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Sample records for higher plants ii

  1. Excitation energy transfer in vitro between phycobiliproteins and thylakoid photosystem II of higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaonan; Tseng, C. K.

    1992-12-01

    The excitation energy transfer from phycobiliproteins to thylakoid PSII of higher plants was investigated. When incubated with spinach thylakoids, phycobiliproteins isolated from red and blue-green algae transferred light energy absorbed to spinach PSII. The efficiency of energy transfer was dependent on the kind of phycobiliproteins used. If spinach thylakoids were replaced by the thylakoids of Brassica chinensis, R-phycoerythin or C-phycocyanin did not transfer their excitation energy to PSII of Brassica chinensis unless allophycocyanin was present.

  2. [Dynamics of cytoskeleton microtubules in higher plant meiosis. II. Perinuclear band formation].

    PubMed

    Shamina, N V; Dorogova, N V; Seriukova, E G

    2003-01-01

    Analyses of correspondent meiotic abnormalities is a good tool for studying cytoskeletal rearrangements during plant cell division. The paper reports on the wheat x wheatgrass F1 hybrids, showing various abnormalities during organization of the prophase perinuclear band of microtubules (PNB) in male meiosis. Based on these data, it may be concluded that the perinuclear system of microtubules (MT) in higher plant meiosis is formed from fibrils of the radial system as a result of their translocation in the cell cytoplasm space. According to our data, at this stage the radial MT arrays pass through the following consequence of events: separating from the nuclear envelope, 2) approaching, 3) tangential orientation to the nuclear surface, 4) bending, 5) co-orientation, lateral interaction. As a result, a flat ring of well organized concentric bent MT bundles encircling the nucleus meridionally is organized.

  3. Flash-induced absorption spectroscopy studies of copper interaction with photosystem II in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Schröder, W P; Arellano, J B; Bittner, T; Barón, M; Eckert, H J; Renger, G

    1994-12-30

    Measurements of flash-induced absorption changes at 325, 436, and 830 nm and of oxygen evolution were performed in order to analyze in detail the inhibition of photosystem II (PS II) by Cu(II) in PS II membrane fragments from spinach. (a) The kinetics of P680+ reduction become markedly slower in the presence of 100 microM CuSO4. (b) The CuSO4-induced kinetics of P680+ reduction are dominated by a 140-160-microsecond decay. (c) The extent of these 140-160-microsecond kinetics, normalized to the overall decay, remains virtually unaffected by addition of the exogenous PS II donor, NH2OH. (d) In thoroughly dark-adapted samples the CuSO4-induced 140-160-microsecond kinetics are already observed after the first flash and remain unchanged by a train of excitation flashes. (e) The extent of P680+ and QA- formation under repetitive flash excitation is not diminished by addition of 100 microM CuSO4. (f) The induction of microsecond kinetics of P680+ reduction at the expense of ns kinetics and the inhibition of the saturation rate of oxygen evolution exhibit the same dependence on CuSO4 concentration. (g) CuSO4 also transforms the 10-20-microsecond reduction of P680+ by TyrZ in Tris-washed PS II membrane fragments into 140-160-microsecond kinetics without any effect on the extent of flash-induced P680+ formation. These results unambiguously show that Cu(II) does not affect the charge separation (P680+QA-), but instead specifically modifies TyrZ and/or its micro environment so that the electron transfer to P680+ becomes blocked.

  4. Ultrafast spectroscopy of trimeric light-harvesting complex II from higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, J.P.; Mueller, G.M.; Hucke, M.; Gatzen, G.; Holzwarth, A.R.; Mullineaux, C.W.; Ruban, A.V.; Horton, P.

    1997-03-06

    Time-resolved femtosecond transient absorption measurements have been carried out at room temperature on light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complex of photosystem II (LHC II) trimers prepared from spinach. Exciting in the chlorophyll (Chl) b region at 650 nm with very low intensity, virtually annihilation-free two-color transient absorption measurement of the kinetics over 100 ps, between 645 and 690 nm, yield global lifetimes of 175 fs, 625 fs, and 5 ps and a long component (>=790 ps) where the three fastest lifetimes reflect Chl b to Chl a energy transfer. On the basis of these results and recent electron diffraction structural data, a preliminary three-pool Ch a, three-pool Chl b kinetic model is proposed. The possible influence of variable xanthophyll composition on quenching in LHC II preparations isolated from light- and dark-adapted leaves has been investigated using time-resolved picosecond fluorescence at room temperature. Global lifetimes of 5 ps and 3.6 ns, the lifetimes of the terminal LHC II excited state, were obtained. No discernable quenching effect due to the presence of zeaxanthin was observed. 38 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Chlorophyll a and carotenoid triplet states in light-harvesting complex II of higher plants.

    PubMed Central

    Peterman, E J; Dukker, F M; van Grondelle, R; van Amerongen, H

    1995-01-01

    Laser-flash-induced transient absorption measurements were performed on trimeric light-harvesting complex II to study carotenoid (Car) and chlorophyll (Chl) triplet states as a function of temperature. In these complexes efficient transfer of triplets from Chl to Car occurs as a protection mechanism against singlet oxygen formation. It appears that at room temperature all triplets are being transferred from Chl to Car; at lower temperatures (77 K and below) the transfer is less efficient and chlorophyll triplets can be observed. In the presence of oxygen at room temperature the Car triplets are partly quenched by oxygen and two different Car triplet spectral species can be distinguished because of a difference in quenching rate. One of these spectral species is replaced by another one upon cooling to 4 Ki demonstrating that at least three carotenoids are in close contact with chlorophylls. The triplet minus singlet absorption (T-S) spectra show maxima at 504-506 nm and 517-523 nm, respectively. In the Chl Qy region absorption changes can be observed that are caused by Car triplets. The T-S spectra in the Chl region show an interesting temperature dependence which indicates that various Car's are in contact with different Chl a molecules. The results are discussed in terms of the crystal structure of light-harvesting complex II. PMID:8599673

  6. Isolation of photosystem II-enriched membranes and the oxygen-evolving complex subunit proteins from higher plants.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasusi; Leng, Jing; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2011-01-01

    We describe methods to isolate highly active oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII) membranes and core complexes from higher plants, and to purify subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). The membrane samples used as the material for various in vitro studies of PSII are prepared by solubilizing thylakoid membranes with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100, and the core complexes are prepared by further solubilization of the PSII membranes with n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (β-DDM). The OEC subunit proteins are dissociated from the PSII-enriched membranes by alkaline or salt treatment, and are then purified by ion-exchange chromatography using an automated high performance liquid chromatography system.

  7. Ab initio calculations of the Fe(II) and Fe(III) isotopic effects in citrates, nicotianamine, and phytosiderophore, and new Fe isotopic measurements in higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moynier, Frédéric; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Wang, Kun; Foriel, Julien

    2013-05-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant transition metal in higher plants and variations in its isotopic compositions can be used to trace its utilization. In order to better understand the effect of plant-induced isotopic fractionation on the global Fe cycling, we have estimated by quantum chemical calculations the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation between different Fe species relevant to the transport and storage of Fe in higher plants: Fe(II)-citrate, Fe(III)-citrate, Fe(II)-nicotianamine, and Fe(III)-phytosiderophore. The ab initio calculations show firstly, that Fe(II)-nicotianamine is ˜3‰ (56Fe/54Fe) isotopically lighter than Fe(III)-phytosiderophore; secondly, even in the absence of redox changes of Fe, change in the speciation alone can create up to ˜1.5‰ isotopic fractionation. For example, Fe(III)-phytosiderophore is up to 1.5‰ heavier than Fe(III)-citrate2 and Fe(II)-nicotianamine is up to 1‰ heavier than Fe(II)-citrate. In addition, in order to better understand the Fe isotopic fractionation between different plant components, we have analyzed the iron isotopic composition of different organs (roots, seeds, germinated seeds, leaves and stems) from six species of higher plants: the dicot lentil (Lens culinaris), and the graminaceous monocots Virginia wild rye (Elymus virginicus), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis), river oat (Uniola latifolia), and Indian goosegrass (Eleusine indica). The calculations may explain that the roots of strategy-II plants (Fe(III)-phytosiderophore) are isotopically heavier (by about 1‰ for the δ56Fe) than the upper parts of the plants (Fe transported as Fe(III)-citrate in the xylem or Fe(II)-nicotianamine in the phloem). In addition, we suggest that the isotopic variations observed between younger and older leaves could be explained by mixing of Fe received from the xylem and the phloem.

  8. Photoprotective energy dissipation in higher plants involves alteration of the excited state energy of the emitting chlorophyll(s) in the light harvesting antenna II (LHCII).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew P; Ruban, Alexander V

    2009-08-28

    Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), a mechanism of energy dissipation in higher plants protects photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers from damage by excess light. NPQ involves a reduction in the chlorophyll excited state lifetime in the PSII harvesting antenna (LHCII) by a quencher. Yet, little is known about the effect of the quencher on chlorophyll excited state energy and dynamics. Application of picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that NPQ involves a red-shift (60 +/- 5 cm(-1)) and slight enhancement of the vibronic satellite of the main PSII lifetime component present in intact chloroplasts. Whereas this fluorescence red-shift was enhanced by the presence of zeaxanthin, it was not dependent upon it. The red-shifted fluorescence of intact chloroplasts in the NPQ state was accompanied by red-shifted chlorophyll a absorption. Nearly identical absorption and fluorescence changes were observed in isolated LHCII complexes quenched in a low detergent media, suggesting that the mechanism of quenching is the same in both systems. In both cases, the extent of the fluorescence red-shift was shown to correlate with the lifetime of a component. The alteration in the energy of the emitting chlorophyll(s) in intact chloroplasts and isolated LHCII was also accompanied by changes in lutein 1 observed in their 77K fluorescence excitation spectra. We suggest that the characteristic red-shifted fluorescence emission reflects an altered environment of the emitting chlorophyll(s) in LHCII brought about by their closer interaction with lutein 1 in the quenching locus.

  9. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Van't Hof, J.

    1987-03-16

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs.

  10. Somatic hybridization in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Constabel, F

    1976-11-01

    Somatic hybridization in higher plants has come into focus since methods have been established for protoplast fusion and uptake of foreign DNA and organelles by protoplasts. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was an effective agent for inducing fusion. Treatment of protoplasts with PEG resulted in 5 to 30% heterospecific fusion products. Protoplasts of different species, genera and even families were compatible when fused. A number of protoplast combinations (soybean + corn, soybean + pea, soybean + tobacco, carrot + barley, etc.) provided fusion products which underwent cell division and callus formation. Fusion products initially were heterokaryocytes. In dividing heterokaryocytes, random distribution of mitotic nuclei was observed to be accompanied by multiple wall formation and to result in chimeral callus. Juxtaposition of mitotic nuclei suggested nuclear fusion and hybrid formation. Fusion of heterospecific interphase nuclei was demonstrated in soybean + pea and carrot + barley heterokaryons. Provided parental protoplasts carry suitable markers, the fusion products can be recognized. For the isolation and cloning of hybrid cells, fusion experiments must be supplemented with a selective system. Complementation of two non-allelic genes that prevent or inhibit growth under special culture conditions appears as the principle on which to base the selection of somatic hybrids. As protoplasts of some species have been induced to regenerate entire plants, the development of hybrid plants from protoplast fusion products is feasible and has already been demonstrated for tobacco.

  11. High Yield Non-detergent Isolation of Photosystem I-Light-harvesting Chlorophyll II Membranes from Spinach Thylakoids: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ORGANIZATION OF THE PS I ANTENNAE IN HIGHER PLANTS.

    PubMed

    Bell, Adam J; Frankel, Laurie K; Bricker, Terry M

    2015-07-24

    Styrene-maleic acid copolymer was used to effect a non-detergent partial solubilization of thylakoids from spinach. A high density membrane fraction, which was not solubilized by the copolymer, was isolated and was highly enriched in the Photosystem (PS) I-light-harvesting chlorophyll (LHC) II supercomplex and depleted of PS II, the cytochrome b6/f complex, and ATP synthase. The LHC II associated with the supercomplex appeared to be energetically coupled to PS I based on 77 K fluorescence, P700 photooxidation, and PS I electron transport light saturation experiments. The chlorophyll (Chl) a/b ratio of the PS I-LHC II membranes was 3.2 ± 0.9, indicating that on average, three LHC II trimers may associate with each PS I. The implication of these findings within the context of higher plant PS I antenna organization is discussed.

  12. Gravitropism in Higher Plant Shoots

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Salisbury, Frank B.

    1981-01-01

    It has long been known that applied ethylene can redirect the gravitropic response, but only occasionally has it been suggested that ethylene normally plays a role in gravitropism. Two inhibitors of ethylene synthesis [Co2+ and aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG)] and two inhibitors of ethylene action (Ag+ and CO2) were shown to delay the gravitropic response of cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium L.), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), and castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) stems. Gentle shaking on a mechanical shaker does not inhibit the gravitropic response, but vigorous hand shaking for 120 seconds delays the response somewhat. AVG and Ag+ further delay the response of mechanically stimulated plants. AVG delays the response of defoliated and of decapitated plants. Plants laid on their side and restricted so that they cannot bend upward store both bending energy and gravitropic stimulus; they bend immediately when released from restriction (stored energy) and continue to bend for some hours after (stored stimulus). AVG retards the storage of bending energy but not of stimulus. In gravitropism, graviperception may first stimulate ethylene evolution, which may then influence bending directly, or responses involving ethylene could be more indirect. PMID:16661736

  13. Iron Isotope Fractionation in Higher Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guelke, M.; von Blanckenburg, F.; Schoenberg, R.; Staubwasser, M.

    2006-12-01

    To maintain an optimal iron supply plants have adopted two different strategies for uptake of iron from soil [1]. Stable iron isotope compositions reflect these uptake strategies. These phenomena can be studied since MC- ICP-MS now routinely allows the resolution of small mass-dependent natural shifts in the relative abundances of the stable Fe isotopes to a precision of 0.05 per mil. In nature a range of about 4.5 per mil has been found for the fractionation between 56Fe and ^{54}Fe. We have measured various parts of different plant types and extracted the plant-available soil Fe with leaching techniques. The 56Fe/^{54}Fe ratio of soils is fractionated by -0.1 per mil relative to the international IRMM14 standard. Strategy I plants (dicots and non- grass monocots) are depleted by up to 1.6 per mil in the 56Fe/^{54}Fe ratio relative to the iron that is available to plants in soil. Isotope fractionation factors predict the depletion of heavy isotopes in the ferrous reservoir during reduction [2];the roots of strategy I plants reduce ferric iron to facilitate uptake. In contrast we found that 56Fe/^{54}Fe of strategy II plants (grasses) is 0.2 per mil heavier than that in soils. Strategy II plants mobilize ferric iron by complexation with siderophores. Indeed a minor enrichment of heavy isotopes is predicted for this process [3]. We also disclosed an evolution of iron towards light compositions during growth, but only in strategy I plants ; this points at entirely different translocation mechanisms between strategy I and II plants, where redox shifts are involved in Fe translocation in strategy I plants while all Fe remains in the ferric state in strategy II plants. We conclude that Fe isotopes serve to characterize (a) the Fe uptake pathways utilized by plants; (b) the Fe translocation mechanisms within plants; (c) the isotope composition of plant- available Fe by measurement of the 56Fe/^{54}Fe ratio of strategy II plants. [1] Roemheld, V. & Marschner, H. (1986

  14. Silicon transporters in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian Feng

    2010-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in the Earth's crust and exerts beneficial effects on plant growth and production by alleviating both biotic and abiotic stresses including diseases, pests, lodging, drought and nutrient imbalance. Silicon is taken up by the roots in the form ofsilicic acid, a noncharged molecule. Recently both influx (Lsil) and efflux (Lsi2) transporters for silicic acid have been identified in gramineous plants including rice, barley and maize. Lsil and its homologs are influx Si transporters, which belong to a Nod26-like major intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily in the aquaporin protein family. They are responsible for the transport of Si from the external solution to the root cells. On the other hand, Lsi2 and its homologs are efflux Si transporters, belonging to putative anion transporters and are responsible for the transport of Si out of the cells toward the xylem. All influx transporters show polar localization at the distal side. Among efflux transporters, Lsi2 in rice shows polar localization at the proximal side, but that in barley and maize does not show polar localization. The cell-specificity of localization of Si transporters and expression patterns are different between species. Rice Si transporters are also permeable to arsenite.

  15. Resolution and identification of the protein components of the photosystem II antenna system of higher plants by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with electrospray-mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Corradini, D; Huber, C G; Timperio, A M; Zolla, L

    2000-07-21

    Reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) was interfaced to mass spectrometry (MS) with an electrospray ion (ESI) source for the separation and accurate molecular mass determination of the individual intrinsic membrane proteins that comprise the photosystem II (PS II) major light-harvesting complex (LHC II) and minor (CP24, CP26 and CP29) antenna system, whose molecular masses range between 22,000 and 29,000. PS II is a supramolecular complex intrinsic of the thylacoid membrane, which plays the important role in photosynthesis of capturing solar energy, and transferring it to photochemical reaction centers where energy conversion occurs. The protein components of the PS II major and minor antenna systems were extracted from spinach thylacoid membranes and separated using a butyl-silica column eluted by an acetonitrile gradient in 0.05% (v/v) aqueous trifluoroacetic acid. On-line electrospray MS allowed accurate molecular mass determination and identification of the protein components of PS II major and minor antenna system. The proposed RPLC-ESI-MS method holds several advantages over sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the conventional technique for studying membrane proteins, including a better protein separation, mass accuracy, speed and efficiency.

  16. Xenobiotic sensing and signalling in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Ramel, Fanny; Sulmon, Cécile; Serra, Anne-Antonella; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Couée, Ivan

    2012-06-01

    Anthropogenic changes and chemical pollution confront plant communities with various xenobiotic compounds or combinations of xenobiotics, involving chemical structures that are at least partially novel for plant species. Plant responses to chemical challenges and stimuli are usually characterized by the approaches of toxicology, ecotoxicology, and stress physiology. Development of transcriptomics and proteomics analysis has demonstrated the importance of modifications to gene expression in plant responses to xenobiotics. It has emerged that xenobiotic effects could involve not only biochemical and physiological disruption, but also the disruption of signalling pathways. Moreover, mutations affecting sensing and signalling pathways result in modifications of responses to xenobiotics, thus confirming interference or crosstalk between xenobiotic effects and signalling pathways. Some of these changes at gene expression, regulation and signalling levels suggest various mechanisms of xenobiotic sensing in higher plants, in accordance with xenobiotic-sensing mechanisms that have been characterized in other phyla (yeast, invertebrates, vertebrates). In higher plants, such sensing systems are difficult to identify, even though different lines of evidence, involving mutant studies, transcription factor analysis, or comparative studies, point to their existence. It remains difficult to distinguish between the hypothesis of direct xenobiotic sensing and indirect sensing of xenobiotic-related modifications. However, future characterization of xenobiotic sensing and signalling in higher plants is likely to be a key element for determining the tolerance and remediation capacities of plant species. This characterization will also be of interest for understanding evolutionary dynamics of stress adaptation and mechanisms of adaptation to novel stressors.

  17. Phosphorylation of photosystem II components, CP43 apoprotein, D1, D2, and 10 to 11 kilodalton protein in chloroplast thylakoids of higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeuchi, M.; Plumley, F.G.; Inoue, Y.; Schmidt, G.W.

    1987-11-01

    Phosphorylated thylakoid proteins of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and pea (Pisum sativum L.) were solubilized, fractionated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and analyzed by gel electrophoresis and crossed immunoelectrophoresis to identify the phosphoproteins. It was found that in addition to intense phosphorylation of light-harvesting chlorophyll complex II, four photosystem II components, CP43 apoprotein, D1, D2, and a 10 to 11 kilodalton protein, are substantially phosphorylated in the light. Furthermore, the CP43 apoprotein, D1 and D2 can be resolved into two electrophoretic subspecies, only one of which is phosphorylated. This indicates that only a fraction of the PSII polypeptides is phosphorylated. Finally, analysis of detergent procedures suggests that the 10 to 11 kilodalton phosphoprotein is a peripheral component of the O/sub 2/-evolving PSII reaction center complex.

  18. The circadian system in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Stacey L

    2009-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates diverse aspects of plant growth and development and promotes plant fitness. Molecular identification of clock components, primarily in Arabidopsis, has led to recent rapid progress in our understanding of the clock mechanism in higher plants. Using mathematical modeling and experimental approaches, workers in the field have developed a model of the clock that incorporates both transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of clock genes. This cell-autonomous clock, or oscillator, generates rhythmic outputs that can be monitored at the cellular and whole-organism level. The clock not only confers daily rhythms in growth and metabolism, but also interacts with signaling pathways involved in plant responses to the environment. Future work will lead to a better understanding of how the clock and other signaling networks are integrated to provide plants with an adaptive advantage.

  19. Regulation of cell division in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-01-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant's essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  20. Photophysical behavior and assignment of the low-energy chlorophyll states in the CP43 proximal antenna protein of higher plant photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Joseph L; Picorel, Rafael; Seibert, Michael; Krausz, Elmars

    2006-10-10

    We have employed absorption, circular dichroism (CD), and persistent spectral hole-burning measurements at 1.7 K to study the photoconversion properties and exciton coupling of low-energy chlorophylls (Chls) in the CP43 proximal antenna light-harvesting subunit of photosystem II (PSII) isolated from spinach. These approximately 683 nm states act as traps for excitation energy in isolated CP43. They "bleach" at 683 nm upon illumination and photoconvert to a form absorbing in the range approximately 660-680 nm. We present new data that show the changes in the CD spectrum due to the photoconversion process. These changes occur in parallel with those in absorption, providing evidence that the feature undergoing the apparent bleach is a component of a weakly exciton-coupled system. From our photoconversion difference spectra, we assign four states in the Chl long-wavelength region of CP43, two of which are the known trap states and are both highly localized on single Chls. The other two states are associated with weak exciton coupling (maximally approximately 50 cm(-)(1)) to one of these traps. We propose a mechanism for photoconversion that involves Chl-protein hydrogen bonding. New hole-burning data are presented that indicate this mechanism is distinct to that for narrow-band spectral hole burning in CP43. We discuss the photophysical behavior of the Chl trap states in isolated CP43 compared to their behavior in intact PSII preparations. The latter represent a more intact, physiological complex, and we find no clear evidence that they exhibit the photoconversion process reported here.

  1. Nickel: a micronutrient essential for higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.H.; Welch, R.M.; Cary, E.E.

    1987-11-01

    Nickel was established as an essential micronutrient for the growth of temperate cereal crops. Grain from barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Onda; containing 40 to 80 nanograms of Ni per gram dry weight) grown in solution culture with negligible Ni concentrations (<30 nanograms of Ni per liter) exhibited greatly reduced germination rates (i.e. 50% less than grain from Ni-adequate plants) and seeding vigor of the viable grain was greatly depressed. Grain containing less than 30 nanograms per gram dry weight was inviable. Under Ni-deficient conditions, barley plants fail to produce viable grain because of a disruption of the maternal plants normal grain-filling and maturation processes that occur following formation of the grain embryo. The observations that (a) barley plants fail to complete their life cycle in the absence of Ni and (b) addition of Ni to the growth medium completely alleviates deficiency symptoms in the maternal plants satisfies the essentiality criteria; thus Ni should be considered a micronutrient for cereals. Because Ni is required by legumes, and is now established for cereals, the authors conclude that Ni should be added to the list of micronutrients essential for all higher plant growth.

  2. Phenol biosynthesis in higher plants. Gallic acid

    PubMed Central

    Dewick, P. M.; Haslam, E.

    1969-01-01

    The biosynthesis of gallic acid in a number of higher plants was investigated by using l-[U-14C]phenylalanine, (−)-[G-14C]shikimic acid, d-[1-14C]glucose and d-[6-14C]glucose as tracers. The results are compared with those obtained similarly for caffeic acid and are interpreted in terms of the dehydrogenation of 5-dehydroshikimic acid as a normal route of metabolism for gallic acid. PMID:5807212

  3. Nickel: an essential element for higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    The inability of cereal crops to complete their life cycle in the absence of Ni demonstrates that Ni is an essential micronutrient for the growth of higher plants. The growth of barley (Hordeum vulgare L., cv. Onda), wheat (Triticum aestivum L., cv. Era), and oats (Avena sativa L., cv. Astro) is depressed under Ni deficient conditions, and grain of severely Ni deficient barley was inviable. Evidence suggests that Ni is essential to the formation of the grain embryo and in the remobilization of N from the leaves to the grain during plant maturation. Nickel deficiency produces characteristic deficiency symptoms in cereals including, leaf chlorosis, premature senescence in oats, and the development of interveinal necrosis. Metabolic effects of Ni deficiency are extensive and cannot be alleviated by the addition of any other essential element.

  4. Effect of free fall on higher plants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    The influence of exposure to the free-fall state on the orientation, morphogenesis, physiology, and radiation response of higher plants is briefly summarized. It is proposed that the duration of the space-flight experiments has been to brief to permit meaningful effects of free fall on general biochemistry, growth, and development to appear. However, two types of significant effect did occur. The first is on differential growth - i.e., tropism and epinasty - resulting from the absence of a normal geostimulus. For these phenomena it is suggested that ground-based experiments with the clinostat would suffice to mimic the effect of the free-fall state. The second is an apparent interaction between the radiation response and some flight condition, yielding an enhanced microspore abortion, a disturbed spindle function, and a stunting of stamen hairs. It is suggested that this apparent interaction may be derived from a shift in the rhythm of the cell cycle, induced by the free fall.

  5. Hormonal control of transcription in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Teissere, M; Penon, P; van Huystee, R B; Azou, Y; Ricard, J

    1975-09-01

    1. Nucleolar RNA polymerase Ib obtained from auxin-treated lentil roots exhibits a higher transcriptional activity than the enzyme obtained from control roots. This difference is due to a change in the enzyme properties after auxin treatment. It is suggested that the hormonal effect is mediated by a factor that changes the molecular properties of nucleolar RNA polymerase. 2. Four fractions, alpha, beta, gamma and delta, that stimulate the activity of RNA polymerase Ib, have been extracted from lentil roots. Two of them, gamma and delta have been studied. Factor delta can stimulate nucleolar polymerase Ib and the nucleoplasmic enzyme II equally well, while factor gamma is specific for polymerase Ib. 3. The curve of UMP incorporation in vitro, with and without factors gamma or delta suggests that they are initiation factors. This conclusion is reinforced by the analysis of simultaneous incorporation of [gamma-32P]ATP and [3H]UMP in the RNAs synthesized in vitro. 4. Although the level of factor delta is independent of auxin treatment, that of factor gamma is doubled in auxin-treated roots. These results suggest that factor gamma is an auxin-induced protein that modulates the specific activity of the nucleolar RNA polymerase. 5. A general model of the mode of action of auxins at the molecular level is proposed. It integrates into a unified scheme the above results as well as those obtained by other workers.

  6. Developing Higher Plant Systems in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of hypogravity and microgravity environments on plant cells are discussed. Experiments on embryos of carrots are discussed. Simulation and spacecraft environments were used in experiments.

  7. Isotopic discrimination of zinc in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Weiss, D J; Mason, T F D; Zhao, F J; Kirk, G J D; Coles, B J; Horstwood, M S A

    2005-03-01

    * The extent of isotopic discrimination of transition metals in biological processes is poorly understood but potentially has important applications in plant and biogeochemical studies. * Using multicollector inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry, we measured isotopic fractionation of zinc (Zn) during uptake from nutrient solutions by rice (Oryza sativa), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants. * For all three species, the roots showed a similar extent of heavy Zn enrichment relative to the nutrient solution, probably reflecting preferential adsorption on external root surfaces. By contrast, a plant-species specific enrichment of the light Zn isotope occurred in the shoots, indicative of a biological, membrane-transport controlled uptake into plant cells. The extent of the fractionation in the shoots further depended on the Zn speciation in the nutrient solution. * The observed isotopic depletion in heavy Zn from root to shoot (-0.13 to -0.26 per atomic mass unit) is equivalent to roughly a quarter of the total reported terrestrial variability of Zn isotopic compositions (c. 0.84 per atomic mass unit). Plant uptake therefore represents an important source of isotopic variation in biogeochemical cycling of Zn.

  8. The cytoskeleton and gravitropism in higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blancaflor, Elison B.

    2002-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the gravitropic response of plants have continued to elude plant biologists despite more than a century of research. Lately there has been increased attention on the role of the cytoskeleton in plant gravitropism, but several controversies and major gaps in our understanding of cytoskeletal involvement in gravitropism remain. A major question in the study of plant gravitropism is how the cytoskeleton mediates early sensing and signal transduction events in plants. Much has been made of the actin cytoskeleton as the cellular structure that sedimenting amyloplasts impinge upon to trigger the downstream signaling events leading to the bending response. There is also strong molecular and biochemical evidence that the transport of auxin, an important player in gravitropism, is regulated by actin. Organizational changes in microtubules during the growth response phase of gravitropism have also been well documented, but the significance of such reorientations in controlling differential cellular growth is unclear. Studies employing pharmacological approaches to dissect cytoskeletal involvement in gravitropism have led to conflicting results and therefore need to be interpreted with caution. Despite the current controversies, the revolutionary advances in molecular, biochemical, and cell biological techniques have opened up several possibilities for further research into this difficult area. The myriad proteins associated with the plant cytoskeleton that are being rapidly characterized provide a rich assortment of candidate regulators that could be targets of the gravity signal transduction chain. Cytoskeletal and ion imaging in real time combined with mutant analysis promises to provide a fresh start into this controversial area of research.

  9. Higher Education Facility Needs in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cresap, McCormick, and Paget, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    Volume II of a study designed by a management consultant firm to develop and implement a system for the inventorying of existing physical facilities and for forecasting future physical plant needs for institutions of higher education in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The report includes instructional space utilization, projected facilities…

  10. Higher plant mitochondrial DNA: Genomes, genes, mutants, transcription, translation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains brief summaries of 63 presentations given at the International Workshop on Higher Plant Mitochondrial DNA. The presentations are organized into topical discussions addressing plant genomes, mitochondrial genes, cytoplasmic male sterility, transcription, translation, plasmids and tissue culture. (DT)

  11. The outer mitochondrial membrane in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Owen; van der Merwe, Margaretha J; Daley, Daniel O; Whelan, James

    2013-04-01

    The acquisition and integration of intracellular organelles, such as mitochondria and plastids, were important steps in the emergence of complex multicellular life. Although the outer membranes of these organelles have lost many of the functions of their free-living bacterial ancestor, others were acquired during organellogenesis. To date, the biological roles of these proteins have not been systematically characterized. In this review, we discuss the evolutionary origins and functions of outer membrane mitochondrial (OMM) proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our analysis, using phylogenetic inference, indicates that several OMM proteins either acquired novel functional roles or were recruited from other subcellular localizations during evolution in Arabidopsis. These observations suggest the existence of novel communication routes and functions between organelles within plant cells.

  12. Controlled Ecological Life Support System: Use of Higher Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbits, T. W.; Alford, D. K.

    1982-01-01

    Results of two workshops concerning the use of higher plants in Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) are summarized. Criteria for plant selection were identified from these categories: food production, nutrition, oxygen production and carbon dioxide utilization, water recycling, waste recycling, and other morphological and physiological considerations. Types of plant species suitable for use in CELSS, growing procedures, and research priorities were recommended. Also included are productivity values for selected plant species.

  13. Higher plant diversity promotes higher diversity of fungal pathogens, while it decreases pathogen infection per plant.

    PubMed

    Rottstock, Tanja; Joshi, Jasmin; Kummer, Volker; Fischer, Markus

    2014-07-01

    Fungal plant pathogens are common in natural communities where they affect plant physiology, plant survival, and biomass production. Conversely, pathogen transmission and infection may be regulated by plant community characteristics such as plant species diversity and functional composition that favor pathogen diversity through increases in host diversity while simultaneously reducing pathogen infection via increased variability in host density and spatial heterogeneity. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of multi-host multi-pathogen interactions is of high significance in the context of biodiversity-ecosystem functioning. We investigated the relationship between plant diversity and aboveground obligate parasitic fungal pathogen ("pathogens" hereafter) diversity and infection in grasslands of a long-term, large-scale, biodiversity experiment with varying plant species (1-60 species) and plant functional group diversity (1-4 groups). To estimate pathogen infection of the plant communities, we visually assessed pathogen-group presence (i.e., rusts, powdery mildews, downy mildews, smuts, and leaf-spot diseases) and overall infection levels (combining incidence and severity of each pathogen group) in 82 experimental plots on all aboveground organs of all plant species per plot during four surveys in 2006. Pathogen diversity, assessed as the cumulative number of pathogen groups on all plant species per plot, increased log-linearly with plant species diversity. However, pathogen incidence and severity, and hence overall infection, decreased with increasing plant species diversity. In addition, co-infection of plant individuals by two or more pathogen groups was less likely with increasing plant community diversity. We conclude that plant community diversity promotes pathogen-community diversity while at the same time reducing pathogen infection levels of plant individuals.

  14. Biophysical characterization of higher plant Rubisco activase.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J Nathan; Hazra, Suratna; Dunkle, Alison M; Salvucci, Michael E; Wachter, Rebekka M

    2013-01-01

    Rubisco activase (Rca) is a chaperone-like protein of the AAA+ family, which uses mechano-chemical energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to release tightly bound inhibitors from the active site of the primary carbon fixing enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate oxygenase/carboxylase (Rubisco). Mechanistic and structural investigations of Rca have been hampered by its exceptional thermolability, high degree of size polydispersity and propensity towards subunit aggregation. In this work, we have characterized the thermal stability and self-association behavior of recombinant Rca preparations, and have developed ligand screening methods. Thermal denaturation profiles generated by circular dichroism indicate that creosote and tobacco short-form Rcas are the most stable proteins examined, with an estimated mid-point temperature of 45-47°C for protein denaturation. We demonstrate that ADP provides a higher degree of stabilization than ATP, that magnesium ions have a small stabilizing effect on ATP-bound, but a significant destabilizing effect on ADP-bound Rca, and that phosphate provides weak stabilization of the ADP-bound form of the protein. A dimeric species was identified by size-exclusion chromatography, suggesting that the two-subunit module may comprise the basic building block for larger assemblies. Evidence is provided that chromatographic procedures reflect non-equilibrium multimeric states. Dynamic light scattering experiments performed on nucleotide-bearing Rca support the notion that several larger, highly polydisperse assembly states coexist over a broad concentration range. No significant changes in aggregation are observed upon replacement of ADP with ATP. However, in the absence of nucleotides, the major protein population appears to consist of a monodisperse oligomer smaller than a hexamer.

  15. Effect of iodine disinfection products on higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, D.; Macler, B.; Macelroy, R. D.; Thorstenson, Y.; Sauer, R.

    1989-01-01

    Iodine is used to disinfect potable water on United States spacecraft. Iodinated potable water will likely be used to grow plants in space. Little is known about the effects of iodine disinfection products on plants. Seeds of select higher plants were germinated in water iodinated using the Shuttle Microbial Check Valve, and water to which measured amounts of iodine was added. Percent germination was decreased in seeds of most species germinated in iodinated water. Beans were most affected. Germination rates, determined from germination half-times, were decreased for beans germinated in iodinated water, and water to which iodide was added. Development was retarded and rootlets were conspicuously absent in bean and several other plant species germinated in iodinated water. Iodide alone did not elicit these responses. Clearly iodine disinfection products can affect higher plants. These effects must be carefully considered for plant experimentation and cultivation in space, and in design and testing of closed environmental life support systems.

  16. Controlled ecological life support system higher plant flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W.; Wheeler, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Requirements for spaceflight experments which involve higher plants were determined. The plants are studied for use in controlled ecological life support systems (CELSS). Two categories of research requirements are discussed: (1) the physical needs which include nutrient, water and gas exchange requirements; (2) the biological and physiological functions which affect plants in zero gravity environments. Physical problems studies are given the priority since they affect all biological experiments.

  17. Design of components for growing higher plants in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to design unique systems and components for growing higher plants in microgravity during long-term space missions (Mars and beyond). Specific design tasks were chosen to contribute to and supplement NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) project. Selected tasks were automated seeding of plants, plant health sensing, and food processing. Prototype systems for planting both germinated and nongerminated seeds were fabricated and tested. Water and air pressure differences and electrostatic fields were used to trap seeds for separation and transport for planting. An absorption spectrometer was developed to measure chlorophyll levels in plants as an early warning of plant health problems. In the area of food processing, a milling system was created using high-speed rotating blades which were aerodynamically configured to produce circulation and retractable to prevent leakage. The project produced significant results having substantial benefit to NASA. It also provided an outstanding learning experience for the students involved.

  18. Selenium in higher plants: understanding mechanisms for biofortification and phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Williams, Paul N; Meharg, Andrew A

    2009-08-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient for many organisms, including plants, animals and humans. As plants are the main source of dietary Se, plant Se metabolism is therefore important for Se nutrition of humans and other animals. However, the concentration of Se in plant foods varies between areas, and too much Se can lead to toxicity. As we discuss here, plant Se uptake and metabolism can be exploited for the purposes of developing high-Se crop cultivars and for plant-mediated removal of excess Se from soil or water. Here, we review key developments in the current understanding of Se in higher plants. We also discuss recent advances in the genetic engineering of Se metabolism, particularly for biofortification and phytoremediation of Se-contaminated environments.

  19. DNA methylation in higher plants: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Vanyushin, Boris F; Ashapkin, Vasili V

    2011-08-01

    A relatively high degree of nuclear DNA (nDNA) methylation is a specific feature of plant genomes. Targets for cytosine DNA methylation in plant genomes are CG, CHG and CHH (H is A, T, C) sequences. More than 30% total m(5)C in plant DNA is located in non-CG sites. DNA methylation in plants is species-, tissue-, organelle- and age-specific; it is involved in the control of all genetic functions including transcription, replication, DNA repair, gene transposition and cell differentiation. DNA methylation is engaged in gene silencing and parental imprinting, it controls expression of transgenes and foreign DNA in cell. Plants have much more complicated and sophisticated system of the multicomponent genome methylations compared to animals; DNA methylation in plant mitochondria is performed in other fashion as compared to that in nuclei. The nDNA methylation is carried out by cytosine DNA methyltransferases of, at least, three families. In contrast to animals the plants with the major maintenance methyltransferase MET1 (similar to animal Dnmt1) inactivated do survive. One and the same plant gene may be methylated at both adenine and cytosine residues; specific plant adenine DNA methyltransferase was described. Thus, two different systems of the genome modification based on methylation of cytosines and adenines seem to coexist in higher plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Epigenetic control of cellular and developmental processes in plants.

  20. Discovery of new anticancer agents from higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Chai, Hee-Byung; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2012-01-01

    1. ABSTRACT Small organic molecules derived from higher plants have been one of the mainstays of cancer chemotherapy for approximately the past half a century. In the present review, selected single chemical entity natural products of plant origin and their semi-synthetic derivatives currently in clinical trials are featured as examples of new cancer chemotherapeutic drug candidates. Several more recently isolated compounds obtained from plants showing promising in vivo biological activity are also discussed in terms of their potential as anticancer agents, with many of these obtained from species that grow in tropical regions. Since extracts of only a relatively small proportion of the ca. 300,000 higher plants on earth have been screened biologically to date, bioactive compounds from plants should play an important role in future anticancer drug discovery efforts. PMID:22202049

  1. Properties of shaker-type potassium channels in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Gambale, F; Uozumi, N

    2006-03-01

    Potassium (K(+)), the most abundant cation in biological organisms, plays a crucial role in the survival and development of plant cells, modulation of basic mechanisms such as enzyme activity, electrical membrane potentials, plant turgor and cellular homeostasis. Due to the absence of a Na(+)/K(+) exchanger, which widely exists in animal cells, K(+) channels and some type of K(+) transporters function as K(+) uptake systems in plants. Plant voltage-dependent K(+) channels, which display striking topological and functional similarities with the voltage-dependent six-transmembrane segment animal Shaker-type K(+) channels, have been found to play an important role in the plasma membrane of a variety of tissues and organs in higher plants. Outward-rectifying, inward-rectifying and weakly-rectifying K(+) channels have been identified and play a crucial role in K(+) homeostasis in plant cells. To adapt to the environmental conditions, plants must take advantage of the large variety of Shaker-type K(+) channels naturally present in the plant kingdom. This review summarizes the extensive data on the structure, function, membrane topogenesis, heteromerization, expression, localization, physiological roles and modulation of Shaker-type K(+) channels from various plant species. The accumulated results also help in understanding the similarities and differences in the properties of Shaker-type K(+) channels in plants in comparison to those of Shaker channels in animals and bacteria.

  2. Heat tolerance of higher plants cenosis to damaging air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, Sofya; Shklavtsova, Ekaterina

    Designing sustained biological-technical life support systems (BTLSS) including higher plants as a part of a photosynthesizing unit, it is important to foresee the multi species cenosis reaction on either stress-factors. Air temperature changing in BTLSS (because of failure of a thermoregulation system) up to the values leading to irreversible damages of photosynthetic processes is one of those factors. However, it is possible to increase, within the certain limits, the plant cenosis tolerance to the unfavorable temperatures’ effect due to the choice of the higher plants possessing resistance both to elevated and to lowered air temperatures. Besides, the plants heat tolerance can be increased when subjecting them during their growing to the hardening off temperatures’ effect. Thus, we have come to the conclusion that it is possible to increase heat tolerance of multi species cenosis under the damaging effect of air temperature of 45 (°) СC.

  3. Higher Plants in Space: Microgravity Perception, Response, and Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hui Qiong; Han, Fei; Le, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Microgravity is a major abiotic stress in space. Its effects on plants may depend on the duration of exposure. We focused on two different phases of microgravity responses in space. When higher plants are exposed to short-term (seconds to hours) microgravity, such as on board parabolic flights and sounding rockets, their cells usually exhibit abiotic stress responses. For example, Ca 2+-, lipid-, and pH-signaling are rapidly enhanced, then the production of reactive oxygen species and other radicals increase dramatically along with changes in metabolism and auxin signaling. Under long-term (days to months) microgravity exposure, plants acclimatize to the stress by changing their metabolism and oxidative response and by enhancing other tropic responses. We conclude by suggesting that a systematic analysis of regulatory networks at the molecular level of higher plants is needed to understand the molecular signals in the distinct phases of the microgravity response and adaptation.

  4. Power plant II - Sodium-water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, M.

    The implementation of a sodium based heat exchange loop is presented as a means of reducing the required size of a solar thermal power plant heat exchanger. Sodium as a heat transfer fluid allows operations near 535 C with electromagnetic pumps. It is noted that sodium must be completely sealed in and surrounded with a neutral gas such as nitrogen or argon. The higher temperatures pave the way for a more efficient thermodynamic cycle, although the Themis receiver would necessarily need a faster loop in addition to more absorbent surfaces to adequately handle the sodium liquid. The steam lines would be helically wound in a chamber through which the sodium flows linearly downward. Storage is concluded to not be feasible under current technology due to the violent reactions possible between sodium and water or hitec salts. An auxiliary heat source would be required.

  5. Fractionation of metal stable isotopes by higher plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Von Blanckenburg, F.; Von Wiren, N.; Guelke, M.; Weiss, D.J.; Bullen, T.D.

    2009-01-01

    Higher plants induce chemical reactions in the rhizosphere, facilitating metal uptake by roots. Fractionation of the isotopes in nutrients such as calcium, iron, magnesium, and zinc produces a stable isotope composition in the plants that generally differs from that of the growth medium. Isotope fractionation also occurs during transport of the metals within most plants, but its extent depends on plant species and on the metal, in particular, on the metal's redox state and what ligand it is bound to. The metal stable isotope variations observed in plants create an isotope signature of life at the Earth's surface, contributing substantially to our understanding of metal cycling processes in the environment and in individual organisms.

  6. Fungal elicitors of the phytoalexin response in higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Charles A.

    1981-09-01

    Several types of fungal molecules including cell wall polysaccharides, polypeptides, glycoproteins and lipid molecules have been found to serve as elicitors of phytoalexins in higher plants. Recent work has shown that an extracellular enzyme, endopolygalacturonase, from culture filtrates of the fungus Rhizopus stolonifer elicits the biosynthesis of an antifungal antibiotic, casbene, in extracts of treated castor bean ( Ricinus communis L.) seedlings. A suggested mode of action of this elicitor in the plant in which fragments of the plant cell wall released through the catalytic action of the enzyme serve as secondary elicitors to trigger the plant response is proposed on the basis of preliminary observations. Possible modes of interaction of other types of fungal elicitors with plants are also discussed.

  7. The Interactions of Aquaporins and Mineral Nutrients in Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Ding, Lei; Gao, Limin; Li, Yingrui; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

    2016-07-29

    Aquaporins, major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) present in the plasma and intracellular membranes, facilitate the transport of small neutral molecules across cell membranes in higher plants. Recently, progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of aquaporin subcellular localization, transport selectivity, and gating properties. Although the role of aquaporins in maintaining the plant water status has been addressed, the interactions between plant aquaporins and mineral nutrients remain largely unknown. This review highlights the roles of various aquaporin orthologues in mineral nutrient uptake and transport, as well as the regulatory effects of mineral nutrients on aquaporin expression and activity, and an integrated link between aquaporins and mineral nutrient metabolism was identified.

  8. The Interactions of Aquaporins and Mineral Nutrients in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Ding, Lei; Gao, Limin; Li, Yingrui; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins, major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) present in the plasma and intracellular membranes, facilitate the transport of small neutral molecules across cell membranes in higher plants. Recently, progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of aquaporin subcellular localization, transport selectivity, and gating properties. Although the role of aquaporins in maintaining the plant water status has been addressed, the interactions between plant aquaporins and mineral nutrients remain largely unknown. This review highlights the roles of various aquaporin orthologues in mineral nutrient uptake and transport, as well as the regulatory effects of mineral nutrients on aquaporin expression and activity, and an integrated link between aquaporins and mineral nutrient metabolism was identified. PMID:27483251

  9. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-07-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant`s essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  10. Cellular Mechanisms of Gravitropic Response in Higher Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Sergei; Smolikova, Galina; Pozhvanov, Gregory; Suslov, Dmitry

    The evolutionary success of land plants in adaptation to the vectorial environmental factors was based mainly on the development of polarity systems. In result, normal plant ontogenesis is based on the positional information. Polarity is a tool by which the developing plant organs and tissues are mapped and the specific three-dimensional structure of the organism is created. It is due to their polar organization plants are able to orient themselves relative to the gravity vector and different vectorial cues, and to respond adequately to various stimuli. Gravitation is one of the most important polarized environmental factor that guides the development of plant organisms in space. Every plant can "estimate" its position relative to the gravity vector and correct it, if necessary, by means of polarized growth. The direction and the magnitude of gravitational stimulus are constant during the whole plant ontogenesis. The key plant response to the action of gravity is gravitropism, i.e. the directed growth of organs with respect to the gravity vector. This response is a very convenient model to study the mechanisms of plant orientation in space. The present report is focused on the main cellular mechanisms responsible for graviropic bending in higher plants. These mechanisms and structures include electric polarization of plant cells, Ca ({2+) }gradients, cytoskeleton, G-proteins, phosphoinositides and the machinery responsible for asymmetric auxin distribution. Those mechanisms tightly interact demonstrating some hierarchy and multiple feedbacks. The Ca (2+) gradients provide the primary physiological basis of polarity in plant cells. Calcium ions influence on the bioelectric potentials, the organization of actin cytoskeleton, the activity of Ca (2+) -binding proteins and Ca (2+) -dependent protein kinases. Protein kinases modulate transcription factors activity thereby regulating the gene expression and switching the developmental programs. Actin cytoskeleton affects

  11. Complexation and Toxicity of Copper in Higher Plants. II. Different Mechanisms for Copper versus Cadmium Detoxification in the Copper-Sensitive Cadmium/Zinc Hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens (Ganges Ecotype)1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Mijovilovich, Ana; Leitenmaier, Barbara; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kroneck, Peter M.H.; Götz, Birgit; Küpper, Hendrik

    2009-01-01

    The cadmium/zinc hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens is sensitive toward copper (Cu) toxicity, which is a problem for phytoremediation of soils with mixed contamination. Cu levels in T. caerulescens grown with 10 μm Cu2+ remained in the nonaccumulator range (<50 ppm), and most individuals were as sensitive toward Cu as the related nonaccumulator Thlaspi fendleri. Obviously, hyperaccumulation and metal resistance are highly metal specific. Cu-induced inhibition of photosynthesis followed the “sun reaction” type of damage, with inhibition of the photosystem II reaction center charge separation and the water-splitting complex. A few individuals of T. caerulescens were more Cu resistant. Compared with Cu-sensitive individuals, they recovered faster from inhibition, at least partially by enhanced repair of chlorophyll-protein complexes but not by exclusion, since the content of Cu in their shoots was increased by about 25%. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements on frozen-hydrated leaf samples revealed that a large proportion of Cu in T. caerulescens is bound by sulfur ligands. This is in contrast to the known binding environment of cadmium and zinc in the same species, which is dominated by oxygen ligands. Clearly, hyperaccumulators detoxify hyperaccumulated metals differently compared with nonaccumulated metals. Furthermore, strong features in the Cu-EXAFS spectra ascribed to metal-metal contributions were found, in particular in the Cu-resistant specimens. Some of these features may be due to Cu binding to metallothioneins, but a larger proportion seems to result from biomineralization, most likely Cu(II) oxalate and Cu(II) oxides. Additional contributions in the EXAFS spectra indicate complexation of Cu(II) by the nonproteogenic amino acid nicotianamine, which has a very high affinity for Cu(II) as further characterized here. PMID:19692532

  12. Cytoskeletal and membrane dynamics during higher plant cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Colleen M; Bednarek, Sebastian Y

    2013-03-01

    Following mitosis, cytoplasm, organelles and genetic material are partitioned into daughter cells through the process of cytokinesis. In somatic cells of higher plants, two cytoskeletal arrays, the preprophase band and the phragmoplast, facilitate the positioning and de novo assembly of the plant-specific cytokinetic organelle, the cell plate, which develops across the division plane and fuses with the parental plasma membrane to yield distinct new cells. The coordination of cytoskeletal and membrane dynamics required to initiate, assemble and shape the cell plate as it grows toward the mother cell cortex is dependent upon a large array of proteins, including molecular motors, membrane tethering, fusion and restructuring factors and biosynthetic, structural and regulatory elements. This review focuses on the temporal and molecular requirements of cytokinesis in somatic cells of higher plants gleaned from recent studies using cell biology, genetics, pharmacology and biochemistry.

  13. Enhanced bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soils with higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, A.P.; Banks, M.K.

    1996-10-01

    Introduction of higher plants into a bioremediation system can enhance degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons and target compounds, particularly relatively immobile and recalcitrant organic molecules. Over the past several years, an interdisciplinary team of civil engineers, chemical engineers, soil chemists, soil microbiologists, and plant scientists at Kansas State University have been studying phytoremediation systems. Greenhouse experiments have focused on selecting plants that are most adapted to degrading target compounds and to surviving in soils highly contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. Plant species do not seem to differ in their ability to aid in the decomposition of pyrene and anthracene, but benzo[a]pyrene is much more difficult to degrade. Most species are ineffective in enhancing the degradation of benzo[a]pyrene. Four field studies have been initiated in California, Texas, New Jersey, and Virginia to test some of our greenhouse observations.

  14. 97. Catalog B, Higher Plants, 200 2 American Chestnut Tree, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. Catalog B, Higher Plants, 200 2 American Chestnut Tree, Negative No. 6032 (Photographer and date unknown) THIS GHOST FOREST OF BLIGHTED CHESTNUTS ONCE STOOD APPROXIMATELY AT THE LOCATION OF THE BYRD VISITOR CENTER. - Skyline Drive, From Front Royal, VA to Rockfish Gap, VA , Luray, Page County, VA

  15. Electrochemical Microsensors for the Detection of Cadmium(II) and Lead(II) Ions in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Krystofova, Olga; Trnkova, Libuse; Adam, Vojtech; Zehnalek, Josef; Hubalek, Jaromir; Babula, Petr; Kizek, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Routine determination of trace metals in complex media is still a difficult task for many analytical instruments. The aim of this work was to compare three electro-chemical instruments [a standard potentiostat (Autolab), a commercially available miniaturized potentiostat (PalmSens) and a homemade micropotentiostat] for easy-to-use and sensitive determination of cadmium(II) and lead(II) ions. The lowest detection limits (hundreds of pM) for both metals was achieved by using of the standard potentiostat, followed by the miniaturized potentiostat (tens of nM) and the homemade instrument (hundreds of nM). Nevertheless, all potentiostats were sensitive enough to evaluate contamination of the environment, because the environmental limits for both metals are higher than detection limits of the instruments. Further, we tested all used potentiostats and working electrodes on analysis of environmental samples (rainwater, flour and plant extract) with artificially added cadmium(II) and lead(II). Based on the similar results obtained for all potentiostats we choose a homemade instrument with a carbon tip working electrode for our subsequent environmental experiments, in which we analyzed maize and sunflower seedlings and rainwater obtained from various sites in the Czech Republic. PMID:22219663

  16. The Relevance of Higher Plants in Lead Compound Discovery Programs⊥

    PubMed Central

    Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Pan, Li; Fletcher, Joshua N.; Chai, Heebyung

    2011-01-01

    Along with compounds from terrestrial microorganisms, the constituents of higher plants have provided a substantial number of the natural product-derived drugs used currently in western medicine. Interest in the elucidation of new structures of the secondary metabolite constituents of plants has remained high among the natural products community over the first decade of the 21st century, particularly of species that are used in systems of traditional medicine or are utilized as botanical dietary supplements. In this review, progress made in the senior author’s laboratory in research work on naturally occurring sweeteners and other taste-modifying substances and on potential anticancer agents from tropical plants will be described. PMID:21650152

  17. Shedding light on ethylene metabolism in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria A.; Bianchetti, Ricardo E.; Freschi, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Ethylene metabolism in higher plants is regulated by a wide array of endogenous and environmental factors. During most physiological processes, ethylene levels are mainly determined by a strict control of the rate-limiting biosynthetic steps responsible for the production of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and its subsequent conversion to ethylene. Responsible for these reactions, the key enzymes ACC synthase and ACC oxidase are encoded by multigene families formed by members that can be differentially regulated at the transcription and post-translational levels by specific developmental and environmental signals. Among the wide variety of environmental cues controlling plant ethylene production, light quality, duration, and intensity have consistently been demonstrated to influence the metabolism of this plant hormone in diverse plant tissues, organs, and species. Although still not completely elucidated, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between light signal transduction and ethylene evolution appears to involve a complex network that includes central transcription factors connecting multiple signaling pathways, which can be reciprocally modulated by ethylene itself, other phytohormones, and specific light wavelengths. Accumulating evidence has indicated particular photoreceptors as essential mediators in light-induced signaling cascades affecting ethylene levels. Therefore, this review specifically focuses on discussing the current knowledge of the potential molecular mechanisms implicated in the light-induced responses affecting ethylene metabolism during the regulation of developmental and metabolic plant responses. Besides presenting the state of the art in this research field, some overlooked mechanisms and future directions to elucidate the exact nature of the light–ethylene interplay in higher plants will also be compiled and discussed. PMID:25520728

  18. Use of higher plants as screens for toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Kristen, U

    1997-01-01

    This review deals with the use of entire plants, seedlings, cell suspension cultures and pollen tubes for the estimation of potential toxicity in the environment, and for risk assessment of chemicals and formulations of human relevance. It is shown that the roots of onions and various crop seedlings, as well as in vitro growing pollen tubes of some mono- and dicotyledonous plants, are most frequently used to obtain toxicity data by determination of root and tube growth inhibition. Both roots and pollen tubes are chloroplast free, non-photosynthetic systems and, therefore, with regard to their cytotoxic reactions are closer to vertebrate tissues and cells than are chloroplast-containing plant organs. Root tips and anthers of flower buds are shown to be applicable to genotoxicity screening by microscopic analysis of mitotic or meiotic aberrations during cell division or microspore development, respectively. The processes of mitosis and meiosis are similar in plants and animals. Therefore, meristematic and sporogenic tissues of plants generally show patterns of cytotoxic response similar to those of embryogenic and spermatogenic tissues of vertebrates. The suitability of root tips, cell suspensions and pollen tubes for the investigation of mechanisms of toxic action and for the analysis of structure-activity relationships is also demonstrated. Two plant-based assays, the Allium test and the pollen tube growth test, both currently being evaluated alongside with established mammalian in vivo and in vitro protocols, are emphasized with regard to their potential use as alternatives to animal in vivo toxicity tests. For both assays, preliminary results indicate that the tips of growing roots and the rapidly elongating pollen tubes of certain higher plant species are as reliable as mammalian cell lines for detecting basal cytotoxicity. It is suggested that seeds and pollen grains, in particular, provide easily storable and convenient systems for inexpensive, relatively

  19. Experimental determination of magnesium isotope fractionation during higher plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolou-Bi, Emile B.; Poszwa, Anne; Leyval, Corinne; Vigier, Nathalie

    2010-05-01

    Two higher plant species (rye grass and clover) were cultivated under laboratory conditions on two substrates (solution, phlogopite) in order to constrain the corresponding Mg isotope fractionations during plant growth and Mg uptake. We show that bulk plants are systematically enriched in heavy isotopes relative to their nutrient source. The Δ 26Mg plant-source range from 0.72‰ to 0.26‰ for rye grass and from 1.05‰ to 0.41‰ for clover. Plants grown on phlogopite display Mg isotope signatures (relative to the Mg source) ˜0.3‰ lower than hydroponic plants. For a given substrate, rye grass display lower δ 26Mg (by ˜0.3‰) relative to clover. Magnesium desorbed from rye grass roots display a δ 26Mg greater than the nutrient solution. Adsorption experiments on dead and living rye grass roots also indicate a significant enrichment in heavy isotopes of the Mg adsorbed on the root surface. Our results indicate that the key processes responsible for heavy isotope enrichment in plants are located at the root level. Both species also exhibit an enrichment in light isotopes from roots to shoots (Δ 26Mg leaf-root = -0.65‰ and -0.34‰ for rye grass and clover grown on phlogopite respectively, and Δ 26Mg leaf-root of -0.06‰ and -0.22‰ for the same species grown hydroponically). This heavy isotope depletion in leaves can be explained by biological processes that affect leaves and roots differently: (1) organo-Mg complex (including chlorophyll) formation, and (2) Mg transport within plant. For both species, a positive correlation between δ 26Mg and K/Mg was observed among the various organs. This correlation is consistent with the link between K and Mg internal cycles, as well as with formation of organo-magnesium compounds associated with enrichment in heavy isotopes. Considering our results together with the published range for δ 26Mg of natural plants and rivers, we estimate that a significant change in continental vegetation would induce a change of

  20. Genetic Manipulation of Condensed Tannins in Higher Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Mark P.; Bavage, Adrian D.; Strudwicke, Catherine; Morris, Phillip

    1998-01-01

    We have produced and analyzed transgenic birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.) plants harboring antisense dihydroflavonol reductase (AS-DFR) sequences. In initial experiments the effect of introducing three different antisense Antirrhinum majus L. DFR constructs into a single recipient genotype (S50) was assessed. There were no obvious effects on plant biomass, but levels of condensed tannins showed a statistical reduction in leaf, stem, and root tissues of some of the antisense lines. Transformation events were also found, which resulted in increased levels of condensed tannins. In subsequent experiments a detailed study of AS-DFR phenotypes was carried out in genotype S33 using pMAJ2 (an antisense construct comprising the 5′ half of the A. majus cDNA). In this case, reduced tannin levels were found in leaf and stem tissues and in juvenile shoot tissues. Analysis of soluble flavonoids and isoflavonoids in tannin down-regulated shoot tissues indicated few obvious default products. When two S33 AS-DFR lines were outcrossed, there was an underrepresentation of transgene sequences in progeny plants and no examples of inheritance of an antisense phenotype were observed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the genetic manipulation of condensed tannin biosynthesis in higher plants. PMID:9501146

  1. Lead stress effects on physiobiochemical activities of higher plants.

    PubMed

    Sengar, Rakesh Singh; Gautam, Madhu; Sengar, Rajesh Singh; Garg, Sanjay Kumar; Sengar, Kalpana; Chaudhary, Reshu

    2008-01-01

    Lead is a metallic pollutant emanating from various environmental sources including industrial wastes, combustion of fossil fuels, and use of agrochemicals. Lead may exist in the atmosphere as dusts, fumes, mists, and vapors, and in soil as a mineral. Soils along roadsides are rich in lead because vehicles burn leaded gasoline, which contributes to environmental lead pollution. Other important sources of lead pollution are geological weathering, industrial processing of ores and minerals, leaching of lead from solid wastes, and animal and human excreta. Lead is nondegradable, readily enters the food chain, and can subsequently endanger human and animal health. Lead is one of the most important environment pollutants and deserves the increasing attention it has received in recent decades. The present effort was undertaken to review lead stress effects on the physiobiochemical activity of higher plants. Lead has gained considerable attention as a potent heavy metal pollutant because of growing anthropogenic pressure on the environment. Lead-contaminated soils show a sharp decline in crop productivity. Lead is absorbed by plants mainly through the root system and in minor amounts through the leaves. Within the plants, lead accumulates primarily in roots, but some is translocated to aerial plant parts. Soil pH, soil particle size, cation-exchange capacity, as well as root surface area, root exudation, and mycorrhizal transpiration rate affect the availability and uptake of lead by plants. Only a limited amount of lead is translocated from roots to other organs because there are natural plant barriers in the root endodermis. At lethal concentrations, this barrier is broken and lead may enter vascular tissues. Lead in plants may form deposits of various sizes, present mainly in intercellular spaces, cell walls, and vacuoles. Small deposits of this metal are also seen in the endoplasmic reticulum, dictyosome, and dictyosome-derived vesicles. After entering the cells, lead

  2. Cloning higher plants from aseptically cultured tissues and cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1982-01-01

    A review of aseptic culture methods for higher plants is presented, which focuses on the existing problems that limit or prevent the full realization of cloning plants from free cells. It is shown that substantial progress in clonal multiplication has been made with explanted stem tips or lateral buds which can be stimulated to produce numerous precocious axillary branches. These branches can then be separated or subdivided and induced to root in order to yield populations of genetically and phenotypically uniorm plantlets. Similarly, undifferentiated calluses can sometimes be induced to form shoots and/or roots adventitiously. Although the cell culture techniques required to produce somatic embryos are presently rudimentary, steady advances are being made in learning how to stimulate formation of somatic or adventive embryos from totipotent cells grown in suspension cultures. It is concluded that many problems exist in the producing and growing of totipotent or morphogenetically competent cell suspensions, but the potential benefits are great.

  3. Phototolerance of lichens, mosses and higher plants in an alpine environment: analysis of photoreactions.

    PubMed

    Heber, U; Bilger, W; Bligny, R; Lange, O L

    2000-11-01

    Adaptation to excessive light is one of the requirements of survival in an alpine environment particularly for poikilohydric organisms which in contrast to the leaves of higher plants tolerate full dehydration. Changes in modulated chlorophyll fluorescence and 820-nm absorption were investigated in the lichens Xanthoria elegans (Link) Th. Fr. and Rhizocarpon geographicum (L.) DC, in the moss Grimmia alpestris Limpr. and the higher plants Geum montanum L., Gentiana lutea L. and Pisum sativum L., all collected at altitudes higher than 2000 m above sea level. In the dehydrated state, chlorophyll fluorescence was very low in the lichens and the moss, but high in the higher plants. It increased on rehydration in the lichens and the moss, but decreased in the higher plants. Light-induced charge separation in photosystem II was indicated by pulse-induced fluorescence increases only in dried leaves, not in the dry moss and dry lichens. Strong illumination caused photodamage in the dried leaves, but not in the dry moss and dry lichens. Light-dependent increases in 820-nm absorption revealed formation of potential quenchers of chlorophyll fluorescence in all dehydrated plants, but energy transfer to quenchers decreased chlorophyll fluorescence only in the moss and the lichens, not in the higher plants. In hydrated systems, coupled cyclic electron transport is suggested to occur concurrently with linear electron transport under strong actinic illumination particularly in the lichens because far more electrons became available after actinic illumination for the reduction of photo-oxidized P700 than were available in the pool of electron carriers between photosystems II and I. In the moss Grimmia, but not in the lichens or in leaves, light-dependent quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence was extensive even under nitrogen, indicating anaerobic thylakoid acidification by persistent cyclic electron transport. In the absence of actinic illumination, acidification by ca. 8% CO2 in

  4. Higher Education and World War II. IHE Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron

    The January 1994 issue of "The Annals" of the American Academy of Political and Social Science provides an overview of thought and discussion concerning the role of colleges and universities during World War II and in the postwar era. Edited by T. R. McConnell and Malcolm Willey, the issue contained articles by educators, most of whom became more…

  5. Structural and functional characteristics of plant proteinase inhibitor-II (PI-II) family.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Shazia; Aziz, Ejaz; Akhtar, Wasim; Ilyas, Muhammad; Mahmood, Tariq

    2017-02-09

    Plant proteinase inhibitor-II (PI-II) proteins are one of the promising defensive proteins that helped the plants to resist against different kinds of unfavorable conditions. Different roles for PI-II have been suggested such as regulation of endogenous proteases, modulation of plant growth and developmental processes and mediating stress responses. The basic knowledge on genetic and molecular diversity of these proteins has provided significant insight into their gene structure and evolutionary relationships in various members of this family. Phylogenetic comparisons of these family genes in different plants suggested that the high rate of retention of gene duplication and inhibitory domain multiplication may have resulted in the expansion and functional diversification of these proteins. Currently, a large number of transgenic plants expressing PI-II genes are being developed for enhancing the defensive capabilities against insects, bacteria and pathogenic fungi. Much emphasis is yet to be given to exploit this ever expanding repertoire of genes for improving abiotic stress resistance in transgenic crops. This review presents an overview about the current knowledge on PI-II family genes, their multifunctional role in plant defense and physiology with their potential applications in biotechnology.

  6. Metabolic engineering of higher plants and algae for isoprenoid production.

    PubMed

    Kempinski, Chase; Jiang, Zuodong; Bell, Stephen; Chappell, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a class of compounds derived from the five carbon precursors, dimethylallyl diphosphate, and isopentenyl diphosphate. These molecules present incredible natural chemical diversity, which can be valuable for humans in many aspects such as cosmetics, agriculture, and medicine. However, many terpenoids are only produced in small quantities by their natural hosts and can be difficult to generate synthetically. Therefore, much interest and effort has been directed toward capturing the genetic blueprint for their biochemistry and engineering it into alternative hosts such as plants and algae. These autotrophic organisms are attractive when compared to traditional microbial platforms because of their ability to utilize atmospheric CO2 as a carbon substrate instead of supplied carbon sources like glucose. This chapter will summarize important techniques and strategies for engineering the accumulation of isoprenoid metabolites into higher plants and algae by choosing the correct host, avoiding endogenous regulatory mechanisms, and optimizing potential flux into the target compound. Future endeavors will build on these efforts by fine-tuning product accumulation levels via the vast amount of available "-omic" data and devising metabolic engineering schemes that integrate this into a whole-organism approach. With the development of high-throughput transformation protocols and synthetic biology molecular tools, we have only begun to harness the power and utility of plant and algae metabolic engineering.

  7. Distribution, congruence, and hotspots of higher plants in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lina; Li, Jinya; Liu, Huiyuan; Qin, Haining

    2016-01-01

    Identifying biodiversity hotspots has become a central issue in setting up priority protection areas, especially as financial resources for biological diversity conservation are limited. Taking China’s Higher Plants Red List (CHPRL), including Bryophytes, Ferns, Gymnosperms, Angiosperms, as the data source, we analyzed the geographic patterns of species richness, endemism, and endangerment via data processing at a fine grid-scale with an average edge length of 30 km based on three aspects of richness information: species richness, endemic species richness, and threatened species richness. We sought to test the accuracy of hotspots used in identifying conservation priorities with regard to higher plants. Next, we tested the congruence of the three aspects and made a comparison of the similarities and differences between the hotspots described in this paper and those in previous studies. We found that over 90% of threatened species in China are concentrated. While a high spatial congruence is observed among the three measures, there is a low congruence between two different sets of hotspots. Our results suggest that biodiversity information should be considered when identifying biological hotspots. Other factors, such as scales, should be included as well to develop biodiversity conservation plans in accordance with the region’s specific conditions.

