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Sample records for high-velocity low-amplitude spinal

  1. Patient-centered outcomes of high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation for low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Goertz, C M; Pohlman, K A; Vining, R D; Brantingham, J W; Long, C R

    2012-10-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a well-recognized public health problem with no clear gold standard medical approach to treatment. Thus, those with LBP frequently turn to treatments such as spinal manipulation (SM). Many clinical trials have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy or effectiveness of SM for LBP. The primary objective of this paper was to describe the current literature on patient-centered outcomes following a specific type of commonly used SM, high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA), in patients with LBP. A systematic search strategy was used to capture all LBP clinical trials of HVLA using our predefined patient-centered outcomes: visual analogue scale, numerical pain rating scale, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, and the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index. Of the 1294 articles identified by our search, 38 met our eligibility criteria. Like previous SM for LBP systematic reviews, this review shows a small but consistent treatment effect at least as large as that seen in other conservative methods of care. The heterogeneity and inconsistency in reporting within the studies reviewed makes it difficult to draw definitive conclusions. Future SM studies for LBP would benefit if some of these issues were addressed by the scientific community before further research in this area is conducted.

  2. Neural responses to the mechanical parameters of a high velocity, low amplitude spinal manipulation: effect of preload parameters

    PubMed Central

    Reed, William. R.; Long, Cynthia R.; Kawchuk, Gregory N.; Pickar, Joel G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine how the preload that precedes a high velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) affects muscle spindle input from lumbar paraspinal muscles both during and after the HVLA-SM. Methods Primary afferent activity from muscle spindles in lumbar paraspinal muscles were recorded from the L6 dorsal root in anesthetized cats. HVLA-SM of the L6 vertebra was preceded either by no preload or by systematic changes in the preload magnitude, duration, and the presence or absence of a downward incisural point (DIP). Immediate effects of preload on muscle spindle responses to the HVLA-SM were determined by comparing mean instantaneous discharge frequencies (MIF) during the HVLA-SM’s thrust phase with baseline. Longer lasting effects of preload on spindle responses to the HVLA-SM were determined by comparing MIF during slow ramp and hold movement of the L6 vertebra before and following the HVLA-SM. Results The smaller compared to the larger preload magnitude and the longer compared to the shorter preload duration significantly increased (P=0.02 and P=0.04) respectively) muscle spindle responses during the HVLA-SM thrust. The absence of preload had the greatest effect on the change in MIF. Interactions between preload magnitude, duration and DIP often produced statistically significant but arguably physiologically modest changes in the passive signaling properties of the muscle spindle following the manipulation. Conclusion Because preload parameters in this animal model were shown to affect neural responses to an HVLA-SM, preload characteristics should be taken into consideration when judging this intervention’s therapeutic benefit in both clinical efficacy studies and in clinical practice. PMID:24387888

  3. Effects of thrust amplitude and duration of high velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation on lumbar muscle spindle responses to vertebral position and movement

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dong-Yuan; Reed, William R.; Long, Cynthia R.; Kawchuk, Gregory N.; Pickar, Joel G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Mechanical characteristics of high velocity low amplitude spinal manipulations (HVLA-SM) can be variable. Sustained changes in peripheral neuronal signaling due to altered load transmission to a sensory receptor’s local mechanical environment are often considered a mechanism contributing to the therapeutic effects of spinal manipulation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an HVLA-SM’s thrust amplitude or duration altered neural responsiveness of lumbar muscle spindles to either vertebral movement or position. METHODS Anesthetized cats (n=112) received L6 HVLA-SMs delivered to the spinous process. Cats were divided into 6 cohorts depending upon the peak thrust force (25%, 55%, 85% body weight) or thrust displacement (1, 2, 3mm) they received. Cats in each cohort received 8 thrust durations (0–250ms). Afferent discharge from 112 spindles was recorded in response to ramp and hold vertebral movement before and after the manipulation. Changes in mean instantaneous frequency (MIF) during the baseline period preceding the ramps (ΔMIFresting), during ramp movements (ΔMIFmovement), and with the vertebra held in the new position (ΔMIFposition) were compared. RESULTS Thrust duration had a small but statistically significant effect on ΔMIFresting at all six thrust amplitudes compared to control (0ms thrust duration). The lowest amplitude thrust displacement (1mm) increased ΔMIFresting at all thrust durations. For all the other thrust displacements and forces, the direction of change in ΔMIFresting was not consistent and the pattern of change was not systematically related to thrust duration. Regardless of thrust force, displacement, or duration, ΔMIFmovement and ΔMIFposition were not significantly different from control. Conclusion Relatively low amplitude thrust displacements applied during an HVLA-SM produced sustained increases in the resting discharge of paraspinal muscle spindles regardless of the duration over which the thrust was

  4. Validation of the cat as a model for the human lumbar spine during simulated high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation.

    PubMed

    Ianuzzi, Allyson; Pickar, Joel G; Khalsa, Partap S

    2010-07-01

    High-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) is an efficacious treatment for low back pain, although the physiological mechanisms underlying its effects remain elusive. The lumbar facet joint capsule (FJC) is innervated with mechanically sensitive neurons and it has been theorized that the neurophysiological benefits of HVLA-SM are partially induced by stimulation of FJC neurons. Biomechanical aspects of this theory have been investigated in humans while neurophysiological aspects have been investigated using cat models. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between human and cat lumbar spines during HVLA-SM. Cat lumbar spine specimens were mechanically tested, using a displacement-controlled apparatus, during simulated HVLA-SM applied at L5, L6, and L7 that produced preload forces of approximately 25% bodyweight for 0.5 s and peak forces that rose to 50-100% bodyweight within approximately 125 ms, similar to that delivered clinically. Joint kinematics and FJC strain were measured optically. Human FJC strain and kinematics data were taken from a prior study. Regression models were established for FJC strain magnitudes as functions of factors species, manipulation site, and interactions thereof. During simulated HVLA-SM, joint kinematics in cat spines were greater in magnitude compared with humans. Similar to human spines, site-specific HVLA-SM produced regional cat FJC strains at distant motion segments. Joint motions and FJC strain magnitudes for cat spines were larger than those for human spine specimens. Regression relationships demonstrated that species, HVLA-SM site, and interactions thereof were significantly and moderately well correlated for HVLA-SM that generated tensile strain in the FJC. The relationships established in the current study can be used in future neurophysiological studies conducted in cats to extrapolate how human FJC afferents might respond to HVLA-SM. The data from the current study warrant further

  5. Teaching and Assessment of High-Velocity, Low-Amplitude Techniques for the Spine in Predoctoral Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Channell, Millicent King

    2016-09-01

    Although national didactic criteria have been set for predoctoral education and assessment in osteopathic manipulative treatment, there is no criterion standard for teaching methods and assessments of osteopathic manipulative treatment competence in colleges of osteopathic medicine. This issue is more pressing with the creation of the single graduate medical education accreditation system by the American Osteopathic Association and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, which introduced the creation of "osteopathic recognition" for residencies that want to incorporate osteopathic principles and practice into their programs. Residencies with osteopathic recognition may include both osteopathic and allopathic graduates. Increased standardization at the predoctoral level, however, is recommended as osteopathic principles and practice training applications are expanded. The objectives of this article are to review the standards for teaching osteopathic medical students high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) techniques for the spine; to review and discuss the methods used to assess medical students' proficiency in using HVLA; and to propose baseline standards for teaching and assessing HVLA techniques among medical students.

  6. Establishing force and speed training targets for lumbar spine high-velocity, low-amplitude chiropractic adjustments*

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Edward F.; Hosek, Ronald S.; Sullivan, Stephanie G.B.; Russell, Brent S.; Mullin, Linda E.; Dever, Lydia L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We developed an adjusting bench with a force plate supporting the lumbar portion to measure loads transmitted during lumbar manual adjustment. It will be used to provide force-feedback to enhance student learning in technique labs. The study goal is to define the learning target loads and speeds, with instructors as expert models. Methods: A total of 11 faculty members experienced in teaching Gonstead technique methods performed 81 simulated adjustments on a mannequin on the force plate. Adjustments were along 9 lumbopelvic “listings” at 3 load levels: light, normal, and heavy. We analyzed the thrusts to find preload, peak load, duration, and thrust rate. Results: Analysis of 891 thrusts showed wide variations between doctors. Peak loads ranged from 100 to 1400 N. All doctors showed clear distinctions between peak load levels, but there was overlap between high and low loads. Thrust rates were more uniform across doctors, averaging 3 N/ms. Conclusion: These faculty members delivered a range of thrusts, not unlike those seen in the literature for high velocity, low amplitude manipulation. We have established at least minimum force and speed targets for student performance, but more work must be done to create a normative adjustment to guide refinement of student learning. PMID:26600272

  7. Teaching and Assessment of High-Velocity, Low-Amplitude Techniques for the Spine in Predoctoral Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Channell, Millicent King

    2016-09-01

    Although national didactic criteria have been set for predoctoral education and assessment in osteopathic manipulative treatment, there is no criterion standard for teaching methods and assessments of osteopathic manipulative treatment competence in colleges of osteopathic medicine. This issue is more pressing with the creation of the single graduate medical education accreditation system by the American Osteopathic Association and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, which introduced the creation of "osteopathic recognition" for residencies that want to incorporate osteopathic principles and practice into their programs. Residencies with osteopathic recognition may include both osteopathic and allopathic graduates. Increased standardization at the predoctoral level, however, is recommended as osteopathic principles and practice training applications are expanded. The objectives of this article are to review the standards for teaching osteopathic medical students high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) techniques for the spine; to review and discuss the methods used to assess medical students' proficiency in using HVLA; and to propose baseline standards for teaching and assessing HVLA techniques among medical students. PMID:27571298

  8. Effect of Sampling Rates on the Quantification of Forces, Durations, and Rates of Loading of Simulated Side Posture High-Velocity, Low-Amplitude Lumbar Spine Manipulation☆

    PubMed Central

    Gudavalli, Maruti Ram; DeVocht, James; Tayh, Ali; Xia, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Objective Quantification of chiropractic high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) may require biomechanical equipment capable of sampling data at high rates. However, there are few studies reported in the literature regarding the minimal sampling rate required to record the HVLA-SM force-time profile data accurately and precisely. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different sampling rates on the quantification of forces, durations, and rates of loading of simulated side posture lumbar spine HVLA-SM delivered by doctors of chiropractic. Methods Five doctors of chiropractic (DCs) and 5 asymptomatic participants were recruited for this study. Force-time profiles were recorded during (i) 52 simulated HVLA-SM thrusts to a force transducer placed on a force plate by 2 DCs and (ii) 12 lumbar side posture HVLA-SM on 5 participants by 3 DCs. Data sampling rate of the force plate remained the same at 1000 Hz, whereas the sampling rate of the force transducer varied at 50, 100, 200, and 500 Hz. The data were reduced using custom-written MATLAB (Mathworks, Inc, Natick, MA) and MathCad (version 15; Parametric Technologies, Natick, MA) programs and analyzed descriptively. Results The average differences in the computed durations and rates of loading are smaller than 5% between 50 and 1000 Hz sampling rates. The differences in the computed preloads and peak loads are smaller than 3%. Conclusions The small differences observed in the characteristics of force-time profiles of simulated manual HVLA-SM thrusts measured using various sampling rates suggest that a sampling rate as low as 50 to 100 Hz may be sufficient. The results are applicable to the manipulation performed in this study: manual side posture lumbar spine HVLA-SM. PMID:23790603

  9. A Case Report of Spinal Cord Injury Patient From a High Velocity Gunshot Wound to the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juyong; Kim, Je Ho

    2013-01-01

    We report on operational and rehabilitation management, as well as the outcome, of a patient who with sustained spinal cord injury from a high velocity gunshot wound to the lumbar spine. More specifically, a patient with a gunshot wound to the spine is more likely to sustain a complete injury and have a poor prognosis. As such, there should be concerns regarding associated and extended injuries related to bullet fragmentation as well as the possibility of long-term sequelae. PMID:23526072

  10. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  11. Particle Distribution Modification by Low Amplitude Modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gorelenkov, N.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2009-08-28

    Modification of a high energy particle distribution by a spectrum of low amplitude modes is investigated using a guiding center code. Only through resonance are modes effective in modifying the distribution. Diagnostics are used to illustrate the mode-particle interaction and to find which effects are relevant in producing significant resonance, including kinetic Poincare plots and plots showing those orbits with time averaged mode-particle energy transfer. Effects of pitch angle scattering and drag are studied, as well as plasma rotation and time dependence of the equilibrium and mode frequencies. A specific example of changes observed in a DIII-D deuterium beam distribution in the presence of low amplitude experimentally validated Toroidal Alfven (TAE) eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfven (RSAE) eigenmodes is examined in detail. Comparison with experimental data shows that multiple low amplitude modes can account for significant modification of high energy beam particle distributions. It is found that there is a stochastic threshold for beam profile modification, and that the experimental amplitudes are only slightly above this threshold.

  12. Learning Spinal Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Marie-Pierre; Wynd, Shari; Richardson, Lance; Dugas, Claude; Descarreaux, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of the present study was to quantify the high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation biomechanical parameters in two cohorts of students from different teaching institutions. The first cohort of students was taught chiropractic techniques in a patient–doctor positioning practice setting, while the second cohort of students was taught in a “complete practice” manipulation setting, thus performing spinal manipulation skills on fellow student colleagues. It was hypothesized that the students exposed to complete practice would perform the standardized spinal manipulation with better biomechanical parameters. Methods: Participants (n = 88) were students enrolled in two distinct chiropractic programs. Thoracic spine manipulation skills were assessed using an instrumented manikin, which allowed the measurement of applied force. Dependent variables included peak force, time to peak force, rate of force production, peak force variability, and global coordination. Results: The results revealed that students exposed to complete practice demonstrated lower time to peak force values, higher peak force, and a steeper rate of force production compared with students in the patient–doctor positioning scenario. A significant group by gender interaction was also noted for the time to peak force and rate of force production variables. Conclusion: The results of the present study confirm the importance of chiropractic technique curriculum and perhaps gender in spinal manipulation skill learning. It also stresses the importance of integrating spinal manipulation skills practice early in training to maximize the number and the quality of significant learner–instructor interactions. PMID:22069337

  13. Effect of Spinal Manipulation Thrust Duration on Trunk Mechanical Activation Thresholds of Nociceptive-Specific Lateral Thalamic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reed, William R.; Sozio, Randall; Pickar, Joel G.; Onifer, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this preliminary study was to determine if high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) thrust duration alters mechanical trunk activation thresholds of nociceptive-specific (NS) lateral thalamic neurons. Methods Extracellular recordings were obtained from 18 NS neurons located in 2 lateral thalamic nuclei (ventrolateral [n = 12] and posterior [n = 6]) in normal anesthetized Wistar rats. Response thresholds to electronic von Frey anesthesiometer (rigid tip) mechanical trunk stimuli applied in 3 lumbar directions (dorsal-ventral, 45° caudal, and 45° cranial) were determined before and immediately after the delivery of 3 HVLA-SM thrust durations (time control 0, 100, and 400 milliseconds). Mean changes in mechanical trunk activation thresholds were compared using a mixed model analysis of variance. Results High-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation duration did not significantly alter NS lateral thalamic neurons’ mechanical trunk responses to any of the 3 directions tested with the anesthesiometer. Conclusions This study is the first to examine the effect of HVLA-SM thrust duration on NS lateral thalamic mechanical response thresholds. High-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation thrust duration did not affect mechanical trunk thresholds. PMID:25220757

  14. Spinal cord injury following chiropractic manipulation to the neck.

    PubMed

    Chakraverty, Julian; Curtis, Olivia; Hughes, Tom; Hourihan, Margaret

    2011-12-01

    Spinal cord injury is a rare complication of chiropractic treatment. This case report describes a 50-year-old man who developed neurological symptoms a few hours after manipulation (high velocity low amplitude [HVLA] technique) of the cervical spine. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the cervical spine revealed intramedullary high signal at the C2/3 level of the right side of the cervical cord on the T2-weighted images. The potential mechanism of injury and causes of the radiological appearance are discussed.

  15. Dust in High Velocity Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakker, B. P.

    The facilities available in Groningen to produce IRAS maps were used to make comparatively high-quality maps of two fields where a high-velocity cloud (HVC) is observed in the 21-cm line. The HVC's are not discernable in these maps although one would expect to see them if the relation between 100 micron emission and H I column density found by Boulanger, Baud & van Albada (1985) is used. The implications of this non-detection are discussed in this contribution.

  16. Mechanical annealing under low-amplitude cyclic loading in micropillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yi-nan; Liu, Zhan-li; Wang, Zhang-jie; Zhuang, Zhuo

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical annealing has been demonstrated to be an effective method for decreasing the overall dislocation density in submicron single crystal. However, simultaneously significant shape change always unexpectedly happens under extremely high monotonic loading to drive the pre-existing dislocations out of the free surfaces. In the present work, through in situ TEM experiments it is found that cyclic loading with low stress amplitude can drive most dislocations out of the submicron sample with virtually little change of the shape. The underlying dislocation mechanism is revealed by carrying out discrete dislocation dynamic (DDD) simulations. The simulation results indicate that the dislocation density decreases within cycles, while the accumulated plastic strain is small. By comparing the evolution of dislocation junction under monotonic, cyclic and relaxation deformation, the cumulative irreversible slip is found to be the key factor of promoting junction destruction and dislocation annihilation at free surface under low-amplitude cyclic loading condition. By introducing this mechanics into dislocation density evolution equations, the critical conditions for mechanical annealing under cyclic and monotonic loadings are discussed. Low-amplitude cyclic loading which strengthens the single crystal without seriously disturbing the structure has the potential applications in the manufacture of defect-free nano-devices.

  17. High velocity impact experiment (HVIE)

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, A.; Donich, T.; Carter, P.

    1998-02-01

    The HVIE space project was conceived as a way to measure the absolute EOS for approximately 10 materials at pressures up to {approximately}30 Mb with order-of-magnitude higher accuracy than obtainable in any comparable experiment conducted on earth. The experiment configuration is such that each of the 10 materials interacts with all of the others thereby producing one-hundred independent, simultaneous EOS experiments The materials will be selected to provide critical information to weapons designers, National Ignition Facility target designers and planetary and geophysical scientists. In addition, HVIE will provide important scientific information to other communities, including the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization and the lethality and vulnerability community. The basic HVIE concept is to place two probes in counter rotating, highly elliptical orbits and collide them at high velocity (20 km/s) at 100 km altitude above the earth. The low altitude of the experiment will provide quick debris strip-out of orbit due to atmospheric drag. The preliminary conceptual evaluation of the HVIE has found no show stoppers. The design has been very easy to keep within the lift capabilities of commonly available rides to low earth orbit including the space shuttle. The cost of approximately 69 million dollars for 100 EOS experiment that will yield the much needed high accuracy, absolute measurement data is a bargain!

  18. Patient positioning and spinal locking for lumbar spine rotation manipulation.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, P; Tehan, P

    2001-08-01

    High velocity low amplitude (HVLA) thrust techniques are widely used by many manual therapists to treat low back pain. There is increasing evidence that spinal manipulation produces positive patient outcomes for acute low back pain. HVLA thrust techniques are associated with an audible release in the form of a pop or cracking sound that is widely accepted to represent cavitation of a spinal zygapophyseal joint. This audible release distinguishes these techniques from other manual therapy interventions. When using long lever HVLA thrust techniques spinal locking is necessary to localize forces and achieve cavitation at a specific vertebral segment. A critical factor in applying lumbar spine manipulation with minimal force is patient positioning and spinal locking. A knowledge of coupled movements of the lumbar spine aids an understanding of the patient positioning required to achieve spinal locking consistent with maximal patient comfort and cooperation. Excessive rotation can result in pain, patient resistance and failed technique. This masterclass presents a model of patient positioning for the lumbar spine that minimizes excessive use of rotation to achieve spinal locking prior to the application of the thrust.

  19. High velocity gas in external galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamphuis, J.; Vanderhulst, J. M.; Sancisi, R.

    1990-01-01

    Two nearby, nearly face-on spiral galaxies, M 101 and NGC 6946, observed in the HI with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) as part of a program to search for high velocity gas in other galaxies, are used to illustrate the range of properties of high velocity gas in other galaxies found thusfar.

  20. Effects of low amplitude pulsed radiofrequency stimulation with different waveform in rats for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Lin, W T; Chang, C H; Cheng, C Y; Chen, M C; Wen, Y R; Lin, C T; Lin, C W

    2013-01-01

    Pulsed-radiofrequency (PRF) electrical stimulation has been widely used for chronic pain treatment. It has been demonstrated with advantages of low temperature over traditional continuous radiofrequency (CRF) lesions with higher amplitude and mono polar electrode to treat pain in clinics (frequency 500 KHz, Pulse duration 20 msec, Amplitude 45 V, Treatment 2 min). We compare the effects of different pulse waveforms and PRF parameters (Pulse duration 25 ms, Treatment duration 5 min, low amplitude of 2.5/1.25 V) with a miniature bi-polar electrode on Dorsal root ganglion (DRG). The pain relief effect due to PRF is evaluated by using Von Frey method for the pain threshold index based on behavior response to mechanical stimulus of various strengths. Experimental results of Von Frey Score show that the sinusoidal group has higher responses than the square wave one. Both fast and secondary expressed proteins of c-fos and pp38 are measured from spinal cord tissue sectioning slides to characterize the pain associated inflammatory responses and their responses due to PRF stimulation.

  1. Cervical radiculopathy: a systematic review on treatment by spinal manipulation and measurement with the Neck Disability Index.

    PubMed

    Rodine, Robert J; Vernon, Howard

    2012-03-01

    Cervical radiculopathy (CR), while less common than conditions with neck pain alone, can be a significant cause of neck pain and disability; thus the determination of adequate treatment options for patients is essential. Currently, inadequate scientific literature restricts specific conservative management recommendations for CR. Despite a paucity of evidence for high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) spinal manipulation in the treatment for CR, this strategy has been frequently labeled as contraindicated. Scientific support for appropriate outcome measures for CR is equally deficient. While more scientific data is needed to draw firm conclusions, the present review suggests that spinal manipulation may be cautiously considered as a therapeutic option for patients suffering from CR. With respect to outcome measures, the Neck Disability Index appears well-suited for spinal manipulative treatment of CR.

  2. Cervical radiculopathy: a systematic review on treatment by spinal manipulation and measurement with the Neck Disability Index

    PubMed Central

    Rodine, Robert J.; Vernon, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Cervical radiculopathy (CR), while less common than conditions with neck pain alone, can be a significant cause of neck pain and disability; thus the determination of adequate treatment options for patients is essential. Currently, inadequate scientific literature restricts specific conservative management recommendations for CR. Despite a paucity of evidence for high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) spinal manipulation in the treatment for CR, this strategy has been frequently labeled as contraindicated. Scientific support for appropriate outcome measures for CR is equally deficient. While more scientific data is needed to draw firm conclusions, the present review suggests that spinal manipulation may be cautiously considered as a therapeutic option for patients suffering from CR. With respect to outcome measures, the Neck Disability Index appears well-suited for spinal manipulative treatment of CR. PMID:22457538

  3. High velocity formability and factors affecting it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehra, Mala Seth

    High velocity forming methods successfully address problems faced in conventional forming techniques. They can be effectively used for forming metals with low formability like aluminum alloys and high strength steel. They can be instrumental is manufacturing of lighter vehicles with higher fuel efficiency. Electromagnetic forming (EMF) is an HVF method that is gaining wide acceptance due to its advantages and scope for commercialization. A number of experimental studies were carried out with EMF with the main goal of exploring fundamentals about material formability at high velocities, which can be used to establish practical design guidelines and to make models of high velocity formability. Thus the main factors that influence high velocity formability-inertia/size effects; changes in constitutive behavior; impact; and dynamic failure modes, were studied mainly with experiments. The role of changes in constitutive behavior in improving formability was studied from existing studies and new theoretical studies involving High velocity Forming Limit Diagram (FLD) and through solving an inverse problem of ring expansion. Tube free-expansion experiments were carried out to demonstrate enhanced metal formability even in the absence of die impact. To further establish the significance of inertia, electromagnetic ring free-expansion experiments with rings of different aspect ratios were carried out. A higher aspect ratio sample had better formability in terms of uniform and total elongation and also had fewer necks than a low aspect ratio (more slender) ring at the same velocity. The results clearly demonstrated the influence of sample aspect ratio (dimensions) and hence inertia on high velocity formability. Die impact experiments were carried out with tubes and rings to show the beneficial influence of die arrest of a moving sample. It was revealed that die impact in an appropriate range of velocities can significantly suppress failure and reduce the number of tears and

  4. High velocity pulsed wire-arc spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor); Kincaid, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Wire arc spraying using repetitively pulsed, high temperature gas jets, usually referred to as plasma jets, and generated by capillary discharges, substantially increases the velocity of atomized and entrained molten droplets. The quality of coatings produced is improved by increasing the velocity with which coating particles impact the coated surface. The effectiveness of wire-arc spraying is improved by replacing the usual atomizing air stream with a rapidly pulsed high velocity plasma jet. Pulsed power provides higher coating particle velocities leading to improved coatings. 50 micron aluminum droplets with velocities of 1500 m/s are produced. Pulsed plasma jet spraying provides the means to coat the insides of pipes, tubes, and engine block cylinders with very high velocity droplet impact.

  5. Instrumented impact testing at high velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Delfosse, D.; Pageau, G.; Bennett, R.; Poursartip, A. Defence Research Establishment Valcartier, Courcelette )

    1993-01-01

    Impact loading of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) aircraft parts is a major concern. Birds or hailstones striking an aircraft generally have a low mass and a high velocity, whereas typically instrumented impact experiments are performed with a high mass and a low velocity. Our aim has been to build an instrumented impact facility with a low-mass projectile capable of simulating these impact events, since there is evidence that a low-velocity impact will not always result in the same amount or even type of damage as a high-velocity impact. This paper provides a detailed description of the instrumented low-mass impact facility at The University of British Columbia (UBC). A gas gun is used to accelerate the instrumented projectile to impact velocities as high as 50 m/s, corresponding to an energy level of 350 J. The contact force during the impact event is measured by an incorporated load cell. The necessary mathematical operations to determine the real load-displacement curves are outlined, and the results of some impact events at different velocities are shown. 23 refs.

  6. Consideration of wear rates at high velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Chad S.

    The development of the research presented here is one in which high velocity relative sliding motion between two bodies in contact has been considered. Overall, the wear environment is truly three-dimensional. The attempt to characterize three-dimensional wear was not economically feasible because it must be analyzed at the micro-mechanical level to get results. Thus, an engineering approximation was carried out. This approximation was based on a metallographic study identifying the need to include viscoplasticity constitutive material models, coefficient of friction, relationships between the normal load and velocity, and the need to understand wave propagation. A sled test run at the Holloman High Speed Test Track (HHSTT) was considered for the determination of high velocity wear rates. In order to adequately characterize high velocity wear, it was necessary to formulate a numerical model that contained all of the physical events present. The experimental results of a VascoMax 300 maraging steel slipper sliding on an AISI 1080 steel rail during a January 2008 sled test mission were analyzed. During this rocket sled test, the slipper traveled 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s. This type of environment was never considered previously in terms of wear evaluation. Each of the features of the metallography were obtained through micro-mechanical experimental techniques. The byproduct of this analysis is that it is now possible to formulate a model that contains viscoplasticity, asperity collisions, temperature and frictional features. Based on the observations of the metallographic analysis, these necessary features have been included in the numerical model, which makes use of a time-dynamic program which follows the movement of a slipper during its experimental test run. The resulting velocity and pressure functions of time have been implemented in the explicit finite element code, ABAQUS. Two-dimensional, plane strain models

  7. How to separate the low amplitude delta Scuti variation in CoRoT data unambigousely?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benko, Jozsef M.; Paparo, Margit

    2015-08-01

    Rich regular frequency patterns were found in the Fourier spectra of low-amplitude Delta Scuti stars observed by CoRoT satellite. The CoRoT observations are, however, influenced by the disturbing effect of the SAA. The effect is marginal for high amplitude variable stars but it could be dangerous in the case of low amplitude variables, especially if the frequency range of the intrinsic variation overlaps the instrumental frequencies. Systematic tests were carried out both on synthetic and real data. Our aim was to determine a limit amplitude above which we were sure that the frequency pattern belonged to the stars.

  8. High velocity clouds in nearby disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulman, Eric; Bregman, Joel N.; Roberts, Morton S.; Brinks, Elias

    1993-01-01

    Clouds of neutral hydrogen in our galaxy with the absolute value of v greater than 100 km/s cover approximately 10 percent of the sky to a limiting column density of 1 x 10(exp 18) cm(exp -2). These high velocity clouds (HVCs) may dominate the kinetic energy of neutral hydrogen in non-circular motion, and are an important though poorly understood component of galactic gas. It has been suggested that the HVCs can be reproduced by a combination of three phenomena: a galactic fountain driven by disk supernovae which would account for most of the HVCs, material tidally torn from the Magellanic Clouds, and an outer arm complex which is associated with the large scale structure of the warped galactic disk. We sought to detect HVCs in external galaxies in order to test the galactic fountain model.

  9. Correlation of expertise with error detection skills of force application during spinal manipulation learning*

    PubMed Central

    Loranger, Michel; Treboz, Julien; Boucher, Jean-Alexandre; Nougarou, François; Dugas, Claude; Descarreaux, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Most studies on spinal manipulation learning demonstrate the relevance of including motor learning strategies in chiropractic curricula. Two outcomes of practice are the production of movement in an efficient manner and the improved capability of learners to evaluate their own motor performance. The goals of this study were to evaluate if expertise is associated with increased spinal manipulation proficiency and if error detection skills of force application during a high-velocity low-amplitude spinal manipulation are related to expertise. Methods: Three groups of students and 1 group of expert chiropractors completed 10 thoracic spine manipulations on an instrumented device with the specific goal of reaching a maximum peak force of 300 N after a brief period of practice. After each trial, participants were asked to give an estimate of their maximal peak force. Force-time profiles were analyzed to determine the biomechanical parameters of each participant and the participant's capacity to estimate his or her own performance. Results: Significant between-group differences were found for each biomechanical parameter. No significant difference was found between groups for the error detection variables (p > .05). The lack of significant effects related to the error detection capabilities with expertise could be related to the specificity of the task and how the training process was structured. Conclusion: This study confirms that improvements in biomechanical parameters of spinal manipulation are related to expertise. Feedback based on error detection could be implemented in chiropractic curricula to improve trainee abilities in detecting motor execution errors. PMID:26270897

  10. Anomalously low amplitude of S waves produced by the 3D structures in the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, Akiko; Capdeville, Yann; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    Direct S and Sdiff phases with anomalously low amplitudes are recorded for the earthquakes in Papua New Guinea by seismographs in northern America. According to the prediction by a standard 1D model, the amplitudes are the lowest at stations in southern California, at a distance and azimuth of around 95° and 55°, respectively, from the earthquake. The amplitude anomaly is more prominent at frequencies higher than 0.03 Hz. We checked and ruled out the possibility of the anomalies appearing because of the errors in the focal mechanism used in the reference synthetic waveform calculations. The observed anomaly distribution changes drastically with a relatively small shift in the location of the earthquake. The observations indicate that the amplitude reduction is likely due to the 3D shear velocity (Vs) structure, which deflects the wave energy away from the original ray paths. Moreover, some previous studies suggested that some of the S and Sdiff phases in our dataset are followed by a prominent postcursor and show a large travel time delay, which was explained by placing a large ultra-low velocity zone (ULVZ) located on the core-mantle boundary southwest of Hawaii. In this study, we evaluated the extent of amplitude anomalies that can be explained by the lower mantle structures in the existing models, including the previously proposed ULVZ. In addition, we modified and tested some models and searched for the possible causes of low amplitudes. Full 3D synthetic waveforms were calculated and compared with the observations. Our results show that while the existing models explain the trends of the observed amplitude anomalies, the size of such anomalies remain under-predicted especially at large distances. Adding a low velocity zone, which is spatially larger and has less Vs reduction than ULVZ, on the southwest side of ULVZ, contributes to explain the low amplitudes observed at distances larger than 100° from the earthquake. The newly proposed low velocity zone

  11. Low amplitude impact of PBX 9501: Modified Steven spigot gun tests

    SciTech Connect

    Idar, D.J.; Lucht, R.A.; Straight, J.W.

    1998-12-01

    Low-velocity mechanical impact and subsequent high explosive (HE) reaction are of concern in credible accident scenarios involving the handling, transport, and storage of nuclear weapons. Using modified Steven spigot gun tests, the authors have investigated the high-explosive violent-reaction (HEVR) potential of PBX 9501 to low-amplitude insult. Reliable modeling predictions require that one identify the relevant parameters and behavioral responses that are key to the reaction mechanism(s) in PBX 9501. Additional efforts have been targeted at identifying relevant differences in the response between baseline and stockpile-aged PBX 9501 to low-velocity impacts.

  12. Speckle interferometric sensor to measure low-amplitude high frequency Ocular Microtremor (OMT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryle, James P.; Al-Kalbani, Mohammed; Gopinathan, Unnikrishnan; Boyle, Gerard; Coakley, Davis; Sheridan, John T.

    2009-08-01

    Ocular microtremor (OMT) is a physiological high frequency (up to 150Hz) low amplitude (150-2500nm) involuntary tremor of the human eye. It is one of the three fixational ocular motions described by Adler and Fliegelman in 1934 as well as microsaccades and drift. Clinical OMT investigations to date have used eye-contacting piezoelectric probes or piezoelectric strain gauges. Before contact can be made, the eye must first be anaesthetised. In some cases, this induces eyelid spasms (blepharospasm) making it impossible to measure OMT. Using the contact probe method, the eye motion is mechanically damped. In addition to this, it is not possible to obtain exact information about the displacement. Results from clinical studies to date have given electrical signal amplitudes from the probe. Recent studies suggest a number of clinical applications for OMT, these include monitoring the depth of anaesthesia of a patient in surgery, prediction of outcome in coma, diagnosis of brainstem death. In addition to this, abnormal OMT frequency content is present in patients with neurological disorders such as Multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. However for ongoing clinical investigations the contact probe method falls short of a non-contact accurate measurement solution. In this paper, we design a compact non contact phase modulating optical fiber speckle interferometer to measure eye motions. We present our calibration results using a calibrated piezoelectric vibration simulator. Digital signal processing is then performed to extract the low amplitude high frequency displacement information.

  13. Vasodilatation in human skin induced by low-amplitude high-frequency vibration.

    PubMed

    Skoglund, C R

    1989-08-01

    Vasomotor effects in human skin induced by vibration of low amplitude (10-25 microns) and high frequency (150-250 Hz) have been studied by using skin temperature changes as an approximative measure of variations in skin blood flow. In all tested areas of the body surface, including the face, low-amplitude high-frequency vibration regularly induces vasodilatation. The spatial distribution of the temperature changes induced from different sites of stimulation was studied by infrared thermography. The latencies of the temperature changes, determined by thermistor recordings, were found to vary with site of stimulation and stimulus parameters. The increase in temperature to a given stimulus is greater the lower the prevalent skin temperature, i.e. the increase in blood flow is larger the greater the initial vasomotor tone. The results are in accordance with the view that the vasodilatation is due to a reflex inhibition of pre-existent vasomotor tone in the skin by the afferent inflow from vibration-sensitive mechanoreceptors. High-amplitude vibration (100-200 microns), performed in a few comparative experiments, caused vasoconstriction.

  14. Comparison of damping in buildings under low-amplitude and strong motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive assessment of damping values and other dynamic characteristics of five buildings using strong-motion and low-amplitude (ambient vibration) data. The strong-motion dynamic characteristics of five buildings within the San Francisco Bay area are extracted from recordings of the 17 October 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake (LPE). Ambient vibration response characteristics for the same five buildings were inferred using data collected in 1990 following LPE. Additional earthquake data other than LPE for one building and ambient vibration data collected before LPE for two other buildings provide additional confirmation of the results obtained. For each building, the percentages of critical damping and the corresponding fundamental periods determined from low-amplitude test data are appreciably lower than those determined from strong-motion recordings. These differences are attributed mainly to soil-structure interaction and other non-linear behavior affecting the structures during strong shaking. Significant contribution of radiation damping to the effective damping of a specific building is discussed in detail.

  15. Low-amplitude non-linear volume vibrations of single microbubbles measured with an "acoustical camera".

    PubMed

    Renaud, Guillaume; Bosch, Johan G; Van Der Steen, Antonius F W; De Jong, Nico

    2014-06-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging is based on the detection of non-linear vibrational responses of a contrast agent after its intravenous administration. Improving contrast-enhanced images requires an accurate understanding of the vibrational response to ultrasound of the lipid-coated gas microbubbles that constitute most ultrasound contrast agents. Variations in the volume of microbubbles provide the most efficient radiation of ultrasound and, therefore, are the most important bubble vibrations for medical diagnostic ultrasound imaging. We developed an "acoustical camera" that measures the dynamic volume change of individual microbubbles when excited by a pressure wave. In the work described here, the technique was applied to the characterization of low-amplitude non-linear behaviors of BR14 microbubbles (Bracco Research, Geneva, Switzerland). The amplitude dependence of the resonance frequency and the damping, the prevalence of efficient subharmonic and ultraharmonic vibrations and the amplitude dependence of the response at the fundamental frequency and at the second harmonic frequency were investigated. Because of the large number of measurements, we provide a statistical characterization of the low-amplitude non-linear properties of the contrast agent.

  16. High Velocity Absorption during Eta Car B's Periastron Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Krister E.; Groh, J. H.; Hillier, J.; Gull, Theodore R.; Owocki, S. P.; Okazaki, A. T.; Damineli, A.; Teodoro, M.; Weigelt, G.; Hartman, H.

    2010-01-01

    Eta Car is one of the most luminous massive stars in the Galaxy, with repeated eruptions with a 5.5 year periodicity. These events are caused by the periastron passage of a massive companion in an eccentric orbit. We report the VLT/CRIRES detection of a strong high-velocity, (<1900 km/s) , broad absorption wing in He I at 10833 A during the 2009.0 periastron passage. Previous observations during the 2003.5 event have shown evidence of such high-velocity absorption in the He I 10833 transition, allowing us to conclude that the high-velocity gas is crossing the line-of-sight toward Eta Car over a time period of approximately 2 months. Our analysis of HST/STlS archival data with observations of high velocity absorption in the ultraviolet Si IV and C IV resonance lines, confirm the presence of a high-velocity material during the spectroscopic low state. The observations provide direct detection of high-velocity material flowing from the wind-wind collision zone around the binary system, and we discuss the implications of the presence of high-velocity gas in Eta Car during periastron

  17. Pilot Test of a Novel Method for Assessing Community Response to Low-Amplitude Sonic Booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fidell, Sanford; Horonjeff, Richard D.; Harris, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A pilot test of a novel method for assessing residents annoyance to sonic booms was performed. During a two-week period, residents of the base housing area at Edwards Air Force Base provided data on their reactions to sonic booms using Smartphone-based interviews. Noise measurements were conducted at the same time. The report presents information about data collection methods and about test participants reactions to low-amplitude sonic booms. The latter information should not be viewed as definitive for several reasons. It may not be reliably generalized to the wider U.S. residential population (because it was not derived from a representative random sample) and the sample itself was not large.

  18. Low amplitude insult project: Structural analysis and prediction of low order reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Scammon, R.J.; Browning, R.V.; Middleditch, J.; Dienes, J.K.; Haberman, K.S.; Bennett, J.G.

    1998-12-31

    The low velocity impact sensitivity of PBX 9501 has been investigated through a series of experiments based on the Steven Test targets and a set of Shear Impact experiments. The authors describe calculations done using DYNA2D, SPRONTO and DYNA3D to support these, and other, low amplitude insult experiments. The calculations allow them to study pressure and strain rate variables, to investigate structural aspects of the experiment, and to predict velocities required for reaction. Structural analyses have played an active role in this project beginning with the original target design and continuing through analyses of the experimental results. Alternative designs and various ideas for active instrumentation were examined as part of the experiment evolution process. Predictions of reaction are used to guide these design studies, even though the authors do not yet have enough experimental data to fully calibrate any of the models.

  19. Low-Amplitude Craniofacial EMG Power Spectral Density and 3D Muscle Reconstruction from MRI.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Lukas; Chaberova, Jana; Edmunds, Kyle; Einarsdóttir, Guðrún; Ramon, Ceon; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2015-03-11

    Improving EEG signal interpretation, specificity, and sensitivity is a primary focus of many current investigations, and the successful application of EEG signal processing methods requires a detailed knowledge of both the topography and frequency spectra of low-amplitude, high-frequency craniofacial EMG. This information remains limited in clinical research, and as such, there is no known reliable technique for the removal of these artifacts from EEG data. The results presented herein outline a preliminary investigation of craniofacial EMG high-frequency spectra and 3D MRI segmentation that offers insight into the development of an anatomically-realistic model for characterizing these effects. The data presented highlights the potential for confounding signal contribution from around 60 to 200 Hz, when observed in frequency space, from both low and high-amplitude EMG signals. This range directly overlaps that of both low γ (30-50 Hz) and high γ (50-80 Hz) waves, as defined traditionally in standatrd EEG measurements, and mainly with waves presented in dense-array EEG recordings. Likewise, average EMG amplitude comparisons from each condition highlights the similarities in signal contribution of low-activity muscular movements and resting, control conditions. In addition to the FFT analysis performed, 3D segmentation and reconstruction of the craniofacial muscles whose EMG signals were measured was successful. This recapitulation of the relevant EMG morphology is a crucial first step in developing an anatomical model for the isolation and removal of confounding low-amplitude craniofacial EMG signals from EEG data. Such a model may be eventually applied in a clinical setting to ultimately help to extend the use of EEG in various clinical roles. PMID:26913150

  20. Measuring the Energy Release of Low Amplitude Impact of High Explosive Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straight, J. W.; Idar, D. J.; Smith, L.; Osborn, M. A.; Viramontes, L. E.; Chavez, P. J.

    2004-07-01

    Predicting the degree of violence of high explosive (HE) reactions for a given event is desirable for risk assessments and a goal for computational models. Historically, different types of low amplitude impact tests on HE specimens have been performed to determine the critical impact-velocity threshold for high explosive violent reactions (HEVR). Additionally, the energy release relative to a steady-state detonation is also desirable for assessing the potential outcome of an accidental event. Traditionally, blast gauge measurements have been used to measure the overpressure of the HEVR event at a defined distance. This paper summarizes the use of this active technique coupled with a passive technique to derive average energy release curves for Modified Steven tests. A classic ballistic pendulum design was employed with the traditional blast gauge method. Calibration of the ballistic pendulum involved three elements. First, two mechanical measurements were related to the actual peak swing of the pendulum. Second, the general nature of the swing versus energy release curve was estimated. Two different approaches were used to estimate the momenta as a function of HE energy release using the Gurney relationships for an unsymmetrical sandwich. Finally, both techniques were simultaneously benchmarked with PBX 9501 calibration charges. Test results demonstrate the utility of using coupled diagnostic methods for low amplitude insult testing. Each set of data was fit to derive a working curve for the determination of the average energy release for HEVR event based on mass relative to a steady-state detonation. These tests results and working curve derivations are presented.

  1. Low-Amplitude Craniofacial EMG Power Spectral Density and 3D Muscle Reconstruction from MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wiedemann, Lukas; Chaberova, Jana; Edmunds, Kyle; Einarsdóttir, Guðrún; Ramon, Ceon

    2015-01-01

    Improving EEG signal interpretation, specificity, and sensitivity is a primary focus of many current investigations, and the successful application of EEG signal processing methods requires a detailed knowledge of both the topography and frequency spectra of low-amplitude, high-frequency craniofacial EMG. This information remains limited in clinical research, and as such, there is no known reliable technique for the removal of these artifacts from EEG data. The results presented herein outline a preliminary investigation of craniofacial EMG high-frequency spectra and 3D MRI segmentation that offers insight into the development of an anatomically-realistic model for characterizing these effects. The data presented highlights the potential for confounding signal contribution from around 60 to 200 Hz, when observed in frequency space, from both low and high-amplitude EMG signals. This range directly overlaps that of both low γ (30-50 Hz) and high γ (50-80 Hz) waves, as defined traditionally in standatrd EEG measurements, and mainly with waves presented in dense-array EEG recordings. Likewise, average EMG amplitude comparisons from each condition highlights the similarities in signal contribution of low-activity muscular movements and resting, control conditions. In addition to the FFT analysis performed, 3D segmentation and reconstruction of the craniofacial muscles whose EMG signals were measured was successful. This recapitulation of the relevant EMG morphology is a crucial first step in developing an anatomical model for the isolation and removal of confounding low-amplitude craniofacial EMG signals from EEG data. Such a model may be eventually applied in a clinical setting to ultimately help to extend the use of EEG in various clinical roles. PMID:26913150

  2. Low-Amplitude Craniofacial EMG Power Spectral Density and 3D Muscle Reconstruction from MRI.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Lukas; Chaberova, Jana; Edmunds, Kyle; Einarsdóttir, Guðrún; Ramon, Ceon; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2015-03-11

    Improving EEG signal interpretation, specificity, and sensitivity is a primary focus of many current investigations, and the successful application of EEG signal processing methods requires a detailed knowledge of both the topography and frequency spectra of low-amplitude, high-frequency craniofacial EMG. This information remains limited in clinical research, and as such, there is no known reliable technique for the removal of these artifacts from EEG data. The results presented herein outline a preliminary investigation of craniofacial EMG high-frequency spectra and 3D MRI segmentation that offers insight into the development of an anatomically-realistic model for characterizing these effects. The data presented highlights the potential for confounding signal contribution from around 60 to 200 Hz, when observed in frequency space, from both low and high-amplitude EMG signals. This range directly overlaps that of both low γ (30-50 Hz) and high γ (50-80 Hz) waves, as defined traditionally in standatrd EEG measurements, and mainly with waves presented in dense-array EEG recordings. Likewise, average EMG amplitude comparisons from each condition highlights the similarities in signal contribution of low-activity muscular movements and resting, control conditions. In addition to the FFT analysis performed, 3D segmentation and reconstruction of the craniofacial muscles whose EMG signals were measured was successful. This recapitulation of the relevant EMG morphology is a crucial first step in developing an anatomical model for the isolation and removal of confounding low-amplitude craniofacial EMG signals from EEG data. Such a model may be eventually applied in a clinical setting to ultimately help to extend the use of EEG in various clinical roles.

  3. On optical studies of high-velocity clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, D. G.; Burks, G. S.; Gibney, T. B.

    1986-01-01

    Lists of distant objects that can be used to study physical conditions in, and distances of, 21 cm (Oort) high-velocity clouds are presented. Recent published observations are used to compile positions, velocities, and distances of the clouds.

  4. The velocity distribution of cometary hydrogen - Evidence for high velocities?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Michael E.; Spinrad, Hyron

    1993-01-01

    The Hamilton Echelle spectrograph on the 3-m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory was used to obtain high-velocity and spatial resolution 2D spectra of H-alpha 6563-A emission in Comets Austin and Levy. The presence of the components expected from water dissociation and collisional thermalization in the inner coma is confirmed by the hydrogen velocity distribution. In Comet Austin, the potential high-velocity hydrogen includes velocities of up to about 40 km/s and is spatially symmetric with respect to the nucleus. In Comet Levy, the high-velocity hydrogen reaches velocities of up to 50 km/s and is situated exclusively on the sunward side of the nucleus. The two distinct signatures of high-velocity hydrogen imply two distinct sources.

  5. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  6. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  7. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  8. Cryogenic Testing of High-Velocity Spoke Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Christopher S.; Delayen, Jean R.; Park, HyeKyoung

    2014-12-01

    Spoke-loaded cavities are being investigated for the high-velocity regime. The relative compactness at low-frequency makes them attractive for applications requiring, or benefiting from, 4 K operation. Additionally, the large velocity acceptance makes them good candidates for the acceleration of high-velocity protons and ions. Here we present the results of cryogenic testing of a 325 MHz, β0= 0.82 single-spoke cavity and a 500 MHz, β0 = 1 double-spoke cavity.

  9. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  10. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  11. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - spinal cord ... spinal tumors occur in the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Most often these are ependymomas and other ... gene mutations. Spinal tumors can occur: Inside the spinal cord (intramedullary) In the membranes (meninges) covering the spinal ...

  12. A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements.

    PubMed

    Luckabauer, Martin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Würschum, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys.

  13. Experimental study of low amplitude, long-duration mechanical loading of reactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P A; Forbes, J W

    2000-10-03

    Studies of the low amplitude, long-duration mechanical loading of reactive materials rely very heavily on the experimental data in general and in particular on the data obtained from gauges placed within the experimental test sample to measure accurately the local changes of parameters of the investigated material. For a complete description of these changes taking place in a dynamically loaded material one would like to know both the spatial and the temporal resolution of pressure, temperature, volume, wave and mass velocity. However, temperature and volume are not easily attainable. Therefore, most of the in-situ work is limited to measurements of pressure and both wave and mass velocities. Various types of these gauges will be discussed and their records will be illustrated. Some of these gauges have limitations but are better suited for particular applications than others. These aspects will also be discussed. Main limitation of most in-situ gauges is that they are built for one-dimensional application. However, some work is being done to develop two-dimensional gauges. This work will also be briefly discussed. While these experiments are necessary to validate theoretical models of the phenomenon, they can also provide sufficient amount of data to yield complete information on material characteristics such as its equation of state (EOS), its phase change under certain loads and its sensitivity to shock loading. Processing of these data to get important information on the behavior of both reactive and non-reactive materials will also be demonstrated.

  14. Laboratory Headphone Studies of Human Response to Low-Amplitude Sonic Booms and Rattle Heard Indoors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loubeau, Alexandra; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Klos, Jacob; Rathsam, Jonathan; Gavin, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    Human response to sonic booms heard indoors is affected by the generation of contact-induced rattle noise. The annoyance caused by sonic boom-induced rattle noise was studied in a series of psychoacoustics tests. Stimuli were divided into three categories and presented in three different studies: isolated rattles at the same calculated Perceived Level (PL), sonic booms combined with rattles with the mixed sound at a single PL, and sonic booms combined with rattles with the mixed sound at three different PL. Subjects listened to sounds over headphones and were asked to report their annoyance. Annoyance to different rattles was shown to vary significantly according to rattle object size. In addition, the combination of low-amplitude sonic booms and rattles can be more annoying than the sonic boom alone. Correlations and regression analyses for the combined sonic boom and rattle sounds identified the Moore and Glasberg Stationary Loudness (MGSL) metric as a primary predictor of annoyance for the tested sounds. Multiple linear regression models were developed to describe annoyance to the tested sounds, and simplifications for applicability to a wider range of sounds are presented.

  15. A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements.

    PubMed

    Luckabauer, Martin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Würschum, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys. PMID:27475604

  16. Viscoelasticity of packed erythrocyte suspensions subjected to low amplitude oscillatory deformation.

    PubMed

    Drasler, W J; Smith, C M; Keller, K H

    1987-09-01

    Concentrated adult erythrocyte suspensions were subjected to low amplitude oscillatory shear in a Weissenberg rheogoniometer equipped with a cone-and-plate assembly. The dynamic viscoelastic properties of the suspension were measured over a broad range of frequency by a numerical solution that accounted for fluid inertia. Variation of shear amplitude and cell volume percent, and comparison of buffered saline, plasma, and dextran as suspending media showed that the cellular elements had undergone small bending and shearing deformations. Studies of normal adult erythrocytes, hypotonically swollen cells, temperature-altered cells, and erythrocyte ghosts suggested that the method was evaluating membrane material properties. The normal membrane was found to exhibit a shear rate dependent elastic modulus that increased by more than a factor of 20 over a frequency range from 0.0076 Hz to 60 Hz. The membrane viscosity showed a substantial drop with frequency indicative of a frequency thinning phenomenon. At high frequency of deformation the viscous response of normal erythrocytes was no longer indicative of a membrane property due to the dominant influence of the internal hemoglobin solution. The studies generally supported the ability of the method to quantify relative membrane material properties and detect changes in membrane structure.

  17. A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckabauer, Martin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Würschum, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys.

  18. Golden Gate Bridge response: a study with low-amplitude data from three earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic response of the Golden Gate Bridge, located north of San Francisco, CA, has been studied previously using ambient vibration data and finite element models. Since permanent seismic instrumentation was installed in 1993, only small earthquakes that originated at distances varying between ~11 to 122 km have been recorded. Nonetheless, these records prompted this study of the response of the bridge to low amplitude shaking caused by three earthquakes. Compared to previous ambient vibration studies, the earthquake response data reveal a slightly higher fundamental frequency (shorter-period) for vertical vibration of the bridge deck center span (~7.7–8.3 s versus 8.2–10.6 s), and a much higher fundamental frequency (shorter period) for the transverse direction of the deck (~11.24–16.3 s versus ~18.2 s). In this study, it is also shown that these two periods are dominant apparent periods representing interaction between tower, cable, and deck.

  19. Viscoelasticity of packed erythrocyte suspensions subjected to low amplitude oscillatory deformation.

    PubMed Central

    Drasler, W J; Smith, C M; Keller, K H

    1987-01-01

    Concentrated adult erythrocyte suspensions were subjected to low amplitude oscillatory shear in a Weissenberg rheogoniometer equipped with a cone-and-plate assembly. The dynamic viscoelastic properties of the suspension were measured over a broad range of frequency by a numerical solution that accounted for fluid inertia. Variation of shear amplitude and cell volume percent, and comparison of buffered saline, plasma, and dextran as suspending media showed that the cellular elements had undergone small bending and shearing deformations. Studies of normal adult erythrocytes, hypotonically swollen cells, temperature-altered cells, and erythrocyte ghosts suggested that the method was evaluating membrane material properties. The normal membrane was found to exhibit a shear rate dependent elastic modulus that increased by more than a factor of 20 over a frequency range from 0.0076 Hz to 60 Hz. The membrane viscosity showed a substantial drop with frequency indicative of a frequency thinning phenomenon. At high frequency of deformation the viscous response of normal erythrocytes was no longer indicative of a membrane property due to the dominant influence of the internal hemoglobin solution. The studies generally supported the ability of the method to quantify relative membrane material properties and detect changes in membrane structure. PMID:3651555

  20. Pierce Prize Lecture: High Velocity Clouds: Cosmological and Galactic Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembach, K.

    2001-12-01

    The Milky Way and its surrounding environs contain gas moving at high velocities with respect to the Sun. For the past half century, most of the information available for these high velocity clouds (HVCs) has come from H I 21cm surveys. Improvements in these surveys have recently led to the idea that some of the high velocity H I clouds may be located outside the Milky Way within the Local Group. Such a hypothesis is testable by various means, but the neutral gas content of the clouds tells only half of a much more complex story. In this talk I will present new information about the ionized gas within HVCs, their impact on the gaseous atmosphere of the Galaxy, and their relevance to the cosmic web of hot gas that may contain a significant fraction of the baryonic material in the low-redshift universe.

  1. Implications of high-velocity interstellar H I absorption features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowie, L.; York, D. G.; Laurent, C.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to the interstellar H I column density at high velocities from immediate postshock gas and from the cooling gas behind a shock are compared. The detection of high-velocity H I in L-epsilon and L-delta for Iota Ori is reported and interpreted as cooling gas behind a shock of 100 km/s velocity. The immediate postshock gas should be observable for shock velocities greater than 200 km/s and permits direct determination of the velocities of adiabatic shocks in the interstellar medium. It is pointed out that interstellar L-alpha and L-beta lines may not have purely Lorentzian profiles if high-velocity H I is a widespread phenomenon.

  2. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Christopher S.; Delayen, Jean R.

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  3. Punch valve development testing: Low and high velocity test results

    SciTech Connect

    Replogle, W.C.; Brandon, S.L.

    1996-09-01

    This is a report on the use of quasi-static tests to predict fundamental parameters for punch valve development. This report summarizes the results from low and high velocity tests performed with 0.63 and 0.38 cm diameter plungers, 5 cm long penetrating aluminium and composite targets. The low velocity tests, 0.025 m/s, were performed to understand the effects and interactions of plunger diameter plunger tip shape, target material, and target support on penetration energy and plunger functionality. High velocity tests, 75 m/s, were compared to low velocity results.

  4. Overview of historical recurring low-amplitude floods in Lower Provence, Southeastern France (1700-1950)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maughan, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    In the Mediterranean world, water plays a prominent role as a « prime mover » in the development of urban and rural spaces. But, the specificities of the typical climate require a management of a natural resource that varies permanently between scarcity and abundance. Since Antiquity, the chronic lack of freshwater could be limited thanks to large hydraulic infrastructures while the flood risk management has always been a recurring problem for rural and urban communities. Because of brief, intense and irregularly distributed rain, amplified by a mountainous topography, stream floods often are heavy and flash with catastrophic consequences. However, often only past extremefloods were studied because both their consequences and available archival materials they have left while many recurring low-amplitude floodshave resulted in severe damagesto hydraulic and road infrastructures, in loss of agricultural soils and inconflicts between citizens and administration. Indeed, these ones were a central problem for rural and urban settlements and for the managementof water bodies.It seems interesting to present adetailed overview of historical recurring low-amplitude floods and consider how local societies have chosen to manage these questions and how these small hydrological events have contributed to shape existing current hydrological and geomorphologicalstructure of hydrosystems. In this context, the Lower Provence area (especially the Bouches-du-Rhône district, southeastern France), subject to recurring floods for centuries, appears to be a perfect place to explore and understand these questions. The decision to start the study at the dawn of the Eighteenth Century is especially interesting because it's a turning point for economic, scientific and engineering development in many European countries during whichdisasters and environmental health risks, including flooding, begin to become a real social and technical problem for authorities and citizens. Moreover, from

  5. Removal of Residual Nuclei Following a Cavitation Event using Low-Amplitude Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Cain, Charles A.; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Microscopic residual bubble nuclei can persist on the order of 1 second following a cavitation event. These bubbles can limit the efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, as they attenuate pulses that arrive subsequent to their formation and seed repetitive cavitation activity at a discrete set of sites (cavitation memory). Here, we explore a strategy for the removal of these residual bubbles following a cavitation event, using low amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate bubble coalescence. All experiments were conducted in degassed water and monitored using high speed photography. In each case, a 2 MHz histotripsy transducer was used to initiate cavitation activity (a cavitational bubble cloud), the collapse of which generated a population of residual bubble nuclei. This residual nuclei population was then sonicated using a 1 ms pulse from a separate 500 kHz transducer, which we term the ‘bubble removal pulse.’ Bubble removal pulse amplitudes ranging from 0 to 1.7 MPa were tested, and the backlit area of shadow from bubbles remaining in the field following bubble removal was calculated to quantify efficacy. It was found that an ideal amplitude range exists (roughly 180 – 570 kPa) in which bubble removal pulses stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubble nuclei, effectively removing them from the field. Further optimization of bubble removal pulse sequences stands to provide an adjunct to cavitation-based ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, mitigating the effects of residual bubble nuclei that currently limit their efficacy. PMID:25265172

  6. LOW AMPLITUDE SINGLE AND MULTIPLE SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING OF LX-04

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Chidester, S; Urtiew, P A; Forbes, J W

    2006-06-27

    Shock initiation experiments were performed on the plastic bonded explosive (PBX) LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton binder) using single and multiple low amplitude shocks to obtain pressure history data for use in Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling parameterization. A 100 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the LX-04 explosive charges containing manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between explosive discs. In the single shock experiments, the run distances to detonation at three shock pressures showed agreement with previously published data above 3 GPa. Even longer run distances to detonation were measured using 80 mm long by 145 mm diameter LX-04 charges impacted by low velocity projectiles from a 155 mm diameter gun. The minimum shock pressure required to cause low levels of exothermic reaction were determined for these large LX-04 charge dimensions. Multiple shocks were generated as double shocks by using a flyer plate with two materials and as reflected shocks by placing a high impedance material at the rear of the explosive charge. In both cases, the first shock pressure was not high enough to cause detonation of LX-04, and the second shock pressure, which would have been sufficient to cause detonation if generated by a single shock, failed to cause detonation. Thus LX-04 exhibited shock desensitization over a range of 0.6 to 1.4 GPa. The higher shock pressure LX-04 model was extended to accurately simulate these lower pressure and multiple shock gauge records. The shock desensitization effects observed with multiple shock compressions were partially accounted for in the model by using a critical compression corresponding to a shock pressure of 1.2 GPa. This shock desensitization effect occurs at higher pressures than those of other HMX-based PBX's containing higher HMX percentages.

  7. Certain optimal parameters of high-velocity Venturi ejection tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, S. B.; Reznichenko, I. G.; Pavlenko, Y. P.

    1984-11-01

    The influence of the geometrical characteristics of centrifugal nozzles in high velocity Venturi ejection tubes for atomizing liquid in gas cleaning plant is analyzed. An optimal value of the nozzle geometrical characteristic, which is a function of the degree of filling of the nozzle outlet opening by the liquid, is given, at which the throat length is independent of water pressure before the nozzle.

  8. A High-Velocity Collision With Our Galaxy's Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    What caused the newly discovered supershell in the outskirts of our galaxy? A new study finds evidence that a high-velocity cloud may have smashed into the Milky Ways disk millions of years ago.Mysterious Gas ShellsA single velocity-channel map of the supershell GS040.2+00.670, with red contours marking the high-velocity cloud at its center. [Adapted from Park et al. 2016]The neutral hydrogen gas that fills interstellar space is organized into structures like filaments, loops, and shells. Supershells are enormous shells of hydrogen gas that can have radii of a thousand light-years or more; weve spotted about 20 of these in our own galaxy, and more in nearby dwarfs and spiral galaxies.How do these structures form? One theory is that they result from several supernovae explosions occurring in the same area. But the energy needed to create a supershell is more than 3 x 1052 erg, which corresponds to over 30 supernovae quite a lot to have exploding in the same region.Theres an interesting alternative scenario: the supershells might instead be caused by the impacts of high-velocity clouds that fall into the galactic disk.Velocity data for the compact high-velocity cloud CHVC040. The cloud is moving fast enough to create the supershell observed. [Adapted from Park et al. 2016]The Milky Ways Speeding CloudsHigh-velocity clouds are clouds of mostly hydrogen that speed through the Milky Way with radial velocities that are very different from the material in the galactic disk. The origins of these clouds are unknown, but its proposed that they come from outside the galaxy they might be fragments of a nearby, disrupting galaxy, or they might have originated from flows of accreting gas in the space in between galaxies.Though high-velocity clouds have long been on the list of things that might cause supershells, weve yet to find conclusive evidence of this. But that might have just changed, with a recent discovery by a team of scientists led by Geumsook Park (Seoul National

  9. Mixing between High Velocity Clouds and the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritton, Jeffrey A.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin

    2014-11-01

    In the Galactic halo, metal-bearing Galactic halo material mixes into high velocity clouds (HVCs) as they hydrodynamically interact. This interaction begins long before the clouds completely dissipate and long before they slow to the velocity of the Galactic material. In order to make quantitative estimates of the mixing efficiency and resulting metal enrichment of HVCs, we made detailed two- and three-dimensional simulations of cloud-interstellar medium interactions. Our simulations track the hydrodynamics and time-dependent ionization levels. They assume that the cloud originally has a warm temperature and extremely low metallicity while the surrounding medium has a high temperature, low density, and substantial metallicity, but our simulations can be generalized to other choices of initial metallicities. In our simulations, mixing between cloud and halo gas noticeably raises the metallicity of the high velocity material. We present plots of the mixing efficiency and metal enrichment as a function of time.

  10. High Velocity Forming of Magnesium and Titanium Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Revuelta, A.; Larkiola, J.; Korhonen, A. S.; Kanervo, K.

    2007-04-07

    Cold forming of magnesium and titanium is difficult due to their hexagonal crystal structure and limited number of available slip systems. However, high velocity deformation can be quite effective in increasing the forming limits. In this study, electromagnetic forming (EMF) of thin AZ31B-O magnesium and CP grade 1 titanium sheets were compared with normal deep drawing. Same dies were used in both forming processes. Finite element (FE) simulations were carried out to improve the EMF process parameters. Constitutive data was determined using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar tests (SHPB). To study formability, sample sheets were electromagnetically launched to the female die, using a flat spiral electromagnetic coil and aluminum driver sheets. Deep drawing tests were made by a laboratory press-machine.Results show that high velocity forming processes increase the formability of Magnesium and Titanium sheets although process parameters have to be carefully tuned to obtain good results.

  11. Mixing between high velocity clouds and the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Gritton, Jeffrey A.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu

    2014-11-01

    In the Galactic halo, metal-bearing Galactic halo material mixes into high velocity clouds (HVCs) as they hydrodynamically interact. This interaction begins long before the clouds completely dissipate and long before they slow to the velocity of the Galactic material. In order to make quantitative estimates of the mixing efficiency and resulting metal enrichment of HVCs, we made detailed two- and three-dimensional simulations of cloud-interstellar medium interactions. Our simulations track the hydrodynamics and time-dependent ionization levels. They assume that the cloud originally has a warm temperature and extremely low metallicity while the surrounding medium has a high temperature, low density, and substantial metallicity, but our simulations can be generalized to other choices of initial metallicities. In our simulations, mixing between cloud and halo gas noticeably raises the metallicity of the high velocity material. We present plots of the mixing efficiency and metal enrichment as a function of time.

  12. Gouge initiation in high-velocity rocket sled testing

    SciTech Connect

    Tachau, R.D.M.; Trucano, T.G.; Yew, C.H.

    1994-07-01

    A model is presented which describes the formation of surface damage ``gouging`` on the rails that guide rocket sleds. An unbalanced sled can randomly cause a very shallow-angle, oblique impact between the sled shoe and the rail. This damage phenomenon has also been observed in high-velocity guns where the projectile is analogous to the moving sled shoe and the gun barrel is analogous to the stationary rail. At sufficiently high velocity, the oblique impact will produce a thin hot layer of soft material on the contact surfaces. Under the action of a normal moving load, the soft layer lends itself to an anti-symmetric deformation and the formation of a ``hump`` in front of the moving load. A gouge is formed when this hump is overrun by the sled shoe. The phenomenon is simulated numerically using the CTH strong shock physics code, and the results are in good agreement with experimental observation.

