Science.gov

Sample records for highly efficient proton

  1. High efficiency proton beam generation through target thickness control in femtosecond laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J. S. Robinson, A. P. L.; Booth, N.; Carroll, D. C.; Rusby, D.; Wilson, L.; Dance, R. J.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Murphy, C. D.

    2014-05-26

    Bright proton beams with maximum energies of up to 30 MeV have been observed in an experiment investigating ion sheath acceleration driven by a short pulse (<50 fs) laser. The scaling of maximum proton energy and total beam energy content at ultra-high intensities of ∼10{sup 21} W cm{sup −2} was investigated, with the interplay between target thickness and laser pre-pulse found to be a key factor. While the maximum proton energies observed were maximised for μm-thick targets, the total proton energy content was seen to peak for thinner, 500 nm, foils. The total proton beam energy reached up to 440 mJ (a conversion efficiency of 4%), marking a significant step forward for many laser-driven ion applications. The experimental results are supported by hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations.

  2. High efficiency proton beam generation through target thickness control in femtosecond laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. S.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Booth, N.; Carroll, D. C.; Dance, R. J.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Murphy, C. D.; Rusby, D.; Wilson, L.

    2014-05-01

    Bright proton beams with maximum energies of up to 30 MeV have been observed in an experiment investigating ion sheath acceleration driven by a short pulse (<50 fs) laser. The scaling of maximum proton energy and total beam energy content at ultra-high intensities of ˜1021 W cm-2 was investigated, with the interplay between target thickness and laser pre-pulse found to be a key factor. While the maximum proton energies observed were maximised for μm-thick targets, the total proton energy content was seen to peak for thinner, 500 nm, foils. The total proton beam energy reached up to 440 mJ (a conversion efficiency of 4%), marking a significant step forward for many laser-driven ion applications. The experimental results are supported by hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations.

  3. Highly Efficient Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence from an Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer System

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials have shown great potential for highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). While the current molecular design of TADF materials primarily focuses on combining donor and acceptor units, we present a novel system based on the use of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) to achieve efficient TADF without relying on the well-established donor–acceptor scheme. In an appropriately designed acridone-based compound with intramolecular hydrogen bonding, ESIPT leads to separation of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, resulting in TADF emission with a photoluminescence quantum yield of nearly 60%. High external electroluminescence quantum efficiencies of up to 14% in OLEDs using this emitter prove that efficient triplet harvesting is possible with ESIPT-based TADF materials. This work will expand and accelerate the development of a wide variety of TADF materials for high performance OLEDs. PMID:28776019

  4. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L.; Zacharias, R. A.; Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-04-14

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, the overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5h etch in 6N NaOH at 80°C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 ×106 cm-2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  5. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    DOE PAGES

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; ...

    2014-04-14

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, the overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5h etch in 6N NaOH at 80°C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detectionmore » of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 ×106 cm-2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.« less

  6. Energy efficiency and saving potential analysis of the high intensity proton accelerator HIPA at PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovach, A.; Parfenova, A.; Grillenberger, J.; Seidel, M.

    2017-07-01

    High power proton machines consume a large amount of energy. Thus, the energy efficiency of grid to beam power conversion is particularly important for the overall power consumption of such facilities. In this study, we analyse the energy efficiency of PSI’s cyclotron-based HIPA facility, which presently delivers a maximum of 1.4 MW beam power. The total power consumption of the entire facility is 12.5 MW at 2.2 mA beam current (1.3 MW). Main power consumers are: RF systems, electromagnets, water cooling and auxiliary systems including infrastructure, each consuming 5.3 MW, 3.6 MW, 1.65 MW and 1.95 MW, respectively. HIPA’s grid to beam efficiency is 18.3% when considering only those parts of any subsystems (RF components, magnets, cooling, and auxiliary systems), which are minimally required to produce a full 1.3 MW beam. The dependency of individual subsystems on beam power was also studied. These findings serve as a basis for further optimizations of the HIPA facility and give a reference of the efficiency estimate for the cyclotron-based high power machines.

  7. High energy conversion efficiency in laser-proton acceleration by controlling laser-energy deposition onto thin foil targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, C. M.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Markey, K.; Scott, R. H. H.; Gray, R. J.; Rosinski, M.; Deppert, O.; Badziak, J.; Batani, D.; Davies, J. R.; Hassan, S. M.; Lancaster, K. L.; Li, K.; Musgrave, I. O.; Norreys, P. A.; Pasley, J.; Roth, M.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Spindloe, C.; Tatarakis, M.; Winstone, T.; Wolowski, J.; Wyatt, D.; McKenna, P.; Neely, D.

    2014-02-01

    An all-optical approach to laser-proton acceleration enhancement is investigated using the simplest of target designs to demonstrate application-relevant levels of energy conversion efficiency between laser and protons. Controlled deposition of laser energy, in the form of a double-pulse temporal envelope, is investigated in combination with thin foil targets in which recirculation of laser-accelerated electrons can lead to optimal conditions for coupling laser drive energy into the proton beam. This approach is shown to deliver a substantial enhancement in the coupling of laser energy to 5-30 MeV protons, compared to single pulse irradiation, reaching a record high 15% conversion efficiency with a temporal separation of 1 ps between the two pulses and a 5 μm-thick Au foil. A 1D simulation code is used to support and explain the origin of the observation of an optimum pulse separation of ˜1 ps.

  8. High energy efficiency and high power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Velev, Omourtag A.; Parthasathy, Arvind; Manko, David J.; Appleby, A. John

    1991-01-01

    The development of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants with high energy efficiencies and high power densities is gaining momentum because of the vital need of such high levels of performance for extraterrestrial (space, underwater) and terrestrial (power source for electric vehicles) applications. Since 1987, considerable progress has been made in achieving energy efficiencies of about 60 percent at a current density of 200 mA/sq cm and high power densities (greater than 1 W/sq cm) in PEM fuel cells with high (4 mg/sq cm) or low (0.4 mg/sq cm) platinum loadings in electrodes. The following areas are discussed: (1) methods to obtain these high levels of performance with low Pt loading electrodes - by proton conductor impregnation into electrodes, localization of Pt near front surface; (2) a novel microelectrode technique which yields electrode kinetic parameters for oxygen reduction and mass transport parameters; (3) demonstration of lack of water transport from anode to cathode; (4) modeling analysis of PEM fuel cell for comparison with experimental results and predicting further improvements in performance; and (5) recommendations of needed research and development for achieving the above goals.

  9. High energy efficiency and high power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Velev, Omourtag A.; Parthasathy, Arvind; Manko, David J.; Appleby, A. John

    1991-01-01

    The development of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants with high energy efficiencies and high power densities is gaining momentum because of the vital need of such high levels of performance for extraterrestrial (space, underwater) and terrestrial (power source for electric vehicles) applications. Since 1987, considerable progress has been made in achieving energy efficiencies of about 60 percent at a current density of 200 mA/sq cm and high power densities (greater than 1 W/sq cm) in PEM fuel cells with high (4 mg/sq cm) or low (0.4 mg/sq cm) platinum loadings in electrodes. The following areas are discussed: (1) methods to obtain these high levels of performance with low Pt loading electrodes - by proton conductor impregnation into electrodes, localization of Pt near front surface; (2) a novel microelectrode technique which yields electrode kinetic parameters for oxygen reduction and mass transport parameters; (3) demonstration of lack of water transport from anode to cathode; (4) modeling analysis of PEM fuel cell for comparison with experimental results and predicting further improvements in performance; and (5) recommendations of needed research and development for achieving the above goals.

  10. Highly efficient sulfonated polybenzimidazole as a proton exchange membrane for microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Shuvra; Jana, Tushar; Modestra, J. Annie; Naresh Kumar, A.; Mohan, S. Venkata

    2016-06-01

    Although microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a promising bio-energy technology with a dual advantage (i.e., electricity production and waste-water treatment), their low power densities and high installation costs are major impediments. To address these bottlenecks and replace highly expensive Nafion, which is a proton exchange membrane (PEM), the current study focuses for the first time on membranes made from an easily synthesizable and more economical oxy-polybenzimidazole (OPBI) and its sulfonated analogue (S-OPBI) as alternate PEMs in single-chambered MFCs. The S-OPBI membrane exhibits better properties, with high water uptake, ion exchange capacity (IEC) and proton conductivity and a comparatively smaller degree of swelling compared to Nafion. The membrane morphology is characterized by atomic force microscopy, and the bright and dark regions of the S-OPBI membrane reveals the formation of ionic domains in the matrix, forming continuous water nanochannels when doped with water. These water-filled nanochannels are responsible for faster proton conduction in S-OPBI than in Nafion; therefore, the power output in the MFC with S-OPBI as the PEM is higher than in other MFCs. The open circuit voltage (460 mV), current generation (2.27 mA) and power density profile (110 mW/m2) as a function of time, as well as the polarization curves, exhibits higher current and power density (87.8 mW/m2) with S-OPBI compared to Nafion as the PEM.

  11. Effect of high energy proton irradiation on InAs/GaAs quantum dots: Enhancement of photoluminescence efficiency (up to {approx}7 times) with minimum spectral signature shift

    SciTech Connect

    Sreekumar, R.; Mandal, A.; Gupta, S.K.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2011-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Authors demonstrate enhancement in photoluminescence efficiency (7 times) in single layer InAs/GaAs quantum dots using proton irradiation without any post-annealing treatment via either varying proton energy (a) or fluence (b). The increase in PL efficiency is explained by a proposed model before (c) and after irradiation (d). Highlights: {yields} Proton irradiation improved PL efficiency in InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs). {yields} Proton irradiation favoured defect and strain annihilation in InAs/GaAs QDs. {yields} Reduction in defects/non-radiative recombination improved PL efficiency. {yields} Protons could be used to improve PL efficiency without spectral shift. {yields} QD based devices will be benefited by this technique to improve device performance. -- Abstract: We demonstrate 7-fold increase of photoluminescence efficiency in GaAs/(InAs/GaAs) quantum dot hetero-structure, employing high energy proton irradiation, without any post-annealing treatment. Protons of energy 3-5 MeV with fluence in the range (1.2-7.04) x 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} were used for irradiation. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed crystalline quality of the GaAs cap layer improves on proton irradiation. Photoluminescence study conducted at low temperature and low laser excitation density proved the presence of non-radiative recombination centers in the system which gets eliminated on proton irradiation. Shift in photoluminescence emission towards higher wavelength upon irradiation substantiated the reduction in strain field existed between GaAs cap layer and InAs/GaAs quantum dots. The enhancement in PL efficiency is thus attributed to the annihilation of defects/non-radiative recombination centers present in GaAs cap layer as well as in InAs/GaAs quantum dots induced by proton irradiation.

  12. Fluence measurement of fast neutron fields with a highly efficient recoil proton telescope using active pixel sensors.

    PubMed

    Taforeau, J; Higueret, S; Husson, D; Kachel, M; Lebreton, L

    2014-10-01

    The spectrometer ATHENA (Accurate Telescope for High-Energy Neutron metrology Applications) is being developed at the LNE-IRSN and aims at characterising energy and fluence of fast neutron fields. The detector is a recoil proton telescope and measures neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV. This telescope is intended to become a primary standard for both energy and fluence measurements. The neutron detection is achieved by a polyethylene radiator for n-p conversion, three 50-µm-thick silicon sensors that use CMOS technology for proton tracking and a 3-mm-thick silicon diode to measure the residual proton energy. The use of CMOS sensors and silicon diode, owing to a large detection solid angle, increases the intrinsic efficiency of the detector by a factor of 10 compared with conventional designs. The ability of the spectrometer to determine the neutron energy was demonstrated and reported elsewhere. This paper focuses on the fluence measurement of monoenergetic neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV. Experimental investigations, performed at the AMANDE facility, indicate a good estimation of neutron fluence at various energies. In addition, a complete description of uncertainties budget is presented in this paper and a Monte Carlo propagation of uncertainty sources leads to a fluence measurement with a precision ∼3-5 % depending on the neutron energy. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. High-cooling-efficiency cryogenic quadrupole ion trap and UV-UV hole burning spectroscopy of protonated tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiuchi, Shun-ichi; Wako, Hiromichi; Kato, Daichi; Fujii, Masaaki

    2017-02-01

    The cooling efficiency of a cryogenic three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap (QIT) is drastically improved by using copper electrodes instead of conventional stainless-steel ones. The temperature of trapped ions (protonated tyrosine TyrH+) was estimated based on the ultraviolet (UV) photo-dissociation spectra. The UV spectrum of TryH+ shows almost no hot bands, and thus the high cooling efficiency of the copper ion trap was proven. The temperature was also estimated by simulating the observed band contour in the UV spectra, which is determined by the population in the rotationally excited levels. From the simulations, the temperature of TryH+ was estimated to be ∼13 K, while that in the stainless-steel QIT was 45-50 K. In addition, to demonstrate the advantage of the copper QIT, UV-UV hole burning (HB) spectra, i.e. conformation-selected UV spectra, were measured. It was confirmed that four different conformers, A∼D, coexist in the ultra-cold protonated tyrosine. By comparing with the calculated Franck-Condon spectra, their structural assignments were discussed, including the orientation of the OH group.

  14. Additive manufactured bipolar plate for high-efficiency hydrogen production in proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cells

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Gaoqiang; Mo, Jingke; Kang, Zhenye; ...

    2017-05-06

    Additive manufacturing (AM) technology is capable of fast and low-cost prototyping from complex 3D digital models. To take advantage of this technology, a stainless steel (SS) plate with parallel flow field served as a combination of a cathode bipolar plate and a current distributor; it was fabricated using selective laser melting (SLM) techniques and investigated in a proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cell (PEMEC) in-situ for the first time. The experimental results show that the PEMEC with an AM SS cathode bipolar plate can achieve an excellent performance for hydrogen production for a voltage of 1.779 V and a current densitymore » of 2.0 A/cm2. The AM SS cathode bipolar plate was also characterized by SEM and EDS, and the results show a uniform elemental distribution across the plate with very limited oxidization. As a result, this research demonstrates that AM method could be a route to aid cost-effective and rapid development of PEMECs.« less

  15. High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred; Berger, Marie-Helen; Sayir, Ali

    2007-01-01

    High Temperature Protonic Conductors (HTPC) with the perovskite structure are envisioned for electrochemical membrane applications such as H2 separation, H2 sensors and fuel cells. Successive membrane commercialization is dependent upon addressing issues with H2 permeation rate and environmental stability with CO2 and H2O. HTPC membranes are conventionally fabricated by solid-state sintering. Grain boundaries and the presence of intergranular second phases reduce the proton mobility by orders of magnitude than the bulk crystalline grain. To enhanced protonic mobility, alternative processing routes were evaluated. A laser melt modulation (LMM) process was utilized to fabricate bulk samples, while pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was utilized to fabricate thin film membranes . Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2-x)O9 and SrCe(1-x)Y(x)O3 bulk samples were fabricated by LMM. Thin film BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3 membranes were fabricated by PLD on porous substrates. Electron microscopy with chemical mapping was done to characterize the resultant microstructures. High temperature protonic conduction was measured by impedance spectroscopy in wet air or H2 environments. The results demonstrate the advantage of thin film membranes to thick membranes but also reveal the negative impact of defects or nanoscale domains on protonic conductivity.

  16. High Power Proton Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the capabilities and challenges of high intensity proton accelerators, such as J-PARC, Fermilab MI, SNS, ISIS, PSI, ESS (in the future) and others. The presentation will focus on lessons learned, new concepts, beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate them.

  17. Development of highly efficient proton recoil counter telescope for absolute measurement of neutron fluences in quasi-monoenergetic neutron calibration fields of high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikaze, Yoshiaki; Tanimura, Yoshihiko; Saegusa, Jun; Tsutsumi, Masahiro

    2010-04-01

    Precise calibration of monitors and dosimeters for use with high energy neutrons necessitates reliable and accurate neutron fluences being evaluated with use of a reference point. A highly efficient Proton Recoil counter Telescope (PRT) to make absolute measurements with use of a reference point was developed to evaluate neutron fluences in quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields. The relatively large design of the PRT componentry and relatively thick, approximately 2 mm, polyethylene converter contributed to high detection efficiency at the reference point over a large irradiation area at a long distance from the target. The polyethylene converter thickness was adjusted to maintain the same carbon density per unit area as the graphite converter for easy background subtraction. The high detection efficiency and thickness adjustment resulted in efficient absolute measurements being made of the neutron fluences of sufficient statistical precision over a short period of time. The neutron detection efficiencies of the PRT were evaluated using MCNPX code at 2.61×10-6, 2.16×10-6 and 1.14×10-6 for the respective neutron peak energies of 45, 60 and 75 MeV. The neutron fluences were determined to have been evaluated at an uncertainty of within 6.5% using analysis of measured data and the detection efficiencies. The PRT was also designed so as to be capable of simultaneously obtaining TOF data. The TOF data also increased the reliability of neutron fluence measurements and provided useful information for use in interpreting the source of proton events.

  18. A highly stable 30 keV proton accelerator for studies of angular detection efficiency on Si detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Bacci, Americo; Baessler, Stefan; Carr, Peter; Hefele, Thomas; Pocanic, Dinko; Roane, Nicholas; Ross, Aaron; Slater, R.; Smith, Alexander; Toth, Csaba; Warner, Dane; Zamperini, Shawn; Zotev, Panaiot; Nab experiment Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Nab experiment at the SNS measures the electron-neutrino correlation parameter and the Fierz interference term in free neutron beta decay by measuring in coincidence the electron energy and proton momentum in a magnetic spectrometer with two Si detectors. These large area, thick, and 127-hexagonal segmented Si detectors have to be carefully characterized for optimal performance and for control of systematic errors. The angular detection efficiency of 30 keV proton incident on Si is an important part of this studies. We will present the design, simulation, operation, and detection of 30 keV H+ and H2+as well as results to control the beam stability by the correlation of both detected ion signals. At present we have reached beam stability of (1.2 +/-1.3)E-7/sec.

  19. Computational study of phosphatase activity in soluble epoxide hydrolase: high efficiency through a water bridge mediated proton shuttle.

    PubMed

    De Vivo, Marco; Ensing, Bernd; Klein, Michael L

    2005-08-17

    Recently, a new branch of fatty acid metabolism has been opened by the novel phosphatase activity found in the N-terminal domain of the, hence bifunctional, soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Importantly, this finding has also provided a new site for drug targeting in sEH's activity regulation. Classical MD and hybrid Car-Parrinello QM/MM calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of the phosphoenzyme intermediate formation in the first step of the catalysis. The results support a concerted multi-event reaction mechanism: (1) a dissociative in-line nucleophilic substitution for the phosphoryl transfer reaction; (2) a double proton transfer involved in the formation of a good leaving group in the transition state. The presence of a water bridge in the substrate/enzyme complex allowed an efficient proton shuttle, showing its key role in speeding up the catalysis. The calculated free energy of the favored catalytic pathway is approximately 19 kcal/mol, in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  20. High density scintillating glass proton imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, C. J.; Goranson, K.; Turney, A.; Xie, Q.; Tillman, I. J.; Thune, Z. L.; Dong, A.; Pritchett, D.; McInally, W.; Potter, A.; Wang, D.; Akgun, U.

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, proton therapy has achieved remarkable precision in delivering doses to cancerous cells while avoiding healthy tissue. However, in order to utilize this high precision treatment, greater accuracy in patient positioning is needed. An accepted approximate uncertainty of +/-3% exists in the current practice of proton therapy due to conversions between x-ray and proton stopping power. The use of protons in imaging would eliminate this source of error and lessen the radiation exposure of the patient. To this end, this study focuses on developing a novel proton-imaging detector built with high-density glass scintillator. The model described herein contains a compact homogeneous proton calorimeter composed of scintillating, high density glass as the active medium. The unique geometry of this detector allows for the measurement of both the position and residual energy of protons, eliminating the need for a separate set of position trackers in the system. Average position and energy of a pencil beam of 106 protons is used to reconstruct the image rather than by analyzing individual proton data. Simplicity and efficiency were major objectives in this model in order to present an imaging technique that is compact, cost-effective, and precise, as well as practical for a clinical setting with pencil-beam scanning proton therapy equipment. In this work, the development of novel high-density glass scintillator and the unique conceptual design of the imager are discussed; a proof-of-principle Monte Carlo simulation study is performed; preliminary two-dimensional images reconstructed from the Geant4 simulation are presented.

  1. Two tyrosyl radicals stabilize high oxidation states in cytochrome c oxidase for efficient energy conservation and proton translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2012-02-01

    The reaction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with oxidized bovine cytochrome c oxidase (bCcO) was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to determine the properties of radical intermediates. Two distinct radicals with widths of 12 and 46 G are directly observed by X-band CW-EPR in the reaction of bCcO with H2O2 at pH 6 and pH 8. High-frequency EPR (D-band) provides assignments to tyrosine for both radicals based on well-resolved g-tensors. The 46 G wide radical has extensive hyperfine structure and can be fit with parameters consistent with Y129. However, the 12 G wide radical has minimal hyperfine structure and can be fit using parameters unique to the post-translationally modified Y244 in CcO. The results are supported by mixed quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations. This study reports spectroscopic evidence of a radical formed on the modified tyrosine in CcO and resolves the much debated controversy of whether the wide radical seen at low pH in the bovine system is a tyrosine or tryptophan. A model is presented showing how radical formation and migration may play an essential role in proton translocation. This work was done in collaboration with Michelle A. Yu, Tsuyoshi Egawa, Syun-Ru Yeh and Gary J. Gerfen from Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Kyoko Shinzawa-Itoh and Shinya Yoshikawa from the University of Hyogo; and Victor Guallar from the Barcelona Supercomputing Center.

  2. Control of laser absorbing efficiency and proton quality by a specific double target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Q.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, X. F.; Qu, J. F.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2016-08-01

    The micro-structured double-layer target is an efficient method to improve proton quality. However, the laser absorption efficiency is low due to strong reflection at the front surface of such targets. Moreover, the proton charge is limited by the driving laser radius. To overcome these shortcomings, a specific double-layer (SDL) target with a vacuum gap in the center of the heavy ion layer is proposed in this paper. In this specified target, the laser reflection effect is significantly weakened and the absorption and penetration efficiencies are greatly enhanced. The high-energy electrons from Breakout afterburner regime efficiently transfer their energy to the protons. Both the energy of the spectral peaks and maximum proton energy are greatly increased. The periodic structure of the longitudinal electric field makes the force applied on the protons becomes homogeneous in time average and therefore reduce the energy spread. In these SDL targets, the proton layer radius and the accelerated proton charge are not limited by the laser radius. With a larger-radius proton layer, the protons can be accelerated to high energy with small energy spread. When the proton layer radius is reduced to the laser radius, the SDL target is still an effective structure to improve the proton quality. The mechanism is proved by a series of particle-in-cell simulations.

  3. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  4. Thin film surface modifications of thin/tunable liquid/gas diffusion layers for high-efficiency proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cells

    DOE PAGES

    Kang, Zhenye; Mo, Jingke; Yang, Gaoqiang; ...

    2017-09-14

    We present that a proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cell (PEMEC) is one of the most promising devices for high-efficiency and low-cost energy storage and ultrahigh purity hydrogen production. As one of the critical components in PEMECs, the titanium thin/tunable LGDL (TT-LGDL) with its advantages of small thickness, planar surface, straight-through pores, and well-controlled pore morphologies, achieved superior multifunctional performance for hydrogen and oxygen production from water splitting even at low temperature. Different thin film surface treatments on the novel TT-LGDLs for enhancing the interfacial contacts and PEMEC performance were investigated both in-situ and ex-situ for the first time. Surface modifiedmore » TT-LGDLs with about 180 nm thick Au thin film yielded performance improvement (voltage reduction), from 1.6849 V with untreated TT-LGDLs to only 1.6328 V with treated TT-LGDLs at 2.0 A/cm2 and 80°C. Furthermore, the hydrogen/oxygen production rate was increased by about 28.2% at 1.60 V and 80°C. The durability test demonstrated that the surface treated TT-LGDL has good stability as well. Finally, the gold electroplating surface treatment is a promising method for the PEMEC performance enhancement and titanium material protection even in harsh environment.« less

  5. Advanced proton-exchange materials for energy efficient fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Hickner, Michael A.; Cornelius, Christopher James; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Hibbs, Michael R.

    2005-12-01

    The ''Advanced Proton-Exchange Materials for Energy Efficient Fuel Cells'' Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project began in October 2002 and ended in September 2005. This LDRD was funded by the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy strategic business unit. The purpose of this LDRD was to initiate the fundamental research necessary for the development of a novel proton-exchange membranes (PEM) to overcome the material and performance limitations of the ''state of the art'' Nafion that is used in both hydrogen and methanol fuel cells. An atomistic modeling effort was added to this LDRD in order to establish a frame work between predicted morphology and observed PEM morphology in order to relate it to fuel cell performance. Significant progress was made in the area of PEM material design, development, and demonstration during this LDRD. A fundamental understanding involving the role of the structure of the PEM material as a function of sulfonic acid content, polymer topology, chemical composition, molecular weight, and electrode electrolyte ink development was demonstrated during this LDRD. PEM materials based upon random and block polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes were created and evaluated for improvements in proton conductivity, reduced swelling, reduced O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} permeability, and increased thermal stability. Results from this work reveal that the family of polyphenylenes potentially solves several technical challenges associated with obtaining a high temperature PEM membrane. Fuel cell relevant properties such as high proton conductivity (>120 mS/cm), good thermal stability, and mechanical robustness were demonstrated during this LDRD. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and results of this LDRD.

  6. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  7. High Transverse Energy Proton - Nuclear Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, James Allen

    1983-06-01

    A study of high transverse energy events resulting from 400 GeV protons scattering from targets of hydrogen, carbon, aluminum, copper, tin, and lead has been performed with the E609 apparatus at Fermilab. Wire chambers and a highly segmented calorimeter detect secondary particles. The use of efficient jet collecting triggers and of a beam jet calorimeter have been originally applied to nuclear target studies in this thesis. $A^{\\alpha}$ scaling with hydrogen deviations is observed for $E_T$ and planarity. The data provide evidence that $A^{\\alpha}$ scaling results from multiple scattering.Evidence for hadron jets is seen with a large solid angle calorimeter for all the targets when triggers requiring two high $E_T$ single particles are employed. Jet cross-sections for nuclei are approximately determined herein. Jet event angular distributions possibly indicate that low and high transverse energy particles in jets from nuclei may result, in part, from different types of interactions.

  8. High intensity protons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Huang, H.; Minty, M.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2012-01-05

    During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

  9. High-energy proton radiation belt.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The experiments and theories to explain the high-energy protons trapped in the earth's radiation belt are reviewed. The theory of cosmic ray albedo neutron decay injection of protons into the radiation belt is discussed. Radial diffusion and change in the earth's dipole moment are considered along with losses of protons by ionization and nuclear collision. It is found that the measured albedo neutron escape current is sufficient to supply trapped protons above 30 MeV. The theoretical calculations of the trapped protons are in agreement with the measurements for L less than or equal to 1.7 both on and off the equator. For L greater than or equal to 1.7, additional trapped proton differential energy measurements should be made before the theory can be adequately tested. It appears that an additional loss mechanism such as pitch angle scattering may be required.

  10. Prioritized efficiency optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Müller, Birgit S; Wilkens, Jan J

    2016-12-07

    A high dosimetric quality and short treatment time are major goals in radiotherapy planning. Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans obtain dose distributions of great conformity but often result in long delivery times which are typically not incorporated into the optimization process. We present an algorithm to optimize delivery efficiency of IMPT plans while maintaining plan quality, and study the potential trade-offs of these interdependent objectives. The algorithm is based on prioritized optimization, a stepwise approach to implemented objectives. First the quality of the plan is optimized. The second step of the prioritized efficiency optimization (PrEfOpt) routine offers four alternatives for reducing delivery time: minimization of the total spot weight sum (A), maximization of the lowest spot intensity of each energy layer (B), elimination of low-weighted spots (C) or energy layers (D). The trade-off between dosimetric quality (step I) and treatment time (step II) is controlled during the optimization by option-dependent parameters. PrEfOpt was applied to a clinical patient case, and plans for different trade-offs were calculated. Delivery times were simulated for two virtual facilities with constant and variable proton current, i.e. independent and dependent on the optimized spot weight distributions. Delivery times decreased without major degradation of plan quality; absolute time reductions varied with the applied method and facility type. Minimizing the total spot weight sum (A) reduced times by 28% for a similar plan quality at a constant current (changes of minimum dose in the target  <1%). For a variable proton current, eliminating low-weighted spots (C) led to remarkably faster delivery (16%). The implementation of an efficiency-optimization step into the optimization process can yield reduced delivery times with similar plan qualities. A potential clinical application of PrEfOpt is the generation of multiple plans with different trade

  11. Prioritized efficiency optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Birgit S.; Wilkens, Jan J.

    2016-12-01

    A high dosimetric quality and short treatment time are major goals in radiotherapy planning. Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans obtain dose distributions of great conformity but often result in long delivery times which are typically not incorporated into the optimization process. We present an algorithm to optimize delivery efficiency of IMPT plans while maintaining plan quality, and study the potential trade-offs of these interdependent objectives. The algorithm is based on prioritized optimization, a stepwise approach to implemented objectives. First the quality of the plan is optimized. The second step of the prioritized efficiency optimization (PrEfOpt) routine offers four alternatives for reducing delivery time: minimization of the total spot weight sum (A), maximization of the lowest spot intensity of each energy layer (B), elimination of low-weighted spots (C) or energy layers (D). The trade-off between dosimetric quality (step I) and treatment time (step II) is controlled during the optimization by option-dependent parameters. PrEfOpt was applied to a clinical patient case, and plans for different trade-offs were calculated. Delivery times were simulated for two virtual facilities with constant and variable proton current, i.e. independent and dependent on the optimized spot weight distributions. Delivery times decreased without major degradation of plan quality; absolute time reductions varied with the applied method and facility type. Minimizing the total spot weight sum (A) reduced times by 28% for a similar plan quality at a constant current (changes of minimum dose in the target  <1%). For a variable proton current, eliminating low-weighted spots (C) led to remarkably faster delivery (16%). The implementation of an efficiency-optimization step into the optimization process can yield reduced delivery times with similar plan qualities. A potential clinical application of PrEfOpt is the generation of multiple plans with different trade

  12. Proton Diffusion Model for High-Throughput Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisesa, Pandu; Mueller, Tim

    2013-03-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have many advantages over other fuel cells with high efficiency, myriad fuel choices, and low cost. The main issue however is the high operating temperature of SOFCs, which can be lowered by using an electrolyte material with high ionic conductivity, such as proton conducting oxides. Our goal is to identify promising proton-conducting materials in a manner that is time and cost efficient through the utilization of high-throughput calculations. We present a model for proton diffusion developed using machine learning techniques with training data that consists of density functional theory (DFT) calculations on various metal oxides. The built model is tested against other DFT results to see how it performs. The results of the DFT calculations and how the model fares are discussed, with focus on hydrogen diffusion pathways inside the bulk material.

  13. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD's) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD's, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  14. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, E.V.; Frank, A.L.