  8. Distribution, congruence, and hotspots of higher plants in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lina; Li, Jinya; Liu, Huiyuan; Qin, Haining

    2016-01-01

    Identifying biodiversity hotspots has become a central issue in setting up priority protection areas, especially as financial resources for biological diversity conservation are limited. Taking China’s Higher Plants Red List (CHPRL), including Bryophytes, Ferns, Gymnosperms, Angiosperms, as the data source, we analyzed the geographic patterns of species richness, endemism, and endangerment via data processing at a fine grid-scale with an average edge length of 30 km based on three aspects of richness information: species richness, endemic species richness, and threatened species richness. We sought to test the accuracy of hotspots used in identifying conservation priorities with regard to higher plants. Next, we tested the congruence of the three aspects and made a comparison of the similarities and differences between the hotspots described in this paper and those in previous studies. We found that over 90% of threatened species in China are concentrated. While a high spatial congruence is observed among the three measures, there is a low congruence between two different sets of hotspots. Our results suggest that biodiversity information should be considered when identifying biological hotspots. Other factors, such as scales, should be included as well to develop biodiversity conservation plans in accordance with the region’s specific conditions. PMID:26750244

  9. Plant invasion is associated with higher plant-soil nutrient concentrations in nutrient-poor environments.

    PubMed

    Sardans, Jordi; Bartrons, Mireia; Margalef, Olga; Gargallo-Garriga, Albert; Janssens, Ivan A; Ciais, Phillipe; Obersteiner, Michael; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D; Chen, Han Y H; Peñuelas, Josep

    2017-03-01

    Plant invasion is an emerging driver of global change worldwide. We aimed to disentangle its impacts on plant-soil nutrient concentrations. We conducted a meta-analysis of 215 peer-reviewed articles and 1233 observations. Invasive plant species had globally higher N and P concentrations in photosynthetic tissues but not in foliar litter, in comparison with their native competitors. Invasive plants were also associated with higher soil C and N stocks and N, P, and K availabilities. The differences in N and P concentrations in photosynthetic tissues and in soil total C and N, soil N, P, and K availabilities between invasive and native species decreased when the environment was richer in nutrient resources. The results thus suggested higher nutrient resorption efficiencies in invasive than in native species in nutrient-poor environments. There were differences in soil total N concentrations but not in total P concentrations, indicating that the differences associated to invasive plants were related with biological processes, not with geochemical processes. The results suggest that invasiveness is not only a driver of changes in ecosystem species composition but that it is also associated with significant changes in plant-soil elemental composition and stoichiometry.

  10. Variation potential in higher plants: Mechanisms of generation and propagation

    PubMed Central

    Vodeneev, Vladimir; Akinchits, Elena; Sukhov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Long-distance intercellular electrical signals, including variation potential (VP) in higher plants, are a potential mechanism of coordinate functional responses in different plant cells under action of stressors. VP, which is caused by damaging factors (e.g., heating, crushing), is transient depolarization with an irregular shape. It can include a long-term depolarization and fast impulse depolarization (‘AP-like’ spikes). Mechanisms of VP generation and propagation are still under investigation. It is probable that VP is a local electrical response induced by propagation of hydraulic wave and (or) chemical agent. Both hypotheses are based on numerous experimental results but they predict VP velocities which are not in a good accordance with speed of variation potential propagation. Thus combination of hydraulic and chemical signals is the probable mechanism of VP propagation. VP generation is traditionally connected with transient H+-ATPase inactivation, but AP-like spikes are also connected with passive ions fluxes. Ca2+ influx is a probable mechanism which triggers H+-ATPase inactivation and ions channels activation at VP. PMID:26313506

  11. Mitochondrial glycolate oxidation contributes to photorespiration in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Markus; Thiruveedhi, Krishnaveni; Rosenkranz, Ruben; Kebeish, Rashad; Hirsch, Heinz-Josef; Kreuzaler, Fritz; Peterhänsel, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    The oxidation of glycolate to glyoxylate is an important reaction step in photorespiration. Land plants and charophycean green algae oxidize glycolate in the peroxisome using oxygen as a co-factor, whereas chlorophycean green algae use a mitochondrial glycolate dehydrogenase (GDH) with organic co-factors. Previous analyses revealed the existence of a GDH in the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana (AtGDH). In this study, the contribution of AtGDH to photorespiration was characterized. Both RNA abundance and mitochondrial GDH activity were up-regulated under photorespiratory growth conditions. Labelling experiments indicated that glycolate oxidation in mitochondrial extracts is coupled to CO(2) release. This effect could be enhanced by adding co-factors for aminotransferases, but is inhibited by the addition of glycine. T-DNA insertion lines for AtGDH show a drastic reduction in mitochondrial GDH activity and CO(2) release from glycolate. Furthermore, photorespiration is reduced in these mutant lines compared with the wild type, as revealed by determination of the post-illumination CO(2) burst and the glycine/serine ratio under photorespiratory growth conditions. The data show that mitochondrial glycolate oxidation contributes to photorespiration in higher plants. This indicates the conservation of chlorophycean photorespiration in streptophytes despite the evolution of leaf-type peroxisomes.

  12. Higgs mechanism for gravity. II. Higher spin connections

    SciTech Connect

    Boulanger, Nicolas; Kirsch, Ingo

    2006-06-15

    We continue the work of [Phys. Rev. D 72, 024001 (2005)] in which gravity is considered as the Goldstone realization of a spontaneously broken diffeomorphism group. We complete the discussion of the coset space Diff (d,R)/SO(1,d-1) formed by the d-dimensional group of analytic diffeomorphisms and the Lorentz group. We find that this coset space is parametrized by coordinates, a metric, and an infinite tower of higher-spin or generalized connections. We then study effective actions for the corresponding symmetry breaking which gives mass to the higher spin connections. Our model predicts that gravity is modified at high energies by the exchange of massive higher spin particles.

  13. Higher-spin charges in Hamiltonian form. II. Fermi fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campoleoni, A.; Henneaux, M.; Hörtner, S.; Leonard, A.

    2017-02-01

    We build the asymptotic higher-spin charges associated with "improper" gauge transformations for fermionic higher-spin gauge fields on Anti de Sitter backgrounds of arbitrary dimension. This is achieved within the canonical formalism. We consider massless fields of spin s+1/2, described by a symmetric spinor-tensor of rank s in the Fang-Fronsdal approach. We begin from a detailed analysis of the spin 5/2 example, for which we cast the Fang-Fronsdal action in Hamiltonian form, we derive the charges and we propose boundary conditions on the canonical variables that secure their finiteness. We then extend the computation of charges and the characterisation of boundary conditions to arbitrary half-integer spin. Our construction generalises to higher-spin fermionic gauge fields the known Hamiltonian derivation of supercharges in AdS supergravity.

  14. Need for higher fuel burnup at the Hatch Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Beckhman, J.T.

    1996-03-01

    Hatch is a BWR 4 and has been in operation for some time. The first unit became commercial about 1975. Obtaining higher burnups, or higher average discharge exposures, is nothing new at Hatch. Since we have started, the discharge exposure of the plant has increased. Now, of course, we are not approaching the numbers currently being discussed but, the average discharge exposure has increased from around 20,000 MWD/MTU in the early to mid-1980s to 34,000 MWD/MTU in 1994, I am talking about batch average values. There are also peak bundle and peak rod values. You will have to make the conversions if you think in one way or the other because I am talking in batch averages. During Hatch`s operating history we have had some problems with fuel failure. Higher burnup fuel raises a concern about how much fuel failure you are going to have. Fuel failure is, of course, an economic issue with us. Back in the early 1980s, we had a problem with crud-induced localized corrosion, known as CILC. We have gotten over that, but we had some times when it was up around 27 fuel failures a year. That is not a pleasant time to live through because it is not what you want from an economic viewpoint or any other. We have gotten that down. We have had some fuel failures recently, but they have not been related to fuel burnup or to corrosion. In fact, the number of failures has decreased from the early 1980s to the 90s even though burnup increased during that time. The fuel failures are more debris-related-type failures. In addition to increasing burnups, utilities are actively evaluating or have already incorporated power uprate and longer fuel cycles (e.g., 2-year cycles). The goal is to balance out the higher power density, longer cycles, higher burnup, and to have no leakers. Why do we as an industry want to have higher burnup fuel? That is what I want to tell you a little bit about.

  15. Transport, Compartmentation, and Metabolism of Homoserine in Higher Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aubert, Serge; Curien, Gilles; Bligny, Richard; Gout, Elisabeth; Douce, Roland

    1998-01-01

    The transport, compartmentation, and metabolism of homoserine was characterized in two strains of meristematic higher plant cells, the dicotyledonous sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) and the monocotyledonous weed Echinochloa colonum. Homoserine is an intermediate in the synthesis of the aspartate-derived amino acids methionine, threonine (Thr), and isoleucine. Using 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, we showed that homoserine actively entered the cells via a high-affinity proton-symport carrier (Km approximately 50–60 μm) at the maximum rate of 8 ± 0.5 μmol h−1 g−1 cell wet weight, and in competition with serine or Thr. We could visualize the compartmentation of homoserine, and observed that it accumulated at a concentration 4 to 5 times higher in the cytoplasm than in the large vacuolar compartment. 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance permitted us to analyze the phosphorylation of homoserine. When sycamore cells were incubated with 100 μm homoserine, phosphohomoserine steadily accumulated in the cytoplasmic compartment over 24 h at the constant rate of 0.7 μmol h−1 g−1 cell wet weight, indicating that homoserine kinase was not inhibited in vivo by its product, phosphohomoserine. The rate of metabolism of phosphohomoserine was much lower (0.06 μmol h−1 g−1 cell wet weight) and essentially sustained Thr accumulation. Similarly, homoserine was actively incorporated by E. colonum cells. However, in contrast to what was seen in sycamore cells, large accumulations of Thr were observed, whereas the intracellular concentration of homoserine remained low, and phosphohomoserine did not accumulate. These differences with sycamore cells were attributed to the presence of a higher Thr synthase activity in this strain of monocot cells. PMID:9490758

  16. Nuclearly encoded splicing factors implicated in RNA splicing in higher plant organelles.

    PubMed

    de Longevialle, Andéol Falcon; Small, Ian D; Lurin, Claire

    2010-07-01

    Plant organelles arose from two independent endosymbiosis events. Throughout evolutionary history, tight control of chloroplasts and mitochondria has been gained by the nucleus, which regulates most steps of organelle genome expression and metabolism. In particular, RNA maturation, including RNA splicing, is highly dependent on nuclearly encoded splicing factors. Most introns in organelles are group II introns, whose catalytic mechanism closely resembles that of the nuclear spliceosome. Plant group II introns have lost the ability to self-splice in vivo and require nuclearly encoded proteins as cofactors. Since the first splicing factor was identified in chloroplasts more than 10 years ago, many other proteins have been shown to be involved in splicing of one or more introns in chloroplasts or mitochondria. These new proteins belong to a variety of different families of RNA binding proteins and provide new insights into ribonucleo-protein complexes and RNA splicing machineries in organelles. In this review, we describe how splicing factors, encoded by the nucleus and targeted to the organelles, take part in post-transcriptional steps in higher plant organelle gene expression. We go on to discuss the potential for these factors to regulate organelle gene expression.

  17. Polyketide folding in higher plants: biosynthesis of the phenylanthraquinone knipholone.

    PubMed

    Bringmann, Gerhard; Noll, Torsten F; Gulder, Tanja; Dreyer, Michael; Grüne, Matthias; Moskau, Detlef

    2007-04-27

    The biosynthesis of knipholone, as an axially chiral phenylanthraquinone, in higher plants was examined by feeding experiments with [13C2]-labeled precursors. [13C2]-Acetate and advanced synthetic intermediates were fed to sterile cultures of Kniphofia pumila (Asphodelaceae), with subsequent NMR analysis on the isolated natural product involving 2D INADEQUATE and SELINQUATE experiments. Due to its uneven number of carbon atoms, and because of its uncertain decarboxylation site, the "northern" part of the molecule (i.e., the chrysophanol portion) might originate from four different cyclization modes. According to the labeling pattern of the product isolated after incorporation, this anthraquinone part of knipholone is formed by the so-called F folding mode (originally established for fungi). The acetophenone part of the molecule, which does not undergo a decarboxylation reaction, originates from four acetate units. The surprising lack of randomization of the intact [13C2] units in this "southern" part reveals the absence of a free symmetric intermediate as initially anticipated. This is in agreement with the intact incorporation of the "authentic" southern molecular portion, 4,6-dihydroxy-2-methoxyacetophenone, while the corresponding symmetrical candidate trihydroxyacetophenone was clearly not incorporated, showing that the O-methylation of the freshly cyclized tetraketide is the step that prevents symmetrization of the acetophenone.

  18. Na+ Tolerance and Na+ Transport in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    TESTER, MARK; DAVENPORT, ROMOLA

    2003-01-01

    Tolerance to high soil [Na+] involves processes in many different parts of the plant, and is manifested in a wide range of specializations at disparate levels of organization, such as gross morphology, membrane transport, biochemistry and gene transcription. Multiple adaptations to high [Na+] operate concurrently within a particular plant, and mechanisms of tolerance show large taxonomic variation. These mechanisms can occur in all cells within the plant, or can occur in specific cell types, reflecting adaptations at two major levels of organization: those that confer tolerance to individual cells, and those that contribute to tolerance not of cells per se, but of the whole plant. Salt‐tolerant cells can contribute to salt tolerance of plants; but we suggest that equally important in a wide range of conditions are processes involving the management of Na+ movements within the plant. These require specific cell types in specific locations within the plant catalysing transport in a coordinated manner. For further understanding of whole plant tolerance, we require more knowledge of cell‐specific transport processes and the consequences of manipulation of transporters and signalling elements in specific cell types. PMID:12646496

  19. Genetic engineering of the biosynthesis of glycinebetaine enhances thermotolerance of photosystem II in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Wen, Xiaogang; Gong, Hongmei; Lu, Qingtao; Yang, Zhipan; Tang, Yunlai; Liang, Zheng; Lu, Congming

    2007-02-01

    Genetically engineered tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) with the ability to accumulate glycinebetaine was established. The wild type and transgenic plants were exposed to heat treatment (25-50 degrees C) for 4 h in the dark and under growth light intensity (300 mumol m(-2) s(-1)). The analyses of oxygen-evolving activity and chlorophyll fluorescence demonstrated that photosystem II (PSII) in transgenic plants showed higher thermotolerance than in wild type plants in particular when heat stress was performed in the light, suggesting that the accumulation of glycinebetaine leads to increased tolerance to heat-enhanced photoinhibition. This increased tolerance was associated with an improvement on thermostability of the oxygen-evolving complex and the reaction center of PSII. The enhanced tolerance was caused by acceleration of the repair of PSII from heat-enhanced photoinhibition. Under heat stress, there was a significant accumulation of H(2)O(2), O (2) (-) and catalytic Fe in wild type plants but this accumulation was much less in transgenic plants. Heat stress significantly decreased the activities of catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, dehydroascorbate reductase, and monodehydroascorbate reductase in wild type plants whereas the activities of these enzymes either decreased much less or maintained or even increased in transgenic plants. In addition, heat stress increased the activity of superoxide dismutase in wild type plants but this increase was much greater in transgenic plants. Furthermore, transgenic plants also showed higher content of ascorbate and reduced glutathione than that of wild type plants under heat stress. The results suggest that the increased thermotolerance induced by accumulation of glycinebetaine in vivo was associated with the enhancement of the repair of PSII from heat-enhanced photo inhibition, which might be due to less accumulation of reactive oxygen species in transgenic plants.

  20. Cesium-137 accumulation in higher plants before and after Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Sawidis, T.; Drossos, E.; Papastefanou, C. ); Heinrick, G. )

    1990-01-01

    Cesium-137 concentrations in plant species of three biotypes of northern Greece, differing in location as well as in vegetation, are reported following the Chernobyl reactor accident. The cesium uptake by plants was due to the foliar deposition rather than the root uptake. The highest level of cesium in plants was found in Ranunculus sardous, a pubescent plant. The {sup 137}Cs concentration was about 22kBq kg{sup {minus}1}d.w. A high level of cesium was also found in Salix alba ({sup 137}Cs: 19.6 kBq kg{sup {minus}1} d.w.), a deciduous tree showing that hairy leaves or leaves having rough and large surfaces can absorb greater amounts of radioactivity (surface effect). A comparison is also made between the results of measurements of the present study and the results of measurements of some herbarium plants collected one year before the accident as well as the results of measurements of some new plants grown and collected one year after the accident resulting in a natural removal rate of {sup 137}Cs in plants varying from 14 to 130 days.

  1. Cell wall, cytoskeleton, and cell expansion in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Bashline, Logan; Lei, Lei; Li, Shundai; Gu, Ying

    2014-04-01

    To accommodate two seemingly contradictory biological roles in plant physiology, providing both the rigid structural support of plant cells and the adjustable elasticity needed for cell expansion, the composition of the plant cell wall has evolved to become an intricate network of cellulosic, hemicellulosic, and pectic polysaccharides and protein. Due to its complexity, many aspects of the cell wall influence plant cell expansion, and many new and insightful observations and technologies are forthcoming. The biosynthesis of cell wall polymers and the roles of the variety of proteins involved in polysaccharide synthesis continue to be characterized. The interactions within the cell wall polymer network and the modification of these interactions provide insight into how the plant cell wall provides its dual function. The complex cell wall architecture is controlled and organized in part by the dynamic intracellular cytoskeleton and by diverse trafficking pathways of the cell wall polymers and cell wall-related machinery. Meanwhile, the cell wall is continually influenced by hormonal and integrity sensing stimuli that are perceived by the cell. These many processes cooperate to construct, maintain, and manipulate the intricate plant cell wall--an essential structure for the sustaining of the plant stature, growth, and life.

  2. Reconciling functions and evolution of isoprene emission in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Loreto, Francesco; Fineschi, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Compilation and analysis of existing inventories reveal that isoprene is emitted by c. 20% of the perennial vegetation of tropical and temperate regions of the world. Isoprene emitters are found across different plant families without any clear phylogenetic thread. However, by critically appraising information in inventories, several ecological patterns of isoprene emission can be highlighted, including absence of emission from C4 and annual plants, and widespread emission from perennial and deciduous plants of temperate environments. Based on this analysis, and on available information on biochemistry, ecology and functional roles of isoprene, it is suggested that isoprene may not have evolved to help plants face heavy or prolonged stresses, but rather assists C3 plants to run efficient photosynthesis and to overcome transient and mild stresses, especially during periods of active plant growth in warm seasons. When the stress status persists, or when evergreen leaves cope with multiple and repeated stresses, isoprene biosynthesis is replaced by the synthesis of less volatile secondary compounds, in part produced by the same biochemical pathway, thus indicating causal determinism in the evolution of isoprene-emitting plants in response to the environment.

  3. Regulation of phosphate starvation responses in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao Juan; Finnegan, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting mineral nutrient for plant growth. Many soils worldwide are deficient in soluble inorganic phosphate (Pi), the form of P most readily absorbed and utilized by plants. A network of elaborate developmental and biochemical adaptations has evolved in plants to enhance Pi acquisition and avoid starvation. Scope Controlling the deployment of adaptations used by plants to avoid Pi starvation requires a sophisticated sensing and regulatory system that can integrate external and internal information regarding Pi availability. In this review, the current knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms that control Pi starvation responses and the local and long-distance signals that may trigger Pi starvation responses are discussed. Uncharacterized mutants that have Pi-related phenotypes and their potential to give us additional insights into regulatory pathways and Pi starvation-induced signalling are also highlighted and assessed. Conclusions An impressive list of factors that regulate Pi starvation responses is now available, as is a good deal of knowledge regarding the local and long-distance signals that allow a plant to sense and respond to Pi availability. However, we are only beginning to understand how these factors and signals are integrated with one another in a regulatory web able to control the range of responses demonstrated by plants grown in low Pi environments. Much more knowledge is needed in this agronomically important area before real gains can be made in improving Pi acquisition in crop plants. PMID:20181569

  4. Symbiosis and the social network of higher plants.

    PubMed

    Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Volkening, Jeremy D; Sussman, Michael R; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2013-02-01

    In the Internet era, communicating with friends and colleagues via social networks constitutes a significant proportion of our daily activities. Similarly animals and plants also interact with many organisms, some of which are pathogens and do no good for the plant, while others are beneficial symbionts. Almost all plants indulge in developing social networks with microbes, in particular with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and emerging evidence indicates that most employ an ancient and widespread central 'social media' pathway made of signaling molecules within what is called the SYM pathway. Some plants, like legumes, are particularly active recruiters of friends, as they have established very sophisticated and beneficial interactions with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, also via the SYM pathway. Interestingly, many members of the Brassicaceae, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, seem to have removed themselves from this ancestral social network and lost the ability to engage in mutually favorable interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Despite these generalizations, recent studies exploring the root microbiota of A. thaliana have found that in natural conditions, A. thaliana roots are colonized by many different bacterial species and therefore may be using different and probably more recent 'social media' for these interactions. In general, recent advances in the understanding of such molecular machinery required for plant-symbiont associations are being obtained using high throughput genomic profiling strategies including transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics. The crucial mechanistic understanding that such data reveal may provide the infrastructure for future efforts to genetically manipulate crop social networks for our own food and fiber needs.

  5. Biochemical Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation during Lipid Biosynthesis in Higher Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahmen, A.; Gamarra, B.; Cormier, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Although hydrogen isotopes (δ2H) of leaf wax lipids are increasingly being applied as (paleo-) hydrological proxies, we still do not understand some of the basic processes that shape the δ2H values of these compounds. In general, it is believed that three variables shape the δ2H values of leaf wax lipids: source water δ2H values, evaporative deuterium (2H) enrichment of leaf water and the biosynthetic fractionation (ɛbio) during the synthesis of organic compounds. While the influences of source water δ2H values and leaf water evaporative 2H enrichment have been well documented, very little is known how ɛbio shapes the δ2H values of plant-derived lipids. I will present the results from recent experiments, where we show that the magnitude of ɛbio, and thus the δ2H value of plant-derived lipids, strongly depends on the carbon (C) metabolism of a plant. Specifically, I will show that plants that rely for their tissue formation on recently assimilated C have δ2H values in their n-alkanes that are up to 60‰ more negative than plants that depend for their tissue formation on stored carbohydrates. Our findings can be explained by the fact that NADPH is the primary source of hydrogen in plant lipids and that the δ2H value of NADPH differs whether NADPH was generated directly in the light reaction of photosynthesis or whether it was generated by processing stored carbohydrates. As such, the δ2H values of plant-derived lipids will directly depend on whether the tissue containing these lipids was synthesized using recent assimilates, e.g. in a C autonomous state or, if it was synthesized from stored or otherwise aquired C sources, e.g. in a not C autonomous state. Given the magnidude of this effect, our results have important implications for interpretation of plant-derived lipid δ2H values when used as (paleo-) hydrological proxies. In addition, our results suggest, that δ2H values of plant-derived lipids could be employed as a new tools to assess the C

  6. Penetration and Toxicity of Nanomaterials in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chichiriccò, Giuseppe; Poma, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) comprise either inorganic particles consisting of metals, oxides, and salts that exist in nature and may be also produced in the laboratory, or organic particles originating only from the laboratory, having at least one dimension between 1 and 100 nm in size. According to shape, size, surface area, and charge, NMs have different mechanical, chemical, electrical, and optical properties that make them suitable for technological and biomedical applications and thus they are being increasingly produced and modified. Despite their beneficial potential, their use may be hazardous to health owing to the capacity to enter the animal and plant body and interact with cells. Studies on NMs involve technologists, biologists, physicists, chemists, and ecologists, so there are numerous reports that are significantly raising the level of knowledge, especially in the field of nanotechnology; however, many aspects concerning nanobiology remain undiscovered, including the interactions with plant biomolecules. In this review we examine current knowledge on the ways in which NMs penetrate plant organs and interact with cells, with the aim of shedding light on the reactivity of NMs and toxicity to plants. These points are discussed critically to adjust the balance with regard to the risk to the health of the plants as well as providing some suggestions for new studies on this topic. PMID:28347040

  7. Physiological Functions of the COPI Complex in Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hee-Kyung; Kang, Yong Won; Lim, Hye Min; Hwang, Inhwan; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2015-10-01

    COPI vesicles are essential to the retrograde transport of proteins in the early secretory pathway. The COPI coatomer complex consists of seven subunits, termed α-, β-, β'-, γ-, δ-, ε-, and ζ-COP, in yeast and mammals. Plant genomes have homologs of these subunits, but the essentiality of their cellular functions has hampered the functional characterization of the subunit genes in plants. Here we have employed virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and dexamethasone (DEX)-inducible RNAi of the COPI subunit genes to study the in vivo functions of the COPI coatomer complex in plants. The β'-, γ-, and δ-COP subunits localized to the Golgi as GFP-fusion proteins and interacted with each other in the Golgi. Silencing of β'-, γ-, and δ-COP by VIGS resulted in growth arrest and acute plant death in Nicotiana benthamiana, with the affected leaf cells exhibiting morphological markers of programmed cell death. Depletion of the COPI subunits resulted in disruption of the Golgi structure and accumulation of autolysosome-like structures in earlier stages of gene silencing. In tobacco BY-2 cells, DEX-inducible RNAi of β'-COP caused aberrant cell plate formation during cytokinesis. Collectively, these results suggest that COPI vesicles are essential to plant growth and survival by maintaining the Golgi apparatus and modulating cell plate formation.

  8. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge on higher plants.

    PubMed

    Corrêa Martins, Maria Nilza; de Souza, Victor Ventura; Souza, Tatiana da Silva

    2016-02-01

    Sewage treatment yields sludge, which is often used as a soil amendment in agriculture and crop production. Although the sludge contains elevated concentrations of macro and micronutrients, high levels of inorganic and organic compounds with genotoxic and mutagenic properties are present in sludge. Application of sludge in agriculture is a pathway for direct contact of crops to toxic chemicals. The objective of this study was to compile information related to the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge in different plant species. In addition, data are presented on toxicological effects in animals fed with plants grown in soils supplemented with sewage sludge. Despite the benefits of using sewage sludge as organic fertilizer, the data showcased in this review suggest that this residue can induce genetic damage in plants. This review alerts potential risks to health outcomes after the intake of food cultivated in sewage sludge-amended soils.

  9. Predicting molybdenum toxicity to higher plants: influence of soil properties.

    PubMed

    McGrath, S P; Micó, C; Curdy, R; Zhao, F J

    2010-10-01

    The effect of soil properties on the toxicity of molybdenum (Mo) to four plant species was investigated. Soil organic carbon or ammonium-oxalate extractable Fe oxides were found to be the best predictors of the 50% effective dose (ED50) of Mo in different soils, explaining>65% of the variance in ED50 for four species except for ryegrass (26-38%). Molybdenum concentrations in soil solution and consequently plant uptake were increased when soil pH was artificially raised because sorption of Mo to amorphous oxides is greatly reduced at high pH. The addition of sulphate significantly decreased Mo uptake by oilseed rape. For risk assessment, we suggest that Mo toxicity values for plants should be normalised using soil amorphous iron oxide concentrations.

  10. Metabolism of Tryptophol in Higher and Lower Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Laćan, Goran; Magnus, Volker; Šimaga, Šumski; Iskrić, Sonja; Hall, Prudence J.

    1985-01-01

    Bacteria, thallophytes, and seed plants (107 species), supplied with exogenous indole-3-ethanol (tryptophol), formed one or more of the following metabolites: O-acetyl tryptophol, an unknown tryptophol ester (or a set of structurally closely related esters), tryptophol glucoside, tryptophol galactoside, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and indole-3-carboxylic acid. The unknown ester was formed by all species examined; O-acetyl tryptophol appeared sporadically in representatives of most major taxonomic groups. Tryptophol galactoside was found in the algae Chlorella, Euglena, and Ochromonas. The glucoside was formed by many eucaryotic plants, but not by bacteria; it was a significant tryptophol metabolite in vascular plants. IAA, if detectable at all, was usually a minor metabolite, as should be expected, if tryptophol oxidase responds to feedback inhibition by IAA. Indole-3-carboxylic acid, formed by a few fungi and mosses, was the only tryptophol metabolite detected which is likely to be formed via IAA. PMID:16664264

  11. Roles of chloroplast RNA polymerase sigma factors in chloroplast development and stress response in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Kengo; Tanaka, Kan

    2004-11-01

    Chloroplast transcription in higher plants is performed by two types of RNA polymerases, plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) and nuclear-encoded RNA polymerase (NEP). PEP is a eubacteria-type multisubunit enzyme whose catalytic core subunits are encoded by the chloroplast genome, whereas NEP is the nuclear encoded T7 phage-type single subunit enzyme. PEP is critical for the biogenesis and maintenance of chloroplasts, and is finely tuned by the nuclear encoded sigma subunits. Of the six Arabidopsis sigma subunits, SIG2 is involved in the transcription of several chloroplast tRNA genes, including trnE encoding tRNA-Glu. SIG2 possibly couples translation and pigment synthesis in chloroplasts. On the other hand, SIG5 is induced by various stresses and contributes to repair of damaged photosystem II (PSII) through transcription of the psbD and psbC genes. Thus target genes and the physiological role of each sigma subunit are becoming clearer.

  12. Experimental identification of Ca isotopic fractionations in higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobert, Florian; Schmitt, Anne-Désirée; Bourgeade, Pascale; Labolle, François; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Chabaux, François; Stille, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Hydroponic experiments have been performed in order to identify the co-occurring geochemical and biological processes affecting the Ca isotopic compositions within plants. To test the influence of the Ca concentration and pH of the nutritive solution on the Ca isotopic composition of the different plant organs, four experimental conditions were chosen combining two different Ca concentrations (5 and 60 ppm) and two pHs (4 and 6). The study was performed on rapid growing bean plants in order to have a complete growth cycle. Several organs (root, stem, leaf, reproductive) were sampled at two different growth stages (10 days and 6 weeks of culture) and prepared for Ca isotopic measurements. The results allow to identify three Ca isotopic fractionation levels. The first one takes place when Ca enters the lateral roots, during Ca adsorption on cation-exchange binding sites in the apoplasm. The second one takes place when Ca is bound to the polygalacturonic acids (pectins) of the middle lamella of the xylem cell wall. Finally, the last fractionation occurs in the reproductive organs, also caused by cation-exchange processes with pectins. However, the cell wall structures of these organs and/or number of available exchange sites seem to be different to those of the xylem wall. These three physico-chemical fractionation mechanisms allow to enrich the organs in the light 40Ca isotope. The amplitude of the Ca isotopic fractionation within plant organs is highly dependent on the composition of the nutritive solution: low pH (4) and Ca concentrations (5 ppm) have no effect on the biomass increase of the plants but induce smaller fractionation amplitudes compared to those obtained from other experimental conditions. Thus, Ca isotopic signatures of bean plants are controlled by the external nutritive medium. This study highlights the potential of Ca isotopes to be applied in plant physiology (to identify Ca uptake, circulation and storage mechanisms within plants) and in

  13. Recent advances of flowering locus T gene in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Rong, Xiaofeng; Huang, Xiaohua; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2012-01-01

    Flowering Locus T (FT) can promote flowering in the plant photoperiod pathway and also facilitates vernalization flowering pathways and other ways to promote flowering. The expression of products of the FT gene is recognized as important parts of the flowering hormone and can induce flowering by long-distance transportation. In the present study, many FT-like genes were isolated, and the transgenic results show that FT gene can promote flowering in plants. This paper reviews the progress of the FT gene and its expression products to provide meaningful information for further studies of the functions of FT genes.

  14. Photosynthetic and respiratory activity in germfree higher plant species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Equipment developed for the study of gas exchange in germfree plants is described. The equipment includes a gas exchange chamber to house the plant under study, a gas feed assembly to introduce and remove gas from the chamber, and a clinostat to rotate the apparatus. Fluorescent and incandescent lights are used to illuminate the chamber and a sealed plastic barrier is used to isolate the potting soil from the chamber atmosphere. The gas outflow from the chamber can be diverted to an infrared CO2 analyzer. The performance of the system was evaluated.

  15. Deployment of the Topaz-II space nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Standley, V.H.; Wyant, F.J.; Polansky, G.F. )

    1993-01-01

    The Topaz-II is a 5-kW(electric) Russian space nuclear power plant. The power plant resembles a shuttlecock standing 3.9 m high and is 1.4 m in diameter at the base. The reactor is at the top, the radiation shield is in the middle, and the radiator is at the bottom. The whole system weighs 1 tonne. The reactor core is 37.5 cm long and 26 cm in diameter. It contains 37 core-length, single-cell thermionic fuel elements embedded in a ZrH moderator. Each thermionic fuel cell is a cylindrical emitter inside a cylindrical collector. Nuclear fuel inside the emitter raises the emitter's temperature.

  16. CAROTENOID BIOSYNTHESIS IN PHOTO-SYNTHETIC BACTERIA AND HIGHER PLANTS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Investigation on the biosynthesis of plant sterols are described. A number of possible phytosterol precursors were identified in peas and larch and...of the steroid side chain. Using mevalonic acid and methionine doubly labelled with 14C and tritium studies were made regarding the mechanism of alkylation of the phytosterol side chain. (Author)

  17. Circadian rhythms and post-transcriptional regulation in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Andrés; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock of plants allows them to cope with daily changes in their environment. This is accomplished by the rhythmic regulation of gene expression, in a process that involves many regulatory steps. One of the key steps involved at the RNA level is post-transcriptional regulation, which ensures a correct control on the different amounts and types of mRNA that will ultimately define the current physiological state of the plant cell. Recent advances in the study of the processes of regulation of pre-mRNA processing, RNA turn-over and surveillance, regulation of translation, function of lncRNAs, biogenesis and function of small RNAs, and the development of bioinformatics tools have helped to vastly expand our understanding of how this regulatory step performs its role. In this work we review the current progress in circadian regulation at the post-transcriptional level research in plants. It is the continuous interaction of all the information flow control post-transcriptional processes that allow a plant to precisely time and predict daily environmental changes. PMID:26124767

  18. The Impact of Higher Education Law on Physical Plant Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, John M.

    This paper reviews the basic legal relationships and duties that affect higher education facility management with special emphasis on the relationships with students, faculty, and staff in both public and private colleges and universities. An introduction briefly reviews the development of higher education law beginning with a landmark case in…

  19. An expanding universe of circadian networks in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Pruneda-Paz, Jose L; Kay, Steve A

    2010-05-01

    Extensive circadian clock networks regulate almost every biological process in plants. Clock-controlled physiological responses are coupled with daily oscillations in environmental conditions resulting in enhanced fitness and growth vigor. Identification of core clock components and their associated molecular interactions has established the basic network architecture of plant clocks, which consists of multiple interlocked feedback loops. A hierarchical structure of transcriptional feedback overlaid with regulated protein turnover sets the pace of the clock and ultimately drives all clock-controlled processes. Although originally described as linear entities, increasing evidence suggests that many signaling pathways can act as both inputs and outputs within the overall network. Future studies will determine the molecular mechanisms involved in these complex regulatory loops.

  20. Final Report for Regulation of Embryonic Development in Higher Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, John J.

    2013-10-22

    The overall goal of the project was to define the cellular processes that underlie embryo development in plants at a mechanistic level. Our studies focused on a critical transcriptional regulator, Arabidopsis LEAFY COTYLEDON (LEC1), that is necessary and sufficient to induce processes required for embryo development. Because LEC1 regulates lipid accumulation during the maturation phase of embryo development, information about LEC1 may be useful in designing approaches to enhance biofuel production in plants. During the tenure of this project, we determined the molecular mechanisms by which LEC1 acts as a transcription factor in embryos. We also identified genes directly regulated by LEC1 and showed that many of these genes are involved in maturation processes. This information has been useful in dissecting the gene regulatory networks controlling embryo development. Finally, LEC1 is a novel isoform of a transcription factor that is conserved among eukaryotes, and LEC1 is active primarily in seeds. Therefore, we determined that the LEC1-type transcription factors first appeared in lycophytes during land plant evolution. Together, this study provides basic information that has implications for biofuel production.

  1. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Thomas W.

    2000-02-29

    Research in the latter part of the grant period was divided into two parts: (1) expansion of the macromolecular tool kit for studying plant cell division; (2) experiments in which the roles played by plant cell cycle regulators were to be cast in the light of the emerging yeast and animal cell paradigm for molecular control of the mitotic cycle. The first objectives were accomplished to a very satisfactory degree. With regard to the second part of the project, we were driven to change our objectives for two reasons. First, the families of cell cycle control genes that we cloned encoded such closely related members that the prospects for success at raising distinguishing antisera against each were sufficiently dubious as to be impractical. Epitope tagging is not feasible in Pisum sativum, our experimental system, as this species is not realistically transformable. Therefore, differentiating the roles of diverse cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases was problematic. Secondly, our procedure for generating mitotically synchronized pea root meristems for biochemical studies was far too labor intensive for the proposed experiments. We therefore shifted our objectives to identifying connections between the conserved proteins of the cell cycle engine and factors that interface it with plant physiology and development. In this, we have obtained some very exciting results.

  2. Strategies for psbA gene expression in cyanobacteria, green algae and higher plants: from transcription to PSII repair.

    PubMed

    Mulo, Paula; Sakurai, Isamu; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-01-01

    The Photosystem (PS) II of cyanobacteria, green algae and higher plants is prone to light-induced inactivation, the D1 protein being the primary target of such damage. As a consequence, the D1 protein, encoded by the psbA gene, is degraded and re-synthesized in a multistep process called PSII repair cycle. In cyanobacteria, a small gene family codes for the various, functionally distinct D1 isoforms. In these organisms, the regulation of the psbA gene expression occurs mainly at the level of transcription, but the expression is fine-tuned by regulation of translation elongation. In plants and green algae, the D1 protein is encoded by a single psbA gene located in the chloroplast genome. In chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the psbA gene expression is strongly regulated by mRNA processing, and particularly at the level of translation initiation. In chloroplasts of higher plants, translation elongation is the prevalent mechanism for regulation of the psbA gene expression. The pre-existing pool of psbA transcripts forms translation initiation complexes in plant chloroplasts even in darkness, while the D1 synthesis can be completed only in the light. Replacement of damaged D1 protein requires also the assistance by a number of auxiliary proteins, which are encoded by the nuclear genome in green algae and higher plants. Nevertheless, many of these chaperones are conserved between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we describe the specific features and fundamental differences of the psbA gene expression and the regeneration of the PSII reaction center protein D1 in cyanobacteria, green algae and higher plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Photosystem II.

  3. Carboxylate metabolism changes induced by Fe deficiency in barley, a Strategy II plant species.

    PubMed

    López-Millán, Ana-Flor; Grusak, Michael A; Abadía, Javier

    2012-07-15

    The effects of iron (Fe) deficiency on carboxylate metabolism were investigated in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) using two cultivars, Steptoe and Morex, which differ in their Fe efficiency response. In both cultivars, root extracts of plants grown in Fe-deficient conditions showed higher activities of enzymes related to organic acid metabolism, including citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, compared to activities measured in root extracts of Fe-sufficient plants. Accordingly, the concentration of total carboxylates was higher in Fe-deficient roots of both cultivars, with citrate concentration showing the greatest increase. In xylem sap, the concentration of total carboxylates was also higher with Fe deficiency in both cultivars, with citrate and malate being the major organic acids. Leaf extracts of Fe-deficient plants also showed increases in citric acid concentration and in the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and fumarase activities, and decreases in aconitase activity. Our results indicate that changes in root carboxylate metabolism previously reported in Strategy I species also occur in barley, a Strategy II plant species, supporting the existence of anaplerotic carbon fixation via increases in the root activities of these enzymes, with citrate playing a major role. However, these changes occur less intensively than in Strategy I plants. Activities of the anaerobic metabolism enzymes pyruvate decarboxylase and lactate dehydrogenase did not change in barley roots with Fe deficiency, in contrast to what occurs in Strategy I plants, suggesting that these changes may be Strategy I-specific. No significant differences were observed in overall carboxylate metabolism between cultivars, for plants challenged with high or low Fe treatments, suggesting that carboxylate metabolism changes are not behind the Fe-efficiency differences between these cultivars. Citrate synthase was the only measured enzyme with

  4. Identification of the alternative terminal oxidase of higher plant mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Elthon, Thomas E.; McIntosh, Lee

    1987-01-01

    In addition to cytochrome oxidase, plant mitochondria have a second terminal oxidase called the alternative oxidase. The alternative oxidase is of great interest in that energy is not conserved when electrons flow through it. The potential energy of the system is thus lost as heat, and, in plants with high levels of the alternative oxidase, this results in thermogenesis. We have purified the alternative oxidase from mitochondria of the thermogenic spadix of Sauromatum guttatum and have identified its polypeptide constituents by using polyclonal antibodies. A 166-fold purification was achieved through a combination of cation-exchange (carboxymethyl-Sepharose) and hydrophobic-interaction (phenyl-Sepharose) chromatography. Polyclonal antibodies raised to the CM-Sepharose fractions readily immunoprecipitated alternative oxidase activity and immunoprecipitated four of the proteins that copurify with the activity. These proteins have apparent molecular masses of 37, 36, 35.5, and 35 kDa. Polyclonal antibodies raised individually to the 37-, 36-, and 35.5- plus 35-kDa proteins cross-reacted with all of these proteins, indicating the presence of common antigenic sites. The 37-kDa protein appears to be constitutive in Sauromatum, whereas expression of the 36- and 35-kDa proteins was correlated with presence of alternative pathway activity. The 35.5-kDa protein appears with loss of alternative pathway activity during senescence, indicating that this protein may be a degradation product of the 36-kDa protein. Binding of anti-36-kDa protein antibodies to total mitochondrial protein blots of five plant species indicated that similar proteins were always present when alternative pathway activity was observed. Images PMID:16593898

  5. Gravitropism in higher plant shoots. I - A role for ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Salisbury, Frank B.

    1981-01-01

    Two inhibitors of ethylene synthesis, Co(2+) and aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG), and two inhibitors of ethylene action, Ag(+) and CO2, are shown to delay the gravitropic response of cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium L.), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), and castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) stems. Gentle shaking on a mechanical shaker does not inhibit the gravitropic response, but vigorous hand shaking for 120 seconds delays the response somewhat. AVG and Ag(+) further delay the response of mechanically stimulated plants. AVG retards the storage of bending energy but not of stimulus. In gravitropism, graviperception may first stimulate ethylene evolution, which may then influence bending directly, or responses involving ethylene could be more indirect.

  6. The cell biology of lignification in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Jaime; Serk, Henrik; Granlund, Irene; Pesquet, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    Background Lignin is a polyphenolic polymer that strengthens and waterproofs the cell wall of specialized plant cell types. Lignification is part of the normal differentiation programme and functioning of specific cell types, but can also be triggered as a response to various biotic and abiotic stresses in cells that would not otherwise be lignifying. Scope Cell wall lignification exhibits specific characteristics depending on the cell type being considered. These characteristics include the timing of lignification during cell differentiation, the palette of associated enzymes and substrates, the sub-cellular deposition sites, the monomeric composition and the cellular autonomy for lignin monomer production. This review provides an overview of the current understanding of lignin biosynthesis and polymerization at the cell biology level. Conclusions The lignification process ranges from full autonomy to complete co-operation depending on the cell type. The different roles of lignin for the function of each specific plant cell type are clearly illustrated by the multiple phenotypic defects exhibited by knock-out mutants in lignin synthesis, which may explain why no general mechanism for lignification has yet been defined. The range of phenotypic effects observed include altered xylem sap transport, loss of mechanical support, reduced seed protection and dispersion, and/or increased pest and disease susceptibility. PMID:25878140

  7. Preliminary study of the higher-harmonic cavity for HLS- II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cong-Feng; Fan, Hao; Wang, Lin; Liu, Guang-Chao; Feng, Guang-Yao; Li, Wei-Min; A. Bosch, R.

    2012-09-01

    A higher-harmonic cavity will be used to increase the beam lifetime and suppress coupled-bunch instabilities for Hefei Light Source- II. In this paper, results simulated by the particle-tracking model confirm that tuning in the harmonic cavity may suppress the parasitic coupled-bunch instabilities. The factors calculated for lifetime improvement are larger than 2.5. The 3rd and 4th harmonic cavities have been designed. In particular, the absorbers and antenna couplers are applied in harmonic cavities to damp the higher order modes. Finally, the 4th harmonic cavity similar to the Duke's RF cavity will be used for HLS- II.

  8. Gravitropism in higher plant shoots. V - Changing sensitivity to auxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, Frank B.; Gillespie, Linda; Rorabaugh, Patricia

    1988-01-01

    The relationship in plants between the sensitivity to auxin and differential growth and bending was investigated experimentally. Decapitated and marked sunflower hypocotyl sections were immersed in buffered auxin solutions of different concentrations (0, 10 to the -8th, or 0.001 molar) and were photographed at 1/2 hr intervals; the negatives were analyzed with a digitizer/computer to evaluate surface-length changes in terms of Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics. It was found that bending decreased with increasing concentration of auxin. Increasing the auxin concentration inhibits the elongation growth of lower surfaces but promotes upper-surface growth, indicating that the lower surfaces have a greater Km sensitivity to applied auxin than the upper surfaces. At optimum auxin levels (maximum growth), the growth of bottom surfaces exceeded that of top surfaces, indicating that bottom tissues had a greater Vmax sensitivity.

  9. Studies of genetic transformation of higher plants using irradiated pollen

    SciTech Connect

    Chyi, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    Pandey has reported extensively on an unusual genetic phenomenon he called egg transformation. When compatible pollen was treated wth genetically lethal dosage of ..gamma..-radiation (100,000 rad), and used as mentor pollen to overcome selfincompatibility of several Nicotiana species, some genetic characters were found to be transferred from the radiation killed pollen to nonhybrid progeny. Observed transformants were fertile, cytogenetically normal, and had maternal phenotypes except for those specific traits transferred from the donors. Heavily irradiated pollen was believed to discharge its radiation-fragmented DNA (chromatin) into the embryo sac and bring about the transformation of the egg. The frequency of gene transfer was reported to be over 50%, and happened for all three characters Pandey studied - self incompatible specificities, flower color, and pollen color. Plant species studied were tomato, pea, apple, rapeseed, and Nicotiana species, including various stocks from Dr. Pandey. Treatments included pollinations with soley irradiated donor pollen, with a mixture of irradiated donor and normal self pollen, with a mixture of normal donor and self pollen, and double pollinations with irradiated donor pollen and normal self pollen, using different time intervals to separate the two pollinations. A total of 6210 pollinations were made, and 17,522 seedlings representing 87,750 potential transformational events were screened. In no case was an unambiguous transformant recovered. This research was unable to confirm or expand upon the findings of Dr. Pandey, or elucidate the mechanisms underlying such phenomena. Alternative explanations for Pandey's data were postulated. This approach to gene transfer by using irradiated pollen appears to be of little practical use to plant breeders.

  10. Radiobiological studies of plants orbited in Biosatellite II.

    PubMed

    Schairer, L A; Sparrow, A H; Marimuthu, K M

    1970-01-01

    The Biosatellite II Tradescantia experiment probed the effects of the space environment on spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation rates and on cytological changes in Tradescantia clone 02. Thirty two young flowering plants arranged in a plastic housing with the roots immersed in nutrient solution were exposed to gamma radiation from an on-board 85 Strontium source during the two-day orbital flight. Unirradiated plants were flown in a package in the spacecraft behind a tungsten radiation shield and identical non-flight control packages (with and without irradiation) were maintained at the launch site. After retrieval of the spacecraft near Hawaii, samples of root tip, ovary and stamen tissues were collected. These and the intact plants were flown to the Brookhaven National Laboratory for observations on the following end points: somatic mutation, cell size, loss of reproductive integrity resulting in stunted stamen hairs, pollen grain mortality, frequency of micronuclei in pollen, disturbed mitotic spindle function and chromosome aberrations. Analysis of data on somatic mutation, cell size and chromosome aberration end points showed no significant differences between flight and non-flight samples. However, pollen abortion, frequency of micronuclei in pollen and loss of reproductive integrity (stamen hair stunting) showed increases associated with weightlessness in irradiated material. Root tip and microspore cells showed effects of disturbed mitotic spindle function in orbited plants both with and without irradiation. Clearly differences exist between flight and non-flight material and the significance and possible mechanisms for these effects are being studied in continuing non-flight tests.

  11. Higher Plants in Space for MELiSSA -Literature Review and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabrodina, Marina; Kittang, Ann-Iren; Coelho, Liz Helena; Karoliussen, Irene; Aase Wolff, Silje; Iversen, Tor-Henning

    The human exploration of space requires the development of closed life support systems to regenerate oxygen, purify water, and produce food. MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) is a model system for advanced life support based on different microbial species and higher plants. The main objective of the LiRHiPliSMe (Literature Review of Higher Plants in Space for MELiSSA) project was to elaborate the preliminary roadmap for higher plant research activities for the MELiSSA project Phase 2 (Preliminary Space Experiments). The first task was to establish an understanding of the current knowledge concerning how higher plant will adapt to Moon/Mars physical factors different from Earth with focus on reduced gravity, space radiation, variations in magnetic field and combined effects of these factors. The literature related to how Moon/Mars physical factors can affect genetic processes, growth regulators, development, morphology, water and nutrients transport, gas exchange and metabolism of higher plants during one life cycle were collected. The possible effects of the space environment on the plant role as a food and on the mass balance in a Life Support System that includes a Higher Plant Compartment are reviewed. Based on this literature review there was made an assessment of where new or extended scientific knowledge about space factors effects on higher plant growth and development is needed. The requirements for research activities on higher plants in enclosed life support systems were identified. The required higher plant research activities for MELiSSA phase 2 both on ground and in space were placed in a timescale from the present until higher plants can be grown in closed life support systems on Moon and Mars.

  12. Automorphosis of higher plants on a 3-D clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoson, T.; Kamisaka, S.; Yamashita, M.; Masuda, Y.

    On a three-dimensional (3-D) clinostat, various plant organs developed statocytes capable of responding to the gravity vector. The graviresponse of primary roots of garden cress and maize grown on the clinostat was the same as the control roots, whereas that of maize coleoptiles was reduced. When maize seedlings were grown in the presence of 10^-4 M gibberellic acid and kinetin, the graviresponse of both roots and shoots was suppressed. The corresponding suppression of amyloplast development was observed in the clinostatted and the hormone-treated seedlings. Maize roots and shoots showed spontaneous curvatures in different portions on the 3-D clinostat. The hormone treatment did not significantly influence such an automorphic curvature. When the root cap was removed, maize roots did not curve gravitropically. However, the removal suppressed the automorphic curvatures only slightly. On the other hand, the removal of coleoptile tip did not influence its graviresponse, whereas the spontaneous curvature of decapitated coleoptiles on the clinostat was strongly suppressed. Also, cytochalasin B differently affected the gravitropic and the automorphic curvatures of maize roots and shoots. From these results it is concluded that the graviperception and the early processes of signal transmission are unnecessary for automorphoses under simulated microgravity conditions. Moreover, the results support the view that the amyloplasts act as statoliths probably via an interaction with microfilaments.

  13. Light intensity-dependent retrograde signalling in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2013-11-15

    Plants are able to acclimate to highly fluctuating light environment and evolved a short- and long-term light acclimatory responses, that are dependent on chloroplasts retrograde signalling. In this review we summarise recent evidences suggesting that the chloroplasts act as key sensors of light intensity changes in a wide range (low, high and excess light conditions) as well as sensors of darkness. They also participate in transduction and synchronisation of systemic retrograde signalling in response to differential light exposure of distinct leaves. Regulation of intra- and inter-cellular chloroplast retrograde signalling is dependent on the developmental and functional stage of the plastids. Therefore, it is discussed in following subsections: firstly, chloroplast biogenic control of nuclear genes, for example, signals related to photosystems and pigment biogenesis during early plastid development; secondly, signals in the mature chloroplast induced by changes in photosynthetic electron transport, reactive oxygen species, hormones and metabolite biosynthesis; thirdly, chloroplast signalling during leaf senescence. Moreover, with a help of meta-analysis of multiple microarray experiments, we showed that the expression of the same set of genes is regulated specifically in particular types of signals and types of light conditions. Furthermore, we also highlight the alternative scenarios of the chloroplast retrograde signals transduction and coordination linked to the role of photo-electrochemical signalling.

  14. Molecular insights into Zeaxanthin-dependent quenching in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pengqi; Tian, Lijin; Kloz, Miroslav; Croce, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms protect themselves from high-light stress by dissipating excess absorbed energy as heat in a process called non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Zeaxanthin is essential for the full development of NPQ, but its role remains debated. The main discussion revolves around two points: where does zeaxanthin bind and does it quench? To answer these questions we have followed the zeaxanthin-dependent quenching from leaves to individual complexes, including supercomplexes. We show that small amounts of zeaxanthin are associated with the complexes, but in contrast to what is generally believed, zeaxanthin binding per se does not cause conformational changes in the complexes and does not induce quenching, not even at low pH. We show that in NPQ conditions zeaxanthin does not exchange for violaxanthin in the internal binding sites of the antennas but is located at the periphery of the complexes. These results together with the observation that the zeaxanthin-dependent quenching is active in isolated membranes, but not in functional supercomplexes, suggests that zeaxanthin is acting in between the complexes, helping to create/participating in a variety of quenching sites. This can explain why none of the antennas appears to be essential for NPQ and the multiple quenching mechanisms that have been observed in plants. PMID:26323786

  15. Effect of Jigsaw II on Literal and Higher Order EFL Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaith, Ghazi; El-Malak, Mirna Abd

    2004-01-01

    The present study examines the effect of the cooperative Jigsaw II method on improving literal and higher order reading comprehension in English as a foreign language (EFL). Forty-eight ( n = 48) students of EFL participated in the study and a pretest-posttest control group experimental design was employed. The results indicated no statistically…

  16. Economic Aspects of Higher Education Taken Under the World War II Bill of Rights. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggertsson, Thrainn

    The aim of this thesis is to bring to bear the concepts, tools, and theories of human capital and human resources economics to evaluate the Federal Government's massive involvement in higher education under the World War II GI Bill of Rights. The major findings include estimates of total human capital formation by education, both during and after…

  17. Molecular biology of Lea genes of higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This report contains our progress to date in determining the function of the D-7 Lea proteins in cotton embryos. We have completely sequenced the D-7 gene and established {ital E. coli} transformants which synthesize reasonable amounts of the D-7 protein. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was required to assay fractions for D-7 protein during purification to homogeneity, since D-7 has no known enzymatic activity, contains no Trp, and little Phe or Tyr, and {ital E. coli} has several proteins of similar molecular weight to D-7. Purified D-7 was used to generate monospecific antibodies which are being used for determination of the cellular distribution of D-7, and also for exact quantitation of D-7 in late-stage cotton embryos. Computerized modelling of D-7 has shown similarities to proteins with a coiled-coil structure, but fitting D-7 to this structure resulted in a violation of the handedness rule. If the pitch of the helix is changed from 3.6 to 3.667, however, a three dimensional structure (not a coiled coil) is generated which has overall energetics of formation nearly as favorable as the traditional {alpha} helix. The driving force for the change in pitch is proposed to result from favorable energetics of dimerization. Preliminary evidence indicates that D-7 does indeed dimerize in solution. Future experiments will determine the exact 3D structure of D-7 and the related protein D-29, as well as test the hypothesis that D-7 and D-29 are involved in mitigating dehydration of embryos and plants through sequestering phosphate or other ions in sufficient quantity to prevent ion precipitation or crystallization. 13 refs., 3 figs. (MHB)

  18. Effects of the Extraterrestrial Environment on Plants: Recommendations for Future Space Experiments for the MELiSSA Higher Plant Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Silje A.; Coelho, Liz H.; Karoliussen, Irene; Jost, Ann-Iren Kittang

    2014-01-01

    Due to logistical challenges, long-term human space exploration missions require a life support system capable of regenerating all the essentials for survival. Higher plants can be utilized to provide a continuous supply of fresh food, atmosphere revitalization, and clean water for humans. Plants can adapt to extreme environments on Earth, and model plants have been shown to grow and develop through a full life cycle in microgravity. However, more knowledge about the long term effects of the extraterrestrial environment on plant growth and development is necessary. The European Space Agency (ESA) has developed the Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) program to develop a closed regenerative life support system, based on micro-organisms and higher plant processes, with continuous recycling of resources. In this context, a literature review to analyze the impact of the space environments on higher plants, with focus on gravity levels, magnetic fields and radiation, has been performed. This communication presents a roadmap giving directions for future scientific activities within space plant cultivation. The roadmap aims to identify the research activities required before higher plants can be included in regenerative life support systems in space. PMID:25370192

  19. Effects of the Extraterrestrial Environment on Plants: Recommendations for Future Space Experiments for the MELiSSA Higher Plant Compartment.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Silje A; Coelho, Liz H; Karoliussen, Irene; Jost, Ann-Iren Kittang

    2014-05-05

    Due to logistical challenges, long-term human space exploration missions require a life support system capable of regenerating all the essentials for survival. Higher plants can be utilized to provide a continuous supply of fresh food, atmosphere revitalization, and clean water for humans. Plants can adapt to extreme environments on Earth, and model plants have been shown to grow and develop through a full life cycle in microgravity. However, more knowledge about the long term effects of the extraterrestrial environment on plant growth and development is necessary. The European Space Agency (ESA) has developed the Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) program to develop a closed regenerative life support system, based on micro-organisms and higher plant processes, with continuous recycling of resources. In this context, a literature review to analyze the impact of the space environments on higher plants, with focus on gravity levels, magnetic fields and radiation, has been performed. This communication presents a roadmap giving directions for future scientific activities within space plant cultivation. The roadmap aims to identify the research activities required before higher plants can be included in regenerative life support systems in space.

  20. Sugarcane spacing. II. Effects of spacing on the plant

    SciTech Connect

    Irvine, J. E.; Benda, G. T.A.

    1980-01-01

    Intrarow spacing with 19 cm between plants on a 183-cm row produced significantly higher yields of biomass, net cane and sugar/ha when compared to intrarow spacings of 38 and 76 cm. Equidistant spacings of 19, 38, 76, and 152 cm produced significant differences in fiber % cane, stalk diameter, and leaf area index, as well as yields of biomass, net cane and sugar/ha. There was no significant effect on the sugar content of cane. Ten equidistant spacings ranging from 26.7 to 179.1 cm produced increases in plant population, biomass, net cane and sugar/ha with decreased spacing. Stalk diameter, shoot number, and plant weight decreased as interplant distance decreased. Varietal differences in yield of cane and sugar/ha were more pronounced with closer than with wider spacings. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.71*) between performance of a variety on closer and wider spacings, indicating selections made on wide rows should perform adequately on closer rows.

  1. Sunflower Plants as Bioindicators of Environmental Pollution with Lead (II) Ions.

    PubMed

    Krystofova, Olga; Shestivska, Violetta; Galiova, Michaela; Novotny, Karel; Kaiser, Jozef; Zehnalek, Josef; Babula, Petr; Opatrilova, Radka; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the influence of lead (II) ions on sunflower growth and biochemistry was investigated from various points of view. Sunflower plants were treated with 0, 10, 50, 100 and/or 500 μM Pb-EDTA for eight days. We observed alterations in growth in all experimental groups compared with non-treated control plants. Further we determined total content of proteins by a Bradford protein assay. By the eighth day of the experiment, total protein contents in all treated plants were much lower compared to control. Particularly noticeable was the loss of approx. 8 μg/mL or 15 μg/mL in shoots or roots of plants treated with 100 mM Pb-EDTA. We also focused our attention on the activity of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and urease. Activity of the enzymes increased with increasing length of the treatment and applied concentration of lead (II) ions. This increase corresponds well with a higher metabolic activity of treated plants. Contents of cysteine, reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and phytochelatin 2 (PC2) were determined by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Cysteine content declined in roots of plants with the increasing time of treatment of plants with Pb-EDTA and the concentration of toxic substance. Moreover, we observed ten times higher content of cysteine in roots in comparison with shoots. The observed reduction of cysteine content probably relates with its utilization for biosynthesis of GSH and phytochelatins, because the content of GSH and PC2 was similar in roots and shoots and increased with increased treatment time and concentration of Pb-EDTA. Moreover, we observed oxidative stress caused by Pb-EDTA in roots where the GSSG/GSH ratio was about 0.66. In shoots, the oxidative stress was less distinctive, with a GSSG/GSH ratio 0.14. We also estimated the rate of phytochelatin biosynthesis from the slope of linear equations plotted with data measured in the particular

  2. Sunflower Plants as Bioindicators of Environmental Pollution with Lead (II) Ions

    PubMed Central

    Krystofova, Olga; Shestivska, Violetta; Galiova, Michaela; Novotny, Karel; Kaiser, Jozef; Zehnalek, Josef; Babula, Petr; Opatrilova, Radka; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the influence of lead (II) ions on sunflower growth and biochemistry was investigated from various points of view. Sunflower plants were treated with 0, 10, 50, 100 and/or 500 μM Pb-EDTA for eight days. We observed alterations in growth in all experimental groups compared with non-treated control plants. Further we determined total content of proteins by a Bradford protein assay. By the eighth day of the experiment, total protein contents in all treated plants were much lower compared to control. Particularly noticeable was the loss of approx. 8 μg/mL or 15 μg/mL in shoots or roots of plants treated with 100 mM Pb-EDTA. We also focused our attention on the activity of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and urease. Activity of the enzymes increased with increasing length of the treatment and applied concentration of lead (II) ions. This increase corresponds well with a higher metabolic activity of treated plants. Contents of cysteine, reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and phytochelatin 2 (PC2) were determined by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Cysteine content declined in roots of plants with the increasing time of treatment of plants with Pb-EDTA and the concentration of toxic substance. Moreover, we observed ten times higher content of cysteine in roots in comparison with shoots. The observed reduction of cysteine content probably relates with its utilization for biosynthesis of GSH and phytochelatins, because the content of GSH and PC2 was similar in roots and shoots and increased with increased treatment time and concentration of Pb-EDTA. Moreover, we observed oxidative stress caused by Pb-EDTA in roots where the GSSG/GSH ratio was about 0.66. In shoots, the oxidative stress was less distinctive, with a GSSG/GSH ratio 0.14. We also estimated the rate of phytochelatin biosynthesis from the slope of linear equations plotted with data measured in the particular

  3. A rapid immunoprecipitation assay for neomycin phosphotransferase II expression in transformed bacteria and plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Baszczynski, C L

    1990-06-01

    Anti-kanamycin antibodies produced in rabbits, following coupling of the antibiotic to bovine serum albumin, were used to immunoprecipitate radioactively labelled phosphorylated kanamycin from transformed bacterial or plant extracts in a novel assay system, for the detection of neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) activity. Radioactive counts in the immunoprecipitated pellet give a semiquantitative measure of the kanamycin phosphorylation and hence the amount of NPTII activity. This assay is sensitive, uses very small amounts of radioactivity, and is very rapid, allowing many samples to be processed within a few hours. Immunoprecipitated counts from reactions with bacteria carrying a kanamycin resistance gene or from tobacco and Brassica napus plants transformed with NPTII gene-containing vectors were consistently higher than counts from nontransformed controls. Results obtained with this assay correlate well with those from the previously described gel overlay and dot-blot assays, but can be obtained in an appreciably shorter time frame.

  4. Modulation of energy-dependent quenching of excitons in antennae of higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Avenson, Thomas J.; Cruz, Jeffrey A.; Kramer, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Energy-dependent exciton quenching, or qE, protects the higher plant photosynthetic apparatus from photodamage. Initiation of qE involves protonation of violaxanthin deepoxidase and PsbS, a component of the photosystem II antenna complex, as a result of lumen acidification driven by photosynthetic electron transfer. It has become clear that the response of qE to linear electron flow, termed “qE sensitivity,” must be modulated in response to fluctuating environmental conditions. Previously, three mechanisms have been proposed to account for qE modulation: (i) the sensitivity of qE to the lumen pH is altered; (ii) elevated cyclic electron flow around photosystem I increases proton translocation into the lumen; and (iii) lowering the conductivity of the thylakoid ATP synthase to protons (gH+) allows formation of a larger steady-state proton motive force (pmf). Kinetic analysis of the electrochromic shift of intrinsic thylakoid pigments, a linear indicator of transthylakoid electric field component, suggests that, when CO2 alone was lowered from 350 ppm to 50 ppm CO2, modulation of qE sensitivity could be explained solely by changes in conductivity. Lowering both CO2 (to 50 ppm) and O2 (to 1%) resulted in an additional increase in qE sensitivity that could not be explained by changes in conductivity or cyclic electron flow associated with photosystem I. Evidence is presented for a fourth mechanism, in which changes in qE sensitivity result from variable partitioning of proton motive force into the electric field and pH gradient components. The implications of this mechanism for the storage of proton motive force and the regulation of the light reactions are discussed. PMID:15064404

  5. Biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation during biosynthesis in higher plants reflects carbon metabolism of the plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Marc-André; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-04-01

    Compound-specific isotope analyses of plant material are frequently applied to understand the response of plants to the environmental changes. As it is generally assume that the main factors controlling δ2H values in plants are the plant's source water and evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water, hydrogen isotope analyses of plant material are mainly applied regarding hydrological conditions at different time scales. However, only few studies have directly addressed the variability of the biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation occurring during biosynthesis of organic compounds (ɛbio), accounting also for a large part in the δ2H values of plants but generally assumed to be constant. Here we present the results from a climate-controlled growth chambers experiment where tested the sensitivity of ɛbio to different light treatments. The different light treatments were applied to induce different metabolic status (autotrophic vs. heterotrophic) in 9 different plant species that we grew from large storage organs (e.g. tubers or roots). The results show a systematic ɛbio shift (up to 80 ) between the different light treatments for different compounds (i.e. long chain n-alkanes and cellulose). We suggest that this shift is due to the different NADPH pools used by the plants to build up the compounds from stored carbohydrates in heterotrophic or autotrophic conditions. Our results have important implications for the calibration and interpretation of sedimentary and tree rings records in geological studies. In addition, as the δ2H values reflect also strongly the carbon metabolism of the plant, our findings support the idea of δ2H values as an interesting proxy for plant physiological studies.

  6. The comet assay in higher terrestrial plant model: Review and evolutionary trends.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Caroline; Manier, Nicolas; Cuny, Damien; Deram, Annabelle

    2015-12-01

    The comet assay is a sensitive technique for the measurement of DNA damage in individual cells. Although it has been primarily applied to animal cells, its adaptation to higher plant tissues significantly extends the utility of plants for environmental genotoxicity research. The present review focuses on 101 key publications and discusses protocols and evolutionary trends specific to higher plants. General consensus validates the use of the percentage of DNA found in the tail, the alkaline version of the test and root study. The comet protocol has proved its effectiveness and its adaptability for cultivated plant models. Its transposition in wild plants thus appears as a logical evolution. However, certain aspects of the protocol can be improved, namely through the systematic use of positive controls and increasing the number of nuclei read. These optimizations will permit the increase in the performance of this test, namely when interpreting mechanistic and physiological phenomena.

  7. Damping Higher Order Modes in the PEP-II B-Factory Vertex Bellows

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S.; Langton, J.; Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; /SLAC

    2005-06-30

    Higher stored currents and shorter bunch lengths are requirements for increasing luminosity in colliding storage rings. As a result, more HOM power is generated in the IP region. This HOM power propagates to sensitive components causing undesirable heating, thus becoming a limiting issue for the PEP-II B-factory. HOM field penetration through RF shielding fingers has been shown to cause heating in bellows structures. To overcome these limitations, a proposal to incorporate ceramic absorbers within the bellows cavity to damp these modes is presented. Results show that the majority of modes of interest are damped, the effectiveness depending on geometrical considerations. An optimal configuration is presented for the PEP-II B-factory IR bellows component utilizing commercial grade ceramics with consideration for heat transfer requirements.

  8. Review of SRC-II process product hydrotreating data, for completeness and applicability to the demo plant

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, G.C.; Faruqi, A.