  13. High Velocity Forming of Magnesium and Titanium Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revuelta, A.; Larkiola, J.; Korhonen, A. S.; Kanervo, K.

    2007-04-01

    Cold forming of magnesium and titanium is difficult due to their hexagonal crystal structure and limited number of available slip systems. However, high velocity deformation can be quite effective in increasing the forming limits. In this study, electromagnetic forming (EMF) of thin AZ31B-O magnesium and CP grade 1 titanium sheets were compared with normal deep drawing. Same dies were used in both forming processes. Finite element (FE) simulations were carried out to improve the EMF process parameters. Constitutive data was determined using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar tests (SHPB). To study formability, sample sheets were electromagnetically launched to the female die, using a flat spiral electromagnetic coil and aluminum driver sheets. Deep drawing tests were made by a laboratory press-machine. Results show that high velocity forming processes increase the formability of Magnesium and Titanium sheets although process parameters have to be carefully tuned to obtain good results.

  14. Gouge initiation in high-velocity rocket sled testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachau, R. D. M.; Trucano, T. G.; Yew, C. H.

    1994-07-01

    A model is presented which describes the formation of surface damage 'gouging' on the rails that guide rocket sleds. An unbalanced sled can randomly cause a very shallow-angle, oblique impact between the sled shoe and the rail. This damage phenomenon has also been observed in high-velocity guns where the projectile is analogous to the moving sled shoe and the gun barrel is analogous to the stationary rail. At sufficiently high velocity, the oblique impact will produce a thin hot layer of soft material on the contact surfaces. Under the action of a normal moving load, the soft layer lends itself to an anti-symmetric deformation and the formation of a 'hump' in front of the moving load. A gouge is formed when this hump is overrun by the sled shoe. The phenomenon is simulated numerically using the CTH strong shock physics code, and the results are in good agreement with experimental observation.

  15. Three-dimensional orientation of compact high velocity clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitsch, F.; Bartell, B.; Clark, S. E.; Peek, J. E. G.; Cheng, D.; Putman, M.

    2016-10-01

    We present a proof-of-concept study of a method to estimate the inclination angle of compact high velocity clouds (CHVCs), i.e. the angle between a CHVC's trajectory and the line of sight. The inclination angle is derived from the CHVC's morphology and kinematics. We calibrate the method with numerical simulations, and we apply it to a sample of CHVCs drawn from HIPASS (Putman et al.). Implications for CHVC distances are discussed.

  16. Stimulation with a low-amplitude, digitized synaptic signal to invoke robust activity within neuronal networks on multielectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Zemianek, Jill M; Serra, Michael; Guaraldi, Mary; Shea, Thomas B

    2012-03-01

    Multielectrode arrays (MEAs) are used for analysis of neuronal activity. Here we report two variations on commonly accepted techniques that increase the precision of extracellular electrical stimulation: (i) the use of a low-amplitude recorded spontaneous synaptic signal as a stimulus waveform and (ii) the use of a specific electrode within the array adjacent to the stimulus electrode as a hard-grounded stimulus signal return path. Both modifications remained compatible with manipulation of neuronal networks. In addition, localized stimulation with the low-amplitude synaptic signal allowed selective stimulation or inhibition of otherwise spontaneous signals. These findings indicate that minimizing the area of the culture impacted by external stimulation allows modulation of signaling patterns within subpopulations of neurons in culture. The simple modifications described herein may be useful for precise monitoring and manipulation of neuronal networks.

  17. Controlling Btu input with high-velocity burners

    SciTech Connect

    Lukacs, J.J.

    1995-09-01

    StepFire{trademark} (sometimes called pulse fire) controls heat input through a burner by rapidly cycling from high fire to low fire (or from high fire to off) to control the temperature of either an entire kiln or a zone within a kiln. In the StepFire process, each burner, rather than an entire zone of burners, is controlled. The StepFire process provides a better approach to temperature control: high-velocity burners improve temperature distribution across the load, whether the burners are fired vertically downward or horizontally; reentrainment effect of the burners breaks up crown drift and allows dissipation of energy into the product; high-velocity burners generate less NO{sub x} and co than injector-type burners; high-velocity burners put most of the combustion air through the burners and do not have to rely on the mass flow of air from the cooling zone to complete combustion and provide uniformity; individual cycling of the burners does not radically change the total input of gases to the furnace, thereby allowing pressure control; because burners are cycled individually, the entire zone of the furnace does not go from a heating to a cooling mode, but continues at an input rate to maintain uniformity of energy input through the stepping process. StepFire use on all types of kilns results in improved product properties and quality, reduced fuel use, increased production, fewer rejects and reduction of NO{sub x} and CO emissions. Because the burners operate under their optimum conditions during most of the firing cycles, NO{sub x} formation is reduced, and the quenching effect of the flame by excess air is not present, reducing the generation of CO.

  18. Analysis of high velocity impact on hybrid composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes recent developments in the analysis of high velocity impact of composite blades using a computerized capability which consists of coupling a composites mechanics code with the direct-time integration features of NASTRAN. The application of the capability to determine the linear dynamic response of an intraply hybrid composite aircraft engine fan blade is described in detail. The predicted results agree with measured data. The results also show that the impact stresses reach sufficiently high magnitudes to cause failures in the impact region at early times of the impact event.

  19. High-Velocity Star Formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    PubMed

    Graff; Gould

    2000-05-01

    Light-echo measurements show that SN 1987A is 425 pc behind the LMC disk. It is continuing to move away from the disk at 18 km s-1. Thus, it has been suggested that SN 1987A was ejected from the LMC disk. However, SN 1987A is a member of a star cluster, so this entire cluster would have to have been ejected from the disk. We show that the cluster was formed in the LMC disk, with a velocity perpendicular to the disk of about 50 km s-1. Such high-velocity formation of a star cluster is unusual, having no known counterpart in the Milky Way.

  20. Analysis of high velocity impact on hybrid composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Recent developments in the analysis of high velocity impact of composite blades are described, using a computerized capability which consists of coupling a composites mechanics code with the direct-time integration features of NASTRAN. The application of the capability to determine the linear dynamic response of an interply hybrid composite aircraft engine fan blade is described in detail. The results also show that the impact stresses reach sufficiently high magnitudes to cause failures in the impact region at early times of the impact event.

  1. High-velocity pulsars in the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, D. ); Silk, J. )

    1992-08-14

    A common origin is proposed for high-velocity pulsars and for gamma-ray bursters. This source is a subdominant population of neutron stars that are in a spatially extended halo around our galaxy. Theoretical speculations and especially recent observations suggest the possible existence of a halo population of neutron stars. Specifically, recent reports of diskward-moving, high-latitude pulsars and of a nearly isotropic distribution of gamma-ray bursters motivate the authors to propose a source of neutron stars in the halo. They suggest that neutron stars could form by mergers of white dwarfs.

  2. Electric rail gun projectile acceleration to high velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, D. P.; Mccormick, T. J.; Barber, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    Electric rail accelerators are being investigated for application in electric propulsion systems. Several electric propulsion applications require that the rail accelerator be capable of launching projectiles at velocities above 10 km/s. An experimental program was conducted to develop rail accelerator technology for high velocity projectile launch. Several 6 mm bore, 3 m long rail accelerators were fabricated. Projectiles with a mass of 0.2 g were accelerated by plasmas, carrying currents up to 150 kA. Experimental design and results are described. Results indicate that the accelerator performed as predicted for a fraction of the total projectile acceleration. The disparity between predicted and measured results are discussed.

  3. Aerosol production by high-velocity molten-metal droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D J; Benson, D A

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by high-velocity molten-metal droplets. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. The primary droplets are produced by the heating and electromagnetic launch of metal wires; velocities approaching Mach 1 can be obtained at present. Size distributions obtained tungsten and zirconium droplets burning in air. Lognormal size distributions were observed in both cases with DMPS-equivalent mean diameters of about 0.4 ..mu..m and geometric standard deviations of about two. SEM and TEM analysis of aerosol samples collected by a point-to-plane electrostatic precipitator showed that the majority of these particles were web-like chain agglomerates. Tests performed in argon atmospheres produced several orders-of-magnitude less aerosol mass than in equivalent air tests, supporting the key role combustion plays in secondary aerosol generation. 26 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. High Velocity Impact Response of Composite Lattice Core Sandwich Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Zhang, Guoqi; Wang, Shixun; Ma, Li; Wu, Linzhi

    2014-04-01

    In this research, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite sandwich structures with pyramidal lattice core subjected to high velocity impact ranging from 180 to 2,000 m/s have been investigated by experimental and numerical methods. Experiments using a two-stage light gas gun are conducted to investigate the impact process and to validate the finite element (FE) model. The energy absorption efficiency (EAE) in carbon fiber composite sandwich panels is compared with that of 304 stainless-steel and aluminum alloy lattice core sandwich structures. In a specific impact energy range, energy absorption efficiency in carbon fiber composite sandwich panels is higher than that of 304 stainless-steel sandwich panels and aluminum alloy sandwich panels owing to the big density of metal materials. Therefore, in addition to the multi-functional applications, carbon fiber composite sandwich panels have a potential advantage to substitute the metal sandwich panels as high velocity impact resistance structures under a specific impact energy range.

  5. High-velocity streams of dust originating from Saturn.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Sascha; Srama, Ralf; Horányi, Mihaly; Burton, Marcia; Helfert, Stefan; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Roy, Mou; Grün, Eberhard

    2005-01-20

    High-velocity submicrometre-sized dust particles expelled from the jovian system have been identified by dust detectors on board several spacecraft. On the basis of periodicities in the dust impact rate, Jupiter's moon Io was found to be the dominant source of the streams. The grains become positively charged within the plasma environment of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and gain energy from its co-rotational electric field. Outside the magnetosphere, the dynamics of the grains are governed by the interaction with the interplanetary magnetic field that eventually forms the streams. A similar process was suggested for Saturn. Here we report the discovery by the Cassini spacecraft of bursts of high-velocity dust particles (> or = 100 km s(-1)) within approximately 70 million kilometres of Saturn. Most of the particles detected at large distances appear to originate from the outskirts of Saturn's outermost main ring. All bursts of dust impacts detected within 150 Saturn radii are characterized by impact directions markedly different from those measured between the bursts, and they clearly coincide with the spacecraft's traversals through streams of compressed solar wind.

  6. MAGNETIZED GAS IN THE SMITH HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Alex S.; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M.; Mao, S. A.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Lockman, Felix J. E-mail: naomi.mcclure-griffiths@csiro.au E-mail: benjamir@uww.edu

    2013-11-01

    We report the first detection of magnetic fields associated with the Smith High Velocity Cloud. We use a catalog of Faraday rotation measures toward extragalactic radio sources behind the Smith Cloud, new H I observations from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, and a spectroscopic map of Hα from the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey. There are enhancements in rotation measure (RM) of ≈100 rad m{sup –2} which are generally well correlated with decelerated Hα emission. We estimate a lower limit on the line-of-sight component of the field of ≈8 μG along a decelerated filament; this is a lower limit due to our assumptions about the geometry. No RM excess is evident in sightlines dominated by H I or Hα at the velocity of the Smith Cloud. The smooth Hα morphology of the emission at the Smith Cloud velocity suggests photoionization by the Galactic ionizing radiation field as the dominant ionization mechanism, while the filamentary morphology and high (≈1 Rayleigh) Hα intensity of the lower-velocity magnetized ionized gas suggests an ionization process associated with shocks due to interaction with the Galactic interstellar medium. The presence of the magnetic field may contribute to the survival of high velocity clouds like the Smith Cloud as they move from the Galactic halo to the disk. We expect these data to provide a test for magnetohydrodynamic simulations of infalling gas.

  7. High-velocity streams of dust originating from Saturn.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Sascha; Srama, Ralf; Horányi, Mihaly; Burton, Marcia; Helfert, Stefan; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Roy, Mou; Grün, Eberhard

    2005-01-20

    High-velocity submicrometre-sized dust particles expelled from the jovian system have been identified by dust detectors on board several spacecraft. On the basis of periodicities in the dust impact rate, Jupiter's moon Io was found to be the dominant source of the streams. The grains become positively charged within the plasma environment of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and gain energy from its co-rotational electric field. Outside the magnetosphere, the dynamics of the grains are governed by the interaction with the interplanetary magnetic field that eventually forms the streams. A similar process was suggested for Saturn. Here we report the discovery by the Cassini spacecraft of bursts of high-velocity dust particles (> or = 100 km s(-1)) within approximately 70 million kilometres of Saturn. Most of the particles detected at large distances appear to originate from the outskirts of Saturn's outermost main ring. All bursts of dust impacts detected within 150 Saturn radii are characterized by impact directions markedly different from those measured between the bursts, and they clearly coincide with the spacecraft's traversals through streams of compressed solar wind. PMID:15662418

  8. High-Velocity Clouds and Superbubbles in Nearby Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Eric

    1996-05-01

    The galactic fountain model predicts that energetic stellar winds and supernovae in OB associations produce superbubbles containing hot gas that breaks out of the Galactic disk, cools radiatively as it rises upward, and recombines and returns to the disk ballistically. The hot (T ~ 10^6 K) gas can be observed with X-ray telescopes, while the cool returning neutral hydrogen (H I) is detectable as 21 cm emission from high-velocity clouds (HVCs). In the Milky Way Galaxy, a combination of infalling material tidally torn from the Magellanic Clouds and a galactic fountain can explain the high-velocity clouds that cover about 10% of the sky down to a column density of 2 to 3 X 10^18 cm^-2. Sensitive H I observations of nearby disk galaxies were performed with the Arecibo 305 m radio telescope to search for and measure the mass of HVCs in other galaxies. Ten of 14 galaxies have high-velocity wings that can be modeled as arising from a component of galactic gas with a velocity dispersion of 30 or 50 km s^-1. The HVC mass for the 10 galaxies ranges from 6 X 10^7 solar mass to 4 X 10^9 solar mass, which corresponds to 4 to 14% of the total H I in the galaxies. This is the first survey to search for HVCs in more than a few galaxies, and the results imply that Galactic HVCs are a disk-wide phenomenon with a characteristic distance of 10 to 20 kpc, containing a substantial fraction (~10%) of the neutral hydrogen in the Galaxy and much of the random kinetic energy in neutral gas. 21 cm synthesis imaging of UGC 12732 and NGC 5668, performed with the Very Large Array, confirmed the Arecibo results that the former does not have high-velocity gas while the latter does. Two components of high-velocity gas are present in NGC~5668; one may be from an accretion event, while the other is visible due to the increased H I velocity dispersion throughout the optical disk and may be galactic fountain gas. Neither of these components are visible in the observations of UGC 12732, and this galaxy

  9. A model for ductile metal friction at high velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerberg, J. E.; Ravelo, R. J.; Germann, T. C.

    We describe a meso-macro scale model for the frictional force at ductile metal interfaces for high velocities and large compressions. The model incorporates the micro-mesoscopic growth and refinement of material microstructure in a highly strained region at the sliding interface and incorporates both rate dependent plasticity and thermal conduction. The model compares favorably with recent large scale (1.8 billion atom) simulations to 50 ns of 3-dimensional polycrystalline 13-50 nm grain size Al-Al interfaces at pressures of 15 GPa using the SPaSM NonEquilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulation code. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. The support of the LANL ASC-PEM program is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. The distance to the high velocity clouds of neutral hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Joel N.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project was to determine the distance to high velocity gas clouds. These clouds are believed to lie in the halo of the galaxy, but this is a matter of controversy. The technique was used to look for the effect of absorption by these clouds against the light of stars at various distances along the line of sight to these clouds. This was done in the ultraviolet using the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Absorption at the velocity of the clouds was not found in any of the stars, which have kiloparsec distances. It was concluded that the vertical distance to these clouds is at least 1.5 kpc, putting them firmly in the halo of the galaxy.

  11. Fluid shielding of high-velocity jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental noise data for a nozzle exhaust system incorporating a thermal acoustic shield (TAS) are presented to show the effect of changes in geometric and flow parameters on attenuation of high-velocity jet exhaust noise in the flyover plane. The results are presented for a 10.00-cm-diameter primary conical nozzle with a TAS configuration consisting of a 2.59- or 5.07-cm-wide annular gap. Shield-stream exhaust velocity was varied from 157 to 248 m/sec to investigate the effect of velocity ratio. The results showed that increasing the annular gap width increases attenuation of high-frequency noise when comparisons are made on the same ideal thrust basis. Varying the velocity ratio had a minor effect on the noise characteristics of the nozzles investigated.

  12. Low and high velocity impact response of thick hybrid composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clement; Ishai, Ori

    1993-01-01

    The effects of low and high velocity impact on thick hybrid composites (THC's) were experimentally compared. Test Beams consisted of CFRP skins which were bonded onto an interleaved syntactic foam core and cured at 177 C (350 F). The impactor tip for both cases was a 16 mm (0.625 inch) steel hemisphere. In spite of the order of magnitude difference in velocity ranges and impactor weights, similar relationships between impact energy, damage size, and residual strength were found. The dependence of the skin compressive strength on damage size agree well with analytical open hole models for composite laminates and may enable the prediction of ultimate performance for the damaged composite, based on visual inspection.

  13. The acceleration of high-velocity clouds in supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, C. F.; Cowie, L. L.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Interstellar clouds passed by blast waves emanating from supernova explosions will be accelerated by the ram pressure of the expanding interior shocked gas. We present numerical and analytical solutions for cloud acceleration in this environment, comparing the results with recent observations of faint, high-velocity (greater than 100 km/sec) filaments observed in Cygnus and Vela. Photons from the conductive interface between the clouds and the surrounding medium can provide the ionizing flux necessary for observable optical emission. Several predictions are made, the most important of which is that fast clouds of neutral hydrogen with column densities of about 10 quintillion per sq cm should be observable in 21 cm studies of SNRs.

  14. HST-FGS parallaxes of two high-velocity stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacConnell, D. Jack; Osborn, Wayne H.; Miller, Richard J.

    1997-09-01

    Astrometric position measurements with the Hubble Space Telescope's Fine Guidance System have been used to measure the trigonometric parallaxes of two high-velocity stars, R50 = G166-37 and W624 = G16-25. In both cases, the parallaxes are small and confirm large velocities in the galactocentric rest frame. We derive pi_ {abs} = 5.2 +/- 0.7 mas and vrf = 467 kms for R50. The results for W624 are pi_ {abs} = 3.8 +/- 1.0 and vrf = 326 kms with an uncertainty of about 30%. Our results support a value for the galactic escape velocity at the solar distance of about 475 kms.

  15. Solar wind collimation of the Jupiter high velocity dust streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandes, A.; Krueger, H.

    2006-12-01

    The dust bursts discovered by the Ulysses dust sensor when approaching Jupiter in 1992 were later confirmed as collimated streams of high velocity (~200 km/s) charged (~5V) dust grains escaping from Jupiter and dominated by the interplanetary Magnetic field (IMF). With Cassini, a similar phenomenon was observed in Saturn. It was demonstrated that the Jovian dust streams are closely related to the solar wind compressed regions, either Corotating interaction regions (CIRs) or Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ¨Cto a minor extent-. Actually the dust streams seem ultimately to be generated by such events. This can be explained considering that dust grains are accelerated as they gain substantial energy while compressed at the forward and reverse shocks that bound or precede these solar wind regions.

  16. Characterization of high velocity oxy-fuel combustion sprayed hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Haman, J D; Lucas, L C; Crawmer, D

    1995-02-01

    Bioceramic coatings, created by the high velocity oxy-fuel combustion spraying of hydroxyapatite (HA) powders onto commercially pure titanium, were characterized in order to determine whether this relatively new coating process can be successfully applied to bioceramic coatings of orthopaedic and dental implants. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize both the HA starting powders and coatings. A 12 wk immersion test was conducted and the resulting changes in the coatings were also characterized. Calcium ion release during dissolution was measured with flame atomic absorption during the first 6 weeks of the immersion study. A comparison of powder and coating X-ray diffraction patterns and lattice parameters revealed an HA-type coating with some loss in crystallinity. Fourier transform infrared results showed a partial loss of the OH- group during spraying, however the phosphate groups were still present. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed a lamellar structure with very close coating-to-substrate apposition. The coatings experienced a loss of calcium during the immersion study, with the greatest release in calcium occurring during the first 6 days of the study. No significant structural or chemical changes were observed during the 12 wk immersion study. These results indicate that the high velocity oxy-fuel process can produce an HA-type coating; however, the process needs further optimization, specifically in the areas of coating-to-substrate bond strength and minimization of phases present other than HA, before it would be recommended for commercial use.

  17. Resonant Orbits and the High Velocity Peaks toward the Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloy, Matthew; Smith, Martin C.; Evans, N. Wyn; Shen, Juntai

    2015-10-01

    We extract the resonant orbits from an N-body bar that is a good representation of the Milky Way, using the method recently introduced by Molloy et al. By decomposing the bar into its constituent orbit families, we show that they are intimately connected to the boxy-peanut shape of the density. We highlight the imprint due solely to resonant orbits on the kinematic landscape toward the Galactic center. The resonant orbits are shown to have distinct kinematic features and may be used to explain the cold velocity peak seen in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment commissioning data. We show that high velocity peaks are a natural consequence of the motions of stars in the 2:1 orbit family and that stars on other higher order resonances can contribute to the peaks. The locations of the peaks vary with bar angle and, with the tacit assumption that the observed peaks are due to the 2:1 family, we find that the locations of the high velocity peaks correspond to bar angles in the range {10}\\circ ≲ {θ }{bar}≲ 25^\\circ . However, some important questions about the nature of the peaks remain, such as their apparent absence in other surveys of the Bulge and the deviations from symmetry between equivalent fields in the north and south. We show that the absence of a peak in surveys at higher latitudes is likely due to the combination of a less prominent peak and a lower number density of bar supporting orbits at these latitudes.

  18. Spinal fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anterior spinal fusion; Spine surgery - spinal fusion; Low back pain - fusion; Herniated disk - fusion ... If you had chronic back pain before surgery, you will likely still have some pain afterward. Spinal fusion is unlikely to take away all your pain ...

  19. Spinal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. Alternative Names Spinal cord injury; SCI Images Skeletal spine Vertebra, cervical (neck) Vertebra, lumbar (low back) Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Vertebral column Central nervous system Spinal cord injury Spinal anatomy Two person roll - ...

  20. Orbital Transfer Vehicle Engine Technology High Velocity Ratio Diffusing Crossover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-01-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  1. Two high-velocity encounters of elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcells, Marc; Borne, Kirk D.; Hoessel, John G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes results obtained on a simulation of two high-velocity encounters of NGC 4782/4783 and NGC 2672/2673 binary elliptical galaxies which differ substantially in mass ratio (about 1 for the first pair, and about 10 for the second). CCD images and velocities obtained from digital spectra were used to constrain simulations of the galaxy collisions. The binary orbital elements, the orientation of the orbit in the sky, the time since pericenter, and the dynamical mass of the pair were derived. Results suggested that the dumb-bell galaxy NGC 4782/4783 is not a supermassive galaxy, as was claimed earlier on the basis of the high relative velocity and high central dispersion, but has a moderate mass to luminosity ratio M/L(B) of about 10. It was concluded that its trajectory changed from hyperbolic to elliptical as a result of energy lost during the collision. It was found that the NGC 2672/2673 also has a moderate M/L(B) of about 7.

  2. Energy loss of heavy ions at high velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, J. U.; Ball, G. C.; Davies, J. A.; Davies, W. G.; Forster, J. S.; Geiger, J. S.; Geissel, H.; Ryabov, V. A.

    1994-05-01

    The slowing down of heavy ions by electronic stopping at high velocity is discussed. The ions are nearly fully stripped and have a well defined charge with relatively small fluctuations. Owing to the large charge of the ions, the classical Bohr formula applies instead of the Bethe formula, which is based on a quantum perturbation calculation. It is essential to include the Barkas effect in the description since it becomes quite large for heavy ions, especially in high-Z materials. In Lindhard's treatment [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 132 (1976) l], the Barkas correction is viewed as an effect of dynamic screening of the ion potential in the initial phase of a collision with an electron, which reduces the relative velocity and therefore enhances the cross section. With inclusion of this enhancement factor for all impact parameters, as evaluated by Jackson and McCarthy for distant collisions [Phys. Rev. B 6 (1972) 4131], the description reproduces within a few percent measurements for 15 MeV/u Br on Si, Ni, and Au and for 10 MeV/u Kr on Al, Ni, and Au. The procedure is shown also to apply at lower velocities near the stopping maximum, albeit with less accuracy. The straggling in energy loss has been analyzed for a measurement on Si and it is well described by a combination of about equal contributions from fluctuations in the number of violent collisions with single electrons (Bohr straggling) and from fluctuations in ion charge state.

  3. Experimental and numerical studies of high-velocity impact fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kipp, M.E.; Grady, D.E.; Swegle, J.W.

    1993-08-01

    Developments are reported in both experimental and numerical capabilities for characterizing the debris spray produced in penetration events. We have performed a series of high-velocity experiments specifically designed to examine the fragmentation of the projectile during impact. High-strength, well-characterized steel spheres (6.35 mm diameter) were launched with a two-stage light-gas gun to velocities in the range of 3 to 5 km/s. Normal impact with PMMA plates, thicknesses of 0.6 to 11 mm, applied impulsive loads of various amplitudes and durations to the steel sphere. Multiple flash radiography diagnostics and recovery techniques were used to assess size, velocity, trajectory and statistics of the impact-induced fragment debris. Damage modes to the primary target plate (plastic) and to a secondary target plate (aluminum) were also evaluated. Dynamic fragmentation theories, based on energy-balance principles, were used to evaluate local material deformation and fracture state information from CTH, a three-dimensional Eulerian solid dynamics shock wave propagation code. The local fragment characterization of the material defines a weighted fragment size distribution, and the sum of these distributions provides a composite particle size distribution for the steel sphere. The calculated axial and radial velocity changes agree well with experimental data, and the calculated fragment sizes are in qualitative agreement with the radiographic data. A secondary effort involved the experimental and computational analyses of normal and oblique copper ball impacts on steel target plates. High-resolution radiography and witness plate diagnostics provided impact motion and statistical fragment size data. CTH simulations were performed to test computational models and numerical methods.

  4. Numerical Investigation of High Velocity Suspension Flame Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleby, M.; Hossainpour, S.

    2012-12-01

    High-velocity suspension flame spraying (HVSFS) has recently developed as a possible alternative to conventional HVOF-spraying employing liquid suspensions instead of dry powder feedstock enables the use of nanoparticles. From the fluid dynamics point of view, the HVSFS system is complex and involves three-phase (gas, liquid and solid particles) turbulent flow, heat transfer, evaporation of the suspension solvent, chemical reactions of main fuel (propane) and suspension solvent (ethanol) and supersonic/subsonic flow transitions. Computational fluid dynamic techniques were carried out to solve the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations. The realizable k-ɛ turbulence model was used to account for the effect of turbulence. The HVSFS process involves two combustion reactions. A primary combustion process is the premixed oxygen-propane reaction and secondary process is the non-premixed oxygen-gaseous ethanol reaction. For each reaction, one step global reaction, which takes dissociations and intermediate reactions into account, was derived from the equilibrium chemistry code developed by Gordon and McBride and eddy dissipation model was used to calculate the rate of reactions based on the transport equations for all species (10 species) mass fractions. Droplets were tracked in the continuum in a Lagrangian approach. In this paper, flow field inside and outside the gun simulated to provide clear and complete insight about the HVSFS processes. Moreover, the effect of some operative parameters (oxy-fuel flow rate, ethanol flow rate, droplets injection velocity and droplets size) on the gas flow field along the centerline and droplets evaporation behavior was discussed.

  5. Effect of Spinal Manipulation Thrust Magnitude on Trunk Mechanical Thresholds of Lateral Thalamic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reed, William R.; Pickar, Joel G.; Sozio, Randall S.; Long, Cynthia R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives High velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM), as performed by manual therapists (eg, doctors of chiropractic and osteopathy) results in mechanical hypoalgesia in clinical settings. This hypoalgesic effect has previously been attributed to alterations in peripheral and/or central pain processing. The objective of this study was to determine whether thrust magnitude of a simulated HVLA-SM alters mechanical trunk response thresholds in wide dynamic range (WDR) and/or nociceptive specific (NS) lateral thalamic neurons. Methods Extracellular recordings were carried out in the thalamus of 15 anesthetized Wistar rats. Lateral thalamic neurons having receptive fields which included the lumbar dorsal-lateral trunk were characterized as either WDR (n=22) or NS (n=25). Response thresholds to electronic von Frey (rigid tip) mechanical trunk stimuli were determined in three directions (dorsal-ventral, 45°caudalward, and 45°cranialward) prior to and immediately following the dorsal-ventral delivery of a 100ms HVLA-SM at three thrust magnitudes (control, 55%, 85% body weight; (BW)). Results There was a significant difference in mechanical threshold between 85% BW manipulation and control thrust magnitudes in the dorsal-ventral direction in NS neurons (p=.01). No changes were found in WDR neurons at either HVLA-SM thrust magnitude. Conclusions This study is the first to investigate the effect of HVLA-SM thrust magnitude on WDR and NS lateral thalamic mechanical response threshold. Our data suggest that at the single lateral thalamic neuron level, there may be a minimal spinal manipulative thrust magnitude required to elicit an increase in trunk mechanical response thresholds. PMID:24928636

  6. Fault gouge rheology under confined, high-velocity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Z.; Madden, A. S.; Chen, X.

    2012-12-01

    We recently developed the experimental capability to investigate the shear properties of fine-grain gouge under confined conditions and high-velocity. The experimental system includes a rotary apparatus that can apply large displacements of tens of meters, slip velocity of 0.001- 2.0 m/s, and normal stress of 35 MPa (Reches and Lockner, 2010). The key new component is a Confined ROtary Cell (CROC) that can shear a gouge layer either dry or under pore-pressure. The pore pressure is controlled by two syringe pumps. CROC includes a ring-shape gouge chamber of 62.5 mm inner diameter, 81.25 mm outer diameter, and up to 3 mm thick gouge sample. The lower, rotating part of CROC contains the sample chamber, and the upper, stationary part includes the loading, hollow cylinder and setting for temperature, and dilation measurements, and pore-pressure control. Each side of the gouge chamber has two pairs of industrial, spring-energized, self-lubricating, teflon-graphite seals, built for particle media and can work at temperature up to 250 ded C. The space between each of the two sets of seals is pressurized by nitrogen. This design generates 'zero-differential pressure' on the inner seal (which is in contact with the gouge powder), and prevents gouge leaks. For the preliminary dry experiments, we used ~2.0 mm thick layers of room-dry kaolinite powder. Total displacements were on the order of meters and normal stress up to 4 MPa. The initial shear was accommodated by multiple internal slip surfaces within the kaolinite layer accommodated as oriented Riedel shear structures. Later, the shear was localized within a thin, plate-parallel Y-surface. The kaolinite layer was compacted at a quasi-asymptotic rate, and displayed a steady-state friction coefficient of ~ 0.5 with no clear dependence on slip velocity up to 0.15 m/s. Further experiments with loose quartz sand (grain size ~ 125 micron) included both dry runs and pore-pressure (distilled water) controlled runs. The sand was

  7. High velocity collisions - probing the edge of planetesimal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teiser, J.; Wurm, G.

    2008-09-01

    field damage around the direct impact site. This near field damage can range from a thin circular trench around the sticking projectile material to a crater which also includes the impact site as material loss. Figure 1 gives an example for a collision with near field damage leading to mass loss. The balance between these two processes determines the mass balance of a collision. (3) When the impact energies are too high a large area of the target surface can be eroded away. This far field damage depends on the target size and thus is not important for realistic conditions. Due to the size dependance of the balance between near and far field damage small projectiles can lead to a net growth even with high velocities. Conclusions Based on experimental results we present a growth model which can be a solution to the question how planetesimal growth is possible once dust aggregates are compact and velocities tend to be destructive. Projectiles of a few mm in size hit a larger aggregate with a size of ~30 cm and leave a crater in the target surface which leads to a slight mass loss. In this colision the projectiles fragment into smaller pieces whereas the target mass hardly changes. In processes of this kind a large amount of sub-mm particles is formed which can lead to a mass gain in a following collisions. Although fragmentation plays a significant role in the high velocity range planetesimal growth via mutual collisions is possible. References [1] Blum, J. and Wurm, G. (2008) ARAA, in press. [2] Dominik, C. and Tielens, A. G. G. M. (1997) ApJ,480, 647-673. [3] Weidenschilling, S. J. and Cuzzi, J. N. (1993) in Levy, E. H. and Lunine, J. I., Protostars and Planets III, 1031-1060. [4] Blum, J. and Münch, (1993) Icarus, 106, 98-116. [5] Wurm, G. et al. (2005) Icarus, 178, 253-263.

  8. ``But I am constant as the North Star*'' - The Return of Polaris as a Low Amplitude Classical Cepheid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. J.; Tracey, J. C.; Engle, S. G.; Guinan, E. F.

    2002-12-01

    * Julius Caesar, William Shakespeare Polaris ( ≈ +2.0 mag; B-V = +0.60; F7 Ib) is a low amplitude Classical Cepheid with a pulsation period of P = 3.97 days. Polaris is one of the nearest (dHipparcos = 132 +/- 8 pc) and brightest Cepheid. This Cepheid (Polaris A) is the luminous member of the multiple star system (ADS 1477). Over the last century amazing changing have been occurring for this famous star. The pulsation period has been increasing a rate of dP/dt = +3.2 sec/yr while the light amplitude has decreased from ~0.12 mag (1900s) to ~0.02 mag (early1990s). A recent summary and thorough discussion of Polaris's interesting properties are given by Evans et al. (2002, ApJ, 567, 1121). We have been carrying out photoelectric photometry of Polaris starting in early 2002. This photometry is a continuation of the work done on Polaris by Kamper and Fernie. Our observations were made to obtain new epochal light curves and accurate times of maximum light. We secured well defined 450 nm and 550 nm light curves from which we extracted accurate measures of light amplitudes of 0.033 +/- 0.004 mag and 0.028 +/- 0.003 mag, respectively. These light amplitudes are slightly larger than those observed during the early 1990s. So it appears that the century long decrease in the light amplitude has halted (or paused). Our time of maximum light was combined with previous timings and reaffirms the increase in period of +3.2 sec/yr. These observations lend strong support to overtone nature of Polaris's pulsations, whose transition from moderate to low amplitude pulsator will be discussed in more detail in this poster. In addition to the long-term secular increase in the Polaris's pulsation period, an analysis of the O-Cs indicates +/-0.25 day cyclic oscillations in the apparent period with time scale of 11-12 years. The nature of these period oscillations is being investigated and will be discussed. We gratefully acknowledge the support for this research from NSF/RUI Grant AST 00

  9. The suitability of sham treatments for use as placebo controls in trials of spinal manipulative therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lougee, Hannah; Johnston, Ross G; Thomson, Oliver P

    2013-01-01

    Despite the augmented use and dependence on manual therapy (MT), there are still calls from both within and outside the MT professions to provide robust evidence that spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) induces therapeutic effects beyond placebo. To facilitate this, placebo or 'sham' treatments, the development of which is notoriously difficult, must be used in rigorously controlled trials. The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of different shams as controls in SMT trials. A repeated measures, single-blind, randomised trial was conducted on 10 asymptomatic subjects. Pain pressure thresholds (PPTs) were measured at 2 sites, local and systemic, before and after the application of either high-velocity low-amplitude thrust (HVLAT), sham functional technique (SFT), sham ultrasound (SUS) or no intervention control (NIC) to the cervico-thoracic (CT) junctional area. Treatment credibility was then assessed using a 4-point Likert Scale in response to 4 statements. Results demonstrated no significant change in PPT following any of the interventions, irrespective of site tested. The effect sizes for all interventions were considered small (d = <0.2). There were significant differences in Likert Scale responses for each statement (P < 0.001), with SUS eliciting significantly different responses as compared to SFT and NIC but not, predominantly, with HVLAT. SUS is implicated as being the most effective sham, having high fidelity to subjects' perceptions of a 'real' treatment, whilst being therapeutically inert i.e. results in no significant change in clinical status.

  10. Friction and Wear of Carbonate Rocks Under High Velocity Sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneh, Y.; Sagy, A.; Reches, Z.

    2012-12-01

    We experimentally investigated the relations between friction and wear-rate during steady-state, high-velocity slip along carbonate faults. Our observations demonstrate a systematic reduction of both friction coefficient and wear-rate with increase of both slip-velocity and normal stress. The experiments were conducted with a rotary shear apparatus on solid, ring-shaped rock samples that slipped for displacements up to tens of meters, with continuous monitoring of stresses, wear and temperature. We performed 107 experiments on experimental faults made of Kasota dolomite, Dover limestone and a fault made of rock-pair Kasota dolomite and Blue quartzite. The friction/wear analysis is focused on the steady-state stage under slip velocity range of 0.002 to 0.96 m/s, and normal stress from 0.25 to 6.9 MPa. The experiments reveal a combined effect of slip-velocity and normal stress on the wear-rate. Under relatively low velocities (V < 0.5 m/s for limestone and V < 0.12 m/s for dolomite-quartzite pair), the wear-rate is proportional to the normal stress, in agreement with Archard (1953) model. On the other hand, in the higher velocity range of V ~ 0.5 - 1 m/s, the wear-rate is not proportional to the normal stress and it reduces with increasing slip-velocity. Further, the velocity effect on the wear-rate becomes stronger with increasing normal stress approaching negligible wear production. The experiments indicate that the steady-state frictional strength of these carbonate samples is best correlated with the power-density (= shear stress * slip-velocity, MW/m2). The observed friction/power-density relation show three regimes: (1) high (μ ~ 0.9), quasi-constant friction coefficient under low power-density of < 0.05 MW/m2; (2) low (μ ~ 0.3), quasi-constant friction coefficient under high power-density > 0.4 MW/m2; and (3) transition zone of friction coefficient dropping from ~ 0.9 to ~ 0.3 for intermediated power density ranging 0.05 - 0.4 MW/m2. During experiments with

  11. Axial and Torsional Load-Type Sequencing in Cumulative Fatigue: Low Amplitude Followed by High Amplitude Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    2001-01-01

    The experiments described herein were performed to determine whether damage imposed by axial loading interacts with damage imposed by torsional loading. This paper is a follow on to a study that investigated effects of load-type sequencing on the cumulative fatigue behavior of a cobalt base superalloy, Haynes 188 at 538 C Both the current and the previous study were used to test the applicability of cumulative fatigue damage models to conditions where damage is imposed by different loading modes. In the previous study, axial and torsional two load level cumulative fatigue experiments were conducted, in varied combinations, with the low-cycle fatigue (high amplitude loading) applied first. In present study, the high-cycle fatigue (low amplitude loading) is applied initially. As in the previous study, four sequences (axial/axial, torsion/torsion, axial/torsion, and torsion/axial) of two load level cumulative fatigue experiments were performed. The amount of fatigue damage contributed by each of the imposed loads was estimated by both the Palmgren-Miner linear damage rule (LDR) and the non-linear damage curve approach (DCA). Life predictions for the various cumulative loading combinations are compared with experimental results.

  12. Paraspinal muscle spindle response to intervertebral fixation and segmental thrust level during spinal manipulation in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Reed, William R.; Pickar, Joel G.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design In vivo cat model study. Objective To determine whether intervertebral facet joint fixation and segmental thrust level alter paraspinal muscle spindle activity during simulated spinal manipulation. Summary of Background Data Intervertebral motion is commonly assessed by manual therapy practitioners during clinical evaluation and treatment. Mechanoreceptor activity elicited during spinal manipulation has been theorized as a potential mechanism of its efficacy. The degree to which intervertebral fixation and segmental thrust level alter paraspinal muscle spindle activity during high velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) is unclear. Methods Intervertebral fixation was created by inserting facet screws through the left L5–6, L6–7 and left L4–5, L5–6, L6–7, facet joints of a cat spine. Changes in the mean instantaneous frequency of L6 muscle spindle discharge were determined during five HVLA-SM thrust durations ((0-control, 75, 100, 150, 250ms) delivered at the L4 or L6 spinous process in each of 3 conditions within the same preparation: laminectomy-only (surgical control; n=23), L5–6 and L6–7 fixations (n=20), and L4–5, L5–6, and L6–7 fixations (n=7). Comparisons were made between thrust levels, thrust durations and spinal joint conditions using a linear mixed model. Results Insertion of facet screws compared to laminectomy-only significantly increased (P<.001) lumbar spinal stiffness during L6 HVLA-SM. Compared to laminectomy-only, both the 2 facet screw (100ms; P<.05) and 3 screw conditions [75 and 100ms (P<.001), 150 ms (P<.005), and 250 ms (P<.05)] significantly decreased L6 spindle response during the L6 HVLA-SM. HVLA-SM delivered 2 segments rostral to the level of muscle spindle input significantly decreases spindle response compared to HVLA-SM delivered at-level, however non-target HVLA-SM still elicits 60–80% of at-level muscle spindle response. Conclusions Intervertebral fixation decreases paraspinal muscle

  13. Investigating Persistent and Distributed Scatterers to Better Resolve Low Amplitude Deformation with InSAR in Vegetated Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, X.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Multi-temporal InSAR methods are successful at revealing low amplitude surface deformation by reducing the noise from the atmosphere and the Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The Persistent Scatters (PS) InSAR and Small baseline (SBAS) methods are used widely by the InSAR community. However, it is still challenging to recover low deformation rates in highly vegetated mountainous areas. Our goal is to explore different approaches to identifying PS or stable Distributed Scatterers (DS) for multi-temporal InSAR processing. We are investigating the following methods: 1) amplitude dispersion (Ferretti et al., 2001); 2) average correlation; 3) spatial correlation of phase (Hooper et al., 2004); 4) comparison of phase against a known mathematical model (Shanker and Zebker, 2007); 5) statistical analysis of the coherence matrix (Ferretti et al., 2011); 6) polarimetric bounce characteristics. We first align the SAR images to form a stack of Single Look Complex (SLC) using "batch processing". We work with this 3-dimensional SLC stack to identify high-quality PS and DS using the aforementioned methods. Next we design a filter based on the characteristics of the scatterers to form interferograms. This comparative study on identifying and filtering PS and DS can be integrated with interferogram stacking or time-series approaches like PSInSAR, SBAS or wavelet-based methods. We are working with the ERS-1, ERS-2 and ALOS-1 SAR data to study landslides and volcano deformation over various terrains in the Cascade Range. From these observations we will be able to construct better physical models to explain various deformation processes.

  14. Effects of unilateral facet fixation and facetectomy on muscle spindle responsiveness during simulated spinal manipulation in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Reed, William R.; Long, Cynthia R.; Pickar, Joel G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Manual therapy practitioners commonly assess lumbar intervertebral mobility before deciding treatment regimens. Changes in mechanoreceptor activity during the manipulative thrust are theorized to be an underlying mechanism of spinal manipulation (SM) efficacy. The objective of this study was to determine if facet fixation or facetectomy at a single lumbar level alters muscle spindle activity during 5 SM thrust durations in an animal model. Methods Spinal stiffness was determined using the slope of a force-displacement curve. Changes in the mean instantaneous frequency of spindle discharge were measured during simulated SM of the L6 vertebra in the same 20 afferents for laminectomy-only, 19 laminectomy & facet screw conditions; only 5 also had data for the laminectomy & facetectomy condition. Neural responses were compared across conditions and five thrust durations (≤ 250ms) using linear mixed models. Results Significant decreases in afferent activity between the laminectomy-only and laminectomy & facet screw conditions were seen during 75ms (P<.001), 100ms (P=.04) and 150ms (P=.02) SM thrust durations. Significant increases in spindle activity between the laminectomy-only and laminectomy & facetectomy conditions were seen during the 75ms (P<.001) and 100ms (P<.001) thrust durations. Conclusion Intervertebral mobility at a single segmental level alters paraspinal sensory response during clinically relevant high velocity low amplitude SM thrust durations (≤150ms). The relationship between intervertebral joint mobility and alterations of primary afferent activity during and following various manual therapy interventions may be used to help to identify patient subpopulations who respond to different types of manual therapy and better inform practitioners (eg, chiropractic, osteopathic) delivering the therapeutic intervention. PMID:24161386

  15. Detection and modeling of low amplitude deformation signals in the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meertens, C. M.; Wahr, J. M.; van Dam, T. M.; Herring, T.

    2011-12-01

    decreased during a prolonged period of drought. The trend reversed from 2009 to the present as the drought ended and net water mass increased in the mountains. These longer term trends, also evident in horizontal components, are corroborated in the model loads derived from GLDAS. Additional low amplitude effects at the sub-mm level from atmospheric pressure variations are also modeled and will be discussed.

  16. High velocity properties of the dynamic frictional force between ductile metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, James Edward; Hollan, Brad L; Germann, Timothy C; Ravelo, Ramon J

    2010-01-01

    The high velocity properties of the tangential frictional force between ductile metal interfaces seen in large-scale NonEquilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulations are characterized by interesting scaling behavior. In many cases a power law decrease in the frictional force with increasing velocity is observed at high velocities. We discuss the velocity dependence of the high velocity branch of the tangential force in terms of structural transformation and ultimate transition, at the highest velocities, to confined fluid behavior characterized by a critical strain rate. The particular case of an Al/Al interface is discussed.

  17. Against the bias in physics of asteroids: Photometric survey of long-period and low-amplitude asteroids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciniak, A.; Pilcher, F.; Santana-Ros, T.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Kankiewicz, P.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Spin and shape parameters of a large sample of asteroids are an important reference point for theories describing Solar System formation and evolution, with, e.g., thermal forces influencing orbital and physical properties of minor bodies. However, the available sample of well-studied asteroids is burdened with substantial selection effects. There exists a strong observational bias against small and/or low-albedo, and/or distant objects due to the limitations of instruments that are commonly used for photometric studies. But there are also other strong selection effects working against asteroids with long period of rotation (here: P>12h) and low lightcurve amplitude (here: a_{max}<0.25 mag). Each of these groups corresponds to almost half of the whole population of bright (H<11 mag) main-belt asteroids, while spin and shape models have been determined for only 20 % of them (source: LCDB; Warner et al. 2009). On the other hand, the remaining populations (short-period and large-amplitude objects) have been each modeled with nearly 40 % completeness. Thus, asteroids modelled today are in majority quickly rotating and elongated in shape. This inevitably skews our knowledge, e.g., on their internal structure and density, on the frequency versus size distribution, and possibly also on the distribution of asteroid spin axes in space. Observing campaign: We have recently started a large, long-term campaign aimed at reducing the observational bias that exist against long-period and low-amplitude asteroids, to obtain their spin and shape models. To do this we coordinated a few telescopes in Poland, Spain and in the US for efficient photometric observations of those asteroids that were usually avoided by the majority of previous studies. We designed a novel observing strategy that makes use of a robotic telescope ability to quickly switch between different targets. Since May 2013, we have been gathering data using, among others, the robotic 80-cm TJO telescope

  18. Spinal brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Tali, E Turgut; Koc, A Murat; Oner, A Yusuf

    2015-05-01

    Spinal involvement in human brucellosis is a common condition and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in endemic areas, because it is often associated with therapeutic failure. Most chronic brucellosis cases are the result of inadequate treatment of the initial episode. Recognition of spinal brucellosis is challenging. Early diagnosis is important to ensure proper treatment and decrease morbidity and mortality. Radiologic evaluation has gained importance in diagnosis and treatment planning, including interventional procedures and monitoring of all spinal infections.

  19. CELFE/NASTRAN Code for the Analysis of Structures Subjected to High Velocity Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1978-01-01

    CELFE (Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian Finite Element)/NASTRAN Code three-dimensional finite element code has the capability for analyzing of structures subjected to high velocity impact. The local response is predicted by CELFE and, for large problems, the far-field impact response is predicted by NASTRAN. The coupling of the CELFE code with NASTRAN (CELFE/NASTRAN code) and the application of the code to selected three-dimensional high velocity impact problems are described.

  20. ARE HIGH VELOCITY PEAKS IN THE MILKY WAY BULGE DUE TO THE BAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhao-Yu; Shen, Juntai; Rich, R. Michael; Kunder, Andrea; Mao, Shude

    2014-04-10

    Recently the commissioning APOGEE observations of the Galactic bulge reported that a significant fraction of stars (∼10%) are in a cold (σ{sub V} ≈ 30 km s{sup –1}) high velocity peak (Galactocentric radial velocity ≈200 km s{sup –1}). These stars are speculated to reflect the stellar orbits in the Galactic bar. In this study, we use two N-body models of a Milky Way-like disk galaxy with different bar strengths to critically examine this possibility. The general trends of the Galactocentric radial velocity distribution in observations and simulations are similar, but neither our models nor the BRAVA data reveal a statistically significant cold high velocity peak. A Monte Carlo test further suggests that it is possible for a spurious high velocity peak to appear if there are only a limited number of stars observed. Thus, the reported cold high velocity peak, even if it is real, is unlikely due to stars on the bar-supporting orbits. Our models do predict an excess of stars with high radial velocity, but not in a distinct peak. In the distance-velocity diagram, the high velocity particles in different fields exist at a similar distance ∼8.5 ± 1 kpc away from the Sun. This result may be explained by geometric intersections between the line-of-sight and the particle orbits; high velocity stars naturally exist approximately at the tangent point, without constituting a distinct peak. We further demonstrate that even without the presence of a bar structure, particle motions in an axisymmetric disk can also exhibit an excess of high velocity stars.

  1. Search for auroral belt E-parallel fields with high-velocity barium ion injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, J. P.; Ledley, B. G.; Miller, M. L.; Marionni, P. A.; Pongratz, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    In April 1984, four high-velocity shaped-charge Ba(+) injections were conducted from two sounding rockets at 770-975 km over northern Alaska under conditions of active auroral and magnetic disturbance. Spatial ionization (brightness) profiles of high-velocity Ba(+) clouds from photometric scans following each release were found to be consistent with the 28-sec theoretical time constant for Ba photoionization determined by Carlsten (1975). These observations therefore revealed no evidence of anomalous fast ionization predicted by the Alfven critical velocity hypothesis.

  2. Relationship between Biomechanical Characteristics of Spinal Manipulation and Neural Responses in an Animal Model: Effect of Linear Control of Thrust Displacement versus Force, Thrust Amplitude, Thrust Duration, and Thrust Rate

    PubMed Central

    Reed, William R.; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Long, Cynthia R.; Kawchuk, Gregory N.; Pickar, Joel G.

    2013-01-01

    High velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) is used frequently to treat musculoskeletal complaints. Little is known about the intervention's biomechanical characteristics that determine its clinical benefit. Using an animal preparation, we determined how neural activity from lumbar muscle spindles during a lumbar HVLA-SM is affected by the type of thrust control and by the thrust's amplitude, duration, and rate. A mechanical device was used to apply a linear increase in thrust displacement or force and to control thrust duration. Under displacement control, neural responses during the HVLA-SM increased in a fashion graded with thrust amplitude. Under force control neural responses were similar regardless of the thrust amplitude. Decreasing thrust durations at all thrust amplitudes except the smallest thrust displacement had an overall significant effect on increasing muscle spindle activity during the HVLA-SMs. Under force control, spindle responses specifically and significantly increased between thrust durations of 75 and 150 ms suggesting the presence of a threshold value. Thrust velocities greater than 20–30 mm/s and thrust rates greater than 300 N/s tended to maximize the spindle responses. This study provides a basis for considering biomechanical characteristics of an HVLA-SM that should be measured and reported in clinical efficacy studies to help define effective clinical dosages. PMID:23401713

  3. Relationship between Biomechanical Characteristics of Spinal Manipulation and Neural Responses in an Animal Model: Effect of Linear Control of Thrust Displacement versus Force, Thrust Amplitude, Thrust Duration, and Thrust Rate.

    PubMed

    Reed, William R; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Long, Cynthia R; Kawchuk, Gregory N; Pickar, Joel G

    2013-01-01

    High velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) is used frequently to treat musculoskeletal complaints. Little is known about the intervention's biomechanical characteristics that determine its clinical benefit. Using an animal preparation, we determined how neural activity from lumbar muscle spindles during a lumbar HVLA-SM is affected by the type of thrust control and by the thrust's amplitude, duration, and rate. A mechanical device was used to apply a linear increase in thrust displacement or force and to control thrust duration. Under displacement control, neural responses during the HVLA-SM increased in a fashion graded with thrust amplitude. Under force control neural responses were similar regardless of the thrust amplitude. Decreasing thrust durations at all thrust amplitudes except the smallest thrust displacement had an overall significant effect on increasing muscle spindle activity during the HVLA-SMs. Under force control, spindle responses specifically and significantly increased between thrust durations of 75 and 150 ms suggesting the presence of a threshold value. Thrust velocities greater than 20-30 mm/s and thrust rates greater than 300 N/s tended to maximize the spindle responses. This study provides a basis for considering biomechanical characteristics of an HVLA-SM that should be measured and reported in clinical efficacy studies to help define effective clinical dosages.

  4. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis. PMID:3786010

  5. High-velocity bipolar mass flow in the planetary nebula NGC 2392

    SciTech Connect

    Gieseking, F.; Becker, I.; Solf, J.

    1985-08-01

    Detailed spectroscopic observations of a high-velocity component in the velocity field of the Eskimo nebula, NGC 2392, are presented. It is interpreted as a jetlike multiknot bipolar mass flow with a velocity of nearly 200 km/s and a small angle of collimation less than 10 deg. Electron density, mass, kinetic energy, and power are estimated. 19 references.

  6. Experimental verification of vapor deposition rate theory in high velocity burner rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Santoro, Gilbert J.

    1985-01-01

    The main objective has been the experimental verification of the corrosive vapor deposition theory in high-temperature, high-velocity environments. Towards this end a Mach 0.3 burner-rig appartus was built to measure deposition rates from salt-seeded (mostly Na salts) combustion gases on the internally cooled cylindrical collector. Deposition experiments are underway.

  7. High Velocity Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Resistance of Some ODS Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys were tested for cyclic, high velocity, oxidation, and hot corrosion resistance. These results were compared to the resistance of an advanced, NiCrAl coated superalloy. An ODS FeCrAl were identified as having sufficient oxidation and hot corrosion resistance to allow potential use in an aircraft gas turbine without coating.

  8. Temporary Network Development Capability in High Velocity Environments: A Dynamic Capability Study of Disaster Relief Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, William Ross

    2010-01-01

    Organizations involved in crisis relief after a natural disaster face the multifaceted challenge of significantly changing needs of their various stakeholders, limited, ambiguous and even incorrect information, and highly compressed time limitations. Yet the performance of these organization in these high velocity environments is critical for the…

  9. Understanding inhibitory mechanisms of lumbar spinal manipulation using H-reflex and F-wave responses: a methodological approach.

    PubMed

    Dishman, J Donald; Weber, Kenneth A; Corbin, Roger L; Burke, Jeanmarie R

    2012-09-30

    The purpose of this research was to characterize unique neurophysiologic events following a high velocity, low amplitude (HVLA) spinal manipulation (SM) procedure. Descriptive time series analysis techniques of time plots, outlier detection and autocorrelation functions were applied to time series of tibial nerve H-reflexes that were evoked at 10-s intervals from 100 s before the event until 100 s after three distinct events L5-S1 HVLA SM, or a L5-S1 joint pre-loading procedure, or the control condition. Sixty-six subjects were randomly assigned to three procedures, i.e., 22 time series per group. If the detection of outliers and correlograms revealed a pattern of non-randomness that was only time-locked to a single, specific event in the normalized time series, then an experimental effect would be inferred beyond the inherent variability of H-reflex responses. Tibial nerve F-wave responses were included to determine if any new information about central nervous function following a HVLA SM procedure could be ascertained. Time series analyses of H(max)/M(max) ratios, pre-post L5-S1 HVLA SM, substantiated the hypothesis that the specific aspects of the manipulative thrust lead to a greater attenuation of the H(max)/M(max) ratio as compared to the non-specific aspects related to the postural perturbation and joint pre-loading. The attenuation of the H(max)/M(max) ratio following the HVLA SM procedure was reliable and may hold promise as a translational tool to measure the consistency and accuracy of protocol implementation involving SM in clinical trials research. F-wave responses were not sensitive to mechanical perturbations of the lumbar spine.

  10. High Velocity Impact Interaction of Metal Particles with Porous Heterogeneous Materials with an Inorganic Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazunov, A. A.; Ishchenko, A. N.; Afanasyeva, S. A.; Belov, N. N.; Burkin, V. V.; Rogaev, K. S.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Khabibulin, M. V.; Yugov, N. T.

    2016-03-01

    A computational-experimental investigation of stress-strain state and fracture of a porous heterogeneous material with an inorganic matrix, used as a thermal barrier coating of flying vehicles, under conditions of a high-velocity impact by a spherical steel projectile imitating a meteorite particle is discussed. Ballistic tests are performed at the velocities about 2.5 km/s. Numerical modeling of the high-velocity impact is described within the framework of a porous elastoplastic model including fracture and different phase states of the materials. The calculations are performed using the Euler and Lagrange numerical techniques for the velocities up to 10 km/s in a complete-space problem statement.

  11. Measuring densities of high-velocity metallic sprays using piezoelectric sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, C. E.; Proud, W. G.

    2007-12-12

    Recent research efforts in large-scale hydrodynamic experiments have concentrated on the possibility of using piezoelectric sensors to study the evolution of ejecta. Ejecta are small (<100 m diameter) particulates that are ejected at high velocity (>1 km s{sup -1}) from a shocked surface. This paper investigates whether Dynasen PZT piezoelectric sensors are reliable and robust enough to measure accurate time-resolved stresses and densities in high-velocity metallic sprays. The sprays are assumed to have similar characteristics to ejecta sprays, and are generated by a gas gun and in a safe and reproducible manner. A complimentary diagnostic technique, utilising high-speed photography and fast x-radiography, measures the densities of the sprays independently, allowing the accuracy of the sensors to be assessed. The Dynasen sensors have been shown to perform relatively well in spray environments. Their accuracy can be improved by taking their mechanical impedance characteristics into account.

  12. The Guitar nebula - A bow shock from a slow-spin, high-velocity neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, James M.; Romani, Roger W.; Lundgren, Scott C.

    1993-01-01

    The discovery is reported of a prominent nebula produced by the motion of a high-velocity pulsar, PSR 2224 + 65, through partially neutral gas. The pulsar's transverse speed of over about 800 km/s makes it arguably the fastest known star in the Galaxy and guarantees that it will ultimately escape the Galactic potential well. A deep H-alpha image reveals a bright head and a giant limb-brightened 'body' whose variable width suggests that the ambient interstellar gas has density variations on length scales less than 0.1 pc. Thermalization of shock energy occurs at a rate of about 0.01 times the pulsar's spindown loss rate. These observations provide some insights into the likelihood of finding shocks around other pulsars and the use of nebulae to find high-velocity neutron stars either not acting as pulsars or with their radiation beamed away from the earth.

  13. The frequency and distribution of high-velocity gas in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency and distribution of high-velocity gas in the Galaxy using UV absorption line measurements from archival high-dispersion IUE spectra and to identify particularly interesting regions for future study. Approximately 500 spectra have been examined. The study began with the creation of a database of all 0 and B stars with b less than or = to 30 deg observed with IUE at high dispersion over its 18-year lifetime. The original database of 2500 unique objects was reduced to 1200 objects which had optimal exposures available. The next task was to determine the distances of these stars so the high-velocity structures could be mapped in the Galaxy. Spectroscopic distances were calculated for each star for which photometry was available. The photometry was acquired for each star using the SIMBAD database. Preference was given to the ubvy system where available; otherwise the UBV system was used.

  14. Electrical method and apparatus for impelling the extruded ejection of high-velocity material jets

    DOEpatents

    Weingart, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus (10, 40) for producing high-velocity material jets provided. An electric current pulse generator (14, 42) is attached to an end of a coaxial two-conductor transmission line (16, 44) having an outer cylindrical conductor (18), an inner cylindrical conductor (20), and a solid plastic or ceramic insulator (21) therebetween. A coxial, thin-walled metal structure (22, 30) is conductively joined to the two conductors (18, 20) of the transmission line (16, 44). An electrical current pulse applies magnetic pressure to and possibly explosively vaporizes metal structure (22), thereby collapsing it and impelling the extruded ejection of a high-velocity material jet therefrom. The jet is comprised of the metal of the structure (22), together with the material that comprises any covering layers (32, 34) disposed on the structure. An electric current pulse generator of the explosively driven magnetic flux compression type or variety (42) may be advantageously used in the practice of this invention.

  15. Chronic symptoms after vestibular neuritis and the high velocity vestibulo-ocular reflex

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mitesh; Arshad, Qadeer; Roberts, R Edward; Ahmad, Hena; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis As the anterior and posterior semicircular canals are vital to the regulation of gaze stability, particularly during locomotion or vehicular travel, we tested whether the high velocity vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of the three ipsilesional semicircular canals elicited by the modified Head Impulse Test would correlate with subjective dizziness or vertigo scores after vestibular neuritis (VN). Background Recovery following acute VN varies with around half reporting persistent symptoms long after the acute episode. However, an unanswered question is whether chronic symptoms are associated with impairment of the high velocity VOR of the anterior or posterior canals. Methods Twenty patients who had experienced an acute episode of VN at least three months earlier were included in this study. Participants were assessed with the video head impulse test (vHIT) of all six canals, bithermal caloric irrigation, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and the Vertigo Symptoms Scale short-form (VSS). Results Of these 20 patients, 12 felt that they had recovered from the initial episode whereas 8 did not and reported elevated DHI and VSS scores. However, we found no correlation between DHI or VSS scores and the ipsilesional single or combined vHIT gain, vHIT gain asymmetry or caloric paresis. The high velocity VOR was not different between patients who felt they had recovered and patients who felt they had not. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic symptoms of dizziness following VN are not associated with the high velocity VOR of the single or combined ipsilesional horizontal, anterior or posterior semicircular canals. PMID:26719963

  16. Heat Transfer and Hydraulic Flow Resistance for Streams of High Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelchuk, V. L.

    1943-01-01

    Problems of hydraulic flow resistance and heat transfer for streams with velocities comparable with acoustic have present great importance for various fields of technical science. Especially, they have great importance for the field of heat transfer in designing and constructing boilers.of the "Velox" type. In this article a description of experiments and their results as regards definition of the laws of heat transfer in differential form for high velocity air streams inside smooth tubes are given.

  17. Treatment Protocol for High Velocity/High Energy Gunshot Injuries to the Face

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Micha; Leiser, Yoav; Emodi, Omri; Krausz, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Major causes of facial combat injuries include blasts, high-velocity/high-energy missiles, and low-velocity missiles. High-velocity bullets fired from assault rifles encompass special ballistic properties, creating a transient cavitation space with a small entrance wound and a much larger exit wound. There is no dispute regarding the fact that primary emergency treatment of ballistic injuries to the face commences in accordance with the current advanced trauma life support (ATLS) recommendations; the main areas in which disputes do exist concern the question of the timing, sequence, and modes of surgical treatment. The aim of the present study is to present the treatment outcome of high-velocity/high-energy gunshot injuries to the face, using a protocol based on the experience of a single level I trauma center. A group of 23 injured combat soldiers who sustained bullet and shrapnel injuries to the maxillofacial region during a 3-week regional military conflict were evaluated in this study. Nine patients met the inclusion criteria (high-velocity/high-energy injuries) and were included in the study. According to our protocol, upon arrival patients underwent endotracheal intubation and were hemodynamically stabilized in the shock-trauma unit and underwent total-body computed tomography with 3-D reconstruction of the head and neck and computed tomography angiography. All patients underwent maxillofacial surgery upon the day of arrival according to the protocol we present. In view of our treatment outcomes, results, and low complication rates, we conclude that strict adherence to a well-founded and structured treatment protocol based on clinical experience is mandatory in providing efficient, appropriate, and successful treatment to a relatively large group of patients who sustain various degrees of maxillofacial injuries during a short period of time. PMID:23449809

  18. Unique charge distribution in surface loops confers high velocity on the fast motor protein Chara myosin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kohji; Yamaguchi, Yukie; Yanase, Kenji; Ichikawa, Yousuke; Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2009-12-22

    Most myosins have a positively charged loop 2 with a cluster of lysine residues that bind to the negatively charged N-terminal segment of actin. However, the net charge of loop 2 of very fast Chara myosin is zero and there is no lysine cluster in it. In contrast, Chara myosin has a highly positively charged loop 3. To elucidate the role of these unique surface loops of Chara myosin in its high velocity and high actin-activated ATPase activity, we have undertaken mutational analysis using recombinant Chara myosin motor domain. It was found that net positive charge in loop 3 affected V(max) and K(app) of actin activated ATPase activity, while it affected the velocity only slightly. The net positive charge in loop 2 affected K(app) and the velocity, although it did not affect V(max). Our results suggested that Chara myosin has evolved to have highly positively charged loop 3 for its high ATPase activity and have less positively charged loop 2 for its high velocity. Since high positive charge in loop 3 and low positive charge in loop 2 seem to be one of the reasons for Chara myosin's high velocity, we manipulated charge contents in loops 2 and 3 of Dictyostelium myosin (class II). Removing positive charge from loop 2 and adding positive charge to loop 3 of Dictyostelium myosin made its velocity higher than that of the wild type, suggesting that the charge strategy in loops 2 and 3 is widely applicable.

  19. Real-time dynamics of high-velocity micro-particle impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veysset, David; Hsieh, Alex; Kooi, Steve; Maznev, Alex A.; Tang, Shengchang; Olsen, Bradley D.; Nelson, Keith A.

