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Sample records for highlights genetic risk

  1. Functional Genomic Annotation of Genetic Risk Loci Highlights Inflammation and Epithelial Biology Networks in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Ledo, Nora; Ko, Yi-An; Park, Ae-Seo Deok; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Han, Sang-Youb; Choi, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified multiple loci associated with the risk of CKD. Almost all risk variants are localized to the noncoding region of the genome; therefore, the role of these variants in CKD development is largely unknown. We hypothesized that polymorphisms alter transcription factor binding, thereby influencing the expression of nearby genes. Here, we examined the regulation of transcripts in the vicinity of CKD-associated polymorphisms in control and diseased human kidney samples and used systems biology approaches to identify potentially causal genes for prioritization. We interrogated the expression and regulation of 226 transcripts in the vicinity of 44 single nucleotide polymorphisms using RNA sequencing and gene expression arrays from 95 microdissected control and diseased tubule samples and 51 glomerular samples. Gene expression analysis from 41 tubule samples served for external validation. 92 transcripts in the tubule compartment and 34 transcripts in glomeruli showed statistically significant correlation with eGFR. Many novel genes, including ACSM2A/2B, FAM47E, and PLXDC1, were identified. We observed that the expression of multiple genes in the vicinity of any single CKD risk allele correlated with renal function, potentially indicating that genetic variants influence multiple transcripts. Network analysis of GFR-correlating transcripts highlighted two major clusters; a positive correlation with epithelial and vascular functions and an inverse correlation with inflammatory gene cluster. In summary, our functional genomics analysis highlighted novel genes and critical pathways associated with kidney function for future analysis. PMID:25231882

  2. Association analyses identify 38 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease and highlight shared genetic risk across populations

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hailiang; Ng, Siew C; Alberts, Rudi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ripke, Stephan; Lee, James C; Jostins, Luke; Shah, Tejas; Abedian, Shifteh; Cheon, Jae Hee; Cho, Judy; Dayani, Naser E; Franke, Lude; Fuyuno, Yuta; Hart, Ailsa; Juyal, Ramesh C; Juyal, Garima; Kim, Won Ho; Morris, Andrew P; Poustchi, Hossein; Newman, William G; Midha, Vandana; Orchard, Timothy R; Vahedi, Homayon; Sood, Ajit; Sung, Joseph Y; Malekzadeh, Reza; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yamazaki, Keiko; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Parkes, Miles; BK, Thelma; Daly, Mark J; Kubo, Michiaki; Anderson, Carl A; Weersma, Rinse K

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Here, we report the first trans-ethnic association study of IBD, with genome-wide or Immunochip genotype data from an extended cohort of 86,640 European individuals and Immunochip data from 9,846 individuals of East-Asian, Indian or Iranian descent. We implicate 38 loci in IBD risk for the first time. For the majority of IBD risk loci, the direction and magnitude of effect is consistent in European and non-European cohorts. Nevertheless, we observe genetic heterogeneity between divergent populations at several established risk loci driven by a combination of differences in allele frequencies (NOD2), effect sizes (TNFSF15, ATG16L1) or a combination of both (IL23R, IRGM). Our results provide biological insights into the pathogenesis of IBD, and demonstrate the utility of trans-ethnic association studies for mapping complex disease loci and understanding genetic architecture across diverse populations. PMID:26192919

  3. Association analyses identify 38 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease and highlight shared genetic risk across populations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jimmy Z; van Sommeren, Suzanne; Huang, Hailiang; Ng, Siew C; Alberts, Rudi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ripke, Stephan; Lee, James C; Jostins, Luke; Shah, Tejas; Abedian, Shifteh; Cheon, Jae Hee; Cho, Judy; Daryani, Naser E; Franke, Lude; Fuyuno, Yuta; Hart, Ailsa; Juyal, Ramesh C; Juyal, Garima; Kim, Won Ho; Morris, Andrew P; Poustchi, Hossein; Newman, William G; Midha, Vandana; Orchard, Timothy R; Vahedi, Homayon; Sood, Ajit; Sung, Joseph J Y; Malekzadeh, Reza; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yamazaki, Keiko; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Franke, Andre; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Parkes, Miles; B K, Thelma; Daly, Mark J; Kubo, Michiaki; Anderson, Carl A; Weersma, Rinse K

    2015-09-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Here we report the first trans-ancestry association study of IBD, with genome-wide or Immunochip genotype data from an extended cohort of 86,640 European individuals and Immunochip data from 9,846 individuals of East Asian, Indian or Iranian descent. We implicate 38 loci in IBD risk for the first time. For the majority of the IBD risk loci, the direction and magnitude of effect are consistent in European and non-European cohorts. Nevertheless, we observe genetic heterogeneity between divergent populations at several established risk loci driven by differences in allele frequency (NOD2) or effect size (TNFSF15 and ATG16L1) or a combination of these factors (IL23R and IRGM). Our results provide biological insights into the pathogenesis of IBD and demonstrate the usefulness of trans-ancestry association studies for mapping loci associated with complex diseases and understanding genetic architecture across diverse populations.

  4. Highlighting nonlinear patterns in population genetics datasets

    PubMed Central

    Alanis-Lobato, Gregorio; Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Eriksson, Anders; Manica, Andrea; Ravasi, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Detecting structure in population genetics and case-control studies is important, as it exposes phenomena such as ecoclines, admixture and stratification. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is a linear dimension-reduction technique commonly used for this purpose, but it struggles to reveal complex, nonlinear data patterns. In this paper we introduce non-centred Minimum Curvilinear Embedding (ncMCE), a nonlinear method to overcome this problem. Our analyses show that ncMCE can separate individuals into ethnic groups in cases in which PCA fails to reveal any clear structure. This increased discrimination power arises from ncMCE's ability to better capture the phylogenetic signal in the samples, whereas PCA better reflects their geographic relation. We also demonstrate how ncMCE can discover interesting patterns, even when the data has been poorly pre-processed. The juxtaposition of PCA and ncMCE visualisations provides a new standard of analysis with utility for discovering and validating significant linear/nonlinear complementary patterns in genetic data. PMID:25633916

  5. Genetic association analyses highlight biological pathways underlying mitral valve prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Dina, Christian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Tucker, Nathan; Delling, Francesca N.; Toomer, Katelynn; Durst, Ronen; Perrocheau, Maelle; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Solis, Jorge; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Chen, Ming-Huei; Probst, Vincent; Bosse, Yohan; Pibarot, Philippe; Zelenika, Diana; Lathrop, Mark; Hercberg, Serge; Roussel, Ronan; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bonnet, Fabrice; Su Hao, LO; Dolmatova, Elena; Simonet, Floriane; Lecointe, Simon; Kyndt, Florence; Redon, Richard; Le Marec, Hervé; Froguel, Philippe; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Bruneval, Patrick; Norris, Russell A.; Milan, David J.; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.; Levine, Robert A.; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Hagege, Albert A.; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Non-syndromic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a common degenerative cardiac valvulopathy of unknown aetiology that predisposes to mitral regurgitation, heart failure and sudden death1. Previous family and pathophysiological studies suggest a complex pattern of inheritance2–5. We performed a meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies in 1,442 cases and 2,439 controls. We identified and replicated in 1,422 cases and 6,779 controls six loci and provide functional evidence for candidate genes. We highlight LMCD1 encoding a transcription factor6, for which morpholino knockdown in zebrafish results in atrioventricular (AV) valve regurgitation. A similar zebrafish phenotype was obtained for tensin1 (TNS1), a focal adhesion protein involved in cytoskeleton organization. We also show the expression of tensin1 during valve morphogenesis and describe enlarged posterior mitral leaflets in Tns1−/− mice. This study identifies the first risk loci for MVP and suggests new mechanisms involved in mitral valve regurgitation, the most common indication for mitral valve repair7. PMID:26301497

  6. Genetic association analyses highlight biological pathways underlying mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Dina, Christian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Tucker, Nathan; Delling, Francesca N; Toomer, Katelynn; Durst, Ronen; Perrocheau, Maelle; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Solis, Jorge; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Chen, Ming-Huei; Probst, Vincent; Bosse, Yohan; Pibarot, Philippe; Zelenika, Diana; Lathrop, Mark; Hercberg, Serge; Roussel, Ronan; Benjamin, Emelia J; Bonnet, Fabrice; Lo, Su Hao; Dolmatova, Elena; Simonet, Floriane; Lecointe, Simon; Kyndt, Florence; Redon, Richard; Le Marec, Hervé; Froguel, Philippe; Ellinor, Patrick T; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Bruneval, Patrick; Markwald, Roger R; Norris, Russell A; Milan, David J; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Levine, Robert A; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Hagege, Albert A; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Nonsyndromic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a common degenerative cardiac valvulopathy of unknown etiology that predisposes to mitral regurgitation, heart failure and sudden death. Previous family and pathophysiological studies suggest a complex pattern of inheritance. We performed a meta-analysis of 2 genome-wide association studies in 1,412 MVP cases and 2,439 controls. We identified 6 loci, which we replicated in 1,422 cases and 6,779 controls, and provide functional evidence for candidate genes. We highlight LMCD1 (LIM and cysteine-rich domains 1), which encodes a transcription factor and for which morpholino knockdown of the ortholog in zebrafish resulted in atrioventricular valve regurgitation. A similar zebrafish phenotype was obtained with knockdown of the ortholog of TNS1, which encodes tensin 1, a focal adhesion protein involved in cytoskeleton organization. We also showed expression of tensin 1 during valve morphogenesis and describe enlarged posterior mitral leaflets in Tns1(-/-) mice. This study identifies the first risk loci for MVP and suggests new mechanisms involved in mitral valve regurgitation, the most common indication for mitral valve repair.

  7. Genome-wide analysis highlights genetic dilution in Algerian sheep.

    PubMed

    Gaouar, S B S; Lafri, M; Djaout, A; El-Bouyahiaoui, R; Bouri, A; Bouchatal, A; Maftah, A; Ciani, E; Da Silva, A B

    2017-03-01

    Algeria represents a reservoir of genetic diversity with local sheep breeds adapted to a large range of environments and showing specific features necessary to deal with harsh conditions. This remarkable diversity results from the traditional management of dryland by pastoralists over centuries. Most of these breeds are poorly productive, and the economic pressure leads farmers to realize anarchic cross-breeding (that is, not carried out in the framework of selection plans) with the hope to increase animal's conformation. In this study, eight of the nine local Algerian sheep breeds (D'men, Hamra, Ouled-Djellal, Rembi, Sidaoun, Tazegzawt, Berber and Barbarine) were investigated for the first time by genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. At an international scale, Algerian sheep occupied an original position shaped by relations with African and European (particularly Italian) breeds. The strong genetic proximity with Caribbean and Brazilian breeds confirmed that the genetic make-up of these American breeds was largely influenced by the Atlantic slave trade. At a national scale, an alarming genetic dilution of the Berber (a primitive breed) and the Rembi was observed, as a consequence of uncontrolled mating practices with Ouled-Djellal. A similar, though less pronounced, phenomenon was also detected for the Barbarine, another ancestral breed. Genetic originality appeared to be better preserved in Tazegzawt, Hamra, D'men and Sidaoun. These breeds should be given high priority in the establishment of conservation plans to halt their progressive loss. For Berber and Barbarine that also occur in the bordering neighbor countries, urgent concerted transnational actions are needed.

  8. Genetic risks and genetic model specification.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jinfeng; Yuan, Ao; Li, Qizhai; Gastwirth, Joseph L

    2016-08-21

    Genetic risks and genetic models are often used in design and analysis of genetic epidemiology studies. A genetic model is defined in terms of two genetic risk measures: genotype relative risk and odds ratio. The impacts of choosing a risk measure on the resulting genetic models are studied in the power to detect association and deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in cases using genetic relative risk. Extensive simulations demonstrate that the power of a study to detect associations using odds ratio is lower than that using relative risk with the same value when other parameters are fixed. When the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium holds in the general population, the genetic model can be inferred by the deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in only cases. Furthermore, it is more efficient than that based on the deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all cases and controls. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Genetic risk and discrimination].

    PubMed

    Vidal Gallardo, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    The continuous advances in our society in the last decades have allowed us to get to know the personal genetic data. Although this discovery has important benefits, it also causes a great paradox, since the genetic information can be an element of social stigma, and its inappropriate use can damage the fundamental rights. It is obvious that there are cases in which the genetic risk, that is, the predisposition of a person to suffer some illnesses, can be a discriminatory element, especially in the contractual field.

  10. Etiology of Obesity Over the Life Span: Ecological and Genetic Highlights from Asian Countries.

    PubMed

    Chong, Pei Nee; Teh, Christinal Pey Wen; Poh, Bee Koon; Noor, Mohd Ismail

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is a worldwide pandemic, and the prevalence rate has doubled since the 1980s. Asian countries are also experiencing the global epidemic of obesity with its related health consequences. The prevalence of overweight and obesity are increasing at an alarming rate across all age groups in Asia. These increases are mainly attributed to rapid economic growth, which leads to socio-economic, nutrition and lifestyle transitions, resulting in a positive energy balance. In addition, fat mass and obesity-associated gene variants, copy number variants in chromosomes and epigenetic modifications have shown positive associations with the risk of obesity among Asians. In this review highlights of prevalence and related ecological and genetic factors that could influence the rapid rise in obesity among Asian populations are discussed.

  11. Genetic-Variation-Driven Gene-Expression Changes Highlight Genes with Important Functions for Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yi-An; Yi, Huiguang; Qiu, Chengxiang; Huang, Shizheng; Park, Jihwan; Ledo, Nora; Köttgen, Anna; Li, Hongzhe; Rader, Daniel J; Pack, Michael A; Brown, Christopher D; Susztak, Katalin

    2017-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex gene-environmental disease affecting close to 10% of the US population. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified sequence variants, localized to non-coding genomic regions, associated with kidney function. Despite these robust observations, the mechanism by which variants lead to CKD remains a critical unanswered question. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis is a method to identify genetic variation associated with gene expression changes in specific tissue types. We hypothesized that an integrative analysis combining CKD GWAS and kidney eQTL results can identify candidate genes for CKD. We performed eQTL analysis by correlating genotype with RNA-seq-based gene expression levels in 96 human kidney samples. Applying stringent statistical criteria, we detected 1,886 genes whose expression differs with the sequence variants. Using direct overlap and Bayesian methods, we identified new potential target genes for CKD. With respect to one of the target genes, lysosomal beta A mannosidase (MANBA), we observed that genetic variants associated with MANBA expression in the kidney showed statistically significant colocalization with variants identified in CKD GWASs, indicating that MANBA is a potential target gene for CKD. The expression of MANBA was significantly lower in kidneys of subjects with risk alleles. Suppressing manba expression in zebrafish resulted in renal tubule defects and pericardial edema, phenotypes typically induced by kidney dysfunction. Our analysis shows that gene-expression changes driven by genetic variation in the kidney can highlight potential new target genes for CKD development. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Coal-ash spills highlight ongoing risk to ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, R.

    2009-05-01

    Two recent large-scale spills of coal combustion waste have highlighted the old problem of handling the enormous quantity of solid waste produced by coal. Both spills happened at power plants run by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). In December 2008 a holding pond for coal ash collapsed at a power plant in Kingstom, Tenn., releasing coal-ash sludge onto farmland and into rivers: in January 2009 a break in a pipe removing water from a holding pond for gypsum caused a spill at Widows Creek Fossil Plant in Stevenson, Ala. The article discusses the toxic outcome of such disasters on ecosystems, quoting work by Willaim Hopkins at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and recommendations and reports of the US EPA. 2 photos.

  13. Genetic Evidence Highlights Potential Impacts of By-Catch to Cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Martin; Rosenbaum, Howard C.; Wells, Randall S.; Stamper, Andrew; Bordino, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Incidental entanglement in fishing gear is arguably the most serious threat to many populations of small cetaceans, judging by the alarming number of captured animals. However, other aspects of this threat, such as the potential capture of mother-offspring pairs or reproductive pairs, could be equally or even more significant but have rarely been evaluated. Using a combination of demographic and genetic data we provide evidence that i) Franciscana dolphin pairs that are potentially reproductive and mother-offspring pairs form temporal bonds, and ii) are entangled simultaneously. Our results highlight potential demographic and genetic impacts of by-catch to cetacean populations: the joint entanglement of mother-offspring or reproductive pairs, compared to random individuals, might exacerbate the demographic consequences of by-catch, and the loss of groups of relatives means that significant components of genetic diversity could be lost together. Given the social nature of many odontocetes (toothed cetaceans), we suggest that these potential impacts could be rather general to the group and therefore by-catch could be more detrimental than previously considered. PMID:21179542

  14. On the Need for Rethinking Current Practice that Highlights Goal Achievement Risk in an Enterprise Context.

    PubMed

    Aven, Eyvind; Aven, Terje

    2015-09-01

    This article addresses the issue of how performance and risk management can complement each other in order to enhance the management of an enterprise. Often, we see that risk management focuses on goal achievements and not the enterprise risk related to its activities in the value chain. The statement "no goal, no risk" is a common misconception. The main aim of the article is to present a normative model for describing the links between performance and risk, and to use this model to give recommendations on how to best structure and plan the management of an enterprise in situations involving risk and uncertainties. The model, which has several novel features, is based on the interaction between different types of risk management (enterprise risk management, task risk management, and personal risk management) and a structure where the enterprise risk management overrules both the task and personal risk management. To illustrate the model we use the metaphor of a ship, where the ship is loaded with cash-generating activities and has a direction over time determined by the overall strategic objectives. Compared to the current enterprise risk management practice, the model and related analysis are founded on a new perspective on risk, highlighting knowledge and uncertainties beyond probabilities.

  15. Convergent Genetic and Expression Datasets Highlight TREM2 in Parkinson's Disease Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guiyou; Liu, Yongquan; Jiang, Qinghua; Jiang, Yongshuai; Feng, Rennan; Zhang, Liangcai; Chen, Zugen; Li, Keshen; Liu, Jiafeng

    2016-09-01

    A rare TREM2 missense mutation (rs75932628-T) was reported to confer a significant Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk. A recent study indicated no evidence of the involvement of this variant in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we used the genetic and expression data to reinvestigate the potential association between TREM2 and PD susceptibility. In stage 1, using 10 independent studies (N = 89,157; 8787 cases and 80,370 controls), we conducted a subgroup meta-analysis. We identified a significant association between rs75932628 and PD (P = 3.10E-03, odds ratio (OR) = 3.88, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.58-9.54) in No-Northern Europe subgroup, and significantly increased PD risks (P = 0.01 for Mann-Whitney test) in No-Northern Europe subgroup than in Northern Europe subgroup. In stage 2, we used the summary results from a large-scale PD genome-wide association study (GWAS; N = 108,990; 13,708 cases and 95,282 controls) to search for other TREM2 variants contributing to PD susceptibility. We identified 14 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with PD within 50-kb upstream and downstream range of TREM2. In stage 3, using two brain expression GWAS datasets (N = 773), we identified 6 of the 14 SNPs regulating increased expression of TREM2. In stage 4, using the whole human genome microarray data (N = 50), we further identified significantly increased expression of TREM2 in PD cases compared with controls in human prefrontal cortex. In summary, convergent genetic and expression datasets demonstrate that TREM2 is a potent risk factor for PD and may be a therapeutic target in PD and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Arking, Dan E.; Pulit, Sara L.; Crotti, Lia; van der Harst, Pim; Munroe, Patricia B.; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Morley, Michael; Wang, Xinchen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lundby, Alicia; Gudbjartsson, Daníel F.; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Bradford, Yuki; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Dörr, Marcus; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lahtinen, Annukka M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Bis, Joshua C.; Isaacs, Aaron; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Evans, Daniel S.; Post, Wendy S.; Waggott, Daryl; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Hicks, Andrew A.; Eisele, Lewin; Ellinghaus, David; Hayward, Caroline; Navarro, Pau; Ulivi, Sheila; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tester, David J.; Chatel, Stéphanie; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Naluai, Åsa T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Kluttig, Alexander; Strohmer, Bernhard; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Torres, Maria; Knoflach, Michael; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kumar, Runjun D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bader, Joel S.; Ehret, Georg; Huang, Hailiang; Kao, W.H. Linda; Strait, James B.; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Brown, Morris; Caulfield, Mark J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kronenberg, Florian; Willeit, Johann; Smith, J. Gustav; Greiser, Karin H.; zu Schwabedissen, Henriette Meyer; Werdan, Karl; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Heckbert, Susan R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kolcic, Ivana; Polašek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Griffin, Maura; Daly, Mark J.; Arnar, David O.; Hólm, Hilma; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S.; Larson, Martin G.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Bobbo, Marco; D'Adamo, Adamo P.; Iorio, Annamaria; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Carracedo, Angel; Cummings, Steven R.; Nalls, Michael A.; Jula, Antti; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Marjamaa, Annukka; Oikarinen, Lasse; Perola, Markus; Porthan, Kimmo; Erbel, Raimund; Hoffmann, Per; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kälsch, Hagen; Nöthen, Markus M.; consortium, HRGEN; den Hoed, Marcel; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Thelle, Dag S.; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Prucha, Hanna; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Franke, Lude; van der Vleuten, Pieter A.; Beckmann, Britt Maria; Martens, Eimo; Bardai, Abdennasser; Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Behr, Elijah R.; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Giudicessi, John R.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Barc, Julien; Kyndt, Florence; Probst, Vincent; Ghidoni, Alice; Insolia, Roberto; Hamilton, Robert M.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Margulies, Kenneth; Moravec, Christine E.; Fabiola Del, Greco M.; Fuchsberger, Christian; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Lee, Wai K.; Watt, Graham C.M.; Campbell, Harry; Wild, Sarah H.; El Mokhtari, Nour E.; Frey, Norbert; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Leach, Irene Mateo; Navis, Gerjan; van den Berg, Maarten P.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Kellis, Manolis; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Kors, Jan A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Lamina, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Mulas, Antonella; Orrú, Marco; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Markus, Marcello R.P.; Völker, Uwe; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Ärnlöv, Johan; Lind, Lars; Sundström, Johan; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Kivimaki, Mika; Kähönen, Mika; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adamkova, Vera; Kiechl, Stefan; Brion, Maria; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haerting, Johannes; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Whincup, Peter H.; Hingorani, Aroon; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Bezzina, Connie R.; Ingelsson, Erik; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gasparini, Paolo; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Franke, Andre; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lehtimäki, Terho J.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Parsa, Afshin; Liu, Yongmei; van Duijn, Cornelia; Siscovick, David S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jamshidi, Yalda; Salomaa, Veikko; Felix, Stephan B.; Sanna, Serena; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Stefansson, Kari; Boyer, Laurie A.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Lage, Kasper; Schwartz, Peter J.; Kääb, Stefan; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ackerman, Michael J.; Pfeufer, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal Mendelian Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). Using a genome-wide association and replication study in up to 100,000 individuals we identified 35 common variant QT interval loci, that collectively explain ∼8-10% of QT variation and highlight the importance of calcium regulation in myocardial repolarization. Rare variant analysis of 6 novel QT loci in 298 unrelated LQTS probands identified coding variants not found in controls but of uncertain causality and therefore requiring validation. Several newly identified loci encode for proteins that physically interact with other recognized repolarization proteins. Our integration of common variant association, expression and orthogonal protein-protein interaction screens provides new insights into cardiac electrophysiology and identifies novel candidate genes for ventricular arrhythmias, LQTS,and SCD. PMID:24952745

  17. Genetic association analysis highlights new loci that modulate hematological trait variation in Caucasians and African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ken Sin; Wilson, James G.; Lange, Leslie A.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Galarneau, Geneviève; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Grant, Struan F. A.; Keating, Brendan J.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Mohler, Emile R.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Palmas, Walter; Tang, Weihong; Tracy, Russell P.

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cell, white blood cell, and platelet measures, including their count, sub-type and volume, are important diagnostic and prognostic clinical parameters for several human diseases. To identify novel loci associated with hematological traits, and compare the architecture of these phenotypes between ethnic groups, the CARe Project genotyped 49,094 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that capture variation in ~2,100 candidate genes in DNA of 23,439 Caucasians and 7,112 African Americans from five population-based cohorts. We found strong novel associations between erythrocyte phenotypes and the glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) A-allele in African Americans (rs1050828, P < 2.0 × 10−13, T-allele associated with lower red blood cell count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit, and higher mean corpuscular volume), and between platelet count and a SNP at the tropomyosin-4 (TPM4) locus (rs8109288, P = 3.0 × 10−7 in Caucasians; P = 3.0 × 10−7 in African Americans, T-allele associated with lower platelet count). We strongly replicated many genetic associations to blood cell phenotypes previously established in Caucasians. A common variant of the α-globin (HBA2-HBA1) locus was associated with red blood cell traits in African Americans, but not in Caucasians (rs1211375, P < 7 × 10−8, A-allele associated with lower hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular volume). Our results show similarities but also differences in the genetic regulation of hematological traits in European- and African-derived populations, and highlight the role of natural selection in shaping these differences. PMID:21153663

  18. Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function.

    PubMed

    Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Gorski, Mathias; Chu, Audrey Y; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Garnaas, Maija; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Li, Yong; Taliun, Daniel; Olden, Matthias; Foster, Meredith; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ming-Huei; Pers, Tune H; Johnson, Andrew D; Ko, Yi-An; Fuchsberger, Christian; Tayo, Bamidele; Nalls, Michael; Feitosa, Mary F; Isaacs, Aaron; Dehghan, Abbas; d'Adamo, Pio; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Zonderman, Alan B; Nolte, Ilja M; van der Most, Peter J; Wright, Alan F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Morrison, Alanna C; Hofman, Albert; Smith, Albert V; Dreisbach, Albert W; Franke, Andre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Metspalu, Andres; Tonjes, Anke; Lupo, Antonio; Robino, Antonietta; Johansson, Åsa; Demirkan, Ayse; Kollerits, Barbara; Freedman, Barry I; Ponte, Belen; Oostra, Ben A; Paulweber, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K; Mitchell, Braxton D; Buckley, Brendan M; Peralta, Carmen A; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Rotimi, Charles N; Shaffer, Christian M; Müller, Christian; Sala, Cinzia; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Ackermann, Daniel; Shriner, Daniel; Ruggiero, Daniela; Toniolo, Daniela; Lu, Yingchang; Cusi, Daniele; Czamara, Darina; Ellinghaus, David; Siscovick, David S; Ruderfer, Douglas; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Rochtchina, Elena; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Boerwinkle, Eric; Salvi, Erika; Bottinger, Erwin P; Murgia, Federico; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ernst, Florian; Kronenberg, Florian; Hu, Frank B; Navis, Gerjan J; Curhan, Gary C; Ehret, George B; Homuth, Georg; Coassin, Stefan; Thun, Gian-Andri; Pistis, Giorgio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Montgomery, Grant W; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jacobs, Gunnar; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H-Erich; Campbell, Harry; Schmidt, Helena; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Hermann; Kroemer, Heyo K; Kramer, Holly; Lin, Honghuang; Leach, I Mateo; Ford, Ian; Guessous, Idris; Rudan, Igor; Prokopenko, Inga; Borecki, Ingrid; Heid, Iris M; Kolcic, Ivana; Persico, Ivana; Jukema, J Wouter; Wilson, James F; Felix, Janine F; Divers, Jasmin; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Stafford, Jeanette M; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Smith, Jennifer A; Faul, Jessica D; Wang, Jie Jin; Ding, Jingzhong; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Attia, John; Whitfield, John B; Chalmers, John; Viikari, Jorma; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C; Karjalainen, Juha; Fernandes, Jyotika K; Endlich, Karlhans; Butterbach, Katja; Keene, Keith L; Lohman, Kurt; Portas, Laura; Launer, Lenore J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Yengo, Loic; Franke, Lude; Ferrucci, Luigi; Rose, Lynda M; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Rao, Madhumathi; Struchalin, Maksim; Kleber, Marcus E; Cavalieri, Margherita; Haun, Margot; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Ciullo, Marina; Pirastu, Mario; de Andrade, Mariza; McEvoy, Mark A; Woodward, Mark; Adam, Martin; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Imboden, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Metzger, Marie; Stumvoll, Michael; Evans, Michele K; Sale, Michele M; Kähönen, Mika; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Martin, Nicholas G; Hastie, Nick; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Devuyst, Olivier; Raitakari, Olli; Gottesman, Omri; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Gasparini, Paolo; Munroe, Patricia B; Ridker, Paul M; Mitchell, Paul; Muntner, Paul; Meisinger, Christa; Smit, Johannes H; Kovacs, Peter; Wild, Philipp S; Froguel, Philippe; Rettig, Rainer; Mägi, Reedik; Biffar, Reiner; Schmidt, Reinhold; Middelberg, Rita P S; Carroll, Robert J; Penninx, Brenda W; Scott, Rodney J; Katz, Ronit; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Wild, Sarah H; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ulivi, Sheila; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Enroth, Stefan; Kloiber, Stefan; Trompet, Stella; Stengel, Benedicte; Hancock, Stephen J; Turner, Stephen T; Rosas, Sylvia E; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Lehtimäki, Terho; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Nikopensius, Tiit; Esko, Tonu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Gyllensten, Ulf; Völker, Uwe; Emilsson, Valur; Vitart, Veronique; Aalto, Ville; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Chen, Wei-Min; Igl, Wilmar; März, Winfried; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loos, Ruth J F; Liu, Yongmei; Snieder, Harold; Pramstaller, Peter P; Parsa, Afshin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Susztak, Katalin; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; de Boer, Ian H; Böger, Carsten A; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I; Köttgen, Anna; Kao, W H Linda; Fox, Caroline S

    2016-01-21

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways.

  19. Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function

    PubMed Central

    Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Gorski, Mathias; Chu, Audrey Y.; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Garnaas, Maija; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Li, Yong; Taliun, Daniel; Olden, Matthias; Foster, Meredith; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ming-Huei; Pers, Tune H.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ko, Yi-An; Fuchsberger, Christian; Tayo, Bamidele; Nalls, Michael; Feitosa, Mary F.; Isaacs, Aaron; Dehghan, Abbas; d'Adamo, Pio; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Zonderman, Alan B.; Nolte, Ilja M.; van der Most, Peter J.; Wright, Alan F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hofman, Albert; Smith, Albert V.; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Franke, Andre; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Metspalu, Andres; Tonjes, Anke; Lupo, Antonio; Robino, Antonietta; Johansson, Åsa; Demirkan, Ayse; Kollerits, Barbara; Freedman, Barry I.; Ponte, Belen; Oostra, Ben A.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Buckley, Brendan M.; Peralta, Carmen A.; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Rotimi, Charles N.; Shaffer, Christian M.; Müller, Christian; Sala, Cinzia; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Ackermann, Daniel; Shriner, Daniel; Ruggiero, Daniela; Toniolo, Daniela; Lu, Yingchang; Cusi, Daniele; Czamara, Darina; Ellinghaus, David; Siscovick, David S.; Ruderfer, Douglas; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Rochtchina, Elena; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Salvi, Erika; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Murgia, Federico; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ernst, Florian; Kronenberg, Florian; Hu, Frank B.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Curhan, Gary C.; Ehret, George B.; Homuth, Georg; Coassin, Stefan; Thun, Gian-Andri; Pistis, Giorgio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Montgomery, Grant W.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jacobs, Gunnar; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H-Erich; Campbell, Harry; Schmidt, Helena; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Hermann; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Kramer, Holly; Lin, Honghuang; Leach, I. Mateo; Ford, Ian; Guessous, Idris; Rudan, Igor; Prokopenko, Inga; Borecki, Ingrid; Heid, Iris M.; Kolcic, Ivana; Persico, Ivana; Jukema, J. Wouter; Wilson, James F.; Felix, Janine F.; Divers, Jasmin; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Smith, Jennifer A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Wang, Jie Jin; Ding, Jingzhong; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Attia, John; Whitfield, John B.; Chalmers, John; Viikari, Jorma; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C.; Karjalainen, Juha; Fernandes, Jyotika K.; Endlich, Karlhans; Butterbach, Katja; Keene, Keith L.; Lohman, Kurt; Portas, Laura; Launer, Lenore J.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Yengo, Loic; Franke, Lude; Ferrucci, Luigi; Rose, Lynda M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Rao, Madhumathi; Struchalin, Maksim; Kleber, Marcus E.; Cavalieri, Margherita; Haun, Margot; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Ciullo, Marina; Pirastu, Mario; de Andrade, Mariza; McEvoy, Mark A.; Woodward, Mark; Adam, Martin; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Imboden, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Metzger, Marie; Stumvoll, Michael; Evans, Michele K.; Sale, Michele M.; Kähönen, Mika; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hastie, Nick; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Devuyst, Olivier; Raitakari, Olli; Gottesman, Omri; Franco, Oscar H.; Polasek, Ozren; Gasparini, Paolo; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ridker, Paul M.; Mitchell, Paul; Muntner, Paul; Meisinger, Christa; Smit, Johannes H.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Adair, Linda S.; Alexander, Myriam; Altshuler, David; Amin, Najaf; Arking, Dan E.; Arora, Pankaj; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barroso, Ines; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Bis, Joshua C.; Boehnke, Michael; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bots, Michiel L.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Brand, Eva; Braund, Peter S.; Brown, Morris J.; Burton, Paul R.; Casas, Juan P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Chang, Yen-Pei C.; Charchar, Fadi J.; Chaturvedi, Nish; Shin Cho, Yoon; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Francis S.; Collins, Rory; Connell, John M.; Cooper, Jackie A.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Cooper, Richard S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Dörr, Marcus; Dahgam, Santosh; Danesh, John; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N. M.; Deloukas, Panos; Denniff, Matthew; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Dong, Yanbin; Doumatey, Ayo; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eyheramendy, Susana; Farrall, Martin; Fava, Cristiano; Forrester, Terrence; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Fox, Ervin R.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Galan, Pilar; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Garcia, Melissa; Gaunt, Tom R.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Go, Min Jin; Goel, Anuj; Grässler, Jürgen; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Groop, Leif; Guarrera, Simonetta; Guo, Xiuqing; Hadley, David; Hamsten, Anders; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hardy, Rebecca; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heath, Simon; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hedblad, Bo; Hercberg, Serge; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hilton, Gina; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Howard, Philip; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Ikram, M. Arfan; Islam, Muhammad; Iwai, Naoharu; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jackson, Anne U.; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Johnson, Toby; Kathiresan, Sekar; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kinra, Sanjay; Kita, Yoshikuni; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kumar, M. J. Kranthi; Kuh, Diana; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Laakso, Markku; Laan, Maris; Laitinen, Jaana; Lakatta, Edward G.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Larson, Martin G.; Lathrop, Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, Nanette R.; Levy, Daniel; Li, Yali; Longstreth, Will T.; Luan, Jian'an; Lucas, Gavin; Ludwig, Barbara; Mangino, Massimo; Mani, K. Radha; Marmot, Michael G.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Matullo, Giuseppe; McArdle, Wendy L.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meneton, Pierre; Meschia, James F.; Miki, Tetsuro; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mohlke, Karen L.; Mooser, Vincent; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Richard W.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Najjar, Samer; Narisu, Narisu; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Nilsson, Peter; Nyberg, Fredrik; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ong, RickTwee-Hee; Ongen, Halit; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Org, Elin; Orru, Marco; Palmas, Walter; Palmen, Jutta; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Parker, Alex N.; Peden, John F.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Pihur, Vasyl; Platou, Carl G. P.; Plump, Andrew; Prabhakaran, Dorairajan; Psaty, Bruce M.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Rasheed, Asif; Ricceri, Fulvio; Rice, Kenneth M.; Rosengren, Annika; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudock, Megan E.; Sõber, Siim; Salako, Tunde; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwartz, Steven M.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Scott, Laura J.; Scott, James; Scuteri, Angelo; Sehmi, Joban S.; Seielstad, Mark; Seshadri, Sudha; Sharma, Pankaj; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Shi, Gang; Shrine, Nick R. G.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Sim, Xueling; Singleton, Andrew; Sjögren, Marketa; Smith, Nicholas L.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Spector, Tim D.; Staessen, Jan A.; Stancakova, Alena; Steinle, Nanette I.; Strachan, David P.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sun, Yan V.; Swift, Amy J.; Tabara, Yasuharu; Tai, E-Shyong; Talmud, Philippa J.; Taylor, Andrew; Terzic, Janos; Thelle, Dag S.; Tobin, Martin D.; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tripathy, Vikal; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Uda, Manuela; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Umemura, Satoshi; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Vartiainen, Erkki; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Veldre, Gudrun; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Viigimaa, Margus; Vinay, D. G.; Vineis, Paolo; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Wain, Louise V.; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Thomas J.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Weder, Alan B.; Whincup, Peter H.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Yao, Jie; Young, J. H.; Zelenika, Diana; Zhai, Guangju; Zhang, Weihua; Zhang, Feng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Haidong; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zitting, Paavo; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Okada, Yukinori; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Gu, Dongfeng; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Maeda, Shiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Chen, Peng; Lim, Su-Chi; Wong, Tien-Yin; Liu, Jianjun; Young, Terri L.; Aung, Tin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Kim, Young Jin; Kang, Daehee; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chang, Li-Ching; Fann, S. -J. Cathy; Mei, Hao; Hixson, James E.; Chen, Shufeng; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Isono, Masato; Albrecht, Eva; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Reilly, Muredach P; Schunkert, Heribert; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Hall, Alistair; Hengstenberg, Christian; König, Inke R.; Laaksonen, Reijo; McPherson, Ruth; Thompson, John R.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Ziegler, Andreas; Absher, Devin; Chen, Li; Cupples13, L. Adrienne; Halperin, Eran; Li, Mingyao; Musunuru, Kiran; Preuss, Michael; Schillert, Arne; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wells, George A.; Holm, Hilma; Roberts, Robert; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Fortmann, Stephen; Go, Alan; Hlatky, Mark; Iribarren, Carlos; Knowles, Joshua; Myers, Richard; Quertermous, Thomas; Sidney, Steven; Risch, Neil; Tang, Hua; Blankenberg, Stefan; Schnabel, Renate; Sinning, Christoph; Lackner, Karl J.; Tiret, Laurence; Nicaud, Viviane; Cambien, Francois; Bickel, Christoph; Rupprecht, Hans J.; Perret, Claire; Proust, Carole; Münzel, Thomas F.; Barbalic, Maja; Chen, Ida Yii-Der; Demissie-Banjaw, Serkalem; Folsom, Aaron; Lumley, Thomas; Marciante, Kristin; Taylor, Kent D.; Volcik, Kelly; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Kong, Augustine; Stefansson, Kari; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Andersen, Karl; Fischer, Marcus; Grosshennig, Anika; Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Stark, Klaus; Schreiber, Stefan; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Bruse, Petra; Doering, Angela; Klopp, Norman; Diemert, Patrick; Loley, Christina; Medack, Anja; Nahrstedt, Janja; Peters, Annette; Wagner, Arnika K.; Willenborg, Christina; Böhm, Bernhard O.; Dobnig, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B.; Hoffmann, Michael M.; Meinitzer, Andreas; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Pilz, Stefan; Renner, Wilfried; Scharnagl, Hubert; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Winkler, Karl; Guiducci, Candace; Burtt, Noel; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Dandona, Sonny; Jarinova, Olga; Qu, Liming; Wilensky, Robert; Matthai, William; Hakonarson, Hakon H.; Devaney, Joe; Burnett, Mary Susan; Pichard, Augusto D.; Kent, Kenneth M.; Satler, Lowell; Lindsay, Joseph M.; Waksman, Ron; Knouff, Christopher W.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Walker, Max C.; Epstein, Stephen E.; Rader, Daniel J.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Wright, Benjamin J.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Ball, Stephen G.; Loehr, Laura R.; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Benjamin, Emelia; Haritunians, Talin; Couper, David; Murabito, Joanne; Wang, Ying A.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Chang, Patricia P.; Willerson, James T.; Felix, Stephan B.; Watzinger, Norbert; Aragam, Jayashri; Zweiker, Robert; Lind, Lars; Rodeheffer, Richard J.; Greiser, Karin Halina; Deckers, Jaap W.; Stritzke, Jan; Ingelsson, Erik; Kullo, Iftikhar; Haerting, Johannes; Reffelmann, Thorsten; Redfield, Margaret M.; Werdan, Karl; Mitchell, Gary F.; Arnett, Donna K.; Gottdiener, John S.; Blettner, Maria; Friedrich, Nele; Kovacs, Peter; Wild, Philipp S.; Froguel, Philippe; Rettig, Rainer; Mägi, Reedik; Biffar, Reiner; Schmidt, Reinhold; Middelberg, Rita P. S.; Carroll, Robert J.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Scott, Rodney J.; Katz, Ronit; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Wild, Sarah H.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Ulivi, Sheila; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Enroth, Stefan; Kloiber, Stefan; Trompet, Stella; Stengel, Benedicte; Hancock, Stephen J.; Turner, Stephen T.; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B.; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Lehtimäki, Terho; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Nikopensius, Tiit; Esko, Tonu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Gyllensten, Ulf; Völker, Uwe; Emilsson, Valur; Vitart, Veronique; Aalto, Ville; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Chen, Wei-Min; Igl, Wilmar; März, Winfried; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Liu, Yongmei; Snieder, Harold; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Parsa, Afshin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Susztak, Katalin; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; de Boer, Ian H.; Böger, Carsten A.; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I.; Köttgen, Anna; Kao, W. H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways. PMID:26831199

  20. Digital Quantification of Human Eye Color Highlights Genetic Association of Three New Loci

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fan; Wollstein, Andreas; Hysi, Pirro G.; Ankra-Badu, Georgina A.; Spector, Timothy D.; Park, Daniel; Zhu, Gu; Larsson, Mats; Duffy, David L.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mackey, David A.; Walsh, Susan; Lao, Oscar; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hammond, Christopher J.; Kayser, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have successfully identified genetic variants in several genes associated with human iris (eye) color; however, they all used simplified categorical trait information. Here, we quantified continuous eye color variation into hue and saturation values using high-resolution digital full-eye photographs and conducted a genome-wide association study on 5,951 Dutch Europeans from the Rotterdam Study. Three new regions, 1q42.3, 17q25.3, and 21q22.13, were highlighted meeting the criterion for genome-wide statistically significant association. The latter two loci were replicated in 2,261 individuals from the UK and in 1,282 from Australia. The LYST gene at 1q42.3 and the DSCR9 gene at 21q22.13 serve as promising functional candidates. A model for predicting quantitative eye colors explained over 50% of trait variance in the Rotterdam Study. Over all our data exemplify that fine phenotyping is a useful strategy for finding genes involved in human complex traits. PMID:20463881

  1. [Genetic risk factors in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Fabisch, H; Kroisel, P M; Fabisch, Karin

    2005-11-01

    The high pathogenetic relevance of genetic factors in schizophrenia is beyond doubt based on the findings of epidemiological studies. By means of a complex mode of transmission, it is likely that several genes with weak to moderate effect jointly constitute a genetic basis for a vulnerability to schizophrenia that may well vary for different individuals. Other organic and psychosocial factors also play an individually different -- in some cases significant -- role in terms of pathogenesis, as a result of which an oligogenic/polygenic multifactor model is assumed from the standpoint of aetiopathogenetics. Molecular genetic methods consist in linkage analyses and association analyses. Positive linkage findings accumulate particularly for the chromosomes 1q, 6p, 8p, 13q and 22q. By themselves, individual mutations contribute little to the range of schizophrenic feature characteristics, it was not possible -- irrespective of some subtypes -- to replicate genes of major effect. From the large number of possible candidate genes, although studies on DRD3, DRD2 and HTR2A produced positive results, the magnitudes of effect were low. The findings for alleles of dysbindin, neuregulin 1, DAO, COMT, PRODH, ZDHHC and DISC are less clear. The search for schizophrenia-relevant mutations is hampered by the possibility of a heterogeneous phenotype of schizophrenia in case of a homogeneous genotype as much as by the possibility of inter-individually homogeneous phenotypical characteristics in case of schizophrenia-relevant heterotype in the genome. With the aid of the concept of endo-phenotypes, based on neurobiological phenomena, it might be possible to take a more direct approach that leads from relevant mutations to the risk of schizophrenias. However, replacing schizophrenic alienation with neurobiological aspects leads to difficulties in explaining these complex disorder profiles. Schizophrenic diseases require an explanatory approach that also incorporates personality and

  2. Common genetic variants highlight the role of insulin resistance and body fat distribution in type 2 diabetes, independently of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Robert A; Fall, Tove; Pasko, Dorota; Barker, Adam; Sharp, Stephen J; Arriola, Larraitz; Balkau, Beverley; Barricarte, Aurelio; Barroso, Inês; Boeing, Heiner; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Crowe, Francesca L; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Fagherazzi, Guy; Ferrannini, Ele; Forouhi, Nita G; Franks, Paul W; Gavrila, Diana; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Grioni, Sara; Groop, Leif C; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J; Kühn, Tilman; Lotta, Luca A; Nilsson, Peter M; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Quirós, J. Ramón; Rolandsson, Olov; Roswall, Nina; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sala, Núria; Sánchez, María-José; Schulze, Matthias B; Siddiq, Afshan; Slimani, Nadia; Sluijs, Ivonne; Spijkerman, Annemieke MW; Tjonneland, Anne; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; McCarthy, Mark I; Semple, Robert K; Riboli, Elio; Walker, Mark; Ingelsson, Erik; Frayling, Tim M; Savage, David B

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to validate genetic variants as instruments for insulin resistance and secretion, to characterise their association with intermediate phenotypes, and to investigate their role in T2D risk among normal-weight, overweight and obese individuals.We investigated the association of genetic scores with euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp- and OGTT-based measures of insulin resistance and secretion, and a range of metabolic measures in up to 18,565 individuals. We also studied their association with T2D risk among normal-weight, overweight and obese individuals in up to 8,124 incident T2D cases. The insulin resistance score was associated with lower insulin sensitivity measured by M/I value (β in SDs-per-allele [95%CI]:−0.03[−0.04,−0.01];p=0.004). This score was associated with lower BMI (−0.01[−0.01,−0.0;p=0.02) and gluteofemoral fat-mass (−0.03[−0.05,−0.02;p=1.4×10−6), and with higher ALT (0.02[0.01,0.03];p=0.002) and gamma-GT (0.02[0.01,0.03];p=0.001). While the secretion score had a stronger association with T2D in leaner individuals (pinteraction=0.001), we saw no difference in the association of the insulin resistance score with T2D among BMI- or waist-strata(pinteraction>0.31). While insulin resistance is often considered secondary to obesity, the association of the insulin resistance score with lower BMI and adiposity and with incident T2D even among individuals of normal weight highlights the role of insulin resistance and ectopic fat distribution in T2D, independently of body size. PMID:24947364

  3. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization.

    PubMed

    Arking, Dan E; Pulit, Sara L; Crotti, Lia; van der Harst, Pim; Munroe, Patricia B; Koopmann, Tamara T; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Morley, Michael; Wang, Xinchen; Johnson, Andrew D; Lundby, Alicia; Gudbjartsson, Daníel F; Noseworthy, Peter A; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Bradford, Yuki; Tarasov, Kirill V; Dörr, Marcus; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lahtinen, Annukka M; Nolte, Ilja M; Smith, Albert Vernon; Bis, Joshua C; Isaacs, Aaron; Newhouse, Stephen J; Evans, Daniel S; Post, Wendy S; Waggott, Daryl; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Hicks, Andrew A; Eisele, Lewin; Ellinghaus, David; Hayward, Caroline; Navarro, Pau; Ulivi, Sheila; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tester, David J; Chatel, Stéphanie; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W; Naluai, Åsa T; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Kluttig, Alexander; Strohmer, Bernhard; Panayiotou, Andrie G; Torres, Maria; Knoflach, Michael; Hubacek, Jaroslav A; Slowikowski, Kamil; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kumar, Runjun D; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Shuldiner, Alan R; Alonso, Alvaro; Bader, Joel S; Ehret, Georg; Huang, Hailiang; Kao, W H Linda; Strait, James B; Macfarlane, Peter W; Brown, Morris; Caulfield, Mark J; Samani, Nilesh J; Kronenberg, Florian; Willeit, Johann; Smith, J Gustav; Greiser, Karin H; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette; Werdan, Karl; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Heckbert, Susan R; Psaty, Bruce M; Rotter, Jerome I; Kolcic, Ivana; Polašek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F; Griffin, Maura; Daly, Mark J; Arnar, David O; Hólm, Hilma; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Denny, Joshua C; Roden, Dan M; Zuvich, Rebecca L; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S; Larson, Martin G; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Yin, Xiaoyan; Bobbo, Marco; D'Adamo, Adamo P; Iorio, Annamaria; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Carracedo, Angel; Cummings, Steven R; Nalls, Michael A; Jula, Antti; Kontula, Kimmo K; Marjamaa, Annukka; Oikarinen, Lasse; Perola, Markus; Porthan, Kimmo; Erbel, Raimund; Hoffmann, Per; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kälsch, Hagen; Nöthen, Markus M; den Hoed, Marcel; Loos, Ruth J F; Thelle, Dag S; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Prucha, Hanna; Sinner, Moritz F; Waldenberger, Melanie; de Boer, Rudolf A; Franke, Lude; van der Vleuten, Pieter A; Beckmann, Britt Maria; Martens, Eimo; Bardai, Abdennasser; Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A M; Behr, Elijah R; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Giudicessi, John R; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Barc, Julien; Kyndt, Florence; Probst, Vincent; Ghidoni, Alice; Insolia, Roberto; Hamilton, Robert M; Scherer, Stephen W; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Margulies, Kenneth; Moravec, Christine E; del Greco M, Fabiola; Fuchsberger, Christian; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Lee, Wai K; Watt, Graham C M; Campbell, Harry; Wild, Sarah H; El Mokhtari, Nour E; Frey, Norbert; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Mateo Leach, Irene; Navis, Gerjan; van den Berg, Maarten P; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Kellis, Manolis; Krijthe, Bouwe P; Franco, Oscar H; Hofman, Albert; Kors, Jan A; Uitterlinden, André G; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Lamina, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Lakatta, Edward G; Mulas, Antonella; Orrú, Marco; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Markus, Marcello R P; Völker, Uwe; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D; Ärnlöv, Johan; Lind, Lars; Sundström, Johan; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Kivimaki, Mika; Kähönen, Mika; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T; Viikari, Jorma S; Adamkova, Vera; Kiechl, Stefan; Brion, Maria; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haerting, Johannes; Dominiczak, Anna F; Nyberg, Fredrik; Whincup, Peter H; Hingorani, Aroon D; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Bezzina, Connie R; Ingelsson, Erik; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gasparini, Paolo; Wilson, James F; Rudan, Igor; Franke, Andre; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Pramstaller, Peter P; Lehtimäki, Terho J; Paterson, Andrew D; Parsa, Afshin; Liu, Yongmei; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Siscovick, David S; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jamshidi, Yalda; Salomaa, Veikko; Felix, Stephan B; Sanna, Serena; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Stricker, Bruno H; Stefansson, Kari; Boyer, Laurie A; Cappola, Thomas P; Olsen, Jesper V; Lage, Kasper; Schwartz, Peter J; Kääb, Stefan; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ackerman, Michael J; Pfeufer, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I W; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2014-08-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Using a genome-wide association and replication study in up to 100,000 individuals, we identified 35 common variant loci associated with QT interval that collectively explain ∼8-10% of QT-interval variation and highlight the importance of calcium regulation in myocardial repolarization. Rare variant analysis of 6 new QT interval-associated loci in 298 unrelated probands with LQTS identified coding variants not found in controls but of uncertain causality and therefore requiring validation. Several newly identified loci encode proteins that physically interact with other recognized repolarization proteins. Our integration of common variant association, expression and orthogonal protein-protein interaction screens provides new insights into cardiac electrophysiology and identifies new candidate genes for ventricular arrhythmias, LQTS and SCD.

  4. Gender, genetic risk, and criminal behavior.

    PubMed

    Vaske, Jamie; Wright, John Paul; Boisvert, Danielle; Beaver, Kevin Michael

    2011-02-28

    The threshold hypothesis asserts that the prevalence of offending is lower among females because females have a higher threshold for risk than males. As a result, females who do offend should exhibit greater concentrations of genetic and environmental risk than male offenders. In light of these statements, the current study examines the role of genetic factors in the etiology of female offending using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. The results reveal that the genetic risk threshold is higher for females than for males. However, contrary to the threshold hypothesis, female offenders exhibit fewer genetic risks than male offenders.

  5. What Are the Risks and Limitations of Genetic Testing?

    MedlinePlus

    ... testing? What are the risks and limitations of genetic testing? The physical risks associated with most genetic ... more information about the risks and limitations of genetic testing: The American College of Medical Genetics and ...

  6. [Genetic risks in plant ex situ conservation].

    PubMed

    Kang, Ming; Ye, Qi-Gang; Huang, Hong-Wen

    2005-01-01

    Conserving genetic diversity of rare and endangered species and their evolutionary potential is one of the long-term goals of ex-situ conservation. Some potential genetic risks in ex-situ conservation in botanical gardens are presented. The preserved species may lack genetic representativity because of poor sampling. Inappropriate plantations, inadequate records and unclear kinships jeopardize endangered species to genetic confusion, inbreeding depression or outbreeding depression. Artificial selection and habitat conversion also potentially result endangered plants in adapting to ex-situ conservation, which had been usually overlooked. All the genetic risks can decrease the success of reintroduction and recovery. Therefore, appropriate genetic management should be carried out in botanical gardens to decrease or avoid genetic risks in ex-situ conservation.

  7. Common genetic variants highlight the role of insulin resistance and body fat distribution in type 2 diabetes, independent of obesity.

    PubMed

    Scott, Robert A; Fall, Tove; Pasko, Dorota; Barker, Adam; Sharp, Stephen J; Arriola, Larraitz; Balkau, Beverley; Barricarte, Aurelio; Barroso, Inês; Boeing, Heiner; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Crowe, Francesca L; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Fagherazzi, Guy; Ferrannini, Ele; Forouhi, Nita G; Franks, Paul W; Gavrila, Diana; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Grioni, Sara; Groop, Leif C; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J; Kühn, Tilman; Lotta, Luca A; Nilsson, Peter M; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Quirós, J Ramón; Rolandsson, Olov; Roswall, Nina; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sala, Núria; Sánchez, María-José; Schulze, Matthias B; Siddiq, Afshan; Slimani, Nadia; Sluijs, Ivonne; Spijkerman, Annemieke Mw; Tjonneland, Anne; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; McCarthy, Mark I; Semple, Robert K; Riboli, Elio; Walker, Mark; Ingelsson, Erik; Frayling, Tim M; Savage, David B; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to validate genetic variants as instruments for insulin resistance and secretion, to characterize their association with intermediate phenotypes, and to investigate their role in type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk among normal-weight, overweight, and obese individuals. We investigated the association of genetic scores with euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp- and oral glucose tolerance test-based measures of insulin resistance and secretion and a range of metabolic measures in up to 18,565 individuals. We also studied their association with T2D risk among normal-weight, overweight, and obese individuals in up to 8,124 incident T2D cases. The insulin resistance score was associated with lower insulin sensitivity measured by M/I value (β in SDs per allele [95% CI], -0.03 [-0.04, -0.01]; P = 0.004). This score was associated with lower BMI (-0.01 [-0.01, -0.0]; P = 0.02) and gluteofemoral fat mass (-0.03 [-0.05, -0.02; P = 1.4 × 10(-6)) and with higher alanine transaminase (0.02 [0.01, 0.03]; P = 0.002) and γ-glutamyl transferase (0.02 [0.01, 0.03]; P = 0.001). While the secretion score had a stronger association with T2D in leaner individuals (Pinteraction = 0.001), we saw no difference in the association of the insulin resistance score with T2D among BMI or waist strata (Pinteraction > 0.31). While insulin resistance is often considered secondary to obesity, the association of the insulin resistance score with lower BMI and adiposity and with incident T2D even among individuals of normal weight highlights the role of insulin resistance and ectopic fat distribution in T2D, independently of body size. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  8. Genetic predisposition, non-genetic risk factors and coronary infarct

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Using a genetic predisposition score (GPS), additively integrating the associations of 11 polymorphisms with coronary heart disease (CHD), we examined the consequences of joint presence of high GPS and non-genetic CHD risk factors. Methods: Within the European Prospective Investigation i...

  9. Risk factors for endemic giardiasis: highlighting the possible association of contaminated water and food.

    PubMed

    Mohammed Mahdy, A K; Lim, Y A L; Surin, Johari; Wan, K L; Al-Mekhlafi, M S Hesham

    2008-05-01

    This study was conducted to reassess the risk factors for giardiasis in communities of the Orang Asli (indigenous people) in Pahang, Malaysia. Stool samples were collected from 321 individuals (2-76 years old; 160 males, 161 females). Data were collected via laboratory analysis of faecal samples and a pre-tested standard questionnaire. River water samples were tested for Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts. The overall prevalence of G. intestinalis infection was 23.7%. Children < or =12 years old had the highest infection rate and have been identified as a high risk group (odds ratio (OR)=6.2, 95% CI 1.5-27.0, P<0.005). The risk of getting giardiasis also appeared to be significantly associated with drinking piped water (OR=5.1, 95% CI 0.06-0.7, P<0.005) and eating raw vegetables (OR=2.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.6, P<0.005). In conclusion, sociodemographic factors have always been associated with the high prevalence of Giardia infections in Malaysia. However, the present study also highlights the need to look into the possibility of other risks such as water and food transmission routes. In future, it is necessary that these two aspects be considered in control strategies.

  10. Genetic risk, risk perception, and decision making

    SciTech Connect

    Evers-Kiebooms, G.; Cassiman, J.J.; VanDenBerghe, H.; D'Ydewalle, G. )

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the proceedings of a conference held by March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. Topics presented include: Diagnosis of Genetic disease by linkage analysis and DNA diagnosis of autosomal dominant and recessive diseases.

  11. Identification of successive flowering phases highlights a new genetic control of the flowering pattern in strawberry.

    PubMed

    Perrotte, Justine; Guédon, Yann; Gaston, Amèlia; Denoyes, Béatrice

    2016-10-01

    The genetic control of the switch between seasonal and perpetual flowering has been deciphered in various perennial species. However, little is known about the genetic control of the dynamics of perpetual flowering, which changes abruptly at well-defined time instants during the growing season. Here, we characterize the perpetual flowering pattern and identify new genetic controls of this pattern in the cultivated strawberry. Twenty-one perpetual flowering strawberry genotypes were phenotyped at the macroscopic scale for their course of emergence of inflorescences and stolons during the growing season. A longitudinal analysis based on the segmentation of flowering rate profiles using multiple change-point models was conducted. The flowering pattern of perpetual flowering genotypes takes the form of three or four successive phases: an autumn-initiated flowering phase, a flowering pause, and a single stationary perpetual flowering phase or two perpetual flowering phases, the second one being more intense. The genetic control of flowering was analysed by quantitative trait locus mapping of flowering traits based on these flowering phases. We showed that the occurrence of a fourth phase of intense flowering is controlled by a newly identified locus, different from the locus FaPFRU, controlling the switch between seasonal and perpetual flowering behaviour. The role of this locus was validated by the analysis of data obtained previously during six consecutive years.

  12. Identification of successive flowering phases highlights a new genetic control of the flowering pattern in strawberry

    PubMed Central

    Perrotte, Justine; Guédon, Yann; Gaston, Amèlia; Denoyes, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    The genetic control of the switch between seasonal and perpetual flowering has been deciphered in various perennial species. However, little is known about the genetic control of the dynamics of perpetual flowering, which changes abruptly at well-defined time instants during the growing season. Here, we characterize the perpetual flowering pattern and identify new genetic controls of this pattern in the cultivated strawberry. Twenty-one perpetual flowering strawberry genotypes were phenotyped at the macroscopic scale for their course of emergence of inflorescences and stolons during the growing season. A longitudinal analysis based on the segmentation of flowering rate profiles using multiple change-point models was conducted. The flowering pattern of perpetual flowering genotypes takes the form of three or four successive phases: an autumn-initiated flowering phase, a flowering pause, and a single stationary perpetual flowering phase or two perpetual flowering phases, the second one being more intense. The genetic control of flowering was analysed by quantitative trait locus mapping of flowering traits based on these flowering phases. We showed that the occurrence of a fourth phase of intense flowering is controlled by a newly identified locus, different from the locus FaPFRU, controlling the switch between seasonal and perpetual flowering behaviour. The role of this locus was validated by the analysis of data obtained previously during six consecutive years. PMID:27664957

  13. Beyond the cancer cell: progression-level determinants highlight the multiscale nature of carcinogenesis risk.

    PubMed

    Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2014-02-01

    Over the last several decades, improved awareness of the prevalence of carcinogens in the environment, along with a growing appreciation of the complexity of the carcinogenesis process, has shifted policy on cancer risk from one of strict avoidance of carcinogens to one of adherence to exposure limits deemed "safe" based on quantitative risk estimation. Meanwhile, given the mutagenic nature of most carcinogens, attention has gravitated to developing a genetic rationale for measuring and comparing risks. This focus has culminated in the now well-established multistage mutational paradigm, which holds that a stepwise sequence of mutations drives cell "initiation" and the subsequent "transformation" of an initiated cell into a cancer cell, and that, once created, a cancer cell will inevitably undergo "progression" to become overt disease. Unanticipated by this paradigm is the effect progression-phase population- and tissue-level bottleneck events may have on this process. Attesting to this is the prevalence of tumor dormancy, a state of arrested growth of an otherwise fully malignant, often microscopic cancer mass, maintained by interactions among cancer cells and between cancer and host cells. The proper inclusion of such progression-modifying influences would clearly behoove risk estimation and improve our understanding of the natural history of cancer by accounting for the less-than-certain risk of eventual cancer disease even when cancer cells are present. Such an improved understanding, in turn, stands to better inform policy-making and influence such clinical practice decisions as whether to treat the increasingly smaller tumors detectable with advancing technologies.

  14. Implementation of next-generation sequencing for molecular diagnosis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer highlights its genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Pedro; Paulo, Paula; Santos, Catarina; Rocha, Patrícia; Pinto, Carla; Veiga, Isabel; Pinheiro, Manuela; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2016-09-01

    Molecular diagnosis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) by standard methodologies has been limited to the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. With the recent development of new sequencing methodologies, the speed and efficiency of DNA testing have dramatically improved. The aim of this work was to validate the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) for the detection of BRCA1/BRCA2 point mutations in a diagnostic setting and to study the role of other genes associated with HBOC in Portuguese families. A cohort of 94 high-risk families was included in the study, and they were initially screened for the two common founder mutations with variant-specific methods. Fourteen index patients were shown to carry the Portuguese founder mutation BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu, and the remaining 80 were analyzed in parallel by Sanger sequencing for the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes and by NGS for a panel of 17 genes that have been described as involved in predisposition to breast and/or ovarian cancer. A total of 506 variants in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes were detected by both methodologies, with a 100 % concordance between them. This strategy allowed the detection of a total of 39 deleterious mutations in the 94 index patients, namely 10 in BRCA1 (25.6 %), 21 in BRCA2 (53.8 %), four in PALB2 (10.3 %), two in ATM (5.1 %), one in CHEK2 (2.6 %), and one in TP53 (2.6 %), with 20.5 % of the deleterious mutations being found in genes other than BRCA1/BRCA2. These results demonstrate the efficiency of NGS for the detection of BRCA1/BRCA2 point mutations and highlight the genetic heterogeneity of HBOC.

  15. Editor's Highlight: Base Excision Repair Variants and Pesticide Exposure Increase Parkinson's Disease Risk.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Laurie H; Paul, Kimberly C; Howlett, Evan H; Lawal, Hakeem; Boppana, Sridhar; Bronstein, Jeff M; Ritz, Beate; Greenamyre, J Timothy

    2017-07-01

    Exposure to certain pesticides induces oxidative stress and increases Parkinson's disease (PD) risk. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage is found in dopaminergic neurons in idiopathic PD and following pesticide exposure in experimental models thereof. Base excision repair (BER) is the major pathway responsible for repairing oxidative DNA damage in cells. Whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in BER genes alone or in combination with pesticide exposure influence PD risk is unknown. We investigated the contributions of functional SNPs in 2 BER genes (APEX1 and OGG1) and mitochondrial dysfunction- or oxidative stress-related pesticide exposure, including paraquat, to PD risk. We also studied the effect of paraquat on levels of mtDNA damage and mitochondrial bioenergetics. 619 PD patients and 854 population-based controls were analyzed for the 2 SNPs, APEX1 rs1130409 and OGG1 rs1052133. Ambient pesticide exposures were assessed with a geographic information system. Individually, or in combination, the BER SNPs did not influence PD risk. Mitochondrial-inhibiting (OR = 1.79, 95% CI [1.32, 2.42]), oxidative stress-inducing pesticides (OR = 1.61, 95% CI [1.22, 2.11]), and paraquat (OR = 1.54, 95% CI [1.23, 1.93]) were associated with PD. Statistical interactions were detected, including for a genetic risk score based on rs1130409 and rs1052133 and oxidative stress inducing pesticides, where highly exposed carriers of both risk genotypes were at the highest risk of PD (OR = 2.21, 95% CI [1.25, 3.86]); similar interactions were estimated for mitochondrial-inhibiting pesticides and paraquat alone. Additionally, paraquat exposure was found to impair mitochondrial respiration and increase mtDNA damage in in vivo and in vitro systems. Our findings provide insight into possible mechanisms involved in increased PD risk due to pesticide exposure in the context of BER genotype variants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  16. Risks of reproducing with a genetic disorder.

    PubMed

    Byler, Melissa Ciano; Lebel, Robert Roger

    2013-07-01

    Male-factor infertility is the cause of reproductive issues in many couples. For approximately 15% of these men, the origin of the infertility is genetic. These causes include both chromosomal and single-gene disorders frequently impacting spermatogenesis. By identifying the genetic mechanism behind the infertility, we determine the ability of the couple to use assisted reproduction technologies. Use of these methods has ignited a new spectrum of concerns for the genetic competence of the offspring. By knowing what specific genetic risks exist for the offspring of men with these particular disorders, we are able to use preimplantation genetic diagnosis to detect these problems.