    1981-03-01

    The SRC-II product naphtha, gas oil, and whole liquid product hydrotreating data base was reviewed for completeness and applicability to the design of the SRC-II Demonstration Plant. Primary data sources were the Chevron and the UOP experimental hydrotreating work and the PNL bioassay investigations on UOP hydrotreated samples. Secondary data were the hydrotreating data for both the EDS and the H-Coal liquid products. The SRC-II product hydrotreating data are sparse at this point, but in view of the fact that these data can be supplemented through correlation with the corresponding data for the EDS and H-Coal liquid fractions, it is concluded that a sufficient data base exists for the closure of a hydrotreating plant material balance at least in the hydrotreating severity range of the Phase 0 design goals. Little thermal property data appear in the literature for coal-derived liquids; thus it will be necessary to draw upon correlations developed in the petroleum industry for closure of the plant energy balance unless experimental thermal property data are forthcoming. An area of uncertainty and concern at this time is the extent to which the Demo Plant product mutagenicity would be reduced by hydrotreatment. Although bioassay tests were conducted on both moderately and severely hydrotreated SRC-II Pilot Plant gas oil, the Demo Plant product is expected to contain an appreciable fraction of 800/sup 0/F/sup +/ material, compared with the Pilot Plant product, which contained essentially no material in this higher boiling range.

  9. Advanced life support systems in lunar and Martian environments utilizing a higher plant based engineering paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberland, Dennis

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes a higher-plant-based engineering paradigm for advanced life support in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) on the surface of the moon or Mars, called the CELSS Breadboard Project, designed at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Such a higher-plant-based system would use the plants for a direct food source, gas exchange, water reclamation, and plant residuals in a complex biological resource recovery scheme. The CELSS Breadboard Project utilizes a 'breadboard' approach of developing independent systems that are evaluated autonomously and are later interconnected. Such a scheme will enable evaluation of life support system methodologies tested for their efficiency in a life support system for habitats on the moon or Mars.

  10. Leaf Optical Properties in Higher Plants: Linking Spectral Characteristics with Plant Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Gregory A.; Knapp, Alan K.

    1999-01-01

    A number of studies have addressed responses of leaf spectral reflectance, transmittance, or absorptance to physiological stress. Stressors included dehydration, ozone, herbicides, disease, insufficient mycorrhizae and N fertilization, flooding and insects. Species included conifers, grasses, and broadleaved trees. Increased reflectance with maximum responses near 700 nm wavelength occurred in all cases. Varying the chlorophyll content in leaves or pigment extracts can simulate this effect. Thus, common optical responses to stress result from decreases in leaf chlorophyll contents or the capacity of chloroplasts to absorb light. Leaf optic can be quite sensitive to any stressor that alters soil-plant-atmosphere processes.

  11. Growth and development in inert non-aqueous liquids. [of higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    A preview is presented of the survival and growth capabilities of higher plants in non-aqueous, inert liquids. The two media which were used are mineral (white) oil and fluorochemical inert liquid FC-75. Both liquids dissolve oxygen and carbon dioxide readily, but are insoluble in water. Consequently, plants submerged in these liquids are capable of gas exchange with the atmosphere, but possess a water impermeable coating the dimensions of which are determined by the size of the liquid holding container. In a sense, growing plants in a tank of mineral oil imparts on them a cuticle. Plants plus prescribed volumes of water were innoculated into mineral oil. Organisms with minimal water supplied could then be observed. Also, submersed plants covered with an oil slick were shown to be capable of growth in dessicating atmospheres.

  12. Voltage-dependent calcium-permeable channels in the plasma membrane of a higher plant cell.

    PubMed Central

    Thuleau, P; Ward, J M; Ranjeva, R; Schroeder, J I

    1994-01-01

    Numerous biological assays and pharmacological studies on various higher plant tissues have led to the suggestion that voltage-dependent plasma membrane Ca2+ channels play prominent roles in initiating signal transduction processes during plant growth and development. However, to date no direct evidence has been obtained for the existence of such depolarization-activated Ca2+ channels in the plasma membrane of higher plant cells. Carrot suspension cells (Daucus carota L.) provide a well-suited system to determine whether voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels are present in the plasma membrane of higher plants and to characterize the properties of putative Ca2+ channels. It is known that both depolarization, caused by raising extracellular K+, and exposure to fungal toxins or oligogalacturonides induce Ca2+ influx into carrot cells. By direct application of patch-clamp techniques to isolated carrot protoplasts, we show here that depolarization of the plasma membrane positive to -135 mV activates Ca(2+)-permeable channels. These voltage-dependent ion channels were more permeable to Ca2+ than K+, while displaying large permeabilities to Ba2+ and Mg2+ ions. Ca(2+)-permeable channels showed slow and reversible inactivation. The single-channel conductance was 13 pS in 40 mM CaCl2. These data provide direct evidence for the existence of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in the plasma membrane of a higher plant cell and point to physiological mechanisms for plant Ca2+ channel regulation. The depolarization-activated Ca(2+)-permeable channels identified here could constitute a regulated pathway for Ca2+ influx in response to physiologically occurring stimulus-induced depolarizations in higher plant cells. PMID:8039493

  13. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.

  14. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Pellerin, Patrice J. M.; Warrenfeltz, Dennis; Vidal, Stephane; Darvill, Alan G.; Albersheim, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

  15. Direct impact of the sustained decline in the photosystem II efficiency upon plant productivity at different developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yonglan; Ungerer, Petra; Zhang, Huayong; Ruban, Alexander V

    2017-02-11

    The impact of chronic photoinhibition of photosystem II (PSII) on the productivity of plants remains unknown. The present study investigated the influences of persistent decline in the PSII yield on morphology and productivity of Arabidopsis plants that were exposed to lincomycin at two different developmental stages (seedling and rosette stage). The results indicated that, although retarded, the lincomycin treated plants were able to accomplish the entire growth period with only 50% of the maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry (Fv/Fm) of the control plants. The decline in quantum yield limited the electron transport rate (ETR). The impact of lincomycin on NPQ was not significant in seedlings, but was pronounced in mature plants. The treated plants produced an above ground biomass of 50% compared to control plants. Moreover, a linear relationship was found between the above ground biomass and total rosette leaf area, and the slope was decreased due to photoinhibition. The starch accumulation was highly inhibited by lincomycin treatment. Lincomycin induced a significant decrease in seed yield with plants treated from the rosette state showing higher yield than those treated from the seedling stage. Our data suggest that the sustained decline of PSII efficiency decreases plant productivity by constraining the ETR, leaf development and starch production.

  16. [Possibility of using higher plants in a life-support system on the moon].

    PubMed

    Terskov, I A; Lisovskiĭ, G M; Ushakova, S A; Parshina, O V; Moiseenko, L P

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses the possibility of repeated termination of plant vegetation by prolonged darkness approximating the lunar night. This may be helpful for the incorporation of higher plants into the life support system of lunar bases, the solar light being used for illumination. In this connection vegetables (beet Bordeaux, turnip Petrovskaya, carrot Chantanet, dill, radish Virovsky white) and wheat (variety Sonora) were cultivated during the lunar light-dark cycle (i. e. 15 day light: 15 day dark). The experiments demonstrated that traditional plant products can be obtained under the conditions of lunar photoperiod. Grain of wheat grown during the lunar photoperiod were tested as seed material for further cultivation under similar conditions.

  17. Aquatic food production modules in bioregenerative life support systems based on higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluem, V.; Paris, F.

    Most bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS) are based on gravitropic higher plants which exhibit growth and seed generation disturbances in microgravity. Even when used for a lunar or martian base the reduced gravity may induce a decreased productivity in comparison to Earth. Therefore, the implementation of aquatic biomass production modules in higher plant and/or hybrid BLSS may compensate for this and offer, in addition, the possibility to produce animal protein for human nutrition. It was shown on the SLS-89 and SLS-90 space shuttle missions with the C.E.B.A.S.-MINI MODULE that the edible non gravitropic rootless higher aquatic plant Ceratophyllum demeresum exhibits an undisturbed high biomass production rate in space and that the teleost fish species, Xiphophorus helleri, adapts rapidly to space conditions without loss of its normal reproductive functions. Based on these findings a series of ground-based aquatic food production systems were developed which are disposed for utilization in space. These are plant production bioreactors for the species mentioned above and another suitable candidate, the lemnacean (duckweed) species, Wolffia arrhiza. Moreover, combined intensive aquaculture systems with a closed food loop between herbivorous fishes and aquatic and land plants are being developed which may be suitable for integration into a BLSS of higher complexity.

  18. Aquatic food production modules in bioregenerative life support systems based on higher plants.

    PubMed

    Bluem, V; Paris, F

    2001-01-01

    Most bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS) are based on gravitropic higher plants which exhibit growth and seed generation disturbances in microgravity. Even when used for a lunar or martian base the reduced gravity may induce a decreased productivity in comparison to Earth. Therefore, the implementation of aquatic biomass production modules in higher plant and/or hybrid BLSS may compensate for this and offer, in addition, the possibility to produce animal protein for human nutrition. It was shown on the SLS-89 and SLS-90 space shuttle missions with the C.E.B.A.S.-MINI MODULE that the edible non gravitropic rootless higher aquatic plant Ceratophyllum demeresum exhibits an undisturbed high biomass production rate in space and that the teleost fish species, Xiphophorus helleri, adapts rapidly to space conditions without loss of its normal reproductive functions. Based on these findings a series of ground-based aquatic food production systems were developed which are disposed for utilization in space. These are plant production bioreactors for the species mentioned above and another suitable candidate, the lemnacean (duckweed) species, Wolffia arrhiza. Moreover, combined intensive aquaculture systems with a closed food loop between herbivorous fishes and aquatic and land plants are being developed which may be suitable for integration into a BLSS of higher complexity. Grant numbers: WS50WB9319-3, IVA1216-00588.

  19. Final Safety Analysis Addenda to Hazards Summary Report, Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II): upgrading of plant protection system. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, N. L.; Keeton, J. M.; Sackett, J. I.

    1980-06-01

    This report is the second in a series of compilations of the formal Final Safety Analysis Addenda (FSAA`s) to the EBR-II Hazard Summary Report and Addendum. Sections 2 and 3 are edited versions of the original FSAA`s prepared in support of certain modifications to the reactor-shutdown-system portion of the EBR-II plant-protection system. Section 4 is an edited version of the original FSAA prepared in support of certain modifications to a system classified as an engineered safety feature. These sections describe the pre- and postmodification system, the rationale for the modification, and required supporting safety analysis. Section 5 provides an updated description and analysis of the EBR-II emergency power system. Section 6 summarizes all significant modifications to the EBR-II plant-protection system to date.

  20. Physiology and toxicology of hormone-disrupting chemicals in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Couée, Ivan; Serra, Anne-Antonella; Ramel, Fanny; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Sulmon, Cécile

    2013-06-01

    Higher plants are exposed to natural environmental organic chemicals, associated with plant-environment interactions, and xenobiotic environmental organic chemicals, associated with anthropogenic activities. The effects of these chemicals result not only from interaction with metabolic targets, but also from interaction with the complex regulatory networks of hormone signaling. Purpose-designed plant hormone analogues thus show extensive signaling effects on gene regulation and are as such important for understanding plant hormone mechanisms and for manipulating plant growth and development. Some natural environmental chemicals also act on plants through interference with the perception and transduction of endogenous hormone signals. In a number of cases, bioactive xenobiotics, including herbicides that have been designed to affect specific metabolic targets, show extensive gene regulation effects, which are more in accordance with signaling effects than with consequences of metabolic effects. Some of these effects could be due to structural analogies with plant hormones or to interference with hormone metabolism, thus resulting in situations of hormone disruption similar to animal cell endocrine disruption by xenobiotics. These hormone-disrupting effects can be superimposed on parallel metabolic effects, thus indicating that toxicological characterisation of xenobiotics must take into consideration the whole range of signaling and metabolic effects. Hormone-disruptive signaling effects probably predominate when xenobiotic concentrations are low, as occurs in situations of residual low-level pollutions. These hormone-disruptive effects in plants may thus be of importance for understanding cryptic effects of low-dosage xenobiotics, as well as the interactive effects of mixtures of xenobiotic pollutants.

  1. Structural and functional dynamics of plant photosystem II.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jan M; Chow, W S

    2002-01-01

    Given the unique problem of the extremely high potential of the oxidant P(+)(680) that is required to oxidize water to oxygen, the photoinactivation of photosystem II in vivo is inevitable, despite many photoprotective strategies. There is, however, a robustness of photosystem II, which depends partly on the highly dynamic compositional and structural heterogeneity of the cycle between functional and non-functional photosystem II complexes in response to light level. This coordinated regulation involves photon usage (energy utilization in photochemistry) and excess energy dissipation as heat, photoprotection by many molecular strategies, photoinactivation followed by photon damage and ultimately the D1 protein dynamics involved in the photosystem II repair cycle. Compelling, though indirect evidence suggests that the radical pair P(+)(680)Pheo(-) in functional PSII should be protected from oxygen. By analogy to the tentative oxygen channel of cytochrome c oxidase, oxygen may be liberated from the two water molecules bound to the catalytic site of the Mn cluster, via a specific pathway to the membrane surface. The function of the proposed oxygen pathway is to prevent O(2) from having direct access to P(+)(680)Pheo(-) and prevent the generation of singlet oxygen via the triplet-P(680) state in functional photosytem IIs. Only when the, as yet unidentified, potential trigger with a fateful first oxidative step destroys oxygen evolution, will the ensuing cascade of structural perturbations of photosystem II destroy the proposed oxygen, water and proton pathways. Then oxygen has direct access to P(+)(680)Pheo(-), singlet oxygen will be produced and may successively oxidize specific amino acids of the phosphorylated D1 protein of photosystem II dimers that are confined to appressed granal domains, thereby targeting D1 protein for eventual degradation and replacement in non-appressed thylakoid domains. PMID:12437881

  2. Soybean ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit: Mechanisms and determinants of RNA turnover in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, R.B.

    1990-02-01

    The goals of examining the mechanisms and determinants of RNA turnover in higher plants remain the same. We will continue with two of the major approaches (1) in vivo chemical modification of RNA structure and (2) analysis of Rubisco SSU RNA structure and turnover in transgenic plants. We plan to reduce the amount of molecular physiology (studies of transcription and steady state levels) to a minimum and expand these efforts into the analysis of plant rebonucleases. We have also broadened our examination of light induced turnover of rubisco SSU RNA to include general RNA turnover. We plan to identify specific 3{prime}->5{prime} precessive ribonuclease by complementation of E. coli mutants. The activity of these novel RNases and their potential role in plant RNA turnover and processing will be characterized.

  3. Design and optimization of an experimental bioregenerative life support system with higher plants and silkworms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Enzhu; Bartsev, Sergey I.; Zhao, Ming; Liu, Professor Hong

    The conceptual scheme of an experimental bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) for planetary exploration was designed, which consisted of four elements - human metabolism, higher plants, silkworms and waste treatment. 15 kinds of higher plants, such as wheat, rice, soybean, lettuce, mulberry, et al., were selected as regenerative component of BLSS providing the crew with air, water, and vegetable food. Silkworms, which producing animal nutrition for crews, were fed by mulberry-leaves during the first three instars, and lettuce leaves last two instars. The inedible biomass of higher plants, human wastes and silkworm feces were composted into soil like substrate, which can be reused by higher plants cultivation. Salt, sugar and some household material such as soap, shampoo would be provided from outside. To support the steady state of BLSS the same amount and elementary composition of dehydrated wastes were removed periodically. The balance of matter flows between BLSS components was described by the system of algebraic equations. The mass flows between the components were optimized by EXCEL spreadsheets and using Solver. The numerical method used in this study was Newton's method.

  4. Gene Expression and Regulation of Higher Plants Under Soil Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Fu-Tai; Chu, Li-Ye; Shao, Hong-Bo; Liu, Zeng-Hui

    2009-01-01

    Higher plants not only provide human beings renewable food, building materials and energy, but also play the most important role in keeping a stable environment on earth. Plants differ from animals in many aspects, but the important is that plants are more easily influenced by environment than animals. Plants have a series of fine mechanisms for responding to environmental changes, which has been established during their long-period evolution and artificial domestication. The machinery related to molecular biology is the most important basis. The elucidation of it will extremely and purposefully promote the sustainable utilization of plant resources and make the best use of its current potential under different scales. This molecular mechanism at least includes drought signal recognition (input), signal transduction (many cascade biochemical reactions are involved in this process), signal output, signal responses and phenotype realization, which is a multi-dimension network system and contains many levels of gene expression and regulation. We will focus on the physiological and molecular adaptive machinery of plants under soil water stress and draw a possible blueprint for it. Meanwhile, the issues and perspectives are also discussed. We conclude that biological measures is the basic solution to solving various types of issues in relation to sustainable development and the plant measures is the eventual way. PMID:19949548

  5. Diurnal adjustment in ultraviolet sunscreen protection is widespread among higher plants.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Paul W; Flint, Stephan D; Tobler, Mark A; Ryel, Ronald J

    2016-05-01

    The accumulation of ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing compounds (flavonoids and related phenylpropanoids) in the epidermis of higher plants reduces the penetration of solar UV radiation to underlying tissues and is a primary mechanism of acclimation to changing UV conditions resulting from ozone depletion and climate change. Previously we reported that several herbaceous plant species were capable of rapid, diurnal adjustments in epidermal UV transmittance (T UV), but how widespread this phenomenon is among plants has been unknown. In the present study, we tested the generality of this response by screening 37 species of various cultivated and wild plants growing in four locations spanning a gradient of ambient solar UV and climate (Hawaii, Utah, Idaho and Louisiana). Non-destructive measurements of adaxial T UV indicated that statistically significant midday decreases in T UV occurred in 49 % of the species tested, including both herbaceous and woody growth forms, and there was substantial interspecific variation in the magnitude of these changes. In general, plants in Louisiana exhibited larger diurnal changes in T UV than those in the other locations. Moreover, across all taxa, the magnitude of these changes was positively correlated with minimum daily air temperatures but not daily UV irradiances. Results indicate that diurnal changes in UV shielding are widespread among higher plants, vary both within and among species and tend to be greatest in herbaceous plants growing in warm environments. These findings suggest that plant species differ in their UV protection "strategies" though the functional and ecological significance of this variation in UV sunscreen protection remains unclear at present.

  6. Study of Robinson instabilities with a higher-harmonic cavity for the HLS phase II project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Ning; Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Cong-Feng; Wang, Lin

    2012-11-01

    In the Phase II Project at the Hefei Light Source, a fourth-harmonic “Landau" cavity will be operated in order to suppress the coupled-bunch instabilities and increase the beam lifetime of the Hefei storage ring. Instabilities limit the utility of the higher-harmonic cavity when the storage ring is operated with a small momentum compaction. Analytical modeling and simulations show that the instabilities result from Robinson mode coupling. In the analytic modeling, we operate an algorithm to consider the Robinson instabilities. To study the evolution of unstable behavior, simulations have been performed in which macroparticles are distributed among the buckets. Both the analytic modeling and simulations agree for passive operation of the harmonic cavity.

  7. Analytic modeling of instabilities driven by higher-order modes in the HLS II RF system with a higher-harmonic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Ning; Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Cong-Feng; Wang, Lin

    2013-08-01

    The utility of a passive fourth-harmonic cavity plays a key role in suppressing longitudinal beam instabilities in the electron storage ring and lengthens the bunch by a factor of 2.6 for the phase II project of the Hefei Light Source (HLS II). Meanwhile, instabilities driven by higher-order modes (HOM) may limit the performance of the higher-harmonic cavity. In this paper, the parasitic coupled-bunch instability, which is driven by narrow band parasitic modes, and the microwave instability, which is driven by broadband HOM, are both modeled analytically. The analytic modeling results are in good agreement with those of our previous simulation study and indicate that the passive fourth-harmonic cavity suppresses parasitic coupled-bunch instabilities and microwave instability. The modeling suggests that a fourth-harmonic cavity may be successfully used at the HLS II.

  8. Plant growth with new fluorescent lamps : II. Growth and reproduction of mature bean plants and dwarf marigold plants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, A S; Dunn, S

    1966-06-01

    Bean and marigold plants were grown to maturity under several kinds of fluorescent lamps to evaluate the effects of spectral differences on development and reproduction. Six kinds of lamps were tested including five lamps that were used in closely related experiments on tomato seedling growth (THOMAS and DUNN, 1967). Evaluation was by fresh- and dry-weight yields of immature and mature pods, and of vegetative tops of plants for bean; and by flowering and fresh-and dry-weight yields for marigold.Bean plants grown under two experimental lamps, Com I and IR III produced significantly higher fresh- and dry-weight yields of both mature and total pods than under Warm-white lamps. This effect could be attributed largely to the considerable energy emitted by the experimental lamps in the red and far-red, as compared to a larger emission in the green and blue for the Warm-white lamps. The differences in the yields for immature pods and vegetative portions of the mature tops were not significant.In a comparison of the effects of three experimental lamps with those of three commercial lamps on growth response of bean plants, the yields were in general higher for the experimental lamps, except for immature pods. The yields of vegetative tops were significantly greater for the 78/22 lamp over the yields for all other lamps. The larger proportion of red and far-red light emitted by the experimental lamps is again the probable cause of the higher yields with these lamps.Two sets of experiments on growth and flowering of marigold under various experimental and commercial lamps were largely inconclusive although there was some indication of beneficial effects by the experimental lamps.In general, the results with bean agree with those for tomato (THOMAS and DUNN, 1967), in that best growth was obtained with a lamp high in red light emission, a moderate amount in the far-red, and very little in the blue part of the spectrum.

  9. Rolling-circle replication of mitochondrial DNA in the higher plant Chenopodium album (L.).

    PubMed Central

    Backert, S; Dörfel, P; Lurz, R; Börner, T

    1996-01-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of higher plants are larger and more complex than those of all other groups of organisms. We have studied the in vivo replication of chromosomal and plasmid mitochondrial DNAs prepared from a suspension culture and whole plants of the dicotyledonous higher plant Chenopodium album (L.). Electron microscopic studies revealed sigma-shaped, linear, and open circular molecules (subgenomic circles) of variable size as well as a minicircular plasmid of 1.3 kb (mp1). The distribution of single-stranded mitochondrial DNA in the sigma structures and the detection of entirely single-stranded molecules indicate a rolling-circle type of replication of plasmid mp1 and subgenomic circles. About half of the sigma-like molecules had tails exceeding the lengths of the corresponding circle, suggesting the formation of concatemers. Two replication origins (nicking sites) could be identified on mpl by electron microscopy and by a new approach based on the mapping of restriction fragments representing the identical 5' ends of the tails of sigma-like molecules. These data provide, for the first time, evidence for a rolling-circle mode of replication in the mitochondria of higher plants. PMID:8887658

  10. The "resurrection method" for modification of specific proteins in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masashi; Dohi, Koji

    2005-11-07

    We describe a new method designated "the resurrection method" by which a modified protein is expressed in higher plants in place of the original protein. The modified gene constructed by introducing synonymous codon substitutions throughout the original gene to prevent the sequence-specific degradation of its mRNA during RNA silencing is expressed while the expression of the original gene is suppressed. Here, we report the successful alteration of the biochemical properties of green fluorescent protein expressed in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana, suggesting that this method could be useful for gene control in living plants.

  11. Water-deficit stress-induced anatomical changes in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hong-Bo; Chu, Li-Ye; Jaleel, Cheruth Abdul; Zhao, Chang-Xing

    2008-03-01

    Water is vital for plant growth and development. Water-deficit stress, permanent or temporary, limits the growth and the distribution of natural vegetation and the performance of cultivated plants more than any other environmental factors do. Although research and practices aimed at improving water-stress resistance and water-use efficiency have been carried out for many years, the mechanism involved is still not clear. Further understanding and manipulating plant-water relations and water-stress tolerance at the scale of physiology and molecular biology can significantly improve plant productivity and environmental quality. Currently, post-genomics and metabolomics are very important to explore anti-drought gene resource in different life forms, but modern agricultural sustainable development must be combined with plant physiological measures in the field, on the basis of which post-genomics and metabolomics will have further a practical prospect. In this review, we discussed the anatomical changes and drought-tolerance strategies under drought condition in higher plants.

  12. Antipyretic studies on some indigenous Pakistani medicinal plants: II.

    PubMed

    Ikram, M; Khattak, S G; Gilani, S N

    1987-01-01

    Eight Pakistani medicinal plants were investigated for antipyretic activity in rabbits receiving subcutaneous yeast injections. Hexane- and chloroform-soluble extracts of Aconitum napellus stems, Corchorus depressus whole plant and Gmelina asiatica roots exhibited prominent oral antipyretic activity while insignificant antipyretic effects were found in the hexane- and chloroform-soluble portions of Melia azadirachta seeds, Tinospora cordifolia stems and Vitex trifolia seeds. No antipyretic actions whatsoever were produced by extracts of A. heterophyllum roots and Hedysarum alhagi aerial parts. Toxicity studies revealed no noteworthy toxic or adverse effects for any of the above plant extracts up to the highest oral doses of 1.6 g/kg except in the case of A. napellus.

  13. Preliminary Modelling of Mass Flux at the Surface of Plant Leaves within the MELiSSA Higher Plant Compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmberg, Madeleine; Paille, Christel; Lasseur, Christophe

    The ESA project Micro Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) is an ecosystem of micro-organisms and higher plants, constructed with the objective of being operated as a tool to understand artificial ecosystems to be used for a long-term or permanent manned planetary base (e.g. Moon or Mars). The purpose of such a system is to provide for generation of food, water recycling, atmospheric regeneration and waste management within defined standards of quality and reliability. As MELiSSA consists of individual compartments which are connected to each other, the robustness of the system is fully dependent on the control of each compartment, as well as the flow management between them. Quality of consumables and reliability of the ecosystem rely on the knowledge, understanding and control of each of the components. This includes the full understanding of all processes related to the higher plants. To progress in that direction, this paper focuses on the mechanical processes driving the gas and liquid exchanges between the plant leaf and its environment. The process responsible for the mass transfer on the surface of plant leaves is diffusion. The diffusion flux is dependent on the behaviour of the stoma of the leaf and also on the leaf boundary layer (BL). In this paper, the physiology of the leaf is briefly examined in order to relate parameters such as light quality, light quantity, CO2 concentration, temperature, leaf water potential, humidity, vapour pressure deficit (VPD) gradients and pollutants to the opening or closing of stomata. The diffusion process is described theoretically and the description is compared to empirical approaches. The variables of the BL are examined and the effect airflow in the compartment has on the BL is investigated. Also presented is the impact changes in different environmental parameters may have on the fluid exchanges. Finally, some tests, to evaluate the accuracy of the concluded model, are suggested.

  14. Gravitropism in higher plant shoots. IV - Further studies on participation of ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; White, Rosemary G.; Salisbury, Frank B.

    1986-01-01

    Various hypotheses regarding the influence of ethylene on gravitropism in higher plant shoots were experimentally tested. It was found that ethylene at 1.0 and 10.0 cu cm/cu m decreased the rate of gravitropic bending in cocklebur stems, while 0.1 cm/cu m of ethylene had little effect. Treating cocklebur plants with 1.0 mmol aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG, an ethylene synthesis inhibitor) delayed stem bending compared with controls, but adding 0.1 cu cm/cu m ethylene in the surrounding atmosphere partially restored the rate of bending of AVG-treated plants. Virtually all newly synthesized ethylene appeared in bottom halves of horizontal stems, where ethylene concentrations were as much as 100 times those in upright stems or in top halves of horizontal stems. Auxin applied to one side of a vertical stem caused extreme bending away from that side; gibberellic acid, kinetin, and abscisic acid were without effect.

  15. Higher plant modelling for life support applications: first results of a simple mechanistic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezard, Pauline; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Sasidharan L, Swathy

    2012-07-01

    In the case of closed ecological life support systems, the air and water regeneration and food production are performed using microorganisms and higher plants. Wheat, rice, soybean, lettuce, tomato or other types of eatable annual plants produce fresh food while recycling CO2 into breathable oxygen. Additionally, they evaporate a large quantity of water, which can be condensed and used as potable water. This shows that recycling functions of air revitalization and food production are completely linked. Consequently, the control of a growth chamber for higher plant production has to be performed with efficient mechanistic models, in order to ensure a realistic prediction of plant behaviour, water and gas recycling whatever the environmental conditions. Purely mechanistic models of plant production in controlled environments are not available yet. This is the reason why new models must be developed and validated. This work concerns the design and test of a simplified version of a mathematical model coupling plant architecture and mass balance purposes in order to compare its results with available data of lettuce grown in closed and controlled chambers. The carbon exchange rate, water absorption and evaporation rate, biomass fresh weight as well as leaf surface are modelled and compared with available data. The model consists of four modules. The first one evaluates plant architecture, like total leaf surface, leaf area index and stem length data. The second one calculates the rate of matter and energy exchange depending on architectural and environmental data: light absorption in the canopy, CO2 uptake or release, water uptake and evapotranspiration. The third module evaluates which of the previous rates is limiting overall biomass growth; and the last one calculates biomass growth rate depending on matter exchange rates, using a global stoichiometric equation. All these rates are a set of differential equations, which are integrated with time in order to provide

  16. Role of Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1992-01-01

    The cytoskeleton including its microtubule (Mt) component participates in processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of Mts into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. The cortical array somehow directs the deposition of cellulose. Little molecular information is available regarding the formation of these arrays or the cellular signals to which they respond. Experimental data described here suggests that plant cells use calcium, in the form of a Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin complex, to affect the dynamics of Mts within the cortical array. Owing to the importance of Ca[sup ++] as a regulatory ion in higher plants we are probing for a putative Ca[sup ++]/Mt transduction pathway which may serve to integrate Mt activities within the growing and developing plant cell. We are using a lysed cell model in conjunction with immunocytochemical and biochemical methodologies to dissect how Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin interacts with Mts to affect their function.

  17. [Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on substrate and germination of higher plants seeds].

    PubMed

    Tsetlin, V V; Levinskikh, M A; Nefedova, E L; Derendiaeva, T A; Fedotova, I V

    2008-01-01

    The investigation had the aim to evaluate the effects of low doses (< 1-10 cGy) of ionizing radiation on the physical-chemical qualities of high-purification water. It had also the goal to study germination rate and energy and sprouting of four species of higher plants exposed directly and indirectly (watering) to alpha- and beta-radiation from radionuclids sources. When compared with intact water, after exposure to beta-particles electrical currents in water-filled containers consistently tended upward and downward after exposure to alpha-particles. Radiation-induced changes in water parameters were observed throughout the experiment with higher plant seeds. Evaluation of the effect of irradiated water on sprouting showed that plant sensitivity varied with species and depended on type of radiation particles. Neither alpha- nor beta particles affected the wheat sprouts; however, both types of particles inhibited growth of mustard and accelerated growth of lentil and haricot Mash as compared with control crops. The investigation suggests that plant species for space greenhouses should be selected with account of their radioresistance and radiosensitivity.

  18. Carbon dioxide and the stomatal control of water balance and photosynthesis in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Taiz, L.; Zeiger, E.; Mawson, B. T.; Cornish, K.; Radin, J. W.; Turcotte, E. L.; Hercovitz, S.; Tallman, G.; Karlsson, P. E.; Bogomolni, R. A.; Talbott, L. D.; Srivastava, A.

    1992-01-01

    Research continued into the investigation of the effects of carbon dioxide on stomatal control of water balance and photosynthesis in higher plants. Topics discussed this period include a method of isolating a sufficient number of guard cell chloroplasts for biochemical studies by mechanical isolation of epidermal peels; the measurement of stomatal apertures with a digital image analysis system; development of a high performance liquid chromatography method for quantification of metabolites in guard cells; and genetic control of stomatal movements in Pima cotton. (CBS)

  19. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume II. Plant specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R. E.

    1983-12-31

    The specifications and design criteria for all plant systems and subsystems used in developing the preliminary design of Carrisa Plains 30-MWe Solar Plant are contained in this volume. The specifications have been organized according to plant systems and levels. The levels are arranged in tiers. Starting at the top tier and proceeding down, the specification levels are the plant, system, subsystem, components, and fabrication. A tab number, listed in the index, has been assigned each document to facilitate document location.

  20. Characterization of photosystem II photochemistry in transgenic tobacco plants with lowered Rubisco activase content.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bin; Zhang, Aihong; Yang, Zhipan; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Lu, Congming

    2010-11-15

    Rubisco activase plays an important role in the regulation of CO(2) assimilation. However, it is unknown how activase regulates photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry. To investigate the effects of Rubisco activase on PSII photochemistry, we obtained transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with 50% (i7), 25% (i28), and 5% (i46) activase levels as compared to wild type plants by using a gene encoding tobacco activase for the RNAi construct. Both CO(2) assimilation and PSII activity were significantly reduced only in transgenic i28 and i46 plants, suggesting that activase deficiency led to decreased PSII activity. Flash-induced fluorescence kinetics indicated that activase deficiency resulted in a slow electron transfer between Q(A) (primary quinine electron acceptor of PSII) and Q(B) (secondary quinone electron acceptor of PSII). Thermoluminescence measurements revealed that activase deficiency induced a shift of S(2)Q(A)(-) and S(2)Q(B)(-) recombinations to higher temperatures in parallel, and a decrease in the intensities of the thermoluminescence emissions. Activase deficiency also dampened the period-four oscillation of the thermoluminescence B-band. Protein gel blot analysis showed that activase deficiency resulted in a significant decrease in the content of D1, D2, CP43, CP47, and PsbO proteins. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that activase deficiency induced a significant decrease in the number of grana stacks per chloroplast and discs per grana stack. Our results suggest that activase plays an important role in maintaining PSII function and chloroplast development.

  1. Low-temperature perception leading to gene expression and cold tolerance in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Knight, Marc R; Knight, Heather

    2012-09-01

    Plant species exhibit a range of tolerances to low temperatures, and these constitute a major determinant of their geographical distribution and use as crops. When tolerance is insufficient, either chilling or freezing injuries result. A variety of mechanisms are employed to evade the ravages of extreme or sub-optimal temperatures. Many of these involve cold-responsive gene expression and require that the drop in temperature is first sensed by the plant. Despite intensive research over the last 100 yr or longer, we still cannot easily answer the question of how plants sense low temperature. Over recent years, genomic and post-genomic approaches have produced a wealth of information relating to the sequence of events leading from cold perception to appropriate and useful responses. However, there are also crucial and significant gaps in the pathways constructed from these data. We describe the literature pertaining to the current understanding of cold perception, signalling and regulation of low-temperature-responsive gene expression in higher plants, raising some of the key questions that still intrigue plant biologists today and that could be targets for future work. Our review focuses on the control of gene expression in the pathways leading from cold perception to chilling and freezing tolerance.

  2. Comparative analysis of microsatellites in chloroplast genomes of lower and higher plants.

    PubMed

    George, Biju; Bhatt, Bhavin S; Awasthi, Mayur; George, Binu; Singh, Achuit K

    2015-11-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), contain repetitive DNA sequence where tandem repeats of one to six base pairs are present number of times. Chloroplast genome sequences have been  shown to possess extensive variations in the length, number and distribution of SSRs. However, a comparative analysis of chloroplast microsatellites is not available. Considering their potential importance in generating genomic diversity, we have systematically analysed the abundance and distribution of simple and compound microsatellites in 164 sequenced chloroplast genomes from wide range of plants. The key findings of these studies are (1) a large number of mononucleotide repeats as compared to SSR(2-6)(di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexanucleotide repeats) are present in all chloroplast genomes investigated, (2) lower plants such as algae show wide variation in relative abundance, density and distribution of microsatellite repeats as compared to flowering plants, (3) longer SSRs are excluded from coding regions of most chloroplast genomes, (4) GC content has a weak influence on number, relative abundance and relative density of mononucleotide as well as SSR(2-6). However, GC content strongly showed negative correlation with relative density (R (2) = 0.5, P < 0.05) and relative abundance (R (2) = 0.6, P < 0.05) of cSSRs. In summary, our comparative studies of chloroplast genomes illustrate the variable distribution of microsatellites and revealed that chloroplast genome of smaller plants possesses relatively more genomic diversity compared to higher plants.

  3. [Plant extracts with cytostatic properties growing in Cuba. II].

    PubMed

    Lopez Abraham, A M; Rojas Hernandez, N M; Jimenez Misas, C A

    1979-01-01

    The study of the cytostatic activity of aqueous, alcoholic and ketonic extracts from 18 parts of 9 species of superior plants of the families Araceae, Borraginacease, Burseraceae, Cesalpinaceae, Meliaceae, Compositae, Rebiaceae, Cruciferaceae and Verbenaceae using the microbiologic method of described by Kubas in 1972 is pursued. The best results were obtained from Hamelia patens. Lippia alba, Lepidium virginicum, Cassia ligustrina, Bursera simaruba and Heliotropium campechianum extracts.

  4. Comparative study on sensitivity of higher plants and fish to heavy fuel oil.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskiene, N; Svecevicius, G; Vosyliene, M Z; Marciulioniene, D; Montvydiene, D

    2004-08-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted on higher plants [garden cress (Lepidium sativum), great duckweed (Spirodela polyrrhiza), and Tradescantia clone BNL 02] and fish [rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at all stages of development: eggs, larvae and adults] to estimate their sensitivity to heavy fuel oil (HFO). A number of biological indices (survival, growth, and physiological and morphological parameters) as well as the genotoxic impact (Tradescantia) of HFO was evaluated by acute and chronic toxicity tests. Fish were found to be more sensitive to the toxic effect of HFO than were higher plants. EC(50) values obtained for higher plants ranged from 8.7 g/L (L. sativum) to 19.8 g/L (Tradescantia), and maximum-acceptable-toxicant concentration (MATC) values ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 g/L of total HFO for L. sativum and Tradescantia, respectively. The 96-h LC(50) values ranged from 0.33 g/L, for larvae, to 2.97 g/L, for adult fish, and the MATC value for fish was found to be equal to 0.0042 g/L of total HFO. To evaluate and predict the ecological risk of the overall effects of oil spills, studies should be performed using a set of acute and chronic bioassays that include test species of different phylogenetic levels with the most sensitive morphological, physiological, and genotoxic indices.

  5. Operational strategies for dispatchable combined cycle plants, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, J.P.; Landis, F.P.

    1996-11-01

    The Brush Cogeneration Facility is a dual-unit, combined cycle, cogeneration plant, operating in a dual cycling, automatically-dispatchable mode. Part I of this report described the contract, including automatic generation control (AGC) by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCO), and the operation of Unit One. This part of the report covers the operation of Unit Two. Unit two is still in its operating infancy, but is showing that fuel efficiency and low emissions levels are not incompatible with cycling, load-following service. 1 fig.

  6. The main goals of experiments with the higher plants in the project MARS - 500.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sychev, Vladimir; Levinskikh, Margarita; Podolsky, Igor; Gushin, Vadim; Bingham, Gail; Bates, Scott

    At the present step of development of manned flight to Mars there is a current opinion that including a greenhouse in the composition of Life Support Systems (LSS) of Martian expedition would essentially improve a spacecraft habitat conditions and also would have impact to preventing of a number of possible consequences of continuous presence of human in artificial environment. Development of design objectives of future space greenhouses applicable for conditions of Martian expedition should be based, in our opinion, not only on the results of real space experiments, conducted onboard of orbital stations, but also on the results of ground-based experiments. In connection with above considerations there is a number of technological, biological and psychological experiments is planned to be conducted in the frame of MARS-500 project to resolve questions related to incorporation of higher plants in LSS of inter-planetary flights. The questions include: testing of developed elements of the greenhouse construction and methods for cultivation of vegetables under conditions of imitation of the flight of Martian expedition; selection of breeds and species of vegetables, characterized by high speed of biomass accumulation, attractive taste and appearance; investigation of growth, development and metabolism of plants under long-term continuous cultivation in manned pressurized object; comparison of the productivity of the plants as a function of utilization of different light source; determination of maximum amount of planted biomass of the plants and number of possible vegetation under conditions of long-term utilization of vegetation chamber of the greenhouse without substrate replacement; investigation of crops dietetic preferences of crew members; estimation of quality of plant biomass using seeding of the plants by microorganisms and nitrates and vitamins content as markers; development and approbation of methodical approaches to estimation of psychological factors of

  7. Minitron II system for precise control of the plant growth environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Sharon L.; Akers, Carolyn P.; Akers, S. W.; Mitchell, Cary A.

    1988-01-01

    The Minitron II system which accommodates hydroponic culture and separate control of atmospheric composition in individual chambers is used to measure gas-exchange by small crop canopies in the undisturbed plant growth environment. It is concluded that the system is capable of providing separate controlled environments for multiple small plants with adequate precision and at relatively low cost when coupled with appropriate control systems.

  8. Isolation of Plant Photosystem II Complexes by Fractional Solubilization

    PubMed Central

    Haniewicz, Patrycja; Floris, Davide; Farci, Domenica; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; Loi, Maria C.; Büchel, Claudia; Bochtler, Matthias; Piano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) occurs in different forms and supercomplexes in thylakoid membranes. Using a transplastomic strain of Nicotiana tabacum histidine tagged on the subunit PsbE, we have previously shown that a mild extraction protocol with β-dodecylmaltoside enriches PSII characteristic of lamellae and grana margins. Here, we characterize residual granal PSII that is not extracted by this first solubilization step. Using affinity purification, we demonstrate that this PSII fraction consists of PSII-LHCII mega- and supercomplexes, PSII dimers, and PSII monomers, which were separated by gel filtration and functionally characterized. Our findings represent an alternative demonstration of different PSII populations in thylakoid membranes, and they make it possible to prepare PSII-LHCII supercomplexes in high yield. PMID:26697050

  9. From Plants to Birds: Higher Avian Predation Rates in Trees Responding to Insect Herbivory

    PubMed Central

    Mäntylä, Elina; Alessio, Giorgio A.; Blande, James D.; Heijari, Juha; Holopainen, Jarmo K.; Laaksonen, Toni; Piirtola, Panu; Klemola, Tero

    2008-01-01

    Background An understanding of the evolution of potential signals from plants to the predators of their herbivores may provide exciting examples of co-evolution among multiple trophic levels. Understanding the mechanism behind the attraction of predators to plants is crucial to conclusions about co-evolution. For example, insectivorous birds are attracted to herbivore-damaged trees without seeing the herbivores or the defoliated parts, but it is not known whether birds use cues from herbivore-damaged plants with a specific adaptation of plants for this purpose. Methodology We examined whether signals from damaged trees attract avian predators in the wild and whether birds could use volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions or net photosynthesis of leaves as cues to detect herbivore-rich trees. We conducted a field experiment with mountain birches (Betula pubescens ssp. czerepanovii), their main herbivore (Epirrita autumnata) and insectivorous birds. Half of the trees had herbivore larvae defoliating trees hidden inside branch bags and half had empty bags as controls. We measured predation rate of birds towards artificial larvae on tree branches, and VOC emissions and net photosynthesis of leaves. Principal Findings and Significance The predation rate was higher in the herbivore trees than in the control trees. This confirms that birds use cues from trees to locate insect-rich trees in the wild. The herbivore trees had decreased photosynthesis and elevated emissions of many VOCs, which suggests that birds could use either one, or both, as cues. There was, however, large variation in how the VOC emission correlated with predation rate. Emissions of (E)-DMNT [(E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene], β-ocimene and linalool were positively correlated with predation rate, while those of highly inducible green leaf volatiles were not. These three VOCs are also involved in the attraction of insect parasitoids and predatory mites to herbivore-damaged plants, which suggests that

  10. Thermal dissipation of light energy is regulated differently and by different mechanisms in lichens and higher plants.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, J; Azarkovich, M; Pfündel, E E; Shuvalov, V A; Heber, U

    2005-03-01

    Modulated chlorophyll fluorescence was used to compare dissipation of light energy as heat in photosystem II of homoiohydric and poikilohydric photosynthetic organisms which were either hydrated or dehydrated. In hydrated chlorolichens with an alga as the photobiont, fluorescence quenching revealed a dominant mechanism of energy dissipation which was based on a protonation reaction when zeaxanthin was present. CO2 was effective as a weak protonating agent and actinic light was not necessary. In a hydrated cyanobacterial lichen, protonation by CO2 was ineffective to initiate energy dissipation. This was also true for leaves of higher plants. Thus, regulation of zeaxanthin-dependent energy dissipation by protonation was different in leaves and in chlorolichens. A mechanism of energy dissipation different from that based on zeaxanthin became apparent on dehydration of both lichens and leaves. Quenching of maximum or Fm fluorescence increased strongly during dehydration. In lichens, this was also true for so-called basal or Fo fluorescence. In contrast to zeaxanthin-dependent quenching, dehydration-induced quenching could not be inhibited by dithiothreitol. Both zeaxanthin-dependent and dehydration-induced quenching cooperated in chlorolichens to increase thermal dissipation of light energy if desiccation occurred in the light. In cyanolichens, which do not possess a zeaxanthin cycle, only desiccation-induced thermal energy dissipation was active in the dry state. Fluorescence emission spectra of chlorolichens revealed stronger desiccation-induced suppression of 685-nm fluorescence than of 720-nm fluorescence. In agreement with earlier reports of , fluorescence excitation data showed that desiccation reduced flow of excitation energy from chlorophyll b of the light harvesting complex II to emitting centres more than flow from chlorophyll a of core pigments. The data are discussed in relation to regulation and localization of thermal energy dissipation mechanisms. It is

  11. Phytate (Inositol Hexakisphosphate) in Soil and Phosphate Acquisition from Inositol Phosphates by Higher Plants. A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gerke, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate (P) fixation to the soil solid phase is considered to be important for P availability and is often attributed to the strong binding of orthophosphate anion species. However, the fixation and subsequent immobilization of inositolhexa and pentaphosphate isomers (phytate) in soil is often much stronger than that of the orthosphate anion species. The result is that phytate is a main organic P form in soil and the dominating form of identifiable organic P. The reasons for the accumulation are not fully clear. Two hypothesis can be found in the literature in the last 20 years, the low activity of phytase (phosphatases) in soil, which makes phytate P unavailable to the plant roots, and, on the other hand, the strong binding of phytate to the soil solid phase with its consequent stabilization and accumulation in soil. The hypothesis that low phytase activity is responsible for phytate accumulation led to the development of genetically modified plant genotypes with a higher expression of phytase activity at the root surface and research on the effect of a higher phytate activity on P acquisition. Obviously, this hypothesis has a basic assumption, that the phytate mobility in soil is not the limiting step for P acquisition of higher plants from soil phytate. This assumption is, however, not justified considering the results on the sorption, immobilization and fixation of phytate to the soil solid phase reported in the last two decades. Phytate is strongly bound, and the P sorption maximum and probably the sorption strength of phytate P to the soil solid phase is much higher, compared to that of orthophosphate P. Mobilization of phytate seems to be a promising step to make it available to the plant roots. The excretion of organic acid anions, citrate and to a lesser extend oxalate, seems to be an important way to make phytate P available to the plants. Phytase activity at the root surface seems not be the limiting step in P acquisition from phytate. Phytate is not

  12. Formation of higher plant component microbial community in closed ecological system.

    PubMed

    Tirranen, L S

    2001-07-01

    Closed ecological systems (CES) place at the disposal of a researcher unique possibilities to study the role of microbial communities in individual components and of the entire system. The microbial community of the higher plant component has been found to form depending on specific conditions of the closed ecosystem: length of time the solution is reused, introduction of intrasystem waste water into the nutrient medium, effect of other component of the system, and system closure in terms of gas exchange. The higher plant component formed its own microbial complex different from that formed prior to closure. The microbial complex of vegetable polyculture is more diverse and stable than the monoculture of wheat. The composition of the components' microflora changed, species diversity decreased, individual species of bacteria and fungi whose numbers were not so great before the closure prevailed. Special attention should be paid to phytopathogenic and conditionally pathogenic species of microorganisms potentially hazardous to man or plants and the least controlled in CES. This situation can endanger creation of CES and make conjectural existence of preplanned components, man, specifically, and consequently, of CES as it is.

  13. Formation of higher plant component microbial community in closed ecological system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirranen, L. S.

    2001-07-01

    Closed ecological systems (CES) place at the disposal of a researcher unique possibilities to study the role of microbial communities in individual components and of the entire system. The microbial community of the higher plant component has been found to form depending on specific conditions of the closed ecosystem: length of time the solution is reused, introduction of intrasystem waste water into the nutrient medium, effect of other component of the system, and system closure in terms of gas exchange. The higher plant component formed its own microbial complex different from that formed prior to closure. The microbial complex of vegetable polyculture is more diverse and stable than the monoculture of wheat. The composition of the components' microflora changed, species diversity decreased, individual species of bacteria and fungi whose numbers were not so great before the closure prevailed. Special attention should be paid to phytopathogenic and conditionally pathogenic species of microorganisms potentially hazardous to man or plants and the least controlled in CES. This situation can endanger creation of CES and make conjectural existence of preplanned components, man, specifically, and consequently, of CES as it is.

  14. Speed versus endurance tradeoff in plants: Leaves with higher photosynthetic rates show stronger seasonal declines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Sack, Lawren; Cao, Kun-Fang; Wei, Xue-Mei; Li, Nan

    2017-02-10

    We tested for a tradeoff across species between plant maximum photosynthetic rate and the ability to maintain photosynthesis under adverse conditions in the unfavorable season. Such a trade-off would be consistent with the observed trade-off between maximum speed and endurance in athletes and some animals that has been explained by cost-benefit theory. This trend would have importance for the general understanding of leaf design, and would simplify models of annual leaf carbon relations. We tested for such a trade-off using a database analysis across vascular plants and using an experimental approach for 29 cycad species, representing an ancient plant lineage with diversified evergreen leaves. In both tests, a higher photosynthetic rate per mass or per area in the favorable season was associated with a stronger absolute or percent decline in the unfavorable season. We resolved a possible mechanism based on biomechanics and nitrogen allocation; cycads with high leaf toughness (leaf mass per area) and higher investment in leaf construction than in physiological function (C/N ratio) tended to have lower warm season photosynthesis but less depression in the cool season. We propose that this trade-off, consistent with cost-benefit theory, represents a significant physio-phenological constraint on the diversity and seasonal dynamics of photosynthetic rate.

  15. Speed versus endurance tradeoff in plants: Leaves with higher photosynthetic rates show stronger seasonal declines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Sack, Lawren; Cao, Kun-Fang; Wei, Xue-Mei; Li, Nan

    2017-01-01

    We tested for a tradeoff across species between plant maximum photosynthetic rate and the ability to maintain photosynthesis under adverse conditions in the unfavorable season. Such a trade-off would be consistent with the observed trade-off between maximum speed and endurance in athletes and some animals that has been explained by cost-benefit theory. This trend would have importance for the general understanding of leaf design, and would simplify models of annual leaf carbon relations. We tested for such a trade-off using a database analysis across vascular plants and using an experimental approach for 29 cycad species, representing an ancient plant lineage with diversified evergreen leaves. In both tests, a higher photosynthetic rate per mass or per area in the favorable season was associated with a stronger absolute or percent decline in the unfavorable season. We resolved a possible mechanism based on biomechanics and nitrogen allocation; cycads with high leaf toughness (leaf mass per area) and higher investment in leaf construction than in physiological function (C/N ratio) tended to have lower warm season photosynthesis but less depression in the cool season. We propose that this trade-off, consistent with cost-benefit theory, represents a significant physio-phenological constraint on the diversity and seasonal dynamics of photosynthetic rate. PMID:28186201

  16. Regulation of photosynthesis by ion channels in cyanobacteria and higher plants.

    PubMed

    Checchetto, Vanessa; Teardo, Enrico; Carraretto, Luca; Formentin, Elide; Bergantino, Elisabetta; Giacometti, Giorgio Mario; Szabo, Ildiko

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthesis converts light energy into chemical energy, and supplies ATP and NADPH for CO2 fixation into carbohydrates and for the synthesis of several compounds which are essential for autotrophic growth. Oxygenic photosynthesis takes place in thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts and photosynthetic prokaryote cyanobacteria. An ancestral photoautotrophic prokaryote related to cyanobacteria has been proposed to give rise to chloroplasts of plants and algae through an endosymbiotic event. Indeed, photosynthetic complexes involved in the electron transport coupled to H(+) translocation and ATP synthesis are similar in higher plants and cyanobacteria. Furthermore, some of the protein and solute/ion conducting machineries also share common structure and function. Electrophysiological and biochemical evidence support the existence of ion channels in the thylakoid membrane in both types of organisms. By allowing specific ion fluxes across thylakoid membranes, ion channels have been hypothesized to either directly or indirectly regulate photosynthesis, by modulating the proton motive force. Recent molecular identification of some of the thylakoid-located channels allowed to obtain genetic proof in favor of such hypothesis. Furthermore, some ion channels of the envelope membrane in chloroplasts have also been shown to impact on this light-driven process. Here we give an overview of thylakoid/chloroplast located ion channels of higher plants and of cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We focus on channels shown to be implicated in the regulation of photosynthesis and discuss the possible mechanisms of action.

  17. Roles of Organic Acid Anion Secretion in Aluminium Tolerance of Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Jiang, Huan-Xin; Chen, Li-Song

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of the world's total land area and over 50% of the world's potential arable lands are acidic. Furthermore, the acidity of the soils is gradually increasing as a result of the environmental problems including some farming practices and acid rain. At mildly acidic or neutral soils, aluminium(Al) occurs primarily as insoluble deposits and is essentially biologically inactive. However, in many acidic soils throughout the tropics and subtropics, Al toxicity is a major factor limiting crop productivity. The Al-induced secretion of organic acid (OA) anions, mainly citrate, oxalate, and malate, from roots is the best documented mechanism of Al tolerance in higher plants. Increasing evidence shows that the Al-induced secretion of OA anions may be related to the following several factors, including (a) anion channels or transporters, (b) internal concentrations of OA anions in plant tissues, (d) temperature, (e) root plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase, (f) magnesium (Mg), and (e) phosphorus (P). Genetically modified plants and cells with higher Al tolerance by overexpressing genes for the secretion and the biosynthesis of OA anions have been obtained. In addition, some aspects needed to be further studied are also discussed. PMID:23509687

  18. Roles of organic acid anion secretion in aluminium tolerance of higher plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Jiang, Huan-Xin; Chen, Li-Song

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of the world's total land area and over 50% of the world's potential arable lands are acidic. Furthermore, the acidity of the soils is gradually increasing as a result of the environmental problems including some farming practices and acid rain. At mildly acidic or neutral soils, aluminium (Al) occurs primarily as insoluble deposits and is essentially biologically inactive. However, in many acidic soils throughout the tropics and subtropics, Al toxicity is a major factor limiting crop productivity. The Al-induced secretion of organic acid (OA) anions, mainly citrate, oxalate, and malate, from roots is the best documented mechanism of Al tolerance in higher plants. Increasing evidence shows that the Al-induced secretion of OA anions may be related to the following several factors, including (a) anion channels or transporters, (b) internal concentrations of OA anions in plant tissues, (d) temperature, (e) root plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase, (f) magnesium (Mg), and (e) phosphorus (P). Genetically modified plants and cells with higher Al tolerance by overexpressing genes for the secretion and the biosynthesis of OA anions have been obtained. In addition, some aspects needed to be further studied are also discussed.

  19. Physcomitrella HMGA-type proteins display structural differences compared to their higher plant counterparts

    SciTech Connect

    Lyngaard, Carina; Stemmer, Christian; Stensballe, Allan; Graf, Manuela; Gorr, Gilbert; Decker, Eva; Grasser, Klaus D.

    2008-10-03

    High mobility group (HMG) proteins of the HMGA family are chromatin-associated proteins that act as architectural factors in nucleoprotein structures involved in gene transcription. To date, HMGA-type proteins have been studied in various higher plant species, but not in lower plants. We have identified two HMGA-type proteins, HMGA1 and HMGA2, encoded in the genome of the moss model Physcomitrella patens. Compared to higher plant HMGA proteins, the two Physcomitrella proteins display some structural differences. Thus, the moss HMGA proteins have six (rather than four) AT-hook DNA-binding motifs and their N-terminal domain lacks similarity to linker histone H1. HMGA2 is expressed in moss protonema and it localises to the cell nucleus. Typical of HMGA proteins, HMGA2 interacts preferentially with A/T-rich DNA, when compared with G/C-rich DNA. In cotransformation assays in Physcomitrella protoplasts, HMGA2 stimulated reporter gene expression. In summary, our data show that functional HMGA-type proteins occur in Physcomitrella.

  20. Risk assessment for selected xenobiotics by bioassay methods with higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Petra; Pestemer, Wilfried

    1990-05-01

    Different bioassays with higher plants were approved for use in a bioassay procedure for testing of xenobiotics according to the German Chemicals Act. Selected environmental pollutants (atrazine, cadmium chloride, 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, pentachlorophenol, potassium dichromate, thiourea), all from a list of reference chemicals, were tested with these methods. Dose-response curves for growth of oats and turnips were evaluated in soil and vermiculite (nonsorptive substrate), and availability to plants was calculated by comparing the EC50 values for one chemical in both substrates. The most active chemical was atrazine, followed by 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, pentachlorophenol, potassium dichromate, cadmium chloride, and thiourea. The least available compound to plants was pentachlorophenol, tested with turnips ( Brassica rapa var. rapa). The strongest inhibition of germination, demonstrated in an in vitro assay with garden cress ( Lepidium sativum), was found with 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, the lowest with atrazine. The effect of an extended exposure of the plants to the chemicals was evaluated in a long-term bioassay with oats ( Avena sativa) in hydroponic culture. Several dose-response curves during the growing period were derived. It was found that the EC50 values for atrazine and thiourea decreased markedly during the first four weeks; thereafter the changes were much smaller. As an overall conclusion, a bioassay procedure is proposed that can be included in the graduated plan recommended by the German Chemicals Act.

  1. Interaction of higher plant (jute), electrofused bacteria and mycorrhiza on anthracene biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Cheung, K C; Zhang, J Y; Deng, H H; Ou, Y K; Leung, H M; Wu, S C; Wong, M H

    2008-05-01

    The interaction of bacteria, mycorrhiza and jute (Corchotus capsulari, a higher plant) to reduce anthracene in different concentrations of spiked soils was investigated. Dominant indigenous bacterium (Pseudomonas sp.) isolated in the rhizosphere of jute was electrofused with anthracene degraders (Sphingomonas paucimobilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) which were able to produce different types of biosurfactants. The highest population (56 x 10(5)CFU/g) was found in the planted soil with the inoculation of mixtures of electrofused anthracene degraders after 7 days. The growth of anthracene degraders in the spiked soil was improved by gene transfer from indigenous bacteria. After 35 days, enhanced anthracene removals were observed in inoculated soils planted with jute (65.5-75.2%) compared with unplanted soil without inoculation (12.5%). The interaction of jute and electrofused S. paucimobilis enabled the greatest reduction of soil anthracene with or without the addition of P. aeruginosa. Mycorrhizal colonization was not significantly inhibited by anthracene in soils up to 150 mg/kg. Inoculation of jute with Glomus mosseae and Glomus intraradices improved plant growth and enhanced anthracene removal in the presence of electrofused S. paucimobilis.

  2. Assessment of organochlorine pesticides residues in higher plants from oil exploration areas of Niger Delta, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Sojinu, O Samuel; Sonibare, Oluwadayo O; Ekundayo, Olusegun O; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2012-09-01

    The concentrations and distributions of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in some higher plant samples collected from oil exploration areas of the Niger Delta, Nigeria were examined. The concentrations of Σ(25)OCP ranged from 82 to 424, 44 to 200 , 34 to 358, 33 to 106 and 16 to 75 ng/g in Olomoro, Oginni, Uzere, Irri and Calabar plants, respectively. The compositional profiles of the analysed OCPs in most of the plants showed no fresh inputs in the area. The OCPs detected in the samples could have resulted from pesticide usage for intense farming activities cum the use of pesticides to control household pests and insects in the area. Drilling fluids and corrosion inhibitors used in petroleum explorations also have chlorinated compounds as additives thereby serving as potential sources of OCPs. Among the studied plants, elephant grass showed high bioaccumulation and phytoremediation potentials of OCPs. The ΣHCH concentrations exceeded the allowable daily intake limit thereby serving as potential threat to humans.

  3. 43 CFR 3108.2-3 - Reinstatement at higher rental and royalty rates: Class II reinstatements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... rates: Class II reinstatements. 3108.2-3 Section 3108.2-3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... rental and royalty rates: Class II reinstatements. (a) The authorized officer may, if the requirements of this section are met, reinstate an oil and gas lease which was terminated by operation of law...

  4. Membrane trafficking in higher plant cells: GFP and antibodies, partners for probing the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Satiat-Jeunemaitre, B; Boevink, P; Hawes, C

    1999-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells are characterised by the organised distribution of membrane bounded compartments in their cytoplasm. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus (GA) are part of this endomembrane machinery. They are involved in protein flow, and are in charge of specific functions such as the assembly, sorting and transport of newly synthesised proteins, glycoproteins or polysaccharides to their final destination, where the macromolecules are recognised either for action, storage, deposition or degradation. The structural and functional relationship between the ER and GA in higher plants is still a matter of debate. Therefore, it was essential to develop probes that would specifically label proteins or glycoproteins of the endomembrane system in situ. Here we compare two complementary approaches to probe plant endomembranes; immunocytochemistry on fixed cells, and in vivo studies using the expression of GFP tagged chimeric proteins. The structural relationship between ER and GA as based on pharmacological approaches using the two systems is explored.

  5. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  6. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailing description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  7. Sterol Biosynthesis in Sub-Cellular Particles of Higher Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, F. F.; Aexel, R. T.; Nicholas, H. J.

    1969-01-01

    Mevalonic acid-2-14C was administered to cut stems of bean seedlings (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) for time intervals varying from 20 min to 24 hr. The plants were homogenized in a pH 7.8 tris-sucrose buffer and the homogenates separated into chloroplast, mitochondrial, microsomal, and supernatant fractions by means of differential centrifugation. The distribution of radioactivity into non-saponifiable material in each of the fractions was then determined. After short incubation periods labeled squalene was localized in the supernatant fraction. Labeled sterol was limited at all incubation periods to the microsomal and supernatant fractions. The data presented clearly implicate the microsomal and supernatant fractions in sterol biosynthesis in higher plants. PMID:16657081

  8. Reorganization of microtubules in endosperm cells and cell fragments of the higher plant Haemanthus in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The reorganization of the microtubular meshwork was studied in intact Haemanthus endosperm cells and cell fragments (cytoplasts). This higher plant tissue is devoid of a known microtubule organizating organelle. Observations on living cells were correlated with microtubule arrangements visualized with the immunogold method. In small fragments, reorganization did not proceed. In medium and large sized fragments, microtubular converging centers formed first. Then these converging centers reorganized into either closed bushy microtubular spiral or chromosome-free cytoplasmic spindles/phragmoplasts. Therefore, the final shape of organized microtubular structures, including spindle shaped, was determined by the initial size of the cell fragments and could be achieved without chromosomes or centrioles. Converging centers elongate due to the formation of additional structures resembling microtubular fir trees. These structures were observed at the pole of the microtubular converging center in anucleate fragments, accessory phragmoplasts in nucleated cells, and in the polar region of the mitotic spindle during anaphase. Therefore, during anaphase pronounced assembly of new microtubules occurs at the polar region of acentriolar spindles. Moreover, statistical analysis demonstrated that during the first two-thirds of anaphase, when chromosomes move with an approximately constant speed, kinetochore fibers shorten, while the length of the kinetochore fiber complex remains constant due to the simultaneous elongation of their integral parts (microtubular fir trees). The half-spindle shortens only during the last one-third of anaphase. These data contradict the presently prevailing view that chromosome-to-pole movements in acentriolar spindles of higher plants are concurrent with the shortening of the half-spindle, the self- reorganizing property of higher plant microtubules (tubulin) in vivo. It may be specific for cells without centrosomes and may be superimposed also on other

  9. Early diagenetic transformation of higher-plant triterpenoids in deep-sea sediments from Baffin Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Ten Haven, H.L. Inst. Francais du Petrole, Rueil-Malmaison ); Peakman, T.M. ); Rullkoetter, J. )

    1992-05-01

    A sediment sequence of early Miocene to Holocene from Ocean Drilling Program Site 645 in central Baffin Bay was found to contain abundant triterpenoids of higher-plant origin including mono-desmethyl derivatives and other oxidative degradation products. 24-nor-triterpenoids of the oleanene, ursene, and lupane series were found in the nonaromatic hydrocarbon and alcohol fractions of the sediment extracts. Other diagenetic transformation products included 24,28-dinor-olean-17-ene and 24-nor-urs-12-en-11-one as well as their tentatively identified des-A counterparts. The identification of these novel degradation products was confirmed by synthesis of a suite of reference compounds. The simple reaction sequence applied to obtain 24-nor-urs-12-ene-from 3{alpha}-acetoxyurs-12-en-24-oic acid is likely to happen in a similar manner during early diagenesis of organic matter in nature. These results have implications for the understanding of the diagenetic reaction sequence leading to the formation of other demethylated triterpenoids of terrigenous origin (e.g., 24,28-dinor-lupanes). 28,30-dinot-17{alpha}-hopane is sometimes the dominant hydrocarbon in the most deeply buried samples. Its co-occurrence with higher plant triterpenoids and the low abundance of other regular hopanoids is not considered an indication, however, that 28,20-dinor-17{alpha}-hopane is derived from a higher plant precursor molecule. It is suggested that two independent sedimentary processes are responsible for the presence of the two types of demethylated triterpenoids observed in Baffin Bay sediments.

  10. Isolation of Nitrospira belonging to Sublineage II from a Wastewater Treatment Plant

    PubMed Central

    Ushiki, Norisuke; Fujitani, Hirotsugu; Aoi, Yoshiteru; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Nitrite oxidation is a key step in nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment plants. Recently, two phylogenetically different Nitrospira (sublineages I and II) have been recognized as the numerically dominant nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in wastewater treatment plants. However, Nitrospira sublineage II inhabiting activated sludge was not isolated and its detailed properties were unclear. In this study, we developed a new method for the isolation of Nitrospira forming micro-colonies using a cell sorter. We obtained a novel pure strain “Nitrospira japonica” from the activated sludge. Subsequently, phylogenetic and physiological analyses revealed that Nitrospira japonica belongs to sublineage II and grew in medium containing formate. This method has the potential to isolate other uncultured microorganisms forming micro-colonies. PMID:24005844

  11. Studies on the chalcone synthase gene of two higher plants: petroselinum hortense and matthiola incana

    SciTech Connect

    Hemleben, V.; Frey, M.; Rall, S.; Koch, M.; Kittel, M.; Kreuzaler, F.; Ragg, H.; Fautz, E.; Hahlbrock, K.

    1982-01-01

    Two higher plant systems are presented which allow to study coordinated gene expression of the light-induced metabolic pathway of flavonoid biosynthesis: tissue culture cells of Petroselinum hortense (Apiaceae) and different developmental stages of various genotypes of Matthiola incana (Brassicaceae). The gene structure of the chalcone synthase is mainly studied. A cDNA clone (pLF56) of parsley has been constructed and characterized conferring the chalcone synthase gene sequence. Strong cross hybridization between the parsley cDNA and Matthiola DNA allowed to identify a HindIII fragment (6000 bp) identical in size for parsley and different Matthiola wild type lines and a mutant line.

  12. FrontiERs: movers and shapers of the higher plant cortical endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, Imogen; Hawes, Chris; Frigerio, Lorenzo

    2011-12-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in higher plants performs many important functions, yet our understanding of how its intricate network shape and dynamics relate to function is very limited. Recent work has begun to unpick key molecular players in the generation of the pleomorphic, highly dynamic ER network structure that pervades the entire cytoplasm. ER movement is acto-myosin dependent. ER shape is dependent on RHD3 (Root Hair Defective 3) and a family of proteins called reticulons. The major challenge that lies ahead is understanding how factors that control ER shape and movement are regulated and how this relates to the numerous functions of the ER.

  13. Design and implementation of components for a bioregenerative system for growing higher order plants in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brakman, B.; Dioso, L.; Parker, D.; Segal, L.; Merriman, C.; Howard, I.; Vu, H.; Anderson, K.; Riley, S.; Amery, D.