    High-velocity micro-particle impact is important for many areas of science and technology, from space exploration to the development of novel drug delivery platforms. We present real-time observations of supersonic micro-particle impacts using multi-frame imaging. In an all optical laser-induced projectile impact test, a monolayer of micro-particles is placed on a transparent substrate coated with a laser absorbing polymer layer. Ablation of a laser-irradiated polymer region accelerates the micro-particles into free space with speeds up to 1.0 km/s. The particles are monitored during the impact on the target with an ultrahigh-speed multi-frame camera that can record up to 16 images with time resolution as short as 3 ns. In particular, we investigated the high-velocity impact deformation response of poly(urethane urea) (PUU) elastomers to further the fundamental understanding of the molecular influence on dynamical behaviors of PUUs. We show the dynamic-stiffening response of the PUUs and demonstrate the significance of segmental dynamics in the response. We also present movies capturing individual particle impact and penetration in gels, and discuss the observed dynamics. The results will provide an impetus for modeling high-velocity microscale impact responses and high strain rate deformation in polymers, gels, and other materials.

  20. High-velocity frictional strength across the Tohoku-Oki megathrust determined from surface drilling torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujiie, Kohtaro; Inoue, Tomoya; Ishiwata, Junya

    2016-03-01

    High-velocity frictional strength is one of the primary factors controlling earthquake faulting. The Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project drilled through the shallow plate boundary fault, where displacement was ~50 m during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. To determine downhole frictional strength, we analyzed the surface drilling torque data acquired at rotation rates equivalent to seismic slip rates (0.8-1.3 m/s). The results show a clear contrast in high-velocity frictional strength across the plate boundary fault: the apparent friction coefficient of frontal prism sediments (hemipelagic mudstones) in the hanging wall is 0.1-0.3, while that of the underthrust sediments (mudstone, laminar pelagic claystone, and chert) in the footwall increases to 0.2-0.4. The apparent friction coefficient of the smectite-rich pelagic clay in the plate boundary fault is 0.08-0.19, which is consistent with that determined from high-velocity (1.1-1.3 m/s) friction experiments. This suggests that surface drilling torque is useful in obtaining downhole frictional strength.

  1. A Investigation of Gouge Initiation in High-Velocity Sliding Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachau, Robert David Mazur

    1991-02-01

    Surface damage has been observed on the rails of rocket sled tracks and on the barrels of high-velocity guns. The phenomenon is generally referred to as "gouging". Damage to a stationary surface (guider) is created from the oblique impact of a high-velocity object (slider) moving over its surface. The surface damage (gouge) is typically a shallow crater in the shape of a teardrop with the leading edge characterized by the wider end and a slightly raised lip. For rocket sleds, rail gouging occurs when the sled velocity is greater than 1.5 km/sec; while in guns, barrel gouging occurs when the velocity exceeds 4 km/sec. A model is developed to describe the phenomenon of gouging. An unbalanced slider randomly causes a shallow -angle, oblique impact between the slider and the guider. At sufficiently high velocity, the impact produces a thin, but very hot, layer of soft material at the contact surface. Under the action of a moving load, the soft layer lends itself to an antisymmetric deformation and a gouge is formed when this soft material is over-run by the slider. The model is simulated numerically with a hydrodynamic (CTH) code. The results of the simulations are in good agreement with the observed phenomena. Based on the simulated temperature and pressure profiles at the contact surface, design criteria for gouge mitigation are developed in this study.

  2. Quasi-static and multi-site high velocity impact response of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Lakshya

    Understanding of low and high velocity transverse impact of laminated fiber reinforced composites is of interest in military, aerospace, marine and civilian structures. Recent advances in the field of numerical simulation provide a means of predicting the performance characteristics of layered materials for impact protection. The overall objective of this work is to investigate the behavior of laminated composites which include both thermoplastic and thermoset systems subjected to quasi-static, low and high velocity impact; both from an experimental and numerical modeling view point. To analyze this problem, a series of quasi-static, low and high velocity impact tests have been performed on laminated composite plates namely E-glass/polypropylene, S2-glass/epoxy and carbon/polyphenylene sulphide. To analyze the perforation mechanism, ballistic limit and damage evolution, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code LS-DYNA is used. Selecting proper material models and contact definition is one of the major criteria for obtaining accurate numerical simulation. Material model 162 (MAT 162), a progressive failure model based on modified Hashin's criteria and continuum damage mechanics (CDM) has been assigned to predict failure of the laminate. This approach is used because during transverse impact, a composite laminate undergoes progressive damage. The laminate and the projectile are meshed using brick elements with single integration points. The impact velocity ranges from 180 to 400 m s -1. This work focuses on three main aspects; (i) To obtain static and dynamic material properties to incorporate into the finite element model and predict the ballistic limit of a composite laminate based on the information from quasi-static punch shear test; (ii) To understand penetration, material erosion, ballistic limit and delamination mechanisms for single and multi-site high velocity (or ballistic) impact of composite laminates; (iii) To investigate the different failure

  3. Spinal Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Katonis, P.; Datsis, G.; Karantanas, A.; Kampouroglou, A.; Lianoudakis, S.; Licoudis, S.; Papoutsopoulou, E.; Alpantaki, K.

    2013-01-01

    Although osteosarcoma represents the second most common primary bone tumor, spinal involvement is rare, accounting for 3%–5% of all osteosarcomas. The most frequent symptom of osteosarcoma is pain, which appears in almost all patients, whereas more than 70% exhibit neurologic deficit. At a molecular level, it is a tumor of great genetic complexity and several genetic disorders have been associated with its appearance. Early diagnosis and careful surgical staging are the most important factors in accomplishing sufficient management. Even though overall prognosis remains poor, en-block tumor removal combined with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy is currently the treatment of choice. This paper outlines histopathological classification, epidemiology, diagnostic procedures, and current concepts of management of spinal osteosarcoma. PMID:24179411

  4. A Gravitational Double-scattering Mechanism for Generating High-velocity Objects during Halo Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsing, Johan

    2015-02-01

    We present a dynamical model that describes how halo particles can receive a significant energy kick from the merger between their own host halo and a target halo. This could provide a possible explanation for some high-velocity objects, including extended systems like globular clusters (GCs). In the model we especially introduce a double-scattering mechanism, where a halo particle receives a significant part of its total energy kick by first undergoing a gravitational deflection by the target halo and subsequently by its original host halo. This generates an energy kick that is due to the relative velocity between the halos during the deflections. We derive analytically the total kick energy of the particle, which is composed of energy from the double-scattering mechanism and tidal fields, as a function of its position in its original host halo just before merger. In the case of a 1:10 merger, we find that the presented mechanisms can easily generate particles with a velocity approximately two times the virial velocity of the target halo. This motivates us to suggest that the high velocity of the recently discovered GC HVGC-1 can be explained by a head-on halo merger. Finally, we illustrate the orbital evolution of high-velocity particles outside the virial sphere of the target halo by solving the equation of motion in an expanding universe. We find a sweet spot around a scale factor of 0.3-0.5 for ejecting particles into large orbits, which can easily reach beyond approximately five virial radii.

  5. A GRAVITATIONAL DOUBLE-SCATTERING MECHANISM FOR GENERATING HIGH-VELOCITY OBJECTS DURING HALO MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Samsing, Johan

    2015-02-01

    We present a dynamical model that describes how halo particles can receive a significant energy kick from the merger between their own host halo and a target halo. This could provide a possible explanation for some high-velocity objects, including extended systems like globular clusters (GCs). In the model we especially introduce a double-scattering mechanism, where a halo particle receives a significant part of its total energy kick by first undergoing a gravitational deflection by the target halo and subsequently by its original host halo. This generates an energy kick that is due to the relative velocity between the halos during the deflections. We derive analytically the total kick energy of the particle, which is composed of energy from the double-scattering mechanism and tidal fields, as a function of its position in its original host halo just before merger. In the case of a 1:10 merger, we find that the presented mechanisms can easily generate particles with a velocity approximately two times the virial velocity of the target halo. This motivates us to suggest that the high velocity of the recently discovered GC HVGC-1 can be explained by a head-on halo merger. Finally, we illustrate the orbital evolution of high-velocity particles outside the virial sphere of the target halo by solving the equation of motion in an expanding universe. We find a sweet spot around a scale factor of 0.3-0.5 for ejecting particles into large orbits, which can easily reach beyond approximately five virial radii.

  6. Supernova 2010ev: A reddened high velocity gradient type Ia supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Folatelli, Gastón; Pignata, Giuliano; Anderson, Joseph P.; Hamuy, Mario; Morrell, Nidia; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Taubenberger, Stefan; Bufano, Filomena; Olivares E., Felipe; Haislip, Joshua B.; Reichart, Daniel E.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present and study the spectroscopic and photometric evolution of the type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2010ev. Methods: We obtain and analyze multiband optical light curves and optical/near-infrared spectroscopy at low and medium resolution spanning -7 days to +300 days from the B-band maximum. Results: A photometric analysis shows that SN 2010ev is a SN Ia of normal brightness with a light-curve shape of Δm15(B) = 1.12 ± 0.02 and a stretch s = 0.94 ± 0.01 suffering significant reddening. From photometric and spectroscopic analysis, we deduce a color excess of E(B - V) = 0.25 ± 0.05 and a reddening law of Rv = 1.54 ± 0.65. Spectroscopically, SN 2010ev belongs to the broad-line SN Ia group, showing stronger than average Si iiλ6355 absorption features. We also find that SN 2010ev is a high velocity gradient SN with v˙Si = 164 ± 7 km s-1 d-1. The photometric and spectral comparison with other supernovae shows that SN 2010ev has similar colors and velocities to SN 2002bo and SN 2002dj. The analysis of the nebular spectra indicates that the [Fe ii]λ7155 and [Ni ii]λ7378 lines are redshifted, as expected for a high velocity gradient supernova. All these common intrinsic and extrinsic properties of the high velocity gradient (HVG) group are different from the low velocity gradient (LVG) normal SN Ia population and suggest significant variety in SN Ia explosions. This paper includes data gathered with the Du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program GS-2010A-Q-14). Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programme 085.D-0577).

  7. Spinal Bracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Dr. Arthur Copes of the Copes Foundation, Baton Rouge, LA, says that 35 percent of the 50 technical reports he received from the NASA/Southern University Industrial Applications Center in Baton Rouge and the Central Industrial Applications Center, Durant, OK, were vital to the development of his Copes Scoliosis Braces, which are custom designed and feature a novel pneumatic bladder that exerts constant corrective pressure to the torso to slowly reduce or eliminate the spinal curve.

  8. High velocity continuous-flow reactor for the production of solar grade silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woerner, L.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of a high volume, high velocity continuous reduction reactor as an economical means of producing solar grade silicon was tested. Bromosilanes and hydrogen were used as the feedstocks for the reactor along with preheated silicon particles which function both as nucleation and deposition sites. A complete reactor system was designed and fabricated. Initial preheating studies have shown the stability of tetrabromosilane to being heated as well as the ability to preheat hydrogen to the desired temperature range. Several test runs were made and some silicon was obtained from runs carried out at temperatures in excess of 1180 K.

  9. A scheme for tracking and pointing at small celestial bodies during high velocity encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdick, G. M.; Lin, H.-S.; Wong, E. C.

    1982-01-01

    A scheme has been developed and verified for closed-loop tracking and pointing space-borne science instruments at small celestial bodies, such as comets and asteroids, during high velocity encounters. To overcome ephemeris uncertainties for these bodies, the scheme involves sequential estimation of flyby model parameters. The design consists of a two-axis gimballed platform mounted on a three-axis stabilized spacecraft. A platform-mounted optical tracker provides closed-loop target measurements and precision micro-step actuators enable high-rate platform slewing. For comet missions which involve dust particle impact disturbances, a dual-mode attitude control scheme is presented for minimizing transient response time.

  10. Negative ion productions in high velocity collision between small carbon clusters and Helium atom target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Chabot; K, Béroff; T, Pino; G, Féraud; N, Dothi; Padellec A, Le; G, Martinet; S, Bouneau; Y, Carpentier

    2012-11-01

    We measured absolute double capture cross section of Cn+ ions (n=1,5) colliding, at 2.3 and 2.6 a.u velocities, with an Helium target atom and the branching ratios of fragmentation of the so formed electronically excited anions Cn-*. We also measured absolute cross section for the electronic attachment on neutral Cn clusters colliding at same velocities with He atom. This is to our knowledge the first measurement of neutral-neutral charge exchange in high velocity collision.

  11. Experimental verification of corrosive vapor deposition rate theory in high velocity burner rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    The ability to predict deposition rates is required to facilitate modelling of high temperature corrosion by fused salt condensates in turbine engines. A corrosive salt vapor deposition theory based on multicomponent chemically frozen boundary layers (CFBL) has been successfully verified by high velocity burner rig experiments. The experiments involved internally air-impingement cooled, both rotating full and stationary segmented cylindrical collectors located in the crossflow of sodium-seeded combustion gases. Excellent agreement is found between the CFBL theory an the experimental measurements for both the absolute amounts of Na2SO4 deposition rates and the behavior of deposition rate with respect to collector temperature, mass flowrate (velocity) and Na concentration.

  12. High-Velocity Absorption Features in FUSE Spectra of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Vieira, G.

    2002-12-01

    Numerous broad (200 to 1000 km/sec) features in the FUSE spectrum (905-1187 A) of eta Carinae are identified as absorption by a forest of high-velocity narrow lines formed in the expanding circumstellar envelope. These features were previously thought to be P-Cygni lines arising in the wind of the central star. The features span a heliocentric velocity range of -140 to -580 km/sec and are seen prominently in low-ionization ground-state transitions (e.g. N I 1134-35, Fe II 1145-42, 1133, 1127-22, P II 1153, C I 1158) in addition to C III] 1176 A. The high-velocity components of the FUSE transitions have depths about 50% below the continuum. The identifications are consistent with the complex velocity structures seen in ground- and excited-state transitions of Mg I, Mg II, Fe II, V II, etc observed in STIS/E230H spectra (see accompanying posters by Gull, Vieira, and Danks). The origin of other broad features of similar width and depth in the FUSE spectrum, but without low-velocity ISM absorption, are unidentified. However, they are suspected of being absorption of singly-ionized iron-peak elements (e.g. Fe II, V II, Cr II) out of excited levels 1,000 to 20,000 cmE-1 above the ground state. The high-velocity features seen in Fe II 1145 are also present in Fe II 1608 (STIS/E140M), but are highly saturated in the latter. Since these transitions have nearly identical log (flambda) (1.998 vs. 2.080), the differences in the profiles are attributable to the different aperture sizes used (30x30 arcsec for FUSE, 0.2x0.2 arcsec for STIS/E140M). The high-velocity gas appears to be very patchy or has a small covering factor near the central star. Eta Carinae has been observed several times by FUSE over the past three years. The FUSE flux levels and spectral features in eta Car are essentially unchanged over the 2000 March to June 2002 period, establishing a baseline far-UV spectrum in advance of the predicted spectroscopic miniumum in 2003.

  13. High-Velocity Absorption Features in FUSE Spectra of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Vieira, G.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous broad (200 to 1000 km/sec) features in the FUSE spectrum (905-1187 A) of eta Carinae are identified as absorption by a forest of high-velocity narrow lines formed in the expanding circumstellar envelope. These features were previously thought to be P-Cygni lines arising in the wind of the central star. The features span a heliocentric velocity range of -140 to -580 km/sec and are seen prominently in low-ionization ground-state transitions (e.g. N I 1134-35, Fe II 1145-42, 1133, 1127- 22, P II 1153, C I 1158) in addition to C III] 1176 A. The high-velocity components of the FUSE transitions have depths about 50% below the continuum. The identifications are consistent with the complex velocity structures seen in ground- and excited-state transitions of Mg I, Mg 11, Fe II, V II, etc observed in STIS/E230H spectra. The origin of other broad features of similar width and depth in the FUSE spectrum, but without low-velocity ISM absorption, are unidentified. However, they are suspected of being absorption of singly-ionized iron-peak elements (e.g. Fe II, V II, Cr II) out of excited levels 1,000 to 20,000 cmE-l above the ground state. The high-velocity features seen in Fe II 1145 are also present in Fe II 1608 (STIS/E140M), but are highly saturated in the latter. Since these transitions have nearly identical log (flambda) (1.998 vs. 2.080), the differences in the profiles are attributable to the different aperture sizes used (30 x 30 arcsec for FUSE, 0.2 x 0.2 arcsec for STIS/E140M). The high-velocity gas appears to be very patchy or has a small covering factor near the central star. Eta Carinae has been observed several times by FUSE over the past three years. The FUSE flux levels and spectral features in eta Car are essentially unchanged over the 2000 March to June 2002 period, establishing a baseline far-UV spectrum in advance of the predicted spectroscopic minimum in 2003.

  14. Shells, holes, worms, high-velocity gas and the z-distribution of gas in galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, R. J.

    The author gives an overview of the current observational understanding of vertically extended gas components in spiral galaxies and the various phenomena which come under such names as shells, holes, worms, and high-velocity gas. For the most part, the focus is on recent high-resolution interferometric studies. The author concentrates on cold gas, and briefly on warm ionized gas, in the Milky Way and a few nearby spirals. Along the way, it is seen how phenomena such as worms and shells may be related to the formation and maintenance of the vertically extended components.

  15. Penetration of Liquid Jets into a High-velocity Air Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelko, Louis J

    1950-01-01

    Data are presented showing the penetration characteristics of liquid jets directed approximately perpendicular to a high-velocity air stream for jet-nozzle-throat diameters from 0.0135 to 0.0625 inch, air stream densities from 0.0805 to 0.1365 pound per cubic foot, liquid jet velocities from 168.1 to 229.0 feet per second and a liquid jet density of approximately 62 pounds per cubic foot. The data were analyzed and a correlation was developed that permitted the determination of the penetration length of the liquid jet for any operation condition within the range of variables investigated.

  16. Variables Affecting Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulation of High-Velocity Flyer Plate Impact Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaram, Deepak S; Trabia, Mohamed; O'Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S

    2014-01-23

    This paper describes our work to characterize the variables affecting the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method in the LS-DYNA package for simulating high-velocity flyer plate impact experiments. LS-DYNA simulations are compared with one-dimensional experimental data of an oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper flyer plate impacting another plate of the same material. The comparison is made by measuring the velocity of a point on the back surface of the impact plate using the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) technique.

  17. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological ...

  18. Spinal Cord Infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Spinal Cord Infarction Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Organizations Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Spinal Cord Infarction? Spinal cord infarction is a stroke either ...

  19. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the severity of the injury. Tap this spinal column to see how the level of injury affects loss of function and control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the ...

  1. Spinal dysraphism.

    PubMed

    Sgouros, Spyros

    2013-09-01

    In the last decade there have been significant improvements in all the fields of management of patients with spinal dysraphism, which have increased dramatically the quality of life of these children. Prevention of spina bifida with food fortification is becoming increasingly practiced worldwide. As result, in many parts of the world the frequency of myelomeningocele has decreased. Intrauterine closure of myelomeningocele has been attempted in many institutions with variable results. While it is still at the sphere of experimental therapy, it is reasonable to anticipate progress in this field in the next decade. Antenatal MR imaging is already providing very high level of detail even before the child is born. This creates new ethical dilemmas and requires additional care, but has improved significantly the overall management of patients and their families. Further improvements are anticipated in this field. Management of neuropathic bladder has improved significantly in the last decade and is anticipated to play an increasing role in the long term follow up. Surgery for spinal cord tethering in all its forms has improved in the last decade, with far more chances of complete untethering now in comparison to 10-15 years ago, with the use of micro-neurosurgical techniques and intraoperative monitoring. It is reasonable to expect that in the next decade, intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during spinal cord surgery will become mandatory. In the 2013 Annual Special Issue we have assembled a team of authors distinguished in their fields, who bring us up to date with all the latest developments. PMID:24013314

  2. Spinal surgery -- cervical - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The cervical spinal column is made up of vertebral bodies which protect the spinal cord. ... spinal nerves, trauma, and narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal column around the spinal cord. Symptoms of cervical spine ...

  3. Anion production in high-velocity cluster-atom collisions; the electron capture process revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béroff, K.; Chabot, M.; Martinet, G.; Pino, T.; Bouneau, S.; Le Padellec, A.; Féraud, G.; Do Thi, N.; Calvo, F.; Bordas, C.; Lépine, F.

    2013-01-01

    Anion production cross sections in collisions between Cn+, Cn carbon clusters (n ≤ 5) and helium atoms have been measured in high-velocity collisions (v = 2.25 and 2.6 au). This paper focuses on two of the three processes responsible for the Cn- production, namely double electron capture (DEC) onto Cn+ cations and single electron capture onto neutral (SECN) Cn. They were experimentally distinguished from a gaseous thickness dependence study. Dissociative and non-dissociative cross sections were measured and, in the case of DEC, all dissociative branching ratios measured; for these small systems, the C2- fragment was found magical. Data concerning electron capture in neutral-neutral collisions are extremely rare, especially at high velocity. Introduction of this measured process in the independent atom and electron (IAE) model allowed us to revisit and satisfactorily reproduce the so-far unexplained size evolution of single electron capture (SEC) cross sections in 2.6 au Cn+-He (n ≤ 10) collisions (Chabot et al 2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 2593-603). IAE calculations for DEC cross sections and their comparison with experiment suggest a loss of electron in anionic Cn- species after the collision, competing with fragmentation and depending on the size.

  4. Characterization of High-Velocity Single Particle Impacts on Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiilakoski, Jarkko; Lindroos, Matti; Apostol, Marian; Koivuluoto, Heli; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani; Vuoristo, Petri

    2016-08-01

    High-velocity impact wear can have a significant effect on the lifetime of thermally sprayed coatings in multiple applications, e.g., in the process and paper industries. Plasma-sprayed oxide coatings, such as Cr2O3- and TiO2-based coatings, are often used in these industries in wear and corrosion applications. An experimental impact study was performed on thermally sprayed ceramic coatings using the High-Velocity Particle Impactor (HVPI) at oblique angles to investigate the damage, failure, and deformation of the coated structures. The impact site was characterized by profilometry, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the connection between the microstructural details and impact behavior was studied in order to reveal the damage and failure characteristics at a more comprehensive level. Differences in the fracture behavior were found between the thermally sprayed Cr2O3 and TiO2 coatings, and a concept of critical impact energy is presented here. The superior cohesion of the TiO2 coating inhibited interlamellar cracking while the Cr2O3 coating suffered greater damage at high impact energies. The HVPI experiment has proven to be able to produce valuable information about the deformation behavior of coatings under high strain rates and could be utilized further in the development of wear-resistant coatings.

  5. A novel platform to study magnetized high-velocity collisionless shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, D. P.; Korneev, Ph; Béard, J.; Chen, S. N.; d'Humières, E.; Pépin, H.; Pikuz, S.; Pollock, B.; Riquier, R.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Fuchs, J.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental platform to study the interaction of two colliding high-velocity (0.01-0.2 c; 0.05-20 MeV) proton plasmas in a high strength (20 T) magnetic field is introduced. This platform aims to study the collision of magnetized plasmas accelerated via the Target-Normal-Sheath-Acceleration mechanism and initially separated by distances of a few hundred microns. The plasmas are accelerated from solid targets positioned inside a few cubic millimeter cavity located within a Helmholtz coil that provides up to 20 T magnetic fields. Various parameters of the plasmas at their interaction location are estimated. These show an interaction that is highly non-collisional, and that becomes more and more dominated by the magnetic fields as time progresses (from 5 to 60 ps). Particle-in-cell simulations are used to reproduce the initial acceleration of the plasma both via simulations including the laser interaction and via simulations that start with preheated electrons (to save dramatically on computational expense). The benchmarking of such simulations with the experiment and with each other will be used to understand the physical interaction when a magnetic field is applied. Finally, the experimental density profile of the interacting plasmas is shown in the case without an applied magnetic magnetic field, so to show that without an applied field that the development of high-velocity shocks, as a result of particle-to-particle collisions, is not achievable in the configuration considered.

  6. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

  7. On projectile fragmentation at high-velocity perforation of a thin bumper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myagkov, N. N.; Stepanov, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    By means of 3D numerical simulations, we study the statistical properties of the fragments cloud formed during high-velocity impact of a spherical projectile on a mesh bumper. We present a quantitative description of the projectile fragmentation, and study the nature of the transition from the damage to the fragmentation of the projectile when the impact velocity varies. A distinctive feature of the present work is that the calculations are carried out by smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method applied to the equations of mechanics of deformable solids (MDS). We describe the materials behavior by the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state and the Johnson-Cook model for the yield strength. The maximum principal stress spall model is used as the fracture model. It is shown that the simulation results of fragmentation based on the MDS equations by the SPH method are qualitatively consistent with the results obtained earlier on the basis of the molecular dynamics and discrete element models. It is found that the power-law distribution exponent does not depend on energy imparted to the projectile during the high-velocity impact. At the same time, our calculations show that the critical impact velocity, the power-law exponent and other critical exponents depend on the fracture criterion.

  8. A SPITZER-MIPS SEARCH FOR DUST IN COMPACT HIGH-VELOCITY H I CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Rik J.; Mathur, Smita; Poindexter, Shawn; Elvis, Martin; Nicastro, Fabrizio

    2012-04-15

    We employ three-band Spitzer-MIPS observations to search for cold dust emission in three neutral hydrogen compact high-velocity clouds (CHVCs) in the vicinity of the Milky Way. Far-infrared emission correlated with H I column density was previously reported in HVC Complex C, indicating that this object contains dust heated by the Galactic radiation field at its distance of {approx}10 kpc. Assuming published Spitzer, IRAS, and Planck, IR-H I correlations for Complex C, our Spitzer observations are of sufficient depth to directly detect 160 {mu}m dust emission in the CHVCs if it is present at the same level as in Complex C, but no emission is detected in any of the targets. For one of the targets (CHVC289) which has well-localized H I clumps, we therefore conclude that it is fundamentally different from Complex C, with either a lower dust-to-gas ratio or a greater distance from the Galactic disk (and consequently cooler dust temperature). Firm conclusions cannot be drawn for the other two Spitzer-observed CHVCs since their small-scale H I structures are not sufficiently well known; nonetheless, no extended dust emission is apparent despite their relatively high H I column densities. The lack of dust emission in CHVC289 suggests that at least some compact high-velocity clouds objects may exhibit very low dust-to-gas ratios and/or greater Galactocentric distances than large HVC complexes.

  9. Discovery of molecular hydrogen in a high-velocity cloud of the Galactic halo.

    PubMed

    Richter, P; de Boer, K S; Widmann, H; Kappelmann, N; Gringel, W; Grewing, M; Barnstedt, J

    1999-11-25

    The Milky Way's halo contains clouds of neutral hydrogen with high radial velocities which do not follow the general rotational motion of the Galaxy. Few distances to these high-velocity clouds are known, so even gross properties such as total mass are hard to determine. As a consequence, there is no generally accepted theory regarding their origin. One idea is that they result from gas that has cooled after being ejected from the Galaxy through fountain-like flows powered by supernovae; another is that they are composed of gas, poor in heavy elements, which is falling onto the disk of the Milky Way from intergalactic space. The presence of molecular hydrogen, whose formation generally requires the presence of dust (and therefore gas, enriched in heavy elements), could help to distinguish between these possibilities. Here we report the discovery of molecular hydrogen absorption in a high-velocity cloud along the line of sight to the Large Magellanic Cloud. We also derive for the same cloud an iron abundance which is half of the solar value. From these data, we conclude that gas in this cloud originated in the disk of the Milky Way.

  10. PTF 12gzk—A rapidly declining, high-velocity type Ic radio supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Arcavi, Iair; Ofek, Eran O.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.

    2013-11-20

    Only a few cases of Type Ic supernovae (SNe) with high-velocity ejecta (≥0.2 c) have been discovered and studied. Here, we present our analysis of radio and X-ray observations of the Type Ic SN PTF 12gzk. The radio emission declined less than 10 days after explosion, suggesting SN ejecta expanding at high velocity (∼0.3 c). The radio data also indicate that the density of the circumstellar material (CSM) around the supernova is lower by a factor of ∼10 than the CSM around normal Type Ic SNe. PTF 12gzk may therefore be an intermediate event between a 'normal' SN Ic and a gamma-ray-burst-SN-like event. Our observations of this rapidly declining radio SN at a distance of 58 Mpc demonstrates the potential to detect many additional radio SNe, given the new capabilities of the Very Large Array (improved sensitivity and dynamic scheduling), which are currently missed, leading to a biased view of radio SNe Ic. Early optical discovery followed by rapid radio observations would provide a full description of the ejecta velocity distribution and CSM densities around stripped massive star explosions as well as strong clues about the nature of their progenitor stars.

  11. Eulerian adaptive finite-difference method for high-velocity impact and penetration problems

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Philip T.; Deiterding, Ralf; Meiron, Daniel I.; Pullin, Dale I

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the complex processes involved, faithful prediction of high-velocity impact events demands a simulation method delivering efficient calculations based on comprehensively formulated constitutive models. Such an approach is presented herein, employing a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) method within an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) framework for the numerical solution of hyperbolic partial differential equations. Applied widely in computational fluid dynamics, these methods are well suited to the involved locally non-smooth finite deformations, circumventing any requirement for artificial viscosity functions for shock capturing. Application of the methods is facilitated through using a model of solid dynamics based upon hyper-elastic theory comprising kinematic evolution equations for the elastic distortion tensor. The model for finite inelastic deformations is phenomenologically equivalent to Maxwell s model of tangential stress relaxation. Closure relations tailored to the expected high-pressure states are proposed and calibrated for the materials of interest. Sharp interface resolution is achieved by employing level-set functions to track boundary motion, along with a ghost material method to capture the necessary internal boundary conditions for material interactions and stress-free surfaces. The approach is demonstrated for the simulation of high velocity impacts of steel projectiles on aluminium target plates in two and three dimensions.

  12. Evidence for a high-velocity slab associated with the Hindu Kush seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellors, R. J.; Pavlis, G. L.; Hamburger, M. W.; Al-Shukri, H. J.; Lukk, A. A.

    1995-03-01

    We used teleseismic travel time residuals to determine lateral velocity variations of the crust and upper mantle in the Pamir-Hindu Kush region in Tadjikistan and Afghanistan. Data from 29 analog seismic stations in Tadjikistan and northern Afghanistan were used to determine travel time residuals for 210 teleseismic events ranging in distance from 28 deg to 87 deg and covering a broad range of azimuths. We inverted for velocity perturbations over a rectangular grid with a block size of 99 x 99 km. The model extended to a depth of 350 km with a 50-km-thick first layer and two 150-km-thick deeper layers. The results show a strong and well-resolved zone of high velocities in the upper mantle at depths greater than 200 km, coincident with the location of the Hindu Kush seismic zone. No clear velocity perturbations are associated with the Pamir seismic zone. Above 200 km little correlation is observed with the seismic zone, but indications of thicker crust under the Pamir and thinner crust under the Tadjik Depression are seen. The high velocities are most likely caused by the presence of oceanic lithosphere at depth.

  13. Development of a high-velocity free-flight launcher : the Ames light-gas gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charters, A C; Denardo, B Pat; Rossow, Vernon J

    1955-01-01

    Recent interest in long-range missiles has stimulated a search for new experimental techniques which can reproduce in the laboratory the high temperatures and Mach numbers associated with the missiles' flight. One promising possibility lies in free-flight testing of laboratory models which are flown at the full velocity of the missile. In this type of test, temperatures are approximated and aerodynamic heating of the model is representative of that experienced by the missile in high-velocity flight. A prime requirement of the free-flight test technique is a device which had the capacity for launching models at the velocities desired. In response to thie need, a gun firing light models at velocities up to 15,000 feet per second has been developed at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory. The design of this gun, the analysis of its performance, and the results of the initial firing trials are described in this paper. The firing trials showed that the measured velocities and pressures agreed well with the predicted values. Also, the erosion of the launch tube was very small for the eleven rounds fired. The performance of the gun suggests that it will prove to be a satisfactory launcher for high-velocity free-flight tests. However, it should be mentioned that only the gross performance has been evaluated so far, and, consequently, the operation of the gun must be investigated in further detail before its performance can be reliably predicted over its full operating range.

  14. Investigation of high velocity separator for particle removal in coal gasification plants. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Linhardt, H.D.

    1980-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of Phase II of the High Velocity Particle Separator Program performed under Contract EF-77-C-01-2709. This high velocity wedge separator has the potential to reduce equipment size and cost of high temperature and pressurized particulate removal equipment for coal derived gases. Phase II has been directed toward testing and detailed conceptual design of an element suitable for a commercial scale high temperature, high pressure particle separator (HTPS). Concurrently, Phase IA has been conducted, which utilized the ambient analog method (AAM) for aerodynamic and collection performance investigation of each HTPS configuration prior and during hot testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase IA and II. The AAM effort established correlation of theoretical analysis and experiment for HTPS pressure drop, purge flow ratio and collection efficiency potential. Task I defined the initial test conditions to be the contract design point of 1800/sup 0/F and 350 psia. The 1800/sup 0/F, 350 psia testing represents the main high temperature testing with coal-derived particulates in the 2 to 10 micron range. Phase IA and Phase II have demonstrated efficient particle collection with acceptable pressure drop. In view of these encouraging results, it is reasonable to apply the developed technology toward future hot gas particulate cleanup requirements.

  15. A novel platform to study magnetized high-velocity collisionless shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D. P.; Korneev, Ph; Béard, J.; Chen, S. N.; d'Humières, E.; Pépin, H.; Pikuz, S.; Pollock, B.; Riquier, R.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Fuchs, J.

    2014-12-13

    An experimental platform to study the interaction of two colliding high-velocity (0.01–0.2c; 0.05–20 MeV) proton plasmas in a high strength (20 T) magnetic field is introduced. This platform aims to study the collision of magnetized plasmas accelerated via the Target-Normal-Sheath-Acceleration mechanism and initially separated by distances of a few hundred microns. The plasmas are accelerated from solid targets positioned inside a few cubic millimeter cavity located within a Helmholtz coil that provides up to 20 T magnetic fields. Various parameters of the plasmas at their interaction location are estimated. These show an interaction that is highly non-collisional, and that becomes more and more dominated by the magnetic fields as time progresses (from 5 to 60 ps). Particle-in-cell simulations are used to reproduce the initial acceleration of the plasma both via simulations including the laser interaction and via simulations that start with preheated electrons (to save dramatically on computational expense). The benchmarking of such simulations with the experiment and with each other will be used to understand the physical interaction when a magnetic field is applied. In conclusion, the experimental density profile of the interacting plasmas is shown in the case without an applied magnetic magnetic field, so to show that without an applied field that the development of high-velocity shocks, as a result of particle-to-particle collisions, is not achievable in the configuration considered.

  16. Corrosion behavior of some high-temperature alloys under high velocity burnt fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Brill, U.; Ibas, O.

    1995-12-31

    In a laboratory burner rig facility developed by Krupp VDM, the corrosion behavior of three high-temperature alloys was investigated under high velocity burnt fuel. A hot gas stream of burnt natural gas hits a sample at an angle of 45{degree}. Gas velocities of up to 80 m/s are obtained, and can be continuously adjusted by varying the air volume. By changing the sample to burner nozzle distance, a temperature gradient from 1,000 C in the center to 880 C at the edges of the sample can be achieved. Corrosion behavior of the two Fe-base alloys 310 S and 800H, and the Ni-base alloy 602CA, was evaluated by means of optical microscopy and SEM/EDAX analysis. According to results obtained so far, the alumina-former, alloy 602CA, provides best performance under high velocity burnt fuel at 880--1,000 C, as well as under steady state cyclic oxidation testing in air.

  17. Streptococcus mutans biofilm transient viscoelastic fluid behaviour during high-velocity microsprays.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, S; Johnston, D A; Rmaile, A; Gottenbos, B; De Jager, M; Aspiras, M; Starke, E M; Ward, M T; Stoodley, P

    2016-06-01

    Using high-speed imaging we assessed Streptococcus mutans biofilm-fluid interactions during exposure to a 60-ms microspray burst with a maximum exit velocity of 51m/s. S. mutans UA159 biofilms were grown for 72h on 10mm-length glass slides pre-conditioned with porcine gastric mucin. Biofilm stiffness was measured by performing uniaxial-compression tests. We developed an in-vitro interproximal model which allowed the parallel insertion of two biofilm-colonized slides separated by a distance of 1mm and enabled high-speed imaging of the removal process at the surface. S. mutans biofilms were exposed to either a water microspray or an air-only microburst. High-speed videos provided further insight into the mechanical behaviour of biofilms as complex liquids and into high-shear fluid-biofilm interaction. We documented biofilms extremely transient fluid behaviour when exposed to the high-velocity microsprays. The presence of time-dependent recoil and residual deformation confirmed the pivotal role of viscoelasticity in biofilm removal. The air-only microburst was effective enough to remove some of the biofilm but created a smaller clearance zone underlying the importance of water and the air-water interface of drops moving over the solid surface in the removal process. Confocal and COMSTAT analysis showed the high-velocity water microspray caused up to a 99.9% reduction in biofilm thickness, biomass and area coverage, within the impact area. PMID:26771168

  18. High-velocity frictional experiments on dolerite and quartzite under controlled pore pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togo, T.; Shimamoto, T.; Ma, S.

    2013-12-01

    High-velocity friction experiments on rocks with or without gouge have been conducted mostly under dry conditions and demonstrated dramatic weakening of faults at high velocities (e.g., Di Toro et al., 2011, Nature). Recent experiments under wet conditions (e.g., Ujiie and Tsutsumi, 2010, GRL; Faulkner et al., 2011, GRL) revealed very different behaviors from those of dry faults, but those experiments were done under drained conditions. Experiments with controlled pore pressure Pp are definitely needed to determine mechanical properties of faults under fluid-rich environments such as those in subduction zones. Thus we have developed a pressure vessel that can be attached to our rotary-shear low to high-velocity friction apparatus (Marui Co Ltd., MIS-233-1-76). With a current specimen holder, friction experiments can be done on hollow-cylindrical specimens of 15 and 40 mm in inner and outer diameters, respectively, at controlled Pp to 35 MPa, at effective normal stresses of 3~9 MPa, and at slip rates of 60 mm/year to 2 m/s. An effective normal stress can be applied with a 100 kN hydraulic actuator. We report an outline of the experimental system and preliminary high-velocity experiments on Shanxi dolerite and a quartzite from China that are composed of pyroxene and plagioclase and of almost pure quartz, respectively. High-velocity friction experiments were performed on hollow-cylindrical specimens of Shanxi dolerite at effective normal stresses of 0.13~1.07 MPa and at slip rates of 1, 10, 100 and 1000 mm/sec. All experiments were conducted first with the nitrogen gas filling the pressure vessel (dry tests) and then with a controlled pore-water pressure (wet tests). In the dry tests an axial force was kept at 1 kN and the nitrogen gas pressure was increased in steps to 5 MPa to change an effective normal stress. In the wet tests the specimens were soaked in distilled water in the vessel and Pp was applied by nitrogen gas in a similar manner as in the dry tests

  19. High velocity anomaly beneath the Deccan volcanic province: Evidence from seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iyer, H.M.; Gaur, V.K.; Rai, S.S.; Ramesh, D.S.; Rao, C.V.R.; Srinagesh, D.; Suryaprakasam, K.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of teleseismic P-wave residuals observed at 15 seismograph stations operated in the Deccan volcanic province (DVP) in west central India points to the existence of a large, deep anomalous region in the upper mantle where the velocity is a few per cent higher than in the surrounding region. The seismic stations were operated in three deployments together with a reference station on precambrian granite at Hyderabad and another common station at Poona. The first group of stations lay along a west-northwesterly profile from Hyderabad through Poona to Bhatsa. The second group roughly formed an L-shaped profile from Poona to Hyderabad through Dharwar and Hospet. The third group of stations lay along a northwesterly profile from Hyderabad to Dhule through Aurangabad and Latur. Relative residuals computed with respect to Hyderabad at all the stations showed two basic features: a large almost linear variation from approximately +1s for teleseisms from the north to-1s for those from the southeast at the western stations, and persistance of the pattern with diminishing magnitudes towards the east. Preliminary ray-plotting and three-dimensional inversion of the P-wave residual data delineate the presence of a 600 km long approximately N-S trending anomalous region of high velocity (1-4% contrast) from a depth of about 100 km in the upper mantle encompassing almost the whole width of the DVP. Inversion of P-wave relative residuals reveal the existence of two prominent features beneath the DVP. The first is a thick high velocity zone (1-4% faster) extending from a depth of about 100 km directly beneath most of the DVP. The second feature is a prominent low velocity region which coincides with the westernmost part of the DVP. A possible explanation for the observed coherent high velocity anomaly is that it forms the root of the lithosphere which coherently translates with the continents during plate motions, an architecture characteristic of precambrian shields. The low

  20. Pulsatile spinal cord surrogate for intradural neuromodulation studies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S; Howard, M A; Rossen, J D; Brennan, T J; Dalm, B D; Dahdaleh, N S; Utz, M; Gillies, G T

    2012-01-01

    We have designed, built and tested a novel spinal cord surrogate that mimics the low-amplitude cardiac-driven pulsations of the human spinal cord, for use in developing intradural implants to be used in a novel form of neuromodulation for the treatment of intractable pain and motor system dysfunction. The silicone surrogate has an oval cross section, 10 mm major axis × 6 mm minor axis, and incorporates a 3 mm diameter × 3 cm long angioplasty balloon that serves as the pulsation actuator. When pneumatically driven at 1 Hz and 1.5 atmospheres (≈ 1140 mm Hg), the surrogate's diametric pulsation is ≈ 100 μm, which corresponds well to in vivo observations. The applications for this surrogate are presented and discussed. PMID:22188575

  1. What Happens to a High Velocity Cloud When it Hits the Milky Way's Disk: Is Dark Matter Necessary for Survival?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Robin L.; Galyardt, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter halos enshroud some of the most massive high velocity clouds. Their gravitational pull confines the clouds as they pass through the intergalactic medium. Given the ability of dark matter halos to stabilize their embedded baryonic clouds against hydrodynamic interactions that would otherwise disrupt them, it has further been suggested that dark matter halos could enable high velocity clouds to survive impacts with the Milky Way's disk. The survival of high velocity clouds, such as the Smith Cloud, during a passage through the disk has been cited as evidence for the presence of dark matter. However, a second actor, the magnetic field, may also be at play. In order to characterize, measure, and disentangle their effects, we have performed magnetohydrodynamic simulations of massive high velocity clouds as they impact a galactic disk. Here, we present the rate at which material dissipates in a variety of situations that include or exclude dark matter and magnetic fields.

  2. Simulation of High Velocity Impact on Composite Structures - Model Implementation and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueler, Dominik; Toso-Pentecôte, Nathalie; Voggenreiter, Heinz

    2016-08-01

    High velocity impact on composite aircraft structures leads to the formation of flexural waves that can cause severe damage to the structure. Damage and failure can occur within the plies and/or in the resin rich interface layers between adjacent plies. In the present paper a modelling methodology is documented that captures intra- and inter-laminar damage and their interrelations by use of shell element layers representing sub-laminates that are connected with cohesive interface layers to simulate delamination. This approach allows the simulation of large structures while still capturing the governing damage mechanisms and their interactions. The paper describes numerical algorithms for the implementation of a Ladevèze continuum damage model for the ply and methods to derive input parameters for the cohesive zone model. By comparison with experimental results from gas gun impact tests the potential and limitations of the modelling approach are discussed.

  3. The use of high velocity launchers for scientific and engineering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, J.R.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Furnish, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    Shockwave techniques have been used for decades to study the dynamic states of matter in temperature and pressure regimes inaccessible by other methods. These techniques have been employed in a wide variety of scientific, military, and commercial applications. A principal scientific objective has been to determine high-pressure equations of state (EOS) to ultra-high pressures; pressures of tens of Mbar have been reported for several materials. Most recently, these methods have been used for studies of thermophysical properties under shock compression, including phase transition kinetics, and mechanical properties, such as the high-pressure yield strength. In this paper, a brief discussion of recent developments in high velocity launchers is given. Advances in techniques for subjecting materials to a wide range of loading conditions is presented, including selected illustrations of shockwave measurements to Mbar pressures. 54 refs.

  4. Entrainment in High-Velocity, High Temperature Plasma Jets Part I: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, J.R.; Crawford, D.M.; Snyder, S.C.; Swank, W.D.; Haggard, D.C.; Williamson, R.L.

    2002-03-27

    The development of a high-velocity, high-temperature argon plasma jet issuing into air has been investigated. In particular the entrainment of the surrounding air, its effect on the temperature and velocity profiles and the subsequent mixing and dissociation of oxygen has been examined in detail. The total concentration of oxygen and the velocity and temperature profiles in the jet were obtained from an enthalpy probe. High-resolution Thomson scattering provided an independent measure of plasma velocity and temperature, validating enthalpy probe measurements and providing non-intrusive measurements near the nozzle exit. The concentration of atomic oxygen was obtained from two-photon Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). Molecular oxygen concentration and temperature was obtained from Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS). It was found that both the incompleteness of mixing at the molecular scale and the rate of oxygen dissociation and recombination effects jet behavior.

  5. The structural and dynamical aspects of boron nitride nanotubes under high velocity impacts.

    PubMed

    Machado, Leonardo D; Ozden, Sehmus; Tiwary, ChandraSekhar; Autreto, Pedro A S; Vajtai, Robert; Barrera, Enrique V; Galvao, Douglas S; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-06-01

    This communication report is a study on the structural and dynamical aspects of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) shot at high velocities (∼5 km s(-1)) against solid targets. The experimental results show unzipping of BNNTs and the formation of hBN nanoribbons. Fully atomistic reactive molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out to gain insights into the BNNT fracture patterns and deformation mechanisms. Our results show that longitudinal and axial tube fractures occur, but the formation of BN nanoribbons from fractured tubes was only observed for some impact angles. Although some structural and dynamical features of the impacts are similar to the ones reported for CNTs, because BNNTs are more brittle than CNTs this results in a larger number of fractured tubes but with fewer formed nanoribbons. PMID:27189765

  6. The detection of high-velocity outflows from M8E-IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, George F.; Allen, Mark; Beer, Reinhard; Dekany, Richard; Huntress, Wesley

    1988-01-01

    A high-resolution (0.059/cm) M band (4.6 micron) spectrum of the embedded young stellar object M8E-IR is presented and discussed. The spectrum shows strong absorption to large blueshifts in the rotational lines of the fundamental vibrational band, v = 1-0, of CO. The absorption is interpreted as being due to gas near to, and flowing from, the central object. The outflowing gas is warm (95-330 K) and consists of discrete velocity components with the very high velocities of 90, 130, 150, and 160 km/s. On the basis of a simple model, it is estimated that the observed outflows are less than 100 yr old.

  7. The Draco Nebula, a Molecular Cloud Associated with a High Velocity Cloud?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mebold, U.; Kalberla, P. W. M.

    1984-01-01

    Extended and very faint bright nebulae are found in high galactic latitudes at the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. Such a nebula, located in the constellation Draco and called Draco Nebula or Dracula, was found to be in detailed positional coincidence with a 21 cm emission line feature. Estimates of the minimum visual extinction from star counts ON and OFF Dracula and an estimated visual surface brightness indicate that Dracula fits the relation SBV = 24.2 - 2.5 log AV for dust clouds located above the galactic plane and reflecting the integrated starlight of the galactic disk. Hence Dracula is probably a reflection nebula. Indicators of molecular hydrogen in Dracula, molecules such as CO, were searched for by using a 2.5-m mm-telescope. Molecular hydrogen column densities were estimated. The dynamics of CO clumps was studied. Dracula has a close positional and possibly even astrophysical relationship to the high velocity cloud phenomenon.

  8. Electric and magnetic field measurements inside a high-velocity neutral beam undergoing ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Swenson, C. M.; Brenning, N.; Baker, K.; Pfaff, R.

    1991-01-01

    Vector electric field measurements were made inside two ionizing, high-velocity streams of barium atoms in the earth's ionosphere, and a variety of electrical phenomena across the frequency spectrum are reported. A very large quasi-dc electric field was detected antiparallel to the beam velocity at a roughly 45 deg angle with the magnetic field B0. A very large component of E is found parallel to B0. The fluctuating electric fields are also quite large, of the same order of magnitude as the quasi-dc pulse. The wave energy maximizes at frequencies below the barium lower hybrid frequency and includes strong signatures of the oxygen cyclotron frequency. Measurements made on a subpayload separated across B0 by several hundred meters and along B0 by several km do not show the large pulse. Very large amplitude magnetic field fluctuations were observed in both bursts.

  9. Aerodynamic study on supersonic flows in high-velocity oxy-fuel thermal spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katanoda, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Kuroda, Seiji; Kawakita, Jin; Fukanuma, Hirotaka; Matsuo, Kazuyasu

    2005-06-01

    To clarify the characteristics of gas flow in high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun, aerodynamic research is performed using a special gun. The gun has rectangular cross-sectional area and sidewalls of optical glass to visualize the internal flow. The gun consists of a supersonic nozzle with the design Mach number of 2.0 followed by a straight passage called barrel. Compressed dry air up to 0.78 MPa is used as a process gas instead of combustion gas which is used in a commercial HVOF gun. The high-speed gas flows with shock waves in the gun and jets are visualized by schlieren technique. Complicated internal and external flow-fields containing various types of shock wave as well as expansion wave are visualized.

  10. High-velocity OH/IR stars at the Galactic centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Langevelde, H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Lindqvist, M.; Habing, H. J.; de Zeeuw, P. T.

    1992-07-01

    We present the results of a small survey for OH/IR stars at high radial velocities in the Galactic center region performed with the VLA and the Nancay telescope. We have detected two new OH/IR stars, one at a peculiar velocity of -309 km/s, the other at -355 km/s. These two objects and one previously detected high-velocity OH/IR star (OH 0.3-0.2, Baud et al., 1975) stand out in the 1, v diagram of OH/IR stars at the Galactic center. Are these stars just on the extreme edge of the radial velocity distribution? Or are these objects no longer bound to the Galactic center? We discuss these possibilities, showing that these are most likely bulge stars on elongated orbits passing close to the Galactic center.

  11. Three-dimensional finite element analysis for high velocity impact. [of projectiles from space debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, S. T. K.; Lee, C. H.; Brashears, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    A finite element algorithm for solving unsteady, three-dimensional high velocity impact problems is presented. A computer program was developed based on the Eulerian hydroelasto-viscoplastic formulation and the utilization of the theorem of weak solutions. The equations solved consist of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, equation of state, and appropriate constitutive equations. The solution technique is a time-dependent finite element analysis utilizing three-dimensional isoparametric elements, in conjunction with a generalized two-step time integration scheme. The developed code was demonstrated by solving one-dimensional as well as three-dimensional impact problems for both the inviscid hydrodynamic model and the hydroelasto-viscoplastic model.

  12. Study of Iron oxide nanoparticles using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Ushakov, M. V.; Šepelák, V.; Semionkin, V. A.; Morais, P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxide (magnetite and maghemite) nanoparticles developed for magnetic fluids were studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution at 295 and 90 K. The recorded Mössbauer spectra have demonstrated that usual physical models based on octahedral and tetrahedral sites were not suitable for fitting. Alternatively, the Mössbauer spectra were nicely fitted using a large number of magnetic sextets. The obtained results showed that the Mössbauer spectra and the assessed parameters were different for nanoparticles as-prepared and dispersed in the dispersing fluid at 295 K. We claim that this finding is mainly due to the interaction of polar molecules with Iron cations at nanoparticle's surface or due to the surface coating using carboxylic-terminated molecules. It is assumed that the large number of spectral components may be related to complexity of the nanoparticle's characteristics and deviations from stoichiometry, including in the latter the influence of the oxidation of magnetite towards maghemite.

  13. High-velocity tails on the velocity distribution of solar wind ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ogilvie, K.W. ); Geiss, J. ); Gloeckler, G. ); Berdichevsky, D. ); Wilken, B. )

    1993-03-01

    Recent observations of the solar wind using the SWICS instrument on the Ulysses spacecraft have shown the presence of high-velocity [open quotes]tails[close quotes] on the velocity distribution of protons. Similar features have also been observed on the velocity distributions of helium and oxygen ions. Of the order of 1% of the solar wind density is involved in these tails, which are approximately exponential in shape and persist to V = V[sub B] + 10V[sub th] or beyond, where V[sub B] is the bulk velocity and V[sub th] the thermal velocity of the solar wind. This paper contains a preliminary description of the phenomenon. It is clear that it is ultimately connected with the passage of interplanetary shocks past the spacecraft and that particle acceleration at oblique shocks is involved. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. The quest for TPa Hugoniot data: using the DEMG in high velocity pulsed power experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Jeff H; Rousculp, Christopher L; Holtkamp, David B; Oro, David M; Griego, Jeffrey R; Atchison, Walter L; Reinovsky, Robert E

    2010-12-20

    ALT-3 is an experiment being designed in collaboration between Russian VNIIEF scientists and LANL that aims to conduct high velocity material experiments to measure shock velocities at pressures near 1 TPa. The DEMG (Disk Explosive Magnetic Generator) is used to drive >60MA currents to accelerate an aluminum liner to speeds in excess of 20 km/s. The 1-D model of the DEMG has been refined from a given current profile to a time-varying inductance. Various techniques are used to model the FOS (Foil Opening Switch) on the DEMG and a refined DEMG model is then used to drive a liner into various targets to determine the optimum design for the experiment and analyze the possible conditions and complications.

  15. Ringlike spin segregation of binary mixtures in a high-velocity rotating drum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decai, Huang; Ming, Lu; Gang, Sun; Yaodong, Feng; Min, Sun; Haiping, Wu; Kaiming, Deng

    2012-03-01

    This study presents molecular dynamics simulations on the segregation of binary mixtures in a high-velocity rotating drum. Depending on the ratio between the particle radius and density, similarities to the Brazil-nut effect and its reverse form are shown in the ringlike spin segregation patterns in radial direction. The smaller and heavier particles accumulated toward the drum wall, whereas the bigger and lighter particles accumulated toward the drum center. The effects of particle radius and density on the segregation states were quantified and the phase diagram of segregation in the ρb/ρs - rb/rs space was plotted. The observed phenomena can be explained by the combined percolation and the buoyancy effects.

  16. Relationship between the upper mantle high velocity seismic lid and the continental lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priestley, Keith; Tilmann, Frederik

    2009-04-01

    The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary corresponds to the base of the "rigid" plates - the depth at which heat transport changes from advection in the convecting deeper upper mantle to conduction in the shallow upper mantle. Although this boundary is a fundamental feature of the Earth, mapping it has been difficult because it does not correspond to a sharp change in temperature or composition. Various definitions of the lithosphere and asthenosphere are based on the analysis of different types of geophysical and geological observations. The depth to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary determined from these different observations often shows little agreement when they are applied to the same region because the geophysical and geological observations (i.e., seismic velocity, strain rate, electrical resistivity, chemical depletion, etc.) are proxies for the change in rheological properties rather than a direct measure of the rheological properties. In this paper, we focus on the seismic mapping of the upper mantle high velocity lid and low velocity zone and its relationship to the lithosphere and asthenosphere. We have two goals: (a) to examine the differences in how teleseismic body-wave travel-time tomography and surface-wave tomography image upper mantle seismic structure; and (b) to summarise how upper mantle seismic velocity structure can be related to the structure of the lithosphere and asthenosphere. Surface-wave tomography provides reasonably good depth resolution, especially when higher modes are included in the analysis, but lateral resolution is limited by the horizontal wavelength of the long-period surface waves used to constrain upper mantle velocity structure. Teleseismic body-wave tomography has poor depth resolution in the upper mantle, particularly when no strong lateral contrasts are present. If station terms are used, features with large lateral extent and gradual boundaries are attenuated in the tomographic image. Body-wave models are not

  17. Cavity dimensions for high velocity penetration events: A comparison of calculational results with data

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetyk, L.N.; Yarrington, P.

    1989-05-01

    Calculations were performed with the CTH and HULL finite difference wavecodes to evaluate computational capabilities for predicting depth and diameter of target cavities produced in high velocity penetration events. The calculations simulated selected tests in a set of armor penetration experiments conducted by the US Army Ballistic Research Laboratory and reported earlier in the literature. The tests and simulations involved penetration of semi-infinite targets by long rod projectiles over a range of impact velocities from 1.3 to 4.5 km/sec. Comparisons are made between the calculated and measured dimensions of the target cavities, and the sensitivity of the predicted results to target property variations is investigated. 9 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. LP 400-22, A Very Low Mass and High-Velocity White Dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawka, Adela; Vennes, Stephane; Oswalt, Terry D.; Smith, J. Allyn; Silvestri, Nicole M.

    2006-01-01

    We report the identification of LP 400-22 (WD 2234+222) as a very low mass and high-velocity white dwarf. The ultraviolet GALEX and optical photometric colors and a spectral line analysis of LP 400-22 show this star to have an effective temperature of 11,080+/-140 K and a surface gravity of log g = 6.32 +/-0.08. Therefore, this is a helium-core white dwarf with a mass of 0.17 M,. The tangential velocity of this white dwarf is 414+/-43 km/s, making it one of the fastest moving white dwarfs known. We discuss probable evolutionary scenarios for this remarkable object.

  19. Spinal instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Spivak, J M; Balderston, R A

    1994-03-01

    The past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the availability of spinal instrumentation devices, enabling surgeons to treat a variety of spinal disorders with improved results and lower morbidity. In each anatomic region new fixation systems exist. Improvement in fusion rates with supplemental plate fixation following anterior cervical diskectomies and reconstructions has been demonstrated; these devices can now be applied more safely than ever before. Posterior occipitocervical plating to the C-2 pedicle and C3-6 lateral masses can provide stable fixation despite incompetent posterior arch bony structures. Newer, more rigid anterior thoracolumbar instrumentation allows for correction of thoracolumbar and lumbar scoliosis along fewer levels and with better maintenance of lordosis and is also useful following anterior decompression for tumor and trauma. Segmental hook fixation of the posterior thoracolumbar spine has allowed for improved correction of deformity without increased morbidity or the need for postoperative bracing in many cases. Finally, the use of transpedicular screw fixation of the lumbosacral spine allows for excellent segmental fixation without intact posterior elements, including facet joints, and has significantly improved the fusion rate in lumbosacral fusions. PMID:8024965

  20. High Velocity Frictional Properties of a Clay-Bearing Fault Gouge and Implications for Earthquake Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, F.; Brantut, N.; Schubnel, A.; Rouzaud, J.; Shimamoto, T.

    2008-12-01

    Frictional properties of natural kaolinite-bearing gouge samples from the Median Tectonic Line (SW Japan) have been studied using a high-velocity rotary shear apparatus. For a slip velocity of 1~m.s-1 and normal stresses from 0.3 to 1.3~MPa, a dramatic slip-weakening behavior was observed. X-ray diffraction analysis of deformed samples and additional high-velocity friction experiments on pure kaolinite indicate kaolinite dehydration during slip. The critical slip-weakening distance Dc is of the order of 1~m to 10~m. These values are extrapolated to higher normal stresses, assuming that Dc is a thermal parameter. The calculation shows that dimensionally, Dc ∝ 1/σn2, where σn is the normal stress applied on the fault. The inferred Dc values range from a few centimeters at 10~MPa normal stress to a few hundreds of microns at 100~MPa normal stress. Microscopic observations show partial amorphization and dramatic grain size reduction (down to the nanometer scale) localized in a narrow zone of about 1 to 10~μm thickness. Fracture energy Gc is calculated and compared to surface energy due to grain size reduction, and energies of chemical reactions, showing that most of the fracture energy is converted into heat. The geophysical consequences of thermal dehydration of bonded water during seismic slip are then commented in the light of mineralogical and poro-mechanical data of several fault zones, which tend to show that this phenomenon has to be taken into account in most of sub-surface faults, and in hydrous rocks of subducted oceanic crust.

  1. High-velocity OH megamasers in IRAS 20100-4156: evidence for a supermassive black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Smith, L.; Allison, J. R.; Green, J. A.; Bannister, K. W.; Chippendale, A.; Edwards, P. G.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Lenc, E.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Phillips, C. J.; Sault, R. J.; Serra, P.; Stevens, J.; Voronkov, M.; Whiting, M.

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of new, high-velocity narrow-line components of the OH megamaser in IRAS 20100-4156. Results from the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP)'s Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) provide two independent measurements of the OH megamaser spectrum. We found evidence for OH megamaser clumps at -409 and -562 km s-1 (blue-shifted) from the systemic velocity of the galaxy, in addition to the lines previously known. The presence of such high velocities in the molecular emission from IRAS 20100-4156 could be explained by a ˜50 pc molecular ring enclosing a ˜3.8 billion solar mass black hole. We also discuss two alternatives, i.e. that the narrow-line masers are dynamically coupled to the wind driven by the active galactic nucleus or they are associated with two separate galactic nuclei. The comparison between the BETA and ATCA spectra provides another scientific verification of ASKAP's BETA. Our data, combined with previous measurements of the source enabled us to study the variability of the source over a 26 yr period. The flux density of the brightest OH maser components has reduced by more than a factor of 2 between 1988 and 2015, whereas a secondary narrow-line component has more than doubled in the same time. Plans for high-resolution very long baseline interferometry follow-up of this source are discussed, as are prospects for discovering new OH megamasers during the ASKAP early science programme.

  2. Chemical reactions induced by high-velocity molecular impacts: challenges for closed-source mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Analysis of upper atmosphere composition using closed-source neutral mass spectrometers (e.g., Cassini INMS, MAVEN NGIMS) is subject to error due to chemical reactions caused by the high-velocity impacts of neutral molecules on the source surfaces. In addition to species traditionally considered "surface reactive" (e.g., O, N) it is likely that many or all impacting molecules are vibrationally excited to the point that chemical changes can occur. Dissociation, fragmentation, formation of radicals and ions, and other reactions likely obscure analysis of the native atmospheric composition, particularly of organic compounds. Existing techniques are not capable of recreating the relevant impact chemistry in the lab. We report on the development of a new capability allowing reactions of high-velocity neutrals impacting surfaces to be characterized directly. Molecules introduced into a vacuum chamber are impacted at several km/s by the surface of a high-speed rotor. These molecules subsequently impact multiple times on other surfaces within the vacuum chamber until they are thermalized, after which they are cryogenically collected and analyzed. Reaction pathways and thermodynamics for volatile compounds are then determined. We will present current results on this project, including data from low- and mid-range velocity experiments. This type of information is critical to clarify prior flight results and plan for future missions. Finally, we present a new type of inlet intended to significantly reduce fragmentation for impact velocities typical of a fly-by mission. Theoretical analysis indicates that this new inlet may reduce fragmentation by more than an order of magnitude for any encounter velocity.

  3. High-velocity Interstellar Bullets in IRAS 05506+2414: A Very Young Protostar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Claussen, Mark; Sanchez Contreras, Carmen; Morris, Mark; Sarkar, Geetanjali

    2008-01-01

    We have made a serendipitous discovery of an enigmatic outflow source, IRAS 05506+2414 (hereafter IRAS 05506), as part of a multiwavelength survey of pre-planetary nebulae (PPNs). The HST optical and near-infrared images show a bright compact central source with a jet-like extension, and a fan-like spray of high-velocity (with radial velocities up to 350 km/s) elongated knots which appear to emanate from it. These structures are possibly analogous to the near-IR bullets'' seen in the Orion Nebula. Interferometric observations at 2.6 mm show the presence of a continuum source and a high-velocity CO outflow, which is aligned with the optical jet structure. IRAS 05506 is most likely not a PPN. We find extended NH3 (1,1) emission toward IRAS 05506; these data, together with the combined presence of far-IR emission, H2O and OH masers, and CO and CS J=2-1 emission, strongly argue for a dense, dusty star-forming core associated with IRAS 05506. IRAS 05506 is probably an intermediate-mass or massive protostar, and the very short timescale (200 yr) of its outflows indicates that it is very young. If IRAS 05506 is a massive star, then the lack of radio continuum and the late G to early K spectral type we find from our optical spectra imply that in this object we are witnessing the earliest stages of its life, while its temperature is still too low to provide sufficient UV flux for ionization.

  4. A novel platform to study magnetized high-velocity collisionless shocks

    DOE PAGES

    Higginson, D. P.; Korneev, Ph; Béard, J.; Chen, S. N.; d'Humières, E.; Pépin, H.; Pikuz, S.; Pollock, B.; Riquier, R.; Tikhonchuk, V.; et al

    2014-12-13

    An experimental platform to study the interaction of two colliding high-velocity (0.01–0.2c; 0.05–20 MeV) proton plasmas in a high strength (20 T) magnetic field is introduced. This platform aims to study the collision of magnetized plasmas accelerated via the Target-Normal-Sheath-Acceleration mechanism and initially separated by distances of a few hundred microns. The plasmas are accelerated from solid targets positioned inside a few cubic millimeter cavity located within a Helmholtz coil that provides up to 20 T magnetic fields. Various parameters of the plasmas at their interaction location are estimated. These show an interaction that is highly non-collisional, and that becomesmore » more and more dominated by the magnetic fields as time progresses (from 5 to 60 ps). Particle-in-cell simulations are used to reproduce the initial acceleration of the plasma both via simulations including the laser interaction and via simulations that start with preheated electrons (to save dramatically on computational expense). The benchmarking of such simulations with the experiment and with each other will be used to understand the physical interaction when a magnetic field is applied. In conclusion, the experimental density profile of the interacting plasmas is shown in the case without an applied magnetic magnetic field, so to show that without an applied field that the development of high-velocity shocks, as a result of particle-to-particle collisions, is not achievable in the configuration considered.« less

  5. Mapping High-Velocity H-alpha and Lyman-alpha Emission from Supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Fransson, Claes; Larsson, Josefin; Frank, Kari A.; Burrows, David N.; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Garnavich, Peter; Heng, Kevin; Lawrence, Stephen S.; Lundqvist, Peter; Smith, Nathan; Sonneborn, George

    2015-01-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope images of high-velocity H-alpha and Lyman-alpha emission in the outer debris of SN 1987A. The H-alpha images are dominated by emission from hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock. For the first time we observe emission from the reverse shock surface well above and below the equatorial ring, suggesting a bipolar or conical structure perpendicular to the ring plane. Using the H-alpha imaging, we measure the mass flux of hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock front, in the velocity intervals (-7,500 < V(sub obs) < -2,800 km/s) and (1,000 < V(sub obs) < 7,500 km/s), ?M(sub H) = 1.2 × 10(exp -3) M/ y. We also present the first Lyman-alpha imaging of the whole remnant and new Chandra X-ray observations. Comparing the spatial distribution of the Lyman-alpha and X-ray emission, we observe that the majority of the high-velocity Lyman-alpha emission originates interior to the equatorial ring. The observed Lyman-alpha/H-alpha photon ratio, R(L-alpha/H-alpha) approx. = 17, is significantly higher than the theoretically predicted ratio of approx. = 5 for neutral atoms crossing the reverse shock front. We attribute this excess to Lyman-alpha emission produced by X-ray heating of the outer debris. The spatial orientation of the Lyman-alpha and X-ray emission suggests that X-ray heating of the outer debris is the dominant Lyman-alpha production mechanism in SN 1987A at this phase in its evolution.