  17. Large-scale targeted sequencing comparison highlights extreme genetic heterogeneity in nephronophthisis-related ciliopathies

    PubMed Central

    Schueler, Markus; Halbritter, Jan; Phelps, Ian G.; Braun, Daniela A.; Otto, Edgar A.; Porath, Jonathan D.; Gee, Heon Yung; Shendure, Jay; O’Roak, Brian J.; Lawson, Jennifer A.; Soliman, Neveen A.; Nabhan, Marwa M.; Doherty, Dan; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    The term nephronophthisis-related ciliopathies (NPHP-RC) describes a group of rare autosomal-recessive cystic kidney diseases, characterized by broad genetic and clinical heterogeneity. NPHP-RC is frequently associated with extrarenal manifestations and accounts for the majority of genetically caused chronic kidney disease (CKD) during childhood and adolescence. Generation of a molecular diagnosis has been impaired by this broad genetic heterogeneity. However, recently developed high-throughput exon sequencing techniques represent powerful and efficient tools to screen large cohorts for dozens of causative genes. Therefore, we performed massively multiplexed targeted sequencing using the modified molecular inversion probe (MIPs) strategy in an international cohort of 384 patients diagnosed with NPHP-RC. As a result, we established the molecular diagnoses in 81/384 unrelated individuals (21.1%). We detected 127 likely disease-causing mutations in 18 of 34 evaluated NPHP-RC genes, 22 of which were novel. We further compared a subgroup of current findings to the results of a previous study in which we used an array-based microfluidic PCR technology in the same cohort. While 78 likely disease-causing mutations were previously detected by the array-based microfluidic PCR, the MIPs approach identified 94 likely pathogenic mutations. Compared to the previous approach, MIPs re-detected 66 out of 78 variants and 28 previously unidentified variants, for a total of 94 variants. In summary, we demonstrate that the modified MIPs technology is a useful approach to screen large cohorts for a multitude of established NPHP genes in order to identify the underlying molecular cause. Combined application of two independent library preparation and sequencing techniques, however, may still be indicated for Mendelian diseases with extensive genetic heterogeneity in order to further increase diagnostic sensitivity. PMID:26673778

  18. Stroke Risk Factors, Genetics, and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Amelia K; Esenwa, Charles; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-02-03

    Stroke is a heterogeneous syndrome, and determining risk factors and treatment depends on the specific pathogenesis of stroke. Risk factors for stroke can be categorized as modifiable and nonmodifiable. Age, sex, and race/ethnicity are nonmodifiable risk factors for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, while hypertension, smoking, diet, and physical inactivity are among some of the more commonly reported modifiable risk factors. More recently described risk factors and triggers of stroke include inflammatory disorders, infection, pollution, and cardiac atrial disorders independent of atrial fibrillation. Single-gene disorders may cause rare, hereditary disorders for which stroke is a primary manifestation. Recent research also suggests that common and rare genetic polymorphisms can influence risk of more common causes of stroke, due to both other risk factors and specific stroke mechanisms, such as atrial fibrillation. Genetic factors, particularly those with environmental interactions, may be more modifiable than previously recognized. Stroke prevention has generally focused on modifiable risk factors. Lifestyle and behavioral modification, such as dietary changes or smoking cessation, not only reduces stroke risk, but also reduces the risk of other cardiovascular diseases. Other prevention strategies include identifying and treating medical conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, that increase stroke risk. Recent research into risk factors and genetics of stroke has not only identified those at risk for stroke but also identified ways to target at-risk populations for stroke prevention. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Coding SNPs analysis highlights genetic relationships and evolution pattern in eggplant complexes

    PubMed Central

    Acquadro, Alberto; Barchi, Lorenzo; Gramazio, Pietro; Portis, Ezio; Vilanova, Santiago; Comino, Cinzia; Plazas, Mariola; Lanteri, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Brinjal (Solanum melongena), scarlet (S. aethiopicum) and gboma (S. macrocarpon) eggplants are three Old World domesticates. The genomic DNA of a collection of accessions belonging to the three cultivated species, along with a representation of various wild relatives, was characterized for the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using a genotype-by-sequencing approach. A total of 210 million useful reads were produced and were successfully aligned to the reference eggplant genome sequence. Out of the 75,399 polymorphic sites identified among the 76 entries in study, 12,859 were associated with coding sequence. A genetic relationships analysis, supported by the output of the FastSTRUCTURE software, identified four major sub-groups as present in the germplasm panel. The first of these clustered S. aethiopicum with its wild ancestor S. anguivi; the second, S. melongena, its wild progenitor S. insanum, and its relatives S. incanum, S. lichtensteinii and S. linneanum; the third, S. macrocarpon and its wild ancestor S. dasyphyllum; and the fourth, the New World species S. sisymbriifolium, S. torvum and S. elaeagnifolium. By applying a hierarchical FastSTRUCTURE analysis on partitioned data, it was also possible to resolve the ambiguous membership of the accessions of S. campylacanthum, S. violaceum, S. lidii, S. vespertilio and S. tomentsum, as well as to genetically differentiate the three species of New World Origin. A principal coordinates analysis performed both on the entire germplasm panel and also separately on the entries belonging to sub-groups revealed a clear separation among species, although not between each of the domesticates and their respective wild ancestors. There was no clear differentiation between either distinct cultivar groups or different geographical provenance. Adopting various approaches to analyze SNP variation provided support for interpretation of results. The genotyping-by-sequencing approach showed to be highly efficient

  20. Coding SNPs analysis highlights genetic relationships and evolution pattern in eggplant complexes.

    PubMed

    Acquadro, Alberto; Barchi, Lorenzo; Gramazio, Pietro; Portis, Ezio; Vilanova, Santiago; Comino, Cinzia; Plazas, Mariola; Prohens, Jaime; Lanteri, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Brinjal (Solanum melongena), scarlet (S. aethiopicum) and gboma (S. macrocarpon) eggplants are three Old World domesticates. The genomic DNA of a collection of accessions belonging to the three cultivated species, along with a representation of various wild relatives, was characterized for the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using a genotype-by-sequencing approach. A total of 210 million useful reads were produced and were successfully aligned to the reference eggplant genome sequence. Out of the 75,399 polymorphic sites identified among the 76 entries in study, 12,859 were associated with coding sequence. A genetic relationships analysis, supported by the output of the FastSTRUCTURE software, identified four major sub-groups as present in the germplasm panel. The first of these clustered S. aethiopicum with its wild ancestor S. anguivi; the second, S. melongena, its wild progenitor S. insanum, and its relatives S. incanum, S. lichtensteinii and S. linneanum; the third, S. macrocarpon and its wild ancestor S. dasyphyllum; and the fourth, the New World species S. sisymbriifolium, S. torvum and S. elaeagnifolium. By applying a hierarchical FastSTRUCTURE analysis on partitioned data, it was also possible to resolve the ambiguous membership of the accessions of S. campylacanthum, S. violaceum, S. lidii, S. vespertilio and S. tomentsum, as well as to genetically differentiate the three species of New World Origin. A principal coordinates analysis performed both on the entire germplasm panel and also separately on the entries belonging to sub-groups revealed a clear separation among species, although not between each of the domesticates and their respective wild ancestors. There was no clear differentiation between either distinct cultivar groups or different geographical provenance. Adopting various approaches to analyze SNP variation provided support for interpretation of results. The genotyping-by-sequencing approach showed to be highly efficient

  1. Integrating Genetics and Social Science: Genetic Risk Scores

    PubMed Central

    Belsky, Daniel W.; Israel, Salomon

    2014-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome and the advent of low-cost genome-wide assays that generate millions of observations of individual genomes in a matter of hours constitute a disruptive innovation for social science. Many public-use social science datasets have or will soon add genome-wide genetic data. With these new data come technical challenges, but also new possibilities. Among these, the lowest hanging fruit and the most potentially disruptive to existing research programs is the ability to measure previously invisible contours of health and disease risk within populations. In this article, we outline why now is the time for social scientists to bring genetics into their research programs. We discuss how to select genetic variants to study. We explain how the polygenic architecture of complex traits and the low penetrance of individual genetic loci pose challenges to research integrating genetics and social science. We introduce genetic risk scores as a method of addressing these challenges and provide guidance on how genetic risk scores can be constructed. We conclude by outlining research questions that are ripe for social science inquiry. PMID:25343363

  2. Integrating genetics and social science: genetic risk scores.

    PubMed

    Belsky, Daniel W; Israel, Salomon

    2014-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome and the advent of low-cost genome-wide assays that generate millions of observations of individual genomes in a matter of hours constitute a disruptive innovation for social science. Many public use social science datasets have or will soon add genome-wide genetic data. With these new data come technical challenges, but also new possibilities. Among these, the lowest-hanging fruit and the most potentially disruptive to existing research programs is the ability to measure previously invisible contours of health and disease risk within populations. In this article, we outline why now is the time for social scientists to bring genetics into their research programs. We discuss how to select genetic variants to study. We explain how the polygenic architecture of complex traits and the low penetrance of individual genetic loci pose challenges to research integrating genetics and social science. We introduce genetic risk scores as a method of addressing these challenges and provide guidance on how genetic risk scores can be constructed. We conclude by outlining research questions that are ripe for social science inquiry.

  3. Non-disclosure of genetic risks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In ABC v. St Georges Healthcare NHS Trust, the High Court of England and Wales rejected the argument that doctors have a legal duty to disclose actionable genetic risks to a patient’s relatives. This article reconsiders the concept of a duty to disclose actionable genetic risks in the context of widening perceptions of legal harm and developing professional and public perceptions of corresponding wrongs. PMID:27630453

  4. Genetic Research on Biospecimens Poses Minimal Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wendler, David S.; Rid, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Genetic research on human biospecimens is increasingly common. Yet, debate continues over the level of risk that this research poses to sample donors. Some argue that genetic research on biospecimens poses minimal risk; others argue that it poses greater than minimal risk and therefore needs additional requirements and limitations. This debate raises concern that some donors are not receiving appropriate protection or, conversely, that valuable research is being subject to unnecessary requirements and limitations. The present paper attempts to address this concern using the widely-endorsed ‘risks of daily life’ standard. The three extant versions of this standard all suggest that, with proper measures in place to protect donor confidentiality, most genetic research on human biospecimens poses minimal risk to donors. PMID:25530152

  5. Environmental chemical mutagens and genetic risks: Lessons from radiation genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaranarayanan, K.

    1996-12-31

    The last three decades have witnessed substantial progress in the development and use of a variety of in vitro and in vivo assay systems for the testing of environmental chemicals which may pose a mutagenic hazard to humans. This is also true of basic studies in chemical mutagenesis on mechanisms, DNA repair, molecular dosimetry, structure-activity relationships, etc. However, the field of quantitative evaluation of genetic risks of environmental chemicals to humans is still in it infancy. This commentary addresses the question of how our experience in estimating genetic risks of exposure to ionizing radiation can be helpful in similar endeavors with environmental chemical mutagens. 24 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Quantifying introgression risk with realistic population genetics

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Atiyo; Meirmans, Patrick G.; Haccou, Patsy

    2012-01-01

    Introgression is the permanent incorporation of genes from the genome of one population into another. This can have severe consequences, such as extinction of endemic species, or the spread of transgenes. Quantification of the risk of introgression is an important component of genetically modified crop regulation. Most theoretical introgression studies aimed at such quantification disregard one or more of the most important factors concerning introgression: realistic genetical mechanisms, repeated invasions and stochasticity. In addition, the use of linkage as a risk mitigation strategy has not been studied properly yet with genetic introgression models. Current genetic introgression studies fail to take repeated invasions and demographic stochasticity into account properly, and use incorrect measures of introgression risk that can be manipulated by arbitrary choices. In this study, we present proper methods for risk quantification that overcome these difficulties. We generalize a probabilistic risk measure, the so-called hazard rate of introgression, for application to introgression models with complex genetics and small natural population sizes. We illustrate the method by studying the effects of linkage and recombination on transgene introgression risk at different population sizes. PMID:23055068

  7. Quantifying introgression risk with realistic population genetics.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Atiyo; Meirmans, Patrick G; Haccou, Patsy

    2012-12-07

    Introgression is the permanent incorporation of genes from the genome of one population into another. This can have severe consequences, such as extinction of endemic species, or the spread of transgenes. Quantification of the risk of introgression is an important component of genetically modified crop regulation. Most theoretical introgression studies aimed at such quantification disregard one or more of the most important factors concerning introgression: realistic genetical mechanisms, repeated invasions and stochasticity. In addition, the use of linkage as a risk mitigation strategy has not been studied properly yet with genetic introgression models. Current genetic introgression studies fail to take repeated invasions and demographic stochasticity into account properly, and use incorrect measures of introgression risk that can be manipulated by arbitrary choices. In this study, we present proper methods for risk quantification that overcome these difficulties. We generalize a probabilistic risk measure, the so-called hazard rate of introgression, for application to introgression models with complex genetics and small natural population sizes. We illustrate the method by studying the effects of linkage and recombination on transgene introgression risk at different population sizes.

  8. Genome-wide genetic analyses highlight mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in the pathogenesis of endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Uimari, Outi; Rahmioglu, Nilufer; Nyholt, Dale R.; Vincent, Katy; Missmer, Stacey A.; Becker, Christian; Morris, Andrew P.; Montgomery, Grant W.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract STUDY QUESTION Do genome-wide association study (GWAS) data for endometriosis provide insight into novel biological pathways associated with its pathogenesis? SUMMARY ANSWER GWAS analysis uncovered multiple pathways that are statistically enriched for genetic association signals, analysis of Stage A disease highlighted a novel variant in MAP3K4, while top pathways significantly associated with all endometriosis and Stage A disease included several mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-related pathways. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Endometriosis is a complex disease with an estimated heritability of 50%. To date, GWAS revealed 10 genomic regions associated with endometriosis, explaining <4% of heritability, while half of the heritability is estimated to be due to common risk variants. Pathway analyses combine the evidence of single variants into gene-based measures, leveraging the aggregate effect of variants in genes and uncovering biological pathways involved in disease pathogenesis. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Pathway analysis was conducted utilizing the International Endogene Consortium GWAS data, comprising 3194 surgically confirmed endometriosis cases and 7060 controls of European ancestry with genotype data imputed up to 1000 Genomes Phase three reference panel. GWAS was performed for all endometriosis cases and for Stage A (revised American Fertility Society (rAFS) I/II, n = 1686) and B (rAFS III/IV, n = 1364) cases separately. The identified significant pathways were compared with pathways previously investigated in the literature through candidate association studies. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS The most comprehensive biological pathway databases, MSigDB (including BioCarta, KEGG, PID, SA, SIG, ST and GO) and PANTHER were utilized to test for enrichment of genetic variants associated with endometriosis. Statistical enrichment analysis was performed using the MAGENTA (Meta-Analysis Gene-set Enrichment of variaNT Associations) software

  9. Ciguatera fish poisoning: a first epidemic in Germany highlights an increasing risk for European countries.

    PubMed

    Mattei, César; Vetter, Irina; Eisenblätter, Anneka; Krock, Bernd; Ebbecke, Martin; Desel, Herbert; Zimmermann, Katharina

    2014-12-01

    Toxin-producing microalgae are thriving worldwide due to coral reef destruction and global warming with major consequences on ecosystems, international trade and human health. Microalgae belonging to the family of flagellate protists, in particular dinoflagellates, secrete a variety of high-molecular-weight polyether toxins that accumulate through the marine food chain to cause disease in humans by acting as sodium channel activator toxins; ciguatera is the most frequent seafood-borne illness worldwide with 50,000 to 500,000 global incidences per annum and is usually limited to endemic areas located between 35° northern and 35° southern latitude. The rising global incidence frequency renders it a major human health problem, because no curative treatment is available yet and reliable detection assays are lacking. During the last decade ciguatera has increasingly become endemic in previously unaffected areas for two reasons: first global warming has contributed to the emergence of dinoflagellate species in subtropical and even temperate regions that previously had been constrained to tropical areas and second: in Europe globalization of fishing industry and tourism has led to a progressive increase in the number of ciguatera cases and a lack of awareness among medical personnel contributes to under-reporting. We review, through a recent ciguatera outbreak in Germany, the risk for ciguatera poisoning in Europe and highlight characteristic symptoms, current knowledge about disease pathomechanisms and treatment options.

  10. Stress and genetic testing for disease risk.

    PubMed

    Baum, A; Friedman, A L; Zakowski, S G

    1997-01-01

    Healthy people who believe they are at risk for a life-threatening disease appear to carry a substantial stress burden because of threat of disease and uncertainty of risk. Testing for risk factors may be helpful by reducing this uncertainty, but diseases with multiple causes, like breast cancer, appear to be determined by genetic factors and by age, reproductive behavior, exposure to environmental toxins, or unknown antecedents. For diseases caused by inherited genetic defects, testing brings different benefits and stressors. A model is proposed that predicts long-term distress when risk analysis suggests a very high risk, when uncertainty is not reduced, when results of testing are at odds with preventive actions already taken, and when people who receive a positive, risk-increasing result lack strong social support, coping skills, other psychosocial resources, or all of these.

  11. Consanguinity Associated with Increased Prevalence and Severity of Bipolar Disorder in Pakistan: A Case Report Highlighting the Genetic Link.

    PubMed

    Aadil, Muhammad; Munir, Aitzaz; Arshad, Hasnain; Tariq, Feham; Anwar, Muhammad Jahanzaib; Amjad, Noman; Akhlaq, Anum

    2017-07-13

    This case report highlights the genetic link associated with bipolar disorder and rising prevalence of such cases in Pakistan due to the lack of knowledge and understanding of the disease. It also shows that a family history of bipolar disorder is associated with more aggressive episodes, early onset, and treatment relapse. Further studies are warranted to fully understand the pathophysiology of genetic linkages causing bipolar disorder so we can understand the natural course of illness and provide effective treatment. We report the case of a 25-year-old girl who presented to the hospital with severe mania and had around 20 episodes of acute mania in the last ten years. Her parents (first cousins) and brother all had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder.

  12. Genetic counseling for prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Nieder, A M; Taneja, S S; Zeegers, M P A; Ostrer, H

    2003-03-01

    Major risk factors for developing prostate cancer, including positive family history and African-American ethnicity, can be quantified for genetic counseling. Factors increasing familial risk for prostate cancer are closer degree of kinship, number of affected relatives, and early age of onset (< 50 years) among the affected relatives. Genetic testing may be useful for modification of risk, but currently should be performed only within the context of a well-designed research study that will determine penetrance and genotype-phenotype correlation of specific mutations. Even in the absence of genetic testing, African-American men and men with a strong family history of prostate cancer may opt to initiate screening by prostate specific antigen (PSA) and digital rectal exam (DRE) screening at age 40.

  13. [Risk assessment of genetically modified organisms].

    PubMed

    Costa, Thadeu Estevam Moreira Maramaldo; Dias, Aline Peçanha Muzy; Scheidegger, Erica Miranda Damasio; Marin, Victor Augustus

    2011-01-01

    Since the commercial approve in 1996, the global area of transgenic crops has raised more than 50 times. In the last two decades, governments have been planning strategies and protocols for safety assessment of food and feed genetically modified (GM). Evaluation of food safety should be taken on a case-by-case analysis depending on the specific traits of the modified crops and the changes introduced by the genetic modification, using for this the concept of substantial equivalence. This work presents approaches for the risk assessment of GM food, as well as some problems related with the genetic construction or even with the expression of the inserted gene.

  14. Communicating risk in prenatal genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Gates, Elena A

    2004-01-01

    Prenatal testing for Down syndrome and neural tube defects has become routine, and testing for other genetic conditions is becoming commonplace. Counseling about these tests involves a discussion of risk information, so pregnant women and their partners can use the information effectively when they make choices about testing. Discussing risk can be challenging, as many individuals, particularly those of lower literacy, have a poor understanding of the numerical concept of risk. Furthermore, whether risk is comprehended accurately or not, it is interpreted by patients in light of their existing knowledge and past experiences. Strategies available to optimize understanding of risk include communication of risk figures as frequencies rather than as probabilities or percentages and explicit discussion of a woman's preconceptions about her risk and about the condition being tested for.

  15. Experimental separation of genetic and demographic factors on extinction risk in wild populations.

    PubMed

    Wootton, J Timothy; Pfister, Catherine A

    2013-10-01

    When populations reach small size, an extinction risk vortex may arise from genetic (inbreeding depression, genetic drift) and ecological (demographic stochasticity, Allee effects, environmental fluctuation) processes. The relative contribution of these processes to extinction in wild populations is unknown, but important for conserving endangered species. In experimental field populations of a harvested kelp (Postelsia palmaeformis), in which we independently varied initial genetic diversity (completely inbred, control, outbred) and population size, ecological processes dominated the risk of extinction, whereas the contribution of genetic diversity was slight. Our results match theoretical predictions that demographic processes will generally doom small populations to extinction before genetic effects act strongly, prioritize detailed ecological analysis over descriptions of genetic structure in assessing conservation of at-risk species, and highlight the need for field experiments manipulating both demographics and genetic structure on long-term extinction risk.

  16. Highlights 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    Current research programs at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are presented. The topics include: the genetic basis for breast cancer, the Advanced Light Source, selenium characterization in soils via x-ray absorption spectroscopy, automated colony sorting in efforts of map the human genome, cancer drugs, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), atomic force microscopes (AFM), mapping the radon risk in homes, ketene research, tracking B mesons and the search for the top quark, computerized scientific visualization, technology transfer efforts, and astronomy in the classroom.

  17. Transcriptomics of liver and muscle in Holstein cows genetically divergent for fertility highlight differences in nutrient partitioning and inflammation processes.

    PubMed

    Moran, Bruce; Cummins, Sean B; Creevey, Christopher J; Butler, Stephen T

    2016-08-11

    The transition between pregnancy and lactation is a major physiological change for dairy cows. Complex systemic and local processes involving regulation of energy balance, galactopoiesis, utilisation of body reserves, insulin resistance, resumption of oestrous cyclicity and involution of the uterus can affect animal productivity and hence farm profitability. Here we used an established Holstein dairy cow model of fertility that displayed genetic and phenotypic divergence in calving interval. Cows had similar genetic merit for milk production traits, but either very good genetic merit for fertility traits ('Fert+'; n = 8) or very poor genetic merit for fertility traits ('Fert-'; n = 8). We used RNA sequencing to investigate gene expression profiles in both liver and muscle tissue biopsies at three distinct time-points: late pregnancy, early lactation and mid lactation (-18, 1 and 147 days relative to parturition, respectively). We found 807 and 815 unique genes to be differentially expressed in at least one time-point in liver and muscle respectively, of which 79 % and 83 % were only found in a single time-point; 40 and 41 genes were found differentially expressed at every time-point indicating possible systemic or chronic dysregulation. Functional annotation of all differentially expressed genes highlighted two physiological processes that were impacted at every time-point in the study, These were immune and inflammation, and metabolic, lipid and carbohydrate-binding. These pathways have previously been identified by other researchers. We show that several specific genes which are differentially regulated, including IGF-1, might impact dairy fertility. We postulate that an increased burden of reactive oxidation species, coupled with a chronic inflammatory state, might reduce dairy cow fertility in our model.

  18. Multilocus Genetic Risk Scores for Venous Thromboembolism Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Soria, José Manuel; Morange, Pierre‐Emmanuel; Vila, Joan; Souto, Juan Carlos; Moyano, Manel; Trégouët, David‐Alexandre; Mateo, José; Saut, Noémi; Salas, Eduardo; Elosua, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetics plays an important role in venous thromboembolism (VTE). Factor V Leiden (FVL or rs6025) and prothrombin gene G20210A (PT or rs1799963) are the genetic variants currently tested for VTE risk assessment. We hypothesized that primary VTE risk assessment can be improved by using genetic risk scores with more genetic markers than just FVL‐rs6025 and prothrombin gene PT‐rs1799963. To this end, we have designed a new genetic risk score called Thrombo inCode (TiC). Methods and Results TiC was evaluated in terms of discrimination (Δ of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) and reclassification (integrated discrimination improvement and net reclassification improvement). This evaluation was performed using 2 age‐ and sex‐matched case–control populations: SANTPAU (248 cases, 249 controls) and the Marseille Thrombosis Association study (MARTHA; 477 cases, 477 controls). TiC was compared with other literature‐based genetic risk scores. TiC including F5 rs6025/rs118203906/rs118203905, F2 rs1799963, F12 rs1801020, F13 rs5985, SERPINC1 rs121909548, and SERPINA10 rs2232698 plus the A1 blood group (rs8176719, rs7853989, rs8176743, rs8176750) improved the area under the curve compared with a model based only on F5‐rs6025 and F2‐rs1799963 in SANTPAU (0.677 versus 0.575, P<0.001) and MARTHA (0.605 versus 0.576, P=0.008). TiC showed good integrated discrimination improvement of 5.49 (P<0.001) for SANTPAU and 0.96 (P=0.045) for MARTHA. Among the genetic risk scores evaluated, the proportion of VTE risk variance explained by TiC was the highest. Conclusions We conclude that TiC greatly improves prediction of VTE risk compared with other genetic risk scores. TiC should improve prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of VTE. PMID:25341889

  19. Identifying Common Genetic Risk Factors of Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Witzel, Ini-Isabée; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Alsafar, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global public health problem of epidemic proportions, with 60–70% of affected individuals suffering from associated neurovascular complications that act on multiple organ systems. The most common and clinically significant neuropathies of T2DM include uremic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. These conditions seriously impact an individual’s quality of life and significantly increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Although advances in gene sequencing technologies have identified several genetic variants that may regulate the development and progression of T2DM, little is known about whether or not the variants are involved in disease progression and how these genetic variants are associated with diabetic neuropathy specifically. Significant missing heritability data and complex disease etiologies remain to be explained. This article is the first to provide a review of the genetic risk variants implicated in the diabetic neuropathies and to highlight potential commonalities. We thereby aim to contribute to the creation of a genetic-metabolic model that will help to elucidate the cause of diabetic neuropathies, evaluate a patient’s risk profile, and ultimately facilitate preventative and targeted treatment for the individual. PMID:26074879

  20. [Quantification of radiation-induced genetic risk].

    PubMed

    Ehling, U H

    1987-05-01

    Associated with technical advances of our civilization is a radiation- and chemically-induced increase in the germ cell mutation rate in man. This would result in an increase in the frequency of genetic diseases and would be detrimental to future generations. It is the duty of our generation to keep this risk as low as possible. The estimation of the radiation-induced genetic risk of human populations is based on the extrapolation of results from animal experiments. Radiation-induced mutations are stochastic events. The probability of the event depends on the dose; the degree of the damage does not. The different methods to estimate the radiation-induced genetic risk will be discussed. The accuracy of the predicted results will be evaluated by a comparison with the observed incidence of dominant mutations in offspring born to radiation exposed survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings. These methods will be used to predict the genetic damage from the fallout of the reactor accident at Chernobyl. For the exposure dose we used the upper limits of the mean effective life time equivalent dose from the fallout values in the Munich region. According to the direct method for the risk estimation we will expect for each 100 to 500 spontaneous dominant mutations one radiation-induced mutation in the first generation. With the indirect method we estimate a ratio of 100 dominant spontaneous mutations to one radiation-induced dominant mutation. The possibilities and the limitations of the different methods to estimate the genetic risk will be discussed. The discrepancy between the high safety standards for radiation protection and the low level of knowledge for the toxicological evaluation of chemical mutagens will be emphasized.

  1. Genetic variants associated with mosaic Y chromosome loss highlight cell cycle genes and overlap with cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wright, Daniel J; Day, Felix R; Kerrison, Nicola D; Zink, Florian; Cardona, Alexia; Sulem, Patrick; Thompson, Deborah J; Sigurjonsdottir, Svanhvit; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Helgason, Agnar; Chapman, J Ross; Jackson, Steve P; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; Scott, Robert A; Thorsteindottir, Unnur; Ong, Ken K; Stefansson, Kari; Perry, John R B

    2017-03-27

    The Y chromosome is frequently lost in hematopoietic cells, which represents the most common somatic alteration in men. However, the mechanisms that regulate mosaic loss of chromosome Y (mLOY), and its clinical relevance, are unknown. We used genotype-array-intensity data and sequence reads from 85,542 men to identify 19 genomic regions (P < 5 × 10(-8)) that are associated with mLOY. Cumulatively, these loci also predicted X chromosome loss in women (n = 96,123; P = 4 × 10(-6)). Additional epigenome-wide methylation analyses using whole blood highlighted 36 differentially methylated sites associated with mLOY. The genes identified converge on aspects of cell proliferation and cell cycle regulation, including DNA synthesis (NPAT), DNA damage response (ATM), mitosis (PMF1, CENPN and MAD1L1) and apoptosis (TP53). We highlight the shared genetic architecture between mLOY and cancer susceptibility, in addition to inferring a causal effect of smoking on mLOY. Collectively, our results demonstrate that genotype-array-intensity data enables a measure of cell cycle efficiency at population scale and identifies genes implicated in aneuploidy, genome instability and cancer susceptibility.

  2. Genetic risk variants for social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Stein, Murray B; Chen, Chia-Yen; Jain, Sonia; Jensen, Kevin P; He, Feng; Heeringa, Steven G; Kessler, Ronald C; Maihofer, Adam; Nock, Matthew K; Ripke, Stephan; Sun, Xiaoying; Thomas, Michael L; Ursano, Robert J; Smoller, Jordan W; Gelernter, Joel

    2017-03-01

    Social anxiety is a neurobehavioral trait characterized by fear and reticence in social situations. Twin studies have shown that social anxiety has a heritable basis, shared with neuroticism and extraversion, but genetic studies have yet to demonstrate robust risk variants. We conducted genomewide association analysis (GWAS) of subjects within the Army Study To Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) to (i) determine SNP-based heritability of social anxiety; (ii) discern genetic risk loci for social anxiety; and (iii) determine shared genetic risk with neuroticism and extraversion. GWAS were conducted within ancestral groups (EUR, AFR, LAT) using linear regression models for each of the three component studies in Army STARRS, and then meta-analyzed across studies. SNP-based heritability for social anxiety was significant (h(2)g  = 0.12, P = 2.17 × 10(-4) in EUR). One meta-analytically genomewide significant locus was seen in each of EUR (rs708012, Chr 6: BP 36965970, P = 1.55 × 10(-8) ; beta = 0.073) and AFR (rs78924501, Chr 1: BP 88406905, P = 3.58 × 10(-8) ; beta = 0.265) samples. Social anxiety in Army STARRS was significantly genetically correlated (negatively) with extraversion (rg  = -0.52, se = 0.22, P = 0.02) but not with neuroticism (rg  = 0.05, se = 0.22, P = 0.81) or with an anxiety disorder factor score (rg  = 0.02, se = 0.32, P = 0.94) from external GWAS meta-analyses. This first GWAS of social anxiety confirms a genetic basis for social anxiety, shared with extraversion but possibly less so with neuroticism. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Pathway analysis of body mass index genome-wide association study highlights risk pathways in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Gu, Jinxia; Li, Ming; Xi, Jie; Sun, Wenyu; Song, Guangmin; Liu, Guiyou

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a class of diseases that involve the heart or blood vessels. It is reported that body mass index (BMI) is risk factor for CVD. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have recently provided rapid insights into genetics of CVD and its risk factors. However, the specific mechanisms how BMI influences CVD risk are largely unknown. We think that BMI may influences CVD risk by shared genetic pathways. In order to confirm this view, we conducted a pathway analysis of BMI GWAS, which examined approximately 329,091 single nucleotide polymorphisms from 4763 samples. We identified 31 significant KEGG pathways. There is literature evidence supporting the involvement of GnRH signaling, vascular smooth muscle contraction, dilated cardiomyopathy, Gap junction, Wnt signaling, Calcium signaling and Chemokine signaling in CVD. Collectively, our study supports the potential role of the CVD risk pathways in BMI. BMI may influence CVD risk by the shared genetic pathways. We believe that our results may advance our understanding of BMI mechanisms in CVD. PMID:26264282

  4. Highlight report: Launch of a large integrated European in vitro toxicology project: EU-ToxRisk.

    PubMed

    Daneshian, Mardas; Kamp, Hennicke; Hengstler, Jan; Leist, Marcel; van de Water, Bob

    2016-05-01

    The integrated European project, EU-ToxRisk, proudly sees itself as "flagship" exploring new alternative-to-animal approaches to chemical safety evaluation. It promotes mechanism-based toxicity testing and risk assessment according to the principles laid down for toxicology for the twenty-first century. The project was officially launched in January 2016 with a kickoff meeting in Egmond aan Zee, the Netherlands. Over 100 scientists representing academia and industry as well as regulatory authorities attended the inaugural meeting. The project will integrate advances in in vitro and in silico toxicology, read-across methods, and adverse outcome pathways. EU-ToxRisk will continue to make use of the case study strategy deployed in SEURAT-1, a FP7 initiative ended in December 2015. Even though the development of new non-animal methods is one target of EU-ToxRisk, the project puts special emphasis on their acceptance and implementation in regulatory contexts. This €30 million Horizon 2020 project involves 38 European partners and one from the USA. EU-ToxRisk aims at the "development of a new way of risk assessment."

  5. Genetic associations with sporadic neuroendocrine tumor risk.

    PubMed

    Ter-Minassian, Monica; Wang, Zhaoxi; Asomaning, Kofi; Wu, Michael C; Liu, Chen-Yu; Paulus, Jessica K; Liu, Geoffrey; Bradbury, Penelope A; Zhai, Rihong; Su, Li; Frauenhoffer, Christine S; Hooshmand, Susanne M; De Vivo, Immaculata; Lin, Xihong; Christiani, David C; Kulke, Matthew H

    2011-08-01

    Genetic risk factors for sporadic neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are poorly understood. We tested risk associations in patients with sporadic NET and non-cancer controls, using a custom array containing 1536 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 355 candidate genes. We identified 18 SNPs associated with NET risk at a P-value <0.01 in a discovery set of 261 cases and 319 controls. Two of these SNPs were found to be significantly associated with NET risk in an independent replication set of 235 cases and 113 controls, at a P value ≤0.05. An SNP in interleukin 12A (IL12A rs2243123), a gene implicated in inflammatory response, replicated with an adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) (aOR) = 1.47 (1.03, 2.11) P-trend = 0.04. A second SNP in defender against cell death, (DAD1 rs8005354), a gene that modulates apoptosis, replicated at aOR = 1.43 (1.02, 2.02) P-trend = 0.04. Consistent with our observations, a pathway analysis, performed in the discovery set, suggested that genetic variation in inflammatory pathways or apoptosis pathways is associated with NET risk. Our findings support further investigation of the potential role of IL12A and DAD1 in the etiology of NET.

  6. Genetic associations with sporadic neuroendocrine tumor risk

    PubMed Central

    Ter-Minassian, Monica; Wang, Zhaoxi; Asomaning, Kofi; Wu, Michael C.; Liu, Chen-Yu; Paulus, Jessica K.; Liu, Geoffrey; Bradbury, Penelope A.; Zhai, Rihong; Su, Li; Frauenhoffer, Christine S.; Hooshmand, Susanne M.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Lin, Xihong; Christiani, David C.; Kulke, Matthew H.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic risk factors for sporadic neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are poorly understood. We tested risk associations in patients with sporadic NET and non-cancer controls, using a custom array containing 1536 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 355 candidate genes. We identified 18 SNPs associated with NET risk at a P-value <0.01 in a discovery set of 261 cases and 319 controls. Two of these SNPs were found to be significantly associated with NET risk in an independent replication set of 235 cases and 113 controls, at a P value ≤0.05. An SNP in interleukin 12A (IL12A rs2243123), a gene implicated in inflammatory response, replicated with an adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) (aOR) = 1.47 (1.03, 2.11) P-trend = 0.04. A second SNP in defender against cell death, (DAD1 rs8005354), a gene that modulates apoptosis, replicated at aOR = 1.43 (1.02, 2.02) P-trend = 0.04. Consistent with our observations, a pathway analysis, performed in the discovery set, suggested that genetic variation in inflammatory pathways or apoptosis pathways is associated with NET risk. Our findings support further investigation of the potential role of IL12A and DAD1 in the etiology of NET. PMID:21606320

  7. Medical radiation exposure and genetic risks

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.G.

    1980-09-01

    Everyone is exposed to background radiation throughout life (100 mrem/year to the gonads or 4 to 5 rem during the reproductive years). A lumbosacral series might deliver 2500 mrem to the male or 400 mrem to the female gonads. A radiologic procedure is a cost/benefit decision, and genetic risk is a part of the cost. Although cost is usually very low compared to benefit, if the procedure is unnecessary then the cost may be unacceptable. On the basis of current estimates, the doubling dose is assumed to be 40 rem (range 20 to 200) for an acute dose, and 100 rem for protracted exposure. Although there is no satisfactory way to predict the size of the risk for an individual exposed, any risk should be incentive to avoid unnecessary radiation to the gonads. Conception should be delayed for at least ten months for women and three or four months for men after irradiation of the gonads. The current incidence of genetically related diseases in the United States population is 60,000 per million live births. Based on the most conservative set of assumptions, an average gonadal dose of 1000 mrem to the whole population would increase the incidence of genetically related diseases by 0.2%.

  8. Genetic factors affecting dental caries risk.

    PubMed

    Opal, S; Garg, S; Jain, J; Walia, I

    2015-03-01

    This article reviews the literature on genetic aspects of dental caries and provides a framework for the rapidly changing disease model of caries. The scope is genetic aspects of various dental factors affecting dental caries. The PubMed database was searched for articles with keywords 'caries', 'genetics', 'taste', 'diet' and 'twins'. This was followed by extensive handsearching using reference lists from relevant articles. The post-genomic era will present many opportunities for improvement in oral health care but will also present a multitude of challenges. We can conclude from the literature that genes have a role to play in dental caries; however, both environmental and genetic factors have been implicated in the aetiology of caries. Additional studies will have to be conducted to replicate the findings in a different population. Identification of genetic risk factors will help screen and identify susceptible patients to better understand the contribution of genes in caries aetiopathogenesis. Information derived from these diverse studies will provide new tools to target individuals and/or populations for a more efficient and effective implementation of newer preventive measures and diagnostic and novel therapeutic approaches in the management of this disease.

  9. Body Mass Index Genetic Risk Score and Endometrial Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Jennifer; Setiawan, Veronica W.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Schumacher, Fredrick; Yu, Herbert; Delahanty, Ryan; Bernstein, Leslie; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Chu; Cook, Linda S.; Friedenreich, Christine; Garcia-Closas, Monserrat; Haiman, Christopher A.; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Olson, Sara H.; Risch, Harvey A.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ursin, Giske; Yang, Hannah P.; Kraft, Peter; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common variants that predispose individuals to a higher body mass index (BMI), an independent risk factor for endometrial cancer. Composite genotype risk scores (GRS) based on the joint effect of published BMI risk loci were used to explore whether endometrial cancer shares a genetic background with obesity. Genotype and risk factor data were available on 3,376 endometrial cancer case and 3,867 control participants of European ancestry from the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium GWAS. A BMI GRS was calculated by summing the number of BMI risk alleles at 97 independent loci. For exploratory analyses, additional GRSs were based on subsets of risk loci within putative etiologic BMI pathways. The BMI GRS was statistically significantly associated with endometrial cancer risk (P = 0.002). For every 10 BMI risk alleles a woman had a 13% increased endometrial cancer risk (95% CI: 4%, 22%). However, after adjusting for BMI, the BMI GRS was no longer associated with risk (per 10 BMI risk alleles OR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.07; P = 0.78). Heterogeneity by BMI did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.06), and no effect modification was noted by age, GWAS Stage, study design or between studies (P≥0.58). In exploratory analyses, the GRS defined by variants at loci containing monogenic obesity syndrome genes was associated with reduced endometrial cancer risk independent of BMI (per BMI risk allele OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88, 0.96; P = 2.1 x 10−5). Possessing a large number of BMI risk alleles does not increase endometrial cancer risk above that conferred by excess body weight among women of European descent. Thus, the GRS based on all current established BMI loci does not provide added value independent of BMI. Future studies are required to validate the unexpected observed relation between monogenic obesity syndrome genetic variants and endometrial cancer risk. PMID:26606540

  10. The ecological risks of genetically engineered organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfenbarger, Lareesa

    2001-03-01

    Highly publicized studies have suggested environmental risks of releasing genetically engineered organisms (GEOs) and have renewed concerns over the evaluation and regulation of these products in domestic and international arenas. I present an overview of the risks of GEOs and the available evidence addressing these and discuss the challenges for risk assessment. Main categories of risk include non-target effects from GEOs, emergence of new viral diseases, and the spread of invasive (weedy) characteristics. Studies have detected non-target effects in some cases but not all; however, much less information exists on other risks, in part due to a lack of conceptual knowledge. For example, general models for predicting invasiveness are not well developed for any introduced organism. The risks of GEOs appear comparable to those for any introduced species or organism, but the magnitude of the risk or the pathway of exposure to the risk can differ among introduced organisms. Therefore, assessing the risks requires a case-by-case analysis so that any differences can be identified. Challenges to assessing risks to valued ecosystems include variability in effects and ecosystem complexity. Ecosystems are a dynamic and complex network of biological and physical interactions. Introducing a new biological entity, such as a GEO, may potentially alter any of these interactions, but evaluating all of these is unrealistic. Effects on a valued ecosystem could vary greatly depending on the geographical location of the experimental site, the GEO used, the plot size of the experiment (scaling effects), and the biological and physical parameters used in the experiment. Experiments that address these sources of variability will provide the most useful information for risk assessments.

  11. Genetic Risk Score for Essential Hypertension and Risk of Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caitlin J; Saftlas, Audrey F; Spracklen, Cassandra N; Triche, Elizabeth W; Bjonnes, Andrew; Keating, Brendan; Saxena, Richa; Breheny, Patrick J; Dewan, Andrew T; Robinson, Jennifer G; Hoh, Josephine; Ryckman, Kelli K

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive complication of pregnancy characterized by novel onset of hypertension after 20 weeks gestation, accompanied by proteinuria. Epidemiological evidence suggests that genetic susceptibility exists for preeclampsia; however, whether preeclampsia is the result of underlying genetic risk for essential hypertension has yet to be investigated. Based on the hypertensive state that is characteristic of preeclampsia, we aimed to determine if established genetic risk scores (GRSs) for hypertension and blood pressure are associated with preeclampsia. Subjects consisted of 162 preeclamptic cases and 108 normotensive pregnant controls, all of Iowa residence. Subjects' DNA was extracted from buccal swab samples and genotyped on the Affymetrix Genome-wide Human SNP Array 6.0 (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA). Missing genotypes were imputed using MaCH and Minimac software. GRSs were calculated for hypertension, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) using established genetic risk loci for each outcome. Regression analyses were performed to determine the association between GRS and risk of preeclampsia. These analyses were replicated in an independent US population of 516 cases and 1,097 controls of European ancestry. GRSs for hypertension, SBP, DBP, and MAP were not significantly associated with risk for preeclampsia (P > 0.189). The results of the replication analysis also yielded nonsignificant associations. GRSs for hypertension and blood pressure are not associated with preeclampsia, suggesting that an underlying predisposition to essential hypertension is not on the causal pathway of preeclampsia. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Communicating genetic risk: pros, cons, and counsel.

    PubMed

    Penson, R T; Seiden, M V; Shannon, K M; Lubratovich, M L; Roche, M; Chabner, B A; Lynch, T J

    2000-01-01

    Shortly before his death in 1995, Kenneth B. Schwartz, a cancer patient at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), founded The Kenneth B. Schwartz Center at MGH. The Schwartz Center is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting and advancing compassionate health care delivery, which provides hope to the patient, support to caregivers, and encourages the healing process. The center sponsors the Schwartz Center Rounds, a monthly multidisciplinary forum where caregivers reflect on important psychosocial issues faced by patients, their families, and their caregivers, and gain insight and support from fellow staff members. This case is of a woman with a personal, and a strong family history of breast cancer, who considered genetic testing for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The details of the case have been altered to protect the patient's anonymity. The patient was very anxious and there was disagreement between her healthcare providers about the potential benefits of genetic testing. The discussion of the case focused on several controversial issues, particularly the ownership of genetic information, and who is responsible for disseminating information to the family members at risk. The difficulties in communicating risk, providing emotional support and coping with the continuing uncertainties about screening and intervention are reviewed with an overview of the molecular biology, inheritance, and epidemiology of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

  13. First-Episode Psychosis and the Criminal Justice System: Using a Sequential Intercept Framework to Highlight Risks and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Wasser, Tobias; Pollard, Jessica; Fisk, Deborah; Srihari, Vinod

    2017-10-01

    In first-episode psychosis there is a heightened risk of aggression and subsequent criminal justice involvement. This column reviews the evidence pointing to these heightened risks and highlights opportunities, using a sequential intercept model, for collaboration between mental health services and existing diversionary programs, particularly for patients whose behavior has already brought them to the attention of the criminal justice system. Coordinating efforts in these areas across criminal justice and clinical spheres can decrease the caseload burden on the criminal justice system and optimize clinical and legal outcomes for this population.

  14. Genetic evidence for PLASMINOGEN as a shared genetic risk factor of coronary artery disease and periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Arne S; Bochenek, Gregor; Jochens, Arne; Ellinghaus, David; Dommisch, Henrik; Güzeldemir-Akçakanat, Esra; Graetz, Christian; Harks, Inga; Jockel-Schneider, Yvonne; Weinspach, Knut; Meyle, Joerg; Eickholz, Peter; Linden, Gerry J; Cine, Naci; Nohutcu, Rahime; Weiss, Ervin; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Iraqi, Fuad; Folwaczny, Mathias; Noack, Barbara; Strauch, Konstantin; Gieger, Christian; Waldenberger, Melanie; Peters, Annette; Wijmenga, Cisca; Yilmaz, Engin; Lieb, Wolfgang; Rosenstiel, Philip; Doerfer, Christof; Bruckmann, Corinna; Erdmann, Jeannette; König, Inke; Jepsen, Søren; Loos, Bruno G; Schreiber, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    Genetic studies demonstrated the presence of risk alleles in the genes ANRIL and CAMTA1/VAMP3 that are shared between coronary artery disease (CAD) and periodontitis. We aimed to identify further shared genetic risk factors to better understand conjoint disease mechanisms. In-depth genotyping of 46 published CAD risk loci of genome-wide significance in the worldwide largest case-control sample of the severe early-onset phenotype aggressive periodontitis (AgP) with the Illumina Immunochip (600 German AgP cases, 1448 controls) and the Affymetrix 500K array set (283 German AgP cases and 972 controls) highlighted ANRIL as the major risk gene and revealed further associations with AgP for the gene PLASMINOGEN (PLG; rs4252120: P=5.9×10(-5); odds ratio, 1.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-1.4 [adjusted for smoking and sex]; 818 cases; 5309 controls). Subsequent combined analyses of several genome-wide data sets of CAD and AgP suggested TGFBRAP1 to be associated with AgP (rs2679895: P=0.0016; odds ratio, 1.27 [95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.5]; 703 cases; 2.143 controls) and CAD (P=0.0003; odds ratio, 0.84 [95% confidence interval, 0.8-0.9]; n=4117 cases; 5824 controls). The study further provides evidence that in addition to PLG, the currently known shared susceptibility loci of CAD and periodontitis, ANRIL and CAMTA1/VAMP3, are subjected to transforming growth factor-β regulation. PLG is the third replicated shared genetic risk factor of atherosclerosis and periodontitis. All known shared risk genes of CAD and periodontitis are members of transforming growth factor-β signaling. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. The Genetic Risk of Kidney Disease in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pezzolesi, Marcus G.; Krolewski, Andrzej S.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of familial aggregation of diabetic nephropathy (DN) in type 2 diabetes and the heritability of its related traits provide compelling evidence that genetic factors contribute to their susceptibility. Segregation analyses suggest the existence of at least one major DN susceptibility gene as well as multiple other genetic factors with small to moderate effects on its risk. For more than 20 years, these studies have motivated investigators working to identify the causal genes responsible for the development of DN. During this period, advances in genomics and evolving technology have improved our understanding of the genetic basis of DN and revolutionized our ability to identify genes that underlie this disease. In this review, we discuss the major approaches being used to identify DN susceptibility genes in T2D and highlight the salient findings from studies where these approaches have been implemented. The recent advent of next-generation sequencing technology is beginning to impact DN gene mapping strategies. As the field moves forward, family-based approaches should greatly facilitate efforts to identify variants in genes that have a major affect on the risk of DN in T2D. To be successful, the ascertainment and comprehensive study of families with multiple affected members is critical. PMID:23290732

  16. A weighted genetic risk score using all known susceptibility variants to estimate rheumatoid arthritis risk

    PubMed Central

    Yarwood, Annie; Han, Buhm; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Lunt, Mark; Pappas, Dimitrios A; Kremer, Joel; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Plenge, Robert; Worthington, Jane; Barton, Anne; Eyre, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Background There is currently great interest in the incorporation of genetic susceptibility loci into screening models to identify individuals at high risk of disease. Here, we present the first risk prediction model including all 46 known genetic loci associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods A weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) was created using 45 RA non-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) susceptibility loci, imputed amino acids at HLA-DRB1 (11, 71 and 74), HLA-DPB1 (position 9) HLA-B (position 9) and gender. The wGRS was tested in 11 366 RA cases and 15 489 healthy controls. The risk of developing RA was estimated using logistic regression by dividing the wGRS into quintiles. The ability of the wGRS to discriminate between cases and controls was assessed by receiver operator characteristic analysis and discrimination improvement tests. Results Individuals in the highest risk group showed significantly increased odds of developing anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide-positive RA compared to the lowest risk group (OR 27.13, 95% CI 23.70 to 31.05). The wGRS was validated in an independent cohort that showed similar results (area under the curve 0.78, OR 18.00, 95% CI 13.67 to 23.71). Comparison of the full wGRS with a wGRS in which HLA amino acids were replaced by a HLA tag single-nucleotide polymorphism showed a significant loss of sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions Our study suggests that in RA, even when using all known genetic susceptibility variants, prediction performance remains modest; while this is insufficiently accurate for general population screening, it may prove of more use in targeted studies. Our study has also highlighted the importance of including HLA variation in risk prediction models. PMID:24092415

  17. Genetic risk factors for intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Alg, Varinder S.; Sofat, Reecha; Houlden, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Objective: There is an urgent need to identify risk factors for sporadic intracranial aneurysm (IA) development and rupture. A genetic component has long been recognized, but firm conclusions have been elusive given the generally small sample sizes and lack of replication. Genome-wide association studies have overcome some limitations, but the number of robust genetic risk factors for IA remains uncertain. Methods: We conducted a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of all genetic association studies (including genome-wide association studies) of sporadic IA, conducted according to Strengthening the Reporting of Genetic Association Studies and Human Genome Epidemiology Network guidelines. We tested the robustness of associations using random-effects and sensitivity analyses. Results: Sixty-one studies including 32,887 IA cases and 83,683 controls were included. We identified 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with IA. The strongest associations, robust to sensitivity analyses for statistical heterogeneity and ethnicity, were found for the following single nucleotide polymorphisms: on chromosome 9 within the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2B antisense inhibitor gene (rs10757278: odds ratio [OR] 1.29; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21–1.38; and rs1333040: OR 1.24; 95% CI 1.20–1.29), on chromosome 8 near the SOX17 transcription regulator gene (rs9298506: OR 1.21; 95% CI 1.15–1.27; and rs10958409: OR 1.19; 95% CI 1.13–1.26), and on chromosome 4 near the endothelin receptor A gene (rs6841581: OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.14–1.31). Conclusions: Our comprehensive meta-analysis confirms a substantial genetic contribution to sporadic IA, implicating multiple pathophysiologic pathways, mainly relating to vascular endothelial maintenance. However, the limited data for IA compared with other complex diseases necessitates large-scale replication studies in a full spectrum of populations, with investigation of how genetic variants relate to phenotype (e

  18. Genetic risk factors for hypertrophic scar development.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Callie M; Hocking, Anne M; Honari, Shari; Muffley, Lara A; Ga, Maricar; Gibran, Nicole S

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTSs) occur in 30 to 72% patients after thermal injury. Risk factors include skin color, female sex, young age, burn site, and burn severity. Recent correlations between genetic variations and clinical conditions suggest that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may be associated with HTS formation. The authors hypothesized that an SNP in the p27 gene (rs36228499) previously associated with decreased restenosis after coronary stenting would be associated with lower Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) measurements and decreased itching. Patient and injury characteristics were collected from adults with thermal burns. VSS scores were calculated at 4 to 9 months after injury. Genotyping was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for HTS as measured by a VSS score >7. Three hundred subjects had a median age of 39 years (range, 18-91); 69% were male and median burn size was 7% TBSA (range, 0.25-80). Consistent with literature, the p27 variant SNP had an allele frequency of 40%, but was not associated with reduced HTS formation or lower itch scores in any genetic model. HTS formation was associated with American Indian/Alaskan Native race (odds ratio [OR], 12.2; P = .02), facial burns (OR, 9.4; P = .04), and burn size ≥20% TBSA (OR, 1.99; P = .03). Although the p27 SNP may protect against vascular fibroproliferation, the effect cannot be generalized to cutaneous scars. This study suggests that American Indian/Alaskan Native race, facial burns, and higher %TBSA are independent risk factors for HTS. The American Indian/Alaskan Native association suggests that there are potentially yet-to-be-identified genetic variants.

  19. Single-gene association between GATA-2 and autoimmune hepatitis: A novel genetic insight highlighting immunologic pathways to disease

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Gwilym; Chen, Yung-Yi; Li, Ka-Kit; Neil, Desley; Oo, Ye Htun; Richter, Alex; Bigley, Venetia; Collin, Matthew; Adams, David H.; Hirschfield, Gideon M.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), an immune-mediated liver disease, originates as a consequence of interacting genetic and environmental risk factors. Treatment remains non-specific and prone to side effects. Deficiencies in regulatory T cell (Treg) function are hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of AIH. Methods We describe an adult patient who presented with AIH in the context of monocytopenia. The patient was characterized by GATA2 gene sequencing, flow cytometry of peripheral blood for leucocyte subsets, ELISA for serum Flt-3 ligand, and immunohistochemistry of liver biopsy tissue. Results Sequencing confirmed a GATA2 mutation. Peripheral Treg were absent in the context of a preserved total T cell count. Immunostaining for the Treg transcription factor FOXP3 was reduced in liver tissue as compared to a control AIH specimen. There were marked deficiencies in multiple antigen-presenting cell subsets and Flt-3 ligand was elevated. These findings are consistent with previous reports of GATA2 dysfunction. Conclusions The association of a GATA2 mutation with AIH is previously unrecognized. GATA2 encodes a hematopoietic cell transcription factor, and mutations may manifest as monocytopenia, dendritic and B cell deficiencies, myelodysplasia, and immunodeficiency. Tregs may be depleted as in this case. Our findings provide support for the role of Tregs in AIH, complement reports of other deficiencies in T cell regulation causing AIH-like syndromes, and support the rationale of attempting to modulate the Treg axis for the therapeutic benefit of AIH patients. PMID:26812071

  20. Cancer genetic counseling: when to refer for cancer risk assessment and genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Barbara; Marty, Denise; Baker-Lange, Katherine

    2012-10-01

    Identifying hereditary cancer risk saves lives through individualized surveillance and prevention efforts. Advances in testing technologies and genetic knowledge are providing us with new tools for identifying individuals and families who are at highest risk for cancer. This article reviews our current genetic testing abilities, describes the role of genetic counselors, and offers guidance and resources for physicians as they determine who ought to be referred for genetic cancer risk assessment and testing.

  1. Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a unique Swedish sample in the journal Nature Genetics, July 20, 2014. “Thanks to the boost ... National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). “Knowing the nature of the genetic risk will reveal clues to ...

  2. Genetic Vulnerability as a Distal Risk Factor for Suicidal Behaviour: Historical Perspective and Current Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Andriessen, Karl; Videtic-Paska, Alja

    2015-09-01

    Suicide is a multidimensional problem. Observations of family history of suicide suggest the existence of a genetic vulnerability to suicidal behaviour. Starting with a historical perspective, the article reviews current knowledge of a genetic vulnerability to suicidal behaviour, distinct from the genetic vulnerability to psychiatric disorders, focused on clinical and population-based studies, and findings from recent molecular genetics association studies. The review includes peer-reviewed research articles and review papers from the professional literature in English language, retrieved from PubMed/Medline and PsycINFO. The research literature confirms a existence of a genetic vulnerability to suicidal behaviour. Even though the results of individual studies are difficult to compare, genetic influences could explain up to half of the variance of the occurrence of suicide. Genetic vulnerability could be a distal risk factor for suicide, which helps us to understand the occurrence of suicide among vulnerable people. Ethical implications of such vulnerability are highlighted.

  3. Effect of framing on the perception of genetic recurrence risks.

    PubMed

    Shiloh, S; Sagi, M

    1989-05-01

    Individuals asked to evaluate genetic recurrence risks were found to be influenced by the way the risks were framed. Presenting a single risk figure resulted in overweighting of low probabilities and underweighting of high probabilities, as compared to presenting a list of sequential risks. Differences were also found between meanings attached to verbal expressions of risks when translating from verbal to numerical expressions, and vice versa. The implications of these findings for genetic counseling are discussed.

  4. Recent Enhancements to the Genetic Risk Prediction Model BRCAPRO

    PubMed Central

    Mazzola, Emanuele; Blackford, Amanda; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Biswas, Swati

    2015-01-01

    BRCAPRO is a widely used model for genetic risk prediction of breast cancer. It is a function within the R package BayesMendel and is used to calculate the probabilities of being a carrier of a deleterious mutation in one or both of the BRCA genes, as well as the probability of being affected with breast and ovarian cancer within a defined time window. Both predictions are based on information contained in the counselee’s family history of cancer. During the last decade, BRCAPRO has undergone several rounds of successive refinements: the current version is part of release 2.1 of BayesMendel. In this review, we showcase some of the most notable features of the software resulting from these recent changes. We provide examples highlighting each feature, using artificial pedigrees motivated by complex clinical examples. We illustrate how BRCAPRO is a comprehensive software for genetic risk prediction with many useful features that allow users the flexibility to incorporate varying amounts of available information. PMID:25983549

  5. Biomarkers, genetics, and risk factors for concussion.

    PubMed

    Finnoff, Jonathan T; Jelsing, Elena J; Smith, Jay

    2011-10-01

    It is estimated that between 1.6 and 3.8 million concussions occur annually in the United States. Although frequently regarded as benign, concussions can lead to multiple different adverse outcomes, including prolonged postconcussive symptoms, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, cognitive impairment, early onset dementia, movement disorders, psychiatric disorders, motor neuron disease, and even death. Therefore it is important to identify individuals with concussion to provide appropriate medical care and minimize adverse outcomes. Furthermore, it is important to identify individuals who are predisposed to sustaining a concussion or to having an adverse outcome after concussion. This article will discuss the current research on serum biomarkers for concussion, genetic influence on concussion, risk factors associated with concussion predisposition and poor outcome, and practical suggestions for the application of this information in clinical practice.

  6. Environmental and genetic risk factors in obesity.

    PubMed

    Hebebrand, Johannes; Hinney, Anke

    2009-01-01

    Because of its high prevalence and the associated medical and psychosocial risks, research into the causes of childhood obesity has experienced a tremendous upswing. Formal genetic data based on twin, adoption, and family studies lead to the conclusion that at least 50% of the interindividual variance of the body mass index (BMI; defined as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) is due to genetic factors. As a result of the recent advent of genome-wide association studies, the first polygenes involved in body weight regulation have been detected. Each of the predisposing alleles explain a few hundred grams of body weight. More polygenes will be detected in the near future, thus for the first time allowing in-depth analyses of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. They also will enable developmental studies to assess the effect of such alleles throughout childhood and adulthood. The recent increase in obesity prevalence rates illustrates the extreme relevance of environmental factors for body weight. Similar to polygenes, the effect sizes of most such environmental factors are likely to be small, thus rendering their detection difficult. In addition, the validation of the true causality of such factors is not a straightforward task. Important factors are socioeconomic status and television consumption. The authors conclude by briefly assessing implications for treatment and prevention of childhood obesity.

  7. Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-Related Cancer in Women

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-related Cancer in Women The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final ...

  8. Interaction between common breast cancer susceptibility variants, genetic ancestry, and non-genetic risk factors in Hispanic women

    PubMed Central

    Fejerman, Laura; Stern, Mariana C.; John, Esther M.; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Hines, Lisa M.; Wolff, Roger K.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Ziv, Elad; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Most genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk have been discovered in women of European ancestry, and only a few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been conducted in minority groups. This research disparity persists in post-GWAS gene-environment interaction analyses. We tested the interaction between hormonal and lifestyle risk factors for breast cancer, and ten GWAS-identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among 2,107 Hispanic women with breast cancer and 2,587 unaffected controls, to gain insight into a previously reported gene by ancestry interaction in this population. Methods We estimated genetic ancestry with a set of 104 ancestry-informative markers selected to discriminate between Indigenous American and European ancestry. We used logistic regression models to evaluate main effects and interactions. Results We found that the rs13387042-2q35(G/A) SNP was associated with breast cancer risk only among postmenopausal women who never used hormone therapy [per A allele odds ratio (OR): 0.94 (95% confidence interval 0.74–1.20), 1.20 (0.94–1.53) and 1.49 (1.28–1.75) for current, former and never hormone therapy users, respectively, P-interaction 0.002] and premenopausal women who breastfed >12 months [OR: 1.01 (0.72–1.42), 1.19 (0.98–1.45) and 1.69 (1.26–2.26) for never, <12 months, and >12 months breastfeeding, respectively, P-interaction 0.014]. Conclusions The correlation between genetic ancestry, hormone replacement therapy use, and breastfeeding behavior partially explained a previously reported interaction between a breast cancer risk variant and genetic ancestry in Hispanic women. Impact These results highlight the importance of understanding the interplay between genetic ancestry, genetics, and non-genetic risk factors and their contribution to breast cancer risk. PMID:26364163

  9. A new explained-variance based genetic risk score for predictive modeling of disease risk.

    PubMed

    Che, Ronglin; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A

    2012-09-25

    The goal of association mapping is to identify genetic variants that predict disease, and as the field of human genetics matures, the number of successful association studies is increasing. Many such studies have shown that for many diseases, risk is explained by a reasonably large number of variants that each explains a very small amount of disease risk. This is prompting the use of genetic risk scores in building predictive models, where information across several variants is combined for predictive modeling. In the current study, we compare the performance of four previously proposed genetic risk score methods and present a new method for constructing genetic risk score that incorporates explained variance information. The methods compared include: a simple count Genetic Risk Score, an odds ratio weighted Genetic Risk Score, a direct logistic regression Genetic Risk Score, a polygenic Genetic Risk Score, and the new explained variance weighted Genetic Risk Score. We compare the methods using a wide range of simulations in two steps, with a range of the number of deleterious single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) explaining disease risk, genetic modes, baseline penetrances, sample sizes, relative risks (RR) and minor allele frequencies (MAF). Several measures of model performance were compared including overall power, C-statistic and Akaike's Information Criterion. Our results show the relative performance of methods differs significantly, with the new explained variance weighted GRS (EV-GRS) generally performing favorably to the other methods.

  10. Explanatory Models of Genetics and Genetic Risk among a Selected Group of Students

    PubMed Central

    Goltz, Heather Honoré; Bergman, Margo; Goodson, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study focuses on how college students conceptualize genetics and genetic risk, concepts essential for genetic literacy (GL) and genetic numeracy (GN), components of overall health literacy (HL). HL is dependent on both the background knowledge and culture of a patient, and lower HL is linked to increased morbidity and mortality for a number of chronic health conditions (e.g., diabetes and cancer). A purposive sample of 86 students from three Southwestern universities participated in eight focus groups. The sample ranged in age from 18 to 54 years, and comprised primarily of female (67.4%), single (74.4%), and non-White (57%) participants, none of whom were genetics/biology majors. A holistic-content approach revealed broad categories concerning participants’ explanatory models (EMs) of genetics and genetic risk. Participants’ EMs were grounded in highly contextualized narratives that only partially overlapped with biomedical models. While higher education levels should be associated with predominately knowledge-based EM of genetic risk, this study shows that even in well-educated populations cultural factors can dominate. Study findings reveal gaps in how this sample of young adults obtains, processes, and understands genetic/genomic concepts. Future studies should assess how individuals with low GL and GN obtain and process genetics and genetic risk information and incorporate this information into health decision making. Future work should also address the interaction of communication between health educators, providers, and genetic counselors, to increase patient understanding of genetic risk. PMID:27376052

  11. Open Chromatin Profiling in hiPSC-Derived Neurons Prioritizes Functional Noncoding Psychiatric Risk Variants and Highlights Neurodevelopmental Loci.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Marc P; Zhang, Hanwen; Moy, Winton; McGowan, Heather; Leites, Catherine; Dionisio, Leonardo E; Xu, Zihui; Shi, Jianxin; Sanders, Alan R; Greenleaf, William J; Cowan, Chad A; Pang, Zhiping P; Gejman, Pablo V; Penzes, Peter; Duan, Jubao

    2017-09-07

    Most disease variants lie within noncoding genomic regions, making their functional interpretation challenging. Because chromatin openness strongly influences transcriptional activity, we hypothesized that cell-type-specific open chromatin regions (OCRs) might highlight disease-relevant noncoding sequences. To investigate, we mapped global OCRs in neurons differentiating from hiPSCs, a cellular model for studying neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia (SZ). We found that the OCRs are highly dynamic and can stratify GWAS-implicated SZ risk variants. Of the more than 3,500 SZ-associated variants analyzed, we prioritized ∼100 putatively functional ones located in neuronal OCRs, including rs1198588, at a leading risk locus flanking MIR137. Excitatory neurons derived from hiPSCs with CRISPR/Cas9-edited rs1198588 or a rare proximally located SZ risk variant showed altered MIR137 expression, dendrite arborization, and synapse maturation. Our study shows that noncoding disease variants in OCRs can affect neurodevelopment, and that analysis of open chromatin regions can help prioritize functionally relevant noncoding variants identified by GWAS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic 'risk carriers' and lifestyle 'risk takers'. Which risks deserve our legal protection in insurance?

    PubMed

    Van Hoyweghen, Ine; Horstman, Klasien; Schepers, Rita

    2007-09-01

    Over the past years, one of the most contentious topics in policy debates on genetics has been the use of genetic testing in insurance. In the rush to confront concerns about potential abuses of genetic information, most countries throughout Europe and the US have enacted genetics-specific legislation for insurance. Drawing on current debates on the pros and cons of a genetics-specific legislative approach, this article offers empirical insight into how such legislation works out in insurance practice. To this end, ethnographic fieldwork was done in the underwriting departments of Belgian insurance companies. Belgium was one of the first European countries introducing genetics-specific legislation in insurance. Although this approach does not allow us to speak in terms of ' the causal effects of the law', it enables us to point to some developments in insurance practice that are quite different than the law's original intentions. It will not only become clear that the Belgian genetics-specific legislation does not offer adequate solutions to the underlying issues it was intended for. We will also show that, while the legislation's focus has been on the inadmissibility of genetic discrimination, at the same time differences are made in the insurance appraisal within the group of the asymptomatic ill. In other words, by giving exclusive legal protection to the group of genetic risks, other non-genetic risk groups are unintendedly being under-protected. From a policy point of view, studying genetics-specific legislation is especially valuable because it forces us to return to first principles: Which risks deserve our legal protection in insurance? Who do we declare our solidarity with?

  13. Can an Internet-based health risk assessment highlight problems of heart disease risk factor awareness? A cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Justin B; McNeal, Catherine J; Tsai, Ginger; Rivera, Cathleen M; Smith, Matthew Lee; Ohsfeldt, Robert L; Ory, Marcia G

    2014-04-18

    Health risk assessments are becoming more popular as a tool to conveniently and effectively reach community-dwelling adults who may be at risk for serious chronic conditions such as coronary heart disease (CHD). The use of such instruments to improve adults' risk factor awareness and concordance with clinically measured risk factor values could be an opportunity to advance public health knowledge and build effective interventions. The objective of this study was to determine if an Internet-based health risk assessment can highlight important aspects of agreement between respondents' self-reported and clinically measured CHD risk factors for community-dwelling adults who may be at risk for CHD. Data from an Internet-based cardiovascular health risk assessment (Heart Aware) administered to community-dwelling adults at 127 clinical sites were analyzed. Respondents were recruited through individual hospital marketing campaigns, such as media advertising and print media, found throughout inpatient and outpatient facilities. CHD risk factors from the Framingham Heart Study were examined. Weighted kappa statistics were calculated to measure interrater agreement between respondents' self-reported and clinically measured CHD risk factors. Weighted kappa statistics were then calculated for each sample by strata of overall 10-year CHD risk. Three samples were drawn based on strategies for treating missing data: a listwise deleted sample, a pairwise deleted sample, and a multiple imputation (MI) sample. The MI sample (n=16,879) was most appropriate for addressing missing data. No CHD risk factor had better than marginal interrater agreement (κ>.60). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) exhibited suboptimal interrater agreement that deteriorated (eg, κ<.30) as overall CHD risk increased. Conversely, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) interrater agreement improved (eg, up to κ=.25) as overall CHD risk increased. Overall CHD risk of the sample was lower than

  14. Update on genetic risk factors for systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Criswell, L A; Amos, C I

    2000-03-01

    The results of twin and family studies clearly implicate an important role for genetic factors in the etiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the complex nature of these diseases has hampered progress in defining the genetic determinants. Recent advances in molecular genetic and statistical methodology offer new hope to overcome these challenges. This review highlights recent efforts to identify genetic risk factors for SLE and RA using allele sharing and other linkage methods. In spite of striking differences between these studies, some agreement in terms of the regions providing evidence of linkage also exists. Thus, together these studies highlight regions of the genome that are likely to contain SLE and RA susceptibility genes. In addition, the results of these studies, in conjunction with progress in other complex human diseases, suggest several important considerations for future studies.

  15. Genetic tests to identify risk for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Julie A; Venne, Vickie; Berse, Brygida

    2015-05-01

    To describe the currently available genetic tests that identify hereditary risk for breast cancer. Systematic review of scientific literature, clinical practice guidelines, and data published by test manufacturers. Changes in gene patent laws and advances in sequencing technologies have resulted in rapid expansion of genetic testing. While BRCA1/2 are the most recognized genes linked to breast cancer, several laboratories now offer multi-gene panels to detect many risk-related mutations. Genetic testing will be increasingly important in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer. Oncology and advanced practice nurses must understand risk factors, significance of various genetic tests, and patient counseling. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Genetic profiling and individualized assessment of fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan V; Eisman, John A

    2013-03-01

    Osteoporosis and its consequence of fragility fracture impose a considerable demand on health-care services because fracture is associated with a series of adverse events, including re-fracture and mortality. One of the major priorities in osteoporosis care is the development of predictive models to identify individuals at high risk of fracture for early intervention and management. Existing predictive models include clinical factors and anthropometric characteristics but have not considered genetic variants in the prediction. Genome-wide association studies conducted in the past decade have identified several genetic variants relevant to fracture risk. These genetic variants are common in frequency but have very modest effect sizes. A remaining challenge is to use these genetic data to individualize fracture risk assessment on the basis of an individual's genetic risk profile. Empirical and simulation studies have shown that the usefulness of a single genetic variant for fracture risk assessment is very limited, but a profile of 50 genetic variants, each with odds ratio ranging from 1.02 to 1.15, could improve the accuracy of fracture prediction beyond that obtained by use of existing clinical risk factors. Thus, genetic profiling when integrated with existing risk assessment models could inform a more accurate prediction of fracture risk in an individual.

  17. Genetic testing and your cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    Genetic mutations; Inherited mutations; Genetic testing - cancer ... Today, we know specific gene mutations that can cause over 50 cancers, and the knowledge is growing. A single gene mutation may be tied to different types ...

