paper and food industries. A deeper understanding of CAZymes is important from both fundamental biology and industrial standpoints. Vast numbers of CAZymes exist in nature (especially in microorganisms) and hundreds of thousands have been cataloged and described in the carbohydrate active enzyme database (CAZy). However, the rate of discovery of putative enzymes has outstripped our ability to biochemically characterize their activities. One reason for this is that advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing, together with associated bioinformatics tools allow for rapid identification of candidate CAZymes, but technology for determining an enzyme's biochemical characteristics has advanced more slowly. To address this technology gap, a novel high-throughput assay kit based on insoluble chromogenic substrates is described here. Two distinct substrate types were produced: Chromogenic Polymer Hydrogel (CPH) substrates (made from purified polysaccharides and proteins) and Insoluble Chromogenic Biomass (ICB) substrates (made from complex biomass materials). Both CPH and ICB substrates are provided in a 96-well high-throughput assay system. The CPH substrates can be made in four different colors, enabling them to be mixed together and thus increasing assay throughput. The protocol describes a 96-well plate assay and illustrates how this assay can be used for screening the activities of enzymes, enzyme cocktails, and broths. PMID:27684747

  8. High-throughput Screening of Carbohydrate-degrading Enzymes Using Novel Insoluble Chromogenic Substrate Assay Kits.

    PubMed

    Schückel, Julia; Kračun, Stjepan Krešimir; Willats, William G T

    2016-09-20

    Carbohydrates active enzymes (CAZymes) have multiple roles in vivo and are widely used for industrial processing in the biofuel, textile, detergent, paper and food industries. A deeper understanding of CAZymes is important from both fundamental biology and industrial standpoints. Vast numbers of CAZymes exist in nature (especially in microorganisms) and hundreds of thousands have been cataloged and described in the carbohydrate active enzyme database (CAZy). However, the rate of discovery of putative enzymes has outstripped our ability to biochemically characterize their activities. One reason for this is that advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing, together with associated bioinformatics tools allow for rapid identification of candidate CAZymes, but technology for determining an enzyme's biochemical characteristics has advanced more slowly. To address this technology gap, a novel high-throughput assay kit based on insoluble chromogenic substrates is described here. Two distinct substrate types were produced: Chromogenic Polymer Hydrogel (CPH) substrates (made from purified polysaccharides and proteins) and Insoluble Chromogenic Biomass (ICB) substrates (made from complex biomass materials). Both CPH and ICB substrates are provided in a 96-well high-throughput assay system. The CPH substrates can be made in four different colors, enabling them to be mixed together and thus increasing assay throughput. The protocol describes a 96-well plate assay and illustrates how this assay can be used for screening the activities of enzymes, enzyme cocktails, and broths.

  9. Single assay-wide variance experimental (SAVE) design for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Murie, Carl; Barette, Caroline; Lafanechère, Laurence; Nadon, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Advantages of statistical testing of high-throughput screens include P-values, which provide objective benchmarks of compound activity, and false discovery rate estimation. The cost of replication required for statistical testing, however, may often be prohibitive. We introduce the single assay-wide variance experimental (SAVE) design whereby a small replicated subset of an entire screen is used to derive empirical Bayes random error estimates, which are applied to the remaining majority of unreplicated measurements. The SAVE design is able to generate P-values comparable with those generated with full replication data. It performs almost as well as the random variance model t-test with duplicate data and outperforms the commonly used Z-scores with unreplicated data and the standard t-test. We illustrate the approach with simulated data and with experimental small molecule and small interfering RNA screens. The SAVE design provides substantial performance improvements over unreplicated screens with only slight increases in cost.

  10. Functional cell-based assays in microliter volumes for ultra-high throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Wunder, Frank; Kalthof, Bernd; Müller, Thomas; Hüser, Jörg

    2008-08-01

    Functional cell-based assays have gained increasing importance for microplate-based high throughput screening (HTS). The use of high-density microplates, most prominently 1536-well plates, and miniaturized assay formats allow screening of comprehensive compound collections with more than 1 million compounds at ultra-high throughput, i.e. in excess of 100,000 samples per day. uHTS operations with numerous campaigns per year should generally support this throughput at all different steps of the process, including the underlying compound logistics, the (automated) testing of the corporate compound collection in the bioassay, and the subsequent follow-up studies for hit confirmation and characterization. A growing number of reports document the general feasibility of cell-based uHTS in microliter volumes. In addition, full automation with integrated robotic systems allows the realization of also complex assay protocols with multiple liquid handling and signal detection steps. For this review, cell-based assays are categorized based on the kinetics of the cellular response to be quantified in the test and the readout method employed. Thus, assays measuring fast cellular responses with high temporal resolution, e.g., receptor mediated calcium signals or changes in membrane potential, are at one end of this spectrum, while tests quantifying cellular transcriptional responses mark the opposite end. Trends for cell-based uHTS assays developed at Bayer-Schering Pharma are, first, to incorporate assay integral reference signals allowing the experimental differentiation of target hits from non-specifically acting compounds, and second, to make use of kinetic, real-time readouts providing additional information on the mode-of-action of test compounds.

  11. A novel multiplex cell viability assay for high-throughput RNAi screening.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Daniel F; Erdmann, Gerrit; Zhang, Xian; Fritzsche, Anja; Demir, Kubilay; Jaedicke, Andreas; Muehlenberg, Katja; Wanker, Erich E; Boutros, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based high-throughput RNAi screening has become a powerful research tool in addressing a variety of biological questions. In RNAi screening, one of the most commonly applied assay system is measuring the fitness of cells that is usually quantified using fluorescence, luminescence and absorption-based readouts. These methods, typically implemented and scaled to large-scale screening format, however often only yield limited information on the cell fitness phenotype due to evaluation of a single and indirect physiological indicator. To address this problem, we have established a cell fitness multiplexing assay which combines a biochemical approach and two fluorescence-based assaying methods. We applied this assay in a large-scale RNAi screening experiment with siRNA pools targeting the human kinome in different modified HEK293 cell lines. Subsequent analysis of ranked fitness phenotypes assessed by the different assaying methods revealed average phenotype intersections of 50.7±2.3%-58.7±14.4% when two indicators were combined and 40-48% when a third indicator was taken into account. From these observations we conclude that combination of multiple fitness measures may decrease false-positive rates and increases confidence for hit selection. Our robust experimental and analytical method improves the classical approach in terms of time, data comprehensiveness and cost.

  12. Development of a thyroperoxidase inhibition assay for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Paul, Katie B; Hedge, Joan M; Rotroff, Daniel M; Hornung, Michael W; Crofton, Kevin M; Simmons, Steven O

    2014-03-17

    High-throughput screening (HTPS) assays to detect inhibitors of thyroperoxidase (TPO), the enzymatic catalyst for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, are not currently available. Herein, we describe the development of a HTPS TPO inhibition assay. Rat thyroid microsomes and a fluorescent peroxidase substrate, Amplex UltraRed (AUR), were employed in an end-point assay for comparison to the existing kinetic guaiacol (GUA) oxidation assay. Following optimization of assay metrics, including Z', dynamic range, and activity, using methimazole (MMI), the assay was tested with a 21-chemical training set. The potency of MMI-induced TPO inhibition was greater with AUR compared to GUA. The dynamic range and Z' score with MMI were as follows: 127-fold and 0.62 for the GUA assay, 18-fold and 0.86 for the 96-well AUR assay, and 11.5-fold and 0.93 for the 384-well AUR assay. The 384-well AUR assay drastically reduced animal use, requiring one-tenth of the rat thyroid microsomal protein needed for the GUA 96-well format assay. Fourteen chemicals inhibited TPO, with a relative potency ranking of MMI > ethylene thiourea > 6-propylthiouracil > 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxy-benzophenone > 2-mercaptobenzothiazole > 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole > genistein > 4-propoxyphenol > sulfamethazine > daidzein > 4-nonylphenol > triclosan > iopanoic acid > resorcinol. These data demonstrate the capacity of this assay to detect diverse TPO inhibitors. Seven chemicals acted as negatives: 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, dibutylphthalate, diethylhexylphthalate, diethylphthalate, 3,5-dimethylpyrazole-1-methanol, methyl 2-methyl-benzoate, and sodium perchlorate. This assay could be used to screen large numbers of chemicals as an integral component of a tiered TH-disruptor screening approach.

  13. A homogeneous and multiplexed immunoassay for high-throughput screening using fluorometric microvolume assay technology.

    PubMed

    Swartzman, E E; Miraglia, S J; Mellentin-Michelotti, J; Evangelista, L; Yuan, P M

    1999-07-01

    We have developed a simple, homogeneous bead-based immunoassay for use with fluorometric microvolume assay technology (FMAT). The FLISA (fluorescence-linked immunosorbent assay) can be easily adapted from existing immunoassays, is comparable to traditional ELISAs with respect to linear dynamic range and sensitivity, and can be readily performed in 96- and 384-well plates. Additionally, the FLISA utilizes 100-fold less primary antibody than the conventional immunoassay. The scanner uses a helium/neon laser to image and measure bead-bound fluorescence while the background fluorescence is ignored. Consequently, no wash steps are required to remove unbound antibody, ligand, and fluorophore. Furthermore, the instrument is capable of detecting two different fluorescent dyes, allowing for multiplexed assays based on color. Fluorescent bead-based immunoassays were developed for the cytokines IL-6 and IL-8, and their use in both one-color and two-color FLISAs is demonstrated. Although no wash steps were employed, the FLISA was able to accurately measure the concentrations of IL-6 and IL-8 in the growth media of cytokine-stimulated HUVEC cells. In addition, a simulated high-throughput two-color FLISA positively identified those wells in a 384-well plate that contained different amounts of IL-6 and/or IL-8 peptide. The homogeneous, multiplex and multiplate format of the FLISA reduces hands-on time and reagent usage, and is therefore ideally suited for high-throughput screening.

  14. Differential nuclear staining assay for high-throughput screening to identify cytotoxic compounds.

    PubMed

    Lema, Carolina; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Aguilera, Renato J

    As large quantities of novel synthetic molecules continue to be generated there is a challenge to identify therapeutic agents with cytotoxic activity. Here we introduce a Differential Nuclear Staining (DNS) assay adapted to live-cell imaging for high throughput screening (HTS) that utilizes two fluorescent DNA intercalators, Hoechst 33342 and Propidium iodide (PI). Since Hoechst can readily cross cell membranes to stain DNA of living and dead cells, it was used to label the total number of cells. In contrast, PI only enters cells with compromised plasma membranes, thus selectively labeling dead cells. The DNS assay was successfully validated by utilizing well known cytotoxic agents with fast or slow cytotoxic activities. The assay was found to be suitable for HTS with Z' factors ranging from 0.86 to 0.60 for 96 and 384-well formats, respectively. Furthermore, besides plate-to-plate reproducibility, assay quality performance was evaluated by determining ratios of signal-to-noise and signal-to-background, as well as coefficient of variation, which resulted in adequate values and validated the assay for HTS initiatives. As proof of concept, eighty structurally diverse compounds from a small molecule library were screened in a 96-well plate format using the DNS assay. Using this DNS assay, six hits with cytotoxic properties were identified and all of them were also successfully identified by using the commercially available MTS assay (CellTiter 96® Cell Proliferation Assay). In addition, the DNS and a flow cytometry assay were used to validate the activity of the cytotoxic compounds. The DNS assay was also used to generate dose-response curves and to obtain CC50 values. The results indicate that the DNS assay is reliable and robust and suitable for primary and secondary screens of compounds with potential cytotoxic activity.

  15. Differential nuclear staining assay for high-throughput screening to identify cytotoxic compounds

    PubMed Central

    LEMA, Carolina; VARELA-RAMIREZ, Armando; AGUILERA, Renato J.

    2016-01-01

    As large quantities of novel synthetic molecules continue to be generated there is a challenge to identify therapeutic agents with cytotoxic activity. Here we introduce a Differential Nuclear Staining (DNS) assay adapted to live-cell imaging for high throughput screening (HTS) that utilizes two fluorescent DNA intercalators, Hoechst 33342 and Propidium iodide (PI). Since Hoechst can readily cross cell membranes to stain DNA of living and dead cells, it was used to label the total number of cells. In contrast, PI only enters cells with compromised plasma membranes, thus selectively labeling dead cells. The DNS assay was successfully validated by utilizing well known cytotoxic agents with fast or slow cytotoxic activities. The assay was found to be suitable for HTS with Z′ factors ranging from 0.86 to 0.60 for 96 and 384-well formats, respectively. Furthermore, besides plate-to-plate reproducibility, assay quality performance was evaluated by determining ratios of signal-to-noise and signal-to-background, as well as coefficient of variation, which resulted in adequate values and validated the assay for HTS initiatives. As proof of concept, eighty structurally diverse compounds from a small molecule library were screened in a 96-well plate format using the DNS assay. Using this DNS assay, six hits with cytotoxic properties were identified and all of them were also successfully identified by using the commercially available MTS assay (CellTiter 96® Cell Proliferation Assay). In addition, the DNS and a flow cytometry assay were used to validate the activity of the cytotoxic compounds. The DNS assay was also used to generate dose-response curves and to obtain CC50 values. The results indicate that the DNS assay is reliable and robust and suitable for primary and secondary screens of compounds with potential cytotoxic activity. PMID:27042697

  16. Design considerations for high-throughput screening and in vitro diagnostic assays.

    PubMed

    Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Whitten, David G

    2007-07-01

    This paper reviews the several different factors that must be considered during the development of assays for high throughput screening (HTS) or in vitro diagnostic (IVD) applications. The reader is introduced to the terminology used in assay development as well as the statistical approaches for evaluating the data. The review is intended to serve as a tutorial to biotechnology, pharmaceutical and clinical professionals, the academic researcher, as well as a guide for established investigators of HTS and IVD. This review is not a comprehensive treatise in its scope or content, but is meant to introduce the reader to key concepts of assay development. Elementary mathematical and statistical tools for designing robust assays and data management are described. While certain design concepts overlap HTS and IVDs, others are more pertinent to one or the other topic. An overview of the regulatory requirements for IVDs is included in the context of the United States Food and Drug Administration. Quality concepts and high content screening are also briefly described. The review does not focus upon any particular assay technology nor does it provide detailed laboratory procedures on specific assays. The references cited are not exhaustive, but meant to steer the reader toward a general status report of the various technologies discussed. The information presented in this review is not intended to replace the judgment of the experienced laboratory scientist. However, this review should assist the scientific professional in executing well designed assays and being aware of design considerations.

  17. Assay development and high throughput antiviral drug screening against Bluetongue virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qianjun; Maddox, Clinton; Rasmussen, Lynn; Hobrath, Judith V.; White, Lucile E.

    2009-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) infection is one of the most important diseases of domestic livestock. There are no antivirals available against BTV disease. In this paper, we present the development, optimization and validation of an in vitro cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay using the luminescent-based CellTiter-Glo reagent to identify novel antivirals against BTV. Conditions of the cytopathic effect (CPE)-based assay were optimized at cell density of 5 000 cells/well in medium containing 1% FBS and a multiplicity of infection at 0.01 in 384-well plate, with Z'-values ≥ 0.70, Coefficient of Variations ≥ 5.68 and signal-to-background ratio ≥ 7.10. This assay was further validated using a 9 532 compound library. The fully validated assay was then used to screen the 194 950 compound collection, which identified 693 compounds with > 30% CPE inhibition. The ten-concentration dose response assay identified 185 structures with IC50 ≤ 100 μM, out of which 42 compounds were grouped into six analog series corresponding to six scaffolds enriched within the active set compared to their distribution in the library. The CPE-based assay development demonstrated its robustness and reliability, and its application in the HTS campaign will make significant contribution to the antiviral drug discovery against BTV disease. PMID:19559054

  18. A high-throughput, multiplex cell death assay using an RNAi screening approach.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, Katrina J; Saunders, Darren N; Simpson, Kaylene J

    2014-06-02

    This protocol outlines a high-throughput, multiplex cell death assay and its use in conjunction with a genome-scale siRNA screen to identify genes that cooperate with a drug to induce apoptosis. The assay, ApoLive-Glo (Promega), measures viability of drug-treated, reverse-transfected cells via the fluorescent CellTiter-Fluor reagent, which includes a substrate that is cleaved by a live cell protease. ApoLive-Glo also quantitates cell death by the amount of cleaved caspases 3 and 7 using a luminescent Caspase-Glo 3/7 caspase activation assay. The advantage of the multiplex assay is that it distinguishes rapid cell death from the slower activation of caspase activity, permitting measurement of different stages of cell death in the same sample at a single time point. In parallel, a high-content imaging protocol involving 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained nuclei is used as a cost-effective way to quantitate viability of vehicle-treated control cells. Automation and robotic liquid handling are built into the protocol to increase speed of workflow and improve reproducibility. A screen using these assays will identify gene targets that are essential for viability irrespective of drug treatment and gene targets that cause a synergistic enhancement of cell death in the presence of drug. Candidate target activity can then be validated by conventional flow cytometry-based assays. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Development of a dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) assay for high throughput chemical screening

    PubMed Central

    Ghebremariam, Yohannes T; Erlanson, Daniel; Yamada, Keisuke; Cooke, John P

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent signaling molecule that needs to be tightly regulated to maintain metabolic and cardiovascular homeostasis. The nitric oxide synthase (NOS)/Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH)/Asymmetric Dimethylarginine (ADMA) pathway is central to this regulation. Specifically, the small molecule ADMA competitively inhibits NOS, thus lowering NO levels. The majority of ADMA is physiologically metabolized by DDAH, thus maintaining NO levels at physiological concentration. However, under pathophysiological conditions, DDAH activity is impaired, in part as a result of its sensitivity to oxidative stress. Therefore, the application of high throughput chemical screening for the discovery of small molecules that could restore or enhance DDAH activity might have significant potential in treating metabolic and vascular diseases characterized by reduced NO levels, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, and insulin resistance. By contrast, excessive generation of NO (primarily driven by iNOS) could play a role in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), sepsis, migraine headaches, and some types of cancer. In these conditions, small molecules that inhibit DDAH activity might be therapeutically useful. Here, we describe optimization and validation of a highly reproducible and robust assay successfully used in a high throughput screen for DDAH modulators. PMID:22460174

  20. Radioligand binding assays in the drug discovery process: potential pitfalls of high throughput screenings.

    PubMed

    Noël, F; Mendonça-Silva, D L; Quintas, L E

    2001-02-01

    Radioligand binding assays evaluating directly the ability of a drug to interact with a defined molecular target is part of the drug discovery process. The need for a high throughput rate in screening drugs is actually leading to simplified experimental schemes that increase the probability of false negative results. Special concern involves voltage-gated ion channel drug discovery where a great care is required in designing assays because of frequent multiplicity of (interacting) binding sites. To clearly illustrate this situation, three different assays used in the academic drug discovery program of the authors were selected because they are rich of intrinsic artifacts: (I) (20 mmol/l caffeine almost duplicated [3H]ryanodine binding (89% higher than control) to rat heart microsomes at 0.3 mumol/l free calcium but did not exert any effect when using a high (107 mumol/l) free calcium, as mostly used in ryanodine binding assays; (II) An agonist for the ionotropic glutamate receptor of the kainate type can distinctly affect [3H]kainate binding to chicken cerebellum membranes depending on its concentration: unlabelled kainic acid per se either stimulated about 30% (at 50-100 nmol/l), had no effect (at 200 nmol/l) or even progressively decreased (at 0.3-2 mumol/l) the binding of 5 nmol/l [3H]kainate, emphasizing the risk of using a single concentration for screening a drug; (III) in a classical [3H]flunitrazepam binding assay, the stimulatory effect of a GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) agonist was only observed when using extensively washed rat brain synaptosomes (10 mumol/l GABA increased flunitrazepam binding by 90%). On the other hand, the inhibitory effect of a GABA antagonist was only observed when using crude synaptosomes (10 mumol/l bicuculine reduced [3H]flunitrazepam binding by 40%). It can be concluded that carefully designed radioligand assays which can be performed in an academic laboratory are appropriate for screening a small number of drugs, especially if

  1. A novel high-throughput screening assay for discovery of molecules that increase cellular tetrahydrobiopterin.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Du, Yuhong; Chen, Wei; Fu, Haian; Harrison, David G

    2011-09-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) is an essential cofactor for the nitric oxide (NO) synthases and the aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Insufficient BH(4) has been implicated in various cardiovascular and neurological disorders. GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH-1) is the rate-limiting enzyme for de novo biosynthesis of BH(4). The authors have recently shown that the interaction of GTPCH-1 with GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) inhibits endothelial GTPCH-1 enzyme activity, BH(4) levels, and NO production. They propose that agents that disrupt the GTPCH-1/GFRP interaction can increase cellular GTPCH-1 activity, BH(4) levels, and NO production. They developed and optimized a novel time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assay to monitor the interaction of GTPCH-1 and GFRP. This assay is highly sensitive and stable and has a signal-to-background ratio (S/B) greater than 12 and a Z' factor greater than 0.8. This assay was used in an ultra-high-throughput screening (uHTS) format to screen the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds. Using independent protein-protein interaction and cellular activity assays, the authors identified compounds that disrupt GTPCH-1/GFRP binding and increase endothelial cell biopterin levels. Thus, this TR-FRET assay could be applied in future uHTS of additional libraries to search for molecules that increase GTPCH-1 activity and BH(4) levels.

  2. Fluorescence polarization assays in high-throughput screening and drug discovery: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew D; Yasgar, Adam; Peryea, Tyler; Braisted, John C; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Coussens, Nathan P

    2017-01-01

    The sensitivity of Fluorescence Polarization (FP) and Fluorescence Anisotropy (FA) to molecular weight changes has enabled the interrogation of diverse biological mechanisms, ranging from molecular interactions to enzymatic activity. Assays based on FP/FA technology have been widely utilized in high-throughput screening (HTS) and drug discovery due to the homogenous format, robust performance and relative insensitivity to some types of interferences, such as inner filter effects. Advancements in assay design, fluorescent probes, and technology have enabled the application of FP assays to increasingly complex biological processes. Herein we discuss different types of FP/FA assays developed for HTS, with examples to emphasize the diversity of applicable targets. Furthermore, trends in target and fluorophore selection, as well as assay type and format, are examined using annotated HTS assays within the PubChem database. Finally, practical considerations for the successful development and implementation of FP/FA assays for HTS are provided based on experience at our center and examples from the literature, including strategies for flagging interference compounds among a list of hits. PMID:28809163

  3. Fluorescence polarization assays in high-throughput screening and drug discovery: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Matthew D.; Yasgar, Adam; Peryea, Tyler; Braisted, John C.; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Coussens, Nathan P.

    2016-06-01

    The sensitivity of fluorescence polarization (FP) and fluorescence anisotropy (FA) to molecular weight changes has enabled the interrogation of diverse biological mechanisms, ranging from molecular interactions to enzymatic activity. Assays based on FP/FA technology have been widely utilized in high-throughput screening (HTS) and drug discovery due to the homogenous format, robust performance and relative insensitivity to some types of interferences, such as inner filter effects. Advancements in assay design, fluorescent probes, and technology have enabled the application of FP assays to increasingly complex biological processes. Herein we discuss different types of FP/FA assays developed for HTS, with examples to emphasize the diversity of applicable targets. Furthermore, trends in target and fluorophore selection, as well as assay type and format, are examined using annotated HTS assays within the PubChem database. Finally, practical considerations for the successful development and implementation of FP/FA assays for HTS are provided based on experience at our center and examples from the literature, including strategies for flagging interference compounds among a list of hits.

  4. High-Throughput Screening Assay for Inhibitors of TonB-Dependent Iron Transport.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Mathew; Jordan, Lorne D; Shipelskiy, Yan; Newton, Salete M; Klebba, Phillip E

    2016-03-01

    The TonB-dependent Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein FepA actively transports the siderophore ferric enterobactin (FeEnt) into the periplasm. We developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay that observes FeEnt uptake through FepA in living Escherichia coli, by monitoring fluorescence quenching that occurs upon binding of FeEnt, and then unquenching as the bacteria deplete it from solution by transport. We optimized the labeling and spectroscopic methods to screen for inhibitors of TonB-dependent iron uptake through the outer membrane. The assay works like a molecular switch that is on in the presence of TonB activity and off in its absence. It functions in 96-well microtiter plates, in a variety of conditions, with Z factors of 0.8-1.0. TonB-dependent iron transport is energy dependent, and the inhibitory effects of the metabolic inhibitors carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, 2,4-dinitrophenol, azide, cyanide, and arsenate on FeEnt uptake were readily detected by the assay. Because iron acquisition is a determinant of bacterial pathogenesis, HTS with this method may identify inhibitors that block TonB function and constitute novel therapeutics against infectious disease caused by Gram-negative bacteria. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  5. A High-throughput Screening Assay for Determining Cellular Levels of Total Tau Protein

    PubMed Central

    Dehdashti, Seameen J.; Zheng, Wei; Gever, Joel R.; Wilhelm, Robert; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; Sittampalam, Gurusingham; McKew, John C.; Austin, Christopher P.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2014-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein (MAP) tau has been implicated in the pathology of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. In the past decade, the hyperphosphorylated and aggregated states of tau protein have been important targets in the drug discovery field for the potential treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. Although several compounds have been reported to reduce the hyperphosphorylated state of tau or impact the stabilization of tau, their therapeutic activities are still to be validated. Recently, reduction of total cellular tau protein has emerged as an alternate intervention point for drug development and a potential treatment of tauopathies. We have developed and optimized a homogenous assay, using the AlphaLISA and HTRF assay technologies, for the quantification of total cellular tau protein levels in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. The signal-to-basal ratios were 375 and 5.3, and the Z’ factors were 0.67 and 0.60 for the AlphaLISA and HTRF tau assays, respectively. The clear advantages of this homogeneous tau assay over conventional total tau assays, such as ELISA and Western blot, are the elimination of plate wash steps and miniaturization of the assay into 1536-well plate format for the ultra–high-throughput screening of large compound libraries. PMID:23905996

  6. A Data Analysis Pipeline Accounting for Artifacts in Tox21 Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Sedykh, Alexander; Huang, Ruili; Xia, Menghang; Tice, Raymond R

    2015-08-01

    A main goal of the U.S. Tox21 program is to profile a 10K-compound library for activity against a panel of stress-related and nuclear receptor signaling pathway assays using a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) approach. However, assay artifacts, including nonreproducible signals and assay interference (e.g., autofluorescence), complicate compound activity interpretation. To address these issues, we have developed a data analysis pipeline that includes an updated signal noise-filtering/curation protocol and an assay interference flagging system. To better characterize various types of signals, we adopted a weighted version of the area under the curve (wAUC) to quantify the amount of activity across the tested concentration range in combination with the assay-dependent point-of-departure (POD) concentration. Based on the 32 Tox21 qHTS assays analyzed, we demonstrate that signal profiling using wAUC affords the best reproducibility (Pearson's r = 0.91) in comparison with the POD (0.82) only or the AC(50) (i.e., half-maximal activity concentration, 0.81). Among the activity artifacts characterized, cytotoxicity is the major confounding factor; on average, about 8% of Tox21 compounds are affected, whereas autofluorescence affects less than 0.5%. To facilitate data evaluation, we implemented two graphical user interface applications, allowing users to rapidly evaluate the in vitro activity of Tox21 compounds.

  7. Robotic Mammosphere Assay for High-Throughput Screening in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, P A; Akrap, N; Söderberg, E M V; Harrison, H; Thomson, G J; Landberg, G

    2017-02-01

    In order to identify novel treatment principles specifically affecting cancer stem cells in triple-negative breast cancer, we have developed a high-throughput screening method based on the mammosphere and anoikis resistance assays allowing us to screen compounds using a functional readout. The assay was validated against manual protocols and through the use of positive controls, such as the response to hypoxia and treatment with the known cancer stem cell-targeting compound salinomycin. Manual and robotic procedures were compared and produced similar results in cell handling, cell cultures, and counting techniques, with no statistically significant difference produced from either method. The variance between samples processed manually versus robotically was no greater than 0.012, while Levene's test of significance was 0.2, indicating no significant difference between mammosphere data produced manually or robotically. Through the screening of 989 FDA-approved drugs and a follow-up screen assessing the antineoplastic subgroup, we have identified three therapeutic compounds with the ability to modulate the breast cancer stem cell fraction in the triple-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, highlighting their potential usage as stem cell-specific adjuvant treatments.

  8. Development of a cell-based, high-throughput screening assay for ATM kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kexiao; Shelat, Anang A; Guy, R Kiplin; Kastan, Michael B

    2014-04-01

    The ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) protein kinase is a major regulator of cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), DNA lesions that can be caused by ionizing irradiation (IR), oxidative damage, or exposure to certain chemical agents. In response to DSBs, the ATM kinase is activated and subsequently phosphorylates numerous downstream substrates, including p53, Chk2, BRCA1, and KAP1, which affect processes such as cell cycle progression and DNA repair. Numerous studies have demonstrated that loss of ATM function results in enhanced sensitivity to ionizing irradiation in clinically relevant dose ranges, suggesting that ATM kinase is an attractive therapeutic target for enhancing tumor cell kill with radiotherapy. Previously identified small-molecule ATM kinase inhibitors, such as CP466722 and Ku55933, were identified using in vitro kinase assays carried out with recombinant ATM kinase isolated from mammalian cells. Since it has not been feasible to express full-length recombinant ATM in bacterial or baculovirus systems, a robust in vitro screening tool has been lacking. We have developed a cell-based assay that is robust, straightforward, and sensitive. Using this high-throughput assay, we screened more than 7000 compounds and discovered additional small molecules that inhibit the ATM kinase and further validated these hits by secondary assays.

  9. Robust ridge regression estimators for nonlinear models with applications to high throughput screening assay data.

    PubMed

    Lim, Changwon

    2015-03-30

    Nonlinear regression is often used to evaluate the toxicity of a chemical or a drug by fitting data from a dose-response study. Toxicologists and pharmacologists may draw a conclusion about whether a chemical is toxic by testing the significance of the estimated parameters. However, sometimes the null hypothesis cannot be rejected even though the fit is quite good. One possible reason for such cases is that the estimated standard errors of the parameter estimates are extremely large. In this paper, we propose robust ridge regression estimation procedures for nonlinear models to solve this problem. The asymptotic properties of the proposed estimators are investigated; in particular, their mean squared errors are derived. The performances of the proposed estimators are compared with several standard estimators using simulation studies. The proposed methodology is also illustrated using high throughput screening assay data obtained from the National Toxicology Program. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Auxotrophy-based High Throughput Screening assay for the identification of Bacillus subtilis stringent response inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Liis; Varik, Vallo; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Jimmy, Steffi; Lindberg, Stina; Tenson, Tanel; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2016-01-01

    The stringent response is a central adaptation mechanism that allows bacteria to adjust their growth and metabolism according to environmental conditions. The functionality of the stringent response is crucial for bacterial virulence, survival during host invasion as well as antibiotic resistance and tolerance. Therefore, specific inhibitors of the stringent response hold great promise as molecular tools for disarming and pacifying bacterial pathogens. By taking advantage of the valine amino acid auxotrophy of the Bacillus subtilis stringent response-deficient strain, we have set up a High Throughput Screening assay for the identification of stringent response inhibitors. By screening 17,500 compounds, we have identified a novel class of antibacterials based on the 4-(6-(phenoxy)alkyl)-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazole core. Detailed characterization of the hit compounds as well as two previously identified promising stringent response inhibitors – a ppGpp-mimic nucleotide Relacin and cationic peptide 1018 – showed that neither of the compounds is sufficiently specific, thus motivating future application of our screening assay to larger and more diverse molecular libraries. PMID:27775002

  11. High-Throughput Screening Assay for Laccase Engineering toward Lignosulfonate Valorization

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez-Escribano, David; de Salas, Felipe; Pardo, Isabel; ...

    2017-08-18

    Lignin valorization is a pending issue for the integrated conversion of lignocellulose in consumer goods. Lignosulfonates (LS) are the main technical lignins commercialized today. However, their molecular weight should be enlarged to meet application requirements as additives or dispersing agents. Oxidation of lignosulfonates with fungal oxidoreductases, such as laccases, can increase the molecular weight of lignosulfonates by the cross-linking of lignin phenols. To advance in this direction, we describe here the development of a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for the directed evolution of laccases, with lignosulfonate as substrate and the Folin-Ciocalteau reagent (FCR), to detect the decrease in phenolic contentmore » produced upon polymerization of lignosulfonate by the enzyme. Once the reaction conditions were adjusted to the 96-well-plate format, the enzyme for validating the assay was selected from a battery of high-redox-potential laccase variants functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae (the preferred host for the directed evolution of fungal oxidoreductases). The colorimetric response (absorbance at 760 nm) correlated with laccase activity secreted by the yeast. The HTS assay was reproducible (coefficient of variation (CV) = 15%) and sensitive enough to detect subtle differences in activity among yeast clones expressing a laccase mutant library obtained by error-prone PCR (epPCR). As a result, the method is therefore feasible for screening thousands of clones during the precise engineering of laccases toward valorization of lignosulfonates.« less

  12. High-Throughput Screening Assay for Laccase Engineering toward Lignosulfonate Valorization.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Escribano, David; de Salas, Felipe; Pardo, Isabel; Camarero, Susana

    2017-08-18

    Lignin valorization is a pending issue for the integrated conversion of lignocellulose in consumer goods. Lignosulfonates (LS) are the main technical lignins commercialized today. However, their molecular weight should be enlarged to meet application requirements as additives or dispersing agents. Oxidation of lignosulfonates with fungal oxidoreductases, such as laccases, can increase the molecular weight of lignosulfonates by the cross-linking of lignin phenols. To advance in this direction, we describe here the development of a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for the directed evolution of laccases, with lignosulfonate as substrate and the Folin-Ciocalteau reagent (FCR), to detect the decrease in phenolic content produced upon polymerization of lignosulfonate by the enzyme. Once the reaction conditions were adjusted to the 96-well-plate format, the enzyme for validating the assay was selected from a battery of high-redox-potential laccase variants functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae (the preferred host for the directed evolution of fungal oxidoreductases). The colorimetric response (absorbance at 760 nm) correlated with laccase activity secreted by the yeast. The HTS assay was reproducible (coefficient of variation (CV) = 15%) and sensitive enough to detect subtle differences in activity among yeast clones expressing a laccase mutant library obtained by error-prone PCR (epPCR). The method is therefore feasible for screening thousands of clones during the precise engineering of laccases toward valorization of lignosulfonates.

  13. Research resource: modulators of glucocorticoid receptor activity identified by a new high-throughput screening assay.

    PubMed

    Blackford, John A; Brimacombe, Kyle R; Dougherty, Edward J; Pradhan, Madhumita; Shen, Min; Li, Zhuyin; Auld, Douglas S; Chow, Carson C; Austin, Christopher P; Simons, S Stoney

    2014-07-01

    Glucocorticoid steroids affect almost every type of tissue and thus are widely used to treat a variety of human pathological conditions. However, the severity of numerous side effects limits the frequency and duration of glucocorticoid treatments. Of the numerous approaches to control off-target responses to glucocorticoids, small molecules and pharmaceuticals offer several advantages. Here we describe a new, extended high-throughput screen in intact cells to identify small molecule modulators of dexamethasone-induced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) transcriptional activity. The novelty of this assay is that it monitors changes in both GR maximal activity (A(max)) and EC(50) (the position of the dexamethasone dose-response curve). Upon screening 1280 chemicals, 10 with the greatest changes in the absolute value of A(max) or EC(50) were selected for further examination. Qualitatively identical behaviors for 60% to 90% of the chemicals were observed in a completely different system, suggesting that other systems will be similarly affected by these chemicals. Additional analysis of the 10 chemicals in a recently described competition assay determined their kinetically defined mechanism and site of action. Some chemicals had similar mechanisms of action despite divergent effects on the level of the GR-induced product. These combined assays offer a straightforward method of identifying numerous new pharmaceuticals that can alter GR transactivation in ways that could be clinically useful.

  14. A high-throughput screening assay to identify bacterial antagonists against Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-López, Alejandro Miguel; Cordero-Ramírez, Jesús Damián; Quiroz-Figueroa, Francisco Roberto; Maldonado-Mendoza, Ignacio Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    A high-throughput antagonistic assay was developed to screen for bacterial isolates capable of controlling the maize fungal phytopathogen Fusarium verticillioides. This assay combines a straightforward methodology, in which the fungus is challenged with bacterial isolates in liquid medium, with a novel approach that uses the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) coupled to a fluorophore (Alexa-Fluor® 488) under the commercial name of WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate. The assay is performed in a 96-well plate format, which reduces the required laboratory space and streamlines quantitation and automation of the process, making it fast and accurate. The basis of our assay is that fungal biomass can be assessed by WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate staining, which recognizes the chitin in the fungal cell wall and thus permits the identification of potential antagonistic bacteria that inhibit fungal growth. This principle was validated by chitin-competition binding assays against WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate; confocal laser microscopy confirmed that the fluorescent WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate binds to the chitin of the fungal cell wall. The majority of bacterial isolates did not bind to the WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate. Furthermore, including washing steps significantly reduced any bacterial staining to background levels, even in the rare cases where bacterial isolates were capable of binding to WGA. Confirmatory conventional agar plate antagonistic assays were also conducted to validate our technique. We are now successfully employing this large-scale antagonistic assay as a pre-screening step for potential fungal antagonists in extensive bacteria collections (on the order of thousands of isolates).

  15. Development of a central nervous system axonal myelination assay for high throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Lariosa-Willingham, Karen D; Rosler, Elen S; Tung, Jay S; Dugas, Jason C; Collins, Tassie L; Leonoudakis, Dmitri

    2016-04-22

    Regeneration of new myelin is impaired in persistent multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, leaving neurons unable to function properly and subject to further degeneration. Current MS therapies attempt to ameliorate autoimmune-mediated demyelination, but none directly promote the regeneration of lost and damaged myelin of the central nervous system (CNS). Development of new drugs that stimulate remyelination has been hampered by the inability to evaluate axonal myelination in a rapid CNS culture system. We established a high throughput cell-based assay to identify compounds that promote myelination. Culture methods were developed for initiating myelination in vitro using primary embryonic rat cortical cells. We developed an immunofluorescent phenotypic image analysis method to quantify the morphological alignment of myelin characteristic of the initiation of myelination. Using γ-secretase inhibitors as promoters of myelination, the optimal growth, time course and compound treatment conditions were established in a 96 well plate format. We have characterized the cortical myelination assay by evaluating the cellular composition of the cultures and expression of markers of differentiation over the time course of the assay. We have validated the assay scalability and consistency by screening the NIH clinical collection library of 727 compounds and identified ten compounds that promote myelination. Half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values for these compounds were determined to rank them according to potency. We have designed the first high capacity in vitro assay that assesses myelination of live axons. This assay will be ideal for screening large compound libraries to identify new drugs that stimulate myelination. Identification of agents capable of promoting the myelination of axons will likely lead to the development of new therapeutics for MS patients.

  16. Evaluating the Impact of Uncertainties in Clearance and Exposure When Prioritizing Chemicals Screened in High-Throughput Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity-testing paradigm has evolved to include high-throughput (HT) methods for addressing the increasing need to screen hundreds to thousands of chemicals rapidly. Approaches that involve in vitro screening assays, in silico predictions of exposure concentrations, and phar...

  17. Evaluating the Impact of Uncertainties in Clearance and Exposure When Prioritizing Chemicals Screened in High-Throughput Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity-testing paradigm has evolved to include high-throughput (HT) methods for addressing the increasing need to screen hundreds to thousands of chemicals rapidly. Approaches that involve in vitro screening assays, in silico predictions of exposure concentrations, and phar...

  18. High throughput screening informatics.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xuefeng Bruce

    2008-03-01

    High throughput screening (HTS), an industrial effort to leverage developments in the areas of modern robotics, data analysis and control software, liquid handling devices, and sensitive detectors, has played a pivotal role in the drug discovery process, allowing researchers to efficiently screen millions of compounds to identify tractable small molecule modulators of a given biological process or disease state and advance them into high quality leads. As HTS throughput has significantly increased the volume, complexity, and information content of datasets, lead discovery research demands a clear corporate strategy for scientific computing and subsequent establishment of robust enterprise-wide (usually global) informatics platforms, which enable complicated HTS work flows, facilitate HTS data mining, and drive effective decision-making. The purpose of this review is, from the data analysis and handling perspective, to examine key elements in HTS operations and some essential data-related activities supporting or interfacing the screening process, and outline properties that various enabling software should have. Additionally, some general advice for corporate managers with system procurement responsibilities is offered.

  19. Development of a facile method for high throughput screening with reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Goetz, A S; Andrews, J L; Littleton, T R; Ignar, D M

    2000-10-01

    This report describes a facile methodology for high throughput screening with stable mammalian cell reporter gene assays. We have adapted a 96-well adherent cell method to an assay in which cells propagated in suspension are dispensed into 96- or 384-well plates containing test compounds in 100% DMSO. The validation of a stable CHO cell line that expresses 6xCRE-luciferase for use as a reporter gene host cell line is described. The reporter gene, when expressed in this particular CHO cell line, appears to respond specifically to modulation of cAMP levels, thus the cell line is appropriate for screening and pharmacological analysis of Galpha(s)- and Galpha(i)-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors. The development of the new suspension cell assay in both 96- and 384-well formats was performed using a derivative of the CHO host reporter cell line that was stably transfected with human melanocortin-1 receptor. The response of this cell line to NDP-alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and forskolin was nearly identical between the adherent and suspension methods. The new method offers improvements in cost, throughput, cell culture effort, compound stability, accuracy of compound delivery, and hands-on time. The 384-well assay can be performed at high capacity in any laboratory without the use of expensive automation systems such that a single person can screen 100 plates per day with 3.5-4 h hands-on time. Although the system has been validated using Galpha(s)-coupled receptor-mediated activation of a cAMP response element, the method can be applied to other types of targets and/or transcriptional response elements.

  20. Development of a Novel Phosphorylated AMPK Protection Assay for High-Throughput Screening Using TR-FRET Assay.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yazhou; Wang, Yunjie; Xu, Yuan; Li, Jia; Liao, Hong; Zhang, Luyong; Pang, Tao

    2015-08-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a conserved heterotrimeric kinase, serves as an energy sensor maintaining energy balance at both cellular and whole-body levels and plays multiple beneficial roles in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, which makes AMPK an attractive target for diabetes and other metabolic disorders. To date, establishment of the physiologically relevant biochemical assay for AMPK has not been reported. Here we developed a phosphorylated AMPK protection assay based on a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assay, using the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) to dephosphorylate AMPK. The partially dephosphorylated AMPK by PP2A had lower activity than phosphorylated AMPK. This specific TR-FRET assay for AMPK was optimized in the 384-well format and produced similar EC(50) values for AMPK activators AMP and A769662 and a similar IC(50) value for AMPK inhibitor compound C, as previously reported. Under the optimized conditions, the assay Z' factor calculated over 160 data points has an optimal value greater than 0.5, which is suitable for high-throughput screening. In conclusion, this phosphorylated AMPK protection assay we developed is very robust, sensitive, and simple to perform and may be useful as a high-throughput assay for identifying AMPK activators with the ability of preventing activated AMPK against dephosphorylation by phosphatase in the physiological conditions.

  1. A High-Throughput Screening Assay of Ascorbate in Brain Samples

    PubMed Central

    Belikova, Natalia A.; Glumac, Ashley L.; Kapralova, Valentyna; Cheikhi, Amin; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Vagni, Vince A.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Kagan, Valerian E.; Bayîr, Hülya

    2011-01-01

    Ascorbate is a vital reductant/free radical scavenger in the CNS, whose content defines – to a large extent - the redox status and the antioxidant reserves. Quick, reliable and specific methods for its measurement in brain samples are highly desirable. We have developed a new high-throughput screening assay for measurements of ascorbate using a fluorescence plate-reader. This assay is based on a direct reaction of ascorbate with a nitroxide radical conjugated with a fluorogenic acridine moiety, 4-((9-acridinecarbonyl)-amino)-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (AC-TEMPO), yielding fluorescent hydroxylamine product (AC-TEMPO-H). The reaction was monitored over time using fluorescence and electron spin resonance techniques. The appearance of fluorescent AC-TEMPO-H was linear within the range of 3.75–75 μM AscH- in the sample (0.5–10 μM AscH- in the well). Assay was validated with high performance liquid chromatography method. The concentration of ascorbate in murine tissue samples, including brain samples after traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock, was measured. PMID:21855575

  2. BioAssay Ontology (BAO): a semantic description of bioassays and high-throughput screening results

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background High-throughput screening (HTS) is one of the main strategies to identify novel entry points for the development of small molecule chemical probes and drugs and is now commonly accessible to public sector research. Large amounts of data generated in HTS campaigns are submitted to public repositories such as PubChem, which is growing at an exponential rate. The diversity and quantity of available HTS assays and screening results pose enormous challenges to organizing, standardizing, integrating, and analyzing the datasets and thus to maximize the scientific and ultimately the public health impact of the huge investments made to implement public sector HTS capabilities. Novel approaches to organize, standardize and access HTS data are required to address these challenges. Results We developed the first ontology to describe HTS experiments and screening results using expressive description logic. The BioAssay Ontology (BAO) serves as a foundation for the standardization of HTS assays and data and as a semantic knowledge model. In this paper we show important examples of formalizing HTS domain knowledge and we point out the advantages of this approach. The ontology is available online at the NCBO bioportal http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/44531. Conclusions After a large manual curation effort, we loaded BAO-mapped data triples into a RDF database store and used a reasoner in several case studies to demonstrate the benefits of formalized domain knowledge representation in BAO. The examples illustrate semantic querying capabilities where BAO enables the retrieval of inferred search results that are relevant to a given query, but are not explicitly defined. BAO thus opens new functionality for annotating, querying, and analyzing HTS datasets and the potential for discovering new knowledge by means of inference. PMID:21702939

  3. High-Throughput/High-Content Screening Assays with Engineered Nanomaterials in ToxCast

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput and high-content screens are attractive approaches for prioritizing nanomaterial hazards and informing targeted testing due to the impracticality of using traditional toxicological testing on the large numbers and varieties of nanomaterials. The ToxCast program a...

  4. High-Throughput/High-Content Screening Assays with Engineered Nanomaterials in ToxCast

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput and high-content screens are attractive approaches for prioritizing nanomaterial hazards and informing targeted testing due to the impracticality of using traditional toxicological testing on the large numbers and varieties of nanomaterials. The ToxCast program a...

  5. Adapting High-Throughput Screening Methods and Assays for Biocontainment Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Tigabu, Bersabeh; White, E. Lucile; Bostwick, Robert; Tower, Nichole; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W.; Noah, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract High-throughput screening (HTS) has been integrated into the drug discovery process, and multiple assay formats have been widely used in many different disease areas but with limited focus on infectious agents. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of HTS campaigns using infectious wild-type pathogens rather than surrogates or biochemical pathogen-derived targets. Concurrently, enhanced emerging pathogen surveillance and increased human mobility have resulted in an increase in the emergence and dissemination of infectious human pathogens with serious public health, economic, and social implications at global levels. Adapting the HTS drug discovery process to biocontainment laboratories to develop new drugs for these previously uncharacterized and highly pathogenic agents is now feasible, but HTS at higher biosafety levels (BSL) presents a number of unique challenges. HTS has been conducted with multiple bacterial and viral pathogens at both BSL-2 and BSL-3, and pilot screens have recently been extended to BSL-4 environments for both Nipah and Ebola viruses. These recent successful efforts demonstrate that HTS can be safely conducted at the highest levels of biological containment. This review outlines the specific issues that must be considered in the execution of an HTS drug discovery program for high-containment pathogens. We present an overview of the requirements for HTS in high-level biocontainment laboratories. PMID:25710545

  6. Adapting high-throughput screening methods and assays for biocontainment laboratories.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Tigabu, Bersabeh; White, E Lucile; Bostwick, Robert; Tower, Nichole; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W; Noah, James W

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has been integrated into the drug discovery process, and multiple assay formats have been widely used in many different disease areas but with limited focus on infectious agents. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of HTS campaigns using infectious wild-type pathogens rather than surrogates or biochemical pathogen-derived targets. Concurrently, enhanced emerging pathogen surveillance and increased human mobility have resulted in an increase in the emergence and dissemination of infectious human pathogens with serious public health, economic, and social implications at global levels. Adapting the HTS drug discovery process to biocontainment laboratories to develop new drugs for these previously uncharacterized and highly pathogenic agents is now feasible, but HTS at higher biosafety levels (BSL) presents a number of unique challenges. HTS has been conducted with multiple bacterial and viral pathogens at both BSL-2 and BSL-3, and pilot screens have recently been extended to BSL-4 environments for both Nipah and Ebola viruses. These recent successful efforts demonstrate that HTS can be safely conducted at the highest levels of biological containment. This review outlines the specific issues that must be considered in the execution of an HTS drug discovery program for high-containment pathogens. We present an overview of the requirements for HTS in high-level biocontainment laboratories.

  7. A high-throughput in vivo micronucleus assay for genome instability screening in mice

    PubMed Central

    Balmus, Gabriel; Karp, Natasha A; Ng, Bee Ling; Jackson, Stephen P; Adams, David J; McIntyre, Rebecca E

    2016-01-01

    We describe a sensitive, robust, high-throughput method for quantifying the formation of micronuclei, markers of genome instability, in mouse erythrocytes. Micronuclei are whole chromosomes or chromosome segments that have been separated from the nucleus. Other methods of detection rely on labour-intensive, microscopy-based techniques. Here, we describe a 2-d, 96-well plate-based flow cytometric method of micronucleus scoring that is simple enough for a research technician experienced in flow cytometry to perform. The assay detects low levels of genome instability that cannot be readily identified by classic phenotyping, using 25 μl of blood. By using this assay, we have screened >10,000 blood samples and discovered novel genes that contribute to vertebrate genome maintenance, as well as novel disease models and mechanisms of genome instability disorders. We discuss experimental design considerations, including statistical power calculation, we provide troubleshooting tips, and we discuss factors that contribute to a false-positive increase in the number of micronucleated red blood cells and to experimental variability. PMID:25551665

  8. Using adverse outcome pathway analysis to guide development of high-throughput screening assays for thyroid-disruptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using Adverse Outcome Pathway Analysis to Guide Development of High-Throughput Screening Assays for Thyroid-Disruptors Katie B. Paul1,2, Joan M. Hedge2, Daniel M. Rotroff4, Kevin M. Crofton4, Michael W. Hornung3, Steven O. Simmons2 1Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Post...

  9. Using adverse outcome pathway analysis to guide development of high-throughput screening assays for thyroid-disruptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using Adverse Outcome Pathway Analysis to Guide Development of High-Throughput Screening Assays for Thyroid-Disruptors Katie B. Paul1,2, Joan M. Hedge2, Daniel M. Rotroff4, Kevin M. Crofton4, Michael W. Hornung3, Steven O. Simmons2 1Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Post...

  10. High-throughput clone screening followed by protein expression cross-check: A visual assay platform.

    PubMed

    Bose, Partha Pratim; Kumar, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    In high-throughput biotechnology and structural biology, molecular cloning is an essential prerequisite for attaining high yields of recombinant protein. However, a rapid, cost-effective, easy clone screening protocol is still required to identify colonies with desired insert along with a cross check method to certify the expression of the desired protein as the end product. We report an easy, fast, sensitive and cheap visual clone screening and protein expression cross check protocol employing gold nanoparticle based plasmonic detection phenomenon. This is a non-gel, non-PCR based visual detection technique, which can be used as simultaneous high throughput clone screening followed by the determination of expression of desired protein.

  11. A High Throughput Screening Assay System for the Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of gsp

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Nisan; Hu, Xin; Chen, Catherine Z.; Mathews Griner, Lesley A.; Zheng, Wei; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Marugan, Juan J.; Southall, Noel; Neumann, Susanne; Northup, John K.; Ferrer, Marc; Collins, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Mis-sense mutations in the α-subunit of the G-protein, Gsα, cause fibrous dysplasia of bone/McCune-Albright syndrome. The biochemical outcome of these mutations is constitutively active Gsα and increased levels of cAMP. The aim of this study was to develop an assay system that would allow the identification of small molecule inhibitors specific for the mutant Gsα protein, the so-called gsp oncogene. Commercially available Chinese hamster ovary cells were stably transfected with either wild-type (WT) or mutant Gsα proteins (R201C and R201H). Stable cell lines with equivalent transfected Gsα protein expression that had relatively lower (WT) or higher (R201C and R201H) cAMP levels were generated. These cell lines were used to develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)–based cAMP assay in 1536-well microplate format for high throughput screening of small molecule libraries. A small molecule library of 343,768 compounds was screened to identify modulators of gsp activity. A total of 1,356 compounds with inhibitory activity were initially identified and reconfirmed when tested in concentration dose responses. Six hundred eighty-six molecules were selected for further analysis after removing cytotoxic compounds and those that were active in forskolin-induced WT cells. These molecules were grouped by potency, efficacy, and structural similarities to yield 22 clusters with more than 5 of structurally similar members and 144 singleton molecules. Seven chemotypes of the major clusters were identified for further testing and analyses. PMID:24667240

  12. A high throughput screening assay system for the identification of small molecule inhibitors of gsp.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Nisan; Hu, Xin; Chen, Catherine Z; Mathews Griner, Lesley A; Zheng, Wei; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P; Marugan, Juan J; Southall, Noel; Neumann, Susanne; Northup, John K; Ferrer, Marc; Collins, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    Mis-sense mutations in the α-subunit of the G-protein, Gsα, cause fibrous dysplasia of bone/McCune-Albright syndrome. The biochemical outcome of these mutations is constitutively active Gsα and increased levels of cAMP. The aim of this study was to develop an assay system that would allow the identification of small molecule inhibitors specific for the mutant Gsα protein, the so-called gsp oncogene. Commercially available Chinese hamster ovary cells were stably transfected with either wild-type (WT) or mutant Gsα proteins (R201C and R201H). Stable cell lines with equivalent transfected Gsα protein expression that had relatively lower (WT) or higher (R201C and R201H) cAMP levels were generated. These cell lines were used to develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP assay in 1536-well microplate format for high throughput screening of small molecule libraries. A small molecule library of 343,768 compounds was screened to identify modulators of gsp activity. A total of 1,356 compounds with inhibitory activity were initially identified and reconfirmed when tested in concentration dose responses. Six hundred eighty-six molecules were selected for further analysis after removing cytotoxic compounds and those that were active in forskolin-induced WT cells. These molecules were grouped by potency, efficacy, and structural similarities to yield 22 clusters with more than 5 of structurally similar members and 144 singleton molecules. Seven chemotypes of the major clusters were identified for further testing and analyses.

  13. Alternative to the soft-agar assay that permits high-throughput drug and genetic screens for cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Rotem, Asaf; Janzer, Andreas; Izar, Benjamin; Ji, Zhe; Doench, John G.; Garraway, Levi A.; Struhl, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Colony formation in soft agar is the gold-standard assay for cellular transformation in vitro, but it is unsuited for high-throughput screening. Here, we describe an assay for cellular transformation that involves growth in low attachment (GILA) conditions and is strongly correlated with the soft-agar assay. Using GILA, we describe high-throughput screens for drugs and genes that selectively inhibit or increase transformation, but not proliferation. Such molecules are unlikely to be found through conventional drug screening, and they include kinase inhibitors and drugs for noncancer diseases. In addition to known oncogenes, the genetic screen identifies genes that contribute to cellular transformation. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of Food and Drug Administration-approved noncancer drugs to selectively kill ovarian cancer cells derived from patients with chemotherapy-resistant disease, suggesting this approach may provide useful information for personalized cancer treatment. PMID:25902495

  14. Development and Optimization of a Novel 384-Well Anti-Malarial Imaging Assay Validated for High-Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M.

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing occurrence of drug resistance in the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, there is a great need for new and novel anti-malarial drugs. We have developed a 384-well, high-throughput imaging assay for the detection of new anti-malarial compounds, which was initially validated by screening a marine natural product library, and subsequently used to screen more than 3 million data points from a variety of compound sources. Founded on another fluorescence-based P. falciparum growth inhibition assay, the DNA-intercalating dye 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, was used to monitor changes in parasite number. Fluorescent images were acquired on the PerkinElmer Opera High Throughput confocal imaging system and analyzed with a spot detection algorithm using the Acapella data processing software. Further optimization of this assay sought to increase throughput, assay stability, and compatibility with our high-throughput screening equipment platforms. The assay typically yielded Z'-factor values of 0.5–0.6, with signal-to-noise ratios of 12. PMID:22232455

  15. Development and optimization of a novel 384-well anti-malarial imaging assay validated for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing occurrence of drug resistance in the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, there is a great need for new and novel anti-malarial drugs. We have developed a 384-well, high-throughput imaging assay for the detection of new anti-malarial compounds, which was initially validated by screening a marine natural product library, and subsequently used to screen more than 3 million data points from a variety of compound sources. Founded on another fluorescence-based P. falciparum growth inhibition assay, the DNA-intercalating dye 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, was used to monitor changes in parasite number. Fluorescent images were acquired on the PerkinElmer Opera High Throughput confocal imaging system and analyzed with a spot detection algorithm using the Acapella data processing software. Further optimization of this assay sought to increase throughput, assay stability, and compatibility with our high-throughput screening equipment platforms. The assay typically yielded Z'-factor values of 0.5-0.6, with signal-to-noise ratios of 12.

  16. Quantitative digital image analysis of chromogenic assays for high throughput screening of alpha-amylase mutant libraries.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Manoharan; Priyadharshini, Ramachandran; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2009-08-01

    An image analysis-based method for high throughput screening of an alpha-amylase mutant library using chromogenic assays was developed. Assays were performed in microplates and high resolution images of the assay plates were read using the Virtual Microplate Reader (VMR) script to quantify the concentration of the chromogen. This method is fast and sensitive in quantifying 0.025-0.3 mg starch/ml as well as 0.05-0.75 mg glucose/ml. It was also an effective screening method for improved alpha-amylase activity with a coefficient of variance of 18%.

  17. One-step seeding of neural stem cells with vitronectin-supplemented medium for high throughput screening assays

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Sheng; Li, Rong; Long, Yan; Titus, Steve; Zhao, Jinghua; Huang, Ruili; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Human neuronal cells differentiated from induced pluripotent cells have emerged as a new model system for the study of disease pathophysiology and evaluation of drug efficacy. Differentiated neuronal cells are more similar in genetics and biological content to the human brain cells than other animal disease models. However, culture of neuronal cells in assay plates requires a labor-intensive procedure of plate pre-coating, hampering its applications in high throughput screening (HTS). We developed a simplified method with one-step seeding of neural stem cells in assay plates by supplementing the medium with a recombinant human vitronectin (VTN), thus avoiding plate pre-coating. Robust results were obtained from cell viability, calcium response, and neurite outgrowth assays using this new method. Our data demonstrate that this approach greatly simplifies high throughput assays using neuronal cells differentiated from human stem cells for translational research. PMID:27647668

  18. High-throughput screening in niche-based assay identifies compounds to target preleukemic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gerby, Bastien; Veiga, Diogo F.T.; Krosl, Jana; Nourreddine, Sami; Ouellette, Julianne; Haman, André; Lavoie, Geneviève; Fares, Iman; Tremblay, Mathieu; Litalien, Véronique; Ottoni, Elizabeth; Geoffrion, Dominique; Maddox, Paul S.; Chagraoui, Jalila; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy; Kwok, Benjamin H.; Roux, Philippe P.