    1989-01-01

    This report summarizes the efforts of the NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program during the 1988-89 scholastic year. The primary goal was to address specific needs in the design of an integrated system to grow higher order plants in space. The initial phase of the design effort concentrated on studying such a system and identifying its needs. Once these needs were defined, emphasis was placed on the design and fabrication of devices to meet them. Specific attention was placed on a hand-held harvester, a nutrient concentration sensor, an air-water separator, and a closed-loop biological system simulation.

  14. Seed sprout production: Consumables and a foundation for higher plant growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Michelle; Thomas, Terri; Johnson, Steve; Luttges, Marvin

    1990-01-01

    Seed sprouts can be produced as a source of fresh vegetable materials and as higher plant seedlings in space. Sprout production was undertaken to evaluate the mass accumulations possible, the technologies needed, and the reliability of the overall process. Baseline experiments corroborated the utility of sprout production protocols for a variety of seed types. The automated delivery of saturated humidity effectively supplants labor intensive manual soaking techniques. Automated humidification also lend itself to modest centrifugal sprout growth environments. A small amount of ultraviolet radiation effectively suppressed bacterial and fungal contamination, and the sprouts were suitable for consumption.

  15. Role of Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1991-01-01

    This work is aimed at defining the role of calcium/calmodulin in regulating cortical microtubules (MTS) in higher plants. Recent thrust has been to define the effects of calcium upon microtubules in vivo. Using lysed protoplasts, we noted Mts are destabilized by calcium/calmodulin. This effect could be the result of gross depolymerization induced by Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin, or by an increase in the dynamic flux rate. Intact protoplasts exposed to high (10 mM) levels of calcium (which would be expected to increase intercellular calcium levels) contained microtubules that were hypersensitive to Mt inhibitors, compared to control protoplasts exposed to low calcium environments.

  16. Small Genetic Circuits and MicroRNAs: Big Players in Polymerase II Transcriptional Control in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Cumbie, Jason S.; Ivanchenko, Maria G.

    2016-01-01

    RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) regulatory cascades involving transcription factors (TFs) and their targets orchestrate the genetic circuitry of every eukaryotic organism. In order to understand how these cascades function, they can be dissected into small genetic networks, each containing just a few Pol II transcribed genes, that generate specific signal-processing outcomes. Small RNA regulatory circuits involve direct regulation of a small RNA by a TF and/or direct regulation of a TF by a small RNA and have been shown to play unique roles in many organisms. Here, we will focus on small RNA regulatory circuits containing Pol II transcribed microRNAs (miRNAs). While the role of miRNA-containing regulatory circuits as modular building blocks for the function of complex networks has long been on the forefront of studies in the animal kingdom, plant studies are poised to take a lead role in this area because of their advantages in probing transcriptional and posttranscriptional control of Pol II genes. The relative simplicity of tissue- and cell-type organization, miRNA targeting, and genomic structure make the Arabidopsis thaliana plant model uniquely amenable for small RNA regulatory circuit studies in a multicellular organism. In this Review, we cover analysis, tools, and validation methods for probing the component interactions in miRNA-containing regulatory circuits. We then review the important roles that plant miRNAs are playing in these circuits and summarize methods for the identification of small genetic circuits that strongly influence plant function. We conclude by noting areas of opportunity where new plant studies are imminently needed. PMID:26869700

  17. Small Genetic Circuits and MicroRNAs: Big Players in Polymerase II Transcriptional Control in Plants.

    PubMed

    Megraw, Molly; Cumbie, Jason S; Ivanchenko, Maria G; Filichkin, Sergei A

    2016-02-01

    RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) regulatory cascades involving transcription factors (TFs) and their targets orchestrate the genetic circuitry of every eukaryotic organism. In order to understand how these cascades function, they can be dissected into small genetic networks, each containing just a few Pol II transcribed genes, that generate specific signal-processing outcomes. Small RNA regulatory circuits involve direct regulation of a small RNA by a TF and/or direct regulation of a TF by a small RNA and have been shown to play unique roles in many organisms. Here, we will focus on small RNA regulatory circuits containing Pol II transcribed microRNAs (miRNAs). While the role of miRNA-containing regulatory circuits as modular building blocks for the function of complex networks has long been on the forefront of studies in the animal kingdom, plant studies are poised to take a lead role in this area because of their advantages in probing transcriptional and posttranscriptional control of Pol II genes. The relative simplicity of tissue- and cell-type organization, miRNA targeting, and genomic structure make the Arabidopsis thaliana plant model uniquely amenable for small RNA regulatory circuit studies in a multicellular organism. In this Review, we cover analysis, tools, and validation methods for probing the component interactions in miRNA-containing regulatory circuits. We then review the important roles that plant miRNAs are playing in these circuits and summarize methods for the identification of small genetic circuits that strongly influence plant function. We conclude by noting areas of opportunity where new plant studies are imminently needed.

  18. Potato type I and II proteinase inhibitors: modulating plant physiology and host resistance.

    PubMed

    Turra, David; Lorito, Matteo

    2011-08-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (PIs) are a large and complex group of plant proteins. Members of the potato type I (Pin1) and II (Pin2) proteinase inhibitor families are among the first and most extensively characterized plant PIs. Many insects and phytopathogenic microorganisms use intracellular and extracellular serine proteases playing important roles in pathogenesis. Plants, however, are able to fight these pathogens through the activation of an intricate defence system that leads to the accumulation of various PIs, including Pin1 and Pin2. Several transgenic plants over-expressing members of the Pin1 and Pin2 families have been obtained in the last twenty years and their enhanced defensive capabilities demonstrated against insects, fungi and bacteria. Furthermore, Pin1 and Pin2 genetically engineered plants showed altered regulation of different plant physiological processes (e.g., dehydratation response, programmed cell death, plant growth, trichome density and branching), supporting an endogenous role in various plant species in addition to the well established defensive one. This review summarizes the current knowledge about Pin1 and Pin2 structure, the role of these proteins in plant defence and physiology, and their potential exploitation in biotechnology.

  19. A new and unified nomenclature for male fertility restorer (RF) proteins in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Kotchoni, Simeon O; Jimenez-Lopez, Jose C; Gachomo, Emma W; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2010-12-28

    The male fertility restorer (RF) proteins belong to extended protein families associated with the cytoplasmic male sterility in higher plants. Up till now, there is no devised nomenclature for naming the RF proteins. The systematic sequencing of new plant species in recent years has uncovered the existence of several novel RF genes and their encoded proteins. Their naming has been simply arbitrary and could not be adequately handled in the context of comparative functional genomics. We propose in this study a unified nomenclature for the RF extended protein families across all plant species. This new and unified nomenclature relies upon previously developed nomenclature for the first ever characterized RF gene, RF2A/ALDH2B2, a member of ALDH gene superfamily, and adheres to the guidelines issued by the ALDH Genome Nomenclature Committees. The proposed nomenclature reveals that RF gene superfamily encodes currently members of 51 families. This unified nomenclature accommodates functional RF genes and pseudogenes, and offers the flexibility needed to incorporate additional RFs as they become available in future. In addition, we provide a phylogenetic relationship between the RF extended families and use computational protein modeling to demonstrate the high divergence of RF functional specializations through specific structural features of selected members of RF superfamily.

  20. Scaling of respiration to nitrogen in leaves, stems and roots of higher land plants.

    PubMed

    Reich, Peter B; Tjoelker, Mark G; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Wright, Ian J; Oleksyn, Jacek; Machado, Jose-Luis

    2008-08-01

    Using a database of 2510 measurements from 287 species, we assessed whether general relationships exist between mass-based dark respiration rate and nitrogen concentration for stems and roots, and if they do, whether they are similar to those for leaves. The results demonstrate strong respiration-nitrogen scaling relationships for all observations and for data averaged by species; for roots, stems and leaves examined separately; and for life-forms (woody, herbaceous plants) and phylogenetic groups (angiosperms, gymnosperms) considered separately. No consistent differences in the slopes of these log-log scaling relations were observed among organs or among plant groups, but respiration rates at any common nitrogen concentration were consistently lower on average in leaves than in stems or roots, indicating that organ-specific relationships should be used in models that simulate respiration based on tissue nitrogen concentrations. The results demonstrate both common and divergent aspects of tissue-level respiration-nitrogen scaling for leaves, stems and roots across higher land plants, which are important in their own right and for their utility in modelling carbon fluxes at local to global scales.

  1. Damping higher order modes in the PEP-II B-Factory storage ring collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weathersby, Stephen

    2007-05-01

    The PEP-II B-Factory storage ring collider at SLAC provides crucial experimental evidence for the physics of CP violation. To investigate rare B-meson decays requires high luminosity which comes mainly from increasing bunch currents and reducing bunch sizes. Electromagnetic effects of intense bunch fields in the form of wake fields couple into accelerator components, inducing Joule heating at levels detrimental to vacuum chamber components. Additionally, wake fields contribute to beam instability, decreasing luminosity. These effects are limiting B-factory performance. Computer simulations and experimental evidence indicate that beam collimators produce wake fields in the form of dipole and quadrupole waveguide modes which can propagate tens of meters from their source before depositing energy at remote locations. Simulations confirm that coupling through narrow slots into bellows cavities occurs for beam pipe modes. Two proposals are set forth to mitigate wake field effects. The first proposal is to reduce the quality factor of resonant structures with a water cooled dielectric lossy material. Electromagnetic energy coupling into resonant structures can be isolated and safely dissipated. Prototype devices have been built and have been shown to reduce resistive heating in large pumping chambers coupled to the beam chamber. Designs and simulations which incorporate such techiques into bellows devices are presented. The second proposal incorporates novel devices introduced in the accelerator vacuum chamber which selectively traps dipole and quadrupole propagating wake fields before they can couple into sensitive beam line components without introducing impedance to the beam. Scattering parameter analysis is used to tailor device response to specific modes. Dangerous modes are extracted from the beam chamber, trapped and dissipated in a water cooled lossy material. Modes which represent an impedance to the beam are not affected. After design optimization, production

  2. Composition, architecture and dynamics of the photosynthetic apparatus in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Nevo, Reinat; Charuvi, Dana; Tsabari, Onie; Reich, Ziv

    2012-04-01

    The process of oxygenic photosynthesis enabled and still sustains aerobic life on Earth. The most elaborate form of the apparatus that carries out the primary steps of this vital process is the one present in higher plants. Here, we review the overall composition and supramolecular organization of this apparatus, as well as the complex architecture of the lamellar system within which it is harbored. Along the way, we refer to the genetic, biochemical, spectroscopic and, in particular, microscopic studies that have been employed to elucidate the structure and working of this remarkable molecular energy conversion device. As an example of the highly dynamic nature of the apparatus, we discuss the molecular and structural events that enable it to maintain high photosynthetic yields under fluctuating light conditions. We conclude the review with a summary of the hypotheses made over the years about the driving forces that underlie the partition of the lamellar system of higher plants and certain green algae into appressed and non-appressed membrane domains and the segregation of the photosynthetic protein complexes within these domains.

  3. Cyanide metabolism in higher plants: cyanoalanine hydratase is a NIT4 homolog.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Markus; Volmer, Julia Jutta

    2006-05-01

    Cyanoalanine hydratase (E.C. 4.2.1.65) is an enzyme involved in the cyanide detoxification pathway of higher plants and catalyzes the hydrolysis of beta-cyano-L-alanine to asparagine. We have isolated the enzyme from seedlings of blue lupine (Lupinus angustifolius) to obtain protein sequence information for molecular cloning. In contrast to earlier reports, extracts of blue lupine cotyledons were found also to contain cyanoalanine-nitrilase (E.C. 3.5.5.4) activity, resulting in aspartic acid production. Both activities co-elute during isolation of cyanoalanine hydratase and are co-precipitated by an antibody directed against Arabidopsis thaliana nitrilase 4 (NIT4). The isolated cyanoalanine hydratase was sequenced by nanospray-MS/MS and shown to be a homolog of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum NIT4. Full-length cDNA sequences for two NIT4 homologs from blue lupine were obtained by PCR using degenerate primers and RACE-experiments. The recombinant LaNIT4 enzymes, like Arabidopsis NIT4, hydrolyze cyanoalanine to asparagine and aspartic acid but show a much higher cyanoalanine-hydratase activity. The two nitrilase genes displayed differential but overlapping expression. Taken together these data show that the so-called 'cyanoalanine hydratase' of plants is not a bacterial type nitrile hydratase enzyme but a nitrilase enzyme which can have a remarkably high nitrile-hydratase activity.

  4. Soluble, highly fluorescent variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) for use in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Davis, S J; Vierstra, R D

    1998-03-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria has rapidly become a standard reporter in many biological systems. However, the use of GFP in higher plants has been limited by aberrant splicing of the corresponding mRNA and by protein insolubility. It has been shown that GFP can be expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana after altering the codon usage in the region that is incorrectly spliced, but the fluorescence signal is weak, possibly due to aggregation of the encoded protein. Through site-directed mutagenesis, we have generated a more soluble version of the codon-modified GFP called soluble-modified GFP (smGFP). The excitation and emission spectra for this protein are nearly identical to wild-type GFP. When introduced into A. thaliana, greater fluorescence was observed compared to the codon-modified GFP, implying that smGFP is 'brighter' because more of it is present in a soluble and functional form. Using the smGFP template, two spectral variants were created, a soluble-modified red-shifted GFP (smRS-GFP) and a soluble-modified blue-fluorescent protein (smBFP). The increased fluorescence output of smGFP will further the use of this reporter in higher plants. In addition, the distinct spectral characters of smRS-GFP and smBFP should allow for dual monitoring of gene expression, protein localization, and detection of in vivo protein-protein interactions.

  5. Influence of gaseous contaminants in the atmosphere of ISS on growth and development of higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinskikh, Margarita; Sychev, Vladimir; Podolsky, Igor; Moukhamedieva, Lana; Gostimskiy, Sergey; Bingham, Gail

    Continues exploitation of pressurized manned objects revealed that artificial gaseous atmosphere is a multi-component mixture containing adverse micro-dirt consisted of 14 classes of chemical compounds (Moukhamedieva, 2003). Dynamics of descendant process depend on duration of pressurized object utilization, resources of life support (e.g. level of closeness), parameters of microclimate and experimental tasks conducted by a crew. Previously it was shown that composition of gas environment of the space station remarkably altered growth and development of higher plants (Levinskikh et al., 2000). Specifically, it was found that the main changes in productivity and morphometric characteristics of the spaceflight plants of superdwarf wheat were caused by phytotoxic effect of ethylene (1,1-2,0 mg/m3) in the atmosphere of MIR orbital station. From 2003 to April, 2007 we have conducted 7 experiments focused on cultivation of dwarf peas in space greenhouse LADA onboard International Space Station (ISS-6-10, 12, 14). Results of the first 5 experiments showed that characteristics of growth and development of the peas planted in the space greenhouse had no differences if compared with ground control variants. In the similar experiments with peas during ISS-12 and ISS-14 it was found that total and seed productions of the plants were lower than ones of the previous experiments and ones of the ground controls. Cytological analysis of roots of the space seeds for the first time revealed significant increase of chromosomal aberrations in comparison with laboratory controls Analysis of total contamination of the atmosphere of the ISS by gaseous dirt showed consistent (starting from ISS-11) increasing of the toxicity coefficient (Kt). W e suppose that the accumulation of pollutant in the atmosphere of ISS is the main reason causing general decreasing of productivity and increasing of the number of chromosomal aberrations in the peas cultivated in space greenhouse LADA at the stage

  6. Trace element availability and plant growth in a mine-spill-contaminated soil under assisted natural remediation II. Plants.

    PubMed

    Pérez-de-Mora, Alfredo; Madejón, Engracia; Burgos, Pilar; Cabrera, Francisco

    2006-06-15

    In this second part, we evaluated the effects of different amendments on plant growth (Agrostis stolonifera L.), and trace element accumulation and removal by plants in a trace element (As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) contaminated soil. Description of the various treatments is given in Part I of this work. The plants were grown for consecutive periods (2002, 2003, 2004), 5 months each and harvested twice in each period. Results showed that plant growth was enhanced and trace element concentrations in plant were reduced in SL, MWC, BC and LEO treatments in the first period. No significant differences were observed in subsequent periods. This seemed to be related with changes in soil pH. Removal of trace elements was higher in SL, MWC, BC and LEO treatments due to higher biomass production in the first period. In following years no significant differences between treatments were found. Data from Part I of this study were also used to compare trace element bioavailable concentrations extracted with 0.01 M CaCl2 and 0.05 M EDTA with trace elements in plant. We observed that 0.01 M CaCl2 was more suitable for determination of bioavailable concentrations and that extraction with EDTA overestimated biovailability of trace elements in amended treatments, especially in those where composts were added.

  7. Isolation and purification of CP43 and CP47 photosystem II proximal antenna complexes from plants.

    PubMed

    Picorel, Rafael; Alfonso, Miguel; Seibert, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A method to isolate and purify CP43 and CP47 pigment-protein complexes from Photosystem (PS) II of higher plants is presented. The method has been developed in spinach, but it may also be valid for other plant species, since there is high PSII core complex homology in all plants. Core complex, obtained from highly enriched PSII membrane fragments (the extrinsic proteins were previously removed by Tris treatment), is used as starting material. The core complex is first treated with the chaotropic agent, LiClO4, and the nonionic detergent, n-dodecyl β-D-maltoside. After dialysis against buffer lacking detergent or chaotropic agent, the solubilized material is separated by anion-exchange chromatography using a TSK Toyopearl DEAE 650s column. CP43 complex does not bind to the column under these conditions and elutes along with free pigments and few other contaminants. When the eluate becomes colorless, the column is subjected to a 0-170-mM LiClO4 linear gradient. The main pigment elution band corresponds to the CP47 complex with some contaminants. To obtain pure preparations of CP43 and CP47 complexes, other chromatographic steps were developed. The CP43 material is passed through a S-Sepharose cation-exchange column at room temperature and then through a Q-Sepharose anion-exchange column. After dialysis, the solution is passed through a new Q-Sepharose anion-exchange column at a different pH. The bound material is eluted with a 10-70-mM MgSO4 linear gradient, and the fractions with a prominent peak at 670 nm and a clear shoulder at 683 nm are combined. This constitutes the pure CP43 complex. The CP47 material from the first column is dialyzed, loaded onto a new TSK Toyopearl DEAE 650s column, and eluted with a 0-175-mM LiClO4 linear gradient. The fractions with a peak at 674.8 nm are combined and constitute the pure CP47 complex.

  8. Some effects of high- gradient magnetic field on tropism of roots of higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrachuk, A.; Belyavskaya, N.

    The perception of gravity in living organisms is mostly based on the response of the gravisensing system to displacement of some specific mass caused by gravitational force. According to the starch-statolith hypothesis the amyloplasts play the role of specific mass in gravisensing cells of higher plants. Kuznetsov & Hasenstein (1996) have demonstrated that the high-gradient magnetic field (HGMF) exerts a directional ponderomotive force on diamagnetic substances, in particular, statoliths. This effect of the HGMF causes root response similar to that produced by the change in gravity vector. Their studies supported the starch-statolith hypothesis and showed that ponderomotive force can be used to modify force acting on statoliths by manipulating statolith locations within gravisensing cells. We have designed the HGMF facility that allows for generating the HGMF and analyzing its effects on higher plants' roots. It records by videosystem and measures with the help of image analysis software the parameters of kinetics of root bending under both the HGMF action and gravistimulation. Two species of plants (pea and cress) have been examined. The main results of the work are the following: 1) The magnetotropic effect of HGMF on root growth was found for both species. 2) The critical value of ponderomotive force that caused the magnetotropic effect was estimated by modeling the magnetic field spatial distribution in the region of root apex. 3) The electron-microscopic analysis of statocytes after the HGMF treatment was carried out. The displacement of amyloplasts in root statocytes of two species of plants in HGMF was firstly demonstrated at the ultrastructural level. 4) Spatial distribution of exogenous proton fluxes (pH) along the roots was studied. The changes in pH distribution along curvature zone and apices of roots were revealed in the HGMF. It is known that application of HGMFs or strong uniform magnetic fields may influence ion transport due to Ampere force. It

  9. Isotopic discrimination of zinc during root-uptake and cellular incorporation in higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, T. F.; Weiss, D. J.; Coles, B. J.; Horstwood, M.; Parrish, R. R.; Zhao, F. J.; Kirk, G. J.

    2003-04-01

    Introduction: Isotopic variability of terrestrial zinc offers a unique tool for studying the geochemical and biochemical cycling of zinc through natural ecosystems. However, to realise this potential, the mechanisms controlling the isotopic composition of zinc during geosphere-biosphere interactions must first be understood. The uptake of zinc by plants involves a variety of abiotic and biochemical reactions, and can provide insights into the types of processes that may fractionate zinc isotopes within living systems. We therefore present an experimental study to quantify if and how zinc isotopes are fractionated during uptake in higher plants. Methodology: Two experimental approaches were taken: (1) a hydroponic study in which rice, lettuce, and tomato cultivars were grown in one of two nutrient solutions (a HEDTA + NTA buffered system, and an EDTA buffered system), and (2) a field-based study in which rice plants were grown in experimental paddy fields under both zinc-sufficient and zinc-deficient conditions. Upon harvest, roots, shoots, nutrient solutions and soils were acid digested, and matrix components were removed from the zinc fraction using anion exchange procedures. For soils the 'bioavailble' zinc fraction was abstracted using a 1 N HCl leaching step. Zinc isotopic compositions were determined on a ThermoElemental Axiom MC-ICP-MS, using copper as an internal reference to correct for mass discrimination effects. Combined measurement errors based on repeated analyses of ultra-pure standards and plant reference materials were <0.035 ppm per atomic mass unit (pamu) (2σ) for 66Zn/64Zn measurements. Results: Under hydroponic condisions, all three plant species exhibit a similar pattern of zinc isotopic discrimination, with a small enrichment from nutrient solution to root of +0.04 to +0.09 ppm pamu, followed by an isotopic depletion from root to shoot of -0.13 to -0.26 ppm pamu. While the same trend is observed with the HEDTA + NTA and EDTA nutrient

  10. Good Policy, Good Practice II. Improving Outcomes and Productivity in Higher Education: A Guide for Policymakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenneman, Meghan Wilson; Callan, Patrick M.; Ewell, Peter T.; Finney, Joni E.; Jones, Dennis P.; Zis, Stacey

    2010-01-01

    This new edition of "Good Policy, Good Practice II" revises and updates the authors' 2007 publication. Like the earlier edition, it responds to one of the questions that is raised most frequently in the authors' work with public policy and education leaders as they begin to address the national and state imperatives to increase the proportion of…

  11. Plant water relations II: how plants manage water deficit and why it matters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The availability of fresh water is possibly the greatest limitation to our ability to feed the growing human population (9 billion people forecast by 2050 and 11 billion by 2100). This Teaching Tool examines why water is so critical for plant growth and particularly their food production (primarily ...

  12. Photoprotection and triplet energy transfer in higher plants: the role of electronic and nuclear fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Cupellini, Lorenzo; Jurinovich, Sandro; Prandi, Ingrid G; Caprasecca, Stefano; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2016-04-28

    Photosynthetic organisms employ several photoprotection strategies to avoid damage due to the excess energy in high light conditions. Among these, quenching of triplet chlorophylls by neighboring carotenoids (Cars) is fundamental in preventing the formation of singlet oxygen. Cars are able to accept the triplets from chlorophylls by triplet energy transfer (TET). We have here studied TET rates in CP29, a minor light-harvesting complex (LHC) of the Photosystem II in plants. A fully atomistic strategy combining classical molecular dynamics of the LHC in its natural environment with a hybrid time-dependent density functional theory/polarizable MM description of the TET is used. We find that the structural fluctuations of the pigment-protein complex can largely enhance the transfer rates with respect to those predicted using the crystal structure, reducing the triplet quenching times in the subnanosecond scale. These findings add a new perspective for the interpretation of the photoprotection function and its relation with structural motions of the LHC.

  13. Electric Current Precedes Emergence of a Lateral Root in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Shingo; Ezaki, Shu; Hayashi, Kenshi; Toko, Kiyoshi; Yamafuji, Kaoru

    1992-01-01

    Stable electrochemical patterns appear spontaneously around roots of higher plants and are closely related to growth. An electric potential pattern accompanied by lateral root emergence was measured along the surface of the primary root of adzuki bean (Phaseolus angularis) over 21 h using a microelectrode manipulated by a newly developed apparatus. The electric potential became lower at the point where a lateral root emerged. This change preceded the emergence of the lateral root by about 10 h. A theory is presented for calculating two-dimensional patterns of electric potential and electric current density around the primary root (and a lateral root) using only data on the one-dimensional electric potential measured near the surface of the primary root. The development of the lateral root inside the primary root is associated with the influx of electric current of about 0.7 μA·cm−2 at the surface. Images Figure 7 PMID:16653036

  14. Structural Basis for Broad Substrate Specificity in Higher Plant β-d-Glucan Glucohydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Hrmova, Maria; De Gori, Ross; Smith, Brian J.; Fairweather, Jon K.; Driguez, Hugues; Varghese, Joseph N.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    2002-01-01

    Family 3 β-d-glucan glucohydrolases are distributed widely in higher plants. The enzymes catalyze the hydrolytic removal of β-d-glucosyl residues from nonreducing termini of a range of β-d-glucans and β-d-oligoglucosides. Their broad specificity can be explained by x-ray crystallographic data obtained from a barley β-d-glucan glucohydrolase in complex with nonhydrolyzable S-glycoside substrate analogs and by molecular modeling of enzyme/substrate complexes. The glucosyl residue that occupies binding subsite −1 is locked tightly into a fixed position through extensive hydrogen bonding with six amino acid residues near the bottom of an active site pocket. In contrast, the glucosyl residue at subsite +1 is located between two Trp residues at the entrance of the pocket, where it is constrained less tightly. The relative flexibility of binding at subsite +1, coupled with the projection of the remainder of bound substrate away from the enzyme's surface, means that the overall active site can accommodate a range of substrates with variable spatial dispositions of adjacent β-d-glucosyl residues. The broad specificity for glycosidic linkage type enables the enzyme to perform diverse functions during plant development. PMID:12034895

  15. Plasmodesmata without callose and calreticulin in higher plants - open channels for fast symplastic transport?

    PubMed

    Demchenko, Kirill N; Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V; Pawlowski, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) represent membrane-lined channels that link adjacent plant cells across the cell wall. PD of higher plants contain a central tube of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) called desmotubule. Membrane and lumen proteins seem to be able to move through the desmotubule, but most transport processes through PD occur through the cytoplasmic annulus (Brunkard etal., 2013). Calreticulin (CRT), a highly conserved Ca(2+)-binding protein found in all multicellular eukaryotes, predominantly located in the ER, was shown to localize to PD, though not all PD accumulate CRT. In nitrogen-fixing actinorhizal root nodules of the Australian tree Casuarina glauca, the primary walls of infected cells containing the microsymbiont become lignified upon infection. TEM analysis of these nodules showed that during the differentiation of infected cells, PD connecting infected cells, and connecting infected and adjacent uninfected cells, were reduced in number as well as diameter (Schubert etal., 2013). In contrast with PD connecting young infected cells, and most PD connecting mature infected and adjacent uninfected cells, PD connecting mature infected cells did not accumulate CRT. Furthermore, as shown here, these PD were not associated with callose, and based on their diameter, they probably had lost their desmotubules. We speculate that either this is a slow path to PD degradation, or that the loss of callose accumulation and presumably also desmotubules leads to the PD becoming open channels and improves metabolite exchange between cells.

  16. A role for ethylene in the metabolism of cyanide by higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Goudey, J.S.; Tittle, F.L.; Spencer, M.S. )

    1989-04-01

    The action of ethylene on the capacity of plant tissues to metabolize cyanice to {beta}-cyanoalanine was examined. Beta-cyanoalanine synthase catalyzes the reaction between cyanide and cysteine to form {beta}-cyanoalanine and hydrogen sulfide. Levels of {beta}-cyanoalanine synthase activity in tissues of 6 day old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings were enhanced severalfold by 1 microliter per liter ethylene. The promotive effect of ethylene increased with increasing ethylene concentrations from 0.01 to 100 microliters per liter and with the period of exposure from 3 to 24 hours. Ethylene enhanced {beta}-cyanoalanine synthase activity in all regions of the seedling (shoots and roots, internodal regions, cotyledons). The promotive effect was eliminated by norbornadiene, a competitive inhibitor of ethylene action. Levels of {beta}-cyanoalanine synthase in seedlings of four other dicots (Phaseolus aureas, Glycine max, Lactuca sativa, Sinapis arvensis) and two monocots (Hordeum vulgares, Triticum aestivum) were also increased in response to ethylene. Our results suggest an important regulatory role for ethylene in the metabolism of cyanide by higher plants.

  17. Growth and development in higher plants under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-dimensional clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, T.; Yuda, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Yamashita, M.; Ueda, J.

    Growth and development of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) and maize (Zea mays L. cv. Golden Cross Bantam) seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions were intensively studied using a 3-dimensional clinostat as a simulator of weightlessness. Epicotyls of etiolated pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were the most oriented toward the direction far from cotyledons. Mesocotyls of etiolated maize seedlings grew at random and coleoptiles curved slightly during clinostat rotation. Clinostat rotation promoted the emergence of the 3rd internodes in etiolated pea seedlings, while it significantly inhibited the growth of the 1st internodes. In maize seedlings, the growth of coleoptiles was little affected by clinostat rotation, but that of mesocotyls was suppressed, and therefore, the emergence of the leaf out of coleoptile was promoted. Clinostat rotation reduced the osmotic concentration in the 1st internodes of pea seedlings, although it has little effect on the 2nd and the 3rd internodes. Clinostat rotation also reduced the osmotic concentrations in both coleoptiles and mesocotyls of maize seedlings. Cell-wall extensibilities of the 1st and the 3rd internodes of pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were significantly lower and higher as compared with those on 1 g conditions, respectively. Cell-wall extensibility of mesocotyls in seedlings grown on the clinostat also decreased. Changes in cell wall properties seem to be well correlated to the growth of each organ in pea and maize seedlings. These results suggest that the growth and development of plants is controlled under gravity on earth, and that the growth responses of higher plants to microgravity conditions are regulated by both cell-wall mechanical properties and osmotic properties of stem cells.

  18. Higher plants as bioindicators of sulphur dioxide emissions in urban environments.

    PubMed

    Hijano, Concepción Fidalgo; Domínguez, Maria Dolores Petit; Gimínez, Rosario García; Sínchez, Pilar Hungría; García, Inís Sancho

    2005-12-01

    The evaluation of certain vascular plants that grow in the city of Madrid as biomonitors of SO(2) air pollution in urban environments has been carried out. Total concentration of sulphur in leaves of the chosen higher plants as well as other parameters in close relation to this contaminant (visible injury symptoms, chlorophyll a- and b-content and peroxidase activity) have been determined in order to study the spatial distribution and temporal changes in SO(2) deposition. Results obtained show that coniferous species such as Pinus pinea, were more sensitive to SO(2) atmospheric concentration than leafy species as Quercux ilex subspecies ballota and, in the same way, bush species, such as Pyracantha coccinea and Nerium oleander, were more sensitive than wooded species, such as Cedrus deodara and Pinus pinea, respectively. There is a higher accumulation of sulphur in vegetable species located near highways and dense traffic incidence roads and near areas with high density of population. The minimum values for accumulation of SO(2) were registered in winter and spring seasons (from January to April) due to the vegetative stop; while maximum values are obtained during the summer season (from June to September), due to the stoma opening. The highest increments in sulphur concentration, calculated as the difference between two consecutive months, are obtained in May and June for all considered species except for Cedrus deodara and Pyracantha coccinea, both species have few seasonal changes during the whole year. Some species are more sensitive to natural washing than others, showing a decrease in sulphur concentration after rainfall periods.

  19. Phragmoplast of the green alga Spirogyra is functionally distinct from the higher plant phragmoplast

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Cytokinesis in the green alga Spirogyra (Zygnemataceae) is characterized by centripetal growth of a septum, which impinges on a persistent, centrifugally expanding telophase spindle, leading to a phragmoplast-like structure of potential phylogenetic significance (Fowke, L. C., and J. D. Pickett-Heaps. 1969. J. Phycol. 5:273-281). Combining fluorescent tagging of the cytoskeleton in situ and video- enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy of live cells, the process of cytokinesis was investigated with emphasis on cytoskeletal reorganization and concomitant redistribution of organelles. Based on a sequence of cytoskeletal arrangements and the effects of cytoskeletal inhibitors thereon, cytokinetic progression could be divided into three functional stages with respect to the contribution of microfilaments (MFs) and microtubules (MTs): (1) Initiation: in early prophase, a cross wall initial was formed independently of MFs and MTs at the presumptive site of wall growth. (2) Septum ingrowth: numerous organelles accumulated at the cross wall initial concomitant with reorganization of the extensive peripheral interphase MF array into a distinct circumferential MF array. This array guided the ingrowing septum until it contacted the expanding interzonal MT array. (3) Cross wall closure: MFs at the growing edge of the septum coaligned with and extended along the interzonal MTs toward the daughter nuclei. Thus, actin-based transportation of small organelles during this third stage occurred, in part, along a scaffold previously deployed in space by MTs. Displacement of the nuclei- associated interzonal MT array by centrifugation and depolymerization of the phragmoplast-like structure showed that the success of cytokinesis at the third stage depends on the interaction of both MF and MT cytoskeletons. Important features of the phragmoplast-like structure in Spirogyra were different from the higher plant phragmoplast: in particular, MFs were responsible for the

  20. Concepts, strategies and potentials using hypo-g and other features of the space environment for commercialization using higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1985-01-01

    Opportunities for releasing, capturing, constructing and/or fixing the differential expressions or response potentials of the higher plant genome in the hypo-g environment for commercialization are explored. General strategies include improved plant-growing, crop and forestry production systems which conserve soil, water, labor and energy resources, and nutritional partitioning and mobilization of nutrients and synthates. Tissue and cell culture techniques of commercial potential include the growing and manipulation of cultured plant cells in vitro in a bioreactor to produce biologicals and secondary plants of economic value. The facilitation of plant breeding, the cloning of specific pathogen-free materials, the elimination of growing point or apex viruses, and the increase of plant yield are other O-g applications. The space environment may be advantageous in somatic embryogenesis, the culture of alkaloids, and the development of completely new crop plant germ plasm.

  1. Unprotected loss-of-heat sink simulation in the EBR-II plant

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, E.E.; Mohr, D.

    1984-01-01

    Two unprotected loss-of-heat sink transients initiated from near full power conditions in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) plant have been simulated. In one transient the secondary sodium flow is reduced to nearly zero (0.5% of its initial value) while in the other the flow simply coasts down to a natural-convective rate of about 8%. In spite of the large difference in primary heat removal rates, which the difference in secondary flow rates represents, both transients have very similar overall behavior. In addition, the large volume of sodium in the primary tank causes a slowly rising tank temperature in response to net heat addition. An important result is that the negative reactivity feedback characteristics of the reactor cause it to shut itself down in a benign manner in both cases. Experiments based on these simulations are planned for the EBR-II in 1985.

  2. Tidal Wave II Revisited: A Review of Earlier Enrollment Projections for California Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, Gerald C.; Breneman, David W.; Estrada, Leobardo F.

    This report examined enrollment projections for higher education institutions in California in relation to earlier projections conducted in the mid-1990s that forecasted steep declines in enrollment. It notes that California's remarkable economic recovery over the last several years has allowed it to fund higher education enrollment growth at a…

  3. Tidal Wave II: An Evaluation of Enrollment Projections for California Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breneman, David W.; And Others

    In light of various signs indicating significant enrollment growth in California higher education, this study reviewed nine available projections of undergraduate enrollment for California public higher education. The study reviewed enrollment forecasts from the California Department of Finance, the California Postsecondary Education Commission,…

  4. Higher Education and Development in South-East Asia. Volume II, Country Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Howard; And Others

    This document, the second of three volumes concerned with the role of institutions of higher education in the development of countries in South-East Asia, presents country profiles for Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Viet-Nam, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines. The profile emphasizes background, higher education, educational…

  5. Prosopis laevigata a potential chromium (VI) and cadmium (II) hyperaccumulator desert plant.

    PubMed

    Buendía-González, L; Orozco-Villafuerte, J; Cruz-Sosa, F; Barrera-Díaz, C E; Vernon-Carter, E J

    2010-08-01

    The bioaccumulation of Cr(VI) and Cd(II) in Prosopis laevigata and the effect of these heavy metals on plant growth were assessed. P. laevigata seeds were cultured during 50 days on modified Murashige-Skoog medium supplemented with four different concentrations of Cr(VI) (0-3.4mM) and Cd(II) (0-2.2mM), respectively. Heavy metals did not stop germination, but smaller plants with fewer leaves and secondary roots were produced. Seedlings showed an accumulation of 8176 and 21,437 mg Cd kg(-1) and of 5461 and 8090 mg Cr kg(-1) dry weight, in shoot and root, when cultured with 0.65 mM Cd(II) and 3.4mM Cr(VI), respectively. These results indicated that significant translocation from the roots unto aerial parts took place. A bioaccumulation factor greater than 100 for Cd and 24 for Cr was exhibited by the seedlings. P. laevigata can be considered as a potential hyperaccumulator of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) species and considered as a promising candidate for phytoremediation purposes.

  6. Thermostability and photostability of photosystem II of the resurrection plant Haberlea rhodopensis studied by chlorophyll fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Katya; Maslenkova, Liliana

    2006-01-01

    The stability of PSII in leaves of the resurrection plant Haberlea rhodopensis to high temperature and high light intensities was studied by means of chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. The photochemical efficiency of PSII in well-hydrated Haberlea leaves was not significantly influenced by temperatures up to 40 degrees C. Fo reached a maximum at 50 degrees C, which is connected with blocking of electron transport in reaction center II. The intrinsic efficiency of PSII photochemistry, monitored as Fv/Fm was less vulnerable to heat stress than the quantum yield of PSII electron transport under illumination (phiPSII). The reduction of phiPSII values was mainly due to a decrease in the proportion of open PSII centers (qP). Haberlea rhodopensis was very sensitive to photoinhibition. The light intensity of 120 micromol m(-2) s(-1) sharply decreased the quantum yield of PSII photochemistry and it was almost fully inhibited at 350 micromol m(-2) s(-1). As could be expected decreased photochemical efficiency of PSII was accompanied by increased proportion of thermal energy dissipation, which is considered as a protective effect regulating the light energy distribution in PSII. When differentiating between the three components of qN it was evident that the energy-dependent quenching, qE, was prevailing over photoinhibitory quenching, qI, and the quenching related to state 1-state 2 transitions, qT, at all light intensities at 25 degrees C. However, the qE values declined with increasing temperature and light intensities. The qI was higher than qE at 40 degrees C and it was the major part of qN at 45 degrees C, indicating a progressing photoinhibition of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis ameliorates the optimum quantum yield of photosystem II and reduces non-photochemical quenching in rice plants subjected to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Porcel, Rosa; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Aroca, Ricardo; Garcia, Rosalva; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2015-08-01

    Rice is the most important food crop in the world and is a primary source of food for more than half of the world population. However, salinity is considered the most common abiotic stress reducing its productivity. Soil salinity inhibits photosynthetic processes, which can induce an over-reduction of the reaction centres in photosystem II (PSII), damaging the photosynthetic machinery. The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis may improve host plant tolerance to salinity, but it is not clear how the AM symbiosis affects the plant photosynthetic capacity, particularly the efficiency of PSII. This study aimed at determining the influence of the AM symbiosis on the performance of PSII in rice plants subjected to salinity. Photosynthetic activity, plant gas-exchange parameters, accumulation of photosynthetic pigments and rubisco activity and gene expression were also measured in order to analyse comprehensively the response of the photosynthetic processes to AM symbiosis and salinity. Results showed that the AM symbiosis enhanced the actual quantum yield of PSII photochemistry and reduced the quantum yield of non-photochemical quenching in rice plants subjected to salinity. AM rice plants maintained higher net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate than nonAM plants. Thus, we propose that AM rice plants had a higher photochemical efficiency for CO2 fixation and solar energy utilization and this increases plant salt tolerance by preventing the injury to the photosystems reaction centres and by allowing a better utilization of light energy in photochemical processes. All these processes translated into higher photosynthetic and rubisco activities in AM rice plants and improved plant biomass production under salinity.

  8. Distribution of drimane sesquiterpenoids and tocopherols in liverworts, ferns and higher plants: Polygonaceae, Canellaceae and Winteraceae species.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Yoshinori; Ludwiczuk, Agnieszka; Harinantenaina, Liva; Toyota, Masao; Nishiki, Mayumi; Bardon, Alicia; Nii, Kaeko

    2012-06-01

    The liverwort, Porella vernicosa complex produces a very hot tasting polygodial, a drimane-type sesquiterpene dialdehyde. The same compound has been isolated from two ferns, Thelypteris hispidula and Blechnum fluviatile, as well as from the higher plants Polygonum hydropiper, P. hydropiper f. purpurascens (Polygonaceae), Cinnamosma, Caspicodendron, Canella and Warburgia species (Canellaceae), and Pseudowintera colorata, Tasmannia lanceolata, Drimys and Zygogynum species (Winteraceae). In addition, the liverworts and higher plants which elaborate polygodial and its related pungent drimane dials contain a small amount of alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol or delta-tocotrienol. The present paper gives the results of a comparative study on the drimane-type sesquiterpenoids in some liverworts, ferns and higher plants, and the role of tocopherols in these plant groups.

  9. A nitrite transporter associated with nitrite uptake by higher plant chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Miwa; Georgescu, Mihaela N; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2007-07-01

    Chloroplasts take up cytosolic nitrite during nitrate assimilation. In this study we identified a nitrite transporter located in the chloroplasts of higher plants. The transporter, CsNitr1-L, a member of the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter (POT) family, was detected during light-induced chloroplast development in de-etiolating cucumber seedlings. We detected a CsNitr1-L-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein in the chloroplasts of leaf cells and found that an immunoreactive 51 kDa protein was present in the isolated inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. CsNitr1-L has an isoform, CsNitr1-S, with an identical 484 amino acid core sequence; however, in CsNitr1-S the 120 amino acid N-terminal extension is missing. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells expressing CsNitr1-S absorbed nitrite from an acidic medium at a slower rate than mock-transformed control cells, and accumulated nitrite to only one-sixth the concentration of the control cells, suggesting that CsNitr1-S enhances the efflux of nitrite from the cell. Insertion of T-DNA in a single CsNitr1-L homolog (At1g68570) in Arabidopsis resulted in nitrite accumulation in leaves to more than five times the concentration found in the wild type. These results show that it is possible that both CsNitr1-L and CsNitr1-S encode efflux-type nitrite transporters, but with different subcellular localizations. CsNitr1-L may possibly load cytosolic nitrite into chloroplast stroma in the chloroplast envelope during nitrate assimilation. The presence of genes homologous to CsNitr1-L in the genomes of Arabidopsis and rice indicates that facilitated nitrite transport is of general physiological importance in plant nutrition.

  10. Contribution of PsbS Function and Stomatal Conductance to Foliar Temperature in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kulasek, Milena; Bernacki, Maciej Jerzy; Ciszak, Kamil; Witoń, Damian; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Natural capacity has evolved in higher plants to absorb and harness excessive light energy. In basic models, the majority of absorbed photon energy is radiated back as fluorescence and heat. For years the proton sensor protein PsbS was considered to play a critical role in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of light absorbed by PSII antennae and in its dissipation as heat. However, the significance of PsbS in regulating heat emission from a whole leaf has never been verified before by direct measurement of foliar temperature under changing light intensity. To test its validity, we here investigated the foliar temperature changes on increasing and decreasing light intensity conditions (foliar temperature dynamics) using a high resolution thermal camera and a powerful adjustable light-emitting diode (LED) light source. First, we showed that light-dependent foliar temperature dynamics is correlated with Chl content in leaves of various plant species. Secondly, we compared the foliar temperature dynamics in Arabidopsis thaliana wild type, the PsbS null mutant npq4-1 and a PsbS-overexpressing transgenic line under different transpiration conditions with or without a photosynthesis inhibitor. We found no direct correlations between the NPQ level and the foliar temperature dynamics. Rather, differences in foliar temperature dynamics are primarily affected by stomatal aperture, and rapid foliar temperature increase during irradiation depends on the water status of the leaf. We conclude that PsbS is not directly involved in regulation of foliar temperature dynamics during excessive light energy episodes. PMID:27273581

  11. Performance of Higher Order Campbell methods, Part II: calibration and experimental application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elter, Zs.; de Izarra, G.; Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C.; Pázsit, I.

    2016-11-01

    Applying Higher Order Campbelling methods in neutron flux monitoring with fission chambers is advantageous due to their capabilities to suppress the impact of unwanted noises and signal contributions (such as gamma radiation). This work aims to verify through experimental results that the basic assumptions behind the Higher Order Campelling methods are valid in critical reactors. The experiments, reported in this work, were performed at the MINERVE reactor in Cadarache. It is shown that the calibration of a fission chamber and the associated electronic system is possible in higher order mode. With the use of unbiased cumulant estimators and with digital processing, it is shown that over a wide count rate range, accurate count rate estimation can be achieved based on signal samples of a few ms, which is a significant progress compared to similar experimental results in the literature. The difference between the count rate estimated by pulse counting and by the Higher Order Campelling is less than 4%. The work also investigates the possibility of monitoring transient events. For this purpose, a control rod drop event was followed in Higher Order Campbelling mode.

  12. Genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from Portugal, Austria and Israel reveals higher genetic variability within the type II lineage.

    PubMed

    Verma, S K; Ajzenberg, D; Rivera-Sanchez, A; Su, C; Dubey, J P

    2015-06-01

    This study compared genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from Portugal, Austria and Israel. For this, we genotyped 90 T. gondii isolates (16 from Portugal, 67 from Austria and 7 from Israel) using 10 nested PCR-restriction length polymorphism (RFLP) genetic markers and 15 microsatellite (MS) markers. By PCR-RFLP typing, 7 isolates from Portugal chickens were identified as type II (ToxoDB #1 or #3), 4 were type III (ToxoDB #2) and the remaining 4 isolates have unique genotype pattern were designated as ToxoDB #254. One mouse virulent isolate from a bovine fetus (Bos taurus) in Portugal was type I (ToxoDB #10) at all loci and designated as TgCowPr1. All 67 isolates from Austria and 7 from Israel were type II (ToxoDB #1 or #3). By MS typing, many additional genetic variations were revealed among the type II and type III isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed that isolates from the same geographical locations tend to cluster together, and there is little overlapping of genotypes among different locations. This study demonstrated that the MS markers can provide higher discriminatory power to reveal association of genotypes with geographical locations. Future studies of the type II strains in Europe by these MS markers will be useful to reveal transmission patterns of the parasite.

  13. Vegetation and plant food reconstruction of lowermost Bed II, Olduvai Gorge, using modern analogs.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Sandi R

    2007-08-01

    Vegetation and plant foods for hominins of lowermost Bed II, Olduvai Gorge were modeled by examining vegetation in modern habitats in northern Tanzania (Lake Manyara, Ngorongoro, Serengeti) that are analogous to the paleolandscape in terms of climate, land forms, and soil types, as indicated by previous paleoenvironmental studies of Olduvai. Plant species in the modern habitats were identified in a series of sample plots, and those known to be eaten by modern humans, chimpanzees, or baboons were considered potentially edible for early hominins. Within the 50-80 kyr deposition of lowermost Bed II, periods of drier climate were characterized by low lake stands and a broad eastern lacustrine plain containing a mosaic of springs, marsh, woodland, and edaphic grassland. Based on results of this study, plant food diversity in each of those habitats was relatively low, but the mosaic nature of the area meant that hominins could reach several different habitat types within short distances, with access to potential plant foods including marsh plants, grass grains, roots, shrub fruits, edible parts from palms, leafy herbaceous plants, and Acacia pods, flowers, and gum. Based on Manyara analogs, a greater variety of plant foods, such as tree fruits (e.g., Ficus, Trichilia) and the roots and fruits of shrubs (e.g., Cordia, Salvadora) would be expected further east along the rivers in the lacustrine terrace and alluvial fans. Interfluves of the alluvial fans were probably less wooded and offered relatively fewer varieties of plant foods, but there is sparse paleoenvironmental evidence for the character of Olduvai's alluvial fans, making the choice of appropriate modern analogs difficult. In the western side of the basin, based on modern analogs in the Serengeti, riverine habitats provided the greatest variety of edible plant food species (e.g., Acacia, Grewia, Justicia). If the interfluves were grassland, then a large variety of potentially edible grasses and forbs were present

  14. Ranunculus glacialis L.: successful reproduction at the altitudinal limits of higher plant life.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Johanna; Steinacher, Gerlinde; Ladinig, Ursula

    2010-07-01

    Biodiversity decreases with increasing altitude, mainly because of the increasingly adverse climate. In the European Alps, only a few plant species occur above 4,000 m a.s.l., among these is Ranunculus glacialis L. Current studies have shown that R. glacialis has a highly conservative growth strategy and low developmental plasticity in response to different dates of snowmelt. Therefore, it was of particular interest to observe whether this strategy is maintained at higher altitudes and to reveal the reproductive limits. We examined the effect of the date of snowmelt on reproductive development and reproductive success in R. glacialis over several years at two subnival sites (2,650 and 2,880 m a.s.l.) and at a nival site (3,440 m a.s.l.) in the Austrian Alps. At the subnival sites, reproductive performance was relatively stable (prefloration period, i.e. snowmelt to onset of anthesis, 2-3 weeks; postfloration period, i.e. onset of anthesis until fruit maturity, 4-5 weeks). Depending on the date of flowering, the mean seed/ovule (S/O) ratio was 0.5-0.8. The temporal safety margin between seed maturation and the onset of winter conditions was at least 1 month. The situation was quite different in the nival zone: the prefloration period usually lasted 1 month, anthesis up to 2 weeks, and seed development 6-7 weeks; when seeds matured in time, the S/O ratio was 0.4-0.6. Overall, R. glacialis shows a high developmental plasticity. At higher altitudes, R. glacialis can double the time taken for seed development but runs a high risk of seeds not maturing in time.

  15. Emerging Issues II: The Changing Roles and Identities of Teachers and Learners in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgs, Bettie, Ed.; McCarthy, Marian, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This book presents a wide selection of issues currently of interest and concern in higher education institutions in Ireland. The chapters are snapshots of the intersection between theory, practice and research in particular settings; they are not meant to be comprehensive. Nevertheless, they present practice approaches, new theoretical…

  16. The Future of Information Technology in Higher Education: II. The Federal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fratkin, Susan

    1991-01-01

    History illustrates how support for technological advancement has been essential. Congress and the administration must take the initiative together to foster a climate for alliances between government, industry, and higher education. New mechanisms permitting joint efforts to compete effectively in the world economy while protecting domestic…

  17. Character Education in Christian Higher Education: A Historical Analysis and Contemporary Challenge (Part II)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, David; Jeynes, William H.

    2010-01-01

    In this pair of two articles, the authors summarize the history of the practice of character instruction in Christian higher education. They examine character education beginning with the founding of Harvard in 1636 to contemporary times. They note that virtually every historian, theologian, and social scientist acknowledges that character…

  18. Recession, Retrenchment, and Recovery: State Higher Education Funding & Student Financial Aid. Volume II: State Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Allison S.; Hines, Edward R.; Hodel, Ross A.; Kelly, Kathleen F.; Mushrush, Christopher E., Pruden, Sheila J.; Vogt, W. Paul

    2006-01-01

    This report is a companion to "Recession, Retrenchment and Recovery: Higher Education Funding and Student Financial Aid" (ED502180). It provides profiles of individual states and their performance on a variety of measures used in the economic and fiscal analysis of the Recession, Retrenchment and Recovery project. The profiles describe the results…

  19. Geometric description and electronic properties of the principal photosynthetic pigments of higher plants: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Torres-Rivas, Francisco; Flores-Hidalgo, Manuel Alberto; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel; Barraza-Jimenez, Diana

    2015-10-01

    The geometric parameters, local and global chemical reactivity parameters (such as the ionization potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, hardness, softness, chemical potential, and electrophilicity index), as well as the energy levels (HOMO/LUMO) and HOMO-LUMO energy gaps have been determined for the principal carotenoids in higher plants. DFT calculations performed using the B3LYP functional in combination with the 6-31G(d,p) (for geometric parameters) and 6-31 + G(d,p) (for energy parameters) basis sets were carried out to study these structures. The HOMO-LUMO energy gaps obtained with the TPSSh functional were compared with the corresponding energy gaps obtained with B3LYP (when both functionals were used with the 6-31 + G(d,p) basis set). Upon analyzing all of the calculated parameters of the studied molecules, both carotenes were found to be the most reactive, followed by β-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin, lutein, violaxanthin, and finally neoxanthin, the least reactive molecule. The results reveal that all of the carotenoids show very high coplanarity in the photochemically active region, resulting in small HOMO-LUMO energy gaps. The calculated local and global chemical reactivity parameters indicate that all of the studied molecules may be classified as soft, as they are good electron donors/acceptors, making these molecules good candidates for use in artificial photosynthetic systems.

  20. Relative in vitro growth rates of duckweeds (Lemnaceae) - the most rapidly growing higher plants.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, P; Adelmann, K; Zimmer, S; Schmidt, C; Appenroth, K-J

    2015-01-01

    Relative growth rates (RGR), doubling times (DT) and relative weekly yields (RY) of 39 clones (ecotypes) from 13 species representing all five genera of duckweeds were determined under standardised cultivation conditions. RGR ranged overall from 0.153 to 0.519 day(-1) , DT from 1.34 to 4.54 days and RY from 2.9 to 37.8 week(-1) . The RGR and RY data can be compared directly to other published findings to only a limited extent on account of missing clonal designations for and limited accessibility to previously investigated clones, as well as the use of different data denominators. However, they are consistent with the published results of other comparative duckweed studies of similar scope in showing that RGR does not vary primarily at the level of the genus or species, but rather reflects the adaptation of individual clones to specific local conditions. The RGR data support the widely held assumption that duckweeds can grow faster than other higher plants and that they can thus surpass land-based agricultural crops in productivity. Duckweeds are highly promising for the production of biomass for nutrition and energy, but extensive clonal comparison will be required to identify the most suitable isolates for this purpose.

  1. [Mechanism of gravi-sensing and -transduction in gravitropism of higher plants].

    PubMed

    Morita, Miyo Terao; Tasaka, Masao

    2003-08-01

    In higher plants, some organs such as roots, hypocotyls, and stems, can sense the direction of gravity to regulate their orientation. Gravitropic response is composed of four steps; 1. gravity sensing and conversion of physical stimuli to biochemical signals, 2. intracellular signal transduction in gravity sensing cells, 3. signal transmitting to responding tissues, 4. differential growth of organs. Here we focus on the former two steps. Recent studies using modern technique have gradually unveiled early events and mechanism of gravitropic response. Genetic approach provided evidences that strongly support the classical theory for gravity sensing (step 1). Computational analysis suggested the existence of another gravity sensing mechanism in roots. Spatial and temporal ion imaging in living organs in real time provided information on step 2. In addition, reverse genetic approach suggested asymmetrical intracellular distribution of auxin transporter [correction of transpoter] is a possible link between step 2 and 3. However, molecular basis of the signaling mechanism remains unknown. We believe extensive molecular genetic approach combined with recent techniques cited here shed the light to this ambiguous area of research.

  2. Photosynthetic complex stoichiometry dynamics in higher plants: environmental acclimation and photosynthetic flux control

    PubMed Central

    Schöttler, Mark A.; Tóth, Szilvia Z.

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants is dynamically adjusted to long-term changes in environmental conditions such as growth light intensity and light quality, and to changing metabolic demands for ATP and NADPH imposed by stresses and leaf aging. By changing photosynthetic complex stoichiometry, a long-term imbalance between the photosynthetic production of ATP and NADPH and their metabolic consumption is avoided, and cytotoxic side reactions are minimized. Otherwise, an excess capacity of the light reactions, relative to the demands of primary metabolism, could result in a disturbance of cellular redox homeostasis and an increased production of reactive oxygen species, leading to the destruction of the photosynthetic apparatus and the initiation of cell death programs. In this review, changes of the abundances of the different constituents of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to environmental conditions and during leaf ontogenesis are summarized. The contributions of the different photosynthetic complexes to photosynthetic flux control and the regulation of electron transport are discussed. PMID:24860580

  3. ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENT OF FUNDAMENTAL AND HIGHER-ORDER MODES FOR 7-CELL CAVITY OF PETRA-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kawashima, Y.; Blednykh, A.; Cupolo, J.; Davidsaver, M.; Holub, B.; Ma, H.; Oliva, J.; Rose, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The booster synchrotron for NSLS-II will include a 7-cell PETRA cavity, which was manufactured for the PETRA-II project at DESY. The cavity fundamental frequency operates at 500 MHz. In order to verify the impedances of the fundamental and higher-order modes (HOM), which were calculated by computer code, we measured the magnitude of the electromagnetic field of the fundamental acceleration mode and HOM using the bead-pull method. To keep the cavity body temperature constant, we used a chiller system to supply cooling water at 20 degrees C. The bead-pull measurement was automated with a computer. We encountered some issues during the measurement process due to the difficulty in measuring the electromagnetic field magnitude in a multi-cell cavity. We describe the method and apparatus for the field measurement, and the obtained results.

  4. Elucidation of structure-function relationships in plant major light-harvesting complex (LHC II) by nonlinear spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lokstein, Heiko; Betke, Alexander; Krikunova, Maria; Teuchner, Klaus; Voigt, Bernd

    2012-03-01

    Conventional linear and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques are often not appropriate to elucidate specific pigment-pigment interactions in light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes (LHCs). Nonlinear (laser-) spectroscopic techniques, including nonlinear polarization spectroscopy in the frequency domain (NLPF) as well as step-wise (resonant) and simultaneous (non-resonant) two-photon excitation spectroscopies may be advantageous in this regard. Nonlinear spectroscopies have been used to elucidate substructure(s) of very complex spectra, including analyses of strong excitonic couplings between chlorophylls and of interactions between (bacterio)chlorophylls and "optically dark" states of carotenoids in LHCs, including the major antenna complex of higher plants, LHC II. This article shortly reviews our previous study and outlines perspectives regarding the application of selected nonlinear laser-spectroscopic techniques to disentangle structure-function relationships in LHCs and other pigment-protein complexes.

  5. Minitron II system for precise control of the plant growth environment.

    PubMed

    Knight, S L; Akers, C P; Akers, S W; Mitchell, C A

    1988-01-01

    A transparent, cylindrical chamber system was developed to allow measurement of gas-exchange by small crop canopies in the undisturbed plant growth environment. The system is an elaboration of the Minitron system developed previously to compare growth of small plants in different environments within the same general growth area. The Minitron II system described herein accommodates hydroponic culture and separate control of atmospheric composition in individual chambers. Root and shoot environments are compartmented separately to accommodate atmospheres of different flow rate and/or gaseous composition. A series of 0-rings and tension-adjustable springs allow carbon dioxide in the flowing atmosphere to be analyzed without cross-contamination between chamber compartments or from external gas sources. Carbon dioxide has been maintained at set point +/- 9 g m-3 over a range of CO2 concentrations from 382 to 2725 g m-3 and with an atmosphere turnover rate of 136.7 cm3 s-1 by computer-assisted mass flow controllers. Each chamber has dimensions large enough (61 cm internal diameter, 0.151 m3 internal volume) to allow adequate replication of individual plants for statistical purposes (e.g., up to 36 equally-spaced plant holders). No significant variation in growth or photosynthetic rate of leaf lettuce occurred between chambers for a given set of environmental conditions. Gas-exchange rates in different chambers changed to a similar extent as CO2 concentration in the flowing atmosphere or chamber temperature were varied by the same amount. When coupled with appropriate control systems, Minitron II chambers can provide separate controlled environments for multiple small plants with adequate precision and at relatively low cost.

  6. Recombinant expressions of sweet plant protein mabinlin II in Escherichia coli and food-grade Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenliang; Xia, Qiyu; Yao, Jing; Fu, Shaoping; Guo, Jianchun; Hu, Xinwen

    2015-04-01

    Sweet plant proteins, which are safe, natural, low-calorie sweeteners, may be suitable replacements for sugars in the food and beverage industries. Mabinlin II, a sweet plant protein, shows the most pronounced heat stability and acid resistance of any of the six known types of plant sweet proteins. However, mabinlin II is difficult to extract from the Capparis masaikai plant, which is itself becoming increasingly scarce. This limits the use of naturally acquired mabinlin II. In this study, recombinant mabinlin II proteins were expressed and purified in Escherichia coli and in food-grade Lactococcus lactis. Recombinant mabinlin II proteins MBL-BH (containing the B-chains of mabinlin II downstream fused with His-tag) and MBL-ABH (containing the A- and B-chains of mabinlin II downstream fused with His-tag) were expressed in E. coli in the form of inclusion bodies. They were then purified and renatured. The refolded MBL-BH was found to be 100 times sweeter than sucrose by weight, but it was not heat-stable. Refolded MBL-ABH was neither sweet nor heat-stable. Recombinant mabinlin II proteins were secreted and expressed intracellularly in food-grade L. lactis, in which the concentrated cell samples and culture medium samples were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting analysis with anti-mabinlin II polyclonal antibody. This study demonstrated that the single B chain of mabinlin II has a sweet taste. The recombinant mabinlin II proteins have been successfully expressed in food-grade L. lactis, which is a crucial step in the production of mabinlin II through microorganism expression systems.

  7. The re-assimilation of ammonia produced by photorespiration and the nitrogen economy of C3 higher plants.

    PubMed

    Keys, Alfred J

    2006-02-01

    Photorespiration involves the conversion of glycine to serine with the release of ammonia and CO(2). In C(3) terrestrial higher plants the flux through glycine and serine is so large that it results in the production of ammonia at a rate far exceeding that from reduction of new nitrogen entering the plant. The photorespiratory nitrogen cycle re-assimilates this ammonia using the enzymes glutamine synthetase and glutamine:2-oxoglutarateaminotransferase.

  8. Class II-restricted T cell receptor engineered in vitro for higher affinity retains peptide specificity and function

    PubMed Central

    Weber, K. Scott; Donermeyer, David L.; Allen, Paul M.; Kranz, David M.

    2005-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) αβ heterodimer determines the peptide and MHC specificity of a T cell. It has been proposed that in vivo selection processes maintain low TCR affinities because T cells with higher-affinity TCRs would (i) have reduced functional capacity or (ii) cross-react with self-peptides resulting in clonal deletion. We used the class II-restricted T cell clone 3.L2, specific for murine hemoglobin (Hb/I-Ek), to explore these possibilities by engineering higher-affinity TCR mutants. A 3.L2 single-chain TCR (Vβ-linker-Vα) was mutagenized and selected for thermal stability and surface expression in a yeast display system. Stabilized mutants were used to generate a library with CDR3 mutations that were selected with Hb/I-Ek to isolate a panel of affinity mutants with KD values as low as 25 nM. Kinetic analysis of soluble single-chain TCRs showed that increased affinities were the result of both faster on-rates and slower off-rates. T cells transfected with the mutant TCRs and wild-type TCR responded to similar concentrations of peptide, indicating that the increased affinity was not detrimental to T cell activation. T cell transfectants maintained exquisite hemoglobin peptide specificity, but an altered peptide ligand that acted as an antagonist for the wild-type TCR was converted to a strong agonist with higher-affinity TCRs. These results show that T cells with high-affinity class II reactive TCRs are functional, but there is an affinity threshold above which an increase in affinity does not result in significant enhancement of T cell activation. PMID:16365315

  9. Progress in accident analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-10-11

    The present work continues our effort to perform an integrated safety analysis for the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design. Recently we developed a base case for a severe accident scenario in order to calculate accident doses for HYLIFE-II. It consisted of a total loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in which all the liquid flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) was lost at the beginning of the accident. Results showed that the off-site dose was below the limit given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for public protection in case of accident, and that his dose was dominated by the tritium released during the accident.

  10. Processes for producing polyhydroxybutyrate and related polyhydroxyalkanoates in the plastids of higher plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Christopher R.; Nawrath, Christiane; Poirier, Yves

    1997-03-11

    The present invention relates to a process for producing poly-D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) and related polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) in the plastids of plants. The production of PHB is accomplished by genetically transforming plants with modified genes from microorganisms. The genes encode the enzymes required to synthesize PHB from acetyl-CoA or related metabolites and are fused with additional plant sequences for targeting the enzymes to the plastid.

  11. Processes for producing polyhydroxybutyrate and related polyhydroxyalkanoates in the plastids of higher plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, C.R.; Nawrath, C.; Poirier, Y.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention relates to a process for producing poly-D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) and related polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) in the plastids of plants. The production of PHB is accomplished by genetically transforming plants with modified genes from microorganisms. The genes encode the enzymes required to synthesize PHB from acetyl-CoA or related metabolites and are fused with additional plant sequences for targeting the enzymes to the plastid. 37 figs.

  12. Production characteristics of the "higher plants-soil-like substrate" system as an element of the bioregenerative life support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, V. V.; Tikhomirov, A. A.; Ushakova, S. A.; Tikhomirova, N. A.; Shihov, V. N.; Tirranen, L. S.; Gribovskaya, I. A.

    2013-01-01

    The study addresses the possibility of long-duration operation of a higher plant conveyor, using a soil-like substrate (SLS) as the root zone. Chufa (Cyperus esculentus L.), radish (Raphanus sativus L.), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were used as study material. A chufa community consisting of 4 age groups and radish and lettuce communities consisting of 2 age groups were irrigated with a nutrient solution, which contained mineral elements extracted from the SLS. After each harvest, inedible biomass of the harvested plants and inedible biomasses of wheat and saltwort were added to the SLS. The amounts of the inedible biomasses of wheat and saltwort to be added to the SLS were determined based on the nitrogen content of the edible mass of harvested plants. CO2 concentration in the growth chamber was maintained within the range of 1100-1700 ppm. The results of the study show that higher plants can be grown quite successfully using the proposed process of plant waste utilization in the SLS. The addition of chufa inedible biomass to the SLS resulted in species-specific inhibition of growth of both cultivated crops and microorganisms in the "higher plants - SLS" system. There were certain differences between the amounts of some mineral elements removed from the SLS with the harvested edible biomass and those added to it with the inedible biomasses of wheat and saltwort.

  13. Research on the effects of altered gravity and other factors on the growth and development of higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The establishment, maintenance and use of the NASA-UCSC Botanical Centrifuge is discussed. The broad goals of this project were: (1) to establish facilities for conducting experiments under conditions of sustained centrifugation; (2) to pursue research on the gravitational physiology of higher plants; (3) to develop experimental hardware suitable for studies of plant development in the weightless condition; and (4) to accommodate visiting investigators whose researches are of interest to the NASA Biomedical Program and who may require for some limited time, the use of a medium size centrifuge with associated facilities appropriate for plant physiological studies.

  14. Impaired growth and development of Colorado potato beetle larvae on potato plants overexpressing the oryzacystatin II gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant proteinase inhibitors are attractive tools for crop improvement and their heterologous expression can enhance insect resistance in transgenic plants. Oryzacystatins I and II (OCI and OCII) show potential in controlling pests that utilize cysteine proteinases for protein digestion. To evaluate ...

  15. [Transcription Factors in Developmental Genetics and the Evolution of Higher Plants].

    PubMed

    Lutova, L A; Dodueva, I E; Lebedeva, M A; Tvorogova, V E

    2015-05-01

    Transcription factors play an essential role in controlling various developmental programs in plants, coordinating the action of any genetic network. Among the most important groups of plant transcription factors are the homeodomain-containing transcription factors, in particular, those belonging to the KNOX and WOX families, the functions of which are associated with regulation of the meristem activity, development of the aboveground and underground parts of plants, and control of embryogenesis. This review examines the role of KNOX and WOX transcription factors in various developmental programs, as well as in the evolutionary complication of the body plan in terrestrial plants.