  18. Genome-wide association studies of autoimmune vitiligo identify 23 new risk loci and highlight key pathways and regulatory variants

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ying; Andersen, Genevieve; Yorgov, Daniel; Ferrara, Tracey M; Ben, Songtao; Brownson, Kelly M; Holland, Paulene J; Birlea, Stanca A; Siebert, Janet; Hartmann, Anke; Lienert, Anne; van Geel, Nanja; Lambert, Jo; Luiten, Rosalie M; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; van der Veen, JP Wietze; Bennett, Dorothy C; Taïeb, Alain; Ezzedine, Khaled; Kemp, E Helen; Gawkrodger, David J; Weetman, Anthony P; Kõks, Sulev; Prans, Ele; Kingo, Külli; Karelson, Maire; Wallace, Margaret R; McCormack, Wayne T; Overbeck, Andreas; Moretti, Silvia; Colucci, Roberta; Picardo, Mauro; Silverberg, Nanette B; Olsson, Mats; Valle, Yan; Korobko, Igor; Böhm, Markus; Lim, Henry W.; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Zhou, Li; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Fain, Pamela R.; Santorico, Stephanie A; Spritz, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease in which depigmented skin results from destruction of melanocytes1, with epidemiologic association with other autoimmune diseases2. In previous linkage and genome-wide association studies (GWAS1, GWAS2), we identified 27 vitiligo susceptibility loci in patients of European (EUR) ancestry. We carried out a third GWAS (GWAS3) in EUR subjects, with augmented GWAS1 and GWAS2 controls, genome-wide imputation, and meta-analysis of all three GWAS, followed by an independent replication. The combined analyses, with 4,680 cases and 39,586 controls, identified 23 new loci and 7 suggestive loci, most encoding immune and apoptotic regulators, some also associated with other autoimmune diseases, as well as several melanocyte regulators. Bioinformatic analyses indicate a predominance of causal regulatory variation, some corresponding to eQTL at these loci. Together, the identified genes provide a framework for vitiligo genetic architecture and pathobiology, highlight relationships to other autoimmune diseases and melanoma, and offer potential targets for treatment. PMID:27723757

  19. Genetic Differentiation of the Western Capercaillie Highlights the Importance of South-Eastern Europe for Understanding the Species Phylogeography

    PubMed Central

    Ballian, Dalibor; Kunovac, Saša; Zubić, Goran; Grubešić, Marijan; Zhelev, Petar; Paule, Ladislav; Grebenc, Tine; Kraigher, Hojka

    2011-01-01

    The Western Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus L.) is a grouse species of open boreal or high altitude forests of Eurasia. It is endangered throughout most mountain range habitat areas in Europe. Two major genetically identifiable lineages of Western Capercaillie have been described to date: the southern lineage at the species' southernmost range of distribution in Europe, and the boreal lineage. We address the question of genetic differentiation of capercaillie populations from the Rhodope and Rila Mountains in Bulgaria, across the Dinaric Mountains to the Slovenian Alps. The two lineages' contact zone and resulting conservation strategies in this so-far understudied area of distribution have not been previously determined. The results of analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences of 319 samples from the studied populations show that Alpine populations were composed exclusively of boreal lineage; Dinaric populations of both, but predominantly (96%) of boreal lineage; and Rhodope-Rila populations predominantly (>90%) of southern lineage individuals. The Bulgarian mountains were identified as the core area of the southern lineage, and the Dinaric Mountains as the western contact zone between both lineages in the Balkans. Bulgarian populations appeared genetically distinct from Alpine and Dinaric populations and exhibited characteristics of a long-term stationary population, suggesting that they should be considered as a glacial relict and probably a distinct subspecies. Although all of the studied populations suffered a decline in the past, the significantly lower level of genetic diversity when compared with the neighbouring Alpine and Bulgarian populations suggests that the isolated Dinaric capercaillie is particularly vulnerable to continuing population decline. The results are discussed in the context of conservation of the species in the Balkans, its principal threats and legal protection status. Potential conservation strategies should consider the

  20. A Genotypic-Oriented View of CFTR Genetics Highlights Specific Mutational Patterns Underlying Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina Maria; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Stamato, Antonella; Narzi, Fabiana; Amato, Annalisa; Cimino, Giuseppe; Bertasi, Serenella; Quattrucci, Serena; Strom, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic disease caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The genotype–phenotype relationship in this disease is still unclear, and diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic challenges persist. We enrolled 610 patients with different forms of CF and studied them from a clinical, biochemical, microbiological and genetic point of view. Overall, there were 125 different mutated alleles (11 with novel mutations and 10 with complex mutations) and 225 genotypes. A strong correlation between mutational patterns at the genotypic level and phenotypic macrocategories emerged. This specificity appears to largely depend on rare and individual mutations, as well as on the varying prevalence of common alleles in different clinical macrocategories. However, 19 genotypes appeared to underlie different clinical forms of the disease. The dissection of the pathway from the CFTR mutated genotype to the clinical phenotype allowed to identify at least two components of the variability usually found in the genotype–phenotype relationship. One component seems to depend on the genetic variation of CFTR, the other component on the cumulative effect of variations in other genes and cellular pathways independent from CFTR. The experimental dissection of the overall biological CFTR pathway appears to be a powerful approach for a better comprehension of the genotype–phenotype relationship. However, a change from an allele-oriented to a genotypic-oriented view of CFTR genetics is mandatory, as well as a better assessment of sources of variability within the CFTR pathway. PMID:25910067

  1. Arranging marriage; negotiating risk: genetics and society in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Kilshaw, Susie; Al Raisi, Tasneem; Alshaban, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers how the globalized discourse of genetic risk in cousin marriage is shaped, informed and taken up in local moral worlds within the context of Qatar. This paper investigates the way Qataris are negotiating the discourse on genetics and risk. It is based on data from ongoing ethnographic research in Qatar and contributes to anthropological knowledge about this understudied country. Participants were ambivalent about genetic risks and often pointed to other theories of causation in relation to illness and disability. The discourse on genetic risk associated with marrying in the family was familiar, but for some participants the benefits of close marriage outweighed potential risks. Furthermore, the introduction of mandatory pre-marital screening gave participants confidence that risks were monitored and minimized.

  2. Development and evaluation of a genetic risk score for obesity.

    PubMed

    Belsky, Daniel W; Moffitt, Terrie E; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Houts, Renate; McCarthy, Jeanette; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-01-01

    Multi-locus profiles of genetic risk, so-called "genetic risk scores," can be used to translate discoveries from genome-wide association studies into tools for population health research. We developed a genetic risk score for obesity from results of 16 published genome-wide association studies of obesity phenotypes in European-descent samples. We then evaluated this genetic risk score using data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort GWAS sample (N = 10,745, 55% female, 77% white, 23% African American). Our 32-locus GRS was a statistically significant predictor of body mass index (BMI) and obesity among ARIC whites [for BMI, r = 0.13, p<1 × 10(-30); for obesity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.57 (95% CI 0.55-0.58)]. The GRS predicted differences in obesity risk net of demographic, geographic, and socioeconomic information. The GRS performed less well among African Americans. The genetic risk score we derived from GWAS provides a molecular measurement of genetic predisposition to elevated BMI and obesity.[Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Biodemography and Social Biology for the following resource: Supplement to Development & Evaluation of a Genetic Risk Score for Obesity.].

  3. Research Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Council for Educational Research, Melbourne.

    This report presents highlights of the research activities of the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER). The ACER is a national independent research body that specializes in collecting and interpreting information to shape strategic decision making. In addition to being a national center for educational policy research and advice,…

  4. Differential Effects of Estrogen and Progesterone on Genetic and Environmental Risk for Emotional Eating in Women

    PubMed Central

    Klump, Kelly L.; O’Connor, Shannon M.; Hildebrandt, Britny A.; Keel, Pamela K.; Neale, Michael; Sisk, Cheryl L.; Boker, Steven; Burt, S. Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Recent data show shifts in genetic and environmental influences on emotional eating across the menstrual cycle, with significant shared environmental influences during pre-ovulation, and primarily genetic effects during post-ovulation. Factors driving differential effects are unknown, although increased estradiol during pre-ovulation and increased progesterone during post-ovulation are thought to play a role. We indirectly investigated this possibility by examining whether overall levels of estradiol and progesterone differentially impact genetic and environmental risk for emotional eating in adult female twins (N = 571) drawn from the MSU Twin Registry. Emotional eating, estradiol levels, and progesterone levels were assessed daily and then averaged to create aggregate measures for analysis. As predicted, shared environmental influences were significantly greater in twins with high estradiol levels, whereas additive genetic effects increased substantially across low versus high progesterone groups. Results highlight significant and differential effects of ovarian hormones on etiologic risk for emotional eating in adulthood. PMID:27747142

  5. Genetic cancer risk assessment. Putting it all together.

    PubMed

    Weitzel, J N

    1999-12-01

    Dramatic advances in our understanding of the genetic basis for cancer have led to the development of new technologies and tools for genetic cancer risk assessment. Yet, cancer is a complex disorder, and risk assessment, counseling, and management strategies need to consider several important domains: state of cancer genetics knowledge, state of mind (previous cancer experience within the family), state of technology, and state of the art in terms of management. There are several barriers to the efficient identification and counseling of patients and families at high risk for cancer because of inherited susceptibility mutations. Chief among these concerns is the lack of access to competent counseling and education services that are equipped to handle the complex and rapidly evolving medical, technological, and ethical issues. Cancer risk assessment is developing into a distinct discipline in which established empiric risk models are recast along with rapidly evolving genetic technologies for estimation of individual cancer risk. Cancer genetics consultants are an important resource for primary care physicians, gynecologists, surgeons, and oncologists. However, no formal qualification criteria exist for either physicians or allied health care professionals who subspecialize in this new field. This article covers the unique domains of cancer genetics in health care and surveys models for delivery of cancer genetics services and tools for risk assessment. Coupled with innovative cancer diagnostic and preventive services and research, we have the potential to make great strides in cancer prevention and control.

  6. Contrasting results from molecular and pedigree-based population diversity measures in captive zebra highlight challenges facing genetic management of zoo populations.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideyuki; Ogden, Rob; Langenhorst, Tanya; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2017-01-01

    Zoo conservation breeding programs manage the retention of population genetic diversity through analysis of pedigree records. The range of demographic and genetic indices determined through pedigree analysis programs allows the conservation of diversity to be monitored relative to the particular founder population for a species. Such approaches are based on a number of well-documented founder assumptions, however without knowledge of actual molecular genetic diversity there is a risk that pedigree-based measures will be misinterpreted and population genetic diversity misunderstood. We examined the genetic diversity of the captive populations of Grevy's zebra, Hartmann's mountain zebra and plains zebra in Japan and the United Kingdom through analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences. Very low nucleotide variability was observed in Grevy's zebra. The results were evaluated with respect to current and historic diversity in the wild, and indicate that low genetic diversity in the captive population is likely a result of low founder diversity, which in turn suggests relatively low wild genetic diversity prior to recent population declines. Comparison of molecular genetic diversity measures with analogous diversity indices generated from the studbook data for Grevy's zebra and Hartmann's mountain zebra show contrasting patterns, with Grevy's zebra displaying markedly less molecular diversity than mountain zebra, despite studbook analysis indicating that the Grevy's zebra population has substantially more founders, greater effective population size, lower mean kinship, and has suffered less loss of gene diversity. These findings emphasize the need to validate theoretical estimates of genetic diversity in captive breeding programs with empirical molecular genetic data. Zoo Biol. 36:87-94, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The Effect of Genetic Risk Information and Health Risk Assessment on Compliance with Preventive Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamberg, Richard; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Results from a study of 82 males provide no statistical support and limited encouragement that genetic risk information may motivate persons to make positive changes in preventive health behaviors. Health risk assessments were used to identify subjects at risk for coronary heart disease or lung cancer because of genetic factors. (IAH)

  8. The Effect of Genetic Risk Information and Health Risk Assessment on Compliance with Preventive Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamberg, Richard; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Results from a study of 82 males provide no statistical support and limited encouragement that genetic risk information may motivate persons to make positive changes in preventive health behaviors. Health risk assessments were used to identify subjects at risk for coronary heart disease or lung cancer because of genetic factors. (IAH)

  9. Multidisciplinary cancer care in Australia: a national audit highlights gaps in care and medico-legal risk for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Wilcoxon, Heidi; Luxford, Karen; Saunders, Christobel; Peterson, Janice; Zorbas, Helen

    2011-03-01

    Multidisciplinary care (MDC) is accepted as best practice in cancer treatment planning and care. Despite recognition of the importance of a team approach, limited data are available about the extent to which MDC has been implemented in Australia. The aim of the audit was to investigate the implementation of MDC for five main cancer types across Australia in line with best practice. A sample of 155 hospitals was surveyed to investigate the status of MDC for cancer treatment planning in Australia across five cancer types (breast, gynecological, lung, prostate and colorectal). The survey investigated team structure, meetings, patient consent, documentation of team recommendations and communication with the patient. Two-thirds of hospitals surveyed did not have a multidisciplinary team. Of those with such a team; in one-third patients were not informed their case would be discussed by the team, in half patient consent was not sought for all cases discussed by the team, in one-quarter the team's recommended treatment plan was not noted in the patient record. Less than 1% of teams reported routine attendance by the tumour-specific minimum core team. MDC is not being implemented in line with best practice or applied consistently across Australia. This audit has highlighted gaps in care delivery, despite national recommendations about MDC. Areas being neglected can affect the quality of care provided and may put clinicians at medico-legal risk. Recommendations to improve uptake and effectiveness of MDC are provided. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Genetic Risk, Adherence to a Healthy Lifestyle, and Coronary Disease.

    PubMed

    Khera, Amit V; Emdin, Connor A; Drake, Isabel; Natarajan, Pradeep; Bick, Alexander G; Cook, Nancy R; Chasman, Daniel I; Baber, Usman; Mehran, Roxana; Rader, Daniel J; Fuster, Valentin; Boerwinkle, Eric; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Ridker, Paul M; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2016-12-15

    Background Both genetic and lifestyle factors contribute to individual-level risk of coronary artery disease. The extent to which increased genetic risk can be offset by a healthy lifestyle is unknown. Methods Using a polygenic score of DNA sequence polymorphisms, we quantified genetic risk for coronary artery disease in three prospective cohorts - 7814 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, 21,222 in the Women's Genome Health Study (WGHS), and 22,389 in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS) - and in 4260 participants in the cross-sectional BioImage Study for whom genotype and covariate data were available. We also determined adherence to a healthy lifestyle among the participants using a scoring system consisting of four factors: no current smoking, no obesity, regular physical activity, and a healthy diet. Results The relative risk of incident coronary events was 91% higher among participants at high genetic risk (top quintile of polygenic scores) than among those at low genetic risk (bottom quintile of polygenic scores) (hazard ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.75 to 2.09). A favorable lifestyle (defined as at least three of the four healthy lifestyle factors) was associated with a substantially lower risk of coronary events than an unfavorable lifestyle (defined as no or only one healthy lifestyle factor), regardless of the genetic risk category. Among participants at high genetic risk, a favorable lifestyle was associated with a 46% lower relative risk of coronary events than an unfavorable lifestyle (hazard ratio, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.63). This finding corresponded to a reduction in the standardized 10-year incidence of coronary events from 10.7% for an unfavorable lifestyle to 5.1% for a favorable lifestyle in ARIC, from 4.6% to 2.0% in WGHS, and from 8.2% to 5.3% in MDCS. In the BioImage Study, a favorable lifestyle was associated with significantly less coronary-artery calcification within each genetic risk

  11. Comparison of koala LPCoLN and human strains of Chlamydia pneumoniae highlights extended genetic diversity in the species.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Candice M; Hovis, Kelley M; Bavoil, Patrik M; Myers, Garry S A; Carrasco, Jose A; Timms, Peter

    2010-07-21

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a widespread pathogen causing upper and lower respiratory tract infections in addition to a range of other diseases in humans and animals. Previous whole genome analyses have focused on four essentially clonal (> 99% identity) C. pneumoniae human genomes (AR39, CWL029, J138 and TW183), providing relatively little insight into strain diversity and evolution of this species. We performed individual gene-by-gene comparisons of the recently sequenced C. pneumoniae koala genome and four C. pneumoniae human genomes to identify species-specific genes, and more importantly, to gain an insight into the genetic diversity and evolution of the species. We selected genes dispersed throughout the chromosome, representing genes that were specific to C. pneumoniae, genes with a demonstrated role in chlamydial biology and/or pathogenicity (n = 49), genes encoding nucleotide salvage or amino acid biosynthesis proteins (n = 6), and extrachromosomal elements (9 plasmid and 2 bacteriophage genes). We have identified strain-specific differences and targets for detection of C. pneumoniae isolates from both human and animal origin. Such characterisation is necessary for an improved understanding of disease transmission and intervention.

  12. Disclosing genetic risk for coronary heart disease: effects on perceived personal control and genetic counseling satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Robinson, C L; Jouni, H; Kruisselbrink, T M; Austin, E E; Christensen, K D; Green, R C; Kullo, I J

    2016-02-01

    We investigated whether disclosure of coronary heart disease (CHD) genetic risk influences perceived personal control (PPC) and genetic counseling satisfaction (GCS). Participants (n = 207, age: 45-65 years) were randomized to receive estimated 10-year risk of CHD based on a conventional risk score (CRS) with or without a genetic risk score (GRS). Risk estimates were disclosed by a genetic counselor who also reviewed how GRS altered risk in those randomized to CRS+GRS. Each participant subsequently met with a physician and then completed surveys to assess PPC and GCS. Participants who received CRS+GRS had higher PPC than those who received CRS alone although the absolute difference was small (25.2 ± 2.7 vs 24.1 ± 3.8, p = 0.04). A greater proportion of CRS+GRS participants had higher GCS scores (17.3 ± 5.3 vs 15.9 ± 6.3, p = 0.06). In the CRS+GRS group, PPC and GCS scores were not correlated with GRS. Within both groups, PPC and GCS scores were similar in patients with or without family history (p = NS). In conclusion, patients who received their genetic risk of CHD had higher PPC and tended to have higher GCS. Our findings suggest that disclosure of genetic risk of CHD together with conventional risk estimates is appreciated by patients. Whether this results in improved outcomes needs additional investigation.

  13. Population-based genetic risk prediction and stratification for ovarian cancer: views from women at high risk.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Belinda; Meisel, Susanne F; Fraser, Lindsay; Side, Lucy; Gessler, Sue; Wardle, Jane; Lanceley, Anne

    2015-03-01

    There is an opportunity to improve outcomes for ovarian cancer (OC) through advances in risk stratification, early detection and diagnosis. A population-based OC genetic risk prediction and stratification program is being developed. A previous focus group study with individuals from the general population showed support for the proposed program. This qualitative interview study explores the attitudes of women at high risk of OC. Eight women participated in one-on-one, in-depth, semi-structured interviews to explore: experiences of learning of OC risk, risk perceptions, OC knowledge and awareness, and opinions on risk stratification approach. There was evidence of strong support for the proposed program. Benefits were seen as providing reassurance to women at low risk, and reducing worry in women at high risk through appropriate clinical management. Stratification into 'low' and 'high' risk groups was well-received. Participants were more hesitant about stratification to the 'intermediate' risk group. The data suggest formats to effectively communicate OC risk estimates will require careful thought. Interactions with GPs were highlighted as a barrier to OC risk assessment and diagnosis. These results are encouraging for the possible introduction and uptake of a risk prediction and stratification program for OC in the general population.

  14. The Next Generation of Risk Assessment Multi-Year Study-Highlights of Findings, Applications to Risk Assessment, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Cote, Ila; Andersen, Melvin E; Ankley, Gerald T; Barone, Stanley; Birnbaum, Linda S; Boekelheide, Kim; Bois, Frederic Y; Burgoon, Lyle D; Chiu, Weihsueh A; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Crofton, Kevin M; DeVito, Michael; Devlin, Robert B; Edwards, Stephen W; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Hattis, Dale; Judson, Richard S; Knight, Derek; Krewski, Daniel; Lambert, Jason; Maull, Elizabeth Anne; Mendrick, Donna; Paoli, Gregory M; Patel, Chirag Jagdish; Perkins, Edward J; Poje, Gerald; Portier, Christopher J; Rusyn, Ivan; Schulte, Paul A; Simeonov, Anton; Smith, Martyn T; Thayer, Kristina A; Thomas, Russell S; Thomas, Reuben; Tice, Raymond R; Vandenberg, John J; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Wesselkamper, Scott; Whelan, Maurice; Whittaker, Christine; White, Ronald; Xia, Menghang; Yauk, Carole; Zeise, Lauren; Zhao, Jay; DeWoskin, Robert S

    2016-11-01

    , Bois FY, Burgoon LD, Chiu WA, Crawford-Brown D, Crofton KM, DeVito M, Devlin RB, Edwards SW, Guyton KZ, Hattis D, Judson RS, Knight D, Krewski D, Lambert J, Maull EA, Mendrick D, Paoli GM, Patel CJ, Perkins EJ, Poje G, Portier CJ, Rusyn I, Schulte PA, Simeonov A, Smith MT, Thayer KA, Thomas RS, Thomas R, Tice RR, Vandenberg JJ, Villeneuve DL, Wesselkamper S, Whelan M, Whittaker C, White R, Xia M, Yauk C, Zeise L, Zhao J, DeWoskin RS. 2016. The Next Generation of Risk Assessment multiyear study-highlights of findings, applications to risk assessment, and future directions. Environ Health Perspect 124:1671-1682; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP233.

  15. The Next Generation of Risk Assessment Multi-Year Study—Highlights of Findings, Applications to Risk Assessment, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Cote, Ila; Andersen, Melvin E.; Ankley, Gerald T.; Barone, Stanley; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Boekelheide, Kim; Bois, Frederic Y.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Crofton, Kevin M.; DeVito, Michael; Devlin, Robert B.; Edwards, Stephen W.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Hattis, Dale; Judson, Richard S.; Knight, Derek; Krewski, Daniel; Lambert, Jason; Maull, Elizabeth Anne; Mendrick, Donna; Paoli, Gregory M.; Patel, Chirag Jagdish; Perkins, Edward J.; Poje, Gerald; Portier, Christopher J.; Rusyn, Ivan; Schulte, Paul A.; Simeonov, Anton; Smith, Martyn T.; Thayer, Kristina A.; Thomas, Russell S.; Thomas, Reuben; Tice, Raymond R.; Vandenberg, John J.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Wesselkamper, Scott; Whelan, Maurice; Whittaker, Christine; White, Ronald; Xia, Menghang; Yauk, Carole; Zeise, Lauren; Zhao, Jay; DeWoskin, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    , Andersen ME, Ankley GT, Barone S, Birnbaum LS, Boekelheide K, Bois FY, Burgoon LD, Chiu WA, Crawford-Brown D, Crofton KM, DeVito M, Devlin RB, Edwards SW, Guyton KZ, Hattis D, Judson RS, Knight D, Krewski D, Lambert J, Maull EA, Mendrick D, Paoli GM, Patel CJ, Perkins EJ, Poje G, Portier CJ, Rusyn I, Schulte PA, Simeonov A, Smith MT, Thayer KA, Thomas RS, Thomas R, Tice RR, Vandenberg JJ, Villeneuve DL, Wesselkamper S, Whelan M, Whittaker C, White R, Xia M, Yauk C, Zeise L, Zhao J, DeWoskin RS. 2016. The Next Generation of Risk Assessment multiyear study—highlights of findings, applications to risk assessment, and future directions. Environ Health Perspect 124:1671–1682; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP233 PMID:27091369

  16. Epidemiology, environmental risk factors and genetics of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Delamarre, Anna; Meissner, Wassilios G

    2017-02-08

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a frequent neurodegenerative disease with a premotor phase that lasts several years. Risk factors that have been linked to PD are tobacco, caffeine, black tea, pesticides and calcium channel blockers. Some risk factors may be due to inverse causality (e.g. changes in personality during the premotor phase). The genetics of PD are complex with a contribution of Mendelian (e.g. SNCA, LRRK2, Parkin, Pink1,…) and non-Mendelian factors (e.g. single nucleotide polymorphisms). Glucocerebrosidase gene mutations (Gaucher disease) are currently the strongest genetic risk factor for PD. Studying risk factors will help to better understand the pathogenesis of PD.

  17. Genetic risk profiling for prediction of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mihaescu, Raluca; Meigs, James; Sijbrands, Eric; Janssens, A. Cecile

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a common disease caused by a complex interplay between many genetic and environmental factors. Candidate gene studies and recent collaborative genome-wide association efforts revealed at least 38 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with increased risk of T2D. Genetic testing of multiple SNPs is considered a potentially useful tool for early detection of individuals at high diabetes risk leading to improved targeting of preventive interventions. PMID:21278902

  18. Communicating genetic risk information within families: a review.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Mel; Dancyger, Caroline; Michie, Susan

    2010-12-01

    This review of family communication of genetic risk information addresses questions of what the functions and influences on communication are; what, who and how family members are told about genetic risk information; what the impact for counsellee, relative and relationships are; whether there are differences by gender and condition; and what theories and methodologies are used. A systematic search strategy identified peer-reviewed journal articles published 1985-2009 using a mixture of methodologies. A Narrative Synthesis was used to extract and summarise data relevant to the research questions. This review identified 33 articles which found a consistent pattern of findings that communication about genetic risk within families is influenced by individual beliefs about the desirability of communicating genetic risk and by closeness of relationships within the family. None of the studies directly investigated the impact of communication on counsellees or their families, differences according to gender of counsellee or by condition nor alternative methods of communication with relatives. The findings mainly apply to late onset conditions such as Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer. The most frequently used theory was Family Systems Theory and methods were generally qualitative. This review points to multifactorial influences on who is communicated with in families and what they are told about genetic risk information. Further research is required to investigate the impact of genetic risk information on family systems and differences between genders and conditions.

  19. Atrial Fibrillation Genetic Risk and Ischemic Stroke Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, Steven A; Parsons, Owen E; Anderson, Christopher D; Benjamin, Emelia J; Malik, Rainer; Weng, Lu-Chen; Dichgans, Martin; Sudlow, Cathie L; Rothwell, Peter M; Rosand, Jonathan; Ellinor, Patrick T; Markus, Hugh S; Traylor, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a leading cause of cardioembolic stroke, but the relationship between AF and noncardioembolic stroke subtypes are unclear. Because AF may be unrecognized, and because AF has a substantial genetic basis, we assessed for predisposition to AF across ischemic stroke subtypes. We examined associations between AF genetic risk and Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment stroke subtypes in 2374 ambulatory individuals with ischemic stroke and 5175 without from the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium 2 using logistic regression. We calculated AF genetic risk scores using single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with AF in a previous independent analysis across a range of preselected significance thresholds. There were 460 (19.4%) individuals with cardioembolic stroke, 498 (21.0%) with large vessel, 474 (20.0%) with small vessel, and 814 (32.3%) individuals with strokes of undetermined cause. Most AF genetic risk scores were associated with stroke, with the strongest association (P=6×10(-)(4)) attributed to scores of 944 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (each associated with AF at P<1×10(-)(3) in a previous analysis). Associations between AF genetic risk and stroke were enriched in the cardioembolic stroke subset (strongest P=1.2×10(-)(9), 944 single-nucleotide polymorphism score). In contrast, AF genetic risk was not significantly associated with noncardioembolic stroke subtypes. Comprehensive AF genetic risk scores were specific for cardioembolic stroke. Incomplete workups and subtype misclassification may have limited the power to detect associations with strokes of undetermined pathogenesis. Future studies are warranted to determine whether AF genetic risk is a useful biomarker to enhance clinical discrimination of stroke pathogeneses. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Breast cancer risk assessment using genetic variants and risk factors in a Singapore Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Genetic variants for breast cancer risk identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in Western populations require further testing in Asian populations. A risk assessment model incorporating both validated genetic variants and established risk factors may improve its performance in risk prediction of Asian women. Methods A nested case-control study of female breast cancer (411 cases and 1,212 controls) within the Singapore Chinese Health Study was conducted to investigate the effects of 51 genetic variants identified in previous GWAS on breast cancer risk. The independent effect of these genetic variants was assessed by creating a summed genetic risk score (GRS) after adjustment for body mass index and the Gail model risk factors for breast cancer. Results The GRS was an independent predictor of breast cancer risk in Chinese women. The multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of breast cancer for the second, third, and fourth quartiles of the GRS were 1.26 (0.90 to 1.76), 1.47 (1.06 to 2.04) and 1.75 (1.27 to 2.41) respectively (P for trend <0.001). In addition to established risk factors, the GRS improved the classification of 6.2% of women for their absolute risk of breast cancer in the next five years. Conclusions Genetic variants on top of conventional risk factors can improve the risk prediction of breast cancer in Chinese women. PMID:24941967

  1. Periodontal disease pathogenesis: genetic risk factors and paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Beth M; Roberts, Frank A

    2005-03-01

    Periodontitis is a widespread disease caused by oral bacteria and their interaction with lifestyle and genetic risk factors. The focus of periodontal research has expanded over the past few years to include significant progress in the understanding of genetic processes provided by the Human Genome Project. This presentation summarizes recent views on periodontal pathogenesis and the genetic risk factors involved in the disease. Additionally, it describes the paradigm shift in periodontal care, which is evolving from a repair-based to a wellness-based model.

  2. Occupational and genetic risk factors for osteoarthritis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Yucesoy, Berran; Charles, Luenda E.; Baker, Brent; Burchfiel, Cecil M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease with strong genetic and occupational components. Although published studies have described several risk factors for OA, very few studies have investigated the occupational and genetic factors that contribute to this debilitating condition. OBJECTIVE To describe occupational and genetic factors that may contribute to the risk of developing (OA). METHODS A literature search was conducted in PubMed using the search terms osteoarthritis, occupation, work, and genetics. RESULTS Heavy physical work load was the most common occupational risk factor for OA in several anatomical locations. Other factors include kneeling and regular stair climbing, crawling, bending and whole body vibration, and repetitive movements. Numerous studies have also shown the influence of genetic variability in the pathogenesis of OA. Genetic variants of several groups of genes e.g., cartilage extracellular matrix structural genes and the genes related to bone density have been implicated in disease pathogenesis. CONCLUSION This review shows that occupational factors were extensively studied in knee OA unlike OA of other anatomical regions. Although genetic association studies performed to date identified a number of risk variants, some of these associations have not been consistently replicated across different studies and populations. Therefore, more research is needed. PMID:24004806

  3. Applying Personal Genetic Data to Injury Risk Assessment in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Goodlin, Gabrielle T.; Roos, Andrew K.; Roos, Thomas R.; Hawkins, Claire; Beache, Sydney; Baur, Stephen; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have identified genetic markers associated with risk for certain sports-related injuries and performance-related conditions, with the hope that these markers could be used by individual athletes to personalize their training and diet regimens. We found that we could greatly expand the knowledge base of sports genetic information by using published data originally found in health and disease studies. For example, the results from large genome-wide association studies for low bone mineral density in elderly women can be re-purposed for low bone mineral density in young endurance athletes. In total, we found 124 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with: anterior cruciate ligament tear, Achilles tendon injury, low bone mineral density and stress fracture, osteoarthritis, vitamin/mineral deficiencies, and sickle cell trait. Of these single nucleotide polymorphisms, 91% have not previously been used in sports genetics. We conducted a pilot program on fourteen triathletes using this expanded knowledge base of genetic variants associated with sports injury. These athletes were genotyped and educated about how their individual genetic make-up affected their personal risk profile during an hour-long personal consultation. Overall, participants were favorable of the program, found it informative, and most acted upon their genetic results. This pilot program shows that recent genetic research provides valuable information to help reduce sports injuries and to optimize nutrition. There are many genetic studies for health and disease that can be mined to provide useful information to athletes about their individual risk for relevant injuries. PMID:25919592

  4. Genetic research: who is at risk for alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Foroud, Tatiana; Edenberg, Howard J; Crabbe, John C

    2010-01-01

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) was founded 40 years ago to help elucidate the biological underpinnings of alcohol dependence, including the potential contribution of genetic factors. Twin, adoption, and family studies conclusively demonstrated that genetic factors account for 50 to 60 percent of the variance in risk for developing alcoholism. Case-control studies and linkage analyses have helped identify DNA variants that contribute to increased risk, and the NIAAA-sponsored Collaborative Studies on Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) has the expressed goal of identifying contributing genes using state-of-the-art genetic technologies. These efforts have ascertained several genes that may contribute to an increased risk of alcoholism, including certain variants encoding alcohol-metabolizing enzymes and neurotransmitter receptors. Genome-wide association studies allowing the analysis of millions of genetic markers located throughout the genome will enable discovery of further candidate genes. In addition to these human studies, genetic animal models of alcohol's effects and alcohol use have greatly advanced our understanding of the genetic basis of alcoholism, resulting in the identification of quantitative trait loci and allowing for targeted manipulation of candidate genes. Novel research approaches-for example, into epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation-also are under way and undoubtedly will further clarify the genetic basis of alcoholism.

  5. Clinical implications of genomics for cancer risk genetics.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; James, Paul A; Ballinger, Mandy L

    2015-06-01

    The study of human genetics has provided substantial insight into cancer biology. With an increase in sequencing capacity and a reduction in sequencing costs, genomics will probably transform clinical cancer genetics. A heritable basis for many cancers is accepted, but so far less than half the genetic drivers have been identified. Genomics will increasingly be applied to populations irrespective of family history, which will change the framework of phenotype-directed genetic testing. Panel testing and whole genome sequencing will identify novel, polygenic, and de-novo determinants of cancer risk, often with lower penetrance, which will challenge present binary clinical classification systems and management algorithms. In the future, genotype-stratified public screening and prevention programmes could form part of tailored population risk management. The integration of research with clinical practice will result in so-called discovery cohorts that will help identify clinically significant genetic variation.

  6. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer risk: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Pasacreta, Jeannie V

    2003-01-01

    The identification of the BRCA1/2 genes, and their possible etiologic relationship with various forms of inherited cancer, has been recognized universally as a cornerstone in the search for cancer's genetic link and has made it possible to identify specific individuals and families who harbor a mutation in one of these predisposition genes. Genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility may pose unanticipated psychological and social problems. Because of the recent availability of predisposition genetic testing, research efforts have begun to investigate factors that may influence an individual's intention to undergo testing and the psychosocial sequelae associated with testing. The purpose of this article is to provide an integrative review of the literature that will delineate what is currently known about the psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer risk. Important generalizations from the literature include: (a) a positive test for breast cancer susceptibility may ignite a psychological response similar to the diagnosis of breast cancer itself; (b) there is likely a subset of individuals at increased risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer who are also at risk for sustained psychosocial problems; (c) available literature challenges a common notion that only individuals with a positive test result will need psychosocial services; and (d) at-risk individuals are basing health care decisions on genetic testing information, thus they are making important decisions under conditions of uncertainty. Clinical issues and directions for future research were highlighted.

  7. Genetic Predisposition to Ischemic Stroke: A Polygenic Risk Score.

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Tsuyoshi; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Takahashi, Atsushi; Hata, Jun; Furukawa, Ryohei; Shiwa, Yuh; Yamaji, Taiki; Hara, Megumi; Tanno, Kozo; Ohmomo, Hideki; Ono, Kanako; Takashima, Naoyuki; Matsuda, Koichi; Wakai, Kenji; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Ago, Tetsuro; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Fukushima, Akimune; Hozawa, Atsushi; Minegishi, Naoko; Satoh, Mamoru; Endo, Ryujin; Sasaki, Makoto; Sakata, Kiyomi; Kobayashi, Seiichiro; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Nakamura, Motoyuki; Hitomi, Jiro; Kita, Yoshikuni; Tanaka, Keitaro; Iso, Hiroyasu; Kitazono, Takanari; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Sobue, Kenji; Shimizu, Atsushi

    2017-02-01

    The prediction of genetic predispositions to ischemic stroke (IS) may allow the identification of individuals at elevated risk and thereby prevent IS in clinical practice. Previously developed weighted multilocus genetic risk scores showed limited predictive ability for IS. Here, we investigated the predictive ability of a newer method, polygenic risk score (polyGRS), based on the idea that a few strong signals, as well as several weaker signals, can be collectively informative to determine IS risk. We genotyped 13 214 Japanese individuals with IS and 26 470 controls (derivation samples) and generated both multilocus genetic risk scores and polyGRS, using the same derivation data set. The predictive abilities of each scoring system were then assessed using 2 independent sets of Japanese samples (KyushuU and JPJM data sets). In both validation data sets, polyGRS was shown to be significantly associated with IS, but weighted multilocus genetic risk scores was not. Comparing the highest with the lowest polyGRS quintile, the odds ratios for IS were 1.75 (95% confidence interval, 1.33-2.31) and 1.99 (95% confidence interval, 1.19-3.33) in the KyushuU and JPJM samples, respectively. Using the KyushuU samples, the addition of polyGRS to a nongenetic risk model resulted in a significant improvement of the predictive ability (net reclassification improvement=0.151; P<0.001). The polyGRS was shown to be superior to weighted multilocus genetic risk scores as an IS prediction model. Thus, together with the nongenetic risk factors, polyGRS will provide valuable information for individual risk assessment and management of modifiable risk factors. © 2016 The Authors.

  8. A family genetic risk communication framework: guiding tool development in genetics health services.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Miriam E; Wilson, Brenda J; Honeywell, Christina; Etchegary, Holly

    2013-04-01

    Family communication of genetic risk information is a complex process. Currently, there are no evidence-based interventions to help genetics professionals facilitate the process of disclosure within families. This study was designed to create a framework to assist in the development of tools to support patients in communicating genetic risk information to family members. A systematic review identified the factors relevant in communicating genetic risk information in families. A guiding theory for the proposed framework was selected and populated with the factors identified from the review. The review identified 112 factors of relevance. The theory of planned behaviour was selected to guide framework development, organising the framework in terms of the patient's attitudes about disclosure, perceived pressure to disclose and perceived control over disclosure. Attitudes about disclosure are influenced by a desire to protect oneself or family members, and the patient's perceptions of relevance of the information for family members, responsibility to disclose, family members' rights to information and the usefulness of communicating. Perceived pressure to disclose information is shaped by genetic professionals, family members and society. Perceived control over disclosure is affected by family relationships/dynamics, personal communication skills, the ability of the patient and family to understand the information and coping skills of the patient and family member. The family genetic risk communication framework presents a concise synthesis of the evidence on family communication of genetic information; it may be useful in creating and evaluating tools to help genetic counsellors and patients with communication issues.

  9. Clinical features of drug abuse that reflect genetic risk

    PubMed Central

    Kendler, K. S.; Ohlsson, H.; Sundquist, K.; Sundquist, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug abuse (DA) is a clinically heterogeneous syndrome. Can we, in a large epidemiological sample, identify clinical features of DA cases that index genetic risk? Method Using registration in medical, legal or pharmacy records, we identified four kinds of relative pairs (n =935854) starting with a proband with DA: monozygotic co-twins; full siblings; half-siblings; and cousins. Using linear hazard regression, we examined the interaction between three clinical features of DA in the proband and risk for DA in these four relative pairs, ordered by degree of genetic relationship. Results Increased risk for DA in relatives was robustly predicted by early age at first registration, total number of registrations, and ascertainment in the criminal versus the medical or pharmacy registry. In multivariate models, all three of these variables remained significant and in aggregate strongly predicted DA risk in relatives. The risk for DA in siblings of DA probands in the highest decile of genetic risk predicted by our three indices was more than twice as great as that predicted in siblings of probands in the lowest decile of risk. Conclusions In an epidemiological sample, genetic risk for DA can be substantially indexed by simple clinical and historical variables. PMID:24461082

  10. Genetic testing for inherited breast cancer risk in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Halbert, Chanita Hughes; Kessler, Lisa Jay; Mitchell, Edith

    2005-01-01

    As genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations is increasingly integrated into the clinical management of high-risk women, it will be important to understand barriers and motivations for genetic counseling among women from underserved minority groups to ensure equitable access to these services. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to synthesize literature on knowledge and attitudes about genetic counseling and testing for inherited breast cancer risk in African Americans. We also review studies that evaluated genetic testing intentions in this population. We conducted a search of the PubMed database to identify studies related to BRCA1/2 testing in African Americans that were published between 1995 and 2003. Overall, studies have evaluated ethnic differences in knowledge and attitudes about genetic testing or have compared African American and Caucasian women in terms of genetic testing intentions. These studies have shown that knowledge about breast cancer genetics and exposure to information about the availability of testing is low among African Americans, whereas expectations about the benefits of genetic testing are endorsed highly. However, much less is known about the psychological and behavioral impact of genetic testing for BRCA1/2 mutations in African Americans. Additional research is needed to understand barriers and motivations for participating in genetic testing for inherited cancer risk in African Americans. The lack of studies on psychological functioning, cancer surveillance, and preventive behaviors following testing is a significant void; however, for these studies to be conducted, greater access to genetic counseling and testing in African Americans will be needed.

  11. Genetic variants influencing elevated myeloperoxidase levels increase risk of stroke.

    PubMed

    Phuah, Chia-Ling; Dave, Tushar; Malik, Rainer; Raffeld, Miriam R; Ayres, Alison M; Goldstein, Joshua N; Viswanathan, Anand; Greenberg, Steven M; Jagiella, Jeremiasz M; Hansen, Björn M; Norrving, Bo; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Roquer, Jaume; Pichler, Alexander; Enzinger, Christian; Montaner, Joan; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; Lindgren, Arne; Slowik, Agnieszka; Schmidt, Reinhold; Biffi, Alessandro; Rost, Natalia; Langefeld, Carl D; Markus, Hugh S; Mitchell, Braxton D; Worrall, Brad B; Kittner, Steven J; Woo, Daniel; Dichgans, Martin; Rosand, Jonathan; Anderson, Christopher D

    2017-10-01

    Primary intracerebral haemorrhage and lacunar ischaemic stroke are acute manifestations of progressive cerebral microvascular disease. Current paradigms suggest atherosclerosis is a chronic, dynamic, inflammatory condition precipitated in response to endothelial injury from various environmental challenges. Myeloperoxidase plays a central role in initiation and progression of vascular inflammation, but prior studies linking myeloperoxidase with stroke risk have been inconclusive. We hypothesized that genetic determinants of myeloperoxidase levels influence the development of vascular instability, leading to increased primary intracerebral haemorrhage and lacunar stroke risk. We used a discovery cohort of 1409 primary intracerebral haemorrhage cases and 1624 controls from three studies, an extension cohort of 12 577 ischaemic stroke cases and 25 643 controls from NINDS-SiGN, and a validation cohort of 10 307 ischaemic stroke cases and 29 326 controls from METASTROKE Consortium with genome-wide genotyping to test this hypothesis. A genetic risk score reflecting elevated myeloperoxidase levels was constructed from 15 common single nucleotide polymorphisms identified from prior genome-wide studies of circulating myeloperoxidase levels (P < 5 × 10-6). This genetic risk score was used as the independent variable in multivariable regression models for association with primary intracerebral haemorrhage and ischaemic stroke subtypes. We used fixed effects meta-analyses to pool estimates across studies. We also used Cox regression models in a prospective cohort of 174 primary intracerebral haemorrhage survivors for association with intracerebral haemorrhage recurrence. We present effects of myeloperoxidase elevating single nucleotide polymorphisms on stroke risk per risk allele, corresponding to a one allele increase in the myeloperoxidase increasing genetic risk score. Genetic determinants of elevated circulating myeloperoxidase levels were associated with both primary

  12. [Risk communication through genetic counselling: requirements and problems].

    PubMed

    Henn, Wolfram; Schindelhauer-Deutscher, H J

    2007-02-01

    Genetic counselling is the single most important instrument for the individual communication of genetic risks. Beyond medical and psychosocial purposes in terms of preparing diagnostic measures and coping with results, genetic counselling also serves as a means to ensure the clients' decision autonomy through adequately informed consent. Accordingly, indispensable preconditions of the counselling process are voluntariness, individuality, non-directiveness, and respect of the right not to know. However, the requirement that any genetic diagnosis should be embedded into genet ic counselling is all too often neglected in today's reality of medicine. Consequently, there is urgent need of legislation ensuring mandatory counselling at least before prenatal and predictive genetic testing. Additionally, clear standards must be established and enforced for the quality of the counselling process as well as for the qualification of counsellors, and sufficient personal and institutional resources must be provided.

  13. Genetic variation of a global germplasm collection of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) including Italian accessions at risk of genetic erosion.

    PubMed

    De Giovanni, C; Pavan, S; Taranto, F; Di Rienzo, V; Miazzi, M M; Marcotrigiano, A R; Mangini, G; Montemurro, C; Ricciardi, L; Lotti, C

    2017-01-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is one of the most important legumes worldwide. We addressed this study to the genetic characterization of a germplasm collection from main chickpea growing countries. Several Italian traditional landraces at risk of genetic erosion were included in the analysis. Twenty-two simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, widely used to explore genetic variation in plants, were selected and yielded 218 different alleles. Structure analysis and hierarchical clustering indicated that a model with three distinct subpopulations best fits the data. The composition of two subpopulations, named K1 and K2, broadly reflects the commercial classification of chickpea in the two types desi and kabuli, respectively. The third subpopulation (K3) is composed by both desi and kabuli genotypes. Italian accessions group both in K2 and K3. Interestingly, this study highlights genetic distance between desi genotypes cultivated in Asia and Ethiopia, which respectively represent the chickpea primary and the secondary centres of diversity. Moreover, European desi are closer to the Ethiopian gene pool. Overall, this study will be of importance for chickpea conservation genetics and breeding, which is limited by the poor characterization of germplasm collection.

  14. Assessing risk assessment: genetic testing and screening for complex disease.

    PubMed

    Cox, S M

    2006-11-01

    This paper reports on the presentations from the second session of a 2-day workshop on genetic diversity and science communication, organized by the Institute of Genetics. The four talks in this session (by Sarah Cunningham-Burley, Gail Geller, Michael Hayden, and Theresa Marteau) focused on the topic of risk assessment in the context of genetic testing, screening and preventive medicine for complex disease. Each talk underscored the urgency and importance of evaluating when and for whom risk assessment may be useful. A recurrent theme was the need to attend closely to the diverse ways that risk is constructed, perceived and communicated in a variety of contexts and the significant implications of this for laypersons as well as experts. Although there was no consensus on when genetic risk assessment ceases (or might begin) to be useful, ensuing dialogue between presenters and participants reflected what is perhaps a new and critical engagement with how risk assessment itself is assessed. In response to this impetus, I use the word RISK as a heuristic to identify, extract and amplify four tendencies that appear to advance understandings of risk assessment towards a more explicitly reflexive, interpretive, and situated form of knowing.

  15. Dietary Restraint Moderates Genetic Risk for Binge Eating

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Sarah E.; Burt, S. Alexandra; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt; Klump, Kelly L.

    2010-01-01

    Dietary restraint is a prospective risk factor for the development of binge eating and bulimia nervosa. Although many women engage in dietary restraint, relatively few develop binge eating. Dietary restraint may only increase susceptibility for binge eating in individuals who are at genetic risk. Specifically, dietary restraint may be a behavioral “exposure” factor that activates genetic predispositions for binge eating. We investigated this possibility in 1,678 young adolescent and adult same-sex female twins from the Minnesota Twin Family Study and the Michigan State University Twin Registry. Twin moderation models were used to examine whether levels of dietary restraint moderate genetic and environmental influences on binge eating. Results indicated that genetic and non-shared environmental factors for binge eating increased at higher levels of dietary restraint. Importantly, these effects were present after controlling for age, body mass index, and genetic and environmental overlap among dietary restraint and binge eating. Results suggest that dietary restraint may be most important for individuals at genetic risk for binge eating, and the combination of these factors could enhance individual differences in risk for binge eating. PMID:21171725

  16. Dietary restraint moderates genetic risk for binge eating.

    PubMed

    Racine, Sarah E; Burt, S Alexandra; Iacono, William G; McGue, Matt; Klump, Kelly L

    2011-02-01

    Dietary restraint is a prospective risk factor for the development of binge eating and bulimia nervosa. Although many women engage in dietary restraint, relatively few develop binge eating. Dietary restraint may increase susceptibility for binge eating only in individuals who are at genetic risk. Specifically, dietary restraint may be a behavioral exposure factor that activates genetic predispositions for binge eating. We investigated this possibility in 1,678 young adolescent and adult same-sex female twins from the Minnesota Twin Family Study and the Michigan State University Twin Registry. Twin moderation models were used to examine whether levels of dietary restraint moderate genetic and environmental influences on binge eating. Results indicated that genetic and nonshared environmental factors for binge eating increased at higher levels of dietary restraint. These effects were present after controlling for age, body mass index, and genetic and environmental overlap among dietary restraint and binge eating. Results suggest that dietary restraint may be most important for individuals at genetic risk for binge eating and that the combination of these factors could enhance individual differences in risk for binge eating.

  17. Quantification of the genetic risk of environmental mutagens

    SciTech Connect

    Ehling, U.H.

    1988-03-01

    Screening methods are used for hazard identification. Assays for heritable mutations in mammals are used for the confirmation of short-term test results and for the quantification of the genetic risk. There are two main approaches in making genetic risk estimates. One of these, termed the direct method, expresses risk in terms of the expected frequency of genetic changes induced per unit. The other, referred to as the doubling dose method or the indirect method, expresses risk in relation to the observed incidence of genetic disorders now present in man. The indirect method uses experimental data only for the calculation of the doubling dose. The quality of the risk estimation depends on the assumption of persistence of the induced mutations and the ability to determine the current incidence of genetic diseases. The difficulties of improving the estimates of current incidences of genetic diseases or the persistence of the genes in the population led them to the development of an alternative method, the direct estimation of the genetic risk. The direct estimation uses experimental data for the induced frequency for dominant mutations in mice. For the verification of these quantifications one can use the data of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. According to the estimation with the direct method, one would expect less than 1 radiation-induced dominant cataract in 19,000 children with one or both parents exposed. The expected overall frequency of dominant mutations in the first generation would be 20-25, based on radiation-induced dominant cataract mutations. It is estimated that 10 times more recessive than dominant mutations are induced. The same approaches can be used to determine the impact of chemical mutagens.

  18. [Environmental and genetic risk factors for endometrial carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Sénéchal, Claire; Cottereau, Edouard; de Pauw, Antoine; Elan, Camille; Dagousset, Isabelle; Fourchotte, Virginie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lae, Marick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    In France, endometrial cancer is at the first rank of gynecological cancers for cancer incidence, before ovarian and cervical cancers. In fact, the number of incident cases has been estimated to 7275 for the year 2012; the number of death due to endometrial cancer to 2025. This cancer is hormone-dependent and endogenous (reproductive factors) or exogenous (oral combined contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy) causes of exposition to estrogens are the major environmental risk factors for both types of endometrial cancers: type I or well-differentiated endometrioid adenocarcinomas; and type II including all other histological types: papillary serous adenocarcinomas, clear cell adenocarcinomas and carcinosarcomas, also known as malignant mixed Mullerian tumor, MMMT. Obesity, diabetes mellitus and adjuvant treatment of breast cancer with tamoxifen are also associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. Genetic factors may also be implicated in the pathogenesis of endometrial cancer either as "minor genetic factors" (susceptibility factors), which remain largely unknown and are responsible for the increased observed risk in relatives of women affected with endometrial cancer; or as major genetic factors responsible for hereditary forms and namely for Lynch syndrome whose genetic transmission is of autosomic dominant type. The appropriate recognition of Lynch syndrome is of critical importance because affected patients and their relatives should benefit from specific care. The aims of this review is to describe major environmental and genetic risk factors for endometrial cancer with specific attention to most recent advances in this field and to describe recommendations for care of at-risk women.

  19. Effect of Alzheimer disease genetic risk disclosure on dietary supplement use1234

    PubMed Central

    Vernarelli, Jacqueline A; Roberts, J Scott; Hiraki, Susan; Chen, Clara A; Cupples, L Adrienne

    2010-01-01

    Background: Genetic susceptibility testing for Alzheimer disease (AD) with APOE genotype disclosure is not recommended for clinical use but is available through direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing companies. Little is known about whether APOE genotype disclosure would actually prompt changes in nutrition behaviors among at-risk individuals. Objective: We studied the effect of APOE genotype disclosure for AD risk assessment on dietary supplement use in adults with a family history of AD. Design: As part of a secondary analysis of data from the second Risk Evaluation and Education for Alzheimer's Disease Study, we examined the effect of genotype disclosure on health-behavior changes among 272 unaffected first-degree relatives of persons with AD. Results: Overall, 16% of all participants reported a change in dietary supplement use after AD risk assessment. Participants who learned that they had at least one copy of the risk-increasing ϵ4 allele (ϵ4+) had 4.75 times the odds of reporting a change in dietary supplement use than did their counterparts who had an absence of the risk-increasing ϵ4 allele (ϵ4−) (95% CI: 2.23, 10.10; P < 0.0001) after adjustment for age, sex, race, baseline supplement use, randomization arm, and educational level. There were no significant differences between APOE ϵ4+ and ϵ4− participants in changes in overall diet, exercise, or medications. Conclusions: In this sample of first-degree relatives receiving genetic susceptibility testing for AD, an APOE ϵ4+ genotype status was positively associated with dietary supplement use after risk disclosure. Such changes occurred despite the absence of evidence that supplement use reduces the risk of AD. Given the expansion of DTC genetic tests, this study highlights the need for future studies in disease risk communication. PMID:20219963

  20. Effect of Alzheimer disease genetic risk disclosure on dietary supplement use.

    PubMed

    Vernarelli, Jacqueline A; Roberts, J Scott; Hiraki, Susan; Chen, Clara A; Cupples, L Adrienne; Green, Robert C

    2010-05-01

    Genetic susceptibility testing for Alzheimer disease (AD) with APOE genotype disclosure is not recommended for clinical use but is available through direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing companies. Little is known about whether APOE genotype disclosure would actually prompt changes in nutrition behaviors among at-risk individuals. We studied the effect of APOE genotype disclosure for AD risk assessment on dietary supplement use in adults with a family history of AD. As part of a secondary analysis of data from the second Risk Evaluation and Education for Alzheimer's Disease Study, we examined the effect of genotype disclosure on health-behavior changes among 272 unaffected first-degree relatives of persons with AD. Overall, 16% of all participants reported a change in dietary supplement use after AD risk assessment. Participants who learned that they had at least one copy of the risk-increasing epsilon4 allele (epsilon4+) had 4.75 times the odds of reporting a change in dietary supplement use than did their counterparts who had an absence of the risk-increasing epsilon4 allele (epsilon4-) (95% CI: 2.23, 10.10; P < 0.0001) after adjustment for age, sex, race, baseline supplement use, randomization arm, and educational level. There were no significant differences between APOE epsilon4+ and epsilon4- participants in changes in overall diet, exercise, or medications. In this sample of first-degree relatives receiving genetic susceptibility testing for AD, an APOE epsilon4+ genotype status was positively associated with dietary supplement use after risk disclosure. Such changes occurred despite the absence of evidence that supplement use reduces the risk of AD. Given the expansion of DTC genetic tests, this study highlights the need for future studies in disease risk communication.

  1. Genetic variants in gastric cancer: Risks and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Rasmussen, Lucas Trevizani; Santos, Leonardo Caires; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Lourenço, Laercio Gomes; Lopes-Filho, Gaspar Jesus; Smith, Marilia Arruda Cardoso

    2017-08-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease that involves many molecular alterations. Gastric cancer (GC) is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. GC is a highly heterogeneous disease with different molecular and genetics features. Therefore, this review focuses on an overview of the genetic aspects of gastric cancer by highlighting the important impact and role of deletions and/or duplications of chromosomal segments, genomic variants, H. pylori infection and interleukin variants, as found in gene expression and newly proposed molecular classification studies. The challenge is to better understand the mechanisms and different pathways that lead to the development and progression of GC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Do Environmental Factors Modify the Genetic Risk of Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Joshu, Corinne E.; Huang, Wen-Yi; Hayes, Richard B.; Carter, H. Ballentine; Isaacs, William B.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many SNPs influence prostate cancer risk. To what extent genetic risk can be reduced by environmental factors is unknown. Methods We evaluated effect modification by environmental factors of the association between susceptibility SNPs and prostate cancer in 1,230 incident prostate cancer cases and 1,361 controls, all white and similar ages, nested in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Trial. Genetic risk scores were calculated as number of risk alleles for 20 validated SNPs. We estimated the association between higher genetic risk (≥ 12 SNPs) and prostate cancer within environmental factor strata and tested for interaction. Results Men with ≥12 risk alleles had 1.98, 2.04, and 1.91 times the odds of total, advanced, and nonadvanced prostate cancer, respectively. These associations were attenuated with the use of selenium supplements, aspirin, ibuprofen, and higher vegetable intake. For selenium, the attenuation was most striking for advanced prostate cancer: compared with <12 alleles and no selenium, the OR for ≥12 alleles was 2.06 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.67–2.55] in nonusers and 0.99 (0.38–2.58) in users (Pinteraction = 0.031). Aspirin had the most marked attenuation for nonadvanced prostate cancer: compared with <12 alleles and nonusers, the OR for ≥12 alleles was 2.25 (1.69–3.00) in nonusers and 1.70 (1.25–2.32) in users (Pinteraction = 0.009). This pattern was similar for ibuprofen (Pinteraction = 0.023) and vegetables (Pinteraction = 0.010). Conclusions This study suggests that selenium supplements may reduce genetic risk of advanced prostate cancer, whereas aspirin, ibuprofen, and vegetables may reduce genetic risk of nonadvanced prostate cancer. PMID:25342390

  3. Changes in Genetic Risk for Emotional Eating across the Menstrual Cycle: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Klump, Kelly L.; Hildebrandt, Britny A.; O’Connor, Shannon M.; Keel, Pamela K.; Neale, Michael; Sisk, Cheryl L.; Boker, Steven; Burt, S. Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies show significant within-person changes in binge eating and emotional eating across the menstrual cycle, with substantial increases in both phenotypes during post-ovulation. Increases in both estradiol and progesterone levels appear to account for these changes in phenotypic risk, possibly via increases in genetic effects. However, to date, no study has examined changes in genetic risk for binge phenotypes (or any other phenotype) across the menstrual cycle. The goal of the present study was to examine within-person changes in genetic risk for emotional eating scores across the menstrual cycle. Methods Participants were 230 female twin pairs (460 twins) from the Michigan State University Twin Registry (MSUTR) who completed daily measures of emotional eating for 45 consecutive days. Menstrual cycle phase was coded based on dates of menstrual bleeding and daily ovarian hormone levels. Results Findings revealed important shifts in genetic and environmental influences, where estimates of genetic influences were two times higher in post- as compared to pre-ovulation. Surprisingly, pre-ovulation was marked by a predominance of environmental influences, including shared environmental effects which have not been previously detected for binge eating phenotypes in adulthood. Conclusions Our study was the first to examine within-person shifts in genetic and environmental influences on a behavioral phenotype across the menstrual cycle. Results highlight a potentially critical role for these shifts in risk for emotional eating across the menstrual cycle and underscore the need for additional, large-scale studies to identify the genetic and environmental factors contributing to menstrual cycle effects. PMID:26174083

  4. Electrophysiological markers of genetic risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tye, Charlotte; McLoughlin, Gráinne; Kuntsi, Jonna; Asherson, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an ideal neuroscientific approach, providing a direct measurement of neural activity that demonstrates reliability, developmental stability and high heritability. This systematic review of a subset of domains evaluates the utility of electrophysiological measures as potential intermediate phenotypes for ADHD in the domains of quantitative EEG indices of arousal and intra-individual variability, and functional investigations of inhibitory and error processing using the event-related potential (ERP) technique. Each domain demonstrates consistent and meaningful associations with ADHD, a degree of genetic overlap with ADHD and potential links to specific genetic variants. Investigations of the genetic and environmental contributions to EEG/ERP and shared genetic overlap with ADHD may enhance molecular genetic studies and provide novel insights into aetiology. Such research will aid in the precise characterisation of the clinical deficits seen in ADHD and guide the development of novel intervention and prevention strategies for those at risk. PMID:21426626

  5. Disparities in Cancer Genetic Risk Assessment and Testing.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Meghan L; Jones, Tarsha; Habin, Karleen

    2016-07-01

    Scientific and technologic advances in genomics have revolutionized genetic counseling and testing, targeted therapy, and cancer screening and prevention. Among younger women, African American and Hispanic women have a higher rate of cancers that are associated with hereditary cancer risk, such as triple-negative breast cancer, which is linked to poorer outcomes. Therefore, genetic testing is particularly important in diverse populations. Unfortunately, all races and ethnic groups are not well represented in current genetic testing practices, leading to disparities in cancer prevention and early detection.

  6. Living with Genetic Risk: Effect on Adolescent Self-Concept

    PubMed Central

    McConkie-Rosell, Allyn; Spiridigliozzi, Gail A.; Melvin, Elizabeth; Dawson, Deborah V.; Lachiewicz, Ave M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the interplay of adolescent girls’ self-concept, coping behaviors, and adjustment associated with knowledge of genetic risk for fragile X syndrome. We will report here findings on self concept. Using a multi-group cross-sectional design this study focused on girls ages 14–25 years from families previously diagnosed with fragile X syndrome, who knew they were 1) carriers (n = 20; mean age 18.35 years s.d. 2.5), or 2) noncarriers (n =18; mean age 17.78 years s.d. 2.69), or 3) at-risk to be carriers (n = 15; mean age 17.87 s.d. 3.18). The girls completed the Tennessee Self Concept Scale (TSCS:2), a visual analog scale, and a guided interview. Total and all subscale scores on the TSCS:2 were in the normal range for all three groups. However, threats to self concept were found in personal self (physical self, genetic identity, and parental role), social self, and family self (family genetic identity) as they specifically related to the meaning of genetic information and varied based on risk status. Our findings suggest that risk information itself is threatening and for some girls, may be as threatening as learning one is a carrier. Certainty related to genetic risk status appears to make a positive difference for some girls by allowing them the opportunity to face the challenge of their genetic risk status and to begin to consider the meaning of this information. PMID:18200514

  7. Perceptions of Familial Risk in those Seeking a Genetic Risk Assessment for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Clara A.; Roberts, J. Scott; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Green, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Perceived risk is a complex concept that influences the genetic counseling process and can affect client coping and behavior. Although the association between family history and risk perception is well recognized in the literature, no studies have explored this relationship specifically in those seeking genetic susceptibility testing for a common chronic condition. REVEAL is a randomized trial assessing the impact of APOE disclosure and genetic risk assessment for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Using baseline REVEAL data, we hypothesized that there would be a significant association between the degree of AD family history and risk perception of AD, and that this relationship would be stronger in those who believed that genetics is a very important AD risk factor. In our sample of 293 participants, we found that a higher self-perceived risk of AD was associated with strength of family history of AD (p<0.001), belief in genetics as an important AD risk factor (p<0.001), being female (p<0.001) and being Caucasian (p=0.02). These results are the first to demonstrate the association between family history and risk perception in persons volunteering for genetic susceptibility testing for a common complex disease. PMID:18949541

  8. Genetic Vulnerability as a Distal Risk Factor for Suicidal Behaviour: Historical Perspective and Current Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    ANDRIESSEN, Karl; VIDETIC-PASKA, Alja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Suicide is a multidimensional problem. Observations of family history of suicide suggest the existence of a genetic vulnerability to suicidal behaviour. Aim Starting with a historical perspective, the article reviews current knowledge of a genetic vulnerability to suicidal behaviour, distinct from the genetic vulnerability to psychiatric disorders, focused on clinical and population-based studies, and findings from recent molecular genetics association studies. Method The review includes peer-reviewed research articles and review papers from the professional literature in English language, retrieved from PubMed/Medline and PsycINFO. Results The research literature confirms a existence of a genetic vulnerability to suicidal behaviour. Even though the results of individual studies are difficult to compare, genetic influences could explain up to half of the variance of the occurrence of suicide. Conclusion Genetic vulnerability could be a distal risk factor for suicide, which helps us to understand the occurrence of suicide among vulnerable people. Ethical implications of such vulnerability are highlighted. PMID:27646732

  9. Are centenarians genetically predisposed to lower disease risk?

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jonatan R; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Buxens, Amaya; Cano-Nieto, Amalia; Gómez-Gallego, Félix; Santiago, Catalina; Rodríguez-Romo, Gabriel; Garatachea, Nuria; Lao, José I; Morán, María; Lucia, Alejandro

    2012-10-01

    Our study purpose was to compare a disease-related polygenic profile that combined a total of 62 genetic variants among (i) people reaching exceptional longevity, i.e., centenarians (n = 54, 100-108 years, 48 women) and (ii) ethnically matched healthy controls (n = 87, 19-43 years, 47 women). We computed a 'global' genotype score (GS) for 62 genetic variants (mutations/polymorphisms) related to cardiometabolic diseases, cancer or exceptional longevity, and also specific GS for main disease categories (cardiometabolic risk and cancer risk, including 36 and 24 genetic variations, respectively) and for exceptional longevity (7 genetic variants). The 'global' GS was similar among groups (centenarians: 31.0 ± 0.6; controls 32.0 ± 0.5, P = 0.263). We observed that the GS for hypertension, cancer (global risk), and other types of cancer was lower in the centenarians group compared with the control group (all P < 0.05), yet the difference became non significant after adjusting for sex. We observed significant between-group differences in the frequency of GSTT1 and GSTM1 (presence/absence) genotypes after adjusting for multiple comparisons. The likelihood of having the GSTT1 low-risk (functional) allele was higher in centenarians (odds ratio [OR] 5.005; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.810-13.839), whereas the likelihood of having the GSTMI low-risk (functional) allele was similar in both groups (OR 1.295; 95% CI, 0.868 -1.931). In conclusion, we found preliminary evidence that Spanish centenarians have a lower genetic predisposition for cancer risk. The wild-type (i.e., functional) genotype of GSTT1, which is associated with lower cancer risk, might be associated with exceptional longevity, yet further studies with larger sample sizes must confirm these findings.

  10. Parents' Attitudes Toward Pediatric Genetic Testing for Common Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hensley Alford, Sharon; Emmons, Karen M.; Lipkus, Isaac M.; Wilfond, Benjamin S.; McBride, Colleen M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe parents' attitudes toward pediatric genetic testing for common, adult-onset health conditions and to identify factors underlying these attitudes. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Parents (n = 219) enrolled in a large, group-practice health plan were offered a “multiplex” genetic test for susceptibility to 8 common, adult-onset health conditions and completed an online survey assessing attitudes and beliefs about the risks and benefits of the test for their child, their willingness to consider having their child tested, and other psychosocial variables. RESULTS: Parents viewed the benefits of pediatric testing to outweigh its risks (positive decisional balance) and were moderately interested in pediatric testing. Variables associated with positive decisional balance included greater interest in knowing about gene-health associations in their child, anticipation of less difficulty understanding their child's genetic health risks, and more positive emotional reactions to learning about their child's decreased health risks (adjusted R2 = 0.33, P < .0001). Similarly, variables associated with greater parental willingness to test were being a mother (versus being a father), greater perceived risk of diseases in their child, greater interest in knowing about gene-health relationships in their child, anticipating less difficulty learning about their child's genetic health risks, anticipating more positive emotional reactions to learning about their child's decreased health risks, and positive decisional balance (adjusted R2 = 0.57, P < .0001). CONCLUSIONS: As genetic susceptibility testing for common, adult-onset health conditions proliferates, pediatricians should anticipate parents' interest in testing children and be prepared to facilitate informed decision making about such testing. PMID:21502235

  11. Analysis of genetic and non genetic risk factors for cisplatin ototoxicity in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Olgun, Yüksel; Aktaş, Safiye; Altun, Zekiye; Kırkım, Günay; Kızmazoğlu, Deniz Çakır; Erçetin, Ayşe Pınar; Demir, Banu; İnce, Dilek; Mutafoğlu, Kamer; Demirağ, Bengü; Ellidokuz, Hülya; Olgun, Nur; Güneri, Enis Alpin

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the genetic and non genetic risk factors for cisplatin ototoxicity. This study was conducted on 72 children who received cisplatin based chemotherapy. Brock and Muenster classifications were used to evaluate ototoxicity seen in these children. 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP); ERCC1 rs 11615, GSTP1 rs1138272, GSTP1 rs1695, LRP2 rs 2075252, TPMT rs 12201199, COMT rs 9332377, were evaluated as genetic factors by real time PCR. Non genetic factors such as cranial irradiation, cumulative doses of cisplatin, age, gender, administration of other ototoxic drugs were analysed as well. By using Chi-square test, risk factors were matched with the ototoxicity classifications. Significant risk factors were reevaluated using logistic regression modelling. According to univariate analyses, male gender, co-treatment with aminoglycosides and mutant genotype of GSTP1 rs1695 were significantly related with cisplatin ototoxicity. Logistic regression modelling analyses also showed that male gender, co-treatment with aminoglycosides were found to be significantly related with cisplatin ototoxicity. Mutant genotype of GSTP1 rs1695 was not found to be significant, but close to the level of statistical significance. Male gender, co-treatment with aminoglycosides are significant risk factors for cisplatin ototoxicity in pediatric patients. Mutant genotype of GSTP1 rs1695 seems to be a genetic risk factor in univariate analyses, although not confirmed by multivariate analyses. Therefore, GSTP1 rs1695 SNP needs to be studied in larger series. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic profiling for risk reduction in human cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Puckelwartz, Megan J; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-03-12

    Cardiovascular disease is a major health concern affecting over 80,000,000 people in the U.S. alone. Heart failure, cardiomyopathy, heart rhythm disorders, atherosclerosis and aneurysm formation have significant heritable contribution. Supported by familial aggregation and twin studies, these cardiovascular diseases are influenced by genetic variation. Family-based linkage studies and population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have each identified genes and variants important for the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. The advent of next generation sequencing has ushered in a new era in the genetic diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, and this is especially evident when considering cardiomyopathy, a leading cause of heart failure. Cardiomyopathy is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by morphologically abnormal heart with abnormal function. Genetic testing for cardiomyopathy employs gene panels, and these panels assess more than 50 genes simultaneously. Despite the large size of these panels, the sensitivity for detecting the primary genetic defect is still only approximately 50%. Recently, there has been a shift towards applying broader exome and/or genome sequencing to interrogate more of the genome to provide a genetic diagnosis for cardiomyopathy. Genetic mutations in cardiomyopathy offer the capacity to predict clinical outcome, including arrhythmia risk, and genetic diagnosis often provides an early window in which to institute therapy. This discussion is an overview as to how genomic data is shaping the current understanding and treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  13. Prefrontal gray matter volume mediates genetic risks for obesity.