    2016-01-01

    Current chemotherapies for T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) efficiently reduce tumor mass. Nonetheless, disease relapse attributed to survival of preleukemic stem cells (pre-LSCs) is associated with poor prognosis. Herein, we provide direct evidence that pre-LSCs are much less chemosensitive to existing chemotherapy drugs than leukemic blasts because of a distinctive lower proliferative state. Improving therapies for T-ALL requires the development of strategies to target pre-LSCs that are absolutely dependent on their microenvironment. Therefore, we designed a robust protocol for high-throughput screening of compounds that target primary pre-LSCs maintained in a niche-like environment, on stromal cells that were engineered for optimal NOTCH1 activation. The multiparametric readout takes into account the intrinsic complexity of primary cells in order to specifically monitor pre-LSCs, which were induced here by the SCL/TAL1 and LMO1 oncogenes. We screened a targeted library of compounds and determined that the estrogen derivative 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME2) disrupted both cell-autonomous and non–cell-autonomous pathways. Specifically, 2-ME2 abrogated pre-LSC viability and self-renewal activity in vivo by inhibiting translation of MYC, a downstream effector of NOTCH1, and preventing SCL/TAL1 activity. In contrast, normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells remained functional. These results illustrate how recapitulating tissue-like properties of primary cells in high-throughput screening is a promising avenue for innovation in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27797342

  19. High-throughput screening in niche-based assay identifies compounds to target preleukemic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gerby, Bastien; Veiga, Diogo F T; Krosl, Jana; Nourreddine, Sami; Ouellette, Julianne; Haman, André; Lavoie, Geneviève; Fares, Iman; Tremblay, Mathieu; Litalien, Véronique; Ottoni, Elizabeth; Kosic, Milena; Geoffrion, Dominique; Ryan, Joël; Maddox, Paul S; Chagraoui, Jalila; Marinier, Anne; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy; Kwok, Benjamin H; Roux, Philippe P; Hoang, Trang

    2016-12-01

    Current chemotherapies for T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) efficiently reduce tumor mass. Nonetheless, disease relapse attributed to survival of preleukemic stem cells (pre-LSCs) is associated with poor prognosis. Herein, we provide direct evidence that pre-LSCs are much less chemosensitive to existing chemotherapy drugs than leukemic blasts because of a distinctive lower proliferative state. Improving therapies for T-ALL requires the development of strategies to target pre-LSCs that are absolutely dependent on their microenvironment. Therefore, we designed a robust protocol for high-throughput screening of compounds that target primary pre-LSCs maintained in a niche-like environment, on stromal cells that were engineered for optimal NOTCH1 activation. The multiparametric readout takes into account the intrinsic complexity of primary cells in order to specifically monitor pre-LSCs, which were induced here by the SCL/TAL1 and LMO1 oncogenes. We screened a targeted library of compounds and determined that the estrogen derivative 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME2) disrupted both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous pathways. Specifically, 2-ME2 abrogated pre-LSC viability and self-renewal activity in vivo by inhibiting translation of MYC, a downstream effector of NOTCH1, and preventing SCL/TAL1 activity. In contrast, normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells remained functional. These results illustrate how recapitulating tissue-like properties of primary cells in high-throughput screening is a promising avenue for innovation in cancer chemotherapy.

  20. High Throughput Screening: Developed Techniques for Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Activities Assay.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Mendivil, Neydeli; Calixto-Romo, María de Los Angeles; Amaya-Delgado, Lorena; Casas-Godoy, Leticia; Sandoval, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    High throughput screening (HTS) is a powerful tool in biotechnology. The search for new or improved enzymes with suitable biochemical properties for industrial processes, has resulted in high efforts and research activities to develop new methodologies for activity screening. In this context, important advances have been achieved for the screening of cellulases and xylanases activities from wild and recombinant microorganisms, and from sequence databases. These enzymes have a wide range of industrial applications, including food, animal feed, textile, pulp and paper industries and detergents. Cellulases and xylanases along with pectinases, represent 20% of the world enzyme market. Recently, cellulases and xylanases have been used on fermentable sugars recovered from lignocellulosic biomass for second-generation biorefineries, aimed to produce chemical and biofuel platforms. As a result, HTS methods for biomass or biomass-degrading enzymes are gaining importance. This article presents evidence of the studies carried out for HTS of cellulase and xylanase activities.

  1. Binding Rate Screen - a high-throughput assay in soluble lysate for prioritizing protein expression constructs.

    PubMed

    Tian-Yu, Jiamin; Licht, Stuart; Pardee, Gwynn; Bhat, Arun; Cao, Ying; Gao, Wei; Sangalang, Emma; Zaror, Isabel

    2010-04-15

    Identification of constructs suitable for the recombinant protein production pipeline is a bottleneck for structural genomics efforts, as most methods require purified proteins and/or are labor-intensive. Here, we present a novel high-throughput approach, Binding Rate Screen, that can alleviate this bottleneck by screening expression constructs in crude soluble lysate. This functional screen utilizes the frequently employed hexahistidine (His(6)) tag as a reporter, and measures its binding rate to an affinity matrix as a metric to reflect aggregation, concentration, and purifiability of the target protein. The constructs with the highest binding rates also exhibit high expression of soluble monomeric protein as judged by analytical size-exclusion chromatography. Constructs expressing variations of the target protein can be prioritized on a time scale of minutes, which is at least 10-100 times faster than any other technologies currently available.

  2. Fluorescence detection-based functional assay for high-throughput screening for MraY.

    PubMed

    Stachyra, Thérèse; Dini, Christophe; Ferrari, Paul; Bouhss, Ahmed; van Heijenoort, Jean; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Blanot, Didier; Biton, Jacques; Le Beller, Dominique

    2004-03-01

    We have developed a novel assay specific to MraY, which catalyzes the first membrane step in the biosynthesis of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan. This was accomplished by using UDP-MurNAc-N(epsilon)-dansylpentapeptide, a fluorescent derivative of the MraY nucleotide substrate, and a partially purified preparation of MraY solubilized from membranes of an Escherichia coli overproducing strain. Two versions of the assay were developed, one consisting of the high-pressure liquid chromatography separation of the substrate and product (dansylated lipid I) and the other, without separation and adapted to the high-throughput format, taking advantage of the different fluorescence properties of the nucleotide and lipid I in the reaction medium. The latter assay was validated with a set of natural and synthetic MraY inhibitors.

  3. Fluorescence Detection-Based Functional Assay for High-Throughput Screening for MraY

    PubMed Central

    Stachyra, Thérèse; Dini, Christophe; Ferrari, Paul; Bouhss, Ahmed; van Heijenoort, Jean; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Blanot, Didier; Biton, Jacques; Le Beller, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a novel assay specific to MraY, which catalyzes the first membrane step in the biosynthesis of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan. This was accomplished by using UDP-MurNAc-Nɛ-dansylpentapeptide, a fluorescent derivative of the MraY nucleotide substrate, and a partially purified preparation of MraY solubilized from membranes of an Escherichia coli overproducing strain. Two versions of the assay were developed, one consisting of the high-pressure liquid chromatography separation of the substrate and product (dansylated lipid I) and the other, without separation and adapted to the high-throughput format, taking advantage of the different fluorescence properties of the nucleotide and lipid I in the reaction medium. The latter assay was validated with a set of natural and synthetic MraY inhibitors. PMID:14982781

  4. Development and Implementation of a High-Throughput Compound Screening Assay for Targeting Disrupted ER Calcium Homeostasis in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Honarnejad, Kamran; Daschner, Alexander; Giese, Armin; Zall, Andrea; Schmidt, Boris; Szybinska, Aleksandra; Kuznicki, Jacek; Herms, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Disrupted intracellular calcium homeostasis is believed to occur early in the cascade of events leading to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Particularly familial AD mutations linked to Presenilins result in exaggerated agonist-evoked calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here we report the development of a fully automated high-throughput calcium imaging assay utilizing a genetically-encoded FRET-based calcium indicator at single cell resolution for compound screening. The established high-throughput screening assay offers several advantages over conventional high-throughput calcium imaging technologies. We employed this assay for drug discovery in AD by screening compound libraries consisting of over 20,000 small molecules followed by structure-activity-relationship analysis. This led to the identification of Bepridil, a calcium channel antagonist drug in addition to four further lead structures capable of normalizing the potentiated FAD-PS1-induced calcium release from ER. Interestingly, it has recently been reported that Bepridil can reduce Aβ production by lowering BACE1 activity. Indeed, we also detected lowered Aβ, increased sAPPα and decreased sAPPβ fragment levels upon Bepridil treatment. The latter findings suggest that Bepridil may provide a multifactorial therapeutic modality for AD by simultaneously addressing multiple aspects of the disease. PMID:24260442

  5. Large-scale drug screening against Babesia divergens parasite using a fluorescence-based high-throughput screening assay.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Mohamed Abdo; El-Sayed, Shimaa Abd El-Salam; AbouLaila, Mahmoud; Tuvshintulga, Bumduuren; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2016-08-30

    The validation of a fluorescence-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for determining the efficacies of large chemical libraries against Babesia divergens (bovine strain) in in vitro cultures was evaluated in this study. Hematocrits (HCTs) of 2.5%, 5%, and 10% were used for the in vitro culture at 1% parasitemia without daily replacement of the medium. Linearity and HTS assay results revealed that the best HCTs were 5% and 10%. The obtained IC50 values of diminazene aceturate, either by fluorescence-based HTS assay with and without daily replacement of medium or by fluorescence- and microscopy-based methods, did not differ significantly at 5% HCT. Actinonin and chloroquine diphosphate were the most effective drugs against the in vitro growth of B. divergens, followed by pyronaridine tetraphosphate- and luteolin-treated cultures. On contrary, tetracycline hydrochloride and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate from green tea exhibited poor activity as compared with diminazene aceturate (positive control drug). The data indicated that 5% HCT without daily replacement of the culture medium mixed with bovine serum in vitro using a fluorescence-based HTS assay creates the best conditions for large-scale drug screening against B. divergens that infect cattle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Screening for lysine-specific demethylase-1 inhibitors using a label-free high-throughput mass spectrometry assay.

    PubMed

    Plant, Matthew; Dineen, Tom; Cheng, Alan; Long, Alexander M; Chen, Hao; Morgenstern, Kurt A

    2011-12-15

    Posttranslational modifications on the N terminus of histone H3 act in a combinatorial fashion to control epigenetic responses to extracellular stimuli. Lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) represents an emerging epigenetic target class for the discovery of novel antitumor therapies. In this study, a high-throughput mass spectrometry (HTMS) assay was developed to measure LSD1-catalyzed demethylation of lysine-4 on several H3 substrates. The assay leverages RapidFire chromatography in line with a triple stage quadrupole detection method to measure multiple LSD1 substrate and product reactions from an assay well. This approach minimizes artifacts from fluorescence interference and eliminates the need for antibody specificity to methylated lysines. The assay was robust in a high-throughput screen of a focused library consisting of more than 56,000 unique chemical scaffolds with a median Z' of 0.76. Validated hits from the primary screen were followed up by successive rounds of virtual and HTMS screening to mine for related structures in a parent library consisting of millions of compounds. The screen resulted in the rapid discovery of multiple chemical classes amenable to medicinal chemistry optimization. This assay was further developed into a generic platform capable of rapidly screening epigenetic targets that use the N-terminal tail of histone H3 as a substrate.

  7. A high-throughput fluorescence-based assay for Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Iván; Lafuente, María José; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Cid, Concepción

    2016-08-01

    Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) is a mitochondrial membrane-associated flavoenzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. DHODH is a validated target for malaria, and DSM265, a potent inhibitor, is currently in clinical trials. The enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate using flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as cofactor in the first half of the reaction. Reoxidation of FMN to regenerate the active enzyme is mediated by ubiquinone (CoQD), which is the physiological final electron acceptor and second substrate of the reaction. We have developed a fluorescence-based high-throughput enzymatic assay to find DHODH inhibitors. In this assay, the CoQD has been replaced by a redox-sensitive fluorogenic dye, resazurin, which changes to a fluorescent state on reduction to resorufin. Remarkably, the assay sensitivity to find competitive inhibitors of the second substrate is higher than that reported for the standard colorimetric assay. It is amenable to 1536-well plates with Z' values close to 0.8. The fact that the human enzyme can also be assayed in the same format opens additional applications of this assay to the discovery of inhibitors to treat cancer, transplant rejection, autoimmune diseases, and other diseases mediated by rapid cellular growth.

  8. Development of a High-Throughput Screening Assay to Identify Inhibitors of the Lipid Kinase PIP5K1C.

    PubMed

    Wright, Brittany D; Simpson, Catherine; Stashko, Michael; Kireev, Dmitri; Hull-Ryde, Emily A; Zylka, Mark J; Janzen, William P

    2015-06-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5Ks) regulate a variety of cellular processes, including signaling through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), endocytosis, exocytosis, and cell migration. These lipid kinases synthesize phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) from phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P]. Because small-molecule inhibitors of these lipid kinases did not exist, molecular and genetic approaches were predominantly used to study PIP5K1 regulation of these cellular processes. Moreover, standard radioisotope-based lipid kinase assays cannot be easily adapted for high-throughput screening. Here, we report a novel, high-throughput, microfluidic mobility shift assay to identify inhibitors of PIP5K1C. This assay uses fluorescently labeled phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate as the substrate and recombinant human PIP5K1C. Our assay exhibited high reproducibility, had a calculated adenosine triphosphate Michaelis constant (Km) of 15 µM, performed with z' values >0.7, and was used to screen a kinase-focused library of ~4700 compounds. From this screen, we identified several potent inhibitors of PIP5K1C, including UNC3230, a compound that we recently found can reduce nociceptive sensitization in animal models of chronic pain. This novel assay will allow continued drug discovery efforts for PIP5K1C and can be adapted easily to screen additional lipid kinases.

  9. Development of a high-throughput screening assay to identify inhibitors of the lipid kinase PIP5K1C

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Brittany D.; Simpson, Catherine; Stashko, Michael; Kireev, Dmitri; Hull-Ryde, Emily A.; Zylka, Mark J.; Janzen, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5Ks) regulate a variety of cellular processes including signaling through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), endocytosis, exocytosis, and cell migration. These lipid kinases synthesize phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) from phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P]. Since small molecule inhibitors of these lipid kinases did not exist, molecular and genetic approaches were predominantly used to study PIP5K1 regulation of these cellular processes. Moreover, standard radioisotope-based lipid kinase assays cannot be easily adapted for high-throughput screening. Here, we report a novel high-throughput microfluidic mobility shift assay to identify inhibitors of PIP5K1C. This assay utilizes fluorescently labeled phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate as the substrate and recombinant human PIP5K1C. Our assay exhibited high reproducibility, had a calculated ATP Km of 15 µM, performed with z’ values >0.7, and was used to screen a kinase-focused library of ~4,700 compounds. From this screen, we identified several potent inhibitors of PIP5K1C, including UNC3230, a compound that we recently found can reduce nociceptive sensitization in animal models of chronic pain. This novel assay will allow continued drug discovery efforts for PIP5K1C and can be easily adapted to screen additional lipid kinases. PMID:25534829

  10. Miniaturization of ultra-high-throughput screening assays into 1536-well format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, James R.; McCoy, Paul M.; Walker, Tiffany; Dunn, David A.

    2002-06-01

    Assay miniaturization and the implementation of high-density 1536 micro-well screening increases the speed and efficiency of screening and lead discovery. To serve this need, a platform of miniaturizable assay technologies has been assembled for specific biological targets. This platform will enable initiation and completion of uHTS screens in a straightforward and expeditious manner. For kinases, we have examined assays using several technologies including DELFIA, HTR-FRET, FP, EFC, and FMAT. This presentation compares these technologies for the measurement of typical tyrosine kinase activity in 1536-well format. Quality parameters such as assay reproducibility, signal: background ratio, Z factor, and assay sensitivity were calculated and compared. Additionally, the relative merits of each of these technologies were assessed in terms of assay miniaturization, ease of development, ultimate screening capability, efficiency, and cost.

  11. Bioluminescent Assays for Glucose and Glutamine Metabolism: High-Throughput Screening for Changes in Extracellular and Intracellular Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Leippe, Donna; Sobol, Mary; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Cali, James J; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2017-04-01

    Cancer cell metabolism is a complex, dynamic network of regulated pathways. Interrogation of this network would benefit from rapid, sensitive techniques that are adaptable to high-throughput formats, facilitating novel compound screening. This requires assays that have minimal sample preparation and are adaptable to lower-volume 384-well formats and automation. Here we describe bioluminescent glucose, lactate, glutamine, and glutamate detection assays that are well suited for high-throughput analysis of two major metabolic pathways in cancer cells: glycolysis and glutaminolysis. The sensitivity (1-5 pmol/sample), broad linear range (0.1-100 µM), and wide dynamic range (>100-fold) are advantageous for measuring both extracellular and intracellular metabolites. Importantly, the assays incorporate rapid inactivation of endogenous enzymes, eliminating deproteinization steps required by other methods. Using ovarian cancer cell lines as a model system, the assays were used to monitor changes in glucose and glutamine consumption and lactate and glutamate secretion over time. Homogeneous formats of the lactate and glutamate assays were robust (Z' = 0.6-0.9) and could be multiplexed with a real-time viability assay to generate internally controlled data. Screening a small-compound library with these assays resulted in the identification of both inhibitors and activators of lactate and glutamate production.

  12. A High-Throughput Screening Assay to Detect Thyroperoxidase Inhibitors (Teratology Society)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of the Endocrine Disruption Screening Program (EDSP21), the US EPA ToxCast program is developing assays to enable screening for chemicals that may disrupt thyroid hormone synthesis. Thyroperoxidase (TPO) is critical for TH synthesis and is a known target of thyroid-dis...

  13. Sandwich ELISA Microarrays: Generating Reliable and Reproducible Assays for High-Throughput Screens

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Rachel M.; Varnum, Susan M.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2009-05-11

    The sandwich ELISA microarray is a powerful screening tool in biomarker discovery and validation due to its ability to simultaneously probe for multiple proteins in a miniaturized assay. The technical challenges of generating and processing the arrays are numerous. However, careful attention to possible pitfalls in the development of your antibody microarray assay can overcome these challenges. In this chapter, we describe in detail the steps that are involved in generating a reliable and reproducible sandwich ELISA microarray assay.

  14. A high-throughput screening assay for assessing the viability of Cryptococcus neoformans under nutrient starvation conditions.

    PubMed

    Dehdashti, Seameen J; Abbott, Jennifer; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; McKew, John C; Williamson, Peter R; Zheng, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans causes an estimated 600,000 AIDS-related deaths annually that occur primarily in resource-limited countries. Fluconazole and amphotericin B are currently available for the treatment of cryptococcal-related infections. However, fluconazole has limited clinical efficacy and amphotericin B requires intravenous infusion and is associated with high renal toxicity. Therefore, there is an unmet need for a new orally administrable anti-cryptococcal drug. We have developed a high-throughput screening assay for the measurement of C. neoformans viability in 1,536-well plate format. The signal-to-basal ratio of the ATP content assay was 21.9 fold with a coefficient of variation and Z' factor of 7.1% and 0.76, respectively. A pilot screen of 1,280 known compounds against the wild-type C. neoformans (strain H99) led to the identification of four active compounds including niclosamide, malonoben, 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime, and 5-[(4-ethylphenyl)methylene]-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone. These compounds were further tested against nine clinical isolates of C. neoformans, and their fungicidal activities were confirmed. The results demonstrate that this miniaturized C. neoformans assay is advantageous for the high-throughput screening of large compound collections to identify lead compounds for new anti-cryptococcal drug development.

  15. Integrated Model of Chemical Perturbations of a Biological PathwayUsing 18 In Vitro High Throughput Screening Assays for the Estrogen Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    We demonstrate a computational network model that integrates 18 in vitro, high-throughput screening assays measuring estrogen receptor (ER) binding, dimerization, chromatin binding, transcriptional activation and ER-dependent cell proliferation. The network model uses activity pa...

  16. Integrated Model of Chemical Perturbations of a Biological PathwayUsing 18 In Vitro High Throughput Screening Assays for the Estrogen Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    We demonstrate a computational network model that integrates 18 in vitro, high-throughput screening assays measuring estrogen receptor (ER) binding, dimerization, chromatin binding, transcriptional activation and ER-dependent cell proliferation. The network model uses activity pa...

  17. Development of a scintillation proximity binding assay for high-throughput screening of hematopoietic prostaglandin D2 synthase.

    PubMed

    Meleza, Cesar; Thomasson, Bobbie; Ramachandran, Chidambaram; O'Neill, Jason W; Michelsen, Klaus; Lo, Mei-Chu

    2016-10-15

    Prostaglandin D2 synthase (PGDS) catalyzes the isomerization of prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) to prostaglandin D2 (PGD2). PGD2 produced by hematopoietic prostaglandin D2 synthase (H-PGDS) in mast cells and Th2 cells is proposed to be a mediator of allergic and inflammatory responses. Consequently, inhibitors of H-PGDS represent potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Due to the instability of the PGDS substrate PGH2, an in-vitro enzymatic assay is not feasible for large-scale screening of H-PGDS inhibitors. Herein, we report the development of a competition binding assay amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS) in a scintillation proximity assay (SPA) format. This assay was used to screen an in-house compound library of approximately 280,000 compounds for novel H-PGDS inhibitors. The hit rate of the H-PGDS primary screen was found to be 4%. This high hit rate suggests that the active site of H-PGDS can accommodate a large diversity of chemical scaffolds. For hit prioritization, these initial hits were rescreened at a lower concentration in SPA and tested in the LAD2 cell assay. 116 compounds were active in both assays with IC50s ranging from 6 to 807 nM in SPA and 82 nM to 10 μM in the LAD2 cell assay.

  18. Growth-Based Bacterial Viability Assay for Interference-Free and High-Throughput Toxicity Screening of Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tian A; Nguyen, Thu Ha Thi; Hudson-Smith, Natalie V; Clement, Peter L; Forester, Dona-Carla; Frew, Hilena; Hang, Mimi N; Murphy, Catherine J; Hamers, Robert J; Feng, Z Vivian; Haynes, Christy L

    2017-02-07

    Current high-throughput approaches evaluating toxicity of chemical agents toward bacteria typically rely on optical assays, such as luminescence and absorbance, to probe the viability of the bacteria. However, when applied to toxicity induced by nanomaterials, scattering and absorbance from the nanomaterials act as interferences that complicate quantitative analysis. Herein, we describe a bacterial viability assay that is free of optical interference from nanomaterials and can be performed in a high-throughput format on 96-well plates. In this assay, bacteria were exposed to various materials and then diluted by a large factor into fresh growth medium. The large dilution ensured minimal optical interference from the nanomaterial when reading optical density, and the residue left from the exposure mixture after dilution was confirmed not to impact the bacterial growth profile. The fractions of viable cells after exposure were allowed to grow in fresh medium to generate measurable growth curves. Bacterial viability was then quantitatively correlated to the delay of bacterial growth compared to a reference regarded as 100% viable cells; data analysis was inspired by that in quantitative polymerase chain reactions, where the delay in the amplification curve is correlated to the starting amount of the template nucleic acid. Fast and robust data analysis was achieved by developing computer algorithms carried out using R. This method was tested on four bacterial strains, including both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, showing great potential for application to all culturable bacterial strains. With the increasing diversity of engineered nanomaterials being considered for large-scale use, this high-throughput screening method will facilitate rapid screening of nanomaterial toxicity and thus inform the risk assessment of nanoparticles in a timely fashion.

  19. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based endothelial cell apoptosis assay and its application for screening vascular disrupting agents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Afu; Luo, Kathy Qian

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An endothelial cell apoptosis assay using FRET-based biosensor was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue during apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method was developed into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This assay was applied to screen vascular disrupting agents. -- Abstract: In this study, we developed a high-throughput endothelial cell apoptosis assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor. After exposure to apoptotic inducer UV-irradiation or anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, the fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue. We developed this method into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates by measuring the emission ratio of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to monitor the activation of a key protease, caspase-3, during apoptosis. The Z Prime factor for this assay was above 0.5 which indicates that this assay is suitable for a high-throughput analysis. Finally, we applied this functional high-throughput assay for screening vascular disrupting agents (VDA) which could induce endothelial cell apoptosis from our in-house compounds library and dioscin was identified as a hit. As this assay allows real time and sensitive detection of cell apoptosis, it will be a useful tool for monitoring endothelial cell apoptosis in living cell situation and for identifying new VDA candidates via a high-throughput screening.

  20. A novel high throughput screening assay for binding affinities of perfluoroalkyl iodide for estrogen receptor alpha and beta isoforms.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenting; Zhao, Lixia; Sun, Zhendong; Yang, Xiaoxi; Zhou, Qunfang; Jiang, Guibin

    2017-12-01

    Contaminants of emerging concern are continuously increasing, which makes it important to develop high throughput screening techniques for the evaluation of their potential biological effects, especially endocrine disrupting effects, which would directly influence the population dynamics in environment. A novel competitive binding assay based on enzyme fragmentation complementation technology was established to screen the binding affinities of emerging chemicals for estrogen receptor (ER) α or β isoforms. Exogenous compounds could compete with the fragment (ED-ES) of genetically engineered β-galactosidase enzyme (β-gal) for the binding to ERα or β, thus quantitatively altering the formation of enzymatically active β-gal and the hydrolysis of luminescent substrate. According to the monitoring of luminescence curves and the optimization of ERα or β concentrations, it was found that luminescent signals were sustainably emitted for 9h, and 40nM ERα or β in the system would lead to the most sensitive luminescence response. Using 17β-estrodiol (E2) and genistein as the representative estrogenic hormones, their binding affinities for ERα and β were evaluated. The results were consistent with those determined by traditional methods, which confirmed the reliability of this competitive binding assay based on β-gal. Four polyfluorinated iodine alkanes (PFIs) with specific structural characteristics in iodine substitution and carbon chain length were screened, and the results showed diverse binding affinities and different preferences of these chemicals to ERα or β isoforms. The binding affinities of PFIs for ERα were consistent with the result from MVLN transcriptional reporter assay. Overall, the competitive binding assay presented in this study provided a promising alternative to high throughput screening of emerging chemicals with estrogenic effects, which would be important in explanation of their potential toxicological effects and human exposure risks

  1. A High-Throughput Screening Assay Using a Photoconvertable Protein for Identifying Inhibitors of Transcription, Translation, or Proteasomal Degradation.

    PubMed

    Heidary, David K; Fox, Ashley; Richards, Chris I; Glazer, Edith C

    2017-04-01

    Dysregulated transcription, translation, and protein degradation are common features of cancer cells, regardless of specific genetic profiles. Several clinical anticancer agents take advantage of this characteristic vulnerability and interfere with the processes of transcription and translation or inhibit protein degradation. However, traditional assays that follow the process of protein production and removal require multistep processing and are not easily amenable to high-throughput screening. The use of recombinant fluorescent proteins provides a convenient solution to this problem, and moreover, photoconvertable fluorescent proteins allow for ratiometric detection of both new protein production and removal of existing proteins. Here, the photoconvertable protein Dendra2 is used in the development of in-cell assays of protein production and degradation that are optimized and validated for high-throughput screening. Conversion from the green to red emissive form can be achieved using a high-intensity light-emitting diode array, producing a stable pool of the red fluorescent form of Dendra2. This allows for rates of protein production or removal to be quantified in a plate reader or by fluorescence microscopy, providing a means to measure the potencies of inhibitors that affect these key processes.

  2. A High Throughput, 384-Well, Semi-Automated, Hepatocyte Intrinsic Clearance Assay for Screening New Molecular Entities in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Heinle, Lance; Peterkin, Vincent; de Morais, Sonia M; Jenkins, Gary J; Badagnani, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput, semi-automated clearance screening assay in hepatocytes was developed allowing a scientist to generate data for 96 compounds in one week. The 384-well format assay utilizes a Thermo Multidrop Combi and an optimized LC-MS/MS method. The previously reported LCMS/ MS method reduced the analytical run time by 3-fold, down to 1.2 min injection-to-injection. The Multidrop was able to deliver hepatocytes to 384-well plates with minimal viability loss. Comparison of results from the new 384-well and historical 24-well assays yielded a correlation of 0.95. In addition, results obtained for 25 marketed drugs with various metabolism pathways had a correlation of 0.75 when compared with literature values. Precision was maintained in the new format as 8 compounds tested in ≥39 independent experiments had coefficients of variation ≤21%. The ability to predict in vivo clearances using the new stability assay format was also investigated using 22 marketed drugs and 26 AbbVie compounds. Correction of intrinsic clearance values with binding to hepatocytes (in vitro data) and plasma (in vivo data) resulted in a higher in vitro to in vivo correlation when comparing 22 marketed compounds in human (0.80 vs 0.35) and 26 AbbVie Discovery compounds in rat (0.56 vs 0.17), demonstrating the importance of correcting for binding in clearance studies. This newly developed high throughput, semi-automated clearance assay allows for rapid screening of Discovery compounds to enable Structure Activity Relationship (SAR) analysis based on high quality hepatocyte stability data in sufficient quantity and quality to drive the next round of compound synthesis.

  3. Utilizing high throughput screening data for predictive toxicology models: protocols and application to MLSCN assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Rajarshi; Schürer, Stephan C.

    2008-06-01

    Computational toxicology is emerging as an encouraging alternative to experimental testing. The Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network (MLSCN) as part of the NIH Molecular Libraries Roadmap has recently started generating large and diverse screening datasets, which are publicly available in PubChem. In this report, we investigate various aspects of developing computational models to predict cell toxicity based on cell proliferation screening data generated in the MLSCN. By capturing feature-based information in those datasets, such predictive models would be useful in evaluating cell-based screening results in general (for example from reporter assays) and could be used as an aid to identify and eliminate potentially undesired compounds. Specifically we present the results of random forest ensemble models developed using different cell proliferation datasets and highlight protocols to take into account their extremely imbalanced nature. Depending on the nature of the datasets and the descriptors employed we were able to achieve percentage correct classification rates between 70% and 85% on the prediction set, though the accuracy rate dropped significantly when the models were applied to in vivo data. In this context we also compare the MLSCN cell proliferation results with animal acute toxicity data to investigate to what extent animal toxicity can be correlated and potentially predicted by proliferation results. Finally, we present a visualization technique that allows one to compare a new dataset to the training set of the models to decide whether the new dataset may be reliably predicted.

  4. High-throughput assays for superoxide and hydrogen peroxide: design of a screening workflow to identify inhibitors of NADPH oxidases.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Jacek; Cheng, Gang; Zielonka, Monika; Ganesh, Thota; Sun, Aiming; Joseph, Joy; Michalski, Radosław; O'Brien, William J; Lambeth, J David; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2014-06-06

    Recent progress characterizing the reaction mechanism(s) of fluorescent probes with reactive oxygen species has made it possible to rigorously analyze these reactive species in biological systems. We have developed rapid high throughput-compatible assays for monitoring cellular production of superoxide radical anion and hydrogen peroxide using hydropropidine and coumarin boronic acid probes, respectively. Coupling plate reader-based fluorescence measurements with HPLC-based simultaneous monitoring of superoxide radical anion and hydrogen peroxide provides the basis for the screening protocol for NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitors. Using this newly developed approach along with the medium-throughput plate reader-based oximetry and EPR spin trapping as confirmatory assays, it is now eminently feasible to rapidly and reliably identify Nox enzyme inhibitors with a markedly lower rate of false positives. These methodological advances provide an opportunity to discover selective inhibitors of Nox isozymes, through enhanced conceptual understanding of their basic mechanisms of action.

  5. A Cell-based PDE4 Assay in 1536-well Plate format for High Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Titus, Steven A.; Li, Xiao; Southall, Noel; Lu, Jianming; Inglese, James; Brasch, Michael; Austin, Christopher P.; Zheng, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are intracellular enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of 3', 5'-cyclic nucleotides, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), to their corresponding 5'-nucleotide monophosphates. These enzymes play an important role in controlling cellular concentrations of cyclic nucleotides and thus regulate a variety of cellular signaling events. PDEs are emerging as drug targets for several diseases including asthma, cardiovascular disease, ADHD, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. Though biochemical assays with purified recombinant PDE enzymes and cAMP or cGMP substrate are commonly used for compound screening, cell-based assays would provide a better assessment of compound activity in a more physiological context. Here we report the development and validation of a new cell-based PDE4 assay using a constitutively active GPCR as a driving force for cAMP production and a cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) cation channel as a biosensor in 1536-well plates. PMID:18591513

  6. Development of a high throughput drug screening assay to identify compounds that protect oligodendrocyte viability and differentiation under inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Lariosa-Willingham, Karen D; Rosler, Elen S; Tung, Jay S; Dugas, Jason C; Collins, Tassie L; Leonoudakis, Dmitri

    2016-09-05

    Newly proliferated oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) migrate and surround lesions of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and other demyelinating diseases, but fail to differentiate into oligodendrocytes (OLs) and remyelinate remaining viable axons. The abundance of secreted inflammatory factors within and surrounding these lesions likely plays a major inhibitory role, promoting cell death and preventing OL differentiation and axon remyelination. To identify clinical candidate compounds that may protect existing and differentiating OLs in patients, we have developed a high throughput screening (HTS) assay that utilizes purified rat OPCs. Using a fluorescent indicator of cell viability coupled with image quantification, we developed an assay to allow the identification of compounds that promote OL viability and differentiation in the presence of the synergistic inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor α and interferon-γ. We have utilized this assay to screen the NIH clinical collection library and identify compounds that protect OLs and promote OL differentiation in the presence of these inflammatory cytokines. This primary OL-based cytokine protection assay is adaptable for HTS and may be easily modified for profiling of compounds in the presence of other potentially inhibitory molecules found in MS lesions. This assay should be of use to those interested in identifying drugs for the treatment of MS and other demyelinating diseases.

  7. Luciferase-Based, High-Throughput Assay for Screening and Profiling Transmission-Blocking Compounds against Plasmodium falciparum Gametocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lucantoni, Leonardo; Fidock, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of new antimalarial drugs able to target both the asexual and gametocyte stages of Plasmodium falciparum is critical to the success of the malaria eradication campaign. We have developed and validated a robust, rapid, and cost-effective high-throughput reporter gene assay to identify compounds active against late-stage (stage IV and V) gametocytes. The assay, which is suitable for testing compound activity at incubation times up to 72 h, demonstrates excellent quality and reproducibility, with average Z′ values of 0.85 ± 0.01. We used the assay to screen more than 10,000 compounds from three chemically diverse libraries. The screening outcomes highlighted the opportunity to use collections of compounds with known activity against the asexual stages of the parasites as a starting point for gametocytocidal activity detection in order to maximize the chances of identifying gametocytocidal compounds. This assay extends the capabilities of our previously reported luciferase assay, which tested compounds against early-stage gametocytes, and opens possibilities to profile the activities of gametocytocidal compounds over the entire course of gametocytogenesis. PMID:26787698

  8. High-throughput in vivo vertebrate screening

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Martin, Carlos; Chang, Tsung-Yao; Koo, Bryan Kyo; Gilleland, Cody L.; Wasserman, Steven C.; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a high-throughput platform for cellular-resolution in vivo pharmaceutical and genetic screens on zebrafish larvae. The system automatically loads animals from reservoirs or multiwell plates, and positions and orients them for high-speed confocal imaging and laser manipulation of both superficial and deep organs within 19 seconds without damage. We show small-scale test screening of retinal axon guidance mutants and neuronal regeneration assays in combination with femtosecond laser microsurgery. PMID:20639868

  9. A high-throughput radiometric kinase assay

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant kinase signaling has been implicated in a number of diseases. While kinases have become attractive drug targets, only a small fraction of human protein kinases have validated inhibitors. Screening libraries of compounds against a kinase or kinases of interest is routinely performed during kinase inhibitor development to identify promising scaffolds for a particular target and to identify kinase targets for compounds of interest. Screening of more focused compound libraries may also be conducted in the later stages of inhibitor development to improve potency and optimize selectivity. The dot blot kinase assay is a robust, high-throughput kinase assay that can be used to screen a number of small molecule compounds against one kinase of interest or several kinases. Here, a protocol for a dot blot kinase assay used for measuring insulin receptor kinase activity is presented. This protocol can be readily adapted for use with other protein kinases. PMID:26501904

  10. Quantitative High Throughput Screening Using a Live Cell cAMP Assay Identifies Small Molecule Agonists of the TSH Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Titus, Steve; Neumann, Susanne; Zheng, Wei; Southall, Noel; Michael, Sam; Klumpp, Carleen; Yasgar, Adam; Shinn, Paul; Thomas, Craig J.; Inglese, Jim; Gershengorn, Marvin C.; Austin, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) belongs to the glycoprotein hormone receptor subfamily of seven-transmembrane spanning receptors. TSHR is expressed in thyroid follicular cells and is activated by TSH, which regulates growth and function of these cells. Recombinant TSH is used in diagnostic screens for thyroid cancer, especially in patients after thyroid cancer surgery. Currently, no selective small molecule agonist of the TSHR is available. To screen for novel TSHR agonists, we miniaturized a cell-based cAMP assay into 1536-well plate format. This assay uses a HEK293 cell line stably expressing the TSHR and a cyclic nucleotide gated ion channel (CNG), which functions as a biosensor. From a quantitative high-throughput screen of 73,180 compounds in parallel with a parental cell line (without the TSHR), 276 primary active compounds were identified. The activities of the selected active compounds were further confirmed in an orthogonal HTRF cAMP-based assay. 49 compounds in several structural classes have been confirmed as small molecule TSHR agonists that will serve as starting compounds for chemical optimization and studies of thyroid physiology in health and disease. PMID:18216391

  11. Risk-based high-throughput chemical screening and prioritization using exposure models and in vitro bioactivity assays

    DOE PAGES

    Shin, Hyeong -Moo; Ernstoff, Alexi; Arnot, Jon A.; ...

    2015-05-01

    We present a risk-based high-throughput screening (HTS) method to identify chemicals for potential health concerns or for which additional information is needed. The method is applied to 180 organic chemicals as a case study. We first obtain information on how the chemical is used and identify relevant use scenarios (e.g., dermal application, indoor emissions). For each chemical and use scenario, exposure models are then used to calculate a chemical intake fraction, or a product intake fraction, accounting for chemical properties and the exposed population. We then combine these intake fractions with use scenario-specific estimates of chemical quantity to calculate dailymore » intake rates (iR; mg/kg/day). These intake rates are compared to oral equivalent doses (OED; mg/kg/day), calculated from a suite of ToxCast in vitro bioactivity assays using in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation and reverse dosimetry. Bioactivity quotients (BQs) are calculated as iR/OED to obtain estimates of potential impact associated with each relevant use scenario. Of the 180 chemicals considered, 38 had maximum iRs exceeding minimum OEDs (i.e., BQs > 1). For most of these compounds, exposures are associated with direct intake, food/oral contact, or dermal exposure. The method provides high-throughput estimates of exposure and important input for decision makers to identify chemicals of concern for further evaluation with additional information or more refined models.« less

  12. Risk-based high-throughput chemical screening and prioritization using exposure models and in vitro bioactivity assays

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Hyeong -Moo; Ernstoff, Alexi; Arnot, Jon A.; Wetmore, Barbara A.; Csiszar, Susan A.; Fantke, Peter; Zhang, Xianming; McKone, Thomas E.; Jolliet, Olivier; Bennett, Deborah H.

    2015-05-01

    We present a risk-based high-throughput screening (HTS) method to identify chemicals for potential health concerns or for which additional information is needed. The method is applied to 180 organic chemicals as a case study. We first obtain information on how the chemical is used and identify relevant use scenarios (e.g., dermal application, indoor emissions). For each chemical and use scenario, exposure models are then used to calculate a chemical intake fraction, or a product intake fraction, accounting for chemical properties and the exposed population. We then combine these intake fractions with use scenario-specific estimates of chemical quantity to calculate daily intake rates (iR; mg/kg/day). These intake rates are compared to oral equivalent doses (OED; mg/kg/day), calculated from a suite of ToxCast in vitro bioactivity assays using in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation and reverse dosimetry. Bioactivity quotients (BQs) are calculated as iR/OED to obtain estimates of potential impact associated with each relevant use scenario. Of the 180 chemicals considered, 38 had maximum iRs exceeding minimum OEDs (i.e., BQs > 1). For most of these compounds, exposures are associated with direct intake, food/oral contact, or dermal exposure. The method provides high-throughput estimates of exposure and important input for decision makers to identify chemicals of concern for further evaluation with additional information or more refined models.

  13. High-throughput fluorescence polarization assay for chemical library screening against anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bfl-1.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Dayong; Godoi, Paulo; Sergienko, Eduard; Dahl, Russell; Chan, Xochella; Brown, Brock; Rascon, Justin; Hurder, Andrew; Su, Ying; Chung, Thomas D Y; Jin, Chaofang; Diaz, Paul; Reed, John C

    2012-03-01

    Overexpression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins occurs commonly in human cancers. Bfl-1 is highly expressed in some types of malignant cells, contributing significantly to tumor cell survival and chemoresistance. Therefore, it would be desirable to have chemical antagonists of Bfl-1. To this end, we devised a fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) using Bfl-1 protein and fluorescein-conjugated Bid BH3 peptide, which was employed for high-throughput screening of chemical libraries. Approximately 66 000 compounds were screened for the ability to inhibit BH3 peptide binding to Bfl-1, yielding 14 reproducible hits with ≥50% displacement. After dose-response analysis and confirmation using a secondary assay based on time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), two groups of Bfl-1-specific inhibitors were identified, including chloromaleimide and sulfonylpyrimidine series compounds. FPAs generated for each of the six anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins demonstrated selective binding of both classes of compounds to Bfl-1. Analogs of the sulfonylpyrimidine series were synthesized and compared with the original hit for Bfl-1 binding by both FPAs and TR-FRET assays. The resulting structure-activity relation analysis led to the chemical probe compound CID-2980973 (ML042). Collectively, these findings demonstrate the feasibility of using the HTS assay for discovery of selective chemical inhibitors of Bfl-1.

  14. High throughput screening technologies for ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai-bo; Li, Min; Wang, Wei-ping; Wang, Xiao-liang

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are involved in a variety of fundamental physiological processes, and their malfunction causes numerous human diseases. Therefore, ion channels represent a class of attractive drug targets and a class of important off-targets for in vitro pharmacological profiling. In the past decades, the rapid progress in developing functional assays and instrumentation has enabled high throughput screening (HTS) campaigns on an expanding list of channel types. Chronologically, HTS methods for ion channels include the ligand binding assay, flux-based assay, fluorescence-based assay, and automated electrophysiological assay. In this review we summarize the current HTS technologies for different ion channel classes and their applications. PMID:26657056

  15. Identification of Rift Valley Fever Virus Nucleocapsid Protein-RNA Binding Inhibitors Using a High-Throughput Screening Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbecker, Mary; Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Lodmell, J. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging infectious pathogen that causes severe disease in humans and livestock and has the potential for global spread. Currently, there is no proven effective treatment for RVFV infection and there is no licensed vaccine. Inhibition of RNA binding to the essential viral nucleocapsid (N) protein represents a potential anti-viral therapeutic strategy because all of the functions performed by N during infection involve RNA binding. To target this interaction, we developed a fluorescence polarization-based high-throughput drug screening assay and tested 26,424 chemical compounds for their ability to disrupt an N-RNA complex. From libraries of FDA approved drugs, drug-like molecules and natural products extracts we identified several lead compounds that are promising candidates for medicinal chemistry. PMID:22644268

  16. High-throughput screening assay for the environmental water samples using cellular response profiles.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tianhong; Li, Haoran; Khare, Swanand; Huang, Biao; Yu Huang, Dorothy; Zhang, Weiping; Gabos, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Chemical and physical analyses are commonly used as screening methods for the environmental water. However, these methods can only look for the targeted substance but may miss unexpected toxicants. Furthermore, the synergistic effects of mixture cannot be detected. In order to set up the assay criteria for determining various biological activities at a cellular level that could potentially lead to toxicity of environmental water samples, a novel test based on cellular response by using Real-Time Cellular Analyzer (RTCA) is proposed in this study. First, the water sample is diluted to a series of strengths (80%, 60%, 40%, 30%, 20% and 10%) to get the multi-concentration cellular response profile. Then, the area under the cellular response profile (AUCRP) is calculated. Comparing to the normal cell growth of negative control, a new biological activity index named Percentage of Effect (PoE) has been presented which reflects the cumulative inhibitory activity of cell growth over the log-phase. Finally, a synthetical index PoE50 is proposed to evaluate the intensity of biological activities in water samples. The biological experiment demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Aqueous biphasic cancer cell migration assay enables robust, high-throughput screening of anti-cancer compounds.

    PubMed

    Lemmo, Stephanie; Nasrollahi, Samila; Tavana, Hossein

    2014-03-01

    Migration of tumor cells is a fundamental event implicated in metastatic progression of cancer. Therapeutic compounds with the ability to inhibit the motility of cancer cells are critical for preventing cancer metastasis. Achieving this goal requires new technologies that enable high-throughput drug screening against migration of cancer cells and expedite drug discovery. We report an easy-to-implement, robotically operated, cell migration microtechnology with the capability of simultaneous screening of multiple compounds. The technology utilizes a fully biocompatible polymeric aqueous two-phase system to pattern a monolayer of cells containing a cell-excluded gap that serves as the migration niche. We adapted this technology to a standard 96-well plate format and parametrically optimized it to generate highly consistent migration niches. The analysis of migration is done automatically using computerized schemes. We use statistical metrics and show the robustness of this assay for drug screening and its sensitivity to identify effects of different drug compounds on migration of cancer cells. This technology can be employed in core centers, research laboratories, and pharmaceutical industries to evaluate the efficacy of compounds against migration of various types of metastatic cancer cells prior to expensive animal tests and thus, streamline anti-migratory drug screening.

  18. A High-Throughput Fluorescence-Based Assay System for Appetite-Regulating Gene and Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yasuhito; Hirano, Minoru; Nishimura, Yuhei; Tanaka, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The increasing number of people suffering from metabolic syndrome and obesity is becoming a serious problem not only in developed countries, but also in developing countries. However, there are few agents currently approved for the treatment of obesity. Those that are available are mainly appetite suppressants and gastrointestinal fat blockers. We have developed a simple and rapid method for the measurement of the feeding volume of Danio rerio (zebrafish). This assay can be used to screen appetite suppressants and enhancers. In this study, zebrafish were fed viable paramecia that were fluorescently-labeled, and feeding volume was measured using a 96-well microplate reader. Gene expression analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf), knockdown of appetite-regulating genes (neuropeptide Y, preproinsulin, melanocortin 4 receptor, agouti related protein, and cannabinoid receptor 1), and the administration of clinical appetite suppressants (fluoxetine, sibutramine, mazindol, phentermine, and rimonabant) revealed the similarity among mechanisms regulating appetite in zebrafish and mammals. In combination with behavioral analysis, we were able to evaluate adverse effects on locomotor activities from gene knockdown and chemical treatments. In conclusion, we have developed an assay that uses zebrafish, which can be applied to high-throughput screening and target gene discovery for appetite suppressants and enhancers. PMID:23300705

  19. Adaptation of the bivalve embryotoxicity assay for the high throughput screening of emerging contaminants in Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Rita; Montagna, Michele; Balbi, Teresa; Raffo, Enrico; Palumbo, Franca; Canesi, Laura

    2014-08-01

    Emerging contaminants (such as Endocrine disrupting chemicals-EDCs, brominated and perfluorinated compounds-BFRs and PFCs, pharmaceuticals) are chemicals currently not included in regulatory monitoring programs, and whose fate and biological impacts are poorly understood. Assessment of ecosystem health with respect to these chemicals is of particular concern also in the marine environment: in this respect, data on the effects on early life stages are important to establish the sensitivity of marine species. In this work, the acute (48 h) bivalve embryo toxicity test was applied for screening the developmental effects of different emerging contaminants in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The assay was adapted to 96-microwell plates, and standardized in order to obtain to normal D-shaped larvae with acceptability of test results based on negative control and positive control (copper) comparable with those reported in literature for Mytilus spp. The effects of different model compounds representative of EDCs (Nonylphenol-NP and Bisphenol A-BPA), BFRs (Tetrabromobisphenol A-TBBPA), PFCs (perfluorooctanoid acid-PFOA and perfluorooctane sulphonate-PFOAS) and pharmaceuticals (Ibuprofen-IBU, Diclofenac-DCF, Bezafibrate-BEZA) in a wide concentration range (0.01-0.1-1-10-100-1000 μg/L) were evaluated. The assay proved as a sensitive tool for high throughput screening of emerging contaminants in a marine species, leading to production of significant amounts of data that may be useful for regulatory purposes.

  20. A high-throughput fluorescence-based assay system for appetite-regulating gene and drug screening.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yasuhito; Hirano, Minoru; Nishimura, Yuhei; Tanaka, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The increasing number of people suffering from metabolic syndrome and obesity is becoming a serious problem not only in developed countries, but also in developing countries. However, there are few agents currently approved for the treatment of obesity. Those that are available are mainly appetite suppressants and gastrointestinal fat blockers. We have developed a simple and rapid method for the measurement of the feeding volume of Danio rerio (zebrafish). This assay can be used to screen appetite suppressants and enhancers. In this study, zebrafish were fed viable paramecia that were fluorescently-labeled, and feeding volume was measured using a 96-well microplate reader. Gene expression analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf), knockdown of appetite-regulating genes (neuropeptide Y, preproinsulin, melanocortin 4 receptor, agouti related protein, and cannabinoid receptor 1), and the administration of clinical appetite suppressants (fluoxetine, sibutramine, mazindol, phentermine, and rimonabant) revealed the similarity among mechanisms regulating appetite in zebrafish and mammals. In combination with behavioral analysis, we were able to evaluate adverse effects on locomotor activities from gene knockdown and chemical treatments. In conclusion, we have developed an assay that uses zebrafish, which can be applied to high-throughput screening and target gene discovery for appetite suppressants and enhancers.

  1. A novel high-throughput screening assay for HCN channel blocker using membrane potential-sensitive dye and FLIPR.

    PubMed

    Vasilyev, Dmitry V; Shan, Qin J; Lee, Yan T; Soloveva, Veronica; Nawoschik, Stanley P; Kaftan, Edward J; Dunlop, John; Mayer, Scott C; Bowlby, Mark R

    2009-10-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cation nonselective (HCN) channels represent an interesting group of targets for drug development. In this study, the authors report the development of a novel membrane potential-sensitive dye (MPSD) assay for HCN channel modulators that has been miniaturized into 384-well fluorescent imaging plate reader (FLIPR) high-throughput screening (HTS) format. When optimized (by cell plating density, plate type, cell recovery from cryopreservation), the well-to-well signal variability was low, with a Z' = 0.73 and coefficient of variation = 6.4%, whereas the MPSD fluorescence signal amplitude was -23,700 +/- 1500 FLIPR(3) relative fluorescence units (a linear relationship was found between HCN1 MPSD fluorescence signal and the cell plating density) and was completely blocked by 30 microM ZD7288. The assay tolerated up to 1% DMSO, inclusion of which did not significantly change the signal kinetics or amplitude. A single-concentration screening of an ion channel-focused library composed of 4855 compounds resulted in 89 HCN1 blocker hits, 51 of which were subsequently analyzed with an 8-point concentration-response analysis on the IonWorks HT electrophysiology platform. The correlation between MPSD and the electrophysiology assay was moderate, as shown by the linear regression analysis (r(2) = 0.56) between the respective IC(50)s obtained using these 2 assays. The reported HTS-compatible HCN channel blocker assay can serve as a tool in drug discovery in the pursuit of HCN channel isoform-selective small molecules that could be used in the development of clinically relevant compounds.

  2. Model for high-throughput screening of multitarget drugs in chemical neurosciences: synthesis, assay, and theoretic study of rasagiline carbamates.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Nerea; Caamaño, Olga; Romero-Duran, Francisco J; Luan, Feng; D S Cordeiro, M Natália; Yañez, Matilde; González-Díaz, Humberto; García-Mera, Xerardo

    2013-10-16

    The disappointing results obtained in recent clinical trials renew the interest in experimental/computational techniques for the discovery of neuroprotective drugs. In this context, multitarget or multiplexing QSAR models (mt-QSAR/mx-QSAR) may help to predict neurotoxicity/neuroprotective effects of drugs in multiple assays, on drug targets, and in model organisms. In this work, we study a data set downloaded from CHEMBL; each data point (>8000) contains the values of one out of 37 possible measures of activity, 493 assays, 169 molecular or cellular targets, and 11 different organisms (including human) for a given compound. In this work, we introduce the first mx-QSAR model for neurotoxicity/neuroprotective effects of drugs based on the MARCH-INSIDE (MI) method. First, we used MI to calculate the stochastic spectral moments (structural descriptors) of all compounds. Next, we found a model that classified correctly 2955 out of 3548 total cases in the training and validation series with Accuracy, Sensitivity, and Specificity values>80%. The model also showed excellent results in Computational-Chemistry simulations of High-Throughput Screening (CCHTS) experiments, with accuracy=90.6% for 4671 positive cases. Next, we reported the synthesis, characterization, and experimental assays of new rasagiline derivatives. We carried out three different experimental tests: assay (1) in the absence of neurotoxic agents, assay (2) in the presence of glutamate, and assay (3) in the presence of H2O2. Compounds 11 with 27.4%, 8 with 11.6%, and 9 with 15.4% showed the highest neuroprotective effects in assays (1), (2), and (3), respectively. After that, we used the mx-QSAR model to carry out a CCHTS of the new compounds in >400 unique pharmacological tests not carried out experimentally. Consequently, this model may become a promising auxiliary tool for the discovery of new drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Model for High-Throughput Screening of Multitarget Drugs in Chemical Neurosciences: Synthesis, Assay, and Theoretic Study of Rasagiline Carbamates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The disappointing results obtained in recent clinical trials renew the interest in experimental/computational techniques for the discovery of neuroprotective drugs. In this context, multitarget or multiplexing QSAR models (mt-QSAR/mx-QSAR) may help to predict neurotoxicity/neuroprotective effects of drugs in multiple assays, on drug targets, and in model organisms. In this work, we study a data set downloaded from CHEMBL; each data point (>8000) contains the values of one out of 37 possible measures of activity, 493 assays, 169 molecular or cellular targets, and 11 different organisms (including human) for a given compound. In this work, we introduce the first mx-QSAR model for neurotoxicity/neuroprotective effects of drugs based on the MARCH-INSIDE (MI) method. First, we used MI to calculate the stochastic spectral moments (structural descriptors) of all compounds. Next, we found a model that classified correctly 2955 out of 3548 total cases in the training and validation series with Accuracy, Sensitivity, and Specificity values > 80%. The model also showed excellent results in Computational-Chemistry simulations of High-Throughput Screening (CCHTS) experiments, with accuracy = 90.6% for 4671 positive cases. Next, we reported the synthesis, characterization, and experimental assays of new rasagiline derivatives. We carried out three different experimental tests: assay (1) in the absence of neurotoxic agents, assay (2) in the presence of glutamate, and assay (3) in the presence of H2O2. Compounds 11 with 27.4%, 8 with 11.6%, and 9 with 15.4% showed the highest neuroprotective effects in assays (1), (2), and (3), respectively. After that, we used the mx-QSAR model to carry out a CCHTS of the new compounds in >400 unique pharmacological tests not carried out experimentally. Consequently, this model may become a promising auxiliary tool for the discovery of new drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23855599

  4. Design, development, and validation of a high-throughput drug-screening assay for targeting of human leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Karjalainen, Katja; Pasqualini, Renata; Cortes, Jorge E.; Kornblau, Steven M.; Lichtiger, Benjamin; O'Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Sidman, Richard L.; Arap, Wadih; Koivunen, Erkki

    2015-01-01

    Background We introduce an ex vivo methodology to perform drug library screening against human leukemia. Method Our strategy relies on human blood or bone marrow cultures under hypoxia; under these conditions, leukemia cells deplete oxygen faster than normal cells, causing a hemoglobin oxygenation shift. We demonstrate several advantages: (I) partial recapitulation of the leukemia microenvironment, (ii) use of native hemoglobin oxygenation as real-time sensor/reporter, (iii) cost-effectiveness, (iv) species-specificity, and (v) format that enables high-throughput screening. Results As a proof-of-concept, we screened a chemical library (size ∼20,000) against human leukemia cells. We identified 70 compounds (“hit” rate=0.35%; Z-factor=0.71) with activity; we examined 20 to find 18 true-positives (90%). Finally, we show that carbonohydraxonic diamide group-containing compounds are potent anti-leukemia agents that induce cell death in leukemia cells and patient-derived samples. Conclusions This unique functional assay can identify novel drug candidates as well as find future applications in personalized drug selection for leukemia patients. PMID:24496871

  5. Brush and spray: a high-throughput systemic acquired resistance assay suitable for large-scale genetic screening.

    PubMed

    Jing, Beibei; Xu, Shaohua; Xu, Mo; Li, Yan; Li, Shuxin; Ding, Jinmei; Zhang, Yuelin

    2011-11-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a defense mechanism induced in the distal parts of plants after primary infection. It confers long-lasting protection against a broad spectrum of microbial pathogens. Lack of high-throughput assays has hampered the forward genetic analysis of SAR. Here, we report the development of an easy and efficient assay for SAR and its application in a forward genetic screen for SAR-deficient mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using the new assay for SAR, we identified six flavin-dependent monooxygenase1, four AGD2-like defense response protein1, three salicylic acid induction-deficient2, one phytoalexin deficient4, and one avrPphB-susceptible3 alleles as well as a gain-of-function mutant of CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR3 designated camta3-3D. Like transgenic plants overexpressing CAMTA3, camta3-3D mutant plants exhibit compromised SAR and enhanced susceptibility to virulent pathogens, suggesting that CAMTA3 is a critical regulator of both basal resistance and SAR.

  6. A cell-based luciferase assay amenable to high-throughput screening of inhibitors of arenavirus budding.

    PubMed

    Capul, Althea A; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2008-12-05

    Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever (HF) disease in humans for which there are no licensed vaccines, and current therapy is limited to the use of ribavirin (Rib) that is only partially effective and associated with significant side effects. In addition, compelling evidence indicates that the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is a neglected human pathogen of clinical significance. Therefore, it is important to develop novel and effective anti-arenaviral drugs. The arenavirus Z protein is the driving force of arenavirus budding, and PPPY and PTAP late (L) domain motifs within Z are critical for Z-mediated budding, which involves the interaction of Z with a variety of host cellular factors. Compounds capable of inhibiting these virus-host cell interactions represent candidate anti-arenaviral drugs. The identification of these candidate compounds would be facilitated by the availability of a Z budding assay amenable to high-throughput screens (HTS). To this end, we have developed a novel assay that allows for rapid and quantitative assessment of Z-mediated budding. We provide evidence that this novel assay is amenable to HTS to identify small molecule inhibitors of Z-mediated budding, as well as to uncover cellular genes contributing to arenavirus budding.