    1995-03-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD`s) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD`s, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  15. Efficient production and diagnostics of MeV proton beams from a cryogenic hydrogen ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velyhan, A.; Giuffrida, L.; Scuderi, V.; Perin, J. P.; Chatain, D.; Garcia, S.; Bonnay, P.; Dostal, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Dudzak, R.; Krousky, E.; Cykhardt, J.; Prokupek, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Rosinski, M.; Krasa, J.; Brabcova, K.; De Napoli, M.; Lastovicka, T.; Margarone, D.

    2017-06-01

    A solid hydrogen thin ribbon, produced by the cryogenic system ELISE (Experiments on Laser Interaction with Solid hydrogEn) target delivery system, was experimentally used at the PALS kJ-laser facility to generate intense proton beams with energies in the MeV range. This sophisticated target system operating at cryogenic temperature (~ 10 K) continuously producing a 62 μm thick target was combined with a 600 J sub-nanosecond laser pulse to generate a collimated proton stream. The accelerated proton beams were fully characterized by a number of diagnostics. High conversion efficiency of laser to energetic protons is of great interest for future potential applications in non-conventional proton therapy and fast ignition for inertial confinement fusion.

  16. Laser-accelerated proton conversion efficiency thickness scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, D. S.; Foord, M. E.; Key, M. H.; LePape, S. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Ping, Y.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Fedosejevs, R.; Friesen, H.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y. Y.

    2009-12-15

    The conversion efficiency from laser energy into proton kinetic energy is measured with the 0.6 ps, 9x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} Titan laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility as a function of target thickness in Au foils. For targets thicker than 20 {mu}m, the conversion efficiency scales approximately as 1/L, where L is the target thickness. This is explained by the domination of hot electron collisional losses over adiabatic cooling. In thinner targets, the two effects become comparable, causing the conversion efficiency to scale weaker than 1/L; the measured conversion efficiency is constant within the scatter in the data for targets between 5 and 15 {mu}m, with a peak conversion efficiency of 4% into protons with energy greater than 3 MeV. Depletion of the hydrocarbon contaminant layer is eliminated as an explanation for this plateau by using targets coated with 200 nm of ErH{sub 3} on the rear surface. The proton acceleration is modeled with the hybrid-particle in cell code LSP, which reproduced the conversion efficiency scaling observed in the data.

  17. Proton Affinity Calculations with High Level Methods.

    PubMed

    Kolboe, Stein

    2014-08-12

    Proton affinities, stretching from small reference compounds, up to the methylbenzenes and naphthalene and anthracene, have been calculated with high accuracy computational methods, viz. W1BD, G4, G3B3, CBS-QB3, and M06-2X. Computed and the currently accepted reference proton affinities are generally in excellent accord, but there are deviations. The literature value for propene appears to be 6-7 kJ/mol too high. Reported proton affinities for the methylbenzenes seem 4-5 kJ/mol too high. G4 and G3 computations generally give results in good accord with the high level W1BD. Proton affinity values computed with the CBS-QB3 scheme are too low, and the error increases with increasing molecule size, reaching nearly 10 kJ/mol for the xylenes. The functional M06-2X fails markedly for some of the small reference compounds, in particular, for CO and ketene, but calculates methylbenzene proton affinities with high accuracy.

  18. Improved laser-to-proton conversion efficiency in isolated reduced mass targets

    SciTech Connect

    Morace, A.; Bellei, C.; Patel, P. K.; Bartal, T.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N.; Willingale, L.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K.; Wei, M. S.; Batani, D.; Piovella, N.; Stephens, R. B.

    2013-07-29

    We present experimental results of laser-to-proton conversion efficiency as a function of lateral confinement of the refluxing electrons. Experiments were carried out using the T-Cubed laser at the Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan. We demonstrate that the laser-to-proton conversion efficiency increases by 50% with increased confinement of the target from surroundings with respect to a flat target of the same thickness. Three-dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell simulations using LSP code agree with the experimental data. The adopted target design is suitable for high repetition rate operation as well as for Inertial Confinement Fusion applications.

  19. Improved laser-to-proton conversion efficiency in isolated reduced mass targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morace, A.; Bellei, C.; Bartal, T.; Willingale, L.; Kim, J.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K.; Wei, M. S.; Patel, P. K.; Batani, D.; Piovella, N.; Stephens, R. B.; Beg, F. N.

    2013-07-01

    We present experimental results of laser-to-proton conversion efficiency as a function of lateral confinement of the refluxing electrons. Experiments were carried out using the T-Cubed laser at the Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan. We demonstrate that the laser-to-proton conversion efficiency increases by 50% with increased confinement of the target from surroundings with respect to a flat target of the same thickness. Three-dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell simulations using LSP code agree with the experimental data. The adopted target design is suitable for high repetition rate operation as well as for Inertial Confinement Fusion applications.

  20. Intense high-quality medical proton beams via laser fields.

    PubMed

    Galow, Benjamin J; Harman, Zoltán; Keitel, Christoph H

    2010-12-06

    Simulations based on the coupled relativistic equations of motion show that protons stemming from laser-plasma processes can be efficiently post-accelerated employing single and crossed pulsed laser beams focused to spot radii on the order of the laser wavelength. We demonstrate that the crossed beams produce quasi-monoenergetic accelerated protons with kinetic energies exceeding 200 MeV, small energy spreads of about 1% and high densities as required for hadron cancer therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first scheme allowing for this important application based on an all-optical set-up.

  1. Channel electron multiplier efficiency for protons of 0.2-10 keV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iglesias, G. E.; Mcgarity, J. O.

    1971-01-01

    The initial results of absolute proton efficiency measurements made in an auroral particle study by sounding rockets are given. The measurements were made at several counting rates from 1000 to 40,000 counts/sec on rocket-borne equipment. The results agree with those of Egidi et al. (1969) in the high energy range and show a disagreement at low energies.

  2. CHALLENGES FACING HIGH POWER PROTON ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the challenges of high power proton accelerators such as SNS, J-PARC, etc., and what we have learned from recent experiences. Beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate beam loss will also be discussed.

  3. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Chakravarthy, D P

    2009-12-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10(11) cm(-3) and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 pi mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  4. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2009-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  5. Applications of High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Rajendran; Mishra, Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency linac development at Fermilab / S. D. Holmes -- Rare muon decay experiments / Y. Kuno -- Rare kaon decays / D. Bryman -- Muon collider / R. B. Palmer -- Neutrino factories / S. Geer -- ADS and its potential / J.-P. Revol -- ADS history in the USA / R. L. Sheffield and E. J. Pitcher -- Accelerator driven transmutation of waste: high power accelerator for the European ADS demonstrator / J. L. Biarrotte and T. Junquera -- Myrrha, technology development for the realisation of ADS in EU: current status & prospects for realisation / R. Fernandez ... [et al.] -- High intensity proton beam production with cyclotrons / J. Grillenberger and M. Seidel -- FFAG for high intensity proton accelerator / Y. Mori -- Kaon yields for 2 to 8 GeV proton beams / K. K. Gudima, N. V. Mokhov and S. I. Striganov -- Pion yield studies for proton driver beams of 2-8 GeV kinetic energy for stopped muon and low-energy muon decay experiments / S. I. Striganov -- J-Parc accelerator status and future plans / H. Kobayashi -- Simulation and verification of DPA in materials / N. V. Mokhov, I. L. Rakhno and S. I. Striganov -- Performance and operational experience of the CNGS facility / E. Gschwendtner -- Particle physics enabled with super-conducting RF technology - summary of working group 1 / D. Jaffe and R. Tschirhart -- Proton beam requirements for a neutrino factory and muon collider / M. S. Zisman -- Proton bunching options / R. B. Palmer -- CW SRF H linac as a proton driver for muon colliders and neutrino factories / M. Popovic, C. M. Ankenbrandt and R. P. Johnson -- Rapid cycling synchrotron option for Project X / W. Chou -- Linac-based proton driver for a neutrino factory / R. Garoby ... [et al.] -- Pion production for neutrino factories and muon colliders / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Proton bunch compression strategies / V. Lebedev -- Accelerator test facility for muon collider and neutrino factory R&D / V. Shiltsev -- The superconducting RF linac for muon

  6. High efficiency RCCI combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splitter, Derek A.

    An experimental investigation of the pragmatic limits of Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) engine efficiency was performed. The study utilized engine experiments combined with zero-dimensional modeling. Initially, simulations were used to suggest conditions of high engine efficiency with RCCI. Preliminary simulations suggested that high efficiency could be obtained by using a very dilute charge with a high compression ratio. Moreover, the preliminary simulations further suggested that with simultaneous 50% reductions in heat transfer and incomplete combustion, 60% gross thermal efficiency may be achievable with RCCI. Following the initial simulations, experiments to investigate the combustion process, fuel effects, and methods to reduce heat transfer and incomplete combustion reduction were conducted. The results demonstrated that the engine cycle and combustion process are linked, and if high efficiency is to be had, then the combustion event must be tailored to the initial cycle conditions. It was found that reductions to engine heat transfer are a key enabler to increasing engine efficiency. In addition, it was found that the piston oil jet gallery cooling in RCCI may be unnecessary, as it had a negative impact on efficiency. Without piston oil gallery cooling, it was found that RCCI was nearly adiabatic, achieving 95% of the theoretical maximum cycle efficiency (air standard Otto cycle efficiency).

  7. Very high energy proton-proton cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Wibig, Tadeusz

    2009-05-01

    The recent Pierre Auger Observatory result suggesting a coincidence of extensive air showers arrival directions with 'nearby' active galactic nuclei and HiRes discovery of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff indicates protons to be only or at least the strongly dominant component of primary extra galactic cosmic ray flux. However, showers initiated by these ultrahigh energy particles developed faster than predicted by the simulation calculations with conventional interaction models. This could be evidence of the substantial increase of the p-air cross section. The progress in understanding the proton-proton cross section description allows us to examine this possibility, and eventually reject it as an explanation of the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray 'pure proton' controversy.

  8. High Temperature Protonic Conductors by Melt Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-21

    produce a family of single crystal and multiphase materials that exhibit high temperature protonic conductance, and superior mechanical properties at...with x = 0.05, 0.2, were ball-milled (WC ball and bottle) for 5 min. The resulting slurry was then dried at 70 ºC. The dried powders were heated 1000...explained taking into account the redistribution of the intercellular amorphous phase, and assuming that viscous flow plays a role at low strains. To

  9. Very high energy proton-proton cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibig, Tadeusz

    2009-05-01

    The recent Pierre Auger Observatory result suggesting a coincidence of extensive air showers arrival directions with “nearby” active galactic nuclei and HiRes discovery of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff indicates protons to be only or at least the strongly dominant component of primary extra galactic cosmic ray flux. However, showers initiated by these ultrahigh energy particles developed faster than predicted by the simulation calculations with conventional interaction models. This could be evidence of the substantial increase of the p-air cross section. The progress in understanding the proton-proton cross section description allows us to examine this possibility, and eventually reject it as an explanation of the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray “pure proton” controversy.

  10. Co-generation of electricity and syngas on proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cell with a perovskite layer as a precursor of a highly efficient reforming catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Tingting; Zhu, Ankang; Guo, Youmin; Wang, Chunchang; Huang, Shouguo; Chen, Huili; Yang, Guangming; Wang, Wei; Shao, Zongping

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a proton conducting solid oxide fuel cell (layered H+-SOFC) is prepared by introducing a La2NiO4perovskite oxide with a Ruddlesden-Popper structure as a catalyst layer onto a conventional NiO + BaZr0.4Ce0.4Y0.2O3-δ (NiO + BZCY4) anode for in situ CO2 dry reforming of methane. The roles of the La2NiO4 catalyst layer on the reforming activity, coking tolerance, electrocatalytic activity and operational stability of the anodes are systematically studied. The La2NiO4 catalyst layer exhibits greater catalytic performance than the NiO + BZCY4 anode during the CO2 dry reforming of methane. An outstanding coking resistance capability is also demonstrated. The layered H+-SOFC consumes H2 produced in situ at the anode and delivers a much higher power output than the conventional cell with the NiO + BZCY4 anode. The improved coking resistance of the layered H+-SOFC results in a steady output voltage of ∼0.6 V under a constant current density of 200 mA cm-2. In summary, the H+-SOFC with La2NiO4 perovskite oxide is a potential energy conversion device for CO2 conversion and utilization with co-generation of electricity and syngas.

  11. PRaVDA: High Energy Physics towards proton Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, T.

    2016-07-01

    Proton radiotherapy is an increasingly popular modality for treating cancers of the head and neck, and in paediatrics. To maximise the potential of proton radiotherapy it is essential to know the distribution, and more importantly the proton stopping powers, of the body tissues between the proton beam and the tumour. A stopping power map could be measured directly, and uncertainties in the treatment vastly reduce, if the patient was imaged with protons instead of conventional x-rays. Here we outline the application of technologies developed for High Energy Physics to provide clinical-quality proton Computed Tomography, in so reducing range uncertainties and enhancing the treatment of cancer.

  12. High efficiency incandescent lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Bermel, Peter; Ilic, Ognjen; Chan, Walker R.; Musabeyoglu, Ahmet; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Harradon, Michael Robert; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-02

    Incandescent lighting structure. The structure includes a thermal emitter that can, but does not have to, include a first photonic crystal on its surface to tailor thermal emission coupled to, in a high-view-factor geometry, a second photonic filter selected to reflect infrared radiation back to the emitter while passing visible light. This structure is highly efficient as compared to standard incandescent light bulbs.

  13. High Efficiency Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbajal, B. G.

    1979-01-01

    The specific activity was to improve the tandem junction Cell (TJC) as a high efficiency solar cell. The TJC development was to be consistent with module assembly and should contribute to the overall goals of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. During 1978, TJC efficiency improved from approximately 11 percent to approximately 16 percent (AMI). Photogenerated current densities in excess of 42 mA/sq cm were observed at AMO. Open circuit voltages as high as 0.615 V were measured at AMO. Fill factor was only 0.68 - 0.75 due to a nonoptimum metal contact design. A device model was conceived in which the solar cell is modelled as a transitor. There are virtually no interconnect or packaging factor systems and the TJC is compatible with all conventional module fabrication systems. A modification of the TJC, the Front Surface Field (FSF) cell, was also explored.

  14. High efficiency magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A.; Jayaraman, Chaitanya P.; Anand, Davinder K.; Kirk, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Research activities concerning high efficiency permanent magnet plus electromagnet (PM/EM) pancake magnetic bearings at the University of Maryland are reported. A description of the construction and working of the magnetic bearing is provided. Next, parameters needed to describe the bearing are explained. Then, methods developed for the design and testing of magnetic bearings are summarized. Finally, a new magnetic bearing which allows active torque control in the off axes directions is discussed.

  15. High Efficiency, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Donald Stanton

    2010-03-31

    Energy use in trucks has been increasing at a faster rate than that of automobiles within the U.S. transportation sector. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), a 23% increase in fuel consumption for the U.S. heavy duty truck segment is expected between 2009 to 2020. The heavy duty vehicle oil consumption is projected to grow between 2009 and 2050 while light duty vehicle (LDV) fuel consumption will eventually experience a decrease. By 2050, the oil consumption rate by LDVs is anticipated to decrease below 2009 levels due to CAFE standards and biofuel use. In contrast, the heavy duty oil consumption rate is anticipated to double. The increasing trend in oil consumption for heavy trucks is linked to the vitality, security, and growth of the U.S. economy. An essential part of a stable and vibrant U.S. economy is a productive U.S. trucking industry. Studies have shown that the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) is strongly correlated to freight transport. Over 90% of all U.S. freight tonnage is transported by diesel power and over 75% is transported by trucks. Given the vital role that the trucking industry plays in the economy, improving the efficiency of the transportation of goods was a central focus of the Cummins High Efficient Clean Combustion (HECC) program. In a commercial vehicle, the diesel engine remains the largest source of fuel efficiency loss, but remains the greatest opportunity for fuel efficiency improvements. In addition to reducing oil consumption and the dependency on foreign oil, this project will mitigate the impact on the environment by meeting US EPA 2010 emissions regulations. Innovation is a key element in sustaining a U.S. trucking industry that is competitive in global markets. Unlike passenger vehicles, the trucking industry cannot simply downsize the vehicle and still transport the freight with improved efficiency. The truck manufacturing and supporting industries are faced with numerous

  16. Proton tracking in a high-granularity Digital Tracking Calorimeter for proton CT purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, H. E. S.; Alme, J.; Biegun, A.; van den Brink, A.; Chaar, M.; Fehlker, D.; Meric, I.; Odland, O. H.; Peitzmann, T.; Rocco, E.; Ullaland, K.; Wang, H.; Yang, S.; Zhang, C.; Röhrich, D.

    2017-07-01

    Radiation therapy with protons as of today utilizes information from x-ray CT in order to estimate the proton stopping power of the traversed tissue in a patient. The conversion from x-ray attenuation to proton stopping power in tissue introduces range uncertainties of the order of 2-3% of the range, uncertainties that are contributing to an increase of the necessary planning margins added to the target volume in a patient. Imaging methods and modalities, such as Dual Energy CT and proton CT, have come into consideration in the pursuit of obtaining an as good as possible estimate of the proton stopping power. In this study, a Digital Tracking Calorimeter is benchmarked for proof-of-concept for proton CT purposes. The Digital Tracking Calorimeter was originally designed for the reconstruction of high-energy electromagnetic showers for the ALICE-FoCal project. The presented prototype forms the basis for a proton CT system using a single technology for tracking and calorimetry. This advantage simplifies the setup and reduces the cost of a proton CT system assembly, and it is a unique feature of the Digital Tracking Calorimeter concept. Data from the AGORFIRM beamline at KVI-CART in Groningen in the Netherlands and Monte Carlo simulation results are used to in order to develop a tracking algorithm for the estimation of the residual ranges of a high number of concurrent proton tracks. High energy protons traversing the detector leave a track through the sensor layers. These tracks are spread out through charge diffusion processes. A charge diffusion model is applied for acquisition of estimates of the deposited energy of the protons in each sensor layer by using the size of the charge diffused area. A model fit of the Bragg Curve is applied to each reconstructed track and through this, estimating the residual range of each proton. The range of the individual protons can at present be estimated with a resolution of 4%. The readout system for this prototype is able to

  17. High power solid state rf amplifier for proton accelerator.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akhilesh; Sharma, Deepak Kumar; Gupta, Alok Kumar; Hannurkar, P R

    2008-01-01

    A 1.5 kW solid state rf amplifier at 352 MHz has been developed and tested at RRCAT. This rf source for cw operation will be used as a part of rf system of 100 MeV proton linear accelerator. A rf power of 1.5 kW has been achieved by combining output power from eight 220 W rf amplifier modules. Amplifier modules, eight-way power combiner and divider, and directional coupler were designed indigenously for this development. High efficiency, ease of fabrication, and low cost are the main features of this design.

  18. Superstructure high efficiency photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, M.; So, L. C.; Leburton, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    A novel class of photovoltaic cascade structures is introduced which features multijunction upper subcells. These superstructure high efficiency photovoltaics (SHEP's) exhibit enhanced upper subcell spectral response because of the additional junctions which serve to reduce bulk recombination losses by decreasing the mean collection distance for photogenerated minority carriers. Two possible electrical configurations were studied and compared: a three-terminal scheme that allows both subcells to be operated at their individual maximum power points and a two-terminal configuration with an intercell ohmic contact for series interconnection. The three-terminal devices were found to be superior both in terms of beginning-of-life expectancy and radiation tolerance. Realistic simulations of three-terminal AlGaAs/GaAs SHEP's show that one sun AMO efficiencies in excess of 26 percent are possible.

  19. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications

    DOE PAGES

    Prall, Matthias; Durante, Marco; Berger, Thomas; ...

    2016-06-10

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allowsmore » imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. As a result, tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics.« less

  20. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Prall, M.; Durante, M.; Berger, T.; Przybyla, B.; Graeff, C.; Lang, P. M.; LaTessa, C.; Shestov, L.; Simoniello, P.; Danly, C.; Mariam, F.; Merrill, F.; Nedrow, P.; Wilde, C.; Varentsov, D.

    2016-01-01

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allows imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. Tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics. PMID:27282667

  1. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Prall, Matthias; Durante, Marco; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, B.; Graeff, C.; Lang, Phillipp M.; LaTessa, Ciara; Shestov, Less; Simoniello, P.; Danly, Christopher R.; Mariam, Fesseha Gebre; Merrill, Frank Edward; Nedrow, Paul; Wilde, Carl Huerstel; Varentsov, Dmitry

    2016-06-10

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allows imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. As a result, tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics.

  2. High efficiency multifrequency feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajioka, J. S.; Tsuda, G. I.; Leeper, W. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Antenna systems and particularly compact and simple antenna feeds which can transmit and receive simultaneously in at least three frequency bands, each with high efficiency and polarization diversity are described. The feed system is applicable for frequency bands having nominal frequency bands with the ratio 1:4:6. By way of example, satellite communications telemetry bands operate in frequency bands 0.8 - 1.0 GHz, 3.7 - 4.2 GHz and 5.9 - 6.4 GHz. In addition, the antenna system of the invention has monopulse capability for reception with circular or diverse polarization at frequency band 1.

  3. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1984-01-31

    A high efficiency photoionization detector is described using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36 [+-] 0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20 C. 6 figs.

  4. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency photoionization detector using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36.+-.0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20.degree. C.

  5. High gradient linac for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, S.; Grudiev, A.; Latina, A.

    2017-04-01

    Proposed for the first time almost 30 years ago, the research on radio frequency linacs for hadron therapy experienced a sparkling interest in the past decade. The different projects found a common ground on a relatively high rf operating frequency of 3 GHz, taking advantage of the availability of affordable and reliable commercial klystrons at this frequency. This article presents for the first time the design of a proton therapy linac, called TULIP all-linac, from the source up to 230 MeV. In the first part, we will review the rationale of linacs for hadron therapy. We then divided this paper in two main sections: first, we will discuss the rf design of the different accelerating structures that compose TULIP; second, we will present the beam dynamics design of the different linac sections.

  6. Electron reconstruction and identification efficiency measurements with the ATLAS detector using the 2011 LHC proton-proton collision data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Khalek, S. Abdel; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Verzini, M. J. Alconada; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Coutinho, Y. Amaral; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Ammosov, V. V.; Santos, S. P. Amor Dos; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Bella, L. Aperio; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Mayes, J. Backus; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Costa, J. Barreiro Guimarães da; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Noccioli, E. Benhar; Garcia, J. A. Benitez; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Kuutmann, E. Bergeaas; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; De Mendizabal, J. Bilbao; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, G.; Brown, J.; Renstrom, P. A. Bruckman de; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Urbán, S. Cabrera; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Toro, R. Camacho; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Armadans, R. Caminal; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Garrido, M. D. M. Capeans; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Gimenez, V. Castillo; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Barajas, C. A. Chavez; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Moursli, R. Cherkaoui El; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christidi, I. A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Muiño, P. Conde; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Ortuzar, M. Crispin; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Donszelmann, T. Cuhadar; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; De Sousa, M. J. Da Cunha Sargedas; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Daniells, A. C.; Hoffmann, M. Dano; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Ciaccio, A. Di; Di Ciaccio, L.; Domenico, A. Di; Donato, C. Di; Girolamo, A. Di; Girolamo, B. Di; Mattia, A. Di; Micco, B. Di; Nardo, R. Di; Simone, A. Di; Sipio, R. Di; Valentino, D. Di; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Vale, M. A. B. do; Wemans, A. Do Valle; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Dwuznik, M.; Dyndal, M.; Ebke, J.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Engelmann, R.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Perez, S. Fernandez; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; de Lima, D. E. Ferreira; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Parodi, A. Ferretto; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, M. J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Castillo, L. R. Flores; Bustos, A. C. Florez; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Torregrosa, E. Fullana; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y. S.; Walls, F. M. Garay; Garberson, F.; García, C.; Navarro, J. E. García; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Glonti, G. L.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goeringer, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Fajardo, L. S. Gomez; Gonçalo, R.; Costa, J. Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da; Gonella, L.; de la Hoz, S. González; Parra, G. Gonzalez; Silva, M. L. Gonzalez; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grout, Z. J.; Grybel, K.; Guan, L.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guicheney, C.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Gunther, J.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guttman, N.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageboeck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Heisterkamp, S.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Heller, C.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hengler, C.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hensel, C.; Herbert, G. H.; Jiménez, Y. Hernández; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hofmann, J. I.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holmes, T. R.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Hurwitz, M.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Ideal, E.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Inamaru, Y.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Quiles, A. Irles; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Ivashin, A. V.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, J. N.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanty, L.; Jeng, G.-Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Ji, W.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Belenguer, M.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Johansson, K. E.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jungst, R. M.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kanno, T.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karastathis, N.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Keeler, R.; Keener, P. T.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Keller, J. S.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Keung, J.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Khodinov, A.; Khomich, A.; Khoo, T. J.; Khoriauli, G.; Khoroshilov, A.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, H.; Kim, S. H.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, R. S. B.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kitamura, T.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiuchi, K.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klinkby, E. B.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P. F.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koevesarki, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. A.; Kohlmann, S.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Koi, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Koletsou, I.; Koll, J.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; König, S.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Köpke, L.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A. A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Korotkov, V. A.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotov, S.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotwal, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kral, V.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J. K.; Kravchenko, A.; Kreiss, S.; Kretz, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kreutzfeldt, K.; Krieger, P.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Kruker, T.; Krumnack, N.; Krumshteyn, Z. V.; Kruse, A.; Kruse, M. C.; Kruskal, M.; Kubota, T.; Kuday, S.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuhl, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kuna, M.; Kunkle, J.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kurumida, R.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; La Rosa, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Labarga, L.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Laier, H.; Lambourne, L.; Lammers, S.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lançon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lang, V. S.; Lange, C.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavorini, V.; Lavrijsen, W.; Law, A. T.; Laycock, P.; Le, B. T.; Le Dortz, O.; Guirriec, E. Le; Menedeu, E. Le; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, C. A.; Lee, H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, G.; Lefebvre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehan, A.; Lehmacher, M.; Miotto, G. Lehmann; Lei, X.; Leister, A. G.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzen, G.; Lenzi, B.; Leone, R.; Leonhardt, K.; Leontsinis, S.; Leroy, C.; Lester, C. G.; Lester, C. M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levy, M.; Lewis, A.; Lewis, G. H.; Leyko, A. M.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, H.; Li, H. L.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Liang, Z.; Liao, H.; Liberti, B.; Lichard, P.; Lie, K.; Liebal, J.; Liebig, W.; Limbach, C.; Limosani, A.; Limper, M.; Lin, S. C.; Linde, F.; Lindquist, B. E.; Linnemann, J. T.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Lisovyi, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, B.; Liu, D.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Livermore, S. S. A.; Lleres, A.; Llorente Merino, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Loddenkoetter, T.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loevschall-Jensen, A. E.; Loginov, A.; Loh, C. W.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Lombardo, V. P.; Long, J. D.; Long, R. E.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Paredes, B. Lopez; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Loscutoff, P.; Losty, M. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lowe, A. J.; Lu, F.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lukas, W.; Luminari, L.; Lundberg, O.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lungwitz, M.; Lynn, D.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Maček, B.; Miguens, J. Machado; Macina, D.; Madaffari, D.; Madar, R.; Maddocks, H. J.; Mader, W. F.; Madsen, A.; Maeno, M.; Maeno, T.; Magradze, E.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahlstedt, J.; Mahmoud, S.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V. M.; Malyukov, S.; Mamuzic, J.; Mandelli, B.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Mandrysch, R.; Maneira, J.; Manfredini, A.; de Andrade Filho, L. Manhaes; Ramos, J. A. Manjarres; Mann, A.; Manning, P. M.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mantifel, R.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchand, J. F.; Marchese, F.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marino, C. P.; Marques, C. N.; Marroquim, F.; Marsden, S. P.; Marshall, Z.; Marti, L. F.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, B.; Martin, J. P.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Martin dit Latour, B.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, M.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marx, M.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massa, I.; Massol, N.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Matricon, P.; Matsunaga, H.; Matsushita, T.; Mättig, P.; Mättig, S.; Mattmann, J.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mazini, R.; Mazzaferro, L.; Mc Goldrick, G.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McCubbin, N. A.; McFarlane, K. W.; Mcfayden, J. A.; Mchedlidze, G.; Mclaughlan, T.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Meade, A.; Mechnich, J.; Medinnis, M.; Meehan, S.; Meera-Lebbai, R.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meineck, C.; Meirose, B.; Melachrinos, C.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meloni, F.; Mendoza Navas, L.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mercurio, K. M.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meric, N.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Merritt, H.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Middleton, R. P.; Migas, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Milstein, D.; Minaenko, A. A.; Moya, M. Miñano; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mirabelli, G.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Mitsui, S.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Moeller, V.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Mönig, K.; Monini, C.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Herrera, C. Mora; Moraes, A.; Morange, N.; Morel, J.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, M.; Morii, M.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Morvaj, L.; Moser, H. G.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Munwes, Y.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagarkar, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagel, M.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Nanava, G.; Narayan, R.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, T. K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newcomer, F. M.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolics, K.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O'Brien, B. J.; O'grady, F.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, M. I.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Ohshima, T.; Okamura, W.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Olchevski, A. G.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Damazio, D. Oliveira; Garcia, E. Oliver; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Barrera, C. Oropeza; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Garzon, G. Otero y.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pages, A. Pacheco; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pedersen, M.; Lopez, S. Pedraza; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; García-Estan, M. T. Pérez; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petteni, M.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Piec, S. M.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pires, S.; Pizio, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Pohl, M.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Portell Bueso, X.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Przysiezniak, H.; Ptacek, E.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quilty, D.; Qureshi, A.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rao, K.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, T. C.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reinsch, A.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodrigues, L.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romeo, G.; Adam, E. Romero; Rompotis, N.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, A.; Rose, M.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Ferrando, B. M. Salvachua; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Castillo, I. Santoyo; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savard, P.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaelicke, A.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Camillocci, E. Solfaroli; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sorin, V.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; Denis, R. D. St.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramania, HS.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Gallego, E. Valladolid; Vallecorsa, S.; Ferrer, J. A. Valls; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; Eldik, N. van; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Schroeder, T. Vazquez; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Schmitt, H. von der; Radziewski, H. von; Toerne, E. von; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Milosavljevic, M. Vranjes; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2014-07-01

    Many of the interesting physics processes to be measured at the LHC have a signature involving one or more isolated electrons. The electron reconstruction and identification efficiencies of the ATLAS detector at the LHC have been evaluated using proton-proton collision data collected in 2011 at TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb. Tag-and-probe methods using events with leptonic decays of and bosons and mesons are employed to benchmark these performance parameters. The combination of all measurements results in identification efficiencies determined with an accuracy at the few per mil level for electron transverse energy greater than 30 GeV.

  7. The second generation Singapore high resolution proton beam writing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, J. A. van; Malar, P.; Baysic de Vera, Armin

    2012-02-15

    A new proton beam focusing facility, designed for proton beam writing (PBW) applications has been tested. PBW allows for proximity free structuring of high aspect ratio, high-density 3D nanostructures. The new facility is designed around OM52 compact quadrupole lenses capable of operating in a variety of high demagnification configurations. Performance tests show that proton beams can be focused down to 19.0 x 29.9 nm{sup 2} and single line scans show a beam width of 12.6 nm. The ultimate goal of sub 10 nm structuring with MeV protons will be discussed.