    PubMed

    Opel, N; Redlich, R; Kaehler, C; Grotegerd, D; Dohm, K; Heindel, W; Kugel, H; Thalamuthu, A; Koutsouleris, N; Arolt, V; Teuber, A; Wersching, H; Baune, B T; Berger, K; Dannlowski, U

    2017-05-01

    Genetic and neuroimaging research has identified neurobiological correlates of obesity. However, evidence for an integrated model of genetic risk and brain structural alterations in the pathophysiology of obesity is still absent. Here we investigated the relationship between polygenic risk for obesity, gray matter structure and body mass index (BMI) by the use of univariate and multivariate analyses in two large, independent cohorts (n=330 and n=347). Higher BMI and higher polygenic risk for obesity were significantly associated with medial prefrontal gray matter decrease, and prefrontal gray matter was further shown to significantly mediate the effect of polygenic risk for obesity on BMI in both samples. Building on this, the successful individualized prediction of BMI by means of multivariate pattern classification algorithms trained on whole-brain imaging data and external validations in the second cohort points to potential clinical applications of this imaging trait marker.

  14. Health risks of genetically modified foods.

    PubMed

    Dona, Artemis; Arvanitoyannis, Ioannis S

    2009-02-01

    As genetically modified (GM) foods are starting to intrude in our diet concerns have been expressed regarding GM food safety. These concerns as well as the limitations of the procedures followed in the evaluation of their safety are presented. Animal toxicity studies with certain GM foods have shown that they may toxically affect several organs and systems. The review of these studies should not be conducted separately for each GM food, but according to the effects exerted on certain organs it may help us create a better picture of the possible health effects on human beings. The results of most studies with GM foods indicate that they may cause some common toxic effects such as hepatic, pancreatic, renal, or reproductive effects and may alter the hematological, biochemical, and immunologic parameters. However, many years of research with animals and clinical trials are required for this assessment. The use of recombinant GH or its expression in animals should be re-examined since it has been shown that it increases IGF-1 which may promote cancer.

  15. Genetic contribution to multiple sclerosis risk among Ashkenazi Jews.

    PubMed

    Khankhanian, Pouya; Matsushita, Takuya; Madireddy, Lohith; Lizée, Antoine; Din, Lennox; Moré, Jayaji M; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Hauser, Stephen L; Baranzini, Sergio E; Oksenberg, Jorge R

    2015-07-28

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system, with a strong genetic component. Over 100 genetic loci have been implicated in susceptibility to MS in European populations, the most prominent being the 15:01 allele of the HLA-DRB1 gene. The prevalence of MS is high in European populations including those of Ashkenazi origin, and low in African and Asian populations including those of Jewish origin. Here we identified and extracted a total of 213 Ashkenazi MS cases and 546 ethnically matched healthy control individuals from two previous genome-wide case-control association analyses, and 72 trios (affected proband and two unaffected parents) from a previous genome-wide transmission disequilibrium association study, using genetic data to define Ashkenazi. We compared the pattern of genetic risk between Ashkenazi and non-Ashkenazi Europeans. We also sought to identify novel Ashkenazi-specific risk loci by performing association tests on the subset of Ashkenazi cases, controls, probands, and parents from each study. The HLA-DRB1*15:01 allele and the non-HLA risk alleles were present at relatively low frequencies among Ashkenazi and explained a smaller fraction of the population-level risk when compared to non-Ashkenazi Europeans. Alternative HLA susceptibility alleles were identified in an Ashkenazi-only association study, including HLA-A*68:02 and one or both genes in the HLA-B*38:01-HLA-C*12:03 haplotype. The genome-wide screen in Ashkenazi did not reveal any loci associated with MS risk. These results suggest that genetic susceptibility to MS in Ashkenazi Jews has not been as well established as that of non-Ashkenazi Europeans. This implies value in studying large well-characterized Ashkenazi populations to accelerate gene discovery in complex genetic diseases.

  16. Alcohol Consumption Indices of Genetic Risk for Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Julia D.; Agrawal, Arpana; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Pergadia, Michele L.; Nelson, Elliot C.; Lynskey, Michael T.; Todd, Richard D.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Whitfield, John B.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Heath, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous research has reported a significant genetic correlation between heaviness of alcohol consumption and alcohol dependence (AD), but this association might be driven by the influence of AD on consumption rather than the reverse. We test the genetic overlap between AD symptoms and a heaviness of consumption measure among individuals who do not have AD. A high genetic correlation between these measures would suggest that a continuous measure of consumption may have a useful role in the discovery of genes contributing to dependence risk. Methods Factor analysis of 5 alcohol use measures was used to create a measure of heaviness of alcohol consumption. Quantitative genetic analyses of interview data from the 1989 Australian Twin Panel (n=6257 individuals; M=29.9 years) assessed the genetic overlap between heaviness of consumption, DSM-IV AD symptoms, DSM-IV AD symptom clustering, and DSM-IV alcohol abuse. Results Genetic influences accounted for 30–51% of the variance in the alcohol measures and genetic correlations were 0.90 or higher for all measures, with the correlation between consumption and dependence symptoms among non-dependent individuals estimated at 0.97 (95% CI: 0.80–1.00). Conclusions Heaviness of consumption and AD symptoms have a high degree of genetic overlap even among non-dependent individuals in the general population, implying that genetic influences on dependence risk in the general population are acting to a considerable degree through heaviness of use, and that quantitative measures of consumption will likely have a useful role in the identification of genes contributing to AD. PMID:19576574

  17. Do genetic risk scores for body mass index predict risk of phobic anxiety? Evidence for a shared genetic risk factor.

    PubMed

    Walter, S; Glymour, M M; Koenen, K; Liang, L; Tchetgen Tchetgen, E J; Cornelis, M; Chang, S-C; Rewak, M; Rimm, E; Kawachi, I; Kubzansky, L D

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and anxiety are often linked but the direction of effects is not clear. Using genetic instrumental variable (IV) analyses in 5911 female participants from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS, initiated 1976) and 3697 male participants from the Health Professional Follow-up Study (HPFS, initiated 1986), we aimed to determine whether obesity increases symptoms of phobic anxiety. As instrumental variables we used the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene, the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) gene and a genetic risk score (GRS) based on 32 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly predict body mass index (BMI). 'Functional' GRSs corresponding with specific biological pathways that shape BMI (adipogenesis, appetite and cardiopulmonary) were considered. The main outcome was phobic anxiety measured by the Crown Crisp Index (CCI) in 2004 in the NHS and in 2000 in the HPFS. In observational analysis, a 1-unit higher BMI was associated with higher phobic anxiety symptoms [women: β = 0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.030-0.068; men: β = 0.04, 95% CI 0.016-0.071). IV analyses showed that BMI was associated with higher phobic anxiety symptoms in the FTO-instrumented analysis (p = 0.005) but not in the GRS-instrumented analysis (p = 0.256). Functional GRSs showed heterogeneous, non-significant effects of BMI on phobic anxiety symptoms. Our findings do not provide conclusive evidence in favor of the hypothesis that higher BMI leads to higher levels of phobic anxiety, but rather suggest that genes that influence obesity, in particular FTO, may have direct effects on phobic anxiety, and hence that obesity and phobic anxiety may share common genetic determinants.

  18. Do genetic risk scores for body mass index predict risk of phobic anxiety? Evidence for a shared genetic risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Stefan; Glymour, M. Maria; Koenen, Karestan; Liang, Liming; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Cornelis, Marilyn; Chang, Shun-Chiao; Rewak, Marissa; Rimm, Eric; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity and anxiety are often linked but the direction of effects is not clear. Methods Using genetic instrumental variable (IV) analyses in a sample of 5911 female participants from the Nurses´ Health Study (NHS, initiated in 1976) and 3697 male participants from the Health Professional Follow-up Study (HPFS, initiated in 1986), we aim to determine whether obesity increases symptoms of phobic anxiety. FTO, MC4R, and a genetic risk score (GRS) based on 32 single nucleotide polymorphisms that significantly predict body mass index (BMI), were used as instrumental variables. “Functional” GRS corresponding with specific biological pathways that shape BMI (adipogenesis, appetite, and cardio-pulmonary), were considered. Phobic anxiety as measured by the Crown Crisp Experimental Index (CCI) in 2004 in NHS and 2000 in HPFS was the main outcome. Results In observational analysis, a one unit higher BMI was associated with higher phobic anxiety symptoms (women NHS: beta=0.05; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.030 – 0.068 and men, HPFS, beta = 0.04; 95% CI: 0.016 – 0.071). IV analyses showed that BMI instrumented by FTO was associated with higher phobic anxiety symptoms (p = 0.005) but BMI instrumented by GRS was not (p=0.256). Functional GRS scores showed heterogeneous, non-significant effects of BMI on phobic anxiety symptoms. Conclusions Our findings do not provide conclusive evidence in favor of the hypothesis that higher BMI leads to higher levels of phobic anxiety, but rather suggest that genes that influence obesity, in particular FTO, may have direct effects on phobic anxiety, i.e., that obesity and phobic anxiety may share common genetic determinants. PMID:25065638

  19. Clinical applications of schizophrenia genetics: genetic diagnosis, risk, and counseling in the molecular era

    PubMed Central

    Costain, Gregory; Bassett, Anne S

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex neuropsychiatric disease with documented clinical and genetic heterogeneity, and evidence for neurodevelopmental origins. Driven by new genetic technologies and advances in molecular medicine, there has recently been concrete progress in understanding some of the specific genetic causes of this serious psychiatric illness. In particular, several large rare structural variants have been convincingly associated with schizophrenia, in targeted studies over two decades with respect to 22q11.2 microdeletions, and more recently in large-scale, genome-wide case-control studies. These advances promise to help many families afflicted with this disease. In this review, we critically appraise recent developments in the field of schizophrenia genetics through the lens of immediate clinical applicability. Much work remains in translating the recent surge of genetic research discoveries into the clinic. The epidemiology and basic genetic parameters (such as penetrance and expression) of most genomic disorders associated with schizophrenia are not yet well characterized. To date, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is the only established genetic subtype of schizophrenia of proven clinical relevance. We use this well-established association as a model to chart the pathway for translating emerging genetic discoveries into clinical practice. We also propose new directions for research involving general genetic risk prediction and counseling in schizophrenia. PMID:23144566

  20. Genetic risk score analysis indicates migraine with and without comorbid depression are genetically different disorders.

    PubMed

    Ligthart, Lannie; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Lewis, Cathryn M; Farmer, Anne E; Craig, Ian W; Breen, Gerome; Willemsen, Gonneke; Vink, Jacqueline M; Middeldorp, Christel M; Byrne, Enda M; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Pergadia, Michele L; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Penninx, Brenda W J H; McGuffin, Peter; Boomsma, Dorret I; Nyholt, Dale R

    2014-02-01

    Migraine and major depressive disorder (MDD) are comorbid, moderately heritable and to some extent influenced by the same genes. In a previous paper, we suggested the possibility of causality (one trait causing the other) underlying this comorbidity. We present a new application of polygenic (genetic risk) score analysis to investigate the mechanisms underlying the genetic overlap of migraine and MDD. Genetic risk scores were constructed based on data from two discovery samples in which genome-wide association analyses (GWA) were performed for migraine and MDD, respectively. The Australian Twin Migraine GWA study (N = 6,350) included 2,825 migraine cases and 3,525 controls, 805 of whom met the diagnostic criteria for MDD. The RADIANT GWA study (N = 3,230) included 1,636 MDD cases and 1,594 controls. Genetic risk scores for migraine and for MDD were used to predict pure and comorbid forms of migraine and MDD in an independent Dutch target sample (NTR-NESDA, N = 2,966), which included 1,476 MDD cases and 1,058 migraine cases (723 of these individuals had both disorders concurrently). The observed patterns of prediction suggest that the 'pure' forms of migraine and MDD are genetically distinct disorders. The subgroup of individuals with comorbid MDD and migraine were genetically most similar to MDD patients. These results indicate that in at least a subset of migraine patients with MDD, migraine may be a symptom or consequence of MDD.

  1. Genetic risk score analysis indicates migraine with and without comorbid depression are genetically different disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ligthart, Lannie; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Farmer, Anne E.; Craig, Ian W.; Breen, Gerome; Willemsen, Gonneke; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Byrne, Enda M.; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Pergadia, Michele L.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H.; McGuffin, Peter; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Nyholt, Dale R.

    2013-01-01

    Migraine and major depressive disorder (MDD) are comorbid, moderately heritable and to some extent influenced by the same genes. In a previous paper, we suggested the possibility of causality (one trait causing the other) underlying this comorbidity. We present a new application of polygenic (genetic risk) score analysis to investigate the mechanisms underlying the genetic overlap of migraine and MDD. Genetic risk scores were constructed based on data from two discovery samples in which genome-wide association analyses (GWA) were performed for migraine and MDD, respectively. The Australian Twin Migraine GWA study (N = 6350) included 2825 migraine cases and 3525 controls, 805 of whom met the diagnostic criteria for MDD. The RADIANT GWA study (N = 3230) included 1636 MDD cases and 1594 controls. Genetic risk scores for migraine and for MDD were used to predict pure and comorbid forms of migraine and MDD in an independent Dutch target sample (NTR-NESDA, N = 2966), which included 1476 MDD cases and 1058 migraine cases (723 of these individuals had both disorders concurrently). The observed patterns of prediction suggest that the ‘pure’ forms of migraine and MDD are genetically distinct disorders. The subgroup of individuals with comorbid MDD and migraine were genetically most similar to MDD patients. These results indicate that in at least a subset of migraine patients with MDD, migraine may be a symptom or consequence of MDD. PMID:24081561

  2. Pathogenesis of coronary artery disease: focus on genetic risk factors and identification of genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Sayols-Baixeras, Sergi; Lluís-Ganella, Carla; Lucas, Gavin; Elosua, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, and its prevalence is expected to increase in the coming years. CAD events are caused by the interplay of genetic and environmental factors, the effects of which are mainly mediated through cardiovascular risk factors. The techniques used to study the genetic basis of these diseases have evolved from linkage studies to candidate gene studies and genome-wide association studies. Linkage studies have been able to identify genetic variants associated with monogenic diseases, whereas genome-wide association studies have been more successful in determining genetic variants associated with complex diseases. Currently, genome-wide association studies have identified approximately 40 loci that explain 6% of the heritability of CAD. The application of this knowledge to clinical practice is challenging, but can be achieved using various strategies, such as genetic variants to identify new therapeutic targets, personal genetic information to improve disease risk prediction, and pharmacogenomics. The main aim of this narrative review is to provide a general overview of our current understanding of the genetics of coronary artery disease and its potential clinical utility. PMID:24520200

  3. Genetics and biological markers of risk for alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Tabakoff, B; Hoffman, P L

    1988-01-01

    Substantial scientific evidence has accumulated that both genetic and environmental factors predispose the development of alcoholism in certain individuals. Evidence has accumulated to indicate that alcoholism is a heterogeneous entity arising from multiple etiologies. The demonstrated role of genetics in increasing the risk of alcoholism has promoted the search for biological markers that could objectively identify individuals who are genetically predisposed to alcoholism. Identifying such markers could allow for early diagnosis, focused prevention, and differential and type-specific treatment of alcoholism. Promising markers have been provided by research in electrophysiology, endocrinology, and biochemistry. Recent advances in molecular genetics are offering prospects for direct analysis of the human genome to determine elements that provide predisposition to, and protection from, alcoholism. Recent advances in research and new knowledge gained by the alcoholism treatment community and the lay public are helping to diminish the societal damage caused by alcohol abuse and alcoholism and to change prevailing attitudes about them. PMID:3141966

  4. An animal model of differential genetic risk for methamphetamine intake

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Tamara J.; Shabani, Shkelzen

    2015-01-01

    The question of whether genetic factors contribute to risk for methamphetamine (MA) use and dependence has not been intensively investigated. Compared to human populations, genetic animal models offer the advantages of control over genetic family history and drug exposure. Using selective breeding, we created lines of mice that differ in genetic risk for voluntary MA intake and identified the chromosomal addresses of contributory genes. A quantitative trait locus was identified on chromosome 10 that accounts for more than 50% of the genetic variance in MA intake in the selected mouse lines. In addition, behavioral and physiological screening identified differences corresponding with risk for MA intake that have generated hypotheses that are testable in humans. Heightened sensitivity to aversive and certain physiological effects of MA, such as MA-induced reduction in body temperature, are hallmarks of mice bred for low MA intake. Furthermore, unlike MA-avoiding mice, MA-preferring mice are sensitive to rewarding and reinforcing MA effects, and to MA-induced increases in brain extracellular dopamine levels. Gene expression analyses implicate the importance of a network enriched in transcription factor genes, some of which regulate the mu opioid receptor gene, Oprm1, in risk for MA use. Neuroimmune factors appear to play a role in differential response to MA between the mice bred for high and low intake. In addition, chromosome 10 candidate gene studies provide strong support for a trace amine-associated receptor 1 gene, Taar1, polymorphism in risk for MA intake. MA is a trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) agonist, and a non-functional Taar1 allele segregates with high MA consumption. Thus, reduced TAAR1 function has the potential to increase risk for MA use. Overall, existing findings support the MA drinking lines as a powerful model for identifying genetic factors involved in determining risk for harmful MA use. Future directions include the development of a

  5. Assessing individual risk for AMD with genetic counseling, family history, and genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Cascella, R; Strafella, C; Longo, G; Manzo, L; Ragazzo, M; De Felici, C; Gambardella, S; Marsella, L T; Novelli, G; Borgiani, P; Sangiuolo, F; Cusumano, A; Ricci, F; Giardina, E

    2017-09-15

    PurposeThe goal was to develop a simple model for predicting the individual risk profile for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) on the basis of genetic information, disease family history, and smoking habits.Patients and methodsThe study enrolled 151 AMD patients following specific clinical and environmental inclusion criteria: age >55 years, positive family history for AMD, presence of at least one first-degree relative affected by AMD, and smoking habits. All of the samples were genotyped for rs1061170 (CFH) and rs10490924 (ARMS2) with a TaqMan assay, using a 7500 Fast Real Time PCR device. Statistical analysis was subsequently employed to calculate the real individual risk (OR) based on the genetic data (ORgn), family history (ORf), and smoking habits (ORsm).Results and conclusionThe combination of ORgn, ORf, and ORsm allowed the calculation of the Ort that represented the realistic individual risk for developing AMD. In this report, we present a computational model for the estimation of the individual risk for AMD. Moreover, we show that the average distribution of risk alleles in the general population and the knowledge of parents' genotype can be decisive to assess the real disease risk. In this contest, genetic counseling is crucial to provide the patients with an understanding of their individual risk and the availability for preventive actions.Eye advance online publication, 15 September 2017; doi:10.1038/eye.2017.192.

  6. Genetic testing and risk assessment for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

    PubMed

    Ogino, Shuji; Wilson, Robert B

    2002-12-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is one of the most common autosomal recessive diseases, affecting approximately 1 in 10,000 live births, and with a carrier frequency of approximately 1 in 50. Because of gene deletion or conversion, SMN1 exon 7 is homozygously absent in approximately 94% of patients with clinically typical SMA. Approximately 30 small intragenic SMN1 mutations have also been described. These mutations are present in many of the approximately 6% of SMA patients who do not lack both copies of SMN1, whereas SMA of other patients without a homozygous absence of SMN1 is unrelated to SMN1. A commonly used polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay can be used to detect a homozygous absence of SMN1 exon 7. SMN gene dosage analyses, which can determine the copy numbers of SMN1 and SMN2 (an SMN1 homolog and a modifier for SMA), have been developed for SMA carrier testing and to confirm that SMN1 is heterozygously absent in symptomatic individuals who do not lack both copies of SMN1. In conjunction with SMN gene dosage analysis, linkage analysis remains an important component of SMA genetic testing in certain circumstances. Genetic risk assessment is an essential and integral component of SMA genetic testing and impacts genetic counseling both before and after genetic testing is performed. Comprehensive SMA genetic testing, comprising PCR-RFLP assay, SMN gene dosage analysis, and linkage analysis, combined with appropriate genetic risk assessment and genetic counseling, offers the most complete evaluation of SMA patients and their families at this time. New technologies, such as haploid analysis techniques, may be widely available in the future.

  7. Genetic Predisposition to Dyslipidemia and Risk of Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Spracklen, Cassandra N; Saftlas, Audrey F; Triche, Elizabeth W; Bjonnes, Andrew; Keating, Brendan; Saxena, Richa; Breheny, Patrick J; Dewan, Andrew T; Robinson, Jennifer G; Hoh, Josephine; Ryckman, Kelli K

    2015-07-01

    Large epidemiologic studies support the role of dyslipidemia in preeclampsia; however, the etiology of preeclampsia or whether dyslipidemia plays a causal role remains unclear. We examined the association between the genetic predisposition to dyslipidemia and risk of preeclampsia using validated genetic markers of dyslipidemia. Preeclampsia cases (n = 164) and normotensive controls (n = 110) were selected from live birth certificates to nulliparous Iowa women during the period August 2002 to May 2005. Disease status was verified by medical chart review. Genetic predisposition to dyslipidemia was estimated by 4 genetic risk scores (GRS) (total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides) on the basis of established loci for blood lipids. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationships between each of the 4 genotype scores and preeclampsia. Replication analyses were performed in an independent, US population of preeclampsia cases (n = 516) and controls (n = 1,097) of European ancestry. The GRS related to higher levels of TC, LDL-C, and triglycerides demonstrated no association with the risk of preeclampsia in either the Iowa or replication population. The GRS related to lower HDL-C was marginally associated with an increased risk for preeclampsia (odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.99-1.07; P = 0.10). In the independent replication population, the association with the HDL-C GRS was also marginally significant (OR = 1.03, 95% CI: 1.00-1.06; P = 0.04). Our data suggest a potential effect between the genetic predisposition to dyslipidemic levels of HDL-C and an increased risk of preeclampsia, and, as such, suggest that dyslipidemia may be a component along the causal pathway to preeclampsia. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. [Genetic risk factors for recurrent abortion and obstetric complications].

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Ole Bjarne

    2010-03-15

    Maternal risk factors dominate among younger women with multiple miscarriages. In all patients, genetic variants associated with low plasma mannose binding lectin or thrombophilia affect the prognosis negatively. In women with secondary recurrent miscarriage, the HLA-DRB1*03 allele or homozygocity for a HLA-G14 basepair insertion is more frequent than in controls. In patients with a first-born boy carrying HLA class II alleles restricting recognition of HY antigens, the live-birth rate is low. Women with these risk genes also have an increased risk of delivering children with a low birth weight.

  9. Genetic Risk Factors for Thrombosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Rachel; Li, Yonghong; Chang, Monica; Catanese, Joseph; Begovich, Ann B.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; McGwin, Gerald; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Petri, Michelle A.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Taylor, Kimberly E.; Criswell, Lindsey A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Thrombosis is a serious complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We investigated whether genetic variants implicated in thrombosis pathways are associated with thrombosis among two ethnically diverse SLE cohorts. Methods Our discovery cohort consisted of 1698 SLE patients enrolled in the UCSF Lupus Genetics Project and our replication cohort included 1361 SLE patients enrolled in the PROFILE cohort. Patients fulfilled American College of Rheumatology SLE criteria and data relevant to thrombosis were available. Thirty-three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously shown to be associated with risk of deep venous thrombosis in the general population or implicated in thrombosis pathways were genotyped and tested for association with thrombosis in bivariate allelic analyses. SNPs with p<0.1 in the bivariate analyses were further tested in multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, disease duration, anti-phospholipid antibody status, smoking, nephritis, and medications. Results In the discovery cohort, 23% of SLE patients experienced a thrombotic event. SNPs in the following genes demonstrated association with thrombosis risk overall in the discovery or replication cohorts and were assessed using meta-analytic methods: factor V Leiden (FVL) rs6025 (OR 1.85, p 0.02) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) rs1801133 (OR 0.75, p 0.04) in European Americans and fibrinogen gamma (FGG) rs2066865 (OR 1.91, p 0.01) in Hispanic Americans. SNPs associated with venous thrombosis risk included: MTHFR rs1801131 (OR 1.51, p=0.01), MTHFR rs1801133 (OR 0.70, p=0.04), FVL rs6025 (OR 2.69, p=0.002) and FGG rs2066865 (OR 1.49, p=0.02) in European Americans. SNPs associated with arterial thrombosis risk included FGG rs2066865 (OR 2.19, p=0.003) in Hispanics. Conclusion Our results implicate specific genetic risk factors for thrombosis in patients with SLE and suggest that genetic risk for thrombosis differs across ethnic groups

  10. Surprises From Genetic Analyses of Lipid Risk Factors for Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Musunuru, Kiran; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2016-02-19

    Observational epidemiological studies have associated plasma lipid concentrations with risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), but these studies cannot distinguish cause from mere correlation. Human genetic studies, when considered with the results of randomized controlled trials of medications, can potentially shed light on whether lipid biomarkers are causal for diseases. Genetic analyses and randomized trials suggest that low-density lipoprotein is causal for CHD, whereas high-density lipoprotein is not. Surprisingly, human genetic evidence suggests that lipoprotein(a) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins causally contribute to CHD. Gene variants leading to higher levels of plasma apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins [low-density lipoprotein, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, or lipoprotein(a)] consistently increase risk for CHD. For triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, the most compelling evidence revolves around lipoprotein lipase and its endogenous facilitator (APOA5 [apolipoprotein A-V]) and inhibitory proteins (APOC3 [apolipoprotein C-III], ANGPTL4 [angiopoietin like 4]). Combined, these genetic results anticipate that, beyond low-density lipoprotein, pharmacological lowering of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins or lipoprotein(a) will reduce risk for CHD, but this remains to be proven through randomized controlled trials. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Environmental risk assessment for medicinal products containing genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Anliker, B; Longhurst, S; Buchholz, C J

    2010-01-01

    Many gene therapy medicinal products and also some vaccines consist of, or contain, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), which require specific consideration in the environmental risk assessment (ERA) before marketing authorisation or clinical trial applications. The ERA is performed in order to identify the potential risks for public health and the environment, which may arise due to the clinical use of these medicinal products. If such environmental risks are identified and considered as not acceptable, the ERA should go on to propose appropriate risk management strategies capable to reduce these risks. This article will provide an overview of the legal basis and requirements for the ERA of GMO-containing medicinal products in the context of marketing authorisation in the EU and clinical trials in Germany. Furthermore, the scientific principles and methodology that generally need to be followed when preparing an ERA for GMOs are discussed.

  12. Shared genetic factors influence amygdala volumes and risk for alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Dager, Alecia D; McKay, D Reese; Kent, Jack W; Curran, Joanne E; Knowles, Emma; Sprooten, Emma; Göring, Harald H H; Dyer, Thomas D; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Olvera, Rene L; Fox, Peter T; Lovallo, William R; Duggirala, Ravi; Almasy, Laura; Blangero, John; Glahn, David C

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse and dependence (alcohol use disorders, AUDs) are associated with brain shrinkage. Subcortical structures including the amygdala, hippocampus, ventral striatum, dorsal striatum, and thalamus subserve reward functioning and may be particularly vulnerable to alcohol-related damage. These structures may also show pre-existing deficits impacting the development and maintenance of AUD. It remains unclear whether there are common genetic features underlying both subcortical volumes and AUD. In this study, structural brain images were acquired from 872 Mexican-American individuals from extended pedigrees. Subcortical volumes were obtained using FreeSurfer, and quantitative genetic analyses were performed in SOLAR. We hypothesized the following: (1) reduced subcortical volumes in individuals with lifetime AUD relative to unrelated controls; (2) reduced subcortical volumes in individuals with current relative to past AUD; (3) in non-AUD individuals, reduced subcortical volumes in those with a family history of AUD compared to those without; and (4) evidence for common genetic underpinnings (pleiotropy) between AUD risk and subcortical volumes. Results showed that individuals with lifetime AUD showed larger ventricular and smaller amygdala volumes compared to non-AUD individuals. For the amygdala, there were no differences in volume between current vs past AUD, and non-AUD individuals with a family history of AUD demonstrated reductions compared to those with no such family history. Finally, amygdala volume was genetically correlated with the risk for AUD. Together, these results suggest that reduced amygdala volume reflects a pre-existing difference rather than alcohol-induced neurotoxic damage. Our genetic correlation analysis provides evidence for a common genetic factor underlying both reduced amygdala volumes and AUD risk.

  13. Shared Genetic Factors Influence Amygdala Volumes and Risk for Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Dager, Alecia D; McKay, D Reese; Kent, Jack W; Curran, Joanne E; Knowles, Emma; Sprooten, Emma; Göring, Harald HH; Dyer, Thomas D; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Olvera, Rene L; Fox, Peter T; Lovallo, William R; Duggirala, Ravi; Almasy, Laura; Blangero, John; Glahn, David C

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse and dependence (alcohol use disorders, AUDs) are associated with brain shrinkage. Subcortical structures including the amygdala, hippocampus, ventral striatum, dorsal striatum, and thalamus subserve reward functioning and may be particularly vulnerable to alcohol-related damage. These structures may also show pre-existing deficits impacting the development and maintenance of AUD. It remains unclear whether there are common genetic features underlying both subcortical volumes and AUD. In this study, structural brain images were acquired from 872 Mexican-American individuals from extended pedigrees. Subcortical volumes were obtained using FreeSurfer, and quantitative genetic analyses were performed in SOLAR. We hypothesized the following: (1) reduced subcortical volumes in individuals with lifetime AUD relative to unrelated controls; (2) reduced subcortical volumes in individuals with current relative to past AUD; (3) in non-AUD individuals, reduced subcortical volumes in those with a family history of AUD compared to those without; and (4) evidence for common genetic underpinnings (pleiotropy) between AUD risk and subcortical volumes. Results showed that individuals with lifetime AUD showed larger ventricular and smaller amygdala volumes compared to non-AUD individuals. For the amygdala, there were no differences in volume between current vs past AUD, and non-AUD individuals with a family history of AUD demonstrated reductions compared to those with no such family history. Finally, amygdala volume was genetically correlated with the risk for AUD. Together, these results suggest that reduced amygdala volume reflects a pre-existing difference rather than alcohol-induced neurotoxic damage. Our genetic correlation analysis provides evidence for a common genetic factor underlying both reduced amygdala volumes and AUD risk. PMID:25079289

  14. Aquaculture: Incorporating risk assessment and risk management into public policies on genetically modified finfish and shellfish

    SciTech Connect

    Hallerman, E.M.; Kapuscinski, A.R.

    1995-12-31

    Genetically modified finfish and shellfish pose economic benefits to aquaculture, but also pose ecological and genetic risks to ecosystems receiving such organisms. Realization of benefits with minimization of risks posed by a new technology can be addressed through the processes of risk assessment and risk management. Public policies adopted by individual countries will reflect differences in the outocme of risk assessment and risk management processes resulting from differences among the receiving ecosystems and sets of human values at issue. A number of countries and international institutions have begun development of policies for oversight of genetically modified aquatic organisms. In the United States, a working group commissioned by the U.S. Department of Agriculture incorporated risk assessment and risk management principles into draft performance standards for safely conducting research with genetically modified finfish and shellfish. The performance standards address research with a broad range of aquatic GMO`s and compliance is intended to be voluntary. In contrast, the Canadian policy mandates adherence to specified guidelines for experiments with transgenic aquatic organisms; establishment as national policy is expended soon.

  15. Assessment of the value of a genetic risk score in improving the estimation of coronary risk

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The American Heart Association has established criteria for the evaluation of novel markers of cardiovascular risk. In accordance with these criteria, we assessed the association between a multi-locus genetic risk score (GRS) and incident coronary heart disease (CHD), and evaluated whether this GRS ...

  16. A conceptual model of geological risk in the Ischia Island (Italy): highlights on volcanic history, seismicity and flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlino, Stefano; Cubellis, Elena; Iannuzzi, Raffaello; Luongo, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    During the last eight centuries the island of Ischia was hit by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and floods producing heavy damages and numerous fatalities. Since the last twenty century the Ischia population is grown very fast, nowadays more than 56.000 people live in the island and 4 million of people visit it during the year, thus this area is characterised as an high geological risk territory. The island is here presented as an interesting "laboratory" for volcanic, seismic and hydrogeological risks assessment, from which to draw lessons for planning in risk areas. Ischia is a volcanic field, formed by the succession of effusive and explosive eruptions which formed lavas, welded and loose pyroclastic rocks. The succession of rock layers, with different permeability, promotes, during heavy rainfall, the formation of flows with high kinetic energy, which can produce devastating landslides. In this context, the remarkable development of settlements in the island, occurred in recent times, and the lack of planning that bring attention to the vulnerability of the area, have produced an exponential risk increase. Eruptions, earthquakes, flooding occurred in the island of Ischia in the past, have produced a wealth literature about catastrophic natural events. In general, the accounts of the events were recorded by various means, such as: newspaper, property disputes, historical and sociological analysis, poetic or artistic works, scientific analysis. As regard volcanism, earthquakes, tsunamis, there are myths, legends, historical documents, archaeological findings and results of recent surveys. Documented descriptions of historical eruptive events are only available for the last eruption of 1301-1302, while there are records for eruptive events in the early centuries of the Christian Age. More comprehensive accounts are available about historical seismicity. Information and documentations are available since the 1228 earthquake. However, more detailed and useful

  17. Understanding inherited genetic risk of adult glioma – a review

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Terri; Lachance, Daniel H.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Francis, Stephen S.; Wiemels, Joseph; Jenkins, Robert B.; Wiencke, John K.; Wrensch, Margaret R.

    2016-01-01

    During the past six years, researchers have made major progress identifying common inherited genetic variation that increases risk for primary adult glioma. This paper summarizes knowledge about rare familial cancer syndromes that include adult glioma and reviews the available literature on the more recently discovered common inherited variation. Ten independent inherited variants in eight chromosomal regions have been convincingly associated with increased risk for adult glioma. Most of these variants increase relative risk of primary adult glioma by 20% to 40%, but the TP53 variant rs78378222 confers a two-fold relative risk (ie, 200%), and rs557505857 on chromosome 8 confers a six-fold relative risk of IDH-mutated astrocytomas and oligodendroglial tumors (ie, 600%). Even with a six-fold relative risk, the overall risk of developing adult glioma is too low for screening for the high-risk variant on chromosome 8. Future studies will help clarify which inherited adult glioma risk variants are associated with subtypes defined by histology and/or acquired tumor mutations. This review also provides an information sheet for primary adult glioma patients and their families. PMID:26941959

  18. Understanding inherited genetic risk of adult glioma - a review.

    PubMed

    Rice, Terri; Lachance, Daniel H; Molinaro, Annette M; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Walsh, Kyle M; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Ostrom, Quinn T; Francis, Stephen S; Wiemels, Joseph; Jenkins, Robert B; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2016-03-01

    During the past six years, researchers have made major progress identifying common inherited genetic variation that increases risk for primary adult glioma. This paper summarizes knowledge about rare familial cancer syndromes that include adult glioma and reviews the available literature on the more recently discovered common inherited variation. Ten independent inherited variants in eight chromosomal regions have been convincingly associated with increased risk for adult glioma. Most of these variants increase relative risk of primary adult glioma by 20% to 40%, but the TP53 variant rs78378222 confers a two-fold relative risk (ie, 200%), and rs557505857 on chromosome 8 confers a six-fold relative risk of IDH-mutated astrocytomas and oligodendroglial tumors (ie, 600%). Even with a six-fold relative risk, the overall risk of developing adult glioma is too low for screening for the high-risk variant on chromosome 8. Future studies will help clarify which inherited adult glioma risk variants are associated with subtypes defined by histology and/or acquired tumor mutations. This review also provides an information sheet for primary adult glioma patients and their families.

  19. Metabolic factors and genetic risk mediate familial type 2 diabetes risk in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Sridharan; Porneala, Bianca; McKeown, Nicola; Fox, Caroline S.; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Type 2 diabetes mellitus in parents is a strong determinant of diabetes risk in their offspring. We hypothesise that offspring diabetes risk associated with parental diabetes is mediated by metabolic risk factors. Methods We studied initially non-diabetic participants of the Framingham Offspring Study. Metabolic risk was estimated using beta cell corrected insulin response (CIR), HOMA-IR or a count of metabolic syndrome components (metabolic syndrome score [MSS]). Dietary risk and physical activity were estimated using questionnaire responses. Genetic risk score (GRS) was estimated as the count of 62 type 2 diabetes risk alleles. The outcome of incident diabetes in offspring was examined across levels of parental diabetes exposure, accounting for sibling correlation and adjusting for age, sex and putative mediators. The proportion mediated was estimated by comparing regression coefficients for parental diabetes with (βadj) and without (βunadj) adjustments for CIR, HOMA-IR, MSS and GRS (percentage mediated = 1 – βadj / βunadj). Results Metabolic factors mediated 11% of offspring diabetes risk associated with parental diabetes, corresponding to a reduction in OR per diabetic parent from 2.13 to 1.96. GRS mediated 9% of risk, corresponding to a reduction in OR per diabetic parent from 2.13 to 1.99. Conclusions/interpretation Metabolic risk factors partially mediated offspring type 2 diabetes risk conferred by parental diabetes to a similar magnitude as genetic risk. However, a substantial proportion of offspring diabetes risk associated with parental diabetes remains unexplained by metabolic factors, genetic risk, diet and physical activity, suggesting that important familial influences on diabetes risk remain undiscovered. PMID:25619168

  20. Mapping autism risk loci using genetic linkage and chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Szatmari, Peter; Paterson, Andrew; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Brian, Jessica; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Vincent, John; Skaug, Jennifer; Thompson, Ann; Senman, Lili; Feuk, Lars; Qian, Cheng; Bryson, Susan; Jones, Marshall; Marshall, Christian; Scherer, Stephen; Vieland, Veronica; Bartlett, Christopher; Mangin, La Vonne; Goedken, Rhinda; Segre, Alberto; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Cuccaro, Michael; Gilbert, John; Wright, Harry; Abramson, Ruth; Betancur, Catalina; Bourgeron, Thomas; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion; Buxbaum, Joseph; Davis, Kenneth; Hollander, Eric; Silverman, Jeremy; Hallmayer, Joachim; Lotspeich, Linda; Sutcliffe, James; Haines, Jonathan; Folstein, Susan; Piven, Joseph; Wassink, Thomas; Sheffield, Val; Geschwind, Daniel; Bucan, Maja; Brown, Ted; Cantor, Rita; Constantino, John; Gilliam, Conrad; Herbert, Martha; Lajonchere, Clara; Ledbetter, David; Lese-Martin, Christa; Miller, Janet; Nelson, Stan; Samango-Sprouse, Carol; Spence, Sarah; State, Matthew; Tanzi, Rudolph; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Devlin, Bernie; Estes, Annette; Flodman, Pamela; Klei, Lambertus; Mcmahon, William; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeff; Korvatska, Elena; Rodier, Patricia; Schellenberg, Gerard; Smith, Moyra; Spence, Anne; Stodgell, Chris; Tepper, Ping Guo; Wijsman, Ellen; Yu, Chang-En; Rogé, Bernadette; Mantoulan, Carine; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Poustka, Annemarie; Felder, Bärbel; Klauck, Sabine; Schuster, Claudia; Poustka, Fritz; Bölte, Sven; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Herbrecht, Evelyn; Schmötzer, Gabi; Tsiantis, John; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Carone, Simona; Toma, Claudio; Van Engeland, Herman; De Jonge, Maretha; Kemner, Chantal; Koop, Frederieke; Langemeijer, Marjolein; Hijmans, Channa; Staal, Wouter; Baird, Gillian; Bolton, Patrick; Rutter, Michael; Weisblatt, Emma; Green, Jonathan; Aldred, Catherine; Wilkinson, Julie-Anne; Pickles, Andrew; Le Couteur, Ann; Berney, Tom; Mcconachie, Helen; Bailey, Anthony; Francis, Kostas; Honeyman, Gemma; Hutchinson, Aislinn; Parr, Jeremy; Wallace, Simon; Monaco, Anthony; Barnby, Gabrielle; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Lamb, Janine; Sousa, Ines; Sykes, Nuala; Cook, Edwin; Guter, Stephen; Leventhal, Bennett; Salt, Jeff; Lord, Catherine; Corsello, Christina; Hus, Vanessa; Weeks, Daniel; Volkmar, Fred; Tauber, Maïté; Fombonne, Eric; Shih, Andy; Meyer, Kacie

    2007-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are common, heritable neurodevelopmental conditions. The genetic architecture of ASD is complex, requiring large samples to overcome heterogeneity. Here we broaden coverage and sample size relative to other studies of ASD by using Affymetrix 10K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and 1168 families with ≥ 2 affected individuals to perform the largest linkage scan to date, while also analyzing copy number variation (CNV) in these families. Linkage and CNV analyses implicate chromosome 11p12-p13 and neurexins, respectively, amongst other candidate loci. Neurexins team with previously-implicated neuroligins for glutamatergic synaptogenesis, highlighting glutamate-related genes as promising candidates for ASD. PMID:17322880

  1. Screening, genetics, risk factors, and treatment of neonatal cataracts.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyu; Xia, Chun-Hong; Wang, Eddie; Yao, Ke; Gong, Xiaohua

    2017-06-01

    Neonatal cataracts remain the most common cause of visual loss in children worldwide and have diverse, often unknown, etiologies. This review summarizes current knowledge about the detection, treatment, genetics, risk factors, and molecular mechanisms of congenital cataracts. We emphasize significant progress and topics requiring further study in both clinical cataract therapy and basic lens research. Advances in genetic screening and surgical technologies have improved the diagnosis, management, and visual outcomes of affected children. For example, mutations in lens crystallins and membrane/cytoskeletal components that commonly underlie genetically inherited cataracts are now known. However, many questions still remain regarding the causes, progression, and pathology of neonatal cataracts. Further investigations are also required to improve diagnostic criteria for determining the timing of appropriate interventions, such as the implantation of intraocular lenses and postoperative management strategies, to ensure safety and predictable visual outcomes for children. Birth Defects Research 109:734-743, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Increased genetic risk for obesity in premature coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Cole, Christopher B; Nikpay, Majid; Stewart, Alexandre F R; McPherson, Ruth

    2016-04-01

    There is ongoing controversy as to whether obesity confers risk for CAD independently of associated risk factors including diabetes mellitus. We have carried out a Mendelian randomization study using a genetic risk score (GRS) for body mass index (BMI) based on 35 risk alleles to investigate this question in a population of 5831 early onset CAD cases without diabetes mellitus and 3832 elderly healthy control subjects, all of strictly European ancestry, with adjustment for traditional risk factors (TRFs). We then estimated the genetic correlation between these BMI and CAD (rg) by relating the pairwise genetic similarity matrix to a phenotypic covariance matrix between these two traits. GRSBMI significantly (P=2.12 × 10(-12)) associated with CAD status in a multivariate model adjusted for TRFs, with a per allele odds ratio (OR) of 1.06 (95% CI 1.042-1.076). The addition of GRSBMI to TRFs explained 0.75% of CAD variance and yielded a continuous net recombination index of 16.54% (95% CI=11.82-21.26%, P<0.0001). To test whether GRSBMI explained CAD status when adjusted for measured BMI, separate models were constructed in which the score and BMI were either included as covariates or not. The addition of BMI explained ~1.9% of CAD variance and GRSBMI plus BMI explained 2.65% of CAD variance. Finally, using bivariate restricted maximum likelihood analysis, we provide strong evidence of genome-wide pleiotropy between obesity and CAD. This analysis supports the hypothesis that obesity is a causal risk factor for CAD.

  3. Assessing and Managing Risk when Sharing Aggregate Genetic Variant Data

    PubMed Central

    Craig, David W.; Goor, Robert; Wang, Zhenyan; Paschall, Justin; Ostell, Jim; Feolo, Mike; Sherry, Stephen T.; Manolio, Teri A.

    2012-01-01

    Preface Access to genetic data across studies is an important aspect of identifying new genetic associations through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Meta-analysis across multiple GWAS with combined cohort sizes of tens of thousands of individuals often uncovers many more genome-wide associated loci than the original individual studies, which emphasizes the importance of tools and mechanisms for data sharing. However, even sharing summary-level data, such as allele frequencies, inherently carries some degree of privacy risk to study participants. Here we discuss mechanisms and resources for sharing data from GWAS, particularly focusing on approaches for assessing and quantifying privacy risks to participants from sharing of summary-level data. PMID:21921928

  4. Genetically modified foods: hazard identification and risk assessment. Session summary.

    PubMed

    Ito, Nobuyuki

    2002-07-01

    During a Joint Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP)/International Federation of Societies of Toxicologic Pathologists (IFSTP) International Symposium, held between June 24 and 28, 2001, in Orlando, FL, USA, there was a session entitled as "Genetically Modified Foods: Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment". The purpose of this session was to present and discuss the current situations in the US, European Union and Japan for the public concerns, safety assessments and regulations on genetically modified (GM) products used as foods or food ingredients. Assuming the wide and fast growing of the usage of GM products, it is the duty for us as toxicologic pathologists, to supply reliable data on their safety and possible risks or hazards as a world-wide basis to not only governments or regulatory agencies but also general public of our countries.

  5. FDA Approves 1st Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Risk Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... 164507.html FDA Approves 1st Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Risk Tests They screen for gene variants linked ... on Thursday approved the first direct-to-consumer genetic health risk tests. Known as the 23andMe Personal ...

  6. Assessment of the value of a genetic risk score in improving the estimation of coronary risk

    PubMed Central

    Lluis-Ganella, Carla; Subirana, Isaac; Lucas, Gavin; Tomás, Marta; Muñoz, Daniel; Sentí, Mariano; Salas, Eduardo; Sala, Joan; Ramos, Rafel; Ordovas, Jose M; Marrugat, Jaume; Elosua, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Background The American Heart Association has established criteria for the evaluation of novel markers of cardiovascular risk. In accordance with these criteria, we assessed the association between a multi-locus genetic risk score (GRS) and incident coronary heart disease (CHD), and evaluated whether this GRS improves the predictive capacity of the Framingham risk function. Methods and results Using eight genetic variants associated with CHD but not with classical cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs), we generated a multi-locus GRS, and found it to be linearly associated with CHD in two population based cohorts: The REGICOR Study (n=2,351) and The Framingham Heart Study (n=3,537) (meta-analyzed HR [95%CI]: ~1.13 [1.01–1.27], per unit). Inclusion of the GRS in the Framingham risk function improved its discriminative capacity in the Framingham sample (c-statistic: 72.81 vs.72.37, p=0.042) but not in the REGICOR sample. According to both the net reclassification improvement (NRI) index and the integrated discrimination index (IDI), the GRS improved re-classification among individuals with intermediate coronary risk (meta-analysis NRI [95%CI]: 17.44 [8.04; 26.83]), but not overall. Conclusions A multi-locus GRS based on genetic variants unrelated to CVRFs was associated with a linear increase in risk of CHD events in two distinct populations. This GRS improves risk reclassification particularly in the population at intermediate coronary risk. These results indicate the potential value of the inclusion of genetic information in classical functions for risk assessment in the intermediate risk population group. PMID:22521901

  7. Identification of new genetic risk factors for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Michelle; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Giles, Graham G.; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Jugurnauth, Sarah K.; Mulholland, Shani; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Edwards, Stephen M.; Morrison, Jonathan; Field, Helen I.; Southey, Melissa C.; Severi, Gianluca; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Dearnaley, David P.; Muir, Kenneth R.; Smith, Charmaine; Bagnato, Melisa; Ardern-Jones, Audrey T.; Hall, Amanda L.; O'Brien, Lynne T.; Gehr-Swain, Beatrice N.; Wilkinson, Rosemary A.; Cox, Angela; Lewis, Sarah; Brown, Paul M.; Jhavar, Sameer G.; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Bryant, Sarah L.; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Parker, Christopher C.; Woodhouse, Christopher J.; Thompson, Alan; Christmas, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Fisher, Cyril; Jameson, Charles; Cooper, Colin S.; English, Dallas R.; Hopper, John L.; Neal, David E.; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that a substantial part of genetic predisposition to prostate cancer (PCa) may be due to lower penetrance genes which are found by genome-wide association studies. We have recently conducted such a study and seven new regions of the genome linked to PCa risk have been identified. Three of these loci contain candidate susceptibility genes: MSMB, LMTK2 and KLK2/3. The MSMB and KLK2/3 genes may be useful for PCa screening, and the LMTK2 gene might provide a potential therapeutic target. Together with results from other groups, there are now 23 germline genetic variants which have been reported. These results have the potential to be developed into a genetic test. However, we consider that marketing of tests to the public is premature, as PCa risk can not be evaluated fully at this stage and the appropriate screening protocols need to be developed. Follow-up validation studies, as well as studies to explore the psychological implications of genetic profile testing, will be vital prior to roll out into healthcare. PMID:19050691

  8. Epidemiology and Genetic Risk Factors of Drug Hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Jawad; Odin, Joseph A

    2017-02-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) from prescription medications and herbal and dietary supplements has an annual incidence rate of approximately 20 cases per 100,000 per year. However, the risk of DILI varies greatly according to the drug. In the United States and Europe, antimicrobials are the commonest implicated agents, with amoxicillin/clavulanate the most common, whereas in Asian countries, herbal and dietary supplements predominate. Genetic analysis of DILI is currently limited, but multiple polymorphisms of human leukocyte antigen genes and genes involved in drug metabolism and transport have been identified as risk factors for DILI.

  9. Familial predisposition and genetic risk factors for lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Slager, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of familial predisposition to lymphoma (collectively defined as non-Hodgkin lymphoma [NHL], Hodgkin lymphoma [HL], and chronic lymphocytic leukemia [CLL]) outside of rare hereditary syndromes has progressed rapidly during the last decade. First-degree relatives of NHL, HL, and CLL patients have an ∼1.7-fold, 3.1-fold, and 8.5-fold elevated risk of developing NHL, HL, and CLL, respectively. These familial risks are elevated for multiple lymphoma subtypes and do not appear to be confounded by nongenetic risk factors, suggesting at least some shared genetic etiology across the lymphoma subtypes. However, a family history of a specific subtype is most strongly associated with risk for that subtype, supporting subtype-specific genetic factors. Although candidate gene studies have had limited success in identifying susceptibility loci, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified 67 single nucleotide polymorphisms from 41 loci, predominately associated with specific subtypes. In general, these GWAS-discovered loci are common (minor allele frequency >5%), have small effect sizes (odds ratios, 0.60-2.0), and are of largely unknown function. The relatively low incidence of lymphoma, modest familial risk, and the lack of a screening test and associated intervention, all argue against active clinical surveillance for lymphoma in affected families at this time. PMID:26405224

  10. Cerivastatin, Genetic Variants, and the Risk of Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Marciante, Kristin D.; Durda, Jon P.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Lumley, Thomas; Rice, Ken; McKnight, Barbara; Totah, Rheem A.; Tamraz, Bani; Kroetz, Deanna L.; Fukushima, Hisayo; Kaspera, Rüdiger; Bis, Joshua C.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Li, Guo; Austin, Thomas R.; Taylor, Kent D.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Jaquish, Cashell E.; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Tracy, Russell P.; Psaty, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The withdrawal of cerivastatin involved an uncommon but serious adverse reaction, rhabdomyolysis. The bimodal response--rhabdomyolysis in a small proportion of users-- points to genetic factors as a potential cause. We conducted a case-control study to evaluate genetic markers for cerivastatin-associated rhabdomyolysis. Methods The study had two components: a candidate gene study to evaluate variants in CYP2C8, UGT1A1, UGT1A3, and SLCO1B1; and a genome-wide association (GWA) study to identify risk factors in other regions of the genome. 185 rhabdomyolysis cases were frequency matched to statin-using controls from the Cardiovascular Health Study (n=374) and the Heart and Vascular Health Study (n=358). Validation relied on functional studies. Results Permutation test results suggested an association between cerivastatin-associated rhabdomyolysis and variants in SLCO1B1 (p = 0.002), but not variants in CYP2C8 (p = 0.073) or the UGTs (p = 0.523). An additional copy of the minor allele of SLCO1B1 rs4149056 (p.Val174Ala) was associated with the risk of rhabdomyolysis (OR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.40 to 2.56). In transfected cells, this variant reduced cerivastatin transport by 40% compared with the reference transporter (p < 0.001). The GWA identified an intronic variant (rs2819742) in the ryanodine receptor 2 gene (RYR2) as significant (p=1.74E-07). An additional copy of the minor allele of the RYR2 variant was associated with a reduced risk of rhabdomyolysis (OR: 0.48; 95% CI: 0.36 to 0.63). Conclusion We identified modest genetic risk factors for an extreme response to cerivastatin. Disabling genetic variants in the candidate genes were not responsible for the bimodal response to cerivastatin. PMID:21386754

  11. Genetic risks for children of women with myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Koch, M C; Grimm, T; Harley, H G; Harper, P S

    1991-06-01

    In genetic counseling, the recommended risk estimate that any heterozygous woman with myotonic dystrophy (DM) will have a congenitally affected child is 3%-9%. However, after already having had such an offspring, a DM mother's risk increases to 20%-37%. The risks of 10% and 41%, respectively, calculated in this study are similar to the estimates in the literature. However, our data on clinical status of the mothers demonstrate that only women with multisystem effects of the disorder at the time of pregnancy and delivery are likely to have congenitally affected offspring. No heterozygous woman with polychromatic lens changes but no other clinically detectable multisystem involvement had a congenitally affected child. In addition, our data suggest that the chance of having a more severely affected child increases with greater severity of maternal disease. The findings of this study are relevant for genetic counseling, as the risk of having a congenitally affected child for women with classical manifestations of the disease is shown to be higher than predicted by the overall risk estimate for any heterozygous woman. We consider it appropriate to give these classically affected women risk figures which approach the recurrence risk given to mothers with congenitally affected children. However, the risk of having a congenitally affected child for heterozygous women with no multisystem involvement appears to be minimal. Our findings support the earlier proposed hypothesis of maternal metabolites acting on a heterozygous offspring. Neither genomic imprinting nor mitochondrial inheritance is able to explain the correlation between the clinical status of heterozygous mothers and that of their children.

  12. Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Genetic Risk of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qibin; Chu, Audrey Y.; Kang, Jae H.; Jensen, Majken K.; Curhan, Gary C.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Ridker, Paul M.; Hunter, David J.; Willett, Walter C.; Rimm, Eric B.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Hu, Frank B.; Qi, Lu

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Temporal increases in the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages have paralleled the rise in obesity prevalence, but whether the intake of such beverages interacts with the genetic predisposition to adiposity is unknown. METHODS We analyzed the interaction between genetic predisposition and the intake of sugar-sweetened beverages in relation to body-mass index (BMI; the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) and obesity risk in 6934 women from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and in 4423 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) and also in a replication cohort of 21,740 women from the Women’s Genome Health Study (WGHS). The genetic-predisposition score was calculated on the basis of 32 BMI-associated loci. The intake of sugar-sweetened beverages was examined prospectively in relation to BMI. RESULTS In the NHS and HPFS cohorts, the genetic association with BMI was stronger among participants with higher intake of sugar-sweetened beverages than among those with lower intake. In the combined cohorts, the increases in BMI per increment of 10 risk alleles were 1.00 for an intake of less than one serving per month, 1.12 for one to four servings per month, 1.38 for two to six servings per week, and 1.78 for one or more servings per day (P<0.001 for interaction). For the same categories of intake, the relative risks of incident obesity per increment of 10 risk alleles were 1.19 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90 to 1.59), 1.67 (95% CI, 1.28 to 2.16), 1.58 (95% CI, 1.01 to 2.47), and 5.06 (95% CI, 1.66 to 15.5) (P = 0.02 for interaction). In the WGHS cohort, the increases in BMI per increment of 10 risk alleles were 1.39, 1.64, 1.90, and 2.53 across the four categories of intake (P = 0.001 for interaction); the relative risks for incident obesity were 1.40 (95% CI, 1.19 to 1.64), 1.50 (95% CI, 1.16 to 1.93), 1.54 (95% CI, 1.21 to 1.94), and 3.16 (95% CI, 2.03 to 4.92), respectively (P = 0.007 for interaction

  13. Sugar-sweetened beverages and genetic risk of obesity.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qibin; Chu, Audrey Y; Kang, Jae H; Jensen, Majken K; Curhan, Gary C; Pasquale, Louis R; Ridker, Paul M; Hunter, David J; Willett, Walter C; Rimm, Eric B; Chasman, Daniel I; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2012-10-11

    Temporal increases in the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages have paralleled the rise in obesity prevalence, but whether the intake of such beverages interacts with the genetic predisposition to adiposity is unknown. We analyzed the interaction between genetic predisposition and the intake of sugar-sweetened beverages in relation to body-mass index (BMI; the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) and obesity risk in 6934 women from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and in 4423 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) and also in a replication cohort of 21,740 women from the Women's Genome Health Study (WGHS). The genetic-predisposition score was calculated on the basis of 32 BMI-associated loci. The intake of sugar-sweetened beverages was examined prospectively in relation to BMI. In the NHS and HPFS cohorts, the genetic association with BMI was stronger among participants with higher intake of sugar-sweetened beverages than among those with lower intake. In the combined cohorts, the increases in BMI per increment of 10 risk alleles were 1.00 for an intake of less than one serving per month, 1.12 for one to four servings per month, 1.38 for two to six servings per week, and 1.78 for one or more servings per day (P<0.001 for interaction). For the same categories of intake, the relative risks of incident obesity per increment of 10 risk alleles were 1.19 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90 to 1.59), 1.67 (95% CI, 1.28 to 2.16), 1.58 (95% CI, 1.01 to 2.47), and 5.06 (95% CI, 1.66 to 15.5) (P=0.02 for interaction). In the WGHS cohort, the increases in BMI per increment of 10 risk alleles were 1.39, 1.64, 1.90, and 2.53 across the four categories of intake (P=0.001 for interaction); the relative risks for incident obesity were 1.40 (95% CI, 1.19 to 1.64), 1.50 (95% CI, 1.16 to 1.93), 1.54 (95% CI, 1.21 to 1.94), and 3.16 (95% CI, 2.03 to 4.92), respectively (P=0.007 for interaction). The genetic association with adiposity

  14. Multi-locus genetic risk score predicts risk for Crohn’s disease in Slovenian population

    PubMed Central

    Zupančič, Katarina; Skok, Kristijan; Repnik, Katja; Weersma, Rinse K; Potočnik, Uroš; Skok, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop a risk model for Crohn’s disease (CD) based on homogeneous population. METHODS: In our study were included 160 CD patients and 209 healthy individuals from Slovenia. The association study was performed for 112 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We generated genetic risk scores (GRS) based on the number of risk alleles using weighted additive model. Discriminatory accuracy was measured by area under ROC curve (AUC). For risk evaluation, we divided individuals according to positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR) of a test, with LR > 5 for high risk group and LR < 0.20 for low risk group. RESULTS: The highest accuracy, AUC of 0.78 was achieved with GRS combining 33 SNPs with optimal sensitivity and specificity of 75.0% and 72.7%, respectively. Individuals with the highest risk (GRS > 5.54) showed significantly increased odds of developing CD (OR = 26.65, 95%CI: 11.25-63.15) compared to the individuals with the lowest risk (GRS < 4.57) which is a considerably greater risk captured than in one SNP with the highest effect size (OR = 3.24). When more than 33 SNPs were included in GRS, discriminatory ability was not improved significantly; AUC of all 74 SNPs was 0.76. CONCLUSION: The authors proved the possibility of building accurate genetic risk score based on 33 risk variants on Slovenian CD patients which may serve as a screening tool in the targeted population. PMID:27076762

  15. Multi-locus genetic risk score predicts risk for Crohn's disease in Slovenian population.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Katarina; Skok, Kristijan; Repnik, Katja; Weersma, Rinse K; Potočnik, Uroš; Skok, Pavel

    2016-04-14

    To develop a risk model for Crohn's disease (CD) based on homogeneous population. In our study were included 160 CD patients and 209 healthy individuals from Slovenia. The association study was performed for 112 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We generated genetic risk scores (GRS) based on the number of risk alleles using weighted additive model. Discriminatory accuracy was measured by area under ROC curve (AUC). For risk evaluation, we divided individuals according to positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR) of a test, with LR > 5 for high risk group and LR < 0.20 for low risk group. The highest accuracy, AUC of 0.78 was achieved with GRS combining 33 SNPs with optimal sensitivity and specificity of 75.0% and 72.7%, respectively. Individuals with the highest risk (GRS > 5.54) showed significantly increased odds of developing CD (OR = 26.65, 95%CI: 11.25-63.15) compared to the individuals with the lowest risk (GRS < 4.57) which is a considerably greater risk captured than in one SNP with the highest effect size (OR = 3.24). When more than 33 SNPs were included in GRS, discriminatory ability was not improved significantly; AUC of all 74 SNPs was 0.76. The authors proved the possibility of building accurate genetic risk score based on 33 risk variants on Slovenian CD patients which may serve as a screening tool in the targeted population.

  16. Orthodontic Treatment, Genetic Factors and Risk of Temporomandibular Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Gary D.; Diatchenko, Luda; Ohrbach, Richard; Maixner, William

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, four groups of factors have been identified in the etiology of temporomandibular disorder (TMD): anatomical variation in the masticatory system; psychosocial characteristics; pain in other body regions; and demographics. Orthodontic treatment has been variously cited both as a protective and harmful factor in TMD etiology. Recently, a search has begun for a genetic influence on TMD etiology. Genetic markers can be of additional value in identifying gene-environment interactions, that is, isolating population sub-groups, defined by genotype in which environmental influences play a relatively greater or lesser etiological role. This paper reviews concepts and study design requirements for epidemiological investigations into TMD etiology. Findings are presented from a prospective cohort study of 186 females that illustrate an example of gene-environment interaction in TMD onset. Among people with a variant of the gene encoding catechol-O-methyl-transferase, an enzyme associated with pain responsiveness, risk of developing TMD was significantly greater for subjects who reported a history of orthodontic treatment compared with subjects who did not (P=0.04). While further studies are needed to investigate TMD etiology, this genetic variant potentially could help to identify patients whose risk of developing TMD is heightened following orthodontic treatment, hence serving as a risk marker useful in planning orthodontic care. PMID:18663384

  17. How does genetic risk information for Lynch syndrome translate to risk management behaviours?

    PubMed

    Steel, Emma; Robbins, Andrew; Jenkins, Mark; Flander, Louisa; Gaff, Clara; Keogh, Louise

    2017-01-01

    There is limited research on why some individuals who have undergone predictive genetic testing for Lynch syndrome do not adhere to screening recommendations. This study aimed to explore qualitatively how Lynch syndrome non-carriers and carriers translate genetic risk information and advice to decisions about risk managment behaviours in the Australian healthcare system. Participants of the Australasian Colorectal Cancer Family Registry who had undergone predictive genetic testing for Lynch syndrome were interviewed on their risk management behaviours. Transcripts were analysed thematically using a comparative coding analysis. Thirty-three people were interviewed. Of the non-carriers (n = 16), 2 reported having apparently unnecessary colonoscopies, and 6 were unsure about what population-based colorectal cancer screening entails. Of the carriers (n = 17), 2 reported they had not had regular colonoscopies, and spoke about their discomfort with the screening process and a lack of faith in the procedure's ability to reduce their risk of developing colorectal cancer. Of the female carriers (n = 9), 2 could not recall being informed about the associated risk of gynaecological cancers. Non-carriers and female carriers of Lynch syndrome could benefit from further clarity and advice about appropriate risk management options. For those carriers who did not adhere to colonoscopy screening, a lack of faith in both genetic test results and screening were evident. It is essential that consistent advice is offered to both carriers and non-carriers of Lynch syndrome.

  18. Interplay of genetic risk (CHRNA5) and environmental risk (partner smoking) on cigarette smoking reduction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Shiun; Baker, Timothy B; Piper, Megan E; Smith, Stevens S; Gu, Charles; Grucza, Richard A; Smith, George Davey; Munafo, Marcus; Bierut, Laura J

    2014-10-01

    This study tests whether the genetic predictor (CHRNA5 nicotine receptor gene variants) and an environmental risk factor (partner smoking) interact in the prediction of smoking reduction. Subjects were from a community-based, longitudinal study of women (n=1856) who smoked before pregnancy, and a randomized comparative effectiveness smoking cessation trial (n=1065). Smoking reduction was defined as the trajectory of self-reported smoking quantities over time in the observational study, and as the trajectory of alveolar CO levels in the cessation trial. In the pregnancy study, rs16969968 genotype and partner smoking status interacted such that the smoking reduction was lowest for expectant mothers with high genetic risk and partner smoking, and highest for those with high genetic risk but not partner smoking (interaction of genotype×partner smoking on smoking quantity trajectory slope β=0.071, 95%CI=0.013, 0.13, p=0.017). In the clinical trial, a similar interaction was found (interaction β=0.20, 95%CI=0.049, 0.36, p=0.010). Furthermore, these associations were moderated by pharmacotherapy such that the interactive relation of genetic and environmental factors occurred in the placebo group, but not in the active pharmacotherapy group (interaction of genotype×partner smoking×pharmacotherapy on CO trajectory slope β=-0.25, 95%CI=-0.42, -0.091, p=0.0023). The CHRNA5 genetic risk synergized the effect of partner smoking, producing an especially low likelihood of successful smoking reduction in two complementary studies. This suggests that the genetic vulnerability may be mitigated by altering environmental factors. In addition, cessation pharmacotherapy neutralizes the increase in cessation failure associated with combined genetic and environmental risks, which has possible relevance to treatment algorithms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Interplay of Genetic Risk (CHRNA5) and Environmental Risk (partner smoking) on Cigarette Smoking Reduction*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Shiun; Baker, Timothy B.; Piper, Megan E.; Smith, Stevens S.; Gu, Charles; Grucza, Richard A.; Smith, George Davey; Munafo, Marcus; Bierut, Laura J.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study tests whether the genetic predictor (CHRNA5 nicotine receptor gene variants) and an environmental risk factor (partner smoking) interact in the prediction of smoking reduction. Methods Subjects were from a community-based, longitudinal study of women (N=1,856) who smoked before pregnancy, and a randomized comparative effectiveness smoking cessation trial (N=1,065). Smoking reduction was defined as the trajectory of self-reported smoking quantities over time in the observational study, and as the trajectory of alveolar CO levels in the cessation trial. Results In the pregnancy study, rs16969968 genotype and partner smoking status interacted such that the smoking reduction was lowest for expectant mothers with high genetic risk and partner smoking, and highest for those with high genetic risk but not partner smoking (interaction of genotype*partner smoking on smoking quantity trajectory slope β=0.071, 95%CI=0.013, 0.13, p=0.017). In the clinical trial, a similar interaction was found (interaction β=0.20, 95%CI=0.049, 0.36, p=0.010). Furthermore, these associations were moderated by pharmacotherapy such that the interactive relation of genetic and environmental factors occurred in the placebo group, but not in the active pharmacotherapy group (interaction of genotype*partner smoking*pharmacotherapy on CO trajectory slope β=-0.25, 95%CI=-0.42, -.091, p=0.0023). Conclusions The CHRNA5 genetic risk synergized the effect of partner smoking, producing an especially low likelihood of successful smoking reduction in two complementary studies. This suggests that the genetic vulnerability may be mitigated by altering environmental factors. In addition, cessation pharmacotherapy neutralizes the increase in cessation failure associated with combined genetic and environmental risks, which has possible relevance to treatment algorithms. PMID:25073833

  20. Knowledge and perceptions of familial and genetic risks for breast cancer risk in adolescent girls

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Angela R.; Patrick-Miller, Linda; Egleston, Brian L.; Schwartz, Lisa A.; Sands, Colleen B.; Shorter, Rebecca; Moore, Cynthia W.; Tuchman, Lisa; Rauch, Paula; Malhotra, Shreya; Rowan, Brianne; van Decker, Stephanie; Schmidheiser, Helen; Bealin, Lisa; Sicilia, Patrick; Daly, Mary B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests early events might modify adult breast cancer risk and many adolescents learn of familial and genetic risks for breast cancer. Little is known about how adolescent girls understand and respond to breast cancer risk. Methods Semi-structured interviews with 11-19 year-old girls at high-risk and population-risk for breast cancer evaluated knowledge and perceptions of breast cancer risk and risk modification. Framework analysis and descriptive statistics were utilized to analyze open-ended responses. Risk group and age differences were evaluated by Fisher’s exact and McNemar’s tests. Results 54 girls (86% of invited), 35 high-risk (65%) and 19 population-risk (35%) completed interviews. The most frequently reported risk for breast cancer was family history/hereditary predisposition (66%). Only 17% of girls were aware of BRCA1/2 genes. The majority (76%) of high-risk girls perceive themselves to be at increased risk for breast cancer, compared to 22% of population-risk girls (p=0.001). Half of girls reported that women can get breast cancer before 20 years old. The majority believe there are things women (70%) and girls (67%) can do to prevent breast cancer. Mother was the most frequently reported source of information for breast cancer among both high-risk (97%) and population-risk (89%) girls. Conclusion In this study, many high-risk girls perceive themselves to be at increased risk for breast cancer, and many girls believe that breast cancer can occur in teens. Yet, most girls believe there are things women and girls can do to prevent breast cancer. Research evaluating the impact of awareness and perceptions of breast cancer risk on psychosocial, health and risk behaviors is needed to develop strategies to optimize responses to cancer risk. PMID:23065030

  1. Genetic risk factors and age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Maryam; Armstrong, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in individuals older than 65 years of age. It is a multifactorial disorder and identification of risk factors enables individuals to make lifestyle choices that may reduce the risk of disease. Collaboration between geneticists, ophthalmologists, and optometrists suggests that genetic risk factors play a more significant role in AMD than previously thought. The most important genes are associated with immune system modulation and the complement system, e.g., complement factor H (CFH), factor B (CFB), factor C3, and serpin peptidase inhibitor (SERPING1). Genes associated with membrane transport, e.g., ATP-binding cassette protein (ABCR) and voltage-dependent calcium channel gamma 3 (CACNG3), the vascular system, e.g., fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), fibulin-5, lysyl oxidase-like gene (LOXL1) and selectin-P (SELP), and with lipid metabolism, e.g., apolipoprotein E (APOE) and hepatic lipase (LIPC) have also been implicated. In addition, several other genes exhibit some statistical association with AMD, e.g., age-related maculopathy susceptibility protein 2 (ARMS2) and DNA excision repair protein gene (ERCC6) but more research is needed to establish their significance. Modifiable risk factors for AMD should be discussed with patients whose lifestyle and/or family history place them in an increased risk category. Furthermore, calculation of AMD risk using current models should be recommended as a tool for patient education. It is likely that AMD management in future will be increasingly influenced by assessment of genetic risk as such screening methods become more widely available.