  7. A whole-cell assay for the high throughput screening of calmodulin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Dikici, Emre; Deo, Sapna K; Daunert, Sylvia

    2008-04-01

    Cell-based screening systems for pharmaceuticals are desired over molecular biosensing systems because of the information they provide on toxicity and bioavailability. However, the majority of sensing systems developed are molecular biosensing type screening systems and cannot be easily adapted to cell-based screening. In this study, we demonstrate that protein-based molecular sensing systems that employ a fluorescent protein as a signal transducer are amenable to cell-based sensing by expressing the protein molecular sensing system in the cell and employing these cells for screening of desired molecules. To achieve this, we expressed a molecular sensing system based on the fusion protein of calmodulin (CaM) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in bacterial cells, and utilized these cells for the screening of CaM antagonists. In the presence of Ca(2+), CaM undergoes a conformational change exposing a hydrophobic pocket that interacts with CaM-binding proteins, peptides, and drugs. This conformational change induced in CaM leads to a change in the microenvironment of EGFP, resulting in a change in its fluorescence intensity. The observed change in fluorescence intensity of EGFP can be correlated to the concentration of the analyte present in the sample. Dose-response curves for various tricyclic antidepressants were generated using cells containing CaM-EGFP fusion protein. Additionally, we demonstrate the versatility of our system for studying protein-protein interactions by using cells to study the binding of a peptide to CaM. The study showed that the CaM-EGFP fusion protein within the intact cells responds similarly to that of the isolated fusion protein, hence eliminating the need for any isolation and purification steps. We have demonstrated that this system can be used for the rapid screening of various CaM antagonists that are potential antipsychotic drugs.

  8. Using in Vitro High Throughput Screening Assays to Identify Potential Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past 20 years, an increased focus on detecting environmental chemicals posing a risk of adverse effects due to endocrine disruption has driven the creation of the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP). Thousands of chemicals are subject to the EDSP, whic...

  9. Using in Vitro High Throughput Screening Assays to Identify Potential Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past 20 years, an increased focus on detecting environmental chemicals posing a risk of adverse effects due to endocrine disruption has driven the creation of the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP). Thousands of chemicals are subject to the EDSP, whic...

  10. A Novel High Throughput Assay for Anthelmintic Drug Screening and Resistance Diagnosis by Real-Time Monitoring of Parasite Motility

    PubMed Central

    Smout, Michael J.; Kotze, Andrew C.; McCarthy, James S.; Loukas, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Background Helminth parasites cause untold morbidity and mortality to billions of people and livestock. Anthelmintic drugs are available but resistance is a problem in livestock parasites, and is a looming threat for human helminths. Testing the efficacy of available anthelmintic drugs and development of new drugs is hindered by the lack of objective high-throughput screening methods. Currently, drug effect is assessed by observing motility or development of parasites using laborious, subjective, low-throughput methods. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a novel application for a real-time cell monitoring device (xCELLigence) that can simply and objectively assess anthelmintic effects by measuring parasite motility in real time in a fully automated high-throughput fashion. We quantitatively assessed motility and determined real time IC50 values of different anthelmintic drugs against several developmental stages of major helminth pathogens of humans and livestock, including larval Haemonchus contortus and Strongyloides ratti, and adult hookworms and blood flukes. The assay enabled quantification of the onset of egg hatching in real time, and the impact of drugs on hatch rate, as well as discriminating between the effects of drugs on motility of drug-susceptible and –resistant isolates of H. contortus. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that this technique will be suitable for discovery and development of new anthelmintic drugs as well as for detection of phenotypic resistance to existing drugs for the majority of helminths and other pathogens where motility is a measure of pathogen viability. The method is also amenable to use for other purposes where motility is assessed, such as gene silencing or antibody-mediated killing. PMID:21103363

  11. A Call for Nominations of Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Assays from Relevant Human Toxicity Pathways

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Research Council of the United States National Academies of Science has recently released a document outlining a long-range vision and strategy for transforming toxicity testing from largely whole animal-based testing to one based on in vitro assays. “Toxicity Testin...

  12. A Call for Nominations of Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Assays from Relevant Human Toxicity Pathways

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Research Council of the United States National Academies of Science has recently released a document outlining a long-range vision and strategy for transforming toxicity testing from largely whole animal-based testing to one based on in vitro assays. “Toxicity Testin...

  13. Characterization of Diversity in Toxicity Mechanism Using In Vitro Cytotoxicity Assays in Quantitative High Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruili; Southall, Noel; Cho, Ming-Hsuang; Xia, Menghang; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    Assessing the potential health risks of environmental chemical compounds is an expensive undertaking which has motivated the development of new alternatives to traditional in vivo toxicological testing. One approach is to stage the evaluation, beginning with less expensive and higher throughput in vitro testing before progressing to more definitive trials. In vitro testing can be used to generate a hypothesis about a compound's mechanism of action, which can then be used to design an appropriate in vivo experiment. Here we begin to address the question of how to design such a battery of in vitro cell-based assays by combining data from two different types of assays, cell viability and caspase activation, with the aim of elucidating mechanism of action. Because caspase activation is a transient event during apoptosis, it is not possible to design a single end-point assay protocol that would identify all instances of compound-induced caspase activation. Nevertheless, useful information about compound mechanism of action can be obtained from these assays in combination with cell viability data. Unsupervised clustering in combination with Dunn's cluster validity index is a robust method for identifying mechanisms of action without requiring any a priori knowledge about mechanisms of toxicity. The performance of this clustering method is evaluated by comparing the clustering results against literature annotations of compound mechanisms. PMID:18281954

  14. Evaluation of Compatibility of ToxCast High-Throughput/High-Content Screening Assays with Engineered Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput and high-content screens are attractive approaches for prioritizing nanomaterial hazards and informing targeted testing due to the impracticality of using traditional toxicological testing on the large numbers and varieties of nanomaterials. The ToxCast program a...

  15. Evaluation of Compatibility of ToxCast High-Throughput/High-Content Screening Assays with Engineered Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput and high-content screens are attractive approaches for prioritizing nanomaterial hazards and informing targeted testing due to the impracticality of using traditional toxicological testing on the large numbers and varieties of nanomaterials. The ToxCast program a...

  16. An in vitro high-throughput assay for screening reproductive and toxic effects of anticancer compounds.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Vicki; Benkendorff, Kirsten; Young, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    An in vitro assay was developed that simultaneously tested the effects of anticancer drug candidates on cytotoxicity, hormone synthesis, and gonadotrophin responsiveness using the choriocarcinoma JAr cell line. JAr culture conditions were optimized and then cells were exposed to a marine mollusc extract in the presence and absence of hCG. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation of the optimized 1 H thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay were 11.3% and 10.9%, respectively. hCG (1,000 mIU/mL) increased progesterone (P4) synthesis after 24 H (P<0.05). The mollusc extract significantly decreased cell viability, with the IC50 affected by incubation time, but not hCG. P4 synthesis was inhibited at low concentrations of the anticancer extract, but stimulated at the highest concentration, and complex interactions of P4 were also found with hCG. In conclusion, the optimized assay is useful to characterize the effects of novel drugs on cytotoxicity, basal, and gonadotrophin-stimulated P4 synthesis in vitro, and can be used to inform subsequent in vivo studies.

  17. Origin and evolution of high throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, D A; Williams, J A

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the origin and evolution of high throughput screening (HTS) through the experience of an individual pharmaceutical company, revealing some of the mysteries of the early stages of drug discovery to the wider pharmacology audience. HTS in this company (Pfizer, Groton, USA) had its origin in natural products screening in 1986, by substituting fermentation broths with dimethyl sulphoxide solutions of synthetic compounds, using 96-well plates and reduced assay volumes of 50-100μl. A nominal 30mM source compound concentration provided high μM assay concentrations. Starting at 800 compounds each week, the process reached a steady state of 7200 compounds per week by 1989. Screening in the Applied Biotechnology and Screening Group was centralized with screens operating in lock-step to maximize efficiency. Initial screens were full files run in triplicate. Autoradiography and image analysis were introduced for 125I receptor ligand screens. Reverse transcriptase (RT) coupled with quantitative PCR and multiplexing addressed several targets in a single assay. By 1992 HTS produced ‘hits' as starting matter for approximately 40% of the Discovery portfolio. In 1995, the HTS methodology was expanded to include ADMET targets. ADME targets required each compound to be physically detected leading to the development of automated high throughput LC-MS. In 1996, 90 compounds/week were screened in microsomal, protein binding and serum stability assays. Subsequently, the mutagenic Ames assay was adapted to a 96-well plate liquid assay and novel algorithms permitted automated image analysis of the micronucleus assay. By 1999 ADME HTS was fully integrated into the discovery cycle. PMID:17603542

  18. Use of Activity-Based Probes to Develop High Throughput Screening Assays That Can Be Performed in Complex Cell Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Deu, Edgar; Yang, Zhimou; Wang, Flora; Klemba, Michael; Bogyo, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Background High throughput screening (HTS) is one of the primary tools used to identify novel enzyme inhibitors. However, its applicability is generally restricted to targets that can either be expressed recombinantly or purified in large quantities. Methodology and Principal Findings Here, we described a method to use activity-based probes (ABPs) to identify substrates that are sufficiently selective to allow HTS in complex biological samples. Because ABPs label their target enzymes through the formation of a permanent covalent bond, we can correlate labeling of target enzymes in a complex mixture with inhibition of turnover of a substrate in that same mixture. Thus, substrate specificity can be determined and substrates with sufficiently high selectivity for HTS can be identified. In this study, we demonstrate this method by using an ABP for dipeptidyl aminopeptidases to identify (Pro-Arg)2-Rhodamine as a specific substrate for DPAP1 in Plasmodium falciparum lysates and Cathepsin C in rat liver extracts. We then used this substrate to develop highly sensitive HTS assays (Z’>0.8) that are suitable for use in screening large collections of small molecules (i.e >300,000) for inhibitors of these proteases. Finally, we demonstrate that it is possible to use broad-spectrum ABPs to identify target-specific substrates. Conclusions We believe that this approach will have value for many enzymatic systems where access to large amounts of active enzyme is problematic. PMID:20700487

  19. Discovery of novel BRD4 inhibitors by high-throughput screening, crystallography, and cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongya; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Zhifeng; Xie, Yiqian; Jiang, Hao; Chen, Limin; Ding, Hong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Hualiang; Zheng, Mingyue; Luo, Cheng

    2017-03-09

    As an epigenetic reader, BRD4 regulates the transcription of important downstream genes that are essential for the survival of tumor cells. Small molecular inhibitors targeting the first bromodomain of BRD4 (BRD4-BD1) have showed promising potentials in the therapies of BRD4-related cancers. Through AlphaScreen-based high-throughput screening assay, a novel small molecular inhibitor was identified, and named DCBD-005, which inhibited the binding between BRD4-BD1 and acetylated lysines with an IC50 value of 0.81±0.03μM. The compound DCBD-005 effectively inhibited the viability, caused cell cycle arrest, and induced apoptosis in human leukemia MV4-11 cells. Moreover, the crystal structure of compound DCBD-005 with the BRD4-BD1 was determined at 1.72Å resolution, which revealed the binding mechanism of the leading compound, and also provided solid basis for further structure-based optimization. These results indicated that this novel BRD4-BD1 inhibitor DCBD-005 is promising to be developed into a drug candidate in the treatment of BRD4-related diseases.

  20. A fluorescence-based assay to monitor autopalmitoylation of zDHHC proteins applicable to high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Laura D; Deschenes, Robert J; Mitchell, David A

    2014-09-01

    Palmitoylation, the posttranslational thioester-linked modification of a 16-carbon saturated fatty acid onto the cysteine residue of a protein, has garnered considerable attention due to its implication in a multitude of disease states. The signature DHHC motif (Asp-His-His-Cys) identifies a family of protein acyltransferases (PATs) that catalyze the S-palmitoylation of target proteins via a two-step mechanism. In the first step, autopalmitoylation, palmitate is transferred from palmitoyl-CoA to the PAT, creating a palmitoyl:PAT intermediate and releasing reduced CoA. The palmitoyl moiety is then transferred to a protein substrate in the second step of the reaction. We have developed an in vitro, single-well, fluorescence-based enzyme assay that monitors the first step of the PAT reaction by coupling the production of reduced CoA to the reduction of NAD(+) using the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. This assay is suitable for determining PAT kinetic parameters, elucidating lipid donor specificity and measuring PAT inhibition by 2-bromopalmitate. Finally, it can be used for high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns for modulators of protein palmitoylation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bringing the light to high throughput screening: use of optogenetic tools for the development of recombinant cellular assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agus, Viviana; Di Silvio, Alberto; Rolland, Jean Francois; Mondini, Anna; Tremolada, Sara; Montag, Katharina; Scarabottolo, Lia; Redaelli, Loredana; Lohmer, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The use of light-activated proteins represents a powerful tool to control biological processes with high spatial and temporal precision. These so called "optogenetic" technologies have been successfully validated in many recombinant systems, and have been widely applied to the study of cellular mechanisms in intact tissues or behaving animals; to do that, complex, high-intensity, often home-made instrumentations were developed to achieve the optimal power and precision of light stimulation. In our study we sought to determine if this optical modulation can be obtained also in a miniaturized format, such as a 384-well plate, using the instrumentations normally dedicated to fluorescence analysis in High Throughput Screening (HTS) activities, such as for example the FLIPR (Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader) instrument. We successfully generated optogenetic assays for the study of different ion channel targets: the CaV1.3 calcium channel was modulated by the light-activated Channelrhodopsin-2, the HCN2 cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channel was modulated by the light activated bPAC adenylyl cyclase, and finally the genetically encoded voltage indicator ArcLight was efficiently used to measure potassium, sodium or chloride channel activity. Our results showed that stable, robust and miniaturized cellular assays can be developed using different optogenetic tools, and efficiently modulated by the FLIPR instrument LEDs in a 384-well format. The spatial and temporal resolution delivered by this technology might enormously advantage the early stages of drug discovery, leading to the identification of more physiological and effective drug molecules.

  2. A high-throughput differential filtration assay to screen and select detergents for membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Vergis, James M; Purdy, Michael D; Wiener, Michael C

    2010-12-01

    Structural studies on integral membrane proteins are routinely performed on protein-detergent complexes (PDCs) consisting of purified protein solubilized in a particular detergent. Of all the membrane protein crystal structures solved to date, a subset of only four detergents has been used in more than half of these structures. Unfortunately, many membrane proteins are not well behaved in these four detergents and/or fail to yield well-diffracting crystals. Identification of detergents that maintain the solubility and stability of a membrane protein is a critical step and can be a lengthy and "protein-expensive" process. We have developed an assay that characterizes the stability and size of membrane proteins exchanged into a panel of 94 commercially available and chemically diverse detergents. This differential filtration assay (DFA), using a set of filtered microplates, requires sub-milligram quantities of purified protein and small quantities of detergents and other reagents and is performed in its entirety in several hours. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A high-throughput differential filtration assay to screen and select detergents for membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vergis, James M.; Purdy, Michael D.; Wiener, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Structural studies on integral membrane proteins are routinely performed on protein–detergent complexes (PDCs) consisting of purified protein solubilized in a particular detergent. Of all the membrane protein crystal structures solved to date, a subset of only four detergents has been used in more than half of these structures. Unfortunately, many membrane proteins are not well behaved in these four detergents and/or fail to yield well-diffracting crystals. Identification of detergents that maintain the solubility and stability of a membrane protein is a critical step and can be a lengthy and “protein-expensive” process. We have developed an assay that characterizes the stability and size of membrane proteins exchanged into a panel of 94 commercially available and chemically diverse detergents. This differential filtration assay (DFA), using a set of filtered microplates, requires sub-milligram quantities of purified protein and small quantities of detergents and other reagents and is performed in its entirety in several hours. PMID:20667442

  4. New high-throughput screening protease assay based upon supramolecular self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, David G.; Tang, Yanli; Zhou, Zhijun; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.

    2008-11-01

    We previously demonstrated that the supramolecular self-assembly of cyanines could be useful for developing fluorescent enzymatic assays. We took that concept a step further by synthesizing a covalent adduct of the tetrapeptide Asp-Glu-Val-Asp (DEVD) and a cyanine (DEVD-cyanine). The DEVD-cyanine due to its canonical sequence was recognized and hydrolyzed by the proteases, Caspase-3 and -7 in 96- or 384-microwell plate reactions. The catalytically liberated cyanine self-assembled upon scaffolds of carboxymethylamylose (CMA), carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), or a mixture of CMA and CMC resulting in a J aggregate exhibiting bright fluorescence at a 470 nm emission wavelength (optimum signal/background using excitation wavelengths of 415-440 nm). The fluorescence intensity increased with enzyme and substrate concentrations or reaction time and exhibited classical saturation profiles of a rectangular hyperbola. Saturation of the reaction was at 30 U/mL (1 {micro}g/mL) Caspase-3 and 250 {micro}M DEVD-cyanine. The reaction kinetics was linear between 1 and 20 min and saturated at 60 min. The affinity constant (Km) for DEVD-cyanine was 23 {micro}M, similar to those of previously reported values for other DEVD substrates of Caspase-3. Maximal fluorescence emission was observed by using a mixture of CMA and CMC scaffolds at 65 and 35 {micro}M, respectively. The reaction kinetics of Caspase-7 executed in a 384-well plate was similar to the reaction kinetics of Caspase-3 conducted in a 96-well plate. We believe that this is the first demonstration of a cyanine liberated from a covalent adduct due to protease action, leading to supramolecular self-assembly and the detection of protease activity.

  5. High-Throughput Screening for RecA Inhibitors Using a Transcreener Adenosine 5′-O-Diphosphate Assay

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Eliza J.R.; Janzen, William P.; Kireev, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The activities of the bacterial RecA protein are involved in the de novo development and transmission of antibiotic resistance genes, thus allowing bacteria to overcome the metabolic stress induced by antibacterial agents. RecA is ubiquitous and highly conserved among bacteria, but has only distant homologs in human cells. Together, this evidence points to RecA as a novel and attractive antibacterial drug target. All known RecA functions require the formation of a complex formed by multiple adenosine 5′-O-triphosphate (ATP)-bound RecA monomers on single-stranded DNA. In this complex, RecA hydrolyzes ATP. Although several methods for assessing RecA's ATPase activity have been reported, these assay conditions included relatively high concentrations of enzyme and ATP and thereby restricted the RecA conformational state. Herein, we describe the validation of commercial reagents (Transcreener® adenosine 5′-O-diphosphate [ADP]2 fluorescence polarization assay) for the high-throughput measurement of RecA's ATPase activity with lower concentrations of ATP and RecA. Under optimized conditions, ADP detection by the Transcreener reagent provided robust and reproducible activity data (Z′=0.92). Using the Transcreener assay, we screened 113,477 small molecules against purified RecA protein. In total, 177 small molecules were identified as confirmed hits, of which 79 were characterized by IC50 values ≤10 μM and 35 were active in bioassays with live bacteria. This set of compounds comprises previously unidentified scaffolds for RecA inhibition and represents tractable hit structures for efforts aimed at tuning RecA inhibitory activity in both biochemical and bacteriological assays. PMID:22192312

  6. High-throughput screening for RecA inhibitors using a transcreener adenosine 5'-O-diphosphate assay.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Eliza J R; Janzen, William P; Kireev, Dmitri; Singleton, Scott F

    2012-06-01

    The activities of the bacterial RecA protein are involved in the de novo development and transmission of antibiotic resistance genes, thus allowing bacteria to overcome the metabolic stress induced by antibacterial agents. RecA is ubiquitous and highly conserved among bacteria, but has only distant homologs in human cells. Together, this evidence points to RecA as a novel and attractive antibacterial drug target. All known RecA functions require the formation of a complex formed by multiple adenosine 5'-O-triphosphate (ATP)-bound RecA monomers on single-stranded DNA. In this complex, RecA hydrolyzes ATP. Although several methods for assessing RecA's ATPase activity have been reported, these assay conditions included relatively high concentrations of enzyme and ATP and thereby restricted the RecA conformational state. Herein, we describe the validation of commercial reagents (Transcreener(®) adenosine 5'-O-diphosphate [ADP](2) fluorescence polarization assay) for the high-throughput measurement of RecA's ATPase activity with lower concentrations of ATP and RecA. Under optimized conditions, ADP detection by the Transcreener reagent provided robust and reproducible activity data (Z'=0.92). Using the Transcreener assay, we screened 113,477 small molecules against purified RecA protein. In total, 177 small molecules were identified as confirmed hits, of which 79 were characterized by IC(50) values ≤ 10 μM and 35 were active in bioassays with live bacteria. This set of compounds comprises previously unidentified scaffolds for RecA inhibition and represents tractable hit structures for efforts aimed at tuning RecA inhibitory activity in both biochemical and bacteriological assays.

  7. Application of Targeted Functional Assays to Assess a Putative Vascular Disruption Developmental Toxicity Pathway Informed By ToxCast High-Throughput Screening Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical perturbation of vascular development is a putative toxicity pathway which may result in developmental toxicity. EPA’s high-throughput screening (HTS) ToxCast program contains assays which measure cellular signals and biological processes critical for blood vessel develop...

  8. High-throughput Screening of ToxCast™ Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell (mESC) Assay Reveals Disruption of Potential Toxicity Pathways

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little information is available regarding the potential for many commercial chemicals to induce developmental toxicity. The mESC Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytoxicity (ACDC) assay is a high-throughput screen used to close this data gap. Thus, ToxCast™ Phase I chemicals wer...

  9. High-throughput Screening of ToxCast™ Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell (mESC) Assay Reveals Disruption of Potential Toxicity Pathways

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little information is available regarding the potential for many commercial chemicals to induce developmental toxicity. The mESC Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytoxicity (ACDC) assay is a high-throughput screen used to close this data gap. Thus, ToxCast™ Phase I chemicals wer...

  10. Application of Targeted Functional Assays to Assess a Putative Vascular Disruption Developmental Toxicity Pathway Informed By ToxCast High-Throughput Screening Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical perturbation of vascular development is a putative toxicity pathway which may result in developmental toxicity. EPA’s high-throughput screening (HTS) ToxCast program contains assays which measure cellular signals and biological processes critical for blood vessel develop...

  11. Big data in chemical toxicity research: the use of high-throughput screening assays to identify potential toxicants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Zhang, Jun; Kim, Marlene T; Boison, Abena; Sedykh, Alexander; Moran, Kimberlee

    2014-10-20

    High-throughput screening (HTS) assays that measure the in vitro toxicity of environmental compounds have been widely applied as an alternative to in vivo animal tests of chemical toxicity. Current HTS studies provide the community with rich toxicology information that has the potential to be integrated into toxicity research. The available in vitro toxicity data is updated daily in structured formats (e.g., deposited into PubChem and other data-sharing web portals) or in an unstructured way (papers, laboratory reports, toxicity Web site updates, etc.). The information derived from the current toxicity data is so large and complex that it becomes difficult to process using available database management tools or traditional data processing applications. For this reason, it is necessary to develop a big data approach when conducting modern chemical toxicity research. In vitro data for a compound, obtained from meaningful bioassays, can be viewed as a response profile that gives detailed information about the compound's ability to affect relevant biological proteins/receptors. This information is critical for the evaluation of complex bioactivities (e.g., animal toxicities) and grows rapidly as big data in toxicology communities. This review focuses mainly on the existing structured in vitro data (e.g., PubChem data sets) as response profiles for compounds of environmental interest (e.g., potential human/animal toxicants). Potential modeling and mining tools to use the current big data pool in chemical toxicity research are also described.

  12. Big Data in Chemical Toxicity Research: The Use of High-Throughput Screening Assays To Identify Potential Toxicants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) assays that measure the in vitro toxicity of environmental compounds have been widely applied as an alternative to in vivo animal tests of chemical toxicity. Current HTS studies provide the community with rich toxicology information that has the potential to be integrated into toxicity research. The available in vitro toxicity data is updated daily in structured formats (e.g., deposited into PubChem and other data-sharing web portals) or in an unstructured way (papers, laboratory reports, toxicity Web site updates, etc.). The information derived from the current toxicity data is so large and complex that it becomes difficult to process using available database management tools or traditional data processing applications. For this reason, it is necessary to develop a big data approach when conducting modern chemical toxicity research. In vitro data for a compound, obtained from meaningful bioassays, can be viewed as a response profile that gives detailed information about the compound’s ability to affect relevant biological proteins/receptors. This information is critical for the evaluation of complex bioactivities (e.g., animal toxicities) and grows rapidly as big data in toxicology communities. This review focuses mainly on the existing structured in vitro data (e.g., PubChem data sets) as response profiles for compounds of environmental interest (e.g., potential human/animal toxicants). Potential modeling and mining tools to use the current big data pool in chemical toxicity research are also described. PMID:25195622

  13. Development of a high-throughput cell-based reporter assay for screening of JAK3 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chang-Hong; Bach, Erika A; Baeg, Gyeong-Hun

    2011-04-01

    JAK3 is an ideal target for the treatment of immune-related diseases and the prevention of organ allograft rejection. Several JAK3 inhibitors have been identified by biochemical enzymatic assays, but the majority display significant off-target effects on JAK2. Therefore, there is a need to develop new experimental approaches to identify compounds that specifically inhibit JAK3. Here, we show that in 32D/IL-2Rβ cells, STAT5 becomes phosphorylated by an IL-3/JAK2- or IL-2/JAK3-dependent pathway. Importantly, the selective JAK3 inhibitor CP-690,550 blocked the phosphorylation and the nuclear translocation of STAT5 following treatment of cells with IL-2 but not with IL-3. In an attempt to use the cells for large-scale chemical screens to identify JAK3 inhibitors, we established a cell line, 32D/IL-2Rβ/6xSTAT5, stably expressing a STAT5 reporter gene. Treatment of this cell line with IL-2 or IL-3 dramatically increased the reporter activity in a high-throughput format. As expected, CP-690,550 selectively inhibited the activity of the 6xSTAT5 reporter following treatment with IL-2. By contrast, the pan-JAK inhibitor curcumin inhibited the activity of this reporter following treatment with either IL-2 or IL-3. Thus, this study indicates that the STAT5 reporter cell line can be used as an efficacious cellular model for chemical screens to identify selective JAK3 inhibitors.

  14. Validation of a human cell based high-throughput genotoxicity assay 'Anthem's Genotoxicity screen' using ECVAM recommended lists of genotoxic and non-genotoxic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Rajakrishna, Lakshmi; Krishnan Unni, Salini; Subbiah, Madhuri; Sadagopan, Sathish; Nair, Ayyappan R; Chandrappa, Ravindra; Sambasivam, Ganesh; Sukumaran, Sunil Kumar

    2014-02-01

    A novel high throughput-enabled human cell based screen, Anthem's Genotoxicity screen, was developed to achieve higher specificity for predicting in vivo genotoxins by an in vitro method. The assay employs engineered human colon carcinoma cell line; HCT116 cells that are stably engineered with three promoter-reporter cassettes such that an increased reporter activity reflects the activation of associated signaling events in a human cell. The current study focuses on the evaluation of sensitivity and specificity of Anthem's Genotoxicity screen using 62 compounds recommended by the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM). The concordance of Anthem's Genotoxicity screen with in vivo tests was 95.5% with sensitivity of 95.2% and specificity of 95.7%. Thus Anthem's Genotoxicity screen, a high-throughput mechanism based genotox indicator test can be employed by a variety of industries for rapid screening and early detection of potential genotoxins.

  15. Droplet microfluidics for high-throughput biological assays.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mira T; Rotem, Assaf; Heyman, John A; Weitz, David A

    2012-06-21

    Droplet microfluidics offers significant advantages for performing high-throughput screens and sensitive assays. Droplets allow sample volumes to be significantly reduced, leading to concomitant reductions in cost. Manipulation and measurement at kilohertz speeds enable up to 10(8) samples to be screened in one day. Compartmentalization in droplets increases assay sensitivity by increasing the effective concentration of rare species and decreasing the time required to reach detection thresholds. Droplet microfluidics combines these powerful features to enable currently inaccessible high-throughput screening applications, including single-cell and single-molecule assays.

  16. High-performance mass spectrometry as a drug discovery tool: a high-throughput screening assay to identify RNA-binding ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannes-Lowery, Kristin A.; Drader, Jared J.; Griffey, Richard H.; Hofstadler, Steven A.

    2001-04-01

    Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) is increasingly being used as a drug discovery tool. We describe the development of a parallel high-throughput screening (HTS) strategy to identify small molecules that bind RNA targets using FTMS as an alternative to classical high-throughput biological screening methods for combinatorial libraries. The Multitarget Affinity/Specificity Screening (MASS) assay takes advantage of the "intrinsic mass" label of each compound and target RNA by employing high resolution, high precision mass measurements. The ability to analyze complex mixtures allows large compound libraries to be screened in the presence of multiple RNA targets simultaneously. The identity of the small molecule(s) which bind, the RNA target to which it binds, the compound-specific binding affinity and the location of the binding site on the RNA can be determined in one set of rapid experiments. The MASS technology detects complexes with dissociation constants of < 5 mM, with high sensitivity.

  17. High throughput protein production screening

    DOEpatents

    Beernink, Peter T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Segelke, Brent W.

    2009-09-08

    Methods, compositions, and kits for the cell-free production and analysis of proteins are provided. The invention allows for the production of proteins from prokaryotic sequences or eukaryotic sequences, including human cDNAs using PCR and IVT methods and detecting the proteins through fluorescence or immunoblot techniques. This invention can be used to identify optimized PCR and WT conditions, codon usages and mutations. The methods are readily automated and can be used for high throughput analysis of protein expression levels, interactions, and functional states.

  18. A high throughput screening assay to screen for CYP2E1 metabolism and inhibition using a fluorogenic vivid p450 substrate.

    PubMed

    Marks, Bryan D; Smith, Ronald W; Braun, Heidi A; Goossens, Tony A; Christenson, Marie; Ozers, Mary S; Lebakken, Connie S; Trubetskoy, Olga V

    2002-11-01

    Large-scale screening of multiple compound libraries and combinatorial libraries for pharmacological activity is one of the novel approaches of the modern drug discovery process. The application of isozyme-specific high-throughput screening (HTS) assays for characterizing the interactions of potential drug candidates with major human drug-metabolizing cytochrome p450 enzymes (p450s) is newly becoming an essential part of this process. Fluorescence-based HTS assays have been successfully employed for in vitro assessment of drug-drug interactions and enzyme inhibition with several p450 isoforms, including CYP3A4, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19. Here we describe a fluorescence-based HTS assay for detecting drug metabolism and inhibition with human CYP2E1. CYP2E1 plays an important role in the metabolism of several drugs, many solvents, and toxins and therefore has been repeatedly linked to numerous pathologies, including cancer, liver and kidney toxicity, diabetes, and alcoholism. The assay is based on the ability of a drug to compete with the fluorogenic Vivid CYP2E1 Blue Substrate for CYP2E1 metabolism and thus enables rapid screening of lead molecules for their inhibitory potential. We have used this assay to screen a panel of drugs and compounds for their effects on CYP2E1 metabolism and inhibition. Our results demonstrate the assay's usefulness in identifying CYP2E1 substrates and inhibitors and in enabling in-depth characterization of their interactions with the CYP2E1 isozyme. We also present detailed characteristics of the assay, including its dynamic range and Z'-factor values, which indicate that this robust assay is well suited for kinetic and inhibition studies in HTS formats.

  19. Fully Bayesian Analysis of High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput metabolomic assays that allow simultaneous targeted screening of hundreds of metabolites have recently become available in kit form. Such assays provide a window into understanding changes to biochemical pathways due to chemical exposure or disease, and are usefu...

  20. Fully Bayesian Analysis of High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput metabolomic assays that allow simultaneous targeted screening of hundreds of metabolites have recently become available in kit form. Such assays provide a window into understanding changes to biochemical pathways due to chemical exposure or disease, and are usefu...

  1. Optimization of a Yellow fluorescent protein-based iodide influx high-throughput screening assay for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators.

    PubMed

    Sui, Jinliang; Cotard, Shakira; Andersen, Jennifer; Zhu, Ping; Staunton, Jane; Lee, Margaret; Lin, Stephen

    2010-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited, life-threatening disease associated with mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The most common mutation, F508del CFTR, is found in 90% of CF patients. The loss of a single amino acid (phenylalanine at position 508) results in malformed CFTR with defective trafficking to the plasma membrane and impaired channel function. A functional assay with cells expressing F508del CFTR has been previously described by others using genetically engineered halide-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein to screen for CFTR modulators. We adapted this yellow fluorescent protein assay to 384-well plate format with a high-throughput screening plate reader, and optimized the assay in terms of data quality, resolution, and throughput, with target-specific protocols. The optimized assay was validated with reference compounds from cystic fibrosis foundation therapeutics. On the basis of the Z-factor range (≥0.5) and the potential productivity, this assay is well suited for high-throughput screening. It was successfully used to screen for active single agent and synergistic combinations of single agent modulators of F508del CFTR from a library collection of current active pharmaceutical ingredients (supported by Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics).

  2. Identification of several high-risk HPV inhibitors and drug targets with a novel high-throughput screening assay

    PubMed Central

    Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Männik, Andres; Mumm, Karl; Tämm, Kaido; Tamm, Tarmo; Ustav, Mart

    2017-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are oncogenic viruses that cause numerous different cancers as well as benign lesions in the epithelia. To date, there is no effective cure for an ongoing HPV infection. Here, we describe the generation process of a platform for the development of anti-HPV drugs. This system consists of engineered full-length HPV genomes that express reporter genes for evaluation of the viral copy number in all three HPV replication stages. We demonstrate the usefulness of this system by conducting high-throughput screens to identify novel high-risk HPV-specific inhibitors. At least five of the inhibitors block the function of Tdp1 and PARP1, which have been identified as essential cellular proteins for HPV replication and promising candidates for the development of antivirals against HPV and possibly against HPV-related cancers. PMID:28182794

  3. Screening of HIV-1 Protease Using a Combination of an Ultra-High-Throughput Fluorescent-Based Assay and RapidFire Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Meng, Juncai; Lai, Ming-Tain; Munshi, Vandna; Grobler, Jay; McCauley, John; Zuck, Paul; Johnson, Eric N; Uebele, Victor N; Hermes, Jeffrey D; Adam, Gregory C

    2015-06-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) represents one of the primary targets for developing antiviral agents for the treatment of HIV-infected patients. To identify novel PR inhibitors, a label-free, high-throughput mass spectrometry (HTMS) assay was developed using the RapidFire platform and applied as an orthogonal assay to confirm hits identified in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based primary screen of > 1 million compounds. For substrate selection, a panel of peptide substrates derived from natural processing sites for PR was evaluated on the RapidFire platform. As a result, KVSLNFPIL, a new substrate measured to have a ~ 20- and 60-fold improvement in k cat/K m over the frequently used sequences SQNYPIVQ and SQNYPIV, respectively, was identified for the HTMS screen. About 17% of hits from the FRET-based primary screen were confirmed in the HTMS confirmatory assay including all 304 known PR inhibitors in the set, demonstrating that the HTMS assay is effective at triaging false-positives while capturing true hits. Hence, with a sampling rate of ~7 s per well, the RapidFire HTMS assay enables the high-throughput evaluation of peptide substrates and functions as an efficient tool for hits triage in the discovery of novel PR inhibitors.

  4. A high-throughput assay for arylamine halogenation based on a peroxidase-mediated quinone-amine coupling with applications in the screening of enzymatic halogenations.

    PubMed

    Hosford, Joseph; Shepherd, Sarah A; Micklefield, Jason; Wong, Lu Shin

    2014-12-08

    Arylhalides are important building blocks in many fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals, and there has been increasing interest in the development of more "green" halogenation methods based on enzyme catalysis. However, the screening and development of new enzymes for biohalogenation has been hampered by a lack of high-throughput screening methods. Described herein is the development of a colorimetric assay for detecting both chemical and enzymatic arylamine halogenation reactions in an aqueous environment. The assay is based on the unique UV/Vis spectrum created by the formation of an ortho-benzoquinone-amine adduct, which is produced by the peroxidase-catalysed benzoquinone generation, followed by Michael addition of either a halogenated or non-halogenated arylamine. This assay is sensitive, rapid and amenable to high-throughput screening platforms. We have also shown this assay to be easily coupled to a flavin-dependent halogenase, which currently lacks any convenient colorimetric assay, in a "one-pot" workflow. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  5. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of a Type 2 Blood Group A Tetrasaccharide and Development of High-throughput Assays Enables a Platform for Screening Blood Group Antigen-cleaving Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kwan, David H; Ernst, Sabrina; Kötzler, Miriam P; Withers, Stephen G

    2015-08-01

    A facile enzymatic synthesis of the methylumbelliferyl β-glycoside of the type 2 A blood group tetrasaccharide in good yields is reported. Using this compound, we developed highly sensitive fluorescence-based high-throughput assays for both endo-β-galactosidase and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity specific for the oligosaccharide structure of the blood group A antigen. We further demonstrate the potential to use this assay to screen the expressed gene products of metagenomic libraries in the search for efficient blood group antigen-cleaving enzymes.

  6. Application of yeast-two hybrid assay to chemical genomic screens: a high-throughput system to identify novel molecules modulating plant hormone receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Chini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Phytohormones are endogenous signalling molecules that regulate plant development, adaptation to the environment, and survival. Upon internal or external stimuli, hormones are quickly accumulated and perceived, which in turn activates specific signalling cascades regulating the appropriate physiological responses. In the last decade, great advances in understanding plant hormone perception mechanisms have been achieved. Among different methodological approaches, yeast-two hybrid (Y2H) assays played a pivotal role in the identification and analysis of plant hormone perception complexes. The Y2H assay is a rapid and straightforward technique that can be easily employed to identify small molecules directly modulating plant hormone perception complexes in a high-throughput manner. However, an Y2H chemical screen tends to isolate false positive molecules, and therefore a secondary in planta screen is required to confirm the genuine bioactivity of putative positive hits. This two-step screening approach can substantially save time and manual labor. This chapter focuses on the prospects of Y2H-based chemical genomic high-throughput screens applied to plant hormone perception complexes. Specifically, the method employed to carry out a chemical genomic screen to identify agonist and antagonist molecules of the phytohormone jasmonic acid in its conjugated form jasmonic acid-isoleucine (JA-Ile) is described. An easy in planta confirmation assay is also illustrated. However, this methodology can be easily extended to detect novel chemical compounds perturbing additional plant hormone receptor complexes. Finally, the high-throughput approach described here can also be implemented for the identification of molecules interfering with protein-protein interaction of plant complexes other than hormone receptors.

  7. TaqMan 5'-nuclease human immunodeficiency virus type 1 PCR assay with phage-packaged competitive internal control for high-throughput blood donor screening.

    PubMed

    Drosten, C; Seifried, E; Roth, W K

    2001-12-01

    Screening of blood donors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection by PCR permits the earlier diagnosis of HIV-1 infection compared with that by serologic assays. We have established a high-throughput reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay based on 5'-nuclease PCR. By in-tube detection of HIV-1 RNA with a fluorogenic probe, the 5'-nuclease PCR technology (TaqMan PCR) eliminates the risk of carryover contamination, a major problem in PCR testing. We outline the development and evaluation of the PCR assay from a technical point of view. A one-step RT-PCR that targets the gag genes of all known HIV-1 group M isolates was developed. An internal control RNA detectable with a heterologous 5'-nuclease probe was derived from the viral target cDNA and was packaged into MS2 coliphages (Armored RNA). Because the RNA was protected against digestion with RNase, it could be spiked into patient plasma to control the complete sample preparation and amplification process. The assay detected 831 HIV-1 type B genome equivalents per ml of native plasma (95% confidence interval [CI], 759 to 936 HIV-1 B genome equivalents per ml) with a >or=95% probability of a positive result, as determined by probit regression analysis. A detection limit of 1,195 genome equivalents per ml of (individual) donor plasma (95% CI, 1,014 to 1,470 genome equivalents per ml of plasma pooled from individuals) was achieved when 96 samples were pooled and enriched by centrifugation. Up to 4,000 plasma samples per PCR run were tested in a 3-month trial period. Although data from the present pilot feasibility study will have to be complemented by a large clinical validation study, the assay is a promising approach to the high-throughput screening of blood donors and is the first noncommercial test for high-throughput screening for HIV-1.

  8. High-Throughput Screening Using a Whole-Cell Virus Replication Reporter Gene Assay to Identify Inhibitory Compounds against Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Koushikul; Baudin, Maria; Eriksson, Jonas; Öberg, Christopher; Habjan, Matthias; Weber, Friedemann; Överby, Anna K; Ahlm, Clas; Evander, Magnus

    2016-04-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging virus that causes serious illness in humans and livestock. There are no approved vaccines or treatments for humans. The purpose of the study was to identify inhibitory compounds of RVFV infection without any preconceived idea of the mechanism of action. A whole-cell-based high-throughput drug screening assay was developed to screen 28,437 small chemical compounds targeting RVFV infection. To accomplish both speed and robustness, a replication-competent NSs-deleted RVFV expressing a fluorescent reporter gene was developed. Inhibition of fluorescence intensity was quantified by spectrophotometry and related to virus infection in human lung epithelial cells (A549). Cell toxicity was assessed by the Resazurin cell viability assay. After primary screening, 641 compounds were identified that inhibited RVFV infection by ≥80%, with ≥50% cell viability at 50 µM concentration. These compounds were subjected to a second screening regarding dose-response profiles, and 63 compounds with ≥60% inhibition of RVFV infection at 3.12 µM compound concentration and ≥50% cell viability at 25 µM were considered hits. Of these, six compounds with high inhibitory activity were identified. In conclusion, the high-throughput assay could efficiently and safely identify several promising compounds that inhibited RVFV infection.

  9. High-Throughput Screening in Primary Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Punita; Ando, D. Michael; Daub, Aaron; Kaye, Julia A.; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Despite years of incremental progress in our understanding of diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), there are still no disease-modifying therapeutics. The discrepancy between the number of lead compounds and approved drugs may partially be a result of the methods used to generate the leads and highlights the need for new technology to obtain more detailed and physiologically relevant information on cellular processes in normal and diseased states. Our high-throughput screening (HTS) system in a primary neuron model can help address this unmet need. HTS allows scientists to assay thousands of conditions in a short period of time which can reveal completely new aspects of biology and identify potential therapeutics in the span of a few months when conventional methods could take years or fail all together. HTS in primary neurons combines the advantages of HTS with the biological relevance of intact, fully differentiated neurons which can capture the critical cellular events or homeostatic states that make neurons uniquely susceptible to disease-associated proteins. We detail methodologies of our primary neuron HTS assay workflow from sample preparation to data reporting. We also discuss our adaptation of our HTS system into high-content screening (HCS), a type of HTS that uses multichannel fluorescence images to capture biological events in situ, and is uniquely suited to study dynamical processes in living cells. PMID:22341232

  10. Uncertainty Quantification in High Throughput Screening ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Using uncertainty quantification, we aim to improve the quality of modeling data from high throughput screening assays for use in risk assessment. ToxCast is a large-scale screening program that analyzes thousands of chemicals using over 800 assays representing hundreds of biochemical and cellular processes, including endocrine disruption, cytotoxicity, and zebrafish development. Over 2.6 million concentration response curves are fit to models to extract parameters related to potency and efficacy. Models built on ToxCast results are being used to rank and prioritize the toxicological risk of tested chemicals and to predict the toxicity of tens of thousands of chemicals not yet tested in vivo. However, the data size also presents challenges. When fitting the data, the choice of models, model selection strategy, and hit call criteria must reflect the need for computational efficiency and robustness, requiring hard and somewhat arbitrary cutoffs. When coupled with unavoidable noise in the experimental concentration response data, these hard cutoffs cause uncertainty in model parameters and the hit call itself. The uncertainty will then propagate through all of the models built on the data. Left unquantified, this uncertainty makes it difficult to fully interpret the data for risk assessment. We used bootstrap resampling methods to quantify the uncertainty in fitting models to the concentration response data. Bootstrap resampling determines confidence intervals for

  11. Development of filtration-based time-resolved fluorescence assay for the high-throughput screening of urotensin II receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Seok; Lee, Sunghou; Lee, Byung Ho

    2011-10-01

    The time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) receptor binding assay has many advantages over the traditional radioligand binding assay in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility for the screening of receptor ligands. The TRF-based urotensin receptor (UT) binding assay with an automatic vacuum filtration system was developed and evaluated for the high-throughput screening of UT receptor antagonists. For this assay development, the human recombinant urotensin II (UII) was modified by labeling europium at its N-terminal position (Eu-UII) and used as a fluorescent tracer. The microsomal membrane fraction of UT receptor was prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing the human UT receptor. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values of UII from competition binding assays with Eu-UII were 2.76 nM, which is very similar to that of fluorescence polarization (FP)-based UT receptor binding experiment (2.18 nM). Comparing with the FP-based receptor binding assay for UII (Z' factor, 0.36), the current TRF assay presented improved Z' factor (0.76) with a relatively higher signal-to-background ratio (1.5 and 2.1, respectively). The known high-affinity UT receptor antagonists, palosuran and SB657510, exhibited IC(50) values of 23.6 and 73.4 nM, respectively, which were consistent with the IC(50) values from FP-based receptor binding assay (30.6 and 78.7 nM, respectively). These results suggest that our filtration-based TRF UT receptor binding assay can achieve the desired sensitivity with higher reproducibility to adapt for the high-throughput screening of compound libraries.

  12. High-throughput crystallization screening.

    PubMed

    Skarina, Tatiana; Xu, Xiaohui; Evdokimova, Elena; Savchenko, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure determination by X-ray crystallography is dependent on obtaining a single protein crystal suitable for diffraction data collection. Due to this requirement, protein crystallization represents a key step in protein structure determination. The conditions for protein crystallization have to be determined empirically for each protein, making this step also a bottleneck in the structure determination process. Typical protein crystallization practice involves parallel setup and monitoring of a considerable number of individual protein crystallization experiments (also called crystallization trials). In these trials the aliquots of purified protein are mixed with a range of solutions composed of a precipitating agent, buffer, and sometimes an additive that have been previously successful in prompting protein crystallization. The individual chemical conditions in which a particular protein shows signs of crystallization are used as a starting point for further crystallization experiments. The goal is optimizing the formation of individual protein crystals of sufficient size and quality to make them suitable for diffraction data collection. Thus the composition of the primary crystallization screen is critical for successful crystallization.Systematic analysis of crystallization experiments carried out on several hundred proteins as part of large-scale structural genomics efforts allowed the optimization of the protein crystallization protocol and identification of a minimal set of 96 crystallization solutions (the "TRAP" screen) that, in our experience, led to crystallization of the maximum number of proteins.

  13. Development of a high-throughput screening for nerve agent detoxifying materials using a fully-automated robot-assisted biological assay.

    PubMed

    Wille, T; Thiermann, H; Worek, F

    2010-04-01

    Developing improved medical countermeasures against chemical warfare agents (nerve agents) is urgently needed but time-consuming and costly. Here we introduce a robot-assisted liquid handling system with warming, cooling and incubating facilities to screen the detoxifying properties of biological and chemical materials against nerve agents. Two biological tests were established and plasma from various species, DFPase and three cyclodextrins were used as test materials. In test 1, plasma was mixed with sarin or VX and the inhibitory potency of the incubate was determined with human acetylcholinesterase (AChE) at 0, 30 and 60 min. In test 2, test materials and nerve agents were mixed and incubated. Between 0 and 40 min samples were taken and incubated for 3 min with AChE and the residual AChE inhibition was determined to enable the semi-quantitative evaluation of the detoxification kinetics. The automated assays proved to be highly reproducible. It was possible to pre-select detoxifying reagents with test 1 and to determine more detailed detoxifying kinetics with test 2. In conclusion, the automated assay may be considered as a versatile tool for the high-throughput screening of potential detoxifying materials against different nerve agents. With this two-step assay it is possible to screen effectively for detoxifying materials in a high-throughput system. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Peptide reactivity assay using spectrophotometric method for high-throughput screening of skin sensitization potential of chemical haptens.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yun Hyeok; An, Susun; Shin, Kyeho; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2013-02-01

    Haptens must react with cellular proteins to be recognized by antigen presenting cells. Therefore, monitoring reactivity of chemicals with peptide/protein has been considered an in vitro skin sensitization testing method. The reactivity of peptides with chemicals (peptide reactivity) has usually been monitored by chromatographic methods like HPLC or LC/MS, which are robust tools for monitoring common chemical reactions but are rather expensive and time consuming. Here, we examined the possibility of using spectrophotometric methods to monitor peptide reactivity. Two synthetic peptides, Ac-RWAACAA and Ac-RWAAKAA, were reacted with 48 chemicals (34 sensitizers and 14 non-sensitizers). Peptide reactivity was measured by monitoring unreacted peptides with UV-Vis spectrophotometer using 5,5'-dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid as a detection reagent for the free thiol group of cysteine-containing peptide or fluorometer using fluorescamine™ as a detection reagent for the free amine group of lysine-containing peptide. Chemicals were categorized as sensitizers when they induced more than 10% depletion of cysteine-containing peptide or 20% depletion of lysine-containing peptide. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of this method were 82.4%, 85.7%, and 83.3%, respectively. These results demonstrate that spectrophotometric methods can be easy, fast, and high-throughput screening tools for the prediction of the skin sensitization potential of chemical haptens.

  15. Development of a high-content high-throughput screening assay for the discovery of ATM signaling inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bardelle, Catherine; Boros, Joanna

    2012-08-01

    The genome is constantly exposed to DNA damage agents, leading up to as many as 1 million individual lesions per cell per day. Cells have developed a variety of DNA damage repair (DDR) mechanisms to respond to harmful effects of DNA damage. Failure to repair the damaged DNA causes genomic instability and, as a result, leads to cellular transformation. Indeed, deficiencies of DDR frequently occur in human cancers, thus providing a great opportunity for cancer therapy by developing anticancer agents that work by synthetic lethality-based mechanisms or enhancing the clinical efficacy of radiotherapy and existing chemotherapies. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a key role in regulating the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks. Ionizing radiation causes double-strand breaks and induces rapid ATM autophosphorylation on serine 1981 that initiates ATM kinase activity. Activation of ATM results in phosphorylation of many downstream targets that modulate numerous damage-response pathways, most notably cell-cycle checkpoints. We describe here the development and validation of a high-throughput imaging assay measuring levels of phospho-ATM Ser1981 in HT29 cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. We also examined activation of downstream ATM effectors and checked specificity of the endpoint using known inhibitors of DNA repair pathways.

  16. A high throughput drug screening assay to identify compounds that promote oligodendrocyte differentiation using acutely dissociated and purified oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Lariosa-Willingham, Karen D; Rosler, Elen S; Tung, Jay S; Dugas, Jason C; Collins, Tassie L; Leonoudakis, Dmitri

    2016-09-05

    Multiple sclerosis is caused by an autoimmune response resulting in demyelination and neural degeneration. The adult central nervous system has the capacity to remyelinate axons in part through the generation of new oligodendrocytes (OLs). To identify clinical candidate compounds that may promote remyelination, we have developed a high throughput screening (HTS) assay to identify compounds that promote the differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) into OLs. Using acutely dissociated and purified rat OPCs coupled with immunofluorescent image quantification, we have developed an OL differentiation assay. We have validated this assay with a known promoter of differentiation, thyroid hormone, and subsequently used the assay to screen the NIH clinical collection library. We have identified twenty-seven hit compounds which were validated by dose response analysis and the generation of half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values allowed for the ranking of efficacy. The assay identified novel promoters of OL differentiation which we attribute to (1) the incorporation of an OL toxicity pre-screen to allow lowering the concentrations of toxic compounds and (2) the utilization of freshly purified, non-passaged OPCs. These features set our assay apart from other OL differentiation assays used for drug discovery efforts. This acute primary OL-based differentiation assay should be of use to those interested in screening large compound libraries for the identification of drugs for the treatment of MS and other demyelinating diseases.

  17. High-Throughput Screening for Small Molecule Inhibitors of LARG-Stimulated RhoA Nucleotide Binding via a Novel Fluorescence Polarization Assay

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Ferng, Timothy; Rojas, Rafael J.; Larsen, Martha J.; Sondek, John; Neubig, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs) stimulate guanine nucleotide exchange and the subsequent activation of Rho-family proteins in response to extracellular stimuli acting upon cytokine, tyrosine kinase, adhesion, integrin, and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Upon Rho activation, several downstream events occur, such as morphological and cytokskeletal changes, motility, growth, survival, and gene transcription. The RhoGEF Leukemia-Associated RhoGEF (LARG) is a member of the Regulators of G-protein Signaling Homology Domain (RH) family of GEFs originally identified as a result of chromosomal translocation in acute myeloid leukemia. Using a novel fluorescence polarization guanine nucleotide binding assay utilizing BODIPY-Texas Red-GTPγS (BODIPY-TR-GTPγS), we performed a ten-thousand compound high-throughput screen for inhibitors of LARG-stimulated RhoA nucleotide binding. Five compounds identified from the high-throughput screen were confirmed in a non-fluorescent radioactive guanine nucleotide binding assay measuring LARG-stimulated [35S] GTPγS binding to RhoA, thus ruling out non-specific fluorescent effects. All five compounds selectively inhibited LARG-stimulated RhoA [35S] GTPγS binding, but had little to no effect upon RhoA or Gαo [35S] GTPγS binding. Therefore, these five compounds should serve as promising starting points for the development of small molecule inhibitors of LARG-mediated nucleotide exchange as both pharmacological tools and therapeutics. In addition, the fluorescence polarization guanine nucleotide binding assay described here should serve as a useful approach for both high-throughput screening and general biological applications. PMID:19196702

  18. Multiplexing Fluo-4 NW and a GeneBLAzer transcriptional assay for high-throughput screening of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Bonnie J

    2006-09-01

    Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) leads to a cascade of signaling events, including calcium mobilization and downstream transcriptional activation of various proteins. Two commonly used methods of high-throughput screening for GPCRs include calcium-sensitive dyes, such as Fluo-4 NW, and reporter gene assays, such as beta-lactamase. To determine whether the advantages of each assay format could be combined by multiplexing, Jurkat and CHO-K1 cell lines over-expressing the M1 muscarinic receptor and beta-lactamase under control of an NFAT response element were tested in a multiplexed format. The Jurkat cell line was further screened with a subset of the LOPAC(1280) library. The multiplexing assay was compatible with both the CHO-K1 and Jurkat cell lines. For the screen, there was 100% correlation of on-target hits in the multiplexed format, and several false positives with each assay format were identified. Therefore, not only can the assays be multiplexed, but by multiplexing, the false positives associated with each assay format also could be easily identified. In addition to enhanced reliability, this method saves time and money because only half the amount of compounds, cells, and consumables are needed to screen a cell line in a multiplexed mode versus separate screening by both methods.

  19. Application of a nonradioactive assay for high throughput screening for inhibition of thyroid hormone uptake via the transmembrane transporter MCT8.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongyan; Wade, Michael G

    2017-04-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play important roles in almost all physiological processes. High-throughput screening (HTS) assays are needed to screen the vast numbers of chemicals for their potential to disrupt TH signalling. The current work has confirmed the ability of a rapid assay to identify substances inhibiting TH uptake through monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 8. Perturbation of MCT8 function results in significant developmental impairments, suggesting substances inhibiting MCT8 may be important developmental toxicants. We examined the accuracy and consistency of a recently described method to identify TH inhibitors via MCT8, using MDCK cells overexpressing human MCT8 gene. We confirmed the method detected T3 uptake in a concentration/time-dependent manner, and this effect was blocked by substances previous reported to block TH uptake via MCT8. Assay performance was assessed extensively and the system was found to have high signal dynamic range and Z' factor. The assay was also validated with a diverse set of training chemicals. This assay was then used to screen chemicals suspected to disrupt TH signalling. Other than bisphenol A (BPA), all substances tested were negative. Our results suggest that this assay could be part of a battery of screening assays to predict the potential thyroid disrupting activity of chemicals.

  20. Development of a novel nonradiometric assay for nucleic acid binding to TDP-43 suitable for high-throughput screening using AlphaScreen technology.

    PubMed

    Cassel, Joel A; Blass, Benjamin E; Reitz, Allen B; Pawlyk, Aaron C

    2010-10-01

    TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a nucleic acid binding protein that is associated with the pathology of cystic fibrosis and neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar dementia. We have developed a robust, quantitative, nonradiometric high-throughput assay measuring oligonucleotide binding to TDP-43 using AlphaScreen technology. Biotinylated single-stranded TAR DNA (bt-TAR-32) and 6 TG repeats (bt-TG6) bound with high affinity to TDP-43, with K(D) values of 0.75 nM and 0.63 nM, respectively. Both oligonucleotides exhibited slow dissociation rates, with half-lives of 750 min for bt-TAR-32 and 150 min for bt-TG6. The affinities of unlabeled oligonucleotides, as determined by displacement of either bt-TAR-32 or bt-TG6, were consistent with previous reports of nucleic acid interactions with TDP-43, where increasing TG or UG repeats yield greater affinity. A diversity library of 7360 compounds was screened for inhibition of TDP-43 binding to bt-TAR-32, and a series of compounds was discovered with nascent SAR and IC(50) values ranging from 100 nM to 10 µM. These compounds may prove to be useful biochemical tools to elucidate the function of TDP-43 and may lead to novel therapeutics for indications where the TDP-43 nucleic acid interaction is causal to the associated pathology.

  1. A Quantitative Toxicogenomics Assay for High-throughput and Mechanistic Genotoxicity Assessment and Screening of Environmental Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jiaqi; Gou, Na; Rahman, Sheikh Mokhles; Gao, Ce; He, Miao; Gu, April Z

    2016-03-15

    The ecological and health concern of mutagenicity and carcinogenicity potentially associated with an overwhelmingly large and ever-increasing number of chemicals demands for cost-effective and feasible method for genotoxicity screening and risk assessment. This study proposed a genotoxicity assay using GFP-tagged yeast reporter strains, covering 38 selected protein biomarkers indicative of all the seven known DNA damage repair pathways. The assay was applied to assess four model genotoxic chemicals, eight environmental pollutants and four negative controls across six concentrations. Quantitative molecular genotoxicity end points were derived based on dose response modeling of a newly developed integrated molecular effect quantifier, Protein Effect Level Index (PELI). The molecular genotoxicity end points were consistent with multiple conventional in vitro genotoxicity assays, as well as with in vivo carcinogenicity assay results. Further more, the proposed genotoxicity end point PELI values quantitatively correlated with both comet assay in human cell and carcinogenicity potency assay in mice, providing promising evidence for linking the molecular disturbance measurements to adverse outcomes at a biological relevant level. In addition, the high-resolution DNA damaging repair pathway alternated protein expression profiles allowed for chemical clustering and classification. This toxicogenomics-based assay presents a promising alternative for fast, efficient and mechanistic genotoxicity screening and assessment of drugs, foods, and environmental contaminants.