  16. Partially massless higher-spin theory II: one-loop effective actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brust, Christopher; Hinterbichler, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    We continue our study of a generalization of the D-dimensional linearized Vasiliev higher-spin equations to include a tower of partially massless (PM) fields. We compute one-loop effective actions by evaluating zeta functions for both the "minimal" and "non-minimal" parity-even versions of the theory. Specifically, we compute the log-divergent part of the effective action in odd-dimensional Euclidean AdS spaces for D = 7 through 19 (dual to the a-type conformal anomaly of the dual boundary theory), and the finite part of the effective action in even-dimensional Euclidean AdS spaces for D = 4 through 8 (dual to the free energy on a sphere of the dual boundary theory). We pay special attention to the case D = 4, where module mixings occur in the dual field theory and subtlety arises in the one-loop computation. The results provide evidence that the theory is UV complete and one-loop exact, and we conjecture and provide evidence for a map between the inverse Newton's constant of the partially massless higher-spin theory and the number of colors in the dual CFT.

  17. Different hydrogen isotope fractionations during lipid formation in higher plants: Implications for paleohydrology reconstruction at a global scale

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinzhao; Liu, Weiguo; An, Zhisheng; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Leaf wax δDn-alkane values have shown to differ significantly among plant life forms (e.g., among grasses, shrubs, and trees) in higher plants. However, the underlying causes for the differences in leaf wax δDn-alkane values among different plant life forms remain poorly understood. In this study, we observed that leaf wax δDn-alkane values between major high plant lineages (eudicots versus monocots) differed significantly under the same environmental conditions. Such a difference primarily inherited from different hydrogen biosynthetic fractionations (εwax-lw). Based upon a reanalysis of the available leaf wax δDn-alkane dataset from modern plants in the Northern Hemisphere, we discovered that the apparent hydrogen fractionation factor (εwax-p) between leaf wax δDn-alkane values of major angiosperm lineages and precipitation δD values exhibited distinguishable distribution patterns at a global scale, with an average of −140‰ for monocotyledonous species, −107‰ for dicotyledonous species. Additionally, variations of leaf wax δDn-alkane values and the εwax-p values in gymnosperms are similar to those of dicotyledonous species. Therefore, the data let us believe that biological factors inherited from plant taxonomies have a significant effect on controlling leaf wax δDn-alkane values in higher plants. PMID:26806719

  18. Different hydrogen isotope fractionations during lipid formation in higher plants: Implications for paleohydrology reconstruction at a global scale.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinzhao; Liu, Weiguo; An, Zhisheng; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-25

    Leaf wax δDn-alkane values have shown to differ significantly among plant life forms (e.g., among grasses, shrubs, and trees) in higher plants. However, the underlying causes for the differences in leaf wax δDn-alkane values among different plant life forms remain poorly understood. In this study, we observed that leaf wax δDn-alkane values between major high plant lineages (eudicots versus monocots) differed significantly under the same environmental conditions. Such a difference primarily inherited from different hydrogen biosynthetic fractionations (εwax-lw). Based upon a reanalysis of the available leaf wax δDn-alkane dataset from modern plants in the Northern Hemisphere, we discovered that the apparent hydrogen fractionation factor (εwax-p) between leaf wax δDn-alkane values of major angiosperm lineages and precipitation δD values exhibited distinguishable distribution patterns at a global scale, with an average of -140‰ for monocotyledonous species, -107‰ for dicotyledonous species. Additionally, variations of leaf wax δDn-alkane values and the εwax-p values in gymnosperms are similar to those of dicotyledonous species. Therefore, the data let us believe that biological factors inherited from plant taxonomies have a significant effect on controlling leaf wax δDn-alkane values in higher plants.

  19. Different hydrogen isotope fractionations during lipid formation in higher plants: Implications for paleohydrology reconstruction at a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinzhao; Liu, Weiguo; An, Zhisheng; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Leaf wax δDn-alkane values have shown to differ significantly among plant life forms (e.g., among grasses, shrubs, and trees) in higher plants. However, the underlying causes for the differences in leaf wax δDn-alkane values among different plant life forms remain poorly understood. In this study, we observed that leaf wax δDn-alkane values between major high plant lineages (eudicots versus monocots) differed significantly under the same environmental conditions. Such a difference primarily inherited from different hydrogen biosynthetic fractionations (εwax-lw). Based upon a reanalysis of the available leaf wax δDn-alkane dataset from modern plants in the Northern Hemisphere, we discovered that the apparent hydrogen fractionation factor (εwax-p) between leaf wax δDn-alkane values of major angiosperm lineages and precipitation δD values exhibited distinguishable distribution patterns at a global scale, with an average of ‑140‰ for monocotyledonous species, ‑107‰ for dicotyledonous species. Additionally, variations of leaf wax δDn-alkane values and the εwax-p values in gymnosperms are similar to those of dicotyledonous species. Therefore, the data let us believe that biological factors inherited from plant taxonomies have a significant effect on controlling leaf wax δDn-alkane values in higher plants.

  20. Resolving the role of plant glutamate dehydrogenase: II. Physiological characterization of plants overexpressing the two enzyme subunits individually or simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Bedu, Magali; Dargel-Grafin, Céline; Dubois, Frédéric; Gibon, Yves; Restivo, Francesco M; Hirel, Bertrand

    2013-10-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH; EC 1.4.1.2) is able to carry out the deamination of glutamate in higher plants. In order to obtain a better understanding of the physiological function of GDH in leaves, transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants were constructed that overexpress two genes from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (GDHA and GDHB under the control of the Cauliflower mosiac virus 35S promoter), which encode the α- and β-subunits of GDH individually or simultaneously. In the transgenic plants, the GDH protein accumulated in the mitochondria of mesophyll cells and in the mitochondria of the phloem companion cells (CCs), where the native enzyme is normally expressed. Such a shift in the cellular location of the GDH enzyme induced major changes in carbon and nitrogen metabolite accumulation and a reduction in growth. These changes were mainly characterized by a decrease in the amount of sucrose, starch and glutamine in the leaves, which was accompanied by an increase in the amount of nitrate and Chl. In addition, there was an increase in the content of asparagine and a decrease in proline. Such changes may explain the lower plant biomass determined in the GDH-overexpressing lines. Overexpressing the two genes GDHA and GDHB individually or simultaneously induced a differential accumulation of glutamate and glutamine and a modification of the glutamate to glutamine ratio. The impact of the metabolic changes occurring in the different types of GDH-overexpressing plants is discussed in relation to the possible physiological function of each subunit when present in the form of homohexamers or heterohexamers.

  1. Functional diversity of 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenases in plant metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, Scott C.; Facchini, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative enzymes catalyze many different reactions in plant metabolism. Among this suite of enzymes are the 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenases (2-ODDs). Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) as often considered the most versatile oxidative enzymes in nature, but the diversity and complexity of reactions catalyzed by 2-ODDs is superior to the CYPs. The list of oxidative reactions catalyzed by 2-ODDs includes hydroxylations, demethylations, desaturations, ring closure, ring cleavage, epimerization, rearrangement, halogenation, and demethylenation. Furthermore, recent work, including the discovery of 2-ODDs involved in epigenetic regulation, and others catalyzing several characteristic steps in specialized metabolic pathways, support the argument that 2-ODDs are among the most versatile and important oxidizing biological catalysts. In this review, we survey and summarize the pertinent literature with a focus on several key reactions catalyzed by 2-ODDs, and discuss the significance and impact of these enzymes in plant metabolism. PMID:25346740

  2. Exploring Cancer Therapeutics with Natural Products from African Medicinal Plants, Part II: Alkaloids, Terpenoids and Flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Nwodo, Justina N; Ibezim, Akachukwu; Simoben, Conrad V; Ntie-Kang, Fidele

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stands as second most common cause of disease-related deaths in humans. Resistance of cancer to chemotherapy remains challenging to both scientists and physicians. Medicinal plants are known to contribute significantly to a large population of Africa, which is to a very large extent linked to folkloric claims which is part of their livelihood. In this review paper, the potential of naturally occurring anti-cancer agents from African flora has been explored, with suggested modes of action, where such data is available. Literature search revealed plant-derived compounds from African flora showing anti-cancer and/or cytotoxic activities, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo. This corresponds to 400 compounds (from mildly active to very active) covering various compound classes. However, in this part II, we only discussed the three major compound classes which are: flavonoids, alkaloids and terpenoids.

  3. Primary charge separation and energy transfer in the photosystem I reaction center of higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    White, N.T.H.; Beddard, G.S.; Thorne J.R.G.; Feehan, T.M.; Keyes, T.E.; Heathcote, P.

    1996-07-18

    Using low intensity femtosecond duration laser pulses at 708 nm, we have observed absorption transients associated with electron transfer through the primary electron acceptor A{sub 0} in the photosystem I (PSI) reaction center from spinach under nonreducing conditions. At this wavelength the electron donor P{sub 700} is excited directly, although some antenna chlorophylls are also excited. Using a nanosecond duration preflash of 690 nm to oxidize P{sub 700}, and then measuring the absorption transients from the antenna alone, it is possible by subtraction to isolate the absorption transients arising from electron transfer. We discuss this method critically. Th spectrum of A{sub 0}{sup -}-A{sub 0} does not appear promptly but takes nearly 3 ps to reach maximum intensity and resembles those spectra previously obtained from higher plants, with a maximum bleaching at 685{+-}2 nm and a shoulder in the region 670-675 nm. The decay time of the primary radical pair P{sub 700}{sup +}A{sub 0}{sup -} is calculated as 20 ps. Analysis of absorption transients indicates that the intrinsic rate constant forming the primary radical pair P{sub 700}{sup +}A{sub 0}{sup -} cannot be measured directly because energy migration in the antenna is fast and quenching is approaching `trap limited` behavior. With use of a detailed model of the antenna energy migration based on the X-ray structure, the intrinsic rate constant for electron transfer is estimated as k{sub 1} nearly equals 0.7 ps{sup -1}. 81 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Hemin inhibits ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis in both a higher plant and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Vierstra, R.D.; Sullivan, M.L.

    1988-05-03

    In eukaryotes, a major route for ATP-dependent protein breakdown proceeds through covalent intermediates of target proteins destined for degradation and the highly conserved, 76 amino acid protein ubiquitin. In rabbit reticulocytes, it has been shown that hemin effectively inhibits this pathway by blocking the catabolism of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. Here the authors demonstrate that hemin is also an effective inhibitor of the ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway in both a higher plant, oats (Avena sativa), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Hemin inhibits all stages of the pathway in vitro, including ATP-dependent formation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates, disassembly of conjugates by ubiquitin-protein lyase(s) (or isopeptidases), and degradation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates by ATP-dependent protease(s). Using ubiquitin-/sup 125/I-lysozyme conjugates synthesized in vitro as substrates, they determined the specific effects of hemin on the rates of disassembly and degradation separately. The concentration of hemin required for half-maximal inhibition of both processes was identical in each species, approx. 60 ..mu..M in oats and approx. 50 ..mu..M in yeast. Similar inhibitory effects were observed when two hemin analogues, mesoheme or protoporphyrin IX, were employed. These results demonstrate that the effect of hemin on ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis is not restricted to erythroid cells and as a result hemin may be a useful tool in studies of this pathway in all eukaryotic cells. These results also question models where hemin serves as a specific negative modulator of proteolysis in erythroid cells.

  5. Arabidopsis carotenoid mutants demonstrate that lutein is not essential for photosynthesis in higher plants.

    PubMed Central

    Pogson, B; McDonald, K A; Truong, M; Britton, G; DellaPenna, D

    1996-01-01

    Lutein, a dihydroxy beta, epsilon-carotenoid, is the predominant carotenoid in photosynthetic plant tissue and plays a critical role in light-harvesting complex assembly and function. To further understand lutein synthesis and function, we isolated four lutein-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis that define two loci, lut1 and lut2 (for lutein deficient). These loci are required for lutein biosynthesis but not for the biosynthesis of beta, beta-carotenoids. The lut1 mutations are recessive, accumulate high levels of zeinoxanthin, which is the immediate precursor of lutein, and define lut1 as a disruption in epsilon ring hydroxylation. The lut2 mutations are semidominant, and their biochemical phenotype is consistent with a disruption of epsilon ring cyclization. The lut2 locus cosegregates with the recently isolated epsilon cyclase gene, thus, providing additional evidence that the lut2 alleles are mutations in the epsilon cyclase gene. It appears likely that the epsilon cyclase is a key step in regulating lutein levels and the ratio of lutein to beta,beta-carotenoids. Surprisingly, despite the absence of lutein, neither the lut1 nor lut2 mutation causes a visible deleterious phenotype or altered chlorophyll content, but both mutants have significantly higher levels of beta, beta-carotenoids. In particular, there is a stable increase in the xanthophyll cycle pigments (violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin) in both lut1 and lut2 mutants as well as an increase in zeinoxanthin in lut1 and beta-carotene in lut2. The accumulation of specific carotenoids is discussed as it pertains to the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis and incorporation into the photosynthetic apparatus. Presumably, particular beta, beta-carotenoids are able to compensate functionally and structurally for lutein in the photosystems of Arabidopsis. PMID:8837513

  6. A higher order GUP with minimal length uncertainty and maximal momentum II: Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedram, Pouria

    2012-12-01

    In a recent paper, we presented a nonperturbative higher order Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) that is consistent with various proposals of quantum gravity such as string theory, loop quantum gravity, doubly special relativity, and predicts both a minimal length uncertainty and a maximal observable momentum. In this Letter, we find exact maximally localized states and present a formally self-adjoint and naturally perturbative representation of this modified algebra. Then we extend this GUP to D dimensions that will be shown it is noncommutative and find invariant density of states. We show that the presence of the maximal momentum results in upper bounds on the energy spectrum of the free particle and the particle in box. Moreover, this form of GUP modifies blackbody radiation spectrum at high frequencies and predicts a finite cosmological constant. Although it does not solve the cosmological constant problem, it gives a better estimation with respect to the presence of just the minimal length.

  7. Ozone and aging up-regulate type II metacaspase gene expression and global metacaspase activity in the leaves of field-grown maize (Zea mays L.) plants.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rafiq; Zuily-Fodil, Yasmine; Passaquet, Chantal; Bethenod, Olivier; Roche, Romain; Repellin, Anne

    2012-05-01

    Maize plants (Zea mays L. cv. NK Perform) were exposed to O(3)-enriched air, using a new field fumigation system. Transcriptional changes for three type II-metacaspase genes were studied in the leaves (ranks 10 and 12), using quantitative real-time PCR. Global metacaspase activity was measured using metacaspase-specific synthetic tripeptide Boc-GRR-AMC. Aging had little effect on mRNA accumulation whereas four to six-fold increases were observed for the most O(3)-responsive type II metacaspase genes, in the older leaves 10. Global metacaspase activity increased by 257% and 333% in leaves 12 and 10, respectively, in response to the highest cumulated concentration. In non-fumigated plants, metacaspase activity progressively increased over the course of the experiment and always was higher in the older leaves 10. Together, these results suggest that metacaspase-mediated proteolysis is a crucial step in leaf responses to both O(3) and age-mediated senescence.

  8. Plant Biology Personnel and Training at Doctorate-Granting Institutions. Higher Education Panel Report Number 62.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Charles J.

    Planning major research programs requires accurate information about funding and personnel. Since reliable baseline data for plant biology have not been available, a study was conducted to provide such data by measuring the total plant biology effort at major doctorate-granting institutions with graduate programs in botany during fall 1982.…

  9. [A model of photosystem II for the analysis of a fast fluorescence rise in plant leaves].

    PubMed

    Beliaeva, N E; Bulychev, A A; Riznichenko, G Iu; Rubin, A B

    2011-01-01

    The polyphasic patterns of fluorescence induction rise in pea leaves in vivo and after the treatment with ionophores have been studied using a plant efficiency analyzer. To analyze in detail photosystem II (PS II) electron transfer processes, an extended PS II model was applied, which included the sums of exponential functions to specify explicitly the light-driven formation of the transmembrane electric potential (delta psi(t)) as well as pH in the lumen (pHL(t)) and stroma (pHs(t)). PS II model parameters and numerical coefficients in delta psi(t), and pHs(t) were evaluated to fit fluorescence induction data for different experimental conditions: leaf in vivo or after ionophore treatment at low or high light intensity. The model imitated changes in the pattern of fluorescence induction rise due to the elimination of transmembrane potential in the presence of ionophores, when delta psi = 0 and pHL(t), pHS(t) altered to small extent relative to control values in vivo, with maximum delta psi(t) approximately 90 MB and delta psi(t) approximately 40 MB, for the stationary state at deltapH aproximately equal to 1.8. As the light intensity was increased from 300 to 1200 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1), the heat dissipation rate constants increased threefold for nonradiative recombination of P680+Phe- and by approximately 30% for P680+Q(A)-. The parameters delta psi, pH(S) and pH(L) were analyzed as factors of PS II redox state populations and fluorescence yield. The kinetic mechanism of qE quenching is discussed, which is related with light induced pH(L) lumen acidification, when Q(A)- and P680+ recombination probability increases to regulate the QA reduction.

  10. Production characteristics of lettuce Lactuca sativa L. in the frame of the first crop tests in the Higher Plant Chamber integrated into the MELiSSA Pilot Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirova, Natalia; Lawson, Jamie; Stasiak, Michael; Dixon, Mike; Paille, Christel; Peiro, Enrique; Fossen, Arnaud; Godia, Francesc

    Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) is an artificial closed ecosystem that is considered a tool for the development of a bioregenerative life support system for manned space missions. One of the five compartments of MELiSSA loop -Higher Plant Chamber was recently integrated into the MELiSSA Pilot Plant facility at Universitat Aut`noma deo Barcelona. The main contributions expected by integration of this photosynthetic compartment are oxygen, water, vegetable food production and CO2 consumption. Production characteristics of Lactuca sativa L., as a MELiSSA candidate crop, were investigated in this work in the first crop experiments in the MELiSSA Pilot Plant facility. The plants were grown in batch culture and totaled 100 plants with a growing area 5 m long and 1 m wide in a sealed controlled environment. Several replicates of the experiments were carried out with varying duration. It was shown that after 46 days of lettuce cultivation dry edible biomass averaged 27, 2 g per plant. However accumulation of oxygen in the chamber, which required purging of the chamber, and decrease in the food value of the plants was observed. Reducing the duration of the tests allowed uninterrupted test without opening the system and also allowed estimation of the crop's carbon balance. Results of productivity, tissue composition, nutrient uptake and canopy photosynthesis of lettuce regardless of test duration are discussed in the paper.

  11. A complete mitochondrial genome of wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Yumai), and fast evolving mitochondrial genes in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peng; Liu, Huitao; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Zhuo, Guoyin; Hu, Songnian; Liu, Dongcheng; Yang, Wenlong; Zhan, Kehui; Zhang, Aimin; Yu, Jun

    2009-12-01

    Plant mitochondrial genomes, encoding necessary proteins involved in the system of energy production, play an important role in the development and reproduction of the plant. They occupy a specific evolutionary pattern relative to their nuclear counterparts. Here, we determined the winter wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Yumai) mitochondrial genome in a length of 452 and 526 bp by shotgun sequencing its BAC library. It contains 202 genes, including 35 known protein-coding genes, three rRNA and 17 tRNA genes, as well as 149 open reading frames (ORFs; greater than 300 bp in length). The sequence is almost identical to the previously reported sequence of the spring wheat (T. aestivum cv. Chinese Spring); we only identified seven SNPs (three transitions and four transversions) and 10 indels (insertions and deletions) between the two independently acquired sequences, and all variations were found in non-coding regions. This result confirmed the accuracy of the previously reported mitochondrial sequence of the Chinese Spring wheat. The nucleotide frequency and codon usage of wheat are common among the lineage of higher plant with a high AT-content of 58%. Molecular evolutionary analysis demonstrated that plant mitochondrial genomes evolved at different rates, which may correlate with substantial variations in metabolic rate and generation time among plant lineages. In addition, through the estimation of the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates between orthologous mitochondrion-encoded genes of higher plants, we found an accelerated evolutionary rate that seems to be the result of relaxed selection.

  12. Interactions of metal-based engineered nanoparticles with aquatic higher plants: A review of the state of current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Thwala, Melusi; Klaine, Stephen J; Musee, Ndeke

    2016-07-01

    The rising potential for the release of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) into aquatic environments requires evaluation of risks to protect ecological health. The present review examines knowledge pertaining to the interactions of metal-based ENPs with aquatic higher plants, identifies information gaps, and raises considerations for future research to advance knowledge on the subject. The discussion focuses on ENPs' bioaccessibility; uptake, adsorption, translocation, and bioaccumulation; and toxicity effects on aquatic higher plants. An information deficit surrounds the uptake of ENPs and associated dynamics, because the influence of ENP characteristics and water quality conditions has not been well documented. Dissolution appears to be a key mechanism driving bioaccumulation of ENPs, whereas nanoparticulates often adsorb to plant surfaces with minimal internalization. However, few reports document the internalization of ENPs by plants; thus, the role of nanoparticulates' internalization in bioaccumulation and toxicity remains unclear, requiring further investigation. The toxicities of metal-based ENPs mainly have been associated with dissolution as a predominant mechanism, although nano toxicity has also been reported. To advance knowledge in this domain, future investigations need to integrate the influence of ENP characteristics and water physicochemical parameters, as their interplay determines ENP bioaccessibility and influences their risk to health of aquatic higher plants. Furthermore, harmonization of test protocols is recommended for fast tracking the generation of comparable data. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1677-1694. © 2016 SETAC.

  13. Small intestinal hydrolysis of plant glucosides: higher glucohydrolase activities in rodents than passerine birds.

    PubMed

    Lessner, Krista M; Dearing, M Denise; Izhaki, Ido; Samuni-Blank, Michal; Arad, Zeev; Karasov, William H

    2015-09-01

    Glycosides are a major group of plant secondary compounds characterized by one or more sugars conjugated to a lipophilic, possibly toxic aglycone, which is released upon hydrolysis. We compared small intestinal homogenate hydrolysis activity of three rodent and two avian species against four substrates: amygdalin and sinigrin, two plant-derived glucosides, the sugar lactose, whose hydrolysis models some activity against flavonoid and isoflavonoid glucosides, and the disaccharide sugar maltose (from starch), used as a comparator. Three new findings extend our understanding of physiological processing of plant glucosides: (1) the capacity of passerine birds to hydrolyze plant glucosides seems relatively low, compared with rodents; (2) in this first test of vertebrates' enzymic capacity to hydrolyze glucosinolates, sinigrin hydrolytic capacity seems low; (3) in laboratory mice, hydrolytic activity against lactose resides on the enterocytes' apical membrane facing the intestinal lumen, but activity against amygdalin seems to reside inside enterocytes.

  14. Gene-enzyme telationships in somatic cells and their organismal derivatives in higher plants. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R. A.

    1980-04-21

    Progress is reported in the following subject areas: (1) chemistry of the arogenate molecule; (2) plant enzymology at the organismal level; (3) isolation of regulatory mutants in tobacco; and (4) stability of the haploid state in Nicotiana sylvestris.

  15. Time to pump iron: iron-deficiency-signaling mechanisms of higher plants.

    PubMed

    Walker, Elsbeth L; Connolly, Erin L

    2008-10-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for plants, yet it often limits plant growth. On the contrary, overaccumulation of iron within plant cells leads to oxidative stress. As a consequence, iron-uptake systems are carefully regulated to ensure that iron homeostasis is maintained. In response to iron limitation, plants induce expression of sets of activities that function at the root-soil interface to solubilize iron and subsequently transfer it across the plasma membrane of root cells. Recent advances have revealed key players in the signaling pathways that function to induce these iron-uptake responses. Transcription factors belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix, ABI3/VP1(B3), and NAC families appear to function either directly or indirectly in the upregulation of iron deficiency responses.

  16. Effect of low-intensity infrared and millimeter radiation on higher plants' biopotentials.

    PubMed

    Mironova, E A; Romanovskii, Y M

    2001-01-01

    This article studies the effect of local low-intensity electromagnetic radiation on the bioelectric responses of plants. In our investigation, we used thirty-three wavelengths in the visible and infrared spectrurm regions as well as three wavelengths in the millimeter spectrum region. As a result, we obtained the bioelectric responses of plants to electromagnetic radiation not only in the absorption region of cellular pigments (such as chlorophyll, flavin, and phytochrome) but also in the absorption region of water molecules.

  17. Electronics and telecommunications in Poland, issues and perspectives: Part II. Science, research, development, higher education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modelski, Józef; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2010-09-01

    important role of ET is combined with the existence in the society of an adequate infrastructure which recreates the full development cycle of high technology embracing: people, institutions, finances and logistics, in this also science, higher education, education, continuous training, dissemination and outreach, professional social environment, legal basis, political support and lobbying, innovation structures, applications, industry and economy. The digest of chosen development tendencies in ET was made here from the academic perspective, in a wider scale and on this background the national one, trying to situate this branch in the society, determine its changing role to build a new technical infrastructure of a society based on knowledge, a role of builder of many practical gadgets facilitating life, a role of a big future integrator of today's single bricks into certain more useful unity. This digest does not have a character of a systematic analysis of ET. It is a kind of an arbitrary utterance of the authors inside their field of competence. The aim of this paper is to take an active part in the discussion of the academic community in this country on the development strategy of ET, choice of priorities for cyclically rebuilding economy, in competitive environments. The review paper was initiated by the Committee of Electronics and Telecommunications of Polish Academy of Sciences and was published in Polish as introductory chapter of a dedicated expertise, printed in a book format. This version makes the included opinions available for a wider community.

  18. Protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) function in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, P L

    1998-12-01

    In the past few years, molecular cloning studies have revealed the primary structure of plant protein serine/threonine phosphatases. Two structurally distinct families, the PP1/PP2A family and the PP2C family, are present in plants as well as in animals. This review will focus on the plant PP2C family of protein phosphatases. Biochemical and molecular genetic studies in Arabidopsis have identified PP2C enzymes as key players in plant signal transduction processes. For instance, the ABI1/ABI2 PP2Cs are central components in abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction. Arabidopsis mutants containing a single amino acid exchange in ABI1 or ABI2 show a reduced response to ABA. Another member of the PP2C family, kinase-associated protein phosphatase (KAPP), appears to be an important element in some receptor-like kinase (RLK) signalling pathways. Finally, an alfalfa PP2C acts as a negative regulator of a plant mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Thus, the plant PP2Cs function as regulators of various signal transduction pathways.

  19. Molecular Properties and Functional Divergence of the Dehydroascorbate Reductase Gene Family in Lower and Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-Jie; Wang, Wei; Yang, Hai-Ling; Li, Yue; Kang, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Yang, Zhi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), which reduces oxidized ascorbate, is important for maintaining an appropriate ascorbate redox state in plant cells. To date, genome-wide molecular characterization of DHARs has only been conducted in bryophytes (Physcomitrella patens) and eudicots (e.g. Arabidopsis thaliana). In this study, to gain a general understanding of the molecular properties and functional divergence of the DHARs in land plants, we further conducted a comprehensive analysis of DHARs from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii, gymnosperm Picea abies and monocot Zea mays. DHARs were present as a small gene family in all of the land plants we examined, with gene numbers ranging from two to four. All the plants contained cytosolic and chloroplastic DHARs, indicating dehydroascorbate (DHA) can be directly reduced in the cytoplasm and chloroplast by DHARs in all the plants. A novel vacuolar DHAR was found in Z. mays, indicating DHA may also be reduced in the vacuole by DHARs in Z. mays. The DHARs within each species showed extensive functional divergence in their gene structures, subcellular localizations, and enzymatic characteristics. This study provides new insights into the molecular characteristics and functional divergence of DHARs in land plants.

  20. Molecular Properties and Functional Divergence of the Dehydroascorbate Reductase Gene Family in Lower and Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan-Jie; Wang, Wei; Yang, Hai-Ling; Li, Yue; Kang, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Yang, Zhi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), which reduces oxidized ascorbate, is important for maintaining an appropriate ascorbate redox state in plant cells. To date, genome-wide molecular characterization of DHARs has only been conducted in bryophytes (Physcomitrella patens) and eudicots (e.g. Arabidopsis thaliana). In this study, to gain a general understanding of the molecular properties and functional divergence of the DHARs in land plants, we further conducted a comprehensive analysis of DHARs from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii, gymnosperm Picea abies and monocot Zea mays. DHARs were present as a small gene family in all of the land plants we examined, with gene numbers ranging from two to four. All the plants contained cytosolic and chloroplastic DHARs, indicating dehydroascorbate (DHA) can be directly reduced in the cytoplasm and chloroplast by DHARs in all the plants. A novel vacuolar DHAR was found in Z. mays, indicating DHA may also be reduced in the vacuole by DHARs in Z. mays. The DHARs within each species showed extensive functional divergence in their gene structures, subcellular localizations, and enzymatic characteristics. This study provides new insights into the molecular characteristics and functional divergence of DHARs in land plants. PMID:26684301

  1. Bioremediation of Atmospheric Hydrocarbons via Bacteria Naturally Associated with Leaves of Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Ali, N; Al-Awadhi, H; Dashti, N; Khanafer, M; El-Nemr, I; Sorkhoh, N; Radwan, S S

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria associated with leaves of sixteen cultivated and wild plant species from all over Kuwait were analyzed by a culture-independent approach. This technique depended on partial sequencing of 16S rDNA regions in total genomic DNA from the bacterial consortia and comparing the resulting sequences with those in the GenBank database. To release bacterial cells from leaves, tough methods such as sonication co-released too much leaf chloroplasts whose DNA interfered with the bacterial DNA. A more satisfactory bacterial release with a minimum of chloroplast co-release was done by gently rubbing the leaf surfaces with soft tooth brushes in phosphate buffer. The leaves of all plant species harbored on their surfaces bacterial communities predominated by hydrocarbonoclastic (hydrocarbon-utilizing) bacterial genera. Leaves of 6 representative plants brought about in the laboratory effective removal of volatile hydrocarbons in sealed microcosms. Each individual plant species had a unique bacterial community structure. Collectively, the phyllospheric microflora on the studied plants comprised the genera Flavobacterium, Halomonas, Arthrobacter, Marinobacter, Neisseria, Ralstonia, Ochrobactrum. Exiguobacterium, Planomicrobium, Propionibacterium, Kocuria, Rhodococcus and Stenotrophomonas. This community structure was dramatically different from the structure we determined earlier for the same plants using the culture-dependent approach, although in both cases, hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria were frequent.

  2. Two Bee-Pollinated Plant Species Show Higher Seed Production when Grown in Gardens Compared to Arable Farmland

    PubMed Central

    Cussans, John; Goulson, David; Sanderson, Roy; Goffe, Louis; Darvill, Ben; Osborne, Juliet L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Insect pollinator abundance, in particular that of bees, has been shown to be high where there is a super-abundance of floral resources; for example in association with mass-flowering crops and also in gardens where flowering plants are often densely planted. Since land management affects pollinator numbers, it is also likely to affect the resultant pollination of plants growing in these habitats. We hypothesised that the seed or fruit set of two plant species, typically pollinated by bumblebees and/or honeybees might respond in one of two ways: 1) pollination success could be reduced when growing in a floriferous environment, via competition for pollinators, or 2) pollination success could be enhanced because of increased pollinator abundance in the vicinity. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the pollination success of experimental plants of Glechoma hederacea L. and Lotus corniculatus L. growing in gardens and arable farmland. On the farms, the plants were placed either next to a mass-flowering crop (oilseed rape, Brassica napus L. or field beans, Vicia faba L.) or next to a cereal crop (wheat, Triticum spp.). Seed set of G. hederacea and fruit set of L. corniculatus were significantly higher in gardens compared to arable farmland. There was no significant difference in pollination success of G. hederacea when grown next to different crops, but for L. corniculatus, fruit set was higher in the plants growing next to oilseed rape when the crop was in flower. Conclusions/Significance The results show that pollination services can limit fruit set of wild plants in arable farmland, but there is some evidence that the presence of a flowering crop can facilitate their pollination (depending on species and season). We have also demonstrated that gardens are not only beneficial to pollinators, but also to the process of pollination. PMID:20668704

  3. Visualizing the mobility and distribution of chlorophyll proteins in higher plant thylakoid membranes: effects of photoinhibition and protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Goral, Tomasz K; Johnson, Matthew P; Brain, Anthony P R; Kirchhoff, Helmut; Ruban, Alexander V; Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2010-06-01

    The diffusion of proteins in chloroplast thylakoid membranes is believed to be important for processes including the photosystem-II repair cycle and the regulation of light harvesting. However, to date there is very little direct information on the mobility of thylakoid proteins. We have used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in a laser-scanning confocal microscope to visualize in real time the exchange of chlorophyll proteins between grana in intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and Arabidopsis chloroplasts. Most chlorophyll proteins in the grana appear immobile on the 10-min timescale of our measurements. However, a limited population of chlorophyll proteins (accounting for around 15% of chlorophyll fluorescence) can exchange between grana on this timescale. In intact, wild-type chloroplasts this mobile population increases significantly after photoinhibition, consistent with a role for protein diffusion in the photosystem-II repair cycle. No such increase in mobility is seen in isolated grana membranes, or in the Arabidopsis stn8 and stn7 stn8 mutants, which lack the protein kinases required for phosphorylation of photosystem II core proteins and light-harvesting complexes. Furthermore, mobility under low-light conditions is significantly lower in stn8 and stn7 stn8 plants than in wild-type Arabidopsis. The changes in protein mobility correlate with changes in the packing density and size of thylakoid protein complexes, as observed by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. We conclude that protein phosphorylation switches the membrane system to a more fluid state, thus facilitating the photosystem-II repair cycle.

  4. Plant Growth During the Greenhouse II Experiment on the MIR Orbital Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Campbell, W. F.; Carman, J. G.; Bingham, G. E.; Bubenheim, D. L.; Yendler, B.; Sytchev, V.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Ivanova, I.; Chernova, L.; Podolsky, I.

    2002-01-01

    We carried out three experiments with Super Dwarf wheat in the Bulgarian/Russian growth chamber Svet (0.1 sq m growing area) on the Space Station Mir. This paper mostly describes the first of these NASA-supported trials, began on Aug. 13, 1995. Plants were sampled five times and harvested on Nov. 9 after 90 days. Equipment failures led to low irradiance (three, then four of six lamp sets failed), instances of high temperatures (ca. 37 C), and sometimes excessive-substrate moisture. Although plants grew for the 90 days, no wheat heads were produced. Considering the low light levels, plants were surprisingly green, but of course biomass production was low. Plants were highly disoriented (low light, mirror walls?). Fixed and dried samples and the root module were returned on the US Shuttle Atlantis on Nov. 20, 1995. Samples of the substrate, a nutrient-charged zeolite called Balkanine, were taken from the root module, carefully examined for roots, weighed, dried, and reweighed. The Svet control unit and the light bank were shipped to Moscow. An experiment validation test (EVT) of plant growth and experiment procedures, carried out in Moscow, was highly successful. Equipment built in Utah to measure CO2, H2O vapor, irradiance, air and leaf (IR) temperature, O2, pressure, and substrate moisture worked well in the EVT and in space. After this manuscript was first prepared, plants were grown in Mir with a new light bank and controller for 123 days in late 1996 and 39 days in 1996/1997. Plants grew exceptionally well with higher biomass production than in any previous space experiment, but the ca. 280 wheat heads that were produced in 1996 contained no seeds. Ethylene in the cabin atmosphere was responsible.

  5. Plant growth during the Greenhouse II experiment on the Mir orbital station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Campbell, W. F.; Carman, J. G.; Bingham, G. E.; Bubenheim, D. L.; Yendler, B.; Sytchev, V.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Ivanova, I.; Chernova, L.; Podolsky, I.

    2003-01-01

    We carried out three experiments with Super Dwarf wheat in the Bulgarian/Russian growth chamber Svet (0.1 m2 growing area) on the Space Station Mir. This paper mostly describes the first of these NASA-supported trials, began on Aug. 13, 1995. Plants were sampled five times and harvested on Nov. 9 after 90 days. Equipment failures led to low irradiance (3, then 4 of 6 lamp sets failed), instances of high temperatures (ca. 37 degrees C), and sometimes excessive substrate moisture. Although plants grew for the 90 d, no wheat heads were produced. Considering the low light levels, plants were surprisingly green, but of course biomass production was low. Plants were highly disoriented (low light, mirror walls?). Fixed and dried samples and the root module were returned on the U.S. Shuttle Atlantis on Nov. 20, 1995. Samples of the substrate, a nutrient-charged zeolite called Balkanine, were taken from the root module, carefully examined for roots, weighed, dried, and reweighed. The Svet control unit and the light bank were shipped to Moscow. An experiment validation test (EVT) of plant growth and experimental procedures, carried out in Moscow, was highly successful. Equipment built in Utah to measure CO2, H2O vapor, irradiance, air and leaf (IR) temperature, O2, pressure, and substrate moisture worked well in the EVT and in space. After this manuscript was first prepared, plants were grown in Mir with a new light bank and controller for 123 d in late 1996 and 39 days in 1996/1997. Plants grew exceptionally well with higher biomass production than in any previous space experiment, but the ca. 280 wheat heads that were produced in 1996 contained no seeds. Ethylene in the cabin atmosphere was responsible. c2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  6. Plant growth during the greenhouse II experiment on the Mir orbital station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Campbell, W. F.; Carman, J. G.; Bingham, G. E.; Bubenheim, D. L.; Yendler, B.; Sytchev, V.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Ivanova, I.; Chernova, L.; Podolsky, I.

    We carried out three experiments with Super Dwarf wheat in the Bulgarian/Russian growth chamber Svet (0.1 m2 growing area) on the Space Station Mir. This paper mostly describes the first of these NASA-supported trials, began on Aug. 13, 1995. Plants were sampled five times and harvested on Nov. 9 after 90 days. Equipment failures led to low irradiance (3, then 4 of 6 lamp sets failed), instances of high temperatures (ca. 37 °C), and sometimes excessive substrate moisture. Although plants grew for the 90 d, no wheat heads were produced. Considering the low light levels, plants were surprisingly green, but of course biomass production was low. Plants were highly disoriented (low light, mirror walls?). Fixed and dried samples and the root module were returned on the U.S. Shuttle Atlantis on Nov. 20, 1995. Samples of the substrate, a nutrient-charged zeolite called Balkanine, were taken from the root module, carefully examined for roots, weighed, dried, and reweighed. The Svet control unit and the light bank were shipped to Moscow. An experiment validation test (EVT) of plant growth and experimental procedures, carried out in Moscow, was highly successful. Equipment built in Utah to measure CO2, H2O vapor, irradiance, air and leaf (IR) temperature, O2, pressure, and substrate moisture worked well in the EVT and in space. After this manuscript was first prepared, plants were grown in Mir with a new light bank and controller for 123 d in late 1996 and 39 days in 1996/1997. Plants grew exceptionally well with higher biomass production than in any previous space experiment, but the ca. 280 wheat heads that were produced in 1996 contained no seeds. Ethylene in the cabin atmosphere was responsible.

  7. Female ROMK null mice manifest more severe Bartter II phenotype on renal function and higher PGE2 production

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qingshang; Yang, Xinbo; Cantone, Alessandra; Giebisch, Gerhard; Hebert, Steven; Wang, Tong

    2008-01-01

    ROMK null mice with a high survival rate and varying severity of hydronephrosis provide a good model to study type II Bartter syndrome pathophysiology (26). During the development of such a colony, we found that more male than female null mice survived, 58.7% vs. 33.3%. To investigate the possible mechanism of this difference, we compared the survival rates, renal functions, degree of hydronephrosis, as well as PGE2 and TXB2 production between male and female ROMK wild-type and null mice. We observed that female ROMK Bartter's mice exhibited lower GFR (0.37 vs. 0.54 ml·min−1·100 g BW−1, P < 0.05) and higher fractional Na+ excretion (0.66% vs. 0.48%, P < 0.05) than male Bartter's. No significant differences in acid-base parameters, urinary K+ excretion, and plasma electrolyte concentrations were observed between sexes. In addition, we assessed the liquid retention rate in the kidney to evaluate the extent of hydronephrosis and observed that 67% of male and 90% of female ROMK null mice were hydronephrotic mice. Urinary PGE2 excretion was higher in both sexes of ROMK null mice: 1.35 vs. 1.10 ng/24 h in males and 2.90 vs. 0.87 ng/24 h in females. TXB2 excretion was higher in female mice in both wild-type and ROMK null mice. The increments of urinary PGE2 and TXB2 were significantly higher in female null mice than males, 233.33% vs. 22.74% of PGE2 and 85.67% vs. 20.36% of TXB2. These data demonstrate a more severe Bartter phenotype in female ROMK null mice, and higher PGE2 and TXB2 production may be one of the mechanisms of this manifestation. PMID:18579648

  8. A phase I/II trial of Erlotinib in higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia after azacitidine failure.

    PubMed

    Thepot, Sylvain; Boehrer, Simone; Seegers, Valérie; Prebet, Thomas; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Wattel, Eric; Delaunay, Jacques; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Hunault, Mathilde; Jourdan, Eric; Chermat, Fatiha; Sebert, Marie; Kroemer, Guido; Fenaux, Pierre; Adès, Lionel

    2014-12-01

    Survival after azacitidine (AZA) failure in higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is poor and new treatment options are needed. Erlotinib, an oral inhibitor of the epidermal-growth-factor-receptor (EGFR), has shown in preclinical models some efficacy in higher risk MDS and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this phase I/II trial, 30 patients received 100mg/day (n=5) or 150mg/day (n=25) of Erlotinib orally after primary or secondary resistance to AZA treatment. Eighteen MDS and 12 AML patients were treated. This outpatient treatment was well tolerated with limited grade III-IV extra hematological toxicities (skin (n=1), and diarrhea (n=3). Response was observed in 6 patients (20%) including 1 complete remission (CR), 1 marrow CR and 4 hematological improvement (2 erythroid and 2 on platelets). Median duration of response was 5 months. Erlotinib appears to induce a significant number of responses in higher risk MDS/AML having failed AZA treatment. Given the good safety profile of Erlotinib, its combination with other drugs could be tested in the future in MDS and AML.

  9. Differentiating moss from higher plants is critical in studying the carbon cycle of the boreal biome.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Shuguang; Dong, Wenjie; Liang, Shunlin; Zhao, Shuqing; Chen, Jingming; Xu, Wenfang; Li, Xianglan; Barr, Alan; Andrew Black, T; Yan, Wende; Goulden, Mike L; Kulmala, Liisa; Lindroth, Anders; Margolis, Hank A; Matsuura, Yojiro; Moors, Eddy; van der Molen, Michiel; Ohta, Takeshi; Pilegaard, Kim; Varlagin, Andrej; Vesala, Timo

    2014-06-26

    The satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is used for estimating gross primary production (GPP), often includes contributions from both mosses and vascular plants in boreal ecosystems. For the same NDVI, moss can generate only about one-third of the GPP that vascular plants can because of its much lower photosynthetic capacity. Here, based on eddy covariance measurements, we show that the difference in photosynthetic capacity between these two plant functional types has never been explicitly included when estimating regional GPP in the boreal region, resulting in a substantial overestimation. The magnitude of this overestimation could have important implications regarding a change from a current carbon sink to a carbon source in the boreal region. Moss abundance, associated with ecosystem disturbances, needs to be mapped and incorporated into GPP estimates in order to adequately assess the role of the boreal region in the global carbon cycle.

  10. Can genetically based clines in plant defence explain greater herbivory at higher latitudes?

    PubMed

    Anstett, Daniel N; Ahern, Jeffrey R; Glinos, Julia; Nawar, Nabanita; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Johnson, Marc T J

    2015-12-01

    Greater plant defence is predicted to evolve at lower latitudes in response to increased herbivore pressure. However, recent studies question the generality of this pattern. In this study, we tested for genetically based latitudinal clines in resistance to herbivores and underlying defence traits of Oenothera biennis. We grew plants from 137 populations from across the entire native range of O. biennis. Populations from lower latitudes showed greater resistance to multiple specialist and generalist herbivores. These patterns were associated with an increase in total phenolics at lower latitudes. A significant proportion of the phenolics were driven by the concentrations of two major ellagitannins, which exhibited opposing latitudinal clines. Our analyses suggest that these findings are unlikely to be explained by local adaptation of herbivore populations or genetic variation in phenology. Rather greater herbivory at high latitudes can be explained by latitudinal clines in the evolution of plant defences.

  11. Testing Crew Responses to Varied Higher Plant Presentations in the MARS-500 Day Mission Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquit, J. D.; Bates, S. C.; Gushin, V. I.; Synchev, V. N.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Podolsky, I. G.; Marchant, C. C.; Bingham, G. E.

    2008-06-01

    Maintaining psychological and behavioral health of humans during long-duration space missions is of great importance for the future success of space exploration as the hostile space environment adversely impacts the psychological, social, and physiological well-being of humans in space. Growing and tending plants has been proposed as a countermeasures for the negative impacts of long-duration space missions[3] as interactions with plant life on earth have been found to be beneficial to humans in other settings. Preliminary results from a pilot 14-day chamber study appear to support the notion that interactions with plant life may act as a countermeasure for the negative impacts of life in space. Additional data will be collected during the Mars 500-day Chamber Study at Institute of Biomedical Problems (IMBP).

  12. Congruence and diversity of butterfly-host plant associations at higher taxonomic levels.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Paris, José R; Sánchez-Mercado, Ada; Viloria, Ángel L; Donaldson, John

    2013-01-01

    We aggregated data on butterfly-host plant associations from existing sources in order to address the following questions: (1) is there a general correlation between host diversity and butterfly species richness?, (2) has the evolution of host plant use followed consistent patterns across butterfly lineages?, (3) what is the common ancestral host plant for all butterfly lineages? The compilation included 44,148 records from 5,152 butterfly species (28.6% of worldwide species of Papilionoidea) and 1,193 genera (66.3%). The overwhelming majority of butterflies use angiosperms as host plants. Fabales is used by most species (1,007 spp.) from all seven butterfly families and most subfamilies, Poales is the second most frequently used order, but is mostly restricted to two species-rich subfamilies: Hesperiinae (56.5% of all Hesperiidae), and Satyrinae (42.6% of all Nymphalidae). We found a significant and strong correlation between host plant diversity and butterfly species richness. A global test for congruence (Parafit test) was sensitive to uncertainty in the butterfly cladogram, and suggests a mixed system with congruent associations between Papilionidae and magnoliids, Hesperiidae and monocots, and the remaining subfamilies with the eudicots (fabids and malvids), but also numerous random associations. The congruent associations are also recovered as the most probable ancestral states in each node using maximum likelihood methods. The shift from basal groups to eudicots appears to be more likely than the other way around, with the only exception being a Satyrine-clade within the Nymphalidae that feed on monocots. Our analysis contributes to the visualization of the complex pattern of interactions at superfamily level and provides a context to discuss the timing of changes in host plant utilization that might have promoted diversification in some butterfly lineages.

  13. Conservation and diversity of gene families explored using the CODEHOP strategy in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Morant, Marc; Hehn, Alain; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2002-01-01

    Background Availability of genomewide information on an increasing but still limited number of plants offers the possibility of identifying orthologues, or related genes, in species with major economical impact and complex genomes. In this paper we exploit the recently described CODEHOP primer design and PCR strategy for targeted isolation of homologues in large gene families. Results The method was tested with two different objectives. The first was to analyze the evolution of the CYP98 family of cytochrome P450 genes involved in 3-hydroxylation of phenolic compounds and lignification in a broad range of plant species. The second was to isolate an orthologue of the sorghum glucosyl transferase UGT85B1 and to determine the complexity of the UGT85 family in wheat. P450s of the CYP98 family or closely related sequences were found in all vascular plants. No related sequence was found in moss. Neither extensive duplication of the CYP98 genes nor an orthologue of UGT85B1 were found in wheat. The UGT85A subfamily was however found to be highly variable in wheat. Conclusions Our data are in agreement with the implication of CYP98s in lignification and the evolution of 3-hydroxylation of lignin precursors with vascular plants. High conservation of the CYP98 family strongly argues in favour of an essential function in plant development. Conversely, high duplication and diversification of the UGT85A gene family in wheat suggests its involvement in adaptative response and provides a valuable pool of genes for biotechnological applications. This work demonstrates the high potential of the CODEHOP strategy for the exploration of large gene families in plants. PMID:12153706

  14. Inflation from superstring and M-theory compactification with higher order corrections. - II. - Case of quartic Weyl terms

    SciTech Connect

    Akune, Kenta; Maeda, Kei-ichi; Ohta, Nobuyoshi

    2006-05-15

    We present a detailed study of inflationary solutions in M theory with higher order quantum corrections. We first exhaust all exact and asymptotic solutions of exponential and power-law expansions in this theory with quartic curvature corrections, and then perform a linear perturbation analysis around fixed points for the exact solutions in order to see which solutions are more generic and give interesting cosmological models. We find an interesting solution in which the external space expands exponentially and the internal space is static both in the original and Einstein frames. Furthermore, we perform a numerical calculation around this solution and find numerical solutions which give enough e-foldings. We also briefly summarize similar solutions in type II superstrings.

  15. How endogenous plant cell-wall degradation mechanisms can help achieve higher efficiency in saccharification of biomass.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Eveline Q P; De Souza, Amanda P; Buckeridge, Marcos S

    2015-07-01

    Cell-wall recalcitrance to hydrolysis still represents one of the major bottlenecks for second-generation bioethanol production. This occurs despite the development of pre-treatments, the prospect of new enzymes, and the production of transgenic plants with less-recalcitrant cell walls. Recalcitrance, which is the intrinsic resistance to breakdown imposed by polymer assembly, is the result of inherent limitations in its three domains. These consist of: (i) porosity, associated with a pectin matrix impairing trafficking through the wall; (ii) the glycomic code, which refers to the fine-structural emergent complexity of cell-wall polymers that are unique to cells, tissues, and species; and (iii) cellulose crystallinity, which refers to the organization in micro- and/or macrofibrils. One way to circumvent recalcitrance could be by following cell-wall hydrolysis strategies underlying plant endogenous mechanisms that are optimized to precisely modify cell walls in planta. Thus, the cell-wall degradation that occurs during fruit ripening, abscission, storage cell-wall mobilization, and aerenchyma formation are reviewed in order to highlight how plants deal with recalcitrance and which are the routes to couple prospective enzymes and cocktail designs with cell-wall features. The manipulation of key enzyme levels in planta can help achieving biologically pre-treated walls (i.e. less recalcitrant) before plants are harvested for bioethanol production. This may be helpful in decreasing the costs associated with producing bioethanol from biomass.

  16. Higher accumulation of F1-V fusion recombinant protein in plants after induction of protein body formation.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M Lucrecia; Topal, Emel; Martin, Federico; Cardineau, Guy A

    2010-01-01

    Improving foreign protein accumulation is crucial for enhancing the commercial success of plant-based production systems since product yields have a major influence on process economics. Cereal grain evolved to store large amounts of proteins in tightly organized aggregates. In maize, gamma-Zein is the major storage protein synthesized by the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and stored in specialized organelles called protein bodies (PB). Zera (gamma-Zein ER-accumulating domain) is the N-terminal proline-rich domain of gamma-zein that is sufficient to induce the assembly of PB formation. Fusion of the Zera domain to proteins of interest results in assembly of dense PB-like, ER-derived organelles, containing high concentration of recombinant protein. Our main goal was to increase recombinant protein accumulation in plants in order to enhance the efficiency of orally-delivered plant-made vaccines. It is well known that oral vaccination requires substantially higher doses than parental formulations. As a part of a project to develop a plant-made plague vaccine, we expressed our model antigen, the Yersinia pestis F1-V antigen fusion protein, with and without a fused Zera domain. We demonstrated that Zera-F1-V protein accumulation was at least 3x higher than F1-V alone when expressed in three different host plant systems: Ncotiana benthamiana, Medicago sativa (alfalfa) and Nicotiana tabacum NT1 cells. We confirmed the feasibility of using Zera technology to induce protein body formation in non-seed tissues. Zera expression and accumulation did not affect plant development and growth. These results confirmed the potential exploitation of Zera technology to substantially increase the accumulation of value-added proteins in plants.

  17. Inhibition of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme, Angiotensin II Receptor Blocking, and Blood Pressure Lowering Bioactivity across Plant Families.

    PubMed

    Patten, Glen S; Abeywardena, Mahinda Y; Bennett, Louise E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease, kidney disease, and stroke. Interest in medicinal or nutraceutical plant bioactives to reduce hypertension has increased dramatically. The main biological regulation of mammalian blood pressure is via the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The key enzyme is angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) that converts angiotensin I into the powerful vasoconstrictor, angiotensin II. Angiotensin II binds to its receptors (AT1) on smooth muscle cells of the arteriole vasculature causing vasoconstriction and elevation of blood pressure. This review focuses on the in vitro and in vivo reports of plant-derived extracts that inhibit ACE activity, block angiotensin II receptor binding and demonstrate hypotensive activity in animal or human studies. We describe 74 families of plants that exhibited significant ACE inhibitory activity and 16 plant families with potential AT1 receptor blocking activity, according to in vitro studies. From 43 plant families including some of those with in vitro bioactivity, the extracts from 73 plant species lowered blood pressure in various normotensive or hypertensive in vivo models by the oral route. Of these, 19 species from 15 families lowered human BP when administered orally. Some of the active plant extracts, isolated bioactives and BP-lowering mechanisms are discussed.

  18. Maize R2R3 Myb genes: Sequence analysis reveals amplification in the higher plants.

    PubMed

    Rabinowicz, P D; Braun, E L; Wolfe, A D; Bowen, B; Grotewold, E

    1999-09-01

    Transcription factors containing the Myb-homologous DNA-binding domain are widely found in eukaryotes. In plants, R2R3 Myb-domain proteins are involved in the control of form and metabolism. The Arabidopsis genome harbors >100 R2R3 Myb genes, but few have been found in monocots, animals, and fungi. Using RT-PCR from different maize organs, we cloned 480 fragments corresponding to a 42-44 residue-long sequence spanning the region between the conserved DNA-recognition helices (Myb(BRH)) of R2R3 Myb domains. We determined that maize expresses >80 different R2R3 Myb genes, and evolutionary distances among maize Myb(BRH) sequences indicate that most of the amplification of the R2R3 Myb gene family occurred after the origin of land plants but prior to the separation of monocots and dicots. In addition, evidence is provided for the very recent duplication of particular classes of R2R3 Myb genes in the grasses. Together, these findings render a novel line of evidence for the amplification of the R2R3 Myb gene family in the early history of land plants and suggest that maize provides a possible model system to examine the hypothesis that the expansion of Myb genes is associated with the regulation of novel plant cellular functions.

  19. Higher effect of plant species diversity on productivity in natural than artificial ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Flombaum, Pedro; Sala, Osvaldo E.

    2008-01-01

    Current and expected changes in biodiversity have motivated major experiments, which reported a positive relationship between plant species diversity and primary production. As a first step in addressing this relationship, these manipulative experiments controlled as many potential confounding covariables as possible and assembled artificial ecosystems for the purpose of the experiments. As a new step in this endeavor, we asked how plant species richness relates to productivity in a natural ecosystem. Here, we report on an experiment conducted in a natural ecosystem in the Patagonian steppe, in which we assessed the biodiversity effect on primary production. Using a plant species diversity gradient generated by removing species while maintaining constant biomass, we found that aboveground net primary production increased with the number of plant species. We also found that the biodiversity effect was larger in natural than in artificial ecosystems. This result supports previous findings and also suggests that the effect of biodiversity in natural ecosystems may be much larger than currently thought. PMID:18427124

  20. Phosphoinositide kinases and the synthesis of polyphosphoinositides in higher plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drobak, B. K.; Dewey, R. E.; Boss, W. F.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are a family of inositol-containing phospholipids which are present in all eukaryotic cells. Although in most cells these lipids, with the exception of phosphatidylinositol, constitute only a very minor proportion of total cellular lipids, they have received immense attention by researchers in the past 15-20 years. This is due to the discovery that these lipids, rather than just having structural functions, play key roles in a wide range of important cellular processes. Much less is known about the plant phosphoinositides than about their mammalian counterparts. However, it has been established that a functional phosphoinositide system exists in plant cells and it is becoming increasingly clear that inositol-containing lipids are likely to play many important roles throughout the life of a plant. It is not our intention to give an exhaustive overview of all aspects of the field, but rather we focus on the phosphoinositide kinases responsible for the synthesis of all phosphorylated forms of phosphatidylinositol. Also, we mention some of the aspects of current phosphoinositide research which, in our opinion, are most likely to provide a suitable starting point for further research into the role of phosphoinositides in plants.

  1. Selection for Higher Gene Copy Number after Different Types of Plant Gene Duplications

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Corey M.; Puckett, Emily E.; Bekaert, Michaël; Pires, J. Chris; Conant, Gavin C.

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary origins of the multitude of duplicate genes in the plant genomes are still incompletely understood. To gain an appreciation of the potential selective forces acting on these duplicates, we phylogenetically inferred the set of metabolic gene families from 10 flowering plant (angiosperm) genomes. We then compared the metabolic fluxes for these families, predicted using the Arabidopsis thaliana and Sorghum bicolor metabolic networks, with the families' duplication propensities. For duplications produced by both small scale (small-scale duplications) and genome duplication (whole-genome duplications), there is a significant association between the flux and the tendency to duplicate. Following this global analysis, we made a more fine-scale study of the selective constraints observed on plant sodium and phosphate transporters. We find that the different duplication mechanisms give rise to differing selective constraints. However, the exact nature of this pattern varies between the gene families, and we argue that the duplication mechanism alone does not define a duplicated gene's subsequent evolutionary trajectory. Collectively, our results argue for the interplay of history, function, and selection in shaping the duplicate gene evolution in plants. PMID:22056313

  2. Plant species richness belowground: higher richness and new patterns revealed by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hiiesalu, Inga; Opik, Maarja; Metsis, Madis; Lilje, Liisa; Davison, John; Vasar, Martti; Moora, Mari; Zobel, Martin; Wilson, Scott D; Pärtel, Meelis

    2012-04-01

    Variation in plant species richness has been described using only aboveground vegetation. The species richness of roots and rhizomes has never been compared with aboveground richness in natural plant communities. We made direct comparisons of grassland plant richness in identical volumes (0.1 × 0.1 × 0.1 m) above and below the soil surface, using conventional species identification to measure aboveground richness and 454 sequencing of the chloroplast trnL(UAA) intron to measure belowground richness. We described above- and belowground richness at multiple spatial scales (from a neighbourhood scale of centimetres to a community scale of hundreds of metres), and related variation in richness to soil fertility. Tests using reference material indicated that 454 sequencing captured patterns of species composition and abundance with acceptable accuracy. At neighbourhood scales, belowground richness was up to two times greater than aboveground richness. The relationship between above- and belowground richness was significantly different from linear: beyond a certain level of belowground richness, aboveground richness did not increase further. Belowground richness also exceeded that of aboveground at the community scale, indicating that some species are temporarily dormant and absent aboveground. Similar to other grassland studies, aboveground richness declined with increasing soil fertility; in contrast, the number of species found only belowground increased significantly with fertility. These results indicate that conventional aboveground studies of plant richness may overlook many coexisting species, and that belowground richness becomes relatively more important in conditions where aboveground richness decreases. Measuring plant belowground richness can considerably alter perceptions of biodiversity and its responses to natural and anthropogenic factors.

  3. Mercury in mercury(II)-spiked soils is highly susceptible to plant bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Hlodák, Michal; Urík, Martin; Matúš, Peter; Kořenková, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metal phytotoxicity assessments usually use soluble metal compounds in spiked soils to evaluate metal bioaccumulation, growth inhibition and adverse effects on physiological parameters. However, exampling mercury phytotoxicity for barley (Hordeum vulgare) this paper highlights unsuitability of this experimental approach. Mercury(II) in spiked soils is extremely bioavailable, and there experimentally determined bioaccumulation is significantly higher compared to reported mercury bioaccumulation efficiency from soils collected from mercury-polluted areas. Our results indicate this is not affected by soil sorption capacity, thus soil ageing and formation of more stable mercuric complexes with soil fractions is necessary for reasonable metal phytotoxicity assessments.

  4. Integration of a Higher Plant Chamber into the European Space Agency's MELiSSA Pilot Plant: The Canadian Role in Advanced Life Support Test-Bed Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Geoffrey; Lawson, Jamie; Gidzinski, Danuta; Stasiak, Michael; Dixon, Mike; Peiro, Enrique; Godia, Francesc; Paille, Christel; Fossen, Arnaud; Lamaze, Brigitte; Lasseur, Christophe

    The European Space Agency's Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) project has been conceived as a tool for developing the technology of future biological life support systems required for long-term human space exploration missions to the Moon or Mars. The main life support functions of MELiSSA are the recycling of waste (inedible plant biomass, human excrement), carbon dioxide and minerals and the production of food, fresh water and air revitalization. Based on the principle of an aquatic ecosystem, MELiSSA is comprised of four microbial compartments and a higher plant compartment integrated in a closed loop. Each compartment is studied, designed and demonstrated at laboratory scale before being scaled-up for subsequent integration into the MELISSA Pilot Plant (MPP) at the Universitat Aut`noma de Barcelona. Work related to higher plant cultivation systems, o which have been historically focussed at the University of Guelph's Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility (CESRF), has included design of the HPC for the MPP, the metabolic characterization of MELiSSA candidate crops and the validation of theoretical gas exchange and nutrient dynamic models, The presented paper will review some of the recent data and HPC design work of CESRF conducted as part of Canada's involvement in the MELiSSA program and its partnership in the development of the MPP terrestrial demonstration test-bed.

  5. Accident consequences analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-02-23

    Previous studies of the safety and environmental (S and E) aspects of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design have used simplistic assumptions in order to estimate radioactivity releases under accident conditions. Conservatisms associated with these traditional analyses can mask the actual behavior of the plant and have revealed the need for more accurate modeling and analysis of accident conditions and radioactivity mobilization mechanisms. In the present work a set of computer codes traditionally used for magnetic fusion safety analyses (CHEMCON, MELCOR) has been applied for simulating accident conditions in a simple model of the HYLIFE-II IFE design. Here the authors consider a severe lost of coolant accident (LOCA) producing simultaneous failures of the beam tubes (providing a pathway for radioactivity release from the vacuum vessel towards the containment) and of the two barriers surrounding the chamber (inner shielding and containment building it self). Even though containment failure would be a very unlikely event it would be needed in order to produce significant off-site doses. CHEMCON code allows calculation of long-term temperature transients in fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield structures resulting from decay heating. MELCOR is used to simulate a wide range of physical phenomena including thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, aerosol physics and fusion product release and transport. The results of these calculations show that the estimated off-site dose is less than 6 mSv (0.6 rem), which is well below the value of 10 mSv (1 rem) given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for protection of the public from exposure to radiation during off-normal conditions.

  6. A Drug-Target Network-Based Approach to Evaluate the Efficacy of Medicinal Plants for Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jiangyong; Chen, Lirong; Yuan, Gu; Xu, Xiaojie

    2013-01-01

    The use of plants as natural medicines in the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has long been of special interest. In this work, we developed a docking score-weighted prediction model based on drug-target network to evaluate the efficacy of medicinal plants for T2DM. High throughput virtual screening from chemical library of natural products was adopted to calculate the binding affinity between natural products contained in medicinal plants and 33 T2DM-related proteins. The drug-target network was constructed according to the strength of the binding affinity if the molecular docking score satisfied the threshold. By linking the medicinal plant with T2DM through drug-target network, the model can predict the efficacy of natural products and medicinal plant for T2DM. Eighteen thousand nine hundred ninety-nine natural products and 1669 medicinal plants were predicted to be potentially bioactive. PMID:24223610

  7. Unravelling the regulatory mechanisms that modulate the MEP pathway in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Cordoba, Elizabeth; Salmi, Mari; León, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    The methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of a substantial number of natural compounds of biological and biotechnological importance. In recent years, this pathway has become an obvious target to develop new herbicides and antimicrobial drugs. In addition, the production of a variety of compounds of medical and agricultural interest may be possible through the genetic manipulation of this pathway. To this end, a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate this pathway is of tremendous importance. Recent data have accumulated that show some of the multiple mechanisms that regulate the methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway in plants. In this review we will describe some of these and discuss their implications. It has been demonstrated that 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS), the first enzyme of this route, plays a major role in the overall regulation of the pathway. A small gene family codes for this enzyme in most of the plants which have been analysed so far, and the members of these gene families belong to different phylogenetic groups. Each of these genes exhibits a distinct expression pattern, suggesting unique functions. One of the most interesting regulatory mechanisms recently described for this pathway is the post-transcriptional regulation of the level of DXS and DXR proteins. In the case of DXS, this regulation appears conserved among plants, supporting its importance. The evidence accumulated suggests that this regulation might link the activity of this pathway with the plant's physiological conditions and the metabolic demand for the final products of this route.

  8. Position based nucleotide analysis of miR168 family in higher plants and its targets in mammalian transcripts.

    PubMed

    Javed, Mohammed; Solanki, Manish; Sinha, Anshika; Shukla, Lata Israni

    2017-02-15

    The conserved miR168 family is evaluated for position based nucleotide preference in higher plants. The mature miRNA sequences include miR168-5p and miR168-3p, were obtained from miRBase (v21, June 2014) for 15 families (28 plants) containing a-c subfamilies. The preferred position based nucleotide sequences were obtained for miR168-5p and miR168-3p using Data Analysis in Molecular Biology and Evolution (DAMBE). miR168-5p shows same nucleotides at positions 1-6, 8-9, 11-12, 15-17 and 19. Also, miR168-3p is present in 3 families (10 plants) shows the same nucleotide at position 1-11, 13-15 and 17-21. Our work suggests that miR168 family has conserved sequence in higher plants. The miR168-5p was subjected to cross kingdom analysis using psRNATarget. The seed region position 2-8 shows 70-95% pairing and cleavage site at position 10-14 were analysed for the base preference, in which pairing with the targets showed 80-96% Watson Crick pairing. The 123 targets in human transcriptome were identified showing 58% cleavage and 41% translation repression. Earlier reported Low density lipoprotein receptor adaptor protein 1(LDLRAP1) target validated for miR168a obtained from rice origin, could also be targeted from miR168 from any other plant sources. The randomly selected 10 targets include some important genes like RPL34, ATXN1, AKAPI3 and ALS2 and is involved in transcription, cell trafficking, cell metabolism and neurodegenerative disorder. This paper provides DAMBE analysis for miR168 across the plant kingdom and identification of new cross kingdom targets for miR168 using psRNATarget.

  9. DNA repair and recombination in higher plants: insights from comparative genomics of arabidopsis and rice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The DNA repair and recombination (DRR) proteins protect organisms against genetic damage, caused by environmental agents and other genotoxic agents, by removal of DNA lesions or helping to abide them. Results We identified genes potentially involved in DRR mechanisms in Arabidopsis and rice using similarity searches and conserved domain analysis against proteins known to be involved in DRR in human, yeast and E. coli. As expected, many of DRR genes are very similar to those found in other eukaryotes. Beside these eukaryotes specific genes, several prokaryotes specific genes were also found to be well conserved in plants. In Arabidopsis, several functionally important DRR gene duplications are present, which do not occur in rice. Among DRR proteins, we found that proteins belonging to the nucleotide excision repair pathway were relatively more conserved than proteins needed for the other DRR pathways. Sub-cellular localization studies of DRR gene suggests that these proteins are mostly reside in nucleus while gene drain in between nucleus and cell organelles were also found in some cases. Conclusions The similarities and dissimilarities in between plants and other organisms' DRR pathways are discussed. The observed differences broaden our knowledge about DRR in the plants world, and raises the potential question of whether differentiated functions have evolved in some cases. These results, altogether, provide a useful framework for further experimental studies in these organisms. PMID:20646326

  10. Causes and consequences of high osmotic potentials in epiphytic higher plants.

    PubMed

    Martin, Craig E; Lin, T C; Lin, K C; Hsu, C C; Chiou, W L

    2004-10-01

    Past reports of the water relations of epiphytes, particularly bromeliads, indicate that tissue osmotic potentials in these tropical and subtropical plants are very high (close to zero) and are similar to values for aquatic plants. This is puzzling because several ecophysiological studies have revealed a high degree of drought stress tolerance in some of these epiphytes. The goal of this study was two-fold: (1) to increase the number of epiphytic taxa sampled for tissue osmotic potentials; and (2) to explain the apparent discrepancy in the significance of the tissue water relations and tolerance of drought stress in epiphytes. Tissue osmotic potentials of 30 species of epiphytic ferns, lycophytes, and orchids were measured in a subtropical rain forest in northeastern Taiwan. Nearly all values were less negative than -1.0 MPa, in line with all previous data for epiphytes. It is argued that such high osmotic potentials, indicative of low solute concentrations, are the result of environmental constraints of the epiphytic habitat on productivity of these plants, and that low rates of photosynthesis and transpiration delay the onset of turgor loss in the tissues of epiphytes such that they appear to be very drought-stress tolerant. Maintenance of photosynthetic activity long into drought periods is ascribed to low rates of transpiration and, hence, delayed tissue desiccation, and hydration of the photosynthetic tissue at the expense of water from the water-storage parenchyma.