  2. Effective Genetic-Risk Prediction Using Mixed Models

    PubMed Central

    Golan, David; Rosset, Saharon

    2014-01-01

    For predicting genetic risk, we propose a statistical approach that is specifically adapted to dealing with the challenges imposed by disease phenotypes and case-control sampling. Our approach (termed Genetic Risk Scores Inference [GeRSI]), combines the power of fixed-effects models (which estimate and aggregate the effects of single SNPs) and random-effects models (which rely primarily on whole-genome similarities between individuals) within the framework of the widely used liability-threshold model. We demonstrate in extensive simulation that GeRSI produces predictions that are consistently superior to current state-of-the-art approaches. When applying GeRSI to seven phenotypes from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) study, we confirm that the use of random effects is most beneficial for diseases that are known to be highly polygenic: hypertension (HT) and bipolar disorder (BD). For HT, there are no significant associations in the WTCCC data. The fixed-effects model yields an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 54%, whereas GeRSI improves it to 59%. For BD, using GeRSI improves the AUC from 55% to 62%. For individuals ranked at the top 10% of BD risk predictions, using GeRSI substantially increases the BD relative risk from 1.4 to 2.5. PMID:25279982

  3. Genome-wide association analyses of sleep disturbance traits identify new loci and highlight shared genetics with neuropsychiatric and metabolic traits.

    PubMed

    Lane, Jacqueline M; Liang, Jingjing; Vlasac, Irma; Anderson, Simon G; Bechtold, David A; Bowden, Jack; Emsley, Richard; Gill, Shubhroz; Little, Max A; Luik, Annemarie I; Loudon, Andrew; Scheer, Frank A J L; Purcell, Shaun M; Kyle, Simon D; Lawlor, Deborah A; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Redline, Susan; Ray, David W; Rutter, Martin K; Saxena, Richa

    2017-02-01

    Chronic sleep disturbances, associated with cardiometabolic diseases, psychiatric disorders and all-cause mortality, affect 25-30% of adults worldwide. Although environmental factors contribute substantially to self-reported habitual sleep duration and disruption, these traits are heritable and identification of the genes involved should improve understanding of sleep, mechanisms linking sleep to disease and development of new therapies. We report single- and multiple-trait genome-wide association analyses of self-reported sleep duration, insomnia symptoms and excessive daytime sleepiness in the UK Biobank (n = 112,586). We discover loci associated with insomnia symptoms (near MEIS1, TMEM132E, CYCL1 and TGFBI in females and WDR27 in males), excessive daytime sleepiness (near AR-OPHN1) and a composite sleep trait (near PATJ (INADL) and HCRTR2) and replicate a locus associated with sleep duration (at PAX8). We also observe genetic correlation between longer sleep duration and schizophrenia risk (rg = 0.29, P = 1.90 × 10(-13)) and between increased levels of excessive daytime sleepiness and increased measures for adiposity traits (body mass index (BMI): rg = 0.20, P = 3.12 × 10(-9); waist circumference: rg = 0.20, P = 2.12 × 10(-7)).

  4. Genetic variants in CETP increase risk of intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Guido J.; Phuah, Chia‐Ling; Radmanesh, Farid; Brouwers, H. Bart; Battey, Thomas W. K.; Biffi, Alessandro; Peloso, Gina M.; Liu, Dajiang J.; Ayres, Alison M.; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Viswanathan, Anand; Greenberg, Steven M.; Selim, Magdy; Meschia, James F.; Brown, Devin L.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Silliman, Scott L.; Tirschwell, David L.; Flaherty, Matthew L.; Kraft, Peter; Jagiella, Jeremiasz M.; Schmidt, Helena; Hansen, Björn M.; Jimenez‐Conde, Jordi; Giralt‐Steinhauer, Eva; Elosua, Roberto; Cuadrado‐Godia, Elisa; Soriano, Carolina; van Nieuwenhuizen, Koen M.; Klijn, Catharina J. M.; Rannikmae, Kristiina; Samarasekera, Neshika; Salman, Rustam Al‐Shahi; Sudlow, Catherine L.; Deary, Ian J.; Morotti, Andrea; Pezzini, Alessandro; Pera, Joanna; Urbanik, Andrzej; Pichler, Alexander; Enzinger, Christian; Norrving, Bo; Montaner, Joan; Fernandez‐Cadenas, Israel; Delgado, Pilar; Roquer, Jaume; Lindgren, Arne; Slowik, Agnieszka; Schmidt, Reinhold; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kittner, Steven J.; Waddy, Salina P.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Abecasis, Goncalo; Willer, Cristen J.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Woo, Daniel; Rosand, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Objective In observational epidemiologic studies, higher plasma high‐density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL‐C) has been associated with increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). DNA sequence variants that decrease cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) gene activity increase plasma HDL‐C; as such, medicines that inhibit CETP and raise HDL‐C are in clinical development. Here, we test the hypothesis that CETP DNA sequence variants associated with higher HDL‐C also increase risk for ICH. Methods We performed 2 candidate‐gene analyses of CETP. First, we tested individual CETP variants in a discovery cohort of 1,149 ICH cases and 1,238 controls from 3 studies, followed by replication in 1,625 cases and 1,845 controls from 5 studies. Second, we constructed a genetic risk score comprised of 7 independent variants at the CETP locus and tested this score for association with HDL‐C as well as ICH risk. Results Twelve variants within CETP demonstrated nominal association with ICH, with the strongest association at the rs173539 locus (odds ratio [OR] = 1.25, standard error [SE] = 0.06, p = 6.0 × 10−4) with no heterogeneity across studies (I 2 = 0%). This association was replicated in patients of European ancestry (p = 0.03). A genetic score of CETP variants found to increase HDL‐C by ∼2.85mg/dl in the Global Lipids Genetics Consortium was strongly associated with ICH risk (OR = 1.86, SE = 0.13, p = 1.39 × 10−6). Interpretation Genetic variants in CETP associated with increased HDL‐C raise the risk of ICH. Given ongoing therapeutic development in CETP inhibition and other HDL‐raising strategies, further exploration of potential adverse cerebrovascular outcomes may be warranted. Ann Neurol 2016;80:730–740 PMID:27717122

  5. Association between OPN genetic variations and nephrolithiasis risk

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xu; Dong, Zhenjia; Ye, Xianqing; Yan, Yao; Chen, Xuehua; Pan, Qin; Xie, Yongfeng; Xie, Jie; Wang, Qiangdong; Yuan, Qinbo

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) has an important role in urolithiasis. However, few studies have explored the association between OPN genetic variants and urolithiasis risk. In the present study, three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs28357094, rs11439060 and rs11730582) located on the promoter of OPN were genotyped in a total of 480 individuals, including 230 nephrolithiasis patients and 250 matched healthy controls, and the associations between these SNPs and nephrolithiasis risk in different genetic models was assessed. No significant differences were identified in the genotype and allele frequencies of OPN rs28357094 or rs11730582 (P=0.805 for rs28357094; P=0.577 for rs11730582, respectively). However, carriers with the OPN rs11439060 insertion (ins) types (ins/deletion and ins/ins) were overrepresented in urolithiasis patients compared with the controls [odds ratio (OR), 1.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.08–2.22]. In the stratified analysis, the increased risk was more evident among younger subjects (adjusted OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.01–2.81), females (2.15; 1.14–4.08), overweight subjects (1.80; 1.07–3.05), normotensive subjects (2.48; 1.02–6.00), abnormal blood sugar subjects (1.58; 1.08–2.30), smokers (1.63; 1.02–2.60), and ever-drinkers (1.98; 1.10–3.60).. These findings revealed that the OPN rs11439060 polymorphism may act as genetic biomarker for the detection of high-risk nephrolithiasis patients. PMID:27602211

  6. Convergent synaptic and circuit substrates underlying autism genetic risks

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Aaron; Li, Guohui; Lu, Zhongming; Qiu, Shenfeng

    2014-01-01

    There has been a surge of diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) over the past decade. While large, high powered genome screening studies of children with ASD have identified numerous genetic risk factors, research efforts to understanding how each of these risk factors contributes to the development autism has met with limited success. Revealing the mechanisms by which these genetic risk factors affect brain development and predispose a child to autism requires mechanistic understanding of the neurobiological changes underlying this devastating group of developmental disorders at multifaceted molecular, cellular and system levels. It has been increasingly clear that the normal trajectory of neurodevelopment is compromised in autism, in multiple domains as much as aberrant neuronal production, growth, functional maturation, patterned connectivity, and balanced excitation and inhibition of brain networks. Many autism risk factors identified in humans have been now reconstituted in experimental mouse models to allow mechanistic interrogation of the biological role of the risk gene. Studies utilizing these mouse models have revealed that underlying the enormous heterogeneity of perturbed cellular events, mechanisms directing synaptic and circuit assembly may provide a unifying explanation for the pathophysiological changes and behavioral endophenotypes seen in autism, although synaptic perturbations are far from being the only alterations relevant for ASD. In this review, we discuss synaptic and circuit abnormalities obtained from several prevalent mouse models, particularly those reflecting syndromic forms of ASD that are caused by single gene perturbations. These compiled results reveal that ASD risk genes contribute to proper signaling of the developing gene networks that maintain synaptic and circuit homeostasis, which is fundamental to normal brain development. PMID:24999357

  7. Novel genetic predictors of venous thromboembolism risk in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Wenndy; Gamazon, Eric R.; Smithberger, Erin; O’Brien, Travis J.; Harralson, Arthur F.; Tuck, Matthew; Barbour, April; Kittles, Rick A.; Cavallari, Larisa H.

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the third most common life-threatening cardiovascular condition in the United States, with African Americans (AAs) having a 30% to 60% higher incidence compared with other ethnicities. The mechanisms underlying population differences in the risk of VTE are poorly understood. We conducted the first genome-wide association study in AAs, comprising 578 subjects, followed by replication of highly significant findings in an independent cohort of 159 AA subjects. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between genetic variants and VTE risk. Through bioinformatics analysis of the top signals, we identified expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) in whole blood and investigated the messenger RNA expression differences in VTE cases and controls. We identified and replicated single-nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 20 (rs2144940, rs2567617, and rs1998081) that increased risk of VTE by 2.3-fold (P < 6 × 10−7). These risk variants were found in higher frequency among populations of African descent (>20%) compared with other ethnic groups (<10%). We demonstrate that SNPs on chromosome 20 are cis-eQTLs for thrombomodulin (THBD), and the expression of THBD is lower among VTE cases compared with controls (P = 9.87 × 10−6). We have identified novel polymorphisms associated with increased risk of VTE in AAs. These polymorphisms are predominantly found among populations of African descent and are associated with THBD gene expression. Our findings provide new molecular insight into a mechanism regulating VTE susceptibility and identify common genetic variants that increase the risk of VTE in AAs, a population disproportionately affected by this disease. PMID:26888256

  8. Benefits and risks associated with genetically modified food products.

    PubMed

    Kramkowska, Marta; Grzelak, Teresa; Czyżewska, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    Scientists employing methods of genetic engineering have developed a new group of living organisms, termed 'modified organisms', which found application in, among others, medicine, the pharmaceutical industry and food distribution. The introduction of transgenic products to the food market resulted in them becoming a controversial topic, with their proponents and contestants. The presented study aims to systematize objective data on the potential benefits and risks resulting from the consumption of transgenic food. Genetic modifications of plants and animals are justified by the potential for improvement of the food situation worldwide, an increase in yield crops, an increase in the nutritional value of food, and the development of pharmaceutical preparations of proven clinical significance. In the opinions of critics, however, transgenic food may unfavourably affect the health of consumers. Therefore, particular attention was devoted to the short- and long-lasting undesirable effects, such as alimentary allergies, synthesis of toxic agents or resistance to antibiotics. Examples arguing for the justified character of genetic modifications and cases proving that their use can be dangerous are innumerable. In view of the presented facts, however, complex studies are indispensable which, in a reliable way, evaluate effects linked to the consumption of food produced with the application of genetic engineering techniques. Whether one backs up or negates transgenic products, the choice between traditional and non-conventional food remains to be decided exclusively by the consumers.

  9. Disparities and genetic risk factors in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Katherine A; Patel, Sanjay R

    2016-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an increasingly prevalent condition. A growing body of literature supports substantial racial disparities in the prevalence, risk factors, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this disease. Craniofacial structure among Asians appears to confer an elevated risk of OSA despite lower rates of obesity. Among African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics, OSA prevalence is increased, likely due in part to obesity. The burden of symptoms, particularly excessive daytime sleepiness, is higher among African Americans, although Hispanics more often report snoring. Limited data suggest that African Americans may be more susceptible to hypertension in the setting of OSA. While differences in genetic risk factors may explain disparities in OSA burden, no definitive genetic differences have yet been identified. In addition to disparities in OSA development, disparities in OSA diagnosis and treatment have also been identified. Increased severity of disease at diagnosis among African Americans suggests a delay in diagnosis. Treatment outcomes are also suboptimal among African Americans. In children, tonsillectomy is less likely to cure OSA and more commonly associated with complications in this group. Among adults, adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is substantially lower in African Americans. The reasons for these disparities, particularly in outcomes, are not well understood and should be a research priority.

  10. Disparities and Genetic Risk Factors in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Katherine A.; Patel, Sanjay R.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an increasingly prevalent condition. A growing body of literature supports substantial racial disparities in the prevalence, risk factors, presentation, diagnosis and treatment of this disease. Craniofacial structure among Asians appears to confer an elevated risk of OSA despite lower rates of obesity. Among African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics, OSA prevalence is increased, likely due in part to obesity. Burden of symptoms, particularly excessive daytime sleepiness, is higher among African Americans, though Hispanics more often report snoring. Limited data suggest African Americans may be more susceptible to hypertension in the setting of OSA. While differences in genetic risk factors may explain disparities in OSA burden, no definitive genetic differences have yet been identified. In addition to disparities in OSA development, disparities in OSA diagnosis and treatment have also been identified. Increased severity of disease at diagnosis among African Americans suggests a delay in diagnosis. Treatment outcomes are also suboptimal among African Americans. In children, tonsillectomy is less likely to cure OSA and more commonly associated with complications in this group. Among adults, adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is substantially lower in African Americans. The reasons for these disparities, particularly in outcomes, are not well understood and should be a research priority. PMID:26428843

  11. Genetic risks associated with radiation exposures during space flight

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, D.

    1983-01-01

    Although the genetic risks of space radiation do not pose a significant hazard to the general population, the risks may be very important to the individual astronaut. The present paper summarizes some experimental results on the induction of dominant lethal mutations and chromosomal damage in the first generation which may be used in the prediction of the genetic risks of radiation exposures of space crews. Young adult male mice were exposed to single, weekly and continuous doses of gamma rays, neutrons in single doses and weekly exposures and continuous doses of Pu-239 alpha particles. Evaluation of fetal survival rates in females mated to the exposed males shows the mutation rate in individuals exposed to gamma rays to decline as the exposure period is prolonged and the dose rate is reduced, while the response to neutrons is in the opposite direction. Cytological determinations show the rate of balanced chromosomal translocations to drop as gamma ray exposures change from one-time to continuous, however little or no dose rate effect is seen with neutron radiation and alpha particle exposure shows no regular dose-response. Based on the above results, it is predicted that the rate of dominant mutations and transmissible chromosome aberrations in astronauts on a 100-day mission will increase by 4.5 to 41.25 percent over the spontaneous rate. 35 references.

  12. Attitudes toward genetic testing for cancer risk after genetic counseling and decision support: a qualitative comparison between hereditary cancer types.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Claire E; Kasparian, Nadine A; Meiser, Bettina; Homewood, Judi; Kirk, Judy; Tucker, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to qualitatively assess individuals' attitudes toward genetic testing for cancer risk after genetic counseling and decision support. As part of a larger study, 78 women considering genetic testing for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) risk and 22 individuals considering genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) completed an open-ended table of their perceived pros and cons of genetic testing. The most frequently reported pros were "to help manage my risk of developing cancer," "to help my family," and "to know my cancer risk." With regards to risk management, the HBOC group perceived genetic testing as most helpful in informing their general risk management practices, while the HN-PCC group focused on the potential to clarify their need for bowel cancer screening, suggesting that patients' perceptions of the benefits of genetic testing may differ across cancer syndromes. Individuals in both groups expressed concern about the potential psychological impact of genetic testing. We also found that some affected individuals may not fully comprehend the meaning of their potential test results. Eliciting patients' perceived pros and cons during genetic counseling is likely to be a valuable tool for improving patient care. This data also provides an improved evidence base for the development of patient education tools.

  13. Identification of Immune-Relevant Factors Conferring Sarcoidosis Genetic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Annegret; Ellinghaus, David; Nutsua, Marcel; Hofmann, Sylvia; Montgomery, Courtney G.; Iannuzzi, Michael C.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Petrek, Martin; Mrazek, Frantisek; Pabst, Stefan; Grohé, Christian; Grunewald, Johan; Ronninger, Marcus; Eklund, Anders; Padyukov, Leonid; Mihailovic-Vucinic, Violeta; Jovanovic, Dragana; Sterclova, Martina; Homolka, Jiri; Nöthen, Markus M.; Herms, Stefan; Gieger, Christian; Strauch, Konstantin; Winkelmann, Juliane; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Brand, Stephan; Büning, Carsten; Schürmann, Manfred; Ellinghaus, Eva; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Lieb, Wolfgang; Nebel, Almut; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Franke, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Genetic variation plays a significant role in the etiology of sarcoidosis. However, only a small fraction of its heritability has been explained so far. Objectives: To define further genetic risk loci for sarcoidosis, we used the Immunochip for a candidate gene association study of immune-associated loci. Methods: Altogether the study population comprised over 19,000 individuals. In a two-stage design, 1,726 German sarcoidosis cases and 5,482 control subjects were genotyped for 128,705 single-nucleotide polymorphisms using the Illumina Immunochip for the screening step. The remaining 3,955 cases, 7,514 control subjects, and 684 parents of affected offspring were used for validation and replication of 44 candidate and two established risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Measurements and Main Results: Four novel susceptibility loci were identified with genome-wide significance in the European case-control populations, located on chromosomes 12q24.12 (rs653178; ATXN2/SH2B3), 5q33.3 (rs4921492; IL12B), 4q24 (rs223498; MANBA/NFKB1), and 2q33.2 (rs6748088; FAM117B). We further defined three independent association signals in the HLA region with genome-wide significance, peaking in the BTNL2 promoter region (rs5007259), at HLA-B (rs4143332/HLA-B*0801) and at HLA-DPB1 (rs9277542), and found another novel independent signal near IL23R (rs12069782) on chromosome 1p31.3. Conclusions: Functional predictions and protein network analyses suggest a prominent role of the drug-targetable IL23/Th17 signaling pathway in the genetic etiology of sarcoidosis. Our findings reveal a substantial genetic overlap of sarcoidosis with diverse immune-mediated inflammatory disorders, which could be of relevance for the clinical application of modern therapeutics PMID:26051272

  14. Experiential knowledge of disability, impairment and illness: The reproductive decisions of families genetically at risk.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Felicity

    2014-09-01

    As the capacities of Reproductive Genetic Technologies expand, would-be parents face an increasing number of reproductive decisions regarding testing and screening for different conditions. Several studies have acknowledged the role that 'experiential knowledge of disability' plays in arriving at decisions around the use of these technologies; however, there is a lack of clarity within this literature as to what constitutes 'experiential knowledge of disability' and an over-reliance on medical diagnoses as a shorthand to describe different types of experience. Drawing on both social model of disability theory and the literature on chronic illness, this article presents an analysis of data from an in-depth qualitative interview study with 64 people with an inheritable condition in their family, Spinal Muscular Atrophy, and reports their views around reproduction and Reproductive Genetic Technologies. An experiential typology is presented which demonstrates the way in which experiences of 'disability', 'embodied experiences of impairment' or 'embodied experiences of illness, death and bereavement' are strategically privileged in accounts of reproductive decisions, in order to validate reproductive decisions taken, and, specifically, justify use (or non-use) of Reproductive Genetic Technologies. By highlighting the experiential categories within which participants embedded their reproductive decisions, this article draws attention to the porous and collapsible nature of diagnostic categories in the context of reproductive decision-making and genetic risk, and suggests new ways of researching 'experiential knowledge of disability' within these contexts which are able to account for the various contours of the embodied lived reality of life with 'disability'.

  15. Genetic determinants of cardiometabolic risk: a proposed model for phenotype association and interaction.

    PubMed

    Blackett, Piers R; Sanghera, Dharambir K

    2013-01-01

    This review provides a translational and unifying summary of metabolic syndrome genetics and highlights evidence that genetic studies are starting to unravel and untangle origins of the complex and challenging cluster of disease phenotypes. The associated genes effectively express in the brain, liver, kidney, arterial endothelium, adipocytes, myocytes, and β cells. Progression of syndrome traits has been associated with ectopic lipid accumulation in the arterial wall, visceral adipocytes, myocytes, and liver. Thus, it follows that the genetics of dyslipidemia, obesity, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease are central in triggering progression of the syndrome to overt expression of disease traits and have become a key focus of interest for early detection and for designing prevention and treatments. To support the "birds' eye view" approach, we provide a road-map depicting commonality and interrelationships between the traits and their genetic and environmental determinants based on known risk factors, metabolic pathways, pharmacologic targets, treatment responses, gene networks, pleiotropy, and association with circadian rhythm. Although only a small portion of the known heritability is accounted for and there is insufficient support for clinical application of gene-based prediction models, there is direction and encouraging progress in a rapidly moving field that is beginning to show clinical relevance.

  16. Development and Evaluation of a Genetic Risk Score for Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Belsky, Daniel W.; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Houts, Renate; McCarthy, Jeanette; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-01-01

    Background Results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) represent a potential resource for etiological and treatment research. GWAS of obesity-related phenotypes have been especially successful. To translate this success into a research tool, we developed and tested a “genetic risk score” (GRS) that summarizes an individual’s genetic predisposition to obesity. Methods Different GWAS of obesity-related phenotypes report different sets of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as the best genomic markers of obesity risk. Therefore, we applied a 3-stage approach that pooled results from multiple GWAS to select SNPs to include in our GRS: The 3 stages are (1) Extraction. SNPs with evidence of association are compiled from published GWAS; (2) Clustering. SNPs are grouped according to patterns of linkage disequilibrium; (3) Selection. Tag SNPs are selected from clusters that meet specific criteria. We applied this 3-stage approach to results from 16 GWAS of obesity-related phenotypes in European-descent samples to create a GRS. We then tested the GRS in the Atherosclerosis Risk in the Communities (ARIC) Study cohort (N=10,745, 55% female, 77% white, 23% African American). Results Our 32-locus GRS was a statistically significant predictor of body mass index (BMI) and obesity among ARIC whites (for BMI, r=0.13, p<1×10−30; for obesity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC)=0.57 [95% CI 0.55–0.58]). The GRS improved prediction of obesity (as measured by delta-AUC and integrated discrimination index) when added to models that included demographic and geographic information. FTO- and MC4R-linked SNPs, and a non-genetic risk assessment consisting of a socioeconomic index (p<0.01 for all comparisons). The GRS also predicted increased mortality risk over 17 years of follow-up. The GRS performed less well among African Americans. Conclusions The obesity GRS derived using our 3-stage approach is not useful for clinical risk prediction, but

  17. Lack of replication of higher genetic risk load in men than in women with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to replicate a recent study which showed higher genetic risk load at 15 loci in men than in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This difference was very significant, and it was interpreted as indicating that men require more genetic susceptibility than women to develop SLE. Methods Nineteen SLE-associated loci (thirteen of which are shared with the previous study) were analyzed in 1,457 SLE patients and 1,728 healthy controls of European ancestry. Genetic risk load was calculated as sex-specific sum genetic risk scores (GRSs). Results Our results did not replicate those of the previous study at either the level of individual loci or the global level of GRSs. GRSs were larger in women than in men (4.20 ± 1.07 in women vs. 3.27 ± 0.98 in men). This very significant difference (P < 10−16) was more dependent on the six new loci not included in the previous study (59% of the difference) than on the thirteen loci that are shared (the remaining 41%). However, the 13 shared loci also showed a higher genetic risk load in women than in men in our study (P = 6.6 × 10−7), suggesting that heterogeneity of participants, in addition to different loci, contributed to the opposite results. Conclusion Our results show the lack of a clear trend toward higher genetic risk in one of the sexes for the analyzed SLE loci. They also highlight several limitations of assessments of genetic risk load, including the possibility of ascertainment bias with loci discovered in studies that have included mainly women. PMID:24946689

  18. Genetic predisposition to obesity and risk of subclinical atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Juan; Hong, Jie; Qi, Lu; Cui, Bin; Gu, Weiqiong; Zhang, Yifei; Li, Lijuan; Miao, Lin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang

    2014-10-10

    Obesity has been associated with increased common carotid artery (CCA) intima-media thickness (IMT), a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis. We assessed the association between genetic predisposition to obesity and CCA IMT. The study included 428 young Chinese adults with CCA IMT measured using a high-resolution B-mode tomographic ultrasound system. We created a genetic risk score (GRS) by summing the risk alleles of 6 obesity-associated genetic variants confirmed in our previous analyses. The GRS was significantly associated with greater CCA IMT (p<0.001) after adjustment for age and gender. Per 2 alleles of the GRS was related to 0.023 mm increment in IMT. The association was attenuated by one half with additional adjustment for obesity status, but remained significant (p=0.009). In addition, we found that blood pressure significantly modified the association between the GRS and CCA IMT (p for interaction=0.001). The associations between the GRS and CCA IMT were stronger in participants with systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥120 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥80 mmHg (per 2 allele increment of the GRS relating to 0.028 mm greater CCA IMT, p for trend<0.001) than those with SBP<120 mmHg and DBP<80 mmHg (per 2 allele increment of the GRS relating to 0.001 smaller CCA IMT, p for trend=0.930). Our data provides suggestive evidence supporting the potential causal relation between obesity and development of subclinical atherosclerosis. Elevated blood pressure might amplify the adverse effect of obesity on cardiovascular risk.

  19. Association between adult height, genetic susceptibility and risk of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Cari M; Wang, Sophia S; Melin, Beatrice S; Wang, Zhaoming; Braganza, Melissa; Inskip, Peter D; Albanes, Demetrius; Andersson, Ulrika; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Buring, Julie E; Carreón, Tania; Feychting, Maria; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E; Henriksson, Roger; Hsing, Ann W; Johansen, Christoffer; Linet, Martha S; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Michaud, Dominique S; Peters, Ulrike; Purdue, Mark P; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Stevens, Victoria L; Visvanathan, Kala; Waters, Martha A; White, Emily; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Hoover, Robert; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J; Hartge, Patricia; Rajaraman, Preetha

    2012-01-01

    Background Some, but not all, observational studies have suggested that taller stature is associated with a significant increased risk of glioma. In a pooled analysis of observational studies, we investigated the strength and consistency of this association, overall and for major sub-types, and investigated effect modification by genetic susceptibility to the disease. Methods We standardized and combined individual-level data on 1354 cases and 4734 control subjects from 13 prospective and 2 case–control studies. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for glioma and glioma sub-types were estimated using logistic regression models stratified by sex and adjusted for birth cohort and study. Pooled ORs were additionally estimated after stratifying the models according to seven recently identified glioma-related genetic variants. Results Among men, we found a positive association between height and glioma risk (≥190 vs 170–174 cm, pooled OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.11–2.61; P-trend = 0.01), which was slightly stronger after restricting to cases with glioblastoma (pooled OR = 1.99, 95% CI: 1.17–3.38; P-trend = 0.02). Among women, these associations were less clear (≥175 vs 160–164 cm, pooled OR for glioma = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.70–1.62; P-trend = 0.22; pooled OR for glioblastoma = 1.36, 95% CI: 0.77–2.39; P-trend = 0.04). In general, we did not observe evidence of effect modification by glioma-related genotypes on the association between height and glioma risk. Conclusion An association of taller adult stature with glioma, particularly for men and stronger for glioblastoma, should be investigated further to clarify the role of environmental and genetic determinants of height in the etiology of this disease. PMID:22933650

  20. Genetic variants of adiponectin and risk of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mingyang; Gong, Jian; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brenner, Hermann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Curtis, Keith R.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hsu, Li; Jiao, Shuo; Le Marchand, Loic; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; White, Emily; Wu, Kana; Ogino, Shuji; Fuchs, Charles S.; Hunter, David J.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Hu, Frank B.; Rimm, Eric; Jensen, Majken; Peters, Ulrike; Chan, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating adiponectin has been associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Genome-wide association studies have identified several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with adiponectin levels. However, it is unclear whether these SNPs are associated with CRC risk. In addition, previous data on SNPs in the adiponectin pathway and their associations with CRC are inconsistent. Therefore, we examined 19 SNPs in genes related to adiponectin or its receptors and their associations with CRC using logistic regression among 7,020 cases and 7,631 controls drawn from 10 studies included in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium. Using data from a subset of two large cohort studies, we also assessed the contribution of individual SNPs and an adiponectin genetic score to plasma adiponectin after accounting for lifestyle factors among 2,217 women and 619 men. We did not find any statistically significant association between the 19 adiponectin-associated SNPs and CRC risk (multivariable-adjusted odds ratios ranged from 0.89 to 1.05, all P > 0.05). Each SNP explained less than 2.50% of the variance of plasma adiponectin, and the genetic score collectively accounted for 2.95% and 1.42% of the variability of adiponectin in women and men, respectively, after adjustment for age, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, regular use of aspirin or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and postmenopausal hormone use. In conclusion, our findings do not support an association between known adiponectin-related common SNPs and CRC incidence. However, known common SNPs account for only a limited proportion of the interindividual variance in circulating adiponectin. Further work is warranted to investigate the relationship between adiponectin and CRC while accounting for other components in the pathway. PMID:25431318

  1. Genetic variants in selenoprotein genes increase risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Méplan, Catherine; Hughes, David J; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Soucek, Pavel; Vodickova, Ludmila; Hlavatá, Ivona; Vrána, David; Vodicka, Pavel; Hesketh, John E

    2010-06-01

    Low selenium (Se) status correlates with increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Since Se exerts its biological roles through the selenoproteins, genetic variations in selenoprotein genes may influence susceptibility to CRC. This study analysed 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in selenoprotein genes [glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1), GPX4, 15 kDa selenoprotein (SEP15), selenoprotein S (SELS), selenoprotein P (SEPP1) and thioredoxin reductase 2 (TXNRD2)] and in genes that code for a key protein in Se incorporation [SECIS-binding protein 2 (SBP2)] and in antioxidant defence [superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2)] in relation to sporadic CRC incidence. CRC patients (832) and controls (705) from the Czech Republic were genotyped using allele specific PCR. Logistic regression analysis showed that three SNPs were significantly associated with an altered risk of CRC: rs7579 (SEPP1), rs713041 (GPX4) and rs34713741 (SELS). The association of these SNPs with disease risk remained after data stratification for diagnosis and adjustments for lifestyle factors and sex. Significant two-loci interactions were observed between rs4880 (SOD2), rs713041 (GPX4) and rs960531 (TXNRD2) and between SEPP1 and either SEP15 or GPX4. The results indicate that SNPs in SEPP1, GPX4 and SELS influence risk of CRC. We hypothesize that the two-loci interactions reflect functional interactions between the gene products. We propose that these variants play a role in cancer development and represent potential biomarkers of CRC risk.

  2. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dilthey, Alexander T; Xifara, Dionysia K; Ban, Maria; Shah, Tejas S; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Alfredsson, Lars; Anderson, Carl A; Attfield, Katherine E; Baranzini, Sergio E; Barrett, Jeffrey; Binder, Thomas M C; Booth, David; Buck, Dorothea; Celius, Elisabeth G; Cotsapas, Chris; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Dendrou, Calliope A; Donnelly, Peter; Dubois, Bénédicte; Fontaine, Bertrand; Fugger, Lars; Goris, An; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Graetz, Christiane; Hemmer, Bernhard; Hillert, Jan; Kockum, Ingrid; Leslie, Stephen; Lill, Christina M; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Olsson, Tomas; Oturai, Annette; Saarela, Janna; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Spurkland, Anne; Taylor, Bruce; Winkelmann, Juliane; Zipp, Frauke; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Spencer, Chris C A; Stewart, Graeme; Hafler, David A; Ivinson, Adrian J; Harbo, Hanne F; Hauser, Stephen L; De Jager, Philip L; Compston, Alastair; McCauley, Jacob L; Sawcer, Stephen; McVean, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Association studies have greatly refined the understanding of how variation within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes influences risk of multiple sclerosis. However, the extent to which major effects are modulated by interactions is poorly characterized. We analyzed high-density SNP data on 17,465 cases and 30,385 controls from 11 cohorts of European ancestry, in combination with imputation of classical HLA alleles, to build a high-resolution map of HLA genetic risk and assess the evidence for interactions involving classical HLA alleles. Among new and previously identified class II risk alleles (HLA-DRB1*15:01, HLA-DRB1*13:03, HLA-DRB1*03:01, HLA-DRB1*08:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:02) and class I protective alleles (HLA-A*02:01, HLA-B*44:02, HLA-B*38:01 and HLA-B*55:01), we find evidence for two interactions involving pairs of class II alleles: HLA-DQA1*01:01–HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:01–HLA-DQB1*03:02. We find no evidence for interactions between classical HLA alleles and non-HLA risk-associated variants and estimate a minimal effect of polygenic epistasis in modulating major risk alleles. PMID:26343388

  3. Perceptions of obesity and cancer risk in female bariatric surgery candidates: highlighting the need for physician action for unsuspectingly obese and high risk patients.

    PubMed

    Henretta, Melissa S; Copeland, Amy R; Kelley, Sarah L; Hallowell, Peter T; Modesitt, Susan C

    2014-04-01

    To determine: 1) whether obese women perceive themselves to be obese or at risk for malignancy, 2) perceived impact of obesity on cancer risks, 3) compliance with cancer screening, and 4) rates of menstrual dysfunction. Surveys were administered to female patients presenting for bariatric weight loss surgery. Demographics, gynecologic history, perception of cancer risk, and screening history were collected/analyzed. Women were categorized as obese (BMI: 30-39kg/m(2)), morbidly obese (40-49kg/m(2)), super obese (≥50kg/m(2)) and compared. Ninety-three women (mean age: 44.9 years, mean BMI: 48.7kg/m(2)) participated and 45.7% felt they were in 'good', 'very good', or 'excellent' health despite frequent medical comorbidities. As BMI increased, women were more likely to correctly identify themselves as obese (23% of obese vs. 77% of morbidly obese vs. 85% of super obese; p<0.001) but there were no significant differences in comorbidities. Two-thirds of women correctly identified obesity as a risk factor for uterine cancer, yet 48% of those retaining a uterus perceived that it was "not likely/not possible" to develop uterine cancer. Menstrual irregularities were common as was evaluation and interventions for the same; 32% had prior hysterectomy. Participation in cancer screening was robust. Women presenting for bariatric surgery have high rates of menstrual dysfunction. While they perceive that obesity increases uterine cancer risk, they often do not perceive themselves to be at risk. This disconnect may stem from the fact that many failed to identify themselves as obese perhaps because overweight/obesity has become the norm in U.S. society. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Cancer Genetics Risk Assessment and Counseling (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary in which cancer risk perception, risk communication, and risk counseling are discussed. The summary also contains information about recording and analyzing a family history of cancer and factors to consider when offering genetic testing.

  5. Risk assessment of genetically modified crops for nutrition and health.

    PubMed

    Magaña-Gómez, Javier A; de la Barca, Ana M Calderón

    2009-01-01

    The risk assessment of genetically modified (GM) crops for human nutrition and health has not been systematic. Evaluations for each GM crop or trait have been conducted using different feeding periods, animal models, and parameters. The most common result is that GM and conventional sources induce similar nutritional performance and growth in animals. However, adverse microscopic and molecular effects of some GM foods in different organs or tissues have been reported. Diversity among the methods and results of the risk assessments reflects the complexity of the subject. While there are currently no standardized methods to evaluate the safety of GM foods, attempts towards harmonization are on the way. More scientific effort is necessary in order to build confidence in the evaluation and acceptance of GM foods.

  6. APOL1 kidney risk alleles: population genetics and disease associations.

    PubMed

    Limou, Sophie; Nelson, George W; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Winkler, Cheryl A

    2014-09-01

    APOL1 kidney disease is a unique case in the field of the genetics of common disease: 2 variants (termed G1 and G2) with high population frequency have been repeatedly associated with nondiabetic CKDs, with very strong effect size (odds ratios 3-29) in populations of sub-Saharan African descent. This review provides an update on the spectrum of APOL1 kidney disease and on the worldwide distribution of these kidney risk variants. We also summarize the proper way to run a recessive analysis on joint and independent effects of APOL1 G1 and G2 kidney risk variants. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ethnic differences in cancer risk resulting from genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Neuhausen, S L

    1999-12-01

    Ethnic differences in cancer incidence and mortality exist and are probably the result of genetic and epidemiological risk factors. Genetic differences caused by founder mutations are reviewed, with special emphasis on mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes have been identified in individuals of all races and ethnic groups. Differences among ethnic groups for cancer risks have been recognized, and a proportion of the differences may be the result of founder mutations within these genes. The BRCA2 999del5 mutation in Iceland and the three BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Ashkenazic Jews have been well characterized and were easy to study because the patient population and anonymous samples were readily available and ethnicity was known. Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 probably account for approximately 3 to 10% of breast cancer in the general population and a much higher proportion in those with a strong family history of breast and ovarian cancers and in those of Ashkenazic Jewish descent. However, no overall increased risk of breast or ovarian cancers exists among Ashkenazic Jewish women compared with non-Jewish Caucasians. Some ethnic variation in cancer risk may be explained by founder mutations identified in cancer-predisposing genes. Knowledge acquired by studying the effect of a single mutation in a well defined population may be applied to larger, more heterogeneous populations. Individuals from all racial and ethnic groups carry deleterious mutations. Mutations are simply easier to find and characterize when identified in a specific ethnic group.

  8. Multiple metabolic genetic risk scores and type 2 diabetes risk in three racial/ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Klimentidis, Yann C; Wineinger, Nathan E; Vazquez, Ana I; de Los Campos, Gustavo

    2014-09-01

    CONTEXT/RATIONALE: Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies have identified many single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with various metabolic and cardiovascular traits, offering us the opportunity to learn about and capitalize on the links between cardiometabolic traits and type 2 diabetes (T2D). In multiple datasets comprising over 30 000 individuals and 3 ethnic/racial groups, we calculated 17 genetic risk scores (GRSs) for glycemic, anthropometric, lipid, hemodynamic, and other traits, based on the results of recent trait-specific meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies, and examined associations with T2D risk. Using a training-testing procedure, we evaluated whether additional GRSs could contribute to risk prediction. In European Americans, we find that GRSs for T2D, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and body mass index are associated with T2D risk. In African Americans, GRSs for T2D, fasting insulin, and waist-to-hip ratio are associated with T2D. In Hispanic Americans, GRSs for T2D and body mass index are associated with T2D. We observed a trend among European Americans suggesting that genetic risk for hyperlipidemia is inversely associated with T2D risk. The use of additional GRSs resulted in only small changes in prediction accuracy in multiple independent validation datasets. The analysis of multiple GRSs can shed light on T2D etiology and how it varies across ethnic/racial groups. Our findings using multiple GRSs are consistent with what is known about the differences in T2D pathogenesis across racial/ethnic groups. However, further work is needed to understand the putative inverse correlation of genetic risk for hyperlipidemia and T2D risk and to develop ethnic-specific GRSs.

  9. Structured Parenting of Toddlers at High versus Low Genetic Risk: Two Pathways to Child Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Ge, Xiaojia; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel; Scaramella, Laura V.; Reiss, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about how parenting might offset genetic risk to prevent the onset of child problems during toddlerhood. We used a prospective adoption design to separate genetic and environmental influences and test whether associations between structured parenting and toddler behavior problems were conditioned by genetic risk for…

  10. Structured Parenting of Toddlers at High versus Low Genetic Risk: Two Pathways to Child Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Ge, Xiaojia; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel; Scaramella, Laura V.; Reiss, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about how parenting might offset genetic risk to prevent the onset of child problems during toddlerhood. We used a prospective adoption design to separate genetic and environmental influences and test whether associations between structured parenting and toddler behavior problems were conditioned by genetic risk for…

  11. Lay responses to health messages about the genetic risk factors for salt sensitivity: do mass media genetic health messages result in genetic determinism?

    PubMed

    Smerecnik, Chris M R

    2010-08-01

    Media coverage of genetics may lead to overestimation of the impact of genetics on disease development. In this study, we presented one student sample and one general public sample from the Netherlands with a general or a genetic health message (HM) about salt sensitivity. After reading the genetic (but not the general) HM, participants reported higher perceived impact of genetic versus lifestyle factors and a higher attributable fraction of genetics on disease development. Nevertheless, participants were able to recognise the balance between lifestyle and genetic risk factors in disease development. They also contextualised and restricted the message's implications to the specific information provided, and did not extrapolate these implications to other diseases. These results illustrate the nuanced understanding the general public may have concerning genetic risk factors.

  12. Analysis of genetics and risk factors of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Panpalli Ates, M; Karaman, Y; Guntekin, S; Ergun, M A

    2016-06-14

    Alzheimer's Disease is the leading neurodegenerative cause of dementia. The pathogenesis is not clearly understood yet, is believed to be the complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Consequently vascular risk factors and Apolipoprotein E genotyping are increasingly gaining importance. This study aimed at assessing the relationships between Alzheimer's Disease and Apolipoprotein E phenotype and vascular risk factors. Patients diagnosed with "possible Alzheimer's Disease" in the Gazi University, Department of Neurology, were included in the study and age-matched volunteer patients who attended the polyclinic were included as a control group. In this study, the risk factors including low education level, smoking, hyperlipidemia, higher serum total cholesterol levels, and hyperhomocysteinemia were found to be statistically significantly more common in the Alzheimer's Disease group in comparison to the Control Group, while all Apolipoprotein E ε4/ε4 genotypes were found in the Alzheimer's Disease group. The presence of the Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele is believed to increase vascular risk factors as well as to affect Alzheimer's Disease directly. The biological indicators which are used in identifying the patients' genes will be probably used in the treatment plan of the patients in the future.

  13. Systems Genetic Analyses Highlight a TGFβ-FOXO3 Dependent Striatal Astrocyte Network Conserved across Species and Associated with Stress, Sleep, and Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, Joseph R; Jiang, Peng; Losic, Bojan; Readhead, Ben; Gao, Vance D; Dudley, Joel T; Vitaterna, Martha H; Turek, Fred W; Kasarskis, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Recent systems-based analyses have demonstrated that sleep and stress traits emerge from shared genetic and transcriptional networks, and clinical work has elucidated the emergence of sleep dysfunction and stress susceptibility as early symptoms of Huntington's disease. Understanding the biological bases of these early non-motor symptoms may reveal therapeutic targets that prevent disease onset or slow disease progression, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this complex clinical presentation remain largely unknown. In the present work, we specifically examine the relationship between these psychiatric traits and Huntington's disease (HD) by identifying striatal transcriptional networks shared by HD, stress, and sleep phenotypes. First, we utilize a systems-based approach to examine a large publicly available human transcriptomic dataset for HD (GSE3790 from GEO) in a novel way. We use weighted gene coexpression network analysis and differential connectivity analyses to identify transcriptional networks dysregulated in HD, and we use an unbiased ranking scheme that leverages both gene- and network-level information to identify a novel astrocyte-specific network as most relevant to HD caudate. We validate this result in an independent HD cohort. Next, we computationally predict FOXO3 as a regulator of this network, and use multiple publicly available in vitro and in vivo experimental datasets to validate that this astrocyte HD network is downstream of a signaling pathway important in adult neurogenesis (TGFβ-FOXO3). We also map this HD-relevant caudate subnetwork to striatal transcriptional networks in a large (n = 100) chronically stressed (B6xA/J)F2 mouse population that has been extensively phenotyped (328 stress- and sleep-related measurements), and we show that this striatal astrocyte network is correlated to sleep and stress traits, many of which are known to be altered in HD cohorts. We identify causal regulators of this network through Bayesian network

  14. Systems Genetic Analyses Highlight a TGFβ-FOXO3 Dependent Striatal Astrocyte Network Conserved across Species and Associated with Stress, Sleep, and Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Scarpa, Joseph R.; Jiang, Peng; Losic, Bojan; Readhead, Ben; Dudley, Joel T.; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.

    2016-01-01

    Recent systems-based analyses have demonstrated that sleep and stress traits emerge from shared genetic and transcriptional networks, and clinical work has elucidated the emergence of sleep dysfunction and stress susceptibility as early symptoms of Huntington's disease. Understanding the biological bases of these early non-motor symptoms may reveal therapeutic targets that prevent disease onset or slow disease progression, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this complex clinical presentation remain largely unknown. In the present work, we specifically examine the relationship between these psychiatric traits and Huntington's disease (HD) by identifying striatal transcriptional networks shared by HD, stress, and sleep phenotypes. First, we utilize a systems-based approach to examine a large publicly available human transcriptomic dataset for HD (GSE3790 from GEO) in a novel way. We use weighted gene coexpression network analysis and differential connectivity analyses to identify transcriptional networks dysregulated in HD, and we use an unbiased ranking scheme that leverages both gene- and network-level information to identify a novel astrocyte-specific network as most relevant to HD caudate. We validate this result in an independent HD cohort. Next, we computationally predict FOXO3 as a regulator of this network, and use multiple publicly available in vitro and in vivo experimental datasets to validate that this astrocyte HD network is downstream of a signaling pathway important in adult neurogenesis (TGFβ-FOXO3). We also map this HD-relevant caudate subnetwork to striatal transcriptional networks in a large (n = 100) chronically stressed (B6xA/J)F2 mouse population that has been extensively phenotyped (328 stress- and sleep-related measurements), and we show that this striatal astrocyte network is correlated to sleep and stress traits, many of which are known to be altered in HD cohorts. We identify causal regulators of this network through Bayesian network

  15. Puzzling role of genetic risk factors in human longevity: "risk alleles" as pro-longevity variants.

    PubMed

    Ukraintseva, Svetlana; Yashin, Anatoliy; Arbeev, Konstantin; Kulminski, Alexander; Akushevich, Igor; Wu, Deqing; Joshi, Gaurang; Land, Kenneth C; Stallard, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Complex diseases are major contributors to human mortality in old age. Paradoxically, many genetic variants that have been associated with increased risks of such diseases are found in genomes of long-lived people, and do not seem to compromise longevity. Here we argue that trade-off-like and conditional effects of genes can play central role in this phenomenon and in determining longevity. Such effects may occur as result of: (i) antagonistic influence of gene on the development of different health disorders; (ii) change in the effect of gene on vulnerability to death with age (especially, from "bad" to "good"); (iii) gene-gene interaction; and (iv) gene-environment interaction, among other factors. A review of current knowledge provides many examples of genetic factors that may increase the risk of one disease but reduce chances of developing another serious health condition, or improve survival from it. Factors that may increase risk of a major disease but attenuate manifestation of physical senescence are also discussed. Overall, available evidence suggests that the influence of a genetic variant on longevity may be negative, neutral or positive, depending on a delicate balance of the detrimental and beneficial effects of such variant on multiple health and aging related traits. This balance may change with age, internal and external environments, and depend on genetic surrounding. We conclude that trade-off-like and conditional genetic effects are very common and may result in situations when a disease "risk allele" can also be a pro-longevity variant, depending on context. We emphasize importance of considering such effects in both aging research and disease prevention.

  16. Genetic Testing and Neuroimaging for Youth at Risk for Mental Illness: Trading off Benefit and Risk.

    PubMed

    Lee, Grace; Mizgalewicz, Ania; Borgelt, Emily; Illes, Judy

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, mental illness is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. The first onset of mental illness usually occurs during childhood or adolescence, with nearly 12 million diagnosed cases in the United States alone. Neuroimaging and genetic testing have been invaluable in research on behavioral, affective, and attentional disorders, particularly with their potential predictive capabilities, and ability to improve diagnosis and to decrease the associated burdens of disease. The present study focused specifically the perspectives of mental health providers on the role of neuroimaging and genetic testing in clinical practice with children and adolescents. We interviewed 38 psychiatrists, psychologists, and allied mental health professionals who work primarily with youth about their receptivity toward either the use of neuroimaging or genetic testing. Interviews probed the role they foresee for these modalities for prediction, diagnosis, treatment planning, and the benefits and risks they anticipate. Practitioners anticipated three major benefits associated with clinical introduction of imaging and genetic testing in the mental health care for youth: (1) improved understanding of the brain and mental illness, (2) more accurate diagnosis than available through conventional clinical examination, and (3) legitimization of treatment plans. They also perceived three major risks: (1) misuse or misinterpretation of the imaging or genetic data, (2) potential adverse impacts on employment and insurance as adolescents reach adulthood, and (3) infringements on self-esteem or self-motivation. The nature of the interview questions focused on the future of neuroimaging and genetic testing testing research in the context of clinical neuroscience. Therefore, the responses from interview participants are based on anticipated rather than actual experience. Continued expansion of brain imaging and genetic testing into clinical care will

  17. Shared Genetic Risk Factors of Intracranial, Abdominal, and Thoracic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    van 't Hof, Femke N G; Ruigrok, Ynte M; Lee, Cue Hyunkyu; Ripke, Stephan; Anderson, Graig; de Andrade, Mariza; Baas, Annette F; Blankensteijn, Jan D; Böttinger, Erwin P; Bown, Matthew J; Broderick, Joseph; Bijlenga, Philippe; Carrell, David S; Crawford, Dana C; Crosslin, David R; Ebeling, Christian; Eriksson, Johan G; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana; von Und Zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Friedrich, Christoph M; Gaál, Emília I; Gottesman, Omri; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Harrison, Seamus C; Hernesniemi, Juha; Hofman, Albert; Inoue, Ituro; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Jones, Gregory T; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Kivisaari, Riku; Ko, Nerissa; Koskinen, Seppo; Kubo, Michiaki; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Kurki, Mitja I; Laakso, Aki; Lai, Dongbing; Leal, Suzanne M; Lehto, Hanna; LeMaire, Scott A; Low, Siew-Kee; Malinowski, Jennifer; McCarty, Catherine A; Milewicz, Dianna M; Mosley, Thomas H; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Niemelä, Mika; Pacheco, Jennifer; Peissig, Peggy L; Pera, Joanna; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Rivadeneira, Fernando; van Rij, Andre M; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Saratzis, Athanasios; Slowik, Agnieszka; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tromp, Gerard; Uitterlinden, André G; Verma, Shefali S; Vermeulen, Sita H; Wang, Gao T; Han, Buhm; Rinkel, Gabriël J E; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2016-07-14

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs), abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), and thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) all have a familial predisposition. Given that aneurysm types are known to co-occur, we hypothesized that there may be shared genetic risk factors for IAs, AAAs, and TAAs. We performed a mega-analysis of 1000 Genomes Project-imputed genome-wide association study (GWAS) data of 4 previously published aneurysm cohorts: 2 IA cohorts (in total 1516 cases, 4305 controls), 1 AAA cohort (818 cases, 3004 controls), and 1 TAA cohort (760 cases, 2212 controls), and observed associations of 4 known IA, AAA, and/or TAA risk loci (9p21, 18q11, 15q21, and 2q33) with consistent effect directions in all 4 cohorts. We calculated polygenic scores based on IA-, AAA-, and TAA-associated SNPs and tested these scores for association to case-control status in the other aneurysm cohorts; this revealed no shared polygenic effects. Similarly, linkage disequilibrium-score regression analyses did not show significant correlations between any pair of aneurysm subtypes. Last, we evaluated the evidence for 14 previously published aneurysm risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms through collaboration in extended aneurysm cohorts, with a total of 6548 cases and 16 843 controls (IA) and 4391 cases and 37 904 controls (AAA), and found nominally significant associations for IA risk locus 18q11 near RBBP8 to AAA (odds ratio [OR]=1.11; P=4.1×10(-5)) and for TAA risk locus 15q21 near FBN1 to AAA (OR=1.07; P=1.1×10(-3)). Although there was no evidence for polygenic overlap between IAs, AAAs, and TAAs, we found nominally significant effects of two established risk loci for IAs and TAAs in AAAs. These two loci will require further replication. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  18. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Somatic Mutations and Candidate Genetic Risk Variants

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Katie M.; Orlow, Irene; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Ballman, Karla; McCall, Linda; DeMatteo, Ronald; Engel, Lawrence S.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated with characteristic mutations, or “signatures” in other cancers, we hypothesized that the characteristic somatic mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes in GIST tumors may similarly be mutational signatures that are causally linked to specific mutagens or susceptibility loci. As previous epidemiologic studies suggest environmental risk factors such as dioxin and radiation exposure may be linked to sarcomas, we chose 208 variants in 39 candidate genes related to DNA repair and dioxin metabolism or response. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between each variant and 7 categories of tumor mutation using logistic regression. We also evaluated gene-level effects using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Although none of the association p-values were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, SNPs in CYP1B1 were strongly associated with KIT exon 11 codon 557-8 deletions (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 for rs2855658 and OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.7 for rs1056836) and wild type GISTs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8 for rs1800440 and OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 for rs1056836). CYP1B1 was also associated with these mutations categories in the SKAT analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively). Other potential risk variants included GSTM1, RAD23B and ERCC2. This preliminary analysis of inherited genetic risk factors for GIST offers some clues about the disease's genetic origins

  19. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors, somatic mutations and candidate genetic risk variants.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Katie M; Orlow, Irene; Antonescu, Cristina R; Ballman, Karla; McCall, Linda; DeMatteo, Ronald; Engel, Lawrence S

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated with characteristic mutations, or "signatures" in other cancers, we hypothesized that the characteristic somatic mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes in GIST tumors may similarly be mutational signatures that are causally linked to specific mutagens or susceptibility loci. As previous epidemiologic studies suggest environmental risk factors such as dioxin and radiation exposure may be linked to sarcomas, we chose 208 variants in 39 candidate genes related to DNA repair and dioxin metabolism or response. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between each variant and 7 categories of tumor mutation using logistic regression. We also evaluated gene-level effects using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Although none of the association p-values were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, SNPs in CYP1B1 were strongly associated with KIT exon 11 codon 557-8 deletions (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 for rs2855658 and OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.7 for rs1056836) and wild type GISTs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8 for rs1800440 and OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 for rs1056836). CYP1B1 was also associated with these mutations categories in the SKAT analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively). Other potential risk variants included GSTM1, RAD23B and ERCC2. This preliminary analysis of inherited genetic risk factors for GIST offers some clues about the disease's genetic origins and

  20. What risk assessments of genetically modified organisms can learn from institutional analyses of public health risks.

    PubMed

    Rajan, S Ravi; Letourneau, Deborah K

    2012-01-01

    The risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are evaluated traditionally by combining hazard identification and exposure estimates to provide decision support for regulatory agencies. We question the utility of the classical risk paradigm and discuss its evolution in GMO risk assessment. First, we consider the problem of uncertainty, by comparing risk assessment for environmental toxins in the public health domain with genetically modified organisms in the environment; we use the specific comparison of an insecticide to a transgenic, insecticidal food crop. Next, we examine normal accident theory (NAT) as a heuristic to consider runaway effects of GMOs, such as negative community level consequences of gene flow from transgenic, insecticidal crops. These examples illustrate how risk assessments are made more complex and contentious by both their inherent uncertainty and the inevitability of failure beyond expectation in complex systems. We emphasize the value of conducting decision-support research, embracing uncertainty, increasing transparency, and building interdisciplinary institutions that can address the complex interactions between ecosystems and society. In particular, we argue against black boxing risk analysis, and for a program to educate policy makers about uncertainty and complexity, so that eventually, decision making is not the burden that falls upon scientists but is assumed by the public at large.

  1. Genetic risk factors for ovarian cancer and their role for endometriosis risk.

    PubMed

    Burghaus, Stefanie; Fasching, Peter A; Häberle, Lothar; Rübner, Matthias; Büchner, Kathrin; Blum, Simon; Engel, Anne; Ekici, Arif B; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Renner, Stefan P

    2017-04-01

    Several genetic variants have been validated as risk factors for ovarian cancer. Endometriosis has also been described as a risk factor for ovarian cancer. Identifying genetic risk factors that are common to the two diseases might help improve our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis potentially linking the two conditions. In a hospital-based case-control analysis, 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), validated by the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC) and the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS) project, were genotyped using TaqMan® OpenArray™ analysis. The cases consisted of patients with endometriosis, and the controls were healthy individuals without endometriosis. A total of 385 cases and 484 controls were analyzed. Odds ratios and P values were obtained using simple logistic regression models, as well as from multiple logistic regression models with adjustment for clinical predictors. rs11651755 in HNF1B was found to be associated with endometriosis in this case-control study. The OR was 0.66 (95% CI, 0.51 to 0.84) and the P value after correction for multiple testing was 0.01. None of the other genotypes was associated with a risk for endometriosis. As rs11651755 in HNF1B modified both the ovarian cancer risk and also the risk for endometriosis, HNF1B may be causally involved in the pathogenetic pathway leading from endometriosis to ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. What Risk Assessments of Genetically Modified Organisms Can Learn from Institutional Analyses of Public Health Risks

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, S. Ravi; Letourneau, Deborah K.

    2012-01-01

    The risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are evaluated traditionally by combining hazard identification and exposure estimates to provide decision support for regulatory agencies. We question the utility of the classical risk paradigm and discuss its evolution in GMO risk assessment. First, we consider the problem of uncertainty, by comparing risk assessment for environmental toxins in the public health domain with genetically modified organisms in the environment; we use the specific comparison of an insecticide to a transgenic, insecticidal food crop. Next, we examine normal accident theory (NAT) as a heuristic to consider runaway effects of GMOs, such as negative community level consequences of gene flow from transgenic, insecticidal crops. These examples illustrate how risk assessments are made more complex and contentious by both their inherent uncertainty and the inevitability of failure beyond expectation in complex systems. We emphasize the value of conducting decision-support research, embracing uncertainty, increasing transparency, and building interdisciplinary institutions that can address the complex interactions between ecosystems and society. In particular, we argue against black boxing risk analysis, and for a program to educate policy makers about uncertainty and complexity, so that eventually, decision making is not the burden that falls upon scientists but is assumed by the public at large. PMID:23193357

  3. Evaluating genetic risk for prostate cancer among Japanese and Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Iona; Chen, Gary K.; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; He, Jing; Wan, Peggy; Laurie, Cathy; Shen, Jess; Sheng, Xin; Pooler, Loreall C.; Crenshaw, Andrew T.; Mirel, Daniel B.; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Donovan, Jenny L.; Guy, Michelle; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Neal, David E.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Monroe, Kristine R.; Stram, Daniel O.; Muir, Kenneth; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Background There have been few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of prostate cancer among diverse populations. To search for novel prostate cancer risk variants, we conducted GWAS of prostate cancer in Japanese and Latinos. In addition, we tested prostate cancer risk variants and developed genetic risk models of prostate cancer for Japanese and Latinos. Methods Our first stage GWAS of prostate cancer included Japanese (cases/controls=1,033/1,042) and Latino (cases/controls=1,043/1,057) from the Multiethnic Cohort. Significant associations from stage 1 (P < 1.0×10−4) were examined in silico in GWAS of prostate cancer (stage 2) in Japanese (cases/controls=1,583/3,386) and Europeans (cases/controls=1,854/1,894). Results No novel stage 1 SNPs outside of known risk regions reached genome-wide significance. For Japanese, in stage 1, the most notable putative novel association was seen with 10 SNPs (P<8.0. x10−6) at chromosome 2q33; however, this was not replicated in stage 2. For Latinos, the most significant association was observed with rs17023900 at the known 3p12 risk locus (stage 1: OR=1.45; P=7.01×10−5 and stage 2: OR=1.58; P =3.05×10−7). The majority of the established risk variants for prostate cancer, 79% and 88%, were positively associated with prostate cancer in Japanese and Latinos (stage I), respectively. The cumulative effects of these variants significantly influence prostate cancer risk (OR per allele=1.10; P = 2.71×10−25 and OR=1.07; P = 1.02×10−16 for Japanese and Latinos, respectively). Conclusion and Impact Our GWAS of prostate cancer did not identify novel genome-wide significant variants. However, our findings demonstrate that established risk variants for prostate cancer significantly contribute to risk among Japanese and Latinos. PMID:22923026

  4. Is primary Sjögren's syndrome a risk factor for malignancies different from lymphomas? What does the literature highlight about it?

    PubMed

    Manzo, Ciro; Kechida, Melek

    2017-01-01

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease with an elevated risk of developing lymphoproliferative malignancies (LM). Whether pSS is a risk factor or not for non-lymphoma malignancies (NLM) has been scarcely evaluated in the literature. Age is per se a risk factor for malignancies: patients over 70 years old have 4 times higher risk for cancers than adults. Even if the mean age of pSS onset usually is in the 4(th) and 5(th) decade, its onset in patients aged over 65 years (Elderly Onset pSS - EOpSS) is not uncommon. To evaluate pSS as a risk factor for NLM we performed a systematic electronic search on PubMed in the period 2006-2016 to identify all the publications on this topic. The studies were eligible for inclusion if they reported specific Standardized Incidence Ratio (SIR) with 95% CI. Studies that did not report sufficient published and/or original data were excluded. Only 7 articles of 494 that we found in PubMed fulfilled the inclusion criterion. In the vast majority of these, SIR values were not statistically significant for NLM. The occurrence of NLM after LM was statistically significant in some studies and a NLM represented the most frequent cause of death. The possibility that NLM may represent a paraneoplastic syndrome seems much more frequent than LM, the risk of which increases with time after the diagnosis. Data regarding the neoplastic weight of EOpSS are mainly pointed out by case reports. Primary Sjögren's syndrome is not associated with an increased risk for NLM. However the possibility that NLM may appear after recovery from lymphoma should be carefully considered because it could be cause of the patient's death. Similarly the possibility that NLM may represent a paraneoplastic syndrome must be highlighted. The relationship between EOpSS and SIRs for NLM should be deepened with studies on ad hoc cohorts.

  5. Dynamic brain network reconfiguration as a potential schizophrenia genetic risk mechanism modulated by NMDA receptor function.

    PubMed

    Braun, Urs; Schäfer, Axel; Bassett, Danielle S; Rausch, Franziska; Schweiger, Janina I; Bilek, Edda; Erk, Susanne; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Grimm, Oliver; Geiger, Lena S; Haddad, Leila; Otto, Kristina; Mohnke, Sebastian; Heinz, Andreas; Zink, Mathias; Walter, Henrik; Schwarz, Emanuel; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Tost, Heike

    2016-11-01

    Schizophrenia is increasingly recognized as a disorder of distributed neural dynamics, but the molecular and genetic contributions are poorly understood. Recent work highlights a role for altered N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor signaling and related impairments in the excitation-inhibitory balance and synchrony of large-scale neural networks. Here, we combined a pharmacological intervention with novel techniques from dynamic network neuroscience applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify alterations in the dynamic reconfiguration of brain networks related to schizophrenia genetic risk and NMDA receptor hypofunction. We quantified "network flexibility," a measure of the dynamic reconfiguration of the community structure of time-variant brain networks during working memory performance. Comparing 28 patients with schizophrenia, 37 unaffected first-degree relatives, and 139 healthy controls, we detected significant differences in network flexibility [F(2,196) = 6.541, P = 0.002] in a pattern consistent with the assumed genetic risk load of the groups (highest for patients, intermediate for relatives, and lowest for controls). In an observer-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized, cross-over pharmacological challenge study in 37 healthy controls, we further detected a significant increase in network flexibility as a result of NMDA receptor antagonism with 120 mg dextromethorphan [F(1,34) = 5.291, P = 0.028]. Our results identify a potential dynamic network intermediate phenotype related to the genetic liability for schizophrenia that manifests as altered reconfiguration of brain networks during working memory. The phenotype appears to be influenced by NMDA receptor antagonism, consistent with a critical role for glutamate in the temporal coordination of neural networks and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  6. Dynamic brain network reconfiguration as a potential schizophrenia genetic risk mechanism modulated by NMDA receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Urs; Schäfer, Axel; Rausch, Franziska; Schweiger, Janina I.; Bilek, Edda; Erk, Susanne; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Grimm, Oliver; Geiger, Lena S.; Haddad, Leila; Otto, Kristina; Mohnke, Sebastian; Heinz, Andreas; Zink, Mathias; Walter, Henrik; Schwarz, Emanuel; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Tost, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is increasingly recognized as a disorder of distributed neural dynamics, but the molecular and genetic contributions are poorly understood. Recent work highlights a role for altered N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor signaling and related impairments in the excitation–inhibitory balance and synchrony of large-scale neural networks. Here, we combined a pharmacological intervention with novel techniques from dynamic network neuroscience applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify alterations in the dynamic reconfiguration of brain networks related to schizophrenia genetic risk and NMDA receptor hypofunction. We quantified “network flexibility,” a measure of the dynamic reconfiguration of the community structure of time-variant brain networks during working memory performance. Comparing 28 patients with schizophrenia, 37 unaffected first-degree relatives, and 139 healthy controls, we detected significant differences in network flexibility [F(2,196) = 6.541, P = 0.002] in a pattern consistent with the assumed genetic risk load of the groups (highest for patients, intermediate for relatives, and lowest for controls). In an observer-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized, cross-over pharmacological challenge study in 37 healthy controls, we further detected a significant increase in network flexibility as a result of NMDA receptor antagonism with 120 mg dextromethorphan [F(1,34) = 5.291, P = 0.028]. Our results identify a potential dynamic network intermediate phenotype related to the genetic liability for schizophrenia that manifests as altered reconfiguration of brain networks during working memory. The phenotype appears to be influenced by NMDA receptor antagonism, consistent with a critical role for glutamate in the temporal coordination of neural networks and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:27791105

  7. Impact of literacy and numeracy on motivation for behavior change after diabetes genetic risk testing.

    PubMed

    Vassy, Jason L; O'Brien, Kelsey E; Waxler, Jessica L; Park, Elyse R; Delahanty, Linda M; Florez, Jose C; Meigs, James B; Grant, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes genetic risk testing might motivate at-risk patients to adopt diabetes prevention behaviors. However, the influence of literacy and numeracy on patient response to diabetes genetic risk is unknown. The authors investigated the association of health literacy, genetic literacy, and health numeracy with patient responses to diabetes genetic risk. and Measurements Overweight patients at high phenotypic risk for type 2 diabetes were recruited for a clinical trial of diabetes genetic risk testing. At baseline, participants predicted how their motivation for lifestyle modification to prevent diabetes might change in response to hypothetical scenarios of receiving "high" and "low" genetic risk results. Responses were analyzed according to participants' health literacy, genetic literacy, and health numeracy. Two-thirds (67%) of participants (n = 175) reported very high motivation to prevent diabetes. Despite high health literacy (92% at high school level), many participants had limited health numeracy (30%) and genetic literacy (38%). Almost all (98%) reported that high-risk genetic results would increase their motivation for lifestyle modification. In contrast, response to low-risk genetic results varied. Higher levels of health literacy (P = 0.04), genetic literacy (P = 0.02), and health numeracy (P = 0.02) were associated with an anticipated decrease in motivation for lifestyle modification in response to low-risk results. While patients reported that high-risk genetic results would motivate them to adopt healthy lifestyle changes, response to low-risk results varied by patient numeracy and literacy. However, anticipated responses may not correlate with true behavior change. If future research justifies the clinical use of genetic testing to motivate behavior change, it may be important to assess how patient characteristics modify that motivational effect.