  2. High-throughput micro-plate HCL-vanillin assay for screening tannin content in sorghum grain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sorghum contains tannin which is a phenolic compound that offers health promoting antioxidant capacity. The HCl-vanillin assay is a common and time consuming method for determining tannin content, but is not efficient for screening large sample sets as seen in association mapping panels or breeding ...

  3. A High-Throughput Mass Spectrometry Assay Coupled with Redox Activity Testing Reduces Artifacts and False Positives in Lysine Demethylase Screening.

    PubMed

    Wigle, Tim J; Swinger, Kerren K; Campbell, John E; Scholle, Michael D; Sherrill, John; Admirand, Elizabeth A; Boriack-Sjodin, P Ann; Kuntz, Kevin W; Chesworth, Richard; Moyer, Mikel P; Scott, Margaret Porter; Copeland, Robert A

    2015-07-01

    Demethylation of histones by lysine demethylases (KDMs) plays a critical role in controlling gene transcription. Aberrant demethylation may play a causal role in diseases such as cancer. Despite the biological significance of these enzymes, there are limited assay technologies for study of KDMs and few quality chemical probes available to interrogate their biology. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of self-assembled monolayer desorption/ionization (SAMDI) mass spectrometry for the investigation of quantitative KDM enzyme kinetics and for high-throughput screening for KDM inhibitors. SAMDI can be performed in 384-well format and rapidly allows reaction components to be purified prior to injection into a mass spectrometer, without a throughput-limiting liquid chromatography step. We developed sensitive and robust assays for KDM1A (LSD1, AOF2) and KDM4C (JMJD2C, GASC1) and screened 13,824 compounds against each enzyme. Hits were rapidly triaged using a redox assay to identify compounds that interfered with the catalytic oxidation chemistry used by the KDMs for the demethylation reaction. We find that overall this high-throughput mass spectrometry platform coupled with the elimination of redox active compounds leads to a hit rate that is manageable for follow-up work.

  4. A 96-well microtiter plate assay for high-throughput screening of Mycobacterium tuberculosis dTDP-d-glucose 4,6-dehydratase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoxia; Sha, Shanshan; Liu, Likun; Li, Xin; Ma, Yufang

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis dTDP-d-glucose 4,6-dehydratase (RmlB) is the second enzyme for the biosynthesis of dTDP-l-rhamnose, which is a sugar donor to the synthesis of the cell wall linker, d-N-acetylglucosamine-l-rhamnose. RmlB is essential to mycobacterial growth and is not found in humans; therefore, it is a potential target for developing new anti-tuberculosis drugs. So far, there has been no suitable method for high-throughput screening of RmlB inhibitors. Here, the recombinant M. tuberculosis RmlB was purified and an absorbance-based microtiter plate assay was developed for RmlB activity. It could be used for high-throughput screening of RmlB inhibitors. The kinetic properties of M. tuberculosis RmlB, including optimal pH, optimal temperature, the effect of metal ions, and the kinetic parameters, were determined with this assay. The inhibitory effects of dTTP and dTDP on M. tuberculosis RmlB were also studied with the assay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of a high-throughput screening assay for chemical effects on proliferation and viability of immortalized human neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Breier, Joseph M; Radio, Nicholas M; Mundy, William R; Shafer, Timothy J

    2008-09-01

    There is considerable public concern that the majority of commercial chemicals have not been evaluated for their potential to cause developmental neurotoxicity. Although several chemicals are assessed annually under the current developmental neurotoxicity guidelines, time, resource, and animal constraints prevent testing of large numbers of chemicals using this approach. Thus, incentive is mounting to develop in vitro methods to screen chemicals for their potential to harm the developing human nervous system. As an initial step toward this end, the present studies evaluated an automated, high-throughput method for screening chemical effects on proliferation and viability using ReNcell CX cells, a human neural progenitor cell (hNPC) line. ReNcell CX cells doubled in approximately 36 h and expressed the neural progenitor markers nestin and SOX2. High-throughput assays for cell proliferation (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation) and viability (propidium iodide exclusion) were optimized and tested using known antiproliferative compounds. The utility of this in vitro screen was evaluated further using a set of compounds containing eight known to cause developmental neurotoxicity and eight presumably nontoxic compounds. Six out of eight developmental neurotoxicants significantly inhibited ReNcell CX cell proliferation and/or viability, whereas two out of eight nontoxic chemicals caused only minimal effects. These results demonstrate that chemical effects on cell proliferation and viability can be assessed via high-throughput methods using hNPCs. Further development of this approach as part of a strategy to screen compounds for potential effects on nervous system development is warranted.

  6. Evaluation of anti-Zika virus activities of broad-spectrum antivirals and NIH clinical collection compounds using a cell-based, high-throughput screen assay.

    PubMed

    Adcock, Robert S; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Golden, Jennifer E; Chung, Dong-Hoon

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have clearly underscored the association between Zika virus (ZIKV) and severe neurological diseases such as microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome. Given the historical complacency surrounding this virus, however, no significant antiviral screenings have been performed to specifically target ZIKV. As a result, there is an urgent need for a validated screening method and strategy that is focused on highlighting potential anti-ZIKV inhibitors that can be further advanced via rigorous validation and optimization. To address this critical gap, we sought to test whether a cell-based assay that measures protection from the ZIKV-induced cytopathic effect could serve as a high-throughput screen assay for discovering novel anti-ZIKV inhibitors. Employing this approach, we tested the anti-ZIKV activity of previously known broad-spectrum antiviral compounds and discovered several compounds (e.g., NITD008, SaliPhe, and CID 91632869) with anti-ZIKV activity. Interestingly, while GTP synthesis inhibitors (e.g., ribavirin or mycophenolic acid) were too toxic or showed no anti-ZIKV activity (EC50 > 50 μM), ZIKV was highly susceptible to pyrimidine synthesis inhibitors (e.g., brequinar) in the assay. We amended the assay into a high-throughput screen (HTS)-compatible 384-well format and then screened the NIH Clinical Compound Collection library, which includes a total of 727 compounds organized, using an 8-point dose response format with two Zika virus strains (MR766 and PRVABC59, a recent human isolate). The screen discovered 6-azauridine and finasteride as potential anti-ZIKV inhibitors with EC50 levels of 3.18 and 9.85 μM for MR766, respectively. We further characterized the anti-ZIKV activity of 6-azauridine and several pyrimidine synthesis inhibitors such as brequinar in various secondary assays including an antiviral spectrum test within flaviviruses and alphaviruses, Western blot (protein), real-time PCR (RNA), and plaque reduction assays (progeny

  7. A System for Performing High Throughput Assays of Synaptic Function

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Chris M.; Sivula, Michael; Levenson, Jonathan M.; Rose, David M.; Li, Bing; Sirianni, Ana C.; Xia, Eva; Ryan, Timothy A.; Gerber, David J.; Cottrell, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Unbiased, high-throughput screening has proven invaluable for dissecting complex biological processes. Application of this general approach to synaptic function would have a major impact on neuroscience research and drug discovery. However, existing techniques for studying synaptic physiology are labor intensive and low-throughput. Here, we describe a new high-throughput technology for performing assays of synaptic function in primary neurons cultured in microtiter plates. We show that this system can perform 96 synaptic vesicle cycling assays in parallel with high sensitivity, precision, uniformity, and reproducibility and can detect modulators of presynaptic function. By screening libraries of pharmacologically defined compounds on rat forebrain cultures, we have used this system to identify novel effects of compounds on specific aspects of presynaptic function. As a system for unbiased compound as well as genomic screening, this technology has significant applications for basic neuroscience research and for the discovery of novel, mechanism-based treatments for central nervous system disorders. PMID:21998743

  8. A high-throughput three-dimensional cell migration assay for toxicity screening with mobile device-based macroscopic image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, David M.; Chen, Jianbo; Sing, David; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Raphael, Robert M.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Killian, T. C.; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R.

    2013-10-01

    There is a growing demand for in vitro assays for toxicity screening in three-dimensional (3D) environments. In this study, 3D cell culture using magnetic levitation was used to create an assay in which cells were patterned into 3D rings that close over time. The rate of closure was determined from time-lapse images taken with a mobile device and related to drug concentration. Rings of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and tracheal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were tested with ibuprofen and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ring closure correlated with the viability and migration of cells in two dimensions (2D). Images taken using a mobile device were similar in analysis to images taken with a microscope. Ring closure may serve as a promising label-free and quantitative assay for high-throughput in vivo toxicity in 3D cultures.

  9. A high-throughput three-dimensional cell migration assay for toxicity screening with mobile device-based macroscopic image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Timm, David M.; Chen, Jianbo; Sing, David; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Raphael, Robert M.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Killian, T. C.; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R.

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing demand for in vitro assays for toxicity screening in three-dimensional (3D) environments. In this study, 3D cell culture using magnetic levitation was used to create an assay in which cells were patterned into 3D rings that close over time. The rate of closure was determined from time-lapse images taken with a mobile device and related to drug concentration. Rings of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and tracheal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were tested with ibuprofen and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ring closure correlated with the viability and migration of cells in two dimensions (2D). Images taken using a mobile device were similar in analysis to images taken with a microscope. Ring closure may serve as a promising label-free and quantitative assay for high-throughput in vivo toxicity in 3D cultures. PMID:24141454

  10. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Parker, Terry L; Walker, David A; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B; Gellert, Paul R; Garnett, Martin C

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money.

  11. Discovery of novel inhibitors of human S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase based on in silico high-throughput screening and a non-radioactive enzymatic assay.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chenzeng; Wang, Yanlin; Tan, Xiao; Sun, Lidan; Liu, Sen

    2015-06-01

    Natural polyamines are small polycationic molecules essential for cell growth and development, and elevated level of polyamines is positively correlated with various cancers. As a rate-limiting enzyme of the polyamine biosynthetic pathway, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) has been an attractive drug target. In this report, we present the discovery of novel human AdoMetDC (hAdoMetDC) inhibitors by coupling computational and experimental tools. We constructed a reasonable computational structure model of hAdoMetDC that is compatible with general protocols for high-throughput drug screening, and used this model in in silico screening of hAdoMetDC inhibitors against a large compound library using a battery of computational tools. We also established and validated a simple, economic, and non-radioactive enzymatic assay, which can be adapted for experimental high-throughput screening of hAdoMetDC inhibitors. Finally, we obtained an hAdoMetDC inhibitor lead with a novel scaffold. This study provides both new tools and a new lead for the developing of novel hAdoMetDC inhibitors.

  12. Development of a Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) Based, High Throughput Screening Feasible Method for the Identification of PDE12 Activity Modulators.

    PubMed

    Mang, Samuel; Bucher, Hannes; Nickolaus, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technology has been widely used to establish high throughput screens (HTS) for a range of targets in the pharmaceutical industry. PDE12 (aka. 2'- phosphodiesterase) has been published to participate in the degradation of oligoadenylates that are involved in the establishment of an antiviral state via the activation of ribonuclease L (RNAse-L). Degradation of oligoadenylates by PDE12 terminates these antiviral activities, leading to decreased resistance of cells for a variety of viral pathogens. Therefore inhibitors of PDE12 are discussed as antiviral therapy. Here we describe the use of the yttrium silicate SPA bead technology to assess inhibitory activity of compounds against PDE12 in a homogeneous, robust HTS feasible assay using tritiated adenosine-P-adenylate ([3H]ApA) as substrate. We found that the used [3H]ApA educt, was not able to bind to SPA beads, whereas the product [3H]AMP, as known before, was able to bind to SPA beads. This enables the measurement of PDE12 activity on [3H]ApA as a substrate using a wallac microbeta counter. This method describes a robust and high throughput capable format in terms of specificity, commonly used compound solvents, ease of detection and assay matrices. The method could facilitate the search for PDE12 inhibitors as antiviral compounds.

  13. Imaging-Based High-Throughput Screening Assay To Identify New Molecules with Transmission-Blocking Potential against Plasmodium falciparum Female Gamete Formation

    PubMed Central

    Miguel-Blanco, Celia; Lelièvre, Joël; Delves, Michael J.; Bardera, Ana I.; Presa, Jesús L.; López-Barragán, María José; Ruecker, Andrea; Marques, Sara; Sinden, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    In response to a call for the global eradication of malaria, drug discovery has recently been extended to identify compounds that prevent the onward transmission of the parasite, which is mediated by Plasmodium falciparum stage V gametocytes. Lately, metabolic activity has been used in vitro as a surrogate for gametocyte viability; however, as gametocytes remain relatively quiescent at this stage, their ability to undergo onward development (gamete formation) may be a better measure of their functional viability. During gamete formation, female gametocytes undergo profound morphological changes and express translationally repressed mRNA. By assessing female gamete cell surface expression of one such repressed protein, Pfs25, as the readout for female gametocyte functional viability, we developed an imaging-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to identify transmission-blocking compounds. This assay, designated the P. falciparum female gametocyte activation assay (FGAA), was scaled up to a high-throughput format (Z′ factor, 0.7 ± 0.1) and subsequently validated using a selection of 50 known antimalarials from diverse chemical families. Only a few of these agents showed submicromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations in the assay: thiostrepton, methylene blue, and some endoperoxides. To determine the best conditions for HTS, a robustness test was performed with a selection of the GlaxoSmithKline Tres Cantos Antimalarial Set (TCAMS) and the final screening conditions for this library were determined to be a 2 μM concentration and 48 h of incubation with gametocytes. The P. falciparum FGAA has been proven to be a robust HTS assay faithful to Plasmodium transmission-stage cell biology, and it is an innovative useful tool for antimalarial drug discovery which aims to identify new molecules with transmission-blocking potential. PMID:25801574

  14. High throughput assays for analyzing transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianqiang; Jiang, Xin; Yaoi, Takuro

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors are a group of proteins that modulate the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations in transcription factor function are associated with many human diseases, and therefore these proteins are attractive potential drug targets. A key issue in the development of such therapeutics is the generation of effective tools that can be used for high throughput discovery of the critical transcription factors involved in human diseases, and the measurement of their activities in a variety of disease or compound-treated samples. Here, a number of innovative arrays and 96-well format assays for profiling and measuring the activities of transcription factors will be discussed.

  15. High throughput screening (HTS) for phototoxicity hazard using the in vitro 3T3 neutral red uptake assay.

    PubMed

    Jones, P A; King, A V

    2003-01-01

    Testing for phototoxic hazard is usually carried out for product ingredients intended for use on skin, which may be exposed to sunlight. Unilever currently uses the validated in vitro 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake phototoxicity test (NRU PT). This protocol involves 2-3 experiments, each taking 3 days to perform. One person can test up to seven test materials plus positive control at any one time, requiring approximately 0.5 g test material. Higher throughput is required where libraries of potential actives are being generated and screening for potential phototoxicants is required. A proposed HTS protocol would use the NRU PT, but only one concentration (10 microg/ml) in a single experiment. The validity of the HTS protocol was investigated by a retrospective examination of data from 86 materials previously tested. Phototoxic hazard predictions made using the conventional NRU PT were compared with those obtained if only data at 10 microg/ml were considered. A majority of 73 materials (84.9%) gave agreement in predictions between the two protocols; for 13 materials (15.1%) the assessments did not agree. There were no false positives; however, there were some false negatives, i.e., predicted as phototoxic from the conventional assay, but non-phototoxic at 10 microg/ml. As this protocol is intended for screening purposes only it is considered that this would be acceptable at this stage in material selection. One person could screen 128 test materials in 3 days, requiring <1 mg test material, giving a substantial increase in productivity. Any material selected for further development and inclusion in a formulation may require further confirmatory testing, e.g. using a human skin model assay for phototoxicity.

  16. Cell-based assay system for high-throughput screening of anti-photo-aging agents in fibroblast transfectants.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Shin, S; Jung, E; Park, D

    2016-08-01

    The matricellular protein CCN1 is significantly elevated in acutely ultraviolet-irradiated human skin and negatively regulates collagen homeostasis by suppressing collagen synthesis and increasing collagen degradation. In this study, we established a stable cell line, termed CCN1-GFs, by transfection of the pAcGFP1-1-CCN1 promoter plasmid and examined its usefulness as a cell-based assay system for screening anti-aging ingredients. The promoter of the reporter plasmid pAcGFP1-1-CCN1 promoter was transfected into NIH3T3 cells using the Lipofectamine reagent. G418-resistant cells were selected and further cloned. To confirm whether AcGFP1-1-CCN1 promoter plasmid recombined in the NIH3T3 cells, the level of AcGFP1-1-CCN1 was measured by PCR analysis. To determine if NIH3T3 cells expressed the gene encoding green fluorescence protein in a CCN1 promoter-dependent manner, the reporter enzyme activities were assayed using a fluorimeter and flow cytometer. To determine if CCN1 inhibitor, which was selected through this system, exerted a direct effect on the downstream signal, mRNA expression of collagen1 and MMP1A was checked by using real-time PCR. UVB irradiation of CCN1-GFs resulted in increased CCN1 promoter activity. Treatment with retinoic acid, a CCN1 inhibitor, inhibited UV-induced CCN1 promoter activity. Subsequent use of this assay system to screen anti-aging ingredients revealed that CCN1-GFs treated with sclareol showed decreased levels of UVB-induced CCN1 expression. Sclareol attenuated UVB-induced photo-aging by an increase in collagen synthesis and decrease in MMP-1 activity.

  17. High-throughput screening using pseudotyped lentiviral particles: a strategy for the identification of HIV-1 inhibitors in a cell-based assay.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Jean-Michel; Gao, Anhui; He, Pei-Lan; Choi, Joyce; Tang, Wei; Bruzzone, Roberto; Schwartz, Olivier; Naya, Hugo; Nan, Fa-Jun; Li, Jia; Altmeyer, Ralf; Zuo, Jian-Ping

    2009-03-01

    Two decades after its discovery the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is still spreading worldwide and killing millions. There are 25 drugs formally approved for HIV currently on the market, but side effects as well as the emergence of HIV strains showing single or multiple resistances to current drug-therapy are causes for concern. Furthermore, these drugs target only 4 steps of the viral cycle, hence the urgent need for new drugs and also new targets. In order to tackle this problem, we have devised a cell-based assay using lentiviral particles to look for post-entry inhibitors of HIV-1. We report here the assay development, validation as well as confirmation of the hits using both wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 viruses. The screening was performed on an original library, rich in natural compounds and pure molecules from Traditional Chinese Medicine pharmacopoeia, which had never been screened for anti-HIV activity. The identified hits belong to four chemical sub-families that appear to be all non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Secondary tests with live viruses showed that there was good agreement with pseudotyped particles, confirming the validity of this approach for high-throughput drug screens. This assay will be a useful tool that can be easily adapted to screen for inhibitors of viral entry.

  18. Microplate alamar blue assay versus BACTEC 460 system for high-throughput screening of compounds against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, L; Franzblau, S G

    1997-01-01

    In response to the need for rapid, inexpensive, high-throughput assays for antimycobacterial drug screening, a microplate-based assay which uses Alamar blue reagent for determination of growth was evaluated. MICs of 30 antimicrobial agents against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, and Mycobacterium avium were determined in the microplate Alamar blue assay (MABA) with both visual and fluorometric readings and compared to MICs determined in the BACTEC 460 system. For all three mycobacterial strains, there was < or = 1 dilution difference between MABA and BACTEC median MICs in four replicate experiments for 25 to 27 of the 30 antimicrobics. Significant differences between MABA and BACTEC MICs were observed with 0, 2, and 5 of 30 antimicrobial agents against H37Rv, H37Ra, and M. avium, respectively. Overall, MICs determined either visually or fluorometrically in MABA were highly correlated with those determined in the BACTEC 460 system, and visual MABA and fluorometric MABA MICs were highly correlated. MICs of rifampin, rifabutin, minocycline, and clarithromycin were consistently lower for H37Ra compared to H37Rv in all assays but were similar for most other drugs. M. tuberculosis H37Ra may be a suitable surrogate for the more virulent H37Rv strain in primary screening of compounds for antituberculosis activity. MABA is sensitive, rapid, inexpensive, and nonradiometric and offers the potential for screening, with or without analytical instrumentation, large numbers of antimicrobial compounds against slow-growing mycobacteria. PMID:9145860

  19. Development of a differential scanning fluorimetry based high throughput screening assay for the discovery of affinity binders against an anthrax protein.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Fiona J; Greenwood, Gemma K; Birchall, Kristian; Chen, Beining

    2010-09-05

    The anthrax protein protective antigen (PA) is responsible for cell-surface recognition and aids the delivery of the toxic anthrax enzymes into host cells. By targeting PA and preventing it from binding to host cells, it is hoped that the delivery of toxins into the cell will be inhibited. The current assay reported for PA is a low throughput functional assay. Here, the high throughput screening method using differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) was developed and optimized to screen a number of libraries from various sources including a selection of FDA-approved drugs as well as hits selected by a virtual screening campaign. DSF is a rapid technique that uses fluorescence to monitor the thermal unfolding of proteins using a standard QPCR instrument. A positive shift in the calculated melting temperature (Tm), of the protein in the presence of a compound, relative to the Tm of the unbound protein, indicates that stabilization of the protein by ligand binding may have occurred. Optimization of the melting assay showed SYPRO Orange to be an ideal dye as a marker and lead to the reduction of DMSO concentration to <1% (v/v) in the final assay. The final assay volume was minimized to 25 L with 5 g protein per well of 96-well plate. In addition, a buffer, salt and additive screen lead to the selection of 10 mM HEPES-NaOH pH 7.5, 100 mM NaCl as the assay buffer. This method has been shown here to be useful as a primary method for the detection of small-molecule PA ligands, giving a hit rate of approximately 7%. These ligands can then be studied further using PA functional assays to confirm their biological activities before being selected as lead compounds for the treatment of anthrax.

  20. Integrated Model of Chemical Perturbations of a Biological Pathway Using 18 In Vitro High-Throughput Screening Assays for the Estrogen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Richard S.; Magpantay, Felicia Maria; Chickarmane, Vijay; Haskell, Cymra; Tania, Nessy; Taylor, Jean; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Rotroff, Daniel M.; Filer, Dayne L.; Houck, Keith A.; Martin, Matthew T.; Sipes, Nisha; Richard, Ann M.; Mansouri, Kamel; Setzer, R. Woodrow; Knudsen, Thomas B.; Crofton, Kevin M.; Thomas, Russell S.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a computational network model that integrates 18 in vitro, high-throughput screening assays measuring estrogen receptor (ER) binding, dimerization, chromatin binding, transcriptional activation, and ER-dependent cell proliferation. The network model uses activity patterns across the in vitro assays to predict whether a chemical is an ER agonist or antagonist, or is otherwise influencing the assays through a manner dependent on the physics and chemistry of the technology platform (“assay interference”). The method is applied to a library of 1812 commercial and environmental chemicals, including 45 ER positive and negative reference chemicals. Among the reference chemicals, the network model correctly identified the agonists and antagonists with the exception of very weak compounds whose activity was outside the concentration range tested. The model agonist score also correlated with the expected potency class of the active reference chemicals. Of the 1812 chemicals evaluated, 111 (6.1%) were predicted to be strongly ER active in agonist or antagonist mode. This dataset and model were also used to begin a systematic investigation of assay interference. The most prominent cause of false-positive activity (activity in an assay that is likely not due to interaction of the chemical with ER) is cytotoxicity. The model provides the ability to prioritize a large set of important environmental chemicals with human exposure potential for additional in vivo endocrine testing. Finally, this model is generalizable to any molecular pathway for which there are multiple upstream and downstream assays available. PMID:26272952

  1. Assay Establishment and Validation of a High-Throughput Screening Platform for Three-Dimensional Patient-Derived Colon Cancer Organoid Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Boehnke, Karsten; Iversen, Philip W.; Schumacher, Dirk; Lallena, María José; Haro, Rubén; Amat, Joaquín; Haybaeck, Johannes; Liebs, Sandra; Lange, Martin; Schäfer, Reinhold; Regenbrecht, Christian R. A.; Reinhard, Christoph; Velasco, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    The application of patient-derived three-dimensional culture systems as disease-specific drug sensitivity models has enormous potential to connect compound screening and clinical trials. However, the implementation of complex cell-based assay systems in drug discovery requires reliable and robust screening platforms. Here we describe the establishment of an automated platform in 384-well format for three-dimensional organoid cultures derived from colon cancer patients. Single cells were embedded in an extracellular matrix by an automated workflow and subsequently self-organized into organoid structures within 4 days of culture before being exposed to compound treatment. We performed validation of assay robustness and reproducibility via plate uniformity and replicate-experiment studies. After assay optimization, the patient-derived organoid platform passed all relevant validation criteria. In addition, we introduced a streamlined plate uniformity study to evaluate patient-derived colon cancer samples from different donors. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using patient-derived tumor samples for high-throughput assays and their integration as disease-specific models in drug discovery. PMID:27233291

  2. Assay Establishment and Validation of a High-Throughput Screening Platform for Three-Dimensional Patient-Derived Colon Cancer Organoid Cultures.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, Karsten; Iversen, Philip W; Schumacher, Dirk; Lallena, María José; Haro, Rubén; Amat, Joaquín; Haybaeck, Johannes; Liebs, Sandra; Lange, Martin; Schäfer, Reinhold; Regenbrecht, Christian R A; Reinhard, Christoph; Velasco, Juan A

    2016-10-01

    The application of patient-derived three-dimensional culture systems as disease-specific drug sensitivity models has enormous potential to connect compound screening and clinical trials. However, the implementation of complex cell-based assay systems in drug discovery requires reliable and robust screening platforms. Here we describe the establishment of an automated platform in 384-well format for three-dimensional organoid cultures derived from colon cancer patients. Single cells were embedded in an extracellular matrix by an automated workflow and subsequently self-organized into organoid structures within 4 days of culture before being exposed to compound treatment. We performed validation of assay robustness and reproducibility via plate uniformity and replicate-experiment studies. After assay optimization, the patient-derived organoid platform passed all relevant validation criteria. In addition, we introduced a streamlined plate uniformity study to evaluate patient-derived colon cancer samples from different donors. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using patient-derived tumor samples for high-throughput assays and their integration as disease-specific models in drug discovery.

  3. Development of a quantitative assay amenable for high-throughput screening to target the type II secretion system for new treatments against plant-pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nini; Zielke, Ryszard A; Vining, Oliver B; Azevedo, Mark D; Armstrong, Donald J; Banowetz, Gary M; McPhail, Kerry L; Sikora, Aleksandra E

    2013-09-01

    Plant-pathogenic bacteria are the causative agents of diseases in important agricultural crops and ornamental plants. The severe economic burden of these diseases requires seeking new approaches for their control, particularly because phytopathogenic bacteria are often resistant to available treatments. The type II secretion (T2S) system is a key virulence factor used by major groups of phytopathogenic bacteria. The T2S machinery transports many hydrolytic enzymes responsible for degradation of the plant cell wall, thus enabling successful colonization and dissemination of the bacteria in the plant host. The genetic inactivation of the T2S system leads to loss of virulence, which strongly suggests that targeting the T2S could enable new treatments against plant-pathogenic bacteria. Accordingly, we have designed and optimized an assay to identify small-molecule inhibitors of the T2S system. This assay uses a double parametric output: measurement of bacterial growth and the enzymatic activity of cellulase, which is secreted via the T2S pathway in our model organism Dickeya dadantii. The assay was evaluated by screening natural extracts, culture filtrates isolated from rhizosphere bacteria, and a collection of pharmaceutically active compounds in LOPAC(1280). The calculated Z' values of 0.63, 0.63, and 0.58, respectively, strongly suggest that the assay is applicable for a high-throughput screening platform.

  4. High throughput screening operations at the University of Kansas.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anuradha

    2014-05-01

    The High Throughput Screening Laboratory at University of Kansas plays a critical role in advancing academic interest in the identification of chemical probes as tools to better understand the biological and biochemical basis of new therapeutic targets. The HTS laboratory has an open service policy and collaborates with internal and external academia as well as for-profit organizations to execute projects requiring HTS-compatible assay development and screening of chemical libraries for target validation, probe selection, hit identification and lead optimization.

  5. Fluorescent biosensors for high throughput screening of protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Van, Thi Nhu Ngoc; Morris, May C

    2014-02-01

    High throughput screening assays aim to identify small molecules that interfere with protein function, activity, or conformation, which can serve as effective tools for chemical biology studies of targets involved in physiological processes or pathways of interest or disease models, as well as templates for development of therapeutics in medicinal chemistry. Fluorescent biosensors constitute attractive and powerful tools for drug discovery programs, from high throughput screening assays, to postscreen characterization of hits, optimization of lead compounds, and preclinical evaluation of candidate drugs. They provide a means of screening for inhibitors that selectively target enzymatic activity, conformation, and/or function in vitro. Moreover, fluorescent biosensors constitute useful tools for cell- and image-based, multiplex and multiparametric, high-content screening. Application of fluorescence-based sensors to screen large and complex libraries of compounds in vitro, in cell-based formats or whole organisms requires several levels of optimization to establish robust and reproducible assays. In this review, we describe the different fluorescent biosensor technologies which have been applied to high throughput screens, and discuss the prerequisite criteria underlying their successful application. Special emphasis is placed on protein kinase biosensors, since these enzymes constitute one of the most important classes of therapeutic targets in drug discovery.

  6. Assay Development and High-Throughput Screening for Inhibitors of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus N-Terminal Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen Binding to Nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, Chantal; Moerke, Nathan J; Faloon, Patrick; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2014-07-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has a causative role in several human malignancies, especially in immunocompromised hosts. KSHV latently infects tumor cells and persists as an extrachromosomal episome (plasmid). KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) mediates KSHV episome persistence. LANA binds specific KSHV sequence to replicate viral DNA. In addition, LANA tethers KSHV genomes to mitotic chromosomes to efficiently segregate episomes to daughter nuclei after mitosis. N-terminal LANA (N-LANA) binds histones H2A and H2B to attach to chromosomes. Currently, there are no specific inhibitors of KSHV latent infection. To enable high-throughput screening (HTS) of inhibitors of N-LANA binding to nucleosomes, here we develop, miniaturize, and validate a fluorescence polarization (FP) assay that detects fluorophore-labeled N-LANA peptide binding to nucleosomes. We also miniaturize a counterscreen to identify DNA intercalators that nonspecifically inhibit N-LANA binding to nucleosomes, and also develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to assess N-LANA binding to nucleosomes in the absence of fluorescence. HTS of libraries containing more than 350,000 compounds identified multiple compounds that inhibited N-LANA binding to nucleosomes. No compounds survived all counterscreens, however. More complex small-molecule libraries will likely be necessary to identify specific inhibitors of N-LANA binding to histones H2A and H2B; these assays should prove useful for future screens.

  7. Miniaturizing 3D assay for high-throughput drug and genetic screens for small patient-derived tumor samples (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotem, Asaf; Garraway, Levi; Su, Mei-Ju; Basu, Anindita; Regev, Aviv; Struhl, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional growth conditions reflect the natural environment of cancer cells and are crucial to be performed at drug screens. We developed a 3D assay for cellular transformation that involves growth in low attachment (GILA) conditions and is strongly correlated with the 50-year old benchmark assay-soft agar. Using GILA, we performed high-throughput screens for drugs and genes that selectively inhibit or increase transformation, but not proliferation. This phenotypic approach is complementary to our genetic approach that utilizes single-cell RNA-sequencing of a patient sample to identify putative oncogenes that confer sensitivity to drugs designed to specifically inhibit the identified oncoprotein. Currently, we are dealing with a big challenge in our field- the limited number of cells that might be extracted from a biopsy. Small patient-derived samples are hard to test in the traditional multiwell plate and it will be helpful to minimize the culture area and the experimental system. We managed to design a suitable microfluidic device for limited number of cells and perform the assay using image analysis. We aim to test drugs on tumor cells, outside of the patient body- and recommend on the ideal treatment that is tailored to the individual. This device will help to minimize biopsy-sampling volumes and minimize interventions in the patient's tumor.

  8. A Quantitative High Throughput Assay for Identifying Gametocytocidal Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takeshi Q.; Dehdashti, Seameen J.; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; McKew, John C.; Zheng, Wei; Williamson, Kim C.

    2013-01-01

    Current antimalarial drug treatment does not effectively kill mature Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes, the parasite stage responsible for malaria transmission from human to human via a mosquito. Consequently, following standard therapy malaria can still be transmitted for over a week after the clearance of asexual parasites. A new generation of malaria drugs with gametocytocidal properties, or a gametocytocidal drug that could be used in combinational therapy with currently available antimalarials, is needed to control the spread of the disease and facilitate eradication efforts. We have developed a 1,536-well gametocyte viability assay for the high throughput screening of large compound collections to identify novel compounds with gametocytocidal activity. The signal-to-basal ratio and Z′-factor for this assay were 3.2-fold and 0.68, respectively. The IC50 value of epoxomicin, the positive control compound, was 1.42 ± 0.09 nM that is comparable to previously reported values. This miniaturized assay significantly reduces the number of gametocytes required for the alamarBlue viability assay, and enables high throughput screening for lead discovery efforts. Additionally, the screen does not require a specialized parasite line, gametocytes from any strain, including field isolates, can be tested. A pilot screen utilizing the commercially available LOPAC library, consisting of 1,280 known compounds, revealed two selective gametocytocidal compounds having 54 and 7.8-fold gametocytocidal selectivity in comparison to their cell cytotoxicity effect against the mammalian SH-SY5Y cell line. PMID:23454872

  9. High-throughput Screening of ToxCast" Phase I Chemicals in an Embryonic Stem Cell Assay Reveals Potential Disruption of a Critical Developmental Signaling Pathway

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about the developmental toxicity of the expansive chemical landscape in existence today. Significant efforts are being made to apply novel methods to predict developmental activity of chemicals utilizing high-throughput screening (HTS) and high-content screening (...

  10. High-throughput Screening of ToxCast" Phase I Chemicals in an Embryonic Stem Cell Assay Reveals Potential Disruption of a Critical Developmental Signaling Pathway

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about the developmental toxicity of the expansive chemical landscape in existence today. Significant efforts are being made to apply novel methods to predict developmental activity of chemicals utilizing high-throughput screening (HTS) and high-content screening (...

  11. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Mitotic Kinase Haspin by High Throughput Screening using a Homogeneous Time-Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Assay

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Debasis; Xian, Jun; Glicksman, Marcie A.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Stein, Ross L.; Higgins, Jonathan M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Haspin/Gsg2 is a kinase that phosphorylates Histone H3 at Thr-3 (H3T3ph) during mitosis. Its depletion by RNA interference results in failure of chromosome alignment and a block in mitosis. Haspin therefore is a novel target for development of anti-mitotic agents. We report the development of a high throughput time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) kinase assay for Haspin. Histone H3 peptide was used as a substrate, and a Europium-labeled H3T3ph phosphospecific monoclonal antibody was used to detect phosphorylation. A library of 137632 small molecules was screened at Km concentrations of ATP and peptide to allow identification of diverse inhibitor types. Reconfirmation of hits and IC50 determinations were carried out with the TR-FRET assay and by a radiometric assay using recombinant Histone H3 as the substrate. A preliminary assessment of specificity was made by testing inhibition of two unrelated kinases. EC50 values in cells were determined using a cell-based ELISA assay of H3T3ph. Five compounds were selected as leads based on potency and chemical structure considerations. These leads form the basis for the development of specific inhibitors of Haspin that will have clear utility in basic research and possible use as starting points for development of anti-mitotic anticancer therapeutics. PMID:18978305

  12. A medium or high throughput protein refolding assay.

    PubMed

    Cowieson, Nathan P; Wensley, Beth; Robin, Gautier; Guncar, Gregor; Forwood, Jade; Hume, David A; Kobe, Bostjan; Martin, Jennifer L

    2008-01-01

    Expression of insoluble protein in E. coli is a major bottleneck of high throughput structural biology projects. Refolding proteins into native conformations from inclusion bodies could significantly increase the number of protein targets that can be taken on to structural studies. This chapter presents a simple assay for screening insoluble protein targets and identifying those that are most amenable to refolding. The assay is based on the observation that when proteins are refolded while bound to metal affinity resin, misfolded proteins are generally not eluted by imidazole. This difference is exploited here to distinguish between folded and misfolded proteins. Two implementations of the assay are described. The assay fits well into a standard high throughput structural biology pipeline, because it begins with the inclusion body preparations that are a byproduct of small-scale, automated expression and purification trials and does not require additional facilities. Two formats of the assay are described, a manual assay that is useful for screening small numbers of targets, and an automated implementation that is useful for large numbers of targets.

  13. High-throughput screening using the differential radial capillary action of ligand assay identifies ebselen as an inhibitor of diguanylate cyclases.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Ori J; Orr, Mona W; Wang, Yan; Lee, Vincent T

    2014-01-17

    The rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has motivated recent efforts to identify new drug candidates that target virulence factors or their regulatory pathways. One such antivirulence target is the cyclic-di-GMP (cdiGMP) signaling pathway, which regulates biofilm formation, motility, and pathogenesis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen that utilizes cdiGMP-regulated polysaccharides, including alginate and pellicle polysaccharide (PEL), to mediate virulence and antibiotic resistance. CdiGMP activates PEL and alginate biosynthesis by binding to specific receptors including PelD and Alg44. Mutations that abrogate cdiGMP binding to these receptors prevent polysaccharide production. Identification of small molecules that can inhibit cdiGMP binding to the allosteric sites on these proteins could mimic binding defective mutants and potentially reduce biofilm formation or alginate secretion. Here, we report the development of a rapid and quantitative high-throughput screen for inhibitors of protein-cdiGMP interactions based on the differential radial capillary action of ligand assay (DRaCALA). Using this approach, we identified ebselen as an inhibitor of cdiGMP binding to receptors containing an RxxD domain including PelD and diguanylate cyclases (DGC). Ebselen reduces diguanylate cyclase activity by covalently modifying cysteine residues. Ebselen oxide, the selenone analogue of ebselen, also inhibits cdiGMP binding through the same covalent mechanism. Ebselen and ebselen oxide inhibit cdiGMP regulation of biofilm formation and flagella-mediated motility in P. aeruginosa through inhibition of diguanylate cyclases. The identification of ebselen provides a proof-of-principle that a DRaCALA high-throughput screening approach can be used to identify bioactive agents that reverse regulation of cdiGMP signaling by targeting cdiGMP-binding domains.

  14. High-throughput screening using the differential radial capillary action of ligand assay identifies ebselen as an inhibitor of diguanylate cyclases

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Ori J.; Orr, Mona W.; Wang, Yan; Lee, Vincent T.

    2013-01-01

    The rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has motivated recent efforts to identify new drug candidates that target virulence factors or their regulatory pathways. One such antivirulence target is the cyclic-di-GMP (cdiGMP) signaling pathway, which regulates biofilm formation, motility, and pathogenesis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen that utilizes cdiGMP-regulated polysaccharides, including alginate and pellicle polysaccharide (PEL), to mediate virulence and antibiotic resistance. CdiGMP activates PEL and alginate biosynthesis by binding to specific receptors including PelD and Alg44. Mutations that abrogate cdiGMP binding to these receptors prevent polysaccharide production. Identification of small molecules that can inhibit cdiGMP binding to the allosteric sites on these proteins could mimic binding defective mutants and potentially reduce biofilm formation or alginate secretion. Here, we report the development of a rapid and quantitative high-throughput screen for inhibitors of protein-cdiGMP interactions based on the differential radial capillary action of ligand assay (DRaCALA). Using this approach, we identified ebselen as an inhibitor of cdiGMP binding to receptors containing an RxxD domain including PelD and diguanylate cyclases (DGC). Ebselen reduces diguanylate cyclase activity by covalently modifying cysteine residues. Ebselen oxide, the selenone analogue of ebselen, also inhibits cdiGMP binding through the same covalent mechanism. Ebselen and ebselen oxide inhibit cdiGMP regulation of biofilm formation and flagella-mediated motility in P. aeruginosa through inhibition of diguanylate cyclases. The identification of ebselen provides a proof-of-principle that a DRaCALA high-throughput screening approach can be used to identify bioactive agents that reverse regulation of cdiGMP signaling by targeting cdiGMP-binding domains. PMID:24134695

  15. Application of a resazurin-based high-throughput screening assay for the identification and progression of new treatments for human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Bowling, Tana; Mercer, Luke; Don, Robert; Jacobs, Robert; Nare, Bakela

    2012-12-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, and the disease is fatal if untreated. There is an urgent need to develop new, safe and effective treatments for HAT because current drugs have extremely poor safety profiles and are difficult to administer. Here we report the development and application of a cell-based resazurin reduction assay for high throughput screening and identification of new inhibitors of T. b. brucei as starting points for the development of new treatments for human HAT. Active compounds identified in primary screening of ∼48,000 compounds representing ∼25 chemical classes were titrated to obtain IC50 values. Cytotoxicity against a mammalian cell line was determined to provide indications of parasite versus host cell selectivity. Examples from hit series that showed selectivity and evidence of preliminary SAR were re-synthesized to confirm trypanocidal activity prior to initiating hit-to-lead expansion efforts. Additional assays such as serum shift, time to kill and reversibility of compound effect were developed and applied to provide further criteria for advancing compounds through the hit-to-lead phase of the project. From this initial effort, six distinct chemical series were selected and hit-to-lead chemistry was initiated to synthesize several key analogs for evaluation of trypanocidal activity in the resazurin-reduction assay for parasite viability. From the hit-to-lead efforts, a series was identified that demonstrated efficacy in a mouse model for T. b. brucei infection and was progressed into the lead optimization stage. In summary, the present study demonstrates the successful and effective use of resazurin-reduction based assays as tools for primary and secondary screening of a new compound series to identify leads for the treatment of HAT.

  16. Inhibitors of Streptococcus pneumoniae surface endonuclease EndA discovered by high-throughput screening using a PicoGreen fluorescence assay.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Eliza J R; Kireev, Dmitri; Moon, Andrea F; Midon, Marika; Janzen, William P; Pingoud, Alfred; Pedersen, Lars C; Singleton, Scott F

    2013-03-01

    The human commensal pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae expresses a number of virulence factors that promote serious pneumococcal diseases, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. These virulence factors may give S. pneumoniae the capacity to escape immune defenses, resist antimicrobial agents, or a combination of both. Virulence factors also present possible points of therapeutic intervention. The activities of the surface endonuclease, EndA, allow S. pneumoniae to establish invasive pneumococcal infection. EndA's role in DNA uptake during transformation contributes to gene transfer and genetic diversification. Moreover, EndA's nuclease activity degrades the DNA backbone of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), allowing pneumococcus to escape host immune responses. Given its potential impact on pneumococcal pathogenicity, EndA is an attractive target for novel antimicrobial therapy. Herein, we describe the development of a high-throughput screening assay for the discovery of nuclease inhibitors. Nuclease-mediated digestion of double-stranded DNA was assessed using fluorescence changes of the DNA dye ligand, PicoGreen. Under optimized conditions, the assay provided robust and reproducible activity data (Z'= 0.87) and was used to screen 4727 small molecules against an imidazole-rescued variant of EndA. In total, six small molecules were confirmed as novel EndA inhibitors, some of which may have utility as research tools for understanding pneumococcal pathogenesis and for drug discovery.

  17. Inhibitors of Streptococcus pneumoniae Surface Endonuclease EndA Discovered by High-Throughput Screening Using a PicoGreen Fluorescence Assay

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Eliza J.R.; Kireev, Dmitri; Moon, Andrea F.; Midon, Marika; Janzen, William P.; Pingoud, Alfred; Pedersen, Lars C.

    2016-01-01

    The human commensal pathogen, Streptococcus pneumoniae, expresses a number of virulence factors that promote serious pneumococcal diseases, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. These virulence factors may give S. pneumoniae the capacity to escape immune defenses, resist antimicrobial agents, or a combination of both. Virulence factors also present possible points of therapeutic intervention. The activities of the surface endonuclease, EndA, allow S. pneumoniae to establish invasive pneumococcal infection. EndA’s role in DNA uptake during transformation contributes to gene transfer and genetic diversitifcation. Moreover, EndA’s nuclease activity degrades the DNA backbone of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), allowing pneumococcus to escape host immune responses. Given its potential impact on pneumococcal pathogenicity, EndA is an attractive target for novel antimicrobial therapy. Herein, we describe the development of a high-throughput screening assay for the discovery of nuclease inhibitors. Nuclease-mediated digestion of double-stranded DNA was assessed using fluorescence intensity changes of the DNA dye ligand, PicoGreen. Under optimized conditions, the assay provided robust and reproducible activity data (Z'=0.87) and was used to screen 4727 small molecules against an imidazole-rescued variant of EndA. In total, 10 small molecules were confirmed as novel EndA inhibitors that may have utility as research tools for understanding pneumococcal pathogenesis, and ultimately drug discovery. PMID:23015019

  18. High Throughput Screening For Hazard and Risk of Environmental Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput toxicity testing provides detailed mechanistic information on the concentration response of environmental contaminants in numerous potential toxicity pathways. High throughput screening (HTS) has several key advantages: (1) expense orders of magnitude less than an...

  19. High Throughput Screening For Hazard and Risk of Environmental Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput toxicity testing provides detailed mechanistic information on the concentration response of environmental contaminants in numerous potential toxicity pathways. High throughput screening (HTS) has several key advantages: (1) expense orders of magnitude less than an...

  20. High Throughput Screening Tools for Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong-Ng, W.; Yan, Y.; Otani, M.; Martin, J.; Talley, K. R.; Barron, S.; Carroll, D. L.; Hewitt, C.; Joress, H.; Thomas, E. L.; Green, M. L.; Tang, X. F.

    2015-06-01

    A suite of complementary high-throughput screening systems for combinatorial films was developed at National Institute of Standards and Technology to facilitate the search for efficient thermoelectric materials. These custom-designed capabilities include a facility for combinatorial thin film synthesis and a suite of tools for screening the Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistance (electrical resistivity), and thermal effusivity (thermal conductivity) of these films. The Seebeck coefficient and resistance are measured via custom-built automated apparatus at both ambient and high temperatures. Thermal effusivity is measured using a frequency domain thermoreflectance technique. This paper will discuss applications using these tools on representative thermoelectric materials, including combinatorial composition-spread films, conventional films, single crystals, and ribbons.

  1. A Time-Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Assay for High-Throughput Screening of 14-3-3 Protein–Protein Interaction Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Robert W.; Lou, Bin; Zhao, Jing; Qui, Min; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Fu, Haian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Protein–protein interaction networks mediate diverse biological processes by regulating various signaling hubs and clusters. 14-3-3 proteins, a family of phosphoserine/threonine-binding molecules, serve as major interaction hubs in eukaryotic cells and have emerged as promising therapeutic targets for various human diseases. In order to identify chemical probes for mechanistic studies and for potential therapeutic development, we have developed highly sensitive bioassays to monitor the interaction of 14-3-3 with a client protein. In this study, we describe a homogenous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assay to detect the interaction of 14-3-3 with Bad, a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family. Through a series of titration studies in which europium-labeled 14-3-3 serves as an FRET donor and a Dy647-labeled phosphorylated Bad, the peptide acts as an FRET acceptor, we have achieved a robust TR-FRET assay that is suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS) with an excellent signal-to-background ratio of >20 and Z′ values >0.7. This assay was further miniaturized to a 1,536-well format for ultra-HTS (uHTS), and exhibited a similar robust performance. The utility and performance of the assay for uHTS were validated by (i) known inhibitors, including peptide R18 and small molecule FOBISIN101, and (ii) screening of a 51,200 compound library. This simple and robust assay is generally applicable to detect the interaction of 14-3-3 with other client proteins. It provides a sensitive and easy-to-use tool to facilitate the discovery of 14-3-3 protein inhibitors as well as to study 14-3-3-mediated protein–protein interactions. PMID:23906346

  2. Integrated Model of Chemical Perturbations of a Biological Pathway Using 18 In Vitro High-Throughput Screening Assays for the Estrogen Receptor.

    PubMed

    Judson, Richard S; Magpantay, Felicia Maria; Chickarmane, Vijay; Haskell, Cymra; Tania, Nessy; Taylor, Jean; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Rotroff, Daniel M; Filer, Dayne L; Houck, Keith A; Martin, Matthew T; Sipes, Nisha; Richard, Ann M; Mansouri, Kamel; Setzer, R Woodrow; Knudsen, Thomas B; Crofton, Kevin M; Thomas, Russell S

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a computational network model that integrates 18 in vitro, high-throughput screening assays measuring estrogen receptor (ER) binding, dimerization, chromatin binding, transcriptional activation, and ER-dependent cell proliferation. The network model uses activity patterns across the in vitro assays to predict whether a chemical is an ER agonist or antagonist, or is otherwise influencing the assays through a manner dependent on the physics and chemistry of the technology platform ("assay interference"). The method is applied to a library of 1812 commercial and environmental chemicals, including 45 ER positive and negative reference chemicals. Among the reference chemicals, the network model correctly identified the agonists and antagonists with the exception of very weak compounds whose activity was outside the concentration range tested. The model agonist score also correlated with the expected potency class of the active reference chemicals. Of the 1812 chemicals evaluated, 111 (6.1%) were predicted to be strongly ER active in agonist or antagonist mode. This dataset and model were also used to begin a systematic investigation of assay interference. The most prominent cause of false-positive activity (activity in an assay that is likely not due to interaction of the chemical with ER) is cytotoxicity. The model provides the ability to prioritize a large set of important environmental chemicals with human exposure potential for additional in vivo endocrine testing. Finally, this model is generalizable to any molecular pathway for which there are multiple upstream and downstream assays available. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  3. Targeting aphA : a new high-throughput screening assay identifies compounds that reduce prime virulence factors of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Galina; Roy, Sambit; Zapol'skii, Viktor A; Kaufmann, Dieter E; Schnürch, Michael; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Nandy, Ranjan K; Tegge, Werner

    2016-07-01

    A high-throughput screening (HTS) assay was developed for identifying compounds with inhibitory effect on aphA, one of the key regulators positively controlling Vibrio cholerae pathogenesis. An inhibitory effect on aphA was expected to lead to attenuation in the secretion of the major pathogenicity factors of V. cholerae, cholera toxin and toxin co-regulated pilus. The plasmid construct pAKSB was developed with a kanamycin resistance (KmR) gene under the control of the aphA -like promoter for conferring a KmR phenotype under aphA -expressing conditions. The HTS assay was performed to identify compounds with inhibitory effect on the growth of O139 V. cholerae MO10 carrying the construct pAKSB in growth medium containing Km (30 g ml-1), but not in its absence. Of 20 338 compounds screened, six compounds were identified to inhibit the pAKSB-induced KmR phenotype and these compounds caused transcriptional inhibition of aphA in V. cholerae O139 strain MO10 as well as variant V. cholerae O1 El Tor strain NM06-058. Of the three most active substances, compound 53760866 showed lowest half-maximal cytotoxicity in a eukaryotic cell viability assay and was characterized further. Compound 53760866 caused reduction in cholera toxin secretion and expression of TcpA in vitro. The in vitro virulence attenuation corroborated well in a suckling mouse model in vivo, which showed reduction of colonization by V. cholerae NM06-058 when co-administered with 53760866. The screening method and the compounds may lead to new preventive strategies for cholera by reducing the pathogenicity of V. cholerae .

  4. Application of a kosmotrope-based solubility assay to multiple protein therapeutic classes indicates broad use as a high-throughput screen for protein therapeutic aggregation propensity.

    PubMed

    Yamniuk, Aaron P; Ditto, Noah; Patel, Mehul; Dai, Jun; Sejwal, Preeti; Stetsko, Paul; Doyle, Michael L

    2013-08-01

    Aggregation propensity is a critical attribute of protein therapeutics that can influence production, manufacturing, delivery, and potential activity and safety (immunogenicity). It is therefore imperative to select molecules with low aggregation propensity in the early stages of drug discovery to mitigate the risk of delays or failure in clinical development. Although many biophysical methods have been developed to characterize protein aggregation, most established methods are low-throughput, requiring large quantities of protein, lengthy assay times, and/or significant upstream sample preparation, which can limit application in early candidate screening. To avoid these limitations, we developed a reliable method to characterize aggregation propensity, by measuring the relative solubility of protein therapeutic candidates in the presence of the kosmotropic salt ammonium sulfate. Manual bench-scale and automated plate-based methods were applied to different protein therapeutic formats including Adnectins, domain antibodies, PEGylated Adnectins, Fc fusion proteins, and monoclonal antibodies. The kosmotrope solubility data agreed well with the aggregation propensity observed by established methods, while being amenable to high-throughput screening because of speed, simplicity, versatility and low protein material requirements. The results suggest that kosmotrope-based solubility assessment has broad applicability to selecting protein therapeutic candidates with low aggregation propensity and high "developability" to progress into development. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A new method with flexible and balanced control of false negatives and false positives for hit selection in RNA interference high-throughput screening assays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2007-08-01

    The z-score method and its variants for testing mean difference are commonly used for hit selection in high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. Strictly standardized mean difference (SSMD) offers a way to measure and classify the short interfering RNA (siRNA) effects. In this article, based on SSMD, the authors propose a new testing method for hit selection in RNA interference (RNAi) HTS assays. This SSMD-based method allows the differentiation between siRNAs with large and small effects on the assay output and maintains flexible and balanced control of both the false-negative rate, in which the siRNAs with strong effects are not selected as hits, and the restricted false-positive rate, in which the siRNAs with weak or no effects are selected as hits. This method directly addresses the size of siRNA effects represented by the strength of difference between an siRNA and a negative reference, whereas the classic z-score method and t-test of testing no mean difference address whether the mean of an siRNA is exactly the same as the mean of a negative reference. This method can readily control the false-negative rate, whereas it is nontrivial for the classic z-score method and t-test to control the false-negative rate. Therefore, theoretically, the SSMD-based method offers better control of the sizes of siRNA effects and the associated false-positive and false-negative rates than the commonly used z-score method and t-test for hit selection in HTS assays. The SSMD-based method should generally be applicable to any assay in which the end point is a difference in signal compared to a reference sample, including those for RNAi, receptor, enzyme, and cellular function.

  6. The high throughput biomedicine unit at the institute for molecular medicine Finland: high throughput screening meets precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Pietiainen, Vilja; Saarela, Jani; von Schantz, Carina; Turunen, Laura; Ostling, Paivi; Wennerberg, Krister

    2014-05-01

    The High Throughput Biomedicine (HTB) unit at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM was established in 2010 to serve as a national and international academic screening unit providing access to state of the art instrumentation for chemical and RNAi-based high throughput screening. The initial focus of the unit was multiwell plate based chemical screening and high content microarray-based siRNA screening. However, over the first four years of operation, the unit has moved to a more flexible service platform where both chemical and siRNA screening is performed at different scales primarily in multiwell plate-based assays with a wide range of readout possibilities with a focus on ultraminiaturization to allow for affordable screening for the academic users. In addition to high throughput screening, the equipment of the unit is also used to support miniaturized, multiplexed and high throughput applications for other types of research such as genomics, sequencing and biobanking operations. Importantly, with the translational research goals at FIMM, an increasing part of the operations at the HTB unit is being focused on high throughput systems biological platforms for functional profiling of patient cells in personalized and precision medicine projects.

  7. High-throughput fluorescence screening assay for the identification and comparison of antimicrobial peptides' activity on various yeast species.

    PubMed

    Kodedová, Marie; Sychrová, Hana

    2016-09-10

    New antifungal compounds that circumvent the resistance of the pathogen by directly damaging yeast cell surface structures are promising agents for the treatment of fungal infections, due to their different mechanism of action from current clinically used antifungal drugs. We present here a rapid and cost-effective fluorescence method suitable for identifying new potent drugs that directly target yeast cell surface structures, causing cell permeabilization and thus bypassing the multidrug resistance mechanisms of pathogens. The fluorescence assay enabled us to detect with high sensitivity damage to the Candida plasma membrane (its hyperpolarization and permeabilization) as a result of short-term exposure to the antifungal compounds. Results can be obtained in 1-2h with minimal effort and consumption of the tested compounds, also 96 samples can be analysed simultaneously. We used this method to study antimicrobial peptides isolated from the venom of bees and their synthetic analogs, compare the potency of the peptides and determine their minimal effective concentrations. The antimicrobial peptides were able to kill yeast cells at low concentrations within a 15-min treatment, the LL-III peptide exhibited a broad spectrum of antifungal activity on various Saccharomyces, pathogenic Candida and osmotolerant yeast species.

  8. HtrA3 as an Early Marker for Preeclampsia: Specific Monoclonal Antibodies and Sensitive High-Throughput Assays for Serum Screening

    PubMed Central

    Dynon, Kemperly; Heng, Sophea; Puryer, Michelle; Li, Ying; Walton, Kelly; Endo, Yaeta; Nie, Guiying

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian HtrA3 (high temperature requirement A3) is a serine protease of the HtrA family. It has two isoforms [long (HtrA3-L) and short (HtrA3-S)] and is important for placental development and cancer progression. Recently, HtrA3 was identified as a potential diagnostic marker for early detection of preeclampsia, a life-threatening pregnancy-specific disorder. Currently there are no high-throughput assays available to detect HtrA3 in human serum. In this study we generated and fully tested a panel of five HtrA3 mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Three mAbs recognised both HtrA3-L and HtrA3-S and the other two detected HtrA3-L only. All five mAbs were highly specific to HtrA3 and applicable in western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis of endogenous HtrA3 proteins in the mouse and human tissues. Amplified luminescent proximity homogeneous assays-linked immunosorbent assays (AlphaLISAs), were developed to detect HtrA3 isoforms in picomolar levels in serum. The HtrA3 AlphaLISA detected significantly higher serum levels of HtrA3 in women at 13–14 weeks of gestation who subsequently developed preeclampsia compared to gestational-age matched controls. These HtrA3 mAbs are valuable for the development of immunoassays and characterisation of HtrA3 isoform-specific biology. The newly developed HtrA3 AlphaLISA assays are suitable for large scale screening of human serum. PMID:23049902

  9. High Throughput Danio Rerio Energy Expenditure Assay.

    PubMed

    Williams, Savannah Y; Renquist, Benjamin J

    2016-01-27

    Zebrafish are an important model organism with inherent advantages that have the potential to make zebrafish a widely applied model for the study of energy homeostasis and obesity. The small size of zebrafish allows for assays on embryos to be conducted in a 96- or 384-well plate format, Morpholino and CRISPR based technologies promote ease of genetic manipulation, and drug treatment by bath application is viable. Moreover, zebrafish are ideal for forward genetic screens allowing for novel gene discovery. Given the relative novelty of zebrafish as a model for obesity, it is necessary to develop tools that fully exploit these benefits. Herein, we describe a method to measure energy expenditure in thousands of embryonic zebrafish simultaneously. We have developed a whole animal microplate platform in which we use 96-well plates to isolate individual fish and we assess cumulative NADH2 production using the commercially available cell culture viability reagent alamarBlue. In poikilotherms the relationship between NADH2 production and energy expenditure is tightly linked. This energy expenditure assay creates the potential to rapidly screen pharmacological or genetic manipulations that directly alter energy expenditure or alter the response to an applied drug (e.g. insulin sensitizers).