  8. HIGH EFFICIENCY SYNGAS GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Copeland; Yevgenia Gershanovich; Brian Windecker

    2005-02-01

    This project investigated an efficient and low cost method of auto-thermally reforming natural gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Reforming is the highest cost step in producing products such as methanol and Fisher Tropsch liquids (i.e., gas to liquids); and reducing the cost of reforming is the key to reducing the cost of these products. Steam reforming is expensive because of the high cost of the high nickel alloy reforming tubes (i.e., indirectly fired reforming tubes). Conventional auto-thermal or Partial Oxidation (POX) reforming minimizes the size and cost of the reformers and provides a near optimum mixture of CO and hydrogen. However POX requires pure oxygen, which consumes power and significantly increases the cost to reforming. Our high efficiency process extracts oxygen from low-pressure air with novel oxygen sorbent and transfers the oxygen to a nickel-catalyzed reformer. The syngas is generated at process pressure (typically 20 to 40 bar) without nitrogen dilution and has a 1CO to 2H{sub 2} ratio that is near optimum for the subsequent production of Fisher-Tropsch liquid to liquids and other chemicals (i.e., Gas to Liquids, GTL). Our high process efficiency comes from the way we transfer the oxygen into the reformer. All of the components of the process, except for the oxygen sorbent, are commonly used in commercial practice. A process based on a longlived, regenerable, oxygen transfer sorbent could substantially reduce the cost of natural gas reforming to syngas. Lower cost syngas (CO + 2H{sub 2}) that is the feedstock for GTL would reduce the cost of GTL and for other commercial applications (e.g., methanol, other organic chemicals). The vast gas resources of Alaska's North Slope (ANS) offer more than 22 Tcf of gas and GTL production in this application alone, and could account for as much as 300,000 to 700,000 bpd for 20 to 30+ years. We developed a new sorbent, which is an essential part of the High Efficiency Oxygen Process (HOP). We tested the

  9. Dynamics of high-energy proton beam acceleration and focusing from hemisphere-cone targets by high-intensity lasers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, B; Foord, M E; Wei, M S; Stephens, R B; Key, M H; McLean, H; Patel, P K; Beg, F N

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration and focusing of high-energy proton beams from fast-ignition (FI) -related hemisphere-cone assembled targets have been numerically studied by hybrid particle-in-cell simulations and compared with those from planar-foil and open-hemisphere targets. The whole physical process including the laser-plasma interaction has been self-consistently modeled for 15 ps, at which time the protons reach asymptotic motion. It is found that the achievable focus of proton beams is limited by the thermal pressure gradients in the co-moving hot electrons, which induce a transverse defocusing electric field that bends proton trajectories near the axis. For the advanced hemisphere-cone target, the flow of hot electrons along the cone wall induces a local transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement in proton focusing; however, it leads to a significant loss of longitudinal sheath potential, reducing the total conversion efficiency from laser to protons.

  10. High-efficiency CARM

    SciTech Connect

    Bratman, V.L.; Kol`chugin, B.D.; Samsonov, S.V.; Volkov, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Cyclotron Autoresonance Maser (CARM) is a well-known variety of FEMs. Unlike the ubitron in which electrons move in a periodical undulator field, in the CARM the particles move along helical trajectories in a uniform magnetic field. Since it is much simpler to generate strong homogeneous magnetic fields than periodical ones for a relatively low electron energy ({Brit_pounds}{le}1-3 MeV) the period of particles` trajectories in the CARM can be sufficiently smaller than in the undulator in which, moreover, the field decreases rapidly in the transverse direction. In spite of this evident advantage, the number of papers on CARM is an order less than on ubitron, which is apparently caused by the low (not more than 10 %) CARM efficiency in experiments. At the same time, ubitrons operating in two rather complicated regimes-trapping and adiabatic deceleration of particles and combined undulator and reversed guiding fields - yielded efficiencies of 34 % and 27 %, respectively. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that high efficiency can be reached even for a simplest version of the CARM. In order to reduce sensitivity to an axial velocity spread of particles, a short interaction length where electrons underwent only 4-5 cyclotron oscillations was used in this work. Like experiments, a narrow anode outlet of a field-emission electron gun cut out the {open_quotes}most rectilinear{close_quotes} near-axis part of the electron beam. Additionally, magnetic field of a small correcting coil compensated spurious electron oscillations pumped by the anode aperture. A kicker in the form of a sloping to the axis frame with current provided a control value of rotary velocity at a small additional velocity spread. A simple cavity consisting of a cylindrical waveguide section restricted by a cut-off waveguide on the cathode side and by a Bragg reflector on the collector side was used as the CARM-oscillator microwave system.

  11. High Efficiency Integrated Package

    SciTech Connect

    Ibbetson, James

    2013-09-15

    Solid-state lighting based on LEDs has emerged as a superior alternative to inefficient conventional lighting, particularly incandescent. LED lighting can lead to 80 percent energy savings; can last 50,000 hours – 2-50 times longer than most bulbs; and contains no toxic lead or mercury. However, to enable mass adoption, particularly at the consumer level, the cost of LED luminaires must be reduced by an order of magnitude while achieving superior efficiency, light quality and lifetime. To become viable, energy-efficient replacement solutions must deliver system efficacies of ≥ 100 lumens per watt (LPW) with excellent color rendering (CRI > 85) at a cost that enables payback cycles of two years or less for commercial applications. This development will enable significant site energy savings as it targets commercial and retail lighting applications that are most sensitive to the lifetime operating costs with their extended operating hours per day. If costs are reduced substantially, dramatic energy savings can be realized by replacing incandescent lighting in the residential market as well. In light of these challenges, Cree proposed to develop a multi-chip integrated LED package with an output of > 1000 lumens of warm white light operating at an efficacy of at least 128 LPW with a CRI > 85. This product will serve as the light engine for replacement lamps and luminaires. At the end of the proposed program, this integrated package was to be used in a proof-of-concept lamp prototype to demonstrate the component’s viability in a common form factor. During this project Cree SBTC developed an efficient, compact warm-white LED package with an integrated remote color down-converter. Via a combination of intensive optical, electrical, and thermal optimization, a package design was obtained that met nearly all project goals. This package emitted 1295 lm under instant-on, room-temperature testing conditions, with an efficacy of 128.4 lm/W at a color temperature of ~2873

  12. Material efficiency studies for a Compton camera designed to measure characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted during proton beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Daniel; Polf, Jerimy C; Peterson, Steve W; Gillin, Michael T; Beddar, Sam

    2011-05-21

    Prompt gamma rays emitted from biological tissues during proton irradiation carry dosimetric and spectroscopic information that can assist with treatment verification and provide an indication of the biological response of the irradiated tissues. Compton cameras are capable of determining the origin and energy of gamma rays. However, prompt gamma monitoring during proton therapy requires new Compton camera designs that perform well at the high gamma energies produced when tissues are bombarded with therapeutic protons. In this study we optimize the materials and geometry of a three-stage Compton camera for prompt gamma detection and calculate the theoretical efficiency of such a detector. The materials evaluated in this study include germanium, bismuth germanate (BGO), NaI, xenon, silicon and lanthanum bromide (LaBr(3)). For each material, the dimensions of each detector stage were optimized to produce the maximum number of relevant interactions. These results were used to predict the efficiency of various multi-material cameras. The theoretical detection efficiencies of the most promising multi-material cameras were then calculated for the photons emitted from a tissue-equivalent phantom irradiated by therapeutic proton beams ranging from 50 to 250 MeV. The optimized detector stages had a lateral extent of 10 × 10 cm(2) with the thickness of the initial two stages dependent on the detector material. The thickness of the third stage was fixed at 10 cm regardless of material. The most efficient single-material cameras were composed of germanium (3 cm) and BGO (2.5 cm). These cameras exhibited efficiencies of 1.15 × 10(-4) and 9.58 × 10(-5) per incident proton, respectively. The most efficient multi-material camera design consisted of two initial stages of germanium (3 cm) and a final stage of BGO, resulting in a theoretical efficiency of 1.26 × 10(-4) per incident proton.

  13. Material efficiency studies for a Compton camera designed to measure characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted during proton beam radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Daniel; Polf, Jerimy C; Peterson, Steve W; Gillin, Michael T; Beddar, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Prompt gamma rays emitted from biological tissues during proton irradiation carry dosimetric and spectroscopic information that can assist with treatment verification and provide an indication of the biological response of the irradiated tissues. Compton cameras are capable of determining the origin and energy of gamma rays. However, prompt gamma monitoring during proton therapy requires new Compton camera designs that perform well at the high gamma energies produced when tissues are bombarded with therapeutic protons. In this study we optimize the materials and geometry of a three-stage Compton camera for prompt gamma detection and calculate the theoretical efficiency of such a detector. The materials evaluated in this study include germanium, bismuth germanate (BGO), NaI, xenon, silicon and lanthanum bromide (LaBr3). For each material, the dimensions of each detector stage were optimized to produce the maximum number of relevant interactions. These results were used to predict the efficiency of various multi-material cameras. The theoretical detection efficiencies of the most promising multi-material cameras were then calculated for the photons emitted from a tissue-equivalent phantom irradiated by therapeutic proton beams ranging from 50 to 250 MeV. The optimized detector stages had a lateral extent of 10 × 10 cm2 with the thickness of the initial two stages dependent on the detector material. The thickness of the third stage was fixed at 10 cm regardless of material. The most efficient single-material cameras were composed of germanium (3 cm) and BGO (2.5 cm). These cameras exhibited efficiencies of 1.15 × 10−4 and 9.58 × 10−5 per incident proton, respectively. The most efficient multi-material camera design consisted of two initial stages of germanium (3 cm) and a final stage of BGO, resulting in a theoretical efficiency of 1.26 × 10−4 per incident proton. PMID:21508442

  14. Periods of High Intensity Solar Proton Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Michael A.; Stauffer, Craig A.; Jordan, Thomas M.; Adams, James H.; Dietrich, William F.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis is presented for times during a space mission that specified solar proton flux levels are exceeded. This includes both total time and continuous time periods during missions. Results for the solar maximum and solar minimum phases of the solar cycle are presented and compared for a broad range of proton energies and shielding levels. This type of approach is more amenable to reliability analysis for spacecraft systems and instrumentation than standard statistical models.

  15. Revealing proton shape fluctuations with incoherent diffraction at high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mantysaari, H.; Schenke, B.

    2016-08-30

    The di erential cross section of exclusive di ractive vector meson production in electron proton collisions carries important information on the geometric structure of the proton. More speci cally, the coherent cross section as a function of the transferred transverse momentum is sensitive to the size of the proton, while the incoherent, or proton dissociative cross section is sensitive to uctuations of the gluon distribution in coordinate space. We show that at high energies the experimentally measured coherent and incoherent cross sections for the production of J= mesons are very well reproduced within the color glass condensate framework when strong geometric uctuations of the gluon distribution in the proton are included. For meson production we also nd reasonable agreement. We study in detail the dependence of our results on various model parameters, including the average proton shape, analyze the e ect of saturation scale and color charge uctuations and constrain the degree of geometric uctuations.

  16. Revealing proton shape fluctuations with incoherent diffraction at high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mantysaari, H.; Schenke, B.

    2016-08-30

    The di erential cross section of exclusive di ractive vector meson production in electron proton collisions carries important information on the geometric structure of the proton. More speci cally, the coherent cross section as a function of the transferred transverse momentum is sensitive to the size of the proton, while the incoherent, or proton dissociative cross section is sensitive to uctuations of the gluon distribution in coordinate space. We show that at high energies the experimentally measured coherent and incoherent cross sections for the production of J= mesons are very well reproduced within the color glass condensate framework when strong geometric uctuations of the gluon distribution in the proton are included. For meson production we also nd reasonable agreement. We study in detail the dependence of our results on various model parameters, including the average proton shape, analyze the e ect of saturation scale and color charge uctuations and constrain the degree of geometric uctuations.

  17. Revealing proton shape fluctuations with incoherent diffraction at high energy

    DOE PAGES

    Mantysaari, H.; Schenke, B.

    2016-08-30

    The di erential cross section of exclusive di ractive vector meson production in electron proton collisions carries important information on the geometric structure of the proton. More speci cally, the coherent cross section as a function of the transferred transverse momentum is sensitive to the size of the proton, while the incoherent, or proton dissociative cross section is sensitive to uctuations of the gluon distribution in coordinate space. We show that at high energies the experimentally measured coherent and incoherent cross sections for the production of J= mesons are very well reproduced within the color glass condensate framework when strongmore » geometric uctuations of the gluon distribution in the proton are included. For meson production we also nd reasonable agreement. We study in detail the dependence of our results on various model parameters, including the average proton shape, analyze the e ect of saturation scale and color charge uctuations and constrain the degree of geometric uctuations.« less

  18. Geometrical splitting technique to improve the computational efficiency in Monte Carlo calculations for proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Méndez, José; Perl, Joseph; Faddegon, Bruce; Schümann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To present the implementation and validation of a geometrical based variance reduction technique for the calculation of phase space data for proton therapy dose calculation. Methods: The treatment heads at the Francis H Burr Proton Therapy Center were modeled with a new Monte Carlo tool (TOPAS based on Geant4). For variance reduction purposes, two particle-splitting planes were implemented. First, the particles were split upstream of the second scatterer or at the second ionization chamber. Then, particles reaching another plane immediately upstream of the field specific aperture were split again. In each case, particles were split by a factor of 8. At the second ionization chamber and at the latter plane, the cylindrical symmetry of the proton beam was exploited to position the split particles at randomly spaced locations rotated around the beam axis. Phase space data in IAEA format were recorded at the treatment head exit and the computational efficiency was calculated. Depth–dose curves and beam profiles were analyzed. Dose distributions were compared for a voxelized water phantom for different treatment fields for both the reference and optimized simulations. In addition, dose in two patients was simulated with and without particle splitting to compare the efficiency and accuracy of the technique. Results: A normalized computational efficiency gain of a factor of 10–20.3 was reached for phase space calculations for the different treatment head options simulated. Depth–dose curves and beam profiles were in reasonable agreement with the simulation done without splitting: within 1% for depth–dose with an average difference of (0.2 ± 0.4)%, 1 standard deviation, and a 0.3% statistical uncertainty of the simulations in the high dose region; 1.6% for planar fluence with an average difference of (0.4 ± 0.5)% and a statistical uncertainty of 0.3% in the high fluence region. The percentage differences between dose distributions in water for

  19. Geometrical splitting technique to improve the computational efficiency in Monte Carlo calculations for proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Mendez, Jose; Perl, Joseph; Faddegon, Bruce; Schuemann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To present the implementation and validation of a geometrical based variance reduction technique for the calculation of phase space data for proton therapy dose calculation. Methods: The treatment heads at the Francis H Burr Proton Therapy Center were modeled with a new Monte Carlo tool (TOPAS based on Geant4). For variance reduction purposes, two particle-splitting planes were implemented. First, the particles were split upstream of the second scatterer or at the second ionization chamber. Then, particles reaching another plane immediately upstream of the field specific aperture were split again. In each case, particles were split by a factor of 8. At the second ionization chamber and at the latter plane, the cylindrical symmetry of the proton beam was exploited to position the split particles at randomly spaced locations rotated around the beam axis. Phase space data in IAEA format were recorded at the treatment head exit and the computational efficiency was calculated. Depth-dose curves and beam profiles were analyzed. Dose distributions were compared for a voxelized water phantom for different treatment fields for both the reference and optimized simulations. In addition, dose in two patients was simulated with and without particle splitting to compare the efficiency and accuracy of the technique. Results: A normalized computational efficiency gain of a factor of 10-20.3 was reached for phase space calculations for the different treatment head options simulated. Depth-dose curves and beam profiles were in reasonable agreement with the simulation done without splitting: within 1% for depth-dose with an average difference of (0.2 {+-} 0.4)%, 1 standard deviation, and a 0.3% statistical uncertainty of the simulations in the high dose region; 1.6% for planar fluence with an average difference of (0.4 {+-} 0.5)% and a statistical uncertainty of 0.3% in the high fluence region. The percentage differences between dose distributions in water for simulations

  20. Sources of high-energy protons in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Simpson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The passage of Pioneer 11 through Saturn's magnetosphere revealed an especially intense region of high-energy particle fluxes that places unique constraints on models for sources of high-energy protons in the innermost radiation zones. Of special interest is the flux of protons with energies above 35 MeV which was measured with a fission cell in the innermost magnetosphere between the A ring and the orbit of Mimas. The negative phase space density gradients derived from the proton and electron observations in this region imply that steady-state inward diffusion from the outer magnetosphere is not an adequate source for these high-energy protons. In the present paper, the nature of the Crand source at Saturn is examined, and its significance for injection of high-energy protons into the region inside L = 4 is estimated.

  1. Unique Proton Dynamics in an Efficient MOF-Based Proton Conductor.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yong-Sheng; Hu, Xiao-Peng; Han, Zhen; Dong, Xi-Yan; Zang, Shuang-Quan; Mak, Thomas C W

    2017-03-08

    Recently, research on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) serving as a new type of proton conductive material has resulted in many exciting achievements. However, direct observation of a well-established proton-transfer mechanism still remains challenging in MOFs and other crystalline compounds, let alone other conductive materials. Herein we report the solvothermal synthesis of a new proton-conducting MOF, (Me2NH2)[Eu(L)] (H4L = 5-(phosphonomethyl)isophthalic acid). The compound consists of a layered anionic framework [Eu(L)](-) and interlayer-embedded counter cations (Me2NH2)(+), which interact with adjacent uncoordinated O atoms of phosphonate groups to form strongly (N-H···O) hydrogen-bonded chains aligned parallel to the c-axis. Facile proton transfer along these chains endows the compound with single-crystal anhydrous conductivity of 1.25 × 10(-3) S·cm(-1) at 150 °C, and water-assisted proton conductivity for a compacted pellet of microcrystalline crystals attains 3.76 × 10(-3) S·cm(-1) at 100 °C and 98% relative humidity (RH). Proton dynamics (vibrating and transfer) within N-H···O chains of the compound are directly observed using a combination of anisotropic conductivity measurements and control experiments using large single-crystals and pelletized samples, in situ variable-temperature characterization techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD), diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrum (DRIFTS), and variable-temperature photoluminescence. In particular, a scarce single-crystal to single-crystal (SCSC) transformation accompanied by proton transfer between an anionic structure (Me2NH2)[Eu(L)] and an identical neutral framework [Eu(HL)] has been identified.

  2. Si film separation obtained by high energy proton implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Braley, C.; Mazen, F.; Papon, A.-M.; Rieutord, F.; Charvet, A.-M.; Ntsoenzok, E.

    2012-11-06

    High energy protons implantation in the 1-1.5 MeV range can be used to detach free-standing thin silicon films with thickness between 15 and 30 {mu}m. Recently, we showed that Si orientation has a strong effect on the layer separation threshold fluence and efficiency. While complete delamination of (111)Si films is achieved, (100)Si films separation is more challenging due to blistering phenomena or partial separation of the implanted layer. In this work, we study the fracture mechanism in (100) and (111)Si after high energy implantation in order to understand the origin of such a behavior. We notably point out that fracture precursor defects, i.e. the platelets, preferentially form on (111) planes, as a consequence of the low strain level in the damaged region in our implantation conditions. Fracture therefore propagates easily in (111)Si, while it requires higher fluence to overcome unfavorable precursors orientation and propagate in (100)Si.

  3. Effect of proton-conduction in electrolyte on electric efficiency of multi-stage solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Yoshio; Tachikawa, Yuya; Somekawa, Takaaki; Hatae, Toru; Matsumoto, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Kazunari

    2015-07-28

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are promising electrochemical devices that enable the highest fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiencies under high operating temperatures. The concept of multi-stage electrochemical oxidation using SOFCs has been proposed and studied over the past several decades for further improving the electrical efficiency. However, the improvement is limited by fuel dilution downstream of the fuel flow. Therefore, evolved technologies are required to achieve considerably higher electrical efficiencies. Here we present an innovative concept for a critically-high fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiency of up to 85% based on the lower heating value (LHV), in which a high-temperature multi-stage electrochemical oxidation is combined with a proton-conducting solid electrolyte. Switching a solid electrolyte material from a conventional oxide-ion conducting material to a proton-conducting material under the high-temperature multi-stage electrochemical oxidation mechanism has proven to be highly advantageous for the electrical efficiency. The DC efficiency of 85% (LHV) corresponds to a net AC efficiency of approximately 76% (LHV), where the net AC efficiency refers to the transmission-end AC efficiency. This evolved concept will yield a considerably higher efficiency with a much smaller generation capacity than the state-of-the-art several tens-of-MW-class most advanced combined cycle (MACC).

  4. Effect of proton-conduction in electrolyte on electric efficiency of multi-stage solid oxide fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Yoshio; Tachikawa, Yuya; Somekawa, Takaaki; Hatae, Toru; Matsumoto, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are promising electrochemical devices that enable the highest fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiencies under high operating temperatures. The concept of multi-stage electrochemical oxidation using SOFCs has been proposed and studied over the past several decades for further improving the electrical efficiency. However, the improvement is limited by fuel dilution downstream of the fuel flow. Therefore, evolved technologies are required to achieve considerably higher electrical efficiencies. Here we present an innovative concept for a critically-high fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiency of up to 85% based on the lower heating value (LHV), in which a high-temperature multi-stage electrochemical oxidation is combined with a proton-conducting solid electrolyte. Switching a solid electrolyte material from a conventional oxide-ion conducting material to a proton-conducting material under the high-temperature multi-stage electrochemical oxidation mechanism has proven to be highly advantageous for the electrical efficiency. The DC efficiency of 85% (LHV) corresponds to a net AC efficiency of approximately 76% (LHV), where the net AC efficiency refers to the transmission-end AC efficiency. This evolved concept will yield a considerably higher efficiency with a much smaller generation capacity than the state-of-the-art several tens-of-MW-class most advanced combined cycle (MACC). PMID:26218470

  5. Effect of proton-conduction in electrolyte on electric efficiency of multi-stage solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Yoshio; Tachikawa, Yuya; Somekawa, Takaaki; Hatae, Toru; Matsumoto, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Kazunari

    2015-07-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are promising electrochemical devices that enable the highest fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiencies under high operating temperatures. The concept of multi-stage electrochemical oxidation using SOFCs has been proposed and studied over the past several decades for further improving the electrical efficiency. However, the improvement is limited by fuel dilution downstream of the fuel flow. Therefore, evolved technologies are required to achieve considerably higher electrical efficiencies. Here we present an innovative concept for a critically-high fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiency of up to 85% based on the lower heating value (LHV), in which a high-temperature multi-stage electrochemical oxidation is combined with a proton-conducting solid electrolyte. Switching a solid electrolyte material from a conventional oxide-ion conducting material to a proton-conducting material under the high-temperature multi-stage electrochemical oxidation mechanism has proven to be highly advantageous for the electrical efficiency. The DC efficiency of 85% (LHV) corresponds to a net AC efficiency of approximately 76% (LHV), where the net AC efficiency refers to the transmission-end AC efficiency. This evolved concept will yield a considerably higher efficiency with a much smaller generation capacity than the state-of-the-art several tens-of-MW-class most advanced combined cycle (MACC).

  6. Hardness assurance for proton direct ionization-induced SEEs using a high-energy proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Dodd, Paul E.; Doyle, Barney Lee; Trinczek, M.; Blackmore, E. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Reed, R. A.; Pellish, J. A.; LaBel, K. A.; Marshall, P. W.; Swanson, Scot E.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Van Deusen, Stuart B.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Martinez, Marino J.; Gordon, M. S.

    2014-11-06

    The low-energy proton energy spectra of all shielded space environments have the same shape. This shape is easily reproduced in the laboratory by degrading a high-energy proton beam, producing a high-fidelity test environment. We use this test environment to dramatically simplify rate prediction for proton direct ionization effects, allowing the work to be done at high-energy proton facilities, on encapsulated parts, without knowledge of the IC design, and with little or no computer simulations required. Proton direct ionization (PDI) is predicted to significantly contribute to the total error rate under the conditions investigated. Scaling effects are discussed using data from 65-nm, 45-nm, and 32-nm SOI SRAMs. These data also show that grazing-angle protons will dominate the PDI-induced error rate due to their higher effective LET, so PDI hardness assurance methods must account for angular effects to be conservative. As a result, we show that this angular dependence can be exploited to quickly assess whether an IC is susceptible to PDI.

  7. Hardness assurance for proton direct ionization-induced SEEs using a high-energy proton beam

    DOE PAGES

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; ...

    2014-11-06

    The low-energy proton energy spectra of all shielded space environments have the same shape. This shape is easily reproduced in the laboratory by degrading a high-energy proton beam, producing a high-fidelity test environment. We use this test environment to dramatically simplify rate prediction for proton direct ionization effects, allowing the work to be done at high-energy proton facilities, on encapsulated parts, without knowledge of the IC design, and with little or no computer simulations required. Proton direct ionization (PDI) is predicted to significantly contribute to the total error rate under the conditions investigated. Scaling effects are discussed using data frommore » 65-nm, 45-nm, and 32-nm SOI SRAMs. These data also show that grazing-angle protons will dominate the PDI-induced error rate due to their higher effective LET, so PDI hardness assurance methods must account for angular effects to be conservative. As a result, we show that this angular dependence can be exploited to quickly assess whether an IC is susceptible to PDI.« less

  8. Proton shock acceleration using a high contrast high intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Maxence; Roedel, Christian; Kim, Jongjin; Aurand, Bastian; Curry, Chandra; Goede, Sebastian; Propp, Adrienne; Goyon, Clement; Pak, Art; Kerr, Shaun; Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Ruby, John; William, Jackson; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven proton acceleration is a field of intense research due to the interesting characteristics of this novel particle source including high brightness, high maximum energy, high laminarity, and short duration. Although the ion beam characteristics are promising for many future applications, such as in the medical field or hybrid accelerators, the ion beam generated using TNSA, the acceleration mechanism commonly achieved, still need to be significantly improved. Several new alternative mechanisms have been proposed such as collisionless shock acceleration (CSA) in order to produce a mono-energetic ion beam favorable for those applications. We report the first results of an experiment performed with the TITAN laser system (JLF, LLNL) dedicated to the study of CSA using a high intensity (5x1019W/cm2) high contrast ps laser pulse focused on 55 μm thick CH and CD targets. We show that the proton spectrum generated during the interaction exhibits high-energy mono-energetic features along the laser axis, characteristic of a shock mechanism.

  9. Are protonated ions efficient sequestration agents for noble gases in the primitive nebula context?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, Françoise; Ellinger, Yves; ozgurel, Ozge; Bacchus-montabonel, Marie-christine; Mousis, Olivier; Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, Institut Lumière Matière, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille

    2016-10-01

    One explanation for the deficiencies of argon, krypton and xenon observed in the atmosphere of Titan might be related to a scenario of sequestration by H3+ in the gas phase at the early evolution of the solar nebula. The chemical process implied is a radiative association, evaluated as rather efficient in the case of H3+, especially for krypton and xenon. In fact, this mechanism of chemical trapping might not be limited to H3+ only, considering that the protonated ions produced in the destruction of H3+ by its main competitors, namely H2O, CO and N2, present in the primitive nebula, might also give stable complexes with the noble gases.Here, the reactivity of the noble gases Ar, Kr, Xe, with all the protonated ions issued from H2O, CO and N2, expected to be present in the nebula with reasonably high abundances, i.e. H3O+, HCO+, HOC+, N2H+, has been studied with quantum simulation methods, quantum dynamics included. All of them give stable complexes; the rate coefficients of their radiative associations have been calculated as a function of temperature between 10 and 100 °K and found ranging from 10-18 to 10-16 cm3s-1, which can be considered as high for this type of reactions and are comparable to the rates obtained with H3+.Consequently, we can consider this process as universal for all protonated ions, which, if present in the primitive nebula as astrophysical models predict, should act as efficient sequestration agents for all three noble gases, in addition to the original H3+ captor.