  8. Impact of Literacy and Numeracy on Motivation for Behavior Change After Diabetes Genetic Risk Testing

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Kelsey E.; Waxler, Jessica L.; Park, Elyse R.; Delahanty, Linda M.; Florez, Jose C.; Meigs, James B.; Grant, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes genetic risk testing might motivate at-risk patients to adopt diabetes prevention behaviors. However, the influence of literacy and numeracy on patient response to diabetes genetic risk is unknown. Objective The authors investigated the association of health literacy, genetic literacy, and health numeracy with patient responses to diabetes genetic risk. Design and Measurements Overweight patients at high phenotypic risk for type 2 diabetes were recruited for a clinical trial of diabetes genetic risk testing. At baseline, participants predicted how their motivation for lifestyle modification to prevent diabetes might change in response to hypothetical scenarios of receiving “high” and “low” genetic risk results. Responses were analyzed according to participants’ health literacy, genetic literacy, and health numeracy. Results Two-thirds (67%) of participants (n = 175) reported very high motivation to prevent diabetes. Despite high health literacy (92% at high school level), many participants had limited health numeracy (30%) and genetic literacy (38%). Almost all (98%) reported that high-risk genetic results would increase their motivation for lifestyle modification. In contrast, response to low-risk genetic results varied. Higher levels of health literacy (P = 0.04), genetic literacy (P = 0.02), and health numeracy (P = 0.02) were associated with an anticipated decrease in motivation for lifestyle modification in response to low-risk results. Conclusions While patients reported that high-risk genetic results would motivate them to adopt healthy lifestyle changes, response to low-risk results varied by patient numeracy and literacy. However, anticipated responses may not correlate with true behavior change. If future research justifies the clinical use of genetic testing to motivate behavior change, it may be important to assess how patient characteristics modify that motivational effect. PMID:22247420

  9. Utility of genetic and non-genetic risk factors in predicting coronary heart disease in Singaporean Chinese.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xuling; Salim, Agus; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Han, Yi; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; van Dam, Rob M; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay; Liu, Jianjun; Goh, Daniel Yt; Wang, Xu; Teo, Yik-Ying; Friedlander, Yechiel; Heng, Chew-Kiat

    2017-01-01

    Background Although numerous phenotype based equations for predicting risk of 'hard' coronary heart disease are available, data on the utility of genetic information for such risk prediction is lacking in Chinese populations. Design Case-control study nested within the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Methods A total of 1306 subjects comprising 836 men (267 incident cases and 569 controls) and 470 women (128 incident cases and 342 controls) were included. A Genetic Risk Score comprising 156 single nucleotide polymorphisms that have been robustly associated with coronary heart disease or its risk factors ( p < 5 × 10(-8)) in at least two independent cohorts of genome-wide association studies was built. For each gender, three base models were used: recalibrated Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII) Model (M1); ATP III model fitted using Singapore Chinese Health Study data (M2) and M3: M2 + C-reactive protein + creatinine. Results The Genetic Risk Score was significantly associated with incident 'hard' coronary heart disease ( p for men: 1.70 × 10(-10)-1.73 × 10(-9); p for women: 0.001). The inclusion of the Genetic Risk Score in the prediction models improved discrimination in both genders (c-statistics: 0.706-0.722 vs. 0.663-0.695 from base models for men; 0.788-0.790 vs. 0.765-0.773 for women). In addition, the inclusion of the Genetic Risk Score also improved risk classification with a net gain of cases being reclassified to higher risk categories (men: 12.4%-16.5%; women: 10.2% (M3)), while not significantly reducing the classification accuracy in controls. Conclusions The Genetic Risk Score is an independent predictor for incident 'hard' coronary heart disease in our ethnic Chinese population. Inclusion of genetic factors into coronary heart disease prediction models could significantly improve risk prediction performance.

  10. Comparative genetic analyses of historical and contemporary collections highlight contrasting demographic histories for the bumble bees Bombus pensylvanicus and B. impatiens in Illinois.

    PubMed

    Lozier, Jeffrey D; Cameron, Sydney A

    2009-05-01

    Direct comparison of genetic patterns between museum specimens and contemporary collections can be a powerful approach for detecting recent demographic changes. Using microsatellite markers, we examined historical and contemporary genetic variation from an apparently declining bumble bee species, Bombus pensylvanicus, and from a stable species, Bombus impatiens, in central Illinois. For each species, we genotyped specimens from the Illinois Natural History Survey collected from three populations between 1969-1972 and from a resurvey of the same areas conducted in 2008. Population structure in B. pensylvanicus increased markedly over the last four decades (from theta(ST) = 0.001 to 0.027) while no structure was detected in B. impatiens for either time period (theta(ST) = -0.006 to -0.003). Changes in genetic diversity were not significant for either species, although small reductions were observed for B. pensylvanicus in all three populations. Coalescent simulations incorporating both contemporary and historical samples suggest that this small change is not surprising for recent population declines, as large reductions in genetic diversity were only apparent under the most severe bottleneck scenarios. These results demonstrate how comparisons of genetic patterns between temporal periods and species can help elucidate potential threats to population health and suggest several strategies that might be useful in the conservation of B. pensylvanicus in the Midwestern USA.

  11. Recommendations for presymptomatic genetic testing and management of individuals at risk for hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Obici, Laura; Kuks, Jan B.; Buades, Juan; Adams, David; Suhr, Ole B.; Coelho, Teresa; Kyriakides, Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review These recommendations highlight recent experience in genetic counselling for the severe autosomal-dominant, late-onset transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) disease, and present a structured approach towards identification and monitoring of asymptomatic carriers of the mutated gene. Recent findings The effectiveness of current treatment options is still limited in patients with TTR-FAP beyond stage I. Diagnosis in the early stages of TTR-FAP is essential to prevent or delay the progression of disease. Existing legal and cultural issues differ among countries within Europe. Experts of the European Network for TTR-FAP (ATTReuNET) concluded that genetic counselling for diagnosed individuals and at-risk family members is mostly beneficial and should be carried out with care by trained professionals. Systematic and regular monitoring of an asymptomatic carrier is necessary to detect early signs of TTR-FAP and maximize the effectiveness of treatment. This includes five areas of assessment: history/clinical examination, sensorimotor function, autonomic dysfunction, cardiac function, and renal function. At least two related symptoms and positive biopsy findings are required to confirm diagnosis of TTR-FAP. Summary Early detection of TTR-FAP is essential to improve the prognosis of TTR-FAP. ATTReuNET recommends genetic counselling and routine monitoring for asymptomatic carriers of TTR-FAP. PMID:26734953

  12. Genetic influences on blood lipids and cardiovascular disease risk: tools for primary prevention1234

    PubMed Central

    Ordovas, José M

    2009-01-01

    Genetic polymorphism in human populations is part of the evolutionary process that results from the interaction between the environment and the human genome. Recent changes in diet have upset this equilibrium, potentially influencing the risk of most common morbidities such as cardiovascular diseases, obesity, diabetes, and cancer. Reduction of these conditions is a major public health concern, and such a reduction could be achieved by improving our ability to detect disease predisposition early in life and by providing more personalized behavioral recommendations for successful primary prevention. In terms of cardiovascular diseases, polymorphisms at multiple genes have been associated with differential effects in terms of lipid metabolism; however, the connection with cardiovascular disease has been more elusive, and considerable heterogeneity exists among studies regarding the predictive value of genetic markers. This may be because of experimental limitations, the intrinsic complexity of the phenotypes, and the aforementioned interactions with environmental factors. The integration of genetic and environmental complexity into current and future research will drive the field toward the implementation of clinical tools aimed at providing dietary advice optimized for the individual's genome. This may imply that dietary changes are implemented early in life to gain maximum benefit. However, it is important to highlight that most reported studies have focused on adult populations and to extrapolate these findings to children and adolescents may not be justified until proper studies have been carried out in these populations and until the ethical and legal issues associated with this new field are adequately addressed. PMID:19339403

  13. Risk assessment and genetic counseling for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: recommendations of the National Society of Genetic Counselors.

    PubMed

    Berliner, Janice L; Fay, Angela Musial

    2007-06-01

    These cancer genetic counseling recommendations describe the medical, psychosocial and ethical implications of identifying at-risk individuals for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) through cancer risk assessment, with or without genetic susceptibility testing. They were developed by members of the Practice Issues Subcommittee of the National Society of Genetic Counselors' Familial Cancer Risk Counseling Special Interest Group. The information contained in this document is derived from extensive review of the current literature on cancer genetic risk assessment as well as the professional expertise of genetic counselors with significant experience in education and counseling regarding hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Critical components of the process include the ascertainment of medical and family histories, determination and communication of cancer risk, assessment of risk perception, education regarding the genetics of HBOC, discussion of molecular testing for HBOC if appropriate (including benefits, risks and limitations) and any necessary follow-up. These recommendations do not dictate an exclusive course of management or guarantee a specific outcome. Moreover, they do not replace the professional judgment of a health care provider based on the clinical situation of a client.

  14. Modulation of prostate cancer genetic risk by omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Berquin, Isabelle M.; Min, Younong; Wu, Ruping; Wu, Jiansheng; Perry, Donna; Cline, J. Mark; Thomas, Mike J.; Thornburg, Todd; Kulik, George; Smith, Adrienne; Edwards, Iris J.; D’Agostino, Ralph; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Hong; Kang, Jing X.; Chen, Yong Q.

    2007-01-01

    Although a causal role of genetic alterations in human cancer is well established, it is still unclear whether dietary fat can modulate cancer risk in a predisposed population. Epidemiological studies suggest that diets rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids reduce cancer incidence. To determine the influence of fatty acids on prostate cancer risk in animals with a defined genetic lesion, we used prostate-specific Pten-knockout mice, an immune-competent, orthotopic prostate cancer model, and diets with defined polyunsaturated fatty acid levels. We found that omega-3 fatty acids reduced prostate tumor growth, slowed histopathological progression, and increased survival, whereas omega-6 fatty acids had opposite effects. Introducing an omega-3 desaturase, which converts omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids, into the Pten-knockout mice reduced tumor growth similarly to the omega-3 diet. Tumors from mice on the omega-3 diet had lower proportions of phosphorylated Bad and higher apoptotic indexes compared with those from mice on omega-6 diet. Knockdown of Bad eliminated omega-3–induced cell death, and introduction of exogenous Bad restored the sensitivity to omega-3 fatty acids. Our data suggest that modulation of prostate cancer development by polyunsaturated fatty acids is mediated in part through Bad-dependent apoptosis. This study highlights the importance of gene-diet interactions in prostate cancer. PMID:17607361

  15. Comparison of the incidence of pathogenic and antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli strains in adult cattle and veal calf slaughterhouse effluents highlighted different risks for public health.

    PubMed

    Um, Maryse Michèle; Barraud, Olivier; Kérourédan, Monique; Gaschet, Margaux; Stalder, Thibault; Oswald, Eric; Dagot, Christophe; Ploy, Marie-Cecile; Brugère, Hubert; Bibbal, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the involvement of bovine slaughterhouse effluents and biosolids in the risk of environmental dissemination of pathogenic and antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli. Several samples were collected from one adult cattle and one veal calf slaughterhouse wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The treatment process had no impact on the percentage of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) and on the percentage of atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC). A STEC O157:H7 was isolated from the thickened sludge of the adult cattle slaughterhouse. As thickened sludge is intended to be spread on agricultural lands, the detection of this pathogenic strain is a public health issue. The percentage of antibiotic-resistant E. coli was 5.0% and 87.5% in wastewater from the adult cattle and the veal calf slaughterhouse, respectively. These percentages were not significantly different after treatment. Integron-bearing E. coli isolates were only detected in the veal calf slaughterhouse WWTP with percentages above 50.0% for all sampling points whatever the step of the treatment process. Taken together, these findings highlighted the fact that different public health risks might be associated with adult cattle or veal calf slaughterhouses regarding the dissemination of pathogenic and antibiotic-resistant E. coli isolates into the environment.

  16. Making sense of risk diagnosis in case of prenatal and reproductive genetic counselling for neuromuscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Zaccaro, Antonella; Freda, Maria Francesca

    2014-03-01

    This study explored the processes of significance about the risk communication in prenatal/preconception setting within 1 month to the end of genetic counselling intervention. Participants were all attending a programme of Cardiomyology and Medical Genetics in Naples, Italy, for the first time. Transcripts of 18 semi-structured interviews were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Themes arising included the following: the familiar outcomes of genetic counselling, the risk representation and the impacts on decision-making. The findings suggest the significance of the experience of genetic risk and the implications for the support of individuals and their family after the conclusion of the genetic counselling intervention.

  17. Genetic risk prediction and neurobiological understanding of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Levey, D F; Le-Niculescu, H; Frank, J; Ayalew, M; Jain, N; Kirlin, B; Learman, R; Winiger, E; Rodd, Z; Shekhar, A; Schork, N; Kiefer, F; Kiefe, F; Wodarz, N; Müller-Myhsok, B; Dahmen, N; Nöthen, M; Sherva, R; Farrer, L; Smith, A H; Kranzler, H R; Rietschel, M; Gelernter, J; Niculescu, A B

    2014-05-20

    We have used a translational Convergent Functional Genomics (CFG) approach to discover genes involved in alcoholism, by gene-level integration of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from a German alcohol dependence cohort with other genetic and gene expression data, from human and animal model studies, similar to our previous work in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. A panel of all the nominally significant P-value SNPs in the top candidate genes discovered by CFG  (n=135 genes, 713 SNPs) was used to generate a genetic  risk prediction score (GRPS), which showed a trend towards significance (P=0.053) in separating  alcohol dependent individuals from controls in an independent German test cohort. We then validated and prioritized our top findings from this discovery work, and subsequently tested them in three independent cohorts, from two continents. A panel of all the nominally significant P-value single-nucleotide length polymorphisms (SNPs) in the top candidate genes discovered by CFG (n=135 genes, 713 SNPs) were used to generate a Genetic Risk Prediction Score (GRPS), which showed a trend towards significance (P=0.053) in separating alcohol-dependent individuals from controls in an independent German test cohort. In order to validate and prioritize the key genes that drive behavior without some of the pleiotropic environmental confounds present in humans, we used a stress-reactive animal model of alcoholism developed by our group, the D-box binding protein (DBP) knockout mouse, consistent with the surfeit of stress theory of addiction proposed by Koob and colleagues. A much smaller panel (n=11 genes, 66 SNPs) of the top CFG-discovered genes for alcoholism, cross-validated and prioritized by this stress-reactive animal model showed better predictive ability in the independent German test cohort (P=0.041). The top CFG scoring gene for alcoholism from the initial discovery step, synuclein alpha (SNCA) remained the top gene after the stress

  18. Scientific reporting is suboptimal for aspects that characterize genetic risk prediction studies: a review of published articles based on the Genetic RIsk Prediction Studies statement.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Adriana I; Mihaescu, Raluca; Ioannidis, John P A; Khoury, Muin J; Little, Julian; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Janssens, A Cecile J W

    2014-05-01

    Our main objective was to raise awareness of the areas that need improvements in the reporting of genetic risk prediction articles for future publications, based on the Genetic RIsk Prediction Studies (GRIPS) statement. We evaluated studies that developed or validated a prediction model based on multiple DNA variants, using empirical data, and were published in 2010. A data extraction form based on the 25 items of the GRIPS statement was created and piloted. Forty-two studies met our inclusion criteria. Overall, more than half of the evaluated items (34 of 62) were reported in at least 85% of included articles. Seventy-seven percentage of the articles were identified as genetic risk prediction studies through title assessment, but only 31% used the keywords recommended by GRIPS in the title or abstract. Seventy-four percentage mentioned which allele was the risk variant. Overall, only 10% of the articles reported all essential items needed to perform external validation of the risk model. Completeness of reporting in genetic risk prediction studies is adequate for general elements of study design but is suboptimal for several aspects that characterize genetic risk prediction studies such as description of the model construction. Improvements in the transparency of reporting of these aspects would facilitate the identification, replication, and application of genetic risk prediction models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fine-mapping in the MHC region accounts for 18% additional genetic risk for celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Pulit, Sara L.; Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A.; Romanos, Jihane; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; van Heel, David A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2015-01-01

    Although dietary gluten is the trigger, celiac disease risk is strongly influenced by genetic variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. We fine-mapped the MHC association signal to identify additional risk factors independent of the HLA-DQ alleles and observed five novel associations that account for 18% of the genetic risk. Together with the 57 known non-MHC loci, genetic variation can now explain up to 48% of celiac disease heritability. PMID:25894500

  20. Most genetic risk for autism resides with common variation

    PubMed Central

    Gaugler, Trent; Klei, Lambertus; Sanders, Stephan J.; Bodea, Corneliu A.; Goldberg, Arthur P.; Lee, Ann B.; Mahajan, Milind; Manaa, Dina; Pawitan, Yudi; Reichert, Jennifer; Ripke, Stephan; Sandin, Sven; Sklar, Pamela; Svantesson, Oscar; Reichenberg, Abraham; Hultman, Christina M.; Devlin, Bernie

    2014-01-01

    A key component of genetic architecture is the allelic spectrum influencing trait variability. For autism spectrum disorder (henceforth autism) the nature of its allelic spectrum is uncertain. Individual risk genes have been identified from rare variation, especially de novo mutations1–8. From this evidence one might conclude that rare variation dominates its allelic spectrum, yet recent studies show that common variation, individually of small effect, has substantial impact en masse9,10. At issue is how much of an impact relative to rare variation. Using a unique epidemiological sample from Sweden, novel methods that distinguish total narrow-sense heritability from that due to common variation, and by synthesizing results from other studies, we reach several conclusions about autism’s genetic architecture: its narrow-sense heritability is ≈54% and most traces to common variation; rare de novo mutations contribute substantially to individuals’ liability; still their contribution to variance in liability, 2.6%, is modest compared to heritable variation. PMID:25038753

  1. Genetic risk factors of cisplatin induced ototoxicity in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Talach, T; Rottenberg, J; Gal, B; Kostrica, R; Jurajda, M; Kocak, I; Lakomy, R; Vogazianos, E

    2016-01-01

    Ototoxicity is an important adverse effect of using Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum) (CDDP) as a form of chemotherapy. The clinical picture of CDDP induced ototoxicity includes perceptive hearing impairment (reversible or permanent) and tinnitus. Ototoxicity manifests with considerable variability between patients. The objective of this prospective study was to investigate a possible genetic background to this variability. We assessed ototoxicity induced by therapeutic doses of CDDP in adult patients with germinative testicular tumors, or other tumors treated with an identical CDDP dosage scheme. Audiological examination before, during and after the treatment has shown deterioration in hearing; first in the high-frequencies and with increased CDDP cumulative doses, impairment in other frequencies as well. Occurrence of tinnitus was not dependent on the administered dose of CDDP, or the other risk factors examined in this study. The association of CDDP induced ototoxicity with genetic polymorphisms in candidate genes was examined. Our study has demonstrated an association of early onset of CDDP induced ototoxicity with the presence of two copies of GSTT1 gene (p=0,009) and with T allele of rs9332377 polymorphism in COMT gene (p=0,001).

  2. The Genetics Revolution: Programs and Issues for the Community College. A Monograph Highlighting the Winners of the Exxon Education Foundation Innovation Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mays, Marilyn Elaine, Ed.

    Presented at a 1996 conference on the implications of the Human Genome Project for community and technical colleges, the 30 papers included in this monograph describe methods for incorporating genetics studies into the two-year college curriculum. Among the papers provided are: (1) "Facing the Unknown: The Ethical Challenges of…

  3. REGENT: a risk assessment and classification algorithm for genetic and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, Daniel JM; Goddard, Graham HM; Lewis, Cathryn M

    2013-01-01

    The identification of environmental and genetic factors that contribute to disease risk requires appropriate statistical methods and software that can integrate different sources of risk, provide statistical assessment of combined risk factors, and facilitate interpretation of this risk. We have developed an R package, REGENT, to calculate risks conferred by genetic factors and multilevel environmental factors. This is performed at a population level, with the option to also analyse individual-level data. REGENT incorporates variability in risk factors to calculate confidence intervals for risk estimates and to classify the population into different categories of risk based on significant differences from the baseline average member of the population. REGENT is an R package available from CRAN: http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/REGENT. It will be of value to genetic researchers exploring the utility of the variants detected for their disorder, and to clinical researchers interested in genetic risk studies. PMID:22669417

  4. Giardiasis among different tribes of Orang Asli in Malaysia: highlighting the presence of other family members infected with Giardia intestinalis as a main risk factor.

    PubMed

    Anuar, Tengku Shahrul; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Ghani, Mohamed Kamel Abdul; Osman, Emelia; Yasin, Azlin Mohd; Nordin, Anisah; Azreen, Siti Nor; Salleh, Fatmah Md; Ghazali, Nuraffini; Bernadus, Mekadina; Moktar, Norhayati

    2012-08-01

    The flagellate protozoan parasite, Giardia intestinalis, is widely distributed throughout the world with a high prevalence in developing countries in the tropics and subtropics, including Malaysia. Approximately 200 million people are infected with the parasite globally, with 500,000 new cases reported annually. This cross-sectional study was conducted among three tribes of Orang Asli communities in Selangor, Perak and Pahang states of Malaysia. The main objective was to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for giardiasis. Stool samples were collected from 500 individuals aged between 2 and 74 years (males=219, females=281). The samples were examined with formalin-ether sedimentation and trichrome staining techniques. Socioeconomic data were collected through a pre-tested questionnaire. The overall prevalence of giardiasis was 20.0% with the highest prevalence in the Proto-Malays (33.3%) followed by Negritos (20.1%) and Senois (10.4%). The positive cases showed a decrease with increasing age and most of the positive cases were observed in individuals less than 24 years old. Males had significantly higher prevalence than females (χ(2)=5.283, P=0.022). Logistic regression analysis of the overall population studied and the Senoi tribe confirmed that being a child aged less than 15 years, being male, the consumption of raw vegetables and the presence of other family members infected with G. intestinalis were the main risk factors for giardiasis. The presence of other family members infected with G. intestinalis was the only risk factor highlighted in the Proto-Malay and Negrito tribes. Diarrhoea was significantly associated with giardiasis. However, the cause and effect relationship has yet to be determined. Thus, screening family members and treating the infected individuals are the main strategies that should be adopted by the public health authority in combating this infection in Orang Asli communities as well as health education regarding good personal and

  5. Combined genetic and splicing analysis of BRCA1 c.[594-2A>C; 641A>G] highlights the relevance of naturally occurring in-frame transcripts for developing disease gene variant classification algorithms.

    PubMed

    de la Hoya, Miguel; Soukarieh, Omar; López-Perolio, Irene; Vega, Ana; Walker, Logan C; van Ierland, Yvette; Baralle, Diana; Santamariña, Marta; Lattimore, Vanessa; Wijnen, Juul; Whiley, Philip; Blanco, Ana; Raponi, Michela; Hauke, Jan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Becker, Alexandra; Hansen, Thomas V O; Behar, Raquel; Investigators, KConFaB; Niederacher, Diether; Arnold, Norbert; Dworniczak, Bernd; Steinemann, Doris; Faust, Ulrike; Rubinstein, Wendy; Hulick, Peter J; Houdayer, Claude; Caputo, Sandrine M; Castera, Laurent; Pesaran, Tina; Chao, Elizabeth; Brewer, Carole; Southey, Melissa C; van Asperen, Christi J; Singer, Christian F; Sullivan, Jan; Poplawski, Nicola; Mai, Phuong; Peto, Julian; Johnson, Nichola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Galastri, Laura; Olson, Janet E; Hallberg, Emily; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Blows, Fiona; Shah, Mitul; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; McGuffog, Lesley; Bolla, Manjeet K; Antoniou, Antonis C; Easton, Douglas F; Couch, Fergus J; Tavtigian, Sean; Vreeswijk, Maaike P; Parsons, Michael; Meeks, Huong D; Martins, Alexandra; Goldgar, David E; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2016-06-01

    A recent analysis using family history weighting and co-observation classification modeling indicated that BRCA1 c.594-2A > C (IVS9-2A > C), previously described to cause exon 10 skipping (a truncating alteration), displays characteristics inconsistent with those of a high risk pathogenic BRCA1 variant. We used large-scale genetic and clinical resources from the ENIGMA, CIMBA and BCAC consortia to assess pathogenicity of c.594-2A > C. The combined odds for causality considering case-control, segregation and breast tumor pathology information was 3.23 × 10(-8) Our data indicate that c.594-2A > C is always in cis with c.641A > G. The spliceogenic effect of c.[594-2A > C;641A > G] was characterized using RNA analysis of human samples and splicing minigenes. As expected, c.[594-2A > C; 641A > G] caused exon 10 skipping, albeit not due to c.594-2A > C impairing the acceptor site but rather by c.641A > G modifying exon 10 splicing regulatory element(s). Multiple blood-based RNA assays indicated that the variant allele did not produce detectable levels of full-length transcripts, with a per allele BRCA1 expression profile composed of ≈70-80% truncating transcripts, and ≈20-30% of in-frame Δ9,10 transcripts predicted to encode a BRCA1 protein with tumor suppression function.We confirm that BRCA1c.[594-2A > C;641A > G] should not be considered a high-risk pathogenic variant. Importantly, results from our detailed mRNA analysis suggest that BRCA-associated cancer risk is likely not markedly increased for individuals who carry a truncating variant in BRCA1 exons 9 or 10, or any other BRCA1 allele that permits 20-30% of tumor suppressor function. More generally, our findings highlight the importance of assessing naturally occurring alternative splicing for clinical evaluation of variants in disease-causing genes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Combined genetic and splicing analysis of BRCA1 c.[594-2A>C; 641A>G] highlights the relevance of naturally occurring in-frame transcripts for developing disease gene variant classification algorithms

    PubMed Central

    de la Hoya, Miguel; Soukarieh, Omar; López-Perolio, Irene; Vega, Ana; Walker, Logan C.; van Ierland, Yvette; Baralle, Diana; Santamariña, Marta; Lattimore, Vanessa; Wijnen, Juul; Whiley, Philip; Blanco, Ana; Raponi, Michela; Hauke, Jan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Becker, Alexandra; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Behar, Raquel; Investigators, KConFaB; Niederacher, Diether; Arnold, Norbert; Dworniczak, Bernd; Steinemann, Doris; Faust, Ulrike; Rubinstein, Wendy; Hulick, Peter J.; Houdayer, Claude; Caputo, Sandrine M.; Castera, Laurent; Pesaran, Tina; Chao, Elizabeth; Brewer, Carole; Southey, Melissa C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Singer, Christian F.; Sullivan, Jan; Poplawski, Nicola; Mai, Phuong; Peto, Julian; Johnson, Nichola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Galastri, Laura; Olson, Janet E.; Hallberg, Emily; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Blows, Fiona; Shah, Mitul; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; McGuffog, Lesley; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Tavtigian, Sean; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Parsons, Michael; Meeks, Huong D.; Martins, Alexandra; Goldgar, David E.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2016-01-01

    A recent analysis using family history weighting and co-observation classification modeling indicated that BRCA1 c.594-2A > C (IVS9-2A > C), previously described to cause exon 10 skipping (a truncating alteration), displays characteristics inconsistent with those of a high risk pathogenic BRCA1 variant. We used large-scale genetic and clinical resources from the ENIGMA, CIMBA and BCAC consortia to assess pathogenicity of c.594-2A > C. The combined odds for causality considering case-control, segregation and breast tumor pathology information was 3.23 × 10−8. Our data indicate that c.594-2A > C is always in cis with c.641A > G. The spliceogenic effect of c.[594-2A > C;641A > G] was characterized using RNA analysis of human samples and splicing minigenes. As expected, c.[594-2A > C; 641A > G] caused exon 10 skipping, albeit not due to c.594-2A > C impairing the acceptor site but rather by c.641A > G modifying exon 10 splicing regulatory element(s). Multiple blood-based RNA assays indicated that the variant allele did not produce detectable levels of full-length transcripts, with a per allele BRCA1 expression profile composed of ≈70–80% truncating transcripts, and ≈20–30% of in-frame Δ9,10 transcripts predicted to encode a BRCA1 protein with tumor suppression function. We confirm that BRCA1c.[594-2A > C;641A > G] should not be considered a high-risk pathogenic variant. Importantly, results from our detailed mRNA analysis suggest that BRCA-associated cancer risk is likely not markedly increased for individuals who carry a truncating variant in BRCA1 exons 9 or 10, or any other BRCA1 allele that permits 20–30% of tumor suppressor function. More generally, our findings highlight the importance of assessing naturally occurring alternative splicing for clinical evaluation of variants in disease-causing genes. PMID:27008870

  7. Implementing visual cervical cancer screening in Senegal: a cross-sectional study of risk factors and prevalence highlighting service utilization barriers

    PubMed Central

    Dykens, J Andrew; Linn, Annē M; Irwin, Tracy; Peters, Karen E; Pyra, Maria; Traoré, Fatoumata; Touré Diarra, Mariama; Hasnain, Memoona; Wallner, Katie; Linn, Patrick; Ndiaye, Youssoupha

    2017-01-01

    Background Senegal ranks 15th in the world in incidence of cervical cancer, the number one cause of cancer mortality among women in this country. The estimated participation rate for cervical cancer screening throughout Senegal is very low (6.9% of women 18–69 years old), especially in rural areas and among older age groups (only 1.9% of women above the age of 40 years). There are no reliable estimates of the prevalence of cervical dysplasia or risk factors for cervical dysplasia specific to rural Senegal. The goals of this study were to estimate the prevalence of cervical dysplasia in a rural region using visual inspection of the cervix with acetic acid (VIA) and to assess risk factors for cervical cancer control. Patients and methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in which we randomly selected 38 villages across the Kédougou region using a three-stage clustering process. Between October 2013 and March 2014, we collected VIA screening results for women aged 30–50 years and cervical cancer risk factors linked to the screening result. Results We screened 509 women; 5.6% of the estimated target population (9,041) in the region. The point prevalence of cervical dysplasia (positive VIA test) was 2.10% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.99–3.21). Moreover, 287 women completed the cervical cancer risk factor survey (56.4% response rate) and only 38% stated awareness of cervical cancer; 75.9% of the screened women were less than 40 years of age. Conclusion The overall prevalence of dysplasia in this sample was lower than anticipated. Despite both overall awareness and screening uptake being less than expected, our study highlights the need to address challenges in future prevalence estimates. Principally, we identified that the highest-risk women are the ones least likely to seek screening services, thus illustrating a need to fully understand demand-side barriers to accessing health services in this population. Targeted efforts to educate and motivate older

  8. Pig traders' networks on the Kenya-Uganda border highlight potential for mitigation of African swine fever virus transmission and improved ASF disease risk management.

    PubMed

    Lichoti, Jacqueline Kasiiti; Davies, Jocelyn; Maru, Yiheyis; Kitala, Philip M; Githigia, Samuel M; Okoth, Edward; Bukachi, Salome A; Okuthe, Sam; Bishop, Richard P

    2017-05-01

    the strong self-interest that established traders have in reducing the disruption and financial losses that outbreaks cause, highlight the importance of governments and traders co-developing an approach to ASF control. Formation of trader organizations or common interest groups warrants government support as an important step in engaging traders in developing and implementing effective approaches to reduce the risk of ASF outbreaks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Structured parenting of toddlers at high versus low genetic risk: two pathways to child problems.

    PubMed

    Leve, Leslie D; Harold, Gordon T; Ge, Xiaojia; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Shaw, Daniel; Scaramella, Laura V; Reiss, David

    2009-11-01

    Little is known about how parenting might offset genetic risk to prevent the onset of child problems during toddlerhood. We used a prospective adoption design to separate genetic and environmental influences and test whether associations between structured parenting and toddler behavior problems were conditioned by genetic risk for psychopathology. The sample included 290 linked sets of adoptive families and birth mothers and 95 linked birth fathers. Genetic risk was assessed via birth mother and birth father psychopathology (anxiety, depression, antisociality, and drug use). Structured parenting was assessed via microsocial coding of adoptive mothers' behavior during a cleanup task. Toddler behavior problems were assessed with the Child Behavior Checklist. Controlling for temperamental risk at 9 months, there was an interaction between birth mother psychopathology and adoptive mothers' parenting on toddler behavior problems at 18 months. The interaction indicated two pathways to child problems: structured parenting was beneficial for toddlers at high genetic risk but was related to behavior problems for toddlers at low genetic risk. This crossover interaction pattern was replicated with birth father psychopathology as the index of genetic risk. The effects of structured parenting on toddler behavior problems varied as a function of genetic risk. Children at genetic risk might benefit from parenting interventions during toddlerhood that enhance structured parenting.

  10. Genetic risk profiles for a childhood with severe overweight.

    PubMed

    González, J R; Estévez, M N; Giralt, P S; Cáceres, A; Pérez, L M L; González-Carpio, M; Ballester, F; Sunyer, J; Rodríguez-López, R

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was the description of a valid genetic risk score (GRS) to predict individuals with high susceptibility to childhood overweight by their genetic profiles. Case-control study including a group of children with high-risk familial predisposition to morbid obesity. Birth cohort from general population constituted the validation sample. For the discovery sample, 218 children with non-syndromic obesity and 190 control individuals were included. The validation sample was 653 children from two birth cohorts belonging to the INMA (Infancia y Medio Ambiente [Environment and Childhood] )project. 109 SNPs located in the genes FTO, SEC16B, BDNF, ETV5, SH2B1, GNPDA2, LYPLAL1, MSRA, TFAP2, KCTD15, MTCH2 and NEGR1, previously reported in association to body mass index (BMI) were analysed. For the validation sample, association between genome-wide data and BMI measurements between 3.5 and 5 years of age, were evaluated. The GRS includes six SNPs in the genes FTO, TFAP2B, SEC16B, ETV5 and SH2B1. The score distribution differs among cases and controls (P = 9.2 × 10(-14) ) showing a significant linear association with obesity (odds ratio [OR] per allele = 1.69; confidence interval [CI] 95% = 1.46-1.97; P = 4.3 × 10(-1) and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] = 0.727; CI 95% = 0.676-0.778). The results were validated by the INMA cohort (OR per allele = 1.23 CI 95% = 1.03-1.48 and AUC = 0.601 CI 95% = 0.522-0.680). The use of our proposed genetic score provides useful information to determine those children who are susceptible to obesity. To improve the efficiency of clinical prevention and treatment of obesity, it is essential to design individualized based protocols in advance knowledge of the molecular basis of inherited susceptibility. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  11. Genetic Risk for Aortic Aneurysm in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Haller, Gabe; Alvarado, David M; Willing, Marcia C; Braverman, Alan C; Bridwell, Keith H; Kelly, Michael; Lenke, Lawrence G; Luhmann, Scott J; Gurnett, Christina A; Dobbs, Matthew B

    2015-09-02

    Scoliosis is a feature of several genetic disorders that are also associated with aortic aneurysm, including Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, and type-IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Life-threatening complications of aortic aneurysm can be decreased through early diagnosis. Genetic screening for mutations in populations at risk, such as patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, may improve recognition of these disorders. The coding regions of five clinically actionable genes associated with scoliosis (COL3A1, FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, and SMAD3) and aortic aneurysm were sequenced in 343 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis cases. Gene variants that had minor allele frequencies of <0.0001 or were present in human disease mutation databases were identified. Variants were classified as pathogenic, likely pathogenic, or variants of unknown significance. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations were identified in 0.9% (three) of 343 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis cases. Two patients had pathogenic SMAD3 nonsense mutations consistent with type-III Loeys-Dietz syndrome and one patient had a pathogenic FBN1 mutation with subsequent confirmation of Marfan syndrome. Variants of unknown significance in COL3A1 and FBN1 were identified in 5.0% (seventeen) of 343 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis cases. Six FBN1 variants were previously reported in patients with Marfan syndrome, yet were considered variants of unknown significance based on the level of evidence. Variants of unknown significance occurred most frequently in FBN1 and were associated with greater curve severity, systemic features of Marfan syndrome, and joint hypermobility. Clinically actionable pathogenic mutations in genes associated with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and aortic aneurysm are rare in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis who are not suspected of having these disorders, although variants of unknown significance are relatively common. Routine genetic screening of all patients with adolescent

  12. Genetic Risk for Aortic Aneurysm in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Gabe; Alvarado, David M.; Willing, Marcia C.; Braverman, Alan C.; Bridwell, Keith H.; Kelly, Michael; Lenke, Lawrence G.; Luhmann, Scott J.; Gurnett, Christina A.; Dobbs, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scoliosis is a feature of several genetic disorders that are also associated with aortic aneurysm, including Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, and type-IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Life-threatening complications of aortic aneurysm can be decreased through early diagnosis. Genetic screening for mutations in populations at risk, such as patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, may improve recognition of these disorders. Methods: The coding regions of five clinically actionable genes associated with scoliosis (COL3A1, FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, and SMAD3) and aortic aneurysm were sequenced in 343 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis cases. Gene variants that had minor allele frequencies of <0.0001 or were present in human disease mutation databases were identified. Variants were classified as pathogenic, likely pathogenic, or variants of unknown significance. Results: Pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations were identified in 0.9% (three) of 343 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis cases. Two patients had pathogenic SMAD3 nonsense mutations consistent with type-III Loeys-Dietz syndrome and one patient had a pathogenic FBN1 mutation with subsequent confirmation of Marfan syndrome. Variants of unknown significance in COL3A1 and FBN1 were identified in 5.0% (seventeen) of 343 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis cases. Six FBN1 variants were previously reported in patients with Marfan syndrome, yet were considered variants of unknown significance based on the level of evidence. Variants of unknown significance occurred most frequently in FBN1 and were associated with greater curve severity, systemic features of Marfan syndrome, and joint hypermobility. Conclusions: Clinically actionable pathogenic mutations in genes associated with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and aortic aneurysm are rare in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis who are not suspected of having these disorders, although variants of unknown significance are relatively common. Clinical

  13. RNA-Seq Analysis of Abdominal Fat in Genetically Fat and Lean Chickens Highlights a Divergence in Expression of Genes Controlling Adiposity, Hemostasis, and Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Resnyk, Christopher W; Chen, Chuming; Huang, Hongzhan; Wu, Cathy H; Simon, Jean; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth; Duclos, Michel J; Cogburn, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    Genetic selection for enhanced growth rate in meat-type chickens (Gallus domesticus) is usually accompanied by excessive adiposity, which has negative impacts on both feed efficiency and carcass quality. Enhanced visceral fatness and several unique features of avian metabolism (i.e., fasting hyperglycemia and insulin insensitivity) mimic overt symptoms of obesity and related metabolic disorders in humans. Elucidation of the genetic and endocrine factors that contribute to excessive visceral fatness in chickens could also advance our understanding of human metabolic diseases. Here, RNA sequencing was used to examine differential gene expression in abdominal fat of genetically fat and lean chickens, which exhibit a 2.8-fold divergence in visceral fatness at 7 wk. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that many of 1687 differentially expressed genes are associated with hemostasis, endocrine function and metabolic syndrome in mammals. Among the highest expressed genes in abdominal fat, across both genotypes, were 25 differentially expressed genes associated with de novo synthesis and metabolism of lipids. Over-expression of numerous adipogenic and lipogenic genes in the FL chickens suggests that in situ lipogenesis in chickens could make a more substantial contribution to expansion of visceral fat mass than previously recognized. Distinguishing features of the abdominal fat transcriptome in lean chickens were high abundance of multiple hemostatic and vasoactive factors, transporters, and ectopic expression of several hormones/receptors, which could control local vasomotor tone and proteolytic processing of adipokines, hemostatic factors and novel endocrine factors. Over-expression of several thrombogenic genes in abdominal fat of lean chickens is quite opposite to the pro-thrombotic state found in obese humans. Clearly, divergent genetic selection for an extreme (2.5-2.8-fold) difference in visceral fatness provokes a number of novel regulatory responses that govern

  14. RNA-Seq Analysis of Abdominal Fat in Genetically Fat and Lean Chickens Highlights a Divergence in Expression of Genes Controlling Adiposity, Hemostasis, and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Resnyk, Christopher W.; Chen, Chuming; Huang, Hongzhan; Wu, Cathy H.; Simon, Jean; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth; Duclos, Michel J.; Cogburn, Larry A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic selection for enhanced growth rate in meat-type chickens (Gallus domesticus) is usually accompanied by excessive adiposity, which has negative impacts on both feed efficiency and carcass quality. Enhanced visceral fatness and several unique features of avian metabolism (i.e., fasting hyperglycemia and insulin insensitivity) mimic overt symptoms of obesity and related metabolic disorders in humans. Elucidation of the genetic and endocrine factors that contribute to excessive visceral fatness in chickens could also advance our understanding of human metabolic diseases. Here, RNA sequencing was used to examine differential gene expression in abdominal fat of genetically fat and lean chickens, which exhibit a 2.8-fold divergence in visceral fatness at 7 wk. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that many of 1687 differentially expressed genes are associated with hemostasis, endocrine function and metabolic syndrome in mammals. Among the highest expressed genes in abdominal fat, across both genotypes, were 25 differentially expressed genes associated with de novo synthesis and metabolism of lipids. Over-expression of numerous adipogenic and lipogenic genes in the FL chickens suggests that in situ lipogenesis in chickens could make a more substantial contribution to expansion of visceral fat mass than previously recognized. Distinguishing features of the abdominal fat transcriptome in lean chickens were high abundance of multiple hemostatic and vasoactive factors, transporters, and ectopic expression of several hormones/receptors, which could control local vasomotor tone and proteolytic processing of adipokines, hemostatic factors and novel endocrine factors. Over-expression of several thrombogenic genes in abdominal fat of lean chickens is quite opposite to the pro-thrombotic state found in obese humans. Clearly, divergent genetic selection for an extreme (2.5–2.8-fold) difference in visceral fatness provokes a number of novel regulatory responses that govern

  15. Subjective versus objective risk in genetic counseling for hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that genetic counseling in oncology provides information regarding objective risks, it can be found a contrast between the subjective and objective risk. The aims of this study were to evaluate the accuracy of the perceived risk compared to the objective risk estimated by the BRCApro computer model and to evaluate any associations between medical, demographic and psychological variables and the accuracy of risk perception. Methods 130 subjects were given medical-demographic file, Cancer and Genetic Risk Perception, Hospital Anxiety-Depression Scale. It was also computed an objective evaluation of the risk by the BRCApro model. Results The subjective risk was significantly higher than objective risk. The risk of tumour was overestimated by 56%, and the genetic risk by 67%. The subjects with less cancer affected relatives significantly overestimated their risk of being mutation carriers and made a more innacurate estimation than high risk subjects. Conclusion The description of this sample shows: general overestimation of the risk, inaccurate perception compared to BRCApro calculation and a more accurate estimation in those subjects with more cancer affected relatives (high risk subjects). No correlation was found between the levels of perception of risk and anxiety and depression. Based on our findings, it is worth pursuing improved communication strategies about the actual cancer and genetic risk, especially for subjects at "intermediate and slightly increased risk" of developing an hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer or of being mutation carrier. PMID:20025726

  16. Impact of a Genetic Risk Score on Myocardial Infarction Risk Across Different Ethnic Populations.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Philip G; Pare, Guillaume; Asma, Senay; Engert, James C; Yusuf, Salim; Anand, Sonia S

    2016-12-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) risk varies by ethnicity, although the influence of genetic factors remains unclear. Using a genetic risk score (GRS), we examined the association between 25 coronary artery disease (CAD)-related single nucleotide polymorphisms and MI across 6 ethnic groups. We studied 8556 participants in the INTERHEART case-control study from 6 ethnic groups: Europeans, South Asians, Southeast Asians, Arabs, Latin Americans, and Africans. Associations between the GRS and MI were tested in each group by logistic regression and overall by meta-analysis. Overall, the GRS increased the odds of MI by 1.07 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.09) per risk allele in the unadjusted model, with little change (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.04-1.09) after adjusting for demographic and modifiable factors. In Europeans, South Asians, Southeast Asians, and Arabs, the GRS was significantly associated with MI, with minimal heterogeneity observed. In these groups, a score > 23 risk alleles (highest 4 quintiles) was associated with only a 5% difference in population attributable risk (PAR) (36% to 41%) for MI. The GRS was not significant in Latin Americans or Africans. In the overall cohort, modest changes, beyond clinical factors, in PAR (88% to 91%), concordance statistic (0.73 to 0.74), and continuous net reclassification improvement (12%) were observed with the GRS. A CAD GRS is associated with MI across a multiethnic cohort, with significant and consistent effects across 4 distinct ethnicities. However, it only modestly improves MI risk prediction beyond clinical factors. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk prediction of pulmonary tuberculosis using genetic and conventional risk factors in adult Korean population

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Eun Pyo; Go, Min Jin; Kim, Hyung-Lae

    2017-01-01

    A complex interplay among host, pathogen, and environmental factors is believed to contribute to the risk of developing pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). The lack of replication of published genome-wide association study (GWAS) findings limits the clinical utility of reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We conducted a GWAS using 467 PTB cases and 1,313 healthy controls obtained from two community-based cohorts in Korea. We evaluated the performance of PTB risk models based on different combinations of genetic and nongenetic factors and validated the results in an independent Korean population comprised of 179 PTB cases and 500 healthy controls. We demonstrated the polygenic nature of PTB and nongenetic factors such as age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) were strongly associated with PTB risk. None of the SNPs achieved genome-wide significance; instead, we were able to replicate the associations between PTB and ten SNPs near or in the genes, CDCA7, GBE1, GADL1, SPATA16, C6orf118, KIAA1432, DMRT2, CTR9, CCDC67, and CDH13, which may play roles in the immune and inflammatory pathways. Among the replicated SNPs, an intergenic SNP, rs9365798, located downstream of the C6orf118 gene showed the most significant association under the dominant model (OR = 1.59, 95% CI 1.32–1.92, P = 2.1×10−6). The performance of a risk model combining the effects of ten replicated SNPs and six nongenetic factors (i.e., age, sex, BMI, cigarette smoking, systolic blood pressure, and hemoglobin) were validated in the replication set (AUC = 0.80, 95% CI 0.76–0.84). The strategy of combining genetic and nongenetic risk factors ultimately resulted in better risk prediction for PTB in the adult Korean population. PMID:28355295

  18. Genetic and environmental determinants of violence risk in psychotic disorders: a multivariate quantitative genetic study of 1.8 million Swedish twins and siblings

    PubMed Central

    Sariaslan, A; Larsson, H; Fazel, S

    2016-01-01

    Patients diagnosed with psychotic disorders (for example, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) have elevated risks of committing violent acts, particularly if they are comorbid with substance misuse. Despite recent insights from quantitative and molecular genetic studies demonstrating considerable pleiotropy in the genetic architecture of these phenotypes, there is currently a lack of large-scale studies that have specifically examined the aetiological links between psychotic disorders and violence. Using a sample of all Swedish individuals born between 1958 and 1989 (n=3 332 101), we identified a total of 923 259 twin-sibling pairs. Patients were identified using the National Patient Register using validated algorithms based on International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 8–10. Univariate quantitative genetic models revealed that all phenotypes (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, substance misuse, and violent crime) were highly heritable (h2=53–71%). Multivariate models further revealed that schizophrenia was a stronger predictor of violence (r=0.32; 95% confidence interval: 0.30–0.33) than bipolar disorder (r=0.23; 0.21–0.25), and large proportions (51–67%) of these phenotypic correlations were explained by genetic factors shared between each disorder, substance misuse, and violence. Importantly, we found that genetic influences that were unrelated to substance misuse explained approximately a fifth (21% 20–22%) of the correlation with violent criminality in bipolar disorder but none of the same correlation in schizophrenia (Pbipolar disorder<0.001; Pschizophrenia=0.55). These findings highlight the problems of not disentangling common and unique sources of covariance across genetically similar phenotypes as the latter sources may include aetiologically important clues. Clinically, these findings underline the importance of assessing risk of different phenotypes together and integrating interventions for psychiatric disorders, substance misuse, and

  19. Kalirin: a novel genetic risk factor for ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Krug, Tiago; Manso, Helena; Gouveia, Liliana; Sobral, João; Xavier, Joana M; Albergaria, Isabel; Gaspar, Gisela; Correia, Manuel; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Simões, Rita Moiron; Pinto, Amélia Nogueira; Taipa, Ricardo; Ferreira, Carla; Fontes, João Ramalho; Silva, Mário Rui; Gabriel, João Paulo; Matos, Ilda; Lopes, Gabriela; Ferro, José M; Vicente, Astrid M; Oliveira, Sofia A

    2010-03-01

    Cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. They are complex disorders resulting from the interplay of genetic and environmental factors, and may share several susceptibility genes. Several recent studies have implicated variants of the Kalirin (KALRN) gene with susceptibility to cardiovascular and metabolic phenotypes, but no studies have yet been performed in stroke patients. KALRN is involved, among others, in the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase, in the regulation of ischemic signal transduction, and in neuronal morphogenesis, plasticity, and stability. The goal of the present study was to determine whether SNPs in the KALRN region on 3q13, which includes the Ropporin gene (ROPN1), predispose to ischemic stroke (IS) in a cohort of Portuguese patients and controls. We genotyped 34 tagging SNPs in the KALRN and ROPN1 chromosomal region on 565 IS patients and 517 unrelated controls, and performed genotype imputation for 405 markers on chromosome 3. We tested the single-marker association of these SNPs with IS. One SNP (rs4499545) in the ROPN1-KALRN intergenic region and two SNPs in KALRN (rs17286604 and rs11712619) showed significant (P < 0.05) allelic and genotypic (unadjusted and adjusted for hypertension, diabetes, and ever smoking) association with IS risk. Thirty-two imputed SNPs also showed an association at P < 0.05, and actual genotyping of three of these polymorphisms (rs7620580, rs6438833, and rs11712039) validated their association. Furthermore, rs11712039 was associated with IS (0.001 < P < 0.01) in a recent well-powered genomewide association study (Ikram et al. 2009). These studies suggest that variants in the KALRN gene region constitute risk factors for stroke and that KALRN may represent a common risk factor for vascular diseases.

  20. Tutorial dialogues and gist explanations of genetic breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Colin L; Wolfe, Christopher R; Reyna, Valerie F; Cedillos-Whynott, Elizabeth M; Brust-Renck, Priscila G; Weil, Audrey M

    2015-09-01

    The intelligent tutoring system (ITS) BRCA Gist is a Web-based tutor developed using the Shareable Knowledge Objects (SKO) platform that uses latent semantic analysis to engage women in natural-language dialogues to teach about breast cancer risk. BRCA Gist appears to be the first ITS designed to assist patients' health decision making. Two studies provide fine-grained analyses of the verbal interactions between BRCA Gist and women responding to five questions pertaining to breast cancer and genetic risk. We examined how "gist explanations" generated by participants during natural-language dialogues related to outcomes. Using reliable rubrics, scripts of the participants' verbal interactions with BRCA Gist were rated for content and for the appropriateness of the tutor's responses. Human researchers' scores for the content covered by the participants were strongly correlated with the coverage scores generated by BRCA Gist, indicating that BRCA Gist accurately assesses the extent to which people respond appropriately. In Study 1, participants' performance during the dialogues was consistently associated with learning outcomes about breast cancer risk. Study 2 was a field study with a more diverse population. Participants with an undergraduate degree or less education who were randomly assigned to BRCA Gist scored higher on tests of knowledge than those assigned to the National Cancer Institute website or than a control group. We replicated findings that the more expected content that participants included in their gist explanations, the better they performed on outcome measures. As fuzzy-trace theory suggests, encouraging people to develop and elaborate upon gist explanations appears to improve learning, comprehension, and decision making.

  1. Genetic risk prediction and neurobiological understanding of alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Levey, D F; Le-Niculescu, H; Frank, J; Ayalew, M; Jain, N; Kirlin, B; Learman, R; Winiger, E; Rodd, Z; Shekhar, A; Schork, N; Kiefe, F; Wodarz, N; Müller-Myhsok, B; Dahmen, N; Nöthen, M; Sherva, R; Farrer, L; Smith, A H; Kranzler, H R; Rietschel, M; Gelernter, J; Niculescu, A B

    2014-01-01

    We have used a translational Convergent Functional Genomics (CFG) approach to discover genes involved in alcoholism, by gene-level integration of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from a German alcohol dependence cohort with other genetic and gene expression data, from human and animal model studies, similar to our previous work in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. A panel of all the nominally significant P-value SNPs in the top candidate genes discovered by CFG  (n=135 genes, 713 SNPs) was used to generate a genetic  risk prediction score (GRPS), which showed a trend towards significance (P=0.053) in separating  alcohol dependent individuals from controls in an independent German test cohort. We then validated and prioritized our top findings from this discovery work, and subsequently tested them in three independent cohorts, from two continents. In order to validate and prioritize the key genes that drive behavior without some of the pleiotropic environmental confounds present in humans, we used a stress-reactive animal model of alcoholism developed by our group, the D-box binding protein (DBP) knockout mouse, consistent with the surfeit of stress theory of addiction proposed by Koob and colleagues. A much smaller panel (n=11 genes, 66 SNPs) of the top CFG-discovered genes for alcoholism, cross-validated and prioritized by this stress-reactive animal model showed better predictive ability in the independent German test cohort (P=0.041). The top CFG scoring gene for alcoholism from the initial discovery step, synuclein alpha (SNCA) remained the top gene after the stress-reactive animal model cross-validation. We also tested this small panel of genes in two other independent test cohorts from the United States, one with alcohol dependence (P=0.00012) and one with alcohol abuse (a less severe form of alcoholism; P=0.0094). SNCA by itself was able to separate alcoholics from controls in the alcohol-dependent cohort (P=0.000013) and the alcohol abuse

  2. Human Papillomavirus 18 Genetic Variation and Cervical Cancer Risk Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alyce A.; Gheit, Tarik; Franceschi, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus 18 (HPV18) is the second most carcinogenic HPV type, after HPV16, and it accounts for approximately 12% of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) as well as 37% of adenocarcinoma (ADC) of the cervix worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the worldwide diversity and carcinogenicity of HPV18 genetic variants by sequencing the entire long control region (LCR) and the E6 open reading frame of 711 HPV18-positive cervical samples from 39 countries, taking advantage of the International Agency for Research on Cancer biobank. A total of 209 unique HPV18 sequence variants were identified that formed three phylogenetic lineages (A, B, and C). A and B lineages each divided into four sublineages, including a newly identified candidate B4 sublineage. The distribution of lineages varied by geographical region, with B and C lineages found principally in Africa. HPV18 (sub)lineages were compared between 453 cancer cases and 236 controls, as well as between 81 ADC and 160 matched SCC cases. In region-stratified analyses, there were no significant differences in the distribution of HPV18 variant lineages between cervical cancer cases and controls or between ADC and SCC. In conclusion, our findings do not support the role of HPV18 (sub)lineages for discriminating cancer risk or explaining why HPV18 is more strongly linked with ADC than SCC. IMPORTANCE This is the largest and most geographically/ethnically diverse study of the genetic variation of HPV18 to date, providing a comprehensive reference for phylogenetic classification of HPV18 sublineages for epidemiological and biological studies. PMID:26269181

  3. Evaluating the Allergic Risk of Genetically Modified Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Ha; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Ye, Young-Min; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Nahm, Dong-Ho; Ryu, Sang-Ryeol; Lee, Bou-Oung

    2006-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) soybean (carrying the EPSPS transgene) is the most common GM food in Korea. In order to assess whether genetic modification increases the allergenic risk of soybeans, the allergenicity and IgE-reactive components of wild-type and GM soybean extracts were compared in allergic adults who had been sensitized to soybeans. We enrolled 1,716 adult allergy patients and 40 healthy, non-atopic controls. Skin prick tests and IgE enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were performed using wild-type and GM soybean extracts, along with other common inhaled allergens. The specificities of serum IgE antibodies from allergic patients and the identities of the IgE-reactive components of the soybean extracts were compared using ELISA inhibition testing, 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and IgE immunoblotting. To evaluate the effects of digestive enzymes and heat treatment, the soybean extracts were heated or pre- incubated with or without simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. The IgE sensitization rates to wild-type and GM soybeans were identical (3.8% of allergic adults), and circulating IgE antibodies specific for the two extracts were comparable. The results of the ELISA inhibition test, SDS-PAGE, and IgE immunoblotting showed a similar composition of IgE-binding components within the wild-type and GM extracts, which was confirmed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, IgE immunoblotting, and amino acid sequencing. None of the subjects had a positive response to purified EPSPS protein in the skin prick test, ELISA, or IgE immunoblot analysis. These findings suggest that the IgE sensitization rate to GM soybean extracts is identical to that of wild-type soybean extracts in adult allergy patients. In addition, based on both in vivo and in vitro methods, the allergenicity of wild type and GM soybean extracts was identical. PMID:16941740

  4. Predicting stroke through genetic risk functions: the CHARGE Risk Score Project.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A; Fornage, Myriam; Bis, Joshua C; Choi, Seung Hoan; Psaty, Bruce M; Meigs, James B; Rao, Madhu; Nalls, Mike; Fontes, Joao D; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Kathiresan, Sekar; Ehret, Georg B; Fox, Caroline S; Malik, Rainer; Dichgans, Martin; Schmidt, Helena; Lahti, Jari; Heckbert, Susan R; Lumley, Thomas; Rice, Kenneth; Rotter, Jerome I; Taylor, Kent D; Folsom, Aaron R; Boerwinkle, Eric; Rosamond, Wayne D; Shahar, Eyal; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Koudstaal, Peter J; Amin, Najaf; Wieberdink, Renske G; Dehghan, Abbas; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Destefano, Anita L; Debette, Stephanie; Xue, Luting; Beiser, Alexa; Wolf, Philip A; Decarli, Charles; Ikram, M Arfan; Seshadri, Sudha; Mosley, Thomas H; Longstreth, W T; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Launer, Lenore J

    2014-02-01

    Beyond the Framingham Stroke Risk Score, prediction of future stroke may improve with a genetic risk score (GRS) based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with stroke and its risk factors. The study includes 4 population-based cohorts with 2047 first incident strokes from 22,720 initially stroke-free European origin participants aged ≥55 years, who were followed for up to 20 years. GRSs were constructed with 324 single-nucleotide polymorphisms implicated in stroke and 9 risk factors. The association of the GRS to first incident stroke was tested using Cox regression; the GRS predictive properties were assessed with area under the curve statistics comparing the GRS with age and sex, Framingham Stroke Risk Score models, and reclassification statistics. These analyses were performed per cohort and in a meta-analysis of pooled data. Replication was sought in a case-control study of ischemic stroke. In the meta-analysis, adding the GRS to the Framingham Stroke Risk Score, age and sex model resulted in a significant improvement in discrimination (all stroke: Δjoint area under the curve=0.016, P=2.3×10(-6); ischemic stroke: Δjoint area under the curve=0.021, P=3.7×10(-7)), although the overall area under the curve remained low. In all the studies, there was a highly significantly improved net reclassification index (P<10(-4)). The single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with stroke and its risk factors result only in a small improvement in prediction of future stroke compared with the classical epidemiological risk factors for stroke.

  5. Genetic Risk by Experience Interaction for Childhood Internalizing Problems: Converging Evidence across Multiple Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vendlinski, Matthew K.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Essex, Marilyn J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2011-01-01

    Background: Identifying how genetic risk interacts with experience to predict psychopathology is an important step toward understanding the etiology of mental health problems. Few studies have examined genetic risk by experience interaction (GxE) in the development of childhood psychopathology. Methods: We used both co-twin and parent mental…

  6. Genetic Risk by Experience Interaction for Childhood Internalizing Problems: Converging Evidence across Multiple Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vendlinski, Matthew K.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Essex, Marilyn J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2011-01-01

    Background: Identifying how genetic risk interacts with experience to predict psychopathology is an important step toward understanding the etiology of mental health problems. Few studies have examined genetic risk by experience interaction (GxE) in the development of childhood psychopathology. Methods: We used both co-twin and parent mental…

  7. Practice considerations in providing cancer risk assessment and genetic testing in women's health.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Suzanne M; Crecelius, Mary E

    2013-01-01

    Providers of women's health services are often confronted with questions about cancer genetic testing. The provision of these services is complex. The process begins with accurate risk assessment and identification of individuals who might benefit from genetic testing services. There are practice, administrative, legal, and ethical considerations that should be considered when developing policies for the referral of at-risk individuals or before deciding to provide genetic services.

  8. Genetic Counselors' Experiences Regarding Communication of Reproductive Risks with Autosomal Recessive Conditions found on Cancer Panels.

    PubMed

    Mets, Sarah; Tryon, Rebecca; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; Zierhut, Heather A

    2016-04-01

    The development of hereditary cancer genetic testing panels has altered genetic counseling practice. Mutations within certain genes on cancer panels pose not only a cancer risk, but also a reproductive risk for autosomal recessive conditions such as Fanconi anemia, constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome, and ataxia telangiectasia. This study aimed to determine if genetic counselors discuss reproductive risks for autosomal recessive conditions associated with genes included on cancer panels, and if so, under what circumstances these risks are discussed. An on-line survey was emailed through the NSGC list-serv. The survey assessed 189 cancer genetic counselors' experiences discussing reproductive risks with patients at risk to carry a mutation or variant of uncertain significance (VUS) in a gene associated with both an autosomal dominant cancer risk and an autosomal recessive syndrome. Over half (n = 82, 55 %) reported having discussed reproductive risks; the remainder (n = 66, 45 %) had not. Genetic counselors who reported discussing reproductive risks primarily did so when patients had a positive result and were of reproductive age. Reasons for not discussing these risks included when a patient had completed childbearing or when a VUS was identified. Most counselors discussed reproductive risk after obtaining results and not during the informed consent process. There is inconsistency as to if and when the discussion of reproductive risks is taking place. The wide variation in responses suggests a need to develop professional guidelines for when and how discussions of reproductive risk for autosomal recessive conditions identified through cancer panels should occur with patients.

  9. Coffee consumption, genetic susceptibility and bladder cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Cristina M.; Silverman, Debra T; Murta-Nascimento, Cristiane; Malats, Núria; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Castro, Francesc; Tardon, Adonina; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; Rothman, Nathaniel; Real, Francisco X; Dosemeci, Mustafa; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2010-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the bladder cancer risk associated with coffee consumption in a case-control study in Spain and examined the gene-environment interactions for genetic variants of caffeine metabolizing enzymes. Methods The analyses included 1136 incident cases with urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder and 1138 controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were adjusted for area, age, gender, amount of cigarette smoking and years since quitting among former smokers. Results The OR (95%CI) for ever consumed coffee was 1.25 (0.95–1.64). For consumers of 1, 2, 3 and 4 or more cups/day relative to never drinkers, OR were, respectively: 1.24 (0.92–1.66), 1.11 (95%CI 0.82–1.51), 1.57 (1.13–2.19) and 1.27 (0.88–1.81). Coffee consumption was higher in smokers compared to never smokers. The OR for drinking at least 4 cups/day was: 1.13 (0.61–2.09) in current smokers, 1.57 (0.86–2.90) in former smokers, and 1.23 (0.55–2.76) in never smokers. Gene-coffee interactions evaluated in NAT2, CYP1A2, and CYP2E1-02 and CYP1A1 were not identified after adjusting for multiple testing. Conclusion The modest increased bladder cancer risk among coffee drinkers supports the hypothesis that coffee is a weak carcinogen, although results may, in part, be explained by residual confounding by smoking. The findings from the gene-coffee interactions need replication in further studies. PMID:18798002

  10. Genetic risk variants for metabolic traits in Arab populations

    PubMed Central

    Hebbar, Prashantha; Elkum, Naser; Alkayal, Fadi; John, Sumi Elsa; Thanaraj, Thangavel Alphonse; Alsmadi, Osama

    2017-01-01

    Despite a high prevalence of metabolic trait related diseases in Arabian Peninsula, there is a lack of convincingly identified genetic determinants for metabolic traits in this population. Arab populations are underrepresented in global genome-wide association studies. We genotyped 1965 unrelated Arab individuals from Kuwait using Cardio-MetaboChip, and tested SNP associations with 13 metabolic traits. Models based on recessive mode of inheritance identified Chr15:40531386-rs12440118/ZNF106/W->R as a risk variant associated with glycated-hemoglobin at close to ‘genome-wide significant’ p-value and five other risk variants ‘nominally’ associated (p-value ≤ 5.45E-07) with fasting plasma glucose (rs7144734/[OTX2-AS1,RPL3P3]) and triglyceride (rs17501809/PLGRKT; rs11143005/LOC105376072; rs900543/[THSD4,NR2E3]; and Chr12:101494770/IGF1). Furthermore, we identified 33 associations (30 SNPs with 12 traits) with ‘suggestive’ evidence of association (p-value < 1.0E-05); 20 of these operate under recessive mode of inheritance. Two of these ‘suggestive’ associations (rs1800775-CETP/HDL; and rs9326246-BUD13/TGL) showed evidence at genome-wide significance in previous studies on Euro-centric populations. Involvement of many of the identified loci in mediating metabolic traits was supported by literature evidences. The identified loci participate in critical metabolic pathways (such as Ceramide signaling, and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase/Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinase signaling). Data from Genotype-Tissue Expression database affirmed that 7 of the identified variants differentially regulate the up/downstream genes that mediate metabolic traits. PMID:28106113

  11. Green tea consumption and glutathione S-transferases genetic polymorphisms on the risk of adult leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Min; Xie, Xing; Jin, Jie; Holman, C D'Arcy J

    2017-03-01

    Green tea may have a beneficial role of inhibiting leukemia. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are known to detoxify certain carcinogens. We investigated the roles of green tea consumption and polymorphisms of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 on the risk of adult leukemia, and to determine whether the associations varied within GSTs genotypes. A multicenter case-control study was conducted in China, 2008-2013. It comprised 442 incident, hematologically confirmed adult leukemia cases and 442 outpatient controls, individually matched to cases by gender, birth quinquennium and study site. Data were collected by face-to-face interview using a validated questionnaire. Genetic polymorphisms were assayed by PCR. An inverse association between green tea consumption and adult leukemia risk was observed. Compared with non-tea drinkers, the adjusted odds ratios (95 % confidence intervals) were 0.50 (0.27-0.93), 0.31 (0.17-0.55) and 0.53 (0.29-0.99) for those who, respectively, consumed green tea >20 years, ≥2 cups daily and dried tea leaves >1000 g annually. In assessing the associations by GSTs genotypes, risk reduction associated with green tea consumption was stronger in individuals with the GSTT1-null genotype (OR 0.24; 95 % CI 0.11-0.53) than GSTT1-normal carriers (OR 0.67; 95 % CI 0.42-1.05; P interaction = 0.02). GSTM1 and GSTP1 did not significantly modify the inverse association of leukemia with green tea. The results suggest that regular daily green tea consumption may reduce leukemia risk in Chinese adults regardless of GSTM1 and GSTP1 polymorphic status. The association between green tea and adult leukemia risk varied with GSTT1 genotype and highlights further study.

  12. Risk perception, worry and satisfaction related to genetic counseling for hereditary cancer.

    PubMed

    Bjorvatn, Cathrine; Eide, Geir Egil; Hanestad, Berit Rokne; Øyen, Nina; Havik, Odd E; Carlsson, Anniken; Berglund, Gunilla

    2007-04-01

    In this multi center study, genetic counseling for hereditary cancer was evaluated by assessing patients' worry, perceived risk of developing cancer and satisfaction with genetic counseling. An overall aim was to identify characteristics of vulnerable patients in order to customize genetic counseling. In addition, agreement between patients' and counselors' scores was measured. A total of 275 Norwegian patients were consecutively recruited, and 213 completed questionnaires before and after genetic counseling. Patients' perceived risk decreased after the genetic counseling session. There was incongruence between risk perception expressed as a percentage and in words. Patients were significantly less worried after counseling. Higher levels of worry were predicted by low instrumental satisfaction with counseling, high degree of perceived risk of developing cancer and younger age. In conclusion, counselors met the patients' psychological needs to a satisfactory degree during counseling. However, patients did not fully understand their risk of developing cancer.

  13. Do Health Professionals Need Additional Competencies for Stratified Cancer Prevention Based on Genetic Risk Profiling?

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Susmita; Henneman, Lidewij; Dent, Tom; Hall, Alison; Burton, Alice; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Burton, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that inclusion of genetic information about known common susceptibility variants may enable population risk-stratification and personalized prevention for common diseases including cancer. This would require the inclusion of genetic testing as an integral part of individual risk assessment of an asymptomatic individual. Front line health professionals would be expected to interact with and assist asymptomatic individuals through the risk stratification process. In that case, additional knowledge and skills may be needed. Current guidelines and frameworks for genetic competencies of non-specialist health professionals place an emphasis on rare inherited genetic diseases. For common diseases, health professionals do use risk assessment tools but such tools currently do not assess genetic susceptibility of individuals. In this article, we compare the skills and knowledge needed by non-genetic health professionals, if risk-stratified prevention is implemented, with existing competence recommendations from the UK, USA and Europe, in order to assess the gaps in current competences. We found that health professionals would benefit from understanding the contribution of common genetic variations in disease risk, the rationale for a risk-stratified prevention pathway, and the implications of using genomic information in risk-assessment and risk management of asymptomatic individuals for common disease prevention. PMID:26068647

  14. Do Health Professionals Need Additional Competencies for Stratified Cancer Prevention Based on Genetic Risk Profiling?