  10. 20150325 - Application of High-Throughput In Vitro Assays for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Multiple drivers shape the types of human-health assessments performed on chemicals by U.S. EPA resulting in chemical assessments are “fit-for-purpose” ranging from prioritization for further testing to full risk assessments. Layered on top of the diverse assessment needs are the resource intensive nature of traditional toxicological studies used to test chemicals and the lack of toxicity information on many chemicals. To address these challenges, the Agency initiated the ToxCast program to screen thousands of chemicals across hundreds of high-throughput screening assays in concentrations-response format. One of the findings of the project has been that the majority of chemicals interact with multiple biological targets within a narrow concentration range and the extent of interactions increases rapidly near the concentration causing cytotoxicity. This means that application of high-throughput in vitro assays to chemical assessments will need to identify both the relative selectivity at chemicals interact with biological targets and the concentration at which these interactions perturb signaling pathways. The integrated analyses will be used to both define a point-of-departure for comparison with human exposure estimates and identify which chemicals may benefit from further studies in a mode-of-action or adverse outcome pathway framework. The application of new technologies in a risk-based, tiered manner provides flexibility in matching throughput and cos

  11. Tiered High-Throughput Screening Approach to Identify ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    High-throughput screening (HTS) for potential thyroid–disrupting chemicals requires a system of assays to capture multiple molecular-initiating events (MIEs) that converge on perturbed thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis. Screening for MIEs specific to TH-disrupting pathways is limited in the US EPA ToxCast screening assay portfolio. To fill one critical screening gap, the Amplex UltraRed-thyroperoxidase (AUR-TPO) assay was developed to identify chemicals that inhibit TPO, as decreased TPO activity reduces TH synthesis. The ToxCast Phase I and II chemical libraries, comprised of 1,074 unique chemicals, were initially screened using a single, high concentration to identify potential TPO inhibitors. Chemicals positive in the single concentration screen were retested in concentration-response. Due to high false positive rates typically observed with loss-of-signal assays such as AUR-TPO, we also employed two additional assays in parallel to identify possible sources of nonspecific assay signal loss, enabling stratification of roughly 300 putative TPO inhibitors based upon selective AUR-TPO activity. A cell-free luciferase inhibition assay was used to identify nonspecific enzyme inhibition among the putative TPO inhibitors, and a cytotoxicity assay using a human cell line was used to estimate the cellular tolerance limit. Additionally, the TPO inhibition activities of 150 chemicals were compared between the AUR-TPO and an orthogonal peroxidase oxidation assay using

  12. A High-Throughput Cidality Screen for Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Parvinder; Ghosh, Anirban; Krishnamurthy, Ramya Vadageri; Bhattacharjee, Deepa Gagwani; Achar, Vijayashree; Datta, Santanu; Narayanan, Shridhar; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) aerosols is a major threat to tuberculosis (TB) researchers, even in bio-safety level-3 (BSL-3) facilities. Automation and high-throughput screens (HTS) in BSL3 facilities are essential for minimizing manual aerosol-generating interventions and facilitating TB research. In the present study, we report the development and validation of a high-throughput, 24-well ‘spot-assay’ for selecting bactericidal compounds against Mtb. The bactericidal screen concept was first validated in the fast-growing surrogate Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) and subsequently confirmed in Mtb using the following reference anti-tubercular drugs: rifampicin, isoniazid, ofloxacin and ethambutol (RIOE, acting on different targets). The potential use of the spot-assay to select bactericidal compounds from a large library was confirmed by screening on Mtb, with parallel plating by the conventional gold standard method (correlation, r2 = 0.808). An automated spot-assay further enabled an MBC90 determination on resistant and sensitive Mtb clinical isolates. The implementation of the spot-assay in kinetic screens to enumerate residual Mtb after either genetic silencing (anti-sense RNA, AS-RNA) or chemical inhibition corroborated its ability to detect cidality. This relatively simple, economical and quantitative HTS considerably minimized the bio-hazard risk and enabled the selection of novel vulnerable Mtb targets and mycobactericidal compounds. Thus, spot-assays have great potential to impact the TB drug discovery process. PMID:25693161

  13. Development and Validation of a Novel Leishmania donovani Screening Cascade for High-Throughput Screening Using a Novel Axenic Assay with High Predictivity of Leishmanicidal Intracellular Activity.

    PubMed

    Nühs, Andrea; De Rycker, Manu; Manthri, Sujatha; Comer, Eamon; Scherer, Christina A; Schreiber, Stuart L; Ioset, Jean-Robert; Gray, David W

    2015-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is an important parasitic disease of the developing world with a limited arsenal of drugs available for treatment. The existing drugs have significant deficiencies so there is an urgent need for new and improved drugs. In the human host, Leishmania are obligate intracellular parasites which poses particular challenges in terms of drug discovery. To achieve sufficient throughput and robustness, free-living parasites are often used in primary screening assays as a surrogate for the more complex intracellular assays. We and others have found that such axenic assays have a high false positive rate relative to the intracellular assays, and that this limits their usefulness as a primary platform for screening of large compound collections. While many different reasons could lie behind the poor translation from axenic parasite to intracellular parasite, we show here that a key factor is the identification of growth slowing and cytostatic compounds by axenic assays in addition to the more desirable cytocidal compounds. We present a screening cascade based on a novel cytocidal-only axenic amastigote assay, developed by increasing starting density of cells and lowering the limit of detection, and show that it has a much improved translation to the intracellular assay. We propose that this assay is an improved primary platform in a new Leishmania screening cascade designed for the screening of large compound collections. This cascade was employed to screen a diversity-oriented-synthesis library, and yielded two novel antileishmanial chemotypes. The approach we have taken may have broad relevance to anti-infective and anti-parasitic drug discovery.

  14. Development and Validation of a Novel Leishmania donovani Screening Cascade for High-Throughput Screening Using a Novel Axenic Assay with High Predictivity of Leishmanicidal Intracellular Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nühs, Andrea; De Rycker, Manu; Manthri, Sujatha; Comer, Eamon; Scherer, Christina A.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Ioset, Jean-Robert; Gray, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is an important parasitic disease of the developing world with a limited arsenal of drugs available for treatment. The existing drugs have significant deficiencies so there is an urgent need for new and improved drugs. In the human host, Leishmania are obligate intracellular parasites which poses particular challenges in terms of drug discovery. To achieve sufficient throughput and robustness, free-living parasites are often used in primary screening assays as a surrogate for the more complex intracellular assays. We and others have found that such axenic assays have a high false positive rate relative to the intracellular assays, and that this limits their usefulness as a primary platform for screening of large compound collections. While many different reasons could lie behind the poor translation from axenic parasite to intracellular parasite, we show here that a key factor is the identification of growth slowing and cytostatic compounds by axenic assays in addition to the more desirable cytocidal compounds. We present a screening cascade based on a novel cytocidal-only axenic amastigote assay, developed by increasing starting density of cells and lowering the limit of detection, and show that it has a much improved translation to the intracellular assay. We propose that this assay is an improved primary platform in a new Leishmania screening cascade designed for the screening of large compound collections. This cascade was employed to screen a diversity-oriented-synthesis library, and yielded two novel antileishmanial chemotypes. The approach we have taken may have broad relevance to anti-infective and anti-parasitic drug discovery. PMID:26407168

  15. A microdroplet dilutor for high-throughput screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xize; Gielen, Fabrice; Edel, Joshua B.; Demello, Andrew J.

    2011-06-01

    Pipetting and dilution are universal processes used in chemical and biological laboratories to assay and experiment. In microfluidics such operations are equally in demand, but difficult to implement. Recently, droplet-based microfluidics has emerged as an exciting new platform for high-throughput experimentation. However, it is challenging to vary the concentration of droplets rapidly and controllably. To this end, we developed a dilution module for high-throughput screening using droplet-based microfluidics. Briefly, a nanolitre-sized sample droplet of defined concentration is trapped within a microfluidic chamber. Through a process of droplet merging, mixing and re-splitting, this droplet is combined with a series of smaller buffer droplets to generate a sequence of output droplets that define a digital concentration gradient. Importantly, the formed droplets can be merged with other reagent droplets to enable rapid chemical and biological screens. As a proof of concept, we used the dilutor to perform a high-throughput homogeneous DNA-binding assay using only nanolitres of sample.

  16. A microdroplet dilutor for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xize; Gielen, Fabrice; Edel, Joshua B; deMello, Andrew J

    2011-06-01

    Pipetting and dilution are universal processes used in chemical and biological laboratories to assay and experiment. In microfluidics such operations are equally in demand, but difficult to implement. Recently, droplet-based microfluidics has emerged as an exciting new platform for high-throughput experimentation. However, it is challenging to vary the concentration of droplets rapidly and controllably. To this end, we developed a dilution module for high-throughput screening using droplet-based microfluidics. Briefly, a nanolitre-sized sample droplet of defined concentration is trapped within a microfluidic chamber. Through a process of droplet merging, mixing and re-splitting, this droplet is combined with a series of smaller buffer droplets to generate a sequence of output droplets that define a digital concentration gradient. Importantly, the formed droplets can be merged with other reagent droplets to enable rapid chemical and biological screens. As a proof of concept, we used the dilutor to perform a high-throughput homogeneous DNA-binding assay using only nanolitres of sample.

  17. A cell-based, high-throughput homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assay for the screening of potential κ-opioid receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Yan, Ming; Zheng, Guang-yao; He, Ling; Yang, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to identify κ-opioid receptor (KOR) agonists from a library of 80 000 small-molecule compounds and provide the experimental basis for the development of new analgesic candidates. Methods: The cell-based, high-throughput screen for human KOR agonists was based on the LANCE™ cAMP assay. Preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis was applied according to the compounds' structures. An acetic acid twisting experiment was used to verify the pharmacodynamics. Results: In total, 31 compounds were identified as KOR agonists after preliminary and secondary screening. Of these compounds, five demonstrated significant KOR-stimulating activity that was comparable to U-50,488, a selective KOR agonist. The EC50 values for I-7, I-8, I-10, II-5, and II-8 were 13.34±1.65, 14.01±1.84, 9.57±0.19, 14.94±0.64, and 8.74±0.72 nmol/L, respectively. Based on SAR studies, the stimulating activity of compounds with 5-phenyl-7-(trifluoromethyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydropyrazolo [1, 5-a] pyrimidine (group I) and 3,4-dimethoxy-N-(2-oxoethyl)-N-p-tolylbenzenesulfonamide (group II) parent structures were higher than the compound with a 5-hydroxy-2-methylbenzofuran-3-carboxylic acid (group III) parent structure. Pharmacodynamic experiments indicated that 20–40 μg/kg ip of compounds I-10 and II-8 significantly decreased the number of writhes induced by acetic acid; this finding is consistent with the SAR studies. Furthermore, the analgesic effects of compounds I-10 and II-8 were significantly antagonized in the presence of the selective KOR antagonist nor-BNI. Conclusion: These findings collectively indicate that compounds I-10 and II-8 exhibit significant analgesic activities, providing evidence, at least in part, for their clinical application as new analgesic drugs. PMID:24930486

  18. AOPs and Biomarkers: Bridging High Throughput Screening ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As high throughput screening (HTS) plays a larger role in toxicity testing, camputational toxicology has emerged as a critical component in interpreting the large volume of data produced. Computational models designed to quantify potential adverse effects based on HTS data will benefit from additional data sources that connect the magnitude of perturbation from the in vitro system to a level of concern at the organism or population level. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) concept provides an ideal framework for combining these complementary data. Recent international efforts under the auspices of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) have resulted in an AOP wiki designed to house formal descriptions of AOPs suitable for use in regulatory decision making. Recent efforts have built upon this to include an ontology describing the AOP with linkages to biological pathways, physiological terminology, and taxonomic applicability domains. Incorporation of an AOP network tool developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers also allows consideration of cumulative risk from chemical and non-chemical stressors. Biomarkers are an important complement to formal AOP descriptions, particularly when dealing with susceptible subpopulations or lifestages in human health risk assessment. To address the issue of nonchemical stressors than may modify effects of criteria air pollutants, a novel method was used to integrate blood gene expression data with hema

  19. AOPs and Biomarkers: Bridging High Throughput Screening ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As high throughput screening (HTS) plays a larger role in toxicity testing, camputational toxicology has emerged as a critical component in interpreting the large volume of data produced. Computational models designed to quantify potential adverse effects based on HTS data will benefit from additional data sources that connect the magnitude of perturbation from the in vitro system to a level of concern at the organism or population level. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) concept provides an ideal framework for combining these complementary data. Recent international efforts under the auspices of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) have resulted in an AOP wiki designed to house formal descriptions of AOPs suitable for use in regulatory decision making. Recent efforts have built upon this to include an ontology describing the AOP with linkages to biological pathways, physiological terminology, and taxonomic applicability domains. Incorporation of an AOP network tool developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers also allows consideration of cumulative risk from chemical and non-chemical stressors. Biomarkers are an important complement to formal AOP descriptions, particularly when dealing with susceptible subpopulations or lifestages in human health risk assessment. To address the issue of nonchemical stressors than may modify effects of criteria air pollutants, a novel method was used to integrate blood gene expression data with hema

  20. An image analysis toolbox for high-throughput C. elegans assays

    PubMed Central

    Wählby, Carolina; Kamentsky, Lee; Liu, Zihan H.; Riklin-Raviv, Tammy; Conery, Annie L.; O’Rourke, Eyleen J.; Sokolnicki, Katherine L.; Visvikis, Orane; Ljosa, Vebjorn; Irazoqui, Javier E.; Golland, Polina; Ruvkun, Gary; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Carpenter, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a toolbox for high-throughput screening of image-based Caenorhabditis elegans phenotypes. The image analysis algorithms measure morphological phenotypes in individual worms and are effective for a variety of assays and imaging systems. This WormToolbox is available via the open-source CellProfiler project and enables objective scoring of whole-animal high-throughput image-based assays of C. elegans for the study of diverse biological pathways relevant to human disease. PMID:22522656

  1. Applications of ambient mass spectrometry in high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Ping; Feng, Bao-Sheng; Yang, Jian-Wang; Chang, Cui-Lan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Hu-Wei

    2013-06-07

    The development of rapid screening and identification techniques is of great importance for drug discovery, doping control, forensic identification, food safety and quality control. Ambient mass spectrometry (AMS) allows rapid and direct analysis of various samples in open air with little sample preparation. Recently, its applications in high-throughput screening have been in rapid progress. During the past decade, various ambient ionization techniques have been developed and applied in high-throughput screening. This review discusses typical applications of AMS, including DESI (desorption electrospray ionization), DART (direct analysis in real time), EESI (extractive electrospray ionization), etc., in high-throughput screening (HTS).

  2. Integration of Dosimetry, Exposure and High-Throughput Screening Data in Chemical Toxicity Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput in vitro toxicity screening can provide an efficient way to identify potential biological targets for chemicals. However, relying on nominal assay concentrations may misrepresent potential in vivo effects of these chemicals due to differences in bioavailability, c...

  3. Integration of Dosimetry, Exposure and High-Throughput Screening Data in Chemical Toxicity Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput in vitro toxicity screening can provide an efficient way to identify potential biological targets for chemicals. However, relying on nominal assay concentrations may misrepresent potential in vivo effects of these chemicals due to differences in bioavailability, c...

  4. High-throughput screening based on label-free detection of small molecule microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chenggang; Fei, Yiyan; Zhu, Xiangdong

    2017-02-01

    Based on small-molecule microarrays (SMMs) and oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) scanner, we have developed a novel high-throughput drug preliminary screening platform based on label-free monitoring of direct interactions between target proteins and immobilized small molecules. The screening platform is especially attractive for screening compounds against targets of unknown function and/or structure that are not compatible with functional assay development. In this screening platform, OI-RD scanner serves as a label-free detection instrument which is able to monitor about 15,000 biomolecular interactions in a single experiment without the need to label any biomolecule. Besides, SMMs serves as a novel format for high-throughput screening by immobilization of tens of thousands of different compounds on a single phenyl-isocyanate functionalized glass slide. Based on the high-throughput screening platform, we sequentially screened five target proteins (purified target proteins or cell lysate containing target protein) in high-throughput and label-free mode. We found hits for respective target protein and the inhibition effects for some hits were confirmed by following functional assays. Compared to traditional high-throughput screening assay, the novel high-throughput screening platform has many advantages, including minimal sample consumption, minimal distortion of interactions through label-free detection, multi-target screening analysis, which has a great potential to be a complementary screening platform in the field of drug discovery.

  5. Towards high throughput screening of nanoparticle flotation collectors.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Carla; Yang, Songtao; Pelton, Robert H

    2015-12-15

    To function as flotation collectors for mineral processing, polymeric nanoparticles require a delicate balance of surface properties to give mineral-specific deposition and colloidal stability in high ionic strength alkaline media, while remaining sufficiently hydrophobic to promote flotation. Combinatorial nanoparticle surface modification, in conjunction with high throughput screening, is a promising approach for nanoparticle development. However, efficient automated screening assays are required to reject ineffective particles without having to undergo time consuming flotation testing. Herein we demonstrate that determining critical coagulation concentrations of sodium carbonate in combination with measuring the advancing water contact angle of nanoparticle-saturated glass surfaces can be used to screen ineffective nanoparticles. Finally, none of our first nanoparticle library based on poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEG-methacrylate) were effective flotation collectors because the nanoparticles were too hydrophilic.

  6. A High-Throughput Yeast Halo Assay for Bioactive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bray, Walter; Lokey, R Scott

    2016-09-01

    When a disk of filter paper is impregnated with a cytotoxic or cytostatic drug and added to solid medium seeded with yeast, a visible clear zone forms around the disk whose size depends on the concentration and potency of the drug. This is the traditional "halo" assay and provides a convenient, if low-throughput, read-out of biological activity that has been the mainstay of antifungal and antibiotic testing for decades. Here, we describe a protocol for a high-throughput version of the halo assay, which uses an array of 384 pins to deliver ∼200 nL of stock solutions from compound plates onto single-well plates seeded with yeast. Using a plate reader in the absorbance mode, the resulting halos can be quantified and the data archived in the form of flat files that can be connected to compound databases with standard software. This assay has the convenience associated with the visual readout of the traditional halo assay but uses far less material and can be automated to screen thousands of compounds per day.

  7. Miniaturization of a transthyretin binding assay using a fluorescent probe for high throughput screening of thyroid hormone disruption in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Xiyu; Froment, Jean; Leonards, Pim E G; Christensen, Guttorm; Tollefsen, Knut-Erik; de Boer, Jacob; Thomas, Kevin V; Lamoree, Marja H

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) disrupting compounds are potentially important environmental contaminants due to their possible adverse neurological and developmental effects on both humans and wildlife. Currently, the most successful bio-analytical method to detect and evaluate TH disruptors, which target the plasma transport of TH in environmental samples, is the radio-ligand thyroxine-transthyretin (T4-TTR) binding assay. Yet, costly materials and tedious handling procedures prevent the use of this assay in high throughput analysis that is nowadays urgently demanded in environmental quality assessment. For the first time a miniaturized fluorescence T4-TTR binding assay was developed in a 96 well microplate and tested with eight TH disrupting compounds. For most of the compounds, the sensitivity of the newly developed assay was slightly lower than the radio-ligand binding assay, however, throughput was enhanced at least 100-fold, while using much cheaper materials. The TH disrupting potency of 22 herring gull (Larus argentatus) egg extracts, collected from two different locations (Musvær and Reiaren) in Norway, was evaluated to demonstrate the applicability of the assay for environmental samples. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. High-throughput assays for sirtuin enzymes: a microfluidic mobility shift assay and a bioluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yichin; Gerber, Raphaele; Wu, John; Tsuruda, Trace; McCarter, John D

    2008-07-01

    Silent information regulator or sirtuin (SIRT) enzymes are beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (oxidized) (NAD(+))-dependent class III histone deacetylases. In this paper, two distinct assays to measure SIRT1 activity are described: a microfluidic mobility shift assay utilizing a fluorophore-labeled peptide substrate and a bioluminescence assay based upon quantitation of remaining NAD(+). The mobility shift assay involves the electrophoretic separation of an N-acetyl-lysine-containing peptide substrate from deacetylated product which bears an additional positive charge. Interference from fluorescent compounds is minimized during screening by direct visualization of separated fluorophore-labeled substrate and product. A preferred peptide substrate for SIRT1 was identified using this assay. The NAD(+) bioluminescence assay couples NAD(+) consumption to the bacterial luciferase-catalyzed oxidation of decanal. This assay does not require synthesis of a labeled peptide and is applicable to sirtuins of any specificity with respect to peptide substrate. The stoichiometry between NAD(+) consumption and peptide deacetylation was shown to be 1:1 by the NAD(+) bioluminescence assay. Kinetic parameters of peptide and NAD(+) cosubstrates and IC(50) values of standard reference inhibitors determined in either assay were similar. With robust Z' values (0.7), both assays are amenable to high-throughput screening.

  9. AOPs & Biomarkers: Bridging High Throughput Screening and Regulatory Decision Making.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As high throughput screening (HTS) approaches play a larger role in toxicity testing, computational toxicology has emerged as a critical component in interpreting the large volume of data produced. Computational models for this purpose are becoming increasingly more sophisticated...

  10. AOPs & Biomarkers: Bridging High Throughput Screening and Regulatory Decision Making.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As high throughput screening (HTS) approaches play a larger role in toxicity testing, computational toxicology has emerged as a critical component in interpreting the large volume of data produced. Computational models for this purpose are becoming increasingly more sophisticated...

  11. A Robotic Platform for Quantitative High-Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Sam; Auld, Douglas; Klumpp, Carleen; Jadhav, Ajit; Zheng, Wei; Thorne, Natasha; Austin, Christopher P.; Inglese, James

    2008-01-01

    Abstract High-throughput screening (HTS) is increasingly being adopted in academic institutions, where the decoupling of screening and drug development has led to unique challenges, as well as novel uses of instrumentation, assay formulations, and software tools. Advances in technology have made automated unattended screening in the 1,536-well plate format broadly accessible and have further facilitated the exploration of new technologies and approaches to screening. A case in point is our recently developed quantitative HTS (qHTS) paradigm, which tests each library compound at multiple concentrations to construct concentration-response curves (CRCs) generating a comprehensive data set for each assay. The practical implementation of qHTS for cell-based and biochemical assays across libraries of > 100,000 compounds (e.g., between 700,000 and 2,000,000 sample wells tested) requires maximal efficiency and miniaturization and the ability to easily accommodate many different assay formats and screening protocols. Here, we describe the design and utilization of a fully integrated and automated screening system for qHTS at the National Institutes of Health's Chemical Genomics Center. We report system productivity, reliability, and flexibility, as well as modifications made to increase throughput, add additional capabilities, and address limitations. The combination of this system and qHTS has led to the generation of over 6 million CRCs from > 120 assays in the last 3 years and is a technology that can be widely implemented to increase efficiency of screening and lead generation. PMID:19035846

  12. Development of an Easy and High-Throughput Cell Assay System with a Culture Chip and an Assay Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Kanako; Kaji, Noritada; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tokeshi, Manabu; Baba, Yoshinobu

    High throughput cell assay is significantly important in drug screening, assessment of toxicity etc. Cell assay with a microchip is one of the candidates for high throughput cell assay. However, reported cell assay system with the microchip requires expensive apparatus for refluxing medium and investigation of optimum experimental condition for steady data. For an inexpensive, easy and high throughput cell assay, we introduce a new cell assay system combined with a culture chip and an assay chip made of poly(dimethyl siloxane). Cell culture chips enabled cell to proliferate along the microchannel without refluxing medium and permitted to prepare cell patterning easily. Also, assay chips formed concentration gradient inside the chip and allowed the cell assay with different concentrations of drug at the same time. Thus, our developed cell assay system can overcome the problems of the present cell assay and would promote the drug discovery, assessment of toxicity etc.

  13. High Throughput Assays and Exposure Science (ISES annual meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput screening (HTS) data characterizing chemical-induced biological activity has been generated for thousands of environmentally-relevant chemicals by the US inter-agency Tox21 and the US EPA ToxCast programs. For a limited set of chemicals, bioactive concentrations r...

  14. High Throughput Assays and Exposure Science (ISES annual meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput screening (HTS) data characterizing chemical-induced biological activity has been generated for thousands of environmentally-relevant chemicals by the US inter-agency Tox21 and the US EPA ToxCast programs. For a limited set of chemicals, bioactive concentrations r...

  15. A Functional High-Throughput Assay of Myelination in Vitro

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    potential therapies for myelin disorders such as multiple sclerosis . Tissues engineered from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) may be effective at...Human induced pluripotent stem cells , hydrogels, 3D culture, electrophysiology, high-throughput assay 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...or remyelination would substantially speed the development and testing of potential therapies for myelin disorders such as multiple sclerosis

  16. Aptamers as reagents for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Green, L S; Bell, C; Janjic, N

    2001-05-01

    The identification of new drug candidates from chemical libraries is a major component of discovery research in many pharmaceutical companies. Given the large size of many conventional and combinatorial libraries and the rapid increase in the number of possible therapeutic targets, the speed with which efficient high-throughput screening (HTS) assays can be developed can be a rate-limiting step in the discovery process. We show here that aptamers, nucleic acids that bind other molecules with high affinity, can be used as versatile reagents in competition binding HTS assays to identify and optimize small-molecule ligands to protein targets. To illustrate this application, we have used labeled aptamers to platelet-derived growth factor B-chain and wheat germ agglutinin to screen two sets of potential small-molecule ligands. In both cases, binding affinities of all ligands tested (small molecules and aptamers) were strongly correlated with their inhibitory potencies in functional assays. The major advantages of using aptamers in HTS assays are speed of aptamer identification, high affinity of aptamers for protein targets, relatively large aptamer-protein interaction surfaces, and compatibility with various labeling/detection strategies. Aptamers may be particularly useful in HTS assays with protein targets that have no known binding partners such as orphan receptors. Since aptamers that bind to proteins are often specific and potent antagonists of protein function, the use of aptamers for target validation can be coupled with their subsequent use in HTS.

  17. Perspectives on Validation of High-Throughput Assays Supporting 21st Century Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays are seeing increasing use in toxicity testing. HTS assays can simultaneously test many chemicals but have seen limited use in the regulatory arena, in part because of the need to undergo rigorous, time-consuming formal validation. ...

  18. Perspectives on Validation of High-Throughput Assays Supporting 21st Century Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays are seeing increasing use in toxicity testing. HTS assays can simultaneously test many chemicals but have seen limited use in the regulatory arena, in part because of the need to undergo rigorous, time-consuming formal validation. ...

  19. Use of High Throughput Screening Data in IARC Monograph ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Purpose: Evaluation of carcinogenic mechanisms serves a critical role in IARC monograph evaluations, and can lead to “upgrade” or “downgrade” of the carcinogenicity conclusions based on human and animal evidence alone. Three recent IARC monograph Working Groups (110, 112, and 113) pioneered analysis of high throughput in vitro screening data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ToxCast program in evaluations of carcinogenic mechanisms. Methods: For monograph 110, ToxCast assay data across multiple nuclear receptors were used to test the hypothesis that PFOA acts exclusively through the PPAR family of receptors, with activity profiles compared to several prototypical nuclear receptor-activating compounds. For monographs 112 and 113, ToxCast assays were systematically evaluated and used as an additional data stream in the overall evaluation of the mechanistic evidence. Specifically, ToxCast assays were mapped to 10 “key characteristics of carcinogens” recently identified by an IARC expert group, and chemicals’ bioactivity profiles were evaluated both in absolute terms (number of relevant assays positive for bioactivity) and relative terms (ranking with respect to other compounds evaluated by IARC, using the ToxPi methodology). Results: PFOA activates multiple nuclear receptors in addition to the PPAR family in the ToxCast assays. ToxCast assays offered substantial coverage for 5 of the 10 “key characteristics,” with the greates

  20. High-throughput screening of chemicals as functional ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Identifying chemicals that provide a specific function within a product, yet have minimal impact on the human body or environment, is the goal of most formulation chemists and engineers practicing green chemistry. We present a methodology to identify potential chemical functional substitutes from large libraries of chemicals using machine learning based models. We collect and analyze publicly available information on the function of chemicals in consumer products or industrial processes to identify a suite of harmonized function categories suitable for modeling. We use structural and physicochemical descriptors for these chemicals to build 41 quantitative structure–use relationship (QSUR) models for harmonized function categories using random forest classification. We apply these models to screen a library of nearly 6400 chemicals with available structure information for potential functional substitutes. Using our Functional Use database (FUse), we could identify uses for 3121 chemicals; 4412 predicted functional uses had a probability of 80% or greater. We demonstrate the potential application of the models to high-throughput (HT) screening for “candidate alternatives” by merging the valid functional substitute classifications with hazard metrics developed from HT screening assays for bioactivity. A descriptor set could be obtained for 6356 Tox21 chemicals that have undergone a battery of HT in vitro bioactivity screening assays. By applying QSURs, we wer

  1. Efficient Management of High-Throughput Screening Libraries with SAVANAH.

    PubMed

    List, Markus; Elnegaard, Marlene Pedersen; Schmidt, Steffen; Christiansen, Helle; Tan, Qihua; Mollenhauer, Jan; Baumbach, Jan

    2017-02-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has become an indispensable tool for the pharmaceutical industry and for biomedical research. A high degree of automation allows for experiments in the range of a few hundred up to several hundred thousand to be performed in close succession. The basis for such screens are molecular libraries, that is, microtiter plates with solubilized reagents such as siRNAs, shRNAs, miRNA inhibitors or mimics, and sgRNAs, or small compounds, that is, drugs. These reagents are typically condensed to provide enough material for covering several screens. Library plates thus need to be serially diluted before they can be used as assay plates. This process, however, leads to an explosion in the number of plates and samples to be tracked. Here, we present SAVANAH, the first tool to effectively manage molecular screening libraries across dilution series. It conveniently links (connects) sample information from the library to experimental results from the assay plates. All results can be exported to the R statistical environment or piped into HiTSeekR ( http://hitseekr.compbio.sdu.dk ) for comprehensive follow-up analyses. In summary, SAVANAH supports the HTS community in managing and analyzing HTS experiments with an emphasis on serially diluted molecular libraries.

  2. High-throughput screening of chemicals as functional ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Identifying chemicals that provide a specific function within a product, yet have minimal impact on the human body or environment, is the goal of most formulation chemists and engineers practicing green chemistry. We present a methodology to identify potential chemical functional substitutes from large libraries of chemicals using machine learning based models. We collect and analyze publicly available information on the function of chemicals in consumer products or industrial processes to identify a suite of harmonized function categories suitable for modeling. We use structural and physicochemical descriptors for these chemicals to build 41 quantitative structure–use relationship (QSUR) models for harmonized function categories using random forest classification. We apply these models to screen a library of nearly 6400 chemicals with available structure information for potential functional substitutes. Using our Functional Use database (FUse), we could identify uses for 3121 chemicals; 4412 predicted functional uses had a probability of 80% or greater. We demonstrate the potential application of the models to high-throughput (HT) screening for “candidate alternatives” by merging the valid functional substitute classifications with hazard metrics developed from HT screening assays for bioactivity. A descriptor set could be obtained for 6356 Tox21 chemicals that have undergone a battery of HT in vitro bioactivity screening assays. By applying QSURs, we wer

  3. Quantitative High-throughput Luciferase Screening in Identifying CAR Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Caitlin; Zhao, Jinghua; Wang, Hongbing; Xia, Menghang

    2017-01-01

    Summary The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is responsible for the transcription of multiple drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. There are two possible methods of activation for CAR, direct ligand binding and a ligand-independent method, which makes this a unique nuclear receptor. Both of these mechanisms require translocation of CAR from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. Interestingly, CAR is constitutively active in immortalized cell lines due to the basal nuclear location of this receptor. This creates an important challenge in most in vitro assay models because immortalized cells cannot be used without inhibiting the basal activity. In this book chapter, we go into detail of how to perform quantitative high-throughput screens to identify hCAR1 modulators through the employment of a double stable cell line. Using this line, we are able to identify activators, as well as deactivators, of the challenging nuclear receptor, CAR. PMID:27518621

  4. Evolving the EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program: The case for and against using high-throughput screening assays in EDSP Tier 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing has begun as part of the EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) Tier 1 battery of 11 in vitro and in vivo tests. A recognized issue with the EDSP is that the current Tier 1 screening battery is highly resource intensive in terms of cost, time and animal usage fo...

  5. Evolving the EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program: The case for and against using high-throughput screening assays in EDSP Tier 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing has begun as part of the EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) Tier 1 battery of 11 in vitro and in vivo tests. A recognized issue with the EDSP is that the current Tier 1 screening battery is highly resource intensive in terms of cost, time and animal usage fo...

  6. Molecular analysis of immunized Jr(a-) or Lan- patients and validation of a high-throughput genotyping assay to screen blood donors for Jr(a-) and Lan- phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Ait Soussan, Aïcha; Ligthart, Peter; de Haas, Masja; van der Schoot, C Ellen

    2014-07-01

    Individuals with anti-Jr(a) or anti-Lan are ideally transfused with rare Jr(a-) or Lan- red blood cells. We characterized mutations in Dutch Jr(a-) and Lan- individuals and developed a high-throughput genotyping assay to detect Jr(a-) and Lan- donors. Six Jr(a-) and seven Lan- persons, who all made anti-Jr(a) or anti-Lan, were sequenced for ABCG2 or ABCB6 and the copy number of ABCG2 and ABCB6 was determined. A total of 3366 Caucasian, 621 black, and 333 Chinese donors were screened with a high-throughput screening assay targeting frequently occurring mutations causing the Jr(a-) or Lan- phenotype. In the six tested Jr(a-) individuals previously described, c.376C > T, c.706C > T, and c.736C > T nonsense mutations in ABCG2 were detected. In the seven Lan- individuals 12 different mutations, of which 10 underlie the Lan- phenotype, were detected. No copy number variation was detected for ABCG2 and ABCB6. The high-throughput screening assay detected five Caucasian donors heterozygous for the c.706C > T or 736C > T mutation in ABCG2 and nine Caucasian donors heterozygous for the 574C > T mutation in ABCB6. No black or Chinese donors were found positive for a mutation. We describe eight new mutations in ABCB6 of which seven, including three missense mutations, underlie the Lan- phenotype and determine that a complete gene deletion of ABCG2 or ABCB6 is not responsible for the Jr(a-) or Lan- phenotype, respectively. The extended heterogeneity of mutations causing the Jr(a-) or Lan- phenotype in most populations makes genetic screening for the Jr(a-) and Lan- phenotype inefficient in those populations. © 2014 AABB.

  7. High-throughput screening for modulators of cellular contractile force†

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Young; Zhou, Enhua H.; Tambe, Dhananjay; Chen, Bohao; Lavoie, Tera; Dowell, Maria; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J.; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Burger, Stephanie; Frykenberg, Matthew; Butler, James P.; Stamer, W. Daniel; Johnson, Mark; Solway, Julian; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    When cellular contractile forces are central to pathophysiology, these forces comprise a logical target of therapy. Nevertheless, existing high-throughput screens are limited to upstream signalling intermediates with poorly defined relationships to such a physiological endpoint. Using cellular force as the target, here we report a new screening technology and demonstrate its applications using human airway smooth muscle cells in the context of asthma and Schlemm's canal endothelial cells in the context of glaucoma. This approach identified several drug candidates for both asthma and glaucoma. We attained rates of 1000 compounds per screening day, thus establishing a force-based cellular platform for high-throughput drug discovery. PMID:25953078

  8. High throughput screening for drug discovery of autophagy modulators.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chih-Wen; Liu, Pei-Feng; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2012-11-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionally conserved process in cells for cleaning abnormal proteins and organelles in a lysosome dependent manner. Growing studies have shown that defects or induced autophagy contributes to many diseases including aging, neurodegeneration, pathogen infection, and cancer. However, the precise involvement of autophagy in health and disease remains controversial because the theories are built on limited assays and chemical modulators, indicating that the role of autophagy in diseases may require further verification. Many food and drug administration (FDA) approved drugs modulate autophagy signaling, suggesting that modulation of autophagy with pharmacological agonists or antagonists provides a potential therapy for autophagy-related diseases. This suggestion raises an attractive issue on drug discovery for exploring chemical modulators of autophagy. High throughput screening (HTS) is becoming a powerful tool for drug discovery that may accelerate screening specific autophagy modulators to clarify the role of autophagy in diseases. Herein, this review lays out current autophagy assays to specifically measure autophagy components such as LC3 (mammalian homologue of yeast Atg8) and Atg4. These assays are feasible or successful for HTS with certain chemical libraries, which might be informative for this intensively growing field as research tools and hopefully developing new drugs for autophagy-related diseases.

  9. Cheminformatics aspects of high throughput screening: from robots to models: symposium summary.

    PubMed

    Jane Tseng, Y; Martin, Eric; G Bologa, Cristian; Shelat, Anang A

    2013-05-01

    The "Cheminformatics aspects of high throughput screening (HTS): from robots to models" symposium was part of the computers in chemistry technical program at the American Chemical Society National Meeting in Denver, Colorado during the fall of 2011. This symposium brought together researchers from high throughput screening centers and molecular modelers from academia and industry to discuss the integration of currently available high throughput screening data and assays with computational analysis. The topics discussed at this symposium covered the data-infrastructure at various academic, hospital, and National Institutes of Health-funded high throughput screening centers, the cheminformatics and molecular modeling methods used in real world examples to guide screening and hit-finding, and how academic and non-profit organizations can benefit from current high throughput screening cheminformatics resources. Specifically, this article also covers the remarks and discussions in the open panel discussion of the symposium and summarizes the following talks on "Accurate Kinase virtual screening: biochemical, cellular and selectivity", "Selective, privileged and promiscuous chemical patterns in high-throughput screening" and "Visualizing and exploring relationships among HTS hits using network graphs".

  10. Cheminformatics aspects of high throughput screening: from robots to models: symposium summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jane Tseng, Y.; Martin, Eric; G. Bologa, Cristian; Shelat, Anang A.

    2013-05-01

    The "Cheminformatics aspects of high throughput screening (HTS): from robots to models" symposium was part of the computers in chemistry technical program at the American Chemical Society National Meeting in Denver, Colorado during the fall of 2011. This symposium brought together researchers from high throughput screening centers and molecular modelers from academia and industry to discuss the integration of currently available high throughput screening data and assays with computational analysis. The topics discussed at this symposium covered the data-infrastructure at various academic, hospital, and National Institutes of Health-funded high throughput screening centers, the cheminformatics and molecular modeling methods used in real world examples to guide screening and hit-finding, and how academic and non-profit organizations can benefit from current high throughput screening cheminformatics resources. Specifically, this article also covers the remarks and discussions in the open panel discussion of the symposium and summarizes the following talks on "Accurate Kinase virtual screening: biochemical, cellular and selectivity", "Selective, privileged and promiscuous chemical patterns in high-throughput screening" and "Visualizing and exploring relationships among HTS hits using network graphs".

  11. A high-throughput screen for antibiotic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Thomas C; Dostal, Sarah M; Griswold, Karl E

    2014-02-01

    We describe an ultra-high-throughput screening platform enabling discovery and/or engineering of natural product antibiotics. The methodology involves creation of hydrogel-in-oil emulsions in which recombinant microorganisms are co-emulsified with bacterial pathogens; antibiotic activity is assayed by use of a fluorescent viability dye. We have successfully utilized both bulk emulsification and microfluidic technology for the generation of hydrogel microdroplets that are size-compatible with conventional flow cytometry. Hydrogel droplets are ∼25 pL in volume, and can be synthesized and sorted at rates exceeding 3,000 drops/s. Using this technique, we have achieved screening throughputs exceeding 5 million clones/day. Proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate efficient selection of antibiotic-secreting yeast from a vast excess of negative controls. In addition, we have successfully used this technique to screen a metagenomic library for secreted antibiotics that kill the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Our results establish the practical utility of the screening platform, and we anticipate that the accessible nature of our methods will enable others seeking to identify and engineer the next generation of antibacterial biomolecules. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Combinatorial and high-throughput screening approaches for strain engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenshan; Jiang, Rongrong

    2015-03-01

    Microbes have long been used in the industry to produce valuable biochemicals. Combinatorial engineering approaches, new strain engineering tools derived from inverse metabolic engineering, have started to attract attention in recent years, including genome shuffling, error-prone DNA polymerase, global transcription machinery engineering (gTME), random knockout/overexpression libraries, ribosome engineering, multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE), customized optimization of metabolic pathways by combinatorial transcriptional engineering (COMPACTER), and library construction of "tunable intergenic regions" (TIGR). Since combinatorial approaches and high-throughput screening methods are fundamentally interconnected, color/fluorescence-based, growth-based, and biosensor-based high-throughput screening methods have been reviewed. We believe that with the help of metabolic engineering tools and new combinatorial approaches, plus effective high-throughput screening methods, researchers will be able to achieve better results on improving microorganism performance under stress or enhancing biochemical yield.

  13. Cheminformatics Aspects of High Throughput Screening: from Robots to Models: Symposium Summary

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Y. Jane; Martin, Eric; Bologa, Cristian; Shelat, Anang A.

    2014-01-01

    The “Cheminformatics aspects of high throughput screening (HTS): from robots to models” symposium was part of the Computers in Chemistry (COMP) technical program at the American Chemical Society National Meeting in Denver, Colorado during the fall of 2011. This symposium brought together researchers from high throughput screening centersand molecular modelers from academia and industry to discuss the integration of currently available high throughput screening data and assays with computational analysis. The topics discussed at this symposium covered the data-infrastructure at various academic, hospital, and NIH-funded high throughput screening centers, the cheminformatics and molecular modeling methods used in real world examples to guide screening and hit-finding, and how academic and non-profit organizations can benefit from current high throughput screening cheminformatics resources. Specifically, this article also covers the remarks and discussions in the open panel discussion in thesymposium and summarizes the following talks on “Accurate Kinase virtual screening: biochemical, cellular and selectivity”, “Selective, privileged and promiscuous chemical patterns in high-throughput screening” and “Visualizing and exploring relationships among HTS hits using network graphs”. PMID:23636795

  14. Using In Vitro High-Throughput Screening Data for Predicting ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Today there are more than 80,000 chemicals in commerce and the environment. The potential human health risks are unknown for the vast majority of these chemicals as they lack human health risk assessments, toxicity reference values and risk screening values. We aim to use computational toxicology and quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) technologies to fill these data gaps, and begin to prioritize these chemicals for additional assessment. By coupling qHTS data with adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) we can use ontologies to make predictions about potential hazards and to identify those assays which are sufficient to infer these same hazards. Once those assays are identified, we can use bootstrap natural spline-based metaregression to integrate the evidence across multiple replicates or assays (if a combination of assays are together necessary to be sufficient). In this pilot, we demonstrate how we were able to identify that benzo[k]fluoranthene (B[k]F) may induce DNA damage and steatosis using qHTS data and two separate AOPs. We also demonstrate how bootstrap natural spline-based metaregression can be used to integrate the data across multiple assay replicates to generate a concentration-response curve. We used this analysis to calculate an internal point of departure of 0.751µM and risk-specific concentrations of 0.378µM for both 1:1,000 and 1:10,000 additive risk for B[k]F induced DNA damage based on the p53 assay. Based on the available evidence, we

  15. Using In Vitro High-Throughput Screening Data for Predicting ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Today there are more than 80,000 chemicals in commerce and the environment. The potential human health risks are unknown for the vast majority of these chemicals as they lack human health risk assessments, toxicity reference values and risk screening values. We aim to use computational toxicology and quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) technologies to fill these data gaps, and begin to prioritize these chemicals for additional assessment. By coupling qHTS data with adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) we can use ontologies to make predictions about potential hazards and to identify those assays which are sufficient to infer these same hazards. Once those assays are identified, we can use bootstrap natural spline-based metaregression to integrate the evidence across multiple replicates or assays (if a combination of assays are together necessary to be sufficient). In this pilot, we demonstrate how we were able to identify that benzo[k]fluoranthene (B[k]F) may induce DNA damage and steatosis using qHTS data and two separate AOPs. We also demonstrate how bootstrap natural spline-based metaregression can be used to integrate the data across multiple assay replicates to generate a concentration-response curve. We used this analysis to calculate an internal point of departure of 0.751µM and risk-specific concentrations of 0.378µM for both 1:1,000 and 1:10,000 additive risk for B[k]F induced DNA damage based on the p53 assay. Based on the available evidence, we

  16. Dual-point competition association assay: a fast and high-throughput kinetic screening method for assessing ligand-receptor binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; van Dorp, Erika J H; Mulder-Krieger, Thea; van Veldhoven, Jacobus P D; Brussee, Johannes; Ijzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2013-03-01

    The concept of ligand-receptor binding kinetics is emerging as an important parameter in the early phase of drug discovery. Since the currently used kinetic assays are laborious and low throughput, we developed a method that enables fast and large format screening. It is a so-called dual-point competition association assay, which measures radioligand binding at two different time points in the absence or presence of unlabeled competitors. Specifically, this assay yields the kinetic rate index (KRI), which is a measure for the binding kinetics of the unlabeled ligands screened. As a prototypical drug target, the adenosine A(1) receptor (A(1)R) was chosen for assay validation and optimization. A screen with 35 high-affinity A(1)R antagonists yielded seven compounds with a KRI value above 1.0, which indicated a relatively slow dissociation from the target. All other compounds had a KRI value below or equal to 1.0, predicting a relatively fast dissociation rate. Several compounds were selected for follow-up kinetic quantifications in classical kinetic assays and were shown to have kinetic rates that corresponded to their KRI values. The dual-point assay and KRI value may have general applicability at other G-protein-coupled receptors, as well as at drug targets from other protein families.

  17. Comprehensive analysis of high-throughput screening data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyse, Stephan

    2002-06-01

    High-Throughput Screening (HTS) data in its entirety is a valuable raw material for the drug-discovery process. It provides the most compete information about the biological activity of a company's compounds. However, its quantity, complexity and heterogeneity require novel, sophisticated approaches in data analysis. At GeneData, we are developing methods for large-scale, synoptical mining of screening data in a five-step analysis: (1) Quality Assurance: Checking data for experimental artifacts and eliminating low quality data. (2) Biological Profiling: Clustering and ranking of compounds based on their biological activity, taking into account specific characteristics of HTS data. (3) Rule-based Classification: Applying user-defined rules to biological and chemical properties, and providing hypotheses on the biological mode-of-action of compounds. (4) Joint Biological-Chemical Analysis: Associating chemical compound data to HTS data, providing hypotheses for structure- activity relationships. (5) integration with Genomic and Gene Expression Data: Linking into other components of GeneData's bioinformatics platform, and assessing the compounds' modes-of-action, toxicity, and metabolic properties. These analyses address issues that are crucial for a correct interpretation and full exploitation of screening data. They lead to a sound rating of assays and compounds at an early state of the lead-finding process.

  18. High-throughput screening of chemical effects on ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Disruption of steroidogenesis by environmental chemicals can result in altered hormone levels causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. A high-throughput assay using H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells was used to evaluate the effect of 2,060 chemical samples on steroidogenesis via HPLC-MS/MS quantification of 10 steroid hormones, including progestagens, glucocorticoids, androgens, and estrogens. The study employed a three stage screening strategy. The first stage established the maximum tolerated concentration (MTC; >70% viability) per sample. The second stage quantified changes in hormone levels at the MTC while the third stage performed concentration-response (CR) on a subset of samples. At all stages, cells were pre-stimulated with 10 µM forskolin for 48 h to induce steroidogenesis followed by chemical treatment for 48 h. Of the 2,060 chemical samples evaluated, 524 samples were selected for six-point CR screening, based in part on significantly altering at least 4 hormones at the MTC. CR screening identified 232 chemical samples with concentration-dependent effects on 17β-estradiol and/or testosterone, with 411 chemical samples showing an effect on at least one hormone across the steroidogenesis pathway. Clustering of the concentration-dependent chemical-mediated steroid hormone effects grouped chemical samples into five distinct profiles generally representing putative mechanisms of action, including CYP17A1 and HSD3B inhibition. A d

  19. High-throughput mass spectrometric cytochrome P450 inhibition screening.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kheng B; Ozbal, Can C; Kassel, Daniel B

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a high-throughput assay to support rapid evaluation of drug discovery compounds for possible drug-drug interaction (DDI). Each compound is evaluated for its DDI potential by incubating over a range of eight concentrations and against a panel of six cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes: 1A2, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4. The method utilizes automated liquid handling for sample preparation, and online solid-phase extraction/tandem mass spectrometry (SPE/MS/MS) for sample analyses. The system is capable of generating two 96-well assay plates in 30 min, and completes the data acquisition and analysis of both plates in about 30 min. Many laboratories that perform the CYP inhibition screening automate only part of the processes leaving a throughput bottleneck within the workflow. The protocols described in this chapter are aimed to streamline the entire process from assay to data acquisition and processing by incorporating automation and utilizing high-precision instrument to maximize throughput and minimize bottleneck.

  20. High-throughput assays for DNA gyrase and other topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Anthony; Burton, Nicolas P.; O'Hagan, Natasha

    2006-01-01

    We have developed high-throughput microtitre plate-based assays for DNA gyrase and other DNA topoisomerases. These assays exploit the fact that negatively supercoiled plasmids form intermolecular triplexes more efficiently than when they are relaxed. Two assays are presented, one using capture of a plasmid containing a single triplex-forming sequence by an oligonucleotide tethered to the surface of a microtitre plate and subsequent detection by staining with a DNA-specific fluorescent dye. The other uses capture of a plasmid containing two triplex-forming sequences by an oligonucleotide tethered to the surface of a microtitre plate and subsequent detection by a second oligonucleotide that is radiolabelled. The assays are shown to be appropriate for assaying DNA supercoiling by Escherichia coli DNA gyrase and DNA relaxation by eukaryotic topoisomerases I and II, and E.coli topoisomerase IV. The assays are readily adaptable to other enzymes that change DNA supercoiling (e.g. restriction enzymes) and are suitable for use in a high-throughput format. PMID:16936317

  1. ToxCast Assay Network (TCAN) Viewer: A Visualization Tool for High-throughput Assay Chemical Data (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    USEPA’s ToxCast program has generated high-throughput bioactivity screening (HTS) data on thousands of chemicals. The ToxCast program has described and annotated the HTS assay battery with respect to assay design and target information (e.g., gene target). Recent stakeholder and ...

  2. ToxCast Assay Network (TCAN) Viewer: A Visualization Tool for High-throughput Assay Chemical Data (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    USEPA’s ToxCast program has generated high-throughput bioactivity screening (HTS) data on thousands of chemicals. The ToxCast program has described and annotated the HTS assay battery with respect to assay design and target information (e.g., gene target). Recent stakeholder and ...

  3. Microfluidic-Enabled Print-to-Screen Platform for High-Throughput Screening of Combinatorial Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuzhe; Li, Jiannan; Xiao, Wenwu; Xiao, Kai; Lee, Joyce; Bhardwaj, Urvashi; Zhu, Zijie; Digiglio, Philip; Yang, Gaomai; Lam, Kit S; Pan, Tingrui

    2015-10-20

    Since the 1960s, combination chemotherapy has been widely utilized as a standard method to treat cancer. However, because of the potentially enormous number of drug candidates and combinations, conventional identification methods of the effective drug combinations are usually associated with significantly high operational costs, low throughput screening, laborious and time-consuming procedures, and ethical concerns. In this paper, we present a low-cost, high-efficiency microfluidic print-to-screen (P2S) platform, which integrates combinatorial screening with biomolecular printing for high-throughput screening of anticancer drug combinations. This P2S platform provides several distinct advantages and features, including automatic combinatorial printing, high-throughput parallel drug screening, modular disposable cartridge, and biocompatibility, which can potentially speed up the entire discovery cycle of potent drug combinations. Microfluidic impact printing utilizing plug-and-play microfluidic cartridges is experimentally characterized with controllable droplet volume and accurate positioning. Furthermore, the combinatorial print-to-screen assay is demonstrated in a proof-of-concept biological experiment which can identify the positive hits among the entire drug combination library in a parallel and rapid manner. Overall, this microfluidic print-to-screen platform offers a simple, low-cost, high-efficiency solution for high-throughput large-scale combinatorial screening and can be applicable for various emerging applications in drug cocktail discovery.

  4. Applications of Biophysics in High-Throughput Screening Hit Validation.

    PubMed

    Genick, Christine Clougherty; Barlier, Danielle; Monna, Dominique; Brunner, Reto; Bé, Céline; Scheufler, Clemens; Ottl, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    For approximately a decade, biophysical methods have been used to validate positive hits selected from high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns with the goal to verify binding interactions using label-free assays. By applying label-free readouts, screen artifacts created by compound interference and fluorescence are discovered, enabling further characterization of the hits for their target specificity and selectivity. The use of several biophysical methods to extract this type of high-content information is required to prevent the promotion of false positives to the next level of hit validation and to select the best candidates for further chemical optimization. The typical technologies applied in this arena include dynamic light scattering, turbidometry, resonance waveguide, surface plasmon resonance, differential scanning fluorimetry, mass spectrometry, and others. Each technology can provide different types of information to enable the characterization of the binding interaction. Thus, these technologies can be incorporated in a hit-validation strategy not only according to the profile of chemical matter that is desired by the medicinal chemists, but also in a manner that is in agreement with the target protein's amenability to the screening format. Here, we present the results of screening strategies using biophysics with the objective to evaluate the approaches, discuss the advantages and challenges, and summarize the benefits in reference to lead discovery. In summary, the biophysics screens presented here demonstrated various hit rates from a list of ~2000 preselected, IC50-validated hits from HTS (an IC50 is the inhibitor concentration at which 50% inhibition of activity is observed). There are several lessons learned from these biophysical screens, which will be discussed in this article.

  5. Bayesian modeling in virtual high throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Klon, Anthony E

    2009-06-01

    Naïve Bayesian classifiers are a relatively recent addition to the arsenal of tools available to computational chemists. These classifiers fall into a class of algorithms referred to broadly as machine learning algorithms. Bayesian classifiers may be used in conjunction with classical modeling techniques to assist in the rapid virtual screening of large compound libraries in a systematic manner with a minimum of human intervention. This approach allows computational scientists to concentrate their efforts on their core strengths of model building. Bayesian classifiers have an added advantage of being able to handle a variety of numerical or binary data such as physicochemical properties or molecular fingerprints, making the addition of new parameters to existing models a relatively straightforward process. As a result, during a drug discovery project these classifiers can better evolve with the needs of the projects from general models in the lead finding stages to increasingly precise models in the lead optimization stages that are of particular interest to a specific medicinal chemistry team. Although other machine learning algorithms abound, Bayesian classifiers have been shown to compare favorably under most working conditions and have been shown to be tolerant of noisy experimental data.

  6. Development and Validation of an Automated High-Throughput System for Zebrafish In Vivo Screenings

    PubMed Central

    Virto, Juan M.; Holgado, Olaia; Diez, Maria; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Callol-Massot, Carles

    2012-01-01

    The zebrafish is a vertebrate model compatible with the paradigms of drug discovery. The small size and transparency of zebrafish embryos make them amenable for the automation necessary in high-throughput screenings. We have developed an automated high-throughput platform for in vivo chemical screenings on zebrafish embryos that includes automated methods for embryo dispensation, compound delivery, incubation, imaging and analysis of the results. At present, two different assays to detect cardiotoxic compounds and angiogenesis inhibitors can be automatically run in the platform, showing the versatility of the system. A validation of these two assays with known positive and negative compounds, as well as a screening for the detection of unknown anti-angiogenic compounds, have been successfully carried out in the system developed. We present a totally automated platform that allows for high-throughput screenings in a vertebrate organism. PMID:22615792

  7. Ultra-high-throughput, automated nucleic acid detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) for infant infection diagnosis using the Gen-Probe Aptima HIV-1 screening assay.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Wendy S; Noble, Lara; Berrie, Leigh; Sarang, Somaya; Scott, Lesley E

    2009-08-01

    The early diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in infants is critical to ensure the initiation of treatment before significant immunological compromise. Each year an estimated 300,000 HIV-exposed infants in South Africa require access to tests for the diagnosis of HIV infection. Currently, testing is performed at several facilities by using PCR amplification of HIV DNA at 6 weeks of age by the use of dried blood spots (DBSs) and whole blood (WB). The Gen-Probe Aptima HIV type 1 (HIV-1) screening assay (the Aptima assay) is a qualitative nucleic acid test based on transcription-mediated amplification (TMA), a technology routinely used in blood banks in South Africa. The performance characteristics of Gen-Probe's TMA technology compared well to those of the Roche Amplicor HIV-1 DNA (version 1.5) assay. The sensitivity of the assay with WB and DBS samples was 100%, and the specificities were 99.4% and 99.5% for DBSs and WB, respectively. The detection of HIV by the Aptima assay at greater levels of dilution in samples negative by the comparator assay indicates an improvement in sensitivity by the use of the TMA technology. The ability to process 1,900 samples in a 24-h period on the Tigris instrument makes the Aptima assay an attractive option for high-volume, centralized laboratories.

  8. Environmental Impact on Vascular Development Predicted by High Throughput Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding health risks to embryonic development from exposure to environmental chemicals is a significant challenge given the diverse chemical landscape and paucity of data for most of these compounds. High throughput screening (HTS) in EPA’s ToxCastTM project provides vast d...

  9. Environmental Impact on Vascular Development Predicted by High Throughput Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding health risks to embryonic development from exposure to environmental chemicals is a significant challenge given the diverse chemical landscape and paucity of data for most of these compounds. High throughput screening (HTS) in EPA’s ToxCastTM project provides vast d...

  10. High-throughput screening, predictive modeling and computational embryology

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to profile thousands of chemical compounds for biological activity and potential toxicity. EPA’s ToxCast™ project, and the broader Tox21 consortium, in addition to projects worldwide,...

  11. High-throughput screening, predictive modeling and computational embryology - Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to chemical profiling to address sensitivity and specificity of molecular targets, biological pathways, cellular and developmental processes. EPA’s ToxCast project is testing 960 uniq...

  12. High-throughput screening, predictive modeling and computational embryology

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to profile thousands of chemical compounds for biological activity and potential toxicity. EPA’s ToxCast™ project, and the broader Tox21 consortium, in addition to projects worldwide,...

  13. High-throughput screening, predictive modeling and computational embryology - Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to chemical profiling to address sensitivity and specificity of molecular targets, biological pathways, cellular and developmental processes. EPA’s ToxCast project is testing 960 uniq...