  11. Role of Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants. Progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1992-12-31

    The cytoskeleton including its microtubule (Mt) component participates in processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of Mts into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. The cortical array somehow directs the deposition of cellulose. Little molecular information is available regarding the formation of these arrays or the cellular signals to which they respond. Experimental data described here suggests that plant cells use calcium, in the form of a Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin complex, to affect the dynamics of Mts within the cortical array. Owing to the importance of Ca{sup ++} as a regulatory ion in higher plants we are probing for a putative Ca{sup ++}/Mt transduction pathway which may serve to integrate Mt activities within the growing and developing plant cell. We are using a lysed cell model in conjunction with immunocytochemical and biochemical methodologies to dissect how Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin interacts with Mts to affect their function.

  12. 14C and 13C characteristics of higher plant biomarkers in Washington margin surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaojuan; Benitez-Nelson, Bryan C.; Montluçon, Daniel B.; Prahl, Fredrick G.; McNichol, Ann P.; Xu, Li; Repeta, Daniel J.; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2013-03-01

    Plant wax lipids and lignin phenols are the two most common classes of molecular markers that are used to trace vascular plant-derived OM in the marine environment. However, their 13C and 14C compositions have not been directly compared, which can be used to constrain the flux and attenuation of terrestrial carbon in marine environment. In this study, we describe a revised method of isolating individual lignin phenols from complex sedimentary matrices for 14C analysis using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and compare this approach to a method utilizing preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC). We then examine in detail the 13C and 14C compositions of plant wax lipids and lignin phenols in sediments from the inner and mid shelf of the Washington margin that are influenced by discharge of the Columbia River. Plant wax lipids (including n-alkanes, n-alkanoic (fatty) acids, n-alkanols, and n-aldehydes) displayed significant variability in both δ13C (-28.3‰ to -37.5‰) and Δ14C values (-204‰ to +2‰), suggesting varied inputs and/or continental storage and transport histories. In contrast, lignin phenols exhibited similar δ13C values (between -30‰ and -34‰) and a relatively narrow range of Δ14C values (-45‰ to -150‰; HPLC-based measurement) that were similar to, or younger than, bulk OM (-195‰ to -137‰). Moreover, lignin phenol 14C age correlated with the degradation characteristics of this terrestrial biopolymer in that vanillyl phenols were on average ˜500 years older than syringyl and cinnamyl phenols that degrade faster in soils and sediments. The isotopic characteristics, abundance, and distribution of lignin phenols in sediments suggest that they serve as promising tracers of recently biosynthesized terrestrial OM during supply to, and dispersal within the marine environment. Lignin phenol 14C measurements may also provide useful constraints on the vascular plant end member in isotopic mixing models for carbon source

  13. Active tectonics and Holocene versus modern catchment erosion rates at 300 MW Baspa II hydroelectric power plant (NW Himalaya, India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganits, Erich; Grasemann, Bernhard; Gier, Susanne; Hofmann, Christa-Charlotte; Janda, Christoph; Bookhagen, Bodo; Preh, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The Baspa River is one of the most important tributaries to the Sutlej River in the NW Himalaya (India). Its catchment is 1116 km2 in size, ranges from c. 6400 m asl to 1770 m asl and contains India's largest private hydroelectric facility, the 300 MW Baspa II. Geologically, the hydroelectric installation is located in the Higher Himalayan Crystalline, just above the active Karcham Normal Fault, which is reactivating the Early Miocene Main Central Thrust, one of the principal Himalayan faults. The area is seismically active and mass-movements are common. Around 8200 yrs BP the Baspa was dammed by a rock-avalanche dam, leading to the formation of the originally c. 260 m deep palaeo-lake Sangla palaeo-lake. Detailed sedimentological investigations and radiocarbon dating indicate that the palaeo-lake was completely filled with sediments until c. 5100 yrs BP. This makes the Sangla palaeo-lake to a very rare example of a mass-movement dam with very long duration and its lacustrine sediments represent a valuable archive for geological processes and environmental proxies within the Baspa catchment during the c. 3100 years of its existence - which are the aim of our study. At least 5 levels of soft-sediment deformation have been recorded in the exposed part of the lacustrine sediments of Sangla palaeo-lake, including brecciated laminae, overturned laminae, folds, faults and deformation bands, separated by undeformed deposits. They are interpreted as seismites, indicating at least 5 earthquakes within 2500 years strong enough to cause liquefaction. The 300 MW Baspa II hydro-electric power plant has been built exactly on top of this palaeo-lake. This special location represents a very rare possibility to evaluate the short-term, river load and hydrological parameters measured during the planning and operational stages of Baspa II with the long-term parameters gained from the palaeo-lake sediments from the catchment. This data show that the Mid-Holocene erosion rates of the

  14. Evolutionary Trails of Plant Group II Pyridoxal Phosphate-Dependent Decarboxylase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Type II pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase (PLP_deC) enzymes play important metabolic roles during nitrogen metabolism. Recent evolutionary profiling of these genes revealed a sharp expansion of histidine decarboxylase genes in the members of Solanaceae family. In spite of the high sequence homology shared by PLP_deC orthologs, these enzymes display remarkable differences in their substrate specificities. Currently, limited information is available on the gene repertoires and substrate specificities of PLP_deCs which renders their precise annotation challenging and offers technical challenges in the immediate identification and biochemical characterization of their full gene complements in plants. Herein, we explored their evolutionary trails in a comprehensive manner by taking advantage of high-throughput data accessibility and computational approaches. We discussed the premise that has enabled an improved reconstruction of their evolutionary lineage and evaluated the factors offering constraints in their rapid functional characterization, till date. We envisage that the synthesized information herein would act as a catalyst for the rapid exploration of their biochemical specificity and physiological roles in more plant species. PMID:27602045

  15. Engineering sciences design. Design and implementation of components for a bioregenerative system for growing higher order plants in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevill, Gale E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The primary goal was to address specific needs in the design of an integrated system to grow higher plants in space. With the needs defined, the emphasis was placed on the design and fabrication of devices to meet these needs. Specific attention was placed on a hand-held harvester, a nutrient concentration sensor, an air-water separator, and a closed-loop biological system simulation.

  16. [Effects of ozone stress on photosynthesis and dry matter production of rice II -you 084 under different Planting densities].

    PubMed

    Peng, Bin; Lai, Shang-kun; Li, Pan-lin; Wang, Yun-xia; Zhu, Jian-guo; Yang, Lian-xin; Wang, Yu-long

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of ozone stress on photosynthesis, dry matter production, non-structural carbohydrate and yield formation of rice, a free air ozone concentration enrichment (FACE) experiment was conducted. A super hybrid rice cultivar II-you 084 with 3 spacing levels, low plant density (LD, 16 hills per m2), medium (MD, 24 hills per m2) and high plant density (HD, 32 hills per m2), was grown in the field at current and elevated ozone concentrations (current × 1.5). The results were as follows: Elevated ozone significantly reduced leaf SPAD value of UI-you 084 by 6%, 11% and 13%, at 63, 77, and 86 days after transplanting, respectively. The declines in leaf net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate at filling stage increased significantly on ozone stress over time. Ozone stress decreased dry matter production of rice by 46% from heading stage to plant maturity, thus reduced biomass yield by 25%. Elevated ozone decreased the concentration and accumulation of soluble carbohydrate and starch in stem of II-you 084 at jointing, heading and plant maturity, but significantly increased the dry matter transportation rate. No significant interaction was observed between ozone and planting density for photosynthesis, dry matter production and non-structural carbohydrate of rice. The above results indicated that elevated ozone reduced photosynthesis and growth of rice II-you 084 at late growth stage, which had no relationship with planting density.

  17. Characteristic effect of an anticancer dinuclear platinum(II) complex on the higher-order structure of DNA.

    PubMed

    Kida, Naoko; Katsuda, Yousuke; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Komeda, Seiji; Sato, Takaji; Saito, Yoshihiro; Chikuma, Masahiko; Suzuki, Mari; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2010-06-01

    It is known that a 1,2,3-triazolato-bridged dinuclear platinum(II) complex, [{cis-Pt(NH(3))(2)}(2)(micro-OH)(micro-1,2,3-ta-N (1),N (2))](NO(3))(2) (AMTA), shows high in vitro cytotoxicity against several human tumor cell lines and circumvents cross-resistance to cisplatin. In the present study, we examined a dose- and time-dependent effect of AMTA on the higher-order structure of a large DNA, T4 phage DNA (166 kbp), by adapting single-molecule observation with fluorescence microscopy. It was found that AMTA induces the shrinking of DNA into a compact state with a much higher potency than cisplatin. From a quantitative analysis of the Brownian motion of individual DNA molecules in solution, it became clear that the density of a DNA segment in the compact state is about 2,000 times greater than that in the absence of AMTA. Circular dichroism spectra suggested that AMTA causes a transition from the B to the C form in the secondary structure of DNA, which is characterized by fast and slow processes. Electrophoretic measurements indicated that the binding of AMTA to supercoiled DNA induces unwinding of the double helix. Our results indicate that AMTA acts on DNA through both electrostatic interaction and coordination binding; the former causes a fast change in the secondary structure from the B to the C form, whereas the latter promotes shrinking in the higher-order structure as a relatively slow kinetic process. The shrinking effect of AMTA on DNA is attributable to the possible increase in the number of bridges along a DNA molecule. It is concluded that AMTA interacts with DNA in a manner markedly different from that of cisplatin.

  18. [Effect of methylmercury chloride on the primary photosynthetic activity of higher plants].

    PubMed

    Kukarskikh, G P; Graevskaia, E E; Lavrukhina, O G; Krendeleva, T E; Rubin, A B

    2004-01-01

    The effect of methylmercury chloride (MeHg) on the fluorescence characteristics of pea seedling leaves and thylakoids isolated from these leaves was studied by the pulse-amplitude-modulation (PAM) fluorometric method. In 3-4 days after the addition of MeHg (20 microM) to the nutritious solution, the maximal (Fv/Fm) and real (under steady state actinic light illumination) (deltaF/F'm) quantum photochemical yield of PS II decreased. The nonphotochemical fluorescence quenching coefficient in control (qN) decreased after its maximum value has been reached. In MeHg-treated samples, this decrease was not observed, possibly due to the disturbance of delta pH energy transducing processes in ATP synthase. This was confirmed by the results of experiments on isolated thylakoids. After MeHg (5 microM) treatment of thylakoids, the photophosphorylation rate and light-triggered Mg2+-dependent H+-ATPase activity were suppressed by 20-40%, depending on the duration of MeHg exposure. However, in experiments with isolated thylakoids, no decrease either in the electron transport rate or in the Fv/Fm ratio was observed. In total, the results obtained allow one to assume that MeHg at concentrations and time duration used directly damages the coupling complex. The PS II inactivation in leaves and algae cells may be a result of the oxidative stress processes.

  19. Preparation of starch and other carbon fractions from higher plant leaves for stable carbon isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Wanek, W; Heintel, S; Richter, A

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of the carbon isotope composition of starch and cellulose still relies on chemical isolation of these water-insoluble plant constituents and subsequent elemental analysis by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS) of the purified fractions, while delta(13)C values of low-molecular-weight organic compounds are now routinely measured by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). Here we report a simple and reliable method for processing milligram quantities of dried plant material for the analysis of the carbon isotope composition of lipids, soluble sugars, starch and cellulose from the same sample. We evaluated three different starch preparation methods, namely (1) enzymatic hydrolysis by alpha-amylase, (2) solubilization by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) followed by precipitation with ethanol, and (3) partial hydrolysis by HCl followed by precipitation of the resulting dextrins by ethanol. Starch recovery for three commercially available native starches (from potato, rice and wheat) varied from 48 to 81% for the techniques based on precipitation, whereas the enzymatic technique exhibited yields between 99 and 105%. In addition, the DMSO and HCl techniques introduced a significant (13)C fractionation of up to 1.9 per thousand, while the carbon isotope composition of native starches analyzed after enzymatic digestion did not show any significant difference from that of untreated samples. The enzymatic starch preparation method was then incorporated into a protocol for determination of delta(13)C signatures of lipids, soluble carbohydrates, starch and crude cellulose. The procedure is based on methanol/chloroform/water extraction of dried and ground leaf material. After recovery of the chloroform phase (lipid fraction), the methanol/water phase was deionized by ion exchange (soluble carbohydrate fraction) and the pellet treated with heat-stable alpha-amylase (starch fraction). The remaining insoluble material was subjected

  20. The role of volatile metabolites in microbial communities of the lSS higher plant link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirranen, L. S.; Gitelson, I. I.

    The possibility of controlling the microbial community composition through metabolites produced by microbes has been considered. Basing on the comparative analysis of the experimental data we have revealed the greater contribution of volatile metabolites to microbial interaction than non-volatile. Investigations proved that the interaction between microorganisms through extracted volatile materials is a widespread phenomenon peculiar to many microorganisms. Most cultures inhibited each other's growth, in a number of cases displayed bactericidal action. Stimulatory action occurred 6 - 8 times rarely. The individuality of affect on studied test-cultures growth and the spectrum of microbial resistance to volatile metabolites have been revealed. Based on the comparative cluster analysis of these spectra from 100 studied cultures we have revealed that studied organisms produce a complex of volatile metabolites including 82 inhibiting and 52 stimulating. It was found that excretion of volatile metabolites of studied microorganisms depended upon the culture age, concentration of nutrient medium separate components and volatile by-products excreted by other microorganisms. The production can be increased or decreased by volatile by-products of other microbes. This is related to strain features and the culture age. The prospects of using these regulating metabolites can be defined by the "range", specificity and safety for other members of the microbial community in insufficient concentrations. Volatile metabolites of either plants and microorganisms or other system links - humans and technological equipment installed inside the closed ecosystem - can influence the formation of microbial communities, gas composition of the system atmosphere and state of the plants through the atmosphere. Special experiments showed that volatile microorganism metabolites could accumulate in the environment, dissolve in atmospheric water and maintain their biological activity for many days

  1. Size, Shape, and Arrangement of Cellulose Microfibril in Higher Plant Cell Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, S. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell walls from maize (Zea mays L.) are imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) at the sub-nanometer resolution. We found that the size and shape of fundamental cellulose elementary fibril (CEF) is essentially identical in different cell wall types, i.e., primary wall (PW), parenchyma secondary wall (pSW), and sclerenchyma secondary wall (sSW), which is consistent with previously proposed 36-chain model (Ding et al., 2006, J. Agric. Food Chem.). The arrangement of individual CEFs in these wall types exhibits two orientations. In PW, CEFs are horizontally associated through their hydrophilic faces, and the planar faces are exposed, forming ribbon-like macrofibrils. In pSW and sSW, CEFs are vertically oriented, forming layers, in which hemicelluloses are interacted with the hydrophobic faces of the CEF and serve as spacers between CEFs. Lignification occurs between CEF-hemicelluloses layers in secondary walls. Furthermore, we demonstrated quantitative analysis of plant cell wall accessibility to and digestibility by different cellulase systems at real-time using chemical imaging (e.g., stimulated Raman scattering) and fluorescence microscopy of labeled cellulases (Ding et al., 2012, Science, in press).

  2. Energetic metabolism response in algae and higher plant species from simulation experiments with the clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilenko, A.; Popova, A. F.

    Adenylate state is acknowledged to be among the most convenient approaches in the study of physiological changes in plant cells under simulation of altered gravity condition with the clinostat. Adenylate levels and the ATP/ADP ratio in cytoplasmic and mitochondrial extracts of cultivated cells of Haplopappus gracilis and algae cells of Chlorella vulgaris under initial stages of the fast-rotating and slow-rotating clinorotation, as well as the long-term clinorotation, have been investigated. For analysis of ATP and ADP levels in the plant cells under the clinorotation, we applied a high-sensitive bioluminescence method using the luciferase and piruvate kinase enzyme systems. It has been shown that the adenylate ratio is already increased during at the start of clinorotation with the different speed of rotation in the biological material tested. The considerable changes in mitochondrial ultrastructure of Chlorella cells, as well as the rising ATP level and dropping of the ATP/ADP ratio appear after long-duration clinorotation if compared to control material. It is probably connected with the distinctions in ATP-synthetase functioning in mitochondria of the cells under the clinorotation conditions.

  3. Quantification and Localization of S-Nitrosothiols (SNOs) in Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Juan B; Valderrama, Raquel; Carreras, Alfonso; Chaki, Mounira; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Corpas, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) are a family of molecules produced by the reaction of nitric oxide (NO) with -SH thiol groups present in the cysteine residues of proteins and peptides caused by a posttranslational modification (PTM) known as S-nitrosylation (strictly speaking S-nitrosation) that can affect the cellular function of proteins. These molecules are a relatively more stable form of NO and consequently can act as a major intracellular NO reservoir and, in some cases, as a long-distance NO signal. Additionally, SNOs can be transferred between small peptides and protein thiol groups through S-transnitrosylation mechanisms. Thus, detection and cellular localization of SNOs in plant cells can be useful tools to determine how these molecules are modulated under physiological and adverse conditions and to determine their importance as a mechanism for regulating different biochemical pathways. Using a highly sensitive chemiluminescence ozone technique and a specific fluorescence probe (Alexa Fluor 488 Hg-link phenylmercury), the methods described in this chapter enable us to determine SNOs in an nM range as well as their cellular distribution in the tissues of different plant species.

  4. Spectroscopic studies of energy transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers of higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Tabbutt, S.

    1987-09-01

    The focus of this thesis is excitation transfer and primary photochemistry in spinach chloroplasts and sub-chloroplast particles. The fluorescence kinetics are measured with a synchronously pumped, mode-locked dye laser excitation source and a reverse single photon-counting timing detection system. Very little has been reported on the fluorescence properties of photosystem I (PS I) due to its relatively weak emission compared to photosystem II (PS II). Using a PS I complex isolated from spinach, two emission bands, 690 nm and 722 nm were observed. The 690 nm fluorescence kinetics has an instrument limited (25 ps) rise and is best fit to three exponential decay components: slow, 2.2 to 2.5 ns; middle, 250 to 300 ps; and fast, 40 to 100 ps. Both the yield and kinetics are temperature independent (77 to 295K). The 722 nm emission is dramatically temperature dependent. At 295K the fluorescence lifetimes at 720 nm are identical to those at 690 nm. Upon lowering the temperature the lifetimes of all three decay components increase, a measurable risetime (>25 ps) grows in at temperatures below 265K, and the fluorescence intensity at 722 nm increases about 20-fold from 295K to 77K. These studies provide excitation transfer rates and activation energies within the PS I centers. The PS I emission data can be explained by two Chl a species: an antenna pool emitting at 690 nm and the reaction center emitting at 722 nm. The PSI reaction center complex (CP1) fluorescence intensity under continuous actinic illumination (690 nm) decreased by about 20% with the same kinetics as the optical bleaching at 699 nm. The kinetics and magnitudes of the fluorescence decrease and photobleaching depend upon excitation intensity, ascorbate concentration, ferri/ferrocyanide redox titration and phenasinemethosulfate concentration. 168 refs., 38 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Can Stress-Induced Biochemical Differences drive Variation in the Hydrogen Isotope Composition of Leaf Wax n-Alkanes from Terrestrial Higher Plants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eley, Y.; Pedentchouk, N.; Dawson, L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent research has identified that interspecies variation in leaf wax n-alkane 2H/1H from plants growing at the same geographical location can exceed 100‰. These differences cannot easily be explained by mechanisms that influence the isotopic composition of leaf water. Biochemical processes are therefore likely to drive some of this variability. Currently, however, little is known about the relative importance of different biochemical processes in shaping n-alkane hydrogen isotope composition. To explore this issue, we combined n-alkane δ2H analysis with measurements of: (i) the percentage content of leaf C and N; and (ii) foliar δ15N, from seven plants growing at Stiffkey salt marsh, Norfolk, UK. These species differ biochemically in respect of the protective compounds they produce under salt or water stressed conditions, with monocots generally producing more carbohydrates, and dicots producing more nitrogenous compounds. We found that monocots had higher %C, while dicots had higher %N and 15N-enriched leaf tissue. We identified a systematic relationship between the nature of the dominant protective compound produced (carbohydrate vs. nitrogenous) and n-alkane 2H/1H: species with a greater proportion of carbohydrates have more negative δ2H values. These findings might imply that shifts in the relative contribution of H to pyruvate from NADPH (2H-depleted) and recycled carbohydrates (2H-enriched) can influence n-alkane δ2H. The 2H-depletion of monocot n-alkanes relative to dicots may therefore be due to a greater proportion of NADPH-derived H incorporated into pyruvate because of their enhanced demand for carbohydrates. The production of protective compounds in plant species is a common response to a range of abiotic stresses (e.g. high UV irradiation, drought, salinity, high/low temperature). Species-specific biochemical responses to stress could therefore influence n-alkane 2H/1H across a range of habitats. This study highlights the importance of detailed

  6. The influence of zinc(II) on thioredoxin/glutathione disulfide exchange: QM/MM studies to explore how zinc(II) accelerates exchange in higher dielectric environments.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Roby; Bruce, Mitchell R M; Bruce, Alice E; Amar, François G

    2015-08-01

    QM/MM studies were performed to explore the energetics of exchange reactions of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and the active site of thioredoxin [Cys32-Gly33-Pro34-Cys35] with and without zinc(II), in vacuum and solvated models. The activation energy for exchange, in the absence of zinc, is 29.7 kcal mol(-1) for the solvated model. This is 3.3 kcal mol(-1) higher than the activation energy for exchange in the gas phase, due to ground state stabilization of the active site Cys-32 thiolate in a polar environment. In the presence of zinc, the activation energy for exchange is 4.9 kcal mol(-1) lower than in the absence of zinc (solvated models). The decrease in activation energy is attributed to stabilization of the charge-separated transition state, which has a 4-centered, cyclic arrangement of Zn-S-S-S with an estimated dipole moment of 4.2 D. A difference of 4.9 kcal mol(-1) in activation energy would translate to an increase in rate by a factor of about 4000 for zinc-assisted thiol-disulfide exchange. The calculations are consistent with previously reported experimental results, which indicate that metal-thiolate, disulfide exchange rates increase as a function of solvent dielectric. This trend is opposite to that observed for the influence of the dielectric environment on the rate of thiol-disulfide exchange in the absence of metal. The results suggest a dynamic role for zinc in thiol-disulfide exchange reactions, involving accessible cysteine sites on proteins, which may contribute to redox regulation and mechanistic pathways during oxidative stress.

  7. The Role of Silicon in Higher Plants under Salinity and Drought Stress

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Devrim; Britto, Dev T.; Huynh, Wayne Q.; Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    2016-01-01

    Although deemed a “non-essential” mineral nutrient, silicon (Si) is clearly beneficial to plant growth and development, particularly under stress conditions, including salinity and drought. Here, we review recent research on the physiological, biochemical, and molecular mechanisms underlying Si-induced alleviation of osmotic and ionic stresses associated with salinity and drought. We distinguish between changes observed in the apoplast (i.e., suberization, lignification, and silicification of the extracellular matrix; transpirational bypass flow of solutes and water), and those of the symplast (i.e., transmembrane transport of solutes and water; gene expression; oxidative stress; metabolism), and discuss these features in the context of Si biogeochemistry and bioavailability in agricultural soils, evaluating the prospect of using Si fertilization to increase crop yield and stress tolerance under salinity and drought conditions. PMID:27486474

  8. Chlorophyll‐Derived Yellow Phyllobilins of Higher Plants as Medium‐Responsive Chiral Photoswitches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengjie; Wurst, Klaus; Jockusch, Steffen; Gruber, Karl; Podewitz, Maren; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The fall colors are signs of chlorophyll breakdown, the biological process in plants that generates phyllobilins. Most of the abundant natural phyllobilins are colorless, but yellow phyllobilins (phylloxanthobilins) also occur in fall leaves. As shown here, phylloxanthobilins are unique four‐stage photoswitches. Which switching mode is turned on is controlled by the molecular environment. In polar media, phylloxanthobilins are monomeric and undergo photoreversible Z/E isomerization, similar to that observed for bilirubin. Unlike bilirubin, however, the phylloxanthobilin Z isomers photodimerize in apolar solvents by regio‐ and stereospecific thermoreversible [2+2] cycloadditions from self‐assembled hydrogen‐bonded dimers. X‐ray analysis revealed the first stereostructure of a phylloxanthobilin and its hydrogen‐bonded self‐templating architecture, helping to rationalize its exceptional photoswitch features. The chemical behavior of phylloxanthobilins will play a seminal role in identifying biological roles of phyllobilins. PMID:27891749

  9. [Proteolytic enzymes and trypsin inhibitors of higher plants under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Domash, V I; Sharpio, T P; Zabreĭko, S A; Sosnovskaia, T F

    2008-01-01

    The response of the components of a protease-inhibitor system of legume and cereal crops to stress factors was studied. It was found that salinization, heavy metal ions, and phytopathogenic flora inhibit the activity of neutral, acidic, and alkaline proteases at early stages of seed germination, the degree of the inhibition of the endoprotease activity being dependent on the index of tolerance of legume and cereal crops. It was shown that, in response to unfavorable conditions, accumulation of trypsin inhibitors occurs, which is accompanied by the appearance of new protein components, as indicated by electrophoresis. The results confirm the presumption that serine protease inhibitors are involved in the response of plants to stress factors.

  10. Regulation of sucrose metabolism in higher plants: localization and regulation of activity of key enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, S. C.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc) plays a central role in plant growth and development. It is a major end product of photosynthesis and functions as a primary transport sugar and in some cases as a direct or indirect regulator of gene expression. Research during the last 2 decades has identified the pathways involved and which enzymes contribute to the control of flux. Availability of metabolites for Suc synthesis and 'demand' for products of sucrose degradation are important factors, but this review specifically focuses on the biosynthetic enzyme sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), and the degradative enzymes, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and the invertases. Recent progress has included the cloning of genes encoding these enzymes and the elucidation of posttranslational regulatory mechanisms. Protein phosphorylation is emerging as an important mechanism controlling SPS activity in response to various environmental and endogenous signals. In terms of Suc degradation, invertase-catalyzed hydrolysis generally has been associated with cell expansion, whereas SuSy-catalyzed metabolism has been linked with biosynthetic processes (e.g., cell wall or storage products). Recent results indicate that SuSy may be localized in multiple cellular compartments: (1) as a soluble enzyme in the cytosol (as traditionally assumed); (2) associated with the plasma membrane; and (3) associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Phosphorylation of SuSy has been shown to occur and may be one of the factors controlling localization of the enzyme. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of the recent developments relating to regulation of activity and localization of key enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism in plants.

  11. Heat stress induces an aggregation of the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II in spinach plants.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yunlai; Wen, Xiaogang; Lu, Qingtao; Yang, Zhipan; Cheng, Zhukuan; Lu, Congming

    2007-02-01

    Whole spinach (Spinacia oleracea) plants were subjected to heat stress (25 degrees C-50 degrees C) in the dark for 30 min. At temperatures higher than 35 degrees C, CO2 assimilation rate decreased significantly. The maximal efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry remained unchanged until 45 degrees C and decreased only slightly at 50 degrees C. Nonphotochemical quenching increased significantly either in the absence or presence of dithiothreitol. There was an appearance of the characteristic band at around 698 nm in 77 K fluorescence emission spectra of leaves. Native green gel of thylakoid membranes isolated immediately from heat-stressed leaves showed that many pigment-protein complexes remained aggregated in the stacking gel. The analyses of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting demonstrated that the aggregates were composed of the main light-harvesting complex of PSII (LHCIIb). To characterize the aggregates, isolated PSII core complexes were incubated at 25 degrees C to 50 degrees C in the dark for 10 min. At temperatures over 35 degrees C, many pigment-protein complexes remained aggregated in the stacking gel of native green gel, and immunoblotting analyses showed that the aggregates were composed of LHCIIb. In addition, isolated LHCII was also incubated at 25 degrees C to 50 degrees C in the dark for 10 min. LHCII remained aggregated in the stacking gel of native green gel at temperatures over 35 degrees C. Massive aggregation of LHCII was clearly observed by using microscope images, which was accompanied by a significant increase in fluorescence quenching. There was a linear relationship between the formation of LHCII aggregates and nonphotochemical quenching in vivo. The results in this study suggest that LHCII aggregates may represent a protective mechanism to dissipate excess excitation energy in heat-stressed plants.

  12. Measurements of higher-order mode damping in the PEP-II low-power test cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.A.; Goldberg, D.A.

    1993-05-01

    The paper describes the results of measurements of the Higher-Order Mode (HOM) spectrum of the low-power test model of the PEP-II RF cavity and the reduction in the Q`s of the modes achieved by the addition of dedicated damping waveguides. All the longitudinal (monopole) and deflecting (dipole) modes below the beam pipe cut-off are identified by comparing their measured frequencies and field distributions with calculations using the URMEL code. Field configurations were determined using a perturbation method with an automated bead positioning system. The loaded Q`s agree well with the calculated values reported previously, and the strongest HOMs are damped by more than three orders of magnitude. This is sufficient to reduce the coupled-bunch growth rates to within the capability of a reasonable feedback system. A high power test cavity will now be built to validate the thermal design at the 150 kW nominal operating level, as described elsewhere at this conference.

  13. Characterization and dynamics of cytoplasmic F-actin in higher plant endosperm cells during interphase, mitosis, and cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We have identified an F-actin cytoskeletal network that remains throughout interphase, mitosis, and cytokinesis of higher plant endosperm cells. Fluorescent labeling was obtained using actin monoclonal antibodies and/or rhodamine-phalloidin. Video-enhanced microscopy and ultrastructural observations of immunogold-labeled preparations illustrated microfilament-microtubule co-distribution and interactions. Actin was also identified in cell crude extract with Western blotting. During interphase, microfilament and microtubule arrays formed two distinct networks that intermingled. At the onset of mitosis, when microtubules rearranged into the mitotic spindle, microfilaments were redistributed to the cell cortex, while few microfilaments remained in the spindle. During mitosis, the cortical actin network remained as an elastic cage around the mitotic apparatus and was stretched parallel to the spindle axis during poleward movement of chromosomes. This suggested the presence of dynamic cross-links that rearrange when they are submitted to slow and regular mitotic forces. At the poles, the regular network is maintained. After midanaphase, new, short microfilaments invaded the equator when interzonal vesicles were transported along the phragmoplast microtubules. Colchicine did not affect actin distribution, and cytochalasin B or D did not inhibit chromosome transport. Our data on endosperm cells suggested that plant cytoplasmic actin has an important role in the cell cortex integrity and in the structural dynamics of the poorly understood cytoplasm- mitotic spindle interface. F-actin may contribute to the regulatory mechanisms of microtubule-dependent or guided transport of vesicles during mitosis and cytokinesis in higher plant cells. PMID:3680376

  14. Genetic engineering of corn and other higher plants: Progress report for the period August 1, 1984--July 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    We have developed a number of potential vectors for maize transformation. All vectors have used the bacterial CAT gene connected between a maize promoter and a maize polyadenylation site. The product of this gene is readily assayed in maize tissue and may provide a fast screen for young seedlings. We have found that chloramphenicol reduces the growth of young seedlings and causes bleaching of the first leaves, but does not kill the plant. A mosaic with a transforming DNA may allow better growth. We remove a portion of the root to assay for CAT activity. CAT activity should be detected even if only a small number of cells contain DNA. If activity is detected in these young plants, the plant will be potted, and F1 and F2 plants will be generated. These will then be screened for stable inheritance of the transforming DNA. The higher the expression of the CAT gene in these few cells, the more reliable will be the assay. Accordingly, we have connected the CAT gene to one of the strongest maize promoters active in the young seedling. This promoter was identified in a large scale screening operation that identified the single copy gene that expressed the most abundant polyA RNA. The promoter and coding regions have been sequenced. The product of this gene has not yet been determined.

  15. Inclusion of human mineralized exometabolites and fish wastes as a source of higher plant mineral nutrition in BTLSS mass exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirova, Natalia; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Ushakova, Sofya; Anischenko, Olesya; Trifonov, Sergey V.

    Human exometabolites inclusion into an intrasystem mass exchange will allow increasing of a closure level of a biological-technical life support system (BTLSS). Previously at the IBP SB RAS it was shown that human mineralized exometabolites could be incorporated in the BTLSS mass exchange as a mineral nutrition source for higher plants. However, it is not known how that combined use of human mineralized exometabolites and fish wastes in the capacity of nutrient medium, being a part of the BTLSS consumer wastes, will affect the plant productivity. Several wheat vegetations were grown in an uneven-aged conveyor on a neutral substrate. A mixture of human mineralized exometabolites and fish wastes was used as a nutrient solution in the experiment treatment and human mineralized exometabolites were used in the control. Consequently, a high wheat yield in the experiment treatment practically equal to the control yield was obtained. Thus, mineralized fish wastes can be an additional source of macro-and micronutrients for plants, and use of such wastes for the plant mineral nutrition allows increasing of BTLSS closure level.

  16. Biological effects of weightlessness and clinostatic conditions registered in cells of root meristem and cap of higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytnik, K. M.; Kordyum, E. L.; Belyavskaya, N. A.; Nedukha, E. M.; Tarasenko, V. A.

    Research in cellular reproduction, differentiation and vital activity, i.e. processes underlying the development and functioning of organisms, plants included, is essential for solving fundamental and applied problems of space biology. Detailed anatomical analysis of roots of higher plants grown on board the Salyut 6 orbital research station show that under conditions of weightlessness for defined duration mitosis, cytokinesis and tissue differentiation in plant vegetative organs occur essentially normally. At the same time, certain rearrangements in the structural organization of cellular organelles - mainly the plastid apparatus, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus and nucleus - are established in the root meristem and cap of the experimental plants. This is evidence for considerable changes in cellular metabolism. The structural changes in the subcellular level arising under spaceflight conditions are partially absent in clinostat experiments designed to simulate weightlessness. Various clinostatic conditions have different influences on the cell structural and functional organization than does space flight. It is suggested that alterations of cellular metabolism under weightlessness and clinostatic conditions occur within existing genetic programs.

  17. Association mapping for phenology and plant architecture in maize shows higher power for developmental traits compared with growth influenced traits.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, S; Bertin, P; Presterl, T; Jamin, P; Coubriche, D; Gouesnard, B; Laborde, J; Charcosset, A

    2017-03-01

    Plant architecture, phenology and yield components of cultivated plants have repeatedly been shaped by selection to meet human needs and adaptation to different environments. Here we assessed the genetic architecture of 24 correlated maize traits that interact during plant cycle. Overall, 336 lines were phenotyped in a network of 9 trials and genotyped with 50K single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Phenology was the main factor of differentiation between genetic groups. Then yield components distinguished dents from lower yielding genetic groups. However, most of trait variation occurred within group and we observed similar overall and within group correlations, suggesting a major effect of pleiotropy and/or linkage. We found 34 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for individual traits and six for trait combinations corresponding to PCA coordinates. Among them, only five were pleiotropic. We found a cluster of QTLs in a 5 Mb region around Tb1 associated with tiller number, ear row number and the first PCA axis, the latter being positively correlated to flowering time and negatively correlated to yield. Kn1 and ZmNIP1 were candidate genes for tillering, ZCN8 for leaf number and Rubisco Activase 1 for kernel weight. Experimental repeatabilities, numbers of QTLs and proportion of explained variation were higher for traits related to plant development such as tillering, leaf number and flowering time, than for traits affected by growth such as yield components. This suggests a simpler genetic determinism with larger individual QTL effects for the first category.

  18. An empirical review: Characteristics of plant microsatellite markers that confer higher levels of genetic variation1

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Benjamin J.; Culley, Theresa M.; Avanesyan, Alina; Stokes, Richard; Brzyski, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    During microsatellite marker development, researchers must choose from a pool of possible primer pairs to further test in their species of interest. In many cases, the goal is maximizing detectable levels of genetic variation. To guide researchers and determine which markers are associated with higher levels of genetic variation, we conducted a literature review based on 6782 genomic microsatellite markers published from 1997–2012. We examined relationships between heterozygosity (He or Ho) or allele number (A) with the following marker characteristics: repeat type, motif length, motif region, repeat frequency, and microsatellite size. Variation across taxonomic groups was also analyzed. There were significant differences between imperfect and perfect repeat types in A and He. Dinucleotide motifs exhibited significantly higher A, He, and Ho than most other motifs. Repeat frequency and motif region were positively correlated with A, He, and Ho, but correlations with microsatellite size were minimal. Higher taxonomic groups were disproportionately represented in the literature and showed little consistency. In conclusion, researchers should carefully consider marker characteristics so they can be tailored to the desired application. If researchers aim to target high genetic variation, dinucleotide motif lengths with large repeat frequencies may be best. PMID:26312192

  19. Plant Elongator regulates auxin-related genes during RNA polymerase II transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Nelissen, Hilde; De Groeve, Steven; Fleury, Delphine; Neyt, Pia; Bruno, Leonardo; Bitonti, Maria Beatrice; Vandenbussche, Filip; Van der Straeten, Dominique; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Witters, Erwin; De Jaeger, Geert; Houben, Andreas; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2010-01-26

    In eukaryotes, transcription of protein-encoding genes is strongly regulated by posttranslational modifications of histones that affect the accessibility of the DNA by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). The Elongator complex was originally identified in yeast as a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex that activates RNAPII-mediated transcription. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the Elongator mutants elo1, elo2, and elo3 with decreased leaf and primary root growth due to reduced cell proliferation identified homologs of components of the yeast Elongator complex, Elp4, Elp1, and Elp3, respectively. Here we show that the Elongator complex was purified from plant cell cultures as a six-component complex. The role of plant Elongator in transcription elongation was supported by colocalization of the HAT enzyme, ELO3, with euchromatin and the phosphorylated form of RNAPII, and reduced histone H3 lysine 14 acetylation at the coding region of the SHORT HYPOCOTYL 2 auxin repressor and the LAX2 auxin influx carrier gene with reduced expression levels in the elo3 mutant. Additional auxin-related genes were down-regulated in the transcriptome of elo mutants but not targeted by the Elongator HAT activity showing specificity in target gene selection. Biological relevance was apparent by auxin-related phenotypes and marker gene analysis. Ethylene and jasmonic acid signaling and abiotic stress responses were up-regulated in the elo transcriptome and might contribute to the pleiotropic elo phenotype. Thus, although the structure of Elongator and its substrate are conserved, target gene selection has diverged, showing that auxin signaling and influx are under chromatin control.

  20. Evidence for Two Catalytic Sites in the Functional Unit of H+-ATPase from Higher Plants.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, G.; Berberian, G.; Beauge, L.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the nature of the complex ATP activation kinetics of plant H+-ATPases. To this aim we analyzed that activation in three isolated isoforms (AHA1, AHA2, and AHA3) of H+-ATPase from Arabidopsis thaliana. The isoforms were obtained by heterologous expression in endoplasmic reticulum of yeast. ATP stimulation was always with low affinity (K0.5 between 500 and 1800 [mu]M). In addition, the curves were not Michaelian and displayed positive cooperativity. Detailed studies with AHA2 showed that (a) enzyme solubilized with lysophosphatidylcholine exhibited Michaelian behavior even in the presence of soybean lecithin liposomes free of enzyme, (b) solubilized enzyme incorporated into the same liposomes displayed two-site kinetics with negative cooperativity, and (c) enzyme partially digested with trypsin lost the C-terminal portion of the molecule. Under this condition the ATP activation kinetics was Michaelian or had a slight negative cooperativity and the K0.5ATP was reduced 3-fold. These data suggest that the functional unit of the H+-ATPase has two catalytic ATP sites with variable cooperativity and kinetics competence of the E(ATP) and E(ATP)2 complexes. Such variability is likely modulated by the association of the enzyme with membrane structures and by a regulatory domain in the C terminus of the enzyme molecule. PMID:12228512

  1. Herbicides do not ensure for higher wheat yield, but eliminate rare plant species

    PubMed Central

    Gaba, Sabrina; Gabriel, Edith; Chadœuf, Joël; Bonneu, Florent; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Weed control is generally considered to be essential for crop production and herbicides have become the main method used for weed control in developed countries. However, concerns about harmful environmental consequences have led to strong pressure on farmers to reduce the use of herbicides. As food demand is forecast to increase by 50% over the next century, an in-depth quantitative analysis of crop yields, weeds and herbicides is required to balance economic and environmental issues. This study analysed the relationship between weeds, herbicides and winter wheat yields using data from 150 winter wheat fields in western France. A Bayesian hierarchical model was built to take account of farmers’ behaviour, including implicitly their perception of weeds and weed control practices, on the effectiveness of treatment. No relationship was detected between crop yields and herbicide use. Herbicides were found to be more effective at controlling rare plant species than abundant weed species. These results suggest that reducing the use of herbicides by up to 50% could maintain crop production, a result confirmed by previous studies, while encouraging weed biodiversity. Food security and biodiversity conservation may, therefore, be achieved simultaneously in intensive agriculture simply by reducing the use of herbicides. PMID:27453451

  2. Transport of phosphocholine in higher plant cells: sup 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gout, E.; Bligny, R.; Roby, C.; Douce, R. )

    1990-06-01

    Phosphocholine (PC) is an abundant primary form of organic phosphate that is transported in plant xylem sap. Addition of PC to the perfusate of compressed P{sub i}-starved sycamore cells monitored by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy resulted in an accumulation of PC and all the other phosphate esters in the cytoplasmic compartment. Addition of hemicholinium-3, an inhibitor of choline uptake, to the perfusate inhibited PC accumulation but not inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}). When the P{sub i}-starved cells were perfused with a medium containing either P{sub i} or PC, the resulting P{sub i} distribution in the cell was the same. Addition of choline instead of PC to the perfusate of compressed cells resulted in an accumulation of PC in the cytoplasmic compartment from choline kinase activity. In addition, PC phosphatase activity has been discovered associated with the cell wall. These results indicate that PC was rapidly hydrolyzed outside the cell and that choline and P{sub i} entered the cytosolic compartment where choline kinase re-forms PC.

  3. Transport of phosphocholine in higher plant cells: 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies.

    PubMed Central

    Gout, E; Bligny, R; Roby, C; Douce, R

    1990-01-01

    Phosphocholine (PC) is an abundant primary form of organic phosphate that is transported in plant xylem sap. Addition of PC to the perfusate of compressed Pi-starved sycamore cells monitored by 31P NMR spectroscopy resulted in an accumulation of PC and all the other phosphate esters in the cytoplasmic compartment. Addition of hemicholinium-3, an inhibitor of choline uptake, to the perfusate inhibited PC accumulation but not inorganic phosphate (Pi). When the Pi-starved cells were perfused with a medium containing either Pi or PC, the resulting Pi distribution in the cell was the same. Addition of choline instead of PC to the perfusate of compressed cells resulted in an accumulation of PC in the cytoplasmic compartment from choline kinase activity. In addition, PC phosphatase activity has been discovered associated with the cell wall. These results indicate that PC was rapidly hydrolyzed outside the cell and that choline and Pi entered the cytosolic compartment where choline kinase re-forms PC. PMID:11607080

  4. The PSII-S protein of higher plants: a new type of pigment-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Funk, C; Schröder, W P; Napiwotzki, A; Tjus, S E; Renger, G; Andersson, B

    1995-09-05

    An intrinsic 22 kDa protein of photosystem II has been shown to possess high sequence homology with the CAB gene products, but differs from these proteins by an additional putative fourth transmembrane helix. This protein, designated PSII-S in accordance with the assignment of the name psbS to its gene, has been isolated by nonionic detergents and preparative isoelectric focusing in this study. The isolated PSII-S protein was shown to bind 5 chlorophyll molecules (a and b) per protein unit and also several different kinds of carotenoids. The room temperature absorption spectrum of the Qy transition of the chlorophylls bound to the isolated protein is characterized by a broad band with a maximum at 671 nm. The 77 K fluorescence spectrum exhibits a peak at 672 nm. A single photon counting technique was applied to resolve the room temperature decay kinetics of the first excited singlet states in the chlorophyll ensemble of the PSII-S protein. The data can be satisfactorily described by triexponential kinetics with lifetimes of tau 1 = 1.8 ns, tau 2 = 4.4 ns, and tau 3 = 6.1 ns and normalized amplitudes of 0.09, 0.60, and 0.31, respectively. Circular dichroism spectra suggest that, in contrast to LHCII, virtually no pigment coupling exists in the PSII-S protein. Two copies of the PSII-S protein were found per PSII in spinach thylakoids. It displays an unusually extreme lateral heterogeneity, since the PSII beta centers located in the stroma exposed thylakoid regions contained only residual amounts of the PSII-S protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. The effect of hydration on protein flexibility in photosystem II of green plants studied by quasielastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Pieper, J; Hauss, T; Buchsteiner, A; Renger, G

    2008-06-01

    The effect of hydration on protein dynamics in photosystem II (PS II) membrane fragments from spinach has been investigated by using the method of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) at room temperature. The QENS data obtained indicate that the protein dynamics is strongly dependent on the extent of hydration. In particular, the hydration-induced activation of localized diffusive protein motions and QA- reoxidation by QB in PS II appear to be correlated in their onset at a hydration value of about 45% relative humidity (r.h.). These findings underline the crucial functional relevance of localized diffusive protein motions on the picosecond-timescale for the reactions of light-induced photosynthetic water splitting under formation of plastoquinol and molecular oxygen in PS II of green plants.

  6. Identification of a mechanism of photoprotective energy dissipation in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Ruban, Alexander V; Berera, Rudi; Ilioaia, Cristian; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Kennis, John T M; Pascal, Andrew A; van Amerongen, Herbert; Robert, Bruno; Horton, Peter; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2007-11-22

    Under conditions of excess sunlight the efficient light-harvesting antenna found in the chloroplast membranes of plants is rapidly and reversibly switched into a photoprotected quenched state in which potentially harmful absorbed energy is dissipated as heat, a process measured as the non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence or qE. Although the biological significance of qE is established, the molecular mechanisms involved are not. LHCII, the main light-harvesting complex, has an inbuilt capability to undergo transformation into a dissipative state by conformational change and it was suggested that this provides a molecular basis for qE, but it is not known if such events occur in vivo or how energy is dissipated in this state. The transition into the dissipative state is associated with a twist in the configuration of the LHCII-bound carotenoid neoxanthin, identified using resonance Raman spectroscopy. Applying this technique to study isolated chloroplasts and whole leaves, we show here that the same change in neoxanthin configuration occurs in vivo, to an extent consistent with the magnitude of energy dissipation. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, performed on purified LHCII in the dissipative state, shows that energy is transferred from chlorophyll a to a low-lying carotenoid excited state, identified as one of the two luteins (lutein 1) in LHCII. Hence, it is experimentally demonstrated that a change in conformation of LHCII occurs in vivo, which opens a channel for energy dissipation by transfer to a bound carotenoid. We suggest that this is the principal mechanism of photoprotection.

  7. Occurrence of the primary cell wall polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II in pteridophytes, lycophytes, and bryophytes. Implications for the evolution of vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Toshiro; Ishii, Tadashi; Matsumoto, Sadamu; Higuchi, Masanobu; Darvill, Alan; Albersheim, Peter; O'Neill, Malcolm A

    2004-01-01

    Borate ester cross-linking of the cell wall pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) is required for the growth and development of angiosperms and gymnosperms. Here, we report that the amounts of borate cross-linked RG-II present in the sporophyte primary walls of members of the most primitive extant vascular plant groups (Lycopsida, Filicopsida, Equisetopsida, and Psilopsida) are comparable with the amounts of RG-II in the primary walls of angiosperms. By contrast, the gametophyte generation of members of the avascular bryophytes (Bryopsida, Hepaticopsida, and Anthocerotopsida) have primary walls that contain small amounts (approximately 1% of the amounts of RG-II present in angiosperm walls) of an RG-II-like polysaccharide. The glycosyl sequence of RG-II is conserved in vascular plants, but these RG-IIs are not identical because the non-reducing L-rhamnosyl residue present on the aceric acid-containing side chain of RG-II of all previously studied plants is replaced by a 3-O-methyl rhamnosyl residue in the RG-IIs isolated from Lycopodium tristachyum, Ceratopteris thalictroides, Platycerium bifurcatum, and Psilotum nudum. Our data indicate that the amount of RG-II incorporated into the walls of plants increased during the evolution of vascular plants from their bryophyte-like ancestors. Thus, the acquisition of a boron-dependent growth habit may be correlated with the ability of vascular plants to maintain upright growth and to form lignified secondary walls. The conserved structures of pteridophyte, lycophyte, and angiosperm RG-IIs suggests that the genes and proteins responsible for the biosynthesis of this polysaccharide appeared early in land plant evolution and that RG-II has a fundamental role in wall structure.

  8. Occurrence of the Primary Cell Wall Polysaccharide Rhamnogalacturonan II in Pteridophytes, Lycophytes, and Bryophytes. Implications for the Evolution of Vascular Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Toshiro; Ishii, Tadashi; Matsumoto, Sadamu; Higuchi, Masanobu; Darvill, Alan; Albersheim, Peter; O'Neill, Malcolm A.

    2004-01-01

    Borate ester cross-linking of the cell wall pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) is required for the growth and development of angiosperms and gymnosperms. Here, we report that the amounts of borate cross-linked RG-II present in the sporophyte primary walls of members of the most primitive extant vascular plant groups (Lycopsida, Filicopsida, Equisetopsida, and Psilopsida) are comparable with the amounts of RG-II in the primary walls of angiosperms. By contrast, the gametophyte generation of members of the avascular bryophytes (Bryopsida, Hepaticopsida, and Anthocerotopsida) have primary walls that contain small amounts (approximately 1% of the amounts of RG-II present in angiosperm walls) of an RG-II-like polysaccharide. The glycosyl sequence of RG-II is conserved in vascular plants, but these RG-IIs are not identical because the non-reducing l-rhamnosyl residue present on the aceric acid-containing side chain of RG-II of all previously studied plants is replaced by a 3-O-methyl rhamnosyl residue in the RG-IIs isolated from Lycopodium tristachyum, Ceratopteris thalictroides, Platycerium bifurcatum, and Psilotum nudum. Our data indicate that the amount of RG-II incorporated into the walls of plants increased during the evolution of vascular plants from their bryophyte-like ancestors. Thus, the acquisition of a boron-dependent growth habit may be correlated with the ability of vascular plants to maintain upright growth and to form lignified secondary walls. The conserved structures of pteridophyte, lycophyte, and angiosperm RG-IIs suggests that the genes and proteins responsible for the biosynthesis of this polysaccharide appeared early in land plant evolution and that RG-II has a fundamental role in wall structure. PMID:14671014

  9. Photochemistry of Acetabularia rhodopsin II from a marine plant, Acetabularia acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Kikukawa, Takashi; Shimono, Kazumi; Tamogami, Jun; Miyauchi, Seiji; Kim, So Young; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kamo, Naoki

    2011-10-18

    Acetabularia rhodopsins are the first microbial rhodopsins discovered in a marine plant organism, Acetabularia acetabulum. Previously, we expressed Acetabularia rhodopsin II (ARII) by a cell-free system from one of two opsin genes in A. acetabulum cDNA and showed that ARII is a light-driven proton pump [Wada, T., et al. (2011) J. Mol. Biol. 411, 986-998]. In this study, the photochemistry of ARII was examined using the flash-photolysis technique, and data were analyzed using a sequential irreversible model. Five photochemically defined intermediates (P(i)) were sufficient to simulate the data. Noticeably, both P(3) and P(4) contain an equilibrium mixture of M, N, and O. Using a transparent indium tin oxide electrode, the photoinduced proton transfer was measured over a wide pH range. Analysis of the pH-dependent proton transfer allowed estimation of the pK(a) values of some amino acid residues. The estimated values were 2.6, 5.9 (or 6.3), 8.4, 9.3, 10.5, and 11.3. These values were assigned as the pK(a) of Asp81 (Asp85(BR)) in the dark, Asp92 (Asp96(BR)) at N, Glu199 (Glu204(BR)) at M, Glu199 in the dark, an undetermined proton-releasing residue at the release, and the pH to start denaturation, respectively. Following this analysis, the proton transfer of ARII is discussed.

  10. A Comparison Between Plant Photosystem I and Photosystem II Architecture and Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Caffarri, Stefano; Tibiletti, Tania; Jennings, Robert C.; Santabarbara, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is indispensable both for the development and maintenance of life on earth by converting light energy into chemical energy and by producing molecular oxygen and consuming carbon dioxide. This latter process has been responsible for reducing the CO2 from its very high levels in the primitive atmosphere to the present low levels and thus reducing global temperatures to levels conducive to the development of life. Photosystem I and photosystem II are the two multi-protein complexes that contain the pigments necessary to harvest photons and use light energy to catalyse the primary photosynthetic endergonic reactions producing high energy compounds. Both photosystems are highly organised membrane supercomplexes composed of a core complex, containing the reaction centre where electron transport is initiated, and of a peripheral antenna system, which is important for light harvesting and photosynthetic activity regulation. If on the one hand both the chemical reactions catalysed by the two photosystems and their detailed structure are different, on the other hand they share many similarities. In this review we discuss and compare various aspects of the organisation, functioning and regulation of plant photosystems by comparing them for similarities and differences as obtained by structural, biochemical and spectroscopic investigations. PMID:24678674

  11. Role of Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants. Progress report, FY91

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1991-12-31

    This work is aimed at defining the role of calcium/calmodulin in regulating cortical microtubules (MTS) in higher plants. Recent thrust has been to define the effects of calcium upon microtubules in vivo. Using lysed protoplasts, we noted Mts are destabilized by calcium/calmodulin. This effect could be the result of gross depolymerization induced by Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin, or by an increase in the dynamic flux rate. Intact protoplasts exposed to high (10 mM) levels of calcium (which would be expected to increase intercellular calcium levels) contained microtubules that were hypersensitive to Mt inhibitors, compared to control protoplasts exposed to low calcium environments.

  12. Amino acids implicated in plant defense are higher in Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus-tolerant citrus varieties.

    PubMed

    Killiny, Nabil; Hijaz, Faraj

    2016-01-01

    Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening, has been threatening the citrus industry since the early 1900's and up to this date there are no effective cures for this disease. Field observations and greenhouse controlled studies demonstrated that some citrus genotypes are more tolerant to Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) pathogen than others. However, the mechanisms underpinning tolerance has not been determined yet. The phloem sap composition of CLas-tolerant and sensitive citrus varieties was studied to identify metabolites that could be responsible for their tolerance to CLas. The citrus phloem sap was collected by centrifugation and was analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after methyl chloroformate derivatization. Thirty-three metabolites were detected in the phloem sap of the studied varieties: twenty 20 amino acids, eight 8 organic acids, and five 5 fatty acids. Interestingly, the levels of most amino acids, especially those implicated in plantdefense to pathogens such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, lysine, and asparagine were higher in tolerant varieties. Although the level of organic acids varied between cultivars, this variation was not correlated with citrus resistance to CLas and could be cultivar specific. The fatty acids were found in trace amounts and in most cases their levels were not significantly different among varieties. Better understanding of the mechanisms underpinning citrus tolerance to CLas will help in developing economically tolerant varieties.

  13. Amino acids implicated in plant defense are higher in Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus-tolerant citrus varieties

    PubMed Central

    Killiny, Nabil; Hijaz, Faraj

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening, has been threatening the citrus industry since the early 1900's and up to this date there are no effective cures for this disease. Field observations and greenhouse controlled studies demonstrated that some citrus genotypes are more tolerant to Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) pathogen than others. However, the mechanisms underpinning tolerance has not been determined yet. The phloem sap composition of CLas-tolerant and sensitive citrus varieties was studied to identify metabolites that could be responsible for their tolerance to CLas. The citrus phloem sap was collected by centrifugation and was analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after methyl chloroformate derivatization. Thirty-three metabolites were detected in the phloem sap of the studied varieties: twenty 20 amino acids, eight 8 organic acids, and five 5 fatty acids. Interestingly, the levels of most amino acids, especially those implicated in plantdefense to pathogens such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, lysine, and asparagine were higher in tolerant varieties. Although the level of organic acids varied between cultivars, this variation was not correlated with citrus resistance to CLas and could be cultivar specific. The fatty acids were found in trace amounts and in most cases their levels were not significantly different among varieties. Better understanding of the mechanisms underpinning citrus tolerance to CLas will help in developing economically tolerant varieties. PMID:27057814

  14. Zeaxanthin Radical Cation Formation in Minor Light-Harvesting Complexes of Higher Plant Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Avenson, Thomas H.; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Zigmantas, Donatas; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Li, Zhirong; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-01-31

    Previous work on intact thylakoid membranes showed that transient formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation was correlated with regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting via energy-dependent quenching. A molecular mechanism for such quenching was proposed to involve charge transfer within a chlorophyll-zeaxanthin heterodimer. Using near infrared (880-1100 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that carotenoid (mainly zeaxanthin) radical cation generation occurs solely in isolated minor light-harvesting complexes that bind zeaxanthin, consistent with the engagement of charge transfer quenching therein. We estimated that less than 0.5percent of the isolated minor complexes undergo charge transfer quenching in vitro, whereas the fraction of minor complexes estimated to be engaged in charge transfer quenching in isolated thylakoids was more than 80 times higher. We conclude that minor complexes which bind zeaxanthin are sites of charge transfer quenching in vivo and that they can assume Non-quenching and Quenching conformations, the equilibrium LHC(N)<--> LHC(Q) of which is modulated by the transthylakoid pH gradient, the PsbS protein, and protein-protein interactions.

  15. Measurement of higher-order mode losses in SPEAR II by shift in synchrotron phase and increase in net cavity power

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    It has been estimated that the loss to higher-order cavity modes in SPEAR II will be 135 keV per cavity at 100 mA for a 10-cm bunch (sigma/sub z/ = 5 cm). This corresponds to a loss of 10 MeV for a 50-m PEP structure. The power lost to higher modes in each SPEAR II cavity at 100 mA would be 13.5 kW. A loss of this order can be measured by calorimetry. This loss is also large enough to cause a significant increase in the net rf power input into the cavities over the power input with no higher-mode excitation. In addition, the higher-mode loss can also produce a measurable shift in the synchronous phase angle. Numbers for these effects are computed in this paper.

  16. Industrial fuel gas plant project. Phase II. Memphis industrial fuel gas plant. Final report. [U-GAS process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    The Industrial Fuel Gas Plant produces a nominal 50 billion Btu/day of product gas. The entire IFG production will be sold to MLGW. Under normal conditions, 20% of the output of the plant will be sold by MLGW to the local MAPCO refinery and exchanged for pipeline quality refinery gas. The MAPCO refinery gas will be inserted into the Memphis Natural Gas Distribution System. A portion (normally 10%) of the IFG output of the plant will be diverted to a Credit Generation Unit, owned by MLGW, where the IFG will be upgraded to pipeline quality (950 Btu/SCF). This gas will be inserted into MLGW's Natural Gas Distribution System. The remaining output of the IFG plant (gas with a gross heating value of 300 Btu/SCF) will be sold by MLGW as Industrial Fuel Gas. During periods when the IFG plant is partially or totally off-stream, natural gas from the Memphis Natural Gas Distribution System will be sent to an air mixing unit where the gas will be diluted to a medium Btu content and distributed to the IFG customers. Drawing 2200-1-50-00104 is the plant block flow diagram showing the process sequence and process related support facilities of this industrial plant. Each process unit as well as each process-related support facility is described briefly.

  17. Organic Acids: The Pools of Fixed Carbon Involved in Redox Regulation and Energy Balance in Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Eprintsev, Alexander T

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are synthesized in plants as a result of the incomplete oxidation of photosynthetic products and represent the stored pools of fixed carbon accumulated due to different transient times of conversion of carbon compounds in metabolic pathways. When redox level in the cell increases, e.g., in conditions of active photosynthesis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in mitochondria is transformed to a partial cycle supplying citrate for the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate (citrate valve), while malate is accumulated and participates in the redox balance in different cell compartments (via malate valve). This results in malate and citrate frequently being the most accumulated acids in plants. However, the intensity of reactions linked to the conversion of these compounds can cause preferential accumulation of other organic acids, e.g., fumarate or isocitrate, in higher concentrations than malate and citrate. The secondary reactions, associated with the central metabolic pathways, in particularly with the TCA cycle, result in accumulation of other organic acids that are derived from the intermediates of the cycle. They form the additional pools of fixed carbon and stabilize the TCA cycle. Trans-aconitate is formed from citrate or cis-aconitate, accumulation of hydroxycitrate can be linked to metabolism of 2-oxoglutarate, while 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutarate can be formed from pyruvate and glyoxylate. Glyoxylate, a product of either glycolate oxidase or isocitrate lyase, can be converted to oxalate. Malonate is accumulated at high concentrations in legume plants. Organic acids play a role in plants in providing redox equilibrium, supporting ionic gradients on membranes, and acidification of the extracellular medium.

  18. Organic Acids: The Pools of Fixed Carbon Involved in Redox Regulation and Energy Balance in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Igamberdiev, Abir U.; Eprintsev, Alexander T.

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are synthesized in plants as a result of the incomplete oxidation of photosynthetic products and represent the stored pools of fixed carbon accumulated due to different transient times of conversion of carbon compounds in metabolic pathways. When redox level in the cell increases, e.g., in conditions of active photosynthesis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in mitochondria is transformed to a partial cycle supplying citrate for the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate (citrate valve), while malate is accumulated and participates in the redox balance in different cell compartments (via malate valve). This results in malate and citrate frequently being the most accumulated acids in plants. However, the intensity of reactions linked to the conversion of these compounds can cause preferential accumulation of other organic acids, e.g., fumarate or isocitrate, in higher concentrations than malate and citrate. The secondary reactions, associated with the central metabolic pathways, in particularly with the TCA cycle, result in accumulation of other organic acids that are derived from the intermediates of the cycle. They form the additional pools of fixed carbon and stabilize the TCA cycle. Trans-aconitate is formed from citrate or cis-aconitate, accumulation of hydroxycitrate can be linked to metabolism of 2-oxoglutarate, while 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutarate can be formed from pyruvate and glyoxylate. Glyoxylate, a product of either glycolate oxidase or isocitrate lyase, can be converted to oxalate. Malonate is accumulated at high concentrations in legume plants. Organic acids play a role in plants in providing redox equilibrium, supporting ionic gradients on membranes, and acidification of the extracellular medium. PMID:27471516

  19. Exploratory Higher Order Analysis of the Luria Interpretive Model on the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition (KABC-II) School-Age Battery.

    PubMed

    McGill, Ryan J; Spurgin, Angelia R

    2015-11-23

    Higher order factor structure of the Luria interpretive scheme on the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition (KABC-II) for the 7- to 12-year and the 13- to 18-year age groups in the KABC-II normative sample (N = 2,025) is reported. Using exploratory factor analysis, multiple factor extraction criteria, and hierarchical exploratory factor analysis not included in the KABC-II manual, two-, three-, and four-factor extractions were analyzed to assess the hierarchical factor structure by sequentially partitioning variance appropriately to higher order and lower order dimensions as recommended by Carroll. No evidence for a four-factor solution was found. Results showed that the largest portions of total and common variance were accounted for by the second-order general factor and that interpretation should focus primarily, if not exclusively, at that level of measurement.

  20. International Student Access to U.S. Higher Education since World War II: How NAFSA (Association of International Educators) Has Influenced Federal Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyokawa, Norifumi

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation is a study of the policy process behind the legislation and regulation governing international student access to U.S. higher education since the immediate aftermath of World War II. The particular research focus of this dissertation is on NAFSA: Association of International Educators (originally established as the National…

  1. Higher-order phylogeny of modern birds (Theropoda, Aves: Neornithes) based on comparative anatomy. II. Analysis and discussion

    PubMed Central

    LIVEZEY, BRADLEY C; ZUSI, RICHARD L

    2007-01-01

    Piciformes. Unresolved portions of the Neornithes (nodes having more than one most-parsimonious solution) comprised three parts of the tree: (a) several interfamilial nodes within the Charadriiformes; (b) a trichotomy comprising the (i) Psittaciformes, (ii) Columbiformes and (iii) Trogonomorphae (Trogoniformes, Coliiformes) + Passerimorphae (Coraciiformes, Piciformes, Passeriformes); and (c) a trichotomy comprising the Coraciiformes, Piciformes and Passeriformes. The remaining polytomies were among outgroups, although several of the highest-order nodes were only marginally supported; however, the majority of nodes were resolved and met or surpassed conventional standards of support. Quantitative comparisons with alternative hypotheses, examination of highly supportive and diagnostic characters for higher taxa, correspondences with prior studies, complementarity and philosophical differences with palaeontological phylogenetics, promises and challenges of palaeogeography and calibration of evolutionary rates of birds, and classes of promising evidence and future directions of study are reviewed. Homology, as applied to avian examples of apparent homologues, is considered in terms of recent theory, and a revised annotated classification of higher-order taxa of Neornithes and other closely related Theropoda is proposed. © 2007 The Linnean Society of London, Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2007, 149, 1–95. PMID:18784798

  2. Higher-order phylogeny of modern birds (Theropoda, Aves: Neornithes) based on comparative anatomy. II. Analysis and discussion.

    PubMed

    Livezey, Bradley C; Zusi, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    Piciformes. Unresolved portions of the Neornithes (nodes having more than one most-parsimonious solution) comprised three parts of the tree: (a) several interfamilial nodes within the Charadriiformes; (b) a trichotomy comprising the (i) Psittaciformes, (ii) Columbiformes and (iii) Trogonomorphae (Trogoniformes, Coliiformes) + Passerimorphae (Coraciiformes, Piciformes, Passeriformes); and (c) a trichotomy comprising the Coraciiformes, Piciformes and Passeriformes. The remaining polytomies were among outgroups, although several of the highest-order nodes were only marginally supported; however, the majority of nodes were resolved and met or surpassed conventional standards of support. Quantitative comparisons with alternative hypotheses, examination of highly supportive and diagnostic characters for higher taxa, correspondences with prior studies, complementarity and philosophical differences with palaeontological phylogenetics, promises and challenges of palaeogeography and calibration of evolutionary rates of birds, and classes of promising evidence and future directions of study are reviewed. Homology, as applied to avian examples of apparent homologues, is considered in terms of recent theory, and a revised annotated classification of higher-order taxa of Neornithes and other closely related Theropoda is proposed. (c) 2007 The Linnean Society of London, Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2007, 149, 1-95.

  3. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors’ dynamics that may be of utility in drug design. PMID:26975976

  4. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2016-03-01

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors’ dynamics that may be of utility in drug design.

  5. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter M; George, Anthony M

    2016-03-15

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors' dynamics that may be of utility in drug design.

  6. Effects of lime and applied Mn on plant Mn, growth and chlorophyll concentration of Tifway II bermudagrass

    SciTech Connect

    McCray, J.M.; Sartain, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    A glasshouse study was conducted to determine effects of lime and Mn applied to three Florida soils on plant Mn, growth, and chlorophyll concentration of Tifway II bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon x Cynodon transvaalensis). Four replications of three lime rates (0, 1000, and 2000 mg CaCO/sub 3//kg as dolomite and Ca(OH)/sub 2/ for Astatula fine sand and Pompano; 0, 2000, and 4000 mg CaCO/sub 3//kg as dolomite and Ca(OH)/sub 2/ for Myakka fine sand and three Mn applications (none, 10 mg Mn/kg as MnSO/sub 4/, and 5 mg Mn/kg as MnEDTA) were used in a randomized, complete block, factorial design. A wide range of plant Mn concentrations existed across treatments for each soil. Differences in plant Mn concentration did not cause significant differences in growth of chlorophyll concentration. The critical plant Mn concentration was not reached, but it appeared to be below 20 mg Mn kg for bermudagrass. Models for prediction of plant Mn concentration using soil pH and extractable soil Mn were obtained. The applications of MnSO/sub 4/ and MnEDTA each resulted in increased plant Mn under acidic soil conditions. Neither Mn application resulted in increased plant Mn concentration in grass grown on Pompano fine sand with soil pH values of 7.0 or above.