  10. Electron reconstruction and identification efficiency measurements with the ATLAS detector using the 2011 LHC proton-proton collision data.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abajyan, T; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Khalek, S Abdel; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Agustoni, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahmad, A; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Verzini, M J Alconada; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Alimonti, G; Alio, L; Alison, J; Allbrooke, B M M; Allison, L J; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Altheimer, A; Gonzalez, B Alvarez; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Coutinho, Y Amaral; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Ammosov, V V; Santos, S P Amor Dos; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Angelidakis, S; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Bella, L Aperio; Apolle, R; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Auerbach, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Bacci, C; Bach, A M; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Mayes, J Backus; Badescu, E; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, S; Balek, P; Balli, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bannoura, A A E; Bansal, V; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Costa, J Barreiro Guimarães da; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Bartsch, V; Bassalat, A; Basye, A; Bates, R L; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bedikian, S; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Behr, K; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Noccioli, E Benhar; Garcia, J A Benitez; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Berge, D; Kuutmann, E Bergeaas; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernard, C; Bernat, P; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertolucci, F; Besana, M I; Besjes, G J; Bessidskaia, O; Besson, N; Betancourt, C; Bethke, S; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianchini, L; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Bierwagen, K; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; De Mendizabal, J Bilbao; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blackburn, D; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Boddy, C R; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boek, T T; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A S; Bolnet, N M; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borri, M; Borroni, S; Bortfeldt, J; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boterenbrood, H; Boudreau, J; Bouffard, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boutouil, S; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Branchini, P; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brazzale, S F; Brelier, B; Brendlinger, K; Brennan, A J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Bristow, K; Bristow, T M; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Bromberg, C; Bronner, J; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brosamer, J; Brost, E; Brown, G; Brown, J; Renstrom, P A Bruckman de; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Bryngemark, L; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Bucci, F; Buchholz, P; Buckingham, R M; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Buehrer, F; Bugge, L; Bugge, M K; Bulekov, O; Bundock, A C; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burghgrave, B; Burke, S; Burmeister, I; Busato, E; Büscher, V; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Butt, A I; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Butti, P; Buttinger, W; Buzatu, A; Byszewski, M; Urbán, S Cabrera; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Toro, R Camacho; Camarda, S; Cameron, D; Caminada, L M; Armadans, R Caminal; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Campoverde, A; Canale, V; Canepa, A; Cantero, J; Cantrill, R; Cao, T; Garrido, M D M Capeans; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capua, M; Caputo, R; Cardarelli, R; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carminati, L; Caron, S; Carquin, E; Carrillo-Montoya, G D; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Castaneda-Miranda, E; Castelli, A; Gimenez, V Castillo; Castro, N F; Catastini, P; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Cattani, G; Caughron, S; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Ceradini, F; Cerio, B; Cerny, K; Cerqueira, A S; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Cerutti, F; Cerv, M; Cervelli, A; Cetin, S A; Chafaq, A; Chakraborty, D; Chalupkova, I; Chan, K; Chang, P; Chapleau, B; Chapman, J D; Charfeddine, D; Charlton, D G; Chau, C C; Barajas, C A Chavez; Cheatham, S; Chegwidden, A; Chekanov, S; Chekulaev, S V; Chelkov, G A; Chelstowska, M A; Chen, C; Chen, H; Chen, K; Chen, L; Chen, S; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Cheng, H C; Cheng, Y; Cheplakov, A; Moursli, R Cherkaoui El; Chernyatin, V; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Chiarella, V; Chiefari, G; Childers, J T; Chilingarov, A; Chiodini, G; Chisholm, A S; Chislett, R T; Chitan, A; Chizhov, M V; Chouridou, S; Chow, B K B; Christidi, I A; Chromek-Burckhart, D; Chu, M L; Chudoba, J; Chytka, L; Ciapetti, G; Ciftci, A K; Ciftci, R; Cinca, D; Cindro, V; Ciocio, A; Cirkovic, P; Citron, Z H; Citterio, M; Ciubancan, M; Clark, A; Clark, P J; Clarke, R N; Cleland, W; Clemens, J C; Clement, B; Clement, C; Coadou, Y; Cobal, M; Coccaro, A; Cochran, J; Coffey, L; Cogan, J G; Coggeshall, J; Cole, B; Cole, S; Colijn, A P; Collins-Tooth, C; Collot, J; Colombo, T; Colon, G; Compostella, G; Muiño, P Conde; Coniavitis, E; Conidi, M C; Connell, S H; Connelly, I A; Consonni, S M; Consorti, V; Constantinescu, S; Conta, C; Conti, G; Conventi, F; Cooke, M; Cooper, B D; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cooper-Smith, N J; Copic, K; Cornelissen, T; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Corso-Radu, A; Cortes-Gonzalez, A; Cortiana, G; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Côté, D; Cottin, G; Cowan, G; Cox, B E; Cranmer, K; Cree, G; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Crescioli, F; Ortuzar, M Crispin; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; Cuciuc, C-M; Cuenca Almenar, C; Donszelmann, T Cuhadar; Cummings, J; Curatolo, M; Cuthbert, C; Czirr, H; Czodrowski, P; Czyczula, Z; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; De Sousa, M J Da Cunha Sargedas; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W; Dafinca, A; Dai, T; Dale, O; Dallaire, F; Dallapiccola, C; Dam, M; Daniells, A C; Hoffmann, M Dano; Dao, V; Darbo, G; Darlea, G L; Darmora, S; Dassoulas, J A; Davey, W; David, C; Davidek, T; Davies, E; Davies, M; Davignon, O; Davison, A R; Davison, P; Davygora, Y; Dawe, E; Dawson, I; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R K; De, K; de Asmundis, R; De Castro, S; De Cecco, S; de Graat, J; De Groot, N; de Jong, P; De La Taille, C; De la Torre, H; De Lorenzi, F; De Nooij, L; De Pedis, D; De Salvo, A; De Sanctis, U; De Santo, A; De Vivie De Regie, J B; De Zorzi, G; Dearnaley, W J; Debbe, R; Debenedetti, C; Dechenaux, B; Dedovich, D V; Degenhardt, J; Deigaard, I; Peso, J Del; Prete, T Del; Deliot, F; Delitzsch, C M; Deliyergiyev, M; Dell'Acqua, A; Dell'Asta, L; Dell'Orso, M; Pietra, M Della; Volpe, D Della; Delmastro, M; Delsart, P A; Deluca, C; Demers, S; Demichev, M; Demilly, A; Denisov, S P; Derendarz, D; Derkaoui, J E; Derue, F; Dervan, P; Desch, K; Deterre, C; Deviveiros, P O; Dewhurst, A; Dhaliwal, S; Ciaccio, A Di; Di Ciaccio, L; Domenico, A Di; Donato, C Di; Girolamo, A Di; Girolamo, B Di; Mattia, A Di; Micco, B Di; Nardo, R Di; Simone, A Di; Sipio, R Di; Valentino, D Di; Diaz, M A; Diehl, E B; Dietrich, J; Dietzsch, T A; Diglio, S; Dimitrievska, A; Dingfelder, J; Dionisi, C; Dita, P; Dita, S; Dittus, F; Djama, F; Djobava, T; Vale, M A B do; Wemans, A Do Valle; Doan, T K O; Dobos, D; Dobson, E; Doglioni, C; Doherty, T; Dohmae, T; Dolejsi, J; Dolezal, Z; Dolgoshein, B A; Donadelli, M; Donati, S; Dondero, P; Donini, J; Dopke, J; Doria, A; Dos Anjos, A; Dova, M T; Doyle, A T; Dris, M; Dubbert, J; Dube, S; Dubreuil, E; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Ducu, O A; Duda, D; Dudarev, A; Dudziak, F; Duflot, L; Duguid, L; Dührssen, M; Dunford, M; Duran Yildiz, H; Düren, M; Durglishvili, A; Dwuznik, M; Dyndal, M; Ebke, J; Edson, W; Edwards, N C; Ehrenfeld, W; Eifert, T; Eigen, G; Einsweiler, K; Ekelof, T; El Kacimi, M; Ellert, M; Elles, S; Ellinghaus, F; Ellis, N; Elmsheuser, J; Elsing, M; Emeliyanov, D; Enari, Y; Endner, O C; Endo, M; Engelmann, R; Erdmann, J; Ereditato, A; Eriksson, D; Ernis, G; Ernst, J; Ernst, M; Ernwein, J; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ertel, E; Escalier, M; Esch, H; Escobar, C; Esposito, B; Etienvre, A I; Etzion, E; Evans, H; Fabbri, L; Facini, G; Fakhrutdinov, R M; Falciano, S; Faltova, J; Fang, Y; Fanti, M; Farbin, A; Farilla, A; Farooque, T; Farrell, S; Farrington, S M; Farthouat, P; Fassi, F; Fassnacht, P; Fassouliotis, D; Favareto, A; Fayard, L; Federic, P; Fedin, O L; Fedorko, W; Fehling-Kaschek, M; Feigl, S; Feligioni, L; Feng, C; Feng, E J; Feng, H; Fenyuk, A B; Perez, S Fernandez; Fernando, W; Ferrag, S; Ferrando, J; Ferrara, V; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrari, R; de Lima, D E Ferreira; Ferrer, A; Ferrere, D; Ferretti, C; Parodi, A Ferretto; Fiascaris, M; Fiedler, F; Filipčič, A; Filipuzzi, M; Filthaut, F; Fincke-Keeler, M; Finelli, K D; Fiolhais, M C N; Fiorini, L; Firan, A; Fischer, J; Fisher, M J; Fisher, W C; Fitzgerald, E A; Flechl, M; Fleck, I; Fleischmann, P; Fleischmann, S; Fletcher, G T; Fletcher, G; Flick, T; Floderus, A; Castillo, L R Flores; Bustos, A C Florez; Flowerdew, M J; Formica, A; Forti, A; Fortin, D; Fournier, D; Fox, H; Fracchia, S; Francavilla, P; Franchini, M; Franchino, S; Francis, D; Franklin, M; Franz, S; Fraternali, M; French, S T; Friedrich, C; Friedrich, F; Froidevaux, D; Frost, J A; Fukunaga, C; Torregrosa, E Fullana; Fulsom, B G; Fuster, J; Gabaldon, C; Gabizon, O; Gabrielli, A; Gadatsch, S; Gadomski, S; Gagliardi, G; Gagnon, P; Galea, C; Galhardo, B; Gallas, E J; Gallo, V; Gallop, B J; Gallus, P; Galster, G; Gan, K K; Gandrajula, R P; Gao, J; Gao, Y S; Walls, F M Garay; Garberson, F; García, C; Navarro, J E García; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Gardner, R W; Garelli, N; Garonne, V; Gatti, C; Gaudio, G; Gaur, B; Gauthier, L; Gauzzi, P; Gavrilenko, I L; Gay, C; Gaycken, G; Gazis, E N; Ge, P; Gecse, Z; Gee, C N P; Geerts, D A A; Geich-Gimbel, Ch; Gellerstedt, K; Gemme, C; Gemmell, A; Genest, M H; Gentile, S; George, M; George, S; Gerbaudo, D; Gershon, A; Ghazlane, H; Ghodbane, N; Giacobbe, B; Giagu, S; Giangiobbe, V; Giannetti, P; Gianotti, F; Gibbard, B; Gibson, S M; Gilchriese, M; Gillam, T P S; Gillberg, D; Gilles, G; Gingrich, D M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M P; Giordano, R; Giorgi, F M; Giraud, P F; Giugni, D; Giuliani, C; Giulini, M; Gjelsten, B K; Gkialas, I; Gladilin, L K; Glasman, C; Glatzer, J; Glaysher, P C F; Glazov, A; Glonti, G L; Goblirsch-Kolb, M; Goddard, J R; Godfrey, J; Godlewski, J; Goeringer, C; Goldfarb, S; Golling, T; Golubkov, D; Gomes, A; Fajardo, L S Gomez; Gonçalo, R; Costa, J Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da; Gonella, L; de la Hoz, S González; Parra, G Gonzalez; Silva, M L Gonzalez; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Goossens, L; Gorbounov, P A; Gordon, H A; Gorelov, I; Gorfine, G; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Gorišek, A; Gornicki, E; Goshaw, A T; Gössling, C; Gostkin, M I; Gouighri, M; Goujdami, D; Goulette, M P; Goussiou, A G; Goy, C; Gozpinar, S; Grabas, H M X; Graber, L; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grafström, P; Grahn, K-J; Gramling, J; Gramstad, E; Grancagnolo, F; Grancagnolo, S; Grassi, V; Gratchev, V; Gray, H M; Graziani, E; Grebenyuk, O G; Greenwood, Z D; Gregersen, K; Gregor, I M; Grenier, P; Griffiths, J; Grigalashvili, N; Grillo, A A; Grimm, K; Grinstein, S; Gris, Ph; Grishkevich, Y V; Grivaz, J-F; Grohs, J P; Grohsjean, A; Gross, E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Grossi, G C; Groth-Jensen, J; Grout, Z J; Grybel, K; Guan, L; Guescini, F; Guest, D; Gueta, O; Guicheney, C; Guido, E; Guillemin, T; Guindon, S; Gul, U; Gumpert, C; Gunther, J; Guo, J; Gupta, S; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez Ortiz, N G; Gutschow, C; Guttman, N; Guyot, C; Gwenlan, C; Gwilliam, C B; Haas, A; Haber, C; Hadavand, H K; Haddad, N; Haefner, P; Hageboeck, S; Hajduk, Z; Hakobyan, H; Haleem, M; Hall, D; Halladjian, G; Hamacher, K; Hamal, P; Hamano, K; Hamer, M; Hamilton, A; Hamilton, S; Hamnett, P G; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hanawa, K; Hance, M; Hanke, P; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, P H; Hara, K; Hard, A S; Harenberg, T; Harkusha, S; Harper, D; Harrington, R D; Harris, O M; Harrison, P F; Hartjes, F; Harvey, A; Hasegawa, S; Hasegawa, Y; Hasib, A; Hassani, S; Haug, S; Hauschild, M; Hauser, R; Havranek, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R J; Hawkins, A D; Hayashi, T; Hayden, D; Hays, C P; Hayward, H S; Haywood, S J; Head, S J; Heck, T; Hedberg, V; Heelan, L; Heim, S; Heim, T; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, L; Heisterkamp, S; Hejbal, J; Helary, L; Heller, C; Heller, M; Hellman, S; Hellmich, D; Helsens, C; Henderson, J; Henderson, R C W; Hengler, C; Henrichs, A; Henriques Correia, A M; Henrot-Versille, S; Hensel, C; Herbert, G H; Jiménez, Y Hernández; Herrberg-Schubert, R; Herten, G; Hertenberger, R; Hervas, L; Hesketh, G G; Hessey, N P; Hickling, R; Higón-Rodriguez, E; Hill, J C; Hiller, K H; Hillert, S; Hillier, S J; Hinchliffe, I; Hines, E; Hirose, M; Hirschbuehl, D; Hobbs, J; Hod, N; Hodgkinson, M C; Hodgson, P; Hoecker, A; Hoeferkamp, M R; Hoffman, J; Hoffmann, D; Hofmann, J I; Hohlfeld, M; Holmes, T R; Hong, T M; Hooft van Huysduynen, L; Hostachy, J-Y; Hou, S; Hoummada, A; Howard, J; Howarth, J; Hrabovsky, M; Hristova, I; Hrivnac, J; Hryn'ova, T; Hsu, P J; Hsu, S-C; Hu, D; Hu, X; Huang, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hubaut, F; Huegging, F; Huffman, T B; Hughes, E W; Hughes, G; Huhtinen, M; Hülsing, T A; Hurwitz, M; Huseynov, N; Huston, J; Huth, J; Iacobucci, G; Iakovidis, G; Ibragimov, I; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Idarraga, J; Ideal, E; Iengo, P; Igonkina, O; Iizawa, T; Ikegami, Y; Ikematsu, K; Ikeno, M; Iliadis, D; Ilic, N; Inamaru, Y; Ince, T; Ioannou, P; Iodice, M; Iordanidou, K; Ippolito, V; Quiles, A Irles; Isaksson, C; Ishino, M; Ishitsuka, M; Ishmukhametov, R; Issever, C; Istin, S; Iturbe Ponce, J M; Ivashin, A V; Iwanski, W; Iwasaki, H; Izen, J M; Izzo, V; Jackson, B; Jackson, J N; Jackson, M; Jackson, P; Jaekel, M R; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jakobsen, S; Jakoubek, T; Jakubek, J; Jamin, D O; Jana, D K; Jansen, E; Jansen, H; Janssen, J; Janus, M; Jarlskog, G; Javůrek, T; Jeanty, L; Jeng, G-Y; Jennens, D; Jenni, P; Jentzsch, J; Jeske, C; Jézéquel, S; Ji, H; Ji, W; Jia, J; Jiang, Y; Jimenez Belenguer, M; Jin, S; Jinaru, A; Jinnouchi, O; Joergensen, M D; Johansson, K E; Johansson, P; Johns, K A; Jon-And, K; Jones, G; Jones, R W L; Jones, T J; Jongmanns, J; Jorge, P M; Joshi, K D; Jovicevic, J; Ju, X; Jung, C A; Jungst, R M; Jussel, P; Juste Rozas, A; Kaci, M; Kaczmarska, A; Kado, M; Kagan, H; Kagan, M; Kajomovitz, E; Kama, S; Kanaya, N; Kaneda, M; Kaneti, S; Kanno, T; Kantserov, V A; Kanzaki, J; Kaplan, B; Kapliy, A; Kar, D; Karakostas, K; Karastathis, N; Karnevskiy, M; Karpov, S N; Karthik, K; Kartvelishvili, V; Karyukhin, A N; Kashif, L; Kasieczka, G; Kass, R D; Kastanas, A; Kataoka, Y; Katre, A; Katzy, J; Kaushik, V; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kawamura, G; Kazama, S; Kazanin, V F; Kazarinov, M Y; Keeler, R; Keener, P T; Kehoe, R; Keil, M; Keller, J S; Keoshkerian, H; Kepka, O; Kerševan, B P; Kersten, S; Kessoku, K; Keung, J; Khalil-Zada, F; Khandanyan, H; Khanov, A; Khodinov, A; Khomich, A; Khoo, T J; Khoriauli, G; Khoroshilov, A; Khovanskiy, V; Khramov, E; Khubua, J; Kim, H Y; Kim, H; Kim, S H; Kimura, N; Kind, O; King, B T; King, M; King, R S B; King, S B; Kirk, J; Kiryunin, A E; Kishimoto, T; Kisielewska, D; Kiss, F; Kitamura, T; Kittelmann, T; Kiuchi, K; Kladiva, E; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kleinknecht, K; Klimek, P; Klimentov, A; Klingenberg, R; Klinger, J A; Klinkby, E B; Klioutchnikova, T; Klok, P F; Kluge, E-E; Kluit, P; Kluth, S; Kneringer, E; Knoops, E B F G; Knue, A; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Kocian, M; Kodys, P; Koevesarki, P; Koffas, T; Koffeman, E; Kogan, L A; Kohlmann, S; Kohout, Z; Kohriki, T; Koi, T; Kolanoski, H; Koletsou, I; Koll, J; Komar, A A; Komori, Y; Kondo, T; Köneke, K; König, A C; König, S; Kono, T; Konoplich, R; Konstantinidis, N; Kopeliansky, R; Koperny, S; Köpke, L; Kopp, A K; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korol, A A; Korolkov, I; Korolkova, E V; Korotkov, V A; Kortner, O; Kortner, S; Kostyukhin, V V; Kotov, S; Kotov, V M; Kotwal, A; Kourkoumelis, C; Kouskoura, V; Koutsman, A; Kowalewski, R; Kowalski, T Z; Kozanecki, W; Kozhin, A S; Kral, V; Kramarenko, V A; Kramberger, G; Krasnopevtsev, D; Krasny, M W; Krasznahorkay, A; Kraus, J K; Kravchenko, A; Kreiss, S; Kretz, M; Kretzschmar, J; Kreutzfeldt, K; Krieger, P; Kroeninger, K; Kroha, H; Kroll, J; Kroseberg, J; Krstic, J; Kruchonak, U; Krüger, H; Kruker, T; Krumnack, N; Krumshteyn, Z V; Kruse, A; Kruse, M C; Kruskal, M; Kubota, T; Kuday, S; Kuehn, S; Kugel, A; Kuhl, A; Kuhl, T; Kukhtin, V; Kulchitsky, Y; Kuleshov, S; Kuna, M; Kunkle, J; Kupco, A; Kurashige, H; Kurochkin, Y A; Kurumida, R; Kus, V; Kuwertz, E S; Kuze, M; Kvita, J; La Rosa, A; La Rotonda, L; Labarga, L; Lacasta, C; Lacava, F; Lacey, J; Lacker, H; Lacour, D; Lacuesta, V R; Ladygin, E; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lagouri, T; Lai, S; Laier, H; Lambourne, L; Lammers, S; Lampen, C L; Lampl, W; Lançon, E; Landgraf, U; Landon, M P J; Lang, V S; Lange, C; Lankford, A J; Lanni, F; Lantzsch, K; Laplace, S; Lapoire, C; Laporte, J F; Lari, T; Lassnig, M; Laurelli, P; Lavorini, V; Lavrijsen, W; Law, A T; Laycock, P; Le, B T; Le Dortz, O; Guirriec, E Le; Menedeu, E Le; LeCompte, T; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Lee, C A; Lee, H; Lee, J S H; Lee, S C; Lee, L; Lefebvre, G; Lefebvre, M; Legger, F; Leggett, C; Lehan, A; Lehmacher, M; Miotto, G Lehmann; Lei, X; Leister, A G; Leite, M A L; Leitner, R; Lellouch, D; Lemmer, B; Leney, K J C; Lenz, T; Lenzen, G; Lenzi, B; Leone, R; Leonhardt, K; Leontsinis, S; Leroy, C; Lester, C G; Lester, C M; Levêque, J; Levin, D; Levinson, L J; Levy, M; Lewis, A; Lewis, G H; Leyko, A M; Leyton, M; Li, B; Li, H; Li, H L; Li, S; Li, X; Li, Y; Liang, Z; Liao, H; Liberti, B; Lichard, P; Lie, K; Liebal, J; Liebig, W; Limbach, C; Limosani, A; Limper, M; Lin, S C; Linde, F; Lindquist, B E; Linnemann, J T; Lipeles, E; Lipniacka, A; Lisovyi, M; Liss, T M; Lissauer, D; Lister, A; Litke, A M; Liu, B; Liu, D; Liu, J B; Liu, K; Liu, L; Liu, M; Liu, Y; Livan, M; Livermore, S S A; Lleres, A; Llorente Merino, J; Lloyd, S L; Lo Sterzo, F; Lobodzinska, E; Loch, P; Lockman, W S; Loddenkoetter, T; Loebinger, F K; Loevschall-Jensen, A E; Loginov, A; Loh, C W; Lohse, T; Lohwasser, K; Lokajicek, M; Lombardo, V P; Long, J D; Long, R E; Lopes, L; Lopez Mateos, D; Paredes, B Lopez; Lorenz, J; Lorenzo Martinez, N; Losada, M; Loscutoff, P; Losty, M J; Lou, X; Lounis, A; Love, J; Love, P A; Lowe, A J; Lu, F; Lubatti, H J; Luci, C; Lucotte, A; Luehring, F; Lukas, W; Luminari, L; Lundberg, O; Lund-Jensen, B; Lungwitz, M; Lynn, D; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Ma, H; Ma, L L; Maccarrone, G; Macchiolo, A; Maček, B; Miguens, J Machado; Macina, D; Madaffari, D; Madar, R; Maddocks, H J; Mader, W F; Madsen, A; Maeno, M; Maeno, T; Magradze, E; Mahboubi, K; Mahlstedt, J; Mahmoud, S; Maiani, C; Maidantchik, C; Maio, A; Majewski, S; Makida, Y; Makovec, N; Mal, P; Malaescu, B; Malecki, Pa; Maleev, V P; Malek, F; Mallik, U; Malon, D; Malone, C; Maltezos, S; Malyshev, V M; Malyukov, S; Mamuzic, J; Mandelli, B; Mandelli, L; Mandić, I; Mandrysch, R; Maneira, J; Manfredini, A; de Andrade Filho, L Manhaes; Ramos, J A Manjarres; Mann, A; Manning, P M; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Mansoulie, B; Mantifel, R; Mapelli, L; March, L; Marchand, J F; Marchese, F; Marchiori, G; Marcisovsky, M; Marino, C P; Marques, C N; Marroquim, F; Marsden, S P; Marshall, Z; Marti, L F; Marti-Garcia, S; Martin, B; Martin, J P; Martin, T A; Martin, V J; Martin Dit Latour, B; Martinez, H; Martinez, M; Martin-Haugh, S; Martyniuk, A C; Marx, M; Marzano, F; Marzin, A; Masetti, L; Mashimo, T; Mashinistov, R; Masik, J; Maslennikov, A L; Massa, I; Massol, N; Mastrandrea, P; Mastroberardino, A; Masubuchi, T; Matricon, P; Matsunaga, H; Matsushita, T; Mättig, P; Mättig, S; Mattmann, J; Maurer, J; Maxfield, S J; Maximov, D A; Mazini, R; Mazzaferro, L; Mc Goldrick, G; Mc Kee, S P; McCarn, A; McCarthy, R L; McCarthy, T G; McCubbin, N A; McFarlane, K W; Mcfayden, J A; Mchedlidze, G; Mclaughlan, T; McMahon, S J; McPherson, R A; Meade, A; Mechnich, J; Medinnis, M; Meehan, S; Meera-Lebbai, R; Mehlhase, S; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meineck, C; Meirose, B; Melachrinos, C; Mellado Garcia, B R; Meloni, F; Mendoza Navas, L; Mengarelli, A; Menke, S; Meoni, E; Mercurio, K M; Mergelmeyer, S; Meric, N; Mermod, P; Merola, L; Meroni, C; Merritt, F S; Merritt, H; Messina, A; Metcalfe, J; Mete, A S; Meyer, C; Meyer, C; Meyer, J-P; Meyer, J; Middleton, R P; Migas, S; Mijović, L; Mikenberg, G; Mikestikova, M; Mikuž, M; Miller, D W; Mills, C; Milov, A; Milstead, D A; Milstein, D; Minaenko, A A; Moya, M Miñano; Minashvili, I A; Mincer, A I; Mindur, B; Mineev, M; Ming, Y; Mir, L M; Mirabelli, G; Mitani, T; Mitrevski, J; Mitsou, V A; Mitsui, S; Miucci, A; Miyagawa, P S; Mjörnmark, J U; Moa, T; Mochizuki, K; Moeller, V; Mohapatra, S; Mohr, W; Molander, S; Moles-Valls, R; Mönig, K; Monini, C; Monk, J; Monnier, E; Montejo Berlingen, J; Monticelli, F; Monzani, S; Moore, R W; Herrera, C Mora; Moraes, A; Morange, N; Morel, J; Moreno, D; Moreno Llácer, M; Morettini, P; Morgenstern, M; Morii, M; Moritz, S; Morley, A K; Mornacchi, G; Morris, J D; Morvaj, L; Moser, H G; Mosidze, M; Moss, J; Mount, R; Mountricha, E; Mouraviev, S V; Moyse, E J W; Muanza, S; Mudd, R D; Mueller, F; Mueller, J; Mueller, K; Mueller, T; Muenstermann, D; Munwes, Y; Murillo Quijada, J A; Murray, W J; Musto, E; Myagkov, A G; Myska, M; Nackenhorst, O; Nadal, J; Nagai, K; Nagai, R; Nagai, Y; Nagano, K; Nagarkar, A; Nagasaka, Y; Nagel, M; Nairz, A M; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, T; Nakano, I; Namasivayam, H; Nanava, G; Narayan, R; Nattermann, T; Naumann, T; Navarro, G; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Nechaeva, P Yu; Neep, T J; Negri, A; Negri, G; Negrini, M; Nektarijevic, S; Nelson, A; Nelson, T K; Nemecek, S; Nemethy, P; Nepomuceno, A A; Nessi, M; Neubauer, M S; Neumann, M; Neves, R M; Nevski, P; Newcomer, F M; Newman, P R; Nguyen, D H; Nickerson, R B; Nicolaidou, R; Nicquevert, B; Nielsen, J; Nikiforou, N; Nikiforov, A; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolic-Audit, I; Nikolics, K; Nikolopoulos, K; Nilsson, P; Ninomiya, Y; Nisati, A; Nisius, R; Nobe, T; Nodulman, L; Nomachi, M; Nomidis, I; Norberg, S; Nordberg, M; Nowak, S; Nozaki, M; Nozka, L; Ntekas, K; Nunes Hanninger, G; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; Nuti, F; O'Brien, B J; O'grady, F; O'Neil, D C; O'Shea, V; Oakham, F G; Oberlack, H; Obermann, T; Ocariz, J; Ochi, A; Ochoa, M I; Oda, S; Odaka, S; Ogren, H; Oh, A; Oh, S H; Ohm, C C; Ohman, H; Ohshima, T; Okamura, W; Okawa, H; Okumura, Y; Okuyama, T; Olariu, A; Olchevski, A G; Olivares Pino, S A; Damazio, D Oliveira; Garcia, E Oliver; Olivito, D; Olszewski, A; Olszowska, J; Onofre, A; Onyisi, P U E; Oram, C J; Oreglia, M J; Oren, Y; Orestano, D; Orlando, N; Barrera, C Oropeza; Orr, R S; Osculati, B; Ospanov, R; Garzon, G Otero Y; Otono, H; Ouchrif, M; Ouellette, E A; Ould-Saada, F; Ouraou, A; Oussoren, K P; Ouyang, Q; Ovcharova, A; Owen, M; Ozcan, V E; Ozturk, N; Pachal, K; Pages, A Pacheco; Padilla Aranda, C; Pagáčová, M; Pagan Griso, S; Paganis, E; Pahl, C; Paige, F; Pais, P; Pajchel, K; Palacino, G; Palestini, S; Pallin, D; Palma, A; Palmer, J D; Pan, Y B; Panagiotopoulou, E; Panduro Vazquez, J G; Pani, P; Panikashvili, N; Panitkin, S; Pantea, D; Paolozzi, L; Papadopoulou, Th D; Papageorgiou, K; Paramonov, A; Paredes Hernandez, D; Parker, M A; Parodi, F; Parsons, J A; Parzefall, U; Pasqualucci, E; Passaggio, S; Passeri, A; Pastore, F; Pastore, Fr; Pásztor, G; Pataraia, S; Patel, N D; Pater, J R; Patricelli, S; Pauly, T; Pearce, J; Pedersen, M; Lopez, S Pedraza; Pedro, R; Peleganchuk, S V; Pelikan, D; Peng, H; Penning, B; Penwell, J; Perepelitsa, D V; Perez Codina, E; García-Estan, M T Pérez; Perez Reale, V; Perini, L; Pernegger, H; Perrino, R; Peschke, R; Peshekhonov, V D; Peters, K; Peters, R F Y; Petersen, B A; Petersen, J; Petersen, T C; Petit, E; Petridis, A; Petridou, C; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, F; Petteni, M; Pettersson, N E; Pezoa, R; Phillips, P W; Piacquadio, G; Pianori, E; Picazio, A; Piccaro, E; Piccinini, M; Piec, S M; Piegaia, R; Pignotti, D T; Pilcher, J E; Pilkington, A D; Pina, J; Pinamonti, M; Pinder, A; Pinfold, J L; Pingel, A; Pinto, B; Pires, S; Pizio, C; Pleier, M-A; Pleskot, V; Plotnikova, E; Plucinski, P; Poddar, S; Podlyski, F; Poettgen, R; Poggioli, L; Pohl, D; Pohl, M; Polesello, G; Policicchio, A; Polifka, R; Polini, A; Pollard, C S; Polychronakos, V; Pommès, K; Pontecorvo, L; Pope, B G; Popeneciu, G A; Popovic, D S; Poppleton, A; Portell Bueso, X; Pospelov, G E; Pospisil, S; Potamianos, K; Potrap, I N; Potter, C J; Potter, C T; Poulard, G; Poveda, J; Pozdnyakov, V; Prabhu, R; Pralavorio, P; Pranko, A; Prasad, S; Pravahan, R; Prell, S; Price, D; Price, J; Price, L E; Prieur, D; Primavera, M; Proissl, M; Prokofiev, K; Prokoshin, F; Protopapadaki, E; Protopopescu, S; Proudfoot, J; Przybycien, M; Przysiezniak, H; Ptacek, E; Pueschel, E; Puldon, D; Purohit, M; Puzo, P; Pylypchenko, Y; Qian, J; Qin, G; Quadt, A; Quarrie, D R; Quayle, W B; Quilty, D; Qureshi, A; Radeka, V; Radescu, V; Radhakrishnan, S K; Radloff, P; Rados, P; Ragusa, F; Rahal, G; Rajagopalan, S; Rammensee, M; Rammes, M; Randle-Conde, A S; Rangel-Smith, C; Rao, K; Rauscher, F; Rave, T C; Ravenscroft, T; Raymond, M; Read, A L; Rebuzzi, D M; Redelbach, A; Redlinger, G; Reece, R; Reeves, K; Rehnisch, L; Reinsch, A; Reisin, H; Relich, M; Rembser, C; Ren, Z L; Renaud, A; Rescigno, M; Resconi, S; Resende, B; Rezanova, O L; Reznicek, P; Rezvani, R; Richter, R; Richter-Was, E; Ridel, M; Rieck, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Rimoldi, A; Rinaldi, L; Ritsch, E; Riu, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rizvi, E; Robertson, S H; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Robinson, D; Robinson, J E M; Robson, A; Roda, C; Rodrigues, L; Roe, S; Røhne, O; Rolli, S; Romaniouk, A; Romano, M; Romeo, G; Adam, E Romero; Rompotis, N; Roos, L; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Rosbach, K; Rose, A; Rose, M; Rosendahl, P L; Rosenthal, O; Rossetti, V; Rossi, E; Rossi, L P; Rosten, R; Rotaru, M; Roth, I; Rothberg, J; Rousseau, D; Royon, C R; Rozanov, A; Rozen, Y; Ruan, X; Rubbo, F; Rubinskiy, I; Rud, V I; Rudolph, C; Rudolph, M S; Rühr, F; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakovich, N A; Ruschke, A; Rutherfoord, J P; Ruthmann, N; Ryabov, Y F; Rybar, M; Rybkin, G; Ryder, N C; Saavedra, A F; Sacerdoti, S; Saddique, A; Sadeh, I; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sadykov, R; Safai Tehrani, F; Sakamoto, H; Sakurai, Y; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Saleem, M; Salek, D; Sales De Bruin, P H; Salihagic, D; Salnikov, A; Salt, J; Ferrando, B M Salvachua; Salvatore, D; Salvatore, F; Salvucci, A; Salzburger, A; Sampsonidis, D; Sanchez, A; Sánchez, J; Sanchez Martinez, V; Sandaker, H; Sander, H G; Sanders, M P; Sandhoff, M; Sandoval, T; Sandoval, C; Sandstroem, R; Sankey, D P C; Sansoni, A; Santoni, C; Santonico, R; Santos, H; Castillo, I Santoyo; Sapp, K; Sapronov, A; Saraiva, J G; Sarrazin, B; Sartisohn, G; Sasaki, O; Sasaki, Y; Satsounkevitch, I; Sauvage, G; Sauvan, E; Savard, P; Savu, D O; Sawyer, C; Sawyer, L; Saxon, J; Sbarra, C; Sbrizzi, A; Scanlon, T; Scannicchio, D A; Scarcella, M; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schaefer, D; Schaefer, R; Schaelicke, A; Schaepe, S; Schaetzel, S; Schäfer, U; Schaffer, A C; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scharf, V; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Scherzer, M I; Schiavi, C; Schieck, J; Schillo, C; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schmidt, E; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitt, S; Schneider, B; Schnellbach, Y J; Schnoor, U; Schoeffel, L; Schoening, A; Schoenrock, B D; Schorlemmer, A L S; Schott, M; Schouten, D; Schovancova, J; Schram, M; Schramm, S; Schreyer, M; Schroeder, C; Schuh, N; Schultens, M J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schulz, H; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwartzman, A; Schwegler, Ph; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwindling, J; Schwindt, T; Schwoerer, M; Sciacca, F G; Scifo, E; Sciolla, G; Scott, W G; Scuri, F; Scutti, F; Searcy, J; Sedov, G; Sedykh, E; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Sekula, S J; Selbach, K E; Seliverstov, D M; Sellers, G; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Serkin, L; Serre, T; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shan, L Y; Shank, J T; Shao, Q T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaw, K; Sherwood, P; Shimizu, S; Shimmin, C O; Shimojima, M; Shiyakova, M; Shmeleva, A; Shochet, M J; Short, D; Shrestha, S; Shulga, E; Shupe, M A; Shushkevich, S; Sicho, P; Sidorov, D; Sidoti, A; Siegert, F; Sijacki, Dj; Silbert, O; Silva, J; Silver, Y; Silverstein, D; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simard, O; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simioni, E; Simmons, B; Simoniello, R; Simonyan, M; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sipica, V; Siragusa, G; Sircar, A; Sisakyan, A N; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjölin, J; Sjursen, T B; Skinnari, L A; Skottowe, H P; Skovpen, K Yu; Skubic, P; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Sliwa, K; Smakhtin, V; Smart, B H; Smestad, L; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snidero, G; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Sobie, R; Socher, F; Sodomka, J; Soffer, A; Soh, D A; Solans, C A; Solar, M; Solc, J; Soldatov, E Yu; Soldevila, U; Camillocci, E Solfaroli; Solodkov, A A; Solovyanov, O V; Solovyev, V; Sommer, P; Song, H Y; Soni, N; Sood, A; Sopko, V; Sopko, B; Sorin, V; Sosebee, M; Soualah, R; Soueid, P; Soukharev, A M; South, D; Spagnolo, S; Spanò, F; Spearman, W R; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spousta, M; Spreitzer, T; Spurlock, B; Denis, R D St; Staerz, S; Stahlman, J; Stamen, R; Stanecka, E; Stanek, R W; Stanescu, C; Stanescu-Bellu, M; Stanitzki, M M; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Staszewski, R; Stavina, P; Steele, G; Steinberg, P; Stekl, I; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stern, S; Stewart, G A; Stillings, J A; Stockton, M C; Stoebe, M; Stoerig, K; Stoicea, G; Stolte, P; Stonjek, S; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Stroynowski, R; Stucci, S A; Stugu, B; Styles, N A; Su, D; Su, J; Subramania, Hs; Subramaniam, R; Succurro, A; Sugaya, Y; Suhr, C; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, Y; Svatos, M; Swedish, S; Swiatlowski, M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Tackmann, K; Taenzer, J; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takahashi, Y; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tam, J Y C; Tamsett, M C; Tan, K G; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, S; Tanasijczuk, A J; Tani, K; Tannoury, N; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Delgado, A Tavares; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, C; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, W; Teischinger, F A; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terzo, S; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Therhaag, J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thoma, S; Thomas, J P; Thomas-Wilsker, J; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, P D; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Thomson, M; Thong, W M; Thun, R P; Tian, F; Tibbetts, M J; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Yu A; Timoshenko, S; Tiouchichine, E; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Toggerson, B; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Topilin, N D; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Tran, H L; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Triplett, N; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trovatelli, M; True, P; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsirintanis, N; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tua, A; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuna, A N; Tupputi, S A; Turchikhin, S; Turecek, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turra, R; Tuts, P M; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Uchida, K; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ughetto, M; Ugland, M; Uhlenbrock, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Urbaniec, D; Urquijo, P; Usai, G; Usanova, A; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Gallego, E Valladolid; Vallecorsa, S; Ferrer, J A Valls; Van Berg, R; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Geer, R; van der Graaf, H; Van Der Leeuw, R; van der Ster, D; Eldik, N van; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vannucci, F; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vazeille, F; Schroeder, T Vazquez; Veatch, J; Veloso, F; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Venturini, A; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Viazlo, O; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Vigne, R; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Virzi, J; Vitells, O; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, A; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; Schmitt, H von der; Radziewski, H von; Toerne, E von; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Milosavljevic, M Vranjes; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Vykydal, Z; Wagner, W; Wagner, P; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wall, R; Waller, P; Walsh, B; Wang, C; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, X; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Warsinsky, M; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watanabe, I; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weigell, P; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wendland, D; Weng, Z; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; White, A; White, M J; White, R; White, S; Whiteson, D; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wijeratne, P A; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilkens, H G; Will, J Z; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winkelmann, S; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Wittig, T; Wittkowski, J; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wright, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wulf, E; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xiao, M; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, H; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yanush, S; Yao, L; Yao, W-M; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zaytsev, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zengel, K; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zevi Della Porta, G; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    Many of the interesting physics processes to be measured at the LHC have a signature involving one or more isolated electrons. The electron reconstruction and identification efficiencies of the ATLAS detector at the LHC have been evaluated using proton-proton collision data collected in 2011 at [Formula: see text] TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb[Formula: see text]. Tag-and-probe methods using events with leptonic decays of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] bosons and [Formula: see text] mesons are employed to benchmark these performance parameters. The combination of all measurements results in identification efficiencies determined with an accuracy at the few per mil level for electron transverse energy greater than 30 GeV.