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Susmita; Henneman, Lidewij; Dent, Tom; Hall, Alison; Burton, Alice; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Burton, Hilary

    2015-06-09

    There is growing evidence that inclusion of genetic information about known common susceptibility variants may enable population risk-stratification and personalized prevention for common diseases including cancer. This would require the inclusion of genetic testing as an integral part of individual risk assessment of an asymptomatic individual. Front line health professionals would be expected to interact with and assist asymptomatic individuals through the risk stratification process. In that case, additional knowledge and skills may be needed. Current guidelines and frameworks for genetic competencies of non-specialist health professionals place an emphasis on rare inherited genetic diseases. For common diseases, health professionals do use risk assessment tools but such tools currently do not assess genetic susceptibility of individuals. In this article, we compare the skills and knowledge needed by non-genetic health professionals, if risk-stratified prevention is implemented, with existing competence recommendations from the UK, USA and Europe, in order to assess the gaps in current competences. We found that health professionals would benefit from understanding the contribution of common genetic variations in disease risk, the rationale for a risk-stratified prevention pathway, and the implications of using genomic information in risk-assessment and risk management of asymptomatic individuals for common disease prevention.

  15. [Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Treatment and genetic risk profile].

    PubMed

    Stilgenbauer, S; Hallek, M

    2013-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by a highly variable clinical course. Among the biological features underlying this heterogeneity, genetic lesions and the mutational status of the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable genes (IGHV) are of importance. Therapeutic options in CLL have been considerably expanded during recent years. The combination of fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab (FCR) has become gold standard in the first-line treatment of physically fit patients. Bendamustine plus rituximab (BR) is currently being compared to FCR in studies and chlorambucil is still of relevance for elderly patients with comorbidities. Alemtuzumab is an alternative for high-risk patients (refractory CLL, 17p deletion, TP53 mutation). Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) offers the only chance of cure but not without substantial mortality. Innovative approaches focus on individualized, targeted therapies. A number of novel agents are in clinical trials and show marked efficacy combined with good tolerability. This review provides an overview of the current therapeutic options and of promising novel approaches.

  16. Genetically modified organisms: do the benefits outweigh the risks?

    PubMed

    Hug, Kristina

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this literature review is to analyze the implications of using genetically modified organisms (GMOs) as well as international and European position regarding such organisms. Review of international and European legal requirements and ethical guidelines and relevant publications, found and accessed with the help of PubMed and Lund University Library databases. The article discusses the main application areas of GMOs, the expansion of using GMOs in the world as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the implications of their usage. It further provides an overview of the suggested ways to tackle or avoid the GMO-related risks. The international and European positions regarding the application of GMOs are discussed and European Directives, Regulations, and ethical guidelines are overviewed. The article further presents the public attitudes towards GMOs in Europe as well as overviews surveys conducted at the national level. Suggested steps to tackle the challenge of developing and managing biotechnology for the benefit of public health and the environment are presented.

  17. Applying evolutionary genetics to developmental toxicology and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Leung, Maxwell C K; Procter, Andrew C; Goldstone, Jared V; Foox, Jonathan; DeSalle, Robert; Mattingly, Carolyn J; Siddall, Mark E; Timme-Laragy, Alicia R

    2017-03-04

    Evolutionary thinking continues to challenge our views on health and disease. Yet, there is a communication gap between evolutionary biologists and toxicologists in recognizing the connections among developmental pathways, high-throughput screening, and birth defects in humans. To increase our capability in identifying potential developmental toxicants in humans, we propose to apply evolutionary genetics to improve the experimental design and data interpretation with various in vitro and whole-organism models. We review five molecular systems of stress response and update 18 consensual cell-cell signaling pathways that are the hallmark for early development, organogenesis, and differentiation; and revisit the principles of teratology in light of recent advances in high-throughput screening, big data techniques, and systems toxicology. Multiscale systems modeling plays an integral role in the evolutionary approach to cross-species extrapolation. Phylogenetic analysis and comparative bioinformatics are both valuable tools in identifying and validating the molecular initiating events that account for adverse developmental outcomes in humans. The discordance of susceptibility between test species and humans (ontogeny) reflects their differences in evolutionary history (phylogeny). This synthesis not only can lead to novel applications in developmental toxicity and risk assessment, but also can pave the way for applying an evo-devo perspective to the study of developmental origins of health and disease.

  18. KCNJ11: Genetic Polymorphisms and Risk of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Haghvirdizadeh, Polin; Mohamed, Zahurin; Abdullah, Nor Azizan; Haghvirdizadeh, Pantea; Haerian, Monir Sadat; Haerian, Batoul Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major worldwide health problem and its prevalence has been rapidly increasing in the last century. It is caused by defects in insulin secretion or insulin action or both, leading to hyperglycemia. Of the various types of DM, type 2 occurs most frequently. Multiple genes and their interactions are involved in the insulin secretion pathway. Insulin secretion is mediated through the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel in pancreatic beta cells. This channel is a heteromeric protein, composed of four inward-rectifier potassium ion channel (Kir6.2) tetramers, which form the pore of the KATP channel, as well as sulfonylurea receptor 1 subunits surrounding the pore. Kir6.2 is encoded by the potassium inwardly rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 11 (KCNJ11) gene, a member of the potassium channel genes. Numerous studies have reported the involvement of single nucleotide polymorphisms of the KCNJ11 gene and their interactions in the susceptibility to DM. This review discusses the current evidence for the contribution of common KCNJ11 genetic variants to the development of DM. Future studies should concentrate on understanding the exact role played by these risk variants in the development of DM. PMID:26448950

  19. Identification of genetic risk factors for maxillary lateral incisor agenesis.

    PubMed

    Alves-Ferreira, M; Pinho, T; Sousa, A; Sequeiros, J; Lemos, C; Alonso, I

    2014-05-01

    Tooth agenesis affects 20% of the world population, and maxillary lateral incisors agenesis (MLIA) is one of the most frequent subtypes, characterized by the absence of formation of deciduous or permanent lateral incisors. Odontogenesis is a complex mechanism regulated by sequential and reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, controlled by activators and inhibitors involved in several pathways. Disturbances in these signaling cascades can lead to abnormalities in odontogenesis, resulting in alterations in the formation of the normal teeth number. Our aim was to study a large number of genes encoding either transcription factors or key components in signaling pathways shown to be involved in tooth odontogenesis. We selected 8 genes-MSX1, PAX9, AXIN2, EDA, SPRY2, TGFA, SPRY4, and WNT10A-and performed one of the largest case-control studies taking into account the number of genes and variants assessed, aiming at the identification of MLIA susceptibility factors. We show the involvement of PAX9, EDA, SPRY2, SPRY4, and WNT10A as risk factors for MLIA. Additionally, we uncovered 3 strong synergistic interactions between MLIA liability and MSX1-TGFA, AXIN2-TGFA, and SPRY2-SPRY4 gene pairs. We report the first evidence of the involvement of sprouty genes in MLIA susceptibility. This large study results in a better understanding of the genetic components and mechanisms underlying this trait.

  20. Genetic risk assessment in carrier testing for spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Shuji; Leonard, Debra G B; Rennert, Hanna; Ewens, Warren J; Wilson, Robert B

    2002-07-15

    As evidenced by the complete absence of a functionally critical sequence in exon 7, approximately 94% of individuals with clinically typical spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) lack both copies of the SMN1 gene at 5q13. Hence most carriers have only one copy of SMN1. Combining linkage and dosage analyses for SMN1, we observed unaffected individuals who have two copies of SMN1 on one chromosome 5 and zero copies of SMN1 on the other chromosome 5. By dosage analysis alone, such individuals, as well as carriers of non-deletion disease alleles, are indistinguishable from non-carrier individuals. We report that approximately 7% of unaffected individuals without a family history of SMA have three or four copies of SMN1, implying a higher frequency of chromosomes with two copies of SMN1 than previously reported. We present updated calculations for disease and non-disease allele frequencies and we describe how these frequencies can be used for genetic risk assessment in carrier testing for SMA. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. International survey of awareness of genetic risk in the clinical sarcoma community.

    PubMed

    McBride, Kate A; Schlub, Timothy E; Ballinger, Mandy L; Thomas, David M; Tattersall, Martin Hn

    2016-06-01

    Integration of clinical genetics into oncology is variable. Sarcomas have a strong genetic component, with up to 1/30 patients carrying germline TP53 mutations. This study aimed to define genetic risk awareness among sarcoma physicians. Outcomes were attitudes toward genetic testing, level of cancer risk and awareness of risk reduction measures. An online survey was administered to members of the Connective Tissue Oncology Society and the Australasian Sarcoma Study Group. Sarcoma physicians (N = 124) from 21 countries participated, 40% of whom favored TP53 mutation testing in children regardless of family history, increasing to ∼83% for all age groups if a family history was present and ∼85% if multiple primary cancers were present. However, 33% were not aware that risk reduction strategies might identify some cancers at a more curable stage in carriers. Clinical genetics is not yet standard of care for multidisciplinary management of sarcoma. Awareness of genetic risk is important among sarcoma physicians. Attitudes among the sarcoma community were generally positive, but education on genetic risk in sarcoma patients and collaboration with clinical genetics services might improve quality of care. Sarcoma physicians need routine access to clinical genetics services so that potential germline TP53 mutation carriers are recognized. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. The link between Family History and risk of Type 2 Diabetes is Not Explained by Anthropometric, Lifestyle or Genetic Risk Factors: the EPIC-InterAct Study

    PubMed Central

    Scott, RA; Langenberg, C; Sharp, SJ; Franks, PW; Rolandsson, O; Drogan, D; van der Schouw, Y T; Ekelund, U; Kerrison, N D; Ardanaz, E; Arriola, L; Balkau, B; Barricarte, A; Barroso, I; Bendinelli, B; Beulens, JWJ; Boeing, H; de Lauzon-Guillain, B; Deloukas, P; Fagherazzi, G; Gonzalez, C; Griffin, SJ; Groop, L; Halkjaer, J; Huerta, JM; Kaaks, R; Khaw, KT; Krogh, V; Nilsson, P; Norat, T; Overvad, K; Panico, S; Suarez, L Rodriguez; Romaguera, D; Romieu, I; Sacerdote, C; Sánchez, M-J; Spijkerman, AMW; Teucher, B; Tjonneland, A; Tumino, R; van der A, DL; Wark, P A; McCarthy, MI; Riboli, E; Wareham, NJ

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Although family history of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a strong risk factor for the disease, the factors mediating this excess risk are poorly understood. In the InterAct case-cohort study we investigated the association of family history of diabetes among different family members with incidence of T2D and the extent to which genetic, anthropometric and lifestyle risk factors mediated this association. Methods 13,869 individuals (including 6,168 incident cases of T2D) had family history data available, and 6,887 individuals had complete data on all mediators. Country-specific Prentice-weighted Cox models were fitted within-country and hazard ratios (HR) combined using random-effects meta-analysis. Lifestyle and anthropometric measurements were performed at baseline and a genetic risk score comprising 35 T2D-associated polymorphisms was created. Results A family history was associated with higher incidence of T2D (HR:2.72(95%CI:2.48-2.99)). Adjustment for established risk factors including BMI and waist-circumference only modestly attenuated this association (HR:2.44(95%CI:2.03,2.95)); the genetic score alone explained only 2% of the family history-associated risk of T2D. Greatest risk of T2D was observed in those with a biparental history of T2D (HR:5.14(95%CI:3.74,7.07)) and those with parental diabetes diagnosis at younger age (<50yrs) (HR:4.69(95%CI:3.35,6.58)) - an effect largely confined to maternal family history. Conclusions/interpretation Prominent lifestyle, anthropometric and genetic risk factors explained only a marginal proportion of the family history-associated excess risk, highlighting that family history remains a strong, independent and easily assessed risk factor for T2D. Discovering the factors explaining the association of family history with T2D risk will provide important insight into the aetiology of T2D. PMID:23052052

  3. Circadian Clock-Related Genetic Risk Scores and Risk of Placental Abruption

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chunfang; Gelaye, Bizu; Denis, Marie; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Fernandez, Miguel Angel Luque; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Ananth, Cande V.; Sanchez, Sixto E.; Williams, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The circadian clock plays an important role in several aspects of female reproductive biology. Evidence linking circadian clock-related genes to pregnancy outcomes has been inconsistent. We sought to examine whether variations in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of circadian clock genes are associated with PA risk. Methods Maternal blood samples were collected from 470 PA case and 473 controls. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina Cardio-MetaboChip platform. We examined 119 SNPs in 13 candidate genes known to control circadian rhythms (e.g., CRY2, ARNTL, and RORA). Univariate and penalized logistic regression models were fit to estimate odds ratios (ORs); and the combined effect of multiple SNPs on PA risk was estimated using a weighted genetic risk score (wGRS). Results A common SNP in the RORA gene (rs2899663) was associated with a 21% reduced odds of PA (P<0.05). The odds of PA increased with increasing wGRS (Ptrend< 0.001). The corresponding ORs were 1.00, 1.83, 2.81 and 5.13 across wGRS quartiles. Participants in the highest wGRS quartile had a 5.13-fold (95% confidence interval: 3.21–8.21) higher odds of PA compared to those in the lowest quartile. Although the test for interaction was not significant, the odds of PA was substantially elevated for preeclamptics with the highest wGRS quartile (OR=14.44, 95%CI: 6.62–31.53) compared to normotensive women in the lowest wGRS quartile. Discussion Genetic variants in circadian rhythm genes may be associated with PA risk. Larger studies are needed to corroborate these findings and to further elucidate the pathogenesis of this important obstetrical complication. PMID:26515929

  4. Circadian clock-related genetic risk scores and risk of placental abruption.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chunfang; Gelaye, Bizu; Denis, Marie; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Luque Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Ananth, Cande V; Sanchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A

    2015-12-01

    The circadian clock plays an important role in several aspects of female reproductive biology. Evidence linking circadian clock-related genes to pregnancy outcomes has been inconsistent. We sought to examine whether variations in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of circadian clock genes are associated with PA risk. Maternal blood samples were collected from 470 PA case and 473 controls. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina Cardio-MetaboChip platform. We examined 119 SNPs in 13 candidate genes known to control circadian rhythms (e.g., CRY2, ARNTL, and RORA). Univariate and penalized logistic regression models were fit to estimate odds ratios (ORs); and the combined effect of multiple SNPs on PA risk was estimated using a weighted genetic risk score (wGRS). A common SNP in the RORA gene (rs2899663) was associated with a 21% reduced odds of PA (P < 0.05). The odds of PA increased with increasing wGRS (Ptrend < 0.001). The corresponding ORs were 1.00, 1.83, 2.81 and 5.13 across wGRS quartiles. Participants in the highest wGRS quartile had a 5.13-fold (95% confidence interval: 3.21-8.21) higher odds of PA compared to those in the lowest quartile. Although the test for interaction was not significant, the odds of PA was substantially elevated for preeclamptics with the highest wGRS quartile (OR = 14.44, 95%CI: 6.62-31.53) compared to normotensive women in the lowest wGRS quartile. Genetic variants in circadian rhythm genes may be associated with PA risk. Larger studies are needed to corroborate these findings and to further elucidate the pathogenesis of this important obstetrical complication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Common Genetic Variant Risk Score is Associated with Drug-Induced QT Prolongation and Torsade de Pointes Risk: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Strauss, David G; Vicente, Jose; Johannesen, Lars; Blinova, Ksenia; Mason, Jay W; Weeke, Peter; Behr, Elijah R; Roden, Dan M; Woosley, Raymond; Kosova, Gulum; Rosenberg, Michael A; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2017-02-17

    Background -Drug-induced QT interval prolongation, a risk factor for life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, is a potential side effect of many marketed and withdrawn medications. The contribution of common genetic variants previously associated with baseline QT interval to drug-induced QT prolongation and arrhythmias is not known. Methods -We tested the hypothesis that a weighted combination of common genetic variants contributing to QT interval at baseline, identified through genome-wide association studies, can predict individual response to multiple QT-prolonging drugs. Genetic analysis of 22 subjects was performed in a secondary analysis of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial of 3 QT-prolonging drugs with 15 time-matched QT and plasma drug concentration measurements. Subjects received single doses of dofetilide, quinidine, ranolazine and placebo. The outcome was the correlation between a genetic QT score comprising 61 common genetic variants and the slope of an individual subject's drug-induced increase in heart rate corrected QT (QTc) vs. drug concentration. Results -The genetic QT score was correlated with drug-induced QTc prolongation. Among white subjects, genetic QT score explained 30% of the variability in response to dofetilide (r = 0.55 [95% CI, 0.09-0.81], P = 0.02), 23% in response to quinidine (r = 0.48 [95% CI, -0.03 to 0.79], P = 0.06) and 27% in response to ranolazine (r = 0.52 [95% CI, 0.05 to 0.80], P = 0.03). Furthermore, the genetic QT score was a significant predictor of drug-induced torsade de pointes in an independent sample of 216 cases compared to 771 controls (r(2) = 12%, P = 1x10(-7)). Conclusions -We demonstrate that a genetic QT score comprising 61 common genetic variants explains a significant proportion of the variability in drug-induced QT prolongation and is a significant predictor of drug-induced torsade de pointes. These findings highlight an opportunity for recent genetic discoveries to improve

  6. Facial emotion perception differs in young persons at genetic and clinical high-risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Christian G; Richard, Jan A; Brensinger, Colleen M; Borgmann-Winter, Karin E; Conroy, Catherine G; Moberg, Paul J; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E; Calkins, Monica E

    2014-05-15

    A large body of literature has documented facial emotion perception impairments in schizophrenia. More recently, emotion perception has been investigated in persons at genetic and clinical high-risk for psychosis. This study compared emotion perception abilities in groups of young persons with schizophrenia, clinical high-risk, genetic risk and healthy controls. Groups, ages 13-25, included 24 persons at clinical high-risk, 52 first-degree relatives at genetic risk, 91 persons with schizophrenia and 90 low risk persons who completed computerized testing of emotion recognition and differentiation. Groups differed by overall emotion recognition abilities and recognition of happy, sad, anger and fear expressions. Pairwise comparisons revealed comparable impairments in recognition of happy, angry, and fearful expressions for persons at clinical high-risk and schizophrenia, while genetic risk participants were less impaired, showing reduced recognition of fearful expressions. Groups also differed for differentiation of happy and sad expressions, but differences were mainly between schizophrenia and control groups. Emotion perception impairments are observable in young persons at-risk for psychosis. Preliminary results with clinical high-risk participants, when considered along findings in genetic risk relatives, suggest social cognition abilities to reflect pathophysiological processes involved in risk of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic risk score and adiposity interact to influence triglyceride levels in a cohort of Filipino women

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, N; Mayer-Davis, E J; Mendez, M A; Mohlke, K L; North, K E; Adair, L S

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Individually, genetic variants only moderately influence cardiometabolic (CM) traits, such as lipid and inflammatory markers. In this study we generated genetic risk scores from a combination of previously reported variants influencing CM traits, and used these scores to explore how adiposity levels could mediate genetic contributions to CM traits. Subjects/Methods: Participants included 1649 women from the 2005 Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey. Three genetic risk scores were constructed for C-reactive protein (CRP), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides (TGs). We used linear regression models to assess the association between each genetic risk score and its related trait. We also tested for interactions between each score and measures of adiposity. Results: Each genetic risk score explained a greater proportion of variance in trait levels than any individual genetic variant. We found an interaction between the TG genetic risk score (2.29–14.34 risk alleles) and waist circumference (WC) (Pinteraction=1.66 × 10−2). Based on model predictions, for individuals with a higher TG genetic risk score (75th percentile=12), having an elevated WC (⩾80 cm) increased TG levels from 1.32 to 1.71 mmol l−1. However, for individuals with a lower score (25th percentile=7), having an elevated WC did not significantly change TG levels. Conclusions: The TG genetic risk score interacted with adiposity to synergistically influence TG levels. For individuals with a genetic predisposition to elevated TG levels, our results suggest that reducing adiposity could possibly prevent further increases in TG levels and thereby lessen the likelihood of adverse health outcomes such as cardiovascular disease. PMID:24932782

  8. Low levels of hybridization between sympatric Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and Dolly Varden char (Salvelinus malma) highlights their genetic distinctiveness and ecological segregation.

    PubMed

    May-McNally, Shannan L; Quinn, Thomas P; Taylor, Eric B

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the extent of interspecific hybridization and how ecological segregation may influence hybridization requires comprehensively sampling different habitats over a range of life history stages. Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and Dolly Varden (S. malma) are recently diverged salmonid fishes that come into contact in several areas of the North Pacific where they occasionally hybridize. To better quantify the degree of hybridization and ecological segregation between these taxa, we sampled over 700 fish from multiple lake (littoral and profundal) and stream sites in two large, interconnected southwestern Alaskan lakes. Individuals were genotyped at 12 microsatellite markers, and genetic admixture (Q) values generated through Bayesian-based clustering revealed hybridization levels generally lower than reported in a previous study (<0.6% to 5% of samples classified as late-generation hybrids). Dolly Varden and Arctic char tended to make different use of stream habitats with the latter apparently abandoning streams for lake habitats after 2-3 years of age. Our results support the distinct biological species status of Dolly Varden and Arctic char and suggest that ecological segregation may be an important factor limiting opportunities for hybridization and/or the ecological performance of hybrid char.

  9. Low levels of hybridization between sympatric Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and Dolly Varden char (Salvelinus malma) highlights their genetic distinctiveness and ecological segregation

    PubMed Central

    May-McNally, Shannan L; Quinn, Thomas P; Taylor, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the extent of interspecific hybridization and how ecological segregation may influence hybridization requires comprehensively sampling different habitats over a range of life history stages. Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and Dolly Varden (S. malma) are recently diverged salmonid fishes that come into contact in several areas of the North Pacific where they occasionally hybridize. To better quantify the degree of hybridization and ecological segregation between these taxa, we sampled over 700 fish from multiple lake (littoral and profundal) and stream sites in two large, interconnected southwestern Alaskan lakes. Individuals were genotyped at 12 microsatellite markers, and genetic admixture (Q) values generated through Bayesian-based clustering revealed hybridization levels generally lower than reported in a previous study (<0.6% to 5% of samples classified as late-generation hybrids). Dolly Varden and Arctic char tended to make different use of stream habitats with the latter apparently abandoning streams for lake habitats after 2–3 years of age. Our results support the distinct biological species status of Dolly Varden and Arctic char and suggest that ecological segregation may be an important factor limiting opportunities for hybridization and/or the ecological performance of hybrid char. PMID:26356310

  10. Genetically engineered Oenococcus oeni strains to highlight the impact of estA2 and estA7 esterase genes on wine ester profile.

    PubMed

    Darsonval, M; Alexandre, H; Grandvalet, C

    2016-12-01

    Besides deacidifying wine, Oenococcus oeni bring significant changes in the chemical composition of wine by releasing esters by the action of their own esterases. The impact of O. oeni esterases remains relatively unexplored. Four esterase genes were identified from O. oeni genome (estA2, estA7, estC, and estB). The dual objective of this study was, first to use a genetic tool enabling the expression of esterase genes in enological conditions and, second, to investigate the impact of O. oeni esterase gene expression during winemaking on wine aromatic profile. Both estA2 and estA7 genes were successfully cloned and expressed in O. oeni and recombinant strains were inoculated in Aligoté wine to initiate malolactic fermentation (MLF). Ester profile of experimental wine was established by SPME-GC-MS. EstA2 caused significant decreases in the concentrations of isoamyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, isobutyl acetate, and hexyl acetate, by 42.7%, 23.4%, 51.5%, and 28.9%, respectively. EstA2 has preferential hydrolytic activity toward acetate esters from higher alcohols. EstA7 has synthetic activity toward hexyl acetate with a significant 22.7% increase. This study reports the first efficient expression system enabling the production of a functional protein in O. oeni in enological conditions.

  11. Considerations for Using Genetic and Epigenetic Information in Occupational Health Risk Assessment and Standard Setting.

    PubMed

    Schulte, P A; Whittaker, C; Curran, C P

    2015-01-01

    Risk assessment forms the basis for both occupational health decision-making and the development of occupational exposure limits (OELs). Although genetic and epigenetic data have not been widely used in risk assessment and ultimately, standard setting, it is possible to envision such uses. A growing body of literature demonstrates that genetic and epigenetic factors condition biological responses to occupational and environmental hazards or serve as targets of them. This presentation addresses the considerations for using genetic and epigenetic information in risk assessments, provides guidance on using this information within the classic risk assessment paradigm, and describes a framework to organize thinking about such uses. The framework is a 4 × 4 matrix involving the risk assessment functions (hazard identification, dose-response modeling, exposure assessment, and risk characterization) on one axis and inherited and acquired genetic and epigenetic data on the other axis. The cells in the matrix identify how genetic and epigenetic data can be used for each risk assessment function. Generally, genetic and epigenetic data might be used as endpoints in hazard identification, as indicators of exposure, as effect modifiers in exposure assessment and dose-response modeling, as descriptors of mode of action, and to characterize toxicity pathways. Vast amounts of genetic and epigenetic data may be generated by high-throughput technologies. These data can be useful for assessing variability and reducing uncertainty in extrapolations, and they may serve as the foundation upon which identification of biological perturbations would lead to a new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessments.

  12. Psychosocial and cultural factors affecting the perceived risk of genetically modified food: an overview of the literature.

    PubMed

    Finucane, Melissa L; Holup, Joan L

    2005-04-01

    The rapid globalization of the world economy has increased the need for an astute understanding of cultural differences in perceptions, values, and ways of thinking about new food technologies. In this paper, we describe how socio-psychological and cultural factors may affect public perceptions of the risk of genetically modified (GM) food. We present psychological, sociological, and anthropological research on risk perception as a framework for understanding cross-national differences in reactions to GM food. Differences in the cultural values and circumstances of people in the US, European countries, and the developing world are examined. The implications of cultural theory for risk communication and decision making about GM food are discussed and directions for future research highlighted.

  13. Predicting stroke through genetic risk functions: The CHARGE risk score project

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A; Fornage, Myriam; Bis, Joshua C; Choi, Seung Hoan; Psaty, Bruce M; Meigs, James B; Rao, Madhu; Nalls, Mike; Fontes, Joao D; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Ehret, Georg B.; Fox, Caroline S; Malik, Rainer; Dichgans, Martin; Schmidt, Helena; Lahti, Jari; Heckbert, Susan R; Lumley, Thomas; Rice, Kenneth; Rotter, Jerome I; Taylor, Kent D; Folsom, Aaron R; Boerwinkle, Eric; Rosamond, Wayne D; Shahar, Eyal; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Koudstaal, Peter J; Amin, Najaf; Wieberdink, Renske G.; Dehghan, Abbas; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; DeStefano, Anita L.; Debette, Stephanie; Xue, Luting; Beiser, Alexa; Wolf, Philip A.; DeCarli, Charles; Ikram, M. Arfan; Seshadri, Sudha; Mosley, Thomas H; Longstreth, WT; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Launer, Lenore J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Beyond the Framingham Stroke Risk Score (FSRS), prediction of future stroke may improve with a genetic risk score (GRS) based on Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with stroke and its risk factors. Methods The study includes four population-based cohorts with 2,047 first incident strokes from 22,720 initially stroke-free European origin participants aged 55 years and older, who were followed for up to 20 years. GRS were constructed with 324 SNPs implicated in stroke and 9 risk factors. The association of the GRS to first incident stroke was tested using Cox regression; the GRS predictive properties were assessed with Area under the curve (AUC) statistics comparing the GRS to age sex, and FSRS models, and with reclassification statistics. These analyses were performed per cohort and in a meta-analysis of pooled data. Replication was sought in a case-control study of ischemic stroke (IS). Results In the meta-analysis, adding the GRS to the FSRS, age and sex model resulted in a significant improvement in discrimination (All stroke: Δjoint AUC =0.016, p-value=2.3*10-6; IS: Δ joint AUC =0.021, p-value=3.7*10−7), although the overall AUC remained low. In all studies there was a highly significantly improved net reclassification index (p-values <10−4). Conclusions The SNPs associated with stroke and its risk factors result only in a small improvement in prediction of future stroke compared to the classical epidemiological risk factors for stroke. PMID:24436238

  14. Genetic predisposition to higher blood pressure increases risk of incident hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiangfeng; Huang, Jianfeng; Wang, Laiyuan; Chen, Shufeng; Yang, Xueli; Li, Jianxin; Cao, Jie; Chen, Jichun; Li, Ying; Zhao, Liancheng; Li, Hongfan; Liu, Fangcao; Huang, Chen; Shen, Chong; Shen, Jinjin; Yu, Ling; Xu, Lihua; Mu, Jianjun; Wu, Xianping; Ji, Xu; Guo, Dongshuang; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Yang, Zili; Wang, Renping; Yang, Jun; Yan, Weili; Gu, Dongfeng

    2015-10-01

    Although multiple genetic markers associated with blood pressure have been identified by genome-wide association studies, their aggregate effect on risk of incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease is uncertain, particularly among East Asian who may have different genetic and environmental exposures from Europeans. We aimed to examine the association between genetic predisposition to higher blood pressure and risk of incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease in 26 262 individuals in 2 Chinese population-based prospective cohorts. A genetic risk score was calculated based on 22 established variants for blood pressure in East Asian. We found the genetic risk score was significantly and independently associated with linear increases in blood pressure and risk of incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease (P range from 4.57×10(-3) to 3.10×10(-6)). In analyses adjusted for traditional risk factors including blood pressure, individuals carrying most blood pressure-related risk alleles (top quintile of genetic score distribution) had 40% (95% confidence interval, 18-66) and 26% (6-45) increased risk for incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease, respectively, when compared with individuals in the bottom quintile. The genetic risk score also significantly improved discrimination for incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease and led to modest improvements in risk reclassification for cardiovascular disease (all the P<0.05). Our data indicate that genetic predisposition to higher blood pressure is an independent risk factor for blood pressure increase and incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease and provides modest incremental information to cardiovascular disease risk prediction. The potential clinical use of this panel of blood pressure-associated polymorphisms remains to be determined. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Genetic Risk, Coronary Heart Disease Events, and the Clinical Benefit of Statin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, JG; Chasman, DI; Caulfield, M; Devlin, JJ; Nordio, F; Hyde, C; Cannon, CP; Sacks, F; Poulter, N; Sever, P; Ridker, PM; Braunwald, E; Melander, O

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic variants have been associated with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We tested whether a composite of these variants could identify the risk of both incident as well as recurrent CHD events and distinguish individuals who derived greater clinical benefit from statin therapy. Methods A community-based cohort and four randomized controlled trials of both primary (JUPITER and ASCOT) and secondary (CARE and PROVE IT-TIMI 22) prevention with statin therapy totaling 48,421 individuals and 3,477 events were included in these analyses. We examined the association of a genetic risk score based on 27 genetic variants with incident or recurrent CHD, adjusting for established clinical predictors. We then investigated the relative and absolute risk reductions in CHD events with statin therapy stratified by genetic risk. Data from studies were combined using meta-analysis. Findings When individuals were divided into low (quintile 1), intermediate (quintiles 2-4), and high (quintile 5) genetic risk categories, a significant gradient of risk for incident or recurrent CHD was demonstrated with the multivariable-adjusted HRs (95% CI) for CHD for the intermediate and high genetic risk categories vs. low genetic risk category being 1.32 (1.20-1.46, P<0.0001) and 1.71 (1.54-1.91, P<0.0001), respectively. In terms of the benefit of statin therapy in the four randomized trials, there was a significant gradient of increasing relative risk reduction across the low, intermediate, and high genetic risk categories (13%, 29%, and 48%, P=0.0277). Similarly, greater absolute risk reductions were seen in those individuals in higher genetic risk categories (P=0.0101), resulting in an approximate three-fold gradient in the number needed to treat (NNT) in the primary prevention trials. Specifically, in the primary prevention trials, the NNT to prevent one MACE over 10 years for the low, intermediate, and high GRS individuals was 66, 42, and 25 in JUPITER and 57, 47, and 20

  16. Pathways and barriers to genetic testing and screening: Molecular genetics meets the high-risk family. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Duster, T.

    1998-11-01

    The proliferation of genetic screening and testing is requiring increasing numbers of Americans to integrate genetic knowledge and interventions into their family life and personal experience. This study examines the social processes that occur as families at risk for two of the most common autosomal recessive diseases, sickle cell disease (SC) and cystic fibrosis (CF), encounter genetic testing. Each of these diseases is found primarily in a different ethnic/racial group (CF in Americans of North European descent and SC in Americans of West African descent). This has permitted them to have a certain additional lens on the role of culture in integrating genetic testing into family life and reproductive planning. A third type of genetic disorder, the thalassemias was added to the sample in order to extent the comparative frame and to include other ethnic and racial groups.

  17. Tourette syndrome research highlights 2015

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Cheryl A.; Black, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    We present selected highlights from research that appeared during 2015 on Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Topics include phenomenology, comorbidities, developmental course, genetics, animal models, neuroimaging, electrophysiology, pharmacology, and treatment. We briefly summarize articles whose results we believe may lead to new treatments, additional research or modifications in current models of TS. PMID:27429744

  18. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H.

    2011-01-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits. PMID:22129781

  19. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H

    2012-02-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Translational bypass of nonsense mutations in zebrafish rep1, pax2.1 and lamb1 highlights a viable therapeutic option for untreatable genetic eye disease.

    PubMed

    Moosajee, Mariya; Gregory-Evans, Kevin; Ellis, Charles D; Seabra, Miguel C; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y

    2008-12-15

    The extensive molecular genetic heterogeneity seen with inherited eye disease is a major barrier to the development of gene-based therapeutics. The underlying molecular pathology in a considerable proportion of these diseases however are nonsense mutations leading to premature termination codons. A therapeutic intervention targeted at this abnormality would therefore potentially be relevant to a wide range of inherited eye diseases. We have taken advantage of the ability of aminoglycoside drugs to suppress such nonsense mutations and partially restore full-length, functional protein in a zebrafish model of choroideraemia (chm(ru848); juvenile chorio-retinal degeneration) and in two models of ocular coloboma (noi(tu29a) and gup(m189); congenital optic fissure closure defects). In vitro cell-based assays showed significant readthrough with two drugs, gentamicin and paromomycin, which was confirmed by western blot and in vitro prenylation assays. The presence of either aminoglycoside during zebrafish development in vivo showed remarkable prevention of mutant ocular phenotypes in each model and a reduction in multisystemic defects leading to a 1.5-1.7-fold increase in survival. We also identified a significant reduction in abnormal cell death shown by TUNEL assay. To test the hypothesis that optic fissure closure was apoptosis-dependent, the anti-apoptotic agents, curcumin and zVAD-fmk, were tested in gup(m189) embryos. Both drugs were found to reduce the size of the coloboma, providing molecular evidence that cell death is required for optic fissure remodelling. These findings draw attention to the value of zebrafish models of eye disease as useful preclinical drug screening tools in studies to identify molecular mechanisms amenable to therapeutic intervention.

  1. Toward an Integration of Cognitive and Genetic Models of Risk for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Brandon E.; Beevers, Christopher G.; McGeary, John E.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing interest in integrating cognitive and genetic models of depression risk. We review two ways in which these models can be meaningfully integrated. First, information-processing biases may represent intermediate phenotypes for specific genetic influences. These genetic influences may represent main effects on specific cognitive processes or may moderate the impact of environmental influences on information-processing biases. Second, cognitive and genetic influences may combine to increase reactivity to environmental stressors, increasing risk for depression in a gene × cognition × environment model of risk. There is now growing support for both of these ways of integrating cognitive and genetic models of depression risk. Specifically, there is support for genetic influences on information-processing biases, particularly the link between 5-HTTLPR and attentional biases, from both genetic association and gene × environment (G × E) studies. There is also initial support for gene × cognition × environment models of risk in which specific genetic influences contribute to increased reactivity to environmental influences. We review this research and discuss important areas of future research, particularly the need for larger samples that allow for a broader examination of genetic and epigenetic influences as well as the combined influence of variability across a number of genes. PMID:22920216

  2. Return of individual genetic results in a high-risk sample: enthusiasm and positive behavioral change.

    PubMed

    Hartz, Sarah M; Olfson, Emily; Culverhouse, Robert; Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia; Chen, Li-Shiun; DuBois, James; Fisher, Sherri; Kaphingst, Kimberly; Kaufman, David; Plunk, Andrew; Ramnarine, Shelina; Solomon, Stephanie; Saccone, Nancy L; Bierut, Laura J

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this study was to examine participant responses to disclosure of genetic results in a minority population at high risk for depression and anxiety. Eighty-two subjects in a genetic study of nicotine dependence were offered personalized genetic results. All were nicotine-dependent and 64% self-identified as African American. Pathway Genomics was used to evaluate genetic risks for five complex diseases. Participants returned 4-8 weeks after enrollment for in-person genetic counseling interviews and evaluation of baseline measures. A telephone follow-up was performed 4-8 weeks later to assess responses to results. Fifty of the 82 subjects (61%) were interested in receiving genetic results. These participants had multiple risk factors, including high baseline measures of depression (66%) and anxiety (32%), as well as low rates of employment (46%), adequate health literacy (46%), and health insurance (45%). Pathway Genomics reported "increased risk" for at least one disease in 77% of subjects. Ninety-five percent of participants reported that they appreciated the genetic results, and receiving these results was not associated with changes in symptoms of depression or anxiety. Furthermore, after return of genetic results, smoking cessation attempts increased (P = 0.003). Even in an underserved population at high risk for adverse psychological reactions, subjects responded positively to personalized genetic results.

  3. Burden of genetic risk variants in multiple sclerosis families in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Mescheriakova, Julia Y; Broer, Linda; Wahedi, Simin; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20% of multiple sclerosis patients have a family history of multiple sclerosis. Studies of multiple sclerosis aggregation in families are inconclusive. To investigate the genetic burden based on currently discovered genetic variants for multiple sclerosis risk in patients from Dutch multiple sclerosis multiplex families versus sporadic multiple sclerosis cases, and to study its influence on clinical phenotype and disease prediction. Our study population consisted of 283 sporadic multiple sclerosis cases, 169 probands from multiplex families and 2028 controls. A weighted genetic risk score based on 102 non-human leukocyte antigen loci and HLA-DRB1*1501 was calculated. The weighted genetic risk score based on all loci was significantly higher in familial than in sporadic cases. The HLA-DRB1*1501 contributed significantly to the difference in genetic burden between the groups. A high weighted genetic risk score was significantly associated with a low age of disease onset in all multiple sclerosis patients, but not in the familial cases separately. The genetic risk score was significantly but modestly better in discriminating familial versus sporadic multiple sclerosis from controls. Familial multiple sclerosis patients are more loaded with the common genetic variants than sporadic cases. The difference is mainly driven by HLA-DRB1*1501. The predictive capacity of genetic loci is poor and unlikely to be useful in clinical settings.

  4. Genetic Obesity Risk and Attenuation Effect of Physical Fitness in Mexican-Mestizo Population: a Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Costa-Urrutia, Paula; Abud, Carolina; Franco-Trecu, Valentina; Colistro, Valentina; Rodríguez-Arellano, Martha Eunice; Vázquez-Pérez, Joel; Granados, Julio; Seelaender, Marilia

    2017-05-01

    We analyzed commonly reported European and Asian obesity-related gene variants in a Mexican-Mestizo population through each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and a genetic risk score (GRS) based on 23 selected SNPs. Study subjects were physically active Mexican-Mestizo adults (n  =  608) with body mass index (BMI) values from 18 to 55 kg/m(2) . For each SNP and for the GRS, logistic models were performed to test for simple SNP associations with BMI, fat mass percentage (FMP), waist circumference (WC), and the interaction with VO2max and muscular endurance (ME). To further understand the SNP or GRS*physical fitness components, generalized linear models were performed. Obesity risk was significantly associated to 6 SNPs (ADRB2 rs1042713, APOB rs512535, PPARA rs1800206, TNFA rs361525, TRHR rs7832552 and rs16892496) after adjustment by gender, age, ancestry, VO2max , and ME. ME attenuated the influence of APOB rs512535 and TNFA rs361525 on obesity risk in FMP. WC was significantly associated to GRS. Both ME and VO2max attenuated GRS effect on WC. We report associations for 6 out of 23 SNPs and for the GRS, which confer obesity risk, a novel finding for Mexican-Mestizo physically active population. Also, the importance of including physical fitness components variables in obesity genetic risk studies is highlighted, with special regard to intervention purposes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  5. Brain Structure and Function Changes During the Development of Schizophrenia: The Evidence From Studies of Subjects at Increased Genetic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lawrie, Stephen M.; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Hall, Jeremy; Owens, David G.C.; Johnstone, Eve C.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the evidence for changes in the structure and function of the brain in subjects at high risk of schizophrenia for genetic reasons during the genesis of the disorder. We first highlight the structural and functional abnormalities in schizophrenia and whether any similar or lesser abnormalities are apparent in unaffected relatives. There is good evidence for subtle abnormalities of hippocampal and ventricle volume in relatives that are not as marked as the deficits in schizophrenia. In addition, the functional imaging literature suggests that prefrontal cortex function may deteriorate in those at risk who go on to develop the disorder. We then review the findings from longitudinal imaging studies of those at high risk, particularly the Edinburgh High-Risk Study, which report gray matter density reductions in medial and lateral temporal lobe because people develop schizophrenia, as well as functional abnormalities which precede onset. We conclude by quoting our own and others’ imaging studies of the associations of genetic and other risk factors for schizophrenia, including stressful life events and cannabis use, which provide mechanistic examples of how these changes may be brought about. Overall, the literature supports the view that there are measurable changes in brain structure and function during the genesis of the disorder, which provide opportunities for early detection and intervention. PMID:18227083

  6. Biotechnology; Managing the Risks of Field Testing Genetically Engineered Organisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    rocesses (plant breeding or Selection of randomily produced mutant mvicrobes). such genetic engineering techniques ofter at more p~recise meanls of...particular organism. Both ecologists and molecular biologists have asserted that too little is known about what happens to genetically engineered...developed by traditional techniques will be adequate to address the reg- ulatory requirements for genetically engineered products. lowever, for cert’iin

  7. Replication of a genetic risk score for venous thromboembolism in whites but not in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Folsom, A R; Tang, W; Weng, L-C; Roetker, N S; Cushman, M; Basu, S; Pankow, J S

    2016-01-01

    ESSENTIALS: There is little prospective information on genetic risk scores to predict venous thromboembolism (VT). Community based cohort followed a median of 22.6 years for VT occurrence. A 5-SNP risk score identified whites at risk of VT, but not African Americans. The utility of genetic risk scores for VT is yet to be established. Case-control studies have created genetic risk scores of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE) and documented their ability to predict VTE, but prospective data are lacking. To test the ability of a genetic risk score to predict VTE incidence in a prospective study, particularly in African Americans. We computed a previously proposed genetic risk score, based on five established VTE SNPs in the F5, F2, ABO, FGG, and F11 genes, in 9520 whites and 3049 African Americans initially free of VTE. We followed them a median of 22.6 years for VTE occurrence (n = 380 events in whites and n = 187 in African Americans). In whites, the five-SNP weighted genetic risk score ranged from 0 to 5.8, and VTE risk increased 1.41-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-fold to 1.56-fold) per allele increment. In African Americans, the weighted genetic risk score ranged from 0 to 4.6 and the hazard ratio per risk allele was 1.14 (95% CI 0.94-1.38), with adjustment for 10 principal components of ancestry. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for 20-year prediction of VTE from the weighted genetic risk score was 0.59 (95% CI 0.56-0.63) in whites and 0.56 (95% CI 0.51-0.61) in African Americans. Adding non-genetic factors increased the area under the curve to 0.67 in whites and to 0.66 in African Americans. Higher values for a five-SNP genetic risk score helped identify white adults at risk of VTE. The genetic risk score did not identify future VTE occurrence in African Americans. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  8. Risk assessment, genetic counseling, and clinical care for hereditary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jacquelyn; Stopfer, Jill Elise

    2014-01-01

    During the last 30 years, key advances in the field of cancer genetics have improved identification of high-risk families in which cancer risk can be linked to mutations in cancer susceptible genes. Identification of individuals with heritable cancer risk may influence short- and long-term medical management issues. Heightened screening and risk reducing options can offer lifesaving interventions for the woman and family members who are at risk. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  9. Design of a randomized trial of diabetes genetic risk testing to motivate behavior change: the Genetic Counseling/lifestyle Change (GC/LC) Study for Diabetes Prevention.

    PubMed

    Grant, Richard W; Meigs, James B; Florez, Jose C; Park, Elyse R; Green, Robert C; Waxler, Jessica L; Delahanty, Linda M; O'Brien, Kelsey E

    2011-10-01

    The efficacy of diabetes genetic risk testing to motivate behavior change for diabetes prevention is currently unknown. This paper presents key issues in the design and implementation of one of the first randomized trials (The Genetic Counseling/Lifestyle Change (GC/LC) Study for Diabetes Prevention) to test whether knowledge of diabetes genetic risk can motivate patients to adopt healthier behaviors. Because individuals may react differently to receiving 'higher' vs 'lower' genetic risk results, we designed a 3-arm parallel group study to separately test the hypotheses that: (1) patients receiving 'higher' diabetes genetic risk results will increase healthy behaviors compared to untested controls, and (2) patients receiving 'lower' diabetes genetic risk results will decrease healthy behaviors compared to untested controls. In this paper we describe several challenges to implementing this study, including: (1) the application of a novel diabetes risk score derived from genetic epidemiology studies to a clinical population, (2) the use of the principle of Mendelian randomization to efficiently exclude 'average' diabetes genetic risk patients from the intervention, and (3) the development of a diabetes genetic risk counseling intervention that maintained the ethical need to motivate behavior change in both 'higher' and 'lower' diabetes genetic risk result recipients. Diabetes genetic risk scores were developed by aggregating the results of 36 diabetes-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms. Relative risk for type 2 diabetes was calculated using Framingham Offspring Study outcomes, grouped by quartiles into 'higher', 'average' (middle two quartiles) and 'lower' genetic risk. From these relative risks, revised absolute risks were estimated using the overall absolute risk for the study group. For study efficiency, we excluded all patients receiving 'average' diabetes risk results from the subsequent intervention. This post-randomization allocation strategy was

  10. Patients' resistance to risk information in genetic counseling for BRCA1/2.

    PubMed

    Gurmankin, Andrea D; Domchek, Susan; Stopfer, Jill; Fels, Christina; Armstrong, Katrina

    2005-03-14

    Risk information from health care providers is relevant to and used in nearly all medical decisions. Patients often misunderstand their risks, yet little is known about the risk perception that patients derive from risk communications with health care providers. This study examines patients' risk perceptions following communication with health care providers during genetic counseling about the risks of breast cancer and BRCA1/2 mutations. A prospective, longitudinal study was conducted from October 2002 to February 2004 of women who received genetic counseling. The women completed a survey before their counseling and a telephone interview in the week after the counseling. Main outcome measures included change from precounseling in risk perception and accuracy of postcounseling risk perception (relative to actual risk information communicated). A total of 108 women agreed to participate in the study. The women's postcounseling risk perceptions were significantly lower than their precounseling risk perceptions (breast cancer: 17%, P<.001; mutation: 13%, P<.001) but were significantly higher than the actual risk information communicated (breast cancer: 19%, P<.001; mutation: 24%, P<.001). Accuracy of breast cancer risk perception but not mutation risk perception was associated with precounseling worry (P = .04), even after adjusting for trait anxiety (P = .01). This research demonstrates patients' resistance to risk information. Inappropriately high risk perception derived from a risk communication with a health care provider can lead patients to make different, and potentially worse, medical decisions than they would with an accurate risk perception and to be unnecessarily distressed about their risk.

  11. Fried food consumption, genetic risk, and body mass index: gene-diet interaction analysis in three US cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qibin; Chu, Audrey Y; Kang, Jae H; Huang, Jinyan; Rose, Lynda M; Jensen, Majken K; Liang, Liming; Curhan, Gary C; Pasquale, Louis R; Wiggs, Janey L; De Vivo, Immaculata; Chan, Andrew T; Choi, Hyon K; Tamimi, Rulla M; Ridker, Paul M; Hunter, David J; Willett, Walter C; Rimm, Eric B; Chasman, Daniel I; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2014-03-19

    To examine the interactions between genetic predisposition and consumption of fried food in relation to body mass index (BMI) and obesity. Prospective cohort study. Health professionals in the United States. 9623 women from the Nurses' Health Study, 6379 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, and a replication cohort of 21,421 women from the Women's Genome Health Study. Repeated measurement of BMI over follow-up. There was an interaction between fried food consumption and a genetic risk score based on 32 BMI-associated variants on BMI in both the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (P ≤ 0.001 for interaction). Among participants in the highest third of the genetic risk score, the differences in BMI between individuals who consumed fried foods four or more times a week and those who consumed fried foods less than once a week amounted to 1.0 (SE 0.2) in women and 0.7 (SE 0.2) in men, whereas the corresponding differences were 0.5 (SE 0.2) and 0.4 (SE 0.2) in the lowest third of the genetic risk score. The gene-diet interaction was replicated in the Women's Genome Health Study (P<0.001 for interaction). Viewed differently, the genetic association with adiposity was strengthened with higher consumption of fried foods. In the combined three cohorts, the differences in BMI per 10 risk alleles were 1.1 (SE 0.2), 1.6 (SE 0.3), and 2.2 (SE 0.6) for fried food consumption less than once, one to three times, and four or more times a week (P<0.001 for interaction); and the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for obesity per 10 risk alleles were 1.61 (1.40 to 1.87), 2.12 (1.73 to 2.59), and 2.72 (2.12 to 3.48) across the three categories of consumption (P=0.002 for interaction). In addition, the variants in or near genes highly expressed or known to act in the central nervous system showed significant interactions with fried food consumption, with the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated) variant showing the strongest result (P<0

  12. The role of support groups in facilitating families in coping with a genetic condition and in discussion of genetic risk information.

    PubMed

    Plumridge, Gillian; Metcalfe, Alison; Coad, Jane; Gill, Paramjit

    2012-09-01

      Giving children and young people information about genetic conditions and associated risk has been shown to be important to their identity, coping and decision making. Parents, however, find talking to their children difficult, and support from health professionals is often not available to them.   To explore the role of support groups in family coping, and in assisting parents' communication about risk with children in families affected by an inherited genetic condition.   Semi-structured interviews analysed using grounded theory and informed by models focusing on aspects of family communication.   Affected and unaffected children and their parents, from families affected by one of six genetic conditions, that represent different patterns of inheritance, and variations in age of onset, life expectancy and impact on families.   Parents often sought support they did not receive elsewhere from support groups. They identified benefits, but also potential disadvantages to this involvement. These related to the specific condition and also whether groups were run solely by parents or had professional input. Support groups rarely helped directly with family communication, but attendance often stimulated family discussion, and they provided information that improved parents' confidence in discussing the condition.   Support groups should be seen only as additional to the support offered by health and social care professionals. An increased understanding of the role of support groups in assisting families with genetic conditions has been highlighted, but further work is needed to explore more fully how this may be made more sustainable and far-reaching. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Genetic Susceptibility to Thrombosis and Its Relationshipto Physiological Risk Factors: The GAIT Study

    PubMed Central

    Souto, Juan Carlos; Almasy, Laura; Borrell, Montserrat; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Mateo, José; Soria, José Manuel; Coll, Inma; Felices, Rosa; Stone, William; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Blangero, John

    2000-01-01

    Although there are a number of well-characterized genetic defects that lead to increased risk of thrombosis, little information is available on the relative importance of genetic factors in thrombosis risk in the general population. We performed a family-based study of the genetics of thrombosis in the Spanish population to assess the heritability of thrombosis and to identify the joint actions of genes on thrombosis risk and related quantitative hemostasis phenotypes. We examined 398 individuals in 21 extended pedigrees. Twelve pedigrees were ascertained through a proband with idiopathic thrombosis, and the remaining pedigrees were randomly ascertained. The heritability of thrombosis liability and the genetic correlations between thrombosis and each of the quantitative risk factors were estimated by means of a novel variance component method that used a multivariate threshold model. More than 60% of the variation in susceptibility to common thrombosis is attributable to genetic factors. Several quantitative risk factors exhibited significant genetic correlations with thrombosis, indicating that some of the genes that influence quantitative variation in these physiological correlates also influence the risk of thrombosis. Traits that exhibited significant genetic correlations with thrombosis included levels of several coagulation factors (factors VII, VIII, IX, XI, XII, and von Willebrand), tissue plasminogen activator, homocysteine, and the activated protein C ratio. This is the first study that quantifies the genetic component of susceptibility to common thrombosis. The high heritability of thrombosis risk and the significant genetic correlations between thrombosis and related risk factors suggest that the exploitation of correlated quantitative phenotypes will aid the search for susceptibility genes. PMID:11038326

  14. Clinical validity and utility of genetic risk scores in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Helfand, Brian T; Kearns, James; Conran, Carly; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Current issues related to prostate cancer (PCa) clinical care (e.g., over-screening, over-diagnosis, and over-treatment of nonaggressive PCa) call for risk assessment tools that can be combined with family history (FH) to stratify disease risk among men in the general population. Since 2007, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified more than 100 SNPs associated with PCa susceptibility. In this review, we discuss (1) the validity of these PCa risk-associated SNPs, individually and collectively; (2) the various methods used for measuring the cumulative effect of multiple SNPs, including genetic risk score (GRS); (3) the adequate number of SNPs needed for risk assessment; (4) reclassification of risk based on evolving numbers of SNPs used to calculate genetic risk, (5) risk assessment for men from various racial groups, and (6) the clinical utility of genetic risk assessment. In conclusion, data available to date support the clinical validity of PCa risk-associated SNPs and GRS in risk assessment among men with or without FH. PCa risk-associated SNPs are not intended for diagnostic use; rather, they should be used the same way as FH. Combining GRS and FH can significantly improve the performance of risk assessment. Improved risk assessment may have important clinical utility in targeted PCa testing. However, clinical trials are urgently needed to evaluate this clinical utility as well as the acceptance of GRS by patients and physicians. PMID:27297129

  15. Perceived risk following melanoma genetic testing: A 2-year prospective study distinguishing subjective estimates from recall

    PubMed Central

    Aspinwall, Lisa G.; Taber, Jennifer M.; Kohlmann, Wendy; Leaf, Samantha L.; Leachman, Sancy A.

    2014-01-01

    A major goal of predictive genetic testing is to alert people to their risk before illness onset; however, little is known about how risk perceptions change following genetic testing and whether information is recalled accurately over time. In the United States, a CDKN2A/p16 mutation confers 76% lifetime risk of melanoma. Following genetic counseling and test reporting, subjective risk estimates and recall of counselor-provided risk estimates were assessed 5 times over the next 2 years among 60 adult members of 2 extended CDKN2A/p16 kindreds. No sustained changes from baseline in risk perceptions were reported. Unaffected carriers (n=15) consistently reported significantly lower subjective risk estimates (46%) than they were actually given (76%, p < .001) or recalled having been given (60%, p < .001). Noncarriers’ (n=27) risk estimates decreased following results disclosure, but rebounded, with both subjective and recalled estimates subsequently exceeding what they were told by the counselor (both ps < .001). Affected carriers’ (n=18) risk estimates for developing a new melanoma corresponded well to counselor-provided information (p =.362). For all 3 patient groups, results were consistent across multiple risk measures and remained similar when demographic, phenotypic, and baseline behavioral contributors to melanoma risk were statistically controlled. These findings are consistent with other studies of risk perception, but additional studies of more diverse populations are needed to understand the reasons behind both the persistence of initial risk estimates and their divergence from information provided by the counselor during genetic counseling. Additionally, determining whether holding subjective risk perceptions that differ from counselor-provided information ultimately affects adherence to management recommendations will help guide the presentation of risk information in genetic counseling practice. PMID:24322567

  16. A Genetics-based Biomarker Risk Algorithm for Predicting Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Michael W.; Sundseth, Scott S.; Burns, Daniel K.; Saunders, Ann M.; Hayden, Kathleen M.; Burke, James R.; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Roses, Allen D.

    2016-01-01

    Background A straightforward, reproducible blood-based test that predicts age dependent risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) could be used as an enrichment tool for clinical development of therapies. This study evaluated the prognostic performance of a genetics-based biomarker risk algorithm (GBRA) established on a combination of Apolipoprotein E (APOE)/Translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog (TOMM40) genotypes and age, then compare it to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, neuroimaging and neurocognitive tests using data from two independent AD cohorts. Methods The GBRA was developed using data from the prospective Bryan-ADRC study (n=407; 86 conversion events (mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or late onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD)). The performance of the algorithm was tested using data from the ADNI study (n=660; 457 individuals categorized as MCI or LOAD). Results The positive predictive values (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) of the GBRA are in the range of 70–80%. The relatively high odds ratio (approximately 3–5) and significant net reclassification index (NRI) scores comparing the GBRA to a version based on APOE and age alone support the value of the GBRA in risk prediction for MCI due to LOAD. Performance of the GBRA compares favorably with CSF and imaging (fMRI) biomarkers. In addition, the GBRA “high” and “low” AD-risk categorizations correlated well with pathological CSF biomarker levels, PET amyloid burden and neurocognitive scores. Conclusions Unlike dynamic markers (i.e., imaging, protein or lipid markers) that may be influenced by factors unrelated to disease, genomic DNA is easily collected, stable, and the technical methods for measurement are robust, inexpensive, and widely available. The performance characteristics of the GBRA support its use as a pharmacogenetic enrichment tool for LOAD delay of onset clinical trials, and merits further evaluation for its clinical utility in evaluating therapeutic

  17. APPA 2011 Conference Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facilities Manager, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents highlights of APPA conference that was held on July 16-18, 2011. The highlights feature photos of 2011-2012 board of directors, outgoing senior regional representatives to the board, meritorious service award, APPA fellow, president's recognition and gavel exchange, and diamond business partner award.

  18. Highlights of 1978 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    General highlights of NASA's activities for 1978 are presented. The highlights are categorized into topics such as space science, space transportation systems, space and terrestrial applications, environment, technology utilization, aeronautics, space research and technology, energy programs, and international. A list of the 1978 launches including: (1) launch date; (2) payload designation; (3) launch vehicle; (4) launch site and (5) mission remarks is also presented.

  19. Consideration of genetic contributions to the risk for spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nutan; Franco, Ramon A

    2011-09-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia, a form of the neurologic condition known as dystonia, results from involuntary spasms of the larynx, producing interruptions of speech and changes in voice quality. The pathogenesis of spasmodic dysphonia is not well understood. However, several genetic mutations have been identified that cause different forms of dystonia. In some individuals, these genetic mutations result in spasmodic dysphonia, either with no other signs of dystonia or as part of a broader dystonia phenotype. Thus, research in the growing field of dystonia genetics may help to inform our understanding of the pathogenesis of spasmodic dysphonia.

  20. Stress and Coping in Genetic Testing for Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    testing 14. Decisions about having children 2 3 4 5 2 3 4 5 15 . Decisions about form of birth control 2 3 4 5 2 3 4 5 16. Decisions about which...or ovarian cancer Would be affected by the results of genetic testing 14. Decisions about having children 2 3 4 5 2 3 4 5 15 . Decisions about...rate your stress when you heard the results of your spouse/partner’s genetic testing ? Stress of hearing partner’s genetic results, N4 15 . How

  1. Integration of genetic and epigenetic markers for risk stratification: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Pashayan, Nora; Reisel, Daniel; Widschwendter, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Common genetic susceptibility variants could be used for risk stratification in risk-tailored cancer screening and prevention programmes. Combining genetic variants with environmental risk factors would improve risk stratification. Epigenetic changes are surrogate markers of environmental exposures during individual's lifetime. Integrating epigenetic markers, in lieu of environmental exposure data, with genetic markers would potentially improve risk stratification. Epigenetic changes are reversible and acquired gradually, providing potentials for prevention and early detection strategies. The epigenetic changes are tissue-specific and stage-of-development-specific, raising challenges in choice of sample and timing for evaluation of cancer-associated changes. The Horizon 2020 funded research programme, FORECEE, using empirical data, will investigate the value of integration of epigenomics with genomics for risk prediction and prevention of women-specific cancers.

  2. Concerns about Genetic Testing for Schizophrenia among Young Adults at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Ryan E.; Friesen, Phoebe; Brucato, Gary; Girgis, Ragy R.; Dixon, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic tests for schizophrenia may introduce risks and benefits. Among young adults at clinical high-risk for psychosis, little is known about their concerns and how they assess potential risks. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with 15 young adults at clinical high-risk for psychosis to ask about their concerns. Results Participants expressed concerns about test reliability, data interpretation, stigma, psychological harm, family planning, and privacy. Participants’ responses showed some departure from the ethics literature insofar as participants were primarily interested in reporting their results to people to whom they felt emotionally close, and expressed little consideration of biological closeness. Additionally, if tests showed an increased genetic risk for schizophrenia, four clinical high-risk persons felt obligated to tell an employer and another three would “maybe” tell an employer, even in the absence of clinical symptoms. Conclusions These findings suggest opportunities for clinicians and genetic counselors to intervene with education and support. PMID:27529075

  3. Behavioural Susceptibility Theory: Professor Jane Wardle and the Role of Appetite in Genetic Risk of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, Clare H; Fildes, Alison

    2017-03-01

    There is considerable variability in human body weight, despite the ubiquity of the 'obesogenic' environment. Human body weight has a strong genetic basis and it has been hypothesised that genetic susceptibility to the environment explains variation in human body weight, with differences in appetite being implicated as the mediating mechanism; so-called 'behavioural susceptibility theory' (BST), first described by Professor Jane Wardle. This review summarises the evidence for the role of appetite as a mediator of genetic risk of obesity. Variation in appetitive traits is observable from infancy, drives early weight gain and is highly heritable in infancy and childhood. Obesity-related common genetic variants identified through genome-wide association studies show associations with appetitive traits, and appetite mediates part of the observed association between genetic risk and adiposity. Obesity results from an interaction between genetic susceptibility to overeating and exposure to an 'obesogenic' food environment.

  4. Communication of Information about Genetic Risks: Putting Families at the Center.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Álvaro; Metcalfe, Alison; Paneque, Milena; Sousa, Liliana; Clarke, Angus J; Sequeiros, Jorge

    2017-07-16

    Genetic information is a family affair. With the expansion of genomic technologies, many new causal genes and variants have been established and the potential for molecular diagnoses increased, with implications not only for patients but also their relatives. The need for genetic counseling and intrafamilial circulation of information on genetic risks grew accordingly. Also, the amount and, particularly, the complexity of the information to convey multiplied. Sharing information about genetic risks with family members, however, has never been an easy matter and often becomes a source of personal and familial conflicts and distress. Ethical requisites generally prevent healthcare professionals from directly contacting their consultands' relatives (affected or still at risk), who often feel unsupported throughout that process. We discuss here the communication of genetic risks to family members. We first consider genomic testing as a basis for family-centered health care, as opposed to a predominant focus on the individual. We reviewed the literature on sharing genetic risk information with family members, and the associated ethical issues for professionals. Some clinical cases are presented and discussed, and key issues for meeting the needs of individuals and families are addressed. We argue that genetic information is inextricably linked to the family and that communicating about genetic risks is a process grounded within the broader milieu of family relationships and functioning. We conclude for the need for a more family-centered approach and interventions that can promote sensitive attitudes to the provision of genetic information to and within the family, as well as its inclusion in educational and training programmes for genetic healthcare professionals. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF AQUATIC MODELS FOR TESTING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GENETIC DIVERSITY AND POPULATION EXTINCTION RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between population adaptive potential and extinction risk in a changing environment is not well understood. Although the expectation is that genetic diversity is directly related to the capacity of populations to adapt, the statistical and predictive aspects of ...

  6. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF RISK FACTORS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE (CVD) IN GENETICALLY PREDISPOSED RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent CVD models are increasingly used for understanding individual differences in susceptibility to environmental stressors such as air pollution. We characterized pathologies and a number of known human risk factors of CVD in genetically predisposed, male young adult Spontaneo...

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF AQUATIC MODELS FOR TESTING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GENETIC DIVERSITY AND POPULATION EXTINCTION RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between population adaptive potential and extinction risk in a changing environment is not well understood. Although the expectation is that genetic diversity is directly related to the capacity of populations to adapt, the statistical and predictive aspects of ...

  8. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF RISK FACTORS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE (CVD) IN GENETICALLY PREDISPOSED RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent CVD models are increasingly used for understanding individual differences in susceptibility to environmental stressors such as air pollution. We characterized pathologies and a number of known human risk factors of CVD in genetically predisposed, male young adult Spontaneo...

  9. Measurement and Associations of Pregnancy Risk Factors with Genetic Influences, Postnatal Environmental Influences, and Toddler Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marceau, Kristine; Hajal, Nastassia; Leve, Leslie D.; Reiss, David; Shaw, Daniel S.; Ganiban, Jody M.; Mayes, Linda C.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates the unique contributions of perinatal risk and genetic and environmental influences on child behavior using data from 561 domestic US adoption triads (birth mothers, adopted child, and adoptive parents). Findings show distinct patterns of associations among genetic (birth mother psychopathology), prenatal (six maternal…

  10. Measurement and Associations of Pregnancy Risk Factors with Genetic Influences, Postnatal Environmental Influences, and Toddler Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marceau, Kristine; Hajal, Nastassia; Leve, Leslie D.; Reiss, David; Shaw, Daniel S.; Ganiban, Jody M.; Mayes, Linda C.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates the unique contributions of perinatal risk and genetic and environmental influences on child behavior using data from 561 domestic US adoption triads (birth mothers, adopted child, and adoptive parents). Findings show distinct patterns of associations among genetic (birth mother psychopathology), prenatal (six maternal…

  11. Genetic driver events in premalignancy: LOH validated for marking the risk of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Cavenee, Webster K

    2012-09-01

    In this issue of the journal (beginning on page 1081), Zhang and colleagues extend the 30-year-old discovery of LOH profiles to provide validated markers of oral premalignant lesion risk for cancer. They prospectively show a dramatic difference in cancer progression between high-risk lesions (LOH) and low-risk (non-LOH) lesions (P = 0.002). This work has important implications for oral cancer prevention and risk modeling and for understanding genetic driver events in premalignancy.

  12. Energy Research Highlights-2

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-08-26

    Highlights the research NETL is doing in the following fields: Clean Coal, Gasification, Carbon Sequestration, and Hydrogen. This video was featured in the lobby of the Forrestal building in Washington, D.C.

  13. Highlights, predictions, and changes.

    PubMed

    Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2012-11-15

    Recent literature highlights at Retrovirology are described. Predictions are made regarding "hot" retrovirology research trends for the coming year based on recent journal access statistics. Changes in Retrovirology editor and the frequency of the Retrovirology Prize are announced.

  14. Langley test highlights, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Significant aircraft tests which were performed are highlighted. The broad range of the research and technology activities. The conributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  15. Highlights from Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oddone, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    DISCUSSION by CHAIRMAN: P.J. ODDONE, Scientific Secretaries: W. Fisher, A. Holzner Note from Publisher: The Slides of the Lecture: "Highlights from Fermilab" can be found at http://www.ccsem.infn.it/issp2007/

  16. Imaging-Genetics in Dyslexia: Connecting risk genetic variants to brain neuroimaging and ultimately to reading impairments

    PubMed Central

    Eicher, John D.; Gruen, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Dyslexia is a common pediatric disorder that affects 5-17% of schoolchildren in the United States. It is marked by unexpected difficulties in fluent reading despite adequate intelligence, opportunity, and instruction. Classically, neuropsychologists have studied dyslexia using a variety of neurocognitive batteries to gain insight into the specific deficits and impairments in affected children. Since dyslexia is a complex genetic trait with high heritability, analyses conditioned on performance on these neurocognitive batteries have been used to try to identify associated genes. This has led to some successes in identifying contributing genes, although much of the heritability remains unexplained. Additionally, the lack of relevant human brain tissue for analysis and the challenges of modeling a uniquely human trait in animals are barriers to advancing our knowledge of the underlying pathophysiology. In vivo imaging technologies, however, present new opportunities to examine dyslexia and reading skills in a clearly relevant context in human subjects. Recent investigations have started to integrate these imaging data with genetic data in attempts to gain a more complete and complex understanding of reading processes. In addition to bridging the gap from genetic risk variant to a discernible neuroimaging phenotype and ultimately to the clinical impairments in reading performance, the use of neuroimaging phenotypes will reveal novel risk genes and variants. In this article, we briefly discuss the genetic and imaging investigations and take an in-depth look at the recent imaging-genetics investigations of dyslexia. PMID:23916419

  17. Possible modification of Alzheimer's disease by statins in midlife: interactions with genetic and non-genetic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Mitsuru; Sato, Naoyuki; Shimamura, Munehisa; Kurinami, Hitomi; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Chatterjee, Amarnath; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of statins, commonly prescribed for hypercholesterolemia, in treating Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not yet been fully established. A recent randomized clinical trial did not show any therapeutic effects of two statins on cognitive function in AD. Interestingly, however, the results of the Rotterdam study, one of the largest prospective cohort studies, showed reduced risk of AD in statin users. Based on the current understanding of statin actions and AD pathogenesis, it is still worth exploring whether statins can prevent AD when administered decades before the onset of AD or from midlife. This review discusses the possible beneficial effects of statins, drawn from previous clinical observations, pathogenic mechanisms, which include β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau metabolism, genetic and non-genetic risk factors (apolipoprotein E, cholesterol, sex, hypertension, and diabetes), and other clinical features (vascular dysfunction and oxidative and inflammatory stress) of AD. These findings suggest that administration of statins in midlife might prevent AD in late life by modifying genetic and non-genetic risk factors for AD. It should be clarified whether statins inhibit Aβ accumulation, tau pathological features, and brain atrophy in humans. To answer this question, a randomized controlled study using amyloid positron emission tomography (PET), tau-PET, and magnetic resonance imaging would be useful. This clinical evaluation could help us to overcome this devastating disease.