  14. High Throughput Assays for Exposure Science (NIEHS OHAT ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    High throughput screening (HTS) data that characterize chemically induced biological activity have been generated for thousands of chemicals by the US interagency Tox21 and the US EPA ToxCast programs. In many cases there are no data available for comparing bioactivity from HTS with relevant human exposures. The EPA’s ExpoCast program is developing high-throughput approaches to generate the needed exposure estimates using existing databases and new, high-throughput measurements. The exposure pathway (i.e., the route of chemical from manufacture to human intake) significantly impacts the level of exposure. The presence, concentration, and formulation of chemicals in consumer products and articles of commerce (e.g., clothing) can therefore provide critical information for estimating risk. We have found that there are only limited data available on the chemical constituents (e.g., flame retardants, plasticizers) within most articles of commerce. Furthermore, the presence of some chemicals in otherwise well characterized products may be due to product packaging. We are analyzing sample consumer products using 2D gas chromatograph (GC) x GC Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (GCxGCTOF/MS), which is suited for forensic investigation of chemicals in complex matrices (including toys, cleaners, and food). In parallel, we are working to create a reference library of retention times and spectral information for the entire Tox21 chemical library. In an examination of five p

  15. Screening and synthesis: high throughput technologies applied to parasitology.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R E; Westwood, N J

    2004-01-01

    High throughput technologies continue to develop in response to the challenges set by the genome projects. This article discusses how the techniques of both high throughput screening (HTS) and synthesis can influence research in parasitology. Examples of the use of targeted and phenotype-based HTS using unbiased compound collections are provided. The important issue of identifying the protein target(s) of bioactive compounds is discussed from the synthetic chemist's perspective. This article concludes by reviewing recent examples of successful target identification studies in parasitology.

  16. High-throughput automated refolding screening of inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Vincentelli, Renaud; Canaan, Stéphane; Campanacci, Valérie; Valencia, Christel; Maurin, Damien; Frassinetti, Frédéric; Scappucini-Calvo, Loréna; Bourne, Yves; Cambillau, Christian; Bignon, Christophe

    2004-10-01

    One of the main stumbling blocks encountered when attempting to express foreign proteins in Escherichia coli is the occurrence of amorphous aggregates of misfolded proteins, called inclusion bodies (IB). Developing efficient protein native structure recovery procedures based on IB refolding is therefore an important challenge. Unfortunately, there is no "universal" refolding buffer: Experience shows that refolding buffer composition varies from one protein to another. In addition, the methods developed so far for finding a suitable refolding buffer suffer from a number of weaknesses. These include the small number of refolding formulations, which often leads to negative results, solubility assays incompatible with high-throughput, and experiment formatting not suitable for automation. To overcome these problems, it was proposed in the present study to address some of these limitations. This resulted in the first completely automated IB refolding screening procedure to be developed using a 96-well format. The 96 refolding buffers were obtained using a fractional factorial approach. The screening procedure is potentially applicable to any nonmembrane protein, and was validated with 24 proteins in the framework of two Structural Genomics projects. The tests used for this purpose included the use of quality control methods such as circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and crystallogenesis. Out of the 24 proteins, 17 remained soluble in at least one of the 96 refolding buffers, 15 passed large-scale purification tests, and five gave crystals.

  17. High throughput screening of physicochemical properties and in vitro ADME profiling in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hong; Holmén, Anders G

    2009-03-01

    Current advances of new technologies with robotic automated assays combined with highly selective and sensitive LC-MS enable high-speed screening of lead series libraries in many in vitro assays. In this review, we summarize state of the art high throughput assays for screening of key physicochemical properties such as solubility, lipophilicity, pKa, drug-plasma protein binding and brain tissue binding as well as in vitro ADME profiling. We discuss two primary approaches for high throughput screening of solubility, i.e. an automated 96-well plate assay integrated with LC-MS and a rapid multi-wavelength UV plate reader. We address the advantages of newly developed miniaturized techniques for high throughput pKa screening by capillary electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry (CE-MS) with automated data analysis flow. Several new lipophilicity approaches other than octanol-water partitioning are critically reviewed, including rapid liquid chromatographic retention based approach, immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) partitioning and liposome, and potential microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) for accurate screening of LogP. We highlight the sample pooling (namely cassette dosing, all-in-one, cocktail) as an efficient approach for high throughput screening of physicochemical properties and in vitro ADME profiling with emphasis on the benefit of on-line quality control. This cassette dosing approach has been widely adapted in drug discovery for rapid screening of in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters with significantly increased capacity and dramatically reduced animal usage.

  18. In Vitro High Throughput Screening, What Next? Lessons from the Screening for Aurora Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Thi-My-Nhung; Vu, Hong-Lien; Le, Ly-Thuy-Tram; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Molla, Annie

    2014-01-01

    Based on in vitro assays, we performed a High Throughput Screening (HTS) to identify kinase inhibitors among 10,000 small chemical compounds. In this didactic paper, we describe step-by-step the approach to validate the hits as well as the major pitfalls encountered in the development of active molecules. We propose a decision tree that could be adapted to most in vitro HTS. PMID:24833340

  19. A novel imaging-based high-throughput screening approach to anti-angiogenic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Evensen, Lasse; Micklem, David R; Link, Wolfgang; Lorens, James B

    2010-01-01

    The successful progression to the clinic of angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer treatment has spurred interest in developing new classes of anti-angiogenic compounds. The resulting surge in available candidate therapeutics highlights the need for robust, high-throughput angiogenesis screening systems that adequately capture the complexity of new vessel formation while providing quantitative evaluation of the potency of these agents. Available in vitro angiogenesis assays are either cumbersome, impeding adaptation to high-throughput screening formats, or inadequately model the complex multistep process of new vessel formation. We therefore developed an organotypic endothelial-mural cell co-culture assay system that reflects several facets of angiogenesis while remaining compatible with high-throughput/high-content image screening. Co-culture of primary human endothelial cells (EC) and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) results in assembly of a network of tubular endothelial structures enveloped with vascular basement membrane proteins, thus, comprising the three main components of blood vessels. Initially, EC are dependent on vSMC-derived VEGF and sensitive to clinical anti-angiogenic therapeutics. A subsequent phenotypic VEGF-switch renders EC networks resistant to anti-VEGF therapeutics, demarcating a mature vascular phenotype. Conversely, mature EC networks remain sensitive to vascular disrupting agents. Therefore, candidate anti-angiogenic compounds can be interrogated for their relative potency on immature and mature networks and classified as either vascular normalizing or vascular disrupting agents. Here, we demonstrate that the EC-vSMC co-culture assay represents a robust high-content imaging high-throughput screening system for identification of novel anti-angiogenic agents. A pilot high-throughput screening campaign was used to define informative imaging parameters and develop a follow-up dose-response scheme for hit characterization. High-throughput

  20. High-throughput multiplexed T-cell-receptor excision circle quantitative PCR assay with internal controls for detection of severe combined immunodeficiency in population-based newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Gerstel-Thompson, Jacalyn L; Wilkey, Jonathan F; Baptiste, Jennifer C; Navas, Jennifer S; Pai, Sung-Yun; Pass, Kenneth A; Eaton, Roger B; Comeau, Anne Marie

    2010-09-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) targeting a specific marker of functional T cells, the T-cell-receptor excision circle (TREC), detects the absence of functional T cells and has a demonstrated clinical validity for detecting severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in infants. There is need for a qPCR TREC assay with an internal control to monitor DNA quality and the relative cellular content of the particular dried blood spot punch sampled in each reaction. The utility of the qPCR TREC assay would also be far improved if more tests could be performed on the same newborn screening sample. We approached the multiplexing of qPCR for TREC by attenuating the reaction for the reference gene, with focus on maintaining tight quality assurance for reproducible slopes and for prevention of sample-to-sample cross contamination. Statewide newborn screening for SCID using the multiplexed assay was implemented, and quality-assurance data were recorded. The multiplex qPCR TREC assay showed nearly 100% amplification efficiency for each of the TREC and reference sequences, clinical validity for multiple forms of SCID, and an analytic limit of detection consistent with prevention of contamination. The eluate and residual ghost from a 3.2-mm dried blood spot could be used as source material for multiplexed immunoassays and multiplexed DNA tests (Multiplex Plus), with no disruption to the multiplex TREC qPCR. Population-based SCID newborn screening programs should consider multiplexing for quality assurance purposes. Potential benefits of using Multiplex Plus include the ability to perform multianalyte profiling.

  1. Characterization of multiple platelet activation pathways in patients with bleeding as a high-throughput screening option: use of 96-well Optimul assay

    PubMed Central

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Chan, Melissa V.; Lundberg, Martina H.; Morgan, Neil V.; Bem, Danai; Nisar, Shaista P.; Leo, Vincenzo C.; Jones, Matthew L.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Daly, Martina E.; Mumford, Andrew D.; Warner, Timothy D.; Watson, Steve P.; Watson, Steve P.; Mumford, Andrew D.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Gissen, Paul; Daly, Martina E.; Lester, Will; Clark, Justin; Williams, Mike; Motwani, Jayashree; Marshall, Dianne; Nyatanga, Priscilla; Mann, Pat; Kirwan, Julie; Wilde, Jonathan; Dunkley, Tracey; Greenway, April; Makris, Michael; Pavord, Sue; Dattani, Rashesh; Grimley, Gerry Dolan Charlotte; Stokley, Simone; Astwood, Emma; Chang, Cherry; Foros, Merri; Trower, Linda; Thachil, Jecko; Hay, Charlie; Pike, Gill; Will, Andrew; Grainger, John; Foulkes, Matt; Fareh, Mona; Talks, Kate; Biss, Tina; Kesteven, Patrick; Hanley, John; Vowles, Julie; Basey, Lesley; Barnes, Michelle; Collins, Peter; Rayment, Rachel; Alikhan, Raza; Morris, Ana Guerrero Rebecca; Mansell, Dianne; Toh, Cheng Hock; Martlew, Vanessa; Murphy, Elaine; Lachmann, Robin; Rose, Peter; Chapman, Oliver; Lokare, Anand; Marshall, Kathryn; Khan, Naseem; Keeling, David; Giangrande, Paul; Austin, Steve; Bevan, David; Alamelu, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Up to 1% of the population have mild bleeding disorders, but these remain poorly characterized, particularly with regard to the roles of platelets. We have compared the usefulness of Optimul, a 96-well plate-based assay of 7 distinct pathways of platelet activation to characterize inherited platelet defects in comparison with light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Using Optimul and LTA, concentration-response curves were generated for arachidonic acid, ADP, collagen, epinephrine, Thrombin receptor activating-peptide, U46619, and ristocetin in samples from (1) healthy volunteers (n = 50), (2) healthy volunteers treated with antiplatelet agents in vitro (n = 10), and (3) patients with bleeding of unknown origin (n = 65). The assays gave concordant results in 82% of cases (κ = 0.62, P < .0001). Normal platelet function results were particularly predictive (sensitivity, 94%; negative predictive value, 91%), whereas a positive result was not always substantiated by LTA (specificity, 67%; positive predictive value, 77%). The Optimul assay was significantly more sensitive at characterizing defects in the thromboxane pathway, which presented with normal responses with LTA. The Optimul assay is sensitive to mild platelet defects, could be used as a rapid screening assay in patients presenting with bleeding symptoms, and detects changes in platelet function more readily than LTA. This trial was registered at www.isrctn.org as #ISRCTN 77951167. PMID:24408324

  2. Characterization of multiple platelet activation pathways in patients with bleeding as a high-throughput screening option: use of 96-well Optimul assay.

    PubMed

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C; Kirkby, Nicholas S; Chan, Melissa V; Lundberg, Martina H; Morgan, Neil V; Bem, Danai; Nisar, Shaista P; Leo, Vincenzo C; Jones, Matthew L; Mundell, Stuart J; Daly, Martina E; Mumford, Andrew D; Warner, Timothy D; Watson, Steve P

    2014-02-20

    Up to 1% of the population have mild bleeding disorders, but these remain poorly characterized, particularly with regard to the roles of platelets. We have compared the usefulness of Optimul, a 96-well plate-based assay of 7 distinct pathways of platelet activation to characterize inherited platelet defects in comparison with light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Using Optimul and LTA, concentration-response curves were generated for arachidonic acid, ADP, collagen, epinephrine, Thrombin receptor activating-peptide, U46619, and ristocetin in samples from (1) healthy volunteers (n = 50), (2) healthy volunteers treated with antiplatelet agents in vitro (n = 10), and (3) patients with bleeding of unknown origin (n = 65). The assays gave concordant results in 82% of cases (κ = 0.62, P < .0001). Normal platelet function results were particularly predictive (sensitivity, 94%; negative predictive value, 91%), whereas a positive result was not always substantiated by LTA (specificity, 67%; positive predictive value, 77%). The Optimul assay was significantly more sensitive at characterizing defects in the thromboxane pathway, which presented with normal responses with LTA. The Optimul assay is sensitive to mild platelet defects, could be used as a rapid screening assay in patients presenting with bleeding symptoms, and detects changes in platelet function more readily than LTA. This trial was registered at www.isrctn.org as #ISRCTN 77951167.

  3. Arbitrarily Accessible 3D Microfluidic Device for Combinatorial High-Throughput Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhuofa; Li, Weizhi; Choi, Gihoon; Yang, Xiaonan; Miao, Jun; Cui, Liwang; Guan, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics-based drug-screening systems have enabled efficient and high-throughput drug screening, but their routine uses in ordinary labs are limited due to the complexity involved in device fabrication and system setup. In this work, we report an easy-to-use and low-cost arbitrarily accessible 3D microfluidic device that can be easily adopted by various labs to perform combinatorial assays for high-throughput drug screening. The device is capable of precisely performing automatic and simultaneous reagent loading and aliquoting tasks and performing multistep assays with arbitrary sequences. The device is not intended to compete with other microfluidic technologies regarding ultra-low reaction volume. Instead, its freedom from tubing or pumping systems and easy operation makes it an ideal platform for routine high-throughput drug screening outside traditional microfluidic labs. The functionality and quantitative reliability of the 3D microfluidic device were demonstrated with a histone acetyltransferase-based drug-screening assay using the recombinant Plasmodium falciparum GCN5 enzyme, benchmarked with a traditional microtiter plate-based method. This arbitrarily accessible, multistep capable, low-cost, and easy-to-use device can be widely adopted in various combinatorial assays beyond high-throughput drug screening. PMID:27690055

  4. Systematic error detection in experimental high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background High-throughput screening (HTS) is a key part of the drug discovery process during which thousands of chemical compounds are screened and their activity levels measured in order to identify potential drug candidates (i.e., hits). Many technical, procedural or environmental factors can cause systematic measurement error or inequalities in the conditions in which the measurements are taken. Such systematic error has the potential to critically affect the hit selection process. Several error correction methods and software have been developed to address this issue in the context of experimental HTS [1-7]. Despite their power to reduce the impact of systematic error when applied to error perturbed datasets, those methods also have one disadvantage - they introduce a bias when applied to data not containing any systematic error [6]. Hence, we need first to assess the presence of systematic error in a given HTS assay and then carry out systematic error correction method if and only if the presence of systematic error has been confirmed by statistical tests. Results We tested three statistical procedures to assess the presence of systematic error in experimental HTS data, including the χ2 goodness-of-fit test, Student's t-test and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test [8] preceded by the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) method [9]. We applied these procedures to raw HTS measurements, first, and to estimated hit distribution surfaces, second. The three competing tests were applied to analyse simulated datasets containing different types of systematic error, and to a real HTS dataset. Their accuracy was compared under various error conditions. Conclusions A successful assessment of the presence of systematic error in experimental HTS assays is possible when the appropriate statistical methodology is used. Namely, the t-test should be carried out by researchers to determine whether systematic error is present in their HTS data prior to applying any error correction method

  5. Systematic error detection in experimental high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Dragiev, Plamen; Nadon, Robert; Makarenkov, Vladimir

    2011-01-19

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is a key part of the drug discovery process during which thousands of chemical compounds are screened and their activity levels measured in order to identify potential drug candidates (i.e., hits). Many technical, procedural or environmental factors can cause systematic measurement error or inequalities in the conditions in which the measurements are taken. Such systematic error has the potential to critically affect the hit selection process. Several error correction methods and software have been developed to address this issue in the context of experimental HTS 1234567. Despite their power to reduce the impact of systematic error when applied to error perturbed datasets, those methods also have one disadvantage - they introduce a bias when applied to data not containing any systematic error 6. Hence, we need first to assess the presence of systematic error in a given HTS assay and then carry out systematic error correction method if and only if the presence of systematic error has been confirmed by statistical tests. We tested three statistical procedures to assess the presence of systematic error in experimental HTS data, including the χ2 goodness-of-fit test, Student's t-test and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test 8 preceded by the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) method 9. We applied these procedures to raw HTS measurements, first, and to estimated hit distribution surfaces, second. The three competing tests were applied to analyse simulated datasets containing different types of systematic error, and to a real HTS dataset. Their accuracy was compared under various error conditions. A successful assessment of the presence of systematic error in experimental HTS assays is possible when the appropriate statistical methodology is used. Namely, the t-test should be carried out by researchers to determine whether systematic error is present in their HTS data prior to applying any error correction method. This important step can significantly

  6. A high throughput assay to identify substrate-selective inhibitors of the ERK protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chad J; Muftuoglu, Yagmur; Turk, Benjamin E

    2017-10-15

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylate a variety of substrates important for survival and proliferation, and their activity is frequently deregulated in tumors. ERK pathway inhibitors have shown clinical efficacy as anti-cancer drugs, but most patients eventually relapse due to reactivation of the pathway. One factor limiting the efficacy of current therapeutics is the difficulty in reaching clinically effective inhibition of the ERK pathway in the absence of on-target toxicities. Here, we describe an assay suitable for high throughput screening to discover substrate selective ERK1/2 inhibitors, which may have a larger therapeutic window than conventional inhibitors. Specifically, we aim to target a substrate-binding pocket within the ERK1/2 catalytic domain outside of the catalytic cleft. The assay uses an AlphaScreen format to detect phosphorylation of a high-efficiency substrate harboring an essential docking site motif. Pilot screening established that the assay is suitably robust for high-throughput screening. Importantly, the assay can be conducted at high ATP concentrations, which we show reduces the discovery of conventional ATP-competitive inhibitors. These studies provide the basis for high-throughput screens to discover new classes of non-conventional ERK1/2 inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of resazurin-based assay in 384-well format for high throughput whole cell screening of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense strain STIB 900 for the identification of potential anti-trypanosomal agents.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kah Tee; Zahari, Zuriati; Amanah, Azimah; Zainuddin, Zafarina; Adenan, Mohd Ilham

    2016-03-01

    To accelerate the discovery of novel leads for the treatment of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), it is necessary to have a simple, robust and cost-effective assay to identify positive hits by high throughput whole cell screening. Most of the fluorescence assay was made in black plate however in this study the HTS assay developed in 384-well format using clear plate and black plate, for comparison. The HTS assay developed is simple, sensitive, reliable and reproducible in both types of plates. Assay robustness and reproducibility were determined under the optimized conditions in 384-well plate was well tolerated in the HTS assay, including percentage of coefficient of variation (% CV) of 4.68% and 4.74% in clear and black 384-well plate, signal-to-background ratio (S/B) of 12.75 in clear 384-well plate and 12.07 in black 384-well plate, Z' factor of 0.79 and 0.82 in clear 384-well plate and black 384-well plate, respectively and final concentration of 0.30% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in both types of plate. Drug sensitivity was found to be comparable to the reported anti-trypanosomal assay in 96-well format. The reproducibility and sensitivity of this assay make it compliant to automated liquid handler use in HTS applications.

  8. High throughput screening for anti-Trypanosoma cruzi drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Rodríguez, Ana

    2014-12-01

    The discovery of new therapeutic options against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, stands as a fundamental need. Currently, there are only two drugs available to treat this neglected disease, which represents a major public health problem in Latin America. Both available therapies, benznidazole and nifurtimox, have significant toxic side effects and their efficacy against the life-threatening symptomatic chronic stage of the disease is variable. Thus, there is an urgent need for new, improved anti-T. cruzi drugs. With the objective to reliably accelerate the drug discovery process against Chagas disease, several advances have been made in the last few years. Availability of engineered reporter gene expressing parasites triggered the development of phenotypic in vitro assays suitable for high throughput screening (HTS) as well as the establishment of new in vivo protocols that allow faster experimental outcomes. Recently, automated high content microscopy approaches have also been used to identify new parasitic inhibitors. These in vitro and in vivo early drug discovery approaches, which hopefully will contribute to bring better anti-T. cruzi drug entities in the near future, are reviewed here.

  9. High-Throughput Screening Using Mass Spectrometry within Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Rohman, Mattias; Wingfield, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In order to detect a biochemical analyte with a mass spectrometer (MS) it is necessary to ionize the analyte of interest. The analyte can be ionized by a number of different mechanisms, however, one common method is electrospray ionization (ESI). Droplets of analyte are sprayed through a highly charged field, the droplets pick up charge, and this is transferred to the analyte. High levels of salt in the assay buffer will potentially steal charge from the analyte and suppress the MS signal. In order to avoid this suppression of signal, salt is often removed from the sample prior to injection into the MS. Traditional ESI MS relies on liquid chromatography (LC) to remove the salt and reduce matrix effects, however, this is a lengthy process. Here we describe the use of RapidFire™ coupled to a triple-quadrupole MS for high-throughput screening. This system uses solid-phase extraction to de-salt samples prior to injection, reducing processing time such that a sample is injected into the MS ~every 10 s.

  10. High Throughput Screening for Anti–Trypanosoma cruzi Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Rodríguez, Ana

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of new therapeutic options against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, stands as a fundamental need. Currently, there are only two drugs available to treat this neglected disease, which represents a major public health problem in Latin America. Both available therapies, benznidazole and nifurtimox, have significant toxic side effects and their efficacy against the life-threatening symptomatic chronic stage of the disease is variable. Thus, there is an urgent need for new, improved anti–T. cruzi drugs. With the objective to reliably accelerate the drug discovery process against Chagas disease, several advances have been made in the last few years. Availability of engineered reporter gene expressing parasites triggered the development of phenotypic in vitro assays suitable for high throughput screening (HTS) as well as the establishment of new in vivo protocols that allow faster experimental outcomes. Recently, automated high content microscopy approaches have also been used to identify new parasitic inhibitors. These in vitro and in vivo early drug discovery approaches, which hopefully will contribute to bring better anti–T. cruzi drug entities in the near future, are reviewed here. PMID:25474364

  11. A new homogeneous high-throughput screening assay for profiling compound activity on the human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel.

    PubMed

    Titus, Steven A; Beacham, Daniel; Shahane, Sampada A; Southall, Noel; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Hooten, Elizabeth; Zhao, Yong; Shou, Louie; Austin, Christopher P; Zheng, Wei

    2009-11-01

    Long QT syndrome, either inherited or acquired from drug treatments, can result in ventricular arrhythmia (torsade de pointes) and sudden death. Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel inhibition by drugs is now recognized as a common reason for the acquired form of long QT syndrome. It has been reported that more than 100 known drugs inhibit the activity of the hERG channel. Since 1997, several drugs have been withdrawn from the market due to the long QT syndrome caused by hERG inhibition. Food and Drug Administration regulations now require safety data on hERG channels for investigative new drug (IND) applications. The assessment of compound activity on the hERG channel has now become an important part of the safety evaluation in the process of drug discovery. During the past decade, several in vitro assay methods have been developed and significant resources have been used to characterize hERG channel activities. However, evaluation of compound activities on hERG have not been performed for large compound collections due to technical difficulty, lack of throughput, and/or lack of biological relevance to function. Here we report a modified form of the FluxOR thallium flux assay, capable of measuring hERG activity in a homogeneous 1536-well plate format. To validate the assay, we screened a 7-point dilution series of the LOPAC 1280 library collection and reported rank order potencies of ten common hERG inhibitors. A correlation was also observed for the hERG channel activities of 10 known hERG inhibitors determined in this thallium flux assay and in the patch clamp experiment. Our findings indicate that this thallium flux assay can be used as an alternative method to profile large-volume compound libraries for compound activity on the hERG channel.

  12. A high throughput respirometric assay for mitochondrial biogenesis and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Beeson, Craig C.; Beeson, Gyda C.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are a common target of toxicity for drugs and other chemicals, and results in decreased aerobic metabolism and cell death. In contrast, mitochondrial biogenesis restores cell vitality and there is a need for new agents to induce biogenesis. Current cell-based models of mitochondrial biogenesis or toxicity are inadequate because cultured cell lines are highly glycolytic with minimal aerobic metabolism and altered mitochondrial physiology. In addition, there are no high-throughput, real-time assays that assess mitochondrial function. We adapted primary cultures of renal proximal tubular cells (RPTC) that exhibit in vivo levels of aerobic metabolism, are not glycolytic, and retain higher levels of differentiated functions and used the Seahorse Biosciences analyzer to measure mitochondrial function in real time in multi-well plates. Using uncoupled respiration as a marker of electron transport chain (ETC) integrity, the nephrotoxicants cisplatin, HgCl2 and gentamicin exhibited mitochondrial toxicity prior to decreases in basal respiration and cell death. Conversely, using FCCP-uncoupled respiration as a marker of maximal ETC activity, 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI), SRT1720, resveratrol, daidzein, and metformin produced mitochondrial biogenesis in RPTC. The merger of the RPTC model and multi-well respirometry results in a single high throughput assay to measure mitochondrial biogenesis and toxicity, and nephrotoxic potential. PMID:20465991

  13. Development and Application of a High Throughput Protein Unfolding Kinetic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Waterhouse, Nicklas; Feyijinmi, Olusegun; Dominguez, Matthew J.; Martinez, Lisa M.; Sharp, Zoey; Service, Rachel; Bothe, Jameson R.; Stollar, Elliott J.

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics of folding and unfolding underlie protein stability and quantification of these rates provides important insights into the folding process. Here, we present a simple high throughput protein unfolding kinetic assay using a plate reader that is applicable to the studies of the majority of 2-state folding proteins. We validate the assay by measuring kinetic unfolding data for the SH3 (Src Homology 3) domain from Actin Binding Protein 1 (AbpSH3) and its stabilized mutants. The results of our approach are in excellent agreement with published values. We further combine our kinetic assay with a plate reader equilibrium assay, to obtain indirect estimates of folding rates and use these approaches to characterize an AbpSH3-peptide hybrid. Our high throughput protein unfolding kinetic assays allow accurate screening of libraries of mutants by providing both kinetic and equilibrium measurements and provide a means for in-depth ϕ-value analyses. PMID:26745729

  14. A Sensitive and Robust High-Throughput Screening Assay for Inhibitors of the Chikungunya Virus nsP1 Capping Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Bullard-Feibelman, Kristen M.; Fuller, Benjamin P.; Geiss, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne Alphavirus that causes severe and debilitating disease symptoms. Alarmingly, transmission rates of CHIKV have increased dramatically over the last decade resulting in 1.7 million suspected cases in the Western hemisphere alone. There are currently no antivirals for treatment of CHIKV infection and novel anti-alphaviral compounds are badly needed. nsP1 is the alphavirus protein responsible for the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase activities necessary for formation of the 5’ type 0 cap structure added to newly formed viral RNA. Formation of this cap depends on nsP1 binding GTP and transferring a methylated GMP to nascent viral RNA. We have developed a fluorescence polarization-based assay that monitors displacement of a fluorescently-labeled GTP analog in real time. Determining the relative affinities of 15 GTP analogs for nsP1 GTP revealed important structural aspects of GTP that will inform identification of inhibitors able to outcompete GTP for the nsP1 binding site. Validation of the assay for HTS was completed and a secondary orthogonal assay that measures guanylation activity was developed in order to evaluate hits from future drug screens. This platform provides an avenue for identification of potent nsP1 inhibitors, which would potentially provide compounds capable of treating disease caused by CHIKV infection. PMID:27427769

  15. High-throughput fragment screening by affinity LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Duong-Thi, Minh-Dao; Bergström, Maria; Fex, Tomas; Isaksson, Roland; Ohlson, Sten

    2013-02-01

    Fragment screening, an emerging approach for hit finding in drug discovery, has recently been proven effective by its first approved drug, vemurafenib, for cancer treatment. Techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, surface plasmon resonance, and isothemal titration calorimetry, with their own pros and cons, have been employed for screening fragment libraries. As an alternative approach, screening based on high-performance liquid chromatography separation has been developed. In this work, we present weak affinity LC/MS as a method to screen fragments under high-throughput conditions. Affinity-based capillary columns with immobilized thrombin were used to screen a collection of 590 compounds from a fragment library. The collection was divided into 11 mixtures (each containing 35 to 65 fragments) and screened by MS detection. The primary screening was performed in <4 h (corresponding to >3500 fragments per day). Thirty hits were defined, which subsequently entered a secondary screening using an active site-blocked thrombin column for confirmation of specificity. One hit showed selective binding to thrombin with an estimated dissociation constant (K (D)) in the 0.1 mM range. This study shows that affinity LC/MS is characterized by high throughput, ease of operation, and low consumption of target and fragments, and therefore it promises to be a valuable method for fragment screening.

  16. High-throughput screening in the C. elegans nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kinser, Holly E; Pincus, Zachary

    2016-06-03

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is widely used as a model organism in the field of neurobiology. The wiring of the C. elegans nervous system has been entirely mapped, and the animal's optical transparency allows for in vivo observation of neuronal activity. The nematode is also small in size, self-fertilizing, and inexpensive to cultivate and maintain, greatly lending to its utility as a whole-animal model for high-throughput screening (HTS) in the nervous system. However, the use of this organism in large-scale screens presents unique technical challenges, including reversible immobilization of the animal, parallel single-animal culture and containment, automation of laser surgery, and high-throughput image acquisition and phenotyping. These obstacles require significant modification of existing techniques and the creation of new C. elegans-based HTS platforms. In this review, we outline these challenges in detail and survey the novel technologies and methods that have been developed to address them.

  17. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Krunic, Susanne Langgaard; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers the potential for rapidly analysing resistant and slowly digested dietary starches. PMID:27468930

  18. Predictive Model of Rat Reproductive Toxicity from ToxCast High Throughput Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA ToxCast research program uses high throughput screening for bioactivity profiling and predicting the toxicity of large numbers of chemicals. ToxCast Phase‐I tested 309 well‐characterized chemicals in over 500 assays for a wide range of molecular targets and cellular respo...

  19. Predictive Model of Rat Reproductive Toxicity from ToxCast High Throughput Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA ToxCast research program uses high throughput screening for bioactivity profiling and predicting the toxicity of large numbers of chemicals. ToxCast Phase‐I tested 309 well‐characterized chemicals in over 500 assays for a wide range of molecular targets and cellular respo...

  20. Multiplex High-Throughput Targeted Proteomic Assay To Identify Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Baud, Anna; Wessely, Frank; Mazzacuva, Francesca; McCormick, James; Camuzeaux, Stephane; Heywood, Wendy E; Little, Daniel; Vowles, Jane; Tuefferd, Marianne; Mosaku, Olukunbi; Lako, Majlinda; Armstrong, Lyle; Webber, Caleb; Cader, M Zameel; Peeters, Pieter; Gissen, Paul; Cowley, Sally A; Mills, Kevin

    2017-02-21

    Induced pluripotent stem cells have great potential as a human model system in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, and drug screening. However, their use in medical research is hampered by laborious reprogramming procedures that yield low numbers of induced pluripotent stem cells. For further applications in research, only the best, competent clones should be used. The standard assays for pluripotency are based on genomic approaches, which take up to 1 week to perform and incur significant cost. Therefore, there is a need for a rapid and cost-effective assay able to distinguish between pluripotent and nonpluripotent cells. Here, we describe a novel multiplexed, high-throughput, and sensitive peptide-based multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry assay, allowing for the identification and absolute quantitation of multiple core transcription factors and pluripotency markers. This assay provides simpler and high-throughput classification into either pluripotent or nonpluripotent cells in 7 min analysis while being more cost-effective than conventional genomic tests.

  1. A conformational switch high-throughput screening assay and allosteric inhibition of the flavivirus NS2B-NS3 protease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Binbin; Zhang, Jing; Koetzner, Cheri A.; Jones, Susan A.; Lin, Qishan

    2017-01-01

    The flavivirus genome encodes a single polyprotein precursor requiring multiple cleavages by host and viral proteases in order to produce the individual proteins that constitute an infectious virion. Previous studies have revealed that the NS2B cofactor of the viral NS2B-NS3 heterocomplex protease displays a conformational dynamic between active and inactive states. Here, we developed a conformational switch assay based on split luciferase complementation (SLC) to monitor the conformational change of NS2B and to characterize candidate allosteric inhibitors. Binding of an active-site inhibitor to the protease resulted in a conformational change of NS2B and led to significant SLC enhancement. Mutagenesis of key residues at an allosteric site abolished this induced conformational change and SLC enhancement. We also performed a virtual screen of NCI library compounds to identify allosteric inhibitors, followed by in vitro biochemical screening of the resultant candidates. Only three of these compounds, NSC135618, 260594, and 146771, significantly inhibited the protease of Dengue virus 2 (DENV2) in vitro, with IC50 values of 1.8 μM, 11.4 μM, and 4.8 μM, respectively. Among the three compounds, only NSC135618 significantly suppressed the SLC enhancement triggered by binding of active-site inhibitor in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that it inhibits the conformational change of NS2B. Results from virus titer reduction assays revealed that NSC135618 is a broad spectrum flavivirus protease inhibitor, and can significantly reduce titers of DENV2, Zika virus (ZIKV), West Nile virus (WNV), and Yellow fever virus (YFV) on A549 cells in vivo, with EC50 values in low micromolar range. In contrast, the cytotoxicity of NSC135618 is only moderate with CC50 of 48.8 μM on A549 cells. Moreover, NSC135618 inhibited ZIKV in human placental and neural progenitor cells relevant to ZIKV pathogenesis. Results from binding, kinetics, Western blot, mass spectrometry and mutagenesis

  2. Development of a high throughput screen for allosteric modulators of melanocortin-4 receptor signaling using a real time cAMP assay

    PubMed Central

    Pantel, Jacques; Williams, Savannah Y.; Mi, Dehui; Sebag, Julien; Corbin, Jackie D.; Weaver, C. David; Cone, Roger D.

    2011-01-01

    The melanocortin MC4 receptor is a potential target for the development of drugs for both obesity and cachexia. Melanocortin MC4 receptor ligands known thus far are orthosteric agonists or antagonists, however the agonists, in particular, have generally exhibited unwanted side effects. For some receptors, allosteric modulators are expected to reduce side-effect profiles. To identify allosteric modulators of the melanocortin MC4 receptor, we created HEK293 cell lines coexpressing the human melanocortin MC4 receptor and a modified luciferase-based cAMP sensor. Monitoring luminescence as a readout of real-time intracellular cAMP concentration, we demonstrate this cell line is able to report melanocortin agonist responses, as well as inverse agonist response to the physiological AgRP peptide. Based on the MC4R-GLO cell line, we developed an assay that was shown to meet HTS standards (Z’=0.50). A pilot screen run on the Microsource Spectrum compound library (n= 2,000) successfully identified 62 positive modulators. This screen identified predicted families of compounds: β2AR agonists –the β2AR being endogenously expressed in HEK293 cells-, an adenylyl cyclase activator and finally a distribution of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors well characterized or recently identified. In this last category, we identified a structural family of coumarin-derived compounds (imperatorin, osthol and prenyletin), along with deracoxib, a drug in veterinary use for its COX2 inhibitory properties. This latter finding unveiled a new off-target mechanism of action for deracoxib as a PDE inhibitor. Overall, these data are the first report of an HTS for allosteric modulators for a Gs protein coupled receptor. PMID:21296065

  3. High-throughput screening with micro-x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.

    2005-06-15

    Micro-x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) is a useful characterization tool for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries. Due to the increasing threat of use of chemical warfare (CW) agents both in military actions and against civilians by terrorist extremists, there is a strong push to improve existing methods and develop means for the detection of a broad spectrum of CW agents in a minimal amount of time to increase national security. This paper describes a combinatorial high-throughput screening technique for CW receptor discovery to aid in sensor development. MXRF can screen materials for elemental composition at the mesoscale level (tens to hundreds of micrometers). The key aspect of this work is the use of commercial MXRF instrumentation coupled with the inherent heteroatom elements within the target molecules of the combinatorial reaction to provide rapid and specific identification of lead species. The method is demonstrated by screening an 11-mer oligopeptide library for selective binding of the degradation products of the nerve agent VX. The identified oligopeptides can be used as selective molecular receptors for sensor development. The MXRF screening method is nondestructive, requires minimal sample preparation or special tags for analysis, and the screening time depends on the desired sensitivity.

  4. High-throughput screening with micro-x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.

    2005-06-01

    Micro-x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) is a useful characterization tool for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries. Due to the increasing threat of use of chemical warfare (CW) agents both in military actions and against civilians by terrorist extremists, there is a strong push to improve existing methods and develop means for the detection of a broad spectrum of CW agents in a minimal amount of time to increase national security. This paper describes a combinatorial high-throughput screening technique for CW receptor discovery to aid in sensor development. MXRF can screen materials for elemental composition at the mesoscale level (tens to hundreds of micrometers). The key aspect of this work is the use of commercial MXRF instrumentation coupled with the inherent heteroatom elements within the target molecules of the combinatorial reaction to provide rapid and specific identification of lead species. The method is demonstrated by screening an 11-mer oligopeptide library for selective binding of the degradation products of the nerve agent VX. The identified oligopeptides can be used as selective molecular receptors for sensor development. The MXRF screening method is nondestructive, requires minimal sample preparation or special tags for analysis, and the screening time depends on the desired sensitivity.

  5. High throughput screening to investigate the interaction of stem cells with their extracellular microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ankam, Soneela; Teo, Benjamin KK; Kukumberg, Marek; Yim, Evelyn KF

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells in vivo are housed within a functional microenvironment termed the “stem cell niche.” As the niche components can modulate stem cell behaviors like proliferation, migration and differentiation, evaluating these components would be important to determine the most optimal platform for their maintenance or differentiation. In this review, we have discussed methods and technologies that have aided in the development of high throughput screening assays for stem cell research, including enabling technologies such as the well-established multiwell/microwell plates and robotic spotting, and emerging technologies like microfluidics, micro-contact printing and lithography. We also discuss the studies that utilized high throughput screening platform to investigate stem cell response to extracellular matrix, topography, biomaterials and stiffness gradients in the stem cell niche. The combination of the aforementioned techniques could lay the foundation for new perspectives in further development of high throughput technology and stem cell research. PMID:23899508

  6. Discovery of novel targets with high throughput RNA interference screening.

    PubMed

    Kassner, Paul D

    2008-03-01

    High throughput technologies have the potential to affect all aspects of drug discovery. Considerable attention is paid to high throughput screening (HTS) for small molecule lead compounds. The identification of the targets that enter those HTS campaigns had been driven by basic research until the advent of genomics level data acquisition such as sequencing and gene expression microarrays. Large-scale profiling approaches (e.g., microarrays, protein analysis by mass spectrometry, and metabolite profiling) can yield vast quantities of data and important information. However, these approaches usually require painstaking in silico analysis and low-throughput basic wet-lab research to identify the function of a gene and validate the gene product as a potential therapeutic drug target. Functional genomic screening offers the promise of direct identification of genes involved in phenotypes of interest. In this review, RNA interference (RNAi) mediated loss-of-function screens will be discussed and as well as their utility in target identification. Some of the genes identified in these screens should produce similar phenotypes if their gene products are antagonized with drugs. With a carefully chosen phenotype, an understanding of the biology of RNAi and appreciation of the limitations of RNAi screening, there is great potential for the discovery of new drug targets.

  7. Automated Segmentation and Classification of High Throughput Yeast Assay Spots

    PubMed Central

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Fotouhi, Farshad; Parrish, Jodi R.; Finley, Russell L.

    2009-01-01

    Several technologies for characterizing genes and proteins from humans and other organisms use yeast growth or color development as read outs. The yeast two-hybrid assay, for example, detects protein-protein interactions by measuring the growth of yeast on a specific solid medium, or the ability of the yeast to change color when grown on a medium containing a chromogenic substrate. Current systems for analyzing the results of these types of assays rely on subjective and inefficient scoring of growth or color by human experts. Here an image analysis system is described for scoring yeast growth and color development in high throughput biological assays. The goal is to locate the spots and score them in color images of two types of plates named “X-Gal” and “growth assay” plates, with uniformly placed spots (cell areas) on each plate (both plates in one image). The scoring system relies on color for the X-Gal spots, and texture properties for the growth assay spots. A maximum likelihood projection-based segmentation is developed to automatically locate spots of yeast on each plate. Then color histogram and wavelet texture features are extracted for scoring using an optimal linear transformation. Finally an artificial neural network is used to score the X-Gal and growth assay spots using the extracted features. The performance of the system is evaluated using spots of 60 images. After training the networks using training and validation sets, the system was assessed on the test set. The overall accuracies of 95.4% and 88.2% are achieved respectively for scoring the X-Gal and growth assay spots. PMID:17948730

  8. Identification of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Small Molecule against Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus and Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah Viruses by Using a Novel High-Throughput Screening Assay

    PubMed Central

    Elshabrawy, Hatem A.; Fan, Jilao; Haddad, Christine S.; Ratia, Kiira; Broder, Christopher C.; Caffrey, Michael

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah viruses are members of different viral families and are known causative agents of fatal viral diseases. These viruses depend on cathepsin L for entry into their target cells. The viral glycoproteins need to be primed by protease cleavage, rendering them active for fusion with the host cell membrane. In this study, we developed a novel high-throughput screening assay based on peptides, derived from the glycoproteins of the aforementioned viruses, which contain the cathepsin L cleavage site. We screened a library of 5,000 small molecules and discovered a small molecule that can inhibit the cathepsin L cleavage of all viral peptides with minimal inhibition of cleavage of a host protein-derived peptide (pro-neuropeptide Y). The small molecule inhibited the entry of all pseudotyped viruses in vitro and the cleavage of SARS-CoV spike glycoprotein in an in vitro cleavage assay. In addition, the Hendra and Nipah virus fusion glycoproteins were not cleaved in the presence of the small molecule in a cell-based cleavage assay. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the small molecule is a mixed inhibitor of cathepsin L. Our broad-spectrum antiviral small molecule appears to be an ideal candidate for future optimization and development into a potent antiviral against SARS-CoV and Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah viruses. IMPORTANCE We developed a novel high-throughput screening assay to identify small molecules that can prevent cathepsin L cleavage of viral glycoproteins derived from SARS-CoV and Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah viruses that are required for their entry into the host cell. We identified a novel broad-spectrum small molecule that could block cathepsin L-mediated cleavage and thus inhibit the entry of pseudotypes bearing the glycoprotein derived from SARS-CoV or Ebola, Hendra, or Nipah virus. The small molecule can be further optimized and developed into a potent broad-spectrum antiviral

  9. Identification of a broad-spectrum antiviral small molecule against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah viruses by using a novel high-throughput screening assay.

    PubMed

    Elshabrawy, Hatem A; Fan, Jilao; Haddad, Christine S; Ratia, Kiira; Broder, Christopher C; Caffrey, Michael; Prabhakar, Bellur S

    2014-04-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah viruses are members of different viral families and are known causative agents of fatal viral diseases. These viruses depend on cathepsin L for entry into their target cells. The viral glycoproteins need to be primed by protease cleavage, rendering them active for fusion with the host cell membrane. In this study, we developed a novel high-throughput screening assay based on peptides, derived from the glycoproteins of the aforementioned viruses, which contain the cathepsin L cleavage site. We screened a library of 5,000 small molecules and discovered a small molecule that can inhibit the cathepsin L cleavage of all viral peptides with minimal inhibition of cleavage of a host protein-derived peptide (pro-neuropeptide Y). The small molecule inhibited the entry of all pseudotyped viruses in vitro and the cleavage of SARS-CoV spike glycoprotein in an in vitro cleavage assay. In addition, the Hendra and Nipah virus fusion glycoproteins were not cleaved in the presence of the small molecule in a cell-based cleavage assay. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the small molecule is a mixed inhibitor of cathepsin L. Our broad-spectrum antiviral small molecule appears to be an ideal candidate for future optimization and development into a potent antiviral against SARS-CoV and Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah viruses. We developed a novel high-throughput screening assay to identify small molecules that can prevent cathepsin L cleavage of viral glycoproteins derived from SARS-CoV and Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah viruses that are required for their entry into the host cell. We identified a novel broad-spectrum small molecule that could block cathepsin L-mediated cleavage and thus inhibit the entry of pseudotypes bearing the glycoprotein derived from SARS-CoV or Ebola, Hendra, or Nipah virus. The small molecule can be further optimized and developed into a potent broad-spectrum antiviral drug.

  10. Microfluidic cell chips for high-throughput drug screening.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chun-Wei; Ahmed, Ah Rezwanuddin; Dereli-Korkut, Zeynep; Wang, Sihong

    2016-05-01

    The current state of screening methods for drug discovery is still riddled with several inefficiencies. Although some widely used high-throughput screening platforms may enhance the drug screening process, their cost and oversimplification of cell-drug interactions pose a translational difficulty. Microfluidic cell-chips resolve many issues found in conventional HTS technology, providing benefits such as reduced sample quantity and integration of 3D cell culture physically more representative of the physiological/pathological microenvironment. In this review, we introduce the advantages of microfluidic devices in drug screening, and outline the critical factors which influence device design, highlighting recent innovations and advances in the field including a summary of commercialization efforts on microfluidic cell chips. Future perspectives of microfluidic cell devices are also provided based on considerations of present technological limitations and translational barriers.

  11. High-throughput screening to enhance oncolytic virus immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Allan, KJ; Stojdl, David F; Swift, SL

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens can rapidly scan and capture large amounts of information across multiple biological parameters. Although many screens have been designed to uncover potential new therapeutic targets capable of crippling viruses that cause disease, there have been relatively few directed at improving the efficacy of viruses that are used to treat disease. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are biotherapeutic agents with an inherent specificity for treating malignant disease. Certain OV platforms – including those based on herpes simplex virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus – have shown success against solid tumors in advanced clinical trials. Yet, many of these OVs have only undergone minimal engineering to solidify tumor specificity, with few extra modifications to manipulate additional factors. Several aspects of the interaction between an OV and a tumor-bearing host have clear value as targets to improve therapeutic outcomes. At the virus level, these include delivery to the tumor, infectivity, productivity, oncolysis, bystander killing, spread, and persistence. At the host level, these include engaging the immune system and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review the chemical- and genome-based high-throughput screens that have been performed to manipulate such parameters during OV infection and analyze their impact on therapeutic efficacy. We further explore emerging themes that represent key areas of focus for future research. PMID:27579293

  12. Development of a High-Throughput Assay for Identifying Inhibitors of TBK1 and IKKε

    PubMed Central

    Hutti, Jessica E.; Porter, Melissa A.; Cheely, Adam W.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wang, Xiaodong; Kireev, Dmitri; Baldwin, Albert S.; Janzen, William P.

    2012-01-01

    IKKε and TBK1 are noncanonical IKK family members which regulate inflammatory signaling pathways and also play important roles in oncogenesis. However, few inhibitors of these kinases have been identified. While the substrate specificity of IKKε has recently been described, the substrate specificity of TBK1 is unknown, hindering the development of high-throughput screening technologies for inhibitor identification. Here, we describe the optimal substrate phosphorylation motif for TBK1, and show that it is identical to the phosphorylation motif previously described for IKKε. This information enabled the design of an optimal TBK1/IKKε substrate peptide amenable to high-throughput screening and we assayed a 6,006 compound library that included 4,727 kinase-focused compounds to discover in vitro inhibitors of TBK1 and IKKε. 227 compounds in this library inhibited TBK1 at a concentration of 10 µM, while 57 compounds inhibited IKKε. Together, these data describe a new high-throughput screening assay which will facilitate the discovery of small molecule TBK1/IKKε inhibitors possessing therapeutic potential for both inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:22859992

  13. Development of a high-throughput assay for identifying inhibitors of TBK1 and IKKε.

    PubMed

    Hutti, Jessica E; Porter, Melissa A; Cheely, Adam W; Cantley, Lewis C; Wang, Xiaodong; Kireev, Dmitri; Baldwin, Albert S; Janzen, William P

    2012-01-01

    IKKε and TBK1 are noncanonical IKK family members which regulate inflammatory signaling pathways and also play important roles in oncogenesis. However, few inhibitors of these kinases have been identified. While the substrate specificity of IKKε has recently been described, the substrate specificity of TBK1 is unknown, hindering the development of high-throughput screening technologies for inhibitor identification. Here, we describe the optimal substrate phosphorylation motif for TBK1, and show that it is identical to the phosphorylation motif previously described for IKKε. This information enabled the design of an optimal TBK1/IKKε substrate peptide amenable to high-throughput screening and we assayed a 6,006 compound library that included 4,727 kinase-focused compounds to discover in vitro inhibitors of TBK1 and IKKε. 227 compounds in this library inhibited TBK1 at a concentration of 10 µM, while 57 compounds inhibited IKKε. Together, these data describe a new high-throughput screening assay which will facilitate the discovery of small molecule TBK1/IKKε inhibitors possessing therapeutic potential for both inflammatory diseases and cancer.

  14. A novel high-throughput nematicidal assay using embryo cells and larvae of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yiling; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Shuchun; Li, Erwei; Che, Yongsheng; Liu, Xingzhong

    2014-04-01

    Human health safety and environmental concerns have resulted in the widespread deregistration of several agronomic important nematicides. New and safer nematicides are urgently needed. However, a high-throughput bioassay for screening potential nematicides has not been established. We developed a two-step high-throughput nematicidal screening method to combine a cell-based MTS colorimetric assay with Caenorhabditis elegans embryo cells for preliminary cytotoxicity screening (step 1) followed by in vitro larval assay for nematicidal activity (step 2). Based on three conventional nematicides' test, high correlations were obtained between cell viability and larval viability and "r" values were 0.78 for Avermectin, 0.95 for Fosthiazate, and 0.65 for Formaldehyde solution. Further assays with 60 fungal secondary metabolites (extracts, fractions and pure compounds) also demonstrated the high correlation between cell viability and larval viability (r=0.60) and between the C. elegans cell viability and the juvenile viability of soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines (r=0.48) and pine wood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (r=0.56). Six metabolites with high cytotoxicity have performed high larval mortality with a LC50 range of 6.8-500μg/ml. These results indicate that the proposed two-step screening assay represents an efficient and labor-saving method for screening natural nematicidal products.

  15. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  16. High Throughput Screening Identifies Novel Lead Compounds with Activity against Larval, Juvenile and Adult Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, J. Mark F.; Bell, Andrew S.; Parkinson, Tanya; Bickle, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 600 million people are affected by the helminth disease schistosomiasis caused by parasites of the genus Schistosoma. There is currently only one drug recommended for treating schistosomiasis, praziquantel (PZQ), which is effective against adult worms but not against the juvenile stage. In an attempt to identify improved drugs for treating the disease, we have carried out high throughput screening of a number of small molecule libraries with the aim of identifying lead compounds with balanced activity against all life stages of Schistosoma. A total of almost 300,000 compounds were screened using a high throughput assay based on motility of worm larvae and image analysis of assay plates. Hits were screened against juvenile and adult worms to identify broadly active compounds and against a mammalian cell line to assess cytotoxicity. A number of compounds were identified as promising leads for further chemical optimization. PMID:27128493

  17. RAS - Screens & Assays - Drug Discovery

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Drug Discovery group aims to develop assays that will reveal aspects of RAS biology upon which cancer cells depend. Successful assay formats are made available for high-throughput screening programs to yield potentially effective drug compounds.

  18. A high-throughput screening assay for inhibitors of bacterial motility identifies a novel inhibitor of the Na+-driven flagellar motor and virulence gene expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile; Pathak, Ashish; Ayala, Julio C; Wang, Hongxia; Wu, Jian-He; Benitez, Jorge A; Silva, Anisia J

    2011-09-01

    Numerous bacterial pathogens, particularly those that colonize fast-flow areas in the bladder and gastrointestinal tract, require motility to establish infection and spread beyond the initially colonized tissue. Vibrio cholerae strains of serogroups O1 and O139, the causative agents of the diarrheal illness cholera, express a single polar flagellum powered by sodium motive force and require motility to colonize and spread along the small intestine. Therefore, motility may be an attractive target for small molecules that can prevent and/or block the infective process. In this study, we describe a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to identify small molecules that selectively inhibit bacterial motility. The HTS assay was used to screen an ∼8,000-compound structurally diverse chemical library for inhibitors of V. cholerae motility. The screen identified a group of quinazoline-2,4-diamino analogs that completely suppressed motility without affecting the growth rate in broth. A further study on the effects of one analog, designated Q24DA, showed that it induces a flagellated but nonmotile (Mot(-)) phenotype and is specific for the Na(+)-driven flagellar motor of pathogenic Vibrio species. A mutation conferring phenamil-resistant motility did not eliminate inhibition of motility by Q24DA. Q24DA diminished the expression of cholera toxin and toxin-coregulated pilus as well as biofilm formation and fluid secretion in the rabbit ileal loop model. Furthermore, treatment of V. cholerae with Q24DA impacted additional phenotypes linked to Na(+) bioenergetics, such as the function of the primary Na(+) pump, Nqr, and susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. The above results clearly show that the described HTS assay is capable of identifying small molecules that specifically block bacterial motility. New inhibitors such as Q24DA may be instrumental in probing the molecular architecture of the Na(+)-driven polar flagellar motor and in studying the role of motility in the

  19. A High-Throughput Screening Assay for Inhibitors of Bacterial Motility Identifies a Novel Inhibitor of the Na+-Driven Flagellar Motor and Virulence Gene Expression in Vibrio cholerae▿†

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E. Lucile; Pathak, Ashish; Ayala, Julio C.; Wang, Hongxia; Wu, Jian-He; Benitez, Jorge A.; Silva, Anisia J.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous bacterial pathogens, particularly those that colonize fast-flow areas in the bladder and gastrointestinal tract, require motility to establish infection and spread beyond the initially colonized tissue. Vibrio cholerae strains of serogroups O1 and O139, the causative agents of the diarrheal illness cholera, express a single polar flagellum powered by sodium motive force and require motility to colonize and spread along the small intestine. Therefore, motility may be an attractive target for small molecules that can prevent and/or block the infective process. In this study, we describe a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to identify small molecules that selectively inhibit bacterial motility. The HTS assay was used to screen an ∼8,000-compound structurally diverse chemical library for inhibitors of V. cholerae motility. The screen identified a group of quinazoline-2,4-diamino analogs that completely suppressed motility without affecting the growth rate in broth. A further study on the effects of one analog, designated Q24DA, showed that it induces a flagellated but nonmotile (Mot−) phenotype and is specific for the Na+-driven flagellar motor of pathogenic Vibrio species. A mutation conferring phenamil-resistant motility did not eliminate inhibition of motility by Q24DA. Q24DA diminished the expression of cholera toxin and toxin-coregulated pilus as well as biofilm formation and fluid secretion in the rabbit ileal loop model. Furthermore, treatment of V. cholerae with Q24DA impacted additional phenotypes linked to Na+ bioenergetics, such as the function of the primary Na+ pump, Nqr, and susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. The above results clearly show that the described HTS assay is capable of identifying small molecules that specifically block bacterial motility. New inhibitors such as Q24DA may be instrumental in probing the molecular architecture of the Na+-driven polar flagellar motor and in studying the role of motility in the expression of

  20. A Microchip for High-throughput Axon Growth Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Jeong, Sehoon; Koo, Chiwan; Han, Arum; Park, Jaewon

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently known that not only the presence of inhibitory molecules associated with myelin but also the reduced growth capability of the axons limit mature central nervous system (CNS) axonal regeneration after injury. Conventional axon growth studies are typically conducted using multi-well cell culture plates that are very challenging to investigate localized effects of drugs and limited to low throughput. Unfortunately, there is currently no other in vitro tools that allow investigating localized axonal responses to biomolecules in high-throughput for screening potential drugs that might promote axonal growth. We have developed a compartmentalized neuron culture platform enabling localized biomolecular treatments in parallel to axons that are physically and fluidically isolated from their neuronal somata. The 24 axon compartments in the developed platform are designed to perform four sets of six different localized biomolecular treatments simultaneously on a single device. In addition, the novel microfluidic configuration allows culture medium of 24 axon compartments to be replenished altogether by a single aspiration process, making high-throughput drug screening a reality. PMID:27928514

  1. A High Throughput Mechanical Screening Device for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Hou, Chieh; Meloni, Greg R.; Cosgrove, Brian D.; Dodge, George R.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage enables efficient and near-frictionless load transmission, but suffers from poor inherent healing capacity. As such, cartilage tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking both compositional and mechanical properties of native tissue in order to provide effective repair materials for the treatment of damaged or degenerated joint surfaces. However, given the large number design parameters available (e.g. cell sources, scaffold designs, and growth factors), it is difficult to conduct combinatorial experiments of engineered cartilage. This is particularly exacerbated when mechanical properties are a primary outcome given the long time required for testing of individual samples. High throughput screening is utilized widely in the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly and cost-effectively assess the effects of thousands of compounds for therapeutic discovery. Here we adapted this approach to develop a high throughput mechanical screening (HTMS) system capable of measuring the mechanical properties of up to 48 materials simultaneously. The HTMS device was validated by testing various biomaterials and engineered cartilage constructs and by comparing the HTMS results to those derived from conventional single sample compression tests. Further evaluation showed that the HTMS system was capable of distinguishing and identifying ‘hits’, or factors that influence the degree of tissue maturation. Future iterations of this device will focus on reducing data variability, increasing force sensitivity and range, as well as scaling-up to even larger (96-well) formats. This HTMS device provides a novel tool for cartilage tissue engineering, freeing experimental design from the limitations of mechanical testing throughput. PMID:24275442

  2. Development of multiplexed microarray binding assays for high-throughput drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yulong; Liu, Li; Pai, Sadashiva; Graf, James N; Rao, Hongwei; Lynn, Jeffrey G; van Staden, Carlo; Lee, Paul H; Lai, Fang; Salon, John A

    2009-06-01

    The ability to combine primary hit identification assays with target profiling would significantly streamline the current drug discovery process. Working towards this end, we report here the development of a microarray-based ligand binding assay that supports multiplexed analysis of G protein-coupled receptor systems in a 96-well microplate format that is compatible with the equipment and infrastructure typical of high-throughput screening laboratories. A prototype microarray was generated by pin-printing seven different receptors within the wells of a specially coated glass-bottom microplate and assaying with a cocktail of fluorescent ligands. Development of the multiplexed system included optimization of methods for depositing receptor membrane proteins and establishing a generic set of assay conditions that simultaneously satisfied the pharmacology requirements of all of the receptor systems included on the array. The multiplexed system is shown to produce valid pharmacological results as evidenced by its ability to report K(i) values for receptor-specific fluorescent ligands and rank ordered potencies for diagnostic displacing compounds comparable to values generated by conventional simplexed assays. Moreover, the results of a 40-compound mini-screen confirmed that the assay accurately identifies valid hits. The results suggest the assay may be immediately suitable for routine profiling tasks and demonstrate the potential of the format for high-throughput multiplexed drug discovery.