  6. Impact of High Velocity Interactions on Galaxy Evolution in Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, Marie E.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Kraft, R. P.; Ashby, M. L.; Hardcastle, M. J.

    2007-05-01

    Galaxy interactions in cool groups dominate galaxy evolution at high redshift. Observations of galaxies interacting in nearby galaxy groups, where the same dynamical processes that transform galaxies at high redshift can be studied in detail, are critical to our understanding of galaxy and group evolution. X-ray observations of hot gas features, e.g. surface brightness edges and wakes, reveal that high velocity interactions play a significant role in the transformation of galaxies in groups, yet, because these encounters are difficult to identify in other wavebands, few have been studied. We present two case studies of high velocity galaxy-galaxy and galaxy-gas interactions in galaxy groups: NGC4782(3C278) and NGC4783 in LGG316, and NGC6872 and NGC6876 in the Pavo group. From Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray data, we measure the hot gas temperature, density and metal abundance in the galaxies and the intragroup medium (IGM) to characterize the thermodynamic state of the group, constrain 3D motions of the galaxies through the IGM, and determine the dominant processes transferring matter and energy between the galaxy and group gas. We compare these results with VLA observations of NGC4782/3 and Spitzer IRAC observations of NGC6872 and NGC6876 to study the impact of these interactions on nuclear activity, radio jet evolution, and star formation in these galaxies, and on the heating and enrichment of the IGM. This work was supported in part by the Smithsonian Institution, the Chandra Science Center, NASA contracts AR5-6011X, GO6-7068X, NNX06AG34G, JPL1279244 and the Royal Society.

  7. High-velocity frictional strength across the Tohoku-Oki megathrust determined from surface drilling torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujiie, K.; Inoue, T.; Ishiwata, J.

    2015-12-01

    Frictional strength at seismic slip rates is a key to evaluate fault weakening and rupture propagation during earthquakes. The Japan Trench First Drilling Project (JFAST) drilled through the shallow plate-boundary thrust, where huge displacements of ~50 m occurred during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. To determine the downhole frictional strength at drilled site (Site C0019), we analyzed surface drilling data. The equivalent slip rate estimated from the rotation rate and inner and outer radiuses of the drill bit ranges from 0.8 to 1.3 m/s. The measured torque includes the frictional torque between the drilling string and borehole wall, the viscous torque between the drilling string and seawater/drilling fluid, and the drilling torque between the drill bit and sediments. We subtracted the former two from the measured torque using the torque data during bottom-up rotating operations at several depths. Then, the shear stress was calculated from the drilling torque taking the configuration of the drill bit into consideration. The normal stress was estimated from the weight on bit data and the projected area of the drill bit. Assuming negligible cohesion, the frictional strength was obtained by dividing shear stress by normal stress. The results show a clear contrast in high-velocity frictional strength across the plate-boundary thrust: the friction coefficient of frontal prism sediments (hemipelagic mudstones) in hanging wall is 0.1-0.2, while that in subducting sediments (hemipelagic to pelagic mudstones and chert) in footwall increases to 0.2-0.4. The friction coefficient of smectite-rich pelagic clay in the plate-boundary thrust is ~0.1, which is consistent with that obtained from high-velocity (1.3 m/s) friction experiments and temperature measurements. We conclude that surface drilling torque provides useful data to obtain a continuous downhole frictional strength.

  8. Optical Emission from High Velocity Clouds and the Nature of HVCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, B. J.; Vogel, S. N.; Williams, T. B.

    1999-12-01

    The nature and origin of the high-velocity clouds of neutral hydrogen remain controversial, and the distances of most HVCs are poorly constrained. Only the large northern HVC complexes M and A have upper distance limits, of <5 and 4--10 kpc, from absorption against halo stars (Danly et al 1993, van Woerden et al 1999). These HVCs have diffuse H-alpha emission of 80--200 milli-Rayleighs (mR) (Tufte, Reynolds & Haffner 1998). We report results from a search of 20 high velocity clouds for faint diffuse optical emission lines in H-alpha and [N II], using a Fabry-Perot at the Las Campanas 2.5-m telescope. A few small complexes are ``bright,'' with H-alpha emission from 100--400 mR and high [N II]/H-alpha. Many HVCs are very faint in H-alpha: HVCs from the Anticenter, Galactic Center Negative, and Extreme Positive complexes have H-alpha from <15 to 30 mR. We construct a simple model for the ionizing flux emergent from the galaxy, normalized by the northern ``bright'' HVCs with known distances and H-alpha fluxes. If the H-alpha from HVCs is produced by ionizing flux escaping from the Galaxy, the H-alpha flux can be used to infer distances for HVCs. The model places the very faint HVCs at distances of 20--60 kpc, in the outer Galactic halo. If H-alpha can be produced by other mechanisms, than these distances could be lower limits. Independent of the model or mechanism, the HVCs that are very faint in H-alpha should be much farther away than the nearby ``bright'' HVCs. The faint HVCs are too far away to be produced by a Galactic fountain, and represent a significant amount of gas accreting onto the Galaxy. This work has been supported by a Carnegie Barbara McClintock Fellowship.

  9. The StEllar Counterparts of COmpact high velocity clouds (SECCO) survey. I. Photos of ghosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellazzini, M.; Beccari, G.; Battaglia, G.; Martin, N.; Testa, V.; Ibata, R.; Correnti, M.; Cusano, F.; Sani, E.

    2015-03-01

    We present an imaging survey that searches for the stellar counterparts of recently discovered ultra-compact high-velocity H i clouds (UCHVC). It has been proposed that these clouds are candidate mini-haloes in the Local Group and its surroundings within a distance range of 0.25-2.0 Mpc. Using the Large Binocular Telescope we obtained wide-field (≃ 23' × 23') g- and r-band images of the twenty-five most promising and most compact clouds amongst the fifty-nine that have been identified. Careful visual inspection of all the images does not reveal any stellar counterpart that even slightly resembles Leo P, the only local dwarf galaxy that was found as a counterpart to a previously detected high-velocity cloud. Only a possible distant (D> 3.0 Mpc) counterpart to HVC274.68+74.70-123 has been identified in our images. The point source photometry in the central 17.3' × 7.7' chips reaches r ≤ 26.5 and is expected to contain most of the stellar counterparts to the UCHVCs. However, no obvious stellar over-density is detected in any of our fields, in marked contrast to our comparison Leo P field, in which the dwarf galaxy is detected at a >30σ-significance level. Only HVC352.45+59.06+263 may be associated with a weak over-density, whose nature cannot be ascertained with our data. Sensitivity tests show that our survey would have detected any dwarf galaxy dominated by an old stellar population, with an integrated absolute magnitude of MV ≤ - 8.0 and a half-light radius of rh ≤ 300 pc that lies within 1.5 Mpc of us, thereby confirming that it is unlikely that the observed UCHVCs are associated with the stellar counterparts typical of known Local Group dwarf galaxies. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration amongst institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica

  10. A dynamic study of fragmentation and energy loss during high velocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zee, Ralph H.

    1992-01-01

    Research conducted under this contract can be divided into two main areas: hypervelocity (in the range up to 7 km/s) and high velocity (less than 1 km/s). Work in the former was performed at NASA-MSFC using the Light Gas Gun Facility. The lower velocity studies were conducted at Auburn University using the ballistic gun. The emphasis of the project was on the hypervelocity phenomenon especially in the characterization of the debris cloud formed by the primary impact events. Special devices were made to determine the angular distributions of momentum and energy of the debris cloud as a function of impact conditions. After several iteration processes, it was decided to concentrate on the momentum effort. Prototype devices were designed, fabricated, and tested. These devices were based on the conservation of momentum. Distributions of the debris cloud formed were measured by determining the amount of momentum transferred from the debris cloud to strategically placed pendulum measurement devices. The motion of the pendula was monitored using itegrated opto-interrupters. The distribution of momentum in the debris cloud was found to be a strong function of the impact condition. Small projectiles at high velocities were observed to produce finely dispersed debris whereas large projectiles generated discrete particles in the debris. Results also show that the momentum in the forward direction was enhanced due to the impact. This phenomenon of momentum multiplication was also observed in other studies and in computer simulations. It was initially planned to determine the energy distribution using deformation energy in a rod with strain gauges. Results from preliminary studies show that this technique is acceptable but too tedious. A new technique was explored based on measuring the heating effect of the debris cloud using an IR camera. The feasibility and sensitivity was established at Auburn University. This type of energy distribution measurement method can easily be

  11. Formation and transformation of amino acids and amino acid precursors by high-velocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Yamori, A.

    A wide variety of organic compounds have been found in extraterrestrial bodies such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites. It is plausible that these extraterrestrial bodies carried organic compounds such as amino acids or their precursors to the early Earth. It is claimed, however, that these extraterrestrial organics were destroyed during impacts to the Earth. We therefore examined possible transformation of amino acids and their precursors during high-velocity impacts by using a rail gun "HYPAC" in ISAS. Starting materials used in the impact experiments were (i) aqueous solution of glycine (10 mM or 1.0 M), and (ii) a mixture of ammonia, methanol and water. The target materials were sealed in stainless steel capsules, and shocked by impact with a polycarbonate projectile accelerated with "HYPAC" to the velocities of 2.5 - 7.0 km/s. A part of the products was acid-hydrolyzed. Both hydrolyzed an unhydrolyzed products were analyzed by mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and chromatography. When an aqueous solution containing ammonia, methanol and water was shocked by impact at the velocity of 6.4 km/s, a number of amino acids (e.g., serine and glycine) were detected after hydrolysis. The present results suggest that amino acid precursors could be formed during cometary impacts. When glycine solution was used as a starting material, about 40 % of glycine was recovered even after 6 km/s impact. Methylamine and ammonia, which are known as pyrolytic products of glycine, were detected, besides them, diketopiperazine and an unidentified product whose molecular weight was 134, were detected, while no glycine peptides were identified in them. It was shown that the impact processes resulted in the formation of amino acid condensates. Thermal stability of glycine precursor is comparable with glycine. The present results suggest that organic material could survive and/or formed during an impact process. Most of organic

  12. In vitro performance of ceramic coatings obtained by high velocity oxy-fuel spray.

    PubMed

    Melero, H; Garcia-Giralt, N; Fernández, J; Díez-Pérez, A; Guilemany, J M

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings obtained by plasma-spraying have been used for many years to improve biological performance of bone implants, but several studies have drawn attention to the problems arising from high temperatures and the lack of mechanical properties. In this study, plasma-spraying is substituted by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray, with lower temperatures reached, and TiO2 is added in low amounts to hydroxyapatite in order to improve the mechanical properties. Four conditions have been tested to evaluate which are those with better biological properties. Viability and proliferation tests, as well as differentiation assays and morphology observation, are performed with human osteoblast cultures onto the studied coatings. The hydroxyapatite-TiO2 coatings maintain good cell viability and proliferation, especially the cases with higher amorphous phase amount and specific surface, and promote excellent differentiation, with a higher ALP amount for these cases than for polystyrene controls. Observation by SEM corroborates this excellent behaviour. In conclusion, these coatings are a good alternative to those used industrially, and an interesting issue would be improving biological behaviour of the worst cases, which in turn show the better mechanical properties.

  13. Numerical Analysis of Multicomponent Suspension Droplets in High-Velocity Flame Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozali, Ebrahim; Mahrukh, Mahrukh; Gu, Sai; Kamnis, Spyros

    2014-08-01

    The liquid feedstock or suspension as a different mixture of liquid fuel ethanol and water is numerically studied in high-velocity suspension flame spray (HVSFS) process, and the results are compared for homogenous liquid feedstock of ethanol and water. The effects of mixture on droplet aerodynamic breakup, evaporation, combustion, and gas dynamics of HVSFS process are thoroughly investigated. The exact location where the particle heating is initiated (above the carrier liquid boiling point) can be controlled by increasing the water content in the mixture. In this way, the particle inflight time in the high-temperature gas regions can be adjusted avoiding adverse effects from surface chemical transformations. The mixture is modeled as a multicomponent droplet, and a convection/diffusion model, which takes into account the convective flow of evaporating material from droplet surface, is used to simulate the suspension evaporation. The model consists of several sub-models that include premixed combustion of propane-oxygen, non-premixed ethanol-oxygen combustion, modeling of multicomponent droplet breakup and evaporation, as well as heat and mass transfer between liquid droplets and gas phase.

  14. Surface-to-borehole illumination of a high-velocity layer using marine VSP

    SciTech Connect

    MacBeth, C.; Liu, E.; Boyd, M.; Sweeney, K.

    1994-12-31

    Two marine walkaway VSP lines are recorded by three-component receivers positioned in a dolomite layer. The layer has a high seismic velocity relative to the surrounding rocks and may be fracture. The recorded wavefield is analyzed to determine whether this acquisition is suitable to image details of the internal structure of the layer. The principal arrivals in the wavefield are a dominant horizontally refracted compressional wave with a smooth unbroken moveout, converted shear-waves from shallow reflectors, and reverberation of these converted shear-waves within the high velocity layer. Anisotropic analyses of the converted shear-waves estimate an overburden birefringence of 3% and a polarization direction consistent with the known NW-SE maximum compressive stress. Full-wave modeling of the recorded wavefield aids identification of the various arrivals and constrains the attenuation and anisotropic properties of the layer, which appears laterally uniform with the most satisfactory model possessing low attenuation but a birefringence of no more than 5%. If the layer is cracked, these results are diagnostic of evenly distributed cracks with a scalelength smaller than a fraction of a wavelength.

  15. Removal of interproximal dental biofilms by high-velocity water microdrops.

    PubMed

    Rmaile, A; Carugo, D; Capretto, L; Aspiras, M; De Jager, M; Ward, M; Stoodley, P

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the impact of a high-velocity water microdrop on the detachment of Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms from the interproximal (IP) space of teeth in a training typodont was studied experimentally and computationally. Twelve-day-old S. mutans biofilms in the IP space were exposed to a prototype AirFloss delivering 115 µL water at a maximum exit velocity of 60 m/sec in a 30-msec burst. Using confocal microscopy and image analysis, we obtained quantitative measurements of the percentage removal of biofilms from different locations in the IP space. The 3D geometry of the typodont and the IP spaces was obtained by micro-computed tomography (µ-CT) imaging. We performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to calculate the wall shear stress (τw ) distribution caused by the drops on the tooth surface. A qualitative agreement and a quantitative relationship between experiments and simulations were achieved. The wall shear stress (τw ) generated by the prototype AirFloss and its spatial distribution on the teeth surface played a key role in dictating the efficacy of biofilm removal in the IP space.

  16. Direct collapse black hole formation via high-velocity collisions of protogalaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inayoshi, Kohei; Visbal, Eli; Kashiyama, Kazumi

    2015-10-01

    We propose high-velocity collisions of protogalaxies as a new pathway to form supermassive stars (SMSs) with masses of ˜105 M⊙ at high redshift (z > 10). When protogalaxies hosted by dark matter haloes with a virial temperature of ˜ 104 K collide with a relative velocity ≳ 200 km s-1, the gas is shock-heated to ˜106 K and subsequently cools isobarically via free-free emission and He+, He, and H line emission. Since the gas density ( ≳ 104 cm- 3) is high enough to destroy H2 molecules by collisional dissociation, the shocked gas never cools below ˜104 K. Once a gas cloud of ˜105 M⊙ reaches this temperature, it becomes gravitationally unstable and forms an SMS which will rapidly collapse into a supermassive black hole via general relativistic instability. We perform a simple analytic estimate of the number density of direct-collapse black holes (DCBHs) formed through this scenario (calibrated with cosmological N-body simulations) and find nDCBH ˜ 10- 9 Mpc- 3 (comoving) by z = 10. This could potentially explain the abundance of bright high-z quasars.

  17. Experimental and analytical study of high velocity impact on Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikarwar, Rahul; Velmurugan, Raman; Madhu, Velmuri

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, impact behavior of Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates has been carried out experimentally by considering different thicknesses and lay-up sequences and compared with analytical results. The effect of thickness, lay-up sequence on energy absorbing capacity has been studied for high velocity impact. Four lay-up sequences and four thickness values have been considered. Initial velocities and residual velocities are measured experimentally to calculate the energy absorbing capacity of laminates. Residual velocity of projectile and energy absorbed by laminates are calculated analytically. The results obtained from analytical study are found to be in good agreement with experimental results. It is observed from the study that 0/90 lay-up sequence is most effective for impact resistance. Delamination area is maximum on the back side of the plate for all thickness values and lay-up sequences. The delamination area on the back is maximum for 0/90/45/-45 laminates compared to other lay-up sequences.

  18. Analysis of a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch. Part 2, Computational results

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Talpallikar, M.

    1993-12-31

    The fluid dynamics inside and outside a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) torch are analyzed using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques. The thermal spray device analyzed is similar to a Metco Diamond Jet torch with powder injection. The spray nozzle is axisymmetric with powder injected on the centerline, premixed fuel and oxygen fed from an annulus, and air cooling injected along the interior surface of the aircap choked flow conditions occur at the exit of the aircap and a supersonic, under-expanded jet develops externally. The details of the CFD simulation are given in a companion paper. This paper describes the general gas dynamic features of HVOF spraying and then gives a detailed discussion of the computational predictions of the present analysis. The gas velocity, temperature, pressure and Mach number distributions are presented for various locations inside and outside the torch. Characteristics of the metal spray particle velocity, temperature, Mach number, trajectory, and phase state (solid or liquid) are also presented and discussed. Extensive numerical flow visualization is provided to show flow features such as mixing layers, shock waves, and expansion waves.

  19. Searching for dark matter annihilation in the Smith high-velocity cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Gómez-Vargas, Germán A.; Hewitt, John W.; Linden, Tim; Tibaldo, Luigi

    2014-07-20

    Recent observations suggest that some high-velocity clouds may be confined by massive dark matter halos. In particular, the proximity and proposed dark matter content of the Smith Cloud make it a tempting target for the indirect detection of dark matter annihilation. We argue that the Smith Cloud may be a better target than some Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies and use γ-ray observations from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to search for a dark matter annihilation signal. No significant γ-ray excess is found coincident with the Smith Cloud, and we set strong limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section assuming a spatially extended dark matter profile consistent with dynamical modeling of the Smith Cloud. Notably, these limits exclude the canonical thermal relic cross section (∼ 3 × 10{sup –26} cm{sup 3} s{sup –1}) for dark matter masses ≲ 30 GeV annihilating via the b b-bar or τ{sup +}τ{sup –} channels for certain assumptions of the dark matter density profile; however, uncertainties in the dark matter content of the Smith Cloud may significantly weaken these constraints.

  20. A High-velocity Cloud Impact Forming a Supershell in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Geumsook; Koo, Bon-Chul; Kang, Ji-hyun; Gibson, Steven J.; Peek, J. E. G.; Douglas, Kevin A.; Korpela, Eric J.; Heiles, Carl E.

    2016-08-01

    Neutral atomic hydrogen (H i) gas in interstellar space is largely organized into filaments, loops, and shells, the most prominent of which are “supershells.” These gigantic structures, which require ≳ 3× {10}52 erg to form, are generally thought to be produced by either the explosion of multiple supernovae (SNe) in OB associations or, alternatively, by the impact of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) falling into the Galactic disk. Here, we report the detection of a kiloparsec (kpc)-size supershell in the outskirts of the Milky Way with the compact HVC 040 + 01-282 (hereafter, CHVC040) at its geometrical center using the “Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array” H i 21 cm survey data. The morphological and physical properties of both objects suggest that CHVC040, which is either a fragment of a nearby disrupted galaxy or a cloud that originated from an intergalactic accreting flow, collided with the disk ˜5 Myr ago to form the supershell. Our results show that some compact HVCs can survive their trip through the Galactic halo and inject energy and momentum into the Milky Way disk.

  1. Energy evaluation of the High Velocity Algae Raceway Integrated Design (ARID-HV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attalah, Said

    The original ARID (Algae Raceway Integrated Design) raceway was an effective method to increase temperature toward the optimal growth range. However, the energy input was high and flow mixing was poor. Thus, the ARID-HV (High Velocity Algae Raceway Integrated Design) raceway was developed to reduce energy input requirements and improve flow mixing. This was accomplished by improving pumping efficiency and using a serpentine flow pattern in which the water flows through channels instead of over barriers. A prototype ARID-HV system was installed in Tucson, Arizona, and the constructability, reliability of components, drainage of channels, and flow and energy requirements of the ARID-HV raceway were evaluated. Each of the electrical energy inputs to the raceway (air sparger, air tube blower, canal lift pump, and channel recirculation pump) was quantified, some by direct measurement and others by simulation. An algae growth model was used to determine the algae production rate vs. flow depth and time of year. Then the electrical energy requirement of the most effective flow depth was calculated. Channel hydraulics was evaluated with Manning's equation and the corner head loss equation. In this way, the maximum length of channels for several raceway slopes and mixing velocities were determined. Algae production in the ARID-HV raceway was simulated with a temperature and light growth model. An energy efficient design for the ARID-HV raceway was developed.

  2. Experimental Characterization of Magnetogasdynamic Phenomena in Ultra-High Velocity Pulsed Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebner, Keith; Wang, Benjamin; Cappelli, Mark

    2014-10-01

    The formation and propagation of high velocity plasma jets in a pulsed, coaxial, deflagration-type discharge is examined experimentally. A sensitive, miniaturized, immersed probe array is used to map out magnetic flux density and associated radial current density as a function of time and axial position. This array is also used to probe the magnetic field gradient across the exit of the accelerator and in the jet formation region. Sensitive interferometry via a continuous-wave helium-neon laser source is used to probe the structure of the plasma jet over multiple chords and axial locations. A two dimensional plasma density gradient profile at an instant in time during jet formation is compiled via Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor analysis. The qualitative characteristics of rarefaction and/or shock wave formation as a function of chamber back-pressure is examined via fast-framing ICCD imaging. These measurements are compared to existing resistive MHD simulations of the coaxial deflagration accelerator and the ensuing rarefaction jet that is expelled from the electrode assembly. The physical mechanisms governing the behavior of the discharge and the formation of these high energy density plasma jets are proposed and validated against both theoretical models and numerically simulated behavior. This research was conducted with Government support under and awarded by DoD, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship, 32 CFR 168a.

  3. Suspension High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (SHVOF)-Sprayed Alumina Coatings: Microstructure, Nanoindentation and Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. W.; Ang, A. S. M.; Pala, Z.; Shaw, E. C.; Hussain, T.

    2016-10-01

    Suspension high velocity oxy-fuel spraying can be used to produce thermally sprayed coatings from powdered feedstocks too small to be processed by mechanical feeders, allowing formation of nanostructured coatings with improved density and mechanical properties. Here, alumina coatings were produced from submicron-sized feedstock in aqueous suspension, using two flame combustion parameters yielding contrasting microstructures. Both coatings were tested in dry sliding wear conditions with an alumina counterbody. The coating processed with high combustion power of 101 kW contained 74 wt.% amorphous phase and 26 wt.% crystalline phase (95 wt.% gamma and 3 wt.% alpha alumina), while the 72-kW coating contained lower 58 wt.% amorphous phase and 42 wt.% crystalline phases (73 wt.% was alpha and 26 wt.% gamma). The 101-kW coating had a dry sliding specific wear rate between 4 and 4.5 × 10-5 mm3/Nm, 2 orders of magnitude higher than the 72-kW coating wear rate of 2-4.2 × 10-7 mm3/Nm. A severe wear regime dominated by brittle fracture and grain pullout of the coating was responsible for the wear of the 101-kW coating, explained by mean fracture toughness three times lower than the 72-kW coating, owing to the almost complete absence of alpha alumina.

  4. Removal of Interproximal Dental Biofilms by High-velocity Water Microdrops

    PubMed Central

    Rmaile, A.; Carugo, D.; Capretto, L.; Aspiras, M.; De Jager, M.; Ward, M.; Stoodley, P.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the impact of a high-velocity water microdrop on the detachment of Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms from the interproximal (IP) space of teeth in a training typodont was studied experimentally and computationally. Twelve-day-old S. mutans biofilms in the IP space were exposed to a prototype AirFloss delivering 115 µL water at a maximum exit velocity of 60 m/sec in a 30-msec burst. Using confocal microscopy and image analysis, we obtained quantitative measurements of the percentage removal of biofilms from different locations in the IP space. The 3D geometry of the typodont and the IP spaces was obtained by micro-computed tomography (µ-CT) imaging. We performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to calculate the wall shear stress (τw) distribution caused by the drops on the tooth surface. A qualitative agreement and a quantitative relationship between experiments and simulations were achieved. The wall shear stress (τw) generated by the prototype AirFloss and its spatial distribution on the teeth surface played a key role in dictating the efficacy of biofilm removal in the IP space. PMID:24170371

  5. Cryogenic spray vaporization in high-velocity helium, argon and nitrogen gasflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    Effects of gas properties on cryogenic liquid-jet atomization in high-velocity helium, nitrogen, and argon gas flows were investigated. Volume median diameter, D(sub v.5e), data were obtained with a scattered-light scanning instrument. By calculating the change in spray drop size, -Delta D(sub v.5)(exp 2), due to droplet vaporization, it was possible to calculate D(sub v.5C). D(sub v.5C) is the unvaporized characteristic drop size formed at the fuel-nozzle orifice. This drop size was normalized with respect to liquid-jet diameter, D(sub O). It was then correlated with several dimensionless groups to give an expression for the volume median diameter of cryogenic LN2 sprays. This expression correlates drop size D(sub v.5c) with aerodynamic and liquid-surface forces so that it can be readily determined in the design of multiphase-flow propellant injectors for rocket combustors.

  6. Analysis of a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch. Part 1, Numerical formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Talpallikar, M.

    1994-01-01

    The fluid and particle dynamics of a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) torch are analyzed using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques. The thermal spray device analyzed is similar to a Metco Diamond Jet torch with powder injection. The spray nozzle is axisymmetric with powder injection on the centerline, premixed fuel and oxygen fed from an annulus, and air cooling injected along the interior surface of the aircap. Choked flow conditions occur at the exit of the aircap and a supersonic, under-expanded jet develops externally. The CFD simulation assumes three injection streams (solid metal particles with argon as a carrier gas, premixed oxygen/fuel, and air) inside the aircap and solves the combusting two-phase flow until the external spray stream decays to sonic conditions. The numerical formulation solves the mass, momentum, and energy transfer for both the gas and particle phase and strongly couples each phase. The combustion process is modeled using approximate equilibrium chemistry with dissociation of the gas with a total of nine species. Melting and re-solidification of the metal panicles is modeled as a lumped-mass system. Turbulent flow is modeled by a two equation k-{epsilon} turbulence model, including compressibility effects on turbulent dissipation. A time iterative, implicit, finite volume numerical method is used to solve the partial differential equations. A companion paper [10] presents the results of the numerical simulation and gives a detailed discussion of the gas and panicle dynamics.

  7. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, B.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1995-09-01

    The gas dynamics of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) torch are analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The thermal spray device analyzed is similar to a Metco Diamond Jet torch with powder feed. The injection nozzle is assumed to be axisymmetric with premixed fuel and oxygen fed from an annulus, and air cooling injected along the interior surface of the aircap. The aircap, a cronically converging nozzle, achieves choked flow conditions at the exit and a supersonic, under-expanded jet develops externally. Finite difference equations for mass, momentum, and energy conservation are solved for the gas dynamics. The combustion process is modeled using a single-step and a 12-step quasi-global finite-rate chemistry model with dissociation of the gas and a total of nine species. Turbulent flow inside the aircap and in the free-jet decay is modeled using a two-equation k-{epsilon} model. An iterative, implicit, finite volume numerical method is used to solve the gas dynamic equations inside and outside the torch . The CFD results are compared with recent experimental measurements of pressure inside the HVOF aircap. Comparisons are made for two flow rates of premixed fuel and oxygen and air cooling. This paper presents the first published comparisons of CFD predictions and experimental measurements for HVOF tbermal spraying.

  8. Cryogenic spray vaporization in high-velocity helium, argon and nitrogen gasflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1993-10-01

    Effects of gas properties on cryogenic liquid-jet atomization in high-velocity helium, nitrogen, and argon gas flows were investigated. Volume median diameter, D(sub v.5e), data were obtained with a scattered-light scanning instrument. By calculating the change in spray drop size, -Delta D(sub v.5)(exp 2), due to droplet vaporization, it was possible to calculate D(sub v.5C). D(sub v.5C) is the unvaporized characteristic drop size formed at the fuel-nozzle orifice. This drop size was normalized with respect to liquid-jet diameter, D(sub O). It was then correlated with several dimensionless groups to give an expression for the volume median diameter of cryogenic LN2 sprays. This expression correlates drop size D(sub v.5c) with aerodynamic and liquid-surface forces so that it can be readily determined in the design of multiphase-flow propellant injectors for rocket combustors.

  9. HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE GALACTIC ALL SKY SURVEY. I. CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, V. A.; Kummerfeld, J. K.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Murphy, T.; Pisano, D. J.; Curran, J. R.

    2013-11-01

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) from the Galactic All Sky Survey (GASS) of southern sky neutral hydrogen, which has 57 mK sensitivity and 1 km s{sup –1} velocity resolution and was obtained with the Parkes Telescope. Our catalog has been derived from the stray-radiation-corrected second release of GASS. We describe the data and our method of identifying HVCs and analyze the overall properties of the GASS population. We catalog a total of 1693 HVCs at declinations <0°, including 1111 positive velocity HVCs and 582 negative velocity HVCs. Our catalog also includes 295 anomalous velocity clouds (AVCs). The cloud line-widths of our HVC population have a median FWHM of ∼19 km s{sup –1}, which is lower than that found in previous surveys. The completeness of our catalog is above 95% based on comparison with the HIPASS catalog of HVCs upon which we improve by an order of magnitude in spectral resolution. We find 758 new HVCs and AVCs with no HIPASS counterpart. The GASS catalog will shed unprecedented light on the distribution and kinematic structure of southern sky HVCs, as well as delve further into the cloud populations that make up the anomalous velocity gas of the Milky Way.

  10. Effect of Operating Parameters on a Dual-Stage High Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammed N.; Shamim, Tariq

    2014-08-01

    High velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray systems are being used to apply coatings to prevent surface degradation. The coatings of temperature sensitive materials such as titanium and copper, which have very low melting points, cannot be applied using a single-stage HVOF system. Therefore, a dual-stage HVOF system has been introduced and modeled computationally. The dual-spray system provides an easy control of particle oxidation by introducing a mixing chamber. In addition to the materials being sprayed, the thermal spray coating quality depends to a large extent on flow behavior of reacting gases and the particle dynamics. The present study investigates the influence of various operating parameters on the performance of a dual-stage thermal spray gun. The objective is to develop a predictive understanding of various parameters. The gas flow field and the free jet are modeled by considering the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy with the turbulence and the equilibrium combustion sub models. The particle phase is decoupled from the gas phase due to very low particle volume fractions. The results demonstrate the advantage of a dual-stage system over a single-stage system especially for the deposition of temperature sensitive materials.

  11. The collision of high-velocity clouds with a galactic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Bodenheimer, P.; Rozyczka, M.; Franco, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations for the interaction of high-velocity clouds with a galactic disk are presented. The impinging clouds are assumed to be spherical and the target disk is represented by a constant density slab, n(g) = 1/cu cm, with a total width W(g) = 200 pc. The numerical experiments cover a wide range of cloud densities, between 0.1 and 100/cu cm, and velocities between 100 and 300 km/s. At a time approximately 10 to the 7th yr after impact, two types of final configurations are found. In the first case, the infalling cloud is completely shocked in a time short compared with the crossing time of the disk. Then, the generated cavity has time to grow sideways and large scale structures with a round shape, and in some cases nearly spherical, are produced. In the second case, which occurs for high density clouds, the cloud is shocked on a time scale longer than or comparable to the crossing time. The resultant cylindrical holes drilled across the entire disk have the dimensions of the impinging cloud. Cloud-galaxy interactions are compared with other energy sources and the morphologies of the resultant structures are suggested to resemble the large scale structures observed in H I.

  12. Estimation of Fuel Rate on the Galactic Disk from High Velocity Clouds (HVCs) Infall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Kwang Hyun; Kwak, Kyujin

    2016-06-01

    Continuous accretion of metal-poor gas can explain the discrepancy between the number of observed G-Dwarfs and the number predicted by the “simple model” of galactic evolution. The maximum accretion rate estimated based upon approaching high velocity clouds (HVCs) can be up to ~0.4 M⊙yr-1 which is comparable with the accretion rate required by many chemical evolution models that is at least ~0.45 M⊙yr-1. However, it is not clear to what extent the exchange of gas between the disk and the cloud can occur when a HVC collides with the galactic disk. Therefore, we examined a series of HVC-Disk collision simulations using the FLASH2.5 hydrodynamics simulation code. Our simulation results show that an HVC will more likely take away substances from the galactic disk rather than adding new material to the disk. We define this as a “negative fuel rate” event. Further outcomes in our study present that the fuel rate, which is defined as how much material is transferred to the galactic disk from the colliding HVC, can change depending on the combination among density, radius and velocity of an approaching HVC as well as the modeled galactic disk.

  13. Flow mechanism of Forchheimer's cubic equation in high-velocity radial gas flow through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Ezeudembah, A.S.; Dranchuk, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    Formal derivation of Forchheimer's cubic equation is made by considering the kinetic energy equation of mean flow and dimensional relations for one-dimensional, linear, incompressible fluid flow. By the addition of the cubic term, this equation is regarded as a modified Forchheimer's quadratic equation which accounts for the flow rates obtained beyond the laminar flow condition. The cubic equation spans a wide range of flow rates and regimes. For suitable use in gas flow studies, this equation has been adapted, modified, and corrected for the gas slippage effect. The physical basis of the cubic term has been established by using boundary layer theory to explain the high-velocity, high-pressure flow behavior through a porous path. Gamma, the main parameter in the cubic term, is related directly to a characteristic, dimensionless shape factor which is significant at higher flow rates. It is inversely related to viscosity, but has no dependence on the gas slippage coefficient in the higher flow regime. 25 references.

  14. A High-velocity Cloud Impact Forming a Supershell in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Geumsook; Koo, Bon-Chul; Kang, Ji-hyun; Gibson, Steven J.; Peek, J. E. G.; Douglas, Kevin A.; Korpela, Eric J.; Heiles, Carl E.

    2016-08-01

    Neutral atomic hydrogen (H i) gas in interstellar space is largely organized into filaments, loops, and shells, the most prominent of which are “supershells.” These gigantic structures, which require ≳ 3× {10}52 erg to form, are generally thought to be produced by either the explosion of multiple supernovae (SNe) in OB associations or, alternatively, by the impact of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) falling into the Galactic disk. Here, we report the detection of a kiloparsec (kpc)-size supershell in the outskirts of the Milky Way with the compact HVC 040 + 01‑282 (hereafter, CHVC040) at its geometrical center using the “Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array” H i 21 cm survey data. The morphological and physical properties of both objects suggest that CHVC040, which is either a fragment of a nearby disrupted galaxy or a cloud that originated from an intergalactic accreting flow, collided with the disk ˜5 Myr ago to form the supershell. Our results show that some compact HVCs can survive their trip through the Galactic halo and inject energy and momentum into the Milky Way disk.

  15. Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation in the Smith High-Velocity Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Gomez-Vargas, German A.; Hewitt, John W.; Linden, Tim; Tibaldo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that some high-velocity clouds may be confined by massive dark matter halos. In particular, the proximity and proposed dark matter content of the Smith Cloud make it a tempting target for the indirect detection of dark matter annihilation. We argue that the Smith Cloud may be a better target than some Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies and use gamma-ray observations from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to search for a dark matter annihilation signal. No significant gamma-ray excess is found coincident with the Smith Cloud, and we set strong limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section assuming a spatially extended dark matter profile consistent with dynamical modeling of the Smith Cloud. Notably, these limits exclude the canonical thermal relic cross section (approximately 3 x 10 (sup -26) cubic centimeters per second) for dark matter masses less than or approximately 30 gigaelectronvolts annihilating via the B/B- bar oscillation or tau/antitau channels for certain assumptions of the dark matter density profile; however, uncertainties in the dark matter content of the Smith Cloud may significantly weaken these constraints.

  16. Analysis of particle behavior in High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel thermal spraying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katanoda, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Kazuyasu

    2003-08-01

    This paper analyzes the behavior of coating particle as well as the gas flow both of inside and outside the High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying gun by using quasi-one-dimensional analysis and numerical simulation. The HVOF gun in the present analysis is an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle with the design Mach number of 2.0 followed by a straight passage called barrel. In the present analysis it is assumed that the influence of the particles injected in the gas flow is neglected, and the interaction between the particles is also neglected. The gas flow in the gun is assumed to be quasi-one-dimensional adiabatic flow. The velocity, temperature and density of gas in the jet discharged from the barrel exit are predicted by solving Navier-Stokes equations numerically. The particle equation of motion is numerically integrated using three-step Runge-Kutta method. The drag coefficient of the particle is calculated by linear interpolation of the experimental data obtained in the past. Particle mean temperature is calculated by using Ranz and Marchalls’ correlation for spherical particles. From the present analysis, the distributions of velocity and temperature of the coating particles flying inside and outside the HVOF gun are predicted.

  17. Variability of the high-velocity outflow in the quasar PDS 456

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, J. N.; Gofford, J.; Costa, M.; Matzeu, G.; Braito, V.; Sim, S. A.; Behar, E.; Kaspi, S.; Miller, L.; O'Brien, P.; Turner, T. J.; Ward, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a comparison of two Suzaku X-ray observations of the nearby (z = 0.184), luminous (L {sub bol} ∼ 10{sup 47} erg s{sup –1}) type I quasar, PDS 456. A new 125 ks Suzaku observation in 2011 caught the quasar during a period of low X-ray flux and with a hard X-ray spectrum, in contrast with a previous 190 ks Suzaku observation in 2007 when the quasar appeared brighter and had a steep (Γ > 2) X-ray spectrum. The 2011 X-ray spectrum contains a pronounced trough near 9 keV in the quasar rest frame, which can be modeled with blueshifted iron K-shell absorption, most likely from the He- and H-like transitions of iron. The absorption trough is observed at a similar rest-frame energy as in the earlier 2007 observation, which appears to confirm the existence of a persistent high-velocity wind in PDS 456, at an outflow velocity of 0.25-0.30c. The spectral variability between 2007 and 2011 can be accounted for by variations in a partial covering absorber, increasing in covering fraction from the brighter 2007 observation to the hard and faint 2011 observation. Overall, the low-flux 2011 observation can be explained if PDS 456 is observed at relatively low inclination angles through a Compton-thick wind, originating from the accretion disk, which significantly attenuates the X-ray flux from the quasar.

  18. Episodic High-velocity Outflows from V899 Mon: A Constraint On The Outflow Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninan, J. P.; Ojha, D. K.; Philip, N. S.

    2016-07-01

    We report the detection of large variations in the outflow wind velocity from a young eruptive star, V899 Mon, during its ongoing high accretion outburst phase. Such large variations in the outflow velocity (from -722 to -425 km s-1) have never been reported previously in this family of objects. Our continuous monitoring of this source shows that the multi-component, clumpy, and episodic high velocity outflows are stable in the timescale of a few days, and vary over the timescale of a few weeks to months. We detect significant decoupling in the instantaneous outflow strength to accretion rate. From the comparison of various possible outflow mechanisms in magnetospheric accretion of young stellar objects, we conclude magnetically driven polar winds to be the most consistent mechanism for the outflows seen in V899 Mon. The large scale fluctuations in outflow over the short period makes V899 Mon the most ideal source to constrain various magnetohydrodynamics simulations of magnetospheric accretion. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT).

  19. Studying counterstreaming high velocity plasma flows relevant to astrophysical collisionless shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, James Steven; Amendt, Peter; Divol, Laurent; Pollock, Brad; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; rozmus, Wojciech; Turnbull, David; Froula, Dustin; morita, taichi; Sakawa, Youichi; Takabe, Hideke; Drake, R. Paul; Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Gregori, Gianluca; Meinecke, Jena; Koenig, Michel; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Park, Hye-Sook

    2015-08-01

    In a broad range of low-density astrophysical plasmas the flow has a high Mach number, making the ion-ion collisional mean free path very large compared to the scale lengths of various observed astrophysical shocks. These shocks are believed to be “collisionless,” driven by plasma instabilities and self-generated magnetic fields. A series of experiments at the NIF and Omega laser facilities is underway to study the formation of collisionless shocks under scaled laboratory conditions, using high velocity counterstreaming and interpenetrating plasma flows. Double CH2, and CH/CD planar foils have been irradiated with a laser intensity of ~1016 W/cm2. The laser-ablated plasma between the two foils was characterized using a suite of diagnostics, including Thomson scattering and x-ray radiography. On the Omega laser facility clear interpenetration and instability growth are observed, although our experimental conditions reached only ~50 ion skin depths (c/wpi) and were insufficient to fully form a collisionless shock. Initial NIF experimental results using 50x more laser energy than the Omega experiments will be presented.

  20. The First Distance Constraint on the Renegade High-velocity Cloud Complex WD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peek, J. E. G.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Sana, Hugues; Roman-Duval, Julia; Tumlinson, Jason; Zheng, Yong

    2016-09-01

    We present medium-resolution, near-ultraviolet Very Large Telescope/FLAMES observations of the star USNO-A0600-15865535. We adapt a standard method of stellar typing to our measurement of the shape of the Balmer ɛ absorption line to demonstrate that USNO-A0600-15865535 is a blue horizontal branch star, residing in the lower stellar halo at a distance of 4.4 kpc from the Sun. We measure the H & K lines of singly ionized calcium and find two isolated velocity components, one originating in the disk, and one associated with the high-velocity cloud complex WD. This detection demonstrated that complex WD is closer than ˜4.4 kpc and is the first distance constraint on the +100 km s-1 Galactic complex of clouds. We find that complex WD is not in corotation with the Galactic disk, which has been assumed for decades. We examine a number of scenarios and find that the most likely scenario is that complex WD was ejected from the solar neighborhood and is only a few kiloparsecs from the Sun.

  1. The First Distance Constraint on the Renegade High-velocity Cloud Complex WD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peek, J. E. G.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Sana, Hugues; Roman-Duval, Julia; Tumlinson, Jason; Zheng, Yong

    2016-09-01

    We present medium-resolution, near-ultraviolet Very Large Telescope/FLAMES observations of the star USNO-A0600-15865535. We adapt a standard method of stellar typing to our measurement of the shape of the Balmer ɛ absorption line to demonstrate that USNO-A0600-15865535 is a blue horizontal branch star, residing in the lower stellar halo at a distance of 4.4 kpc from the Sun. We measure the H & K lines of singly ionized calcium and find two isolated velocity components, one originating in the disk, and one associated with the high-velocity cloud complex WD. This detection demonstrated that complex WD is closer than ∼4.4 kpc and is the first distance constraint on the +100 km s‑1 Galactic complex of clouds. We find that complex WD is not in corotation with the Galactic disk, which has been assumed for decades. We examine a number of scenarios and find that the most likely scenario is that complex WD was ejected from the solar neighborhood and is only a few kiloparsecs from the Sun.

  2. Stability analysis of confined V-shaped flames in high-velocity streams.

    PubMed

    El-Rabii, Hazem; Joulin, Guy; Kazakov, Kirill A

    2010-06-01

    The problem of linear stability of confined V-shaped flames with arbitrary gas expansion is addressed. Using the on-shell description of flame dynamics, a general equation governing propagation of disturbances of an anchored flame is obtained. This equation is solved analytically for V-flames anchored in high-velocity channel streams. It is demonstrated that dynamics of the flame disturbances in this case is controlled by the memory effects associated with vorticity generated by the perturbed flame. The perturbation growth rate spectrum is determined, and explicit analytical expressions for the eigenfunctions are given. It is found that the piecewise linear V structure is unstable for all values of the gas expansion coefficient. Despite the linearity of the basic pattern, however, evolutions of the V-flame disturbances are completely different from those found for freely propagating planar flames or open anchored flames. The obtained results reveal strong influence of the basic flow and the channel walls on the stability properties of confined V-flames. PMID:20866527

  3. High-Velocity Gas in the SN1991T/3C273 Sightline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, David M.

    Meyer & Roth (1991) have recently obtained high SIN observations of the Ca II absorption toward SN1991T and 3C273 which exhibit weak components at vLSR=-87, +215, and +263 km s^-1 toward SN1991T that are absent in the adjacent (sep.=1.4degrees) 3C273 sightline. In this proposal, we discuss our plans to test the local hypothesis for these high-velocity clouds (HVCs) by observing the interstellar Mg II absorption toward several stars in the SN1991T/3C273 field with IUE. Although the many HVCs observed in H I 21 cm emission have not yet been conclusively detected in metal absorption against any Galactic source (Wakker 1991), our particular search is worthwhile given that: (1) the general issue of HVC distances remains unclear due to metallicity uncertainties and, (2) the SN1991T/3C273 sightline presents a possibly unique case where there is radio continuum evidence of a local disturbance.

  4. H ii REGIONS WITHIN A COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD. A NEARLY STARLESS DWARF GALAXY?

    SciTech Connect

    Bellazzini, M.; Magrini, L.; Mucciarelli, A.; Fraternali, F.; Ibata, R.; Martin, N.; Battaglia, G.; Testa, V.; Fumana, M.; Marchetti, A.; Correnti, M.

    2015-02-10

    Within the SECCO survey we identified a candidate stellar counterpart to the Ultra Compact High Velocity Cloud (UCHVC) HVC274.68+74.70-123 that was suggested by Adams et al. to be a possible mini halo within the Local Group of galaxies. The spectroscopic follow-up of the brightest sources within the candidate reveals the presence of two H ii regions whose radial velocity is compatible with a physical association with the UVHVC. The available data do not allow us to give a definite answer on the nature of the newly identified system. A few alternative hypotheses are discussed. However, the most likely possibility is that we have found a new faint dwarf galaxy residing in the Virgo cluster of galaxies, which we name SECCO 1. Independently of its actual distance, SECCO 1 displays a ratio of neutral hydrogen mass to V luminosity of M{sub H} {sub I}/L{sub V}≳20, by far the largest among local dwarfs. Hence, it appears to be a nearly starless galaxy and it may be an example of the missing links between normal dwarfs and the dark mini halos that are predicted to exist in large numbers according to the currently accepted cosmological model.

  5. Detection Of New High Velocity Clouds Using The Leiden-Argentina-Bonn Hi All-sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Tyler; Wakker, B.; Witt, C.; Gostisha, M. C.; Thomson, E.; Stratman, L.; Benjamin, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new effort to use the Leiden/Argentina/Bonn (LAB) Galactic HI survey to update the high-velocity clouds catalog of Wakker and van Woerden (1991). The LAB survey (Kalberla et al 2005) combined the Leiden-Dwingeloo survey (Hartmann and Burton 1997) with a complementary southern sky survey (Arnal et al 2000). This survey provides improved angular spacing (0.5 deg vs. 1 deg) and velocity resolution (1 km/s vs. 16 km/s), although it was less sensitive than previous surveys. We describe how we fit the LAB high velocity gas with Gaussian components, providing three levels of review for the quality of fits, and compare the resulting high velocity cloud catalog to previous results for galactic latitudes greater than b=45 degrees. This research was supported by NASA ATP grant NNX10AI70G to the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater.

  6. AXAOTHER XL -- A spreadsheet for determining doses for incidents caused by tornadoes or high-velocity straight winds

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, A.A.

    1996-09-01

    AXAOTHER XL is an Excel Spreadsheet used to determine dose to the maximally exposed offsite individual during high-velocity straight winds or tornado conditions. Both individual and population doses may be considered. Potential exposure pathways are inhalation and plume shine. For high-velocity straight winds the spreadsheet has the capability to determine the downwind relative air concentration, however for the tornado conditions, the user must enter the relative air concentration. Theoretical models are discussed and hand calculations are performed to ensure proper application of methodologies. A section has also been included that contains user instructions for the spreadsheet.

  7. Spinal cord trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... if the bones or disks have been weakened Fragments of bone (such as from broken vertebrae, which are the ... presses on the spinal cord (decompression laminectomy ) Remove bone fragments, disk fragments, or foreign objects Fuse broken spinal ...

  8. Uvby-B Photometry of High Velocity Stars. Photometric Parallaxes and Preliminary Kinematic Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, W. J.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se han explorado dos metodos para la determinaci6n de paralajes fotometricos usando fotometrfa uv - . Estos metodos dependen de las relaciones estandar de Crawford (1975) y de Olsen (1984) y de colores y magnitudes sinteticas de VandenBerg y Bell (1985). Ambos metodos incluyen una correcci6n evolucionaria de forma f6c0. Se calculan las distancias para las 711 estrellas de alta velocidad y pobres en metales en el catalogo uvby-p de Schuster y Nissen (1988). Se comparan estas con las distancias de Sandage y Fouts (1987) y Laird, Carney y Latham (1988) para las estrellas en comtfin. Tambien son aplicables nuestros metodos a estrellas de paralaje. En general las comparaciones son satisfactorias y las sistematicas son despreciables o pequefias. Las distancias finales de nuestras 711 estrellas se aplican a un numero de problemas cinematicos. Se estudian algunos diagramas interesantes, tales como el diagrama de energia de Toomre y el diagrama V(rot) versus [Fe/H]. ABSTRACT Two methods for the determination of parallaxes using uvbyP photometry are being explored. These methods depend upon the standard relations of Crawford (1975) and of Olsen (1984) and upon synthetic colors and magnitudes of VandenBerg and Bell (1985). Both include an evolutionary correction of the form f6c0. Distances are calculated for the 711 high-velocity and metal-poor stars in the uvby-P catalogue of Schuster and Nissen (1988). These are compared to the distances of Sandage and Fouts (1987) and Laird, Carney, and Lathain (1988) for stars in common. Also our methods are applied to parallax stars. In general the comparisons are good with negligible or small systematic differences. The final distances of our 711 stars are applied to a number of kinematical problems. Several interesting diagrams are studied, sucl as Toomre energy diagram and the plot of V(rot) versus [Fe/H]. Key words: DISTANCES - PHOTOMETRY - STARS-POPULATION II

  9. Evolution of the High Velocity X-Ray Emission in SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, Daniel; Haberl, F.; Dwarkadas, V. V.; Burrows, D. N.; Park, S.

    2011-01-01

    Chandra HETG observations of SN 1987A in late 1999 showed very broad lines with observed FWHM of order 7000 km/s (Michael et al. 2002). At this time (SN day 4600) the blastwave was already interacting with the HII region around the progenitor and optical spots had recently appeared. High-resolution spectra taken from May 2003 ( day 5900) to the present by XMM-Newton and Chandra have been well fit by models with FWHM less than 2000 km/s (Zhekov et al. 2005; Dewey et al. 2008; Sturm et al 2010). The emission is increasingly dominated by these narrower components as the blastwave encounters more of the dense equatorial ring. However emission from the HII region out of the ring plane is still expected at late times and would contribute a high-velocity component to the spectra. We analyze 6 epochs of SN 1987A grating data and include an additional very broad component in the spectral model. We find that deep HETG 2007 data are better fit when one quarter of the flux comes from a component with FWHM 8500 km/s, and that RGS 2003 data show an improved fit with a very-broad fraction that is between the 1999 and 2007 values. Later data continue a progression to lower, but still significant, very-broad fractions. The measurements are discussed in terms of the density and extent of the out-of-plane HII region, hydrodynamical simulations, and 3D models of SN 1987A's emission. Support for this work was provided by NASA/USA through contract NAS8-03060 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and further SAO sub-contracts TM9-0004X to VVD (U Chicago) and SV3-73016 to MIT for support of the CXC.

  10. Shear instability of plastically-deforming metals in high-velocity impact welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassiri, Ali; Kinsey, Brad; Chini, Greg

    2016-10-01

    High-speed oblique impact of two metal plates results in the development of an intense shear region at their interface leading to interfacial profile distortion and interatomic bonding. If the relative velocity is sufficient, a distinct wavy morphology with a well-defined amplitude and wavelength is observed. Emergence of this morphology below the melting point of the metal plates is usually taken as evidence of a successful weld. Amongvarious proposed mechanisms, instability owing to large tangential velocity variations near the interface has received significant attention. With one exception, the few quantitative stability analyses of this proposed mechanism have treated an anti-symmetric/shear-layer base profile (i.e., a Kelvin-Helmholtz configuration) and employed an inviscid or Newtonian viscous fluid constitutive relation. The former stipulation implies the energy source for the instability is the presumed relative shearing motion of the two plates, while the latter is appropriate only if melting occurs locally near the interface. In this study, these restrictions, which are at odds with the conditions realized in high-velocity impact welding, are relaxed. A quantitative temporal linear stability analysis is performed to investigate whether the interfacial wave morphology could be the signature of a shear-driven high strain-rate instability of a perfectly plastic material undergoing a jet-like deformation near the interface. The resulting partial differential eigenvalue problem is solved numerically using a spectral collocation method in which customized boundary conditions near the interface are implemented to properly treat the singularity arising from the vanishing of the base flow strain-rate at the symmetry plane of the jet. The solution of the eigenvalue problem yields the wavelength and growth rate of the dominant wave-like disturbances along the interface and confirms that a shear instability of a plastically-deforming material is compatible with the

  11. WSRT HI imaging of ultra-compact high velocity clouds: gas-bearing dark matter minihalos?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Elizabeth A.; Oosterloo, Tom; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Cannon, John M.; Faerman, Yakov; Janesh, William; Janowiecki, Steven; Munoz, Ricardo; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John Joseph; Sternberg, Amiel

    2015-01-01

    A long standing problem in cosmology is the mismatch between the number of low mass dark matter halos predicted by simulations and the number of low mass galaxies observed in the Local Volume. We recently presented a set of isolated ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) identified within the dataset of the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) HI line survey that are consistent with representing low-mass gas-bearing dark matter halos within the Local Volume (Adams+ 2013). At distances of ~1 Mpc, the UCHVCs have HI masses of ~10^5 Msun and indicative dynamical masses of 10^7-10^8 Msun. The HI diameters of the UCHVCs range from 4' to 20', or 1 to 6 kpc at a distance of 1 Mpc.We have selected the most compact and isolated UCHVCs with the highest average column densities as representing the best galaxy candidates. These systems have been observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) to enable higher spatial resolution (~60") studies of the HI distribution. The HI morphology revealed by the WSRT data offers clues to the environment and origin of the UCHVCs, the kinematics of the HI allow the underlying mass distribution to be constrained, and the combination of spatial and spectral resolution allow the detection of a cold neutral medium component to the HI. The WSRT HI observations discriminate among the selected galaxy candidates for those objects that are most likely gas-bearing dark matter halos.One UCHVC, AGC198606, is of particular interest as it is located 16 km/s and 1.2 degrees from Leo T and has similar HI properties within the ALFALFA dataset. The WSRT HI observations reveal a smooth HI morphology and a velocity gradient along the HI major axis of the system consistent with rotation. These properties are consistent with the hypothesis that this object is a gas-bearing low-mass dark matter halo.

  12. Characteristics of MCrAlY coatings sprayed by high velocity oxygen-fuel spraying system

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Y.; Saitoh, M.; Tamura, M.

    2000-01-01

    High velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) spraying system in open air has been established for producing the coatings that are extremely clean and dense. It is thought that the HVOF sprayed MCrAlY (M is Fe, Ni and/or Co) coatings can be applied to provide resistance against oxidation and corrosion to the hot parts of gas turbines. Also, it is well known that the thicker coating can be sprayed in comparison with any other thermal spraying systems due to improved residual stresses. However, thermal and mechanical properties of HVOF coatings have not been clarified. Especially, the characteristics of residual stress, that are the most important property from the view point of production technique, have not been made clear. In this paper, the mechanical properties of HVOF sprayed MCrAlY coatings were measured in both the case of as-sprayed and heat-treated coatings in comparison with a vacuum plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings. It was confirmed that the mechanical properties of HVOF sprayed MCrAlY coatings could be improved by a diffusion heat treatment to equate the vacuum plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings. Also, the residual stress characteristics were analyzed using a deflection measurement technique and a X-ray technique. The residual stress of HVOF coating was reduced by the shot-peening effect comparable to that of a plasma spray system in open air. This phenomena could be explained by the reason that the HVOF sprayed MCrAlY coating was built up by poorly melted particles.

  13. Monitoring High Velocity Salt Tracer via 4D Electrical Resistivity Tomography - Possibility for Salt Tracer Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doro, K. O.; Cirpka, O. A.; Patzelt, A.; Leven, C.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogeological testing in a tomographic sequence as shown by the use of hydraulic tomography, allows an improvement of the spatial resolution of subsurface parameters. In this regard, recent studies show increasing interest in tracer tomography which involves sequential and spatially separated tracer injections and the measurement of their corresponding tracer breakthrough at different locations and depths. Such concentration measurements however require large experimental efforts and can be simplified by geophysical tracer monitoring techniques such as electrical resistivity. In this study, we present the use of 4-D, cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) for monitoring salt tracer experiments in high velocity flow fields. For our study, we utilized a set up that enables the conduction of salt tracer experiments with complete recovery within 84 hours over a transport distance of 16 m. This allows the repetition of the experiments with different injection depths for a tomographic salt tracer testing. For ERT monitoring, we designed modular borehole electrodes for repeated usage in a flexible manner. We also assess the use of a high speed resistivity data acquisition mode for field scale tracer monitoring ensuring high spatial and temporal resolution without sacrificing data accuracy. We applied our approach at the Lauswiesen test site, Tübingen, Germany. In our 10 m × 10 m tracer monitoring domain with 16 borehole electrodes, we acquired 4650 data points in less than 18 minutes for each monitoring cycle. Inversion results show that the tracer could be successfully imaged using this approach. The results show that repeated salt tracer tests can be efficiently monitored at a high resolution with ERT which gives the possibility for salt tracer tomography at field scale. Our results also provide a data base for extending current hydrogeophysical inversion approaches to field scale data.

  14. H II Regions Within a Compact High Velocity Cloud. A Nearly Starless Dwarf Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellazzini, M.; Magrini, L.; Mucciarelli, A.; Beccari, G.; Ibata, R.; Battaglia, G.; Martin, N.; Testa, V.; Fumana, M.; Marchetti, A.; Correnti, M.; Fraternali, F.

    2015-02-01

    Within the SECCO survey we identified a candidate stellar counterpart to the Ultra Compact High Velocity Cloud (UCHVC) HVC274.68+74.70-123 that was suggested by Adams et al. to be a possible mini halo within the Local Group of galaxies. The spectroscopic follow-up of the brightest sources within the candidate reveals the presence of two H ii regions whose radial velocity is compatible with a physical association with the UVHVC. The available data do not allow us to give a definite answer on the nature of the newly identified system. A few alternative hypotheses are discussed. However, the most likely possibility is that we have found a new faint dwarf galaxy residing in the Virgo cluster of galaxies, which we name SECCO 1. Independently of its actual distance, SECCO 1 displays a ratio of neutral hydrogen mass to V luminosity of {{M}H I}/{{L}V}≳ 20, by far the largest among local dwarfs. Hence, it appears to be a nearly starless galaxy and it may be an example of the missing links between normal dwarfs and the dark mini halos that are predicted to exist in large numbers according to the currently accepted cosmological model. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; The Ohio State University; and The Research Corporation, on behalf of The University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and University of Virginia.

  15. The effects of varying resistance-training loads on intermediate- and high-velocity-specific adaptations.

    PubMed

    Jones, K; Bishop, P; Hunter, G; Fleisig, G

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare changes in velocity-specific adaptations in moderately resistance-trained athletes who trained with either low or high resistances. The study used tests of sport-specific skills across an intermediate- to high-velocity spectrum. Thirty NCAA Division I baseball players were randomly assigned to either a low-resistance (40-60% 1 repetition maximum [1RM]) training group or a high-resistance (70-90% 1RM) training group. Both of the training groups intended to maximallv accelerate each repetition during the concentric phase (IMCA). The 10 weeks of training consisted of 4 training sessions a week using basic core exercises. Peak force, velocity, and power were evaluated during set angle and depth jumps as well as weighted jumps using 30 and 50% 1RM. Squat 1RMs were also tested. Although no interactions for any of the jump tests were found, trends supported the hypothesis of velocity-specific training. Percentage gains suggest that the combined use of heavier training loads (70-90% 1RM) and IMCA tend to increase peak force in the lower-body leg and hip extensors. Trends also show that the combined use of lighter training loads (40-60% 1RM) and IMCA tend to increase peak power and peak velocity in the lower-body leg and hip extensors. The high-resistance group improved squats more than the low-resistance group (p < 0.05; +22.7 vs. + 16.1 kg). The results of this study support the use of a combination of heavier training loads and IMCA to increase 1RM strength in the lower bodies of resistance-trained athletes.

  16. Cognate xenoliths in Mt. Etna lavas: witnesses of the high-velocity body beneath the volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, Rosa Anna; Rotolo, Silvio Giuseppe; Cocina, Ornella; Tumbarello, Gianvito

    2014-01-01

    Various xenoliths have been found in lavas of the 1763 ("La Montagnola"), 2001, and 2002-03 eruptions at Mt. Etna whose petrographic evidence and mineral chemistry exclude a mantle origin and clearly point to a cognate nature. Consequently, cognate xenoliths might represent a proxy to infer the nature of the high-velocity body (HVB) imaged beneath the volcano by seismic tomography. Petrography allows us to group the cognate xenoliths as follows: i) gabbros with amphibole and amphibole-bearing mela-gabbros, ii) olivine-bearing leuco-gabbros, iii) leuco-gabbros with amphibole, and iv) Plg-rich leuco gabbros. Geobarometry estimates the crystallization pressure of the cognate xenoliths between 1.9 and 4.1 kbar. The bulk density of the cognate xenoliths varies from 2.6 to 3.0 g/cm3. P wave velocities (V P ), calculated in relation to xenolith density, range from 4.9 to 6.1 km/s. The integration of mineralogical, compositional, geobarometric data, and density-dependent V P with recent literature data on 3D V P seismic tomography enabled us to formulate the first hypothesis about the nature of the HVB which, in the depth range of 3-13 km b.s.l., is likely made of intrusive gabbroic rocks. These are believed to have formed at the "solidification front", a marginal zone that encompasses a deep region (>5 km b.s.l.) of Mt. Etna's plumbing system, within which magma crystallization takes place. The intrusive rocks were afterwards fragmented and transported as cognate xenoliths by the volatile-rich and fast-ascending magmas of the 1763 "La Montagnola", 2001 and 2002-03 eruptions.

  17. COLLISIONS BETWEEN DARK MATTER CONFINED HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS AND MAGNETIZED GALACTIC DISKS: THE SMITH CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Galyardt, Jason; Shelton, Robin L. E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy’s population of High Velocity Clouds (HVCs) may include a subpopulation that is confined by dark matter minihalos and falling toward the Galactic disk. We present the first magnetohydrodynamic simulational study of dark-matter-dominated HVCs colliding with a weakly magnetized galactic disk. Our HVCs have baryonic masses of 5 × 10{sup 6}M{sub ⊙} and dark matter minihalo masses of 0, 3 × 10{sup 8}, or 1 × 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}. They are modeled on the Smith Cloud, which is said to have collided with the disk 70 Myr ago. We find that, in all cases, the cloud’s collision with the galactic disk creates a hole in the disk, completely disperses the cloud, and forms a bubble-shaped structure on the far side of the disk. In contrast, when present, the dark matter minihalo continues unimpeded along its trajectory. Later, as the minihalo passes through the bubble structure and galactic halo, it accretes up to 6.0 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ⊙} in baryonic material, depending on the strengths of the magnetic field and minihalo gravity. These simulations suggest that if the Smith Cloud is associated with a dark matter minihalo and collided with the Galactic disk, the minihalo has accreted the observed gas. However, if the Smith Cloud is dark-matter-free, it is on its first approach toward the disk. These simulations also suggest that the dark matter is most concentrated either at the head of the cloud or near the cloud, depending upon the strength of the magnetic field, a point that could inform indirect dark matter searches.

  18. A DETAILED KINEMATIC MAP OF CASSIOPEIA A'S OPTICAL MAIN SHELL AND OUTER HIGH-VELOCITY EJECTA

    SciTech Connect

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert A.

    2013-08-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) kinematic reconstructions of optically emitting material in the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). These Doppler maps have the highest spectral and spatial resolutions of any previous survey of Cas A and represent the most complete catalog of its optically emitting material to date. We confirm that the bulk of Cas A's optically bright ejecta populate a torus-like geometry tilted approximately 30 Degree-Sign with respect to the plane of the sky with a -4000 to +6000 km s{sup -1} radial velocity asymmetry. Near-tangent viewing angle effects and an inhomogeneous surrounding circumstellar material/interstellar medium environment suggest that this geometry and velocity asymmetry may not be faithfully representative of the remnant's true 3D structure or the kinematic properties of the original explosion. The majority of the optical ejecta are arranged in several well-defined and nearly circular ring-like structures with diameters between approximately 30'' (0.5 pc) and 2' (2 pc). These ejecta rings appear to be a common phenomenon of young core-collapse remnants and may be associated with post-explosion input of energy from plumes of radioactive {sup 56}Ni-rich ejecta that rise, expand, and compress non-radioactive material. Our optical survey encompasses Cas A's faint outlying ejecta knots and exceptionally high-velocity NE and SW streams of S-rich debris often referred to as ''jets''. These outer knots, which exhibit a chemical make-up suggestive of an origin deep within the progenitor star, appear to be arranged in opposing and wide-angle outflows with opening half-angles of Almost-Equal-To 40 Degree-Sign.