  7. Nano modification of NZVI with an aquatic plant Azolla filiculoides to remove Pb(II) and Hg(II) from water: Aging time and mechanism study.

    PubMed

    Arshadi, M; Abdolmaleki, M K; Mousavinia, F; Foroughifard, S; Karimzadeh, A

    2017-01-15

    This paper reports the preparation and stabilization of nano zero valent iron (NZVI) on a modified aquatic plant, Azolla filiculoides, and investigates its potential for the adsorption/reduction of Pb(II) and Hg(II) ions from aqueous media even after six months of storage in the lab condition. XRD, TEM and zeta potential results demonstrated that the Azolla-NaOH could be a good stabilizer of aged NZVI (six months) and the green support suppressed the oxidation and aggregation of immobilized NZVI. Kinetic and equilibrium models for lead and mercury ions uptake were developed by considering the effect of the initial Pb(II) and Hg(II) concentrations, contact time, adsorbent dosage, initial pH and effect of temperature. The contact time to obtain equilibrium for maximum uptake by Azolla-OH-NZVI was 20min. The removal of toxic metal ions has been monitored in terms of pseudo-first- and -second-order kinetics, and the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms models have also been utilized to the equilibrium uptake results. The uptake kinetics followed the mechanism of the pseudo-second-order equation for all systems studied, confirming chemical sorption as the rate-limiting step of adsorption mechanisms and not involving a mass transfer in solution. The thermodynamic results confirmed that the uptake of Pb(II) and Hg(II) ions were feasible, spontaneous and endothermic at 25-80°C. XRD and zeta potential data displayed the existence of Pb(0) and Hg(0) on the Azolla-OH-NZVI surface. The nanobioadsorbent revealed high recyclability due to its reasonable uptake efficiency after 7th adsorption-desorption cycles. The proposed nano biocomposite could also be utilized to uptake Pb(II) and Hg(II) ions from the real water (Anzali lagoon water). However, coated NZVI with Azolla filiculoides as a green and environmentally friendly support suppressed rapid oxidation and aggregation of the immobilized NZVI, therefore vastly enhancing the probability of environmental transport and reducing

  8. Towards systems biology of the gravity response of higher plants -multiscale analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana root growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palme, Klaus; Aubry, D.; Bensch, M.; Schmidt, T.; Ronneberger, O.; Neu, C.; Li, X.; Wang, H.; Santos, F.; Wang, B.; Paponov, I.; Ditengou, F. A.; Teale, W. T.; Volkmann, D.; Baluska, F.; Nonis, A.; Trevisan, S.; Ruperti, B.; Dovzhenko, A.

    Gravity plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development. Up to now, little is known about the molecular organisation of the signal transduction cascades and networks which co-ordinate gravity perception and response. By using an integrated systems biological approach, a systems analysis of gravity perception and the subsequent tightly-regulated growth response is planned in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This approach will address questions such as: (i) what are the components of gravity signal transduction pathways? (ii) what are the dynamics of these components? (iii) what is their spatio-temporal regulation in different tis-sues? Using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model-we use root growth to obtain insights in the gravity response. New techniques enable identification of the individual genes affected by grav-ity and further integration of transcriptomics and proteomics data into interaction networks and cell communication events that operate during gravitropic curvature. Using systematic multiscale analysis we have identified regulatory networks consisting of transcription factors, the protein degradation machinery, vesicle trafficking and cellular signalling during the gravire-sponse. We developed approach allowing to incorporate key features of the root system across all relevant spatial and temporal scales to describe gene-expression patterns and correlate them with individual gene and protein functions. Combination of high-resolution microscopy and novel computational tools resulted in development of the root 3D model in which quantitative descriptions of cellular network properties and of multicellular interactions important in root growth and gravitropism can be integrated for the first time.

  9. Higher β-diversity observed for herbs over woody plants is driven by stronger habitat filtering in a tropical understory.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stephen J; Salpeter, Kara; Comita, Liza S

    2016-08-01

    Herbaceous plants are a key component of tropical forests. Previous work indicates that herbs contribute substantially to the species richness of tropical plant communities. However, the processes structuring tropical herb diversity, and how they contrast with woody communities, have been underexplored. Within the understory of a 50-ha forest dynamics plot in central Panama, we compared the diversity, distribution, and abundance of vascular herbaceous plants with woody seedlings (i.e., tree and lianas <1 cm DBH and ≥20 cm tall). Beta-diversity was calculated for each community using a null model approach. We then assessed the similarity in alpha and beta-diversity among herbs, tree seedlings, and liana seedlings. Strengths of habitat associations were measured using permutational ANOVA among topographic habitat-types. Variance partitioning was then used to quantify the amount of variation in species richness and composition explained by spatial and environmental variables (i.e., topography, soils, and shade) for each growth form. Species richness and diversity were highest for tree seedlings, followed by liana seedlings and then herbs. In contrast, beta-diversity was 16-127% higher for herbs compared to woody seedlings, indicating higher spatial variation in this stratum. We observed no correlation between local richness or compositional uniqueness of herbs and woody seedlings across sites, indicating that different processes control the spatial patterns of woody and herbaceous diversity and composition. Habitat associations were strongest for herbs, as indicated by greater compositional dissimilarity among habitat types. Likewise, environmental variables explained a larger proportion of the variation in species richness and composition for herbs than for woody seedlings (richness = 25%, 14%, 12%; composition = 25%, 9%, 6%, for herbs, trees, and lianas, respectively). These differences between strata did not appear to be due to differences in lifespan alone

  10. Land application of chemically treated sewage sludge. II. Effects on soil and plant heavy metal content

    SciTech Connect

    Soon, Y.K.; Bates, T.E.; Moyer, J.R.

    1980-07-01

    Anaerobically digested sewage sludges resulting from treatment of sewage with Ca(OH)/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 3/, or FeCl/sub 3/ for phosphorus precipitation were applied to corn (Zea mays L.) and bromegrass (Bromus inermis Leyess) grown on a soil having an initial pH of 7.3. Rates of sludge supplied 200, 400, 800, and and 1,600 kg N/ha each year for 5 years. Treatments with NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/ supplying 0, 100, 20, and 400 kg N/ha were included for comparison. Plant tissue was analyzed for Cu, Zn, Mn, Cd, Ni, Cr, and Pb. No toxicity or deficiency symptoms were noted. Soil Zn, Cd, and Ni extracted by NTA (nitrilotriacetic acid) were increased by continued sludge application. The NTA-extractable Zn and Cd were positively correlated with the Zn and Cd concentrations in corn stover. Soil pH was reduced by the Fe-sludge application, slightly affected by the Al-sludge, and increased by the Ca-sludge. Increases in Cu concentrations in bromegrass and corn stover were associated with increases in the N content rather than the source of N, and plant Cu concentrations remained relatively constant across years. Sewage sludge application increased Zn, Cd, and Ni concentrations in bromegrass and corn stover, and Zn and Ni concentrations in corn grain, particularly at the higher metal loadings from sludge application. Zinc and Cd concentrations, especially in corn stover, increased with continued sludge application during the 5-year period. The inclusion of soil pH as a factor, in addition to cummulative amounts of Zn or Cd added as a constituent of sludge, improved the regression equations predicting Zn or Cd uptake.

  11. Granal stacking of thylakoid membranes in higher plant chloroplasts: the physicochemical forces at work and the functional consequences that ensue.

    PubMed

    Chow, Wah Soon; Kim, Eun-Ha; Horton, Peter; Anderson, Jan M

    2005-12-01

    The formation of grana in chloroplasts of higher plants is examined in terms of the subtle interplay of physicochemical forces of attraction and repulsion. The attractive forces between two adjacent membranes comprise (1) van der Waals attraction that depends on the abundance and type of atoms in each membrane, on the distance between the membranes and on the dielectric constant, (2) depletion attraction that generates local order by granal stacking at the expense of greater disorder (i.e. entropy) in the stroma, and (3) an electrostatic attraction of opposite charges located on adjacent membranes. The repulsive forces comprise (1) electrostatic repulsion due to the net negative charge on the outer surface of thylakoid membranes, (2) hydration repulsion that operates at small separations between thylakoid membranes due to layers of bound water molecules, and (3) steric hindrance due to bulky protrusions of Photosystem I (PSI) and ATP synthase into the stroma. In addition, specific interactions may occur, but they await experimental demonstration. Although grana are not essential for photosynthesis, they are ubiquitous in higher plants. Grana may have been selected during evolution for the functional advantages that they confer on higher plants. The functional consequences of grana stacking include (1) enhancement of light capture through a vastly increased area-to-volume ratio and connectivity of several PSIIs with large functional antenna size, (2) the ability to control the lateral separation of PSI from PSII and, therefore, the balanced distribution of excitation energy between two photosystems working in series, (3) the reversible fine-tuning of energy distribution between the photosystems by State 1-State 2 transitions, (4) the ability to regulate light-harvesting via controlled thermal dissipation of excess excitation energy, detected as non-photochemical quenching, (5) dynamic flexibility in the light reactions mediated by a granal structure in response to

  12. Over-expression of AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa leads to faster plant growth and higher seed yield

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lipids extracted from seeds of Camelina sativa have been successfully used as a reliable source of aviation biofuels. This biofuel is environmentally friendly because the drought resistance, frost tolerance and low fertilizer requirement of Camelina sativa allow it to grow on marginal lands. Improving the species growth and seed yield by genetic engineering is therefore a target for the biofuels industry. In Arabidopsis, overexpression of purple acid phosphatase 2 encoded by Arabidopsis (AtPAP2) promotes plant growth by modulating carbon metabolism. Overexpression lines bolt earlier and produce 50% more seeds per plant than wild type. In this study, we explored the effects of overexpressing AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa. Results Under controlled environmental conditions, overexpression of AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa resulted in longer hypocotyls, earlier flowering, faster growth rate, higher photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance, increased seed yield and seed size in comparison with the wild-type line and null-lines. Similar to transgenic Arabidopsis, activity of sucrose phosphate synthase in leaves of transgenic Camelina was also significantly up-regulated. Sucrose produced in photosynthetic tissues supplies the building blocks for cellulose, starch and lipids for growth and fuel for anabolic metabolism. Changes in carbon flow and sink/source activities in transgenic lines may affect floral, architectural, and reproductive traits of plants. Conclusions Lipids extracted from the seeds of Camelina sativa have been used as a major constituent of aviation biofuels. The improved growth rate and seed yield of transgenic Camelina under controlled environmental conditions have the potential to boost oil yield on an area basis in field conditions and thus make Camelina-based biofuels more environmentally friendly and economically attractive. PMID:22472516

  13. Isolation and characterization of soluble boron complexes in higher plants. The mechanism of phloem mobility of boron.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, H; Penn, S G; Lebrilla, C B; Brown, P H

    1997-01-01

    Boron (B) polyol complexes have been isolated and characterized from the phloem sap of celery (Apium graveolens L.) and the extrafloral nectar of peach (Prunus persica L.). In celery the direct analysis of untreated phloem sap by matrix-assisted laser desorption-Fourier transform mass spectrometry, with verification by high-performance liquid chromagraphy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, revealed that B is present in the phloem as the mannitol-B-mannitol complex. Molecular modeling further predicted that this complex is present in the 3,4 3',4' bis-mannitol configuration. In the extrafloral nectar of peach, B was present as a mixture of sorbitol-B-sorbitol, fructose-B-fructose, or sorbitol-B-fructose. To our knowledge, these findings represent the first successful isolation and characterization of soluble B complexes from higher plants and provide a mechanistic explanation for the observed phloem B mobility in these species. PMID:9046600

  14. Genotoxicity Assessment of Volatile Organic Compounds in Landfill Gas Emission Using Comet Assay in Higher Terrestrial Plant.

    PubMed

    Na Roi-Et, Veerapas; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Chiemchaisri, Chart

    2017-02-01

    Genotoxicity model is developed to assess the individual subacute toxicity of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) at very low levels as in a landfill gas. Golden Pothos (Epipremnum aureum), a higher plant, was tested under variation of benzene 54-5656 ng/L, toluene 10-4362 ng/L, ethylbenzene 28-4997 ng/L, xylene 53-4845 ng/L, for 96 h. DNA fragmentation in plant leaves were investigated via comet assay. The results show that DNA migration ratio increased with the BTEX concentrations, but at different rates. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) of DNA fragmentation from the dose-response relationships indicated toluene has the highest EC50 value and followed by benzene, xylene and ethylbenzene. Alternatively, ethylbenzene has the highest toxicity unit and followed by xylene, benzene and toluene as described by toxicity unit (TU). In conclusion, comet assay of Pothos can be used in differentiating DNA fragmentation against very low levels of BTEX in the atmosphere. Pothos is recommended for genotoxicity assessment of a low BTEX contaminated atmosphere.

  15. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 against a main feedwater turbopump trip transient in the Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, C.; Casals, A.; Perez, J.; Mendizabal, R.

    1993-12-01

    The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN) and the Asociacion Nuclear Vandellos (ANV) have developed a model of Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant. The ANV collaboration consisted in the supply of design and actual data, the cooperation in the simulation of the control systems and other model components, as well as in the results analysis. The obtained model has been assessed against the following transients occurred in plant: A trip from the 100% power level (CSN); a load rejection from 100% to 50% (CSN); a load rejection from 75% to 65% (ANV); and, a feedwater turbopump trip (ANV). This copy is a report of the feedwater turbopump trip transient simulation. This transient actually occurred in the plant on June 19, 1989.

  16. Interaction of amatoxins with plant cells and RNA polymerases II: selection of amanitin-resistant cell lines and synthesis of amanitin-based affinity ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Little, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    A series of experiments directed toward deriving basic information regarding plant RNA polymerase II is presented. The experiments described relate to the potential of isolating RNA polymerase II mutants in plants, using carrot cell cultures as models. Additionally, the synthesis of amanitin-based affinity ligands to immobilize isolated plant RNA polymerase II and associated transcriptional complexes is described. RNA polymerase II activities have been isolated from suspension cultures of carrot and compared to other plant RNA polymerases II with respect to subunit analysis and inhibition with ..cap alpha..-amanitin. RNA polymerase II purified by polymin P absorption, DE52, phosphocellulose, and RNA-agarose chromatography is shown to copurify with proteins of 175 (and 200), 135, 70, 43, 28, 22, and 17 kdaltons apparent molecular weights. Conditions for accurate determination of amanitin inhibition of the enzyme are established using /sup 3/H-amanitin and are presented for the first time for plant RNA polymerase II; RNA polymerase II from these cultures is shown to be inhibited by 50% at 3-5 nM by ..cap alpha..-amanitin, a value 10-50 times lower than previously reported.

  17. Higher-Order Factor Structure of the Differential Ability Scales-II: Consistency across Ages 4 to 17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Timothy Z.; Low, Justin A.; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Patel, Puja G.; Ridley, Kristen P.

    2010-01-01

    The recently published second edition of the Differential Abilities Scale (DAS-II) is designed to measure multiple broad and general abilities from Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory. Although the technical manual presents information supporting the test's structure, additional research is needed to determine the constructs measured by the test and…

  18. 76 FR 6811 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permit; Construction and Operation of Kaheawa II...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... Operation of Kaheawa II Wind Energy Generation Facility, Maui, HI; Draft Habitat Conservation Plan and Draft... caused by the construction and operation of the KWP II wind energy facility on the island of Maui. The... permit under the ESA to authorize take of three federally endangered and one threatened bird species....

  19. C-Terminally fused affinity Strep-tag II is removed by proteolysis from recombinant human erythropoietin expressed in transgenic tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Kittur, Farooqahmed S.; Lalgondar, Mallikarjun; Hung, Chiu-Yueh; Sane, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Asialo-erythropoietin (asialo-EPO), a desialylated form of EPO, is a potent tissue-protective agent. Recently, we and others have exploited a low cost plant-based expression system to produce recombinant human asialo-EPO (asialo-rhuEPOP). To facilitate purification from plant extracts, Strep-tag II was engineered at the C-terminus of EPO. Although asialo-rhuEPOP was efficiently expressed in transgenic tobacco plants, affinity purification based on Strep-tag II did not result in the recovery of the protein. In this study, we investigated the stability of Strep-tag II tagged asialo-rhuEPOP expressed in tobacco plants to understand whether this fused tag is cleaved or inaccessible. Sequencing RT-PCR products confirmed that fused DNA sequences encoding Strep-tag II were properly transcribed, and three-dimensional protein structure model revealed that the tag must be fully accessible. However, Western blot analysis of leaf extracts and purified asialo-rhuEPOP revealed that the Strep-tag II was absent on the protein. Additionally, no peptide fragment containing Strep-tag II was identified in the LC-MS/MS analysis of purified protein further supporting that the affinity tag was absent on asialo-rhuEPOP. However, Strep-tag II was detected on asialo-rhuEPOP that was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, suggesting that the Strep-tag II is removed during protein secretion or extraction. These findings together with recent reports that C-terminally fused Strep-tag II or IgG Fc domain are also removed from EPO in tobacco plants, suggest that its C-terminus may be highly susceptible to proteolysis in tobacco plants. Therefore, direct fusion of purification tags at the C-terminus of EPO should be avoided while expressing it in tobacco plants. PMID:25504272

  20. Molecular characterization of a novel heavy metal uptake transporter from higher plants and its potential for use in phytoremediation. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.I.

    1997-01-01

    'In the following the author reports on progress on the Department of Energy Grant from the Office of Energy Research and Office of Environmental Management on the topic of Molecular characterization of a novel heavy metal uptake transporter from higher plants and its potential use in phytoremediation. In this research the authors are investigating the following hypotheses: (1) A novel metal transporter cDNA isolated in my lab functions as a plasma membrane heavy metal and uptake transporter in plants roots. (2.) Over-expression of this cDNA in plants can be used to enhance plasma membrane metal uptake into plant tissues.'

  1. Photosystem I shows a higher tolerance to sorbitol-induced osmotic stress than photosystem II in the intertidal macro-algae Ulva prolifera (Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Zheng, Zhenbing; Gu, Wenhui; Xie, Xiujun; Huan, Li; Pan, Guanghua; Wang, Guangce

    2014-10-01

    The photosynthetic performance of the desiccation-tolerant, intertidal macro-algae Ulva prolifera was significantly affected by sorbitol-induced osmotic stress. Our results showed that photosynthetic activity decreased significantly with increases in sorbitol concentration. Although the partial activity of both photosystem I (PS I) and photosystem II (PS II) was able to recover after 30 min of rehydration, the activity of PS II decreased more rapidly than PS I. At 4 M sorbitol concentration, the activity of PS II was almost 0 while that of PS I was still at about one third of normal levels. Following prolonged treatment with 1 and 2 M sorbitol, the activity of PS I and PS II decreased slowly, suggesting that the effects of moderate concentrations of sorbitol on PS I and PS II were gradual. Interestingly, an increase in non-photochemical quenching occurred under these conditions in response to moderate osmotic stress, whereas it declined significantly under severe osmotic stress. These results suggest that photoprotection in U. prolifera could also be induced by moderate osmotic stress. In addition, the oxidation of PS I was significantly affected by osmotic stress. P700(+) in the thalli treated with high concentrations of sorbitol could still be reduced, as PS II was inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), but it could not be fully oxidized. This observation may be caused by the higher quantum yield of non-photochemical energy dissipation in PS I due to acceptor-side limitation (Y(NA)) during rehydration in seawater containing DCMU.

  2. Slow molecular evolution in 18S rDNA, rbcL and nad5 genes of mosses compared with higher plants.

    PubMed

    Stenøien, H K

    2008-03-01

    The evolutionary potential of bryophytes (mosses, liverworts and hornworts) has been debated for decades. Fossil record and biogeographical distribution patterns suggest very slow morphological evolution and the retainment of several ancient traits since the split with vascular plants some 450 million years ago. Many have argued that bryophytes may evolve as rapidly as higher plants on the molecular level, but this hypothesis has not been tested so far. Here, it is shown that mosses have experienced significantly lower rates of molecular evolution than higher plants within 18S rDNA (nuclear), rbcL (chloroplast) and nad5 (mitochondrial) genes. Mosses are on an average evolving 2-3 times slower than ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms; and also green algae seem to be evolving faster than nonvascular plants. These results support the observation of a general correlation between morphological and molecular evolutionary rates in plants and also show that mosses are 'evolutionary sphinxes' regarding both morphological and molecular evolutionary potential.

  3. Simultaneous determination of Cd(II) and Cu(II) using stripping voltammetry in groundwater, soil and Alhagi maurorum plants in industrial and urban areas in Northern Border, Saudi Arabia with luminol as a chelating agent.

    PubMed

    Al-Hossainy, Ahmed Farouk

    2015-01-01

    The cathodic stripping voltammetry of Cu(II) and Cd(II) speciation was re-optimized by using luminol (Lu) in groundwater, soil and Alhagi maurorum plants, finding differences with the pre-existing method and a different interpretation for the electroactive species. The main findings are that optimum sensitivity is obtained at 0.3-142.5 ng/mL and 0.065-60.0 ng/mL for copper and cadmium, respectively, that the complexes responsible for adsorption on the electrode are CuLu and CdLu, and that the sensitivity of the method is much improved in the absence of dissolved oxygen. The limit of detection of the method was 0.011 ± 0.001 ng/mL for Cu(II) and 0.013 ± 0.001 ng/mL for Cd(II). The interference of some common ions: Cr(III), Fe(III), Zn(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Mo(II) was studied. It was concluded that application of this method for the determination of Cu(II) and Cd(II) in groundwater, soil and Alhagi maurorum plants led to satisfactory results.

  4. Multi-unit inertial fusion plants based on HYLIFE-II, with shared heavy-ion RIA driver and target factory, producing electricity and hydrogen fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, G.; Moir, R.; Hoffman, M.

    1994-05-05

    Following is a modification of the IFEFUEL systems code, called IFEFUEL2, to treat specifically the HYLIFE-II target chamber concept. The same improved Recirculating Induction Accelerator (RIA) energy scaling model developed recently by Bieri is used in this survey of the economics of multi-unit IFE plants producing both electricity and hydrogen fuel. Reference cases will assume conventional HI-indirect target gains for a 2 mm spot, and improved HYLIFE-II BoP models as per Hoffman. Credits for improved plant availability and lower operating costs due to HYLIFE-II`s 30-yr target chamber lifetime are included, as well as unit cost reductions suggested by Delene to credit greater {open_quotes}learning curve{close_quotes} benefits for the duplicated portions of a multi-unit plant. To illustrate the potential impact of more advanced assumptions, additional {open_quotes}advanced{close_quotes} cases will consider the possible benefits of an MHD + Steam BoP, where direct MHD conversion of plasma from baseball-size LiH target blanket shells is assumed to be possible in a new (as yet undesigned) liquid Flibe-walled target chamber, together and separately, with advanced, higher-gain heavy-ion targets with Fast Ignitors. These runs may help decide the course of a possible future {open_quotes}HYLIFE-III{close_quotes} IFE study. Beam switchyard and final focusing system costs per target chamber are assumed to be consistent with single-sided illumination, for either {open_quotes}conventional{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}advanced{close_quotes} indirect target gain assumptions. Target costs are scaled according to the model by Woodworth. In all cases, the driver energy and rep rate for each chosen number of target chambers and total plant output will be optimized to minimize the cost of electricity (CoE) and the associated cost of hydrogen (CoH), using a relationship between CoE and CoH to be presented in the next section.

  5. [Impacts of human disturbance on the species composition of higher plants in the wetlands around Dianchi Lake, Yunnan Province of Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xi-Xi; Wu, Zhao-Lu; Luo, Kang; Ding, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Hai-Yan

    2013-09-01

    Introducing higher plants to build semi-natural wetland ecosystem is one of the key approaches to restore the wetlands and lakes that suffered from serious pollution and destruction. Based on the investigation data from 128 quadrats at 26 sampling sites in the wetlands around Dianchi Lake in December 2011-October 2012, and in combining with the references published in the 1960s, this paper discussed the impacts of human activities on the species composition of higher plants in the wetlands around the Lake. In 2012, there were 299 species of 88 families in the wetlands, of which, 181 species were native species, and 118 species were alien ones (including 32 invasive species). Of the 42 species of hydrophytes in the total species, 13 species were alien ones (including 2 invasive species). In comparing with the species data recorded in the 1960s, 232 plants were newly recorded and 43 species disappeared in 2012. Aquatic plants changed obviously. The decreased species were 2 submerged plants, 2 floating plants, and 5 floating leaved plants, and the increased species were 8 emergent plants. Fourteen community types were identified by cluster analysis, of which, the main communities were those dominated by alien species including Pistia stratiotes and Alternanthera philoxeroides. As compared with the data in the 1960s, the plant communities dominated by native species such as Ottelia acuminate and Vallisneria natans were not found presently. Therefore, in the practice of introducing higher plants to restore the degraded wetlands and lakes, it would be necessary to scientifically and appropriately select and blend plant species to avoid the wetland degradation by human activities.

  6. Naturally occurring insect growth regulators. II. Screening of insect and plant extracts as insect juvenile hormone mimics.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M; Redfern, R E; Mills, G D

    1975-01-01

    Ethereal extracts prepared from the larvae, pupae, or eggs of 10 species of insects and from various parts of 343 species of higher plants were screened for juvenilizing effects against Tenebrio molitor and Oncopeltus fasciatus. Activity in both species was shown by an extract of the larvae of the stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans, whereas an extract of the pupae was active in O. fasiatus only. Extracts of two plant species (Echinacea angustifolia roots and Chamaecyparis lawsoniana seeds) showed high juvenilizing activity in T. MOLITOR, AND EXtracts of five plant species (Clethra alnifolia stems, leaves, and fruits, Sassafras albidum roots and root bark, Eucalyptus camaldulensis stems and bark, Pinus rigida twigs and leaves, and Iris douglasiana roots, stems, and fruits) were highly active in O. fasciatus an extract of Tsuga canadensis leaves showed lower activity in this insect. Extracts of 16 species of plants showed high insecticidal activity (mortality) in O. fasciatus but lacked juvenilizing properties in both species of test insects.

  7. Results of the first stage (2002-2009) of investigation of higher plants onboard RS ISS, as an element of future closed Life Support Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sychev, Vladimir; Levinskikh, Margarita; Podolsky, Igor; Bingham, Gail; Novikova, Nataliya; Sugimoto, Manabu

    A key task for biomedical human support in long-term manned space expeditions is the develop-ment of the Life Support System (LSS). It is expected that in the first continuous interplanetary expeditions LSS of only a few biological elements of the LSS, such as higher plants will be in-cluded. Therefore, investigations of growth and development of higher plants for consideration in the LSS are of high importance. In a period from October, 2002 to December 2009, 15 ex-periments on cultivation of different plants, including two genetically marked species of dwarf peas, a leaf vegetable strain of Mizuna, radish, barley and wheat were conducted in space greenhouse "LADA" onboard Russian Segment (RS) of International Space Station (ISS). The experiments resulted in the conclusion that the properties of growth and development of plants grown in space greenhouse "LADA" were unaffected by spaceflight conditions. In experiments conducted in a period from 2003 to 2005, it was shown for the first time that pea plants pre-serve reproductive functions, forming viable seeds during at least four continuous full cycles of ontogenesis ("seed to seed") under spaceflight conditions. No changes were found in the genetic apparatus of the pea plants in the four "space" generations. Since 2005, there have been routine collections of microbiological samples from the surfaces of the plants grown on-board in "LADA" greenhouse. Analysis has shown that the properties of contamination of the plants grown aboard by microorganism contain no abnormal patterns. Since 2008, the plants cultivated in "LADA" greenhouse have been frozen onboard RS ISS in the MELFI refrigerator and transferred to the Earth for further investigations. Investigations of Mizuna plants grown and frozen onboard of ISS, showed no differences between "ground control" and "space" plants in chemical and biochemical properties. There also no stress-response was found in kashinriki strain barley planted and frozen onboard ISS.

  8. Kinetics and isotherm studies of Cd(II) adsorption from aqueous solution utilizing seeds of bottlebrush plant ( Callistemon chisholmii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Rifaqat Ali Khan; Kashifuddin, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    Seeds of bottlebrush, a novel plant material, were found to exhibit excellent adsorption capacity over a wide range of Cd(II) concentration. It was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy to support the adsorption of Cd(II) ions. Effect of various parameters like pH, contact time, initial concentration and different electrolytes was investigated using batch process to optimize conditions for maximum adsorption. The adsorbent data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Redushkeuich isotherm equations at 30°, 40° and 50 °C. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard enthalpy change (Δ H°), free energy change (Δ G°) and entropy change (Δ S°) were also evaluated and the results indicated that adsorption of Cd(II) are spontaneous and endothermic. Various kinetics models including the Pseudo-first-order kinetics, Pseudo-second-order kinetics and Intraparticle diffusion models have been applied to the experimental data to predict the adsorption kinetics. Kinetic study was carried out by varying initial concentration of Cd(II) at constant temperature and it was found that pseudo-second-order rate equation was better obeyed than pseudo-first-order equation supporting that chemisorption process was involved.

  9. A CRM domain protein functions dually in group I and group II intron splicing in land plant chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Yukari; Barkan, Alice

    2007-12-01

    The CRM domain is a recently recognized RNA binding domain found in three group II intron splicing factors in chloroplasts, in a bacterial protein that associates with ribosome precursors, and in a family of uncharacterized proteins in plants. To elucidate the functional repertoire of proteins with CRM domains, we studied CFM2 (for CRM Family Member 2), which harbors four CRM domains. RNA coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that CFM2 in maize (Zea mays) chloroplasts is associated with the group I intron in pre-trnL-UAA and group II introns in the ndhA and ycf3 pre-mRNAs. T-DNA insertions in the Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog condition a defective-seed phenotype (strong allele) or chlorophyll-deficient seedlings with impaired splicing of the trnL group I intron and the ndhA, ycf3-int1, and clpP-int2 group II introns (weak alleles). CFM2 and two previously described CRM proteins are bound simultaneously to the ndhA and ycf3-int1 introns and act in a nonredundant fashion to promote their splicing. With these findings, CRM domain proteins are implicated in the activities of three classes of catalytic RNA: group I introns, group II introns, and 23S rRNA.

  10. The Dof domain, a zinc finger DNA-binding domain conserved only in higher plants, truly functions as a Cys2/Cys2 Zn finger domain.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Yoshimi; Ishiduka, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Rie; Esaka, Muneharu

    2004-03-01

    The Dof (DNA-binding with one finger) proteins are plant transcription factors that have a highly conserved DNA-binding domain, called the Dof domain. The Dof domain, which is composed of 52 amino acid residues, is similar to the Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger DNA-binding domain of GATA1 and steroid hormone receptors, but has a longer putative loop than that in the case of these zinc finger domains. The DNA-binding function of ascorbate oxidase gene binding protein (AOBP), a Dof protein, was investigated by gel retardation analysis. When Cys was replaced by His, the Dof domain could not function as a Cys3/His- or a Cys2/His2-type zinc finger. The characteristic longer loop was essential for DNA-binding activity. Furthermore, heavy metals such as Co(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Hg(II), Fe(II), and Fe(III) inhibited the DNA-binding activity of the Dof domain. Manganese ion as well as zinc ion was coordinated by the Dof domain in vitro. On the other hand, the analysis using inductively coupled argon plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) showed that the Dof domain contained zinc ion but not manganese ion. Thus, the Dof domain was proved to function as a Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger domain.

  11. Analysis of TOPAZ II and SPACE-R space nuclear power plants using a modified thermionic model

    SciTech Connect

    Habedank, O.D.

    1993-03-01

    Models based on the TDS thermionic diode model were developed for the TOPAZ II and SPACE-R nuclear power systems. Due to computer code limitations inherent in the TDS model, only the TOPAZ II system model ran successfully. Several parameter studies were conducted on the TOPAZ II model. These studies determined system performance and efficiency while varying the following: (1) the coolant flow inlet temperatures; (2) the rate of coolant temperature change; (3) the power profile of the core; and (4) the cesium reservoir temperature. Analysis of the results indicate that the model accurately represented the TOPAZ II system, underestimating published data by 10%. Coolant flow parameter studies indicate that raising coolant flow temperatures up to 100 K higher increases system power by put to 5%. Additional increases in temperature result in gradual performance degradation. Varying the axial power profile of the core from the actual peaked profile to a flat profile results in a negligible 0.3% change in total system performance. The peaked profile used in TOPAZ II produces the highest system efficiency of all the profiles modeled. The cesium pressure study indicates that the system is operating above optimum cesium pressure and that system performance is strongly dependent on cesium pressure. Increasing cesium reservoir temperature above design temperature by 30 K decreases system efficiency by 30%.

  12. Comprehensive compositional analysis of plant cell walls (lignocellulosic biomass) part II: carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Foster, Cliff E; Martin, Tina M; Pauly, Markus

    2010-03-12

    The need for renewable, carbon neutral, and sustainable raw materials for industry and society has become one of the most pressing issues for the 21st century. This has rekindled interest in the use of plant products as industrial raw materials for the production of liquid fuels for transportation(2) and other products such as biocomposite materials(6). Plant biomass remains one of the greatest untapped reserves on the planet(4). It is mostly comprised of cell walls that are composed of energy rich polymers including cellulose, various hemicelluloses, and the polyphenol lignin(5) and thus sometimes termed lignocellulosics. However, plant cell walls have evolved to be recalcitrant to degradation as walls contribute extensively to the strength and structural integrity of the entire plant. Despite its necessary rigidity, the cell wall is a highly dynamic entity that is metabolically active and plays crucial roles in numerous cell activities such as plant growth and differentiation(5). Due to the various functions of walls, there is an immense structural diversity within the walls of different plant species and cell types within a single plant(4). Hence, depending of what crop species, crop variety, or plant tissue is used for a biorefinery, the processing steps for depolymerisation by chemical/enzymatic processes and subsequent fermentation of the various sugars to liquid biofuels need to be adjusted and optimized. This fact underpins the need for a thorough characterization of plant biomass feedstocks. Here we describe a comprehensive analytical methodology that enables the determination of the composition of lignocellulosics and is amenable to a medium to high-throughput analysis (Figure 1). The method starts of with preparing destarched cell wall material. The resulting lignocellulosics are then split up to determine its monosaccharide composition of the hemicelluloses and other matrix polysaccharides1, and its content of crystalline cellulose(7). The protocol for

  13. Comprehensive Compositional Analysis of Plant Cell Walls (Lignocellulosic biomass) Part II: Carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Cliff E.; Martin, Tina M.; Pauly, Markus

    2010-01-01

    The need for renewable, carbon neutral, and sustainable raw materials for industry and society has become one of the most pressing issues for the 21st century. This has rekindled interest in the use of plant products as industrial raw materials for the production of liquid fuels for transportation2 and other products such as biocomposite materials6. Plant biomass remains one of the greatest untapped reserves on the planet4. It is mostly comprised of cell walls that are composed of energy rich polymers including cellulose, various hemicelluloses, and the polyphenol lignin5 and thus sometimes termed lignocellulosics. However, plant cell walls have evolved to be recalcitrant to degradation as walls contribute extensively to the strength and structural integrity of the entire plant. Despite its necessary rigidity, the cell wall is a highly dynamic entity that is metabolically active and plays crucial roles in numerous cell activities such as plant growth and differentiation5. Due to the various functions of walls, there is an immense structural diversity within the walls of different plant species and cell types within a single plant4. Hence, depending of what crop species, crop variety, or plant tissue is used for a biorefinery, the processing steps for depolymerisation by chemical/enzymatic processes and subsequent fermentation of the various sugars to liquid biofuels need to be adjusted and optimized. This fact underpins the need for a thorough characterization of plant biomass feedstocks. Here we describe a comprehensive analytical methodology that enables the determination of the composition of lignocellulosics and is amenable to a medium to high-throughput analysis (Figure 1). The method starts of with preparing destarched cell wall material. The resulting lignocellulosics are then split up to determine its monosaccharide composition of the hemicelluloses and other matrix polysaccharides1, and its content of crystalline cellulose7. The protocol for analyzing the

  14. Leaves of higher plants as biomonitors of radionuclides (137Cs, 40K, 210Pb and 7Be) in urban air.

    PubMed

    Todorović, Dragana; Popović, Dragana; Ajtić, Jelena; Nikolić, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Leaves of linden (Tilia tomentosa L. and Tilia cordata Mill.) and horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) were analysed as biomonitors of radionuclides in urban air. Samples of soils, leaves and aerosols were collected in Belgrade, Serbia. Activities of (137)Cs, (40)K, (210)Pb and (7)Be in the samples were measured on an HPGe detector by standard gamma spectrometry. "Soil-to-leaves" transfer factors were calculated. Student's t test and linear Pearson correlation coefficients were used for statistical analysis. Differences in local conditions at the sampling sites were not significant, and the mechanisms of the radionuclides' accumulation in both plant species are similar. Ceasium-137 was detected in some of the leaf samples only. Transfer factors for (137)Cs and (40)K were (0.03-0.08) and 1.3, respectively. The concentrations of (210)Pb and (7)Be in leaves were higher in autumn than in spring, and there were some similarities in their seasonal patterns in leaves and in air. Weak to medium correlation was obtained for the (210)Pb and (7)Be activities in leaves and aerosols. Large positive correlation was obtained for the (210)Pb activities in linden leaves and the mean activity in aerosols for the preceding months. Different primary modes of radionuclides accumulation in leaves were observed. Since large positive correlation was obtained for the (210)Pb activity in linden leaves and the mean in aerosols for the preceding months, mature linden leaves could be used as biomonitors of recent (210)Pb activity in air.

  15. Evidence for a universal pathway of abscisic acid biosynthesis in higher plants from sup 18 O incorporation patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Zeevaart, J.A.D.; Heath, T.G.; Gage, D.A. )

    1989-12-01

    Previous labeling studies of abscisic acid (ABA) with {sup 18}O{sub 2} have been mainly conducted with water-stressed leaves. In this study, {sup 18}O incorporation into ABA of stressed leaves of various species was compared with {sup 18}O labeling of ABA of turgid leaves and of fruit tissue in different stages of ripening. In stressed leaves of all six species investigated, avocado (Persea americana), barley (Hordeum vulgare), bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium), spinach (Spinacia oleracea), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), {sup 18}O was most abundant in the carboxyl group, whereas incorporation of a second and third {sup 18}O in the oxygen atoms on the ring of ABA was much less prominent after 24 h in {sup 18}O{sub 2}. ABA from turgid bean leaves showed significant {sup 18}O incorporation, again with highest {sup 18}O enrichment in the carboxyl group. On the basis of {sup 18}O-labeling patterns observed in ABA from different tissues it is concluded that, despite variations in precusor pool sizes and intermediate turnover rates, there is a universal pathway of ABA biosynthesis in higher plants which involves cleavage of a larger precursor molecule, presumably an oxygenated carotenoid.

  16. Organization of transmembrane helices in photosystem II: comparison of plants and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Barber, J; Nield, J

    2002-01-01

    Electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography are revealing the structure of photosystem II. Electron crystallography has yielded a 3D structure at sufficient resolution to identify subunit positioning and transmembrane organization of the reaction-centre core complex of spinach. Single-particle analyses are providing 3D structures of photosystem II-light-harvesting complex II supercomplexes that can be used to incorporate high-resolution structural data emerging from electron and X-ray crystallography. The positions of the chlorins and metal centres within photosystem II are now available. It can be concluded that photosystem II is a dimeric complex with the transmembrane helices of CP47/D2 proteins related to those of the CP43/D1 proteins by a twofold axis within each monomer. Further, both electron microscopy and X-ray analyses show that P(680) is not a 'special pair' and that cytochrome b559 is located on the D2 side of the reaction centres some distance from P(680). However, although comparison of the electron microscopy and X-ray models for spinach and Synechococcus elongatus show considerable similarities, there seem to be differences in the number and positioning of some small subunits. PMID:12437871

  17. Photosystem II Repair and Plant Immunity: Lessons Learned from Arabidopsis Mutant Lacking the THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN 18.3

    PubMed Central

    Järvi, Sari; Isojärvi, Janne; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Mamedov, Fikret; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415–425). Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light. PMID:27064270

  18. Functional characterization of the Xcs and Xps type II secretion systems from the plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria.

    PubMed

    Szczesny, Robert; Jordan, Matthias; Schramm, Claudia; Schulz, Steve; Cogez, Virginie; Bonas, Ulla; Büttner, Daniela

    2010-09-01

    *Type II secretion (T2S) systems of many plant-pathogenic bacteria often secrete cell wall-degrading enzymes into the plant apoplast. *Here, we show that the Xps-T2S system from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv) promotes disease and contributes to the translocation of effector proteins that are delivered into the plant cell by the type III secretion (T3S) system. *The Xcs-T2S system instead lacks an obvious virulence function. However, individual xcs genes can partially complement mutants in homologous xps genes, indicating that they encode functional components of T2S systems. Enzyme activity assays showed that the Xps system contributes to secretion of proteases and xylanases. We identified the virulence-associated xylanase XynC as a substrate of the Xps system. However, homologs of known T2S substrates from other Xanthomonas spp. are not secreted by the T2S systems from Xcv. Thus, T2S systems from Xanthomonas spp. appear to differ significantly in their substrate specificities. *Transcript analyses revealed that expression of xps genes in Xcv is activated by HrpG and HrpX, key regulators of the T3S system. By contrast, expression of xynC and extracellular protease and xylanase activities are repressed by HrpG and HrpX, suggesting that components and substrates of the Xps system are differentially regulated.

  19. Emissions, Monitoring, and Control of Mercury from Subbituminous Coal-Fired Power Plants - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Bland; Jesse Newcomer; Allen Kephart; Volker Schmidt; Gerald Butcher

    2008-10-31

    Western Research Institute (WRI), in conjunction with Western Farmers Electric Cooperative (WFEC), has teamed with Clean Air Engineering of Pittsburgh PA to conduct a mercury monitoring program at the WEFC Hugo plant in Oklahoma. Sponsored by US Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-26-98FT40323, the program included the following members of the Subbituminous Energy Coalition (SEC) as co-sponsors: Missouri Basin Power Project; DTE Energy; Entergy; Grand River Dam Authority; and Nebraska Public Power District. This research effort had five objectives: (1) determine the mass balance of mercury for subbituminous coal-fired power plant; (2) assess the distribution of mercury species in the flue gas (3) perform a comparison of three different Hg test methods; (4) investigate the long-term (six months) mercury variability at a subbituminous coal-fired power plant; and (5) assess operation and maintenance of the Method 324 and Horiba CEMS utilizing plant personnel.

  20. H-coal pilot plant. Phase II. Construction. Phase III. Operation. Annual report No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-04

    At the request of DOE Oak Ridge, ASFI agreed to assume responsibility for completion of Plant construction in December, 1979, at which time Badger Plants' on-site work was ended. This construction effort consisted of electric heat tracing and insulation of piping and instrumentation. At the close of the reporting period the work was completed, or was projected to be completed, within the ASFI budgeted amounts and by dates that will not impact Plant operations. Engineering design solutions were completed for problems encountered with such equipment as the High Pressure Letdown Valves; Slurry Block Valves; Slurry Pumps; the Bowl Mill System; the Dowtherm System; and the Ebullating Pump. A Corrosion Monitoring Program was established. With the exception of Area 500, the Antisolvent Deashing Unit, all operating units were commissioned and operated during the reporting period. Coal was first introduced into the Plant on May 29, 1980, with coal operations continuing periodically through September 30, 1980. The longest continuous coal run was 119 hours. A total of 677 tons of Kentucky No. 11 Coal were processed during the reporting period. The problems encountered were mechanical, not process, in nature. Various Environmental and Health programs were implemented to assure worker safety and protection and to obtain data from Plant operations for scientific analysis. These comprehensive programs will contribute greatly in determining the acceptability of long term H-Coal Plant operations.

  1. The Influence of the Host Plant Is the Major Ecological Determinant of the Presence of Nitrogen-Fixing Root Nodule Symbiont Cluster II Frankia Species in Soil.

    PubMed

    Battenberg, Kai; Wren, Jannah A; Hillman, Janell; Edwards, Joseph; Huang, Liujing; Berry, Alison M

    2017-01-01

    The actinobacterial genus Frankia establishes nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses with specific hosts within the nitrogen-fixing plant clade. Of four genetically distinct subgroups of Frankia, cluster I, II, and III strains are capable of forming effective nitrogen-fixing symbiotic associations, while cluster IV strains generally do not. Cluster II Frankia strains have rarely been detected in soil devoid of host plants, unlike cluster I or III strains, suggesting a stronger association with their host. To investigate the degree of host influence, we characterized the cluster II Frankia strain distribution in rhizosphere soil in three locations in northern California. The presence/absence of cluster II Frankia strains at a given site correlated significantly with the presence/absence of host plants on the site, as determined by glutamine synthetase (glnA) gene sequence analysis, and by microbiome analysis (16S rRNA gene) of a subset of host/nonhost rhizosphere soils. However, the distribution of cluster II Frankia strains was not significantly affected by other potential determinants such as host-plant species, geographical location, climate, soil pH, or soil type. Rhizosphere soil microbiome analysis showed that cluster II Frankia strains occupied only a minute fraction of the microbiome even in the host-plant-present site and further revealed no statistically significant difference in the α-diversity or in the microbiome composition between the host-plant-present or -absent sites. Taken together, these data suggest that host plants provide a factor that is specific for cluster II Frankia strains, not a general growth-promoting factor. Further, the factor accumulates or is transported at the site level, i.e., beyond the host rhizosphere.

  2. Widening Our Horizons: Report of the Review of the Teaching of Modern Languages in Higher Education. Volumes I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian National Languages Inst., Melbourne.

    A report on the teaching of modern languages in Australian higher education is presented in two volumes. The first volume contains the text of the report. An introductory section describes the aims and methodology of the national review and places it in a historical context. The remainder of this volume is in three parts. The first part identifies…

  3. PIXE analysis of some Nigerian anti-diabetic medicinal plants (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olabanji, S. O.; Adebajo, A. C.; Omobuwajo, O. R.; Ceccato, D.; Buoso, M. C.; Moschini, G.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disease characterized by high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) due to defects in insulin secretion, or action, or both, is a debilitating disease leading to other complications and death of many people in the world. Some of the medicinal plants implicated in the herbal recipes for the treatment of diabetes in Nigeria have been reported. Additional medicinal plants used for the treatment of diabetes in Nigeria are presented in this work. These medicinal plants are becoming increasingly important and relevant as herbal drugs due to their use as antioxidants, nutraceuticals, food additives and supplements in combating diabetes. Elemental compositions of these anti-diabetic medicinal plants were determined using PIXE technique. The 1.8 MV collimated proton beam from the 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerator at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) Legnaro (Padova) Italy was employed for the work. The results show the detection of twenty-one elements which include Mg, P, Ca, K, Mn, Cu, Zn, S, Cr, Co, Ni and V that are implicated in the regulation of insulin and the control of the blood-sugar levels in the human body. The entire plant of Boerhavia diffusa, Securidaca longipedunculata stem, leaves of Peperomia pellucida, Macrosphyra longistyla, Olax subscorpioidea, Phyllanthus muerillanus, Jatropha gossypifolia, Cassia occidentalis, Phyllanthus amarus, and leaf and stem of Murraya koenigii, which have high concentrations of these elements could be recommended as vegetables, nutraceuticals, food additives, supplements and drugs in the control and management of diabetes, if toxicity profiles indicate that they are safe. However, significantly high contents of Al and Si in the entire plant of Bryophyllum pinnatum, and As, Cr, and Cu in Ocimum gratissimum leaf suggest that these plants should be avoided by diabetic patients to prevent complications.

  4. Applicability of Isolates and Fractions of Plant Extracts in Murine Models in Type II Diabetes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Vanessa Soares; do Amaral, Laura Vieira; Novaes, Rômulo Dias

    2016-01-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus is one of the most common public health problems worldwide. Its increasing prevalence in several countries and the difficult metabolic control of individuals with the disease justify studying strategies for primary prevention. The population has sought alternative and cheaper ways to treat the disease, including the use of plants considered medicinal by the population. In this study, we carried out a systematic review on the applicability of isolates and fractions of plant extracts in animal models in type II diabetes. A literature search was performed in MEDLINE/PubMed and Scopus databases. Studies using other experimental animals (horses, rabbits, and monkeys) and humans as well as articles in Chinese, German, and Russian were excluded. We assessed the quality of the studies included by using the criteria described in the ARRIVE guidelines. In general, the animals that received fractions or isolates presented reduced blood glucose levels, normalization of body weight and plasma insulin levels, and reduced total triglycerides and cholesterol. In addition, we observed wide variation among the analyzed parameters, which hindered comparison between the studies found. In further studies, standardized reports and experimental design would help to establish comparable study groups and advance the overall knowledge, thus facilitating translatability from animal data to human clinical conditions. PMID:27843476

  5. Polyamine formation by arginine decarboxylase as a transducer of hormonal, environmental and stress stimuli in higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galston, A. W.; Flores, H. E.; Kaur-Sawhney, R.

    1982-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates polyamines including putrescine in the regulation of such diverse plant processes as cell division, embryogenesis and senescence. We find that the enzyme arginine decarboxylase, which controls the rate of putrescine formation in some plant systems, is activated by light acting through P(r) phytochrome as a receptor, by the plant hormone gibberellic acid, by osmotic shock and by other stress stimuli. We therefore propose arginine decarboxylase as a possible transducer of the various initially received tropistic stimuli in plants. The putrescine formed could act by affecting cytoskeletal components.

  6. 75 FR 68821 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permit; Construction and Operation of Kaheawa II...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ...- megawatt (MW), 21-turbine Kaheawa Wind Power I (KWP I) project. Like KWP II, KWP I is owned by First Wind... wind turbine structures. The Hawaiian petrel and Newell's shearwater breed on Maui and feed in the open... proposed wind energy facility. The Hawaii hoary bat has been observed on site by acoustic...

  7. Investigation of high velocity separator for particle removal in coal gasification plants. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Linhardt, H.D.

    1980-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of Phase II of the High Velocity Particle Separator Program performed under Contract EF-77-C-01-2709. This high velocity wedge separator has the potential to reduce equipment size and cost of high temperature and pressurized particulate removal equipment for coal derived gases. Phase II has been directed toward testing and detailed conceptual design of an element suitable for a commercial scale high temperature, high pressure particle separator (HTPS). Concurrently, Phase IA has been conducted, which utilized the ambient analog method (AAM) for aerodynamic and collection performance investigation of each HTPS configuration prior and during hot testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase IA and II. The AAM effort established correlation of theoretical analysis and experiment for HTPS pressure drop, purge flow ratio and collection efficiency potential. Task I defined the initial test conditions to be the contract design point of 1800/sup 0/F and 350 psia. The 1800/sup 0/F, 350 psia testing represents the main high temperature testing with coal-derived particulates in the 2 to 10 micron range. Phase IA and Phase II have demonstrated efficient particle collection with acceptable pressure drop. In view of these encouraging results, it is reasonable to apply the developed technology toward future hot gas particulate cleanup requirements.

  8. Parametric study of potential early commercial MHD power plants. Task 3: Parameter variation of plant size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hals, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    Plants with a nominal output of 200 and 500 MWe and conforming to the same design configuration as the Task II plant were investigated. This information is intended to permit an assessment of the competitiveness of first generation MHD/steam plants with conventional steam plants over the range of 200 to 1000 MWe. The results show that net plant efficiency of the MHD plant is significantly higher than a conventional steam plant of corresponding size. The cost of electricity is also less for the MHD plant over the entire plant size range. As expected, the cost differential is higher for the larger plant and decreases with plant size. Even at the 200 MWe capacity, however, the differential in COE between the MHD plant and the conventional plant is sufficient attractive to warrant serious consideration. Escalating fuel costs will enhance the competitive position of MHD plants because they can utilize the fuel more efficiently than conventional steam plants.

  9. Final Report: Phase II Geothermal Exploration and Geothermal Power Plant Update for Ascension Island, South Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, D.L.; Sibbett, B.S.; Shane, M.K.; Whitbeck, J.F.

    1984-07-01

    The Phase I study of the geothermal potential of Ascension Island concluded that the possibility of a geothermal resource existing under the island was excellent. This conclusion was based on the presence of young volcanic rocks (a heat source close to the surface), an ample supply of water from the sea, and high permeability of many of the rocks which make up the island. The assumption was made that the resource would be similar to geothermal systems in the Azores or Japan, and a conceptual design of a power plant to utilize the resource was prepared upon which cost estimates and an economic analysis were subsequently performed. The results of the economic analysis were very favorable, and the Air Force decided to proceed into Phase II of the project. Under Phase II, an exploration program was designed and carried out. The purpose of the program was to ascertain whether or not a geothermal resource existed beneath Ascension island and, to the extent possible, to evaluate the quality of that resource. The exploration involved a detailed aeromagnetic survey of the island, reconnaissance and detailed electrical resistivity surveys, and drilling of holes for the measurement of temperatures. These methods have confirmed the existence of geothermal activity beneath Ascension. Measured temperature gradients and bottom hole temperatures as well as chemical geothermometers indicate temperatures sufficient for the generation of electricity within reasonable drilling depths. This report documents those conclusions and the supporting data. This report also documents the results of the power plant update with new data supplied from the Phase II exploration activities on the island. The power plant scenario has been changed to reflect the fact that the resource temperature may not be as high as that originally assumed in the Phase I study, the location of the production wells will in all likelihood be farther from the existing Air Force facilities--either north of Grazing

  10. Use of Clearance Indexes to Assess Waste Disposal Issues for the HYLIFE-II Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plant Design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Sanz, J

    2002-01-17

    Traditionally, waste management studies for fusion energy have used the Waste Disposal Rating (WDR) to evaluate if radioactive material from irradiated structures could qualify for shallow land burial. However, given the space limitations and the negative public perception of large volumes of waste, there is a growing international motivation to develop a fusion waste management system that maximizes the amount of material that can be cleared or recycled. In this work, we present an updated assessment of the waste management options for the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant, using the concept of Clearance Index (CI) for radioactive waste disposal. With that purpose, we have performed a detailed neutronics analysis of the HYLIFE-II design, using the TART and ACAB computer codes for neutron transport and activation, respectively. Whereas the traditional version of ACAB only provided the user with the WDR as an index for waste considerations, here we have modified the code to calculate Clearance Indexes using the current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) clearance limits for radiological waste disposal. The results from the analysis are used to perform an assessment of the waste management options for the HYLIFE-II IFE design.

  11. A Comprehensive Phylogeny Reveals Functional Conservation of the UV-B Photoreceptor UVR8 from Green Algae to Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, María B.; Tossi, Vanesa; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Cassia, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) is present in sunlight (280–315 nm) and has diverse effects on living organisms. Low fluence rate of exposure induces a specific photomorphogenic response regulated by the UV-B response locus 8 (UVR8) receptor. UVR8 was first described in Arabidopsis thaliana. In the absence of stimuli it is located in the cytoplasm as a homodimer. However, upon UV-B irradiation, it switches to a monomer and interacts with the ubiquitin ligase E3 COP1 via the UVR8 β-propeller domain and the VP core. This induces the expression of the transcription factor HY5 leading to changes in the expression of genes associated with UV-B acclimation and stress tolerance. UVR8 senses UV-B through tryptophan residues being Trp233 and 285 the most important. Based on the comparison and analysis of UVR8 functionally important motifs, we report a comprehensive phylogeny of UVR8, trying to identify UVR8 homologs and the ancestral organism where this gene could be originated. Results obtained showed that Chlorophytes are the first organisms from the Viridiplantae group where UVR8 appears. UVR8 is present in green algae, bryophytes, lycophytes, and angiosperms. All the sequences identified contain tryptophans 233 and 285, arginines involved in homodimerization and the VP domain suggesting they are true UVR8 photoreceptors. We also determined that some species from bryophytes and angiosperms contain more than one UVR8 gene copy posing the question if UVR8 could constitute a gene family in these species. In conclusion, we described the functional conservation among UVR8 proteins from green algae to higher plants. PMID:27895654

  12. Effects of drilling fluids on soils and plants: II. Complete drilling fluid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.W.; Pesaran, P.

    1980-01-01

    Six typical drilling fluids (muds) and a drilling fluid base were mixed with six soils at ratios of 1:1 and 1:4 volumes of liquid mud/soil; these mixtures were tested for their effects on plant growth. Green beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and sweet corn (Zea mays var. succharata (Sturtev.) Bailey) in pots in the greenhouse grew normally in a few mixtures, but in most instances plants had reduced growth when compared to those growing in soil alone (controls). It was concluded that high levels of soluble salts or the high exchangeable sodium percentages were the primary causes of reduced plant growth. The high salt content in some fluids was mostly from added potassium chloride, sodium hydroxide, and sodium dichromate. Dispersion of mud-treated soils caused by high exchangeable sodium percentages occurred in these samples because of the sodium hydroxide and sodium dichromate added to typical muds.

  13. Analysis of TOPAZ II and SPACE-R space nuclear power plants using a modified thermionic model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Habedank, O.D.

    1993-03-01

    Models based on the TDS thermionic diode model were developed for TOPAZ II and SPACER nuclear power systems. Several parameter studies were conducted with the TOPAZ II model. These determined system performance and efficiency while varying the following: (1) Coolant flow inlet temperatures. (2) Rate of coolant temperature change. (3) Power profile of the core. (4) Cesium reservoir temperature. Analysis of results indicate the model accurately represented the TOPAZ II system, underestimating published data by 10%. Coolant flow studies indicate that raising coolant temperatures up to 100 K higher increases system power by up to 5%. Additional increases in temperature result in gradual performance degradation. Varying the axial power profile of the core from the actual peaked profile to a flat profile results in a negligible 0.3% change in system performance. The peaked profile used in TOPAZ II produces the highest system efficiency of all the profiles modeled. The cesium pressure study indicates the system is operating above optimum cesium pressure and system performance is strongly dependent on cesium pressure. Increasing cesium reservoir temperature above design temperature by 30 K decreases system efficiency by 30%.

  14. Optimization of a 200 kW SOFC cogeneration power plant. Part II: variation of the flowsheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riensche, Ernst; Meusinger, Josefin; Stimming, Ulrich; Unverzagt, Guido

    An energetic and economic analysis of a decentralized natural gas-fuelled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power plant in the range of 200 kW capacity is carried out. All calculations start from a basic plant concept with a simple flowsheet and a basic parameter set of SOFC operation and economic data. Changes in costs of electricity and plant efficiencies are determined for variations of the plant concept. Flowsheets with gas recycling by blowers or jet boosters are described. Cathode gas recycling by jet boosters turns out to be more advantageous with respect to the costs of electricity than gas recycling by hot gas fans. The influence of pressure drop in the cathode gas circuit is analyzed. In case of anode gas recycling an internal steam circuit exists. This has the advantage that the external steam generator is eliminated and that the steam concentration in the exhaust gas is reduced. Therefore, a higher amount of excess heat can be used. Removal of useful heat at higher temperature levels diminishes the driving temperature differences and enlarges the heat exchange area of the recuperative heat exchangers located downstream.

  15. Comprehensive cooling water study annual report. Volume II: introduction and site description, Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gladden, J.B.; Lower, M.W.; Mackey, H.E.; Specht, W.L.; Wilde, E.W.

    1985-07-01

    The Comprehensive Cooling Water Study was initiated in 1983 to evaluate the environmental effecs of the intake and release of cooling water on the structure and function of aquatic ecosystems at the Savannah River Plant. This report presents the results from the first year of the two year study and also summarizes results from previous studies on aquatic ecosystems of the Savannah River Plant. Five major program elements are addressed: water quality, radionuclide and heavy metal transport, wetlands ecology, aquatic ecology, and endangered species. 63 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Understanding water deficit stress-induced changes in the basic metabolism of higher plants - biotechnologically and sustainably improving agriculture and the ecoenvironment in arid regions of the globe.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hong-Bo; Chu, Li-Ye; Jaleel, C Abdul; Manivannan, P; Panneerselvam, R; Shao, Ming-An

    2009-01-01

    Water is vital for plant growth, development and productivity. Permanent or temporary water deficit stress limits the growth and distribution of natural and artificial vegetation and the performance of cultivated plants (crops) more than any other environmental factor. Productive and sustainable agriculture necessitates growing plants (crops) in arid and semiarid regions with less input of precious resources such as fresh water. For a better understanding and rapid improvement of soil-water stress tolerance in these regions, especially in the water-wind eroded crossing region, it is very important to link physiological and biochemical studies to molecular work in genetically tractable model plants and important native plants, and further extending them to practical ecological restoration and efficient crop production. Although basic studies and practices aimed at improving soil water stress resistance and plant water use efficiency have been carried out for many years, the mechanisms involved at different scales are still not clear. Further understanding and manipulating soil-plant water relationships and soil-water stress tolerance at the scales of ecology, physiology and molecular biology can significantly improve plant productivity and environmental quality. Currently, post-genomics and metabolomics are very important in exploring anti-drought gene resources in various life forms, but modern agriculturally sustainable development must be combined with plant physiological measures in the field, on the basis of which post-genomics and metabolomics have further practical prospects. In this review, we discuss physiological and molecular insights and effects in basic plant metabolism, drought tolerance strategies under drought conditions in higher plants for sustainable agriculture and ecoenvironments in arid and semiarid areas of the world. We conclude that biological measures are the bases for the solutions to the issues relating to the different types of

  17. Modelling ¹⁸O₂ and ¹⁶O₂ unidirectional fluxes in plants: II. analysis of rubisco evolution.

    PubMed

    André, Marcel J

    2011-02-01

    The studies of Rubisco characteristics observed during plant evolution show that the variation of the Rubisco specificity factor only improved by two times from cyanobacteria to modern C3 plants. However we note important variations of the ratio between the maximum rates of oxygenation and carboxylation (V(O)/V(C)). Modelling in vivo ¹⁸O₂ data in plant gas exchange shows that the oxygenation reaction of Rubisco plays a regulating role when the photochemical energy exceeds the carboxylation capacity. A protective index 'oxygenation capacity' is postulated, related to the ratio V(O)/V(C) of Rubisco, and hence to the sink energy effect of photorespiration. Analysing the trends of Rubisco parameters along the evolutionary scale, we show: (1) the increase of both V(C) and V(O); (2) the enhancement of CO₂ affinity; and (3) the rise in oxygenation capacity at the expense of the CO₂ specificity. Hence, the factors of evolutionary pressure have not only directed the enzyme towards a more efficient utilisation of CO₂, but mainly to positively use the unavoidable great loss of energy and assimilated carbon in the process of photorespiration. These observations reinforce the hypothesis of plant-atmosphere co-evolution and of the complex role of Rubisco, which seems to be selected to develop both better CO₂ affinity and oxygenation capacity. The latter increases the capacity of sink of photorespiration, in particular, during water stress or under high irradiance, the two conditions experienced by plants in terrestrial environments. These observations help to explain some handicaps of C4 plants, and the supremacy of CAM and C3 perennial higher plants in arid environments.

  18. Water Treatment Plant Operation. Volume II. A Field Study Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS AT A CHLOR-ALKALI PLANT, VOLUME II. APPENDICES F-J

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a characterization of mercury (Hg) emissions at a chlor-alkali plant. Up to 160 short tons (146 Mg) of Hg is consumed by the chlor-alkali industry each year. Very little quantitative information is currently available however, on the actual Hg losses f...

  20. Design report small-scale fuel alcohol plant. Volume II. Detailed construction information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The objectives of the report are to (a) provide potential alcohol producers with a reference design and (b) provide a complete, demonstrated design of a small-scale fuel alcohol plant. This report describes a small-scale fuel alcohol plant designed and constructed for the DOE by EG and G Idaho, Inc., an operating contractor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The plant is reasonably complete, having the capability for feedstock preparation, cooking, saccharification, fermentation, distillation, by-product dewatering, and process steam generation. An interesting feature is an instrumentation and control system designed to allow the plant to run 24 hours per day with only four hours of operator attention. Where possible, this document follows the design requirements established in the DOE publication Fuel From Farms, which was published in February 1980. For instance, critical requirements such as using corn as the primary feedstock, production of 25 gallons of 190 proof ethanol per hour, and using batch fermentation were taken from Fuel From Farms. One significant deviation is alcohol dehydration. Fuel From Farms recommends the use of a molecular sieve for dehydration, but a preliminary design raised significant questions about the cost effectiveness of this approach. A cost trade-off study is currently under way to establish the best alcohol dehydration method and will be the subject of a later report. Volume two includes equipment and instrumentation data sheets, instrument loop wiring diagrams, and vendor lists.

  1. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Field Study Training Program. Volume II. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    This manual was prepared by experienced wastewater collection system workers to provide a home study course to develop new qualified workers and expand the abilities of existing workers. This volume emphasizes material needed by intermediate-level operators and stresses the operation and maintenance of conventional treatment plants. This volume…

  2. Growth and development of Colorado potato beetle larvae, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, on potato plants expressing the oryzacystatin II proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Cingel, Aleksandar; Savić, Jelena; Vinterhalter, Branka; Vinterhalter, Dragan; Kostić, Miroslav; Jovanović, Darka Šešlija; Smigocki, Ann; Ninković, Slavica

    2015-08-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are attractive tools for crop improvement and their heterologous expression can enhance insect resistance in transgenic plants. PI oryzacystatin II (OCII), isolated from rice, showed potential in controlling pests that utilize cysteine proteinases for protein digestion. To evaluate the applicability of the OCII gene in enhancing plant defence, OCII-transformed potatoes were bioassayed for resistance to Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say). Feeding on transformed leaves of potato cultivars Desiree and Jelica significantly affected larval growth and development, but did not change mortality rates. During the L2 and L3 developmental stages larvae consumed the OCII-transformed foliage faster as compared to the nontransformed control. Also these larvae reached the prepupal stage (end of L4 stage) 2 days earlier than those fed on control leaves. However, the total amounts of consumed OCII-transformed leaves were up to 23% lower than of control, and the maximal weights of prepupal larvae were reduced by up to 18% as compared to larvae fed on nontransformed leaves. The reduction in insect fitness reported in this study in combination with other control measures, could lead to improved CPB resistance management in potato.

  3. Proceedings: EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) Power Plant valves symposium II

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, B.; McCloskey, T.H.

    1989-07-01

    On October 11-12, 1988, an EPRI Power Plant Valves Symposium was conducted in Charlotte, North Carolina, to address significant current issues relating to valves in both nuclear and fossil fueled power plants. This was the second such meeting on this subject. The proceedings of the first meeting are published in EPRI Report CS/NP 5878-SR. Approximately 250 attendees, consisting of representatives from the utility industry, valve manufacturers and service organizations, and government, university and other organizations, participated in the symposium. A total of 14 technical papers was presented in the following three major categories: Check Valve Performance, Motor Operated Valve Performance, and Valve Improvement Programs. Separate from the formal presentations of the symposium, discussion groups were organized for each of these categories to provide a format for further discussion, description of experience, and exchange of ideas. 46 refs., 76 figs., 17 tabs.

  4. Studies on the acetogenins of Formosan annonaceous plants. II. Cytotoxic acetogenins from Annona reticulata.

    PubMed

    Chang, F R; Wu, Y C; Duh, C Y; Wang, S K

    1993-10-01

    Using cytotoxicity as a guide to fractionation, one novel acetogenin, annoreticuin-9-one [3], and four known cytotoxic acetogenins, squamone [4], solamin [5], annomonicin [6] and rolliniastatin 2 [7], were isolated from active extracts of the leaves of the Formosan plant Annona reticulata. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of uv, ir, 1H- and 13C-nmr, and ms data of the natural compounds and their derivatives.

  5. Partner orbits and action differences on compact factors of the hyperbolic plane. II: Higher-order encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Minh Hien

    2016-01-01

    Physicists have argued that periodic orbit bunching leads to universal spectral fluctuations for chaotic quantum systems. To establish a more detailed mathematical understanding of this fact, it is first necessary to look more closely at the classical side of the problem and determine orbit pairs consisting of orbits which have similar actions. We specialize to the geodesic flow on compact factors of the hyperbolic plane as a classical chaotic system. The companion paper (Huynh and Kunze, 2015) proved the existence of a unique periodic partner orbit for a given periodic orbit with a small-angle self-crossing in configuration space that is a 2-encounter and derived an estimate for the action difference of the orbit pair. In this paper, we provide an inductive argument to deal with higher-order encounters: we prove that a given periodic orbit including an L-parallel encounter has (L - 1) ! - 1 partner orbits; we construct partner orbits and give estimates for the action differences between orbit pairs.