  11. H- Ion Sources for High Intensity Proton Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Johnson, Rolland P.; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F; Dudnikova, Galina

    2010-01-01

    Spallation neutron source user facilities require reliable, intense beams of protons. The technique of H- charge exchange injection into a storage ring or synchrotron can provide the needed beam currents, but may be limited by the ion sources that have currents and reliability that do not meet future requirements and emittances that are too large for efficient acceleration. In this project we are developing an H- source which will synthesize the most important developments in the field of negative ion sources to provide high current, small emittance, good lifetime, high reliability, and power efficiency. We describe planned modifications to the present external antenna source at SNS that involve: 1) replacing the present 2 MHz plasma-forming solenoid antenna with a 60 MHz saddle-type antenna and 2) replacing the permanent multicusp magnet with a weaker electromagnet, in order to increase the plasma density near the outlet aperture. The SNS test stand will then be used to verify simulations of this approach that indicate significant improvements in H- output current and efficiency, where lower RF power will allow higher duty factor, longer source lifetime, and/or better reliability.

  12. Proton conductive Pt-Co nanoparticles anchoring on citric acid functionalized graphene for efficient oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yige; Liu, Jingjun; Wu, Yijun; Wang, Feng

    2017-08-01

    Designing highly efficient electro-catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has been regarded as a demanding task in the development of renewable energy sources. However, little attention has been paid on improving Pt-based catalysts by promoting proton transfer from the electrolyte solutions to the catalyst layer at the cathode. Herein, we design proton conductive Pt-Co alloy nanoparticles anchoring on citric acid functionalized graphene (Pt-Co/CA-G) catalysts for efficient ORR. The facile modification approach for graphene can introduce oxygenated functional groups on the graphene surface to promote proton transfer as well as keeping the high electron conductivity without destroying the graphene original structure. The electrochemical results show that the Pt-Co/CA-G catalyst exhibits more excellent ORR activity and stability than the commercial Pt/C catalyst, which can be attributed to its improved proton transfer ability. The fast proton transfer comes from the hydrogen-bonding networks formed by the interaction between the oxygenated functional groups and water molecules. This work provides not only a novel and simple approach to modify graphene but also an effective strategy to improve Pt-based catalysts for the ORR.

  13. Encapsulating Mobile Proton Carriers into Structural Defects in Coordination Polymer Crystals: High Anhydrous Proton Conduction and Fuel Cell Application.

    PubMed

    Inukai, Munehiro; Horike, Satoshi; Itakura, Tomoya; Shinozaki, Ryota; Ogiwara, Naoki; Umeyama, Daiki; Nagarkar, Sanjog; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Malon, Michal; Hayashi, Akari; Ohhara, Takashi; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2016-07-13

    We describe the encapsulation of mobile proton carriers into defect sites in nonporous coordination polymers (CPs). The proton carriers were encapsulated with high mobility and provided high proton conductivity at 150 °C under anhydrous conditions. The high proton conductivity and nonporous nature of the CP allowed its application as an electrolyte in a fuel cell. The defects and mobile proton carriers were investigated using solid-state NMR, XAFS, XRD, and ICP-AES/EA. On the basis of these analyses, we concluded that the defect sites provide space for mobile uncoordinated H3PO4, H2PO4(-), and H2O. These mobile carriers play a key role in expanding the proton-hopping path and promoting the mobility of protons in the coordination framework, leading to high proton conductivity and fuel cell power generation.

  14. High energy protons generation by two sequential laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jiancai; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin

    2015-04-15

    The sequential proton acceleration by two laser pulses of relativistic intensity is proposed to produce high energy protons. In the scheme, a relativistic super-Gaussian (SG) laser pulse followed by a Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) pulse irradiates dense plasma attached by underdense plasma. A proton beam is produced from the target and accelerated in the radiation pressure regime by the short SG pulse and then trapped and re-accelerated in a special bubble driven by the LG pulse in the underdense plasma. The advantages of radiation pressure acceleration and LG transverse structure are combined to achieve the effective trapping and acceleration of protons. In a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, protons of 6.7 GeV are obtained from a 2 × 10{sup 22 }W/cm{sup 2} SG laser pulse and a LG pulse at a lower peak intensity.

  15. Efficient energy conversion from laser to proton beam in a laser-foil interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Kawata, S.; Satoh, D.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.

    2010-09-15

    Demonstrated is a remarkable improvement on the energy conversion efficiency from laser to protons in a laser-foil interaction by particle simulations. The total laser-proton energy conversion efficiency becomes 16.7%, although a conventional plane foil target serves a rather low efficiency. In our previous study we found that Al multihole thin-foil target was efficient for the energy conversion from laser to protons [Y. Nodera and S. Kawata, Phys. Rev. E 78, 046401 (2008)], and the energy conversion efficiency was 9.3%. In our 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations the Al multihole structure is also employed, and the parameters of the Al multihole wing width and length are optimized in the paper. The present results clarify the roles of the target Al hole width and depth in the laser-proton energy conversion. The main physical reason for the enhancement of the conversion efficiency is a reduction of the laser reflection at the target surface area. The optimized multihole foil target provides a remarkable increase in the laser-proton energy conversion efficiency as shown above.

  16. Numerical studies on alpha production from high energy proton beam interaction with Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustaizis, S. D.; Lalousis, P.; Hora, H.; Korn, G.

    2017-05-01

    Numerical investigations on high energy proton beam interaction with high density Boron plasma allows to simulate conditions concerning the alpha production from recent experimental measurements . The experiments measure the alpha production due to p11B nuclear fusion reactions when a laser-driven high energy proton beam interacts with Boron plasma produced by laser beam interaction with solid Boron. The alpha production and consequently the efficiency of the process depends on the initial proton beam energy, proton beam density, the Boron plasma density and temperature, and their temporal evolution. The main advantage for the p11B nuclear fusion reaction is the production of three alphas with total energy of 8.9 MeV, which could enhance the alpha heating effect and improve the alpha production. This particular effect is termed in the international literature as the alpha avalanche effect. Numerical results using a multi-fluid, global particle and energy balance, code shows the alpha production efficiency as a function of the initial energy of the proton beam, the Boron plasma density, the initial Boron plasma temperature and the temporal evolution of the plasma parameters. The simulations enable us to determine the interaction conditions (proton beam - B plasma) for which the alpha heating effect becomes important.

  17. Generalized z-scaling in proton-proton collisions at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zborovský, I.; Tokarev, M. V.

    2007-05-01

    New generalization of the z-scaling in inclusive particle production is proposed. The scaling variable z is a fractal measure which depends on kinematic characteristics of the underlying subprocess expressed in terms of the momentum fractions x1 and x2 of the incoming protons. In the generalized approach, x1 and x2 are functions of the momentum fractions ya and yb of the scattered and recoil constituents carried by the inclusive particle and recoil object, respectively. The scaling function ψ(z) for charged and identified hadrons produced in proton-proton collisions is constructed. The fractal dimensions and heat capacity of the produced medium entering definition of the variable z are established to restore energy, angular, and multiplicity independence of ψ(z). The proposed scheme allows a unique description of data on inclusive cross sections at high energies. Universality of the shape of the scaling function for various types of produced hadrons (π, K, p¯, Λ) is shown. Results of the analysis of experimental data are compared with the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD calculations in pT and z-presentations. The obtained results suggest that the z-scaling may be used as a tool for searching for new physics phenomena of particle production in high transverse momentum and the high multiplicity region at proton-proton colliders RHIC and LHC.

  18. Protic Salt Polymer Membranes: High-Temperature Water-Free Proton-Conducting Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Gervasio, Dominic Francis

    2010-09-30

    This research on proton-containing (protic) salts directly addresses proton conduction at high and low temperatures. This research is unique, because no water is used for proton ionization nor conduction, so the properties of water do not limit proton fuel cells. A protic salt is all that is needed to give rise to ionized proton and to support proton mobility. A protic salt forms when proton transfers from an acid to a base. Protic salts were found to have proton conductivities that are as high as or higher than the best aqueous electrolytes at ambient pressures and comparable temperatures without or with water present. Proton conductivity of the protic salts occurs providing two conditions exist: i) the energy difference is about 0.8 eV between the protic-salt state versus the state in which the acid and base are separated and 2) the chemical constituents rotate freely. The physical state of these proton-conducting salts can be liquid, plastic crystal as well as solid organic and inorganic polymer membranes and their mixtures. Many acids and bases can be used to make a protic salt which allows tailoring of proton conductivity, as well as other properties that affect their use as electrolytes in fuel cells, such as, stability, adsorption on catalysts, environmental impact, etc. During this project, highly proton conducting (~ 0.1S/cm) protic salts were made that are stable under fuel-cell operating conditions and that gave highly efficient fuel cells. The high efficiency is attributed to an improved oxygen electroreduction process on Pt which was found to be virtually reversible in a number of liquid protic salts with low water activity (< 1% water). Solid flexible non-porous composite membranes, made from inorganic polymer (e.g., 10%indium 90%tin pyrophosphate, ITP) and organic polymer (e.g., polyvinyl pyridinium phosphate, PVPP), were found that give conductivity and fuel cell performances similar to phosphoric acid electrolyte with no need for hydration at

  19. An efficient method to determine double Gaussian fluence parameters in the eclipse™ proton pencil beam model.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiajian; Liu, Wei; Stoker, Joshua; Ding, Xiaoning; Anand, Aman; Hu, Yanle; Herman, Michael G; Bues, Martin

    2016-12-01

    To find an efficient method to configure the proton fluence for a commercial proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment planning system (TPS). An in-water dose kernel was developed to mimic the dose kernel of the pencil beam convolution superposition algorithm, which is part of the commercial proton beam therapy planning software, eclipse™ (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The field size factor (FSF) was calculated based on the spot profile reconstructed by the in-house dose kernel. The workflow of using FSFs to find the desirable proton fluence is presented. The in-house derived spot profile and FSF were validated by a direct comparison with those calculated by the eclipse TPS. The validation included 420 comparisons of the FSFs from 14 proton energies, various field sizes from 2 to 20 cm and various depths from 20% to 80% of proton range. The relative in-water lateral profiles between the in-house calculation and the eclipse TPS agree very well even at the level of 10(-4). The FSFs between the in-house calculation and the eclipse TPS also agree well. The maximum deviation is within 0.5%, and the standard deviation is less than 0.1%. The authors' method significantly reduced the time to find the desirable proton fluences of the clinical energies. The method is extensively validated and can be applied to any proton centers using PBS and the eclipse TPS.

  20. High efficiency furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K. S.; Koestler, D. J.

    1985-12-31

    Disclosed is a dwelling furnace having at least one clam-shell type primary heat exchanger in parallel orientation with a secondary heat exchanger, both the primary and secondary heat exchangers being vertically oriented relative to a furnace housing and parallel to the flow of air to be heated. The primary heat exchanger has a combustion chamber in the lower end thereof, and the lower end of the secondary heat exchanger exhausts into a tertiary heat exchanger oriented approximately perpendicular to the primary and secondary heat exchangers and horizontally relative to the housing, below the combustion chambers of the primary heat exchangers and below the exhaust outlet of the secondary heat exchanger. The tertiary heat exchanger includes a plurality of condensation tubes for retrieving the latent heat of condensation of the combustion gases. The furnace further comprises an induced draft blower for drawing combustion gases through the heat exchangers and inducting sufficient air to the combustion chamber of the primary heat exchanger for efficient combustion.

  1. Structural origins of efficient proton abstraction from carbon by a catalytic antibody

    PubMed Central

    Debler, Erik W.; Ito, Shuichiro; Seebeck, Florian P.; Heine, Andreas; Hilvert, Donald; Wilson, Ian A.

    2005-01-01

    Antibody 34E4 catalyzes the conversion of benzisoxazoles to salicylonitriles with high rates and multiple turnovers. The crystal structure of its complex with the benzimidazolium hapten at 2.5-Å resolution shows that a combination of hydrogen bonding, π stacking, and van der Waals interactions is exploited to position both the base, GluH50, and the substrate for efficient proton transfer. Suboptimal placement of the catalytic carboxylate, as observed in the 2.8-Å structure of the GluH50Asp variant, results in substantially reduced catalytic efficiency. In addition to imposing high positional order on the transition state, the antibody pocket provides a highly structured microenvironment for the reaction in which the carboxylate base is activated through partial desolvation, and the highly polarizable transition state is stabilized by dispersion interactions with the aromatic residue TrpL91 and solvation of the leaving group oxygen by external water. The enzyme-like efficiency of general base catalysis in this system directly reflects the original hapten design, in which a charged guanidinium moiety was strategically used to elicit an accurately positioned functional group in an appropriate reaction environment and suggests that even larger catalytic effects may be achievable by extending this approach to the induction of acid-base pairs capable of bifunctional catalysis. PMID:15788533

  2. A maximum likelihood method for high resolution proton radiography/proton CT.

    PubMed

    Collins-Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Brousmiche, Sébastien; Portillo, Stephen K N; Beaulieu, Luc; Seco, Joao

    2016-12-07

    Multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) is the largest contributor to blurring in proton imaging. In this work, we developed a maximum likelihood least squares estimator that improves proton radiography's spatial resolution. The water equivalent thickness (WET) through projections defined from the source to the detector pixels were estimated such that they maximizes the likelihood of the energy loss of every proton crossing the volume. The length spent in each projection was calculated through the optimized cubic spline path estimate. The proton radiographies were produced using Geant4 simulations. Three phantoms were studied here: a slanted cube in a tank of water to measure 2D spatial resolution, a voxelized head phantom for clinical performance evaluation as well as a parametric Catphan phantom (CTP528) for 3D spatial resolution. Two proton beam configurations were used: a parallel and a conical beam. Proton beams of 200 and 330 MeV were simulated to acquire the radiography. Spatial resolution is increased from 2.44 lp cm(-1) to 4.53 lp cm(-1) in the 200 MeV beam and from 3.49 lp cm(-1) to 5.76 lp cm(-1) in the 330 MeV beam. Beam configurations do not affect the reconstructed spatial resolution as investigated between a radiography acquired with the parallel (3.49 lp cm(-1) to 5.76 lp cm(-1)) or conical beam (from 3.49 lp cm(-1) to 5.56 lp cm(-1)). The improved images were then used as input in a photon tomography algorithm. The proton CT reconstruction of the Catphan phantom shows high spatial resolution (from 2.79 to 5.55 lp cm(-1) for the parallel beam and from 3.03 to 5.15 lp cm(-1) for the conical beam) and the reconstruction of the head phantom, although qualitative, shows high contrast in the gradient region. The proposed formulation of the optimization demonstrates serious potential to increase the spatial resolution (up by 65[Formula: see text]) in proton radiography and greatly accelerate proton computed tomography reconstruction.

  3. A maximum likelihood method for high resolution proton radiography/proton CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins-Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Brousmiche, Sébastien; Portillo, Stephen K. N.; Beaulieu, Luc; Seco, Joao

    2016-12-01

    Multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) is the largest contributor to blurring in proton imaging. In this work, we developed a maximum likelihood least squares estimator that improves proton radiography’s spatial resolution. The water equivalent thickness (WET) through projections defined from the source to the detector pixels were estimated such that they maximizes the likelihood of the energy loss of every proton crossing the volume. The length spent in each projection was calculated through the optimized cubic spline path estimate. The proton radiographies were produced using Geant4 simulations. Three phantoms were studied here: a slanted cube in a tank of water to measure 2D spatial resolution, a voxelized head phantom for clinical performance evaluation as well as a parametric Catphan phantom (CTP528) for 3D spatial resolution. Two proton beam configurations were used: a parallel and a conical beam. Proton beams of 200 and 330 MeV were simulated to acquire the radiography. Spatial resolution is increased from 2.44 lp cm-1 to 4.53 lp cm-1 in the 200 MeV beam and from 3.49 lp cm-1 to 5.76 lp cm-1 in the 330 MeV beam. Beam configurations do not affect the reconstructed spatial resolution as investigated between a radiography acquired with the parallel (3.49 lp cm-1 to 5.76 lp cm-1) or conical beam (from 3.49 lp cm-1 to 5.56 lp cm-1). The improved images were then used as input in a photon tomography algorithm. The proton CT reconstruction of the Catphan phantom shows high spatial resolution (from 2.79 to 5.55 lp cm-1 for the parallel beam and from 3.03 to 5.15 lp cm-1 for the conical beam) and the reconstruction of the head phantom, although qualitative, shows high contrast in the gradient region. The proposed formulation of the optimization demonstrates serious potential to increase the spatial resolution (up by 65 % ) in proton radiography and greatly accelerate proton computed tomography reconstruction.

  4. High efficiency gas burner

    DOEpatents

    Schuetz, Mark A.

    1983-01-01

    A burner assembly provides for 100% premixing of fuel and air by drawing the air into at least one high velocity stream of fuel without power assist. Specifically, the nozzle assembly for injecting the fuel into a throat comprises a plurality of nozzles in a generally circular array. Preferably, swirl is imparted to the air/fuel mixture by angling the nozzles. The diffuser comprises a conical primary diffuser followed by a cusp diffuser.

  5. High power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Oliver J.; Hitchens, G. Duncan; Manko, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells use a perfluorosulfonic acid solid polymer film as an electrolyte which simplifies water and electrolyte management. Their thin electrolyte layers give efficient systems of low weight, and their materials of construction show extremely long laboratory lifetimes. Their high reliability and their suitability for use in a microgravity environment makes them particularly attractive as a substitute for batteries in satellites utilizing high-power, high energy-density electrochemical energy storage systems. In this investigation, the Dow experimental PEM (XUS-13204.10) and unsupported high platinum loading electrodes yielded very high power densities, of the order of 2.5 W cm(exp -2). A platinum black loading of 5 mg per cm(exp 2) was found to be optimum. On extending the three-dimensional reaction zone of fuel cell electrodes by impregnating solid polymer electrolyte into the electrode structures, Nafion was found to give better performance than the Dow experimental PEM. The depth of penetration of the solid polymer electrolyte into electrode structures was 50-70 percent of the thickness of the platinum-catalyzed active layer. However, the degree of platinum utilization was only 16.6 percent and the roughness factor of a typical electrode was 274.

  6. Enhanced production of multi-strange hadrons in high-multiplicity proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Molina, R. Alfaro; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Prado, C. Alves Garcia; An, M.; Andrei, C.; Andrews, H. A.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Camejo, A. Batista; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Martinez, H. Bello; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Beltran, L. G. E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bonora, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Diaz, L. Calero; Caliva, A.; Villar, E. Calvo; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castellanos, J. Castillo; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Sanchez, C. Ceballos; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Barroso, V. Chibante; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Balbastre, G. Conesa; Del Valle, Z. Conesa; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Morales, Y. Corrales; Maldonado, I. Cortés; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crkovska, J.; Crochet, P.; Albino, R. Cruz; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; de Souza, R. D.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; di Bari, D.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; di Ruzza, B.; Corchero, M. A. Diaz; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Gimenez, D. Domenicis; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Téllez, A. Fernández; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Francisco, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Girard, M. Fusco; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gajdosova, K.; Gallio, M.; Galvan, C. D.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garg, K.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Coral, D. M. Goméz; Ramirez, A. Gomez; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Gruber, L.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Hellbär, E.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Corral, G. Herrera; Herrmann, F.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Hughes, C.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Isakov, V.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacak, B.; Jacazio, N.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Bustamante, R. T. Jimenez; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Uysal, A. Karasu; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, M. Mohisin; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Khatun, A.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Meethaleveedu, G. Koyithatta; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; de Guevara, P. Ladron; Fernandes, C. Lagana; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lehner, S.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Monzón, I. León; Vargas, H. León; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; Torres, E. López; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Lupi, M.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Cervantes, I. Maldonado; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; García, G. Martínez; Pedreira, M. Martinez; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzilli, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; McDonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Pérez, J. Mercado; Meres, M.; Mhlanga, S.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Mishra, T.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Zetina, L. Montaño; Montes, E.; de Godoy, D. A. Moreira; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Münning, K.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; da Luz, H. Natal; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; de Oliveira, R. A. Negrao; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Oleniacz, J.; da Silva, A. C. Oliveira; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Oravec, M.; Velasquez, A. Ortiz; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, D.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Palni, P.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Peng, X.; da Costa, H. Pereira; Peresunko, D.; Lezama, E. Perez; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Poppenborg, H.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Ravasenga, I.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Cahuantzi, M. Rodríguez; Manso, A. Rodriguez; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Montero, A. J. Rubio; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Saarinen, S.; Sadhu, S.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, N.; Sarma, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schmidt, M.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Sheikh, A. I.; Shigaki, K.; Shou, Q.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Sozzi, F.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Swain, S.; Szabo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Muñoz, G. Tejeda; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thakur, D.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Tikhonov, A.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vala, M.; Palomo, L. Valencia; van der Maarel, J.; van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vyvre, P. Vande; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Doce, O. Vázquez; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Velure, A.; Vercellin, E.; Limón, S. Vergara; Vernet, R.; Vickovic, L.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Baillie, O. Villalobos; Tello, A. Villatoro; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Weiser, D. F.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Willems, G. A.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yalcin, S.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2017-06-01

    At sufficiently high temperature and energy density, nuclear matter undergoes a transition to a phase in which quarks and gluons are not confined: the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Such an exotic state of strongly interacting quantum chromodynamics matter is produced in the laboratory in heavy nuclei high-energy collisions, where an enhanced production of strange hadrons is observed. Strangeness enhancement, originally proposed as a signature of QGP formation in nuclear collisions, is more pronounced for multi-strange baryons. Several effects typical of heavy-ion phenomenology have been observed in high-multiplicity proton-proton (pp) collisions, but the enhanced production of multi-strange particles has not been reported so far. Here we present the first observation of strangeness enhancement in high-multiplicity proton-proton collisions. We find that the integrated yields of strange and multi-strange particles, relative to pions, increases significantly with the event charged-particle multiplicity. The measurements are in remarkable agreement with the p-Pb collision results, indicating that the phenomenon is related to the final system created in the collision. In high-multiplicity events strangeness production reaches values similar to those observed in Pb-Pb collisions, where a QGP is formed.

  7. Proton-Proton On Shell Optical Potential at High Energies and the Hollowness Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriola, Enrique Ruiz; Broniowski, Wojciech

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the usefulness of the optical potential as suggested by the double spectral Mandelstam representation at very high energies, such as in the proton-proton scattering at ISR and the LHC. Its particular meaning regarding the interpretation of the scattering data up to the maximum available measured energies is discussed. Our analysis reconstructs 3D dynamics from the effective transverse 2D impact parameter representation and suggests that besides the onset of gray nucleons at the LHC there appears an inelasticity depletion (hollowness) which precludes convolution models at the attometer scale.

  8. Triple Parton Scatterings in High-Energy Proton-Proton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Enterria, David; Snigirev, Alexander M.

    2017-03-01

    A generic expression to compute triple parton scattering cross sections in high-energy proton-proton (p p ) collisions is presented as a function of the corresponding single parton cross sections and the transverse parton profile of the proton encoded in an effective parameter σeff,TPS . The value of σeff,TPS is closely related to the similar effective cross section that characterizes double parton scatterings, and amounts to σeff,TPS=12.5 ±4.5 mb . Estimates for triple charm (c c ¯) and bottom (b b ¯) production in p p collisions at LHC and FCC energies are presented based on next-to-next-to-leading-order perturbative calculations for single c c ¯ , b b ¯ cross sections. At √{s }≈100 TeV , about 15% of the p p collisions produce three c c ¯ pairs from three different parton-parton scatterings.

  9. Quarkonium production in high energyproton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    del Valle, Z C; Corcella, G; Fleuret, F; Ferreiro, E G; Kartvelishvili, V; Kopeliovich, B; Lansberg, J P; Lourenco, C; Martinez, G; Papadimitriou, V; Satz, H; Scomparin, E; Ullrich, T; Teryaev, O; Vogt, R; Wang, J X

    2011-03-14

    We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarization studies. Afterwards, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in broader perpectives, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate the quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.

  10. Laser-driven ultraintense proton beams for high energy-density physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Slawomir; Badziak, Jan; Parys, Piotr; Rosinski, Marcin; Wolowski, Jerzy; Szydlowski, Adam; Antici, P.; Fuchs, J.; Mancic, A.