  3. RABiT-II: Implementation of a High-Throughput Micronucleus Biodosimetry Assay on Commercial Biotech Robotic Systems.

    PubMed

    Repin, Mikhail; Pampou, Sergey; Karan, Charles; Brenner, David J; Garty, Guy

    2017-02-23

    We demonstrate the use of high-throughput biodosimetry platforms based on commercial high-throughput/high-content screening robotic systems. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay, using only 20 μl whole blood from a fingerstick, was implemented on a PerkinElmer cell::explorer and General Electric IN Cell Analyzer 2000. On average 500 binucleated cells per sample were detected by our FluorQuantMN software. A calibration curve was generated in the radiation dose range up to 5.0 Gy using the data from 8 donors and 48,083 binucleated cells in total. The study described here demonstrates that high-throughput radiation biodosimetry is practical using current commercial high-throughput/high-content screening robotic systems, which can be readily programmed to perform and analyze robotics-optimized cytogenetic assays. Application to other commercial high-throughput/high-content screening systems beyond the ones used in this study is clearly practical. This approach will allow much wider access to high-throughput biodosimetric screening for large-scale radiological incidents than is currently available.

  4. Droplet microfluidic technology for single-cell high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Brouzes, Eric; Medkova, Martina; Savenelli, Neal; Marran, Dave; Twardowski, Mariusz; Hutchison, J Brian; Rothberg, Jonathan M; Link, Darren R; Perrimon, Norbert; Samuels, Michael L

    2009-08-25

    We present a droplet-based microfluidic technology that enables high-throughput screening of single mammalian cells. This integrated platform allows for the encapsulation of single cells and reagents in independent aqueous microdroplets (1 pL to 10 nL volumes) dispersed in an immiscible carrier oil and enables the digital manipulation of these reactors at a very high-throughput. Here, we validate a full droplet screening workflow by conducting a droplet-based cytotoxicity screen. To perform this screen, we first developed a droplet viability assay that permits the quantitative scoring of cell viability and growth within intact droplets. Next, we demonstrated the high viability of encapsulated human monocytic U937 cells over a period of 4 days. Finally, we developed an optically-coded droplet library enabling the identification of the droplets composition during the assay read-out. Using the integrated droplet technology, we screened a drug library for its cytotoxic effect against U937 cells. Taken together our droplet microfluidic platform is modular, robust, uses no moving parts, and has a wide range of potential applications including high-throughput single-cell analyses, combinatorial screening, and facilitating small sample analyses.

  5. Automated high-throughput nanoliter-scale protein crystallization screening.

    PubMed

    Li, Fenglei; Robinson, Howard; Yeung, Edward S

    2005-12-01

    A highly efficient method is developed for automated high-throughput screening of nanoliter-scale protein crystallization. The system integrates liquid dispensing, crystallization and detection. The automated liquid dispensing system handles nanoliters of protein and various combinations of precipitants in parallel to access diverse regions of the phase diagram. A new detection scheme, native fluorescence, with complementary visible-light detection is employed for monitoring the progress of crystallization. This detection mode can distinguish protein crystals from inorganic crystals in a nondestructive manner. A gas-permeable membrane covering the microwells simplifies evaporation rate control and probes extended conditions in the phase diagram. The system was successfully demonstrated for the screening of lysozyme crystallization under 81 different conditions.

  6. High-throughput screening and rapid inhibitor triage using an infectious chimeric Hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Wichroski, Michael J; Fang, Jie; Eggers, Betsy J; Rose, Ronald E; Mazzucco, Charles E; Pokornowski, Kevin A; Baldick, Carl J; Anthony, Monique N; Dowling, Craig J; Barber, Lauren E; Leet, John E; Beno, Brett R; Gerritz, Samuel W; Agler, Michele L; Cockett, Mark I; Tenney, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of a Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infectious virus cell culture model system has facilitated the development of whole-virus screening assays which can be used to interrogate the entire virus life cycle. Here, we describe the development of an HCV growth assay capable of identifying inhibitors against all stages of the virus life cycle with assay throughput suitable for rapid screening of large-scale chemical libraries. Novel features include, 1) the use of an efficiently-spreading, full-length, intergenotypic chimeric reporter virus with genotype 1 structural proteins, 2) a homogenous assay format compatible with miniaturization and automated liquid-handling, and 3) flexible assay end-points using either chemiluminescence (high-throughput screening) or Cellomics ArrayScan™ technology (high-content screening). The assay was validated using known HCV antivirals and through a large-scale, high-throughput screening campaign that identified novel and selective entry, replication and late-stage inhibitors. Selection and characterization of resistant viruses provided information regarding inhibitor target and mechanism. Leveraging results from this robust whole-virus assay represents a critical first step towards identifying inhibitors of novel targets to broaden the spectrum of antivirals for the treatment of HCV.

  7. WGA-coated yttrium oxide beads enable an imaging-based adenosine 2a receptor binding scintillation proximity assay suitable for high throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Robert; McGuinness, Debra; Turek-Etienne, Tammy; Guyer, Deborah; Yu, Liming; Howells, Leighton; Caravano, Joseph; Zhai, Ying; Lachowicz, Jean

    2004-06-01

    Adenosine receptors belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors and are involved in a variety of physiologic functions. Traditionally, binding assays to detect adenosine 2a (A2a) antagonists and agonists have used filtration methods that are cumbersome to run and not amenable to HTS. We developed scintillation proximity assays (SPA trade mark ) utilizing HEK293 RBHA2AM cell membranes, either wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-coated yttrium silicate (YSi) or red-shifted yttrium oxide (YO) beads and the A2a-selective radioligand [(3)H]SCH 58261. Both beads gave windows (total binding/nonspecific binding) of >5 and K(d) values of 2-3 nM for the radioligand, in agreement with results obtained by filtration. In contrast, WGA-polyvinyltoluene as well as other bead types had windows of <3 and significant radioligand binding to the uncoated beads. A 384-well WGA-YO bead SPA was optimized utilizing a LEADseeker imaging system and an automated trituration process for dispensing the dense yttrium-based beads. Signals were stable after 4 h, and Z' values were 0.7-0.8. The LEADseeker imaging assay tolerated 2% dimethyl sulfoxide and generated IC(50) values of 3-5 nM for the A2a antagonist CGS 15943, comparable to that obtained by the filtration method. A number of adenosine and xanthine analogues were identified as hits in the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC). This imaging-based A2a SPA enables HTS and is a major improvement over the filtration method.

  8. Evaluation of High-throughput Genotoxicity Assays Used in Profiling the US EPA ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three high-throughput screening (HTS) genotoxicity assays-GreenScreen HC GADD45a-GFP (Gentronix Ltd.), CellCiphr p53 (Cellumen Inc.) and CellSensor p53RE-bla (Invitrogen Corp.)-were used to analyze the collection of 320 predominantly pesticide active compounds being tested in Pha...

  9. Evaluation of High-throughput Genotoxicity Assays Used in Profiling the US EPA ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three high-throughput screening (HTS) genotoxicity assays-GreenScreen HC GADD45a-GFP (Gentronix Ltd.), CellCiphr p53 (Cellumen Inc.) and CellSensor p53RE-bla (Invitrogen Corp.)-were used to analyze the collection of 320 predominantly pesticide active compounds being tested in Pha...

  10. Uncertainty Quantification in High Throughput Screening: Applications to Models of Endocrine Disruption, Cytotoxicity, and Zebrafish Development (GRC Drug Safety)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using uncertainty quantification, we aim to improve the quality of modeling data from high throughput screening assays for use in risk assessment. ToxCast is a large-scale screening program that analyzes thousands of chemicals using over 800 assays representing hundreds of bioche...

  11. Optimization of a Non-Radioactive High-Throughput Assay for Decarboxylase Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Herein, we describe the optimization of a linked enzyme assay suitable for high-throughput screening of decarboxylases, a target family whose activity has historically been difficult to quantify. Our approach uses a commercially available bicarbonate detection reagent to measure decarboxylase activity. The assay is performed in a fully enclosed automated screening system under inert nitrogen atmosphere to minimize perturbation by exogenous CO2. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis following a pilot screen of a small library of ∼3,600 unique molecules for inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei ornithine decarboxylase quantitatively demonstrates that the assay has excellent discriminatory power (area under the curve = 0.90 with 95% confidence interval between 0.82 and 0.97). PMID:20085486

  12. A new homogeneous assay for high throughput serological diagnosis of brucellosis in ruminants.

    PubMed

    McGiven, John A; Sawyer, Jason; Perrett, Lorraine L; Brew, Simon D; Commander, Nicola J; Fisher, Alan; McLarnon, Stuart; Harper, Kate; Stack, Judy A

    2008-08-20

    The control and eradication of brucellosis is highly desirable but heavily resource intensive as high throughput serological testing is required. The aim of this study was to meet the needs of high throughput screening laboratories involved in this process through the development of a new assay. An existing cELISA used for the serodiagnosis of brucellosis in ruminants was converted to an AlphaLISA homogenous proximity based assay. This assay requires no separation steps and can be performed in low volume microtitre format. The Brucella AlphaLISA was validated on a panel of bovine, ovine and caprine sera from infected and uninfected animals. The diagnostic sensitivities (>96%) and specificities (>98%) obtained compared well to those from cELISA, iELISA and FPA performed on the same samples. The AlphaLISA met the testing criteria set for ELISAs as defined by the OIEELISA standards and had an analytical sensitivity similar to that of the parent cELISA. The method was also used on a small panel of serum samples from cattle that were experimentally infected with Yersinia enterocolitica O:9. Some false positive reactions were obtained as was also the case with results from FPA, iELISA, cELISA, CFT and SAT. Despite this, the methodological advantages of the AlphaLISA mean that this assay is well suited to high throughput serodiagnosis. This report is the first description of the use of AlphaLISA to detect pathogen specific antibodies. Furthermore, the relative ease with which the cELISA was converted to this platform indicates that this technology is ready to meet the high throughput testing requirements for the diagnosis of many other diseases.

  13. High-throughput screening of small molecule libraries using SAMDI mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Scholle, Michael D; Eisenberg, Adam H; Mrksich, Milan

    2011-07-11

    High-throughput screening is a common strategy used to identify compounds that modulate biochemical activities, but many approaches depend on cumbersome fluorescent reporters or antibodies and often produce false-positive hits. The development of "label-free" assays addresses many of these limitations, but current approaches still lack the throughput needed for applications in drug discovery. This paper describes a high-throughput, label-free assay that combines self-assembled monolayers with mass spectrometry, in a technique called SAMDI, as a tool for screening libraries of 100,000 compounds in one day. This method is fast, has high discrimination, and is amenable to a broad range of chemical and biological applications.

  14. A powerful antiradiation compound revealed by a new high-throughput screening method.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Stéphane; Desage-El Murr, Marine; Nowaczyk, Stéphanie; Le Gall, Thierry; Pin, Serge; Renault, Jean-Philippe; Boquet, Didier; Créminon, Christophe; Saint-Aman, Eric; Valleix, Alain; Taran, Frédéric; Mioskowski, Charles

    2004-06-07

    We present a new high-throughput screening method for the selection of powerful water-soluble antiradiation compounds. This method, which uses conventional immunoassay techniques, allowed the capacity of a given compound to protect thymidine from irradiation to be evaluated. By applying this assay to an antioxidant library, we showed for the first time that norbadione A, a well-known mushroom pigment, has pronounced atypical antiradiation properties.

  15. Identification of Adiponectin Receptor Agonist Utilizing a Fluorescence Polarization Based High Throughput Assay

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yiyi; Zang, Zhihe; Zhong, Ling; Wu, Min; Su, Qing; Gao, Xiurong; Zan, Wang; Lin, Dong; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Zhonglin

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin, the adipose-derived hormone, plays an important role in the suppression of metabolic disorders that can result in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. It has been shown that up-regulation of adiponectin or adiponectin receptor has a number of therapeutic benefits. Given that it is hard to convert the full size adiponectin protein into a viable drug, adiponectin receptor agonists could be designed or identified using high-throughput screening. Here, we report on the development of a two-step screening process to identify adiponectin agonists. First step, we developed a high throughput screening assay based on fluorescence polarization to identify adiponectin ligands. The fluorescence polarization assay reported here could be adapted to screening against larger small molecular compound libraries. A natural product library containing 10,000 compounds was screened and 9 hits were selected for validation. These compounds have been taken for the second-step in vitro tests to confirm their agonistic activity. The most active adiponectin receptor 1 agonists are matairesinol, arctiin, (-)-arctigenin and gramine. The most active adiponectin receptor 2 agonists are parthenolide, taxifoliol, deoxyschizandrin, and syringin. These compounds may be useful drug candidates for hypoadiponectin related diseases. PMID:23691032

  16. Fully automatized high-throughput enzyme library screening using a robotic platform.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Mark; Fibinger, Michael P C; Last, Daniel; Schmidt, Sandy; Santos-Aberturas, Javier; Böttcher, Dominique; Hummel, Anke; Vickers, Clare; Voss, Moritz; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2016-07-01

    A fully automatized robotic platform has been established to facilitate high-throughput screening for protein engineering purposes. This platform enables proper monitoring and control of growth conditions in the microtiter plate format to ensure precise enzyme production for the interrogation of enzyme mutant libraries, protein stability tests and multiple assay screenings. The performance of this system has been exemplified for four enzyme classes important for biocatalysis such as Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase, transaminase, dehalogenase and acylase in the high-throughput screening of various mutant libraries. This allowed the identification of novel enzyme variants in a sophisticated and highly reliable manner. Furthermore, the detailed optimization protocols should enable other researchers to adapt and improve their methods. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1421-1432. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Hypothesis testing in high-throughput screening for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Prummer, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Following the success of small-molecule high-throughput screening (HTS) in drug discovery, other large-scale screening techniques are currently revolutionizing the biological sciences. Powerful new statistical tools have been developed to analyze the vast amounts of data in DNA chip studies, but have not yet found their way into compound screening. In HTS, characterization of single-point hit lists is often done only in retrospect after the results of confirmation experiments are available. However, for prioritization, for optimal use of resources, for quality control, and for comparison of screens it would be extremely valuable to predict the rates of false positives and false negatives directly from the primary screening results. Making full use of the available information about compounds and controls contained in HTS results and replicated pilot runs, the Z score and from it the p value can be estimated for each measurement. Based on this consideration, we have applied the concept of p-value distribution analysis (PVDA), which was originally developed for gene expression studies, to HTS data. PVDA allowed prediction of all relevant error rates as well as the rate of true inactives, and excellent agreement with confirmation experiments was found.

  18. A High-throughput Fluorescence Polarization Assay for Inhibitors of Gyrase B

    PubMed Central

    GLASER, BRYAN T.; MALERICH, JEREMIAH P.; DUELLMAN, SARAH J.; FONG, JULIE; HUTSON, CHRISTOPHER; FINE, RICHARD M.; KEBLANSKY, BORIS; TANGA, MARY J.; MADRID, PETER B.

    2011-01-01

    DNA gyrase, a type II topoisomerase that introduces negative supercoils into DNA, is a validated antibacterial drug target. The holoenzyme is composed of 2 subunits, gyrase A (GyrA) and gyrase B (GyrB), which form a functional A2B2 heterotetramer required for bacterial viability. A novel fluorescence polarization (FP) assay has been developed and optimized to detect inhibitors that bind to the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding domain of GyrB. Guided by the crystal structure of the natural product novobiocin bound to GyrB, a novel novobiocin–Texas Red probe (Novo-TRX) was designed and synthesized for use in a high-throughput FP assay. The binding kinetics of the interaction of Novo-TRX with GyrB from Francisella tularensis has been characterized, as well as the effect of common buffer additives on the interaction. The assay was developed into a 21-μL, 384-well assay format and has been validated for use in high-throughput screening against a collection of Food and Drug Administration–approved compounds. The assay performed with an average Z′ factor of 0.80 and was able to identify GyrB inhibitors from a screening library. PMID:21245469

  19. A high throughput mechanical screening device for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Hou, Chieh; Meloni, Gregory R; Cosgrove, Brian D; Dodge, George R; Mauck, Robert L

    2014-06-27

    Articular cartilage enables efficient and near-frictionless load transmission, but suffers from poor inherent healing capacity. As such, cartilage tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking both compositional and mechanical properties of native tissue in order to provide effective repair materials for the treatment of damaged or degenerated joint surfaces. However, given the large number design parameters available (e.g. cell sources, scaffold designs, and growth factors), it is difficult to conduct combinatorial experiments of engineered cartilage. This is particularly exacerbated when mechanical properties are a primary outcome, given the long time required for testing of individual samples. High throughput screening is utilized widely in the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly and cost-effectively assess the effects of thousands of compounds for therapeutic discovery. Here we adapted this approach to develop a high throughput mechanical screening (HTMS) system capable of measuring the mechanical properties of up to 48 materials simultaneously. The HTMS device was validated by testing various biomaterials and engineered cartilage constructs and by comparing the HTMS results to those derived from conventional single sample compression tests. Further evaluation showed that the HTMS system was capable of distinguishing and identifying 'hits', or factors that influence the degree of tissue maturation. Future iterations of this device will focus on reducing data variability, increasing force sensitivity and range, as well as scaling-up to even larger (96-well) formats. This HTMS device provides a novel tool for cartilage tissue engineering, freeing experimental design from the limitations of mechanical testing throughput. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. A high-throughput ligand competition binding assay for the androgen receptor and other nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Féau, Clémentine; Arnold, Leggy A; Kosinski, Aaron; Guy, R Kiplin

    2009-01-01

    Standardized, automated ligand-binding assays facilitate evaluation of endocrine activities of environmental chemicals and identification of antagonists of nuclear receptor ligands. Many current assays rely on fluorescently labeled ligands that are significantly different from the native ligands. The authors describe a radiolabeled ligand competition scintillation proximity assay (SPA) for the androgen receptor (AR) using Ni-coated 384-well FlashPlates and liganded AR-LBD protein. This highly reproducible, low-cost assay is well suited for automated high-throughput screening. In addition, the authors show that this assay can be adapted to measure ligand affinities for other nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor gamma, thyroid receptors alpha and beta).

  1. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert; Gagnon, David; Gjoerup, Ole; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2014-11-15

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. - Highlights: • Development of a high-throughput screening assay for JCV DNA replication using C33A cells. • Evidence that T-ag fails to accumulate in the nuclei of established glioma cell lines. • Evidence that NF-1 directly promotes JCV DNA replication in C33A cells. • Proof-of-concept that the HTS assay can be used to identify pharmacological inhibitor of JCV DNA replication.

  2. Peptoid Library Agar Diffusion (PLAD) Assay for the High-Throughput Identification of Antimicrobial Peptoids.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Kevin J; Turkett, Jeremy A; Corson, Ashley E; Bicker, Kevin L

    2016-06-13

    Rapid emergence of antimicrobial resistant organisms necessitates equally rapid methods for the development of new antimicrobial compounds. Of recent interest have been mimics of antimicrobial peptides known as antimicrobial peptoids, which exhibit similar potency to the former but with improved proteolytic stability. Presented herein is a high-throughput method to screen libraries of antimicrobial peptoids immobilized on beads embedded into solid media. Termed the peptoid library agar diffusion (PLAD) assay, this assay allows for individual chemical manipulation of two identical peptoid strands. One strand can be released to diffuse out from a solid support bead and interact with the microorganism during screening. The other strand can be cleaved after screening from beads showing strong antimicrobial activity and analyzed by mass spectrometry to deconvolute the structure of the peptoid. This method was applied to a small library of peptoids to identify an antimicrobial peptoid with modest efficacy against the ESKAPE pathogens.

  3. Application of high-throughput affinity-selection mass spectrometry for screening of chemical compound libraries in lead discovery.

    PubMed

    Zehender, Hartmut; Mayr, Lorenz M

    2007-02-01

    High-throughput screening of chemical libraries for compounds that interfere with a particular molecular target is among the most powerful methodologies applied in lead discovery at present. In this review, the authors describe a label-free, homogeneous, affinity-selection-based technology developed at Novartis, termed SpeedScreen, which is compared with similar technologies used for high-throughput screening in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. The focus at present of SpeedScreen is twofold: first, this technology is applied to orphan genomic targets and to those targets that are non-tractable by a functional assay; second, this technology is applied complementary to the well-established traditional methodologies for the screening of molecular targets. In summary, the authors discuss the value of affinity-selection-based high-throughput screening as a complementary technology to the common functional screening platforms and the benefits as well as the limitations of this new technology are outlined.

  4. From Classical to High Throughput Screening Methods for Feruloyl Esterases: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Velasco, Lorena; Armendáriz-Ruiz, Mariana; Rodríguez-González, Jorge Alberto; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Asaff-Torres, Ali; Mateos-Díaz, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Feruloyl esterases (FAEs) are a diverse group of hydrolases widely distributed in plants and microorganisms which catalyzes the cleavage and formation of ester bonds between plant cell wall polysaccharides and phenolic acids. FAEs have gained importance in biofuel, medicine and food industries due to their capability of acting on a large range of substrates for cleaving ester bonds and synthesizing highadded value molecules through esterification and transesterification reactions. During the past two decades extensive studies have been carried out on the production, characterization and classification of FAEs, however only a few reports of suitable High Throughput Screening assays for this kind of enzymes have been reported. This review is focused on a concise but complete revision of classical to High Throughput Screening methods for FAEs, highlighting its advantages and disadvantages, and finally suggesting future perspectives for this important research field.

  5. High-throughput receptor-based assay for the detection of spirolides by chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Laura P; Vilariño, Natalia; Molgó, Jordi; Aráoz, Rómulo; Botana, Luis M

    2013-12-01

    The spirolides are marine toxins that belong to a new class of macrocyclic imines produced by dinoflagellates. In this study a previously described solid-phase receptor-based assay for the detection of spirolides was optimized for high-throughput screening and prevalidated. This method is based on the competition between 13-desmethyl spirolide C and biotin-α-bungarotoxin immobilized on a streptavidin-coated surface, for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In this inhibition assay the amount of nAChR bound to the well surface is quantified using a specific antibody, followed by a second anti-mouse IgG antibody labeled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The assay protocol was optimized for 384-well microplates, which allowed a reduction of the amount of reagents per sample and an increase of the number of samples per plate versus previously published receptor-based assays. The sensitivity of the assay for 13-desmethyl spirolide C ranged from 5 to 150 ng mL(-1). The performance of the assay in scallop extracts was adequate, with an estimated detection limit for 13-desmethyl spirolide C of 50 μg kg(-1) of shellfish meat. The recovery rate of 13-desmethyl spirolide C for spiked samples with this assay was 80% and the inter-assay coefficient of variation was 8%. This 384-well microplate, chemiluminescence method can be used as a high-throughput screening assay to detect 13-desmethyl spirolide C in shellfish meat in order to reduce the number of samples to be processed through bioassays or analytical methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Multi-enzyme Screening Using a High-throughput Genetic Enzyme Screening System.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haseong; Kwon, Kil Koang; Seong, Wonjae; Lee, Seung-Goo

    2016-08-08

    The recent development of a high-throughput single-cell assay technique enables the screening of novel enzymes based on functional activities from a large-scale metagenomic library(1). We previously proposed a genetic enzyme screening system (GESS) that uses dimethylphenol regulator activated by phenol or p-nitrophenol. Since a vast amount of natural enzymatic reactions produce these phenolic compounds from phenol deriving substrates, this single genetic screening system can be theoretically applied to screen over 200 different enzymes in the BRENDA database. Despite the general applicability of GESS, applying the screening process requires a specific procedure to reach the maximum flow cytometry signals. Here, we detail the developed screening process, which includes metagenome preprocessing with GESS and the operation of a flow cytometry sorter. Three different phenolic substrates (p-nitrophenyl acetate, p-nitrophenyl-β-D-cellobioside, and phenyl phosphate) with GESS were used to screen and to identify three different enzymes (lipase, cellulase, and alkaline phosphatase), respectively. The selected metagenomic enzyme activities were confirmed only with the flow cytometry but DNA sequencing and diverse in vitro analysis can be used for further gene identification.

  7. High-throughput screening of solid-state catalyst libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkan, Selim M.

    1998-07-01

    Combinatorial synthesis methods allow the rapid preparation and processing of large libraries of solid-state materials. The use of these methods, together with the appropriate screening techniques, has recently led to the discovery of materials with promising superconducting, magnetoresistive, luminescent and dielectric properties. Solid-state catalysts, which play an increasingly important role in the chemical and oil industries, represent another class of material amenable to combinatorial synthesis. Yet typically, catalyst discovery still involves inefficient trial-and-error processes, because catalytic activity is inherently difficult to screen. In contrast to superconductivity, magnetoresistivity and dielectric properties, which can be tested by contact probes, or luminescence, which can be observed directly, the assessment of catalytic activity requires the unambiguous detection of a specific product molecule above a small catalyst site on a large library. Screening by in situ infrared thermography and microprobe sampling mass spectrometry, have been suggested, but the first method, while probing activity, provides no information on reaction products, whereas the second is difficult to implement because it requires the transport of minute gas samples from each library site to the detection system. Here I describe the use of laser-induced resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization for sensitive, selective and high-throughput screening of a library of solid-state catalysts that activate the dehydrogenation of cyclohexane to benzene. I show that benzene, the product molecule, can be selectively photoionized in the vicinity of the catalytic sites, and that the detection of the resultant photoions by an array of microelectrodes provides information on the activity of individual sites. Adaptation of this technique for the screening of other catalytic reactions and larger libraries with smaller site size seems feasible, thus opening up the possibility of exploiting

  8. Total Synthesis of Dansylated Park's Nucleotide for High-Throughput MraY Assays.

    PubMed

    Wohnig, Stephanie; Spork, Anatol P; Koppermann, Stefan; Mieskes, Gottfried; Gisch, Nicolas; Jahn, Reinhard; Ducho, Christian

    2016-12-05

    The membrane protein translocase I (MraY) is a key enzyme in bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis. It is therefore frequently discussed as a target for the development of novel antibiotics. The screening of compound libraries for the identification of MraY inhibitors is enabled by an established fluorescence-based MraY assay. However, this assay requires a dansylated derivative of the bacterial biosynthetic intermediate Park's nucleotide as the MraY substrate. Isolation of Park's nucleotide from bacteria and subsequent dansylation only furnishes limited amounts of this substrate, thus hampering the high-throughput screening for MraY inhibitors. Accordingly, the efficient provision of dansylated Park's nucleotide is a major bottleneck in the exploration of this promising drug target. In this work, we present the first total synthesis of dansylated Park's nucleotide, affording an unprecedented amount of the target compound for high-throughput MraY assays. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Silicon microphysiometer for high-throughput drug screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, Katarina; Baert, Christiaan; Puers, Bob; Sansen, Willy; Simaels, Jeannine; Van Driessche, Veerle; Hermans, Lou; Mertens, Robert P.

    1999-06-01

    We report on a micromachined silicon chip that is capable of providing a high-throughput functional assay based on calorimetry. A prototype twin microcalorimeter based on the Seebeck effect has been fabricated by IC technology and micromachined postprocessing techniques. A biocompatible liquid rubber membrane supports two identical 0.5 X 2 cm2 measurement chambers, situated at the cold and hot junction of a 666-junction aluminum/p+-polysilicon thermopile. The chambers can house up to 106 eukaryotic cells cultured to confluence. The advantage of the device over microcalorimeters on the market, is the integration of the measurement channels on chip, rendering microvolume reaction vessels, ranging from 10 to 600 (mu) l, in the closest possible contact with the thermopile sensor (no springs are needed). Power and temperature sensitivity of the sensor are 23 V/W and 130 mV/K, respectively. The small thermal inertia of the microchannels results in the short response time of 70 s, when filled with 50 (mu) l of water. Biological experiments were done with cultured kidney cells of Xenopus laevis (A6). The thermal equilibration time of the device is 45 min. Stimulation of transport mechanisms by reducing bath osmolality by 50% increased metabolism by 20%. Our results show that it is feasible to apply this large-area, small- volume whole-cell biosensor for drug discovery, where the binding assays that are commonly used to provide high- throughput need to be complemented with a functional assay. Solutions are brought onto the sensor by a simple pipette, making the use of an industrial microtiterplate dispenser feasible on a nx96-array of the microcalorimeter biosensor. Such an array of biosensors has been designed based on a new set of requirements as set forth by people in the field as this project moved on. The results obtained from the prototype large-area sensor were used to obtain an accurate model of the calorimeter, checked for by the simulation software ANSYS. At

  10. High-throughput screening and biophysical interrogation of hepatotropic AAV.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Samuel L; Bhagwat, Anand; Edmonson, Shyrie; Zhou, Shangzhen; High, Katherine A

    2008-12-01

    We set out to analyze the fundamental biological differences between AAV2 and AAV8 that may contribute to their different performances in vivo. High-throughput protein interaction screens were used to identify binding partners for each serotype. Of the >8,000 proteins probed, 115 and 134 proteins were identified that interact with AAV2 and AAV8, respectively. Notably, 76 of these protein interactions were shared between the two serotypes. CDK2/cyclinA kinase was identified as a binding partner for both serotypes in the screen. Subsequent analysis confirmed direct binding of CDK2/cyclinA by AAV2 and AAV8. Inhibition of CDK2/cyclinA resulted in increased levels of vector transduction. Biophysical study of vector particle stability and genome uncoating demonstrated slightly greater thermostability for AAV8 than for AAV2. Heat-induced genome uncoating occurred at the same temperature as particle degradation, suggesting that these two processes may be intrinsically related for adeno-associated virus (AAV). Together, these analyses provide insight into commonalities and divergences in the biology of functionally distinct hepatotropic AAV serotypes.

  11. New high throughput screening method for drug release measurements.

    PubMed

    Pelczarska, Aleksandra; Delie, Florence; Domańska, Urszula; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Martel, Sophie

    2013-09-01

    In the field of drug delivery systems, microparticles made of polymeric matrix appear as an attractive approach. The in vitro release kinetic profile is crucial information when developing new particulate formulations. These data are essential for batch to batch comparison, quality control as well as for anticipation of in vivo behavior to select the best formulation to go further in preclinical investigations. The methods available present common drawbacks such as the time- and compound-consumption that does not fit with formulation screening requirements in early development stages. In this study, a new microscale high throughput screening (HTS) method has been developed to investigate drug release kinetic from piroxicam-loaded polylactic acid (PLA) and polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microparticles. The method is a sample- and separation-based method where separation is performed by filtration using 96-well micro filter plates. 96 experiments can therefore be performed on one plate in one time in a fully automated way and with a very low sample and particle consumption. The influence of different parameters controlling release profiles was also investigated using this technique. The HTS method gave the same release profile than the standard dialysis method. Shaking, particle concentration, and the nature of the release medium were found to be of influence. The HTS method appears as a reliable method to evaluate drug release from particles with smaller standard deviation and less consumption of material.

  12. High-throughput screening and optimization of photoembossed relief structures.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nico; De Gans, Berend-Jan; Kozodaev, Dimitri; Sanchez, Carlos; Bastiaansen, Cees W M; Broer, Dirk J; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2006-01-01

    A methodology for the rapid design, screening, and optimization of coating systems with surface relief structures, using a combination of statistical experimental design, high-throughput experimentation, data mining, and graphical and mathematical optimization routines was developed. The methodology was applied to photopolymers used in photoembossing applications. A library of 72 films was prepared by dispensing a given amount of sample onto a chemically patterned substrate consisting of hydrophilic areas separated by fluorinated hydrophobic barriers. Film composition and film processing conditions were determined using statistical experimental design. The surface topology of the films was characterized by automated AFM. Subsequently, models explaining the dependence of surface topologies on sample composition and processing parameters were developed and used for screening a virtual 4000-membered in silico library of photopolymer lacquers. Simple graphical optimization or Pareto algorithms were subsequently used to find an ensemble of formulations, which were optimal with respect to a predefined set of properties, such as aspect ratio and shape of the relief structures.

  13. High-throughput optical screening of cellular mechanotransduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Jonathan L.; Luo, Justin C.; Ma, Huan; Botvinick, Elliot; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-09-01

    We introduce an optical platform for rapid, high-throughput screening of exogenous molecules that affect cellular mechanotransduction. Our method initiates mechanotransduction in adherent cells using single laser-microbeam generated microcavitation bubbles without requiring flow chambers or microfluidics. These microcavitation bubbles expose adherent cells to a microtsunami, a transient microscale burst of hydrodynamic shear stress, which stimulates cells over areas approaching 1 mm2. We demonstrate microtsunami-initiated mechanosignalling in primary human endothelial cells. This observed signalling is consistent with G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation, resulting in Ca2+ release by the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, we demonstrate the dose-dependent modulation of microtsunami-induced Ca2+ signalling by introducing a known inhibitor to this pathway. The imaging of Ca2+ signalling and its modulation by exogenous molecules demonstrates the capacity to initiate and assess cellular mechanosignalling in real time. We utilize this capability to screen the effects of a set of small molecules on cellular mechanotransduction in 96-well plates using standard imaging cytometry.

  14. High-Throughput Screening of Myometrial Calcium-Mobilization to Identify Modulators of Uterine Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Herington, Jennifer L.; Swale, Daniel R.; Brown, Naoko; Shelton, Elaine L.; Choi, Hyehun; Williams, Charles H.; Hong, Charles C.; Paria, Bibhash C.; Denton, Jerod S.; Reese, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The uterine myometrium (UT-myo) is a therapeutic target for preterm labor, labor induction, and postpartum hemorrhage. Stimulation of intracellular Ca2+-release in UT-myo cells by oxytocin is a final pathway controlling myometrial contractions. The goal of this study was to develop a dual-addition assay for high-throughput screening of small molecular compounds, which could regulate Ca2+-mobilization in UT-myo cells, and hence, myometrial contractions. Primary murine UT-myo cells in 384-well plates were loaded with a Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent probe, and then screened for inducers of Ca2+-mobilization and inhibitors of oxytocin-induced Ca2+-mobilization. The assay exhibited robust screening statistics (Z´ = 0.73), DMSO-tolerance, and was validated for high-throughput screening against 2,727 small molecules from the Spectrum, NIH Clinical I and II collections of well-annotated compounds. The screen revealed a hit-rate of 1.80% for agonist and 1.39% for antagonist compounds. Concentration-dependent responses of hit-compounds demonstrated an EC50 less than 10μM for 21 hit-antagonist compounds, compared to only 7 hit-agonist compounds. Subsequent studies focused on hit-antagonist compounds. Based on the percent inhibition and functional annotation analyses, we selected 4 confirmed hit-antagonist compounds (benzbromarone, dipyridamole, fenoterol hydrobromide and nisoldipine) for further analysis. Using an ex vivo isometric contractility assay, each compound significantly inhibited uterine contractility, at different potencies (IC50). Overall, these results demonstrate for the first time that high-throughput small-molecules screening of myometrial Ca2+-mobilization is an ideal primary approach for discovering modulators of uterine contractility. PMID:26600013

  15. NanoStore: a concept for logistical improvements of compound handling in high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Benson, Neil; Boyd, Helen F; Everett, Jeremy R; Fries, Joachim; Gribbon, Philip; Haque, Nuzrul; Henco, Karsten; Jessen, Timm; Martin, William H; Mathewson, Travis J; Sharp, R Eryl; Spencer, Robin W; Stuhmeier, Frank; Wallace, Mark S; Winkler, Dirk

    2005-09-01

    Small molecule screening, the systematic encounter of biology space with chemical space, has provoked the emergence of a whole industry that recreates itself by constant iterative improvements to this process. The authors describe an approach to tackle the problem for one of the most time-consuming steps in the execution of a screening campaign, namely, the reformatting of high-throughput screening test compounds from master plates to daughter assay plates used in the execution of the screen. Through an engineered storage procedure, they prepare plates ahead of the screening process with the respective compounds in a ready-to-use format. They show the biological inertness of the method and how it facilitates efficient recovery of compound activity. This uncoupling of normally interconnected processes provides time and compound savings, avoids repeated freeze-thaw cycles of compound solutions, and removes the problems associated with the DMSO sensitivity of certain assays types.

  16. A High Throughput Scintillation Proximity Imaging Assay for Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, Glorymar; Shum, David; Blum, Gil; Bhinder, Bhavneet; Radu, Constantin; Antczak, Christophe; Luo, Minkui; Djaballah, Hakim

    2013-01-01

    Protein methyltransferases (PMTs) orchestrate epigenetic modifications through post-translational methylation of various protein substrates including histones. Since dysregulation of this process is widely implicated in many cancers, it is of pertinent interest to screen inhibitors of PMTs, as they offer novel target-based opportunities to discover small molecules with potential chemotherapeutic use. We have thus developed an enzymatic screening strategy, which can be adapted to scintillation proximity imaging assay (SPIA) format, to identify these inhibitors. We took advantage of S-adenosyl-L-[3H-methyl]-methionine availability and monitored the enzymatically catalyzed [3H]-methyl addition on lysine residues of biotinylated peptide substrates. The radiolabeled peptides were subsequently captured by streptavidin coated SPA imaging PS beads. We applied this strategy to four PMTs: SET7/9, SET8, SETD2, and EuHMTase1, and optimized assay conditions to achieve Z′ values ranging from 0.48 to 0.91. The robust performance of this SPIA for the four PMTs was validated in a pilot screen of approximately 7,000 compounds. We identified 80 cumulative hits across the four targets. NF279, a suramin analogue found to specifically inhibit SET7/9 and SETD2 with IC50 values of 1.9 and 1.1 μM, respectively. Another identified compound, Merbromin, a topical antiseptic, was classified as a pan-active inhibitor of the four PMTs. These findings demonstrate that our proposed SPIA strategy is generic for multiple PMTs and can be successfully implemented to identify novel and specific inhibitors of PMTs. The specific PMT inhibitors may constitute a new class of anti-proliferative agents for potential therapeutic use. PMID:22256970

  17. High-throughput screening method for lipases/esterases.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Díaz, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Jorge Alberto; de Los Ángeles Camacho-Ruiz, María; Mateos-Díaz, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) methods for lipases and esterases are generally performed by using synthetic chromogenic substrates (e.g., p-nitrophenyl, resorufin, and umbelliferyl esters) which may be misleading since they are not their natural substrates (e.g., partially or insoluble triglycerides). In previous works, we have shown that soluble nonchromogenic substrates and p-nitrophenol (as a pH indicator) can be used to quantify the hydrolysis and estimate the substrate selectivity of lipases and esterases from several sources. However, in order to implement a spectrophotometric HTS method using partially or insoluble triglycerides, it is necessary to find particular conditions which allow a quantitative detection of the enzymatic activity. In this work, we used Triton X-100, CHAPS, and N-lauroyl sarcosine as emulsifiers, β-cyclodextrin as a fatty acid captor, and two substrate concentrations, 1 mM of tributyrin (TC4) and 5 mM of trioctanoin (TC8), to improve the test conditions. To demonstrate the utility of this method, we screened 12 enzymes (commercial preparations and culture broth extracts) for the hydrolysis of TC4 and TC8, which are both classical substrates for lipases and esterases (for esterases, only TC4 may be hydrolyzed). Subsequent pH-stat experiments were performed to confirm the preference of substrate hydrolysis with the hydrolases tested. We have shown that this method is very useful for screening a high number of lipases (hydrolysis of TC4 and TC8) or esterases (only hydrolysis of TC4) from wild isolates or variants generated by directed evolution using nonchromogenic triglycerides directly in the test.

  18. Institutional Profile: The Sheffield RNAi screening facility: a service for high-throughput, genome-wide Drosophila RNAi screens.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen

    2010-12-01

    The Sheffield RNAi Screening Facility (SRSF) was established in November 2008, as Britain's first Drosophila RNAi screening centre, funded by the University of Sheffield, Biomedical Sciences Department and the Wellcome Trust. The SRSF was formed to service the needs of research groups wanting to carry out high-throughput RNAi screens with Drosophila cells. The rationale for the SRSF is to provide RNAi libraries and the specialist equipment and expertise to do such screens. The facility supports both plate reader assays, high-content microscopy as well as the equipment needed to process these samples in a high-throughput fashion. The SRSF can either be used to identify genes involved in disease representing future drug targets, or to identify genes involved in drug resistance and efficacy.

  19. High-throughput microtitre plate-based assay for DNA topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James A; Burton, Nicolas P; Maxwell, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a rapid, high-throughput assay for measuring the catalytic activity (DNA supercoiling or relaxation) of DNA topoisomerases. The assay utilizes intermolecular triplex formation between an immobilized triplex-forming oligo (TFO) and a triplex-forming region inserted into the plasmid substrate (pNO1), and capitalizes on the observation that supercoiled DNA forms triplexes more readily than relaxed DNA. Thus, supercoiled DNA is preferentially retained by the TFO under triplex-forming conditions while relaxed DNA can be washed away. Due to its high speed of sample analysis and reduced sample handling over conventional gel-based techniques, this assay can be used to screen chemical libraries for novel inhibitors of topoisomerases.

  20. Application of High-Throughput In Vitro Assays for Risk-Based ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Multiple drivers shape the types of human-health assessments performed on chemicals by U.S. EPA resulting in chemical assessments are “fit-for-purpose” ranging from prioritization for further testing to full risk assessments. Layered on top of the diverse assessment needs are the resource intensive nature of traditional toxicological studies used to test chemicals and the lack of toxicity information on many chemicals. To address these challenges, the Agency initiated the ToxCast program to screen thousands of chemicals across hundreds of high-throughput screening assays in concentrations-response format. One of the findings of the project has been that the majority of chemicals interact with multiple biological targets within a narrow concentration range and the extent of interactions increases rapidly near the concentration causing cytotoxicity. This means that application of high-throughput in vitro assays to chemical assessments will need to identify both the relative selectivity at chemicals interact with biological targets and the concentration at which these interactions perturb signaling pathways. The integrated analyses will be used to both define a point-of-departure for comparison with human exposure estimates and identify which chemicals may benefit from further studies in a mode-of-action or adverse outcome pathway framework. The application of new technologies in a risk-based, tiered manner provides flexibility in matching throughput and cos

  1. High throughput fluorescence polarization assay to identify inhibitors of Cbl(TKB)-PTK interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Eric A.; Charvet, Casey D.; Lokesh, G. L.; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2011-01-01

    The Casitas-B-lineage Lymphoma (Cbl) proteins play an important role in regulating signal transduction pathways by functioning as E3-ubiquitin ligases. The Cbl proteins contain a conserved tyrosine kinase binding (TKB) domain that bind over a dozen proteins, including protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in a phosphorylation dependent manner. The cell surface expression levels of the PTKs are regulated by Cbl-mediated ubiquitination, internalization, and degradation. Dysfunction in this signaling cascade has resulted in prolonged activation of the PTKs and therefore implicated in inflammatory diseases and various cancers. Due to this negative regulatory function, Cbl has been largely ignored as a therapeutic target. However recent studies such as the identification of (a) gain of function c-Cbl mutations in subsets of myeloid cancer and (b) c-Cbl as a prostate basal cell marker that correlates with poor clinical outcome, suggests otherwise. Here we report the development of a competitive high throughput fluorescence polarization assay in a 384-well format to identify inhibitors of Cbl(TKB). The high throughput screen (HTS) readiness of the assay was demonstrated by screening the Prestwick chemical library®. PMID:21129358

  2. Adaptation to high throughput batch chromatography enhances multivariate screening.

    PubMed

    Barker, Gregory A; Calzada, Joseph; Herzer, Sibylle; Rieble, Siegfried

    2015-09-01

    High throughput process development offers unique approaches to explore complex process design spaces with relatively low material consumption. Batch chromatography is one technique that can be used to screen chromatographic conditions in a 96-well plate. Typical batch chromatography workflows examine variations in buffer conditions or comparison of multiple resins in a given process, as opposed to the assessment of protein loading conditions in combination with other factors. A modification to the batch chromatography paradigm is described here where experimental planning, programming, and a staggered loading approach increase the multivariate space that can be explored with a liquid handling system. The iterative batch chromatography (IBC) approach is described, which treats every well in a 96-well plate as an individual experiment, wherein protein loading conditions can be varied alongside other factors such as wash and elution buffer conditions. As all of these factors are explored in the same experiment, the interactions between them are characterized and the number of follow-up confirmatory experiments is reduced. This in turn improves statistical power and throughput. Two examples of the IBC method are shown and the impact of the load conditions are assessed in combination with the other factors explored. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Advances in High Throughput Screening of Biomass Recalcitrance (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, G. B.; Decker, S. R.; Tucker, M. P.; Law, C.; Doeppke, C.; Sykes, R. W.; Davis, M. F.; Ziebell, A.

    2012-06-01

    This was a poster displayed at the Symposium. Advances on previous high throughput screening of biomass recalcitrance methods have resulted in improved conversion and replicate precision. Changes in plate reactor metallurgy, improved preparation of control biomass, species-specific pretreatment conditions, and enzymatic hydrolysis parameters have reduced overall coefficients of variation to an average of 6% for sample replicates. These method changes have improved plate-to-plate variation of control biomass recalcitrance and improved confidence in sugar release differences between samples. With smaller errors plant researchers can have a higher degree of assurance more low recalcitrance candidates can be identified. Significant changes in plate reactor, control biomass preparation, pretreatment conditions and enzyme have significantly reduced sample and control replicate variability. Reactor plate metallurgy significantly impacts sugar release aluminum leaching into reaction during pretreatment degrades sugars and inhibits enzyme activity. Removal of starch and extractives significantly decreases control biomass variability. New enzyme formulations give more consistent and higher conversion levels, however required re-optimization for switchgrass. Pretreatment time and temperature (severity) should be adjusted to specific biomass types i.e. woody vs. herbaceous. Desalting of enzyme preps to remove low molecular weight stabilizers and improved conversion levels likely due to water activity impacts on enzyme structure and substrate interactions not attempted here due to need to continually desalt and validate precise enzyme concentration and activity.

  4. Adaptation of NS cells growth and differentiation to high-throughput screening-compatible plates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need of neuronal cell models to be applied to high-throughput screening settings while recapitulating physiological and/or pathological events occurring in the Central Nervous System (CNS). Stem cells offer a great opportunity in this direction since their self renewal capacity allows for large scale expansion. Protocols for directed differentiation also promise to generate populations of biochemically homogenous neuronal progenies. NS (Neural Stem) cells are a novel population of stem cells that undergo symmetric cell division in monolayer and chemically defined media, while remaining highly neurogenic. Results We report the full adaptation of the NS cell systems for their growth and neuronal differentiation to 96- and 384-well microplates. This optimized system has also been exploited in homogeneous and high-content assays. Conclusions Our results show that these mouse NS cells may be suitable for a series of applications in high-throughput format. PMID:20085655

  5. High-throughput screening of microchip-synthesized genes in programmable double-emulsion droplets.

    PubMed

    Chan, H F; Ma, S; Tian, J; Leong, K W

    2017-03-09

    The rapid advances in synthetic biology and biotechnology are increasingly demanding high-throughput screening technology, such as screening of the functionalities of synthetic genes for optimization of protein expression. Compartmentalization of single cells in water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion droplets allows screening of a vast number of individualized assays, and recent advances in automated microfluidic devices further help realize the potential of droplet technology for high-throughput screening. However these single-emulsion droplets are incompatible with aqueous phase analysis and the inner droplet environment cannot easily communicate with the external phase. We present a high-throughput, miniaturized screening platform for microchip-synthesized genes using microfluidics-generated water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) double emulsion (DE) droplets that overcome these limitations. Synthetic gene variants of fluorescent proteins are synthesized with a custom-built microarray inkjet synthesizer, which are then screened for expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. Bacteria bearing individual fluorescent gene variants are encapsulated as single cells into DE droplets where fluorescence signals are enhanced by 100 times within 24 h of proliferation. Enrichment of functionally-correct genes by employing an error correction method is demonstrated by screening DE droplets containing fluorescent clones of bacteria with the red fluorescent protein (rfp) gene. Permeation of isopropyl β-d-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) through the thin oil layer from the external solution initiates target gene expression. The induced expression of the synthetic fluorescent proteins from at least ∼100 bacteria per droplet generates detectable fluorescence signals to enable fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of the intact droplets. This technology obviates time- and labor-intensive cell culture typically required in conventional bulk experiment.

  6. A high-throughput chemical screen for resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Karl; Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Peek, James; Desveaux, Darrell

    2008-05-01

    The study of plant pathogenesis and the development of effective treatments to protect plants from diseases could be greatly facilitated by a high-throughput pathosystem to evaluate small-molecule libraries for inhibitors of pathogen virulence. The interaction between the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas syringae and Arabidopsis thaliana is a model for plant pathogenesis. However, a robust high-throughput assay to score the outcome of this interaction is currently lacking. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis seedlings incubated with P. syringae in liquid culture display a macroscopically visible 'bleaching' symptom within 5 days of infection. Bleaching is associated with a loss of chlorophyll from cotyledonary tissues, and is correlated with bacterial virulence. Gene-for-gene resistance is absent in the liquid environment, possibly because of the suppression of the hypersensitive response under these conditions. Importantly, bleaching can be prevented by treating seedlings with known inducers of plant defence, such as salicylic acid (SA) or a basal defence-inducing peptide of bacterial flagellin (flg22) prior to inoculation. Based on these observations, we have devised a high-throughput liquid assay using standard 96-well plates to investigate the P. syringae-Arabidopsis interaction. An initial screen of small molecules active on Arabidopsis revealed a family of sulfanilamide compounds that afford protection against the bleaching symptom. The most active compound, sulfamethoxazole, also reduced in planta bacterial growth when applied to mature soil-grown plants. The whole-organism liquid assay provides a novel approach to probe chemical libraries in a high-throughput manner for compounds that reduce bacterial virulence in plants.

  7. A high throughput fluorescent assay for measuring the activity of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Kage, Karen L; Richardson, Paul L; Traphagen, Linda; Severin, Jean; Pereda-Lopez, Ana; Lubben, Thomas; Davis-Taber, Rachel; Vos, Melissa H; Bartley, Diane; Walter, Karl; Harlan, John; Solomon, Larry; Warrior, Usha; Holzman, Thomas F; Faltynek, Connie; Surowy, Carol S; Scott, Victoria E

    2007-03-30

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is the enzyme responsible for the rapid degradation of fatty acid amides such as the endocannabinoid anandamide. Inhibition of FAAH activity has been suggested as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of chronic pain, depression and anxiety, through local activation of the cannabinoid receptor CB1. We have developed a high throughput screening assay for identification of FAAH inhibitors using a novel substrate, decanoyl 7-amino-4-methyl coumarin (D-AMC) that is cleaved by FAAH to release decanoic acid and the highly fluorescent molecule 7-amino-4-methyl coumarin (AMC). This assay gives an excellent signal window for measuring FAAH activity and, as a continuous assay, inherently offers improved sensitivity and accuracy over previously reported endpoint assays. The assay was validated using a panel of known FAAH inhibitors and purified recombinant human FAAH, then converted to a 384 well format and used to screen a large library of compounds (>600,000 compounds) to identify FAAH inhibitors. This screen identified numerous novel FAAH inhibitors of diverse chemotypes. These hits confirmed using a native FAAH substrate, anandamide, and had very similar rank order potency to that obtained using the D-AMC substrate. Collectively these data demonstrate that D-AMC can be successfully used to rapidly and effectively identify novel FAAH inhibitors for potential therapeutic use.

  8. HTSvis: a web app for exploratory data analysis and visualization of arrayed high-throughput screens.

    PubMed

    Scheeder, Christian; Heigwer, Florian; Boutros, Michael

    2017-09-15

    Arrayed high-throughput screens (HTS) cover a broad range of applications using RNAi or small molecules as perturbations and specialized software packages for statistical analysis have become available. However, exploratory data analysis and integration of screening results has remained challenging due to the size of the data sets and the lack of user-friendly tools for interpretation and visualization of screening results. Here we present HTSvis, a web application to interactively visualize raw data, perform quality control and assess screening results from single to multi-channel measurements such as image-based screens. Per well aggregated raw and analyzed data of various assay types and scales can be loaded in a generic tabular format. HTSvis is distributed as an open-source R package, downloadable from https://github.com/boutroslab/HTSvis and can also be accessed at http://htsvis.dkfz.de . m.boutros@dkfz.de. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online .

  9. Adaptation and validation of DNA synthesis detection by fluorescent dye derivatization for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Ranall, Max V; Gabrielli, Brian G; Gonda, Thomas J

    2010-05-01

    Cellular proliferation is fundamental to organism development, tissue renewal, and diverse disease states such as cancer. In vitro measurement of proliferation by high-throughput screening allows rapid characterization of the effects of small-molecule or genetic treatments on primary and established cell lines. Current assays that directly measure the cell cycle are not amenable to high-throughput processing and analysis. Here we report the adaptation of the chemical method for detecting DNA synthesis by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation into both high-throughput liquid handling and high-content imaging analysis. We demonstrate that chemical detection of EdU incorporation is effective for high-resolution analysis and quantitation of DNA synthesis by high-content imaging. To validate this assay platform we used treatments of MCF10A cells with media supplements and pharmacological inhibitors that are known to affect cell proliferation. Treatments with specific kinase inhibitors indicate that EGF and serum stimulation employs both the mitogen extracellular kinase (MEK)/extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling networks. As described here, this method is fast, reliable, and inexpensive and yields robust data that can be easily interpreted.

  10. mQC: A Heuristic Quality-Control Metric for High-Throughput Drug Combination Screening

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Wilson, Kelli; Goldlust, Ian; Mott, Bryan T.; Eastman, Richard; Davis, Mindy I.; Zhang, Xiaohu; McKnight, Crystal; Klumpp-Thomas, Carleen; Shinn, Paul; Simmons, John; Gormally, Mike; Michael, Sam; Thomas, Craig J.; Ferrer, Marc; Guha, Rajarshi

    2016-01-01

    Quality control (QC) metrics are critical in high throughput screening (HTS) platforms to ensure reliability and confidence in assay data and downstream analyses. Most reported HTS QC metrics are designed for plate level or single well level analysis. With the advent of high throughput combination screening there is a need for QC metrics that quantify the quality of combination response matrices. We introduce a predictive, interpretable, matrix-level QC metric, mQC, based on a mix of data-derived and heuristic features. mQC accurately reproduces the expert assessment of combination response quality and correctly identifies unreliable response matrices that can lead to erroneous or misleading characterization of synergy. When combined with the plate-level QC metric, Z’, mQC provides a more appropriate determination of the quality of a drug combination screen. Retrospective analysis on a number of completed combination screens further shows that mQC is able to identify problematic screens whereas plate-level QC was not able to. In conclusion, our data indicates that mQC is a reliable QC filter that can be used to identify problematic drug combinations matrices and prevent further analysis on erroneously active combinations as well as for troubleshooting failed screens. The R source code of mQC is available at http://matrix.ncats.nih.gov/mQC. PMID:27883049

  11. A Microfluidic Platform for High-Throughput Screening of Small Mutant Libraries.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji Won; Shin, Kwang Soo; Moon, Jaemin; Lee, Sung Kuk; Kim, Taesung

    2016-05-17

    The screening and isolation of target microorganisms from mutated recombinant libraries are crucial for the advancement of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. However, conventional screening tools present several limitations in throughput, cost, and labor. Herein, we describe a novel microfluidic high-throughput screening (HTS) platform with several advantages. The platform utilizes a fluid array to compartmentalize bacterial cells in well-ordered separated microwells and allows long-term cell culture with high throughput. The platform enables the extraction of selected target cells from the fluid array for additional culture and postanalysis by using a capillary-driven sample relocation method. To confirm the feasibility of the platform, we demonstrated two different types of HTS methods based on the levels of reporter gene expression and cellular growth rate difference. For the reporter gene-based HTS, a spike recovery approach was taken to demonstrate that target cells are successfully screened out from a mixture containing nontarget cells by repeating the culture and extraction processes. Additionally, the same platform allowed us to screen and sort target cells according to their cellular growth rate difference, which seems hard in conventional screening methods. Hence, the platform could be used for various microbiological assays, including the detection of cell-excreted metabolites, microbial biosensors, and other HTS systems.

  12. High-throughput assay and engineering of self-cleaving ribozymes by sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kobori, Shungo; Nomura, Yoko; Miu, Anh; Yokobayashi, Yohei

    2015-01-01

    Self-cleaving ribozymes are found in all domains of life and are believed to play important roles in biology. Additionally, self-cleaving ribozymes have been the subject of extensive engineering efforts for applications in synthetic biology. These studies often involve laborious assays of multiple individual variants that are either designed rationally or discovered through selection or screening. However, these assays provide only a limited view of the large sequence space relevant to the ribozyme function. Here, we report a strategy that allows quantitative characterization of greater than 1000 ribozyme variants in a single experiment. We generated a library of predefined ribozyme variants that were converted to DNA and analyzed by high-throughput sequencing. By counting the number of cleaved and uncleaved reads of every variant in the library, we obtained a complete activity profile of the ribozyme pool which was used to both analyze and engineer allosteric ribozymes. PMID:25829176

  13. Time-stretch microscopy on a DVD for high-throughput imaging cell-based assay

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Anson H. L.; Yeung, P.; Chan, Godfrey C. F.; Chan, Barbara P.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2017-01-01

    Cell-based assay based on time-stretch imaging is recognized to be well-suited for high-throughput phenotypic screening. However, this ultrafast imaging technique has primarily been limited to suspension-cell assay, leaving a wide range of solid-substrate assay formats uncharted. Moreover, time-stretch imaging is generally restricted to intrinsic biophysical phenotyping, but lacks the biomolecular signatures of the cells. To address these challenges, we develop a spinning time-stretch imaging assay platform based on the functionalized digital versatile disc (DVD). We demonstrate that adherent cell culture and biochemically-specific cell-capture can now be assayed with time-stretch microscopy, thanks to the high-speed DVD spinning motion that naturally enables on-the-fly cellular imaging at an ultrafast line-scan rate of >10MHz. As scanning the whole DVD at such a high speed enables ultra-large field-of-view imaging, it could be favorable for scaling both the assay throughput and content as demanded in many applications, e.g. drug discovery, and rare cancer cell screening. PMID:28270973

  14. Time-stretch microscopy on a DVD for high-throughput imaging cell-based assay.

    PubMed

    Tang, Anson H L; Yeung, P; Chan, Godfrey C F; Chan, Barbara P; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Tsia, Kevin K

    2017-02-01

    Cell-based assay based on time-stretch imaging is recognized to be well-suited for high-throughput phenotypic screening. However, this ultrafast imaging technique has primarily been limited to suspension-cell assay, leaving a wide range of solid-substrate assay formats uncharted. Moreover, time-stretch imaging is generally restricted to intrinsic biophysical phenotyping, but lacks the biomolecular signatures of the cells. To address these challenges, we develop a spinning time-stretch imaging assay platform based on the functionalized digital versatile disc (DVD). We demonstrate that adherent cell culture and biochemically-specific cell-capture can now be assayed with time-stretch microscopy, thanks to the high-speed DVD spinning motion that naturally enables on-the-fly cellular imaging at an ultrafast line-scan rate of >10MHz. As scanning the whole DVD at such a high speed enables ultra-large field-of-view imaging, it could be favorable for scaling both the assay throughput and content as demanded in many applications, e.g. drug discovery, and rare cancer cell screening.