  18. Career and Technical Education Reforms and Comprehensive School Reforms in High Schools: Their Impact on Education Outcomes for At-Risk Youth. The Highlight Zone: Research @ Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellano, Marisa; Stringfield, Samuel; Stone, James R., III

    The impact of career and technical education (CTE) reforms and comprehensive school reforms in high schools on education outcomes for at-risk youth was examined in a review of research on current reforms. The review identified a series of individual, family and home, school, and community factors that can place students at risk of failing to…

  19. Genetic risk for obesity predicts nucleus accumbens size and responsivity to real-world food cues.

    PubMed

    Rapuano, Kristina M; Zieselman, Amanda L; Kelley, William M; Sargent, James D; Heatherton, Todd F; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane

    2017-01-03

    Obesity is a major public health concern that involves an interaction between genetic susceptibility and exposure to environmental cues (e.g., food marketing); however, the mechanisms that link these factors and contribute to unhealthy eating are unclear. Using a well-known obesity risk polymorphism (FTO rs9939609) in a sample of 78 children (ages 9-12 y), we observed that children at risk for obesity exhibited stronger responses to food commercials in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) than children not at risk. Similarly, children at a higher genetic risk for obesity demonstrated larger NAcc volumes. Although a recessive model of this polymorphism best predicted body mass and adiposity, a dominant model was most predictive of NAcc size and responsivity to food cues. These findings suggest that children genetically at risk for obesity are predisposed to represent reward signals more strongly, which, in turn, may contribute to unhealthy eating behaviors later in life.

  20. Genetic risk for obesity predicts nucleus accumbens size and responsivity to real-world food cues

    PubMed Central

    Rapuano, Kristina M.; Zieselman, Amanda L.; Kelley, William M.; Sargent, James D.; Heatherton, Todd F.

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern that involves an interaction between genetic susceptibility and exposure to environmental cues (e.g., food marketing); however, the mechanisms that link these factors and contribute to unhealthy eating are unclear. Using a well-known obesity risk polymorphism (FTO rs9939609) in a sample of 78 children (ages 9–12 y), we observed that children at risk for obesity exhibited stronger responses to food commercials in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) than children not at risk. Similarly, children at a higher genetic risk for obesity demonstrated larger NAcc volumes. Although a recessive model of this polymorphism best predicted body mass and adiposity, a dominant model was most predictive of NAcc size and responsivity to food cues. These findings suggest that children genetically at risk for obesity are predisposed to represent reward signals more strongly, which, in turn, may contribute to unhealthy eating behaviors later in life. PMID:27994159

  1. Subjects At-Risk for Genetic Diseases in Portugal: Illness Representations.

    PubMed

    Leite, Ângela; Dinis, Maria Alzira P; Sequeiros, Jorge; Paúl, Constança

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates illness representations of subjects at-risk for 3 autosomal dominant late-onset disorders: Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (FAP) TTR V30M, Huntington's disease (HD) and Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), comparing them with the illness representations of subjects at-risk for Hemochromatosis (HH). The present study included a clinical group that consisted of 213 subjects at genetic risk (FAP, HD and MJD), comprising 174 subjects at-risk for FAP, 34 subjects at-risk for HD and only 5 subjects at-risk for MJD; and the control group consisting of 31 subjects at genetic risk for HH. All subjects at-risk were undergoing the process of genetic counseling to learn their genetic status (carrier or non-carrier). Subjects were assessed through a semi-structured single interview, in order to obtain sociodemographic data and the answer to an open-ended question relating to the illness representation issue: "What does this illness mean to you?/ What is this disease to you?" It was in the subjects' metaphors that subjects best expressed what they felt regarding the disease and the situation of being at-risk for this disease. Family is their mirror and their source of learning and, therefore, it is inevitable that family is related to the meaning of the disease itself.

  2. Genetic risk signatures of opioid-induced respiratory depression following pediatric tonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Biesiada, Jacek; Chidambaran, Vidya; Wagner, Michael; Zhang, Xue; Martin, Lisa J; Meller, Jaroslaw; Sadhasivam, Senthilkumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory depression is a clinically and economically important but preventable complication of opioids. Genetic factors can help identify patients with high risk for respiratory depression. Methods In this prospective genotype blinded clinical study, we evaluated the effect of a panel of variants in candidate genes on opioid-related respiratory depression in 347 children following tonsillectomy. Results Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering and a combination of candidate genotypes and clinical variables, we identified several distinct clusters of patients at high risk (36–38%) and low risk (10–17%) of respiratory depression; the relative risk of respiratory depression for high versus low risk clusters was 2.1–3.8 (p = 0.003). Conclusion Genetic risk predictions (genetic signatures) along with clinical risk factors effectively identify children at higher and lower risks of opioid-induced respiratory depression. Genetic signatures of respiratory depression offer strategies for improved clinical decision support to guide clinicians to balance the risks of opioid adverse effects with analgesia. PMID:25493568

  3. Plant Oils and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors: The Role of Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Caren E.

    2012-01-01

    More than 25 years have passed since Ancel Keys and others observed that high intake of monounsaturated fatty acids, especially as supplied by plants (eg, olive oil) was associated with lower cardiovascular and overall mortality. About 15 years later, advances in genotyping technologies began to facilitate widespread study of relationships between dietary fats and genetic variants, illuminating the role of genetic variation in modulating human responses to fatty acids. More recently, microarray technologies evaluate the ways in which minor, bioactive compounds in plant oils (including olive, thyme, lemongrass, clove, eucalyptus, and others) alter gene expression to mediate anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Results from a range of diverse technologies and approaches are coalescing to improve understanding of the role of the genome in shaping our responses to plant oils, and to clarify the genetic mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective benefits we derive from a wide range of plant oil constituents. PMID:23001455

  4. Genetic Polymorphisms in Estrogen Metabolic Pathway Associated with Risks of Alzheimer's Disease: Evidence from a Southern Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lu Hua; Fan, Yan Hui; Kao, Patrick Yu Ping; Ho, Deborah Tip Yin; Ha, Joyce Cheuk Tung; Chu, Leung Wing; Song, You-Qiang

    2017-02-01

    To investigate whether genetic variations on the estrogen metabolic pathway would be associated with risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cross-sectional study. Individuals were recruited at the Memory Clinic, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong. Chinese individuals with (n = 426) and without (n = 350) AD. All subjects underwent a standardized cognitive assessment and genotyping of four candidate genes on the estrogen metabolic pathway (estrogen receptor α gene (ESR1), estrogen receptor β gene (ESR2), cytochrome P450 19A1 gene (CYP19A1), cytochrome P450 11A1 gene (CYP11A1)). Apart from consistent results showing an association between apolipoprotein (APO)E and AD, strong evidence of disease associations were found for polymorphisms in ESR2 and CYP11A1 based on the entire data set. For ESR2, significant protective effects were found for A alleles of rs4986938 (permuted P = .02) and rs867443 (permuted P = .02). For CYP11A1, significant risk effects were found for G alleles of rs11638442 (permuted P = .03) and rs11632698 (permuted P = .03). Stratifying subjects according to APOE ε4 status, their genetic effects continued to be significant in the APOE ε4-negative subgroup. Associations between CYP11A1 polymorphisms (rs2279357, rs2073475) and risk of AD were detected in women but not men. Further gene-level analysis confirmed the above association between ESR2 and CYP11A1, and pathway-level analysis highlighted the genetic effect of the estrogen metabolic pathway on disease susceptibility (permuted pathway-level P = .03). Consistent with previous biological findings for sex steroid hormones in the central nervous system, genetic alterations on the estrogen metabolic pathway were revealed in the Chinese population. Confirmation of these present findings in an independent population is warranted to elucidate disease pathogenesis and to explore the potential of hormone therapy in the treatment of AD. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American

  5. Genetic and ethnic risk factors associated with drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Ye, Young-Min; Palikhe, Nami Shrestha; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Park, Hae-Sim

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the recent findings of studies reporting on the genetic and ethnic factors associated with hypersensitivity reactions to common drugs such as acetyl salicylic acid/NSAIDs, antibiotics, antituberculus medications, and other drugs including carbamazepine (CBZ), abacarvir, and allopurinol that can cause severe hypersensitivity reactions. Aspirin hypersensitivity has recently been associated with a variety of genetic polymorphisms associated with leukotriene overproduction, eosinophil infiltration, and histamine-related genes. Recently, beta-lactam antibiotic hypersensitivity has been reported to be associated with interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 receptors in Italian, Chinese, and French populations. Moreover, a significant association of CYP2E1 in the Chinese, NAT2 in Koreans and glutathione S-transferase genotypes in Caucasians has been reported with antituberculus drug-induced hepatitis. The association of the HLA-B*1502 allele with CBZ-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome in Asian population has also recently been observed. Aspirin hypersensitivity has been associated with various genetic polymorphisms. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-related markers and a variety of genetic polymorphisms of leukotriene-related genes, eosinophil-related genes, and genes associated with immune function have been described according to ethnicity. The genetic mechanisms of antibiotic hypersensitivity have been reported in Italian, French, and Chinese populations in addition to antibiotics-induced cutaneous reactions in the Korean population. Most prior genetic studies on antituberculus drug-induced hepatitis have focused on a few drug-metabolizing enzymes such as cytochrome P450 and N-acetyltransferase 2. HLA-related markers associated with CBZ, lamotrigine, and abacavir-induced severe hypersensitivity reactions have been described.

  6. What is the Contribution of Genetics to Periodontal Risk?

    PubMed

    Loos, Bruno G; Papantonopoulos, Georgios; Jepsen, Søren; Laine, Marja L

    2015-10-01

    This review addresses the multicausal etiology of periodontitis, in which genetic factors play a role. The various proposed causes for periodontitis always work simultaneously, but the relative contribution of each of these varies from case to case. We are still at an early stage to identify the genes involved, in comparison with other chronic diseases. To date, the genetic variations firmly and repeatedly associated with periodontitis in some populations are found within the following genes: ANRIL, COX2, IL1, IL10, DEFB1, whereas many other proposed periodontitis candidate genes have not been firmly proven or replicated.

  7. A common genetic risk factor for colorectal and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haiman, Christopher A; Le Marchand, Loïc; Yamamato, Jennifer; Stram, Daniel O; Sheng, Xin; Kolonel, Laurence N; Wu, Anna H; Reich, David; Henderson, Brian E

    2008-01-01

    Variants on chromosome 8q24 contribute risk for prostate cancer; here, we tested whether they also modulate risk for colorectal cancer. We studied 1,807 affected individuals and 5,511 controls and found that one variant, rs6983267, is also significantly associated with colorectal cancer (odds ratio = 1.22; P = 4.4 × 10−6) and that the apportionment of risk among the variants differs significantly between the two cancers. Comprehensive testing in the region uncovered variants capturing significant additional risk. Our results show that variants at 8q24 have different effects on cancer development that depend on the tissue type. PMID:17618282

  8. Incorporating ethnicity into genetic risk assessment for Alzheimer disease: the REVEAL study experience.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Kurt D; Roberts, J Scott; Royal, Charmaine D M; Fasaye, Grace-Ann; Obisesan, Thomas; Cupples, L Adrienne; Whitehouse, Peter J; Butson, Melissa Barber; Linnenbringer, Erin; Relkin, Norman R; Farrer, Lindsay; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Green, Robert C

    2008-03-01

    To describe how investigators in a multisite randomized clinical trial addressed scientific and ethical issues involved in creating risk models based on genetic testing for African American participants. The following informed our decision whether to stratify risk assessment by ethnicity: evaluation of epidemiological data, appraisal of benefits and risks of incorporating ethnicity into calculations, and feasibility of creating ethnicity-specific risk curves. Once the decision was made, risk curves were created based on data from a large, diverse study of first-degree relatives of patients with Alzheimer disease. Review of epidemiological data suggested notable differences in risk between African Americans and whites and that Apolipoprotein E genotype predicts risk in both groups. Discussions about the benefits and risks of stratified risk assessments reached consensus that estimates based on data from whites should not preclude enrolling African Americans, but population-specific risk curves should be created if feasible. Risk models specific to ethnicity, gender, and Apolipoprotein E genotype were subsequently developed for the randomized clinical trial that oversampled African Americans. The Risk Evaluation and Education for Alzheimer Disease study provides an instructive example of a process to develop risk assessment protocols that are sensitive to the implications of genetic testing for multiple ethnic groups with differing levels of risk.

  9. Incorporating ethnicity into genetic risk assessment for Alzheimer disease: the REVEAL study experience

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Kurt D.; Roberts, J. Scott; Royal, Charmaine D. M.; Fasaye, Grace-Ann; Obisesan, Thomas; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Whitehouse, Peter J.; Butson, Melissa Barber; Linnenbringer, Erin; Relkin, Norman R.; Farrer, Lindsay; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Green, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To describe how investigators in a multisite randomized clinical trial addressed scientific and ethical issues involved in creating risk models based on genetic testing for African American participants. Methods The following informed our decision whether to stratify risk assessment by ethnicity: evaluation of epidemiological data, appraisal of benefits and risks of incorporating ethnicity into calculations, and feasibility of creating ethnicity-specific risk curves. Once the decision was made, risk curves were created based on data from a large, diverse study of first-degree relatives of patients with Alzheimer disease. Results Review of epidemiological data suggested notable differences in risk between African Americans and whites and that Apolipoprotein E genotype predicts risk in both groups. Discussions about the benefits and risks of stratified risk assessments reached consensus that estimates based on data from whites should not preclude enrolling African Americans, but population-specific risk curves should be created if feasible. Risk models specific to ethnicity, gender, and Apolipoprotein E genotype were subsequently developed for the randomized clinical trial that oversampled African Americans. Conclusion The Risk Evaluation and Education for Alzheimer Disease study provides an instructive example of a process to develop risk assessment protocols that are sensitive to the implications of genetic testing for multiple ethnic groups with differing levels of risk. PMID:18344711

  10. Genetics of ischemic stroke, stroke-related risk factors, stroke precursors and treatments.

    PubMed

    Della-Morte, David; Guadagni, Fiorella; Palmirotta, Raffaele; Testa, Gianluca; Caso, Valeria; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Abete, Pasquale; Rengo, Franco; Ferroni, Patrizia; Sacco, Ralph L; Rundek, Tatjana

    2012-04-01

    Stroke remains a leading cause of death worldwide and the first cause of disability in the western world. Ischemic stroke (IS) accounts for almost 80% of the total cases of strokes and is a complex and multifactorial disease caused by the combination of vascular risk factors, environment and genetic factors. Investigations of the genetics of atherosclerosis and IS has greatly enhanced our knowledge of this complex multifactorial disease. In this article we sought to review common single-gene disorders relevant to IS, summarize candidate gene and genome-wide studies aimed at discovering genetic stroke risk factors and subclinical phenotypes, and to briefly discuss pharmacogenetics related to stroke treatments. Genetics of IS is, in fact, one of the most promising research frontiers and genetic testing may be helpful for novel drug discoveries as well as for appropriate drug and dose selection for treatment of patients with cerebrovascular disease.

  11. Genome-wide approaches for identifying genetic risk factors for osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis, the most common type of bone disease worldwide, is clinically characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and increased susceptibility to fracture. Multiple genetic and environmental factors and gene-environment interactions have been implicated in its pathogenesis. Osteoporosis has strong genetic determination, with the heritability of BMD estimated to be as high as 60%. More than 80 genes or genetic variants have been implicated in risk of osteoporosis by hypothesis-free genome-wide studies. However, these genes or genetic variants can only explain a small portion of BMD variation, suggesting that many other genes or genetic variants underlying osteoporosis risk await discovery. Here, we review recent progress in genome-wide studies of osteoporosis and discuss their implications for medicine and the major challenges in the field. PMID:23731620

  12. Interest and Beliefs About BRCA Genetic Counseling Among At-Risk Latinas in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Sussner, Katarina M.; Jandorf, Lina; Thompson, Hayley S.; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Latinas are less likely to use genetic services (counseling and testing) for hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer risk compared to other ethnic groups. Meanwhile, little is known about barriers to genetic counseling among Latinas at increased risk of inherited breast cancer. Methods A two-phase pilot study was conducted to examine interest, barriers and beliefs about BRCA genetic counseling among at-risk Latinas in New York City and explore the potential for developing a culturally-tailored narrative educational tool for use in future studies. Phase 1 included quantitative telephone interviews (N=15) with bilingual participants with a personal diagnosis at a young age and/or family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Quantitative results informed development of a narrative prototype educational presentation viewed by a subset of participants (N=10) in Phase 2 focus groups. Results Despite barriers, including lack of awareness/knowledge, concerns related to learning cancer risks of family members, and concerns about cost/health insurance, participants reported positive attitudes, beliefs and interest in learning about BRCA genetic counseling. Further, significant increases in knowledge were demonstrated from pre-post presentation (p=0.04). Conclusion There is an unmet need to educate at-risk Latinas about BRCA genetic counseling. Culturally-tailored educational materials including narratives may increase knowledge about BRCA genetic counseling among this underserved group. The effectiveness of these approaches should be tested in future research with larger samples. PMID:20151317

  13. Risk stratification in multiple myeloma, part 2: the significance of genetic risk factors in the era of currently available therapies.

    PubMed

    Biran, Noa; Jagannath, Sundar; Chari, Ajai

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a heterogeneous disease, and a variety of risk factors at the time of initial diagnosis can be used to stratify patients. In the first part of this 2-part series, we reviewed the currently identified prognostic factors, characterized by disease burden, host factors, tumor biology, and depth of response to therapy. However, these risk factors cannot be interpreted independently of therapies. Novel therapies have the potential to worsen or improve outcomes compared with conventional therapy in high-risk patients, or actually overcome the high-risk status, thereby resulting in reclassification as standard risk. For example, thalidomide (Thalomid, Celgene) is associated with worse outcomes in patients with high-risk cytogenetic abnormalities, such as deletion of chromosomes 13 and 17p, whereas proteasome inhibitors appear to overcome t(4;14). The second part of this series reviews the significance of various genetic risks in the era of novel therapies for MM.

  14. Genome-based, mechanism-driven computational modeling of risks of ionizing radiation: The next frontier in genetic risk estimation?

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, K; Nikjoo, H

    2015-01-01

    Research activity in the field of estimation of genetic risks of ionizing radiation to human populations started in the late 1940s and now appears to be passing through a plateau phase. This paper provides a background to the concepts, findings and methods of risk estimation that guided the field through the period of its growth to the beginning of the 21st century. It draws attention to several key facts: (a) thus far, genetic risk estimates have been made indirectly using mutation data collected in mouse radiation studies; (b) important uncertainties and unsolved problems remain, one notable example being that we still do not know the sensitivity of human female germ cells to radiation-induced mutations; and (c) the concept that dominated the field thus far, namely, that radiation exposures to germ cells can result in single gene diseases in the descendants of those exposed has been replaced by the concept that radiation exposure can cause DNA deletions, often involving more than one gene. Genetic risk estimation now encompasses work devoted to studies on DNA deletions induced in human germ cells, their expected frequencies, and phenotypes and associated clinical consequences in the progeny. We argue that the time is ripe to embark on a human genome-based, mechanism-driven, computational modeling of genetic risks of ionizing radiation, and we present a provisional framework for catalyzing research in the field in the 21st century.

  15. Genetic risks and healthy choices: creating citizen-consumers of genetic services through empowerment and facilitation.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Alison

    2010-03-01

    Genetic testing to identify susceptibility to a variety of common complex diseases is increasingly becoming available. In this article, focusing on the development of genetic susceptibility testing for diet-related disease, I examine the emergence of direct-to-the-consumer genetic testing services and the (re)configuration of healthcare provision, both within and outside the specialist genetics service, in the UK. I identify two key techniques within these practices: empowerment and facilitation. Using Foucauldian social theory, I show that empowerment and facilitation are being positioned as tools for the creation of citizen-consumers who will make appropriate dietary choices, based on the results of their genetic analysis. Through these techniques, individuals are transformed into properly entrepreneurial citizens who will, through judicious choices, act to maximise their 'vital capital' (their health) and the capital of the social body. I argue that the user of these services is not purely an economic figure, making rational choices as a consumer, but that her configuration as a citizen-consumer who avails herself of genetic information and services in a proper manner ensures that she is fit to contribute to the economic life of our present.

  16. Barriers and Facilitators to BRCA Genetic Counseling Among At-Risk Latinas in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Sussner, Katarina M.; Jandorf, Lina; Thompson, Hayley S.; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Despite underuse of genetic services for hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer risk among Latinas (including counseling and testing for BRCA mutations), there is little known about the barriers and facilitators to BRCA genetic counseling among this group. It is imperative to first understand factors that may impede Latinas seeking BRCA genetic counseling, as it is considered a prerequisite to testing. Methods Quantitative telephone interviews (N=120) were conducted with at-risk Latinas in New York City to investigate interest, barriers and beliefs about BRCA genetic counseling. Statistical analyses examined predictors of intention to undergo BRCA genetic counseling. Results Despite moderate levels of awareness, Latinas held largely positive beliefs, attitudes and knowledge about BRCA genetic counseling. Perceived barriers included logistic concerns (e.g., where to go, cost/health insurance coverage), emotional concerns (e.g., fear, distress) and competing life concerns (e.g, too many other things to worry about, too busy taking care of children or family members). Multivariate results showed that the strongest predictor of intention to undergo BRCA genetic counseling was competing life concerns; Latinas with more competing life concerns were less likely to intend to undergo BRCA genetic counseling (p=0.0002). Other significant predictors of intention included perceived risk of carrying a BRCA mutation (p=0.01) and referral by their physician (p=0.02). Conclusion Educational efforts to promote BRCA genetic counseling among at-risk Latinas and increase referrals by their physicians should incorporate discussion of perceived barriers to counseling, such as competing life concerns that Latinas may need to overcome in order to seek genetic counseling. PMID:22987526

  17. Risk for Patient Harm in Canadian Genetic Counseling Practice: It's Time to Consider Regulation.

    PubMed

    Shugar, Andrea L; Quercia, Nada; Trevors, Christopher; Rabideau, Marina M; Ahmed, Sohnee

    2017-02-01

    With the increasing awareness of genetic contributions to disease in Canada, the availability of and demand for genetic testing has soared. Genetic counseling is becoming a recognized and rapidly growing (yet unregulated) health profession in Canada. We hypothesized that the potential risk for harm to the public posed by genetic counseling practice in the province of Ontario is sufficient to consider regulation. The Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHTLC) sets criteria (both primary and secondary) to identify health professional bodies that meet the threshold for regulation in the province. We developed a survey based on the MOHTLC criteria to determine if genetic counselors meet the primary criteria to be considered for health professions regulation in Ontario. We surveyed 120 Ontario genetic counselors about their clinical practice and perceptions of risk for harm to the public. Results indicate that Ontario genetic counselors are highly independent in their clinical practice and are involved in patient care activities, clinical judgement and decision-making that have the potential to harm patients. In particular, cancer genetic counselors were identified as a cohort that practices with relatively high autonomy and low supervision. In summary, our study indicates that genetic counseling practice in Ontario meets the primary criteria to be considered for regulation.

  18. The potential of large studies for building genetic risk prediction models

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have developed a new paradigm to assess hereditary risk prediction in common diseases, such as prostate cancer. This genetic risk prediction concept is based on polygenic analysis—the study of a group of common DNA sequences, known as singl

  19. Common genetic loci influencing plasma homocysteine concentrations and their effect on risk of coronary artery disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The strong observational association between total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the null associations in the homocysteine-lowering trials have prompted the need to identify genetic variants associated with homocysteine concentrations and risk of CA...

  20. NASA Langley Highlights, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Langley's mission is accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government Agencies, industry, other NASA Centers, the educational community, and the local community. This report contains highlights of some of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year. The highlights illustrate the broad range of research and technology activities carried out by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States' leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  1. A systematic review of perceived risks, psychological and behavioral impacts of genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Heshka, Jodi T; Palleschi, Crystal; Howley, Heather; Wilson, Brenda; Wells, Philip S

    2008-01-01

    Genetic testing may enable early disease detection, targeted surveillance, and result in effective prevention strategies. Knowledge of genetic risk may also enable behavioral change. However, the impact of carrier status from the psychological, behavior, and perceived risk perspectives is not well understood. We conducted a systematic review to summarize the available literature on these elements. An extensive literature review was performed to identify studies that measured the perceived risk, psychological, and/or behavioral impacts of genetic testing on individuals. The search was not limited to specific diseases but excluded the impacts of testing for single gene disorders. A total of 35 articles and 30 studies were included. The studies evaluated hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, and Alzheimer disease. For affective outcomes, the majority of the studies reported negative effects on carriers but these were short-lived. For behavioral outcomes, an increase in screening behavior of varying rates was demonstrated in carriers but the change in behaviors was less than expected. With respect to perceived risk, there were generally no differences between carriers and noncarriers by 12 months after genetic testing and over time risk perception decreased. Overall, predispositional genetic testing has no significant impact on psychological outcomes, little effect on behavior, and did not change perceived risk. It seems as though better patient education strategies are required. Our data would suggest better knowledge among carriers would not have significant psychological impacts and therefore, it is worth pursuing improved educational strategies.

  2. A comprehensive genetic approach for improving prediction of skin cancer risk in humans.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Ana I; de los Campos, Gustavo; Klimentidis, Yann C; Rosa, Guilherme J M; Gianola, Daniel; Yi, Nengjun; Allison, David B

    2012-12-01

    Prediction of genetic risk for disease is needed for preventive and personalized medicine. Genome-wide association studies have found unprecedented numbers of variants associated with complex human traits and diseases. However, these variants explain only a small proportion of genetic risk. Mounting evidence suggests that many traits, relevant to public health, are affected by large numbers of small-effect genes and that prediction of genetic risk to those traits and diseases could be improved by incorporating large numbers of markers into whole-genome prediction (WGP) models. We developed a WGP model incorporating thousands of markers for prediction of skin cancer risk in humans. We also considered other ways of incorporating genetic information into prediction models, such as family history or ancestry (using principal components, PCs, of informative markers). Prediction accuracy was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) estimated in a cross-validation. Incorporation of genetic information (i.e., familial relationships, PCs, or WGP) yielded a significant increase in prediction accuracy: from an AUC of 0.53 for a baseline model that accounted for nongenetic covariates to AUCs of 0.58 (pedigree), 0.62 (PCs), and 0.64 (WGP). In summary, prediction of skin cancer risk could be improved by considering genetic information and using a large number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a WGP model, which allows for the detection of patterns of genetic risk that are above and beyond those that can be captured using family history. We discuss avenues for improving prediction accuracy and speculate on the possible use of WGP to prospectively identify individuals at high risk.

  3. Parental interest in a genetic risk assessment test for autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Narcisa, Vivien; Discenza, Marie; Vaccari, Erica; Rosen-Sheidley, Beth; Hardan, Antonio Y; Couchon, Elizabeth

    2013-02-01

    To better understand parental opinions regarding the diagnostic process and use of genetic testing to assess risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in the younger siblings of affected children in the Unites States, we conducted a survey of parents who had at least one child with ASD. A total of 162 surveys were completed anonymously using an Internet-based survey tool. The mean reported time to ASD diagnosis and age at diagnosis were 35.2 months and 56.6 months, respectively. Seventy-two percent of parents felt there was a delay in diagnosis. Most parents indicated they would want to pursue genetic testing if a test were available that could identify risk in a younger sibling (80%). Earlier evaluation/intervention, closer monitoring, and lessened anxiety were reasons cited for testing. Our survey indicates most parents would pursue genetic risk assessment testing in children at high risk for ASD.

  4. [Genetically modified foods. Advantages and human health risks].

    PubMed

    Filip, Lorena; Miere, Doina; Indrei, L L

    2004-01-01

    One of the most important issue with which the mankind is confronting now is related to the quantitatively as well as qualitatively assurance of the food supply necessary for human species existence. In this context, by means of genetic engineering, modified genetic organisms were obtained. In the first stage, plant crops with high productivity and resistant against diseases and pests were obtained. After that, food products having modified organoleptic properties and high nutrition values were produced. The main problem concerning the long-term consumption of these products is their toxicity, which until now was not confirmed or denied. For this reason, tests are necessary to be made in order to stipulate and prevent these effects.

  5. Designing clinical and genetic guidelines of colorectal cancer screening as an effective roadmap for risk management

    PubMed Central

    Zali, Mohammad Reza; Safdari, Reza; Maserat, Elham; Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to present clinical and genetic guidelines of colorectal cancer screening for risk assessment of populations at risk. Background: National guidelines can be used as a guide for choosing the method of screening for each individual. These guidelines facilitate decision making and support the delivery of cancer screening service. Methods: In the first step, a comparative study was performed by using secondary data extracted from the literature review. Three countries (Canada, Australia and United States) were selected from 25 countries that are member in the International Cancer Screening Network (ICSN). The second step of study was qualitative survey. The study was based on the grounded theory approach. Study tool was semi-structured interview. Interviewing involves asking questions and getting answers from participants. 22 expert’s perspectives about guidelines of colorectal cancer screening were surveyed. Results: Screening program of selected countries was compared. Countries were surveyed by number of risk groups and subgroups, criteria for risk assessment, beginning age, recommendations, screening approaches and intervals. Australia and United States have three risk groups and Canada has two risk groups. Four risk groups were defined in the national guideline, including high risk, increased risk, average and low risk group. The high risk group comprises of 8 subgroups, increased risk group comprises of 3 subgroups and average risk group contain 4 subgroups. Approved clinical criteria for hereditary syndromes and the roadmap of genetic and pathologic survey were designed. Conclusions: Guidelines and pathways have a vital role in the quality improvement of CRC screening program. National guidelines were refined according to the environmental and genetic criteria of colorectal cancer in Iran. These guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations by risk groups. National pathways as a risk assessment tool can evaluate and improve the processes and

  6. Collegiate Athletics Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Highlights 15 trends/events in black college athletics, including championship coaches, Black Coaches Association, eligibility issues, disclosure of athlete graduation rates, athletics resource allocation, early adoption of professional athlete status, success of the Women's National Basketball Association, lack of black access to certain sports,…

  7. E News: Report highlights

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    Three technologies are highlighted in this issue: a rooftop ice storage system for small commercial loads; chlorofluorocarbon-free electric chillers and their expected market; and the FlashBake oven, a commercial-sized oven that uses high intensity quartz lamps to cook food quickly. Regular columns on Member News and Work in Progress are included.

  8. NASA highlights, 1986 - 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Highlights of NASA research from 1986 to 1988 are discussed. Topics covered include Space Shuttle flights, understanding the Universe and its origins, understanding the Earth and its environment, air and space transportation, using space to make America more competitive, using space technology an Earth, strengthening America's education in science and technology, the space station, and human exploration of the solar system.

  9. Highlights of 1976 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.

    1976-01-01

    Highlights of NASA's 1976 activities are summarized. Sixteen successful launches were made. Two landings of Viking spacecraft on Mars and rollout of the space shuttle orbiter are reviewed. Applications of aerospace science to education, health care, and community services are also discussed.

  10. Highlights of 1981 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The highlights of NASA's 1981 activities are presented, including the results of the two flights of the space shuttle Columbia and the Voyager 2 encounter with Saturn. Accomplishments in the areas of space transportation operations; space science; aeronautical, energy, and space research and development; as well as space tracking, international activities, and 1981 launch activities are discussed.

  11. Highlighting our Tiniest Neighbors

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-08

    This image shows our own back yard, astronomically speaking, from a vantage point about 30 light-years away from the sun. It highlights the population of tiny brown dwarfs recently discovered by NASA WISE. The image simulates actual positions of stars.

  12. Prostate cancer screening using risk stratification based on a multi-state model of genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Auvinen, Anssi; Schleutker, Johanna; Wu, Yi-Ying; Fann, Jean Ching-Yuan; Tammela, Teuvo; Chen, Sam Li-Sheng; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi

    2015-06-01

    Risk-stratified screening for prostate cancer (PCa) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing incorporating genetic variants has received some attention but has been scarcely investigated. We developed a model to stratify the Finnish population by different risk profiles related to genetic variants to optimize the screening policy. Data from the Finnish randomized controlled trial on screening for PCa with PSA testing were used to estimate a six-state Markov model of disease progression. Blood samples from Finnish men were used to assess the risk of PCa related to three genetic variants (rs4242382, rs138213197, and rs200331695). A risk score-based approach combined with a series of computer simulation models was applied to optimize individual screening policies. The 10-year risk of having progressive prostate cancer detected ranged from 43% in the top 5% risk group to approximately 11% in the bottom half of the population. Using the median group, with screening every four years beginning at 55 years-old, as the reference group, the recommended age beginning screening was approximately 47 years-old for the top 5% risk group and 55 years-old for those in the lower 60% risk group. The recommended interscreening interval has been shortened for individuals in the high risk group. The increased availability of genomic information allows the proposed multistate model to be more discriminating with respect to risk stratification and the suggested screening policy, particularly for the lowest risk groups-. -- A multi-state genetic variant-based model was developed for further application to population risk stratification to optimize the interscreening interval and the age at which to begin screening for PSA. A small sub-group of the population is likely to benefit from more intensive screening with early start and short interval, while half of the population is unlikely to benefit from such protocol (compared with four-year interval after age 55 years). © 2015 Wiley

  13. 'Battling my biology': psychological effects of genetic testing for risk of weight gain.

    PubMed

    Meisel, S F; Wardle, J

    2014-04-01

    The availability of genetic tests for multifactorial conditions such as obesity raises concerns that higher-risk results could lead to fatalistic reactions or lower-risk results to complacency. No study has investigated the effects of genetic test feedback for the risk of obesity in non-clinical samples. The present study explored psychological and behavioral reactions to genetic test feedback for a weight related gene (FTO) in a volunteer sample (n = 18) using semi-structured interviews. Respondents perceived the gene test result as scientifically objective; removing some of the emotion attached to the issue of weight control. Those who were struggling with weight control reported relief of self-blame. There was no evidence for either complacency or fatalism; all respondents emphasized the importance of lifestyle choices in long-term weight management, although they recognized the role of both genes and environment. Regardless of the test result, respondents evaluated the testing positively and found it motivating and informative. Genetic test feedback for risk of weight gain may offer psychological benefits beyond its objectively limited clinical utility. As the role of genetic counselors is likely to expand, awareness of reasons for genetic testing for common, complex conditions and reactions to the test result is important.

  14. A genetic approach to stratification of risk for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zanke, Brent; Hawken, Steven; Carter, Ronald; Chow, David

    2010-02-01

    The genetic determinants of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are reviewed and a novel approach to risk determination based upon inherited genetic polymorphisms and smoking history is presented. Although AMD was long thought to have primarily an environmental etiology, genetic variation is now known to account for the majority of the disease risk, with variations in the genes of the complement pathways playing a prominent role. Independent and validated clinical studies have implicated the C3 gene and its regulator, complement factor H (1q31.1), complement component 2 (6q21.33), and complement factor B (6q21.33). Subtle variations in complement activity increase the risk of symptomatic macular inflammation with age. A second group of AMD-associated genetic markers may aggravate complement-mediated inflammation by permitting retinal oxidative damage. Variation within the chromosomal site (10q26) coding a mitochondrial-associated protein (age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2) and an independent variation within the mitochondrial genome itself (A4917G) suggest a contributing pathophysiological role of retinal oxidative stress. A genetic panel of disease-susceptibility markers and smoking history can identify a group of individuals with greater than 65% lifetime risk of AMD. The introduction of genetic marker testing into clinical practice may identify patients with early disease who may be aided by presymptomatic monitoring or inclusion into trials of newer prophylactic agents.

  15. Cumulative impact of common genetic variants and other risk factors on colorectal cancer risk in 42,103 individuals

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Tenesa, Albert; Farrington, Susan M.; Ballereau, Stephane; Brewster, David H.; Pharoah, Paul DP.; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen; Völzke, Henry; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann; von Holst, Susanna; Picelli, Simone; Lindblom, Annika; Jenkins, Mark A.; Hopper, John L.; Casey, Graham; Duggan, David; Newcomb, Polly; Abulí, Anna; Bessa, Xavier; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Niittymäki, Iina; Tuupanen, Sari; Karhu, Auli; Aaltonen, Lauri; Zanke, Brent W.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Gallinger, Steven; Barclay, Ella; Martin, Lynn; Gorman, Maggie; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Walther, Axel; Kerr, David; Lubbe, Steven; Broderick, Peter; Chandler, Ian; Pittman, Alan; Penegar, Steven; Campbell, Harry; Tomlinson, Ian; Houlston, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Colorectal cancer (CRC) has a substantial heritable component. Common genetic variation has been shown to contribute to CRC risk. In a large, multi-population study, we set out to assess the feasibility of CRC risk prediction using common genetic variant data, combined with other risk factors. We built a risk prediction model and applied it to the Scottish population using available data. Design Nine populations of European descent were studied to develop and validate colorectal cancer risk prediction models. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the combined effect of age, gender, family history (FH) and genotypes at 10 susceptibility loci that individually only modestly influence colorectal cancer risk. Risk models were generated from case-control data incorporating genotypes alone (n=39,266), and in combination with gender, age and family history (n=11,324). Model discriminatory performance was assessed using 10-fold internal cross-validation and externally using 4,187 independent samples. 10-year absolute risk was estimated by modelling genotype and FH with age- and gender-specific population risks. Results Median number of risk alleles was greater in cases than controls (10 vs 9, p<2.2×10−16), confirmed in external validation sets (Sweden p=1.2×10−6, Finland p=2×10−5). Mean per-allele increase in risk was 9% (OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.05–1.13). Discriminative performance was poor across the risk spectrum (area under curve (AUC) for genotypes alone - 0.57; AUC for genotype/age/gender/FH - 0.59). However, modelling genotype data, FH, age and gender with Scottish population data shows the practicalities of identifying a subgroup with >5% predicted 10-year absolute risk. Conclusion We show that genotype data provides additional information that complements age, gender and FH as risk factors. However, individualized genetic risk prediction is not currently feasible. Nonetheless, the modelling exercise suggests public health potential, since it

  16. Genetic variation in CYP2J2 and risk of coronary heart disease: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    CYP2J2 metabolizes arachidonic acid to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) which regulate endothelial function and serve as a reserve system to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3). We sought to determine if genetic variation in CYP2J2 was associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events...

  17. Breast Cancer Risk – From Genetics to Molecular Understanding of Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fasching, P. A.; Ekici, A. B.; Wachter, D. L.; Hein, A.; Bayer, C. M.; Häberle, L.; Loehberg, C. R.; Schneider, M.; Jud, S. M.; Heusinger, K.; Rübner, M.; Rauh, C.; Bani, M. R.; Lux, M. P.; Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Hartmann, A.; Beckmann, M. W.

    2013-01-01

    Several advancements over the last decade have triggered the developments in the field of breast cancer risk research. One of them is the availability of the human genome sequence along with cheap genotyping possibilities. Another is the globalization of research, which has led to the growth of research collaboration into large international consortia that facilitate the pooling of clinical and genotype data of hundreds of thousands of patients and healthy control individuals. This review concerns with the recent developments in breast cancer risk research and focuses on the discovery of new genetic breast cancer risk factors and their meaning in the context of established non-genetic risk factors. Finally the clinical application is highly dependent on the accuracy of breast cancer risk prediction models, not only for all breast cancer patients, but also for molecular subtypes, preferably for those which are associated with an unfavorable prognosis. Recently risk prediction incorporates all possible risk factors, which include epidemiological risk factors, mammographic density and genetic risk factors. PMID:24771903

  18. Genetic determinants of hair color and Parkinson's disease risk.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Simon, Kelly C; Han, Jiali; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Ascherio, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    A history of melanoma is associated with increased risks for Parkinson's disease (PD). We examined whether hair color, one of the most important phenotypes of pigmentation and a risk factor for melanoma, was associated with PD risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS; 1986-2002) and the Nurses' Health Study (NHS; 1980-2002). We included 38,641 men and 93,661 women who were free of PD at baseline. Information on natural hair color in early adulthood (age 18-21 years) was assessed via a questionnaire. We also conducted a case-control study (298 PD cases) nested in these two cohorts to examine the association between the melanocortin1-receptor Arg151Cys polymorphism and PD risk. Relative risks (RRs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models in the cohort analyses and conditional logistic regression in the nested case-control study. PD risk increased with decreasing darkness of hair color. Pooled RRs for PD were 1 (reference), 1.40, 1.61, and 1.93 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.4) for black, brown, blond, and red hair, respectively, after adjusting for age, smoking, ethnicity, and other covariates. The associations between hair color and PD were particularly strong for relative younger onset of PD (<70 yr) (adjusted RR for red vs black hair = 3.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-8.7). In the case-control study, participants with Cys/Cys genotype, which was associated with red hair, had a greater PD risk, relative to the Arg/Arg genotype (adjusted RR, 3.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-9.4). These findings suggest a potential role of pigmentation in PD.

  19. Heavy metal contamination of freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) and prawn feed in Bangladesh: A market-based study to highlight probable health risks.

    PubMed

    Rabiul Islam, G M; Habib, Mohammad Ruzlan; Waid, Jillian L; Rahman, M Safiur; Kabir, J; Akter, S; Jolly, Y N

    2017-03-01

    An assessment of the dietary risk of heavy metal exposure to humans is important since it is the main source of exposure. This study aimed to estimate the degree of contamination and assess the probable health risk in the prawn food chain. In prawn feed, the concentrations of metals were detected in the following order: Hg > Co > Pb > Cd. The concentrations of heavy metals in prawn were the highest for Co and lowest for Cd. Trace amounts of As and Cr were detected in the analyzed sample. Target hazard quotients for heavy metals for adults were >1 for Pb, Cd, Hg, and Co, and for children, the same were high for Co and Hg, indicating significant health risks upon dietary exposure. All the prawn samples contained nine-fold and fourteen-fold higher concentrations than the maximum acceptable levels for Pb and Hg, respectively (0.5 mg kg(-1); WHO/FAO). Human health risk due to the Co exposure is quite alarming as the level of exposure was found to be very high. In the prawn samples intended for human consumption, the hazard index (HI) was highest in the samples obtained from Bagerhat (3.25 in flesh and 3.26 in skin), followed by the samples obtained from Satkhira (2.84 in flesh and 3.10 in skin) and Dhaka City Corporation (2.81 in flesh and 3.42 in Skin); this indicates a potential risk of prawn consumption obtained from Southeast Bangladesh. This is particularly problematic as this area accounts for the majority of prawn production and export of the country. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Physical activity reduces hippocampal atrophy in elders at genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Carson; Nielson, Kristy A.; Woodard, John L.; Seidenberg, Michael; Durgerian, Sally; Hazlett, Kathleen E.; Figueroa, Christina M.; Kandah, Cassandra C.; Kay, Christina D.; Matthews, Monica A.; Rao, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the impact of physical activity (PA) on longitudinal change in hippocampal volume in cognitively intact older adults at varying genetic risk for the sporadic form of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hippocampal volume was measured from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans administered at baseline and at an 18-month follow-up in 97 healthy, cognitively intact older adults. Participants were classified as High or Low PA based on a self-report questionnaire of frequency and intensity of exercise. Risk status was defined by the presence or absence of the apolipoprotein E-epsilon 4 (APOE-ε4) allele. Four subgroups were studied: Low Risk/High PA (n = 24), Low Risk/Low PA (n = 34), High Risk/High PA (n = 22), and High Risk/Low PA (n = 17). Over the 18 month follow-up interval, hippocampal volume decreased by 3% in the High Risk/Low PA group, but remained stable in the three remaining groups. No main effects or interactions between genetic risk and PA were observed in control brain regions, including the caudate, amygdala, thalamus, pre-central gyrus, caudal middle frontal gyrus, cortical white matter (WM), and total gray matter (GM). These findings suggest that PA may help to preserve hippocampal volume in individuals at increased genetic risk for AD. The protective effects of PA on hippocampal atrophy were not observed in individuals at low risk for AD. These data suggest that individuals at genetic risk for AD should be targeted for increased levels of PA as a means of reducing atrophy in a brain region critical for the formation of episodic memories. PMID:24795624

  1. Genetic vulnerability to diabetes and obesity: does education offset the risk?

    PubMed

    Liu, S Y; Walter, S; Marden, J; Rehkopf, D H; Kubzansky, L D; Nguyen, T; Glymour, M M

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity has recently increased dramatically. These common diseases are likely to arise from the interaction of multiple genetic, socio-demographic and environmental risk factors. While previous research has found genetic risk and education to be strong predictors of these diseases, few studies to date have examined their joint effects. This study investigates whether education modifies the association between genetic background and risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity. Using data from non-Hispanic Whites in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS, n = 8398), we tested whether education modifies genetic risk for obesity and T2D, offsetting genetic effects; whether this effect is larger for individuals who have high risk for other (unobserved) reasons, i.e., at higher quantiles of HbA1c and BMI; and whether effects differ by gender. We measured T2D risk using Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level, and obesity risk using body-mass index (BMI). We constructed separate genetic risk scores (GRS) for obesity and diabetes respectively based on the most current available information on the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) confirmed as genome-wide significant predictors for BMI (29 SNPs) and diabetes risk (39 SNPs). Linear regression models with years of schooling indicate that the effect of genetic risk on HbA1c is smaller among people with more years of schooling and larger among those with less than a high school (HS) degree compared to HS degree-holders. Quantile regression models show that the GRS × education effect systematically increased along the HbA1c outcome distribution; for example the GRS × years of education interaction coefficient was -0.01 (95% CI = -0.03, 0.00) at the 10th percentile compared to -0.03 (95% CI = -0.07, 0.00) at the 90th percentile. These results suggest that education may be an important socioeconomic source of heterogeneity in responses to genetic vulnerability to T2D. Copyright

  2. POMC and TP53 genetic variability and risk of basal cell carcinoma of skin: Interaction between host and genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Rizzato, Cosmeri; Scherer, Dominique; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugen; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Hemminki, Kari; Canzian, Federico; Kumar, Rajiv; Campa, Daniele

    2011-07-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin is the most common neoplasm among the Caucasian population of the western world. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced p53 activation promotes cutaneous pigmentation by increasing transcriptional activity of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) in the skin. Induction of POMC/α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) activates the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), resulting in skin pigmentation. The tumor suppressor p53 is a key player in stress responses that preserve genomic stability, responding to a variety of insults including DNA damage, hypoxia, metabolic stress and oncogene activation. Malfunction of the p53 pathway is an almost universal hallmark of human tumors. Polymorphisms in the gene encoding p53 (TP53) alter its transcriptional activity, which in turn may influence the UV radiation-induced tanning response. The aim of the present work is to test association between POMC and TP53 genetic variability, the possible interplay with host factors and the risk of basal cell carcinoma of skin. We covered the variability of the two genes we used 17 tagging polymorphisms in 529 BCC cases and 532 healthy controls. We have also tested the possible interactions between the genetic variants and three known risk factors for BCC: skin complexion, sun effect and skin response to sun exposure. We did not observe any statistically significant association between SNPs in these two genes and BCC risk overall, nor interactions of SNPs with known BCC risk factors. However we found that, in the group of subjects with lower sun exposure, carriers of one copy of the C allele of the TP53 SNP rs12951053 had a decreased risk of BCC (OR=0.28, 95% CI 0.12-0.62, P=0.002). We have observed that the interplay of an environmental risk factor and one polymorphism in TP53 gene could modulate the risk of BCC. Copyright © 2011 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. NASA Langley Highlights, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Langley's mission is accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government Agencies, industry, other NASA Centers, the educational community, and the local community. This report contains highlights of some of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year. The highlights illustrate the broad range of research and technology activities carried out by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States' leadership in aeronautics and space research. A color electronic version of this report is available at URL http://larcpubs.larc.nasa.gov/randt/1998/.

  4. Modeling the cumulative genetic risk for multiple sclerosis from genome-wide association data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Joanne H; Pappas, Derek; De Jager, Philip L; Pelletier, Daniel; de Bakker, Paul Iw; Kappos, Ludwig; Polman, Chris H; Chibnik, Lori B; Hafler, David A; Matthews, Paul M; Hauser, Stephen L; Baranzini, Sergio E; Oksenberg, Jorge R

    2011-01-18

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common cause of chronic neurologic disability beginning in early to middle adult life. Results from recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have substantially lengthened the list of disease loci and provide convincing evidence supporting a multifactorial and polygenic model of inheritance. Nevertheless, the knowledge of MS genetics remains incomplete, with many risk alleles still to be revealed. We used a discovery GWAS dataset (8,844 samples, 2,124 cases and 6,720 controls) and a multi-step logistic regression protocol to identify novel genetic associations. The emerging genetic profile included 350 independent markers and was used to calculate and estimate the cumulative genetic risk in an independent validation dataset (3,606 samples). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was implemented to compare clinical characteristics of individuals with various degrees of genetic risk. Gene ontology and pathway enrichment analysis was done using the DAVID functional annotation tool, the GO Tree Machine, and the Pathway-Express profiling tool. In the discovery dataset, the median cumulative genetic risk (P-Hat) was 0.903 and 0.007 in the case and control groups, respectively, together with 79.9% classification sensitivity and 95.8% specificity. The identified profile shows a significant enrichment of genes involved in the immune response, cell adhesion, cell communication/signaling, nervous system development, and neuronal signaling, including ionotropic glutamate receptors, which have been implicated in the pathological mechanism driving neurodegeneration. In the validation dataset, the median cumulative genetic risk was 0.59 and 0.32 in the case and control groups, respectively, with classification sensitivity 62.3% and specificity 75.9%. No differences in disease progression or T2-lesion volumes were observed among four levels of predicted genetic risk groups (high, medium, low, misclassified). On the other hand, a significant

  5. Highlights from PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drees, Axel

    2016-12-01

    This talk presents highlights from the PHENIX experiment. These include results from the beam energy scan at √{sNN} = 7.7 to 200 GeV, yield and anisotropy of low pT direct photon emission in Au+Au, results on the e+e- pair continuum measured with the hadron blind detector (HBD), separation of charm and bottom energy loss using the PHENIX vertex tracker (VTX), and evidence for strongly coupled matter in small systems.

  6. Clinical highlights from Amsterdam

    PubMed Central

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Grgic, Aleksander; Antoniou, Katerina; Ställberg, Björn; Herth, Felix F.

    2016-01-01

    This article contains highlights and a selection of the scientific advances from the Clinical Assembly that were presented at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The most relevant topics for clinicians will be discussed, covering a wide range of areas including interventional pulmonology, rehabilitation and chronic care, thoracic imaging, diffuse and parenchymal lung diseases, and general practice and primary care. In this comprehensive review, exciting novel data will be discussed and put into perspective. PMID:27730202

  7. Clinical highlights from Amsterdam.

    PubMed

    Annema, Jouke T; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Grgic, Aleksander; Antoniou, Katerina; Ställberg, Björn; Herth, Felix F

    2016-07-01

    This article contains highlights and a selection of the scientific advances from the Clinical Assembly that were presented at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The most relevant topics for clinicians will be discussed, covering a wide range of areas including interventional pulmonology, rehabilitation and chronic care, thoracic imaging, diffuse and parenchymal lung diseases, and general practice and primary care. In this comprehensive review, exciting novel data will be discussed and put into perspective.

  8. Neighborhood deprivation affects children's mental health: environmental risks identified in a genetic design.

    PubMed

    Caspi, A; Taylor, A; Moffitt, T E; Plomin, R

    2000-07-01

    The possibility that neighborhood conditions affect children's development has captured much attention because of its implications for prevention. But does growing up in deprived neighborhoods matter above and beyond a genetic liability to behavior problems, if genetically vulnerable families tend to concentrate in poor neighborhoods? A nationwide study of 2-year-old twins shows that children in deprived neighborhoods were at increased risk for emotional and behavioral problems over and above any genetic liability. Environmental factors shared by members of a family accounted for 20% of the population variation in children's behavior problems, and neighborhood deprivation accounted for 5% of this family-wide environmental effect. The results suggest that the link between poor neighborhoods and children's mental health may be a true environmental effect, and demonstrate that genetic designs are environmentally informative and can be used to identify modifiable risk factors for promoting child health.

  9. Genetic risk for atrial fibrillation could motivate patient adherence to warfarin therapy: a cost effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Shiffman, Dov; Perez, Marco V; Bare, Lance A; Louie, Judy Z; Arellano, Andre R; Devlin, James J

    2015-09-29

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases risk of stroke, and although this stroke risk can be ameliorated by warfarin therapy, some patients decline to adhere to warfarin therapy. A prospective clinical study could be conducted to determine whether knowledge of genetic risk for AF could increase adherence to warfarin therapy for patients who initially declined therapy. As a prelude to a potential prospective clinical study, we investigated whether the use of genetic information to increase adherence could be cost effective. Markov model assessed costs and utilities of two care strategies for AF patients who declined warfarin therapy. In the usual care strategy patients received aspirin. In the test strategy genetic risk for AF was assessed (genotype of the 4q25 locus) and some patients with a positive genetic test (≥1 risk allele) were assumed to adhere to warfarin therapy. The remaining patients received aspirin. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was the ratio of the costs differential and the quality adjusted life-years (QALYs) differential for the two strategies. We found that the 4q25 genetic testing strategy, compared with the usual care strategy (aspirin therapy), would be cost-effective (ICER $ 47,148) if 2.1 % or more of the test positive patients were to adhere to warfarin therapy. The test strategy would become a cost saving strategy if 5.3 % or more of the test positive patients were to adhere to warfarin therapy. If 20 % of test positive patients were to adhere to warfarin therapy in a hypothetical cohort of 1000 patients, 7 stroke events would be prevented and 3 extra-cranial major bleeding events would be caused over 5 years, resulting in a cost savings of ~ $250,000 and a net gain of 9 QALYs. A clinical study to assess the impact of patient knowledge of genetic risk of AF on adherence to warfarin therapy would be merited because even a modest increase in patient adherence would make a genetic testing strategy cost

  10. Genetic risk profiling and gene signature modeling to predict risk of complications after IPAA.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Rishabh; Berg, Arthur; Polinski, Joseph I; Hegarty, John P; Lin, Zhenwu; McKenna, Kevin J; Stewart, David B; Poritz, Lisa S; Koltun, Walter A

    2012-03-01

    Severe pouchitis and Crohn's disease-like complications are 2 adverse postoperative complications that confound the success of the IPAA in patients with ulcerative colitis. To date, approximately 83 single nucleotide polymorphisms within 55 genes have been associated with IBD. The aim of this study was to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms that correlate with complications after IPAA that could be utilized in a gene signature fashion to predict postoperative complications and aid in preoperative surgical decision making. One hundred forty-two IPAA patients were retrospectively classified as "asymptomatic" (n = 104, defined as no Crohn's disease-like complications or severe pouchitis for at least 2 years after IPAA) and compared with a "severe pouchitis" group (n = 12, ≥ 4 episodes pouchitis per year for 2 years including the need for long-term therapy to maintain remission) and a "Crohn's disease-like" group (n = 26, presence of fistulae, pouch inlet stricture, proximal small-bowel disease, or pouch granulomata, occurring at least 6 months after surgery). Genotyping for 83 single-nucleotide polymorphisms previously associated with Crohn's disease and/or ulcerative colitis was performed on a customized Illumina genotyping platform. The top 2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms statistically identified as being independently associated with each of Crohn's disease-like and severe pouchitis were used in a multivariate logistic regression model. These single-nucleotide polymorphisms were then used to create probability equations to predict overall chance of a positive or negative outcome for that complication. The top 2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms for Crohn's disease-like complications were in the 10q21 locus and the gene for PTGER4 (p = 0.006 and 0.007), whereas for severe pouchitis it was NOD2 and TNFSF15 (p = 0.003 and 0.011). Probability equations suggested that the risk of these 2 complications greatly increased with increasing number of risk alleles

  11. Role of risk stratification and genetics in sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vikrant; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-03-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major public health issue due to its increasing incidence in the general population and the difficulty in identifying high-risk individuals. Nearly 300 000 - 350 000 patients in the United States and 4-5 million patients in the world die annually from SCD. Coronary artery disease and advanced heart failure are the main etiology for SCD. Ischemia of any cause precipitates lethal arrhythmias, and ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation are the most common lethal arrhythmias precipitating SCD. Pulseless electrical activity, bradyarrhythmia, and electromechanical dissociation also result in SCD. Most SCDs occur outside of the hospital setting, so it is difficult to estimate the public burden, which results in overestimating the incidence of SCD. The insufficiency and limited predictive value of various indicators and criteria for SCD result in the increasing incidence. As a result, there is a need to develop better risk stratification criteria and find modifiable variables to decrease the incidence. Primary and secondary prevention and treatment of SCD need further research. This critical review is focused on the etiology, risk factors, prognostic factors, and importance of risk stratification of SCD.

  12. Risk perceptions, worry, and attitudes about genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Linda D; Reeve, Jeanne

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the unique associations of risk perceptions and worry with attitudes about genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility. Women (general practitioner clinic attenders, university students, and first-degree relatives of breast cancer survivors; N = 303) read information about genetic testing and completed measures assessing perceived cancer risk, cancer worry, and genetic testing attitudes and beliefs. Worry was associated with greater interest in genetic testing, stronger beliefs that testing has detrimental emotional consequences, and positive beliefs about benefits of testing and risk-reducing surgeries. Perceived risk was unrelated to interest and associated with more skeptical beliefs about emotional consequences and benefits of testing and risk-reducing surgeries. At low worry levels, testing interest increased with more positive beliefs about testing benefits; at high worry levels, interest was high regardless of benefits beliefs. The findings support Leventhal's Common-Sense Model of self-regulation delineating interactive influences of risk-related cognitions and emotions on information processing and behavior.

  13. Genetic, nongenetic and epigenetic risk determinants in developmental programming of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vaag, Allan; Brøns, Charlotte; Gillberg, Linn; Hansen, Ninna S; Hjort, Line; Arora, Geeti P; Thomas, Nihal; Broholm, Christa; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Grunnet, Louise G

    2014-11-01

    Low birthweight (LBW) individuals and offspring of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) exhibit increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) and associated cardiometabolic traits in adulthood, which for both groups may be mediated by adverse events and developmental changes in fetal life. T2D is a multifactorial disease occurring as a result of complicated interplay between genetic and both prenatal and postnatal nongenetic factors, and it remains unknown to what extent the increased risk of T2D associated with LBW or GDM in the mother may be due to, or confounded by, genetic factors. Indeed, it has been shown that genetic changes influencing risk of diabetes may also be associated with reduced fetal growth as a result of reduced insulin secretion and/or action. Similarly, increased risk of T2D among offspring could be explained by T2D susceptibility genes shared between the mother and her offspring. Epigenetic mechanisms may explain the link between factors operating in fetal life and later risk of developing T2D, but so far convincing evidence is lacking for epigenetic changes as a prime and direct cause of T2D. This review addresses recent literature on the early origins of adult disease hypothesis, with a special emphasis on the role of genetic compared with nongenetic and epigenetic risk determinants and disease mechanisms. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  14. [Assisted reproduction technologies and the risk of fetal, chromosomal and genetic malformations].

    PubMed

    Imbar, T; Tsafrir, A; Lev-Sagie, A; Hurwitz, A; Laufer, N; Holzer, H

    2006-03-01

    Assisted reproduction techniques allowed thousands of otherwise infertile couples to attain pregnancy. As this technology moves into the mainstream of infertility treatment, it has become more critical to reassess its safety. To review the birth outcome of patients undergoing conventional in-vitro fertilization and intracyto- plasmic sperm injection regarding fetal malformations, chromosomal and genetic abnormalities. Selective review of the literature. Most of the published data is from observational studies and is not randomized or blinded. Unfortunately, most articles are inherently biased. Chromosomal and genetic abnormalities are increased probably only as a direct corollary to the underlying parental risk and not due to the technology itself. There is a slight increase in the congenital malformations rate, but inspection of these malformations reveal no clustering of any specific abnormality. Children born after assisted reproduction technologies have an increased risk of a major congenital malformation and chromosomal abnormalities compared with those born after natural conception. The risk is mainly due to paternal and maternal risk factors, which are more prevalent in couples who use assisted reproduction techniques for reproduction. Infertility-linked risk is highly probable for the observed findings. A technique-related risk, however, cannot be ruled out. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection appears to be a safe alternative for couples who otherwise would be unable to achieve pregnancy. The inherent risks associated with these genetically "at risk" couples mandate thorough evaluation and counseling before undertaking ICSI.

  15. Genetic Heterogeneity among Fanconi Anemia Heterozygotes and Risk of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Berwick, Marianne; Satagopan, Jaya M.; Ben-Porat, Leah; Carlson, Ann; Mah, Katherine; Henry, Rashida; Diotti, Raffaella; Milton, Kelly; Pujara, Kanan; Landers, Tom; Batish, Sat Dev; Morales, José; Schindler, Detlev; Hanenberg, Helmut; Hromas, Robert; Levran, Orna; Auerbach, Arleen D.

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by a greatly increased risk of cancer among those diagnosed with the syndrome. The question as to whether FA heterozygotes are at increased risk for cancer is of great importance to those at risk for being a carrier. To address this question, we formed a cohort of grandparents of probands identified through the International Fanconi Anemia Registry. We obtained informed consent, a short questionnaire, and either blood or buccal swab DNA. After diagnosis of the proband was confirmed and complementation studies or DNA sequencing on the proband were completed, mutation analyses of the putative carriers and noncarriers was carried out. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated to compare the observed cancer incidence of the grandparents and other relatives with the expected rates of cancer, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries and the Connecticut Cancer registry. In the 944 study subjects who participated (784 grandparents and 160 other relatives), there was no suggestion of an increase in overall cancer incidence. On the other hand, a significantly higher rate of breast cancer than expected was observed among carrier grandmothers [SIR, 1.7; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.1–2.7]. Among the grandmothers, those who were carriers of FANCC mutations were found to be at highest risk (SIR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.1–5.2). Overall, there was no increased risk for cancer among FA heterozygotes in this study of Fanconi relatives, although there is some evidence that FANCC mutations are possibly breast cancer susceptibility alleles. PMID:17909071

  16. Weighted Genetic Risk Scores and Prediction of Weight Gain in Solid Organ Transplant Populations

    PubMed Central

    Saigi-Morgui, Núria; Quteineh, Lina; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Crettol, Severine; Kutalik, Zoltán; Wojtowicz, Agnieszka; Bibert, Stéphanie; Beckmann, Sonja; Mueller, Nicolas J; Binet, Isabelle; van Delden, Christian; Steiger, Jürg; Mohacsi, Paul; Stirnimann, Guido; Soccal, Paola M.; Pascual, Manuel; Eap, Chin B

    2016-01-01

    Background Polygenic obesity in Solid Organ Transplant (SOT) populations is considered a risk factor for the development of metabolic abnormalities and graft survival. Few studies to date have studied the genetics of weight gain in SOT recipients. We aimed to determine whether weighted genetic risk scores (w-GRS) integrating genetic polymorphisms from GWAS studies (SNP group#1 and SNP group#2) and from Candidate Gene studies (SNP group#3) influence BMI in SOT populations and if they predict ≥10% weight gain (WG) one year after transplantation. To do so, two samples (nA = 995, nB = 156) were obtained from naturalistic studies and three w-GRS were constructed and tested for association with BMI over time. Prediction of 10% WG at one year after transplantation was assessed with models containing genetic and clinical factors. Results w-GRS were associated with BMI in sample A and B combined (BMI increased by 0.14 and 0.11 units per additional risk allele in SNP group#1 and #2, respectively, p-values<0.008). w-GRS of SNP group#3 showed an effect of 0.01 kg/m2 per additional risk allele when combining sample A and B (p-value 0.04). Models with genetic factors performed better than models without in predicting 10% WG at one year after transplantation. Conclusions This is the first study in SOT evaluating extensively the association of w-GRS with BMI and the influence of clinical and genetic factors on 10% of WG one year after transplantation, showing the importance of integrating genetic factors in the final model. Genetics of obesity among SOT recipients remains an important issue and can contribute to treatment personalization and prediction of WG after transplantation. PMID:27788139

  17. Confidentiality & the Risk of Genetic Discrimination: What Surgeons Need to Know

    PubMed Central

    Gammon, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, federal and state laws have been passed to provide legal protections against genetic discrimination as it pertains to employment, health coverage and rates. Much of the public and a notable portion of medical providers are not aware of the legislation surrounding genetic discrimination and unnecessary concerns about genetic privacy can get in the way of opportunities to deliver the optimal medical care. Patient health information including genetic testing and family history are protected under Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA). Additional protections are afforded through the American with Disabilities Act, state laws, and the Affordable Care Act. Communicating a genetic test result back to a patient is important for medical management decisions. Physicians also have a duty to warn patients of genetic findings and that the patient’s relatives are at risk from a genetically transferable condition. Medical care providers cannot, however, inform relatives in the absence of patient permission. Because management of a patient with a positive genetic test extends to the family members, it is important to empower and provide the tools for the patient to communicate with relatives. A discussion of family implications includes benefits and challenges to the larger family, maintaining confidentiality in light of sharing information with family members, and disclosure of result if patient dies. Emerging issues include the use of whole genome sequencing for both germline and tumor DNA and confidentiality in the era of social media. PMID:26363536

  18. Ionizing radiation and genetic risks. XIII. Summary and synthesis of papers VI to XII and estimates of genetic risks in the year 2000.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, K; Chakraborty, R

    2000-10-16

    This paper recapitulates the advances in the field of genetic risk estimation that have occurred during the past decade and using them as a basis, presents revised estimates of genetic risks of exposure to radiation. The advances include: (i) an upward revision of the estimates of incidence for Mendelian diseases (2.4% now versus 1.25% in 1993); (ii) the introduction of a conceptual change for calculating doubling doses; (iii) the elaboration of methods to estimate the mutation component (i.e. the relative increase in disease frequency per unit relative increase in mutation rate) and the use of the estimates obtained through these methods for assessing the impact of induced mutations on the incidence of Mendelian and chronic multifactorial diseases; (iv) the introduction of an additional factor called the "potential recoverability correction factor" in the risk equation to bridge the gap between radiation-induced mutations that have been recovered in mice and the risk of radiation-inducible genetic disease in human live births and (v) the introduction of the concept that the adverse effects of radiation-induced genetic damage are likely to be manifest predominantly as multi-system developmental abnormalities in the progeny. For all classes of genetic disease (except congenital abnormalities), the estimates of risk have been obtained using a doubling dose of 1 Gy. For a population exposed to low LET, chronic/ low dose irradiation, the current estimates for the first generation progeny are the following (all estimates per million live born progeny per Gy of parental irradiation): autosomal dominant and X-linked diseases, approximately 750-1500 cases; autosomal recessive, nearly zero and chronic multifactorial diseases, approximately 250-1200 cases. For congenital abnormalities, the estimate is approximately 2000 cases and is based on mouse data on developmental abnormalities. The total risk per Gy is of the order of approximately 3000-4700 cases which represent

  19. Factors Motivating Individuals to Consider Genetic Testing for Type 2 Diabetes Risk Prediction.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jennifer; Gupta, Jyoti; de Groot, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes and perceptions of willingness to participate in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk prediction in the general population. Adults (n = 598) were surveyed on attitudes about utilizing genetic testing to predict future risk of T2D. Participants were recruited from public libraries (53%), online registry (37%) and a safety net hospital emergency department (10%). Respondents were 37 ± 11 years old, primarily White (54%), female (69%), college educated (46%), with an annual income ≥$25,000 (56%). Half of participants were interested in genetic testing for T2D (52%) and 81% agreed/strongly agreed genetic testing should be available to the public. Only 57% of individuals knew T2D is preventable. A multivariate model to predict interest in genetic testing was adjusted for age, gender, recruitment location and BMI; significant predictors were motivation (high perceived personal risk of T2D [OR = 4.38 (1.76, 10.9)]; family history [OR = 2.56 (1.46, 4.48)]; desire to know risk prior to disease onset [OR = 3.25 (1.94, 5.42)]; and knowing T2D is preventable [OR = 2.11 (1.24, 3.60)], intention (if the cost is free [OR = 10.2 (4.27, 24.6)]; and learning T2D is preventable [OR = 5.18 (1.95, 13.7)]) and trust of genetic testing results [OR = 0.03 (0.003, 0.30)]. Individuals are interested in genetic testing for T2D risk which offers unique information that is personalized. Financial accessibility, validity of the test and availability of diabetes prevention programs were identified as predictors of interest in T2D testing.

  20. A Two-Stage Approach to Genetic Risk Assessment in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Swati; Atienza, Philamer; Chipman, Jonathan; Blackford, Amanda L.; Arun, Banu; Hughes, Kevin; Parmigiani, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Genetic risk prediction models such as BRCAPRO are used routinely in genetic counseling for identification of potential BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. They require extensive information on the counselee and her famil