    2008-04-01

    The results of studies of high-intensity proton beam generation from thin (1 -- 3μm) solid targets irradiated by 0.35-ps laser pulse of energy up to 15J and intensity up to 2x10^19 W/cm^2 are reported. It is shown that the proton beams of multi-TW power and intensity above 10^18 W/cm^2 at the source can be produced when the laser-target interaction conditions approach the Skin-Layer Ponderomotive Acceleration requirements. The laser-protons energy conversion efficiency and proton beam parameters remarkably depend on the target structure. In particular, using a double-layer Au/PS target (plastic covered by 0.1 -- 0.2μm Au front layer) results in two-fold higher conversion efficiency and proton beam intensity than in the case of a plastic target. The values of proton beam intensities attained in our experiment are the highest among the ones measured so far.

  11. High efficiency centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Nasvytis, P.J.; Jahrstorfer, G.W.

    1983-10-11

    A high speed fuel pump for a gas turnbine engine has a positively-driven shroud positioned between a main impeller and the wall of a pumping cavity to reduce impeller drag. The shroud is formed by a first disc having a boost impeller connected to its central hub portion and a second disc having a gear carried by its central hub portion. The main drive shaft assembly to which the main impeller is connected, carries a gear which meshes with gear mounted upon a shaft. The shaft also carries a gear which meshes with the gear. The gears are sized so that the shroud is driven at one-half the speed of the main impeller in order to maximize impeller drag reduction and enhance pumping capability when severe inlet conditions are present at the pump inlet.

  12. Determining relative proton and electron auroral LBH emission efficiencies from FUV-ionosonde comparisons - preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, H. K.; Galkin, I. A.; Reinisch, B. W.; Paxton, L.

    2013-12-01

    Comparisons are being made between ionospheric E-region parameters derived from NASA's Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics Global Ultraviolet Imager (TIMED/GUVI) and DMSP's Special Sensor Ultraviolet Spectrographic Imager (SSUSI) auroral far ultraviolet (FUV) images and coincident E-region observations by five ground-based high latitude ionosondes (i.e. digisondes) that are part of the Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory (GIRO) [Earth, Planets and Space, 2011]. The purpose of the comparisons is to determine whether the relative difference in efficiencies between proton and electron aurora in producing Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) emission is as great as is indicated by comparisons between SSUSI and SSJ/5 particle detector observations, as described in Knight et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2008, 2012] and Correira et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2011]. These previous results imply that proton auroral LBH emission efficiency could be as much as a factor of 4.5 greater than electron auroral LBH emission efficiency, which has important implications for auroral FUV remote sensing algorithms. Auroral HmE (height of maximum E region electron density) and NmE (maximum E region electron density) are derived from the travel times of reflected radio signals for a range of frequencies. It is necessary to extract the auroral E layer information manually (using visual inspection) from the ionograms because of the presence of sporadic E layer echoes and other complications. The benefit of making comparisons with digisonde observations is that they remain in operation continuously and record observations every few minutes, making it possible to gather large numbers of FUV image-coincident observation for statistical studies. We expect to process ionograms for ~5000 overpasses of FUV imagers in which significant auroral activity is observed over the ground stations. This work is being funded by the NASA Geospace Science program.

  13. Phoswich scintillator for proton and gamma radiation of high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Tengblad, O.; Borge, M. J. G.; Briz, J. A.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Cruz, C.; Gugliermina, V.; Nacher, E.; Perea, A.; Sanchez del Rio, J.; Nieves, M. Turrion; Nilsson, T.; Johansson, H. T.; Bergstroem, J.; Blomberg, E.; Buelling, A.; Gallneby, E.; Hagdahl, J.; Jansson, L.; Jareteg, K.; Masgren, R.; and others

    2011-11-30

    We present here a Phoswich scintillator design to achieve both high resolution gamma ray detection, and good efficiency for high energy protons. There are recent developments of new high resolution scintillator materials. Especially the LaBr3(Ce) and LaCl3(Ce) crystals have very good energy resolution in the order of 3% for 662 keV gamma radiation. In addition, these materials exhibit a very good light output (63 and 32 photons/keV respectively).A demonstrator detector in the form of an Al cylinder of 24 mm diameter and a total length of 80 mm with 2 mm wall thickness, containing a LaBr3(Ce) crystal of 20 mm diameter and 30 mm length directly coupled to a LaCl3(Ce) crystal of 50 mm length, and closed with a glass window of 5 mm, was delivered by Saint Gobain. To the glass window a Hamamatsu R5380 Photomultiplier tube (PMT) was coupled using silicon optical grease.

  14. Star tracker operation in a high density proton field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miklus, Kenneth J.; Kissh, Frank; Flynn, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Algorithms that reject transient signals due to proton effects on charge coupled device (CCD) sensors have been implemented in the HDOS ASTRA-l Star Trackers to be flown on the TOPEX mission scheduled for launch in July 1992. A unique technique for simulating a proton-rich environment to test trackers is described, as well as the test results obtained. Solar flares or an orbit that passes through the South Atlantic Anomaly can subject the vehicle to very high proton flux levels. There are three ways in which spurious proton generated signals can impact tracker performance: the many false signals can prevent or extend the time to acquire a star; a proton-generated signal can compromise the accuracy of the star's reported magnitude and position; and the tracked star can be lost, requiring reacquisition. Tests simulating a proton-rich environment were performed on two ASTRA-1 Star Trackers utilizing these new algorithms. There were no false acquisitions, no lost stars, and a significant reduction in reported position errors due to these improvements.

  15. Protonation enthalpies of metal oxides from high temperature electrophoresis.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Santiago, V; Fedkin, Mark V; Lvov, Serguei N.

    2012-01-01

    Surface protonation reactions play an important role in the behavior of mineral and colloidal systems, specifically in hydrothermal aqueous environments. However, studies addressing the reactions at the solid/liquid interface at temperatures above 100 C are scarce. In this study, newly and previously obtained high temperature electrophoresis data (up to 260 C) - zeta potentials and isoelectric points - for metal oxides, including SiO{sub 2}, SnO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, were used in thermodynamic analysis to derive the standard enthalpies of their surface protonation. Two different approaches were used for calculating the protonation enthalpy: one is based on thermodynamic description of the 1-pKa model for surface protonation, and another one - on a combination of crystal chemistry and solvation theories which link the relative permittivity of the solid phase and the ratio of the Pauling bond strength and bond length to standard protonation enthalpy. From this analysis, two expressions relating the protonation enthalpy to the relative permittivity of the solid phase were obtained.

  16. Protonation enthalpies of metal oxides from high temperature electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Santiago, V; Fedkin, Mark V.; Lvov, Serguei N.

    2012-01-01

    Surface protonation reactions play an important role in the behavior of mineral and colloidal systems, specifically in hydrothermal aqueous environments. However, studies addressing the reactions at the solid/liquid interface at temperatures above 100 C are scarce. In this study, newly and previously obtained high temperature electrophoresis data (up to 260 C) zeta potentials and isoelectric points for metal oxides, including SiO2, SnO2, ZrO2, TiO2, and Fe3O4, were used in thermodynamic analysis to derive the standard enthalpies of their surface protonation. Two different approaches were used for calculating the protonation enthalpy: one is based on thermodynamic description of the 1-pKa model for surface protonation, and another one on a combination of crystal chemistry and solvation theories which link the relative permittivity of the solid phase and the ratio of the Pauling bond strength and bond length to standard protonation enthalpy. From this analysis, two expressions relating the protonation enthalpy to the relative permittivity of the solid phase were obtained.

  17. Heavy quark energy loss in high multiplicity proton-proton collisions at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Sascha; Gossiaux, Pol Bernard; Werner, Klaus; Aichelin, Jörg

    2011-07-15

    One of the most promising probes to study deconfined matter created in high energy nuclear collisions is the energy loss of (heavy) quarks. It has been shown in experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider that even charm and bottom quarks, despite their high mass, experience a remarkable medium suppression in the quark gluon plasma. In this exploratory investigation we study the energy loss of heavy quarks in high multiplicity proton-proton collisions at LHC energies. Although the colliding systems are smaller than compared to those at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (p+p vs Au+Au), the higher energy might lead to multiplicities comparable to Cu+Cu collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The interaction of charm quarks with this environment gives rise to a non-negligible suppression of high momentum heavy quarks in elementary collisions.

  18. High intensity proton linac activities at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B.; Chan, K.C.; Campbell, B.

    1998-09-01

    High-current proton linear accelerators offer an attractive alternative for generating the intense neutron fluxes needed for transmutations technologies, tritium production and neutron science. To achieve the fluxes required for tritium production, a 100-mA, 1700-MeV cw proton accelerator is being designed that uses superconducting cavities for the high-energy portion of the linac, from 211 to 1,700 MeV. The development work supporting the linac design effort is focused on three areas: superconducting cavity performance for medium-beta cavities at 700 MHz, high power rf coupler development, and cryomodule design. An overview of the progress in these three areas is presented.

  19. Accumulation efficiency of cancer stem-like cells post γ-ray and proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yi; Wang, Weikang; Fu, Qibin; Mei, Tao; Wu, Jingwen; Li, Jia; Yang, Gen; Wang, Yugang

    2012-09-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) has been proven to be a powerful medical treatment in cancer therapy. Rational and effective use of its killing power depends on understanding IR-mediated responses at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. Increasing evidence supports that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) play an important role in tumor regrowth and spread post radiotherapy, for they are resistant to various therapy methods including radiation. Presently, SW620 colon carcinoma monolayer culture cells were irradiated with γ-rays and protons of 2 Gy. Then apoptosis, clonogenic survival and the expression of CD133+ protein were examined. The results showed that there was no significantly difference either on long-term clonogenic survival or on short-term apoptosis ratio. However, compared with γ-rays, irradiation with protons was less efficient to accumulate CSCs at the same dose, although both protons and γ-rays can significantly accumulate the CD133+ CSCs subpopulation. In addition, the results of sphere formation assay also confirmed that proton irradiation is less efficient in CSCs accumulation, suggesting proton irradiation might have higher efficiency in CSCs elimination for cancer radiotherapy.

  20. Electron efficiency measurements with the ATLAS detector using 2012 LHC proton-proton collision data.

    PubMed

    Aaboud, M; Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdinov, O; Abeloos, B; AbouZeid, O S; Abraham, N L; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adachi, S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Affolder, A A; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Ali, B; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Alkire, S P; Allbrooke, B M M; Allen, B W; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Alshehri, A A; Alstaty, M; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Álvarez Piqueras, D; Alviggi, M G; Amadio, B T; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, J K; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antel, C; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antrim, D J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Arabidze, G; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arduh, F A; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Armitage, L J; Arnaez, O; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Artz, S; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Augsten, K; Avolio, G; Axen, B; Ayoub, M K; Azuelos, G; Baak, M A; Baas, A E; Baca, M J; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Baines, J T; Bajic, M; Baker, O K; Baldin, E M; Balek, P; Balestri, T; Balli, F; Balunas, W K; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Barak, L; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisits, M-S; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnes, S L; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barranco Navarro, L; Barreiro, F; da Costa, J Barreiro Guimarães; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Basalaev, A; Bassalat, A; Bates, R L; Batista, S J; Batley, J R; Battaglia, M; Bauce, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beacham, J B; Beattie, M D; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, M; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednyakov, V A; Bedognetti, M; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Behr, J K; Bell, A S; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Belyaev, N L; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bender, M; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez, J; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Bentvelsen, S; Beresford, L; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Beringer, J; Berlendis, S; Bernard, N R; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertoli, G; Bertolucci, F; Bertram, I A; Bertsche, C; Bertsche, D; Besjes, G J; Bessidskaia Bylund, O; Bessner, M; Besson, N; Betancourt, C; Bethani, A; Bethke, S; Bevan, A J; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Biedermann, D; Bielski, R; Biesuz, N V; Biglietti, M; De Mendizabal, J Bilbao; Billoud, T R V; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biondi, S; Bisanz, T; Bjergaard, D M; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blackburn, D; Blair, R E; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blue, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Blunier, S; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Bock, C; Boehler, M; Boerner, D; Bogaerts, J A; Bogavac, D; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bokan, P; Bold, T; Boldyrev, A S; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Bortfeldt, J; Bortoletto, D; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Bossio Sola, J D; Boudreau, J; Bouffard, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Boutle, S K; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Breaden Madden, W D; Brendlinger, K; Brennan, A J; Brenner, L; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Bristow, T M; Britton, D; Britzger, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brosamer, J; Brost, E; Broughton, J H; de Renstrom, P A Bruckman; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruni, L S; Brunt, B H; Bruschi, M; Bruscino, N; Bryant, P; Bryngemark, L; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Budagov, I A; Buehrer, F; Bugge, M K; Bulekov, O; Bullock, D; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgard, C D; Burger, A M; Burghgrave, B; Burka, K; Burke, S; Burmeister, I; Burr, J T P; Busato, E; Büscher, D; Büscher, V; Bussey, P; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Butti, P; Buttinger, W; Buzatu, A; Buzykaev, A R; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cairo, V M; Cakir, O; Calace, N; Calafiura, P; Calandri, A; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Callea, G; Caloba, L P; Calvente Lopez, S; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Calvet, T P; Camacho Toro, R; Camarda, S; Camarri, P; Cameron, D; Caminal Armadans, R; Camincher, C; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Camplani, A; Campoverde, A; Canale, V; Canepa, A; Cano Bret, M; Cantero, J; Cao, T; Capeans Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capua, M; Carbone, R M; Cardarelli, R; Cardillo, F; Carli, I; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carlson, B T; Carminati, L; Carney, R M D; Caron, S; Carquin, E; Carrillo-Montoya, G D; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Casolino, M; Casper, D W; Castaneda-Miranda, E; Castelijn, R; Castelli, A; Castillo Gimenez, V; Castro, N F; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Caudron, J; Cavaliere, V; Cavallaro, E; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Ceradini, F; Cerda Alberich, L; Cerqueira, A S; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Cerutti, F; Cervelli, A; Cetin, S A; Chafaq, A; Chakraborty, D; Chan, S K; Chan, Y L; Chang, P; Chapman, J D; Charlton, D G; Chatterjee, A; Chau, C C; Chavez Barajas, C A; Che, S; Cheatham, S; Chegwidden, A; Chekanov, S; Chekulaev, S V; Chelkov, G A; Chelstowska, M A; Chen, C; Chen, H; Chen, S; Chen, S; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Cheng, H C; Cheng, H J; Cheng, Y; Cheplakov, A; Cheremushkina, E; El Moursli, R Cherkaoui; Chernyatin, V; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Chiarella, V; Chiarelli, G; Chiodini, G; Chisholm, A S; Chitan, A; Chizhov, M V; Choi, K; Chomont, A R; Chouridou, S; Chow, B K B; Christodoulou, V; Chromek-Burckhart, D; Chudoba, J; Chuinard, A J; Chwastowski, J J; Chytka, L; Ciapetti, G; Ciftci, A K; Cinca, D; Cindro, V; Cioara, I A; Ciocca, C; Ciocio, A; Cirotto, F; Citron, Z H; Citterio, M; Ciubancan, M; Clark, A; Clark, B L; Clark, M R; Clark, P J; Clarke, R N; Clement, C; Coadou, Y; Cobal, M; Coccaro, A; Cochran, J; Colasurdo, L; Cole, B; Colijn, A P; Collot, J; Colombo, T; Conde Muiño, P; Coniavitis, E; Connell, S H; Connelly, I A; Consorti, V; Constantinescu, S; Conti, G; Conventi, F; Cooke, M; Cooper, B D; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cormier, F; Cormier, K J R; Cornelissen, T; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Cortes-Gonzalez, A; Cortiana, G; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Cottin, G; Cowan, G; Cox, B E; Cranmer, K; Crawley, S J; Cree, G; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Crescioli, F; Cribbs, W A; Crispin Ortuzar, M; Cristinziani, M; Croft, V; Crosetti, G; Cueto, A; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T; Cummings, J; Curatolo, M; Cúth, J; Czirr, H; Czodrowski, P; D'amen, G; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M J; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W; Dado, T; Dai, T; Dale, O; Dallaire, F; Dallapiccola, C; Dam, M; Dandoy, J R; Dang, N P; Daniells, A C; Dann, N S; Danninger, M; Dano Hoffmann, M; Dao, V; Darbo, G; Darmora, S; Dassoulas, J; Dattagupta, A; Davey, W; David, C; Davidek, T; Davies, M; Davison, P; Dawe, E; Dawson, I; De, K; de Asmundis, R; De Benedetti, A; De Castro, S; De Cecco, S; De Groot, N; de Jong, P; De la Torre, H; De Lorenzi, F; De Maria, A; De Pedis, D; De Salvo, A; De Sanctis, U; De Santo, A; De Vivie De Regie, J B; Dearnaley, W J; Debbe, R; Debenedetti, C; Dedovich, D V; Dehghanian, N; Deigaard, I; Del Gaudio, M; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; Delgove, D; Deliot, F; Delitzsch, C M; Dell'Acqua, A; Dell'Asta, L; Dell'Orso, M; Della Pietra, M; Della Volpe, D; Delmastro, M; Delsart, P A; DeMarco, D A; Demers, S; Demichev, M; Demilly, A; Denisov, S P; Denysiuk, D; Derendarz, D; Derkaoui, J E; Derue, F; Dervan, P; Desch, K; Deterre, C; Dette, K; Deviveiros, P O; Dewhurst, A; Dhaliwal, S; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Clemente, W K; Di Donato, C; Di Girolamo, A; Di Girolamo, B; Di Micco, B; Di Nardo, R; Di Petrillo, K F; Di Simone, A; Di Sipio, R; Di Valentino, D; Diaconu, C; Diamond, M; Dias, F A; Diaz, M A; Diehl, E B; Dietrich, J; Díez Cornell, S; Dimitrievska, A; Dingfelder, J; Dita, P; Dita, S; Dittus, F; Djama, F; Djobava, T; Djuvsland, J I; do Vale, M A B; Dobos, D; Dobre, M; Doglioni, C; Dolejsi, J; Dolezal, Z; Donadelli, M; Donati, S; Dondero, P; Donini, J; Dopke, J; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Doyle, A T; Drechsler, E; Dris, M; Du, Y; Duarte-Campderros, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Ducu, O A; Duda, D; Dudarev, A; Dudder, A Chr; Duffield, E M; Duflot, L; Dührssen, M; Dumancic, M; Duncan, A K; Dunford, M; Duran Yildiz, H; Düren, M; Durglishvili, A; Duschinger, D; Dutta, B; Dyndal, M; Eckardt, C; Ecker, K M; Edgar, R C; Edwards, N C; Eifert, T; Eigen, G; Einsweiler, K; Ekelof, T; Kacimi, M El; Ellajosyula, V; Ellert, M; Elles, S; Ellinghaus, F; Elliot, A A; Ellis, N; Elmsheuser, J; Elsing, M; Emeliyanov, D; Enari, Y; Endner, O C; Ennis, J S; Erdmann, J; Ereditato, A; Ernis, G; Ernst, J; Ernst, M; Errede, S; Ertel, E; Escalier, M; Esch, H; Escobar, C; Esposito, B; Etienvre, A I; Etzion, E; Evans, H; Ezhilov, A; Fabbri, F; Fabbri, L; Facini, G; Fakhrutdinov, R M; Falciano, S; Falla, R J; Faltova, J; Fang, Y; Fanti, M; Farbin, A; Farilla, A; Farina, C; Farina, E M; Farooque, T; Farrell, S; Farrington, S M; Farthouat, P; Fassi, F; Fassnacht, P; Fassouliotis, D; Faucci Giannelli, M; Favareto, A; Fawcett, W J; Fayard, L; Fedin, O L; Fedorko, W; Feigl, S; Feligioni, L; Feng, C; Feng, E J; Feng, H; Fenyuk, A B; Feremenga, L; Fernandez Martinez, P; Fernandez Perez, S; Ferrando, J; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrari, R; de Lima, D E Ferreira; Ferrer, A; Ferrere, D; Ferretti, C; Fiedler, F; Filipčič, A; Filipuzzi, M; Filthaut, F; Fincke-Keeler, M; Finelli, K D; Fiolhais, M C N; Fiorini, L; Fischer, A; Fischer, C; Fischer, J; Fisher, W C; Flaschel, N; Fleck, I; Fleischmann, P; Fletcher, G T; Fletcher, R R M; Flick, T; Flierl, B M; Flores Castillo, L R; Flowerdew, M J; Forcolin, G T; Formica, A; Forti, A; Foster, A G; Fournier, D; Fox, H; Fracchia, S; Francavilla, P; Franchini, M; Francis, D; Franconi, L; Franklin, M; Frate, M; Fraternali, M; Freeborn, D; Fressard-Batraneanu, S M; Friedrich, F; Froidevaux, D; Frost, J A; Fukunaga, C; Fullana Torregrosa, E; Fusayasu, T; Fuster, J; Gabaldon, C; Gabizon, O; Gabrielli, A; Gabrielli, A; Gach, G P; Gadatsch, S; Gagliardi, G; Gagnon, L G; Gagnon, P; Galea, C; Galhardo, B; Gallas, E J; Gallop, B J; Gallus, P; Galster, G; Gan, K K; Ganguly, S; Gao, J; Gao, Y; Gao, Y S; Garay Walls, F M; García, C; García Navarro, J E; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Gardner, R W; Garelli, N; Garonne, V; Gascon Bravo, A; Gasnikova, K; Gatti, C; Gaudiello, A; Gaudio, G; Gauthier, L; Gavrilenko, I L; Gay, C; Gaycken, G; Gazis, E N; Gecse, Z; Gee, C N P; Geich-Gimbel, Ch; Geisen, M; Geisler, M P; Gellerstedt, K; Gemme, C; Genest, M H; Geng, C; Gentile, S; Gentsos, C; George, S; Gerbaudo, D; Gershon, A; Ghasemi, S; Ghneimat, M; Giacobbe, B; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, S M; Gignac, M; Gilchriese, M; Gillam, T P S; Gillberg, D; Gilles, G; Gingrich, D M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M P; Giorgi, F M; Giraud, P F; Giromini, P; Giugni, D; Giuli, F; Giuliani, C; Giulini, M; Gjelsten, B K; Gkaitatzis, S; Gkialas, I; Gkougkousis, E L; Gladilin, L K; Glasman, C; Glatzer, J; Glaysher, P C F; Glazov, A; Goblirsch-Kolb, M; Godlewski, J; Goldfarb, S; Golling, T; Golubkov, D; Gomes, A; Gonçalo, R; Da Costa, J Goncalves Pinto Firmino; Gonella, G; Gonella, L; Gongadze, A; de la Hoz, S González; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Goossens, L; Gorbounov, P A; Gordon, H A; Gorelov, I; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Gorišek, A; Goshaw, A T; Gössling, C; Gostkin, M I; Goudet, C R; Goujdami, D; Goussiou, A G; Govender, N; Gozani, E; Graber, L; Grabowska-Bold, I; Gradin, P O J; Grafström, P; Gramling, J; Gramstad, E; Grancagnolo, S; Gratchev, V; Gravila, P M; Gray, H M; Graziani, E; Greenwood, Z D; Grefe, C; Gregersen, K; Gregor, I M; Grenier, P; Grevtsov, K; Griffiths, J; Grillo, A A; Grimm, K; Grinstein, S; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groh, S; Gross, E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Grossi, G C; Grout, Z J; Guan, L; Guan, W; Guenther, J; Guescini, F; Guest, D; Gueta, O; Gui, B; Guido, E; Guillemin, T; Guindon, S; Gul, U; Gumpert, C; Guo, J; Guo, W; Guo, Y; Gupta, R; Gupta, S; Gustavino, G; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez Ortiz, N G; Gutschow, C; Guyot, C; Gwenlan, C; Gwilliam, C B; Haas, A; Haber, C; Hadavand, H K; Hadef, A; Hageböck, S; Hagihara, M; Hakobyan, H; Haleem, M; Haley, J; Halladjian, G; Hallewell, G D; Hamacher, K; Hamal, P; Hamano, K; Hamilton, A; Hamity, G N; Hamnett, P G; Han, L; Han, S; Hanagaki, K; Hanawa, K; Hance, M; Haney, B; Hanke, P; Hanna, R; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, M C; Hansen, P H; Hara, K; Hard, A S; Harenberg, T; Hariri, F; Harkusha, S; Harrington, R D; Harrison, P F; Hartjes, F; Hartmann, N M; Hasegawa, M; Hasegawa, Y; Hasib, A; Hassani, S; Haug, S; Hauser, R; Hauswald, L; Havranek, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R J; Hayakawa, D; Hayden, D; Hays, C P; Hays, J M; Hayward, H S; Haywood, S J; Head, S J; Heck, T; Hedberg, V; Heelan, L; Heim, S; Heim, T; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J J; Heinrich, L; Heinz, C; Hejbal, J; Helary, L; Hellman, S; Helsens, C; Henderson, J; Henderson, R C W; Heng, Y; Henkelmann, S; Henriques Correia, A M; Henrot-Versille, S; Herbert, G H; Herde, H; Herget, V; Hernández Jiménez, Y; Herten, G; Hertenberger, R; Hervas, L; Hesketh, G G; Hessey, N P; Hetherly, J W; Higón-Rodriguez, E; Hill, E; Hill, J C; Hiller, K H; Hillier, S J; Hinchliffe, I; Hines, E; Hirose, M; Hirschbuehl, D; Hladik, O; Hoad, X; Hobbs, J; Hod, N; Hodgkinson, M C; Hodgson, P; Hoecker, A; Hoeferkamp, M R; Hoenig, F; Hohn, D; Holmes, T R; Homann, M; Honda, S; Honda, T; Hong, T M; Hooberman, B H; Hopkins, W H; Horii, Y; Horton, A J; Hostachy, J-Y; Hou, S; Hoummada, A; Howarth, J; Hoya, J; Hrabovsky, M; Hristova, I; Hrivnac, J; Hryn'ova, T; Hrynevich, A; Hsu, P J; Hsu, S-C; Hu, Q; Hu, S; Huang, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hubaut, F; Huegging, F; Huffman, T B; Hughes, E W; Hughes, G; Huhtinen, M; Huo, P; Huseynov, N; Huston, J; Huth, J; Iacobucci, G; Iakovidis, G; Ibragimov, I; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Ideal, E; Iengo, P; Igonkina, O; Iizawa, T; Ikegami, Y; Ikeno, M; Ilchenko, Y; Iliadis, D; Ilic, N; Introzzi, G; Ioannou, P; Iodice, M; Iordanidou, K; Ippolito, V; Ishijima, N; Ishino, M; Ishitsuka, M; Issever, C; Istin, S; Ito, F; Iturbe Ponce, J M; Iuppa, R; Iwasaki, H; Izen, J M; Izzo, V; Jabbar, S; Jackson, B; Jackson, P; Jain, V; Jakobi, K B; Jakobs, K; Jakobsen, S; Jakoubek, T; Jamin, D O; Jana, D K; Jansky, R; Janssen, J; Janus, M; Janus, P A; Jarlskog, G; Javadov, N; Javůrek, T; Javurkova, M; Jeanneau, F; Jeanty, L; Jejelava, J; Jeng, G-Y; Jenni, P; Jeske, C; Jézéquel, S; Ji, H; Jia, J; Jiang, H; Jiang, Y; Jiang, Z; Jiggins, S; Jimenez Pena, J; Jin, S; Jinaru, A; Jinnouchi, O; Jivan, H; Johansson, P; Johns, K A; Johnson, C A; Johnson, W J; Jon-And, K; Jones, G; Jones, R W L; Jones, S; Jones, T J; Jongmanns, J; Jorge, P M; Jovicevic, J; Ju, X; Juste Rozas, A; Köhler, M K; Kaczmarska, A; Kado, M; Kagan, H; Kagan, M; Kahn, S J; Kaji, T; Kajomovitz, E; Kalderon, C W; Kaluza, A; Kama, S; Kamenshchikov, A; Kanaya, N; Kaneti, S; Kanjir, L; Kantserov, V A; Kanzaki, J; Kaplan, B; Kaplan, L S; Kapliy, A; Kar, D; Karakostas, K; Karamaoun, A; Karastathis, N; Kareem, M J; Karentzos, E; Karnevskiy, M; Karpov, S N; Karpova, Z M; Karthik, K; Kartvelishvili, V; Karyukhin, A N; Kasahara, K; Kashif, L; Kass, R D; Kastanas, A; Kataoka, Y; Kato, C; Katre, A; Katzy, J; Kawade, K; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kawamura, G; Kazanin, V F; Keeler, R; Kehoe, R; Keller, J S; Kempster, J J; Keoshkerian, H; Kepka, O; Kerševan, B P; Kersten, S; Keyes, R A; Khader, M; Khalil-Zada, F; Khanov, A; Kharlamov, A G; Kharlamova, T; Khoo, T J; Khovanskiy, V; Khramov, E; Khubua, J; Kido, S; Kilby, C R; Kim, H Y; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kind, O M; King, B T; King, M; Kirk, J; Kiryunin, A E; Kishimoto, T; Kisielewska, D; Kiss, F; Kiuchi, K; Kivernyk, O; Kladiva, E; Klein, M H; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kleinknecht, K; Klimek, P; Klimentov, A; Klingenberg, R; Klioutchnikova, T; Kluge, E-E; Kluit, P; Kluth, S; Knapik, J; Kneringer, E; Knoops, E B F G; Knue, A; Kobayashi, A; Kobayashi, D; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Kocian, M; Kodys, P; Koffas, T; Koffeman, E; Köhler, N M; Koi, T; Kolanoski, H; Kolb, M; Koletsou, I; Komar, A A; Komori, Y; Kondo, T; Kondrashova, N; Köneke, K; König, A C; Kono, T; Konoplich, R; Konstantinidis, N; Kopeliansky, R; Koperny, S; Kopp, A K; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korol, A A; Korolkov, I; Korolkova, E V; Kortner, O; Kortner, S; Kosek, T; Kostyukhin, V V; Kotwal, A; Koulouris, A; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A; Kourkoumelis, C; Kouskoura, V; Kowalewska, A B; Kowalewski, R; Kowalski, T Z; Kozakai, C; Kozanecki, W; Kozhin, A S; Kramarenko, V A; Kramberger, G; Krasnopevtsev, D; Krasny, M W; Krasznahorkay, A; Kravchenko, A; Kretz, M; Kretzschmar, J; Kreutzfeldt, K; Krieger, P; Krizka, K; Kroeninger, K; Kroha, H; Kroll, J; Kroseberg, J; Krstic, J; Kruchonak, U; Krüger, H; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M C; Kruskal, M; Kubota, T; Kucuk, H; Kuday, S; Kuechler, J T; Kuehn, S; Kugel, A; Kuger, F; Kuhl, T; Kukhtin, V; Kukla, R; Kulchitsky, Y; Kuleshov, S; Kuna, M; Kunigo, T; Kupco, A; Kuprash, O; Kurashige, H; Kurchaninov, L L; Kurochkin, Y A; Kurth, M G; Kus, V; Kuwertz, E S; Kuze, M; Kvita, J; Kwan, T; Kyriazopoulos, D; La Rosa, A; Rosa Navarro, J L La; La Rotonda, L; Lacasta, C; Lacava, F; Lacey, J; Lacker, H; Lacour, D; Ladygin, E; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lagouri, T; Lai, S; Lammers, S; Lampl, W; Lançon, E; Landgraf, U; Landon, M P J; Lanfermann, M C; Lang, V S; Lange, J C; Lankford, A J; Lanni, F; Lantzsch, K; Lanza, A; Laplace, S; Lapoire, C; Laporte, J F; Lari, T; Lasagni Manghi, F; Lassnig, M; Laurelli, P; Lavrijsen, W; Law, A T; Laycock, P; Lazovich, T; Lazzaroni, M; Le, B; Le Dortz, O; Le Guirriec, E; Le Quilleuc, E P; LeBlanc, M; LeCompte, T; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Lee, C A; Lee, S C; Lee, L; Lefebvre, B; Lefebvre, G; Lefebvre, M; Legger, F; Leggett, C; Lehan, A; Lehmann Miotto, G; Lei, X; Leight, W A; Leister, A G; Leite, M A L; Leitner, R; Lellouch, D; Lemmer, B; Leney, K J C; Lenz, T; Lenzi, B; Leone, R; Leone, S; Leonidopoulos, C; Leontsinis, S; Lerner, G; Leroy, C; Lesage, A A J; Lester, C G; Lester, C M; Levchenko, M; Levêque, J; Levin, D; Levinson, L J; Levy, M; Lewis, D; Leyton, M; Li, B; Li, C; Li, H; Li, L; Li, L; Li, Q; Li, S; Li, X; Li, Y; Liang, Z; Liberti, B; Liblong, A; Lichard, P; Lie, K; Liebal, J; Liebig, W; Limosani, A; Lin, S C; Lin, T H; Lindquist, B E; Lionti, A E; Lipeles, E; Lipniacka, A; Lisovyi, M; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litke, A M; Liu, B; Liu, D; Liu, H; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, K; Liu, L; Liu, M; Liu, Y L; Liu, Y; Livan, M; Lleres, A; Llorente Merino, J; Lloyd, S L; Lo Sterzo, F; Lobodzinska, E M; Loch, P; Loebinger, F K; Loew, K M; Loginov, A; Lohse, T; Lohwasser, K; Lokajicek, M; Long, B A; Long, J D; Long, R E; Longo, L; Looper, K A; Lopez, J A; Lopez Mateos, D; Lopez Paredes, B; Lopez Paz, I; Lopez Solis, A; Lorenz, J; Lorenzo Martinez, N; Losada, M; Lösel, P J; Lou, X; Lounis, A; Love, J; Love, P A; Lu, H; Lu, N; Lubatti, H J; Luci, C; Lucotte, A; Luedtke, C; Luehring, F; Lukas, W; Luminari, L; Lundberg, O; Lund-Jensen, B; Luzi, P M; Lynn, D; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Lyubushkin, V; Ma, H; Ma, L L; Ma, Y; Maccarrone, G; Macchiolo, A; Macdonald, C M; Maček, B; Machado Miguens, J; Madaffari, D; Madar, R; Maddocks, H J; Mader, W F; Madsen, A; Maeda, J; Maeland, S; Maeno, T; Maevskiy, A; Magradze, E; Mahlstedt, J; Maiani, C; Maidantchik, C; Maier, A A; Maier, T; Maio, A; Majewski, S; Makida, Y; Makovec, N; Malaescu, B; Malecki, Pa; Maleev, V P; Malek, F; Mallik, U; Malon, D; Malone, C; Maltezos, S; Malyukov, S; Mamuzic, J; Mancini, G; Mandelli, L; Mandić, I; Maneira, J; de Andrade Filho, L Manhaes; Manjarres Ramos, J; Mann, A; Manousos, A; Mansoulie, B; Mansour, J D; Mantifel, R; Mantoani, M; Manzoni, S; Mapelli, L; Marceca, G; March, L; Marchiori, G; Marcisovsky, M; Marjanovic, M; Marley, D E; Marroquim, F; Marsden, S P; Marshall, Z; Marti-Garcia, S; Martin, B; Martin, T A; Martin, V J; Martin Dit Latour, B; Martinez, M; Martinez Outschoorn, V I; Martin-Haugh, S; Martoiu, V S; Martyniuk, A C; Marzin, A; Masetti, L; Mashimo, T; Mashinistov, R; Masik, J; Maslennikov, A L; Massa, I; Massa, L; Mastrandrea, P; Mastroberardino, A; Masubuchi, T; Mättig, P; Mattmann, J; Maurer, J; Maxfield, S J; Maximov, D A; Mazini, R; Maznas, I; Mazza, S M; Mc Fadden, N C; Goldrick, G Mc; Mc Kee, S P; McCarn, A; McCarthy, R L; McCarthy, T G; McClymont, L I; McDonald, E F; Mcfayden, J A; Mchedlidze, G; McMahon, S J; McPherson, R A; Medinnis, M; Meehan, S; Mehlhase, S; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meineck, C; Meirose, B; Melini, D; Mellado Garcia, B R; Melo, M; Meloni, F; Menary, S B; Meng, L; Meng, X T; Mengarelli, A; Menke, S; Meoni, E; Mergelmeyer, S; Mermod, P; Merola, L; Meroni, C; Merritt, F S; Messina, A; Metcalfe, J; Mete, A S; Meyer, C; Meyer, C; Meyer, J-P; Meyer, J; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, H; Miano, F; Middleton, R P; Miglioranzi, S; Mijović, L; Mikenberg, G; Mikestikova, M; Mikuž, M; Milesi, M; Milic, A; Miller, D W; Mills, C; Milov, A; Milstead, D A; Minaenko, A A; Minami, Y; Minashvili, I A; Mincer, A I; Mindur, B; Mineev, M; Minegishi, Y; Ming, Y; Mir, L M; Mistry, K P; Mitani, T; Mitrevski, J; Mitsou, V A; Miucci, A; Miyagawa, P S; Mizukami, A; Mjörnmark, J U; Mlynarikova, M; Moa, T; Mochizuki, K; Mogg, P; Mohapatra, S; Molander, S; Moles-Valls, R; Monden, R; Mondragon, M C; Mönig, K; Monk, J; Monnier, E; Montalbano, A; Montejo Berlingen, J; Monticelli, F; Monzani, S; Moore, R W; Morange, N; Moreno, D; Moreno Llácer, M; Morettini, P; Morgenstern, S; Mori, D; Mori, T; Morii, M; Morinaga, M; Morisbak, V; Moritz, S; Morley, A K; Mornacchi, G; Morris, J D; Morvaj, L; Moschovakos, P; Mosidze, M; Moss, H J; Moss, J; Motohashi, K; Mount, R; Mountricha, E; Moyse, E J W; Muanza, S; Mudd, R D; Mueller, F; Mueller, J; Mueller, R S P; Mueller, T; Muenstermann, D; Mullen, P; Mullier, G A; Munoz Sanchez, F J; Murillo Quijada, J A; Murray, W J; Musheghyan, H; Muškinja, M; Myagkov, A G; Myska, M; Nachman, B P; Nackenhorst, O; Nagai, K; Nagai, R; Nagano, K; Nagasaka, Y; Nagata, K; Nagel, M; Nagy, E; Nairz, A M; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, T; Nakano, I; Naranjo Garcia, R F; Narayan, R; Narrias Villar, D I; Naryshkin, I; Naumann, T; Navarro, G; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Nechaeva, P Yu; Neep, T J; Negri, A; Negrini, M; Nektarijevic, S; Nellist, C; Nelson, A; Nemecek, S; Nemethy, P; Nepomuceno, A A; Nessi, M; Neubauer, M S; Neumann, M; Neves, R M; Nevski, P; Newman, P R; Nguyen, D H; Nguyen Manh, T; Nickerson, R B; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, J; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolic-Audit, I; Nikolopoulos, K; Nilsen, J K; Nilsson, P; Ninomiya, Y; Nisati, A; Nisius, R; Nobe, T; Nomachi, M; Nomidis, I; Nooney, T; Norberg, S; Nordberg, M; Norjoharuddeen, N; Novgorodova, O; Nowak, S; Nozaki, M; Nozka, L; Ntekas, K; Nurse, E; Nuti, F; O'grady, F; O'Neil, D C; O'Rourke, A A; O'Shea, V; Oakham, F G; Oberlack, H; Obermann, T; Ocariz, J; Ochi, A; Ochoa, I; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oda, S; Odaka, S; Ogren, H; Oh, A; Oh, S H; Ohm, C C; Ohman, H; Oide, H; Okawa, H; Okumura, Y; Okuyama, T; Olariu, A; Oleiro Seabra, L F; Olivares Pino, S A; Oliveira Damazio, D; Olszewski, A; Olszowska, J; Onofre, A; Onogi, K; Onyisi, P U E; Oreglia, M J; Oren, Y; Orestano, D; Orlando, N; Orr, R S; Osculati, B; Ospanov, R; Otero Y Garzon, G; Otono, H; Ouchrif, M; Ould-Saada, F; Ouraou, A; Oussoren, K P; Ouyang, Q; Owen, M; Owen, R E; Ozcan, V E; Ozturk, N; Pachal, K; Pacheco Pages, A; Pacheco Rodriguez, L; Padilla Aranda, C; Pagan Griso, S; Paganini, M; Paige, F; Pais, P; Pajchel, K; Palacino, G; Palazzo, S; Palestini, S; Palka, M; Pallin, D; Panagiotopoulou, E St; Panagoulias, I; Pandini, C E; Panduro Vazquez, J G; Pani, P; Panitkin, S; Pantea, D; Paolozzi, L; Papadopoulou, Th D; Papageorgiou, K; Paramonov, A; Paredes Hernandez, D; Parker, A J; Parker, M A; Parker, K A; Parodi, F; Parsons, J A; Parzefall, U; Pascuzzi, V R; Pasqualucci, E; Passaggio, S; Pastore, Fr; Pásztor, G; Pataraia, S; Pater, J R; Pauly, T; Pearce, J; Pearson, B; Pedersen, L E; Pedraza Lopez, S; Pedro, R; Peleganchuk, S V; Penc, O; Peng, C; Peng, H; Penwell, J; Peralva, B S; Perego, M M; Perepelitsa, D V; Perez Codina, E; Perini, L; Pernegger, H; Perrella, S; Peschke, R; Peshekhonov, V D; Peters, K; Peters, R F Y; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petit, E; Petridis, A; Petridou, C; Petroff, P; Petrolo, E; Petrov, M; Petrucci, F; Pettersson, N E; Peyaud, A; Pezoa, R; Phillips, P W; Piacquadio, G; Pianori, E; Picazio, A; Piccaro, E; Piccinini, M; Pickering, M A; Piegaia, R; Pilcher, J E; Pilkington, A D; Pin, A W J; Pinamonti, M; Pinfold, J L; Pingel, A; Pires, S; Pirumov, H; Pitt, M; Plazak, L; Pleier, M-A; Pleskot, V; Plotnikova, E; Pluth, D; Poettgen, R; Poggioli, L; Pohl, D; Polesello, G; Poley, A; Policicchio, A; Polifka, R; Polini, A; Pollard, C S; Polychronakos, V; Pommès, K; Pontecorvo, L; Pope, B G; Popeneciu, G A; Poppleton, A; Pospisil, S; Potamianos, K; Potrap, I N; Potter, C J; Potter, C T; Poulard, G; Poveda, J; Pozdnyakov, V; Pozo Astigarraga, M E; Pralavorio, P; Pranko, A; Prell, S; Price, D; Price, L E; Primavera, M; Prince, S; Prokofiev, K; Prokoshin, F; Protopopescu, S; Proudfoot, J; Przybycien, M; Puddu, D; Purohit, M; Puzo, P; Qian, J; Qin, G; Qin, Y; Quadt, A; Quayle, W B; Queitsch-Maitland, M; Quilty, D; Raddum, S; Radeka, V; Radescu, V; Radhakrishnan, S K; Radloff, P; Rados, P; Ragusa, F; Rahal, G; Raine, J A; Rajagopalan, S; Rammensee, M; Rangel-Smith, C; Ratti, M G; Rauch, D M; Rauscher, F; Rave, S; Ravenscroft, T; Ravinovich, I; Raymond, M; Read, A L; Readioff, N P; Reale, M; Rebuzzi, D M; Redelbach, A; Redlinger, G; Reece, R; Reed, R G; Reeves, K; Rehnisch, L; Reichert, J; Reiss, A; Rembser, C; Ren, H; Rescigno, M; Resconi, S; Resseguie, E D; Rezanova, O L; Reznicek, P; Rezvani, R; Richter, R; Richter, S; Richter-Was, E; Ricken, O; Ridel, M; Rieck, P; Riegel, C J; Rieger, J; Rifki, O; Rijssenbeek, M; Rimoldi, A; Rimoldi, M; Rinaldi, L; Ristić, B; Ritsch, E; Riu, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rizvi, E; Rizzi, C; Roberts, R T; Robertson, S H; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Robinson, D; Robinson, J E M; Robson, A; Roda, C; Rodina, Y; Rodriguez Perez, A; Rodriguez, D; Roe, S; Rogan, C S; Røhne, O; Roloff, J; Romaniouk, A; Romano, M; Saez, S M Romano; Romero Adam, E; Rompotis, N; Ronzani, M; Roos, L; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Rosbach, K; Rose, P; Rosien, N-A; Rossetti, V; Rossi, E; Rossi, L P; Rosten, J H N; Rosten, R; Rotaru, M; Roth, I; Rothberg, J; Rousseau, D; Rozanov, A; Rozen, Y; Ruan, X; Rubbo, F; Rudolph, M S; Rühr, F; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakovich, N A; Ruschke, A; Russell, H L; Rutherfoord, J P; Ruthmann, N; Ryabov, Y F; Rybar, M; Rybkin, G; Ryu, S; Ryzhov, A; Rzehorz, G F; Saavedra, A F; Sabato, G; Sacerdoti, S; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sadykov, R; Safai Tehrani, F; Saha, P; Sahinsoy, M; Saimpert, M; Saito, T; Sakamoto, H; Sakurai, Y; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Salazar Loyola, J E; Salek, D; De Bruin, P H Sales; Salihagic, D; Salnikov, A; Salt, J; Salvatore, D; Salvatore, F; Salvucci, A; Salzburger, A; Sammel, D; Sampsonidis, D; Sánchez, J; Sanchez Martinez, V; Pineda, A Sanchez; Sandaker, H; Sandbach, R L; Sandhoff, M; Sandoval, C; Sankey, D P C; Sannino, M; Sansoni, A; Santoni, C; Santonico, R; Santos, H; Santoyo Castillo, I; Sapp, K; Sapronov, A; Saraiva, J G; Sarrazin, B; Sasaki, O; Sato, K; Sauvan, E; Savage, G; Savard, P; Savic, N; Sawyer, C; Sawyer, L; Saxon, J; Sbarra, C; Sbrizzi, A; Scanlon, T; Scannicchio, D A; Scarcella, M; Scarfone, V; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schachtner, B M; Schaefer, D; Schaefer, L; Schaefer, R; Schaeffer, J; Schaepe, S; Schaetzel, S; Schäfer, U; Schaffer, A C; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scharf, V; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Schiavi, C; Schier, S; Schillo, C; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K R; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, S; Schneider, B; Schnoor, U; Schoeffel, L; Schoening, A; Schoenrock, B D; Schopf, E; Schott, M; Schouwenberg, J F P; Schovancova, J; Schramm, S; Schreyer, M; Schuh, N; Schulte, A; Schultens, M J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schulz, H; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwartzman, A; Schwarz, T A; Schweiger, H; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwindling, J; Schwindt, T; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Scutti, F; Searcy, J; Seema, P; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Sekhon, K; Sekula, S J; Seliverstov, D M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Serkin, L; Serre, T; Sessa, M; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sfiligoj, T; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shaikh, N W; Shan, L Y; Shang, R; Shank, J T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaw, K; Shaw, S M; Shcherbakova, A; Shehu, C Y; Sherwood, P; Shi, L; Shimizu, S; Shimmin, C O; Shimojima, M; Shirabe, S; Shiyakova, M; Shmeleva, A; Shoaleh Saadi, D; Shochet, M J; Shojaii, S; Shope, D R; Shrestha, S; Shulga, E; Shupe, M A; Sicho, P; Sickles, A M; Sidebo, P E; Sideras Haddad, E; Sidiropoulou, O; Sidorov, D; Sidoti, A; Siegert, F; Sijacki, Dj; Silva, J; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simioni, E; Simmons, B; Simon, D; Simon, M; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sioli, M; Siragusa, G; Siral, I; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjölin, J; Skinner, M B; Skottowe, H P; Skubic, P; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Slawinska, M; Sliwa, K; Slovak, R; Smakhtin, V; Smart, B H; Smestad, L; Smiesko, J; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, J W; Smith, M N K; Smith, R W; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snyder, I M; Snyder, S; Sobie, R; Socher, F; Soffer, A; Soh, D A; Sokhrannyi, G; Solans Sanchez, C A; Solar, M; Soldatov, E Yu; Soldevila, U; Solodkov, A A; Soloshenko, A; Solovyanov, O V; Solovyev, V; Sommer, P; Son, H; Song, H Y; Sood, A; Sopczak, A; Sopko, V; Sorin, V; Sosa, D; Sotiropoulou, C L; Soualah, R; Soukharev, A M; South, D; Sowden, B C; Spagnolo, S; Spalla, M; Spangenberg, M; Spanò, F; Sperlich, D; Spettel, F; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spiller, L A; Spousta, M; Denis, R D St; Stabile, A; Stamen, R; Stamm, S; Stanecka, E; Stanek, R W; Stanescu, C; Stanescu-Bellu, M; Stanitzki, M M; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, G H; Stark, J; Stark, S H; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Stärz, S; Staszewski, R; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stewart, G A; Stillings, J A; Stockton, M C; Stoebe, M; Stoicea, G; Stolte, P; Stonjek, S; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Stramaglia, M E; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Stroynowski, R; Strubig, A; Stucci, S A; Stugu, B; Styles, N A; Su, D; Su, J; Suchek, S; Sugaya, Y; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, S; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Suster, C J E; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, S; Svatos, M; Swiatlowski, M; Swift, S P; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Tackmann, K; Taenzer, J; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanioka, R; Tannenwald, B B; Tapia Araya, S; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Tavares Delgado, A; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, A C; Taylor, G N; Taylor, P T E; Taylor, W; Teischinger, F A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Temple, D; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Teoh, J J; Tepel, F; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terzo, S; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thomas, J P; Thomas-Wilsker, J; Thompson, P D; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Tibbetts, M J; Ticse Torres, R E; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Yu A; Timoshenko, S; Tiouchichine, E; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todome, K; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tolley, E; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Tong, B; Tornambe, P; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Trefzger, T; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Trofymov, A; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trovatelli, M; Truong, L; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsipolitis, G; Tsirintanis, N; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsui, K M; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tu, Y; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tulbure, T T; Tuna, A N; Tupputi, S A; Turchikhin, S; Turgeman, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turra, R; Tuts, P M; Ucchielli, G; Ueda, I; Ughetto, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Unverdorben, C; Urban, J; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Usui, J; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Valderanis, C; Valdes Santurio, E; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Den Wollenberg, W; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Graaf, H; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vanguri, R; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vasquez, J G; Vasquez, G A; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Veatch, J; Veeraraghavan, V; Veloce, L M; Veloso, F; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Venturini, A; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Viazlo, O; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Vigani, L; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Vittori, C; Vivarelli, I; Vlachos, S; Vlasak, M; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; von der Schmitt, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Wagner, P; Wagner, W; Wahlberg, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wallangen, V; Wang, C; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, W; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Washbrook, A; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Weber, S A; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M D; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; Whallon, N L; Wharton, A M; White, A; White, M J; White, R; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wilk, F; Wilkens, H G; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Winston, O J; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wolf, T M H; Wolff, R; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Worm, S D; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wu, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xi, Z; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yamaguchi, D; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yao, W-M; Yap, Y C; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yildirim, E; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yuen, S P Y; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zacharis, G; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zakharchuk, N; Zalieckas, J; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zeng, J C; Zeng, Q; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, G; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, R; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, M; Zhou, M; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zwalinski, L