  15. A Sensitive High-Throughput Assay for Evaluating Host-Pathogen Interactions in Cryptococcus neoformans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Srikanta, Deepa; Yang, Meng; Williams, Matthew; Doering, Tamara L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cryptococcus neoformans causes serious disease in immunocompromised individuals, leading to over 600,000 deaths per year worldwide. Part of this impact is due to the organism's ability to thwart what should be the mammalian hosts' first line of defense against cryptococcal infection: internalization by macrophages. Even when C. neoformans is engulfed by host phagocytes, it can survive and replicate within them rather than being destroyed; this ability is central in cryptococcal virulence. It is therefore critical to elucidate the interactions of this facultative intracellular pathogen with phagocytic cells of its mammalian host. Methodology/Principal Findings To accurately assess initial interactions between human phagocytic cells and fungi, we have developed a method using high-throughput microscopy to efficiently distinguish adherent and engulfed cryptococci and quantitate each population. This method offers significant advantages over currently available means of assaying host-fungal cell interactions, and remains statistically robust when implemented in an automated fashion appropriate for screening. It was used to demonstrate the sensitivity of human phagocytes to subtle changes in the cryptococcal capsule, a major virulence factor of this pathogen. Conclusions/Significance Our high-throughput method for characterizing interactions between C. neoformans and mammalian phagocytic cells offers a powerful tool for elucidating the relationship between these cell types during pathogenesis. This approach will be useful for screens of this organism and has potentially broad applications for investigating host-pathogen interactions. PMID:21829509

  16. High-Throughput Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays for Quantitative Analysis of Molecular Binding Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe a platform for high-throughput electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) for identification and characterization of molecular binding reactions. A photopatterned free-standing polyacrylamide gel array comprised of 8 mm-scale polyacrylamide gel strips acts as a chassis for 96 concurrent EMSAs. The high-throughput EMSAs was employed to assess binding of the Vc2 cyclic-di-GMP riboswitch to its ligand. In optimizing the riboswitch EMSAs on the free-standing polyacrylamide gel array, three design considerations were made: minimizing sample injection dispersion, mitigating evaporation from the open free-standing polyacrylamide gel structures during electrophoresis, and controlling unit-to-unit variation across the large-format free-standing polyacrylamide gel array. Optimized electrophoretic mobility shift conditions allowed for 10% difference in mobility shift baseline resolution within 3 min. The powerful 96-plex EMSAs increased the throughput to ∼10 data/min, notably more efficient than either conventional slab EMSAs (∼0.01 data/min) or even microchannel based microfluidic EMSAs (∼0.3 data/min). The free-standing polyacrylamide gel EMSAs yielded reliable quantification of molecular binding and associated mobility shifts for a riboswitch–ligand interaction, thus demonstrating a screening assay platform suitable for riboswitches and potentially a wide range of RNA and other macromolecular targets. PMID:25233437

  17. High Throughput Scintillation Proximity Assay for the Identification of FKBP-12 Ligands.

    PubMed

    Graziani; Aldegheri; Terstappen

    1999-01-01

    A high throughput scintillation proximity assay (SPA) was developed to identify novel ligands of FKBP-12, an immunophilin with peptidyl prolyl isomerase (rotamase) activity. Recombinant histidine-tagged FKBP-12 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by metal ion affinity chromatography, and immobilized to SPA beads by an antibody that recognizes the histidine tag of the recombinant protein. Using 1 nM [3H] FK506, a well-known macrolid ligand of FKBP-12, specific binding was saturable and accounted for 95% of total binding. Analysis of saturation and homologous displacement isotherms indicated the existence of a single binding site with a Kd value of 1.6 nM. The specificity of [3H] FK506 binding was demonstrated in displacement experiments and showed that rapamycin, another macrolid, was as active as FK506 (IC50 of 3.5 and 3.2 nM, respectively), whereas GPI-1046, a prototype of small molecular compounds with neurotrophic properties and affinity for FKBP-type immunophilins, was more than 1000-fold less active. The high signal-to-noise ratio of 30, together with small standard deviations, makes this novel assay well suited for automated high throughput screening.

  18. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay for DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Adam B; Eakin, Ann E; Walkup, Grant K; Rivin, Olga

    2011-06-01

    DNA ligase is the enzyme that catalyzes the formation of the backbone phosphodiester bond between the 5'-PO(4) and 3'-OH of adjacent DNA nucleotides at single-stranded nicks. These nicks occur between Okazaki fragments during replication of the lagging strand of the DNA as well as during DNA repair and recombination. As essential enzymes for DNA replication, the NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases of pathogenic bacteria are potential targets for the development of antibacterial drugs. For the purposes of drug discovery, a high-throughput assay for DNA ligase activity is invaluable. This article describes a straightforward, fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based DNA ligase assay that is well suited for high-throughput screening for DNA ligase inhibitors as well as for use in enzyme kinetics studies. Its use is demonstrated for measurement of the steady-state kinetic constants of Haemophilus influenzae NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase and for measurement of the potency of an inhibitor of this enzyme.

  19. High-throughput non-heme iron assay for animal tissues.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Martin A; Gorman, Nadia; Sinclair, Peter R; Chorney, Michael J; Gerhard, Glenn S

    2004-05-31

    Iron has been widely studied in nearly every realm of biology. However, current methodologies, such as genetic mapping or mutation screening, have been difficult to apply due to the lack of robust high-throughput methods for quantifying iron levels from cells or tissues. The measurement of total iron levels in tissues, usually done with atomic absorption spectroscopy, is impractical for large numbers of samples and includes the contribution of heme iron from hemoglobin contained in red blood cells. The measurement of non-heme iron by reaction with a bathophenanthroline reagent, a commonly used assay reported more than 30 years ago, is also not feasible for large-scale analyses because it is cuvette-based. We therefore have modified this method to a microplate format that will facilitate large-scale analysis. The microplate assay is highly sensitive and specific, and is a simple and effective method for the measurement of non-heme iron for animal tissues that will enable the application of high-throughput of genetic methodologies.

  20. Sensitive high-throughput screening for the detection of reducing sugars.

    PubMed

    Mellitzer, Andrea; Glieder, Anton; Weis, Roland; Reisinger, Christoph; Flicker, Karlheinz

    2012-01-01

    The exploitation of renewable resources for the production of biofuels relies on efficient processes for the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials. The development of enzymes and strains for these processes requires reliable and fast activity-based screening assays. Additionally, these assays are also required to operate on the microscale and on the high-throughput level. Herein, we report the development of a highly sensitive reducing-sugar assay in a 96-well microplate screening format. The assay is based on the formation of osazones from reducing sugars and para-hydroxybenzoic acid hydrazide. By using this sensitive assay, the enzyme loads and conversion times during lignocellulose hydrolysis can be reduced, thus allowing higher throughput. The assay is about five times more sensitive than the widely applied dinitrosalicylic acid based assay and can reliably detect reducing sugars down to 10 μM. The assay-specific variation over one microplate was determined for three different lignocellulolytic enzymes and ranges from 2 to 8%. Furthermore, the assay was combined with a microscale cultivation procedure for the activity-based screening of Pichia pastoris strains expressing functional Thermomyces lanuginosus xylanase A, Trichoderma reesei β-mannanase, or T. reesei cellobiohydrolase 2.

  1. Primary cells and stem cells in drug discovery: emerging tools for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Eglen, Richard; Reisine, Terry

    2011-04-01

    Many drug discovery screening programs employ immortalized cells, recombinantly engineered to express a defined molecular target. Several technologies are now emerging that render it feasible to employ more physiologically, and clinically relevant, cell phenotypes. Consequently, numerous approaches use primary cells, which retain many functions seen in vivo, as well as endogenously expressing the target of interest. Furthermore, stem cells, of either embryonic or adult origin, as well as those derived from differentiated cells, are now finding a place in drug discovery. Collectively, these cells are expanding the utility of authentic human cells, either as screening tools or as therapeutics, as well as providing cells derived directly from patients. Nonetheless, the growing use of phenotypically relevant cells (including primary cells or stem cells) is not without technical difficulties, particularly when their envisioned use lies in high-throughput screening (HTS) protocols. In particular, the limited availability of homogeneous primary or stem cell populations for HTS mandates that novel technologies be developed to accelerate their adoption. These technologies include detection of responses with very few cells as well as protocols to generate cell lines in abundant, homogeneous populations. In parallel, the growing use of changes in cell phenotype as the assay readout is driving greater use of high-throughput imaging techniques in screening. Taken together, the greater availability of novel primary and stem cell phenotypes as well as new detection technologies is heralding a new era of cellular screening. This convergence offers unique opportunities to identify drug candidates for disorders at which few therapeutics are presently available.

  2. Testing Tuberculosis Drug Efficacy in a Zebrafish High-Throughput Translational Medicine Screen

    PubMed Central

    Ordas, Anita; Raterink, Robert-Jan; Cunningham, Fraser; Jansen, Hans J.; Wiweger, Malgorzata I.; Jong-Raadsen, Susanne; Bos, Sabine; Bates, Robert H.; Barros, David; Meijer, Annemarie H.; Vreeken, Rob J.; Ballell-Pages, Lluís; Dirks, Ron P.

    2014-01-01

    The translational value of zebrafish high-throughput screens can be improved when more knowledge is available on uptake characteristics of potential drugs. We investigated reference antibiotics and 15 preclinical compounds in a translational zebrafish-rodent screening system for tuberculosis. As a major advance, we have developed a new tool for testing drug uptake in the zebrafish model. This is important, because despite the many applications of assessing drug efficacy in zebrafish research, the current methods for measuring uptake using mass spectrometry do not take into account the possible adherence of drugs to the larval surface. Our approach combines nanoliter sampling from the yolk using a microneedle, followed by mass spectrometric analysis. To date, no single physicochemical property has been identified to accurately predict compound uptake; our method offers a great possibility to monitor how any novel compound behaves within the system. We have correlated the uptake data with high-throughput drug-screening data from Mycobacterium marinum-infected zebrafish larvae. As a result, we present an improved zebrafish larva drug-screening platform which offers new insights into drug efficacy and identifies potential false negatives and drugs that are effective in zebrafish and rodents. We demonstrate that this improved zebrafish drug-screening platform can complement conventional models of in vivo Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected rodent assays. The detailed comparison of two vertebrate systems, fish and rodent, may give more predictive value for efficacy of drugs in humans. PMID:25385118

  3. High throughput assay for evaluation of reactive carbonyl scavenging capacity☆

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, N.; Cavaille, J.P.; Graziani, F.; Robin, M.; Ouari, O.; Pietri, S.; Stocker, P.

    2014-01-01

    Many carbonyl species from either lipid peroxidation or glycoxidation are extremely reactive and can disrupt the function of proteins and enzymes. 4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal are the most abundant and toxic lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species. The presence of these toxics leads to carbonyl stress and cause a significant amount of macromolecular damages in several diseases. Much evidence indicates trapping of reactive carbonyl intermediates may be a useful strategy for inhibiting or decreasing carbonyl stress-associated pathologies. There is no rapid and convenient analytical method available for the assessment of direct carbonyl scavenging capacity, and a very limited number of carbonyl scavengers have been identified to date, their therapeutic potential being highlighted only recently. In this context, we have developed a new and rapid sensitive fluorimetric method for the assessment of reactive carbonyl scavengers without involvement glycoxidation systems. Efficacy of various thiol- and non-thiol-carbonyl scavenger pharmacophores was tested both using this screening assay adapted to 96-well microplates and in cultured cells. The scavenging effects on the formation of Advanced Glycation End-product of Bovine Serum Albumin formed with methylglyoxal, 4-hydroxynonenal and glucose-glycated as molecular models were also examined. Low molecular mass thiols with an α-amino-β-mercaptoethane structure showed the highest degree of inhibitory activity toward both α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyls. Cysteine and cysteamine have the best scavenging ability toward methylglyoxal. WR-1065 which is currently approved for clinical use as a protective agent against radiation and renal toxicity was identified as the best inhibitor of 4-hydroxynonenal. PMID:24688895

  4. The rodent malaria lactate dehydrogenase assay provides a high throughput solution for in vivo vaccine studies.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Hitoshi; Yokouchi, Yuki; Iyoku, Natsumi; Tachibana, Mayumi; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Torii, Motomi

    2015-08-01

    Rodent malaria is a useful model for evaluating the efficacy of malaria vaccine candidates; however, labor-intensive microscopic parasite counting hampers the use of an in vivo parasite challenge in high-throughput screening. The measurement of malaria parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) activity, which is commonly used in the in vitro growth inhibition assay of Plasmodium falciparum, may be the cheapest and simplest alternative to microscopic parasite counting. However, the pLDH assay has not been applied in the in vivo rodent malaria model. Here, we showed that the pLDH assay is reliable and accurately determines parasitemia in the rodent malaria model. pLDH activity measured using a chromogenic substrate reflects the parasite number in the blood; it allows fast and easy assessment using a conventional microplate reader. To validate this approach, we synthesized recombinant PyMSP1-19 protein (rPyMSP1-19) using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system and immunized mice with rPyMSP1-19. The antisera showed specific reactivity on the surface of the Plasmodium yoelii merozoite and immunized mice were protected against a lethal P. yoelii 17 XL challenge. The pLDH assay quickly and easily demonstrated a significant reduction of the parasite numbers in the immunized mice. Accordingly, the pLDH assay proved to be an efficient alternative to rodent malaria parasite counting, and may therefore accelerate in vivo vaccine candidate screening.

  5. A Novel High-Throughput 1536-well Notch1 γ-Secretase AlphaLISA Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chau, De-ming; Shum, David; Radu, Constantin; Bhinder, Bhavneet; Gin, David; Gilchrist, M. Lane; Djaballah, Hakim; Li, Yue-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The Notch pathway plays a crucial role in cell fate decisions through controlling various cellular processes. Overactive Notch signal contributes to cancer development from leukemias to solid tumors. γ-Secretase is an intramembrane protease responsible for the final proteolytic step of Notch that releases the membrane-tethered Notch fragment for signaling. Therefore, γ-secretase is an attractive drug target in treating Notch-mediated cancers. However, the absence of high-throughput γ-secretase assay using Notch substrate has limited the identification and development of γ-secretase inhibitors that specifically target the Notch signaling pathway. Here, we report on the development of a 1536-well γ-secretase assay using a biotinylated recombinant Notch1 substrate. We effectively assimilated and miniaturized this newly developed Notch1 substrate with the AlphaLISA detection technology and demonstrated its robustness with a calculated Z’ score of 0.66. We further validated this optimized assay by performing a pilot screening against a chemical library consisting of ~5,600 chemicals and identified known γ-secretase inhibitors e.g. DAPT, and Calpeptin; as well as a novel γ-secretase inhibitor referred to as KD-I-085. This assay is the first reported 1536-well AlphaLISA format and represents a novel high-throughput Notch1-γ-secretase assay, which provides an unprecedented opportunity to discover Notch-selective γ-secretase inhibitors that can be potentially used for the treatment of cancer and other human disorders. PMID:23448293

  6. A quantitative and high-throughput assay of human papillomavirus DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, David; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Replication of the human papillomavirus (HPV) double-stranded DNA genome is accomplished by the two viral proteins E1 and E2 in concert with host DNA replication factors. HPV DNA replication is an established model of eukaryotic DNA replication and a potential target for antiviral therapy. Assays to measure the transient replication of HPV DNA in transfected cells have been developed, which rely on a plasmid carrying the viral origin of DNA replication (ori) together with expression vectors for E1 and E2. Replication of the ori-plasmid is typically measured by Southern blotting or PCR analysis of newly replicated DNA (i.e., DpnI digested DNA) several days post-transfection. Although extremely valuable, these assays have been difficult to perform in a high-throughput and quantitative manner. Here, we describe a modified version of the transient DNA replication assay that circumvents these limitations by incorporating a firefly luciferase expression cassette in cis of the ori. Replication of this ori-plasmid by E1 and E2 results in increased levels of firefly luciferase activity that can be accurately quantified and normalized to those of Renilla luciferase expressed from a control plasmid, thus obviating the need for DNA extraction, digestion, and analysis. We provide a detailed protocol for performing the HPV type 31 DNA replication assay in a 96-well plate format suitable for small-molecule screening and EC50 determinations. The quantitative and high-throughput nature of the assay should greatly facilitate the study of HPV DNA replication and the identification of inhibitors thereof.

  7. High-throughput pKa screening and prediction amenable for ADME profiling.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hong; Ulander, Johan

    2006-02-01

    Recent technological advances have made it possible for several new pK(a) assays to be used in drug screening. In this review, a critical overview is provided of current new methodologies for high-throughput screening and prediction of pK(a). Typical applications of using pK(a )constants and charge state for absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) profiling and quantitative structure-activity relationship modelling complements the methodological comparisons and discussions. The experimental methods discussed include high-throughput screening of pK(a) by multiplexed capillary with ultraviolet absorbance detection on a 96-capillary format instrument, capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (CEMS) based on sample pooling, determination of pK(a) by pH gradient high-performance liquid chromatography, and measurement of pK(a) by a mixed-buffer liner pH gradient system. Comparisons of the different experimental assays are made with emphasis on the newly developed CEMS method. The current status and recent progress in computational approaches to pK(a) prediction are also discussed. In particular, the accuracy limits of simple fragment-based approaches as well as quantum mechanical methods are addressed. Examples of pK(a) prediction from in-house drug candidates as well as commercially available drug molecules are shown and an outline is provided for how drug discovery companies can integrate experiments with computational approaches for increased applications for ADME profiling.

  8. Agrosuppression: a bioassay for the hypersensitive response suited to high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Sophien; Hamada, Walid; Huitema, Edgar

    2003-01-01

    We describe a novel method, agrosuppression, that addresses the need for an assay of the hypersensitive response (HR) in intact plants that is rapid and adapted to high-throughput functional screening of plant and pathogen genes. The agrosuppression assay is based on inoculation of intact plants with a mixture of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains carrying (i) a binary plasmid with one or more candidate HR-inducing genes and (ii) a tumor-inducing (oncogenic) T-DNA. In the absence of HR induction, tumor formation is initiated, resulting in a typical crown gall phenotype. However, upon induction of the HR, tumor formation by the oncogenic T-DNA is suppressed, resulting in a phenotype that can be readily scored. We tested and optimized agrosuppression in Nicotiana benthamiana using the inf1 elicitin gene from the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, which specifically induces the HR in Nicotiana spp., and the gene-for-gene pair Avr9/Cf-9 from the fungal pathogen Cladosporium fulvum and Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium (currant tomato), respectively. Agrosuppression protocols that can be rapidly performed using simple mechanical wounding of petioles of intact N. benthamiana plants were developed and appeared particularly adapted to intensive high-throughput screening. This assay promises to greatly facilitate the cloning of novel plant R genes and pathogen Avr genes and to accelerate functional analyses and structure-function studies of these genes.

  9. Upscaling of hiPS Cell-Derived Neurons for High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Traub, Stefanie; Stahl, Heiko; Rosenbrock, Holger; Simon, Eric; Heilker, Ralf

    2017-03-01

    The advent of human-induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell-derived neurons promised to provide better model cells for drug discovery in the context of the central nervous system. This work demonstrates both the upscaling of cellular expansion and the acceleration of neuronal differentiation to accommodate the immense material needs of a high-throughput screening (HTS) approach. Using GRowth factor-driven expansion and INhibition of NotCH (GRINCH) during maturation, the derived cells are here referred to as GRINCH neurons. GRINCH cells displayed neuronal markers, and their functional activity could be demonstrated by electrophysiological recordings. In an application of GRINCH neurons, the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-mediated activation of tropomyosin receptor kinase (TrkB) was investigated as a promising drug target to treat synaptic dysfunctions. To assess the phosphorylation of endogenous TrkB in the GRINCH cells, the highly sensitive amplified luminescent proximity homogeneous assay LISA (AlphaLISA) format was established as a primary screen. A high-throughput reverse transcription (RT)-PCR format was employed as a secondary assay to analyze TrkB-mediated downstream target gene expression. In summary, an optimized differentiation protocol, highly efficient cell upscaling, and advanced assay miniaturization, combined with increased detection sensitivity, pave the way for a new generation of predictive cell-based drug discovery.

  10. Mass spectrometric techniques for label-free high-throughput screening in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Roddy, Thomas P; Horvath, Christopher R; Stout, Steven J; Kenney, Kristin L; Ho, Pei-I; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Vickers, Chad; Kaushik, Virendar; Hubbard, Brian; Wang, Y Karen

    2007-11-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is an important tool for finding active compounds to initiate medicinal chemistry programs in pharmaceutical discovery research. Traditional HTS methods rely on fluorescent or radiolabeled reagents and/or coupling assays to permit quantitation of enzymatic target inhibition or activation. Mass spectrometry-based high-throughput screening (MS-HTS) is an alternative that is not susceptible to the limitations imposed by labeling and coupling enzymes. MS-HTS offers a selective and sensitive analytical method for unlabeled substrates and products. Furthermore, method development times are reduced without the need to incorporate labels or coupling assays. MS-HTS also permits screening of targets that are difficult or impossible to screen by other techniques. For example, enzymes that are challenging to purify can lead to the nonspecific detection of structurally similar components of the impure enzyme or matrix of membraneous enzymes. The high selectivity of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) enables these screens to proceed with low levels of background noise to sensitively discover interesting hits even with relatively weak activity. In this article, we describe three techniques that we have adapted for large-scale (approximately 175,000 sample) compound library screening, including four-way parallel multiplexed electrospray liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (MUX-LC/MS/MS), four-way parallel staggered gradient liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), and eight-way staggered flow injection MS/MS following 384-well plate solid-phase extraction (SPE). These methods are capable of analyzing a 384-well plate in 37 min, with typical analysis times of less than 2 h. The quality of the MS-HTS approach is demonstrated herein with screening data from two large-scale screens.

  11. Bioluminescence Methods for Assaying Kinases in Quantitative High-Throughput Screening (qHTS) Format Applied to Yes1 Tyrosine Kinase, Glucokinase, and PI5P4Kα Lipid Kinase.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mindy I; Auld, Douglas S; Inglese, James

    2016-01-01

    Assays in which the detection of a biological phenomenon is coupled to the production of bioluminescence by luciferase have gained widespread use. As firefly luciferases (FLuc) and kinases share a common substrate (ATP), coupling of a kinase to FLuc allows for the amount of ATP remaining following a kinase reaction to be assessed by quantitating the amount of luminescence produced. Alternatively, the amount of ADP produced by the kinase reaction can be coupled to FLuc through a two-step process. This chapter describes the bioluminescent assays that were developed for three classes of kinases (lipid, protein, and metabolic kinases) and miniaturized to 1536-well format, enabling their use for quantitative high-throughput (qHTS) of small-molecule libraries.

  12. A High-Throughput Assay to Identify Inhibitors of the Apicoplast DNA Polymerase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Miller, Morgan E; Parrott, Eric E; Singh, Risham; Nelson, Scott W

    2014-07-01

    Infection by Plasmodium falciparum is the leading cause of malaria in humans. The parasite contains a unique and essential plastid-like organelle called the apicoplast that, similar to the mitochondria and chloroplast, houses its own genome that must undergo replication and repair. The putative apicoplast replicative DNA polymerase, POM1, has no direct orthologs in mammals, making the P. falciparum POM1 an attractive antimalarial drug target. Here, we report on a fluorescent high-throughput DNA polymerase assay that relies on the ability of POM1 to perform strand-displacement synthesis through the stem of a DNA hairpin substrate, thereby separating a Cy3 dye from a quencher. Assay-validation experiments were performed using 384-well plates and resulted in a signal window of 7.90 and aZ' factor of 0.71. A pilot screen of a 2880-compound library identified 62 possible inhibitors that cause more than 50% inhibition of polymerase activity. The simplicity and statistical robustness of the assay suggest it is well suited for the screening of novel apicoplast polymerase inhibitors that may serve as lead compounds in antimalarial drug-discovery efforts. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  13. A High-Throughput Screen Identifies a New Natural Product with Broad-Spectrum Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ymele-Leki, Patrick; Cao, Shugeng; Sharp, Jared; Lambert, Kathleen G.; McAdam, Alexander J.; Husson, Robert N.; Tamayo, Giselle; Clardy, Jon; Watnick, Paula I.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the inexorable invasion of our hospitals and communities by drug-resistant bacteria, there is a pressing need for novel antibacterial agents. Here we report the development of a sensitive and robust but low-tech and inexpensive high-throughput metabolic screen for novel antibiotics. This screen is based on a colorimetric assay of pH that identifies inhibitors of bacterial sugar fermentation. After validation of the method, we screened over 39,000 crude extracts derived from organisms that grow in the diverse ecosystems of Costa Rica and identified 49 with reproducible antibacterial effects. An extract from an endophytic fungus was further characterized, and this led to the discovery of three novel natural products. One of these, which we named mirandamycin, has broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio cholerae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This demonstrates the power of simple high throughput screens for rapid identification of new antibacterial agents from environmental samples. PMID:22359585

  14. A High-Throughput MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry-Based Assay of Chitinase Activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A high-throughput MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric assay is described for assay of chitolytic enzyme activity. The assay uses unmodified chitin oligosaccharide substrates, and is readily achievable on a microliter scale (2 µL total volume, containing 2 µg of substrate and 1 ng of protein). The speed a...

  15. High-Throughput Giardia lamblia Viability Assay Using Bioluminescent ATP Content Measurements▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Catherine Z.; Kulakova, Liudmila; Southall, Noel; Marugan, Juan J.; Galkin, Andrey; Austin, Christopher P.; Herzberg, Osnat; Zheng, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The human pathogen Giardia lamblia is an anaerobic protozoan parasite that causes giardiasis, one of the most common diarrheal diseases worldwide. Although several drugs are available for the treatment of giardiasis, drug resistance has been reported and is likely to increase, and recurrent infections are common. The search for new drugs that can overcome the drug-resistant strains of Giardia is an unmet medical need. New drug screen methods can facilitate the drug discovery process and aid with the identification of new drug targets. Using a bioluminescent ATP content assay, we have developed a phenotypic drug screen method to identify compounds that act against the actively growing trophozoite stage of the parasite. This assay is homogeneous, robust, and suitable for high-throughput screening of large compound collections. A screen of 4,096 pharmacologically active small molecules and approved drugs revealed 43 compounds with selective anti-Giardia properties, including 32 previously reported and 11 novel anti-Giardia agents. The most potent novel compound was fumagillin, which showed 50% inhibitory concentrations of 10 nM against the WB isolate and 2 nM against the GS isolate. PMID:21078930

  16. The "TSH Receptor Glo Assay" - A High-Throughput Detection System for Thyroid Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Latif, Rauf; Lau, Zerlina; Cheung, Pamela; Felsenfeld, Dan P; Davies, Terry F

    2016-01-01

    To identify novel small molecules against the TSH receptor, we developed a sensitive transcription-based luciferase high-throughput screening (HTS) system named the TSHR-Glo Assay (TSHR-Glo). This assay uses double-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the human TSHR and a cAMP-response element (CRE) construct fused to an improved luciferase reporter gene. The assay was highly responsive toward TSH in a dose-dependent manner with a TSH sensitivity of 10(-10)M (10 ± 1.12 μU/ml) and thyroid-stimulating antibodies, a hallmark of Graves' disease, could also be detected. The assay was validated against the standard indicator of HTS performance - the Z-factor (Z') - producing a score of 0.895. Using the TSHR-Glo assay, we screened 48,224 compounds from a diverse chemical library in duplicate plates at a fixed dose of 17 μM. Twenty molecules with the greatest activity out of 62 molecules that were identified by this technique were subsequently screened against the parent luciferase stable cell line in order to eliminate false positive stimulators. Using this approach, we were able to identify specific agonists against the TSH receptor leading to the characterization of several TSH agonist molecules. Hence, the TSHR-Glo assay was a one-step cell-based HTS assay, which was successful in the discovery of novel small molecular agonists and for the detection of stimulating antibodies to the TSH receptor.

  17. High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer T.; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Huang, Ruili; Teneva, Nedelina; Simmons, Steven O.; Xia, Menghang; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Myung, Kyungjae

    2012-01-01

    Human ATAD5 is a biomarker for identifying genotoxic compounds because ATAD5 protein levels increase posttranscriptionally in response to DNA damage. We screened over 4,000 compounds with a cell-based quantitative high-throughput ATAD5-luciferase assay detecting genotoxic compounds. We identified 22 antioxidants, including resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein, that are currently used or investigated for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and chronic hepatitis, as well as for antiaging. Treatment of dividing cells with these compounds induced DNA damage and resulted in cell death. Despite their genotoxic effects, resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein did not cause mutagenesis, which is a major side effect of conventional anticancer drugs. Furthermore, resveratrol and genistein killed multidrug-resistant cancer cells. We therefore propose that resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein are attractive candidates for improved chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:22431602

  18. An integrated bioanalytical platform for supporting high-throughput serum protein binding screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Shou, Wilson Z; Vath, Marianne; Kieltyka, Kasia; Maloney, Jennifer; Elvebak, Larry; Stewart, Jeremy; Herbst, John; Weller, Harold N

    2010-12-30

    Quantification of small molecules using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer has become a common practice in bioanalytical support of in vitro adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) screening. The bioanalysis process involves primarily three indispensable steps: MS/MS optimization for a large number of new chemical compounds undergoing various screening assays in early drug discovery, high-throughput sample analysis with LC/MS/MS for those chemically diverse compounds using the optimized MS/MS conditions, and post-acquisition data review and reporting. To improve overall efficiency of ADME bioanalysis, an integrated system was proposed featuring an automated and unattended MS/MS optimization, a staggered parallel LC/MS/MS for high-throughput sample analysis, and a sophisticated software tool for LC/MS/MS raw data review as well as biological data calculation and reporting. The integrated platform has been used in bioanalytical support of a serum protein binding screening assay with high speed, high capacity, and good robustness. In this new platform, a unique sample dilution scheme was also introduced. With this dilution design, the total number of analytical samples was reduced; therefore, the total operation time was reduced and the overall throughput was further improved. The performance of the protein binding screening assay was monitored with two controls representing high and low binding properties and an acceptable inter-assay consistency was achieved. This platform has been successfully used for the determination of serum protein binding in multiple species for more than 4000 compounds.

  19. A high-throughput screening strategy for nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes based on ferric hydroxamate spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Cai; Ma, Cui-Luan; Xu, Jian-He; Zhou, Li

    2011-02-01

    Nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes (nitrilase or nitrile hydratase/amidase) have been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for the production of carboxylic acids and their derivatives, and it is important to build a method for screening for nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes. In this paper, a simple, rapid, and high-throughput screening method based on the ferric hydroxamate spectrophotometry has been proposed. To validate the accuracy of this screening strategy, the nitrilases from Rhodococcus erythropolis CGMCC 1.2362 and Alcaligenes sp. ECU0401 were used for evaluating the method. As a result, the accuracy for assaying aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids was as high as the HPLC-based method. Therefore, the method may be potentially used in the selection of microorganisms or engineered proteins with nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes.

  20. Development and implementation of industrialized, fully automated high throughput screening systems

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Automation has long been a resource for high-throughput screening at Bristol-Myers Squibb. However, with growing deck sizes and decreasing time lines, a new generation of more robust, supportable automated systems was necessary for accomplishing high-throughput screening goals. Implementation of this new generation of automated systems required numerous decisions concerning hardware, software and the value of in-house automation expertise. This project has resulted in fast, flexible, industrialized automation systems with a strong in-house support structure that we believe meets our current high-throughput screening requirements and will continue to meet them well into the future. PMID:18924614

  1. High Throughput Screen Identifies Small Molecule Inhibitors Specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Phosphoserine Phosphatase*

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Garima; Tiwari, Prabhakar; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Gupta, Arpit; Sharma, Deepak; Saha, Sudipto; Singh, Ramandeep

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis makes identification and validation of newer drug targets a global priority. Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP), a key essential metabolic enzyme involved in conversion of O-phospho-l-serine to l-serine, was characterized in this study. The M. tuberculosis genome harbors all enzymes involved in l-serine biosynthesis including two PSP homologs: Rv0505c (SerB1) and Rv3042c (SerB2). In the present study, we have biochemically characterized SerB2 enzyme and developed malachite green-based high throughput assay system to identify SerB2 inhibitors. We have identified 10 compounds that were structurally different from known PSP inhibitors, and few of these scaffolds were highly specific in their ability to inhibit SerB2 enzyme, were noncytotoxic against mammalian cell lines, and inhibited M. tuberculosis growth in vitro. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated the relative binding for these inhibitors. The two best hits identified in our screen, clorobiocin and rosaniline, were bactericidal in activity and killed intracellular bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. We have also identified amino acid residues critical for these SerB2-small molecule interactions. This is the first study where we validate that M. tuberculosis SerB2 is a druggable and suitable target to pursue for further high throughput assay system screening. PMID:25037224

  2. High throughput screen identifies small molecule inhibitors specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphoserine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Arora, Garima; Tiwari, Prabhakar; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Gupta, Arpit; Sharma, Deepak; Saha, Sudipto; Singh, Ramandeep

    2014-09-05

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis makes identification and validation of newer drug targets a global priority. Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP), a key essential metabolic enzyme involved in conversion of O-phospho-l-serine to l-serine, was characterized in this study. The M. tuberculosis genome harbors all enzymes involved in l-serine biosynthesis including two PSP homologs: Rv0505c (SerB1) and Rv3042c (SerB2). In the present study, we have biochemically characterized SerB2 enzyme and developed malachite green-based high throughput assay system to identify SerB2 inhibitors. We have identified 10 compounds that were structurally different from known PSP inhibitors, and few of these scaffolds were highly specific in their ability to inhibit SerB2 enzyme, were noncytotoxic against mammalian cell lines, and inhibited M. tuberculosis growth in vitro. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated the relative binding for these inhibitors. The two best hits identified in our screen, clorobiocin and rosaniline, were bactericidal in activity and killed intracellular bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. We have also identified amino acid residues critical for these SerB2-small molecule interactions. This is the first study where we validate that M. tuberculosis SerB2 is a druggable and suitable target to pursue for further high throughput assay system screening.

  3. Perspectives on Validation of High-Throughput Assays Supporting 21st Century Toxicity Testing1

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Richard; Kavlock, Robert; Martin, Matt; Reif, David; Houck, Keith; Knudsen, Thomas; Richard, Ann; Tice, Raymond R.; Whelan, Maurice; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Austin, Christopher; Daston, George; Hartung, Thomas; Fowle, John R.; Wooge, William; Tong, Weida; Dix, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary In vitro, high-throughput screening (HTS) assays are seeing increasing use in toxicity testing. HTS assays can simultaneously test many chemicals, but have seen limited use in the regulatory arena, in part because of the need to undergo rigorous, time-consuming formal validation. Here we discuss streamlining the validation process, specifically for prioritization applications in which HTS assays are used to identify a high-concern subset of a collection of chemicals. The high-concern chemicals could then be tested sooner rather than later in standard guideline bioassays. The streamlined validation process would continue to ensure the reliability and relevance of assays for this application. We discuss the following practical guidelines: (1) follow current validation practice to the extent possible and practical; (2) make increased use of reference compounds to better demonstrate assay reliability and relevance; (3) deemphasize the need for cross-laboratory testing, and; (4) implement a web-based, transparent and expedited peer review process. PMID:23338806

  4. Novel LC/MS/MS and High-Throughput Mass Spectrometric Assays for Monoacylglycerol Acyltransferase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jenson; Masucci, John A; Lang, Wensheng; Connelly, Margery A; Caldwell, Gary W; Petrounia, Ioanna; Kirkpatrick, Jennifer; Barnakov, Alexander N; Struble, Geoffrey; Miller, Robyn; Dzordzorine, Keli; Kuo, Gee-Hong; Gaul, Michael; Pocai, Alessandro; Lee, Seunghun

    2017-04-01

    Monoacylglycerol acyltransferase enzymes (MGAT1, MGAT2, and MGAT3) convert monoacylglycerol to diacylglycerol (DAG). MGAT1 and MGAT2 are both implicated in obesity-related metabolic diseases. Conventional MGAT enzyme assays use radioactive substrates, wherein the product of the MGAT-catalyzed reaction is usually resolved by time-consuming thin layer chromatography (TLC) analysis. Furthermore, microsomal membrane preparations typically contain endogenous diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) from the host cells, and these DGAT activities can further acylate DAG to form triglyceride (TG). Our mass spectrometry (liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, or LC/MS/MS) MGAT2 assay measures human recombinant MGAT2-catalyzed formation of didecanoyl-glycerol from 1-decanoyl-rac-glycerol and decanoyl-CoA, to produce predominantly 1,3-didecanoyl-glycerol. Unlike 1,2-DAG, 1,3-didecanoyl-glycerol is proved to be not susceptible to further acylation to TG. 1,3-Didecanoyl-glycerol product can be readily solubilized and directly subjected to high-throughput mass spectrometry (HTMS) without further extraction in a 384-well format. We also have established the LC/MS/MS MGAT activity assay in the intestinal microsomes from various species. Our assay is proved to be highly sensitive, and thus it allows measurement of endogenous MGAT activity in cell lysates and tissue preparations. The implementation of the HTMS MGAT activity assay has facilitated the robust screening and evaluation of MGAT inhibitors for the treatment of metabolic diseases.

  5. High-throughput screening normalized to biological response: application to antiviral drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhara A; Patel, Anand C; Nolan, William C; Huang, Guangming; Romero, Arthur G; Charlton, Nichole; Agapov, Eugene; Zhang, Yong; Holtzman, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The process of conducting cell-based phenotypic screens can result in data sets from small libraries or portions of large libraries, making accurate hit picking from multiple data sets important for efficient drug discovery. Here, we describe a screen design and data analysis approach that allow for normalization not only between quadrants and plates but also between screens or batches in a robust, quantitative fashion, enabling hit selection from multiple data sets. We independently screened the MicroSource Spectrum and NCI Diversity Set II libraries using a cell-based phenotypic high-throughput screening (HTS) assay that uses an interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE)-driven luciferase-reporter assay to identify interferon (IFN) signal enhancers. Inclusion of a per-plate, per-quadrant IFN dose-response standard curve enabled conversion of ISRE activity to effective IFN concentrations. We identified 45 hits based on a combined z score ≥2.5 from the two libraries, and 25 of 35 available hits were validated in a compound concentration-response assay when tested using fresh compound. The results provide a basis for further analysis of chemical structure in relation to biological function. Together, the results establish an HTS method that can be extended to screening for any class of compounds that influence a quantifiable biological response for which a standard is available.

  6. A Novel High-Throughput Cell-Based Assay Aimed at Identifying Inhibitors of DNA Metabolism in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jun; de Jonge, Boudewijn L. M.; MacCormack, Kathy; Sriram, Shubha; McLaughlin, Robert E.; Plant, Helen; Preston, Marian; Fleming, Paul R.; Albert, Robert; Foulk, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial biosensor strains can be useful tools for the discovery and characterization of antibacterial compounds. A plasmid-based reporter vector containing a transcriptional fusion between the recA promoter and green fluorescence protein gene was introduced into an Escherichia coli ΔtolC strain to create a biosensor strain that selectively senses inhibitors of DNA metabolism via the SOS response. The strain was used to develop a high-throughput assay to identify new inhibitors of DNA metabolism. Screening of the AstraZeneca compound library with this strain identified known inhibitors of DNA metabolism, as well as novel chemotypes. The cellular target of one novel series was elucidated as DNA gyrase through genetic characterization of laboratory-generated resistant mutants followed by 50% inhibitory concentration measurements in a DNA gyrase activity assay. These studies validated the use of this antibiotic biosensor strain to identify novel selective inhibitors of DNA metabolism by high-throughput screening. PMID:25246396

  7. High-Throughput Phenotypic Screening of Human Astrocytes to Identify Compounds That Protect Against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Nasir; Shah, Sonia; Zhao, Jean; Class, Bradley; Aguisanda, Francis; Southall, Noel; Xia, Menghang; McKew, John C.; Rao, Mahendra

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes are the predominant cell type in the nervous system and play a significant role in maintaining neuronal health and homeostasis. Recently, astrocyte dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Astrocytes are thus an attractive new target for drug discovery for neurological disorders. Using astrocytes differentiated from human embryonic stem cells, we have developed an assay to identify compounds that protect against oxidative stress, a condition associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. This phenotypic oxidative stress assay has been optimized for high-throughput screening in a 1,536-well plate format. From a screen of approximately 4,100 bioactive tool compounds and approved drugs, we identified a set of 22 that acutely protect human astrocytes from the consequences of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. Nine of these compounds were also found to be protective of induced pluripotent stem cell-differentiated astrocytes in a related assay. These compounds are thought to confer protection through hormesis, activating stress-response pathways and preconditioning astrocytes to handle subsequent exposure to hydrogen peroxide. In fact, four of these compounds were found to activate the antioxidant response element/nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 pathway, a protective pathway induced by toxic insults. Our results demonstrate the relevancy and utility of using astrocytes differentiated from human stem cells as a disease model for drug discovery and development. Significance Astrocytes play a key role in neurological diseases. Drug discovery efforts that target astrocytes can identify novel therapeutics. Human astrocytes are difficult to obtain and thus are challenging to use for high-throughput screening, which requires large numbers of cells. Using human embryonic stem cell

  8. High throughput screening of hydrolytic enzymes from termites using a natural substrate derived from sugarcane bagasse

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The description of new hydrolytic enzymes is an important step in the development of techniques which use lignocellulosic materials as a starting point for fuel production. Sugarcane bagasse, which is subjected to pre-treatment, hydrolysis and fermentation for the production of ethanol in several test refineries, is the most promising source of raw material for the production of second generation renewable fuels in Brazil. One problem when screening hydrolytic activities is that the activity against commercial substrates, such as carboxymethylcellulose, does not always correspond to the activity against the natural lignocellulosic material. Besides that, the macroscopic characteristics of the raw material, such as insolubility and heterogeneity, hinder its use for high throughput screenings. Results In this paper, we present the preparation of a colloidal suspension of particles obtained from sugarcane bagasse, with minimal chemical change in the lignocellulosic material, and demonstrate its use for high throughput assays of hydrolases using Brazilian termites as the screened organisms. Conclusions Important differences between the use of the natural substrate and commercial cellulase substrates, such as carboxymethylcellulose or crystalline cellulose, were observed. This suggests that wood feeding termites, in contrast to litter feeding termites, might not be the best source for enzymes that degrade sugarcane biomass. PMID:22081987

  9. Novel Acoustic Loading of a Mass Spectrometer: Toward Next-Generation High-Throughput MS Screening.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Ian; Stearns, Rick; Pringle, Steven; Wingfield, Jonathan; Datwani, Sammy; Hall, Eric; Ghislain, Luke; Majlof, Lars; Bachman, Martin

    2016-02-01

    High-throughput, direct measurement of substrate-to-product conversion by label-free detection, without the need for engineered substrates or secondary assays, could be considered the "holy grail" of drug discovery screening. Mass spectrometry (MS) has the potential to be part of this ultimate screening solution, but is constrained by the limitations of existing MS sample introduction modes that cannot meet the throughput requirements of high-throughput screening (HTS). Here we report data from a prototype system (Echo-MS) that uses acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) to transfer femtoliter-scale droplets in a rapid, precise, and accurate fashion directly into the MS. The acoustic source can load samples into the MS from a microtiter plate at a rate of up to three samples per second. The resulting MS signal displays a very sharp attack profile and ions are detected within 50 ms of activation of the acoustic transducer. Additionally, we show that the system is capable of generating multiply charged ion species from simple peptides and large proteins. The combination of high speed and low sample volume has significant potential within not only drug discovery, but also other areas of the industry.

  10. High-Throughput Luciferase-Based Assay for the Discovery of Therapeutics That Prevent Malaria

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In order to identify the most attractive starting points for drugs that can be used to prevent malaria, a diverse chemical space comprising tens of thousands to millions of small molecules may need to be examined. Achieving this throughput necessitates the development of efficient ultra-high-throughput screening methods. Here, we report the development and evaluation of a luciferase-based phenotypic screen of malaria exoerythrocytic-stage parasites optimized for a 1536-well format. This assay uses the exoerythrocytic stage of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, and a human hepatoma cell line. We use this assay to evaluate several biased and unbiased compound libraries, including two small sets of molecules (400 and 89 compounds, respectively) with known activity against malaria erythrocytic-stage parasites and a set of 9886 diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS)-derived compounds. Of the compounds screened, we obtain hit rates of 12–13 and 0.6% in preselected and naïve libraries, respectively, and identify 52 compounds with exoerythrocytic-stage activity less than 1 μM and having minimal host cell toxicity. Our data demonstrate the ability of this method to identify compounds known to have causal prophylactic activity in both human and animal models of malaria, as well as novel compounds, including some exclusively active against parasite exoerythrocytic stages. PMID:27275010

  11. Bioluminescence-Based High-Throughput Screen Identifies Pharmacological Agents That Target Neurotransmitter Signaling in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Improgo, Ma. Reina D.; Johnson, Christopher W.; Tapper, Andrew R.; Gardner, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Frontline treatment of small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) relies heavily on chemotherapeutic agents and radiation therapy. Though SCLC patients respond well to initial cycles of chemotherapy, they eventually develop resistance. Identification of novel therapies against SCLC is therefore imperative. Methods and Findings We have designed a bioluminescence-based cell viability assay for high-throughput screening of anti-SCLC agents. The assay was first validated via standard pharmacological agents and RNA interference using two human SCLC cell lines. We then utilized the assay in a high-throughput screen using the LOPAC1280 compound library. The screening identified several drugs that target classic cancer signaling pathways as well as neuroendocrine markers in SCLC. In particular, perturbation of dopaminergic and serotonergic signaling inhibits SCLC cell viability. Conclusions The convergence of our pharmacological data with key SCLC pathway components reiterates the importance of neurotransmitter signaling in SCLC etiology and points to possible leads for drug development. PMID:21931655

  12. Discovery of a Novel General Anesthetic Chemotype Using High-throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    McKinstry-Wu, Andrew R.; Bu, Weiming; Rai, Ganesha; Lea, Wendy A.; Weiser, Brian P.; Liang, David F.; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Maloney, David J.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The development of novel anesthetics has historically been a process of combined serendipity and empiricism, with most recent new anesthetics developed via modification of existing anesthetic structures. Methods Using a novel high-throughput screen employing the fluorescent anesthetic 1-aminoanthracene (1-AMA) and apoferritin as a surrogate for on-pathway anesthetic protein target(s), we screened a 350,000 compound library for competition with 1-AMA-apoferritin binding. Hit compounds meeting structural criteria had their binding affinities for apoferritin quantified with isothermal titration calorimetry and were tested for γ-aminobutyric acid type A-receptor binding using a flunitrazepam binding assay. Chemotypes with a strong presence in the top 700 and exhibiting activity via isothermal titration calorimetry were selected for medicinal chemistry optimization including testing for anesthetic potency and toxicity in an in vivo Xenopus laevis tadpole assay. Compounds with low toxicity and high potency were tested for anesthetic potency in mice. Results From an initial chemical library of over 350,000 compounds, we identified 2,600 compounds that potently inhibited 1-AMA binding to apoferritin. A subset of compounds chosen by structural criteria (700) was successfully reconfirmed using the initial assay. Based upon a strong presence in both the initial and secondary screens the 6-phenylpyridazin-3(2H)-one chemotype was assessed for anesthetic activity in tadpoles. Medicinal chemistry efforts identified four compounds with high potency and low toxicity in tadpoles, two were found to be effective novel anesthetics in mice. Conclusions We demonstrate the first use of a high-throughput screen to successfully identify a novel anesthetic chemotype and show mammalian anesthetic activity for members of that chemotype. PMID:25603205

  13. Introducing Bayesian thinking to high-throughput screening for false-negative rate estimation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xin; Gao, Lin; Zhang, Xiaolei; Qian, Hong; Rowan, Karen; Mark, David; Peng, Zhengwei; Huang, Kuo-Sen

    2013-10-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has been widely used to identify active compounds (hits) that bind to biological targets. Because of cost concerns, the comprehensive screening of millions of compounds is typically conducted without replication. Real hits that fail to exhibit measurable activity in the primary screen due to random experimental errors will be lost as false-negatives. Conceivably, the projected false-negative rate is a parameter that reflects screening quality. Furthermore, it can be used to guide the selection of optimal numbers of compounds for hit confirmation. Therefore, a method that predicts false-negative rates from the primary screening data is extremely valuable. In this article, we describe the implementation of a pilot screen on a representative fraction (1%) of the screening library in order to obtain information about assay variability as well as a preliminary hit activity distribution profile. Using this training data set, we then developed an algorithm based on Bayesian logic and Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the number of true active compounds and potential missed hits from the full library screen. We have applied this strategy to five screening projects. The results demonstrate that this method produces useful predictions on the numbers of false negatives.

  14. Picking Cell Lines for High-Throughput Transcriptomic Toxicity Screening (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput, whole genome transcriptomic profiling is a promising approach to comprehensively evaluate chemicals for potential biological effects. To be useful for in vitro toxicity screening, gene expression must be quantified in a set of representative cell types that captu...

  15. Novel cell-free high-throughput screening method for pharmacological tools targeting K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhenwei; Brown, Emily C.; Wang, Weiwei; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    K+ channels, a superfamily of ∼80 members, control cell excitability, ion homeostasis, and many forms of cell signaling. Their malfunctions cause numerous diseases including neuronal disorders, cardiac arrhythmia, diabetes, and asthma. Here we present a novel liposome flux assay (LFA) that is applicable to most K+ channels. It is robust, low cost, and high throughput. Using LFA, we performed small molecule screens on three different K+ channels and identified new activators and inhibitors for biological research on channel function and for medicinal development. We further engineered a hERG (human ether-à-go-go-related gene) channel, which, when used in LFA, provides a highly sensitive (zero false negatives on 50 hERG-sensitive drugs) and highly specific (zero false positives on 50 hERG-insensitive drugs), low-cost hERG safety assay. PMID:27091997

  16. Intersection of toxicogenomics and high throughput screening in the Tox21 program: an NIEHS perspective.

    PubMed

    Merrick, B Alex; Paules, Richard S; Tice, Raymond R

    Humans are exposed to thousands of chemicals with inadequate toxicological data. Advances in computational toxicology, robotic high throughput screening (HTS), and genome-wide expression have been integrated into the Tox21 program to better predict the toxicological effects of chemicals. Tox21 is a collaboration among US government agencies initiated in 2008 that aims to shift chemical hazard assessment from traditional animal toxicology to target-specific, mechanism-based, biological observations using in vitro assays and lower organism models. HTS uses biocomputational methods for probing thousands of chemicals in in vitro assays for gene-pathway response patterns predictive of adverse human health outcomes. In 1999, NIEHS began exploring the application of toxicogenomics to toxicology and recent advances in NextGen sequencing should greatly enhance the biological content obtained from HTS platforms. We foresee an intersection of new technologies in toxicogenomics and HTS as an innovative development in Tox21. Tox21 goals, priorities, progress, and challenges will be reviewed.

  17. Evaluation of the Droplet-Microarray Platform for High-Throughput Screening of Suspension Cells.

    PubMed

    Popova, Anna A; Depew, Claire; Permana, Katya Manuella; Trubitsyn, Alexander; Peravali, Ravindra; Ordiano, Jorge Ángel González; Reischl, Markus; Levkin, Pavel A

    2017-04-01

    Phenotypic cell-based high-throughput screenings play a central role in drug discovery and toxicology. The main tendency in cell screenings is the increase of the throughput and decrease of reaction volume in order to accelerate the experiments, reduce the costs, and enable screenings of rare cells. Conventionally, cell-based assays are performed in microtiter plates, which exist in 96- to 1536-wells formats and cannot be further miniaturized. In addition, performing screenings of suspension cells is associated with risk of losing cell content during the staining procedures and incompatibility with high-content microscopy. Here, we evaluate the Droplet-Microarray screening platform for culturing, screening, and imaging of suspension cells. We demonstrate pipetting-free cell seeding and proliferation of cells in individual droplets of 3-80 nL in volume. We developed a methodology to perform parallel treatment, staining, and fixation of suspension cells in individual droplets. Automated imaging of live suspension cells directly in the droplets combined with algorithms for pattern recognition for image analysis is demonstrated. We evaluated the developed methodology by performing a dose-response study with antineoplastic drugs. We believe that the DMA screening platform carries great potential to be adopted for broad spectrum of screenings of suspension cells.

  18. A high throughput splicing assay identifies new classes of inhibitors of human and yeast spliceosomes

    PubMed Central

    Effenberger, Kerstin A.; Perriman, Rhonda J.; Bray, Walter M.; Lokey, R. Scott; Ares, Manuel; Jurica, Melissa S.

    2014-01-01

    The spliceosome is the macromolecular machine responsible for pre-mRNA splicing, an essential step in eukaryotic gene expression. During splicing a myriad of subunits join and leave the spliceosome as it works on the pre-mRNA substrate. Strikingly, there are very few small molecules known to interact with the spliceosome. Splicing inhibitors are needed to capture transient spliceosome conformations and probe important functional components. Such compounds may also have chemotherapeutic applications, as links between splicing and cancer are increasingly uncovered. To identify new splicing inhibitors, we developed a high throughput assay for in vitro splicing using an RT-qPCR readout. In a pilot screen of 3,080 compounds we identified three small molecules that inhibit splicing in HeLa extract by interfering with different stages of human spliceosome assembly. Two of the compounds similarly impact spliceosomes in yeast extracts, suggesting selective targeting of conserved components. By examining related molecules, we identified chemical features required for the activity of two of the splicing inhibitors. In addition to verifying our assay procedure and paving the way to larger screens, these studies establish new compounds as chemical probes for investigating the splicing machinery. PMID:23771823

  19. Development of a novel high-throughput assay for the investigation of GlyT-1b neurotransmitter transporter function.

    PubMed

    Allan, Lynda; Leith, J Lianne; Papakosta, Marianthi; Morrow, John A; Irving, Nicholas G; McFerran, Brian W; Clark, Alan G

    2006-01-01

    The glycine transporter (GlyT-1b) is a Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent electrogenic transporter which mediates the rapid re-uptake of glycine from the synaptic cleft. Based on its tissue distribution, GlyT-1 has been suggested to co-localise with the NMDA receptor where it may modulate the concentration of glycine at its co-agonist binding site. This data has led to GlyT-1 inhibitors being proposed as targets for disorders such as schizophrenia and cognitive dysfunction. Radiolabelled uptake assays (e.g. [(3)H]glycine) have been traditionally used in compound screening to identify glycine transporter inhibitors. While such an assay format is useful for testing limited numbers of compounds, the identification of novel glycine uptake inhibitors requires a functional assay compatible with high-throughput screening (HTS) of large compound libraries. Here, the authors present the development of a novel homogenous cell-based assay using the FLIPR membrane potential blue dye (Molecular Devices) and FLEXstation. Pharmacological data for the GlyT-1 inhibitors Org 24598 and ALX 5407 obtained using this novel electrogenic assay correlated well with the conventional [(3)H]-glycine uptake assay format. Furthermore, the assay has been successfully miniaturised using FLIPR(3) and therefore has the potential to be used for high-throughput screening.

  20. High-Throughput Screening for Novel Inhibitors of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Penicillin-Binding Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Fedarovich, Alena; Djordjevic, Kevin A.; Swanson, Shauna M.; Peterson, Yuri K.; Nicholas, Robert A.; Davies, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of N. gonorrhoeae strains exhibiting decreased susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins and the recent isolation of two distinct strains with high-level resistance to cefixime or ceftriaxone heralds the possible demise of β-lactam antibiotics as effective treatments for gonorrhea. To identify new compounds that inhibit penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), which are proven targets for β-lactam antibiotics, we developed a high-throughput assay that uses fluorescence polarization (FP) to distinguish the fluorescent penicillin, Bocillin-FL, in free or PBP-bound form. This assay was used to screen a 50,000 compound library for potential inhibitors of N. gonorrhoeae PBP 2, and 32 compounds were identified that exhibited >50% inhibition of Bocillin-FL binding to PBP 2. These included a cephalosporin that provided validation of the assay. After elimination of compounds that failed to exhibit concentration-dependent inhibition, the antimicrobial activity of the remaining 24 was tested. Of these, 7 showed antimicrobial activity against susceptible and penicillin- or cephalosporin-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae. In molecular docking simulations using the crystal structure of PBP 2, two of these inhibitors docked into the active site of the enzyme and each mediate interactions with the active site serine nucleophile. This study demonstrates the validity of a FP-based assay to find novel inhibitors of PBPs and paves the way for more comprehensive high-throughput screening against highly resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae. It also provides a set of lead compounds for optimization of anti-gonococcal agents. PMID:23049763

  1. A Systematic Approach to Identify Biased Agonists of the Apelin Receptor through High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    McAnally, Danielle; Siddiquee, Khandaker; Sharir, Haleli; Qi, Feng; Phatak, Sharangdhar; Li, Jian-Liang; Berg, Eric; Fishman, Jordan; Smith, Layton

    2017-03-01

    Biased agonists are defined by their ability to selectively activate distinct signaling pathways of a receptor, and they hold enormous promise for the development of novel drugs that specifically elicit only the desired therapeutic response and avoid potential adverse effects. Unfortunately, most high-throughput screening (HTS) assays are designed to detect signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) downstream of either G protein or β-arrestin-mediated signaling but not both. A comprehensive drug discovery program seeking biased agonists must employ assays that report on the activity of each compound at multiple discrete pathways, particularly for HTS campaigns. Here, we report a systematic approach to the identification of biased agonists of human apelin receptor (APJ). We synthesized 448 modified versions of apelin and screened them against a cascade of cell-based assays, including intracellular cAMP and β-arrestin recruitment to APJ, simultaneously. The screen yielded potent and highly selective APJ agonists. Representative hits displaying preferential signaling via either G-protein or β-arrestin were subjected to a battery of confirmation assays. These biased agonists will be useful as tools to probe the function and pharmacology of APJ and provide proof of concept of our systematic approach to the discovery of biased ligands. This approach is likely universally applicable to the search for biased agonists of GPCRs.

  2. Use of differential scanning fluorimetry as a high-throughput assay to identify nuclear receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    DeSantis, Kara; Reed, Aaron; Rahhal, Raneen; Reinking, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Identification of ligands that interact with nuclear receptors is both a major biological problem and an important initial step in drug discovery. Several in vitro and in vivo techniques are commonly used to screen ligand candidates against nuclear receptors; however, none of the current assays allow screening without modification of either the protein and/or the ligand in a high-throughput fashion. Differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) allows unmodified potential ligands to be screened as 10µL reactions in 96-well format against partially purified protein, revealing specific interactors. As a proof of principle, we used a commercially-available nuclear receptor ligand candidate chemical library to identify interactors of the human estrogen receptor α ligand binding domain (ERα LBD). Compounds that interact specifically with ERα LBD stabilize the protein and result in an elevation of the thermal denaturation point, as monitored by the environmentally-sensitive dye SYPRO orange. We successfully identified all three compounds in the library that have previously been identified to interact with ERα, with no false positive results. PMID:22438792