  6. Forensic botany II, DNA barcode for land plants: Which markers after the international agreement?

    PubMed

    Ferri, G; Corradini, B; Ferrari, F; Santunione, A L; Palazzoli, F; Alu', M

    2015-03-01

    The ambitious idea of using a short piece of DNA for large-scale species identification (DNA barcoding) is already a powerful tool for scientists and the application of this standard technique seems promising in a range of fields including forensic genetics. While DNA barcoding enjoyed a remarkable success for animal identification through cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) analysis, the attempts to identify a single barcode for plants remained a vain hope for a longtime. From the beginning, the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL) showed a lack of agreement on a core plant barcode, reflecting the diversity of viewpoints. Different research groups advocated various markers with divergent set of criteria until the recent publication by the CBOL-Plant Working Group. After a four-year effort, in 2009 the International Team concluded to agree on standard markers promoting a multilocus solution (rbcL and matK), with 70-75% of discrimination to the species level. In 2009 our group firstly proposed the broad application of DNA barcoding principles as a tool for identification of trace botanical evidence through the analysis of two chloroplast loci (trnH-psbA and trnL-trnF) in plant species belonging to local flora. Difficulties and drawbacks that were encountered included a poor coverage of species in specific databases and the lack of authenticated reference sequences for the selected markers. Successful preliminary results were obtained providing an approach to progressively identify unknown plant specimens to a given taxonomic rank, usable by any non-specialist botanist or in case of a shortage of taxonomic expertise. Now we considered mandatory to update and to compare our previous findings with the new selected plastid markers (matK+rbcL), taking into account forensic requirements. Features of all the four loci (the two previously analyzed trnH-psbA+trnL-trnF and matK+rbcL) were compared singly and in multilocus solutions to assess the most suitable combination for

  7. Modulation of RNA polymerase II phosphorylation downstream of pathogen perception orchestrates plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangjun; Cheng, Cheng; Cui, Fuhao; de Oliveira, Marcos V V; Yu, Xiao; Meng, Xiangzong; Intorne, Aline C; Babilonia, Kevin; Li, Maoying; Li, Bo; Chen, Sixue; Ma, Xianfeng; Xiao, Shunyuan; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; Metz, Richard P; Johnson, Charles D; Koiwa, Hisashi; Sun, Wenxian; Li, Zhaohu; de Souza Filho, Gonçalo A; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2014-12-10

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) elicits host transcriptional reprogramming as part of the immune response. Although pathogen perception is well studied, the signaling networks orchestrating immune gene expression remain less clear. In a genetic screen for components involved in the early immune gene transcription reprogramming, we identified Arabidopsis RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase-like 3 (CPL3) as a negative regulator of immune gene expression. MAMP perception induced rapid and transient cyclin-dependent kinase C (CDKC)-mediated phosphorylation of Arabidopsis CTD. The CDKCs, which are in turn phosphorylated and activated by a canonical MAP kinase (MAPK) cascade, represent a point of signaling convergence downstream of multiple immune receptors. CPL3 directly dephosphorylated CTD to counteract MAPK-mediated CDKC regulation. Thus, modulation of the phosphorylation dynamics of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcription machinery by MAPKs, CTD kinases, and phosphatases constitutes an essential mechanism for rapid orchestration of host immune gene expression and defense upon pathogen attacks.

  8. Modulation of RNA polymerase II phosphorylation downstream of pathogen perception orchestrates plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fangjun; Cheng, Cheng; Cui, Fuhao; de Oliveira, Marcos V. V.; Yu, Xiao; Meng, Xiangzong; Intorne, Aline C.; Babilonia, Kevin; Li, Maoying; Li, Bo; Chen, Sixue; Ma, Xiaofeng; Xiao, Shunyuan; Zeng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; Metz, Richard; Johnson, Charles D.; Koiwa, Hisashi; Sun, Wenxian; Li, Zhaohu; de Souza Filho, Gonçalo A.; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Summary Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) elicits host transcriptional reprogramming as part of the immune response. Although pathogen perception is well studied, the signaling networks orchestrating immune gene expression remain less clear. In a genetic screen for components involved in the early immune gene transcription reprogramming, we identified Arabidopsis RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase-like 3 (CPL3) as a negative regulator of immune gene expression. MAMP perception induced rapid and transient cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKC)-mediated phosphorylation of Arabidopsis CTD. The CDKCs, which are in-turn phosphorylated and activated by a canonical MAP kinase (MAPK) cascade, represent a point of signaling convergence downstream of multiple immune receptors. CPL3 directly dephosphorylated CTD to counteract MAPK-mediated CDKC regulation. Thus, modulation of the phosphorylation dynamics of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcription machinery by MAPKs, CTD kinases and phosphatases constitutes an essential mechanism for rapid orchestration of host immune gene expression and defense upon pathogen attacks. PMID:25464831

  9. Evaluating the Effects of Illumination Quality on Higher Plant Value in the MARS 500-Day Mission Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, C. C.; Karetkin, I. G.; Podolsky, I. G.; Bingham, G. E.

    2008-06-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LED) have a number of advantages over other light sources for space horticulture, including greater output efficiency, increased safety, and small size and mass. Much of the previous work with LEDs has ignored their effect on the plants' visible appearances. Part of the MARS 500 experiment at the IBMP in Moscow will be evaluating the plants' psychological value. In that experiment, white LEDs will be compared against fluorescent lighting to determine yield and perception effectiveness. For this study, the suitability of white LEDs for spaceflight is evaluated with respect to both biomass yield as well as plant appearance. In these studies, a variety of plant types have been used, including radish, leaf mustard, dwarf peas, and super-dwarf wheat. An LED bank with white elements is compared against a conventional fluorescent source and an LED bank with 90% red and 10% blue elements. Results showed biomass yield to be comparable for all three sources, but with species-specific reactions to LED lighting. White LEDs can significantly improve illumination efficiency relative to fluorescent lighting, while retaining the psychological value of the plants.

  10. Criticality analysis for weapon disassembly at the Pantex-Plant part II: Staging

    SciTech Connect

    Knief, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    This paper very briefly describes criticality investigations for nuclear weapon dismantlement at the Pantex Plant. The investigations performed were for pit staging, and build on previous criticality calculations for single pits. The KENO and MCNP computer models were used for pit and container combinations. Scenarios were based on administrative limits and actual or potential physical conditions in the facilities. Essentially all of the pit configurations modeled were subcritical by a substantial amount. It was concluded that a critical configuration involving pit/container combinations is not credible.

  11. An ESEEM study of the oxidized electron donor of plant photosystem II: Evidence that D ? is a neutral tyrosine radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evelo, R. G.; Hoff, A. J.; Dikanov, S. A.; Tyryshkin, A. M.

    1989-09-01

    Electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) has been performed on the tyrosyl radical D ? in photosystem II of plants and algae. This radical was investigated in PS II-enriched subchloroplast particles, and in perdeuterated and 15N-substituted Chlorella vulgaris algae. From the ESEEM analysis in the time and frequency domain, two proton hyperfine interactions were determined. One of these protons has hyperfine parameters aiso=27.2 MHz, T11=-3.1 MHz and T22/ T11=0.5. The second proton, which is easily exchangeable by deuterium, has parameters aiso=±1.6 MHz, T11=∓8.4 MHz and T22/ T11=1. The hyperfine parameters of the first proton are characteristic of a β-methylene proton, whereas those of the second indicate that it is a proton hydrogen bonded to the tyrosyl oxygen. We conclude that the oxidized tyrosyl donor is a neutral hydrogen-bonded radical.

  12. Golgi-Mediated Synthesis and Secretion of Matrix Polysaccharides of the Primary Cell Wall of Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Driouich, Azeddine; Follet-Gueye, Marie-Laure; Bernard, Sophie; Kousar, Sumaira; Chevalier, Laurence; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Lerouxel, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus of eukaryotic cells is known for its central role in the processing, sorting, and transport of proteins to intra- and extra-cellular compartments. In plants, it has the additional task of assembling and exporting the non-cellulosic polysaccharides of the cell wall matrix including pectin and hemicelluloses, which are important for plant development and protection. In this review, we focus on the biosynthesis of complex polysaccharides of the primary cell wall of eudicotyledonous plants. We present and discuss the compartmental organization of the Golgi stacks with regards to complex polysaccharide assembly and secretion using immuno-electron microscopy and specific antibodies recognizing various sugar epitopes. We also discuss the significance of the recently identified Golgi-localized glycosyltransferases responsible for the biosynthesis of xyloglucan (XyG) and pectin. PMID:22639665

  13. Evaluation of the biotic potential of microorganisms and higher plants to enhance the quality of constructed wetlands. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, D.A.; Floyd, M.; Taylor, R.W.; Sistani, K.

    1998-09-30

    A project was carried out from October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1998 to evaluate the growth of several species of wetland plants in constructed cells using mine spoil as a growth medium, to evaluate microbial diversity and finally, to demonstrate the concept on an actual strip-mined site. In order to gain background information for evaluation of constructed wetlands, several wetlands on both undisturbed and strip-mined areas were evaluated to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of the substrates as well as the vegetation characteristics. The research phase of this projects consisted of 10 wetland cells each 7x16 m in size with the water depth varying from 0 to 40 cm. The substrates were allowed to stabilize over winter and each cell was planted in the spring of 1993 with 18 plants each of cattail, maidencance, soft stem bulrush and pickerel weed. All cells were thickly vegetated by the end of the first growing season.

  14. Microgravity effects on different stages of higher plant life cycle and completion of the seed-to-seed cycle.

    PubMed

    De Micco, V; De Pascale, S; Paradiso, R; Aronne, G

    2014-01-01

    Human inhabitation of Space requires the efficient realisation of crop cultivation in bioregenerative life-support systems (BLSS). It is well known that plants can grow under Space conditions; however, perturbations of many biological phenomena have been highlighted due to the effect of altered gravity and its possible interactions with other factors. The mechanisms priming plant responses to Space factors, as well as the consequences of such alterations on crop productivity, have not been completely elucidated. These perturbations can occur at different stages of plant life and are potentially responsible for failure of the completion of the seed-to-seed cycle. After brief consideration of the main constraints found in the most recent experiments aiming to produce seeds in Space, we focus on two developmental phases in which the plant life cycle can be interrupted more easily than in others also on Earth. The first regards seedling development and establishment; we discuss reasons for slow development at the seedling stage that often occurs under microgravity conditions and can reduce successful establishment. The second stage comprises gametogenesis and pollination; we focus on male gamete formation, also identifying potential constraints to subsequent fertilisation. We finally highlight how similar alterations at cytological level can not only be common to different processes occurring at different life stages, but can be primed by different stress factors; such alterations can be interpreted within the model of 'stress-induced morphogenic response' (SIMR). We conclude by suggesting that a systematic analysis of all growth and reproductive phases during the plant life cycle is needed to optimise resource use in plant-based BLSS.

  15. Perturbation of the ubiquitin system causes leaf curling, vascular tissue alterations and necrotic lesions in a higher plant.

    PubMed Central

    Bachmair, A; Becker, F; Masterson, R V; Schell, J

    1990-01-01

    A ubiquitin variant with Lys48 changed to Arg acts in vitro as an inhibitor of ubiquitin dependent protein degradation. To assess the role of this proteolytic pathway in the life cycle of plants, we expressed the ubiquitin variant in Nicotiana tabacum. Expression of variant mono- or polyubiquitin leads to marked abnormalities in vascular tissue. In addition, overexpression of variant polyubiquitin induces discrete lesions on leaves. This indicates that perturbations of the ubiquitin system can induce a programmed necrotic response in plants. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2176155

  16. A controlled aquatic ecological life support system (CAELSS) for combined production of fish and higher plant biomass suitable for integration into a lunar or planetary base.

    PubMed

    Blum, V; Andriske, M; Eichhorn, H; Kreuzberg, K; Schreibman, M P

    1995-10-01

    Based on the construction principle of the already operative Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System (C.E.B.A.S.) the concept of an aquaculture system for combined production of animal and plant biomass was developed. It consists of a tank for intensive fish culture which is equipped with a feeding lock representing also a trap for biomass removal followed by a water recycling system. This is an optimized version of the original C.E.B.A.S. filters adapted to higher water pollutions. It operates in a fully biological mode and is able to convert the high ammonia ion concentrations excreted by the fish gills into nitrite ions. The second biomass production site is a higher plant cultivator with an internal fiber optics light distributor which may utilize of solar energy. The selected water plant is a tropical rootless duckweed of the genus Wolffia which possesses a high capacity in nitrate elimination and is terrestrially cultured as a vegetable for human nutrition in Southeast Asia. It is produced in an improved suspension culture which allows the removal of excess biomass by tangential centrifugation. The plant cultivator is able to supply the whole system with oxygen for respiration and eliminates vice versa the carbon dioxide exhaled by the fish via photosynthesis. A gas exchanger may be used for emergency purposes or to deliver excess oxygen into the environment and may be implemented into the air regeneration system of a closed environment of higher order. The plant biomass is fed into a biomass processor which delivers condensed fresh and dried biomass as pellets. The recovered water is fed back into the aquaculture loop. The fresh plants can be used for human nutrition immediately or can be stored after sterilization in an adequate packing. The dried Wolffia pellets are collected and brought into the fish tank by an automated feeder. In parallel the water from the plant cultivator is driven back to the animal tank by a pump. The special feature of the

  17. Polyamines and cellular metabolism in plants: Transgenic approaches reveal different responses to diamine putrescine versus higher polyamines spermidine and spermine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Distribution of biogenic amines – the diamine putrescine (Put), triamine spermidine (Spd), and tetraamine spermine (Spm) - differs between species with Put and Spd being particularly abundant and Spm the least abundant in plant cells. These amines are important for cell viability and their intracel...

  18. Expansion Mechanisms and Functional Divergence of the Glutathione S-Transferase Family in Sorghum and Other Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yunhua; Cheng, Yansong; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Kumar, Nadimuthu; Ramamoorthy, Rengasamy; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Jiang, Shu-Ye

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) exist in various eukaryotes and function in detoxification of xenobiotics and in response to abiotic and biotic stresses. We have carried out a genome-wide survey of this gene family in 10 plant genomes. Our data show that tandem duplication has been regarded as the major expansion mechanism and both monocot and dicot plants may have practiced different expansion and evolutionary history. Non-synonymous substitutions per site (Ka) and synonymous substitutions per site (Ks) analyses showed that N- and C-terminal functional domains of GSTs (GST_N and GST_C) seem to have evolved under a strong purifying selection (Ka/Ks < 1) under different selective pressures. Differential evolutionary rates between GST_N and GST_C and high degree of expression divergence have been regarded as the major drivers for the retention of duplicated genes and the adaptability to various stresses. Expression profiling also indicated that the gene family plays a role not only in stress-related biological processes but also in the sugar-signalling pathway. Our survey provides additional annotation of the plant GST gene family and advance the understanding of plant GSTs in lineage-specific expansion and species diversification. PMID:21169340

  19. Survival of plant seeds, their UV screens, and nptII DNA for 18 months outside the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Tepfer, David; Zalar, Andreja; Leach, Sydney

    2012-05-01

    The plausibility that life was imported to Earth from elsewhere can be tested by subjecting life-forms to space travel. Ultraviolet light is the major liability in short-term exposures (Horneck et al., 2001 ), and plant seeds, tardigrades, and lichens-but not microorganisms and their spores-are candidates for long-term survival (Anikeeva et al., 1990 ; Sancho et al., 2007 ; Jönsson et al., 2008 ; de la Torre et al., 2010 ). In the present study, plant seeds germinated after 1.5 years of exposure to solar UV, solar and galactic cosmic radiation, temperature fluctuations, and space vacuum outside the International Space Station. Of the 2100 exposed wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) seeds, 23% produced viable plants after return to Earth. Survival was lower in the Arabidopsis Wassilewskija ecotype and in mutants (tt4-8 and fah1-2) lacking UV screens. The highest survival occurred in tobacco (44%). Germination was delayed in seeds shielded from solar light, yet full survival was attained, which indicates that longer space travel would be possible for seeds embedded in an opaque matrix. We conclude that a naked, seed-like entity could have survived exposure to solar UV radiation during a hypothetical transfer from Mars to Earth. Chemical samples of seed flavonoid UV screens were degraded by UV, but their overall capacity to absorb UV was retained. Naked DNA encoding the nptII gene (kanamycin resistance) was also degraded by UV. A fragment, however, was detected by the polymerase chain reaction, and the gene survived in space when protected from UV. Even if seeds do not survive, components (e.g., their DNA) might survive transfer over cosmic distances.

  20. Statistical genetics of an annual plant, Impatiens capensis. II. Natural selection.

    PubMed

    Mitchell-Olds, T; Bergelson, J

    1990-02-01

    Measurement of natural selection on correlated characters provides valuable information on fitness surfaces, patterns of directional, stabilizing, or disruptive selection, mechanisms of fitness variation operating in nature, and possible spatial variation in selective pressures. We examined effects of seed weight, germination date, plant size, early growth, and late growth on individual fitness. Path analysis showed that most characters had direct or indirect effects on individual fitness, indicating directional selection. For most early life-cycle characters, indirect effects via later characters exceed the direct causal effect on fitness. Selection gradients were uniform across the experimental site. There was no evidence for stabilizing or disruptive selection. We discuss several definitions of stabilizing and disruptive selection. Although early events in the life of an individual have important causal effects on subsequent characters and fitness, there is no detectable genetic variance for most of these characters, so little or no genetic response to natural selection is expected.

  1. A probabilistic seismic risk assessment procedure for nuclear power plants: (II) Application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Y.-N.; Whittaker, A.S.; Luco, N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the procedures and results of intensity- and time-based seismic risk assessments of a sample nuclear power plant (NPP) to demonstrate the risk-assessment methodology proposed in its companion paper. The intensity-based assessments include three sets of sensitivity studies to identify the impact of the following factors on the seismic vulnerability of the sample NPP, namely: (1) the description of fragility curves for primary and secondary components of NPPs, (2) the number of simulations of NPP response required for risk assessment, and (3) the correlation in responses between NPP components. The time-based assessment is performed as a series of intensity-based assessments. The studies illustrate the utility of the response-based fragility curves and the inclusion of the correlation in the responses of NPP components directly in the risk computation. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Development of a simple PCR-based assay for the identification of triazine resistance in the noxious plant common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) and its applicability in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Mátyás, Kinga Klára; Taller, János; Cseh, András; Poczai, Péter; Cernák, István

    2011-12-01

    Bidirectional allele-specific PCR (Bi-PASA) was used to detect a point mutation causing triazine resistance in common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia). The external primers amplified a 278 bp standard DNA fragment in all genotypes. In the susceptible S264S genotypes, a 208 bp fragment was expected while in resistant S264G common ragweed genotypes a 109 bp band was expected. In resistant plants, both the wild and mutant type fragments were detected, indicating that the original triazine sensitive cpDNA is maintained in a heteroplasmic state in the resistant S264G genotypes. Additionally, in silico analysis confirmed the potential applicability of our diagnostic assay for other plant species. In 24 out of 74 taxa (32%), the assay could be used without any change, while in the others some of the primers should be redesigned before use.

  3. Analysis of Radionuclide Releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achim, Pascal; Monfort, Marguerite; Le Petit, Gilbert; Gross, Philippe; Douysset, Guilhem; Taffary, Thomas; Blanchard, Xavier; Moulin, Christophe

    2014-03-01

    The present part of the publication (Part II) deals with long range dispersion of radionuclides emitted into the atmosphere during the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident that occurred after the March 11, 2011 tsunami. The first part (Part I) is dedicated to the accident features relying on radionuclide detections performed by monitoring stations of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization network. In this study, the emissions of the three fission products Cs-137, I-131 and Xe-133 are investigated. Regarding Xe-133, the total release is estimated to be of the order of 6 × 1018 Bq emitted during the explosions of units 1, 2 and 3. The total source term estimated gives a fraction of core inventory of about 8 × 1018 Bq at the time of reactors shutdown. This result suggests that at least 80 % of the core inventory has been released into the atmosphere and indicates a broad meltdown of reactor cores. Total atmospheric releases of Cs-137 and I-131 aerosols are estimated to be 1016 and 1017 Bq, respectively. By neglecting gas/particulate conversion phenomena, the total release of I-131 (gas + aerosol) could be estimated to be 4 × 1017 Bq. Atmospheric transport simulations suggest that the main air emissions have occurred during the events of March 14, 2011 (UTC) and that no major release occurred after March 23. The radioactivity emitted into the atmosphere could represent 10 % of the Chernobyl accident releases for I-131 and Cs-137.

  4. Higher Lipoprotein (a) Levels Are Associated with Better Pulmonary Function in Community-Dwelling Older People - Data from the Berlin Aging Study II.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, Nikolaus; Kassner, Ursula; Norman, Kristina; Goldeck, David; Eckardt, Rahel; Pawelec, Graham; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Ilja

    2015-01-01

    Reduced pulmonary function and elevated serum cholesterol levels are recognized risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Currently, there is some controversy concerning relationships between cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, serum triglycerides and lung function. However, most previous studies compared patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with healthy controls, and only a small number examined this relationship in population-based cohorts. Moreover, lipoprotein a [Lp(a)], another lipid parameter independently associated with cardiovascular diseases, appears not to have been addressed at all in studies of lung function at the population level. Here, we determined relationships between lung function and several lipid parameters including Lp(a) in 606 older community-dwelling participants (55.1% women, 68±4 years old) from the Berlin Aging Study II (BASE-II). We found a significantly lower forced expiration volume in 1 second (FEV1) in men with low Lp(a) concentrations (t-test). This finding was further substantiated by linear regression models adjusting for known covariates, showing that these associations are statistically significant in both men and women. According to the highest adjusted model, men and women with Lp(a) levels below the 20th percentile had 217.3ml and 124.2ml less FEV1 and 239.0ml and 135.2ml less FVC, respectively, compared to participants with higher Lp(a) levels. The adjusted models also suggest that the known strong correlation between pro-inflammatory parameters and lung function has only a marginal impact on the Lp(a)-pulmonary function association. Our results do not support the hypothesis that higher Lp(a) levels are responsible for the increased CVD risk in people with reduced lung function, at least not in the group of community-dwelling older people studied here.

  5. Higher Lipoprotein (a) Levels Are Associated with Better Pulmonary Function in Community-Dwelling Older People – Data from the Berlin Aging Study II

    PubMed Central

    Buchmann, Nikolaus; Kassner, Ursula; Norman, Kristina; Goldeck, David; Eckardt, Rahel; Pawelec, Graham; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Ilja

    2015-01-01

    Reduced pulmonary function and elevated serum cholesterol levels are recognized risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Currently, there is some controversy concerning relationships between cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, serum triglycerides and lung function. However, most previous studies compared patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with healthy controls, and only a small number examined this relationship in population-based cohorts. Moreover, lipoprotein a [Lp(a)], another lipid parameter independently associated with cardiovascular diseases, appears not to have been addressed at all in studies of lung function at the population level. Here, we determined relationships between lung function and several lipid parameters including Lp(a) in 606 older community-dwelling participants (55.1% women, 68±4 years old) from the Berlin Aging Study II (BASE-II). We found a significantly lower forced expiration volume in 1 second (FEV1) in men with low Lp(a) concentrations (t-test). This finding was further substantiated by linear regression models adjusting for known covariates, showing that these associations are statistically significant in both men and women. According to the highest adjusted model, men and women with Lp(a) levels below the 20th percentile had 217.3ml and 124.2ml less FEV1 and 239.0ml and 135.2ml less FVC, respectively, compared to participants with higher Lp(a) levels. The adjusted models also suggest that the known strong correlation between pro-inflammatory parameters and lung function has only a marginal impact on the Lp(a)-pulmonary function association. Our results do not support the hypothesis that higher Lp(a) levels are responsible for the increased CVD risk in people with reduced lung function, at least not in the group of community-dwelling older people studied here. PMID:26421427

  6. Two cytochrome P-450 isoforms catalysing O-de-ethylation of ethoxycoumarin and ethoxyresorufin in higher plants.

    PubMed Central

    Werck-Reichhart, D; Gabriac, B; Teutsch, H; Durst, F

    1990-01-01

    The O-dealkylating activities of 7-ethoxycoumarin O-de-ethylase (ECOD) and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-de-ethylase (EROD) have been fluorimetrically detected in microsomes prepared from manganese-induced Jerusalem artichoke tubers. Cytochrome P-450 dependence of the reactions was demonstrated by light-reversed CO inhibition, NADPH-dependence, NADH-NADPH synergism and by use of specific inhibitors: antibodies to NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase, mechanism-based inactivators and tetcyclasis. Apparent Km values of 161 microM for 7-ethoxycoumarin and 0.4 microM for 7-ethoxyresorufin were determined. O-De-ethylase activity was also detected in microsomes prepared from several other plant species, including wheat, maize, tulip, avocado and Vicia. ECOD and EROD were low or undetectable in uninduced plant tissues, and both activities were stimulated by wounding or by chemical inducers. Two distinct cytochrome P-450 isoforms are involved in ECOD and EROD activities since (1) they showed different distributions among plant species; (2) they showed contrasting inhibition and induction patterns; and (3) ECOD but not EROD activity was supported by cumene hydroperoxide. PMID:2241905

  7. Microinjected fluorescent phalloidin in vivo reveals the F-actin dynamics and assembly in higher plant mitotic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schmit, A C; Lambert, A M

    1990-01-01

    Endosperm mitotic cells microinjected with fluorescent phalloidin enabled us to follow the in vivo dynamics of the F-actin cytoskeleton. The fluorescent probe immediately bound to plant microfilaments. First, we investigated the active rearrangement of F-actin during chromosome migration, which appeared to be slowed down in the presence of phalloidin. These findings were compared with the actin patterns observed in mitotic cells fixed at different stages. Our second aim was to determine the origin of the actin filaments that appear at the equator during anaphase-telophase transition. It is not clear whether this F-actin is newly assembled at the end of mitosis and could control plant cytokinesis or whether it corresponds to a passive redistribution of broken polymers in response to microtubule dynamics. We microinjected the same cells twice, first in metaphase with rhodamine-phalloidin and then in late anaphase with fluorescein isothiocyanate-phalloidin. This technique enabled us to visualize two F-actin populations that are not co-localized, suggesting that actin is newly assembled during cell plate development. These in vivo data shed new light on the role of actin in plant mitosis and cytokinesis. PMID:2136631

  8. An Ancient P-Loop GTPase in Rice Is Regulated by a Higher Plant-specific Regulatory Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ming-Yan; Xue, Yan; Zhou, Liang; Li, Man-Wah; Sun, Samuel Sai-Ming; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2010-01-01

    YchF is a subfamily of the Obg family in the TRAFAC class of P-loop GTPases. The wide distribution of YchF homologues in both eukarya and bacteria suggests that they are descendents of an ancient protein, yet their physiological roles remain unclear. Using the OsYchF1-OsGAP1 pair from rice as the prototype, we provide evidence for the regulation of GTPase/ATPase activities and RNA binding capacity of a plant YchF (OsYchF1) by its regulatory protein (OsGAP1). The effects of OsGAP1 on the subcellular localization/cycling and physiological functions of OsYchF1 are also discussed. The finding that OsYchF1 and OsGAP1 are involved in plant defense response might shed light on the functional roles of YchF homologues in plants. This work suggests that during evolution, an ancestral P-loop GTPase/ATPase may acquire new regulation and function(s) by the evolution of a lineage-specific regulatory protein. PMID:20876569

  9. Evaluation of higher plant virus resistance genes in the green alga, Chlorella variabilis NC64A, during the early phase of infection with Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus-1

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Janet M.; Dunigan, David D.; Blanc, Guillaume; Gurnon, James R.; Xia, Yuannan; Van Etten, James L.

    2014-01-01

    With growing industrial interest in algae plus their critical roles in aquatic systems, the need to understand the effects of algal pathogens is increasing. We examined a model algal host–virus system, Chlorella variabilis NC64A and virus, PBCV-1. C. variabilis encodes 375 homologs to genes involved in RNA silencing and in response to virus infection in higher plants. Illumina RNA-Seq data showed that 325 of these homologs were expressed in healthy and early PBCV-1 infected (≤60 min) cells. For each of the RNA silencing genes to which homologs were found, mRNA transcripts were detected in healthy and infected cells. C. variabilis, like higher plants, may employ certain RNA silencing pathways to defend itself against virus infection. To our knowledge this is the first examination of RNA silencing genes in algae beyond core proteins, and the first analysis of their transcription during virus infection. PMID:23701839

  10. Requirements of blue, UV-A, and UV-B light for normal growth of higher plants, as assessed by action spectra for growth and related phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, T.

    1994-01-01

    Artificial lighting is very important for experimental purposes, as well as for the practical use of plants when not enough sunlight is available. To grow green higher plants in their normal forms under artificial lighting constructing efficient and economically reasonable lighting systems is not an easy task. One possible approach would be to simulate sunlight in intensity and the radiation spectrum, but its high construction and running costs are not likely to allow its use in practice. Sunlight may be excessive in irradiance in some or all portions of the spectrum. Reducing irradiance and removing unnecessary wavebands might lead to an economically feasible light source. However, removing or reducing a particular waveband from sunlight for testing is not easy. Another approach might be to find the wavebands required for respective aspects of plant growth and to combine them in a proper ratio and intensity. The latter approach seems more practical and economical, and the aim of this Workshop lies in advancing this approach. I summarize our present knowledge on the waveband requirements of higher plants for the regions of blue, UV-A and UV-B.

  11. Studies on the sorption and desorption characteristics of Zn(II) on the surface soils of nuclear power plant sites in India using a radiotracer technique.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Sudhir; Shanwal, A V; Hegde, A G

    2005-09-01

    Zinc adsorption was studied in the soils of three nuclear power plant sites of India. 65Zn was used as a radiotracer to study the sorption characteristics of Zn(II). The sorption of zinc was determined at 25 and 45 degrees C at pH 7.8+/-0.2 in the solution of 0.01 M Ca(NO3)2 as supporting electrolyte. The sorption data was tested both in Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms and could be described satisfactorily. The effect of organic matter and other physico-chemical properties on the uptake of zinc was also studied in all the soil samples. The results showed that the cation exchange capacity, organic matter, pH and clay content were the main contributors to zinc sorption in these soils. The adsorption maximum was found to be higher in the soil on Kakarpara Atomic Power Plant sites soils having high organic matter and clay content. The zinc supply parameters of the soils are also discussed. In the desorption studies, the sequential extraction of the adsorbed zinc from soils showed that the diethylene triamine penta acetic acid extracted maximum amount of adsorbed zinc than CaCl2 and Mg(NO3)2. The zinc sorption on the soil and amount of zinc retention after extractants desorption shows a positively correlation with vermiculite and smectite mineral content present in the clay fraction of the soil. The amount desorbed by strong base (NaOH) and demineralised water was almost negligible from soils of all the sites, whereas the desorption by strong acid (HNO3) was 75-96% of the adsorbed zinc.

  12. Carbon dioxide and the stomatal control of water balance and photosynthesis in higher plants. Progress report, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    Research continued into the investigation of the effects of carbon dioxide on stomatal control of water balance and photosynthesis in higher plants. Topics discussed this period include a method of isolating a sufficient number of guard cell chloroplasts for biochemical studies by mechanical isolation of epidermal peels; the measurement of stomatal apertures with a digital image analysis system; development of a high performance liquid chromatography method for quantification of metabolites in guard cells; and genetic control of stomatal movements in Pima cotton. (CBS)

  13. Pilot Plant Program for the AED Advanced Coal Cleaning System. Phase II. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    Advanced Energy Dynamics, Inc. (AED), has developed a proprietary coal cleaning process which employs a combination of ionization and electrostatic separation to remove both sulfur and ash from dry pulverized coal. The Ohio Department of Energy sponsored the first part of a program to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate the process in a continuous-flow pilot plant. Various coals used by Ohio electric utilities were characterized and classified, and sulfur reduction, ash reduction and Btu recovery were measured. Sulfur removal in various coals ranged from 33 to 68% (on a Btu basis). Ash removal ranged from 17 to 59% (on a Btu basis). Ash removal of particles greater than 53 microns ranged from 46 to 88%. Btu recovery ranged from 90 to 97%. These results, especially the large percentage removal of ash particles greater than 53 microns, suggest that the AED system can contribute materially to improved boiler performance and availability. The study indicated the following potential areas for commercial utilization of the AED process: installation between the pulverizer and boiler of conventional coal-fired power utilities; reclamation of fine coal refuse; dry coal cleaning to supplement, and, if necessary, to take the place of conventional coal cleaning; upgrading coal used in: (1) coal-oil mixtures, (2) gasification and liquefaction processes designed to handle pulverized coal; and (3) blast furnaces for making steel, as a fuel supplement to the coke. Partial cleaning of coking coal blends during preheating may also prove economically attractive. Numerous other industrial processes which use pulverized coal such as the production of activated carbon and direct reduction of iron ore may also benefit from the use of AED coal cleaning.

  14. USE OF NATIVE PLANTS FOR REMEDIATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE: II. CONIFEROUS TREES.

    PubMed

    Strycharz, S; Newman, L

    2009-02-01

    The phytoremediation of trichloroethylene (TCE) from contaminated groundwater has been extensively studied using the hybrid poplar tree (Populus spp.). Several metabolites of TCE have been identified in the tissue of poplar including trichloroethanol (TCEOH) and dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA). In addition to the use of hybrid poplar for the phytoremediation of TCE, it is important to screen native tree species that could be successful candidates for field use. This study involves a greenhouse-based comparison of four different native southeastern conifers to a hybrid poplar species for their potential to phytoremediate TCE through the analysis of various plant tissues for TCE and major TCE metabolites, as well as several growth parameters that are desirable for phytoremediation. Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris), Leyland cypress (X Cupressocyparis leylandii), two varieties of Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), and hybrid poplar species H11-11 (Populus trichocarpa x deltoides) were examined for the concentration of TCE and its metabolites in their tissue following treatment with either a low (50 mg L(-1)) or high dose of TCE (150 mg L(-1)) for 2 mo. The amount of water taken up, change in height of the tree, TCE transpiration, and total fresh weight of various tissue types were also measured. All trees contained detectable levels of TCE in their root and stem tissue. TCEOH was found only in the tissue of longleaf pine, suggesting that TCE metabolism was occurring in this tree. TCAA was only detected in the leaves of hybrid poplar and piedmont loblolly pine. Conifers took up less water over the 2-mo treatment period than hybrid poplar and grew at a slower rate. However, phytoremediation field sites may benefit from the evergreen's ability to transpire water throughout the winter months.

  15. Selection and adaptation to high plant density in the Iowa Stiff Stalk synthetic maize (Zea mays L.) population: II. Plant morphology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant density at which Zea mays L. hybrids achieve maximum grain yield has increased throughout the hybrid era while grain yield on a per plant basis has increased little. Changes in plant characteristics including flag leaf angle, anthesis-silking interval (ASI), plant height, tassel branch num...

  16. Attempts to Detect Cyclic Adenosine 3′:5′-Monophosphate in Higher Plants by Three Assay Methods 12

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Ray A.; Ross, Cleon W.; Vandepeute, Jozef

    1976-01-01

    Endogenous levels of cyclic adenosine-3′:5′-monophosphate in coleoptile first leaf segments of oat (Avena sativa L.), potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) callus, and germinating seeds of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were measured with a modified Gilman binding assay and a protein kinase activation assay. The incorporation of adenosine-8-14C into compounds with properties similar to those of cyclic AMP was also measured in studies with germinating lettuce seeds. The binding assay proved reliable for mouse and rat liver analyses, but was nonspecific for plant tissues. It responded to various components from lettuce and potato tissues chromatographically similar to but not identical with cyclic AMP. The protein kinase activation assay was much more specific, but it also exhibited positive responses in the presence of compounds not chromatographically identical to cyclic AMP. The concentrations of cyclic AMP in the plant tissues tested were at the lower limits of detection and characterization obtainable with these assays. The estimates of maximal levels were much lower than reported in many previous studies. PMID:16659419

  17. Stable Accumulation of Modified 2S Albumin Seed Storage Proteins with Higher Methionine Contents in Transgenic Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, Ann; Vandewiele, Martine; Van Damme, Jozef; Guerche, Philippe; Van Montagu, Marc; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Krebbers, Enno

    1990-01-01

    We present the results of two sets of experiments designed to express high methionine proteins in transgenic seeds in three different plant species. In the first approach, two chimeric genes were constructed in which parts of the Arabidopsis 2S albumin gene 1 (AT2S1) were fused at different positions to a Brazil nut 2S albumin cDNA clone. Brazil nut 2S albumin was found to accumulate stably in transgenic Arabidopsis, Brassica napus, and tobacco seeds. In the second approach, methionine-enriched AT2S1 genes were constructed by deleting sequences encoding a region of the protein which is not highly conserved among 2S albumins of different species and replacing them with methioninerich sequences. Introduction of the modified AT2S1 genes into three different plant species resulted in the accumulation of the methionine-enriched 2S albumins in all three species at levels reaching 1 to 2% of the total high salt-extractable seed protein. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:16667878

  18. A higher plant mitochondrial homologue of the yeast m-AAA protease. Molecular cloning, localization, and putative function.

    PubMed

    Kolodziejczak, Marta; Kolaczkowska, Anna; Szczesny, Bartosz; Urantowka, Adam; Knorpp, Carina; Kieleczawa, Jan; Janska, Hanna

    2002-11-15

    Mitochondrial AAA metalloproteases play a fundamental role in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. They have been identified in yeast and animals but not yet in plants. This work describes the isolation and sequence analysis of the full-length cDNA from the pea (Pisum sativum) with significant homology to the yeast matrix AAA (m-AAA) protease. The product of this clone was imported into isolated pea mitochondria where it was processed to its mature form (PsFtsH). We have shown that the central region of PsFtsH containing the chaperone domain is exposed to the matrix space. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the pea protease can complement respiration deficiency in the yta10 and/or yta12 null yeast mutants, indicating that the plant protein can compensate for the loss of at least some of the important m-AAA functions in yeast. Based on biochemical experiments using isolated pea mitochondria, we propose that PsFtsH-like m-AAA is involved in the accumulation of the subunit 9 of the ATP synthase in the mitochondrial membrane.

  19. Mechanisms to Detoxify Selected Organic Contaminants in Higher Plants and Microbes, and Their Potential Use in Landscape Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    Phanerochaete chrisosporium Phanerochaete sordida Phellinus werii Polyporus versicolor Pleurotus ostreatus This strain degrades ~50% DDT in 30 days... substrate , was also identified in potato cells (Edwards and Owen, 1989). Conjugation with glutathione is characteristic of chloroacetamide herbicides (Le...xenobiotic conjugation with glutathione, had a three times higher activity when alachlor was used as a substrate than with metolachlor (O’Connel et al

  20. Complexation and toxicity of copper in higher plants. I. Characterization of copper accumulation, speciation, and toxicity in Crassula helmsii as a new copper accumulator.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Hendrik; Götz, Birgit; Mijovilovich, Ana; Küpper, Frithjof C; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram

    2009-10-01

    The amphibious water plant Crassula helmsii is an invasive copper (Cu)-tolerant neophyte in Europe. It now turned out to accumulate Cu up to more than 9,000 ppm in its shoots at 10 microm (=0.6 ppm) Cu(2+) in the nutrient solution, indicating that it is a Cu hyperaccumulator. We investigated uptake, binding environment, and toxicity of Cu in this plant under emerged and submerged conditions. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements on frozen-hydrated samples revealed that Cu was bound almost exclusively by oxygen ligands, likely organic acids, and not any sulfur ligands. Despite significant differences in photosynthesis biochemistry and biophysics between emerged and submerged plants, no differences in Cu ligands were found. While measurements of tissue pH confirmed the diurnal acid cycle typical for Crassulacean acid metabolism, Delta(13)C measurements showed values typical for regular C3 photosynthesis. Cu-induced inhibition of photosynthesis mainly affected the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center, but with some unusual features. Most obviously, the degree of light saturation of electron transport increased during Cu stress, while maximal dark-adapted PSII quantum yield did not change and light-adapted quantum yield of PSII photochemistry decreased particularly in the first 50 s after onset of actinic irradiance. This combination of changes, which were strongest in submerged cultures, shows a decreasing number of functional reaction centers relative to the antenna in a system with high antenna connectivity. Nonphotochemical quenching, in contrast, was modified by Cu mainly in emerged cultures. Pigment concentrations in stressed plants strongly decreased, but no changes in their ratios occurred, indicating that cells either survived intact or died and bleached quickly.

  1. Diacylglycerol Kinases Are Widespread in Higher Plants and Display Inducible Gene Expression in Response to Beneficial Elements, Metal, and Metalloid Ions.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Sepúlveda, Hugo F; Trejo-Téllez, Libia I; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Hidalgo-Contreras, Juan V; Gómez-Merino, Fernando C

    2017-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) are pivotal signaling enzymes that phosphorylate diacylglycerol (DAG) to yield phosphatidic acid (PA). The biosynthesis of PA from phospholipase D (PLD) and the coupled phospholipase C (PLC)/DGK route is a crucial signaling process in eukaryotic cells. Next to PLD, the PLC/DGK pathway is the second most important generator of PA in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In eukaryotic cells, DGK, DAG, and PA are implicated in vital processes such as growth, development, and responses to environmental cues. A plethora of DGK isoforms have been identified so far, making this a rather large family of enzymes in plants. Herein we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of DGK isoforms in model and crop plants in order to gain insight into the evolution of higher plant DGKs. Furthermore, we explored the expression profiling data available in public data bases concerning the regulation of plant DGK genes in response to beneficial elements and other metal and metalloid ions, including silver (Ag), aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), and sodium (Na). In all plant genomes explored, we were able to find DGK representatives, though in different numbers. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that these enzymes fall into three major clusters, whose distribution depends on the composition of structural domains. The catalytic domain conserves the consensus sequence GXGXXG/A where ATP binds. The expression profiling data demonstrated that DGK genes are rapidly but transiently regulated in response to certain concentrations and time exposures of beneficial elements and other ions in different plant tissues analyzed, suggesting that DGKs may mediate signals triggered by these elements. Though this evidence is conclusive, further signaling cascades that such elements may stimulate during hormesis, involving the phosphoinositide signaling pathway and DGK genes and enzymes, remain to be elucidated.

  2. Diacylglycerol Kinases Are Widespread in Higher Plants and Display Inducible Gene Expression in Response to Beneficial Elements, Metal, and Metalloid Ions

    PubMed Central

    Escobar-Sepúlveda, Hugo F.; Trejo-Téllez, Libia I.; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Hidalgo-Contreras, Juan V.; Gómez-Merino, Fernando C.

    2017-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) are pivotal signaling enzymes that phosphorylate diacylglycerol (DAG) to yield phosphatidic acid (PA). The biosynthesis of PA from phospholipase D (PLD) and the coupled phospholipase C (PLC)/DGK route is a crucial signaling process in eukaryotic cells. Next to PLD, the PLC/DGK pathway is the second most important generator of PA in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In eukaryotic cells, DGK, DAG, and PA are implicated in vital processes such as growth, development, and responses to environmental cues. A plethora of DGK isoforms have been identified so far, making this a rather large family of enzymes in plants. Herein we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of DGK isoforms in model and crop plants in order to gain insight into the evolution of higher plant DGKs. Furthermore, we explored the expression profiling data available in public data bases concerning the regulation of plant DGK genes in response to beneficial elements and other metal and metalloid ions, including silver (Ag), aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), and sodium (Na). In all plant genomes explored, we were able to find DGK representatives, though in different numbers. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that these enzymes fall into three major clusters, whose distribution depends on the composition of structural domains. The catalytic domain conserves the consensus sequence GXGXXG/A where ATP binds. The expression profiling data demonstrated that DGK genes are rapidly but transiently regulated in response to certain concentrations and time exposures of beneficial elements and other ions in different plant tissues analyzed, suggesting that DGKs may mediate signals triggered by these elements. Though this evidence is conclusive, further signaling cascades that such elements may stimulate during hormesis, involving the phosphoinositide signaling pathway and DGK genes and enzymes, remain to be elucidated. PMID:28223993

  3. Generation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate from acetate in higher plants: Detection of acetoacetyl CoA reductase- and PHB synthase- activities in rice.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Hirohisa; Shiraki, Mari; Inoue, Eri; Saito, Terumi

    2016-08-20

    It has been reported that Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is generated from acetate in the rice root. However, no information is available about the biosynthetic pathway of PHB from acetate in plant cells. In the bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 (R. eutropha), PHB is synthesized from acetyl CoA by the consecutive reaction of three enzymes: β-ketothiolase (EC: 2.3.1.9), acetoacetyl CoA reductase (EC: 1.1.1.36) and PHB synthase (EC: 2.3.1.-). Thus, in this study, we examined whether the above three enzymatic activities were also detected in rice seedlings. The results clearly showed that the activities of the above three enzymes were all detected in rice. In particular, the PHB synthase activity was detected specifically in the sonicated particulate fractions (2000g 10min precipitate (ppt) and the 8000g 30min ppt) of rice roots and leaves. In addition to these enzyme activities, several new experimental results were obtained on PHB synthesis in higher plants: (a) (14)C-PHB generated from 2-(14)C-acetate was mainly localized in the 2000g 10min ppt and the 8000g 30min ppt of rice root. (b) Addition of acetate (0.1-10mM) to culture medium of rice seedlings did not increase the content of PHB in the rice root or leaf. (c) In addition to C3 plants, PHB was generated from acetate in a C4 plant (corn) and in a CAM plant (Bryophyllum pinnatum). d) Washing with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) strongly suggested that the PHB synthesized from acetate was of plant origin and was not bacterial contamination.

  4. Torrefaction of invasive alien plants: Influence of heating rate and other conversion parameters on mass yield and higher heating value.

    PubMed

    Mundike, Jhonnah; Collard, François-Xavier; Görgens, Johann F

    2016-06-01

    With the aim of controlling their proliferation, two invasive alien plants, Lantana camara (LC) and Mimosa pigra (MP), both widespread in Africa, were considered for torrefaction for renewable energy applications. Using thermogravimetric analysis, the influence of heating rate (HR: 2.18-19.82°Cmin(-1)) together with variable temperature and hold time on char yield and HHV (in a bomb calorimeter) were determined. Statistically significant effects of HR on HHV with optima at 10.5°Cmin(-1) for LC and 20°Cmin(-1) for MP were obtained. Increases of HHV up to 0.8MJkg(-1) or energy yield greater than 10%, together with a 3-fold reduction in torrefaction conversion time could be achieved by optimisation of HR. Analysis of the torrefaction volatiles by TG-MS showed that not only hemicelluloses, but also lignin conversion, could influence the optimum HR value.

  5. A symbiosis-dedicated SYNTAXIN OF PLANTS 13II isoform controls the formation of a stable host-microbe interface in symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Rik; Hontelez, Jan; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Wen, Jiangqi; Bisseling, Ton; Limpens, Erik

    2016-09-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and rhizobium bacteria are accommodated in specialized membrane compartments that form a host-microbe interface. To better understand how these interfaces are made, we studied the regulation of exocytosis during interface formation. We used a phylogenetic approach to identify target soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein receptors (t-SNAREs) that are dedicated to symbiosis and used cell-specific expression analysis together with protein localization to identify t-SNAREs that are present on the host-microbe interface in Medicago truncatula. We investigated the role of these t-SNAREs during the formation of a host-microbe interface. We showed that multiple syntaxins are present on the peri-arbuscular membrane. From these, we identified SYNTAXIN OF PLANTS 13II (SYP13II) as a t-SNARE that is essential for the formation of a stable symbiotic interface in both AM and rhizobium symbiosis. In most dicot plants, the SYP13II transcript is alternatively spliced, resulting in two isoforms, SYP13IIα and SYP13IIβ. These splice-forms differentially mark functional and degrading arbuscule branches. Our results show that vesicle traffic to the symbiotic interface is specialized and required for its maintenance. Alternative splicing of SYP13II allows plants to replace a t-SNARE involved in traffic to the plasma membrane with a t-SNARE that is more stringent in its localization to functional arbuscules.

  6. PRH75, a new nucleus-localized member of the DEAD-box protein family from higher plants.

    PubMed Central

    Lorković, Z J; Herrmann, R G; Oelmüller, R

    1997-01-01

    The putative RNA helicases of the DEAD-box protein family are involved in pre-mRNA splicing, rRNA maturation, ribosome assembly, and translation. Members of this protein family have been identified in organisms from Escherichia coli to humans, but except for the translation initiation factor 4A, there have been no reports on the characterization of other DEAD-box proteins from plants. Here we report on a novel member of the DEAD-box protein family, the plant RNA helicase 75 (PRH75). PRH75 is localized in the nucleus and contains two domains for RNA binding. One is located at the C terminus and is similar to RGG RNA-binding domains of nucleus-localized RNA-binding proteins. The other one is located between amino acids 308 and 622, a region containing the conserved motif VI characteristic of DEAD-box proteins and known as the RNA-binding site of eIF-4A. The N-terminal 81 amino acids are sufficient for nuclear targeting of the protein. Northern and Western blot analyses show that PRH75 is mainly expressed in young and rapidly developing tissues. The purified recombinant PRH75 has a weak ATPase activity which is barely stimulated by RNA ligands. The fractionation of spinach whole-cell extracts by glycerol gradient centrifugation and gel filtration on a Superdex 200 column shows that the protein exists in a complex of about 500 kDa. Possible biological functions of PRH75 as well as structure-function relationships in the context of its modular primary structure are discussed. PMID:9121476

  7. AMT1;1 transgenic rice plants with enhanced NH4(+) permeability show superior growth and higher yield under optimal and suboptimal NH4(+) conditions.

    PubMed

    Ranathunge, Kosala; El-Kereamy, Ashraf; Gidda, Satinder; Bi, Yong-Mei; Rothstein, Steven J

    2014-03-01

    The major source of nitrogen for rice (Oryza sativa L.) is ammonium (NH4(+)). The NH4(+) uptake of roots is mainly governed by membrane transporters, with OsAMT1;1 being a prominent member of the OsAMT1 gene family that is known to be involved in NH4(+) transport in rice plants. However, little is known about its involvement in NH4(+) uptake in rice roots and subsequent effects on NH4(+) assimilation. This study shows that OsAMT1;1 is a constitutively expressed, nitrogen-responsive gene, and its protein product is localized in the plasma membrane. Its expression level is under the control of circadian rhythm. Transgenic rice lines (L-2 and L-3) overexpressing the OsAMT1;1 gene had the same root structure as the wild type (WT). However, they had 2-fold greater NH4(+) permeability than the WT, whereas OsAMT1;1 gene expression was 20-fold higher than in the WT. Analogous to the expression, transgenic lines had a higher NH4(+) content in the shoots and roots than the WT. Direct NH4(+) fluxes in the xylem showed that the transgenic lines had significantly greater uptake rates than the WT. Higher NH4(+) contents also promoted higher expression levels of genes in the nitrogen assimilation pathway, resulting in greater nitrogen assimilates, chlorophyll, starch, sugars, and grain yield in transgenic lines than in the WT under suboptimal and optimal nitrogen conditions. OsAMT1;1 also enhanced overall plant growth, especially under suboptimal NH4(+) levels. These results suggest that OsAMT1;1 has the potential for improving nitrogen use efficiency, plant growth, and grain yield under both suboptimal and optimal nitrogen fertilizer conditions.

  8. Overexpression of GlyI and GlyII genes in transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill.) plants confers salt tolerance by decreasing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Viveros, María Fernanda; Inostroza-Blancheteau, Claudio; Timmermann, Tania; González, Máximo; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2013-04-01

    The glyoxalase system plays an important role in various physiological processes in plants, including salt stress tolerance. We report the effects of overexpressing glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II genes in transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill.) cv. Ailsa Craig. Stable expression of both transgenes was detected in the transformed tomato plants under salt stress. The transgenic lines overexpressing GlyI and GlyII under a high NaCl concentration (800 mM) showed reduced lipid peroxidation and the production of H2O2 in leaf tissues. A greater decrease in the chlorophyll a+b content in wild-type (WT) compared with transgenic lines was also observed. These results suggest that the over expression of two genes, GlyI and GlyII, may enhance salt stress tolerance by decreasing oxidative stress in transformed tomato plants. This work will help our understanding of the putative role of the glyoxalase system in the tolerance to abiotic stress in tomato plants.

  9. Immunological cross-reactions between P700 chlorophyll-proteins isolated from two marine green algae and one higher plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaonan; Zhou, Baicheng; Tseng, C. K.

    1991-06-01

    P700 Chl-protein was isolated from a marine green alga Bryopsis corticulans with SDS-resolved thylakoid membranes by SDS-PAGE. After elution from the gel, the recovered protein revealed a 100 KD polypeptide by re-electrophoresis. The same SDS-PAGE procedure was used to isolate P700 Chl-proteins from spinach ( Spinacea oleracea) and another marine green alga Codium fragile. Polyclonal antibodies to Bryopsis P700 protein were raised in rabbits. The antibodies were shown to cross-react with P700 Chl-protein and Chl-protein complexes containing P700 protein from B. Corticulans, C. f ragile, and even spinach. Results indicate similarity of the amino acid sequences of the P700 Chl-proteins and the highly conserved structure of the apoproteins of phylogenetically distant species over evolution. The antibodies cross-react with none of the components of PSII in the species tested, indicating an independent pathway of evolution of photosystem I and photosystem II of later origin.

  10. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in higher plants and in Escherichia coli: on the branching in the methylerythritol phosphate pathway and the independent biosynthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Hoeffler, Jean-François; Hemmerlin, Andréa; Grosdemange-Billiard, Catherine; Bach, Thomas J; Rohmer, Michel

    2002-01-01

    In the bacterium Escherichia coli, the mevalonic-acid (MVA)-independent 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway is characterized by two branches leading separately to isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). The signature of this branching is the retention of deuterium in DMAPP and the deuterium loss in IPP after incorporation of 1-[4-(2)H]deoxy-d-xylulose ([4-(2)H]DX). Feeding tobacco BY-2 cell-suspension cultures with [4-(2)H]DX resulted in deuterium retention in the isoprene units derived from DMAPP, as well as from IPP in the plastidial isoprenoids, phytoene and plastoquinone, synthesized via the MEP pathway. This labelling pattern represents direct evidence for the presence of the DMAPP branch of the MEP pathway in a higher plant, and shows that IPP can be synthesized from DMAPP in plant plastids, most probably via a plastidial IPP isomerase. PMID:12010124

  11. The Rf and Rf-like PPR in higher plants, a fast-evolving subclass of PPR genes.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Jennifer; Mireau, Hakim

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, a number of nuclear genes restoring cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) have been cloned in various crop species. The majority of these genes have been shown to encode pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPR) that act by specifically suppressing the expression of sterility-causing mitochondrial transcripts. Functional analysis of these proteins has indicated that the inhibitory effects of restoring PPR (Rf-PPR) proteins involve various mechanisms, including RNA cleavage, RNA destabilization, or translation inhibition. Cross-species sequence comparison of PPR protein complements revealed that most plant genomes encode 10-30 Rf-like (RFL) proteins sharing high-sequence similarity with the identified Rf-PPRs from crops. Evolutionary analyses further showed that they constitute a monophyletic group apart in the PPR family, with peculiar evolution dynamic and constraints. Here we review recent data on RF-PPRs and present the latest discoveries on the RFL family, with prospects on the functionality and evolution of this peculiar subclass of PPR.

  12. Volatile metabolites of higher plant crops as a photosynthesizing life support system component under temperature stress at different light intensities.

    PubMed

    Gitelson, I I; Tikhomirov, A A; Parshina, O V; Ushakova, S A; Kalacheva, G S

    2003-01-01

    The effect of elevated temperatures of 35 and 45 degrees C (at the intensities of photosynthetically active radiation 322, 690 and 1104 micromoles m-2 s-1) on the photosynthesis, respiration, and qualitative and quantitative composition of the volatiles emitted by wheat (Triticum aestuvi L., cultivar 232) crops was investigated in growth chambers. Identification and quantification of more than 20 volatile compounds (terpenoids--alpha-pinene, delta 3 carene, limonene, benzene, alpha- and trans-caryophyllene, alpha- and gamma-terpinene, their derivatives, aromatic hydrocarbons, etc.) were conducted by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry. Under light intensity of 1104 micromoles m-2 s-1 heat resistance of photosynthesis and respiration increased at 35 degrees C and decreased at 45 degrees C. The action of elevated temperatures brought about variations in the rate and direction of the synthesis of volatile metabolites. The emission of volatile compounds was the greatest under a reduced irradiation of 322 micromoles m-2 s-1 and the smallest under 1104 micromoles m-2 s-1 at 35 degrees C. During the repair period, the contents and proportions of volatile compounds were different from their initial values, too. The degree of disruption and the following recovery of the functional state depended on the light intensity during the exposure to elevated temperatures. The investigation of the atmosphere of the growth chamber without plants has revealed the substances that were definitely technogenic in origin: tetramethylurea, dimethylsulfide, dibutylsulfide, dibutylphthalate, and a number of components of furan and silane nature.

  13. A Guide to Choosing Vectors for Transformation of the Plastid Genome of Higher Plants1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Kerry Ann; Azhagiri, Arun Kumar; Tungsuchat-Huang, Tarinee; Maliga, Pal

    2007-01-01

    Plastid transformation, originally developed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), has recently been extended to a number of crop species enabling in vivo probing of plastid function and biotechnological applications. In this article we report new plastid vectors that enable insertion of transgenes in the inverted repeat region of the plastome between the trnV and 3′rps12 or trnI and trnA genes. Efficient recovery of transplastomic clones is ensured by selection for spectinomycin (aadA) or kanamycin (neo) resistance genes. Expression of marker genes can be verified using commercial antibodies that detect the accumulation of neomycin phosphotranseferase II, the neo gene product, or the C-terminal c-myc tag of aminoglycoside-3″-adenylytransferase, encoded by the aadA gene. Aminoglycoside-3″-adenylytransferase, the spectinomycin inactivating enzyme, is translationally fused with green fluorescent protein in two vectors so that transplastomic clones can be selected by spectinomycin resistance and visually identified by fluorescence in ultraviolet light. The marker genes in the new vectors are flanked by target sites for Cre or Int, the P1 and phiC31 phage site-specific recombinases. When uniform transformation of all plastid genomes is obtained, the marker genes can be excised by Cre or Int expressed from a nuclear gene. Choice of expression signals for the gene of interest, complications caused by the presence of plastid DNA sequences recognized by Cre, and loss of transgenes by homologous recombination via duplicated sequences are also discussed to facilitate a rational choice from among the existing vectors and to aid with new target-specific vector designs. PMID:17965179

  14. Toxicity of combined chromium(VI) and phenanthrene pollution on the seed germination, stem lengths, and fresh weights of higher plants.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuangqing; Gu, Hairong; Cui, Chunyan; Ji, Rong

    2016-08-01

    Studies of the interaction and toxicity of pollutant combinations such as heavy metals and PAHs are of practical importance in the remediation and monitoring of the industrial soil environment. This study investigated the single and combined toxicity of chromium(VI) and phenanthrene on three important higher plants: mung beans (Phaseolus aureus), pakchoi cabbage (Brassica chinensis), and rice (Oryza sativa). In experiments using artificial soil matrix, the EC10 and EC20 of the two pollutants, alone and in combination, were analyzed with respect to seed germination, stem length, and above-ground fresh weight of these higher plants. The additive index method was used to evaluate the combined biological toxicity of chromium(VI) and phenanthrene. The results showed that the EC20 of chromium(VI) on the stem lengths of mung beans, pakchoi cabbage, and rice was 289, 248, and 550 mg kg(-1), respectively. The corresponding EC20 values for the fresh weights of the three plants were 334, 307, and 551 mg kg(-1). The EC20 of phenanthrene on the stem lengths of mung beans, pakchoi cabbage, and rice was 528, 426, and 628 mg kg(-1), respectively. The corresponding EC20 values for the fresh weights of the three plants were 696, 585, and 768 mg kg(-1). The EC20 of a combination of chromium(VI) and phenanthrene on the stem lengths of mung beans, pakchoi cabbage, and rice was 192, 173, and 279 mg kg(-1), respectively, and 200, 205, and 271 mg kg(-1) for the fresh weights of the three plants. The single and combined exposure of soil to chromium(VI) and phenanthrene had deleterious effects on plants in the early stage of growth. Overall, pakchoi cabbage was more sensitive than mung beans and rice. The two pollutants exerted synergistic effects on the stem lengths and above-ground fresh weights of both mung beans and rice but antagonistic effects on pakchoi cabbage. The results of this study also suggested pakchoi cabbage as a sensitive indicator of soil pollution.

  15. Isotopic niche variation in a higher trophic level ectotherm: highlighting the role of succulent plants in desert food webs.

    PubMed

    Delibes, Miguel; Blazquez, Ma Carmen; Fedriani, Jose Maria; Granados, Arsenio; Soriano, Laura; Delgado, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis of animal tissues allows description of isotopic niches, whose axes in an n-dimensional space are the isotopic ratios, compared to a standard, of different isotope systems (e.g. δ(13)C, δ(15)N). Isotopic niches are informative about where an animal, population or species lives and about what it consumes. Here we describe inter- and intrapopulation isotopic niche (bidimensional δ(13)C-δ(15)N space) of the Orange-throated whiptail (Aspidoscelis hyperythra), an arthropodivorous small lizard, in ten localities of Baja California Sur (Mexico). These localities range from extreme arid to subtropical conditions. Between 13 and 20 individuals were sampled at each locality and 1 cm of tail-tip was collected for isotope analysis. As expected, interpopulation niche width variation was much larger than intrapopulation one. Besides, isotopic variation was not related to age, sex or individual size of lizards. This suggests geographic variation of the isotopic niche was related to changes in the basal resources that fuel the trophic web at each locality. The position of Bayesian isotope ellipses in the δ-space indicated that whiptails in more arid localities were enriched in 13C, suggesting most of the carbon they ingested came from CAM succulent plants (cacti, agaves) and in minor degree in C4 grasses. Contrarily, whiptails in subtropical areas were depleted in 13C, as they received more carbon from C3 scrubs and trees. Localities closer to sea-level tended to be enriched in 15N, but a clear influence of marine subsidies was detected only at individual level. The study contributes to identify the origin and pathways through which energy flows across the trophic webs of North American deserts.

  16. Isotopic Niche Variation in a Higher Trophic Level Ectotherm: Highlighting the Role of Succulent Plants in Desert Food Webs

    PubMed Central

    Delibes, Miguel; Blazquez, Ma Carmen; Fedriani, Jose Maria; Granados, Arsenio; Soriano, Laura; Delgado, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis of animal tissues allows description of isotopic niches, whose axes in an n-dimensional space are the isotopic ratios, compared to a standard, of different isotope systems (e.g. δ13C, δ15N). Isotopic niches are informative about where an animal, population or species lives and about what it consumes. Here we describe inter- and intrapopulation isotopic niche (bidimensional δ13C-δ15N space) of the Orange-throated whiptail (Aspidoscelis hyperythra), an arthropodivorous small lizard, in ten localities of Baja California Sur (Mexico). These localities range from extreme arid to subtropical conditions. Between 13 and 20 individuals were sampled at each locality and 1 cm of tail-tip was collected for isotope analysis. As expected, interpopulation niche width variation was much larger than intrapopulation one. Besides, isotopic variation was not related to age, sex or individual size of lizards. This suggests geographic variation of the isotopic niche was related to changes in the basal resources that fuel the trophic web at each locality. The position of Bayesian isotope ellipses in the δ-space indicated that whiptails in more arid localities were enriched in 13C, suggesting most of the carbon they ingested came from CAM succulent plants (cacti, agaves) and in minor degree in C4 grasses. Contrarily, whiptails in subtropical areas were depleted in 13C, as they received more carbon from C3 scrubs and trees. Localities closer to sea-level tended to be enriched in 15N, but a clear influence of marine subsidies was detected only at individual level. The study contributes to identify the origin and pathways through which energy flows across the trophic webs of North American deserts. PMID:25973609

  17. Supercomplexes of plant photosystem I with cytochrome b6f, light-harvesting complex II and NDH.

    PubMed

    Yadav, K N Sathish; Semchonok, Dmitry A; Nosek, Lukáš; Kouřil, Roman; Fucile, Geoffrey; Boekema, Egbert J; Eichacker, Lutz A

    2017-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) is a pigment-protein complex required for the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis and participates in light-harvesting and redox-driven chloroplast metabolism. Assembly of PSI into supercomplexes with light harvesting complex (LHC) II, cytochrome b6f (Cytb6f) or NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex (NDH) has been proposed as a means for regulating photosynthesis. However, structural details about the binding positions in plant PSI are lacking. We analyzed large data sets of electron microscopy single particle projections of supercomplexes obtained from the stroma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana. By single particle analysis, we established the binding position of Cytb6f at the antenna side of PSI. The rectangular-shaped Cytb6f dimer binds at the side where Lhca1 is located. The complex binds with its short side rather than its long side to PSI, which may explain why these supercomplexes are difficult to purify and easily disrupted. Refined analysis of the interaction between PSI and the NDH complex indicates that in total up to 6 copies of PSI can arrange with one NDH complex. Most PSI-NDH supercomplexes appeared to have 1-3 PSI copies associated. Finally, the PSI-LHCII supercomplex was found to bind an additional LHCII trimer at two positions on the LHCI side in Arabidopsis. The organization of PSI, either in a complex with NDH or with Cytb6f, may improve regulation of electron transport by the control of binding partners and distances in small domains.

  18. Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase from higher plants is structurally unrelated to the animal and fungal homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Shanklin, J.; Somerville, C. )

    1991-03-15

    Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein (ACP) desaturase was purified to homogeneity from avocado mesocarp, and monospecific polyclonal antibodies directed against the protein were used to isolate full-length cDNA clones from Ricinus communis (castor) seed and Cucumis sativus (cucumber). The nucleotide sequence of the castor clone pRCD1 revealed an open reading frame of 1.2 kilobases encoding a 396-amino acid protein of 45 kDa. The cucumber clone pCSD1 encoded a homologous 396-amino acid protein with 88% amino acid identity to the castor clone. Expression of pRCD1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in the accumulation of a functional stearoyl-ACP desaturase, demonstrating that the introduction of this single gene product was sufficient to confer soluble desaturase activity to yeast. There was a 48-residue region of 29% amino acid sequence identity between residues 53 and 101 of the castor desaturase and the proximal border of the dehydratase region of the fatty acid synthase from yeast. Stearoyl-ACP mRNA was present at substantially higher levels in developing seeds than in leaf and root tissue, suggesting that expression of the {Delta}{sup 9} desaturase is developmentally regulated.

  19. The RNase E/G-type endoribonuclease of higher plants is located in the chloroplast and cleaves RNA similarly to the E. coli enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Schein, Aleks; Sheffy-Levin, Sharon; Glaser, Fabian; Schuster, Gadi

    2008-01-01

    RNase E is an endoribonuclease that has been studied primarily in Escherichia coli, where it is prominently involved in the processing and degradation of RNA. Homologs of bacterial RNase E are encoded in the nuclear genome of higher plants. RNA degradation in the chloroplast, an organelle that originated from a prokaryote similar to cyanobacteria, occurs via the polyadenylation-assisted degradation pathway. In E. coli, this process is probably initiated with the removal of 5′-end phosphates followed by endonucleolytic cleavage by RNase E. The plant homolog has been proposed to function in a similar way in the chloroplast. Here we show that RNase E of Arabidopsis is located in the soluble fraction of the chloroplast as a high molecular weight complex. In order to characterize its endonucleolytic activity, Arabidopsis RNase E was expressed in bacteria and analyzed. Similar to its E. coli counterpart, the endonucleolytic activity of the Arabidopsis enzyme depends on the number of phosphates at the 5′ end, is inhibited by structured RNA, and preferentially cleaves A/U-rich sequences. The enzyme forms an oligomeric complex of ∼680 kDa. The chloroplast localization and the similarity in the two enzymes' characteristics suggest that plant