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the algorithms for the reconstruction and identification of electrons in the central region of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These algorithms were used for all ATLAS results with electrons in the final state that are based on the 2012 pp collision data produced by the LHC at [Formula: see text] = 8 [Formula: see text]. The efficiency of these algorithms, together with the charge misidentification rate, is measured in data and evaluated in simulated samples using electrons from [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] decays. For these efficiency measurements, the full recorded data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb[Formula: see text], is used. Based on a new reconstruction algorithm used in 2012, the electron reconstruction efficiency is 97% for electrons with [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] and 99% at [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text]. Combining this with the efficiency of additional selection criteria to reject electrons from background processes or misidentified hadrons, the efficiency to reconstruct and identify electrons at the ATLAS experiment varies from 65 to 95%, depending on the transverse momentum of the electron and background rejection.

  1. Electron efficiency measurements with the ATLAS detector using 2012 LHC proton-proton collision data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antrim, D. J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Bajic, M.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; da Costa, J. Barreiro Guimarães; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; De Mendizabal, J. Bilbao; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; de Renstrom, P. A. Bruckman; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, B. H.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burger, A. M.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carlson, B. T.; Carminati, L.; Carney, R. M. D.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; El Moursli, R. Cherkaoui; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, F.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'amen, G.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Petrillo, K. F.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Díez Cornell, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudder, A. Chr.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dumancic, M.; Duncan, A. K.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; Kacimi, M. El; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; de Lima, D. E. Ferreira; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Flierl, B. M.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Ganguly, S.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gasnikova, K.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisen, M.; Geisler, M. P.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; Gentsos, C.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghneimat, M.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuli, F.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Da Costa, J. Goncalves Pinto Firmino; Gonella, G.; Gonella, L.; Gongadze, A.; de la Hoz, S. González; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goudet, C. R.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gravila, P. M.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grevtsov, K.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groh, S.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guan, W.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Gui, B.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, W.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hadef, A.; Hageböck, S.; Hagihara, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Han, S.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hartmann, N. M.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hayakawa, D.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J. J.; Heinrich, L.; Heinz, C.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Henkelmann, S.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Herde, H.; Herget, V.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hladik, O.; Hoad, X.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Honda, S.; Honda, T.; Hong, T. M.; Hooberman, B. H.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howarth, J.; Hoya, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, Q.; Hu, S.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Huo, P.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Ishijima, N.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ito, F.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, P.; Jain, V.; Jakobi, K. B.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Janus, P. A.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Javurkova, M.; Jeanneau, F.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G.-Y.; Jenni, P.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, H.; Jiang, Y.; Jiang, Z.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Jivan, H.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, C. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, S.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Juste Rozas, A.; Köhler, M. K.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kaji, T.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kaluza, A.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneti, S.; Kanjir, L.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Kato, C.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawade, K.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazanin, V. F.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khader, M.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Kharlamova, T.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kido, S.; Kilby, C. R.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; King, M.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kiuchi, K.; Kivernyk, O.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M. H.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Knapik, J.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Köhler, N. M.; Koi, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolb, M.; Koletsou, I.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kondrashova, N.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A. A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kosek, T.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotwal, A.; Koulouris, A.; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Kowalewska, A. B.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozakai, C.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kravchenko, A.; Kretz, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kreutzfeldt, K.; Krieger, P.; Krizka, K.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M. C.; Kruskal, M.; Kubota, T.; Kucuk, H.; Kuday, S.; Kuechler, J. T.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuger, F.; Kuhl, T.; Kukhtin, V.; Kukla, R.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kuna, M.; Kunigo, T.; Kupco, A.; Kuprash, O.; Kurashige, H.; Kurchaninov, L. L.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kurth, M. G.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; Kwan, T.; Kyriazopoulos, D.; La Rosa, A.; Rosa Navarro, J. L. La; La Rotonda, L.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Lammers, S.; Lampl, W.; Lançon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lanfermann, M. C.; Lang, V. S.; Lange, J. C.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Lasagni Manghi, F.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavrijsen, W.; Law, A. T.; Laycock, P.; Lazovich, T.; Lazzaroni, M.; Le, B.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Quilleuc, E. P.; LeBlanc, M.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, C. A.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, B.; Lefebvre, G.; Lefebvre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehan, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leight, W. A.; Leister, A. G.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzi, B.; Leone, R.; Leone, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Leontsinis, S.; Lerner, G.; Leroy, C.; Lesage, A. A. J.; Lester, C. G.; Lester, C. M.; Levchenko, M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levy, M.; Lewis, D.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, C.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, L.; Li, Q.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Liang, Z.; Liberti, B.; Liblong, A.; Lichard, P.; Lie, K.; Liebal, J.; Liebig, W.; Limosani, A.; Lin, S. C.; Lin, T. H.; Lindquist, B. E.; Lionti, A. E.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Lisovyi, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, B.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y. L.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Lleres, A.; Llorente Merino, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Lobodzinska, E. M.; Loch, P.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loew, K. M.; Loginov, A.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Long, B. A.; Long, J. D.; Long, R. E.; Longo, L.; Looper, K. A.; Lopez, J. A.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lopez Paredes, B.; Lopez Paz, I.; Lopez Solis, A.; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Lösel, P. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lu, H.; Lu, N.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Luedtke, C.; Luehring, F.; Lukas, W.; Luminari, L.; Lundberg, O.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Luzi, P. M.; Lynn, D.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Lyubushkin, V.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Y.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Macdonald, C. M.; Maček, B.; Machado Miguens, J.; Madaffari, D.; Madar, R.; Maddocks, H. J.; Mader, W. F.; Madsen, A.; Maeda, J.; Maeland, S.; Maeno, T.; Maevskiy, A.; Magradze, E.; Mahlstedt, J.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maier, A. A.; Maier, T.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyukov, S.; Mamuzic, J.; Mancini, G.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Maneira, J.; de Andrade Filho, L. Manhaes; Manjarres Ramos, J.; Mann, A.; Manousos, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mansour, J. D.; Mantifel, R.; Mantoani, M.; Manzoni, S.; Mapelli, L.; Marceca, G.; March, L.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marjanovic, M.; Marley, D. E.; Marroquim, F.; Marsden, S. P.; Marshall, Z.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, B.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Martin dit Latour, B.; Martinez, M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martoiu, V. S.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massa, I.; Massa, L.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Mättig, P.; Mattmann, J.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mazini, R.; Maznas, I.; Mazza, S. M.; Mc Fadden, N. C.; Goldrick, G. Mc; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McClymont, L. I.; McDonald, E. F.; Mcfayden, J. A.; Mchedlidze, G.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Medinnis, M.; Meehan, S.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meineck, C.; Meirose, B.; Melini, D.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Melo, M.; Meloni, F.; Menary, S. B.; Meng, L.; Meng, X. T.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, H.; Miano, F.; Middleton, R. P.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Milesi, M.; Milic, A.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Minaenko, A. A.; Minami, Y.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Minegishi, Y.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mistry, K. P.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mizukami, A.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Mlynarikova, M.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Mogg, P.; Mohapatra, S.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Monden, R.; Mondragon, M. C.; Mönig, K.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montalbano, A.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, S.; Mori, D.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Morinaga, M.; Morisbak, V.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Morvaj, L.; Moschovakos, P.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, H. J.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, R. S. P.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Mullen, P.; Mullier, G. A.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Muškinja, M.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nachman, B. P.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nagy, E.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Narrias Villar, D. I.; Naryshkin, I.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nguyen Manh, T.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, J.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nooney, T.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Norjoharuddeen, N.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O'grady, F.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Rourke, A. A.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Oleiro Seabra, L. F.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onogi, K.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Pacheco Rodriguez, L.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganini, M.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palazzo, S.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Panagiotopoulou, E. St.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, A. J.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V. R.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perego, M. M.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puddu, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauch, D. M.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Ravinovich, I.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Reale, M.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reed, R. G.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reiss, A.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resseguie, E. D.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rimoldi, M.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Roberts, R. T.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; Røhne, O.; Roloff, J.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Saez, S. M. Romano; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosien, N.-A.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Rzehorz, G. F.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; De Bruin, P. H. Sales; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Pineda, A. Sanchez; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sato, K.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Savic, N.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schachtner, B. M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, L.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schouwenberg, J. F. P.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schulte, A.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shirabe, S.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shope, D. R.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sideras Haddad, E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Siral, I.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, J. W.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, I. M.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Stark, S. H.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Suster, C. J. E.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Swift, S. P.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanioka, R.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Tornambe, P.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tulbure, T. T.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turgeman, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usui, J.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolff, R.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xi, Z.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zacharis, G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes the algorithms for the reconstruction and identification of electrons in the central region of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These algorithms were used for all ATLAS results with electrons in the final state that are based on the 2012 pp collision data produced by the LHC at √{s} = 8 {TeV}. The efficiency of these algorithms, together with the charge misidentification rate, is measured in data and evaluated in simulated samples using electrons from Z→ ee, Z→ eeγ and J/ψ → ee decays. For these efficiency measurements, the full recorded data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb^{-1}, is used. Based on a new reconstruction algorithm used in 2012, the electron reconstruction efficiency is 97% for electrons with ET=15 {GeV} and 99% at ET= 50 {GeV}. Combining this with the efficiency of additional selection criteria to reject electrons from background processes or misidentified hadrons, the efficiency to reconstruct and identify electrons at the ATLAS experiment varies from 65 to 95%, depending on the transverse momentum of the electron and background rejection.

  2. Spot-Scanning Proton Arc (SPArc) Therapy: The First Robust and Delivery-Efficient Spot-Scanning Proton Arc Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, J Michele; Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Stevens, Craig; Yan, Di

    2016-12-01

    To present a novel robust and delivery-efficient spot-scanning proton arc (SPArc) therapy technique. A SPArc optimization algorithm was developed that integrates control point resampling, energy layer redistribution, energy layer filtration, and energy layer resampling. The feasibility of such a technique was evaluated using sample patients: 1 patient with locally advanced head and neck oropharyngeal cancer with bilateral lymph node coverage, and 1 with a nonmobile lung cancer. Plan quality, robustness, and total estimated delivery time were compared with the robust optimized multifield step-and-shoot arc plan without SPArc optimization (Arcmulti-field) and the standard robust optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan. Dose-volume histograms of target and organs at risk were analyzed, taking into account the setup and range uncertainties. Total delivery time was calculated on the basis of a 360° gantry room with 1 revolutions per minute gantry rotation speed, 2-millisecond spot switching time, 1-nA beam current, 0.01 minimum spot monitor unit, and energy layer switching time of 0.5 to 4 seconds. The SPArc plan showed potential dosimetric advantages for both clinical sample cases. Compared with IMPT, SPArc delivered 8% and 14% less integral dose for oropharyngeal and lung cancer cases, respectively. Furthermore, evaluating the lung cancer plan compared with IMPT, it was evident that the maximum skin dose, the mean lung dose, and the maximum dose to ribs were reduced by 60%, 15%, and 35%, respectively, whereas the conformity index was improved from 7.6 (IMPT) to 4.0 (SPArc). The total treatment delivery time for lung and oropharyngeal cancer patients was reduced by 55% to 60% and 56% to 67%, respectively, when compared with Arcmulti-field plans. The SPArc plan is the first robust and delivery-efficient proton spot-scanning arc therapy technique, which could potentially be implemented into routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc

  3. High efficiency solar cell processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, F.; Iles, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    At the time of writing, cells made by several groups are approaching 19% efficiency. General aspects of the processing required for such cells are discussed. Most processing used for high efficiency cells is derived from space-cell or concentrator cell technology, and recent advances have been obtained from improved techniques rather than from better understanding of the limiting mechanisms. Theory and modeling are fairly well developed, and adequate to guide further asymptotic increases in performance of near conventional cells. There are several competitive cell designs with promise of higher performance ( 20%) but for these designs further improvements are required. The available cell processing technology to fabricate high efficiency cells is examined.