  19. Chemical abundances in a high-velocity RR Lyrae star near the bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Rich, R. M.; Koch, A.; Xu, S.; Kunder, A.; Ludwig, H.-G.

    2016-05-01

    Low-mass variable high-velocity stars are interesting study cases for many aspects of Galactic structure and evolution. Until recently, the only known high- or hyper-velocity stars were young stars thought to originate from the Galactic center. Wide-area surveys such as APOGEE and BRAVA have found several low-mass stars in the bulge with Galactic rest-frame velocities higher than 350 km s-1. In this study we present the first abundance analysis of a low-mass RR Lyrae star that is located close to the Galactic bulge, with a space motion of ~-400 km s-1. Using medium-resolution spectra, we derived abundances (including upper limits) of 11 elements. These allowed us to chemically tag the star and discuss its origin, although our derived abundances and metallicity, at [Fe/H] =-0.9 dex, do not point toward one unambiguous answer. Based on the chemical tagging, we cannot exclude that it originated in the bulge. However, its retrograde orbit and the derived abundances combined suggest that the star was accelerated from the outskirts of the inner (or even outer) halo during many-body interactions. Other possible origins include the bulge itself, or the star might have been stripped from a stellar cluster or the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy when it merged with the Milky Way. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  20. Observational parameters of the dusty plasma line during high velocity meteor streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musatenko, S.; Musatenko, Yu.; Kurochka, E.; Choliy, V.; Lastochkin, A.; Slipchenko, O.

    The parameters of the dusty plasma line were determined from the observations of the high velocity meteor streams: Perseids, Orionids, Leonids whose velocities are greater than 70 km/sec. The observed line frequency variation is in 12-60 Hz range. The outline of the line is asymmetric, it contains a set of peaks 2-3 Hz wide and some of them may be approximated by gaussian. In some cases the line is accompanied with higher frequency satellite at the distance 3-5 Hz. The spectral behavior of the line during observation time is very individual for concrete meteor shower. In the Leonids-2000 campaign the sharp line intensity maximum was registered between 02-04 LT, whereas during Leonids-2003 there were no maxima found. During Perseids-1999 the line was detectable all the night time. From these follows that dusty component of ionosphere plasma was either cloud shaped or consisted of streams of different scale. The line could be detected with high confidence during low or middle solar activity. We failed to detect the line when the storm (Dst=235nT, F10.7=195) took place during Perseids-2000 campaign. It was impossible for us to make some conclusion about the influence of solar bursts hard emission on the line characteristics due to poor statistics. Also, some of the low velocity meteor streams like Geminids-2000 may produce weak line. We have evidence of line arising even when regular meteor showers are absent (our experiment in June 2000 when no any of the streams were awaited). Basing on characteristics of plasma line the structure of dust clouds created by meteor streams in Earth ionosphere could be determined.

  1. Petrophysical models of high velocity lower crust on the South Atlantic rifted margins: whence the asymmetry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbull, Robert B.; Franke, Dieter; Bauer, Klaus; Sobolev, Stephan V.

    2015-04-01

    Lower crustal bodies with high seismic velocity (Vp > 7km/s) underlie seaward-dipping reflector wedges on both margins of the South Atlantic, as on many other volcanic rifted margins worldwide. A comprehensive geophysical study of the South Atlantic margins by Becker et al. (Solid Earth, 5: 1011-1026, 2014) showed a strong asymmetry in the development of high-velocity lower crust (HVLC), with about 4 times larger volumes of HVLC on the African margin. That study also found interesting variations in the vertical position of HVLC relative to seaward-dipping reflectors which question a simple intrusive vs. extrusive relationship between these lower- and upper crustal features. The asymmetry of HVLC volumes on the conjugate margins is paradoxically exactly the opposite to that of surface lavas in the Paraná-Etendeka flood basalt province, which are much more voluminous on the South American margin. This contribution highlights the asymmetric features of magma distribution on the South Atlantic margins and explores their geodynamic significance. Petrophysical models of the HVLC are presented in the context of mantle melt generation, based on thickness-velocity (H-Vp) relations. These suggest that the greater volumes and average Vp values of HVLC on the African margin are due to active upwelling and high temperature, whereas passive upwelling under a thick lithospheric lid suppressed magma generation on the South American margin. The contrast in mantle upwelling rate and lithospheric thickness on the two margins predictably causes differential uplift, and this may help explain the greater accomodation space for surface lavas on the South American side although melt generation was strongest under the African margin.

  2. Energy Productivity of the High Velocity Algae Raceway Integrated Design (ARID-HV)

    SciTech Connect

    Attalah, Said; Waller, Peter M.; Khawam, George; Ryan, Randy D.; Huesemann, Michael H.

    2015-06-03

    The original Algae Raceway Integrated Design (ARID) raceway was an effective method to increase algae culture temperature in open raceways. However, the energy input was high and flow mixing was poor. Thus, the High Velocity Algae Raceway Integrated Design (ARID-HV) raceway was developed to reduce energy input requirements and improve flow mixing in a serpentine flow path. A prototype ARID-HV system was installed in Tucson, Arizona. Based on algae growth simulation and hydraulic analysis, an optimal ARID-HV raceway was designed, and the electrical energy input requirement (kWh ha-1 d-1) was calculated. An algae growth model was used to compare the productivity of ARIDHV and conventional raceways. The model uses a pond surface energy balance to calculate water temperature as a function of environmental parameters. Algae growth and biomass loss are calculated based on rate constants during day and night, respectively. A 10 year simulation of DOE strain 1412 (Chlorella sorokiniana) showed that the ARID-HV raceway had significantly higher production than a conventional raceway for all months of the year in Tucson, Arizona. It should be noted that this difference is species and climate specific and is not observed in other climates and with other algae species. The algae growth model results and electrical energy input evaluation were used to compare the energy productivity (algae production rate/energy input) of the ARID-HV and conventional raceways for Chlorella sorokiniana in Tucson, Arizona. The energy productivity of the ARID-HV raceway was significantly greater than the energy productivity of a conventional raceway for all months of the year.

  3. Collisions between Dark Matter Confined High Velocity Clouds and Magnetized Galactic Disks: The Smith Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galyardt, Jason; Shelton, Robin L.

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy’s population of High Velocity Clouds (HVCs) may include a subpopulation that is confined by dark matter minihalos and falling toward the Galactic disk. We present the first magnetohydrodynamic simulational study of dark-matter-dominated HVCs colliding with a weakly magnetized galactic disk. Our HVCs have baryonic masses of 5 × 106M⊙ and dark matter minihalo masses of 0, 3 × 108, or 1 × 109 M⊙. They are modeled on the Smith Cloud, which is said to have collided with the disk 70 Myr ago. We find that, in all cases, the cloud’s collision with the galactic disk creates a hole in the disk, completely disperses the cloud, and forms a bubble-shaped structure on the far side of the disk. In contrast, when present, the dark matter minihalo continues unimpeded along its trajectory. Later, as the minihalo passes through the bubble structure and galactic halo, it accretes up to 6.0 × 105 M⊙ in baryonic material, depending on the strengths of the magnetic field and minihalo gravity. These simulations suggest that if the Smith Cloud is associated with a dark matter minihalo and collided with the Galactic disk, the minihalo has accreted the observed gas. However, if the Smith Cloud is dark-matter-free, it is on its first approach toward the disk. These simulations also suggest that the dark matter is most concentrated either at the head of the cloud or near the cloud, depending upon the strength of the magnetic field, a point that could inform indirect dark matter searches.

  4. Brain and Spinal Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brain and Spinal Tumors Information Page Synonym(s): Spinal Cord ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Brain and Spinal Tumors? Tumors of the brain and ...

  5. Spinal Cord Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... damages the vertebrae or other parts of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, ...

  7. Management of Spinal Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Schmidt, Meic H

    2016-04-01

    Spinal meningiomas are the most common spinal tumors encountered in adults, and account for 6.5% of all craniospinal tumors. The treatment for these lesions is primarily surgical, but emerging modalities may include chemotherapy and radiosurgery. In this article, the current management of spinal meningiomas and the body of literature surrounding conventional treatment is reviewed and discussed.

  8. Iron containing vitamins and dietary supplements: control of the iron state using Mössbauer spectroscopy with high velocity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Semionkin, V. A.; Milder, O. B.; Novikov, E. G.

    2009-04-01

    Control of the iron state in iron containing vitamins and dietary supplements using Mössbauer spectroscopy with high velocity resolution was done. An improvement of velocity resolution appeared to be useful in determination of impurities and analysis of the main components in iron containing pharmaceuticals with better quality.

  9. High- and low-temperature-stable thermite composition for producing high-pressure, high-velocity gases

    DOEpatents

    Halcomb, Danny L.; Mohler, Jonathan H.

    1990-10-16

    A high- and low-temperature-stable thermite composition for producing high-pressure and high-velocity gases comprises an oxidizable metal, an oxidizing reagent, and a high-temperature-stable gas-producing additive selected from the group consisting of metal carbides and metal nitrides.

  10. The Small-Scale Structure of High-Velocity Na I Absorption Toward M81

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, K. C.; Meyer, D. M.; Lauroesch, J. T.

    2000-12-01

    We present high-resolution (R=20,000) integral field spectra of the Na I absorption toward the nucleus of the nearby spiral galaxy M81 (NGC 3031) obtained in April 2000 with the WIYN 3.5-m telescope and the DensePak fiber optic bundle. Our DensePak map covers the central 27 x 43 arcsec of M81 at a spatial resolution of 4 arcsec which corresponds to a projected length scale of 63 pc at the distance of the galaxy (3.25 Mpc). These data were intended to explore the spatial extent of high-velocity (v = 110-130 km/s) gas seen in Na I, Mg I and Mg II absorption toward SN 1993J by Bowen et al. (1994), which they proposed is due to tidal material associated with interactions between M81 and nearby M82 (Yun, Ho & Lo 1993). No H I gas at these velocities has been detected in 21 cm interferometry maps near the position of SN 1993J (2.6 arcmin SW of the M81 nucleus). Our Na I map of the M81 core shows no evidence of the strong absorption seen at v = 110-130 km/s toward SN 1993J. However, our map does reveal a strong Na I component at v = 220 km/s in several fibers that appears to trace a filamentary structure running from the SW to the NE across the M81 nuclear region. The origin and distance of this filament are unknown. No H I gas at v = 220 km/s has previously been detected in 21 cm studies of the core. At the location of SN 1993J, Bowen et al. measured weak Mg II absorption at this velocity but found no evidence of corresponding Na I absorption. The only known H I gas that corresponds to this velocity in the M81 group are the H I streamers found around M82 by Yun, Ho, & Lo that they interpreted as tidally disrupted M82 disk material.

  11. On the Metallicity and Origin of the Smith High-velocity Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Andrew J.; Lehner, Nicolas; Lockman, Felix J.; Wakker, Bart P.; Hill, Alex S.; Heitsch, Fabian; Stark, David V.; Barger, Kathleen A.; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Rahman, Mubdi

    2016-01-01

    The Smith Cloud (SC) is a gaseous high-velocity cloud (HVC) in an advanced state of accretion, only 2.9 kpc below the Galactic plane and due to impact the disk in ≈27 Myr. It is unique among HVCs in having a known distance (12.4 ± 1.3 kpc) and a well-constrained 3D velocity (296 km s-1), but its origin has long remained a mystery. Here we present the first absorption-line measurements of its metallicity, using Hubble Space Telescope/COS UV spectra of three active galactic nuclei lying behind the Cloud together with Green Bank Telescope 21 cm spectra of the same directions. Using Voigt-profile fitting of the S ii λλ1250, 1253, 1259 triplet together with ionization corrections derived from photoionization modeling, we derive the sulfur abundance in each direction; a weighted average of the three measurements gives [S/H] = -0.28 ± 0.14, or {0.53}-0.15+0.21 solar metallicity. The finding that the SC is metal-enriched lends support to scenarios where it represents recycled Galactic material, rather than the remnant of a dwarf galaxy or accreting intergalactic gas. The metallicity and trajectory of the Cloud are both indicative of an origin in the outer disk. However, its large mass and prograde kinematics remain to be fully explained. If the cloud has accreted cooling gas from the corona during its fountain trajectory, as predicted in recent theoretical work, its current mass would be higher than its launch mass, alleviating the mass concern. Based on observations taken under program 13840 of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, and under program GBT09A_17 of the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under a cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  12. Force Criterion Prediction of Damage for Carbon/Epoxy Composite Panels Impacted by High Velocity Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhymer, Jennifer D.

    The use of advanced fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites in load-bearing aircraft structures is increasing, as evident by the various composites-intensive transport aircraft presently under development. A major impact source of concern for these structures is hail ice, which affects design and skin-sizing (skin thickness determination) at various locations of the aircraft. Impacts onto composite structures often cause internal damage that is not visually detectable due to the high strength and resiliency of the composite material (unlike impacts onto metallic structures). This internal damage and its effect on the performance of the structure are of great concern to the aircraft industry. The prediction of damage in composite structures due to SHI impact has been accomplished via experimental work, explicit dynamic nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) and the definition of design oriented relationships. Experiments established the critical threshold and corresponding analysis provided contact force results not readily measurable in high velocity SHI impact experiments. The design oriented relationships summarize the FEA results and experimental database into contact force estimation curves that can be easily applied for damage prediction. Failure thresholds were established for the experimental conditions (panel thickness ranging from 1.56 to 4.66 mm and ice diameters from 38.1 to 61.0 mm). Additionally, the observations made by high-speed video during the impact event, and ultrasonic C-scan post-impact, showed how the ice failed during impact and the overall shape and location of the panel damage. Through analysis, the critical force, the force level where damage occurs above but not below, of a SHI impact onto the panel was found to be dependent only on the target structure. However, the peak force generated during impact was dependent on both the projectile and target. Design-oriented curves were generated allowing the prediction of the allowable

  13. High Velocity Linear Induction Launcher with Exit-Edge Compensation for Testing of Aerospace Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsov, Stephen; Marriott, Darin

    2008-01-01

    Advances in ultra high speed linear induction electromagnetic launchers over the past decade have focused on magnetic compensation of the exit and entry-edge transient flux wave to produce efficient and compact linear electric machinery. The paper discusses two approaches to edge compensation in long-stator induction catapults with typical end speeds of 150 to 1,500 m/s. In classical linear induction machines, the exit-edge effect is manifest as two auxiliary traveling waves that produce a magnetic drag on the projectile and a loss of magnetic flux over the main surface of the machine. In the new design for the Stator Compensated Induction Machine (SCIM) high velocity launcher, the exit-edge effect is nulled by a dual wavelength machine or alternately the airgap flux is peaked at a location prior to the exit edge. A four (4) stage LIM catapult is presently being constructed for 180 m/s end speed operation using double-sided longitudinal flux machines. Advanced exit and entry edge compensation is being used to maximize system efficiency, and minimize stray heating of the reaction armature. Each stage will output approximately 60 kN of force and produce over 500 G s of acceleration on the armature. The advantage of this design is there is no ablation to the projectile and no sliding contacts, allowing repeated firing of the launcher without maintenance of any sort. The paper shows results of a parametric study for 500 m/s and 1,500 m/s linear induction launchers incorporating two of the latest compensation techniques for an air-core stator primary and an iron-core primary winding. Typical thrust densities for these machines are in the range of 150 kN/sq.m. to 225 kN/sq.m. and these compete favorably with permanent magnet linear synchronous machines. The operational advantages of the high speed SCIM launcher are shown by eliminating the need for pole-angle position sensors as would be required by synchronous systems. The stator power factor is also improved.

  14. Titanium dioxide reinforced hydroxyapatite coatings deposited by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Khor, K A; Cheang, P

    2002-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings with titania addition were produced by the high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray process. Mechanical properties of the as-sprayed coatings in terms of adhesive strength, shear strength and fracture toughness were investigated to reveal the effect of the titania reinforcement on HA. Qualitative phase analysis with X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that mutual chemical reaction between TiO2 and HA, that formed CaTiO3 occurred during coating formation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis of the starting powders showed that the mutual chemical reaction temperature was approximately 1410 degrees C and the existence of TiO2 can effectively inhibit the decomposition of HA at elevated temperatures. The positive influence of TiO2 addition on the shear strength was revealed. The incorporation of 10 vol% TiO2 significantly improved the Young's modulus of HA coatings from 24.82 (+/- 2.44) GPa to 43.23 (+/- 3.20) GPa. It decreased to 38.51 (+/- 3.65) GPa as the amount of TiO2 increased to 20 vol%. However, the addition of TiO2 has a negative bias on the adhesive strength of HA coatings especially when the content of TiO2 reached 20 vol%. This is attributed to the weak chemical bonding and brittle phases existing at the splats' interface that resulted from mutual chemical reactions. The fracture toughness exhibited values of 0.48 (+/- 0.08) MPa m0.5, 0.60 (+/- 0.07) MPa m0.5 and 0.67 (+/- 0.06) MPa m0.5 for the HA coating, 10 vol% TiO2 blended HA coating and 20 vol% TiO2 blended HA coating respectively. The addition of TiO2 in HA coating with the amount of less than 20 vol% is suggested for satisfactory toughening effect in HVOF HA coating. PMID:11762858

  15. Global properties of the HI high velocity sky. A statistical investigation based on the LAB survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Haud, U.

    2006-08-01

    Context.Since 1973, it has been known that some H i high velocity clouds (HVCs) have a core-envelope structure. Recent observations of compact HVCs confirm this, but more general investigations have been missing so far.Aims.We study the properties of all major HVC complexes from a sample compiled in 1991 by Wakker & van Woerden (WvW). Methods.We use the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn all sky 21-cm line survey and decompose the profiles into Gaussian components.Results.We find the WvW line widths and column densities to be underestimated by ~40%. In 1991, these line widths could not be measured directly, but had to be estimated with the help of higher resolution data. We find a well-defined multi-component structure for most of the HVC complexes. The cold HVC phase has lines with typical velocity dispersions of σ = 3 km s-1 and exists only within more extended broad line regions, typically with σ = 12 km s-1. The motions of the cores relative to the envelopes are characterized by Mach numbers M = (vcore-venvelope)/σenvelope ˜ 1.5. The center velocities of the cores within a HVC complex have typical dispersions of 20 km s-1. The well-defined two-component structure of some prominent HVC complexes in the outskirts of the Milky Way is remakable: Complex H lies approximately in the Galactic plane, and the most plausible distance estimate of R ˜ 33 kpc places it at the edge of the disk. The Magellanic Stream and the Leading Arm (complex EP) reach higher latitudes and are probably more distant, R ˜ 50 kpc. There might be some indications for an interaction between HVCs and disk gas at intermediate velocities. This is possible for complex H, M, C, WB, WD, WE, WC, R, G, GCP, and OA, but not for complex A, MS, ACVHV, EN, WA, and P. Conclusions.The line widths, determined by us, imply that estimates of HVC masses, as far as those derived from the WvW database are concerned, need to be scaled up by a factor 1.4. Correspondingly, guesses for the external pressure of a confining

  16. Earthquake Energy Dissipation in Light of High-Velocity, Slip-Pulse Shear Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Z.; Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the energy dissipation during earthquakes by analysis of high-velocity shear experiments conducted on room-dry, solid samples of granite, tonalite, and dolomite sheared at slip-velocity of 0.0006-1m/s, and normal stress of 1-11.5MPa. The experimental fault were loaded in one of three modes: (1) Slip-pulse of abrupt, intense acceleration followed by moderate deceleration; (2) Impact by a spinning, heavy flywheel (225 kg); and (3) Constant velocity loading. We refer to energy dissipation in terms of power-density (PD=shear stress*slip-velocity; units of MW/m^2), and Coulomb-energy-density (CED= mechanical energy/normal stress; units of m). We present two aspects: Relative energy dissipation of the above loading modes, and relative energy dissipation between impact experiments and moderate earthquakes. For the first aspect, we used: (i) the lowest friction coefficient of the dynamic weakening; (ii) the work dissipated before reaching the lowest friction; and (iii) the cumulative mechanical work during the complete run. The results show that the slip-pulse/impact modes are energy efficient relatively to the constant-velocity mode as manifested by faster, more intense weakening and 50-90% lower energy dissipation. Thus, for a finite amount of pre-seismic crustal energy, the efficiency of slip-pulse would amplify earthquake instability. For the second aspect, we compare the experimental CED of the impact experiments to the reported breakdown energy (EG) of moderate earthquakes, Mw = 5.6 to 7.2 (Chang et al., 2012). In is commonly assumed that the seismic EG is a small fraction of the total earthquake energy, and as expected in 9 out of 11 examined earthquakes, EG was 0.005 to 0.07 of the experimental CED. We thus speculate that the experimental relation of Coulomb-energy-density to total slip distance, D, CED = 0.605 × D^0.933, is a reasonable estimate of total earthquake energy, a quantity that cannot be determined from seismic data.

  17. Effect of spinal manipulation on sensorimotor functions in back pain patients: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP) is a recognized public health problem, impacting up to 80% of US adults at some point in their lives. Patients with LBP are utilizing integrative health care such as spinal manipulation (SM). SM is the therapeutic application of a load to specific body tissues or structures and can be divided into two broad categories: SM with a high-velocity low-amplitude load, or an impulse "thrust", (HVLA-SM) and SM with a low-velocity variable-amplitude load (LVVA-SM). There is evidence that sensorimotor function in people with LBP is altered. This study evaluates the sensorimotor function in the lumbopelvic region, as measured by postural sway, response to sudden load and repositioning accuracy, following SM to the lumbar and pelvic region when compared to a sham treatment. Methods/Design A total of 219 participants with acute, subacute or chronic low back pain are being recruited from the Quad Cities area located in Iowa and Illinois. They are allocated through a minimization algorithm in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive either 13 HVLA-SM treatments over 6 weeks, 13 LVVA-SM treatments over 6 weeks or 2 weeks of a sham treatment followed by 4 weeks of full spine "doctor's choice" SM. Sensorimotor function tests are performed before and immediately after treatment at baseline, week 2 and week 6. Self-report outcome assessments are also collected. The primary aims of this study are to 1) determine immediate pre to post changes in sensorimotor function as measured by postural sway following delivery of a single HVLA-SM or LVVA-SM treatment when compared to a sham treatment and 2) to determine changes from baseline to 2 weeks (4 treatments) of HVLA-SM or LVVA-SM compared to a sham treatment. Secondary aims include changes in response to sudden loads and lumbar repositioning accuracy at these endpoints, estimating sensorimotor function in the SM groups after 6 weeks of treatment, and exploring if changes in sensorimotor function are associated with changes in

  18. Spinal pain.

    PubMed

    Izzo, R; Popolizio, T; D'Aprile, P; Muto, M

    2015-05-01

    The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic pain, much more difficult to treat. The clinical assessment of pain source can be a challenge because of the complex anatomy and function of the spine; the advanced imaging methods are often not sufficient for a definitive diagnosis because similar findings could be present in either asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects: a clinical correlation is always mandatory and the therapy cannot rely uniquely upon any imaging abnormalities. Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally

  19. Spinal cord contusion models.

    PubMed

    Young, Wise

    2002-01-01

    Most human spinal cord injuries involve contusions of the spinal cord. Many investigators have long used weight-drop contusion animal models to study the pathophysiology and genetic responses of spinal cord injury. All spinal cord injury therapies tested to date in clinical trial were validated in such models. In recent years, the trend has been towards use of rats for spinal cord injury studies. The MASCIS Impactor is a well-standardized rat spinal cord contusion model that produces very consistent graded spinal cord damage that linearly predicts 24-h lesion volumes, 6-week white matter sparing, and locomotor recovery in rats. All aspects of the model, including anesthesia for male and female rats, age rather than body weight criteria, and arterial blood gases were empirically selected to enhance the consistency of injury. PMID:12440371

  20. Ultra-compact high velocity clouds in the ALFALFA HI survey: Candidate Local Group galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Elizabeth Ann Kovenz

    The increased sensitivity and spatial resolution of the ALFALFA HI survey has resulted in the detection of ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs). These objects are good candidates to represent low mass gas-rich galaxies in the Local Group and Local Volume with stellar populations that are too faint to be detected in extant optical surveys. This idea is referred to as the "minihalo hypothesis". We identify the UCHVCs within the ALFALFA dataset via the use of a 3D matched filtering signal identification algorithm. UCHVCs are selected based on a compact size (< 30'), separation from Galactic HI (|upsilon LSR| > 120 km s-1) and isolation. Within the 40% complete ALFALFA survey (alpha.40), 59 UCHVCs are identified; 19 are in a most-isolated subset and are the best galaxy candidates. Due to the presence of large HVC complexes in the fall sky, most notably the Magellanic Stream, the association of UCHVCs with existing structure cannot be ruled out. In the spring sky, the spatial and kinematic distribution of the UCHVCs is consistent with simulations of dark matter halos within the Local Group. In addition, the HI properties of the UCHVCs (if placed at 1 Mpc) are consistent with both theoretical and observational predictions for low mass gas-rich galaxies. Importantly, the HI properties of the UCHVCs are consistent with those of two recently discovered low mass gas-rich galaxies in the Local Group and Local Volume, Leo T and Leo P. Detailed follow-up observations are key for addressing the minihalo hypothesis. High resolution HI observations can constrain the environment of a UCHVC and offer evidence for a hosting dark matter halo through evidence of rotation support and comparison to theoretical models. Observations of one UCHVC at high resolution (15'') reveal the presence of a clumpy HI distribution, similar to both low mass galaxies and circumgalactic compact HVCs. An extended envelope containing ˜50% of the HI flux is resolved out by the array configuration

  1. Frictional behavior of talc at seismic slip rates: preliminary results from high-velocity experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutareaud, S.; Hirose, T.; Doan, M. L.; Andréani, M.; Calugaru, D. G.

    2009-04-01

    Talc is one of the few minerals not following the Byerlee law, its static friction velocity is 0.2-0.25. Talc has been identified in the San Andreas Fault, and is expected to occur within subduction zone. Talc can then affect their seismic behavior. Yet, the details of its frictional properties are poorly known, especially at seismic velocities. Our study aims at understanding its behavior at these velocities. The properties of the talc were studied during high-velocity rotary-shear experiments carried out at from 0.01 m/s to 1.31 m/s, at normal stresses of 0.6 to 1.4 MPa, using the frictional testing apparatus of the JAMSTEC. The experimental gouge is a pure natural talc schist powder (99.9% wt). The samples were test used in dry (i.e. at room moisture conditions) or wet conditions. During experiments, we were able to measure simulated fault thickness evolution, moisture release and to calculate friction coefficient. Even though it is from the start a weak material, talc schist follows a slip weakening law, which appears to depend strongly on the saturation of the sample. Dry samples sliding at speed of 1.31m/s an exponential decrease of friction coefficient from a peak value of 0.98-0.71 to a steady state value between 0.18 and 0.59. This weakening is strongly dependent on normal stress. Dry sample also experienced large gouge dilation. Results from experiments on wet samples are different. The friction peak values of 0.52-0.36 drop to a steady state value between 0.1 and 0.18. Moreover the steady state friction seems to be independent on the applied normal stress. Finally, the wet samples do not experience dilation, but a large release of water steam. This preliminary work suggests two different weakening processes for dry and wet conditions, respectively. To understand the talc friction behavior, we performed studies on talc schist decomposition, in case flash heating would locally alter the talc structure. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) combined to

  2. Electrospray Charging of Minerals: Surface Chemistry and Applications to High-Velocity Microparticle Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, T.; Call, S.; Austin, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    charge detector measures the electrosprayed mineral particles’ speed and charge. Quartz microparticles have been successfully electrosprayed. Variation in quartz microparticles’ charge as a function of pH is being evaluated. In addition, we are studying how to completely desolvate electrosprayed mineral particles. Desolvation is not trivial and often requires more than the passive passage of the droplets from the needle to the grounded plate and into vacuum. We are testing two desolvation methods: a heated beam tube and a heated capillary. Preliminary data suggests we have achieved complete desolvation with a hot beam tube. Although quartz’s surface chemistry is rather unique, successful electrospray of quartz microparticles strongly suggests that other minerals may also be electrosprayed. We are preparing olivine samples for electrospray. In addition, an instrument that creates high-velocity microparticle impacts using electrospray-charged mineral microparticles is being developed. This instrument will not only permit minerals to be used as projectiles, but also allows direction characterization of chemical speciation occurring during microparticle impacts.

  3. RESPONSE OF LUMBAR PARASPINAL MUSCLES SPINDLES IS GREATER TO SPINAL MANIPULATIVE LOADING COMPARED WITH SLOWER LOADING UNDER LENGTH CONTROL

    PubMed Central

    Pickar, Joel G.; Sung, Paul S.; Kang, Yu-Ming; Ge, Weiqing

    2007-01-01

    Background Context Spinal manipulation (SM) is a form of manual therapy used clinically to treat patients with low back and neck pain. The most common form of this maneuver is characterized as a high velocity (duration < 150ms), low amplitude (segmental translation < 2mm, rotation < 4°, and applied force 220-889N) impulse thrust (HVLA-SM). Clinical skill in applying an HVLA-SM lies in the practitioner's ability to control the duration and magnitude of the load (i.e., the rate of loading), the direction in which the load is applied, and the contact point at which the load is applied. Control over its mechanical delivery presumably related to its clinical effects. Biomechanical changes evoked by an HVLA-SM are thought to have physiological consequences caused, at least in part, by changes in sensory signaling from paraspinal tissues. Purpose If activation of afferent pathways does contribute to the effects of an HVLA-SM, it seems reasonable to anticipate that neural discharge might increase or decrease in a non-linear fashion as the thrust duration thrust approaches a threshold value. We hypothesized that the relationship between the duration of an impulsive thrust to a vertebra and paraspinal muscle spindle discharge would be non-linear with an inflection near the duration of an HVLA-SM delivered clinically (<150ms). In addition, we anticipated that muscle spindle discharge would be more sensitive to larger amplitude thrusts. Study Design/Setting A neurophysiological study of spinal manipulation using the lumbar spine of a feline model. Methods Impulse thrusts (duration: 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 ms; amplitude 1 or 2mm posterior to anterior) were applied to the spinous process of the L6 vertebra of deeply anesthetized cats while recording single unit activity from dorsal root filaments of muscle spindle afferents innervating the lumbar paraspinal muscles. A feedback motor was used in displacement control mode to deliver the impulse thrusts. The motor's drive

  4. Long-term carbide development in high-velocity oxygen fuel/high-velocity air fuel Cr3C2-NiCr coatings heat treated at 900 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, S.; Hyland, M.; James, B.

    2004-12-01

    During the deposition of Cr3C2-NiCr coatings, compositional degradation occurs, primarily through the dissolution of the carbide phase into the matrix. Exposure at an elevated temperature leads to transformations in the compositional distribution and microstructure. While these have been investigated in short-term trials, no systematic investigations of the long-term microstructural development have been presented for high-velocity sprayed coatings. In this work, high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) and high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) coatings were treated at 900 °C for up to 60 days. Rapid refinement of the supersaturated matrix phase occurred, with the degree of matrix phase alloying continuing to decrease over the following 20 to 40 days. Carbide nucleation in the HVAF coatings occurred preferentially on the retained carbide grains, while that in the HVOF coatings developed in the regions of greatest carbide dissolution. This difference resulted in a variation in carbide morphologies. Preferential horizontal growth was evident in both coatings over the first 20 to 30 days of exposure, beyond which spheroidization of the microstructure occurred. After 30 days, the carbide morphology of both coatings was comparable, tending toward an expansive structure of coalesced carbide grains. The development of the carbide phase played a significant role in the microhardness variation of these coatings with time.

  5. Imprints of a high-velocity wind on the soft X-ray spectrum of PG1211+143

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, K. A.; Lobban, A.; Reeves, J. N.; Vaughan, S.; Costa, M.

    2016-07-01

    An extended XMM-Newton observation of the luminous narrow-line Seyfert galaxy PG1211+143 in 2014 has revealed a more complex high-velocity wind, with components distinguished in velocity, ionization level, and column density. Here we report soft X-ray emission and absorption features from the ionized outflow, finding counterparts of both high-velocity components, v ˜ 0.129c and v ˜ 0.066c, recently identified in the highly ionized Fe K absorption spectrum. The lower ionization of the comoving soft X-ray absorbers imply a distribution of higher density clouds embedded in the main outflow, while much higher column densities for the same flow component in the hard X-ray spectra suggest differing sightlines to the continuum X-ray source.

  6. Microstructural and Tribological Investigation of High-Velocity Suspension Flame Sprayed (HVSFS) Al2O3 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolelli, Giovanni; Rauch, Johannes; Cannillo, Valeria; Killinger, Andreas; Lusvarghi, Luca; Gadow, Rainer

    2009-03-01

    Al2O3 coatings were manufactured by the high-velocity suspension flame spraying (HVSFS) technique using a nanopowder suspension. Their structural and microstructural characteristics, micromechanical behavior, and tribological properties were studied and compared to conventional atmospheric plasma sprayed and high-velocity oxygen-fuel-sprayed Al2O3 coatings manufactured using commercially available feedstock. The HVSFS process enables near full melting of the nanopowder particles, resulting in very small and well flattened lamellae (thickness range 100 nm to 1 μm), almost free of transverse microcracking, with very few unmelted inclusions. Thus, porosity is much lower and pores are smaller than in conventional coatings. Moreover, few interlamellar or intralamellar cracks exist, resulting in reduced pore interconnectivity (evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy). Such strong interlamellar cohesion favors much better dry sliding wear resistance at room temperature and at 400 °C.

  7. Effects of pulsed, high-velocity water flow on larval robust redhorse and V-lip redhorse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weyers, R.S.; Jennings, C.A.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2003-01-01

    The pulsed, high-velocity water flow characteristic of water-flow patterns downstream from hydropower-generating dams has been implicated in the declining abundance of both aquatic insects and fishes in dam-regulated rivers. This study examined the effects of 0, 4, and 12 h per day of pulsed, high-velocity water flow on the egg mortality, hatch length, final length, and survival of larval robust redhorse Moxostoma robusturn, a presumedly extinct species that was rediscovered in the 1990s, and V-lip redhorse M. collapsum (previously synonomized with the silver redhorse M. anisurum) over a 3-5 week period in three separate experiments. Twelve 38.0-L aquaria (four per treatment) were modified to simulate pulsed, high-velocity water flow (>35 cm/s) and stable, low-velocity water flow (<10 cm/s). Temperature, dissolved oxygen, zooplankton density, and water quality variables were kept the same across treatments. Fertilized eggs were placed in gravel nests in each aquarium. Hatch success was estimated visually at greater than 90%, and the mean larval length at 24 h posthatch was similar in each experiment. After emergence from the gravel nest, larvae exposed to 4 and 12 h of pulsed, high-velocity water flow grew significantly more slowly and had lower survival than those in the 0-h treatment. These results demonstrate that the altered water-flow patterns that typically occur when water is released during hydropower generation can have negative effects on the growth and survival of larval catostomid suckers.

  8. Study of maghemite nanoparticles as prepared and coated with DMSA using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Ushakov, M. V.; Semionkin, V. A.; Lima, E. C. D.; Morais, P. C.

    2014-04-01

    Study of maghemite nanoparticles, native and coated with DMSA as magnetic fluid for biomedical applications, was carried out using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution at 295 and 90 K. The obtained results demonstrated differences in Mössbauer hyperfine parameters for uncoated and DMSA-coated nanoparticles which were related to the interactions of DMSA molecules with Fe3+ ions on maghemite nanoparticle's surface.

  9. Phase contrast ultrashort TE: A more reliable technique for measurement of high-velocity turbulent stenotic jets.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kieran R; Myerson, Saul G; Cowan, Brett R; Young, Alistair A; Robson, Matthew D

    2009-09-01

    Accurate measurement of peak velocity is critical to the assessment of patients with stenotic valvular disease. Conventional phase contrast (PC) methods for imaging high-velocity jets in aortic stenosis are susceptible to intravoxel dephasing signal loss, which can result in unreliable measurements. The most effective method for reducing intravoxel dephasing is to shorten the echo time (TE); however, the amount that TE can be shortened in conventional sequences is limited. A new sequence incorporating velocity-dependent slice excitation and ultrashort TE (UTE) centric radial readout trajectories is proposed that reduces TE from 2.85 to 0.65 ms. In a high-velocity stenotic jet phantom, a conventional sequence had >5% flow error at a flow rate of only 400 mL/s (velocity >358 cm/s), whereas the PC-UTE showed excellent agreement (<5% error) at much higher flow rates (1080 mL/s, 965 cm/s). In vivo feasibility studies demonstrated that by measuring velocity over a shorter time the PC-UTE approach is more robust to intravoxel dephasing signal loss. It also has less inherent higher-order motion encoding. This sequence therefore demonstrates potential as a more robust method for measuring peak velocity and flow in high-velocity turbulent stenotic jets.

  10. THE HIGH-VELOCITY MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN MASSIVE CLUSTER-FORMING REGION G10.6-0.4

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hauyu Baobab; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang Qizhou E-mail: pho@asiaa.sinica.edu.t

    2010-12-20

    We report the arcsecond resolution Submillimeter Array observations of the {sup 12}CO (2-1) transition in the massive cluster-forming region G10.6-0.4. In these observations, the high-velocity {sup 12}CO emission is resolved into individual outflow systems, which have a typical size scale of a few arcseconds. These molecular outflows are energetic and are interacting with the ambient molecular gas. By inspecting the shock signatures traced by CH{sub 3}OH, SiO, and HCN emissions, we suggest that abundant star formation activities are distributed over the entire 0.5 pc scale dense molecular envelope. The star formation efficiency over one global free-fall timescale (of the 0.5 pc molecular envelope, {approx}10{sup 5} years) is about a few percent. The total energy feedback of these high-velocity outflows is higher than 10{sup 47} erg, which is comparable to the total kinetic energy in the rotational motion of the dense molecular envelope. From order-of-magnitude estimations, we suggest that the energy injected from the protostellar outflows is capable of balancing the turbulent energy dissipation. No high-velocity bipolar molecular outflow associated with the central OB cluster is directly detected, which can be due to the photoionization.

  11. The High-velocity Molecular Outflows in Massive Cluster-forming Region G10.6-0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang, Qizhou

    2010-12-01

    We report the arcsecond resolution Submillimeter Array observations of the 12CO (2-1) transition in the massive cluster-forming region G10.6-0.4. In these observations, the high-velocity 12CO emission is resolved into individual outflow systems, which have a typical size scale of a few arcseconds. These molecular outflows are energetic and are interacting with the ambient molecular gas. By inspecting the shock signatures traced by CH3OH, SiO, and HCN emissions, we suggest that abundant star formation activities are distributed over the entire 0.5 pc scale dense molecular envelope. The star formation efficiency over one global free-fall timescale (of the 0.5 pc molecular envelope, ~105 years) is about a few percent. The total energy feedback of these high-velocity outflows is higher than 1047 erg, which is comparable to the total kinetic energy in the rotational motion of the dense molecular envelope. From order-of-magnitude estimations, we suggest that the energy injected from the protostellar outflows is capable of balancing the turbulent energy dissipation. No high-velocity bipolar molecular outflow associated with the central OB cluster is directly detected, which can be due to the photoionization.

  12. Spinal subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia: case report.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Marion; Strzelecki, Antoine; Houadec, Mireille; Krikken, Isabelle Ranz; Danielli, Antoine; Souza Neto, Edmundo Pereira de

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia is known to be very rare. In the majority of these cases, spinal anaesthesia was difficult to perform and/or unsuccessful; other risk factors included antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, and direct spinal cord trauma. We report a case of subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia in a young patient without risk factors. PMID:27591468

  13. Si IV Column Densities Predicted from Non-equilibrium Ionization Simulations of Turbulent Mixing Layers and High-velocity Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Shelton, Robin L.; Henley, David B.

    2015-10-01

    We present predictions of the Si iv ions in turbulent mixing layers (TMLs) between hot and cool gas and in cool high-velocity clouds (HVCs) that travel through a hot halo, complementing the C iv, N v, and O vi predictions in Kwak & Shelton, Kwak et al., and Henley et al. We find that the Si iv ions are most abundant in regions where the hot and cool gases first begin to mix or where the mixed gas has cooled significantly. The predicted column densities of high velocity Si iv and the predicted ratios of Si iv to C iv and O vi found on individual sightlines in our HVC simulations are in good agreement with observations of high velocity gas. Low velocity Si iv is also seen in the simulations, as a result of decelerated gas in the case of the HVC simulations and when looking along directions that pass perpendicular to the direction of motion in the TML simulations. The ratios of low velocity Si iv to C iv and O vi in the TML simulations are in good agreement with those recorded for Milky Way halo gas, while the ratio of Si iv to O vi from the decelerated gas in the HVC simulations is lower than that observed at normal velocity in the Milky Way halo. We attribute the shortfall of normal velocity Si iv to not having modeled the effects of photoionization and, following Henley et al., consider a composite model that includes decelerated HVC gas, supernova remnants, galactic fountain gas, and the effect of photoionization.

  14. High velocity flyer plates launched by magnetic pressure on pulsed power generator CQ-4 and applied in shock Hugoniot experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuping; Wang, Guiji; Zhao, Jianheng; Tan, Fuli; Luo, Binqiang; Sun, Chengwei

    2014-05-01

    High velocity flyer plates with good flatness and some thickness have being widely used to the field of shock physics for characterizations of materials under dynamical loading. The techniques of magnetically driven high-velocity flyer plates are further researched based on our pulsed power generators CQ-4 and some good results got on Sandia's Z machine. With large current of several mega-amperes, the loading surface of electrode panel will suffer acute phase transitions caused from magnetic diffusion and Joule heating, and the thickness and flatness of the flyer plates will change with time. In order to obtain the flyer plates with high performances for shock physics, some researches on electrode panels were done by means of LS-DYNA980 software with electro-magnetic package. Two typical configurations for high velocity flyer plates were compared from distribution uniformity of magnetic field in simulation. The results show that the configuration with counter-bore with "notch" and "ear" is better than the other. Then, with the better configuration panels, some experiments were designed and done to validate the simulation results and obtain high velocity flyer plates with good flatness for one-dimensional strain shock experiments on CQ-4. The velocity profiles of the flyer plates were measured by displacement interferometer systems for any reflectors. And the planarity of flyer plates was measured by using the optical fiber pins array for recording the flyer arrival time. The peak velocities of 8.7 km/s with initial dimension of 10 × 7.2 × 0.62 mm for aluminum flyer plates have been achieved. And the flyer plate with initial size of 12 × 9.2 × 0.73 mm was accelerated to velocity of 6.5 km/s with the flatness of less than 11 ns in the central region of 6 mm in diameter and the effective thickness of about 0.220 mm. Based on these work, the symmetrical impact experiments were performed to obtain the high accuracy Hugoniot data of OFHC (oxygen free high conductance

  15. Oxidation and thermal fatigue of coated and uncoated NX-188 nickel-base alloy in a high velocity gas stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Young, S. G.

    1972-01-01

    A cast nickel-base superalloy, NX-188, coated and uncoated, was tested in a high-velocity gas stream for resistance to oxidation and thermal fatigue by cycling between room temperature and 980, 1040, and 1090 C. Contrary to the behavior of more conventional nickel-base alloys, uncoated NX-188 exhibited the greatest weight loss at the lowest test temperature. In general, on the basis of weight change and metallographic observations a coating consisting of vapor-deposited Fe-Cr-Al-Y over a chromized substrate exhibited the best overall performance in resistance to oxidation and thermal fatigue.

  16. Plane-wave and common-translation-factor treatments of He sup 2+ +H collisions at high velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Errea, L.F. ); Harel, C.; Jouin, H. ); Maidagan, J.M.; Mendez, L. ); Pons, B. ); Riera, A. )

    1992-11-01

    We complement previous work that showed that the molecular approach, modified with plane-wave translation factors, is able to reproduce the fall of charge-exchange cross sections in He{sup 2+}+H collisions, by presenting the molecular data, and studying the corresponding mechanism. We test the accuracy of simplifications of the method that have been employed in the literature, and that lead to very simple calculations. We show that the common-translation-factor method is also successful at high nuclear velocities, provided that sufficiently excited states are included in the basis; moreover, it yields a simple picture of the mechanism and a description of ionization processes at high velocities.

  17. The effect of low- and high-velocity tendon excursion on the mechanical properties of human cadaver subsynovial connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Filius, Anika; Thoreson, Andrew R; Yang, Tai-Hua; Vanhees, Matthias; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng; Amadio, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) in the carpal tunnel is the most common histological finding in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Fibrosis may result from damaged SSCT. Previous studies found that with low-velocity (2 mm/s), tendon excursions can irreversibly damage the SSCT. We investigated the effect of tendon excursion velocity in the generation of SSCT damage. Nine human cadaver wrists were used. Three repeated cycles of ramp-stretch testing were performed simulating 40%, 60%, 90%, and 120% of the middle finger flexor tendon superficialis physiological excursion with an excursion velocity of 60 mm/s. Energy and force were calculated and normalized by values obtained in the first cycle for each excursion level. Data were compared with low-velocity excursion data. For high-velocity excursions, a significant drop in the excursion energy ratio was first observed at an excursion level of 60% physiological excursion (p < 0.024) and that for low-velocity excursions was first observed at 90% physiological excursion (p < 0.038). Furthermore, the energy ratio was lower at 60% for high velocities (p ≤ 0.039). Increasing velocity lowers the SSCT damage threshold. This finding may be relevant for understanding the pathogenesis of SSCT fibrosis, such as that accompanying CTS, and a relationship with occupational factors.

  18. Stimulated Raman scattering as an explanation for the extreme high-velocity features of water maser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, Shuji

    1994-01-01

    Extreme high-velocity features in the water maser spectra with velocity shifts of about +/- 900 km/s have recently been detected in the extragalactic water maser source, NGC 4258. We explain these extreme high-velocity features of water masers by stimulated Raman scattering in the plasma of the electron density of about 106-107/cu cm. For the Raman masers to occur, the brightness temperature of the original masers must be greater than about 1016-1019 K (depending on the maser beam solid angles, etc.), and the amplification path length of the maser must be about 3 x 1014 cm. We show that the frequency-downshifted (Stokes) photons are produced by the backward scattering and that upshifted (anti-Stokes) photons are created by interacting intersecting masers in the plasma. The intensity of the upshifted component is slightly lower than the intensity of the downshifted component. Time variations of upshifted and downshifted features must be independent. A crucial test for the Raman maser model is proposed.

  19. Characterization of High-Velocity Solution Precursor Flame-Sprayed Manganese Cobalt Oxide Spinel Coatings for Metallic SOFC Interconnectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puranen, Jouni; Laakso, Jarmo; Kylmälahti, Mikko; Vuoristo, Petri

    2013-06-01

    A modified high-velocity oxy-fuel spray (HVOF) thermal spray torch equipped with liquid feeding hardware was used to spray manganese-cobalt solutions on ferritic stainless steel grade Crofer 22 APU substrates. The HVOF torch was modified in such a way that the solution could be fed axially into the combustion chamber through 250- and 300-μm-diameter liquid injector nozzles. The solution used in this study was prepared by diluting nitrates of manganese and cobalt, i.e., Mn(NO3)2·4H2O and Co(NO3)2·6H2O, respectively, in deionized water. The as-sprayed coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy operating in secondary electron mode. Chemical analyses were performed on an energy dispersive spectrometer. Coatings with remarkable density could be prepared by the novel high-velocity solution precursor flame spray (HVSPFS) process. Due to finely sized droplet formation in the HVSPFS process and the use of as delivered Crofer 22 APU substrate material having very low substrate roughness ( R a < 0.5 μm), thin and homogeneous coatings, with thicknesses lower than 10 μm could be prepared. The coatings were found to have a crystalline structure equivalent to MnCo2O4 spinel with addition of Co-oxide phases. Crystallographic structure was restored back to single-phase spinel structure by heat treatment.

  20. GALACTIC ALL-SKY SURVEY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE REGION OF THE MAGELLANIC LEADING ARM

    SciTech Connect

    For, Bi-Qing; Staveley-Smith, Lister; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2013-02-10

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds in the region of the Magellanic Leading Arm. The catalog is based on neutral hydrogen (H I) observations from the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Excellent spectral resolution allows clouds with narrow-line components to be resolved. The total number of detected clouds is 419. We describe the method of cataloging and present the basic parameters of the clouds. We discuss the general distribution of the high-velocity clouds and classify the clouds based on their morphological type. The presence of a significant number of head-tail clouds and their distribution in the region is discussed in the context of Magellanic System simulations. We suggest that ram-pressure stripping is a more important factor than tidal forces for the morphology and formation of the Magellanic Leading Arm and that different environmental conditions might explain the morphological difference between the Magellanic Leading Arm and Magellanic Stream. We also discuss a newly identified population of clouds that forms the LA IV and a new diffuse bridge-like feature connecting the LA II and III complexes.

  1. MULTIPLE HIGH-VELOCITY SiO MASER FEATURES FROM THE HIGH-MASS PROTOSTAR W51 NORTH

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Se-Hyung; Kim, Jaeheon; Byun, Do-Young E-mail: jhkim@kasi.re.kr

    2011-02-01

    We present the detection of multiple high-velocity silicon monoxide (SiO v = 1, 2, J = 1-0) maser features in the high-mass protostar W51 North which are distributed over an exceedingly large velocity range from 105 to 230 km s{sup -1}. The SiO v = 1, J = 1-0 maser emission shows 3-5 narrow components which span a velocity range from 154 to 230 km s{sup -1} according to observational epochs. The SiO v = 2, J = 1-0 maser also shows 3-5 narrow components that do not correspond to the SiO v = 1 maser and span a velocity range from 105 to 154 km s{sup -1}. The multiple maser components show significant changes on very short timescales (<1 month) from epoch to epoch. We suggest that the high-velocity SiO masers may be emanated from massive star-forming activity of the W51 North protostar as SiO maser jets and will be a good probe of the earliest evolutionary stages of high-mass star formation via an accretion model. Further high angular resolution observations will be required for confirmation.

  2. 3 mm band line survey toward the high-velocity compact cloud CO-0.40-0.22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, T.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumura, S.; Miura, K.; Takekawa, S.; Takahata, Y.; Nishino, Akihiko

    2014-05-01

    High-velocity compact clouds (HVCCs) are a population of molecular clouds which have compact appearance (d < 10 pc) and large velocity width (Δ V > 50 km s-1), and are found in the central molecular zone of our Galaxy. We performed a 3 mm band line survey toward CO-0.40-0.22, a spatially unresolved HVCC with an extremely large velocity width (Δ V ≃ 90 km s-1), using the Mopra 22 m telescope. We surveyed the frequency range between 76 GHz and 116 GHz with a 0.27 MHz frequency resolution. We detect at least 54 lines from 32 molecules. Many line profiles show a prominent peak at vLSR ˜ 70 km s-1 with very large velocity width, indicating they are emitted by the HVCC. Detections of largish molecules are indicative of non-equilibrium chemistry. We extracted some prominent lines based on velocity structure, intensity ratios, and PCA analyses. Shock diagnostic lines (SiO, SO, CH3OH, HNCO) and dense gas probes (HCN, HCO+) appear to be prominent. Excitation analysis of CH3OH lines show an enhancement in T rot in the negative high-velocity end of the profile. These results suggest that CO-0.40-0.22 has experienced a shock, acceleration, compression, and heating in the recent past.

  3. Severe lung contusion and death after high-velocity behind-armor blunt trauma: relation to protection level.

    PubMed

    Gryth, Dan; Rocksén, David; Persson, Jonas K E; Arborelius, Ulf P; Drobin, Dan; Bursell, Jenny; Olsson, Lars-Gunnar; Kjellström, Thomas B

    2007-10-01

    The most-used safety recommendation for protective vests is that the impact should not cause more than a 44-mm impression in plasticine. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this criterion was sufficient if the vest was exposed to a high-velocity projectile. We tested the hypothesis with pigs divided into a 40-mm group (n = 10) and a 34-mm group (n = 8) protected by a vest allowing a 40-mm or 34-mm impression in plasticine, respectively. Five (50%) of 10 animals in the 40-mm group and 2 (25%) of 8 in the 34-mm group died due to the trauma. We observed severe lung hematoma, impaired circulation, desaturation, and electroencephalogram changes. These effects were more aggravated in the 40-mm group compared to the 34-mm group. Based on our results, the overall judgment is that the safety criterion of 44-mm impression is insufficient when a vest is exposed to a high-velocity projectile. PMID:17985777

  4. High-velocity frictional properties and microstructures of clay-rich fault gouge in megasplay fault zone, Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujiie, K.; Tsutsumi, A.

    2010-12-01

    In accretionary margins, a large out-of-sequence fault system (the megasplay fault) commonly branches from the megathrust and intersects the seafloor along the lower slope of the margin. Detailed seismic reflection surveys and theoretical studies have suggested that the propagation of earthquake rupture occurred repeatedly along the megasplay fault during great subduction earthquakes. Recently, IODP Expedition 316 drilled into the shallow portion of the megasplay fault zone in the Nankai subduction zone offshore the Kii Peninsula, southwest Japan and found the evidence for the slip localization and past frictional heating along ~10-mm-thick dark gouges in the microbreccia. Thus, high-velocity frictional properties of the megasplay fault material are crucial for understanding whether the megasplay fault efficiently transfers displacement toward the seafloor and fosters a tsunami genesis during a subduction earthquake. We conducted high-velocity friction experiments on clay-rich fault gouge taken from the Nankai megasplay fault zone at a slip rate of 1.3 m/s and normal stresses of 0.6-2.0 MPa under dry and wet conditions. After the experiments, the microstructures of the fault gouges were examined by optical microscope and SEM. In the dry tests, dehydration of clay minerals occurred by frictional heating, and the slip weakening is related to the fault gouge expansion due to a water phase transition from liquid to vapor. The water is derived from the dehydration of clay minerals by frictional heating. The resulting microstructure in the gouge layer is a random distribution of spherical clay-clast aggregates (CCA) in the optically isotropic, dark matrix. In the wet tests, the slip weakening is caused by pore-fluid pressurization resulting from shear-enhanced compaction of the water-saturated gouge and frictional heating. Compared to the dry tests, the wet tests show smaller dynamic stress drops and slip weakening distance. The steady-state shear stress in the wet tests

  5. Spinal and epidural anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    Intraspinal anesthesia; Subarachnoid anesthesia; Epidural; Peridural anesthesia ... Spinal and epidural anesthesia have fewer side effects and risks than general anesthesia (asleep and pain-free). Patients usually recover their senses ...

  6. Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases that progressively destroy lower motor neurons—nerve cells in the brain stem and spinal cord that control essential voluntary muscle activity such as speaking, walking, breathing, and swallowing. ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    MedlinePlus

    ... is "Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? When can we expect ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dramatically Improves Function After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats May 2004 press release on an experimental treatment ... NINDS). Signaling Molecule Improves Nerve Cell Regeneration in Rats August 2002 news summary on a signaling molecule ...

  9. What Is Spinal Stenosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... To order the Sports Injuries Handout on Health full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information ... publication. To order the Spinal Stenosis Q&A full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information ...

  10. Spinal cord abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... irritation (inflammation) and the collection of infected material (pus) in or around the spinal cord. ... occurs as a complication of an epidural abscess . Pus forms as a collection of: Destroyed tissue cells ...

  11. Detection of High Velocity Absorption Components in the He I Lines of Eta Carinae near the Time of Periastron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Noel D.; St-Jean, Lucas; Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, Thomas; Hillier, D. John; Teodoro, Mairan; Moffat, Anthony; Corcoran, Michael; Damineli, Augusto

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained a total of 58 high spectral resolution (R90,000) spectra of the massive binary star eta Carinae since 2012 in an effort to continue our orbital and long-term echelle monitoring of this extreme binary (Richardson et al. 2010, AJ, 139, 1534) with the CHIRON spectrograph on the CTIO 1.5 m telescope (Tokovinin et al. 2013, PASP, 125, 1336) in the 45507500A region. We have increased our monitoring efforts and observation frequency as the periastron event of 2014 has approached. We note that there were multiple epochs this year where we observe unusual absorption components in the P Cygni troughs of the He I triplet lines. In particular, we note high velocity absorption components related to the following epochs for the following lines: He I 4713: HJD 2456754- 2456795 (velocity -450 to -560 kms) He I 5876: HJD 2456791- 2456819 (velocity -690 to -800 kms) He I 7065: HJD 2456791- 2456810 (velocity -665 to -730 kms) Figures: Note that red indicates a high-velocity component noted above. He I 4713: http:www.astro.umontreal.carichardson4713.png He I 5876: http:www.astro.umontreal.carichardson5876.png He I 7065: http:www.astro.umontreal.carichardson7065.png These absorptions are likely related to the wind-wind collision region and bow shock, as suggested by the high-velocity absorption observed by Groh et al. (2010, AA, 519, 9) in the He I 10830 Atransition. In these cases, we suspect that we look along an arm of the shock cone and that we will see a fast absorption change from the other collision region shortly after periastron. We suspect that this is related to the multiple-components of the He II 4686 line that was noted by Walter (ATel6334), and is confirmed in our data. Further, high spectral resolution data are highly encouraged,especially for resolving powers greater than 50,000.These observations were obtained with the CTIO 1.5 m telescope, operated by the SMARTS Consortium, and were obtained through both SMARTS and NOAO programs 2012A-0216,2012B-0194

  12. [Meningitis after spinal anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Mouchrif, Issam; Berdaii, Adnane; Labib, Ismail; Harrandou, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is a rare but serious complication of epidural and spinal anesthesia. Bacterial meningitis is mainly caused by Gram-positive cocci, implying an exogenous contamination which suggests a lack of asepsis. The evolution is usually favorable after treatment, but at the expense of increased health care costs and, sometimes, of significant neurological sequelae. We report a case of bacterial meningitis after spinal anesthesia for caesarean section. PMID:27642477

  13. First g(2+) measurement on neutron-rich 72Zn, and the high-velocity transient field technique for radioactive heavy-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiori, E.; Georgiev, G.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Jungclaus, A.; Balabanski, D. L.; Blazhev, A.; Cabaret, S.; Clément, E.; Danchev, M.; Daugas, J. M.; Grevy, S.; Hass, M.; Kumar, V.; Leske, J.; Lozeva, R.; Lukyanov, S.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Modamio, V.; Mouginot, B.; Nowacki, F.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Perrot, L.; Pietralla, N.; Sieja, K.; Speidel, K.-H.; Stefan, I.; Stodel, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Walker, J.; Zell, K. O.

    2012-03-01

    The high-velocity transient-field (HVTF) technique was used to measure the g factor of the 2+ state of 72Zn produced as a radioactive beam. The transient-field strength was probed at high velocity in ferromagnetic iron and gadolinium hosts using 76Ge beams. The potential of the HVTF method is demonstrated and the difficulties that need to be overcome for a reliable use of the TF technique with high-Z, high-velocity radioactive beams are revealed. The polarization of K-shell vacancies at high velocity, which shows more than an order of magnitude difference between Z=20 and Z=30 is discussed. The g-factor measurement hints at the theoretically predicted transition in the structure of the Zn isotopes near N=40.

  14. Modeling spinal cord biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Carlos; Shah, Sameer; Cohen, Avis; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration after spinal cord injury is a serious health issue and there is no treatment for ailing patients. To understand regeneration of the spinal cord we used a system where regeneration occurs naturally, such as the lamprey. In this work, we analyzed the stress response of the spinal cord to tensile loading and obtained the mechanical properties of the cord both in vitro and in vivo. Physiological measurements showed that the spinal cord is pre-stressed to a strain of 10%, and during sinusoidal swimming, there is a local strain of 5% concentrated evenly at the mid-body and caudal sections. We found that the mechanical properties are homogeneous along the body and independent of the meninges. The mechanical behavior of the spinal cord can be characterized by a non-linear viscoelastic model, described by a modulus of 20 KPa for strains up to 15% and a modulus of 0.5 MPa for strains above 15%, in agreement with experimental data. However, this model does not offer a full understanding of the behavior of the spinal cord fibers. Using polymer physics we developed a model that relates the stress response as a function of the number of fibers.

  15. Standard Stars for the High-velocity and Metal-poor project at San Pedro Mártir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, W. J.; Parrao, L.; Contreras, M. E.

    2016-04-01

    The main documentation for the primary and secondary standard stars used in the high-velocity and metal-poor stars project is presented. Observations were taken using the Strömgren-Crawford, uvby-Hβ, 6-channel, spectrophotometric equipment with the H.L. Johnson 1.5-m telescope at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, San Pedro Mártir, between 1987 and 2007. Standard photometric values from the literature are reported for our standard stars, as well as transformed standard values, errors in the instrumental system, the transformation coefficients obtained for the standard system, the transformation errors, and the methods used to obtain such photometric observations and their standard transformations.

  16. Titanium K-Shell X-Ray Production from High Velocity Wire Arrays Implosions on the 20-MA Z Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Apruzese, J.P.; Beg, F.N.; Clark, R.C.; Coverdale, C.A.; Davis, J.; Deeney, C.; Douglas, M.R.; Nash, T.J.; Ruiz-Comacho, J.; Spielman, R.B.; Struve, K.W.; Thornhill, J.W.; Whitney, K.G.

    1999-01-27

    The advent of the 20-MA Z accelerator [R.B. Spielman, C. Deeney, G.A. Chandler, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2105, (1997)] has enabled implosions of large diameter, high-wire-number arrays of titanium to begin testing Z-pinch K-shell scaling theories. The 2-cm long titanium arrays, which were mounted on a 40-mm diameter, produced between 75{+-}15 to 125{+-}20 kJ of K-shell x-rays. Mass scans indicate that, as predicted, higher velocity implosions in the series produced higher x-ray yields. Spectroscopic analyses indicate that these high velocity implosions achieved peak electron temperatures from 2.7{+-}0.1 to 3.2{+-}0.2 keV and obtained a K-shell emission mass participation of up to 12%.

  17. The Space Density of Primordial Gas Clouds near Galaxies and Groups and their Relation to Galactic High-Velocity Clouds.

    PubMed

    Zwaan; Briggs

    2000-02-20

    The Arecibo H i Strip Survey probed the halos of approximately 300 cataloged galaxies and the environments of approximately 14 groups with sensitivity to neutral hydrogen masses >/=107 M middle dot in circle. The survey detected no objects with properties resembling the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) associated with the Milky Way or Local Group. If the HVCs were typically MHi=107.5 M middle dot in circle objects distributed throughout groups and galaxy halos at distances of approximately 1 Mpc, the survey should have made approximately 70 HVC detections in groups and approximately 250 detections around galaxies. The null detection implies that HVCs are deployed at typical distances of

  18. Wear Behavior of High Velocity Arc Spraying FeNiCrAlBRE/Ni95Al Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, H. L.; Wei, S. C.; Chen, Y. X.; Tong, H.; Liu, Y.; Xu, B. S.

    Wear-resistant FeNiCrAlBRE/Ni95Al composite coatings were deposited on carbon steel plate by high velocity arc spraying. Adhesive strength of the composite coating was improved by spraying Ni95Al cored wires as transition layer between working coating and substrate. Scanning electron microscopy and Vickers hardness testing were used to evaluate coatings structure and mechanical properties. For quantitative investigation of porosity, a computer image analyzer was used. The forming, the wear resistance and its mechanism of the coatings were studied. The results show that coating has relatively high average hardness about 550 HV0.1 and adhesive strength is 47 MPa. The worn surface characterized shallow grooves and few of debris on the coating manifested that the coating has better wear resistance under dry sliding conditions.

  19. Surface Remelting Treated High Velocity arc Sprayed FeNiCrAlBRE Coating by Tungsten Inert Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, H. L.; Wei, S. C.; Chen, Y. X.; Tong, H.; Liu, Y.; Xu, B. S.

    This study aims at evaluating the effect of the TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) remelting treatment of self-fluxing FeNiCrAlBRE alloy coatings, formed by means of high velocity arc spraying on steel surfaces. The treated and untreated samples were subjected to comparative structural examination using scanning electron microscopes. For quantitative investigation of porosity, a computer image analyser was used. Additionally, the wear resistance and wear volume loss of the worn tracks before and after the remelting process were contrastively evaluated in details. After the sprayed coatings were treated by TIG remelting in a proper conditions, the microstructure examination of the remelted coatings showed that a change of the microstructure from lamellar to cellular structure. Also, the results show that the remelting process decrease the coating defects and make the coating more wearable.

  20. Gamma-ray bursts from the accretion of solid bodies onto high-velocity Galactic neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Leonard, P.J.T.

    1993-12-31

    We propose a simple model for the gamma-ray bursts based on high- velocity Galactic neutron stars that have accretion disks. The latter are formed from a mixture of material from the supernova shell and that ablated from a pre-supernova binary companion. Accretion onto the neutron star from this disk when the disk is still largely gaseous may result in a soft gamma-ray repeater phase. Much later, after the neutron star has moved away from its birthplace, solid bodies form in the disk, and some are perturbed into hitting the neutron star to create gamma-ray bursts. This model makes several predictions that are consistent with the observations. The observed combination of a high degree of isotropy on the sky coupled with the observed value of < V/V{sub max}> is not, at first glance, predicted, but is not impossible to attain in our model.

  1. High-velocity frictional properties of a clay-bearing fault gouge and implications for earthquake mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, N.; Schubnel, A.; Rouzaud, J.-N.; Brunet, F.; Shimamoto, T.

    2008-10-01

    Frictional properties of natural kaolinite-bearing gouge samples from the Median Tectonic Line (SW Japan) have been studied using a high-velocity rotary shear apparatus, and deformed samples have been observed with optical and electron (scanning and transmission) microscopy. For a slip velocity of 1 m s-1 and normal stresses from 0.3 to 1.3 MPa, a dramatic slip-weakening behavior was observed. X-ray diffraction analysis of deformed samples and additional high-velocity friction experiments on pure kaolinite indicate kaolinite dehydration during slip. The critical slip-weakening distance Dc is of the order of 1 to 10 m. These values are extrapolated to higher normal stresses, assuming that Dc is rather a thermal parameter than a parameter related to a true characteristic length. The calculation shows that dimensionally, Dc ∝ 1/σn2, where σn is the normal stress applied on the fault. The inferred Dc values range from a few centimeters at 10 MPa normal stress to a few hundreds of microns at 100 MPa normal stress. Microscopic observations show partial amorphization and dramatic grain size reduction (down to the nanometer scale) localized in a narrow zone of about 1 to 10 μm thickness. Fracture energy Gc is calculated from the mechanical curves and compared to surface energy due to grain size reduction, and energies of mineralogic transformations. We show that most of the fracture energy is either converted into heat or radiated energy. The geophysical consequences of thermal dehydration of bonded water during seismic slip are then commented in the light of mineralogical and poromechanical data of several fault zones, which tend to show that this phenomenon has to be taken into account in most of subsurface faults and in hydrous rocks of subducted oceanic crust.

  2. THE 21 cm 'OUTER ARM' AND THE OUTER-GALAXY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS: CONNECTED BY KINEMATICS, METALLICITY, AND DISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, Todd M.; Song Limin

    2012-02-20

    Using high-resolution ultraviolet spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, we study the metallicity, kinematics, and distance of the gaseous 'outer arm' (OA) and the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) in the outer Galaxy. We detect the OA in a variety of absorption lines toward two QSOs, H1821+643 and HS0624+6907. We search for OA absorption toward eight Galactic stars and detect it in one case, which constrains the OA Galactocentric radius to 9 kpc high velocities that are not consistent with Galactic rotation, suggests that the OA and outer-Galaxy HVCs could have a common origin.

  3. Precise Astrometry in the Core of the Globular Cluster 47 Tuc: a Complete Census of High-Velocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meylan, Georges

    1995-07-01

    Binary stars play an essential role during the late phases of the dynamical evolution of a globular cluster. They transfer energy to passing stars, and so can strongly influence the cluster evolution - enough to delay, halt, and even reverse core collapse. Hard binaries are known to exist in cluster cores, e.g., in the form of millisecond pulsars. The presence of hard binaries may also be revealed by searching for the by- products of close encounters: high-velocity stars. Two such stars were serendipitously discovered in the core of 47 Tuc by Meylan et al. (1991), and similar stars have since been detected by Pryor et al. (1994). This represents the limit of the radial velocity data which can be obtained from the ground. If more progress is to be made in the search for high- velocity stars in 47 Tuc it must be made by obtaining proper motions - a task for which only HST is suitable. We propose to use WFPC2 to obtain deep U (F300W) images of the core of 47 Tuc at three different epochs over two years. This will allow us to measure differential proper motions to a 1 sigma limit of 0.23 mas/yr - this corresponds to a 5 sigma detection of all stars with velocities greater than 22 km/s. The choice of F300W will allow stars to be measured over the whole color-magnitude diagram - from the red-giant branch to well down the main sequence. Such a complete census will provide unique constraints on relaxation processes, collision and ejection rates, and velocity distributions.

  4. Precise Astrometry in the Core of the Globular Cluster 47 Tuc: A Complete Census of High-Velocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meylan, Georges

    1996-07-01

    Binary stars play an essential role during the late phases of the dynamical evolution of a globular cluster. They transfer energy to passing stars, and so can strongly influence the cluster evolution. Hard binaries are known to exist in cluster cores, e.g., in the form of millisecond pulsars. The presence of hard binaries may also be revealed by searching for the by- products of close encounters: high-velocity stars. Two such stars were serendipitously discovered in the core of 47 Tuc by Meylan et al. {1991}, and similar stars have since been detected by Pryor et al. {1994}. This represents the limit of the radial velocity data from the ground. If more progress is to be made in the search for high-velocity stars in 47 Tuc, it must be made by obtaining proper motions, a task for which only HST is suitable. We propose to continue {Cycle 5 observations are scheduled for the fall of 1995} to use WFPC2 to obtain deep U {F300W} images of the core of 47 Tuc at three different epochs over two years. This will allow us to measure differential proper motions to a 1-Sigma limit of 0.23 mas/yr - this corresponds to a 5-Sigma detection of all stars with velocities greater than 22 km/s. The choice of F300W will allow stars to be measured over the whole color-magnitude diagram, from the red-giant branch to well down the main sequence. Such a complete census will provide unique constraints on relaxation processes, collision and ejection rates, and velocity distribution, as a function of the stellar mass.

  5. Precise Astrometry in the Core of the Globular Cluster 47 Tuc: A Complete Census of High-Velocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meylan, Georges

    1997-07-01

    We propose to obtain the third and final epoch for our measurement of differential proper motions in the core of 47 Tuc using deep U {F300W} and V {F555W} WFPC2 images over two years {1^st epoch: Oct. 1995; 2^nd: Cycle 6 scheduled}. The resulting motions will have a 1-Sigma uncertainty of 0.23 mas/yr - corresponds to a 5-Sigma detection of all stars with velocities greater than 22 km/s. The choice of F300W will allow stars to be measured over the whole color-magnitude diagram, from the red-giant branch to well down the main sequence. Such a complete census will provide unique constraints on relaxation processes, collision and ejection rates, and the velocity distribution, as a function of the stellar mass. Binary stars play an essential role during the late phases of the dynamical evolution of a globular cluster. They transfer energy to passing stars, and so can strongly influence the cluster evolution. Hard binaries are known to exist in cluster cores, e.g., in th e form of millisecond pulsars. Th e presence of hard binaries may also be revealed by searching for the by-products of close encounters: high-velocity stars. Two such stars were serendipitously discovered in the core of 47 Tuc by Meylan et al. {1991}, and similar stars have since been detected by Pryor et al. {1994}. This represents the limit of the radial velocity data from the ground. If more progress is to be made in the search for high-velocity stars in 47 Tuc, it must be made by obtaining proper motions, a task for which only HST is suitable.

  6. Large- and small-scale structure of the intermediate- and high-velocity clouds towards the LMC and SMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoker, J. V.; Fox, A. J.; Keenan, F. P.

    2015-08-01

    We employ Ca II K and Na I D interstellar absorption-line spectroscopy of early-type stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC, SMC) to investigate the large- and small-scale structure in foreground intermediate- and high-velocity clouds (I/HVCs). Data include FLAMES-GIRAFFE Ca II K observations of 403 stars in four open clusters, plus FEROS or UVES spectra of 156 stars in the LMC and SMC. The FLAMES observations are amongst the most extensive probes to date of Ca II structures on ˜20 arcsec scales in Magellanic I/HVCs. From the FLAMES data within a 0.5° field of view, the Ca II K equivalent width in the I/HVC components towards three clusters varies by factors of ≥10. There are no detections of molecular gas in absorption at intermediate or high velocities, although molecular absorption is present at LMC and Galactic velocities towards some sightlines. The FEROS/UVES data show Ca II K I/HVC absorption in ˜60 per cent of sightlines. The range in the Ca II/Na I ratio in I/HVCs is from -0.45 to +1.5 dex, similar to previous measurements for I/HVCs. In 10 sightlines we find Ca II/O I ratios in I/HVC gas ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 dex below the solar value, indicating either dust or ionization effects. In nine sightlines I/HVC gas is detected in both H I and Ca II at similar velocities, implying that the two elements form part of the same structure.

  7. A CATALOG OF ULTRA-COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS FROM THE ALFALFA SURVEY: LOCAL GROUP GALAXY CANDIDATES?

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P. E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu

    2013-05-01

    We present a catalog of 59 ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) extracted from the 40% complete ALFALFA HI-line survey. The ALFALFA UCHVCs have median flux densities of 1.34 Jy km s{sup -1}, median angular diameters of 10', and median velocity widths of 23 km s{sup -1}. We show that the full UCHVC population cannot easily be associated with known populations of high velocity clouds. Of the 59 clouds presented here, only 11 are also present in the compact cloud catalog extracted from the commensal GALFA-HI survey, demonstrating the utility of this separate dataset and analysis. Based on their sky distribution and observed properties, we infer that the ALFALFA UCHVCs are consistent with the hypothesis that they may be very low mass galaxies within the Local Volume. In that case, most of their baryons would be in the form of gas, and because of their low stellar content, they remain unidentified by extant optical surveys. At distances of {approx}1 Mpc, the UCHVCs have neutral hydrogen (H I) masses of {approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }, H I diameters of {approx}2-3 kpc, and indicative dynamical masses within the H I extent of {approx}10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, similar to the Local Group ultra-faint dwarf Leo T. The recent ALFALFA discovery of the star-forming, metal-poor, low mass galaxy Leo P demonstrates that this hypothesis is true in at least one case. In the case of the individual UCHVCs presented here, confirmation of their extragalactic nature will require further work, such as the identification of an optical counterpart to constrain their distance.

  8. Highly Ionized Gas in the Galactic Halo and the High Velocity Clouds Toward PG 1116+215

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, R.; Sembach, K. R.; Tripp, T. M.; Savage, B. D.

    2003-12-01

    Recent observations of extragalactic objects with FUSE have revealed the presence of high ionization OVI absorption associated with high velocity clouds (HVCs), defined as gas which lies at absolute velocities beyond 100 km/s in the Local Standard of Rest. We have acquired high spectral resolution observations with STIS ( ˜ 10 km/s) and FUSE ( ˜ 20 km/s) of the quasar PG 1116+215. The spectra show absorption at Vlsr=184km/s from a wide range of ionization species:CIV, OI, OVI, MgII, SiII, SiIII, SiIV, and FeII. The strong and broad O VI absorption in this HVC extends from ˜ 120 to 230 km/s with a weak wing of absorption to 300km/s. Although the HVC is not seen in HI 21 cm emission down to N(HI) ˜ 2x1018 cm-2, it is seen in the HI Lyman series up to at least the 918.13Å line. In addition, we have non-detection constraints on the column denisties of CI, NI, NV, and SII. We can rule out photoionization in an ultra-low density (n ˜ 10-6 cm-3) Local Group medium adopted by some investigators to explain the O VI and O VII absorption detected in several directions. We are currently in the process of determining if these data either support or rule out other models of HVCs, such as the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium, Dark Matter dominated mini-halos, or interactions with a low density (10-4-10-5 cm-3) Galactic corona or Local Group medium. In addition, we will also use abundance infomation to study the enrichment history and constrain possible sources for the high velocity gas, such as tidal debris from cannibalized galaxies.

  9. A Catalog of Ultra-compact High Velocity Clouds from the ALFALFA Survey: Local Group Galaxy Candidates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.

    2013-05-01

    We present a catalog of 59 ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) extracted from the 40% complete ALFALFA HI-line survey. The ALFALFA UCHVCs have median flux densities of 1.34 Jy km s-1, median angular diameters of 10', and median velocity widths of 23 km s-1. We show that the full UCHVC population cannot easily be associated with known populations of high velocity clouds. Of the 59 clouds presented here, only 11 are also present in the compact cloud catalog extracted from the commensal GALFA-HI survey, demonstrating the utility of this separate dataset and analysis. Based on their sky distribution and observed properties, we infer that the ALFALFA UCHVCs are consistent with the hypothesis that they may be very low mass galaxies within the Local Volume. In that case, most of their baryons would be in the form of gas, and because of their low stellar content, they remain unidentified by extant optical surveys. At distances of ~1 Mpc, the UCHVCs have neutral hydrogen (H I) masses of ~105-106 M ⊙, H I diameters of ~2-3 kpc, and indicative dynamical masses within the H I extent of ~107-108 M ⊙, similar to the Local Group ultra-faint dwarf Leo T. The recent ALFALFA discovery of the star-forming, metal-poor, low mass galaxy Leo P demonstrates that this hypothesis is true in at least one case. In the case of the individual UCHVCs presented here, confirmation of their extragalactic nature will require further work, such as the identification of an optical counterpart to constrain their distance.

  10. High velocity acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, R.

    1992-09-01

    Different types of aerodynamically generated noise of practical interest are examined using a novel, physically based, approach. A simple source model for turbulence noise is proposed. The prediction for turbulent mixing layer noise, produced by this model based on a simple monopole-type source mechanism, is that the radiated sound power varies as the eighth power of the relative velocity. The model is too simple to allow calculations to be carried further to the extent of determining the radiated sound power level, so that an empirical factor must still be considered, as in the case of Lighthill's formula.

  11. Pediatric spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Wagner, Matthias W; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Tekes, Aylin; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric spinal trauma is unique. The developing pediatric spinal column and spinal cord deal with direct impact and indirect acceleration/deceleration or shear forces very different compared to adult patients. In addition children are exposed to different kind of traumas. Moreover, each age group has its unique patterns of injury. Familiarity with the normal developing spinal anatomy and kind of traumas is essential to correctly diagnose injury. Various imaging modalities can be used. Ultrasound is limited to the neonatal time period; plain radiography and computer tomography are typically used in the acute work-up and give highly detailed information about the osseous lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive for disco-ligamentous and spinal cord injuries. Depending on the clinical presentation and timing of trauma the various imaging modalities will be employed. In the current review article, a summary of the epidemiology and distribution of posttraumatic lesions is discussed in the context of the normal anatomical variations due to progressing development of the child. PMID:25512255

  12. Speed and spinal injuries.

    PubMed

    Healy, D G; Connolly, P; Stephens, M M; O'Byrne, J M; McManus, F; McCormack, D

    2004-09-01

    Road traffic accidents (RTA) are a significant cause of spinal trauma. On the 31st of October 2002 a new penalty system for speed related driving offences was introduced in Ireland. Our intention was to assess the effects of the introduction of this system on the activity of the National Spinal Injuries Centre (NSIC) with a retrospective review of all admissions from November 1998 until October 2003. The number of new acute admissions to the spinal injury unit during the study period was 831. In the first 6 months of the new system the number of RTA related admissions fell significantly to 17 compared to an average of 33 in the preceding 4 years. However, this effect was not maintained in the second 6 months. The fall in spinal injuries following RTA in the first 6 months of the new system parallels the pattern of road death reduction in this period. This suggests that driving behaviour can be modified with direct benefits in reducing spinal injuries. However, this effect has not persisted in the second 6 months of the new system suggesting that to maintain this change the perception and familiarity of a penalty are important factors in its impact.

  13. Analysis of the flux and polarization spectra of the type Ia supernova SN 2001el: Exploring the geometry of the high-velocity Ejecta

    SciTech Connect

    Kasen, Daniel; Nugent, Peter; Wang, Lifan; Howell, D.A.; Wheeler, J. Craig; Hoeflich, Peter; Baade, Dietrich; Baron, E.; Hauschildt, P.H.

    2003-01-15

    SN 2001el is the first normal Type Ia supernova to show a strong, intrinsic polarization signal. In addition, during the epochs prior to maximum light, the CaII IR triplet absorption is seen distinctly and separately at both normal photospheric velocities and at very high velocities. The unusual, high-velocity triplet absorption is highly polarized, with a different polarization angle than the rest of the spectrum. The unique observation allows us to construct a relatively detailed picture of the layered geometrical structure of the supernova ejecta: in our interpretation, the ejecta layers near the photosphere (v approximately 10,000 km/s) obey a near axial symmetry, while a detached, high-velocity structure (v approximately 18,000-25,000 $ km/s) of CaII line opacity deviates from the photospheric axisymmetry. By partially obscuring the underlying photosphere, the high-velocity structure causes a more incomplete cancellation of the polarization of the photospheric light, and so gives rise to the polarization peak of the high-velocity IR triplet feature. In an effort to constrain the ejecta geometry, we develop a technique for calculating 3-D synthetic polarization spectra and use it to generate polarization profiles for several parameterized configurations. In particular, we examine the case where the inner ejecta layers are ellipsoidal and the outer, high-velocity structure is one of four possibilities: a spherical shell, an ellipsoidal shell, a clumped shell, or a toroid. The synthetic spectra rule out the clearly discriminated if observations are obtained from several different lines of sight. Thus, assuming the high velocity structure observed for SN 2001el is a consistent feature of at least known subset of type Ia supernovae, future observations and analyses such as these may allow one to put strong constraints on the ejecta geometry and hence on supernova progenitors and explosion mechanisms.

  14. Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hardage, Bob A.; DeAngelo, Michael V.; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A.; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

    2013-02-01

    The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal

  15. The influence of slip velocity and temperature on permeability during and after high-velocity fault slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, W.; Mukoyoshi, H.; Tadai, O.; Hirose, T.; Lin, W.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid transport properties in fault zones play an important role in dynamic processes during large earthquakes. If the permeability in a fault zone is low, high pore-fluid pressures caused by thermal pressurization (Sibson, 1973) or shear-induced compaction (Blanpied et al., 1992) can lead to an apparent reduction of fault strength. Changes in porosity and permeability of fault rocks within a fault zone during earthquakes and the subsequent progressive recovery of these properties may have a large influence on earthquake recurrence (Sleep and Blanpied, 1992). A rotary shear apparatus was used to investigate changes of fluid transport properties in a fault zone by real-time measurement of gas flow rates during and after shearing of hollow sandstone and granite cylinders at various slip rates. Our apparatus measures permeability parallel to the slip plane in both the slip zone and wall rocks. In all cases, permeability decreased rapidly with an increase of friction, but recovered soon after slip, reaching a steady state within several tens of minutes. The rate of reduction of permeability increased with increasing slip velocity. Permeability did not recover to pre-slip levels after low-velocity tests but recovered to exceed them after high-velocity tests. Frictional heating of gases at the slip surface increased gas viscosity, which increased gas flow rate to produce an apparent permeability increase. The irreversible permeability changes of the low-velocity tests were caused by gouge formation due to wearing and smoothing of the slip surface. The increase of permeability after high-velocity tests was caused by mesoscale fracturing in response to rapid temperature rise. Changes of pore fluid viscosity contributed more to changes of flow rate than did permeability changes caused by shear deformation, although test results from different rocks and pore fluids might be different. References Blanpied, M.L., Lockner, D.A., Byerlee, J.D., 1992. An earthquake mechanism

  16. High-velocity Frictional Behavior of Dunite, Biotite Gneiss, Phyllite and Coal Show Evidence for Melting and Thermal Degasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, K. D.; Mizoguchi, K.; Shimamoto, T.

    2004-12-01

    We conducted high-velocity frictional experiments on dunite, biotite gneiss, phyllite gouge and coal gouge at Kyoto University using a rotary high-velocity frictional testing machine. The purpose was to examine the effect of frictional melting in various rock types and to explore the effect of thermal degassing using coal as an analogue for a volatile fault zone. Experiments were conducted dry at equivalent slip rates of 1 m/s (1200 rpm) at normal stresses of 0.6-16 MPa for distances up to 90 m. Solid cylinders (25 mm diameter) of dunite and biotite gneiss were sheared with aluminum-alloy jackets at high stress, whereas phyllite and coal gouges were sheared with Teflon sleeves at low stress. The metal jackets allow high stress experiments to be performed and are inferred to melt before rock melting occurs. Dunite sheared at 10-16 MPa shows a weakening-strengthening followed by second weakening on melting, similar to previous experiments on gabbro without a metal jacket. Dunite melting is confirmed by, as yet unidentified, dendritic microlites, and a rapid reduction of steady-state frictional strength to 0.15. Under similar conditions, biotite gneiss shows apparent melting, but undergoes continuous strengthening without reaching steady state. Bituminous coal gouge sheared at 0.6 MPa undergoes a highly reproducible rapid weakening from 0.75 to 0.2, with odorous white gas emissions, sometimes accompanied by liquid hydrocarbons. Shear stress decreases prior to gasification and rapidly oscillating sample shortening/elongation occurs during gas emission. A slowly sheared sample (15 rpm) did not show weakening or gas emission. This is the first experimental demonstration of weakening associated with devolatilization during rapid slip. Vitrinite reflectance measurements on sheared coal samples may provide constraints on the temperature during gasification. Phyllite gouge sheared under the same conditions shows a gradual weakening to a steady-state strength of about 0

  17. High-Velocity Frictional Properties of Westerly Granite and the Role of Thermal Cracking on Gouge Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelegue, F. X.; Di Toro, G.; Spagnuolo, E.; Violay, M.; Nielsen, S. B.; Schubnel, A.

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of high-velocity rotary shear apparatus, several experimental studies have been conducted in the last decades improving our understanding of fault friction at seismic slip rates (0.1 < Vs < 10 m/s). Here, we present the results of a series of tests conducted on Westerly granite with the Slow to HIgh Velocity Apparatus (SHIVA - INGV Rome), coupled with a high frequency acoustic monitoring (4 MHz sampling rate). Experiments were conducted under normal stress (σn) ranging from 5 to 20 MPa and at Vs between 3 mm/s and 3 m/s. Additional experiments were conducted in the presence of pore fluid at equivalent effective normal stress. In dry conditions, two friction drops are observed: the first drop at Vs > 0.1 m/s is explained by flash heating mechanism while the second drop is due to the formation and growth of a continuous melt layer on the fault surface. In wet conditions, only the second drop of friction is observed. Average values of the fracture energy are independent of normal stress and sliding velocity. However, measurements of elastic wave velocities travelling through the fault strongly suggest that higher damage is induced for 0.1< Vs <0.3 m/s for equivalent final displacement. This observation is also supported by acoustic emission (AEs) recordings. Indeed, most the AEs are recorded after the initiation of the second friction drop, that is, once the fault surface temperature is high, suggesting they may be due to thermal cracking induced by heat diffusion. In addition, the presence of pore fluid pressure (water) delayed the appearance of AEs, supporting the link between AEs and the production and diffusion of heat. Using the thermo-elastic crack model, we demonstrate that damage can indeed be induced by heat diffusion. Our theoretical results predict accurately the amount of sample wear, supporting the idea that gouge production and gouge comminution is in fact largely controlled by thermal cracking. Finally, we show that this new fracture

  18. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

    PubMed

    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection. PMID:27263067

  19. Spinal injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Babcock, J L

    1975-05-01

    Spinal injuries with neurologic sequelae are a rare but catastrophic injury. Many of these injuries might be preventable through proper parent and child education, particularly in water sports and vehicles accidents. A significant number of neurologic injuries are incomplete at the time of injury and proper rescue and initial care may make the difference between life as a quadriplegic and life as a normal individual. Because of the complexity of the management of the child with spinal injuries and their relative rarity, the definitive care is best undertaken at hospitals which specialize in the care of spinal injuries. Progressive deformity of the spine, a problem unique to childhood and adolescent paralysis, is often preventable with prolonged immobilization and protection of the spine. Progressive deformities which interfere with function or result in neurologic deterioration require an aggressive surgical approach. PMID:1124228

  20. Spinal Subdural Haematoma

    PubMed Central

    Manish K, Kothari; Chandrakant, Shah Kunal; Abhay M, Nene

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Spinal Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of radiculopathy and spinal cord compression syndromes. It’s early diagnosis is essential. Chronological appearance of these bleeds vary on MRI. Case Report: A 56 year old man presented with progressive left lower limb radiculopathy and paraesthesias with claudication of three days duration. MRI revealed a subdural space occupying lesion compressing the cauda equina at L5-S1 level producing a ‘Y’ shaped dural sac (Y sign), which was hyperintense on T1W imaging and hypointense to cord on T2W image. The STIR sequence showed hyperintensity to cord. There was no history of bleeding diathesis. The patient underwent decompressive durotomy and biopsy which confirmed the diagnosis. Conclusion: Spinal subdural hematoma may present with rapidly progressive neurological symptoms. MRI is the investigation of choice. The knowledge of MRI appearance with respect to the chronological stage of the bleed is essential to avoid diagnostic and hence surgical dilemma PMID:27299051

  1. [Spinal cord infarction].

    PubMed

    Naumann, N; Shariat, K; Ulmer, S; Stippich, C; Ahlhelm, F J

    2012-05-01

    Infarction of the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms and neurological deficits because of the complex vascular supply of the myelon. The most common leading symptom is distal paresis ranging from paraparesis to tetraplegia caused by arterial ischemia or infarction of the myelon. Venous infarction, however, cannot always be distinguished from arterial infarction based on the symptoms alone.Modern imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) assist in preoperative planning of aortic operations to reliably identify not only the most important vascular structure supplying the spinal cord, the artery of Adamkiewicz, but also other pathologies such as tumors or infectious disorders. In contrast to CT, MRI can reliably depict infarction of the spinal cord.

  2. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

    PubMed

    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection.

  3. Skiing and spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Frymoyer, J W; Pope, M H; Kristiansen, T

    1982-07-01

    Spinal injury in skiers can either be acute or chronic. Acute spinal injury accounts for 3 to 3.6 per cent of all injuries occurring in Alpine skiing. Fewer acute injuries occur in cross-country skiing, and those that do usually are the result of a sudden, compressive force from a seated fall. The prevalence of chronic spinal trauma in skiing is unknown. Both cross-country and Alpine skiers appear to have greater complaints of mild to moderate low back pain as compared with their nonskiing counterparts. These differences may be the result of a complex interaction between recreational and occupational activities. Theoretical analyses suggest a risk for low-grade torsional injury to the Alpine skier's spine, whereas in cross-country skiing significant shear forces are applied to lumbar discs during the kick but not the double-poling phase.

  4. Changes in spinal alignment.

    PubMed

    Veintemillas Aráiz, M T; Beltrán Salazar, V P; Rivera Valladares, L; Marín Aznar, A; Melloni Ribas, P; Valls Pascual, R

    2016-04-01

    Spinal misalignments are a common reason for consultation at primary care centers and specialized departments. Misalignment has diverse causes and is influenced by multiple factors: in adolescence, the most frequent misalignment is scoliosis, which is idiopathic in 80% of cases and normally asymptomatic. In adults, the most common cause is degenerative. It is important to know the natural history and to detect factors that might predict progression. The correct diagnosis of spinal deformities requires specific imaging studies. The degree of deformity determines the type of treatment. The aim is to prevent progression of the deformity and to recover the flexibility and balance of the body.

  5. High velocity circuit resistance training improves cognition, psychiatric symptoms and neuromuscular performance in overweight outpatients with severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Strassnig, Martin T; Signorile, Joseph F; Potiaumpai, Melanie; Romero, Matthew A; Gonzalez, Carolina; Czaja, Sara; Harvey, Philip D

    2015-09-30

    We developed a physical exercise intervention aimed at improving multiple determinants of physical performance in severe mental illness. A sample of 12 (9M, 3F) overweight or obese community-dwelling patients with schizophrenia (n=9) and bipolar disorder (n=3) completed an eight-week, high-velocity circuit resistance training, performed twice a week on the computerized Keiser pneumatic exercise machines, including extensive pre/post physical performance testing. Participants showed significant increases in strength and power in all major muscle groups. There were significant positive cognitive changes, objectively measured with the Brief Assessment of Cognition Scale: improvement in composite scores, processing speed and symbol coding. Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total scores improved significantly. There were large gains in neuromuscular performance that have functional implications. The cognitive domains that showed the greatest improvements (memory and processing speed) are most highly predictive of disability in schizophrenia. Moreover, the improvements seen in depression suggest this type of exercise intervention may be a valuable add-on therapy for bipolar depression.

  6. Improvement of corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxyfuel-sprayed stainless steel coatings by addition of molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakita, Jin; Kuroda, Seiji; Fukushima, Takeshi; Kodama, Toshiaki

    2005-06-01

    To improve the marine corrosion resistance of stainless steel coatings fabricated by high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) spraying with a gas shroud attachment, the molybdenum (Mo) content of stainless steel was increased to form coatings with a chemical composition of Fe balance-18mass%Cr-22mass%Ni-2˜8mass%Mo. These coatings were highly dense, with <0.1 vol.% in porosity, and less oxidized, with 0.5 mass% in oxygen content at most. The corrosion mechanism and resistance of the coatings were investigated by electrochemical measurement, chemical analysis, and statistical processing. The general corrosion resistance of the coatings in 0.5 mol/dm3 sulfuric acid was improved with increases in Mo content, and the corrosion rate could be decreased to 8.8 × 10-2 mg/cm2 per hour (˜1 mm/year) at 8 mass% Mo. The pitting corrosion resistance of the coatings in artificial seawater was improved with increases in Mo content and was superior to that of the 316L stainless steel coating. The crevice corrosion resistance of the coatings in artificial seawater was improved and the number of rust spots at 4 mass% Mo was decreased to 38% of that for the 316L coating. Accordingly, Mo is highly effective in improving the corrosion resistance of the stainless steel coatings by HVOF spraying.

  7. Comparative characteristic and erosion behavior of NiCr coatings deposited by various high-velocity oxyfuel spray processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, Hazoor Singh; Sidhu, Buta Singh; Prakash, S.

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze and compare the mechanical properties and microstructure details at the interface of high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF)-sprayed NiCr-coated boiler tube steels, namely ASTM-SA-210 grade A1, ASTM-SA213-T-11, and ASTM-SA213-T-22. Coatings were developed by two different techniques, and in these techniques liquefied petroleum gas was used as the fuel gas. First, the coatings were characterized by metallographic, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, x-ray diffraction, surface roughness, and microhardness, and then were subjected to erosion testing. An attempt has been made to describe the transformations taking place during thermal spraying. It is concluded that the HVOF wire spraying process offers a technically viable and cost-effective alternative to HVOF powder spraying process for applications in an energy generation power plant with a point view of life enhancement and to minimize the tube failures because it gives a coating having better resistance to erosion.

  8. Manufacturing and Properties of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF)-Sprayed FeVCrC Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassatelli, Paolo; Bolelli, Giovanni; Lusvarghi, Luca; Manfredini, Tiziano; Rigon, Rinaldo

    2016-09-01

    This paper studies the microstructure, sliding wear behavior and corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF)-sprayed FeVCrC-based coatings. Various process parameters were tested to evaluate their effects on the coating properties, which were also compared to those of HVOF-sprayed NiCrBSi and Stellite-6 coatings. The Fe alloy coatings are composed of flattened splats, originating from molten droplets and consisting of a super-saturated solid solution, together with rounded particles, coming from partially unmolten material and containing V- and Fe-based carbide precipitates. All process parameters, apart from "extreme" settings with excess comburent in the flame, produce dense coatings, indicating that the feedstock powder is quite easily processable by HVOF. These coatings, with a microhardness of 650-750 HV0.3, exhibit wear rates of ≈2 × 10-6 mm3/(Nm) in ball-on-disk tests against sintered Al2O3 spheres. They perform far better than the reference coatings, and better than other Fe- and Ni-based alloy coatings tested in previous research. On the other hand, the corrosion resistance of the coating material (tested by electrochemical polarization in 0.1 M HCl solution) is quite low. Even in the absence of interconnected porosity, this results in extensive, selective damage to the Fe-based matrix. This coating material is therefore unadvisable for severely corrosive environments.

  9. An Extremely High Velocity Molecular Jet Surrounded by an Ionized Cavity in the Protostellar Source Serpens SMM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Charles L. H.; Girart, Josep M.; Kristensen, Lars E.; Dunham, Michael M.; Rodríguez-Kamenetzky, Adriana; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Cortés, Paulo C.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Plambeck, Richard L.

    2016-06-01

    We report Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of a one-sided, high-velocity (˜80 km s-1) CO(J = 2\\to 1) jet powered by the intermediate-mass protostellar source Serpens SMM1-a. The highly collimated molecular jet is flanked at the base by a wide-angle cavity; the walls of the cavity can be seen in both 4 cm free-free emission detected by the Very Large Array and 1.3 mm thermal dust emission detected by ALMA. This is the first time that ionization of an outflow cavity has been directly detected via free-free emission in a very young, embedded Class 0 protostellar source that is still powering a molecular jet. The cavity walls are ionized either by UV photons escaping from the accreting protostellar source or by the precessing molecular jet impacting the walls. These observations suggest that ionized outflow cavities may be common in Class 0 protostellar sources, shedding further light on the radiation, outflow, and jet environments in the youngest, most embedded forming stars.

  10. Discovery of star formation in the extreme outer galaxy possibly induced by a high-velocity cloud impact

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, Natsuko; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hamano, Satoshi; Yasui, Chikako; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Saito, Masao

    2014-11-01

    We report the discovery of star formation activity in perhaps the most distant molecular cloud in the extreme outer galaxy. We performed deep near-infrared imaging with the Subaru 8.2 m telescope, and found two young embedded clusters at two CO peaks of 'Digel Cloud 1' at the kinematic distance of D = 16 kpc (Galactocentric radius R {sub G} = 22 kpc). We identified 18 and 45 cluster members in the two peaks, and the estimated stellar densities are ∼5 and ∼3 pc{sup –2}, respectively. The observed K-band luminosity function suggests that the age of the clusters is less than 1 Myr and also that the distance to the clusters is consistent with the kinematic distance. On the sky, Cloud 1 is located very close to the H I peak of high-velocity cloud Complex H, and there are some H I intermediate velocity structures between the Complex H and the Galactic disk, which could indicate an interaction between them. We suggest the possibility that Complex H impacting on the Galactic disk has triggered star formation in Cloud 1 as well as the formation of the Cloud 1 molecular cloud.

  11. Computational analysis of a three-dimensional High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, B.; Lopez, A.R.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1995-07-01

    An analysis of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch is presented using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Three-dimensional CFD results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire torch, but wire feed is not simulated. To the authors` knowledge, these are the first published 3-D results of a thermal spray device. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Argon is injected through the center of the nozzle. Pre-mixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled assuming instantaneous chemistry. A standard, two-equation, K-{var_epsilon} turbulence model is employed for the turbulent flow field. An implicit, iterative, finite volume numerical technique is used to solve the coupled conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations for the gas in a sequential manner. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and discussed.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a wire-feed, high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.R.; Hassan, B.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1996-09-01

    The fluid and particle dynamics of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch are analyzed using computational and experimental techniques. Three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire (DJRW) torch. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Premixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled using a single-step finite-rate chemistry model with a total of 9 gas species which includes dissociation of combustion products. A continually-fed steel wire passes through the center of the nozzle and melting occurs at a conical tip near the exit of the aircap. Wire melting is simulated computationally by injecting liquid steel particles into the flow field near the tip of the wire. Experimental particle velocity measurements during wire feed were also taken using a Laser Two-Focus (L2F) velocimeter system. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and particle velocity predictions are compared with experimental measurements outside of the aircap.

  13. Hot corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxyfuel sprayed coatings on a nickel-base superalloy in molten salt environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, T. S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R. D.

    2006-09-01

    No alloy is immune to hot corrosion attack indefinitely. Coatings can extend the lives of substrate materials used at higher temperatures in corrosive environments by forming protective oxides layers that are reasonably effective for long-term applications. This article is concerned with studying the performance of high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCrBSi, Cr3C2-NiCr, Ni-20Cr, and Stellite-6 coatings on a nickel-base superalloy at 900 °C in the molten salt (Na2SO4-60% V2O5) environment under cyclic oxidation conditions. The thermogravimetric technique was used to establish kinetics of corrosion. Optical microscope, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive analysis by x-ray (SEM/EDAX), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) techniques were used to characterize the as-sprayed coatings and corrosion products. The bare superalloy suffered somewhat accelerated corrosion in the given environmental conditions. whereas hot corrosion resistance of all the coated superalloys was found to be better. Among the coating studied, Ni-20Cr coated superalloy imparted maximum hot corrosion resistance, whereas Stellite-6 coated indicated minimum resistance. The hot corrosion resistance of all the coatings may be attributed to the formation of oxides and spinels of nickel, chromium, or cobalt.

  14. AN EXTREME HIGH-VELOCITY BIPOLAR OUTFLOW IN THE PRE-PLANETARY NEBULA IRAS 08005-2356

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, R.; Patel, N. A.

    2015-09-01

    We report interferometric mapping of the bipolar pre-planetary nebula IRAS 08005-2356 (I 08005) with an angular resolution of ∼1″–5″, using the Submillimeter Array, in the {sup 12}CO J = 2–1, 3–2, {sup 13}CO J = 2–1, and SiO J = 5–4 (v = 0) lines. Single-dish observations, using the SMT 10 m, were made in these lines as well as in the CO J = 4–3 and SiO J = 6–5 (v = 0) lines. The line profiles are very broad, showing the presence of a massive (>0.1 M{sub ⊙}), extreme high velocity outflow (V ∼ 200 km s{sup −1}) directed along the nebular symmetry axis derived from the Hubble Space Telescope imaging of this object. The outflow's scalar momentum far exceeds that available from radiation pressure of the central post-AGB star, and it may be launched from an accretion disk around a main-sequence companion. We provide indirect evidence for such a disk from its previously published, broad Hα emission profile, which we propose results from Lyβ emission generated in the disk followed by Raman-scattering in the innermost regions of a fast, neutral wind.

  15. Influence of Processing Parameters on Residual Stress of High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermally Sprayed WC-Co-Cr Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, M.; Eybel, R.; Asselin, B.; Radhakrishnan, S.; Cerps, J.

    2012-10-01

    Residual stress in high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermally sprayed WC-10Co-4Cr coating was studied based on design of experiment (DOE) with five factors of oxygen flow, fuel gas hydrogen flow, powder feed rate, stand-off distance, and surface speed of substrate. In each DOE run, the velocity and temperature of in-flight particle in flame, and substrate temperature were measured. Almen-type N strips were coated, and their deflections after coating were used for evaluation of residual stress level in the coating. The residual stress in the coating obtained in all DOE runs is compressive. In the present case of HVOF thermally sprayed coating, the residual stress is determined by three types of stress: peening, quenching, and cooling stress generated during spraying or post spraying. The contribution of each type stress to the final compressive residual stress in the coating depends on material properties of coating and substrate, velocity and temperature of in-flight particle, and substrate temperature. It is found that stand-off distance is the most important factor to affect the final residual stress in the coating, following by two-factor interaction of oxygen flow and hydrogen flow. At low level of stand-off distance, higher velocity of in-flight particle in flame and higher substrate temperature post spraying generate more peening stress and cooling stress, resulting in higher compressive residual stress in the coating.

  16. THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT: FIRST DETECTION OF HIGH-VELOCITY MILKY WAY BAR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nidever, David L.; Zasowski, Gail; Majewski, Steven R.; Beaton, Rachael L.; Wilson, John C.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Bird, Jonathan; Schoenrich, Ralph; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Sellgren, Kris; Robin, Annie C.; Schultheis, Mathias; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; Gerhard, Ortwin; Shetrone, Matthew; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Weiner, Benjamin; Schneider, Donald P.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; and others

    2012-08-20

    Commissioning observations with the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, have produced radial velocities (RVs) for {approx}4700 K/M-giant stars in the Milky Way (MW) bulge. These high-resolution (R {approx} 22, 500), high-S/N (>100 per resolution element), near-infrared (NIR; 1.51-1.70 {mu}m) spectra provide accurate RVs ({epsilon}{sub V} {approx} 0.2 km s{sup -1}) for the sample of stars in 18 Galactic bulge fields spanning -1 Degree-Sign -32 Degree-Sign . This represents the largest NIR high-resolution spectroscopic sample of giant stars ever assembled in this region of the Galaxy. A cold ({sigma}{sub V} {approx} 30 km s{sup -1}), high-velocity peak (V{sub GSR} Almost-Equal-To +200 km s{sup -1}) is found to comprise a significant fraction ({approx}10%) of stars in many of these fields. These high RVs have not been detected in previous MW surveys and are not expected for a simple, circularly rotating disk. Preliminary distance estimates rule out an origin from the background Sagittarius tidal stream or a new stream in the MW disk. Comparison to various Galactic models suggests that these high RVs are best explained by stars in orbits of the Galactic bar potential, although some observational features remain unexplained.

  17. Burst Speed of Wild Fishes under High-Velocity Flow Conditions Using Stamina Tunnel with Natural Guidance System in River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Mattashi; Yamamoto, Yasuyuki; Yataya, Kenichi; Kamiyama, Kohhei

    Swimming experiments were conducted on wild fishes in a natural guidance system stamina tunnel (cylindrical pipe) installed in a fishway of a local river under high-velocity flow conditions (tunnel flow velocity : 211 to 279 cm·s-1). In this study, the swimming characteristics of fishes were observed. The results show that (1) the swimming speeds of Tribolodon hakonensis (Japanese dace), Phoxinus lagowshi steindachneri (Japanese fat-minnow), Plecoglossus altivelis (Ayu), and Zacco platypus (Pale chub) were in proportion to their body length under identical water flow velocity conditions; (2) the maximum burst speed of Japanese dace and Japanese fat-minnow (measuring 4 to 6 cm in length) was 262 to 319 cm·s-1 under high flow velocity conditions (225 to 230 cm·s-1), while the maximum burst speed of Ayu and Pale chub (measuring 5 cm to 12 cm in length) was 308 to 355 cm·s-1 under high flow velocity conditions (264 to 273 cm·s-1) ; (3) the 50cm-maximum swimming speed of swimming fishes was 1.07 times faster than the pipe-swimming speed; (4) the faster the flow velocity, the shorter the swimming distance became.

  18. Manufacturing and Properties of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF)-Sprayed FeVCrC Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassatelli, Paolo; Bolelli, Giovanni; Lusvarghi, Luca; Manfredini, Tiziano; Rigon, Rinaldo

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the microstructure, sliding wear behavior and corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF)-sprayed FeVCrC-based coatings. Various process parameters were tested to evaluate their effects on the coating properties, which were also compared to those of HVOF-sprayed NiCrBSi and Stellite-6 coatings. The Fe alloy coatings are composed of flattened splats, originating from molten droplets and consisting of a super-saturated solid solution, together with rounded particles, coming from partially unmolten material and containing V- and Fe-based carbide precipitates. All process parameters, apart from "extreme" settings with excess comburent in the flame, produce dense coatings, indicating that the feedstock powder is quite easily processable by HVOF. These coatings, with a microhardness of 650-750 HV0.3, exhibit wear rates of ≈2 × 10-6 mm3/(Nm) in ball-on-disk tests against sintered Al2O3 spheres. They perform far better than the reference coatings, and better than other Fe- and Ni-based alloy coatings tested in previous research. On the other hand, the corrosion resistance of the coating material (tested by electrochemical polarization in 0.1 M HCl solution) is quite low. Even in the absence of interconnected porosity, this results in extensive, selective damage to the Fe-based matrix. This coating material is therefore unadvisable for severely corrosive environments.

  19. Survivability of bare, individual Bacillus subtilis spores to high-velocity surface impact: Implications for microbial transfer through space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Brandon L.; Pratt, Sara N.; Austin, Daniel E.

    2016-06-01

    Laboratory experiments show that endospores of Bacillus subtilis survive impact against a solid surface at velocities as high as 299 ±28 m/s. During impact, spores experience and survive accelerations of at least 1010 m/s2. The spores were introduced into a vacuum chamber using an electrospray source and accelerated to a narrow velocity distribution by entrainment in a differentially pumped gas flow. Different velocity ranges were studied by modifying the gas flow parameters. The spores were electrically charged, allowing direct measurement of the velocity of each spore as it passed through an image charge detector prior to surface impact. Spores impacted a glass surface and were collected for subsequent analysis by culturing. Most spores survived impact at all measured velocities. These experiments differ fundamentally from other studies that show either shock or impact survivability of bacteria embedded within or on the surface of a projectile. Bacteria in the present experiments undergo a single interaction with a solid surface at the full impact velocity, in the absence of any other effects such as cushioning due to microbe agglomerations, deceleration due to air or vapor, or transfer of impact shock through solid or liquid media. During these full-velocity impact events, the spores experience extremely high decelerations. This study is the first reported instance of accelerations of this magnitude experienced during a bacteria impact event. These results are discussed in the context of potential transfer of viable microbes in space and other scenarios involving surface impacts at high velocities.

  20. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SHOCK WAVES RESULTING FROM THE IMPACT OF HIGH VELOCITY MISSILES ON ANIMAL TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, E. Newton; McMillen, J. Howard

    1947-01-01

    The spark shadowgram method of studying shock waves is described. It has been used to investigate the properties of such waves produced by the impact of a high velocity missile on the surface of water. The method can be adapted for study of behavior of shock waves in tissue by placing the tissue on a water surface or immersing it in water. Spark shadowgrams then reveal waves passing from tissue to water or reflected from tissue surfaces. Reflection and transmission of shock waves from muscle, liver, stomach, and intestinal wall are compared with reflection from non-living surfaces such as gelatin gel, steel, plexiglas, cork, and air. Because of its heterogeneous structure, waves transmitted by tissue are dispersed and appear as a series of wavelets. When the accoustical impedance (density x wave velocity) of a medium is less than that in which the wave is moving, reflection will occur with inversion of the wave; i.e., a high pressure wave will become a low pressure wave. This inversion occurs at an air surface and is illustrated by shadowgrams of reflection from stomach wall, from a segment of colon filled with gas, and from air-filled rubber balloons. Bone (human skull and beef ribs) shows good reflection and some transmission of shock waves. When steel is directly hit by a missile, clearly visible elastic waves pass from metal to water, but a similar direct hit on bone does not result in elastic waves strong enough to be detected by a spark shadowgram. PMID:19871617

  1. Neurosurgical approaches to spinal infections.

    PubMed

    Hazer, Derya Burcu; Ayhan, Selim; Palaoglu, Selcuk

    2015-05-01

    Spinal infection is rare. Clinical suspicion is important in patients with nonmechanical neck and/or back pain to make the proper diagnosis in early disease. Before planning surgery, a thorough evaluation of the spinal stability, alignment, and deformity is necessary. Timing of surgery, side of approach, appropriate surgical technique, and spinal instruments used are crucial. Biomechanical preservation of the spinal column during and after the infection is a significant issue. Postoperative spine infection is another entity of which spinal surgeons should be aware of. Proper septic conditions with meticulous planning of surgery are essential for successful spine surgery and better outcome. PMID:25952179

  2. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... How much do you know about taking good care of yourself? Links to more information girlshealth glossary girlshealth.gov home http://www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Illness & disability Types of ... Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a pediatric rehabilitation specialist at the Children’s National Medical Center. ...

  3. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID

  4. Dozens of compact and high velocity-dispersion, early-type galaxies in Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulder, Christoph; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Mieske, Steffen

    2015-06-01

    Context. Passive galaxies at high redshift are much smaller than equally massive early types today. If this size evolution is caused by stochastic merging processes, then a small fraction of the compact galaxies should persist until today. Up to now it has not been possible to systematically identify the existence of such objects in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Aims: We aim at finding potential survivors of these compact galaxies in SDSS, as targets for more detailed follow-up observations. Methods: From the virial theorem, it is expected that for a given mass, compact galaxies have stellar velocity dispersion higher than the mean owing to their smaller sizes. Therefore velocity dispersion, coupled with size (or mass), is an appropriate method of selecting relics, independent of the stellar population properties. Based on these considerations, we designed a set of criteria the use the distribution of early-type galaxies from SDSS on the log 10(R0) - log 10(σ0) plane to find the most extreme objects on it. We thus selected compact massive galaxy candidates by restricting them to high velocity dispersions σ0> 323.2 km s-1 and small sizes R0< 2.18 kpc. Results: We find 76 galaxies at 0.05

  5. High-Velocity Frictional Properties of Westerly Granite and the Role of Thermal Cracking on Gouge Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelegue, Francois; Spanuolo, Elena; Violay, Marie; Nielsen, Stefan; Di Toro, Giulio; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of high-velocity shear apparatus, several experimental studies have been conducted in recent years improving our understanding of fault friction at seismic slip rates (0.1-10 m/s). Here, we present the results of a series of tests conducted on Westerly granite, at INGV Roma, on a Slow to HIgh Velocity Apparatus (SHIVA), coupled with a high frequency monitoring (4MHz sampling rate). Experiments were conducted under normal stress (σn) ranging from 5 to 20 MPa and at sliding velocities (V) comprised between 3 mm/s and 3 m/s. Additional experiments were conducted in the presence of pore fluid at equivalent effective normal stress. In dry conditions, two friction drops are observed. The first drop is independent of the normal stress and occurs when V become higher than a critical value (Vc≈0.15 m/s). The second friction drop occurs after a critical slip weakening distance which decreases as a power law with the power density (τV). The first, abrupt, drop is explained by flash heating and weakening mechanism while the second, smooth, drop is due to the formation and growth of molten patches on the fault surface. In wet conditions, only the second drop of friction is observed. Average values of the fracture energy are independent of normal stress and sliding velocity at V > 0.01 m/s. However, measurements of elastic wave velocities travelling through the fault strongly suggest that higher damage is induced for 0.1 < V < 0.3 m/s for a same finite displacement. This observation is also supported by acoustic emission (AE) recordings. Indeed, most the AEs are recorded after the initiation of the second friction drop, that is, once the fault surface temperature is high. Some AEs are even recorded few seconds after the end of the experiments, suggesting they may be due to thermal cracking induced by heat diffusion. In addition, the presence of pore fluid pressure (water) delayed the apparition of AEs at equivalent effective pressure, supporting the link

  6. Friction and wear properties of high-velocity oxygen fuel sprayed WC-17Co coating under rotational fretting conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jun; Cai, Zhenbing; Mo, Jiliang; Peng, Jinfang; Zhu, Minhao

    2016-05-01

    Rotational fretting which exist in many engineering applications has incurred enormous economic loss. Thus, accessible methods are urgently needed to alleviate or eliminate damage by rotational fretting. Surface engineering is an effective approach that is successfully adopted to enhance the ability of components to resist the fretting damage. In this paper, using a high-velocity oxygen fuel sprayed (HVOF) technique WC-17Co coating is deposited on an LZ50 steel surface to study its properties through Vickers hardness testing, scanning electric microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffractrometry (XRD). Rotational fretting wear tests are conducted under normal load varied from 10 N to 50 N, and angular displacement amplitudes vary from 0.125° to 1°. Wear scars are examined using SEM, EDX, optical microscopy (OM), and surface topography. The experimental results reveal that the WC-17Co coating adjusted the boundary between the partial slip regime (PSR) and the slip regime (SR) to the direction of smaller amplitude displacement. As a result, the coefficients of friction are consistently lower than the substrate's coefficients of friction both in the PSR and SR. The damage to the coating in the PSR is very slight. In the SR, the coating exhibits higher debris removal efficiency and load-carrying capacity. The bulge is not found for the coating due to the coating's higher hardness to restrain plastic flow. This research could provide experimental bases for promoting industrial application of WC-17Co coating in prevention of rotational fretting wear.

  7. Spatially extended and high-velocity dispersion molecular component in spiral galaxies: Single-dish versus interferometric observations

    SciTech Connect

    Caldú-Primo, Anahi; Walter, Fabian; Schruba, Andreas; Leroy, Adam; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Vogel, Stuart

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies of the molecular medium in nearby galaxies have provided mounting evidence that the molecular gas can exist in two phases: one that is clumpy and organized as molecular clouds and another one that is more diffuse. This last component has a higher velocity dispersion than the clumpy one. In order to investigate these two molecular components further, we compare the fluxes and line widths of CO in NGC 4736 and NGC 5055, two nearby spiral galaxies for which high-quality interferometric as well as single-dish data sets are available. Our analysis leads to two main results: (1) employing three different methods, we determine the flux recovery of the interferometer as compared to the single-dish to be within a range of 35%–74% for NGC 4736 and 81%–92% for NGC 5055, and (2) when focusing on high (S/N ≥ 5) lines of sight (LOSs), the single-dish line widths are larger by ∼(40 ± 20)% than the ones derived from interferometric data, which is in agreement with stacking all LOSs. These results point to a molecular gas component that is distributed over spatial scales larger than 30″(∼1 kpc), and is therefore filtered out by the interferometer. The available observations do not allow us to distinguish between a truly diffuse gas morphology and a uniform distribution of small clouds that are separated by less than the synthesized beam size (∼3″ or ∼100 pc), as they would both be invisible for the interferometer. This high velocity dispersion component has a dispersion similar to what is found in the atomic medium, as traced through observations of the H i line.

  8. Optimization of magnetically accelerated, ultra-high velocity aluminum flyer plates for use in plate impact, shock wave experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Knudson, Marcus D.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Lemke, Raymond William; Davis, J. P.; Harjes, Henry Charles III; Giunta, Anthony Andrew; Bliss, David Emery

    2005-05-01

    The intense magnetic field produced by the 20 MA Z accelerator is used as an impulsive pressure source to accelerate metal flyer plates to high velocity for the purpose of performing plate impact, shock wave experiments. This capability has been significantly enhanced by the recently developed pulse shaping capability of Z, which enables tailoring the rise time to peak current for a specific material and drive pressure to avoid shock formation within the flyer plate during acceleration. Consequently, full advantage can be taken of the available current to achieve the maximum possible magnetic drive pressure. In this way, peak magnetic drive pressures up to 490 GPa have been produced, which shocklessly accelerated 850 {micro}m aluminum (6061-T6) flyer plates to peak velocities of 34 km/s. We discuss magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations that are used to optimize the magnetic pressure for a given flyer load and to determine the shape of the current rise time that precludes shock formation within the flyer during acceleration to peak velocity. In addition, we present results pertaining to plate impact, shock wave experiments in which the aluminum flyer plates were magnetically accelerated across a vacuum gap and impacted z-cut, {alpha}-quartz targets. Accurate measurements of resulting quartz shock velocities are presented and analyzed through high-fidelity MHD simulations enhanced using optimization techniques. Results show that a fraction of the flyer remains at solid density at impact, that the fraction of material at solid density decreases with increasing magnetic pressure, and that the observed abrupt decrease in the quartz shock velocity is well correlated with the melt transition in the aluminum flyer.

  9. A Comprehensive Archival Search for Counterparts to Ultra-compact High-Velocity Clouds: Five Local Volume Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, D. J.; Crnojević, D.; Bennet, P.; Willman, B.; Hargis, J.; Strader, J.; Olszewski, E.; Tollerud, E. J.; Simon, J. D.; Caldwell, N.; Guhathakurta, P.; James, B. L.; Koposov, S.; McLeod, B.; Morrell, N.; Peacock, M.; Salinas, R.; Seth, A. C.; Stark, D. P.; Toloba, E.

    2015-06-01

    We report five Local Volume dwarf galaxies (two of which are presented here for the first time) uncovered during a comprehensive archival search for optical counterparts to ultra-compact high-velocity clouds (UCHVCs). The UCHVC population of HI clouds are thought to be candidate gas-rich, low-mass halos at the edge of the Local Group and beyond, but no comprehensive search for stellar counterparts to these systems has been presented. Careful visual inspection of all publicly available optical and ultraviolet imaging at the position of the UCHVCs revealed six blue, diffuse counterparts with a morphology consistent with a faint dwarf galaxy beyond the Local Group. Optical spectroscopy of all six candidate dwarf counterparts show that five have an Hα-derived velocity consistent with the coincident HI cloud, confirming their association; the sixth diffuse counterpart is likely a background object. The size and luminosity of the UCHVC dwarfs is consistent with other known Local Volume dwarf irregular galaxies. The gas fraction ({{M}HI}/{{M}star}) of the five dwarfs are generally consistent with that of dwarf irregular galaxies in the Local Volume, although ALFALFA-Dw1 (associated with ALFALFA UCHVC HVC274.68+74.70-123) has a very high {{M}HI}/{{M}star} ˜ 40. Despite the heterogenous nature of our search, we demonstrate that the current dwarf companions to UCHVCs are at the edge of detectability due to their low surface brightness, and that deeper searches are likely to find more stellar systems. If more sensitive searches do not reveal further stellar counterparts to UCHVCs, then the dearth of such systems around the Local Group may be in conflict with ΛCDM simulations.

  10. A Comprehensive Archival Search for Counterparts to Ultra-Compact High Velocity Clouds: Five Local Volume Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crnojevic, Denija; Sand, David J.

    2015-08-01

    We report the discovery of five Local Volume dwarf galaxies uncovered during a comprehensive archival search for optical counterparts to ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs). The UCHVC population of HI clouds are thought to be candidate gas-rich, low mass halos at the edge of the Local Group and beyond, but no comprehensive search for stellar counterparts to these systems has been presented. Careful visual inspection of all publicly available optical and ultraviolet imaging at the position of the UCHVCs revealed six blue, diffuse counterparts with a morphology consistent with a faint dwarf galaxy beyond the Local Group. Optical spectroscopy of all six candidate dwarf counterparts show that five have an Halpha-derived velocity consistent with the coincident HI cloud, confirming their association; the sixth diffuse counterpart is likely a background object. The size and luminosity of the UCHVC dwarfs is consistent with other known Local Volume dwarf irregular galaxies. The gas fraction (M_HI/M_star) of the five dwarfs are generally consistent with that of dwarf irregular galaxies in the Local Volume, although ALFALFA-Dw1 (associated with ALFALFA UCHVC HVC274.68+74.70-123) has a very high M_HI/M_star~40. Despite the heterogenous nature of our search, we demonstrate that the current dwarf companions to UCHVCs are at the edge of detectability due to their low surface brightness, and that deeper searches are likely to find more stellar systems. If more sensitive searches do not reveal further stellar counterparts to UCHVCs, then the dearth of such systems around the Local Group may be in conflict with LambdaCDM simulations.

  11. Searching for Optical Counterparts to Ultra-compact High Velocity Clouds: Possible Detection of a Counterpart to AGC 198606

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesh, William; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Janowiecki, Steven; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Cannon, John M.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.

    2015-09-01

    We report initial results from a campaign to obtain optical imaging of Ultra Compact High Velocity Clouds (UCHVCs) discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) Hi survey. UCHVCs have properties consistent with their being low-mass dwarf galaxies in the Local Volume, but do not have identified optical counterparts. We are using the WIYN 3.5 m telescope to image these objects and search for an associated stellar population. Here we present our observational strategy and method for searching for resolved stellar counterparts to the UCHVCs. We combine careful photometry, a color–magnitude filter, and spatial smoothing techniques to search for stellar overdensities in the g- and i-band images. We also run statistical tests to quantify the likelihood that detected overdensities are real and not chance superpositions of sources. We demonstrate the method by applying it to WIYN imaging of two objects: Leo P, a UCHVC discovered by ALFALFA and shown to be a star-forming dwarf galaxy in the Local Volume and AGC 198606, an ALFALFA source near in position and velocity to the Local Group dwarf galaxy Leo T. Applying the search method to the Leo P data yields an unambiguous detection (>99% confidence) of the galaxy’s stellar population. Applying the method to the AGC 198606 imaging yields a possible detection (92% confidence) of an optical counterpart located ∼2.5 arcmin from the centroid of AGC 198606's Hi distribution and within the Hi disk. We estimate a distance to the stellar counterpart of 373–393 kpc, an absolute magnitude Mi = ‑4.67 ± 0.09, and an Hi-to-stellar mass ratio of ∼45–110.

  12. PRESENT-DAY GALACTIC EVOLUTION: LOW-METALLICITY, WARM, IONIZED GAS INFLOW ASSOCIATED WITH HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUD COMPLEX A

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, K. A.; Haffner, L. M.; Wakker, B. P.; Hill, Alex S.; Madsen, G. J.; Duncan, A. K. E-mail: haffner@astro.wisc.edu E-mail: wakker@astro.wisc.edu

    2012-12-20

    The high-velocity cloud Complex A is a probe of the physical conditions in the Galactic halo. The kinematics, morphology, distance, and metallicity of Complex A indicate that it represents new material that is accreting onto the Galaxy. We present Wisconsin H{alpha} Mapper kinematically resolved observations of Complex A over the velocity range of -250 to -50 km s{sup -1} in the local standard of rest reference frame. These observations include the first full H{alpha} intensity map of Complex A across (l, b) = (124 Degree-Sign , 18 Degree-Sign ) to (171 Degree-Sign , 53 Degree-Sign ) and deep targeted observations in H{alpha}, [S II] {lambda}6716, [N II] {lambda}6584, and [O I] {lambda}6300 toward regions with high H I column densities, background quasars, and stars. The H{alpha} data imply that the masses of neutral and ionized material in the cloud are similar, both being greater than 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }. We find that the Bland-Hawthorn and Maloney model for the intensity of the ionizing radiation near the Milky Way is consistent with the known distance of the high-latitude part of Complex A and an assumed cloud geometry that puts the lower-latitude parts of the cloud at a distance of 7-8 kpc. This compatibility implies a 5% ionizing photon escape fraction from the Galactic disk. We also provide the nitrogen and sulfur upper abundance solutions for a series of temperatures, metallicities, and cloud configurations for purely photoionized gas; these solutions are consistent with the sub-solar abundances found by previous studies, especially for temperatures above 10{sup 4} K or for gas with a high fraction of singly ionized nitrogen and sulfur.

  13. A HIGH-METALLICITY, HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUD ALONG THE Mrk 421 SIGHT LINE: A TRACER OF COMPLEX M?

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Yangsen; Shull, J. Michael; Danforth, Charles W. E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.edu

    2011-02-10

    We present a new measurement, 0.85-3.5 Z{sub sun}, of the metallicity of high-velocity cloud (HVC) Complex M by analyzing ultraviolet spectroscopic observations of the blazar Mrk 421 taken with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope and the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. Although an HVC at V{sub LSR} = -131 km s{sup -1} is not visible in 21 cm emission (log N{sub H{sub I}} < 18.38; 3{sigma}), it is detected in ultraviolet absorption lines of C II, N I, O I, O VI, Si II, Si III, Si IV, Fe II, and H I. By referencing velocities to the intermediate-velocity cloud at -60 km s{sup -1} and jointly analyzing H I absorption from high-order H I Lyman lines, we measure log N{sub H{sub I}} = 16.84{sup +0.34}{sub -0.13} (1{sigma}) in the HVC. Comparing H I and O I, we find an HVC metallicity [O/H] =0.32{sup +0.22}{sub -0.39}. Because the sight line passes {approx}4{sup 0} from the HVCs in Complex M, the detected HVC may represent the highest velocity component of the Complex, and our measurements provide a lower limit to its metallicity. The high, possibly super-solar metallicity, together with the low distance, z < 3.5 kpc, above the Galactic plane suggests that Complex M is condensed returning gas from a Galactic fountain.

  14. Present-day Galactic Evolution: Low-metallicity, Warm, Ionized Gas Inflow Associated with High-velocity Cloud Complex A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, K. A.; Haffner, L. M.; Wakker, B. P.; Hill, Alex. S.; Madsen, G. J.; Duncan, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    The high-velocity cloud Complex A is a probe of the physical conditions in the Galactic halo. The kinematics, morphology, distance, and metallicity of Complex A indicate that it represents new material that is accreting onto the Galaxy. We present Wisconsin Hα Mapper kinematically resolved observations of Complex A over the velocity range of -250 to -50 km s-1 in the local standard of rest reference frame. These observations include the first full Hα intensity map of Complex A across (\\mathit {l, b}) = (124{^\\circ }, 18{^\\circ }) to (171°, 53°) and deep targeted observations in Hα, [S II] λ6716, [N II] λ6584, and [O I] λ6300 toward regions with high H I column densities, background quasars, and stars. The Hα data imply that the masses of neutral and ionized material in the cloud are similar, both being greater than 106 M ⊙. We find that the Bland-Hawthorn & Maloney model for the intensity of the ionizing radiation near the Milky Way is consistent with the known distance of the high-latitude part of Complex A and an assumed cloud geometry that puts the lower-latitude parts of the cloud at a distance of 7-8 kpc. This compatibility implies a 5% ionizing photon escape fraction from the Galactic disk. We also provide the nitrogen and sulfur upper abundance solutions for a series of temperatures, metallicities, and cloud configurations for purely photoionized gas; these solutions are consistent with the sub-solar abundances found by previous studies, especially for temperatures above 104 K or for gas with a high fraction of singly ionized nitrogen and sulfur.

  15. The Silicon and Calcium High-velocity Features in Type Ia Supernovae from Early to Maximum Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xulin; Wang, Xiaofeng; Maeda, Keiichi; Sai, Hanna; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Jujia; Huang, Fang; Rui, Liming; Zhou, Qi; Mo, Jun

    2015-09-01

    The high-velocity features (HVFs) in optical spectra of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are examined with a large sample including very early-time spectra (e.g., t < -7 days). Multiple Gaussian fits are applied to examine the HVFs and their evolutions, using constraints on expansion velocities for the same species (i.e., Si ii 5972 and Si ii 6355). We find that strong HVFs tend to appear in SNe Ia with smaller decline rates (e.g., Δm15(B) ≲ 1.4 {mag}), clarifying that the finding by Childress et al. for the Ca-HVFs in near-maximum-light spectra applies both to the Si-HVFs and Ca-HVFs in the earlier phase. The Si-HVFs seem to be more common in rapidly expanding SNe Ia, which is different from the earlier result that Ca-HVFs are associated with SNe Ia that have slower Si ii 6355 velocities at maximum light (i.e., VSimax). Moreover, SNe Ia with both stronger HVFs at early phases and larger VSimax are found to have noticeably redder B-V colors and to occur preferentially in the inner regions of their host galaxies, while those with stronger HVFs but smaller VSimax show opposite tendencies, suggesting that these two subclasses have different explosion environments and their HVFs may have different origins. We further examine the relationships between the absorption features of Si ii 6355 and Ca ii IR lines, and find that their photospheric components are well correlated in velocity and strength but that the corresponding HVFs show larger scatter. These results cannot be explained with ionization and/or thermal processes alone, and different mechanisms are required for the creation of HVF-forming regions in SNe Ia.

  16. Development of wear resistant nanostructured duplex coatings by high velocity oxy-fuel process for use in oil sands industry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Gobinda C; Khan, Tahir I; Glenesk, Larry B

    2009-07-01

    Oil sands deposits in Northern Alberta, Canada represent a wealth of resources attracting huge capital investment and significant research focus in recent years. As of 2005, crude oil production from the current oil sands operators accounted for 50% of Canada's domestic production. Alberta's oil sands deposits contain approximately 1.7 trillion barrels of bitumen, of which over 175 billion are recoverable with current technology, and 315 billion barrels are ultimately recoverable with technological advances. A major problem of operating machinery and equipment in the oil sands is the unpredictable failure from operating in this highly aggressive environment. One of the significant causes of that problem is premature material wear. An approach to minimize this wear is the use of protective coatings and, in particular, a cermet thin coating. A high level of coating homogeneity is critical for components such as bucketwheels, draglines, conveyors, shovels, heavyhauler trucks etc. that are subjected to severe degradation through abrasive wear. The identification, development and application of optimum wear solutions for these components pose an ongoing challenge. Nanostructured cermet coatings have shown the best results of achieving the degree of homogeneity required for these applications. In this study, WC-17Co cermet powder with nanocrystalline WC core encapsulated with 'duplex' Co layer was used to obtain a nanostructured coating. To apply this coating, high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying technique was used, as it is known for producing wear-resistant coatings superior to those obtained from plasma-based techniques. Mechanical, sliding wear and microstructural behavior of the coating was compared with those of the microstructured coating obtained from spraying WC-10Co-4Cr cermet powder by HVOF technique. Results from the nanostructured coating, among others, showed an average of 25% increase in microhardness, 30% increase in sliding wear resistance and

  17. Study of irradiated Hadfield steel using transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy with high velocity resolution and conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semionkin, V. A.; Neshev, F. G.; Tsurin, V. A.; Milder, O. B.; Oshtrakh, M. I.

    2010-03-01

    Proton irradiated Hadfield steel foil was studied using transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy with high velocity resolution and conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy. It was shown that proton irradiation leads to structural changes in the foil as well as to surface oxidation with ferric hydrous oxide formation (ferrihydrite). Moreover, oxidation on the foil underside was higher than on the foil right side.

  18. Characterizing high-velocity angular vestibulo-ocular reflex function in service members post-blast exposure.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Matthew R; Shelhamer, Mark J; Schubert, Michael C

    2011-02-01

    Blasts (explosions) are the most common mechanism of injury in modern warfare. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and dizziness are common sequelae associated with blasts, and many service members (SMs) report symptoms worsen with activity. The purpose of this study was to measure angular vestibulo-ocular reflex gain (aVOR) of blast-exposed SMs with TBI during head impulse testing. We also assessed their symptoms during exertion. Twenty-four SMs recovering from TBI were prospectively assigned to one of two groups based on the presence or absence of dizziness. Wireless monocular scleral search coil and rate sensor were used to characterize active and passive yaw and pitch head and eye rotations. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used to monitor symptoms during fast walking/running. For active yaw head impulses, aVOR gains were significantly lower in the symptomatic group (0.79 ± 0.15) versus asymptomatic (0.87 ± 0.18), but not for passive head rotation. For pitch head rotation, the symptomatic group had both active (0.915 ± 0.24) and passive (0.878 ± 0.22) aVOR gains lower than the asymptomatic group (active 1.03 ± 0.27, passive 0.97 ± 0.23). Some SMs had elevated aVOR gain. VAS scores for all symptoms were highest during exertion. Our data suggest symptomatic SMs with TBI as a result of blast have varied aVOR gain during high-velocity head impulses and provide compelling evidence of pathology affecting the vestibular system. Potential loci of injury in this population include the following: disruption of pathways relaying vestibular efference signals, differential destruction of type I vestibular hair cells, or selective damage to irregular afferent pathways-any of which may explain the common discrepancy between reports of vestibular-like symptoms and laboratory testing results. Significantly reduced pitch aVOR in symptomatic SMs and peak symptom severity during exertional testing support earlier findings in the chronic blast-exposed active duty SMs.

  19. Searching for Stellar Counterparts to ALFALFA Ultra-Compact High Velocity Clouds with WIYN / pODI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesh, William; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John Joseph; Janowiecki, Steven; Adams, Elizabeth A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Cannon, John M.; Munoz, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    A current issue in cosmology is the disagreement between models and observations regarding the number of low-mass galaxies in the Local Volume. While simulations of structure formation in a Lambda-CDM universe predict large numbers of low-mass dark matter halos, observational campaigns have not yet found sufficient numbers of faint, low-mass galaxies to match the models. The ALFALFA neutral hydrogen (HI) survey has detected a sample of isolated ultra-compact high-velocity HI clouds (UCHVCs) with kinematic properties that make them likely members of the Local Volume. This UCHVC sample as a group possesses properties similar to other known ultra-faint dwarf galaxies like Leo T (at 1 Mpc, HI masses of ~105-106 M⊙, HI diameters of ~2-3 kpc, and dynamical masses of ~107-108 M⊙). We have initiated a campaign to obtain deep optical imaging of the UCHVCs using the 24' x 24' pODI camera on the WIYN 3.5-m telescope. Here we present a technique to search for faint but resolved stellar counterparts to the UCHVCs in our optical images. We begin by processing and stacking the pipeline-reduced pODI g'- and i'-band images in order to maximize the number of sources we can detect while preserving the photometric integrity of the data. We then remove extended sources and measure calibrated g' and i' magnitudes for all the resulting point sources in the images. We apply a color-magnitude filter, constructed using theoretical isochrones for old stellar populations, to select stars in a single population and at a given distance. The spatial distribution of the point sources selected by the filter is then smoothed on a number of spatial scales. Strong overdensities in the resulting smoothed spatial distributions indicate the possible presence of a dwarf galaxy counterpart to the UCHVC. We have also developed statistical tests that quantify the likelihood of detecting true stellar overdensities in our images. We show recent examples of our results.

  20. Proper motion with HST: Searching for high-velocity stars in the core of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae

    SciTech Connect

    Meylan, G.; Minniti, D.; Pryor, C.; Tinney, C.G.; Phinney, E.S.; Sams, B.

    1996-02-13

    Binary stars play an essential role during the late phases of the dynamical evolution of a globular cluster. They transfer energy to passing stars and so can strongly influence the cluster evolution, enough to delay, halt, and even reverse core collapse. Hard binaries are known to exist in cluster cores, e.g., in the form of millisecond pulsars (about half of the millisecond pulsars observed in 47 Tucanae are such hard binaries). The presence of hard binaries may also be revealed by searching for the by-products of close encounters: high- velocity stars, such as those discovered in the core of 47 Tuc by Meylan et al. (1991) and Gebhardt et al. (1995). These studies represent the limit of the radial velocity data which can be obtained from the ground. If more progress is to be made, it must come through obtaining proper motions--a task for which {ital only} the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is suitable. We are using WFPC2 to obtain deep U (F300W) images of the core of 47 Tuc at three different epochs over two years, with which we will measure differential proper motions to a 1-{sigma} limit of 0.23 mas/yr. This--rather conservative--estimate corresponds to a 5-{sigma} detection of all stars with tangential velocities greater than 22 km s{sup -1}. By using the F300W filter we can measure stars over the whole color-magnitude diagram, from the red-giant branch to well down the main sequence. Such a complete census will provide unique constraints as a function of the stellar mass on relaxation processes, collision and ejection rates, and the velocity distribution. Here we report on the first-epoch (Cycle 5) observations of this project. Although no proper motions are available yet, some preliminary by-product results are presented. These include luminosity functions and color-magnitude diagrams for the core of 47 Tuc and the light curves of variable blue straggler stars and of a candidate X-ray source. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  1. High-velocity extended molecular outflow in the star-formation dominated luminous infrared galaxy ESO 320-G030

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira-Santaella, M.; Colina, L.; García-Burillo, S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Arribas, S.; Cazzoli, S.; Emonts, B.; Piqueras López, J.; Planesas, P.; Storchi Bergmann, T.; Usero, A.; Villar-Martín, M.

    2016-10-01

    We analyze new high spatial resolution (~60 pc) ALMA CO(2-1) observations of the isolated luminous infrared galaxy ESO 320-G030 (d = 48 Mpc) in combination with ancillary Hubble Space Telescope optical and near infrared (IR) imaging, as well as VLT/SINFONI near-IR integral field spectroscopy. We detect a high-velocity (~450 km s-1) spatially resolved (size~2.5 kpc; dynamical time ~3 Myr) massive (~107 M⊙; Ṁ ~ 2-8 M⊙ yr-1) molecular outflow that has originated in the central ~250 pc. We observe a clumpy structure in the outflowing cold molecular gas with clump sizes between 60 and 150 pc and masses between 105.5 and 106.4 M⊙. The mass of the clumps decreases with increasing distance, while the velocity is approximately constant. Therefore, both the momentum and kinetic energy of the clumps decrease outwards. In the innermost (~100 pc) part of the outflow, we measure a hot-to-cold molecular gas ratio of 7 × 10-5, which is similar to that measured in other resolved molecular outflows. We do not find evidence of an ionized phase in this outflow. The nuclear IR and radio properties are compatible with strong and highly obscured star-formation (Ak ~ 4.6 mag; star formation rate ~ 15 M⊙ yr-1). We do not find any evidence for the presence of an active galactic nucleus. We estimate that supernova explosions in the nuclear starburst (νSN ~ 0.2 yr-1) can power the observed molecular outflow. The kinetic energy and radial momentum of the cold molecular phase of the outflow correspond to about 2% and 20%, respectively, of the supernovae output. The cold molecular outflow velocity is lower than the escape velocity, so the gas will likely return to the galaxy disk. The mass loading factor is ~0.1-0.5, so the negative feedback owing to this star-formation-powered molecular outflow is probably limited. The reduced images and datacubes (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  2. Characterizing high-velocity angular vestibulo-ocular reflex function in service members post-blast exposure

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Matthew R.; Shelhamer, Mark J.; Schubert, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Blasts (explosions) are the most common mechanism of injury in modern warfare. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and dizziness are common sequelae associated with blasts, and many service members (SMs) report symptoms worsen with activity. The purpose of this study was to measure angular vestibulo-ocular reflex gain (aVOR) of blast-exposed SMs with TBI during head impulse testing. We also assessed their symptoms during exertion. Twenty-four SMs recovering from TBI were prospectively assigned to one of two groups based on the presence or absence of dizziness. Wireless monocular scleral search coil and rate sensor were used to characterize active and passive yaw and pitch head and eye rotations. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used to monitor symptoms during fast walking/running. For active yaw head impulses, aVOR gains were significantly lower in the symptomatic group (0.79 ± 0.15) versus asymptomatic (0.87 ± 0.18), but not for passive head rotation. For pitch head rotation, the symptomatic group had both active (0.915 ± 0.24) and passive (0.878 ± 0.22) aVOR gains lower than the asymptomatic group (active 1.03 ± 0.27, passive 0.97 ± 0.23). Some SMs had elevated aVOR gain. VAS scores for all symptoms were highest during exertion. Our data suggest symptomatic SMs with TBI as a result of blast have varied aVOR gain during high-velocity head impulses and provide compelling evidence of pathology affecting the vestibular system. Potential loci of injury in this population include the following: disruption of pathways relaying vestibular efference signals, differential destruction of type I vestibular hair cells, or selective damage to irregular afferent pathways—any of which may explain the common discrepancy between reports of vestibular-like symptoms and laboratory testing results. significantly reduced pitch aVOR in symptomatic SMs and peak symptom severity during exertional testing support earlier findings in the chronic blast-exposed active duty SMs. PMID:21113582

  3. Fault strength evolution during high velocity friction experiments with slip-pulse and constant-velocity loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Reches, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic analyses show that slip during large earthquakes evolves in a slip-pulse mode that is characterized by abrupt, intense acceleration followed by moderate deceleration. We experimentally analyze the friction evolution under slip-pulse proxy of a large earthquake, and compare it with the evolution at loading modes of constant-velocity and changing-velocity. We present a series of 42 experiments conducted on granite samples sheared in a high-velocity rotary apparatus. The experiments were conducted on room-dry, solid granite samples at slip-velocities of 0.0006-1 m/s, and normal stress of 1-11.5 MPa. The constitutive relations are presented with respect to mechanical power-density: PD= [shear stress * slip velocity], with units of power per area (MW/m^2). The experimental constitutive relations strongly depend on the loading mode. Constant velocity mode displays initial weakening with increasing PD that is followed by strengthening for PD = 0.02-0.5 MW/m^2, and abrupt weakening at PD > 0.5 MW/m^2. Changing-velocity modes display gentle strengthening for PD < 0.2 MW/m^2 that is followed by abrupt weakening as PD reaches 0.7-0.8 MW/m^2. Beyond this level of power-density, the two loading modes diverge: in changing-velocity of quake-mode the experimental fault continues to weaken with friction coefficient approaching 0.2, whereas in changing-velocity of ramp-mode the fault strengthens with friction coefficient approaching 1.0. The analysis demonstrates that (1) the strength evolution and constitutive parameters of the granite fault strongly depend on the loading mode, and (2) the slip-pulse mode is energy efficient relatively to the constant-velocity mode as manifested by faster, more intense weakening and 50-90% lower energy dissipation. The results suggest that the frictional strength determined in slip-pulse experiments, is more relevant to simulations of earthquake rupture than frictional strength determined in constant-velocity experiments.Figure 1. Friction

  4. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, B.F. III; Weiner, M.H.; McGee, Z.A.

    1982-12-17

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host.

  5. FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Website Managing Bowel Function After Spinal Cord Injury Resilience, Depression and Bouncing Back after SCI Getting to ... a “complete” and “incomplete” spinal cord injury? What recovery is expected following spinal cord injury? Where is ...

  6. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal tap; Ventricular puncture; Lumbar puncture; Cisternal puncture; Cerebrospinal fluid culture ... brain stem. It is always done with fluoroscopy. Ventricular puncture may be recommended in people with possible ...

  7. Spinal angiolipoma--case report.

    PubMed

    Chotai, Silky; Hur, Jun Seok; Moon, Hong Joo; Kwon, Taek-Hyun; Park, Youn Kwan; Kim, Joo Han

    2011-01-01

    A 69-year-old male presented with a rare spinal angiolipoma manifesting as history of back pain, and numbness in both lower limbs, which progressed over a period of 5 years. Total T10-T12 laminectomy was performed and the tumor was removed en bloc. The symptoms gradually improved postoperatively. Spinal angiolipoma is an uncommon benign extradural tumor of spine, which accounts for 0.14-1.2% of all spinal tumors and is a rare cause of spinal cord compression. Recognition of this entity is crucial as a benign and curable cause of paraplegia and back pain.

  8. Spinal bone density following spinal fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscomb, H.J.; Grubb, S.A.; Talmage, R.V.

    1989-04-01

    Spinal bone densities were assessed in 25 patients following lumbar fusion and bracing, in an attempt to study bone remodeling by noninvasive methods. Dual-photon densitometry was used to study specific areas of autologous bone grafts and adjacent vertebrae above the fusion mass. Measurements were made preoperatively and at 6-week intervals postoperatively. The data for the first 12 months postoperatively are reported here. In all patients there was at first a consistent loss in density in the vertebrae above the fusion mass, averaging 15.7%. This was followed by a gradual density increase such that by 1 year postoperatively, in 60% of the subjects, the density of these vertebrae was higher than the preoperative level. In the grafted areas, bone changes were cyclical, demonstrating a remodeling pattern consistent with that described in animal literature for graft healing and also consistent with modern bone remodeling theory. There was a general tendency toward a gradual increase in the density of the fusion mass.

  9. High velocity Van de Graaff shots of mineral dust: application to STARDUST and other in situ space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postberg, Frank; Srama, Ralf; Trieloff, Mario; Hillier, Jon; Gainsforth, Zack; Westphal, Andrew; Grün, Eberhard; Armes, Steve; Kearsley, Anton

    2010-05-01

    The detection and collection of high velocity interplanetary or interstellar dust grains by space missions is a nontrivial task, as high speed impacts on collectors or detectors may cause significant structural and chemical modification. Hence, simulation of high speed dust impacts is required, e.g. into STARDUST aerogel or foils [1], or impact ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometers as onboard CASSINI [2,3]. Particle speeds up to 50 km/sec can only be achieved by a Van de Graaff accelerator as operated at the Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik (Heidelberg). Here, only charged particles can be ac-celerated: While metals (e.g., Fe, Al) or magnetite work well, ac-celeration of silicates or organics requires a complex chemical coating procedure, to achieve acceptable levels of conductivity. A thin platinum coating [4] was successfully applied to analogue ma-terial like silicates (quartz, orthopyroxene, anorthite, olivine), and carbon rich particles (silicon carbide). Organic and sulfide (e.g. pyrrhotite) grains have been coated with a thin conductive layer of Polypyrrole [5], which allows acceleration in the Van de Graaff. All coated grains were successfully accelerated and provided im-pacts with speeds between 1 - 40 km/s. Impact signals as well as high resolution impact ionisation mass spectra were evaluated using the large area mass analyzer [6] (LAMA). These TOF spectra provide a mass resolution of about 200 and allow for qualitative determination of mineral compounds and isotopes in individual grains. However, while for these kinds of experiments active selection of suitable particle impacts is possible, the preparation for shots into STARDUST collectors requires com-plete control of particle size and speed by an improved new version of specific Particle Selection Unit, which is currently implemented. This provides a clear advantage over shots with a light gas gun where single shots of selected grain within a narrow mass and speed range are not achievable

  10. Spinal Injury Rehabilitation in Singapore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, H. L.; Chua, K.; Chan, W.

    1998-01-01

    This study reviewed 231 cases of spinal cord injury treated in Singapore. Data on demographic characteristics, common causes (mostly falls and traffic accidents), types of spinal damage, and outcomes are reported. Following rehabilitation, 68 patients were able to ambulate independently and 45 patients achieved independence in activities of daily…

  11. Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... of injury are alive and easily get educational information on the Internet. Web happy. sites such as the National Spinal Cord Injury Association (www.spinalcord.org) and SPINAL CORD Injury ♦ “Because of my injury, it is now impossible for me Information Network (www.spinalcord.uab.edu) have to ever ...

  12. Hemorrhagic onset of spinal angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Marcos Devanir Silva; Paz, Daniel de Araujo; Rodrigues, Thiago Pereira; Gandolfi, Ana Camila de Castro; Lamis, Fabricio Correa; Stavale, João Norberto; Suriano, Italo Capraro; Cetl, Luiz Daniel Marques Neves; Cavalheiro, Sergio

    2014-12-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are rare benign tumors that generally induce slow progressive cord compression. Here, the authors describe a case of sudden-onset palsy of the lower extremities caused by hemorrhagic spinal angiolipoma. An emergent laminectomy was performed to achieve total lesion removal. Follow-up examinations indicated neurological improvement and the absence of recurrence.

  13. Imaging modalities in spinal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kricun, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an approach to the various imaging modalities used to view the spine. It discusses the indications, limitations and practical use of each in the diagnosis, work-up and staging of various spinal disorders, and compares each of them in various clinical settings. Topics covered include low back pain syndrome, disk disease, spinal cord lesions, congenital abnormalities, and trauma.

  14. Assessment of spinal pain.

    PubMed

    Braun, J; Baraliakos, X; Regel, A; Kiltz, U

    2014-12-01

    Spinal pain or back pain is a very common symptom that can have many reasons. The most studied location is low back pain, and it is considered to be nonspecific in the majority of cases. Only a small proportion of patients have axial inflammation as the major cause of their back complaints with chronic inflammatory back pain (IBP) as the most prominent clinical feature of spondyloarthritis (SpA). The recognition of IBP and patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) is challenging in primary care, and it is important to further facilitate the early diagnosis of SpA. Proposals for improving the referral of patients with a possible diagnosis of axSpA include clinical parameters, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B27, and imaging parameters. Imaging is crucial for the visualization, objective validation, and understanding of back pain. Numerous diseases such as degenerative disk disease, degenerative changes in the intervertebral (facet) joints and the associated ligaments, spinal instability, herniation of the intervertebral disk, and spinal stenosis have to be differentiated in interpreting imaging of the spine. The sacroiliac joints and the spine are of major importance for the diagnosis and classification of axSpA. Conventional radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most important imaging technologies for visualization of structural changes such as syndesmophytes and axial inflammation such as sacroiliitis and spondylitis. The pathogenesis of axSpA is largely genetically determined. HLA B27 has the strongest contribution to the total genetic burden, but other major contributors such as endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase (ERAP)-1 and interleukin (IL)-23R have also been identified. PMID:26096091

  15. High-velocity interstellar gas in the lines of sight to the Wolf-Rayet stars HD 97152 and HD 96548

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols-Bohlin, Joy; Fesen, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The interstellar medium was studied in the direction to the WR stars HD 96548 and HD 97152, and the results are reported. New observational data on the UV spectra of several field stars near both these WR stars are presented. The high-velocity gas seen in the spectra of these stars suggests that the detected expanding interstellar gas structure consists of two OB cluster supershells. The presence of high-velocity absorption components in one of five field star spectra in the direction of the more isolated WR star HD 96548 suggests that this expanding gas does not originate from the optical ring nebula RCW 58 surrounding HD 96548, as previously believed, but instead indicates the detection of a previously unknown expanding interstellar shell in this line of sight.

  16. Numerical Simulation of the Twin-Wire Arc Spraying Process: Modeling the High Velocity Gas Flow Field Distribution and Droplets Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongxiong; Liang, Xiubing; Wei, Shicheng; Chen, Xi; Xu, Binshi

    2012-03-01

    During the twin-wire arc spraying, a high velocity gas stream is used to accelerate the arc-melting materials and propel the droplets toward the substrate surface. This study is aimed at investigating the gas flow formation and droplets transport processes using numerical simulation method. Results from the 3-D gas flow field model show that the distribution of the gas flow velocity on the twin-wire intersection plane is quite different from that on the twin-wire vertical plane. Based on the 3-D model, the convergence amplitude of the high velocity zone in the jet center is improved by modifying the gun head design. It is also observed that a flat substrate existed downstream from the gas nozzle exit results in decreasing close to zero in velocity of the gas jet near the substrate. In addition, the predicted droplet trajectories and velocity distributions exhibited good agreement with experimentally observations.

  17. Infiltrating spinal angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Yen, Han-Lin; Tsai, Shih-Chung; Liu, Shian-Min

    2008-10-01

    Infiltrating angiolipomas are rarely encountered in the spine. We present a case involving a 71-year-old man with a dorsal epidural angiolipoma at the T5-T7 level. The tumor involved the T5-T6 vertebral bodies and left pedicle. The patient presented with acute paraparesis and MRI showed a homogeneously hyphointense lesion on T1-weighted images. The epidural component of the tumor was removed via laminectomy to achieve adequate cord decompression. The patient was symptom-free at a 2-year follow-up. This report emphasizes the unusual clinical presentation and MRI features of an infiltrating spinal angiolipoma and discusses therapeutic management options.

  18. Lumbar spinal epidural angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Nanassis, Kimon; Tsitsopoulos, Parmenion; Marinopoulos, Dimitrios; Mintelis, Apostolos; Tsitsopoulos, Philippos

    2008-04-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are rare benign tumours most commonly found in the thoracic spine. A case of an extradural lumbar angiolipoma in a 47-year-old female is described. She had a recent history of lower back pain accompanied by sciatica. Lumbar MRI revealed a dorsal epidural mass at the L2-L3 level. The patient underwent a bilateral laminectomy, in which the tumour was totally excised. The pathological examination indicated haemangiolipoma. Post-operatively, the patient's neurological signs and symptoms improved remarkably quickly. MRI at 6 and 18 months after surgery revealed no evidence of tumour recurrence.

  19. Characterization of impact damage resistance of CF/PEEK and CF/toughened epoxy laminates under low and high velocity impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Hideo; Adachi, Tadaharu; Tateishi, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    1995-12-31

    In order to use composite materials in aeronautical turbo engines, their resistance to impact damage must be understood. In this work the subperforation flat-wise impact resistance of three kinds of high resistance material systems were evaluated under low and high velocity impact tests. Tested systems were AS4/PEEK (APC-2/AS4, ICI-Fiberite), AS4/PEEK+IL, which consists of APC-2 prepreg and PEEK film inserted between layers as an interleave, and toughened epoxy system T800/{number_sign}3900 (Toray). To investigate the effects of stacking sequence on resistance, three lay-ups -- (0/+30/0/{minus}30)s, (0/+60/0/{minus}60)s, and (0/+45/90/{minus}45)s -- were tested. A drop weight system was used for the low velocity tests, where the velocity ranged from 1.5 to 3.1 m/s. An air gun system was used for the high velocity tests, where the velocity range was between 50 and 100 m/s. The relation between damage area (DA) and impact energy (IE) was linear, and the ratio of the DA/IE quantified the impact resistance of each specimen. The value of DA/IE for the high velocity tests was larger than the value for low velocity tests. To estimate the lay-up effect, a stacking parameter {beta}, which indicates the difference of the inplane stiffness between the adjacent laminae, was proposed. A proportional relation between the DA/IE and the {beta} was obtained. The value of (DA/IE)/{beta}, which was independent of stacking sequence, indicated the impact resistance of the tested material systems for both velocity levels. The ratio of (DA/IE)/{beta} for the high velocity to the value for the low velocity changed with material systems.

  20. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; Tobin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  1. Real-Time Thermographic-Phosphor-Based Temperature Measurements of Thermal Barrier Coating Surfaces Subjected to a High-Velocity Combustor Burner Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Jenkins, Thomas P.; Allison, Stephen W.; Cruzen, Scott; Condevaux, J. J.; Senk, J. R.; Paul, A. D.

    2011-01-01

    Surface temperature measurements were conducted on metallic specimens coated with an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating (TBC) with a YAG:Dy phosphor layer that were subjected to an aggressive high-velocity combustor burner environment. Luminescence-based surface temperature measurements of the same TBC system have previously been demonstrated for specimens subjected to static furnace or laser heating. Surface temperatures were determined from the decay time of the luminescence signal of the YAG:Dy phosphor layer that was excited by a pulsed laser source. However, the furnace and laser heating provides a much more benign environment than that which exists in a turbine engine, where there are additional challenges of a highly radiant background and high velocity gases. As the next step in validating the suitability of luminescence-based temperature measurements for turbine engine environments, new testing was performed where heating was provided by a high-velocity combustor burner rig at Williams International. Real-time surface temperature measurements during burner rig heating were obtained from the decay of the luminescence from the YAG:Dy surface layer. The robustness of several temperature probe designs in the sonic velocity, high radiance flame environment was evaluated. In addition, analysis was performed to show whether the luminescence decay could be satisfactorily extracted from the high radiance background.

  2. X-rays from High-Velocity Clouds: XMM-Newton Observations of MS30.7-81.4-118

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Robin

    Recently, XMM-Newton and Chandra observations have shown evidence of enhanced X- ray emission associated with compact high-velocity clouds (HVCs). While the Chandra detections are of low significance, XMM-Newton observed a 6.4sigma X-ray enhancement associated with the HVC MS30.7-81.4-118 (hereafter, MS30.7), which is part of the Magellanic Stream. As there is currently only one detection of X-rays from a compact HVC with any great significance, it is important to confirm that this enhancement is real, and not due to some transient event. If it is real, then X-ray enhancements associated with HVCs potentially provide a new way to study HVCs and their interaction with the Galaxy. Both the morphology and the spectrum of the emission provide clues to the mechanism that produces the hot X-ray-emitting gas, as different physical processes predict different morphologies and spectral properties. For example, shock-heating of the ambient gas leads to X-ray emission in front the HVC, while mixing of the cool cloud material with hot ambient material leads to enhanced emission behind the cloud. (Note that in the case of MS30.7, we know its likely direction of motion on the sky, as it is likely moving toward the Magellanic Clouds.) On the spectral side, different physical processes lead to different temperatures for the X-ray-emitting gas. Strong adiabatic shocks with speeds of 300-400 km/s (the speed of the Magellanic Stream) will yield temperatures of ~1e6-2e6 K. Slower and/or radiative shocks will yield lower temperatures, while magnetic reconnection is predicted to lead to temperatures of >~ 6e6 K. Furthermore, spectral models generated from hydrodynamical simulations, such as those carried out by our group, can be used to narrow down the region of parameter space relevant to the X-ray enhancement. In the most recent XMM-Newton proposal round (AO-10), we were awarded a second observation of MS30.7 (PI: Shelton), to the east of the existing observation. We are applying for

  3. Attitudes Towards Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Cassandra Sligh D.; Gooden, Randy; Nowell, Jennifer; Wilson, Navodda

    2010-01-01

    This paper will shed light on the lives of persons with spinal cord injuries by revealing the literature on spinal cord injuries that focuses on research that can shed light on attitudes towards persons with spinal cord injuries. The background literature related to incidences, the definition of spinal cord injury, and vocational opportunities are…

  4. Spinal epidural angiolipoma: A rare cause of spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, Rajesh K; Koti, Kalyan; Dandamudi, Srinivas

    2012-09-01

    Spinal epidural angiolipomas are rare, benign tumors composed of mature lipocytes admixed with abnormal blood vessels. Only 128 cases of spinal epidural angiolipomas have been reported in literature till now. Spinal angiolipomas are predominantly located in the mid-thoracic region. We report a case of dorsal epidural angiolipoma in a 56-year-old male who presented with paraparesis and was diagnosed to have D4-5 epidural angiolipoma. Total surgical excision of the epidural angiolipoma was done and his paraparesis gradually improved.

  5. Spinal Plasticity following Intermittent Hypoxia: Implications for Spinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dale-Nagle, Erica A.; Hoffman, Michael S.; MacFarlane, Peter M.; Satriotomo, Irawan; Lovett-Barr, Mary Rachael; Vinit, Stéphane; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2011-01-01

    Plasticity is a fundamental property of the neural system controlling breathing. One frequently studied model of respiratory plasticity is long-term facilitation of phrenic motor output (pLTF) following acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH). pLTF arises from spinal plasticity, increasing respiratory motor output through a mechanism that requires new synthesis of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), activation of its high affinity receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and extracellular-related kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling in or near phrenic motor neurons. Since intermittent hypoxia induces spinal plasticity, we are exploring the potential to harness repetitive AIH as a means of inducing functional recovery in conditions causing respiratory insufficiency, such as cervical spinal injury. Since repetitive AIH induces phenotypic plasticity in respiratory and motor neurons, it may restore respiratory motor function in patients with incomplete spinal injury. PMID:20536940

  6. Spinal Chondrosarcoma: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Katonis, Pavlos; Alpantaki, Kalliopi; Michail, Konstantinos; Lianoudakis, Stratos; Christoforakis, Zaharias; Tzanakakis, George; Karantanas, Apostolos

    2011-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the third most common primary malignant bone tumor. Yet the spine represents the primary location in only 2% to 12% of these tumors. Almost all patients present with pain and a palpable mass. About 50% of patients present with neurologic symptoms. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are generally unsuccessful while surgical resection is the treatment of choice. Early diagnosis and careful surgical staging are important to achieve adequate management. This paper provides an overview of the histopathological classification, clinical presentation, and diagnostic procedures regarding spinal chondrosarcoma. We highlight specific treatment modalities and discuss which is truly the most suitable approach for these tumors. Abstracts and original articles in English investigating these tumors were searched and analyzed with the use of the PubMed and Scopus databases with “chondrosarcoma and spine” as keywords. PMID:21437176

  7. Simulation in spinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Aso Escario, José; Martínez Quiñones, José Vicente; Aso Vizán, Alberto; Arregui Calvo, Ricardo; Bernal Lafuente, Marta; Alcázar Crevillén, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Simulation is frequent in spinal disease, resulting in problems for specialists like Orthopedic Surgeons, Neurosurgeons, Reumathologists, etc. Simulation requires demonstration of the intentional production of false or exaggerated symptoms following an external incentive. The clinician has difficulties in demonstrating these criteria, resulting in misdiagnosis of simulation or misinterpretation of the normal patient as a simulator, with the possibility of iatrogenic distress and litigation. We review simulation-related problems in spine, proposing a terminological, as well as a diagnostic strategy including clinical and complementary diagnosis, as a way to avoid misinterpretation and minimize the iatrogenic distress and liability Based on the clinical-Forensic author's expertise, the literature is analyzed and the terminology readdressed to develop new terms (inconsistences, incongruences, discrepancies and contradictions). Clinical semiology and complementary test are adapted to the new scenario. Diagnostic strategy relies on anamnesis, clinical and complementary tests, adapting them to a uniform terminology with clear meaning of signs and symptoms.

  8. Simulation in spinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Aso Escario, José; Martínez Quiñones, José Vicente; Aso Vizán, Alberto; Arregui Calvo, Ricardo; Bernal Lafuente, Marta; Alcázar Crevillén, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Simulation is frequent in spinal disease, resulting in problems for specialists like Orthopedic Surgeons, Neurosurgeons, Reumathologists, etc. Simulation requires demonstration of the intentional production of false or exaggerated symptoms following an external incentive. The clinician has difficulties in demonstrating these criteria, resulting in misdiagnosis of simulation or misinterpretation of the normal patient as a simulator, with the possibility of iatrogenic distress and litigation. We review simulation-related problems in spine, proposing a terminological, as well as a diagnostic strategy including clinical and complementary diagnosis, as a way to avoid misinterpretation and minimize the iatrogenic distress and liability Based on the clinical-Forensic author's expertise, the literature is analyzed and the terminology readdressed to develop new terms (inconsistences, incongruences, discrepancies and contradictions). Clinical semiology and complementary test are adapted to the new scenario. Diagnostic strategy relies on anamnesis, clinical and complementary tests, adapting them to a uniform terminology with clear meaning of signs and symptoms. PMID:24913963

  9. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... temperature from the body to the spinal cord. Did You Know... Doctors can often tell where the ... on symptoms and results of a physical examination. Did You Know... Nerves from the lowest parts of ...

  10. What Is Spinal Cord Injury?

    MedlinePlus

    ... lowest point on the spinal cord below which sensory feeling and motor movement diminish or disappear. The ... injury is so severe that almost all feeling (sensory function) and all ability to control movement (motor ...

  11. THE M81 GROUP DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY DDO 165. I. HIGH-VELOCITY NEUTRAL GAS IN A POST-STARBURST SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, John M.; Most, Hans P.; Skillman, Evan D.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Warren, Steven R.; Cook, David; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Lee, Janice; Seth, Anil; Walter, Fabian E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu E-mail: warren@astro.umn.edu E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com E-mail: jlee@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: walter@mpia.de

    2011-07-01

    We present new multi-configuration Very Large Array H I spectral line observations of the M81 group dwarf irregular post-starburst galaxy DDO 165. The H I morphology is complex, with multiple column density peaks surrounding a large region of very low H I surface density that is offset from the center of the stellar distribution. The bulk of the neutral gas is associated with the southern section of the galaxy; a secondary peak in the north contains {approx}15% of the total H I mass. These components appear to be kinematically distinct, suggesting that either tidal processes or large-scale blowout have recently shaped the interstellar medium (ISM) of DDO 165. Using spatially resolved position-velocity maps, we find multiple localized high-velocity gas features. Cross-correlating with radius-velocity analyses, we identify eight shell/hole structures in the ISM with a range of sizes ({approx}400-900 pc) and expansion velocities ({approx}7-11 km s{sup -1}). These structures are compared with narrow- and broadband imaging from the Kitt Peak National Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Using the latter data, recent works have shown that DDO 165's previous 'burst' phase was extended temporally ({approx}>1 Gyr). We thus interpret the high-velocity gas features, H I holes, and kinematically distinct components of the galaxy in the context of the immediate effects of 'feedback' from recent star formation (SF). In addition to creating H I holes and shells, extended SF events are capable of creating localized high-velocity motion of the surrounding interstellar material. A companion paper connects the energetics from the H I and HST data.

  12. MATTER MIXING IN ASPHERICAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: A SEARCH FOR POSSIBLE CONDITIONS FOR CONVEYING {sup 56}Ni INTO HIGH VELOCITY REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Masaomi; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ito, Hirotaka; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong; Tolstov, Alexey; Hashimoto, Masa-aki

    2013-08-20

    We perform two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of matter mixing in aspherical core-collapse supernova explosions of a 16.3 M{sub Sun} star with a compact hydrogen envelope. Observations of SN 1987A have provided evidence that {sup 56}Ni synthesized by explosive nucleosynthesis is mixed into fast moving matter ({approx}>3500 km s{sup -1}) in the exploding star. In order to clarify the key conditions for reproducing such high velocity of {sup 56}Ni, we revisit matter mixing in aspherical core-collapse supernova explosions. Explosions are initiated artificially by injecting thermal and kinetic energies around the interface between the iron core and the silicon-rich layer. Perturbations of 5% or 30% amplitude in the radial velocities are introduced at several points in time. We find that no high velocity {sup 56}Ni can be obtained if we consider bipolar explosions with perturbations (5% amplitude) of pre-supernova origins. If large perturbations (30% amplitude) are introduced or exist due to some unknown mechanism in a later phase just before the shock wave reaches the hydrogen envelope, {sup 56}Ni with a velocity of 3000 km s{sup -1} can be obtained. Aspherical explosions that are asymmetric across the equatorial plane with clumpy structures in the initial shock waves are investigated. We find that the clump sizes affect the penetration of {sup 56}Ni. Finally, we report that an aspherical explosion model that is asymmetric across the equatorial plane with multiple perturbations of pre-supernova origins can cause the penetration of {sup 56}Ni clumps into fast moving matter of 3000 km s{sup -1}. We show that both aspherical explosions with clumpy structures and perturbations of pre-supernova origins may be necessary to reproduce the observed high velocity of {sup 56}Ni. To confirm this, more robust three-dimensional simulations are required.

  13. High-velocity-oxidation performance of metal-chromium-aluminum (MCrAl), cermet, and modified aluminide coatings on IN-100 and type VIA alloys at 1093 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Cermet, MCrAl, and modified aluminide types of coatings applied to IN-100 and NASA-TRW-VIA alloy specimens were cyclically oxidation tested in a high velocity (Mach 1) gas flame at 1093 C. Several coating compositions of each type were evaluated for oxidation resistance. The modified aluminide coating, Pt-Al, applied to alloy 6A proved to be the best, providing oxidation protection to approximately 750 hours based on weight change measurements. The second best, a CoCrAlY coating applied to 6A, provided protection to 450 hours. The third best was a cermet + aluminide coating on 6A with a protection time to 385 hours.

  14. Signs of interaction of the NGC 1275 nucleus with the high-velocity system according to 0.7 sec seeing observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudinov, V. N.; Tsvetkova, V. S.; Novikov, S. B.; Pronik, I. I.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1275 was observed in the B system on 1 December 1989 with seeing 0, 7 seconds using the Zeiss-1000 telescope on Mount Majdanak in Central Asia. Special methods of processing reveal low-contrast details. The nucleus and circumnucleus are stretched in NW-SE direction. There are two narrow filaments near the nucleus in position angles roughly 340 degrees and 320 degrees. The first is directed near the radio jet of the nucleus, the second has broken details curved to the NW or toward the high-velocity system of NGC 1275.

  15. [Subarachnoid hematoma and spinal anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Dupeyrat, A; Dequiré, P M; Mérouani, A; Moullier, P; Eid, G

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of spinal subarachnoid haematoma occurring after spinal anaesthesia are reported. In the first case, lumbar puncture was attempted three times in a 81-year-old man; spinal anaesthesia trial was than abandoned, and the patient given a general anaesthetic. He was given prophylactic calcium heparinate soon after surgery. On the fourth day, the patient became paraparetic. Radioculography revealed a blockage between T10 and L3. Laminectomy was performed to remove the haematoma, but the patient recovered motor activity only very partially. The second case was a 67-year-old man, in whom spinal anaesthesia was easily carried out. He was also given prophylactic calcium heparinate soon after surgery. On the fourth postoperative day, pulmonary embolism was suspected. Heparin treatment was then started. Twelve hours later, lumbar and bilateral buttock pain occurred, which later spread to the neck. On the eighth day, the patient had neck stiffness and two seizures. Emergency laminectomy was carried out, which revealed a subarachnoid haematoma spreading to a level higher than T6 and below L1, with no flow of cerebrospinal fluid, and a non pulsatile spinal cord. Surgery was stopped. The patient died on the following day. Both these cases are similar to those previously reported and point out the role played by anticoagulants. Because early diagnosis of spinal cord compression is difficult, the prognosis is poor, especially in case of paraplegia. PMID:2278424

  16. Neurotrophins and spinal circuit function

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Vanessa S.; Mendell, Lorne M.

    2014-01-01

    Work early in the last century emphasized the stereotyped activity of spinal circuits based on studies of reflexes. However, the last several decades have focused on the plasticity of these spinal circuits. These considerations began with studies of the effects of monoamines on descending and reflex circuits. In recent years new classes of compounds called growth factors that are found in peripheral nerves and the spinal cord have been shown to affect circuit behavior in the spinal cord. In this review we will focus on the effects of neurotrophins, particularly nerve growth factor (NGF), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), on spinal circuits. We also discuss evidence that these molecules can modify functions including nociceptive behavior, motor reflexes and stepping behavior. Since these substances and their receptors are normally present in the spinal cord, they could potentially be useful in improving function in disease states and after injury. Here we review recent findings relevant to these translational issues. PMID:24926235

  17. Role of spinal metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in pudendal inhibition of the nociceptive bladder reflex in cats.

    PubMed

    Reese, Jeremy N; Rogers, Marc J; Xiao, Zhiying; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-04-15

    This study examined the role of spinal metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) in the nociceptive C-fiber afferent-mediated spinal bladder reflex and in the inhibtion of this reflex by pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS). In α-chloralose-anesthetized cats after spinal cord transection at the T9/T10 level, intravesical infusion of 0.25% acetic acid irritated the bladder, activated nociceptive C-fiber afferents, and induced spinal reflex bladder contractions of low amplitude (<50 cmH2O) and short duration (<20 s) at a smaller bladder capacity ∼80% of saline control capacity. PNS significantly (P < 0.01) increased bladder capacity from 85.5 ± 10.1 to 137.3 ± 14.1 or 148.2 ± 11.2% at 2T or 4T stimulation, respectively, where T is the threshold intensity for PNS to induce anal twitch. MTEP {3-[(2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl]pyridine; 3 mg/kg iv, a selective mGluR5 antagonist} completely removed the PNS inhibition and significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity from 71.8 ± 9.9 to 94.0 ± 13.9% of saline control, but it did not change the bladder contraction amplitude. After propranolol (3 mg/kg iv, a β1/β2-adrenergic receptor antagonist) treatment, PNS inhibition remained but MTEP significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the bladder contraction amplitude from 18.6 ± 2.1 to 6.6 ± 1.2 cmH2O and eliminated PNS inhibition. At the end of experiments, hexamethonium (10 mg/kg iv, a ganglionic blocker) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the bladder contraction amplitude from 20.9 ± 3.2 to 8.1 ± 1.5 cmH2O on average demonstrating that spinal reflexes were responsible for a major component of the contractions. This study shows that spinal mGluR5 plays an important role in the nociceptive C-fiber afferent-mediated spinal bladder reflex and in pudendal inhibition of this spinal reflex.

  18. Role of spinal metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in pudendal inhibition of the nociceptive bladder reflex in cats.

    PubMed

    Reese, Jeremy N; Rogers, Marc J; Xiao, Zhiying; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-04-15

    This study examined the role of spinal metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) in the nociceptive C-fiber afferent-mediated spinal bladder reflex and in the inhibtion of this reflex by pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS). In α-chloralose-anesthetized cats after spinal cord transection at the T9/T10 level, intravesical infusion of 0.25% acetic acid irritated the bladder, activated nociceptive C-fiber afferents, and induced spinal reflex bladder contractions of low amplitude (<50 cmH2O) and short duration (<20 s) at a smaller bladder capacity ∼80% of saline control capacity. PNS significantly (P < 0.01) increased bladder capacity from 85.5 ± 10.1 to 137.3 ± 14.1 or 148.2 ± 11.2% at 2T or 4T stimulation, respectively, where T is the threshold intensity for PNS to induce anal twitch. MTEP {3-[(2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl]pyridine; 3 mg/kg iv, a selective mGluR5 antagonist} completely removed the PNS inhibition and significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity from 71.8 ± 9.9 to 94.0 ± 13.9% of saline control, but it did not change the bladder contraction amplitude. After propranolol (3 mg/kg iv, a β1/β2-adrenergic receptor antagonist) treatment, PNS inhibition remained but MTEP significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the bladder contraction amplitude from 18.6 ± 2.1 to 6.6 ± 1.2 cmH2O and eliminated PNS inhibition. At the end of experiments, hexamethonium (10 mg/kg iv, a ganglionic blocker) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the bladder contraction amplitude from 20.9 ± 3.2 to 8.1 ± 1.5 cmH2O on average demonstrating that spinal reflexes were responsible for a major component of the contractions. This study shows that spinal mGluR5 plays an important role in the nociceptive C-fiber afferent-mediated spinal bladder reflex and in pudendal inhibition of this spinal reflex. PMID:25673810

  19. Comparative study of iron oxide nanoparticles as-prepared and dispersed in Copaiba oil using Mössbauer spectroscopy with low and high velocity resolution.

    PubMed

    Oshtrakh, M I; Šepelák, V; Rodriguez, A F R; Semionkin, V A; Ushakov, M V; Santos, J G; Silveira, L B; Marmolejo, E M; De Souza Parise, M; Morais, P C

    2013-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles, probably magnetite, as-prepared and dispersed in Copaiba oil were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy using two different spectrometers: with a low velocity resolution (512 channels) for measurements at 295 and 21K and with a high velocity resolution (4096 channels) for measurements at 295 and 90K. The fitting of all measured spectra demonstrated that usual models applied to fit Mössbauer spectra of magnetite and maghemite particles were not suitable. Therefore, the recorded spectra were fitted using a large number of spectral components on the basis of better quality of the fit and linearity of differential spectra. The number of components obtained for the better fit appeared to be different for spectra measured with a low and a high velocity resolution. However, these results demonstrated differences of Mössbauer parameters for iron oxide nanoparticles as-prepared and dispersed in Copaiba oil at applied temperatures. The effect of Copaiba oil molecules on Mössbauer parameters may be a result of the interactions of polar molecules such as kaurinic acid with nanoparticles' surface.

  20. Comparative study of iron oxide nanoparticles as-prepared and dispersed in Copaiba oil using Mössbauer spectroscopy with low and high velocity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Šepelák, V.; Rodriguez, A. F. R.; Semionkin, V. A.; Ushakov, M. V.; Santos, J. G.; Silveira, L. B.; Marmolejo, E. M.; Parise, M. De Souza; Morais, P. C.

    Iron oxide nanoparticles, probably magnetite, as-prepared and dispersed in Copaiba oil were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy using two different spectrometers: with a low velocity resolution (512 channels) for measurements at 295 and 21 K and with a high velocity resolution (4096 channels) for measurements at 295 and 90 K. The fitting of all measured spectra demonstrated that usual models applied to fit Mössbauer spectra of magnetite and maghemite particles were not suitable. Therefore, the recorded spectra were fitted using a large number of spectral components on the basis of better quality of the fit and linearity of differential spectra. The number of components obtained for the better fit appeared to be different for spectra measured with a low and a high velocity resolution. However, these results demonstrated differences of Mössbauer parameters for iron oxide nanoparticles as-prepared and dispersed in Copaiba oil at applied temperatures. The effect of Copaiba oil molecules on Mössbauer parameters may be a result of the interactions of polar molecules such as kaurinic acid with nanoparticles' surface.

  1. Comparative study of iron oxide nanoparticles as-prepared and dispersed in Copaiba oil using Mössbauer spectroscopy with low and high velocity resolution.

    PubMed

    Oshtrakh, M I; Šepelák, V; Rodriguez, A F R; Semionkin, V A; Ushakov, M V; Santos, J G; Silveira, L B; Marmolejo, E M; De Souza Parise, M; Morais, P C

    2013-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles, probably magnetite, as-prepared and dispersed in Copaiba oil were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy using two different spectrometers: with a low velocity resolution (512 channels) for measurements at 295 and 21K and with a high velocity resolution (4096 channels) for measurements at 295 and 90K. The fitting of all measured spectra demonstrated that usual models applied to fit Mössbauer spectra of magnetite and maghemite particles were not suitable. Therefore, the recorded spectra were fitted using a large number of spectral components on the basis of better quality of the fit and linearity of differential spectra. The number of components obtained for the better fit appeared to be different for spectra measured with a low and a high velocity resolution. However, these results demonstrated differences of Mössbauer parameters for iron oxide nanoparticles as-prepared and dispersed in Copaiba oil at applied temperatures. The effect of Copaiba oil molecules on Mössbauer parameters may be a result of the interactions of polar molecules such as kaurinic acid with nanoparticles' surface. PMID:22465304

  2. Pathophysiology of primary spinal syringomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, John D.; Snyder, Kendall; Peterson, Matthew M.; Patronas, Nicholas J.; Butman, John A.; Smith, René K.; DeVroom, Hetty L.; Sansur, Charles A.; Eskioglu, Eric; Kammerer, William A.; Oldfield, Edward H.

    2013-01-01

    Object The pathogenesis of syringomyelia in patients with an associated spinal lesion is incompletely understood. The authors hypothesized that in primary spinal syringomyelia, a subarachnoid block effectively shortens the length of the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS), reducing compliance and the ability of the spinal theca to dampen the subarachnoid CSF pressure waves produced by brain expansion during cardiac systole. This creates exaggerated spinal subarachnoid pressure waves during every heartbeat that act on the spinal cord above the block to drive CSF into the spinal cord and create a syrinx. After a syrinx is formed, enlarged subarachnoid pressure waves compress the external surface of the spinal cord, propel the syrinx fluid, and promote syrinx progression. Methods To elucidate the pathophysiology, the authors prospectively studied 36 adult patients with spinal lesions obstructing the spinal SAS. Testing before surgery included clinical examination; evaluation of anatomy on T1-weighted MRI; measurement of lumbar and cervical subarachnoid mean and pulse pressures at rest, during Valsalva maneuver, during jugular compression, and after removal of CSF (CSF compliance measurement); and evaluation with CT myelography. During surgery, pressure measurements from the SAS above the level of the lesion and the lumbar intrathecal space below the lesion were obtained, and cardiac-gated ultrasonography was performed. One week after surgery, CT myelography was repeated. Three months after surgery, clinical examination, T1-weighted MRI, and CSF pressure recordings (cervical and lumbar) were repeated. Clinical examination and MRI studies were repeated annually thereafter. Findings in patients were compared with those obtained in a group of 18 healthy individuals who had already undergone T1-weighted MRI, cine MRI, and cervical and lumbar subarachnoid pressure testing. Results In syringomyelia patients compared with healthy volunteers, cervical subarachnoid pulse pressure

  3. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a loss of specialized nerve cells, called motor neurons , in the spinal cord and the part of ... spinal cord ( the brainstem ). The loss of motor neurons leads to weakness and wasting ( atrophy ) of muscles ...

  4. Rehabilitation in spinal infection diseases.

    PubMed

    Nas, Kemal; Karakoç, Mehmet; Aydın, Abdulkadir; Öneş, Kadriye

    2015-01-18

    Spinal cord infections were the diseases defined by Hypocrite yet the absence of modern medicine and there was not a real protocol in rehabilitation although there were many aspects in surgical treatment options. The patients whether surgically or conservatively treated had a lot of neurological, motor, and sensory disturbances. Our clinic has quite experience from our previous researchs. Unfortunately, serious spinal cord infections are still present in our region. In these patients the basic rehabilitation approaches during early, pre-operation, post-operation period and in the home environment will provide significant contributions to improve the patients' sensory and motor skills, develop the balance and proriocaption, increase the independence of patients in daily living activities and minimize the assistance of other people. There is limited information in the literature related with the nature of the rehabilitation programmes to be applied for patients with spinal infections. The aim of this review is to share our clinic experience and summarise the publications about spinal infection rehabilitation. There are very few studies about the rehabilitation of spinal infections. There are still not enough studies about planning and performing rehabilitation programs in these patients. Therefore, a comprehensive rehabilitation programme during the hospitalisation and home periods is emphasised in order to provide optimal management and prevent further disability.

  5. Rehabilitation in spinal infection diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nas, Kemal; Karakoç, Mehmet; Aydın, Abdulkadir; Öneş, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord infections were the diseases defined by Hypocrite yet the absence of modern medicine and there was not a real protocol in rehabilitation although there were many aspects in surgical treatment options. The patients whether surgically or conservatively treated had a lot of neurological, motor, and sensory disturbances. Our clinic has quite experience from our previous researchs. Unfortunately, serious spinal cord infections are still present in our region. In these patients the basic rehabilitation approaches during early, pre-operation, post-operation period and in the home environment will provide significant contributions to improve the patients’ sensory and motor skills, develop the balance and proriocaption, increase the independence of patients in daily living activities and minimize the assistance of other people. There is limited information in the literature related with the nature of the rehabilitation programmes to be applied for patients with spinal infections. The aim of this review is to share our clinic experience and summarise the publications about spinal infection rehabilitation. There are very few studies about the rehabilitation of spinal infections. There are still not enough studies about planning and performing rehabilitation programs in these patients. Therefore, a comprehensive rehabilitation programme during the hospitalisation and home periods is emphasised in order to provide optimal management and prevent further disability. PMID:25621205

  6. Ruptured Isolated Spinal Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez Romero, Diego; Batista, Andre Lima; Gentric, Jean Christoph; Raymond, Jean; Roy, Daniel; Weill, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Summary Isolated spinal artery aneurysms are exceedingly rare vascular lesions thought to be related to dissection of the arterial wall. We describe two cases presenting with spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage that underwent conservative management. In the first patient the radiculomedullary branch involved was feeding the anterior spinal artery at the level of D3 and thus, neither endovascular nor surgical approach was employed. Control angiography was performed at seven days and at three months, demonstrating complete resolution of the lesion. In our second case, neither the anterior spinal artery or the artery of Adamkiewicz could be identified during angiography, thus endovascular management was deemed contraindicated. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a stable lesion in the second patient. No rebleeding or other complications were seen. In comparison to intracranial aneurysms, spinal artery aneurysms tend to display a fusiform appearance and lack a clear neck in relation to the likely dissecting nature of the lesions. Due to the small number of cases reported, the natural history of these lesions is not well known making it difficult to establish the optimal treatment approach. Various management strategies may be supported, including surgical and endovascular treatment, but It would seem that a wait and see approach is also viable, with control angiogram and treatment decisions based on the evolution of the lesion. PMID:25496690

  7. Recurrence of spinal schwannoma: Is it preventable?

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Satya B.; Mishra, Sudhansu S.; Dhir, Manmath K.; Patnaik, Ashis; Panigrahi, Souvagya

    2016-01-01

    Spinal schwannomas account for about 25% of primary intradural spinal cord tumors in adult. The prognosis for spinal schwannomas is excellent in most cases. Complete resection is curative. However following subtotal removal, recurrence develops after several years. We describe a case of recurrent spinal schwannoma who had been operated twice before for same disease. The possible cause of recurrence and difficulties in reoperation are discussed.

  8. Recurrence of spinal schwannoma: Is it preventable?

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Satya B.; Mishra, Sudhansu S.; Dhir, Manmath K.; Patnaik, Ashis; Panigrahi, Souvagya

    2016-01-01

    Spinal schwannomas account for about 25% of primary intradural spinal cord tumors in adult. The prognosis for spinal schwannomas is excellent in most cases. Complete resection is curative. However following subtotal removal, recurrence develops after several years. We describe a case of recurrent spinal schwannoma who had been operated twice before for same disease. The possible cause of recurrence and difficulties in reoperation are discussed. PMID:27695564

  9. Spinal angiolipoma with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, S; Krishnamoorthy, T; Ashalatha, R; Kesavadas, C

    2007-10-01

    Angiolipoma is a rare tumor of the spine commonly presenting with compressive myelopathy. We report a spinal angiolipoma in a 14-year-old patient with acute spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). To our knowledge this is the first reported case of a spinal angiolipoma presenting with SAH, associated with post-subclavian coarctation with diffuse hypoplasia of the descending aorta. This association of coarctation of aorta, aortic hypoplasia and spinal angiolipoma has also not been reported previously.

  10. Effects of mechanical horseback riding velocity on spinal alignment in young adults.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae-Heon; Cho, Woon-Su; Lee, Seong-Jin; Park, Chi-Bok; Park, Jang-Sung

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine if the velocity of mechanical horseback-riding training can improve spinal alignment in young adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-six subjects were enrolled in this study. The subjects were randomly allocated into high-, moderate-, and low-velocity mechanical horseback-riding training groups. All participants completed one 20-minute session per day, 3 days per week, for 6 weeks. The evaluation was performed before and 6 weeks after the training intervention. The spinal alignment was measured by a Formetric III device. The measurement items were kyphotic angle, lordotic angle, trunk inclination, pelvic torsion, pelvic rotation, and lateral deviation. The data were analyzed using analysis of covariance to determine the statistical significance. [Results] The kyphotic angle and trunk inclination were significantly different among the groups. The kyphotic angles of the high- and moderate-velocity groups were significantly lower than that of the low-velocity group after the intervention. The trunk inclination of the high-velocity group was significantly lower than that of the low-velocity group after intervention. [Conclusion] Higher-velocity mechanical horseback-riding training is more effective than lower-velocity mechanical horseback-riding training for improving spinal alignment.

  11. Effects of mechanical horseback riding velocity on spinal alignment in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae-Heon; Cho, Woon-Su; Lee, Seong-Jin; Park, Chi-Bok; Park, Jang-Sung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine if the velocity of mechanical horseback-riding training can improve spinal alignment in young adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-six subjects were enrolled in this study. The subjects were randomly allocated into high-, moderate-, and low-velocity mechanical horseback-riding training groups. All participants completed one 20-minute session per day, 3 days per week, for 6 weeks. The evaluation was performed before and 6 weeks after the training intervention. The spinal alignment was measured by a Formetric III device. The measurement items were kyphotic angle, lordotic angle, trunk inclination, pelvic torsion, pelvic rotation, and lateral deviation. The data were analyzed using analysis of covariance to determine the statistical significance. [Results] The kyphotic angle and trunk inclination were significantly different among the groups. The kyphotic angles of the high- and moderate-velocity groups were significantly lower than that of the low-velocity group after the intervention. The trunk inclination of the high-velocity group was significantly lower than that of the low-velocity group after intervention. [Conclusion] Higher-velocity mechanical horseback-riding training is more effective than lower-velocity mechanical horseback-riding training for improving spinal alignment. PMID:27390428

  12. The Friction Evolution of Siliceous Rocks during High-Velocity Slip By Thermal Activated Transition from Powder Lubrication and Rolling to Gouge Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Madden, A. S.; Reches, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Experimental analyses of the frictional strength of siliceous rocks (granite, tonalite, and diorite) sheared in a rotary apparatus in the velocity range of 0.002-1 m/s (0.3-7.1 MPa, 0.002 - 1 m/s, total slip up to 60 m) revealed that: (1) During long slip-distances (tens of m) at low to moderate velocity (< 5 cm/s) the friction coefficient evolves with a weakening-strengthening-weakening path (Fig. 1a); and (2) The dependence of the friction coefficient on the slip-velocity is non-monotonous with weakening-strengthening-weakening sections (Fig. 1b) (Reches & Lockner, 2010). In a typical run with granite (Fig. 1a), the friction coefficient dropped from a static value of 0.86 to a steady value of 0.35 after 2.5 m of slip, followed by a sharp increase to 0.5±0.1 after ~7 m that was maintained for the next 10 m. Then, the friction started to increase again at 17 m to 0.78 at ~20 m, and finally dropped rapidly to 0.4. The first weakening stage (< 2.5m) is associated with formation of cohesive gouge flakes made of mixture of partially hydrated and recrystallized fine-grained gouge (20-50 nm). The top of these flakes displayed cylindrical rolls, 1 micron in diameter, oriented normal to slip, and the macroscopic weakening correlates with the presence of abundant rolls. SEM analysis of fault surfaces at the second weakening stage (> 17m) revealed abundant melt features such as stretched melt drops, melt coating of solid grains and abundant voids in the melt matrix, contrasting with the total melt in high velocity experiments. These friction-distance curves in our granite experiments (e.g., Fig. 1a) bears a similar path of gabbro friction curve at high velocity (Hirose and Shimamoto 2005). We propose that this non-monotonous friction evolution can be explained as a phase transition from initial pulverization of the brittle stage (low velocity, low normal stress, small slip distance), that leads to powder lubrication by powder rolling, to partial-to-full melting of the

  13. High-velocity frictional behavior of Longmenshan fault gouge from Hongkou outcrop and its implications for dynamic weakening of fault during the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togo, Tetsuhiro; Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Ma, Shengli; Hirose, Takehiro

    2011-06-01

    High-velocity friction experiments were conducted on clayey fault gouge collected from Hongkou outcrop of Beichuan fault, located at the southwestern part of Longmenshan fault system that caused the disastrous 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. The ultimate purpose of this study is to reproduce this earthquake by modeling based on measured frictional properties. Dry gouge of about 1 mm in thickness was deformed dry at slip rates of 0.01 to 1.3 m/s and at normal stresses of 0.61 to 3.04 MPa, using a rotary-shear high-velocity frictional testing machine. The gouge displays slip weakening behavior as initial peak friction decays towards steady-state values after a given displacement. Both peak friction and steady-state friction remain high at slow slip rates are examined and gouge only exhibits dramatic weakening at high slip rates, with steady-state friction coefficient values of about 0.1 to 0.2. Specific fracture energy ranges from 1 to 4 MN/m in our results and this is of the same order as seismically determined values. Low friction coefficients measured on experimental faults are in broad agreement with lack of thermal anomaly observed from temperature measurements in WFSD-1 drill hole (Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling Project), which can be explained by even smaller friction coefficient for the Wenchuan earthquake fault. High-velocity friction experiments with pore water needs to be done to see if even smaller friction is attained or not. Shiny slickenside surfaces form at high slip rates, but not at slow slip rates. Slip zone with slickenside surface changes its color to dark brown and forms duplex-like microstructures, which are similar to those microstructures found in the fault gouges from the Hongkou outcrop. Detailed comparisons between experimentally deformed gouge samples and WFSD drill cores in the future will reveal how much we could reproduce the dynamic weakening processes in operation in fault zones during Wenchuan earthquake at present.

  14. Crustal high-velocity anomaly at the East European Craton margin in SE Poland (TESZ) modelled by 3-D seismic tomography of refracted and reflected arrivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Środa, Piotr; Dec, Monika

    2016-04-01

    The area of Trans-European Suture Zone in SE Poland represents a contact of major tectonic units of different consolidation age - from the Precambrian East European Craton, through Palaeozoic West European Platform to Cenozoic Carpathian orogen. The region was built by several phases of crustal accretion, which resulted in a complex collage of tectonic blocks. In 2000, this region was studied by several seismic wide-angle profiles of CELEBRATION 2000 experiment, providing a dense coverage of seismic data in SE Poland and allowing for detailed investigations of the crustal structure and properties in this area. Beneath the marginal part of the EEC, the 2-D modelling of in-line data form several CELEBRATION profiles revealed a prominent high P-wave velocity anomaly in the upper crust, with Vp of 6.7-7.1 km/s, starting at 10-16 km depth (e.g., Środa et al., 2006). Anomalously high velocities are observed in the area located approximately beneath Lublin trough, to the NE of Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone. Based on 3-D tomography of first arrivals of in- and off-line CELEBRATION 2000 recordings (Malinowski et al., 2008), elevated velocities are also reported in the same area and seem to continue to the SW, off the craton margin. Gravimetric modelling also revealed anomalously high density in the same region at similar depths. High seismic velocities and densities are interpreted as indicative for a pronounced mafic intrusion, possibly related to extensional processes at the EEC margin. Previous 3-D models of the high-velocity intrusion were based on first arrivals (crustal refractions) only. In this study, also off-line reflections (not modelled up to now) are used, in order to enlarge the data set and to better constrain the geometry and properties of the velocity anomaly. A code for 3-D joint tomographic inversion of refracted and reflected arrivals, with model parametrization allowing for velocity discontinuities was used (Rawlinson, 2007). With this approach, besides the

  15. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Fang, Marong; Chen, Haohao; Gou, Fangming; Ding, Mingxing

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies. PMID:25598784

  16. Four cases of spinal epidural angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Sim, Kenneth; Tsui, Alpha; Paldor, Iddo; Kaye, Andrew H; Gaillard, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumours composed of mature fatty tissue and abnormal vascular elements, most commonly found within the posterior spinal epidural space. Most tumours are located within the mid-thoracic spine; in contrast thoracolumbar junction and purely lumbar angiolipomas are rare. We report a case series of four spinal angiolipomas, including a thoracolumbar junction and a purely lumbar tumour.

  17. Spinal reflexes in brain death.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Yesim; Çiftçi, Yeliz; Incesu, Tülay Kurt; Seçil, Yaprak; Akhan, Galip

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous and reflex movements have been described in brain death and these unusual movements might cause uncertainties in diagnosis. In this study we evaluated the presence of spinal reflexes in patients who fulfilled the criteria for brain death. Thirty-two (22 %) of 144 patients presented unexpected motor movements spontaneously or during examinations. These patients exhibited the following signs: undulating toe, increased deep tendon reflexes, plantar responses, Lazarus sign, flexion-withdrawal reflex, facial myokymia, neck-arm flexion, finger jerks and fasciculations. In comparison, there were no significant differences in age, sex, etiology of brain death and hemodynamic laboratory findings in patients with and without reflex motor movement. Spinal reflexes should be well recognized by physicians and it should be born in mind that brain death can be determined in the presence of spinal reflexes.

  18. Phase-resolved optical coherence tomography and optical Doppler tomography for imaging blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yonghua; Chen, Zhongping; Saxer, Christopher; Xiang, Shaohua; Boer, Johannes F. de; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2000-01-15

    We have developed a novel phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical Doppler tomography (ODT) system that uses phase information derived from a Hilbert transformation to image blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity. Using the phase change between sequential scans to construct flow-velocity imaging, this technique decouples spatial resolution and velocity sensitivity in flow images and increases imaging speed by more than 2 orders of magnitude without compromising spatial resolution or velocity sensitivity. The minimum flow velocity that can be detected with an axial-line scanning speed of 400 Hz and an average phase change over eight sequential scans is as low as 10 {mu}m/s , while a spatial resolution of 10 {mu}m is maintained. Using this technique, we present what are to our knowledge the first phase-resolved OCT/ODT images of blood flow in human skin. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  19. Cyclic oxidation of cobalt-chromium-aluminum-yttrium and aluminide coatings on IN-100 and VIA alloys in high velocity gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Embedded-alumina-particle aluminide (EAPA) coated and CoCrAlY coated IN-100 and NASA-TRW-VIA specimens were cyclically oxidation tested in a high velocity (approximately Mach 1) gas flame at 1093 C (2000 F). The EAPA coatings on both alloys performed very similarly to commercial pack aluminide coatings with respect to weight change and thermal fatigue cracking. The CoCrAlY coating on IN-100 had weight changes similar to commercial pack aluminide coatings but no thermal fatigue cracks appeared at 300 hours. The CoCrAlY coating on VIA performed significantly better than the commercial aluminide coatings, providing oxidation protection (based on weight change) to 450 hours and thermal fatigue crack prevention to at least 600 hours.

  20. History of high-velocity impact water trauma at Letterman Army Medical Center: a 54-year experience with the Golden Gate Bridge.

    PubMed

    Lafave, M; LaPorta, A J; Hutton, J; Mallory, P L

    1995-04-01

    Three time frames were studied during the 54-year history of the Golden Gate Bridge from 1937 to 1991. During that period of time, there were 918 documented jumps from this majestic structure to the water 250 feet below. The last 15 years provided us with 297 consecutive patients, all brought to one institution, which were retrospectively reviewed and categorized as to site and type of injury for survivors and fatalities. This is the largest high-velocity water impact trauma series in the world. Certain unique characteristics of the Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco Bay lend itself to this extremely popular and successful form of suicide. These characteristics, as well as personal factors of free-fall water impact from each patient, are summarized and discussed in this paper.

  1. Study of Chelyabinsk LL5 meteorite fragment with a light lithology and its fusion crust using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimova, Alevtina A.; Petrova, Evgeniya V.; Grokhovsky, Victor I.; Oshtrakh, Michael I. Semionkin, Vladimir A.

    2014-10-27

    Study of Chelyabinsk LL5 ordinary chondrite fragment with a light lithology and its fusion crust, fallen on February 15, 2013, in Russian Federation, was carried out using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution. The Mössbauer spectra of the internal matter and fusion crust were fitted and all components were related to iron-bearing phases such as olivine, pyroxene, troilite, Fe-Ni-Co alloy, and chromite in the internal matter and olivine, pyroxene, troilite, Fe-Ni-Co alloy, and magnesioferrite in the fusion crust. A comparison of the content of different phases in the internal matter and in the fusion crust of this fragment showed that ferric compounds resulted from olivine, pyroxene, and troilite combustion in the atmosphere.

  2. Study of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution: Implication for the analysis of ferritin-like iron cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alenkina, I. V.; Oshtrakh, M. I.; Tugarova, A. V.; Biró, B.; Semionkin, V. A.; Kamnev, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    The results of a comparative study of two samples of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense (strain Sp245) prepared in different conditions and of human liver ferritin using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution demonstrated the presence of ferritin-like iron (i.e. iron similar to that found in ferritin-like proteins) in the bacterium. Mössbauer spectra of these samples were fitted in two ways: as a rough approximation using a one quadrupole doublet fit (the homogeneous iron core model) and using a superposition of quadrupole doublets (the heterogeneous iron core model). Both results demonstrated differences in the Mössbauer parameters for mammalian ferritin and for bacterial ferritin-like iron. Moreover, some differences in the Mössbauer parameters were observed between the two samples of A. brasilense Sp245 related to the differences in their preparation conditions.

  3. A Kiloparsec-scale Nuclear Stellar Disk in the Milky Way as a Possible Explanation of the High Velocity Peaks in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debattista, Victor P.; Ness, Melissa; Earp, Samuel W. F.; Cole, David R.

    2015-10-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment has measured the stellar velocities of red giant stars in the inner Milky Way. We confirm that the line of sight velocity distributions (LOSVDs) in the mid-plane exhibit a second peak at high velocities, whereas those at | b| =2^\\circ do not. We use a high resolution simulation of a barred galaxy, which crucially includes gas and star formation, to guide our interpretation of the LOSVDs. We show that the data are fully consistent with the presence of a thin, rapidly rotating, nuclear disk extending to ∼1 kpc. This nuclear disk is orientated perpendicular to the bar and is likely to be composed of stars on x2 orbits. The gas in the simulation is able to fall onto such orbits, leading to stars populating an orthogonal disk.

  4. Spinal injuries in contact sports.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joseph B; Zarzour, Robert; Moorman, Claude T

    2006-02-01

    Contact and collision sports such as American football expose the athlete to a wide array of potential injuries. Knee injuries garner much of the attention, but spinal injuries are potentially catastrophic and all levels of medical coverage of football must be knowledgeable and prepared to attend to an athlete with a neck injury. Of the other possible spinal conditions, some resolve on their own, others might require conservative therapy, and still others might require surgical intervention. The spectrum of potential injury is wide, yet the medical team must practice and prepare to treat the possible catastrophic neck injury.

  5. SHORT-DURATION LENSING EVENTS. I. WIDE-ORBIT PLANETS? FREE-FLOATING LOW-MASS OBJECTS? OR HIGH-VELOCITY STARS?

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2012-08-01

    Short-duration lensing events tend to be generated by low-mass lenses or by lenses with high transverse velocities. Furthermore, for any given lens mass and speed, events of short duration are preferentially caused by nearby lenses (mesolenses) that can be studied in detail, or else by lenses so close to the source star that finite-source-size effects may be detected, yielding information about both the Einstein ring radius and the surface of the lensed star. Planets causing short-duration events may be in orbits with any orientation, and may have semimajor axes smaller than 1 AU, or they may reach the outer limits of their planetary systems, in the region corresponding to the solar system's Oort Cloud. They can have masses larger than Jupiter's or smaller than Pluto's. Lensing therefore has a unique potential to expand our understanding of planetary systems. A particular advantage of lensing is that it can provide precision measurements of system parameters, including the masses of and projected separation between star and planet. We demonstrate how the parameters can be extracted and show that a great deal can be learned. For example, it is remarkable that the gravitational mass of nearby free-floating planet-mass lenses can be measured by complementing observations of a photometric event with deep images that detect the planet itself. A fraction of short events may be caused by high-velocity stars located within a kiloparsec. Many high-velocity lenses are likely to be neutron stars that received large natal kicks. Other high-speed stars may be members of the halo population. Still others may be hypervelocity stars that have been ejected from the Galactic center, or runaway stars escaped from close binaries, possibly including the progenitor binaries of Type Ia supernovae.

  6. SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SN 2012fr: A LUMINOUS, NORMAL TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA WITH EARLY HIGH-VELOCITY FEATURES AND A LATE VELOCITY PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, M. J.; Scalzo, R. A.; Sim, S. A.; Tucker, B. E.; Yuan, F.; Schmidt, B. P.; Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A. V.; Silverman, J. M.; Contreras, C.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M.; Morrell, N.; Jha, S. W.; McCully, C.; Anderson, J. P.; De Jaeger, T.; Forster, F.; Benetti, S.; Bufano, F.; and others

    2013-06-10

    We present 65 optical spectra of the Type Ia SN 2012fr, 33 of which were obtained before maximum light. At early times, SN 2012fr shows clear evidence of a high-velocity feature (HVF) in the Si II {lambda}6355 line that can be cleanly decoupled from the lower velocity ''photospheric'' component. This Si II {lambda}6355 HVF fades by phase -5; subsequently, the photospheric component exhibits a very narrow velocity width and remains at a nearly constant velocity of {approx}12,000 km s{sup -1} until at least five weeks after maximum brightness. The Ca II infrared triplet exhibits similar evidence for both a photospheric component at v Almost-Equal-To 12,000 km s{sup -1} with narrow line width and long velocity plateau, as well as an HVF beginning at v Almost-Equal-To 31,000 km s{sup -1} two weeks before maximum. SN 2012fr resides on the border between the ''shallow silicon'' and ''core-normal'' subclasses in the Branch et al. classification scheme, and on the border between normal and high-velocity Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Wang et al. system. Though it is a clear member of the ''low velocity gradient'' group of SNe Ia and exhibits a very slow light-curve decline, it shows key dissimilarities with the overluminous SN 1991T or SN 1999aa subclasses of SNe Ia. SN 2012fr represents a well-observed SN Ia at the luminous end of the normal SN Ia distribution and a key transitional event between nominal spectroscopic subclasses of SNe Ia.

  7. Management of Chronic Spinal Cord Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Gary M.; Ganguly, Karunesh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Both acute and chronic spinal cord disorders present multisystem management problems to the clinician. This article highlights key issues associated with chronic spinal cord dysfunction. Recent Findings: Advances in symptomatic management for chronic spinal cord dysfunction include use of botulinum toxin to manage detrusor hyperreflexia, pregabalin for management of neuropathic pain, and intensive locomotor training for improved walking ability in incomplete spinal cord injuries. Summary: The care of spinal cord dysfunction has advanced significantly over the past 2 decades. Management and treatment of neurologic and non-neurologic complications of chronic myelopathies ensure that each patient will be able to maximize their functional independence and quality of life. PMID:25651225

  8. Vestibulo-spinal reflex mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The specific objectives of experiments designed to investigate postural reflex behavior during sustained weightlessness are discussed. The first is to investigate, during prolonged weightlessness with Hoffmann response (H-reflex) measurement procedures, vestibulo-spinal reflexes associated with vestibular (otolith) responses evoked during an applied linear acceleration. This objective includes not only an evaluation of otolith-induced changes in a major postural muscle but also an investigation with this technique of the adaptive process of the vestibular system and spinal reflex mechanisms to this unique environment. The second objective is to relate space motion sickness to the results of this investigation. Finally, a return to the vestibulo-spinal and postural reflexes to normal values following the flight will be examined. The flight experiment involves activation of nerve tissue (tibial N) with electrical shock and the recording of resulting muscle activity (soleus) with surface electrodes. Soleus/spinal H-reflex testing procedures will be used in conjuction with linear acceleration through the subject's X-axis.

  9. Biomechanics of Degenerative Spinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Justin A.; Jakoi, Andre M.

    2016-01-01

    The spine has several important functions including load transmission, permission of limited motion, and protection of the spinal cord. The vertebrae form functional spinal units, which represent the smallest segment that has characteristics of the entire spinal column. Discs and paired facet joints within each functional unit form a three-joint complex between which loads are transmitted. Surrounding the spinal motion segment are ligaments, composed of elastin and collagen, and joint capsules which restrict motion to within normal limits. Ligaments have variable strengths and act via different lever arm lengths to contribute to spinal stability. As a consequence of the longer moment arm from the spinous process to the instantaneous axis of rotation, inherently weaker ligaments (interspinous and supraspinous) are able to provide resistance to excessive flexion. Degenerative processes of the spine are a normal result of aging and occur on a spectrum. During the second decade of life, the intervertebral disc demonstrates histologic evidence of nucleus pulposus degradation caused by reduced end plate blood supply. As disc height decreases, the functional unit is capable of an increased range of axial rotation which subjects the posterior facet capsules to greater mechanical loads. A concurrent change in load transmission across the end plates and translation of the instantaneous axis of rotation further increase the degenerative processes at adjacent structures. The behavior of the functional unit is impacted by these processes and is reflected by changes in the stress-strain relationship. Back pain and other clinical symptoms may occur as a result of the biomechanical alterations of degeneration. PMID:27114783

  10. Management of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Jon; Tomkins-Lane, Christy

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) affects more than 200,000 adults in the United States, resulting in substantial pain and disability. It is the most common reason for spinal surgery in patients over 65 years. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a clinical syndrome of pain in the buttocks or lower extremities, with or without back pain. It is associated with reduced space available for the neural and vascular elements of the lumbar spine. The condition is often exacerbated by standing, walking, or lumbar extension and relieved by forward flexion, sitting, or recumbency. Clinical care and research into lumbar spinal stenosis is complicated by the heterogeneity of the condition, the lack of standard criteria for diagnosis and inclusion in studies, and high rates of anatomic stenosis on imaging studies in older people who are completely asymptomatic. The options for non-surgical management include drugs, physiotherapy, spinal injections, lifestyle modification, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation. However, few high quality randomized trials have looked at conservative management. A systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to recommend any specific type of non-surgical treatment. Several different surgical procedures are used to treat patients who do not improve with non-operative therapies. Given that rapid deterioration is rare and that symptoms often wax and wane or gradually improve, surgery is almost always elective and considered only if sufficiently bothersome symptoms persist despite trials of less invasive interventions. Outcomes (leg pain and disability) seem to be better for surgery than for non-operative treatment, but the evidence is heterogeneous and often of limited quality. PMID:26727925

  11. [Iatrogenic spinal epidermoid tumors. A late complication of spinal puncture].

    PubMed

    Reina, M A; López-García, A; Dittmann, M; de Andrés, J A; Blázquez, M G

    1996-04-01

    INTRODUCTION. Epidermoid tumors in the spinal canal are rare. Whether congenitally or iatrogenically caused, they form as the result of epidermal cells implanted within the spinal channel. Such implantation can occur during a variety of procedures and events such as bullet wounds, surgery, myelography or punctures for diagnosis, anesthesia or treatment. Although this complication is not discussed in books or journals on anesthesiology, we have found it mentioned in over 100 published cases reporting iatrogenically caused spinal epidermoid tumors. ETIOPATHOGENESIS. Iatrogenic epidermoid tumors of the spine derive from the implantation of epidermal tissue transported inside the spinal canal during lumbar punctures without guidance or with inadequate guidance. There is ample evidence that such tumors are iatrogenic. All cases occur in patients with a history of lumbar puncture. They are rarely associated with congenital anomalies. They are extramedullary. They tend to develop near sites of earlier lumbar puncture, usually near the conus medullaris and the cauda equina. Iatrogenic epidermoid tumors of the spine have been reproduced experimentally in two studies in which autologous skin fragments were implanted in the spinal canal. CLINICAL SIGNS. These tumors are well tolerated by patients for extended periods of time, ranging from 2 to 10 years. At the cauda equinus, tumors can grow slowly for long periods without signs of nerve compression. Symptoms are directly related to tumor size and site. All patients with tumors at the cauda equinus report severe pain radiating toward the roots of compressed nerves. Nuclear magnetic resonance makes it possible to detect the tumor without administration of intrathecal contrast. At present gadolinium-DTPA improves the image so that these tumors can be distinguished from other types. The prognosis for epidermoid tumors of the spine is good, as they are histologically benign. Treatment is always surgical. CONCLUSION. Although the

  12. Estimating Uncertainty and Frequency of High-Velocity Paleotsunami Inundation From Geologic Records in Back Barrier Settings, Test Locality Cannon Beach, Oregon, Central Cascadia Margin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, C. D.; Jaffe, B.; Peters, R.

    2004-12-01

    Historic-tsunami sand deposits (1964 Alaskan far-field source) in Cascadia back barrier settings have been examined for distinctive criteria from Seaside, OR, Crescent City, CA, and Port Alberni, BC. These historic Pacific Northwest criteria have been combined with similar data from recent tsunami investigations in Papua New Guinea, Peru, and Japan to discriminate high-velocity paleotsunami inundation (at least 0.5 m/s) from non-tsunami deposition such as river flood, storm surge, extreme spring-tide, debris flow, coseismic-fluidization, and anthropogenic activities. The criteria are semi-quantitatively analyzed to evaluate the certainty of paleotsunami inundation records from geologic deposits. The criteria used for a representative test locality Cannon Beach, Oregon, include (1) event dating, (2) anomalous sand lithology, (3) debris cap, (4) distinct layer(s), (5), fining-upward grain-size, (6) laterally continuous deposition (10's of meters), (7) landward-thinning deposition (100's of meters), (8) landward-fining deposits (100's of meters), (9) beach sand mineralogy, and (10) marine diatoms. At least three nearest-neighbor' distal sites of target sand sheets were evaluated for the ten criteria, yielding a certainty index (CI). Four of the events (2-5) demonstrate high certainties (7-9) for tsunami origins. Event data as follows: Event (1/Far-field) Age (1964) CI (6) ID (50m) RI (260yr), Event (2/Cascadia) Age (1700AD) CI (8) ID (250m) RI (325yr), Event (3/Unknown) Age (0.8-0.9ka) CI (7) ID (400m) RI (434yr), Event (4/Cascadia) Age (1.1ka) CI (8) ID (500m) RI (651yr), Event (5/Cascadia) Age (1.3ka) CI (9) ID (900m) RI (1301yr). High-velocity inundation distances (ID) of 50-900m were measured by straight line from the crest of the beach barrier (6 m elevation contour). The tsunami recurrence interval (RI) where RI=(n+1)/m and n=record length (1300yr) is calculated for the 5 events. The event recurrence interval is then plotted against inundation distance (Y

  13. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; da Rocha, Ivan Dias

    2012-01-01

    This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a “disease that should not be treated.” Over the last two decades, several studies have been performed to obtain more effective treatments for spinal cord injury. Most of these studies approach a patient with acute spinal cord injury in one of four manners: corrective surgery or a physical, biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life. PMID:23070351

  14. Ultrasonic cavitation erosion of high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) sprayed near-nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coating in NaCl solution.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sheng; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Yugui; Qin, Yujiao; Lin, Jinran

    2015-09-01

    The high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) spraying process was used to prepare near-nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coating. The cavitation erosion behavior and mechanism of the coating in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution were analyzed in detail. The results showed that the amorphous phase and WC grain were present in the coating. The cavitation erosion resistance of the coating was about 1.27 times that of the stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti under the same testing conditions. The effects of erosion time on the microstructural evolution were discussed. It was revealed that cracks initiated at the edge of pre-existing pores and propagated along the carbide-binder interface, leading to the pull-out of carbide particle and the formation of pits and craters on the surface. The main failure mechanism of the coating was erosion of the binder phases, brittle detachment of hard phases and formation of pitting corrosion products. PMID:25617967

  15. Comparison of the Mechanical and Electrochemical Properties of WC-25Co Coatings Obtained by High Velocity Oxy-Fuel and Cold Gas Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, M.; Dosta, S.; Fernández, J.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Cold gas spray (CGS) coatings were previously produced by spraying WC-25Co cermet powders onto Al7075-T6 and low-carbon steel substrates. Unlike conventional flame spray techniques (e.g., high-velocity oxy-fuel; HVOF), no melting of the powder occurs; the particles are deformed and bond together after being sprayed by a supersonic jet of compressed gas, thereby building up several layers and forming a coating. WC-Co cermets are used in wear-resistant parts, because of their combination of mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. XRD tests were previously run on the initial powder and the coatings to determine possible phase changes during spraying. The bonding strength of the coatings was measured by adhesion tests. Here, WC-25Co coatings were also deposited on the same substrates by HVOF spraying. The wear resistance and fracture toughness of the coatings obtained previously by CGS and the HVOF coatings obtained here were studied. Their corrosion resistance was determined by electrochemical measurements. It was possible to achieve thick, dense, and hard CGS coatings on Al7075-T6 and low-carbon steel substrates, with better or the same mechanical and electrochemical properties as those of the HVOF coatings; making the former a highly competitive method for producing WC-25Co coatings.

  16. High-Temperature Behavior of a High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Harpreet; Prakash, Satya

    2012-08-01

    High-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed coatings have the potential to enhance the high-temperature oxidation, corrosion, and erosion-corrosion resistance of boiler steels. In the current work, 75 pct chromium carbide-25 pct (nickel-20 pct chromium) [Cr3C2-NiCr] coating was deposited on ASTM SA213-T22 boiler steel using the HVOF thermal spray process. High-temperature oxidation, hot corrosion, and erosion-corrosion behavior of the coated and bare steel was evaluated in the air, molten salt [Na2SO4-82 pct Fe2(SO4)3], and actual boiler environments under cyclic conditions. Weight-change measurements were taken at the end of each cycle. Efforts were made to formulate the kinetics of the oxidation, corrosion, and erosion-corrosion. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) techniques were used to analyze the oxidation products. The coating was found to be intact and spallation free in all the environments of the study in general, whereas the bare steel suffered extensive spallation and a relatively higher rate of degradation. The coating was found to be useful to enhance the high-temperature resistance of the steel in all the three environments in this study.

  17. CELFE: Coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian Finite Element program for high velocity impact. Part 1: Theory and formulation. [hydroelasto-viscoplastic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    A 3-D finite element program capable of simulating the dynamic behavior in the vicinity of the impact point, together with predicting the dynamic response in the remaining part of the structural component subjected to high velocity impact is discussed. The finite algorithm is formulated in a general moving coordinate system. In the vicinity of the impact point contained by a moving failure front, the relative velocity of the coordinate system will approach the material particle velocity. The dynamic behavior inside the region is described by Eulerian formulation based on a hydroelasto-viscoplastic model. The failure front which can be regarded as the boundary of the impact zone is described by a transition layer. The layer changes the representation from the Eulerian mode to the Lagrangian mode outside the failure front by varying the relative velocity of the coordinate system to zero. The dynamic response in the remaining part of the structure described by the Lagrangian formulation is treated using advanced structural analysis. An interfacing algorithm for coupling CELFE with NASTRAN is constructed to provide computational capabilities for large structures.

  18. Effect of the increase in the entrance convergent section length of the gun nozzle on the high-velocity oxygen fuel and cold spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

    2001-09-01

    Nozzle geometry, which influences combustion gas dynamics and, therefore, sprayed particle behavior, is one of the most important parameters in the high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. The nozzle geometry is also important in the cold spray method. The gas flows in the entrance convergent section of the nozzle exhibit a relatively higher temperature and are subsonic; thus, this region is most suitable for heating spray particles. In this study, numerical simulation and experiments investigated the effect of the entrance geometry of the gun nozzle on the HVOF process. The process changes inside the nozzle, as obtained by numerical simulation studies, were related to the coating properties. An Al2O3-40 mass% TiO2 powder was used for the experimental studies. The change in entrance convergent section length (rather than barrel part length or total length) of the gun nozzle had a significant effect on the deposition efficiency, microstructure, and hardness. The deposition efficiency and hardness increased as this geometry increased. On the other hand, the calculated and measured particle velocity showed a slight decrease. This effect on the HVOF process will also be applied to the nozzle design for the cold spray method.

  19. Experimental and numerical evaluation of the performance of supersonic two-stage high-velocity oxy-fuel thermal spray (Warm Spray) gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katanoda, H.; Morita, H.; Komatsu, M.; Kuroda, S.

    2011-03-01

    The water-cooled supersonic two-stage high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun was developed to make a coating of temperature-sensitive material, such as titanium, on a substrate. The gun has a combustion chamber (CC) followed by a mixing chamber (MC), in which the combustion gas is mixed with the nitrogen gas at room temperature. The mixed gas is accelerated to supersonic speed through a converging-diverging (C-D) nozzle followed by a straight passage called the barrel. This paper proposes an experimental procedure to estimate the cooling rate of CC, MC and barrel separately. Then, the mathematical model is presented to predict the pressure and temperature in the MC for the specific mass flow rates of fuel, oxygen and nitrogen by assuming chemical equilibrium with water-cooling in the CC and MC, and frozen flow with constant specific heat from stagnant condition to the throat in the CC and MC. Finally, the present mathematical model was validated by comparing the calculated and measured stagnant pressures of the CC of the two-stage HVOF gun.

  20. APEX CO (9-8) MAPPING OF AN EXTREMELY HIGH VELOCITY AND JET-LIKE OUTFLOW IN A HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Keping; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf; Leurini, Silvia; Leinz, Christian

    2011-12-10

    Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) mapping observations in CO (9-8) and (4-3) toward a high-mass star-forming region, NGC 6334 I, are presented. The CO (9-8) map has a 6.''4 resolution, revealing a {approx}0.5 pc, jet-like, and bipolar outflow. This is the first map of a molecular outflow in a THz line. The CO (9-8) and (4-3) lines arising from the outflow lobes both show extremely high velocity line wings, and their ratios indicate a gas temperature greater than 100 K and a density higher than 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}. The spatial-velocity structure of the CO (9-8) data is typical of a bow-shock-driven flow, which is consistent with the association between the bipolar outflow and the infrared bow-shaped tips. In short, the observations unveil a highly excited and collimated component in a bipolar outflow that is powered by a high-mass protostar, and provide insights into the driving mechanism of the outflow. Meanwhile, the observations demonstrate that high-quality mapping observations can be performed with the new THz receiver on APEX.

  1. Characterization of Oxide Scales Formed on High-Velocity Oxyfuel-Sprayed Ni-Co-Cr-Al-Y + ReTa Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. B.; Ko, J. H.; Yi, J. H.

    2005-09-01

    A high-velocity oxyfuel-sprayed 30 wt.% Ni-20 wt.% Co-30 wt.% Cr-10 wt.% Al-2 wt.% Y-4 wt.% Re-4 wt.% Ta coating was oxidized between 1000 and 1200 °C for up to 200 h in air, and the oxide scales were examined. The dense, sprayed coating consisted mainly of Cr3Ni2, Ni3Al, Ni3Ta, Ni, NiO, Al5Y3O12, and Cr2O3. Intermetallics and some oxides formed during spraying. During oxidation, mainly αAl2O3, along with some Al5Y3O12, CoAl2O4, CoCr2O4, Ta2O5, and Ta2O2.2 formed on the coating. The preferential oxidation of Al to form the Al-rich scales resulted in the formation of an Al-depleted region beneath the scales. Rhenium, being the most noble element, was distributed throughout the oxide scale and the coating, without forming any independent oxides.

  2. Microstructural Characterization and Wear Behavior of Nano-Boride Dispersed Coating on AISI 304 Stainless Steel by Hybrid High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Spraying Laser Surface Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prashant; Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta

    2015-07-01

    The current study concerns the detailed microstructural characterization and investigation of wear behavior of nano-boride dispersed coating developed on AISI 304 stainless steel by high velocity oxy-fuel spray deposition of nickel-based alloy and subsequent laser melting. There is a significant refinement and homogenization of microstructure with improvement in microhardness due to laser surface melting (1200 VHN as compared to 945 VHN of as-sprayed and 250 VHN of as-received substrate). The high temperature phase stability of the as-coated and laser melted surface has been studied by differential scanning calorimeter followed by detailed phase analysis at room and elevated temperature. There is a significant improvement in wear resistance of laser melted surface as compared to as-sprayed and the as-received one due to increased hardness and reduced coefficient of friction. The mechanism of wear has been investigated in details. Corrosion resistance of the coating in a 3.56 wt pct NaCl solution is significantly improved (4.43 E-2 mm/year as compared to 5 E-1 mm/year of as-sprayed and 1.66 mm/year of as-received substrate) due to laser surface melting as compared to as-sprayed surface.

  3. Improvement in wear and corrosion resistance of AISI 1020 steel by high velocity oxy-fuel spray coating containing Ni-Cr-B-Si-Fe-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, M.; Thanu, A. Justin; Gopalakrishnan, P.

    2012-04-01

    In this investigation, AISI 1020 low carbon steel has been selected as the base material. The Ni based super alloy powder NiCrBSiFeC was sprayed on the base material using high velocity oxy-fuel spraying (HVOF) technique. The thickness of the coating was approximately 0.5 mm (500 μm). The coating was characterized using optical microscopy, Vickers microhardness testing, X-ray diffraction technique and scanning electron microscopy. Dry sliding wear tests were carried out at 3 m/s sliding speed under the load of 10 N for 1000 m sliding distance at various temperatures i.e., 35° C, 250° C and 350° C. The corrosion test was carried out in 1 M copper chloride in acetic acid solution. The polarization studies were also conducted for both base material and coating. The improvement in microhardness from 1.72 GPa (175 HV0.05) to 10.54 GPa (1075 HV0.05) was observed. The coatings exhibited 3-6 times improved wear resistance as compared with base material. Also, the corrosion rate was reduced by 3.5 times due to the presence of coatings.

  4. Whole Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyeong-Wook; Song, Jae Gyok; Ryu, Jae-Wook

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male who had no underlying disease, including coagulopathy, underwent thoracotomy and bleeding control due to hemothorax. On the fifth postoperative day, paralysis of both lower limbs occurred. Urgent spine magnetic resonance imaging showed a massive anterior spinal epidural hematoma from C2 to L1 level with different signal intensities, which was suspected to be staged hemorrhage. Hematoma evacuation with decompressive laminectomy was performed. The patient's neurologic deterioration was recovered immediately, and he was discharged without neurological deficits. A drug history of naftazone, which could induce a drug-induced platelet dysfunction, was revealed retrospectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of whole spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a young patient, with a history of hemorrhoid medication. PMID:24967052

  5. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Report.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Sunil; Nanda, Anil

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a 12-year-old female, who presented with significant upper and lower extremities weakness preceded by pain around the neck and shoulder girdle. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed epidural hematoma extending from C6-T2 with characteristic heterogeneously hyperintensity on T2 and homogenously isointensity on T1. Emergent spinal decompression was performed. However, the patient remained substantially weak in her lower extremities and was wheelchair bound at 3 months postoperatively. We have discussed clinical features, predisposing events, pathogenesis and treatment guidelines described in the literature. We also aim to reinforce the notion of keeping a high degree of clinical suspicion to identify and intervene at the earliest stage to prevent the physically and socially challenging consequences of SSEH. PMID:27598898

  6. [Spinal stenosis: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Faundez, Antonio; Genevay, Stéphane

    2012-06-27

    Spondylotic cervical myelopathy (SCM) is a radiologic entity that can match a clinical syndrome of varying degree of severity, and results from spinal canal narrowing due to physiological degeneration of the cervical spine. Clinically, cervical spinal canal narrowing can produce minimal symptoms such as non-specific neck pain, foraminal entrapment of nerve roots, or more severe, chronic myelopathy. SCM initially manifests by signs of posterior medullary tract dysfunction with subsequent pallesthesia, resulting in gait and balance disturbance. Spasticity due to lower motoneurone impairment and incontinence may appear in later stages. Once the symptoms of myelopathy occur, functional deterioration will take place sooner or later. Surgery can then be recommended and scheduled according to the severity of functional impairment and imaging.

  7. Ganglioglioma of the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Daniel C; Johnson, Mahlon D; Judkins, Alexander R

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioglioma is a rare tumor consisting of neoplastic glial and neuronal elements. It accounts for only 0.5% of all primary central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms. We report an unusual case of extensive intramedullary thoracic spinal cord ganglioglioma in a 14-month-old girl who underwent subtotal resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. The epidemiology, histopathologic features, imaging findings, treatment, and prognosis are subsequently reviewed. PMID:26605127

  8. How Are Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Children Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord tumors in children staged? How are brain and spinal cord tumors diagnosed in children? Brain ... resonance angiography (MRA) or computerized tomographic angiography (CTA). Brain or spinal cord tumor biopsy Imaging tests such ...

  9. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-07

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  10. Advances in Spinal Interbody Cages.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sukrit; Eltorai, Adam E M; Ruttiman, Roy; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-08-01

    Since the late 1980s, spinal interbody cages (ICs) have been used to aid bone fusion in a variety of spinal disorders. Utilized to restore intervertebral height, enable bone graft containment for arthrodesis, and restore anterior column biomechanical stability, ICs have since evolved to become a highly successful means of achieving fusion, being associated with less postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay, fewer complications and higher rates of fusion when than bone graft only spinal fusion. IC design and materials have changed considerably over the past two decades. The threaded titanium-alloy cylindrical screw cages, typically filled with autologous bone graft, of the mid-1990s achieved greater fusion rates than bone grafts and non-threaded cages. Threaded screw cages, however, were soon found to be less stable in extension and flexion; additionally, they had a high incidence of cage subsidence. As of the early 2000s, non-threaded box-shaped titanium or polyether ether ketone IC designs have become increasingly more common. This modern design continues to achieve greater cage stability in flexion, axial rotation and bending. However, cage stability and subsidence, bone fusion rates and surgical complications still require optimization. Thus, this review provides an update of recent research findings relevant to ICs over the past 3 years, highlighting trends in optimization of cage design, materials, alternatives to bone grafts, and coatings that may enhance fusion. PMID:27627709

  11. Postoperative posterior spinal wound infections.

    PubMed

    Massie, J B; Heller, J G; Abitbol, J J; McPherson, D; Garfin, S R

    1992-11-01

    The incidence of postoperative spinal infections increases with the complexity of the procedure. Diskectomy is associated with less than a 1% risk of infection; spinal fusion without instrumentation is associated with a 1%-5% risk; and fusion with instrumentation may be associated with a risk of 6% or more. Twenty-two postoperative posterior spinal infections that occurred during a three-year period were reviewed for this report. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent organism cultured (more than 50% of the cases). Other recurring organisms were Staphylococcus epidermis, Peptococcus, Enterobacter cloacae, and Bacteroides. Many patients had multiple organisms. Risk factors appeared to include advanced age, prolonged hospital bed rest, obesity, diabetes, immunosuppression, and infection at remote sites. Operative factors included prolonged surgery (greater than five hours), high volume of personnel moving through the operating room, and instrumentation. Postoperative contamination may occur and may be related to prolonged postoperative bed rest, skin maceration (thoracolumbosacral orthoses), and drainage tubes exiting distally from lumbar wounds (toward the rectum). Effective treatment includes early diagnosis, surgical debridement and irrigation, and parenteral antibiotics. Superficial infections were treated successfully with wound closure over outflow tubes, and deep infections with inflow-outflow systems. Maintaining the instrumentation in place was possible in most cases. Parenteral antibiotics were maintained for six weeks in every case. PMID:1395319

  12. Spinal cord compression due to ethmoid adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Johns, D R; Sweriduk, S T

    1987-10-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the ethmoid sinus is a rare tumor which has been epidemiologically linked to woodworking in the furniture industry. It has a low propensity to metastasize and has not been previously reported to cause spinal cord compression. A symptomatic epidural spinal cord compression was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan in a former furniture worker with widely disseminated metastases. The clinical features of ethmoid sinus adenocarcinoma and neoplastic spinal cord compression, and the comparative value of MRI scanning in the neuroradiologic diagnosis of spinal cord compression are reviewed.

  13. The StEllar Counterparts of COmpact high velocity clouds (SECCO) survey. II. Sensitivity of the survey and the atlas of synthetic dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccari, G.; Bellazzini, M.; Battaglia, G.; Ibata, R.; Martin, N.; Testa, V.; Cignoni, M.; Correnti, M.

    2016-06-01

    The searching for StEllar Counterparts of COmpact high velocity clouds (SECCO) survey is devoted to the search for stellar counterparts within ultra compact high velocity clouds that are candidate low-mass, low-luminosity galaxies. We present the results of a set of simulations aimed at the quantitative estimate of the sensitivity of the survey as a function of the total luminosity, size, and distance of the stellar systems we are looking for. For all of our synthetic galaxies we assumed an exponential surface brightness profile and an old and metal-poor population. The synthetic galaxies are simulated both on the images and on the photometric catalogues, taking all the observational effects into account. In the fields where the available observational material is of top quality (≃36% of the SECCO fields), we detect synthetic galaxies as ≥5σ over-densities of resolved stars down to μV,h ≃ 30.0 mag/arcsec2, for D ≤ 1.5 Mpc, and down to μV,h ≃ 29.5 mag/arcsec2, for D ≤ 2.5 Mpc. In the field with the worst observational material of the whole survey, we detect synthetic galaxies with μV,h ≤ 28.8 mag/arcsec2 out to D ≤ 1.0 Mpc, and those with μV,h ≤ 27.5 mag/arcsec2 out to D ≤ 2.5 Mpc. Dwarf galaxies with MV = -10.0, with sizes in the range spanned by known dwarfs, are detected by visual inspection of the images up to D = 5 Mpc independent of the image quality. In the best quality images, dwarfs are partially resolved into stars up to D = 3.0 Mpc and completely unresolved at D = 5 Mpc. As an independent test of the sensitivity of our images to low surface brightness galaxies, we report on the detection of several dwarf spheroidal galaxies probably located in the Virgo cluster with MV ≲ -8.0 and μV,h ≲ 26.8 mag/arcsec2. The nature of the previously discovered SECCO 1 stellar system, also likely located in the Virgo cluster, is rediscussed in comparison with these dwarfs. While specific for the SECCO survey, our study may also provide general

  14. The Origin of the X-Ray Emission from the High-velocity Cloud MS30.7-81.4-118

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin

    2014-08-01

    A soft X-ray enhancement has recently been reported toward the high-velocity cloud MS30.7-81.4-118 (MS30.7), a constituent of the Magellanic Stream. In order to investigate the origin of this enhancement, we have analyzed two overlapping XMM-Newton observations of this cloud. We find that the X-ray enhancement is ~6' or ~100 pc across, and is concentrated to the north and west of the densest part of the cloud. We modeled the X-ray enhancement with a variety of spectral models. A single-temperature equilibrium plasma model yields a temperature of (3.69^{+0.47}_{-0.44}) \\times 10^6 \\,K and a 0.4-2.0 keV luminosity of 7.9 × 1033 erg s-1. However, this model underpredicts the on-enhancement emission around 1 keV, which may indicate the additional presence of hotter plasma (T >~ 107 K), or that recombination emission is important. We examined several different physical models for the origin of the X-ray enhancement. We find that turbulent mixing of cold cloud material with hot ambient material, compression or shock heating of a hot ambient medium, and charge exchange reactions between cloud atoms and ions in a hot ambient medium all lead to emission that is too faint. In addition, shock heating in a cool or warm medium leads to emission that is too soft (for reasonable cloud speeds). We find that magnetic reconnection could plausibly power the observed X-ray emission, but resistive magnetohydrodynamical simulations are needed to test this hypothesis. If magnetic reconnection is responsible for the X-ray enhancement, the observed spectral properties could potentially constrain the magnetic field in the vicinity of the Magellanic Stream.

  15. Fe-Al Weld Overlay and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Waterwalls in Fossil Fired Plants with Low NOx Burners

    SciTech Connect

    Regina, J.R.

    2002-02-08

    Iron-aluminum-chromium coatings were investigated to determine the best candidates for coatings of boiler tubes in Low NOx fossil fueled power plants. Ten iron-aluminum-chromium weld claddings with aluminum concentrations up to 10wt% were tested in a variety of environments to evaluate their high temperature corrosion resistance. The weld overlay claddings also contained titanium additions to investigate any beneficial effects from these ternary and quaternary alloying additions. Several High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings with higher aluminum concentrations were investigated as well. Gaseous corrosion testing revealed that at least 10wt%Al is required for protection in the range of environments examined. Chromium additions were beneficial in all of the environments, but additions of titanium were beneficial only in sulfur rich atmospheres. Similar results were observed when weld claddings were in contact with corrosive slag while simultaneously, exposed to the corrosive environments. An aluminum concentration of 10wt% was required to prevent large amounts of corrosion to take place. Again chromium additions were beneficial with the greatest corrosion protection occurring for welds containing both 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr. The exposed thermal spray coatings showed either significant cracking within the coating, considerable thickness loss, or corrosion products at the coating substrate interface. Therefore, the thermal spray coatings provided the substrate very little protection. Overall, it was concluded that of the coatings studied weld overlay coatings provide superior protection in these Low NOx environments; specifically, the ternary weld composition of 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr provided the best corrosion protection in all of the environments tested.

  16. Constraints from sill intrusions and their deeper source magma chambers (seismic high velocity bodies) on the origins of volcanic rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrman, M.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic rifted margins are characterized by massive igneous activity originating from the rift margin, characterized by seaward dipping reflectors. These consist of basalt flows and associated magmatic products, from deep magma chambers imaged on seismic data as High Velocity Bodies (HVB) with seismic velocities between 7 and 7.5 km/s. The relationship between rifting and decompression melting have been well quantified, using the HVB's as constraints on magmatic production to match extension models. Crucial in this approach are the relationship between extension and mantle plumes, with HVB's generated by mantle plumes often indicative of velocities between 7.5 - 7.8 km/s. Here I address information that can be obtained from sill complexes in sedimentary basins associated with rifting, representing the earliest phase of magmatism. I use a simple crustal scale hydrostatic model for dikes while incorporating the presence of sills by calculating magmatic overpressures from differences in pressure gradients. It transpires that the presence of sills as observed on seismic reflection and outcrop data, can be predicted. Modelling further suggests that the source of these sill complexes are large magma chambers at or near the Moho, and equate to HVB's observed on seismic data. Utilizing simple mass balance calculations, the ratio of cumulate thickness (from HVB thickness) and expelled melt (from accumulated sill thicknesses) can be related to MgO content in expelled liquids, primary magma and cumulates. Higher MgO content translates in higher seismic velocities. Thus, HVB velocity can subsequently be used to discriminate between mantle plume, or shallow rift related melting. The theory is applied to various basins bordering the northern North Atlantic (Vøring Basin, Jameson Land Basin and Rockall Basin) and South Atlantic rifts (Namibia), associated with the Paleocene/Eocene Iceland mantle plume and the Early Cretaceous Tristan da Cunha mantle plume magmatism respectively.

  17. The origin of the X-ray emission from the high-velocity cloud MS30.7–81.4–118

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu

    2014-08-10

    A soft X-ray enhancement has recently been reported toward the high-velocity cloud MS30.7–81.4–118 (MS30.7), a constituent of the Magellanic Stream. In order to investigate the origin of this enhancement, we have analyzed two overlapping XMM-Newton observations of this cloud. We find that the X-ray enhancement is ∼6' or ∼100 pc across, and is concentrated to the north and west of the densest part of the cloud. We modeled the X-ray enhancement with a variety of spectral models. A single-temperature equilibrium plasma model yields a temperature of (3.69{sub −0.44}{sup +0.47})×10{sup 6} K and a 0.4-2.0 keV luminosity of 7.9 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1}. However, this model underpredicts the on-enhancement emission around 1 keV, which may indicate the additional presence of hotter plasma (T ≳ 10{sup 7} K), or that recombination emission is important. We examined several different physical models for the origin of the X-ray enhancement. We find that turbulent mixing of cold cloud material with hot ambient material, compression or shock heating of a hot ambient medium, and charge exchange reactions between cloud atoms and ions in a hot ambient medium all lead to emission that is too faint. In addition, shock heating in a cool or warm medium leads to emission that is too soft (for reasonable cloud speeds). We find that magnetic reconnection could plausibly power the observed X-ray emission, but resistive magnetohydrodynamical simulations are needed to test this hypothesis. If magnetic reconnection is responsible for the X-ray enhancement, the observed spectral properties could potentially constrain the magnetic field in the vicinity of the Magellanic Stream.

  18. THE HIGH-VELOCITY SYSTEM: INFALL OF A GIANT LOW-SURFACE-BRIGHTNESS GALAXY TOWARD THE CENTER OF THE PERSEUS CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Alice P.-Y.; Lim, Jeremy; Chan, Jeffrey C.-C.; Ohyama, Youichi; Broadhurst, T.

    2015-12-01

    The high-velocity system (HVS) lies just north-west of the center and is moving at a speed of 3000 km s{sup −1} toward NGC 1275, the central giant elliptical galaxy in the Perseus cluster. We report imaging spectroscopy of the HVS in Hα and [N ii] that resolves both the nature of this galaxy and its physical relationship with NGC 1275. The HVS exhibits a distorted disk having a projected rotational velocity that rises steadily to ∼200 km s{sup −1} at a radius of ∼12 kpc, the same maximal extent detectable in neutral gas and dust. We discover highly blueshifted emission at relative velocities of up to ∼800 km s{sup −1} distributed throughout and confined almost entirely within the projected area of the disk, tracing gas stripped by ram pressure. The distribution of the stripped gas implies that the HVS is moving essentially along our sightline closely toward the center of NGC 1275. We show that the speed of the HVS is consistent with it having fallen from rest at the virial radius of the Perseus cluster and reached ∼100 kpc from the cluster center. Despite having an overall metallicity (inferred from [N ii]/Hα) significantly lower than that of star-forming disk galaxies, the HVS exhibits a current star formation rate of ∼3.6 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} and numerous young star clusters projected against giant H ii regions. The evidence assembled implicates a progenitor giant low-surface-brightness galaxy that, because of galaxy harassment and/or the cluster tidal field, has developed two prominent spiral arms along which star formation is strongly elevated.

  19. Asymmetry of high-velocity lower crust on the South Atlantic rifted margins and implications for the interplay of magmatism and tectonics in continental breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K.; Franke, D.; Trumbull, R.; Schnabel, M.; Heyde, I.; Schreckenberger, B.; Koopmann, H.; Bauer, K.; Jokat, W.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2014-10-01

    High-velocity lower crust (HVLC) and seaward-dipping reflector (SDR) sequences are typical features of volcanic rifted margins. However, the nature and origin of HVLC is under discussion. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of deep crustal structures in the southern segment of the South Atlantic and an assessment of HVLC along the margins. Two new seismic refraction lines off South America fill a gap in the data coverage and together with five existing velocity models allow for a detailed investigation of the lower crustal properties on both margins. An important finding is the major asymmetry in volumes of HVLC on the conjugate margins. The seismic refraction lines across the South African margin reveal cross-sectional areas of HVLC 4 times larger than at the South American margin, a finding that is opposite to the asymmetric distribution of the flood basalts in the Paraná-Etendeka Large Igneous Province. Also, the position of the HVLC with respect to the SDR sequences varies consistently along both margins. Close to the Falkland-Agulhas Fracture Zone in the south, a small body of HVLC is not accompanied by SDRs. In the central portion of both margins, the HVLC is below the inner SDR wedges while in the northern area, closer to the Rio Grande Rise-Walvis Ridge, large volumes of HVLC extend far seaward of the inner SDRs. This challenges the concept of a simple extrusive/intrusive relationship between SDR sequences and HVLC, and it provides evidence for formation of the HVLC at different times during the rifting and breakup process. We suggest that the drastically different HVLC volumes are caused by asymmetric rifting in a simple-shear-dominated extension.

  20. Asymmetry of high-velocity lower crust on the South Atlantic rifted margins and implications for the interplay of magmatism and tectonics in continental break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K.; Franke, D.; Trumbull, R. B.; Schnabel, M.; Heyde, I.; Schreckenberger, B.; Koopmann, H.; Bauer, K.; Jokat, W.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2014-06-01

    High-velocity lower crust (HVLC) and seaward dipping reflector sequences (SDRs) are typical features of volcanic rifted margins. However, the nature and origin of HVLC is under discussion. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of deep crustal structures in the southern segment of the South Atlantic and an assessment of HVLC along the margins. Two new seismic refraction lines off South America fill a gap in the data coverage and together with five existing velocity models allow a detailed investigation of the lower crustal properties on both margins. An important finding is the major asymmetry in volumes of HVLC on the conjugate margins. The seismic refraction lines across the South African margin reveal four times larger cross sectional areas of HVLC than at the South American margin, a finding that is in sharp contrast to the distribution of the flood basalts in the Paraná-Etendeka Large Igneous Provinces (LIP). Also, the position of the HVLC with respect to the seaward dipping reflector sequences varies consistently along both margins. Close to the Falkland-Agulhas Fracture Zone a small body of HVLC is not accompanied by seaward dipping reflectors. In the central portion of both margins, the HVLC is below the inner seaward dipping reflector wedges while in the northern area, closer to the Rio Grande Rise/Walvis Ridge, large volumes of HVLC extend far seawards of the inner seaward dipping reflectors. This challenges the concept of a simple extrusive/intrusive relationship between seaward dipping reflector sequences and HVLC, and it provides evidence for formation of the HVLC at different times during the rifting and break-up process. We suggest that the drastically different HVLC volumes are caused by asymmetric rifting in a simple shear dominated extension.

  1. The Evolution of Gas Clouds Falling in the Magnetized Galactic Halo: High-Velocity Clouds (HVCs) Originated in the Galactic Fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Shelton, Robin L.; Raley, Elizabeth A.

    2009-07-01

    In the Galactic fountain scenario, supernovae and/or stellar winds propel material into the Galactic halo. As the material cools, it condenses into clouds. By using FLASH three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we model and study the dynamical evolution of these gas clouds after they form and begin to fall toward the Galactic plane. In our simulations, we assume that the gas clouds form at a height of z = 5 kpc above the Galactic midplane, then begin to fall from rest. We investigate how the cloud's evolution, dynamics, and interaction with the interstellar medium (ISM) are affected by the initial mass of the cloud. We find that clouds with sufficiently large initial densities (n >= 0.1 H atoms cm-3) accelerate sufficiently and maintain sufficiently large column densities as to be observed and identified as high-velocity clouds (HVCs) even if the ISM is weakly magnetized (1.3 μG). However, the ISM can provide noticeable resistance to the motion of a low-density cloud (n <= 0.01 H atoms cm-3) thus making it more probable that a low-density cloud will attain the speed of an intermediate-velocity cloud rather than the speed of an HVC. We also investigate the effects of various possible magnetic field configurations. As expected, the ISM's resistance is greatest when the magnetic field is strong and perpendicular to the motion of the cloud. The trajectory of the cloud is guided by the magnetic field lines in cases where the magnetic field is oriented diagonal to the Galactic plane. The model cloud simulations show that the interactions between the cloud and the ISM can be understood via analogy to the shock tube problem which involves shock and rarefaction waves. We also discuss accelerated ambient gas, streamers of material ablated from the clouds, and the cloud's evolution from a sphere-shaped to a disk- or cigar-shaped object.

  2. Fetal segmental spinal dysgenesis and unusual segmental agenesis of the anterior spinal artery.

    PubMed

    Valdez Quintana, Melissa; Michaud, Jean; El-Chaar, Darine; El Demellawy, Dina; Nikkel, Sarah M; Miller, Elka

    2016-08-01

    Segmental spinal dysgenesis (SSD) is a rare congenital spinal abnormality characterized by segmental dysgenesis or agenesis of the thoracolumbar or lumbar spine, congenital kyphosis, and abnormal configuration of the underlying spinal cord. A unique feature of SSD is that the vertebrae are present above and below the defect, and there is often a lower cord segment in the caudal spinal canal. We report a fetal MRI case of SSD with postmortem and neuropathological correlations. Our report confirms already published findings including the presence of a neurenteric cyst but is the first to document anterior spinal artery segmental agenesis in SSD. PMID:26969176

  3. Spinal deformity after multilevel osteoplastic laminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Juergen, Krauss; Gloger, Harald; Soerensen, Nils; Wild, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Multilevel laminectomy in children has a significant rate of postoperative spinal deformity. To decrease the incidence of this complication, the use of osteoplastic laminotomy is advocated to minimise the risk of spinal deformity by preserving the normal architecture of the spine. In this retrospective study, a 10-year series of a paediatric population undergoing multilevel osteoplastic laminotomy is reviewed to determine the incidence, especially in contrast to laminectomies, and to identify factors that affect the occurrence of spinal column deformity. Seventy patients (mean age 4.2 years) underwent multilevel osteoplastic laminotomy for congenital anomalies or removal of spinal tumours. All patients had a clinical and radiographic examination preoperatively, 12 months postoperatively and at follow-up. Mean follow-up was 5.3 years (range 3–12.6 years). Nineteen patients (27%) had a new or progressive spinal deformity. There was an increased incidence in patients who had surgery for spinal tumours (P < 0.05), surgery of the cervical spine (P < 0.01), and who had more than five levels of the spine included (P < 0.05). A review of the literature on children with multilevel laminectomy (n = 330), the incidence of spinal deformity found a significantly higher (46%) compared to our study group. This study demonstrates that osteoplastic laminotomy was found to be very effective in decreasing the incidence of spinal deformities after spinal-canal surgery for spinal-cord tumours or congenital anomalies in children and adolescents. The choice of an anatomical reconstructive surgical technique such as osteoplastic laminotomy seems to be essential to minimise secondary problems due to the surgical technique itself. Nevertheless, growing patients should be followed up for several years after the initial operation for early detection and consequent management of any possible deformity of the spinal column. PMID:17323095

  4. DELTAE. Design Environment for Low-Amplitude Thermoacoustic Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C.; Swift, G.W.

    1993-10-01

    In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, and in many simple acoustic systems, a one dimensional wave equation determines the spatial dependence of the acoustic pressure and velocity. DELTAE numerically integrates such wave equations in the acoustic approximation, in gases or liquids, in user-defined geometries. Boundary conditions can include conventional acoustic boundary conditions of geometry and impedance, as well as temperature and thermal power in thermoacoustic systems. DELTAE can be used easily for apparatus ranging from simple duct networks and resonators to thermoacoustic engines refrigerators and combinations thereof. It can predict how a given apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. DELTAE views systems as a series of segments; twenty segment types are supported. The purely acoustic segments include ducts and cones, and lumped impedances including compliances, series impedances, and endcaps. Electroacoustics tranducer segments can be defined using either frequency-independent coefficients or the conventional parameters of loudspeaker-style drivers: mass, spring constant, magnetic field strength, etc. Tranducers can be current driven, voltage driven, or connected to an electrical load impedance. Thermoacoustic segment geometries include parallel plates, circular and rectangular pores, and pin arrays. Side branches can be defined with fixed impedances, frequency-dependent radiation impedances, or as an auxiliary series of segments of any types. The user can select working fluids from among air, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium-argon mixtures, helium-xenon mixtures, liquid sodium, and eutectic sodium-potassium. Additional fluids and solids can be defined by the user.

  5. DELTAE. Design Environment for Low-Amplitude Thermoacoustic Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C.

    1993-10-10

    In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, and in many simple acoustic systems, a one dimensional wave equation determines the spatial dependence of the acoustic pressure and velocity. DELTAE numerically integrates such wave equations in the acoustic approximation, in gases or liquids, in user-defined geometries. Boundary conditions can include conventional acoustic boundary conditions of geometry and impedance, as well as temperature and thermal power in thermoacoustic systems. DELTAE can be used easily for apparatus ranging from simple duct networks and resonators to thermoacoustic engines refrigerators and combinations thereof. It can predict how a given apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. DELTAE views systems as a series of segments; twenty segment types are supported. The purely acoustic segments include ducts and cones, and lumped impedances including compliances, series impedances, and endcaps. Electroacoustics tranducer segments can be defined using either frequency-independent coefficients or the conventional parameters of loudspeaker-style drivers: mass, spring constant, magnetic field strength, etc. Tranducers can be current driven, voltage driven, or connected to an electrical load impedance. Thermoacoustic segment geometries include parallel plates, circular and rectangular pores, and pin arrays. Side branches can be defined with fixed impedances, frequency-dependent radiation impedances, or as an auxiliary series of segments of any types. The user can select working fluids from among air, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium-argon mixtures, helium-xenon mixtures, liquid sodium, and eutectic sodium-potassium. Additional fluids and solids can be defined by the user.

  6. DELTAE+. Design Environment for Low-Amplitude Thermoacoustic Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C; Swift, G.W.

    1993-10-01

    In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, and in many simple acoustic systems, a one dimensional wave equation determines the spatial dependence of the acoustic pressure and velocity. DELTAE numerically integrates such wave equations in the acoustic approximation, in gases or liquids, in user-defined geometries. Boundary conditions can include conventional acoustic boundary conditions of geometry and impedance, as well as temperature and thermal power in thermoacoustic systems. DELTAE can be used easily for apparatus ranging from simple duct networks and resonators to thermoacoustic engines refrigerators and combinations thereof. It can predict how a given apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. DELTAE views systems as a series of segments; twenty segment types are supported. The purely acoustic segments include ducts and cones, and lumped impedances including compliances, series impedances, and endcaps. Electroacoustics tranducer segments can be defined using either frequency-independent coefficients or the conventional parameters of loudspeaker-style drivers: mass, spring constant, magnetic field strength, etc. Tranducers can be current driven, voltage driven, or connected to an electrical load impedance. Thermoacoustic segment geometries include parallel plates, circular and rectangular pores, and pin arrays. Side branches can be defined with fixed impedances, frequency-dependent radiation impedances, or as an auxiliary series of segments of any types. The user can select working fluids from among air, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium-argon mixtures, helium-xenon mixtures, liquid sodium, and eutectic sodium-potassium. Additional fluids and solids can be defined by the user.

  7. Design Environment for Low-Amplitude Thermoacoustic Engines

    2002-01-07

    DeltaE is a computer program that can preduct how a given thermoacoustic apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. It is substantially menu-oriented. Input data can be modified or entered bia DeltaE's menu or using any text editor. Results can be examined via the menus, the operating systems text utilities, or any spreadsheet or graphics software.

  8. Effect of locomotor training in completely spinalized cats previously submitted to a spinal hemisection.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marina; Delivet-Mongrain, Hugo; Leblond, Hugues; Rossignol, Serge

    2012-08-01

    After a spinal hemisection in cats, locomotor plasticity occurring at the spinal level can be revealed by performing, several weeks later, a complete spinalization below the first hemisection. Using this paradigm, we recently demonstrated that the hemisection induces durable changes in the symmetry of locomotor kinematics that persist after spinalization. Can this asymmetry be changed again in the spinal state by interventions such as treadmill locomotor training started within a few days after the spinalization? We performed, in 9 adult cats, a spinal hemisection at thoracic level 10 and then a complete spinalization at T13, 3 weeks later. Cats were not treadmill trained during the hemispinal period. After spinalization, 5 of 9 cats were not trained and served as control while 4 of 9 cats were trained on the treadmill for 20 min, 5 d a week for 3 weeks. Using detailed kinematic analyses, we showed that, without training, the asymmetrical state of locomotion induced by the hemisection was retained durably after the subsequent spinalization. By contrast, training cats after spinalization induced a reversal of the left/right asymmetries, suggesting that new plastic changes occurred within the spinal cord through locomotor training. Moreover, training was shown to improve the kinematic parameters and the performance of the hindlimb on the previously hemisected side. These results indicate that spinal locomotor circuits, previously modified by past experience such as required for adaptation to the hemisection, can remarkably respond to subsequent locomotor training and improve bilateral locomotor kinematics, clearly showing the benefits of locomotor training in the spinal state.

  9. Nutrition of People with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This conference proceeding summarizes current knowledge about the nutritional status and needs of the spinal cord injured patient. Topics covered include the aspects of spinal cord injury that influence nutrient intakes and status, and the nutrients most likely to be problematic in this diverse gro...

  10. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring in spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Hyun, Seung-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Recently, many surgeons have been using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) in spinal surgery to reduce the incidence of postoperative neurological complications, including level of the spinal cord, cauda equina and nerve root. Several established technologies are available and combined motor and somatosensory evoked potentials are considered mandatory for practical and successful IOM. Spinal cord evoked potentials are elicited compound potentials recorded over the spinal cord. Electrical stimulation is provoked on the dorsal spinal cord from an epidural electrode. Somatosensory evoked potentials assess the functional integrity of sensory pathways from the peripheral nerve through the dorsal column and to the sensory cortex. For identification of the physiological midline, the dorsal column mapping technique can be used. It is helpful for reducing the postoperative morbidity associated with dorsal column dysfunction when distortion of the normal spinal cord anatomy caused by an intramedullary cord lesion results in confusion in localizing the midline for the myelotomy. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) consist of spinal, neurogenic and muscle MEPs. MEPs allow selective and specific assessment of the functional integrity of descending motor pathways, from the motor cortex to peripheral muscles. Spinal surgeons should understand the concept of the monitoring techniques and interpret monitoring records adequately to use IOM for the decision making during the surgery for safe surgery and a favorable surgical outcome. PMID:26380823

  11. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa de; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; Rocha, Ivan Dias da

    2012-10-01

    This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a "disease that should not be treated." Over the last biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life. PMID:23070351

  12. Psychological Aspects of Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Daniel W.

    1976-01-01

    Reviewing literature on the psychological impact of spinal cord injury suggests: (a) depression may not be a precondition for injury adjustment; (b) many persons sustaining cord injury may have experienced psychological disruption prior to injury; and (c) indexes of rehabilitation success need to be developed for the spinal cord injured. (Author)

  13. Epidemiology of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kurtzke, J F

    1977-01-01

    Accidents are the cause of some 50 deaths per 100 000 population each year in the US; some 3% of these are from traumatic spinal cord injury alone. Traumatic spinal cord injury in socioeconomically advanced countries, has a probably annual incidence rate of 3 per 100 000 population. Males are affected five times as often as females, and in the US, Negroes have twice the rates of whites. Half the cases are due to motor vehicle accidents, 1/4 to falls, and 1/10 to sports injuries. Maximal ages at risk are 15 to 34; only for cord damage due to falls do this risk differ, and here elderly are the more prone. Associated injuries are common in traumatic cord injury, and head injury and pulmonary dysfunction are frequent causes of the acute deaths in traumatic SCI which is why complete quadriplegia has a high early case-fatality ratio. Late deaths in SCI are principally the direct or indirect result of the neurogenic bladder. With treatment in comprehensive spinal cord injury centers, more than 4 of 5 traumatic SCI patients will survive ten years with an average of almost 18 years. Median survival may be almost 14 years for complete quadriplegia, 17 for complete paraplegia, 19 for incomplete quadriplegia, 20 for incomplete paraplegia and 28 for cauda equina lesions. Prevalence is likely to be some 50 per 100 000 population with about 20 per 100 000 completely paralyzed (3 quadriplegic and 19 paraplegic). Some 4 out of 5 survivors of traumatic SCI should be able to live at home and perform gainful work after such treatment. PMID:616527

  14. Fictive motor patterns in chronic spinal cats.

    PubMed

    Pearson, K G; Rossignol, S

    1991-12-01

    1. Fictive motor patterns were recorded in hind leg nerves of 10 adult chronic spinal cats (spinalized at T13). Four of these animals had been trained to step with their hind legs on a treadmill (late-spinal animals), whereas the remainder received no training and were examined a short time after spinalization (early-spinal animals). 2. A fictive pattern resembling the locomotor pattern for stepping was evoked in all animals in response to stimulation of the skin of the perineal region. (2-[2,6-Dichloroaniline]-2-imidazoline) hydrochloride (Clonidine) at doses ranging from 100 to 500 micrograms/kg iv facilitated the production of this pattern, particularly in early-spinal animals. 3. The fictive locomotor pattern in late-spinal animals was more complex than that occurring in early-spinal animals. In the latter the pattern consisted of an alternation of activity in flexor and extensor nerves, and changing leg position did not qualitatively alter the pattern, whereas in late-spinal animals the relative durations of the bursts in different flexors were usually not the same, and the pattern of flexor activity was dependent on leg position. 4. Moving the legs from extension to flexion progressively decreased the duration of flexor bursts, increased the cycle period, and decreased the ease with which the pattern could be evoked in both early- and late-spinal animals. 5. 1-beta-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)/Isonocotinic acid 2-[(2-benzylcarbamoyl)ethyl]hydrazide (Nialamide) treatment following Clonidine in early-spinal animals increased the complexity of flexor burst activity. This, and other observations, indicates that DOPA and Clonidine do not have strictly identical actions on the locomotor pattern generator. 6. Stimulation of the paws in late-spinal animals produced two patterns of activity distinctly different from the locomotor pattern. of activity distinctly different from the locomotor pattern. One was a short sequence of high-frequency rhythmic activity (at

  15. Sphingolipids in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Zachary B; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Despite progress over the last few decades, the molecular mechanisms of secondary SCI that continue to occur days and weeks after the original trauma remain poorly understood. As a result, current therapies for SCI are only marginally effective. Sphingolipids, a diverse class of bioactive lipids, have been shown to regulate SCI repair and key secondary injury processes such as apoptosis, ischemia and inflammation. This review will discuss the numerous roles of sphingolipids and highlight the potential of sphingolipid-targeted therapies for SCI. PMID:27570580

  16. Parasitic and rare spinal infections.

    PubMed

    do Amaral, Lázaro Luís Faria; Nunes, Renato Hoffmann; da Rocha, Antonio Jose

    2015-05-01

    The imaging features of spinal parasitic diseases and other rare infections are herein discussed. These diseases are distributed worldwide, with increased prevalence in areas with poor sanitary conditions and in developing countries. In nonendemic areas, sporadic cases may occur, consequent to increased international travel and immunocompromising conditions. Infectious diseases are usually treatable, and early detection is often crucial. A thorough comprehension of the imaging patterns associated with the clinical features, epidemiology, and laboratory results allows the radiologist to narrow down the options for differential diagnosis and facilitates the timely implementation of appropriate therapies. PMID:25952177

  17. Ambulation and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Elizabeth C; Kobetic, Rudi; Triolo, Ronald J

    2013-05-01

    Walking is possible for many patients with a spinal cord injury. Avenues enabling walking include braces, robotics and FES. Among the benefits are improved musculoskeletal and mental health, however unrealistic expectations may lead to negative changes in quality of life. Use rigorous assessment standards to gauge the improvement of walking during the rehabilitation process, but also yearly. Continued walking after discharge may be limited by challenges, such as lack of accessibility in and outside the home, and complications, such as shoulder pain or injuries from falls. It is critical to determine the risks and benefits of walking for each patient.

  18. Sphingolipids in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jones, Zachary B; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Despite progress over the last few decades, the molecular mechanisms of secondary SCI that continue to occur days and weeks after the original trauma remain poorly understood. As a result, current therapies for SCI are only marginally effective. Sphingolipids, a diverse class of bioactive lipids, have been shown to regulate SCI repair and key secondary injury processes such as apoptosis, ischemia and inflammation. This review will discuss the numerous roles of sphingolipids and highlight the potential of sphingolipid-targeted therapies for SCI. PMID:27570580

  19. Neuroimaging of Spinal Canal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Spinal stenosis is common and presents in a variety of forms. Symptomatic lumbar stenosis occurs in approximately 10% of the population and cervical stenosis in 9% over age 70. Imaging is central to the management decision process and first-choice MR imaging may be substituted with CT and CT myelography. A review of the literature is presented with particular emphasis on the clinical-radiologic correlation in both neurogenic intermittent claudication and cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Advanced techniques promise improvements, particularly with radicular compressive lesions, but remain underutilized in routine clinical practice.

  20. Spinal morphine anesthesia and urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Mahan, K T; Wang, J

    1993-11-01

    Spinal anesthetic is a common form of surgical anesthetic used in foot and ankle surgery. Spinal morphine anesthetic is less common, but has the advantage of providing postoperative analgesia for 12 to 24 hr. A number of complications can occur with spinal anesthesia, including urinary retention that may be a source of severe and often prolonged discomfort and pain for the patient. Management of this problem may require repeated bladder catheterization, which may lead to urinary tract infections or impairment of urethrovesicular function. This study reviews the incidence of urinary retention in 80 patients (40 after general anesthesia and 40 after spinal anesthesia) who underwent foot and ankle surgery at Saint Joseph's Hospital, Philadelphia, PA. Twenty-five percent of the patients who had spinal anesthesia experienced urinary retention, while only 7 1/2% of the group who had general anesthesia had this complication. Predisposing factors, treatment regimen, and recommendations for the prevention and management of urinary retention are presented.