  4. Zwitterionic microcapsules as water reservoirs and proton carriers within a Nafion membrane to confer high proton conductivity under low humidity.

    PubMed

    He, Guangwei; Li, Zongyu; Li, Yifan; Li, Zhen; Wu, Hong; Yang, Xinlin; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2014-04-23

    Zwitterionic microcapsules (ZMCs) based on sulfobetaine with tunable hierarchical structures, superior water retention properties, and high proton conduction capacities are synthesized via precipitation polymerization. The incorporation of ZMCs into a Nafion matrix renders the composite membranes with significantly enhanced proton conductivity especially under low humidity. The composite membrane with 15 wt % ZMC-I displayed the highest proton conductivity of 5.8 × 10(-2) S cm(-1) at 40 °C and 20% relative humidity after 90 min of testing, about 21 times higher than that of the Nafion control membrane. The increased proton conductivity is primarily attributed to the versatile roles of ZMCs as water reservoirs and proton conductors for rendering a stable water environment and an additional proton conduction pathway within the membranes. This study may contribute to the rational design of water-retaining and proton-conducting materials.

  5. High-resolution proton-detected NMR of proteins at very fast MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, Loren B.; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Pintacuda, Guido

    2015-04-01

    When combined with high-frequency (currently ∼60 kHz) magic-angle spinning (MAS), proton detection boosts sensitivity and increases coherence lifetimes, resulting in narrow 1H lines. Herein, we review methods for efficient proton detected techniques and applications in highly deuterated proteins, with an emphasis on 100% selected 1H site concentration for the purpose of sensitivity. We discuss the factors affecting resolution and sensitivity that have resulted in higher and higher frequency MAS. Next we describe the various methods that have been used for backbone and side-chain assignment with proton detection, highlighting the efficient use of scalar-based 13C-13C transfers. Additionally, we show new spectra making use of these schemes for side-chain assignment of methyl 13C-1H resonances. The rapid acquisition of resolved 2D spectra with proton detection allows efficient measurement of relaxation parameters used as a measure of dynamic processes. Under rapid MAS, relaxation times can be measured in a site-specific manner in medium-sized proteins, enabling the investigation of molecular motions at high resolution. Additionally, we discuss methods for measurement of structural parameters, including measurement of internuclear 1H-1H contacts and the use of paramagnetic effects in the determination of global structure.

  6. High-resolution proton-detected NMR of proteins at very fast MAS.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Pintacuda, Guido

    2015-04-01

    When combined with high-frequency (currently ∼60 kHz) magic-angle spinning (MAS), proton detection boosts sensitivity and increases coherence lifetimes, resulting in narrow ((1))H lines. Herein, we review methods for efficient proton detected techniques and applications in highly deuterated proteins, with an emphasis on 100% selected ((1))H site concentration for the purpose of sensitivity. We discuss the factors affecting resolution and sensitivity that have resulted in higher and higher frequency MAS. Next we describe the various methods that have been used for backbone and side-chain assignment with proton detection, highlighting the efficient use of scalar-based ((13))C-((13))C transfers. Additionally, we show new spectra making use of these schemes for side-chain assignment of methyl ((13))C-((1))H resonances. The rapid acquisition of resolved 2D spectra with proton detection allows efficient measurement of relaxation parameters used as a measure of dynamic processes. Under rapid MAS, relaxation times can be measured in a site-specific manner in medium-sized proteins, enabling the investigation of molecular motions at high resolution. Additionally, we discuss methods for measurement of structural parameters, including measurement of internuclear ((1))H-((1))H contacts and the use of paramagnetic effects in the determination of global structure.

  7. Novel collective phenomena in high-energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusling, Kevin; Li, Wei; Schenke, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The observation of long-range rapidity correlations among particles in high-multiplicity p-p and p-Pb collisions has created new opportunities for investigating novel high-density QCD phenomena in small colliding systems. We review experimental results related to the study of collective phenomena in small systems at RHIC and the LHC along with the related developments in theory and phenomenology. Perspectives on possible future directions for research are discussed with the aim of exploring emergent QCD phenomena.

  8. Correcting the NOAA/MEPED energetic electron fluxes for detector efficiency and proton contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asikainen, T.; Mursula, K.

    2013-10-01

    The Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) instruments onboard the NOAA/POES satellites have provided a valuable long-term database of low-altitude energetic particle observations spanning from 1978 to present. Here we study the instrumental problems of the NOAA/MEPED electron detectors and present methods to correct them. It is well known that the MEPED electron detectors are contaminated by protons of certain energy range. Using the recently corrected MEPED proton fluxes, we are now able to reliably remove this contamination. Using a simple simulation model to estimate the response of the MEPED electron detectors to incoming electrons and protons, we show that efficiencies of (Space Environment Monitors) SEM-1 and SEM-2 versions of the detectors have large differences due to different detector designs. This leads to a systematic difference between the SEM-1 and SEM-2 measurements and causes a significant long-term inhomogeneity in measured MEPED electron fluxes. Using the estimated efficiencies, we remove the proton contamination and correct the electron measurements for nonideal detector efficiency. We discuss the entire 34 year time series of MEPED measurements and show that, on an average, the correction affects different energy channels and SEM-1 and SEM-2 instruments differently. Accordingly, the uncorrected electron fluxes and electron spectra are severely distorted by nonideal detector efficiency and proton contamination, and their long-term evolution is misrepresented without the correction. The present correction of the MEPED electron fluxes over the whole interval of NOAA/POES measurements covering several solar cycles is important for long-term studies of, e.g., magnetospheric dynamics, solar activity, ionospheric research, and atmospheric effects of energetic electrons.

  9. Microstructured snow targets for high energy quasi-monoenergetic proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleifer, E.; Nahum, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Baspaly, A.; Pomerantz, I.; Abricht, F.; Branzel, J.; Priebe, G.; Steinke, S.; Andreev, A.; Schnuerer, M.; Sandner, W.; Gordon, D.; Sprangle, P.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Zigler, A.

    2013-05-01

    Compact size sources of high energy protons (50-200MeV) are expected to be key technology in a wide range of scientific applications 1-8. One promising approach is the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) scheme 9,10, holding record level of 67MeV protons generated by a peta-Watt laser 11. In general, laser intensity exceeding 1018 W/cm2 is required to produce MeV level protons. Another approach is the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) scheme which is a more efficient acceleration scheme but requires an extremely clean pulse with contrast ratio of above 10-10. Increasing the energy of the accelerated protons using modest energy laser sources is a very attractive task nowadays. Recently, nano-scale targets were used to accelerate ions 12,13 but no significant enhancement of the accelerated proton energy was measured. Here we report on the generation of up to 20MeV by a modest (5TW) laser system interacting with a microstructured snow target deposited on a Sapphire substrate. This scheme relax also the requirement of high contrast ratio between the pulse and the pre-pulse, where the latter produces the highly structured plasma essential for the interaction process. The plasma near the tip of the snow target is subject to locally enhanced laser intensity with high spatial gradients, and enhanced charge separation is obtained. Electrostatic fields of extremely high intensities are produced, and protons are accelerated to MeV-level energies. PIC simulations of this targets reproduce the experimentally measured energy scaling and predict the generation of 150 MeV protons from laser power of 100TW laser system18.

  10. CGC/saturation approach for high energy soft interactions: v2 in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotsman, E.; Levin, E.; Maor, U.; Tapia, S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we continue our program to construct a model for high energy soft interactions, based on the CGC/saturation approach. We demonstrate that in our model, which describes diffractive physics as well as multiparticle production at high energy, the density variation mechanism leads to the value of v2 , which is about 60%-70% of the measured v2 . Bearing in mind that in the CGC/saturation approach there are two other mechanisms present, Bose enhancement in the wave function and local anisotropy, we believe that the azimuthal long range rapidity correlations in proton-proton collisions stem from the CGC/saturation physics, and not from quark-gluon plasma production.

  11. Energy dependence of the ridge in high multiplicity proton-proton collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Dusling, Kevin; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

    2016-01-27

    In this study, we demonstrate that the recent measurement of azimuthally collimated, long-range rapidity (“ridge”) correlations in √s=13 TeV proton-proton (p+p) collisions by the ATLAS Collaboration at the LHC are in agreement with expectations from the color glass condensate effective theory of high-energy QCD. The observation that the integrated near-side yield as a function of multiplicity is independent of collision energy is a natural consequence of the fact that multiparticle production is driven by a single semihard saturation scale in the color glass condensate framework. We argue further that the azimuthal structure of these recent ATLAS ridge measurements strongly constrainsmore » hydrodynamic interpretations of such correlations in high-multiplicity p+p collisions.« less

  12. Energy dependence of the ridge in high multiplicity proton-proton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dusling, Kevin; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

    2016-01-27

    In this study, we demonstrate that the recent measurement of azimuthally collimated, long-range rapidity (“ridge”) correlations in √s=13 TeV proton-proton (p+p) collisions by the ATLAS Collaboration at the LHC are in agreement with expectations from the color glass condensate effective theory of high-energy QCD. The observation that the integrated near-side yield as a function of multiplicity is independent of collision energy is a natural consequence of the fact that multiparticle production is driven by a single semihard saturation scale in the color glass condensate framework. We argue further that the azimuthal structure of these recent ATLAS ridge measurements strongly constrains hydrodynamic interpretations of such correlations in high-multiplicity p+p collisions.

  13. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future High Energy Proton Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourlay, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Interest in high field dipoles has been given a boost by new proposals to build a high-energy proton-proton collider to follow the LHC and programs around the world are taking on the task to answer the need. Studies aiming toward future high-energy proton-proton colliders at the 100 TeV scale are now being organized. The LHC and current cost models are based on technology close to four decades old and point to a broad optimum of operation using dipoles with fields between 5 and 12T when site constraints, either geographical or political, are not a factor. Site geography constraints that limit the ring circumference can drive the required dipole field up to 20T, which is more than a factor of two beyond state-of-the-art. After a brief review of current progress, the talk will describe the challenges facing future development and present a roadmap for moving high field accelerator magnet technology forward. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, High Energy Physics, US Department of Energy, under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  14. Displacement damage effects in silicon MEMS at high proton doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, João; Shea, Herbert R.

    2011-02-01

    We report on a study of the sensitivity of silicon MEMS to proton radiation and mitigation strategies. MEMS can degrade due to ionizing radiation (electron-hole pair creation) and non-ionizing radiation (displacement damage), such as electrons, trapped and solar protons, or cosmic rays, typically found in a space environment. Over the past few years there has been several reports on the effects of ionizing radiation in silicon MEMS, with failure generally linked to trapped charge in dielectrics. However there is near complete lack of studies on displacement damage effects in silicon- MEMS: how does silicon change mechanically due to proton irradiation? We report on an investigation on the susceptibility of 50 μm thick SOI-based MEMS resonators to displacement damages due to proton beams, with energies from 1 to 60 MeV, and annealing of this damage. We measure ppm changes on the Young's modulus and Poisson ratio by means of accurately monitoring the resonant frequency of devices in vacuum using a Laser Doppler Vibrometer. We observed for the first time an increase (up to 0.05%) of the Young's modulus of single-crystal silicon electromagnetically-actuated micromirrors after exposure to low energy protons (1-4 MeV) at high absorbed doses ~ 100 Mrad (Si). This investigation will contribute to a better understanding of the susceptibility of silicon-based MEMS to displacement damages frequently encountered in a space radiation environment, and allow appropriated design margin and shielding to be implemented.

  15. Advanced high efficiency concentrator cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, R. . Varian Research Center)

    1992-06-01

    This report describes research to develop the technology needed to demonstrate a monolithic, multijunction, two-terminal, concentrator solar cell with a terrestrial power conversion efficiency greater than 35%. Under three previous subcontracts, Varian developed many of the aspects of a technology needed to fabricate very high efficiency concentrator cells. The current project was aimed at exploiting the new understanding of high efficiency solar cells. Key results covered in this report are as follows. (1) A 1.93-eV AlGaAs/1.42-eV GaAs metal-interconnected cascade cell was manufactured with a one-sun efficiency at 27.6% at air mass 1.5 (AM1.5) global. (2) A 1.0eV InGaAs cell was fabricated on the reverse'' side of a low-doped GaAs substrate with a one-sun efficiency of 2.5% AM1.5 diffuse and a short-circuit current of 14.4 mA/cm{sup 2}. (3) Small-scale manufacturing of GaAs p/n concentrator cells was attempted and obtained an excellent yield of high-efficiency cells. (4) Grown-in tunnel junction cell interconnects that are transparent and thermally stable using C and Si dopants were developed. 10 refs.

  16. Theoretical Studies in Enhancing the Efficiency of Cathode and Anode Materials in PEMFC (Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-04

    efficiency of cathode and anode materials in PEMFC (Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA23861014012 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Theoretical studies in enhancing the efficiency of cathode and anode materials in PEMFC (Proton Exchange

  17. Production of isotopes using high power proton beams

    DOEpatents

    Nolen, Jr., Jerry A.; Gomes, Itacil C.

    2015-12-01

    The invention provides for a method for producing isotopes using a beam of particles from an accelerator, whereby the beam is maintained at between about 70 to 2000 MeV; and contacting a thorium-containing target with the particles. The medically important isotope .sup.225Ac is produced via the nuclear reaction (p,2p6n), whereby an energetic proton causes the ejection of 2 protons and 6 neutrons from a .sup.232Th target nucleus. Another medically important isotope .sup.213Bi is then available as a decay product. The production of highly purified .sup.211At is also provided.

  18. Polarisation Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, David Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E99-114 comprised a series of measurements to explore proton Compton scattering at high momentum transfer. For the first time, the polarisation transfer observables in the p ($\\vec{γ}$, γ' \\vec{p}$) reaction were measured in the GeV energy range, where it is believed that quark-gluon degrees of freedom begin to dominate. The experiment utilised a circularly polarised photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target, with the scattered photon and recoil proton detected in a lead-glass calorimeter and a magnetic spectrometer, respectively.

  19. Ultra-High Intensity Proton Accelerators and their Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W. T.

    1997-12-31

    The science and technology of proton accelerators have progressed considerably in the past three decades. Three to four orders of magnitude increase in both peak intensity and average flux have made it possible to construct high intensity proton accelerators for modern applications, such as: spallation neutron sources, kaon factory, accelerator production of tritium, energy amplifier and muon collider drivers. The accelerator design focus switched over from intensity for synchrotrons, to brightness for colliders to halos for spallation sources. An overview of this tremendous progress in both accelerator science and technology is presented, with special emphasis on the new challenges of accelerator physics issues such as: H(-) injection, halo formation and reduction of losses.

  20. Klystron based high power rf system for proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, Manjiri; Shrotriya, Sandip; Sharma, Sonal; Patel, Niranjan; Handu, Verander E-mail: manjiri08@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    As a part of ADS program a proton accelerator (20 MeV, 30 mA) and its high power RF systems (HPRF) are being developed in BARC. This paper explains design details of this klystron based HPRF system. (author)

  1. Reuse Recycler: High Intensity Proton Stacking at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.

    2016-07-17

    After a successful career as an antiproton storage and cooling ring, Recycler has been converted to a high intensity proton stacker for the Main Injector. We discuss the commissioning and operation of the Recycler in this new role, and the progress towards the 700 kW design goal.

  2. Los Alamos high-power proton linac designs

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.P.

    1995-10-01

    Medium-energy high-power proton linear accelerators have been studied at Los Alamos as drivers for spallation neutron applications requiring large amounts of beam power. Reference designs for such accelerators are discussed, important design factors are reviewed, and issues and concern specific to this unprecedented power regime are discussed.

  3. Critical design issues of high intensity proton linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.P.

    1994-08-01

    Medium-energy proton linear accelerators are being studied as drivers for spallation applications requiring large amounts of beam powder. Important design factors for such high-intensity linacs are reviewed, and issues and concerns specific to this unprecedented power regime are discussed.

  4. Proton beam writing using the high energy ion nanoprobe LIPSION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, F.; Spemann, D.; Lenzner, J.; Vogt, J.; Butz, T.

    2005-04-01

    Proton beam writing (PBW) is a very unique technique capable of the direct creation of three dimensional structures with a very high aspect ratio. Since the high energy ion nanoprobe LIPSION has a very high spatial resolution and is therefore well suited for the creation of structures in the micrometre range or below, it is planned to establish the PBW technique at the University of Leipzig. The results of the first proton beam writing experiments at the LIPSION nanoprobe are presented in this article. Structures with high aspect ratio and smooth side walls with an edge definition of ∼0.2 μm were created in negative SU-8 photo resist using 2.25 MeV protons. Furthermore, investigations were carried out concerning the mechanical stability of single free standing walls in order to collect information for the targeted production of samples with smaller feature sizes in the submicrometre range. Up to now, wall widths down to 1.5 μm were achieved. However, smaller feature sizes could not be obtained due to beam spot fluctuations which enlarge the wall width by a factor of three. Self-supported structures were produced using 2.25 MeV protons and subsequently 1.5 MeV helium ions demonstrating the stability and accuracy of these real three dimensional structures. In addition, different methods for online dose normalization were tested showing that ionoluminescence is the most suitable method for this purpose.

  5. Micro-sphere layered targets efficiency in laser driven proton acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Floquet, V.; Martin, Ph.; Ceccotti, T.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Limpouch, J.; Proska, J.; Novotny, F.; Stolcova, L.; Velyhan, A.; Macchi, A.; Sgattoni, A.; Vassura, L.; Labate, L.; Baffigi, F.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2013-08-28

    Proton acceleration from the interaction of high contrast, 25 fs laser pulses at >10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} intensity with plastic foils covered with a single layer of regularly packed micro-spheres has been investigated experimentally. The proton cut-off energy has been measured as a function of the micro-sphere size and laser incidence angle for different substrate thickness, and for both P and S polarization. The presence of micro-spheres with a size comparable to the laser wavelength allows to increase the proton cut-off energy for both polarizations at small angles of incidence (10∘). For large angles of incidence, however, proton energy enhancement with respect to flat targets is absent. Analysis of electron trajectories in particle-in-cell simulations highlights the role of the surface geometry in the heating of electrons.

  6. High efficiency SPS klystron design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalos, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    The most likely compact configuration to realize both high efficiency and high gain (approx. 40 dB) is a 5-6 cavity design focused by an electromagnet. The basic klystron efficiency cannot be expected to exceed 70-75% without collector depression. It was estimated that the net benefit of a 5 stage collector over a 2 stage collector is between 1.5 and 3.5 kW per tube. A modulating anode is incorporated in the design to enable rapid shutoff of the beam current in case the r.f. drive should be removed.

  7. High efficiency solar panel /HESP/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, P. M.; Gay, C.; Uno, F.; Scott-Monck, J.

    1978-01-01

    A family of high efficiency, weldable silicon solar cells, incorporating nearly every feature of advanced cell technology developed in the past four years, was produced and subjected to space qualification testing. This matrix contained both field and non-field cells ranging in thickness from 0.10 mm to 0.30 mm, and in base resistivity from nominal two to one hundred ohm-cm. Initial power outputs as high as 20 mW/sq cm (14.8% AM0 efficiency) were produced by certain cell types within the matrix.

  8. CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, C.; Berz, M.; Makino, K.; Snopok, P.; /IIT, Chicago

    2011-04-01

    Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS) and many HEP programs (Muon Collider). These high-intensity GeV-range proton drivers are particularly challenging, encountering duty cycle and space-charge limits in the synchrotron and machine size concerns in the weaker-focusing cyclotrons; a 10-20 MW proton driver is not presently considered technically achievable with conventional re-circulating accelerators. One, as-yet, unexplored re-circulating accelerator, the Fixed-field Alternating Gradient, or FFAG, is an attractive alternative to the cyclotron. Its strong focusing optics are expected to mitigate space charge effects, and a recent innovation in design has coupled stable tunes with isochronous orbits, making the FFAG capable of fixed-frequency, CW acceleration, as in the classical cyclotron. This paper reports on these new advances in FFAG accelerator technology and references advanced modeling tools for fixed-field accelerators developed for and unique to the code COSY INFINITY.

  9. Efficient laser-proton acceleration from an insulating foil with an attached small metal disk

    SciTech Connect

    Otani, Kazuto; Tokita, Shigeki; Nishoji, Toshihiko; Inoue, Shunsuke; Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji

    2011-10-17

    Efficient proton acceleration by the interaction of an intense femtosecond laser pulse with a solid foil has been demonstrated. An aluminum coating (thickness: 0.2 {mu}m) on a polyethylene (PE) foil was irradiated at 2 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. The protons from the aluminum-disk (diameter: 150 {mu}m to 15 mm) foil were accelerated to much higher energy in comparison with conventional targets such as PE and aluminum-coated PE foils. The fast electron signal along the foil surface was significantly higher from the aluminum-coated PE foil. The laser-proton acceleration appeared to be affected to the size of surrounding conductive material.

  10. Triple Parton Scatterings in High-Energy Proton-Proton Collisions.

    PubMed

    d'Enterria, David; Snigirev, Alexander M

    2017-03-24

    A generic expression to compute triple parton scattering cross sections in high-energy proton-proton (pp) collisions is presented as a function of the corresponding single parton cross sections and the transverse parton profile of the proton encoded in an effective parameter σ_{eff,TPS}. The value of σ_{eff,TPS} is closely related to the similar effective cross section that characterizes double parton scatterings, and amounts to σ_{eff,TPS}=12.5±4.5  mb. Estimates for triple charm (cc[over ¯]) and bottom (bb[over ¯]) production in pp collisions at LHC and FCC energies are presented based on next-to-next-to-leading-order perturbative calculations for single cc[over ¯], bb[over ¯] cross sections. At sqrt[s]≈100  TeV, about 15% of the pp collisions produce three cc[over ¯] pairs from three different parton-parton scatterings.

  11. High Efficiency Engine Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Kruiswyk

    2010-07-13

    Caterpillar's Product Development and Global Technology Division carried out a research program on waste heat recovery with support from DOE (Department of Energy) and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The objective of the program was to develop a new air management and exhaust energy recovery system that would demonstrate a minimum 10% improvement in thermal efficiency over a base heavy-duty on-highway diesel truck engine. The base engine for this program was a 2007 C15 15.2L series-turbocharged on-highway truck engine with a LPL (low-pressure loop) exhaust recirculation system. The focus of the program was on the development of high efficiency turbomachinery and a high efficiency turbocompound waste heat recovery system. The focus of each area of development was as follows: (1) For turbine stages, the focus was on investigation and development of technologies that would improve on-engine exhaust energy utilization compared to the conventional radial turbines in widespread use today. (2) For compressor stages, the focus was on investigating compressor wheel design parameters beyond the range typically utilized in production, to determine the potential efficiency benefits thereof. (3) For turbocompound, the focus was on the development of a robust bearing system that would provide higher bearing efficiencies compared to systems used in turbocompound power turbines in production. None of the turbocharger technologies investigated involved addition of moving parts, actuators, or exotic materials, thereby increasing the likelihood of a favorable cost-value tradeoff for each technology. And the turbocompound system requires less hardware addition than competing bottoming cycle technologies, making it a more attractive solution from a cost and packaging standpoint. Main outcomes of the program are as follows: (1) Two turbine technologies that demonstrated up to 6% improvement in turbine efficiency on gas stand and 1-3% improvement in thermal efficiency in

  12. Efficient laser-driven proton acceleration from cylindrical and planar cryogenic hydrogen jets

    DOE PAGES

    Obst, Lieselotte; Gode, Sebastian; Rehwald, Martin; ...

    2017-08-31

    We report on recent experimental results deploying a continuous cryogenic hydrogen jet as a debris-free, renewable laser-driven source of pure proton beams generated at the 150 TW ultrashort pulse laser Draco. Efficient proton acceleration reaching cut-off energies of up to 20 MeV with particle numbers exceeding 109 particles per MeV per steradian is demonstrated, showing for the first time that the acceleration performance is comparable to solid foil targets with thicknesses in the micrometer range. Two different target geometries are presented and their proton beam deliverance characterized: cylindrical (Ø 5 μm) and planar (20 μm × 2 μm). In bothmore » cases typical Target Normal Sheath Acceleration emission patterns with exponential proton energy spectra are detected. Significantly higher proton numbers in laser-forward direction are observed when deploying the planar jet as compared to the cylindrical jet case. As a result, this is confirmed by two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell (2D3V PIC) simulations, which demonstrate that the planar jet proves favorable as its geometry leads to more optimized acceleration conditions.« less

  13. Efficient laser-driven proton acceleration from cylindrical and planar cryogenic hydrogen jets.

    PubMed

    Obst, Lieselotte; Göde, Sebastian; Rehwald, Martin; Brack, Florian-Emanuel; Branco, João; Bock, Stefan; Bussmann, Michael; Cowan, Thomas E; Curry, Chandra B; Fiuza, Frederico; Gauthier, Maxence; Gebhardt, René; Helbig, Uwe; Huebl, Axel; Hübner, Uwe; Irman, Arie; Kazak, Lev; Kim, Jongjin B; Kluge, Thomas; Kraft, Stephan; Loeser, Markus; Metzkes, Josefine; Mishra, Rohini; Rödel, Christian; Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Siebold, Mathias; Tiggesbäumker, Josef; Wolter, Steffen; Ziegler, Tim; Schramm, Ulrich; Glenzer, Siegfried H; Zeil, Karl

    2017-08-31

    We report on recent experimental results deploying a continuous cryogenic hydrogen jet as a debris-free, renewable laser-driven source of pure proton beams generated at the 150 TW ultrashort pulse laser Draco. Efficient proton acceleration reaching cut-off energies of up to 20 MeV with particle numbers exceeding 10(9) particles per MeV per steradian is demonstrated, showing for the first time that the acceleration performance is comparable to solid foil targets with thicknesses in the micrometer range. Two different target geometries are presented and their proton beam deliverance characterized: cylindrical (∅ 5 μm) and planar (20 μm × 2 μm). In both cases typical Target Normal Sheath Acceleration emission patterns with exponential proton energy spectra are detected. Significantly higher proton numbers in laser-forward direction are observed when deploying the planar jet as compared to the cylindrical jet case. This is confirmed by two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell (2D3V PIC) simulations, which demonstrate that the planar jet proves favorable as its geometry leads to more optimized acceleration conditions.

  14. Enabling High Efficiency Ethanol Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, J.; Confer, K.

    2011-03-01

    Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to explore the potential to improve the energy efficiency of spark-ignited engines operating on ethanol-gasoline blends. By taking advantage of the fuel properties of ethanol, such as high compression ratio and high latent heat of vaporization, it is possible to increase efficiency with ethanol blends. Increasing the efficiency with ethanol-containing blends aims to remove a market barrier of reduced fuel economy with E85 fuel blends, which is currently about 30% lower than with petroleum-derived gasoline. The same or higher engine efficiency is achieved with E85, and the reduction in fuel economy is due to the lower energy density of E85. By making ethanol-blends more efficient, the fuel economy gap between gasoline and E85 can be reduced. In the partnership between Delphi and ORNL, each organization brought a unique and complementary set of skills to the project. Delphi has extensive knowledge and experience in powertrain components and subsystems as well as overcoming real-world implementation barriers. ORNL has extensive knowledge and expertise in non-traditional fuels and improving engine system efficiency for the next generation of internal combustion engines. Partnering to combine these knowledge bases was essential towards making progress to reducing the fuel economy gap between gasoline and E85. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout the project. Meetings were held regularly, usually on a bi-weekly basis, with additional reports, presentations, and meetings as necessary to maintain progress. Delphi provided substantial hardware support to the project by providing components for the single-cylinder engine experiments, engineering support for hardware modifications, guidance for operational strategies on engine research, and hardware support by providing a flexible multi-cylinder engine to be used for optimizing engine efficiency with ethanol-containing fuels.

  15. Relative TL and OSL efficiency to protons of various dosimetric materials.

    PubMed

    Sądel, M; Bilski, P; Swakoń, J

    2014-10-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) are the well-known phenomena used for passive methods of dose measurements. TL and OSL detectors are frequently used in the dosimetry of cosmic radiation in space and of particle radiotherapy beams. However, the relative TL/OSL efficiency, which is defined as a ratio of the emitted light intensity per unit dose for a given radiation type, to the same quantity for the reference gamma radiation is not constant and depends on radiation type and energy. In the present work several types of TL and OSL dosimetric materials, including lithium fluoride (LiF), aluminium oxide, beryllium oxide and lithium aluminate, were tested with protons. The measurements were realised exploiting the 60-MeV proton beam of the AIC-144 cyclotron in the Proton Eye Radiotherapy Facility at Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ PAN). The influence of proton energy on the relative efficiency and other TL/OSL characteristics of the studied detector types was presented. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Equipartitioning in a high current proton linac

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.

    1997-08-01

    The code PARMILA simulates the beam transmission through the Accelerator for the Production of Tritium (APT) linac. The beam is equipartitioned when the longitudinal and transverse temperatures are equal. This paper explores the consequence of equipartitioning in the APT linac. The simulations begin with a beam that starts at the ion-source plasma surface. PARMILA tracks the particles from the RFQ exit through the 1.7-GeV linac. This paper compares two focusing schemes. One scheme uses mostly equal strength quadrupoles. The equipartitioning scheme uses weaker focusing in the high-energy portion of the linac. The RMS beam size with the equipartitioning scheme is larger, but the relative size of the halo is less than in the equal-strength design.

  17. Mammalian complex I pumps 4 protons per 2 electrons at high and physiological proton motive force in living cells.

    PubMed

    Ripple, Maureen O; Kim, Namjoon; Springett, Roger

    2013-02-22

    Mitochondrial complex I couples electron transfer between matrix NADH and inner-membrane ubiquinone to the pumping of protons against a proton motive force. The accepted proton pumping stoichiometry was 4 protons per 2 electrons transferred (4H(+)/2e(-)) but it has been suggested that stoichiometry may be 3H(+)/2e(-) based on the identification of only 3 proton pumping units in the crystal structure and a revision of the previous experimental data. Measurement of proton pumping stoichiometry is challenging because, even in isolated mitochondria, it is difficult to measure the proton motive force while simultaneously measuring the redox potentials of the NADH/NAD(+) and ubiquinol/ubiquinone pools. Here we employ a new method to quantify the proton motive force in living cells from the redox poise of the bc(1) complex measured using multiwavelength cell spectroscopy and show that the correct stoichiometry for complex I is 4H(+)/2e(-) in mouse and human cells at high and physiological proton motive force.

  18. Mammalian Complex I Pumps 4 Protons per 2 Electrons at High and Physiological Proton Motive Force in Living Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ripple, Maureen O.; Kim, Namjoon; Springett, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I couples electron transfer between matrix NADH and inner-membrane ubiquinone to the pumping of protons against a proton motive force. The accepted proton pumping stoichiometry was 4 protons per 2 electrons transferred (4H+/2e−) but it has been suggested that stoichiometry may be 3H+/2e− based on the identification of only 3 proton pumping units in the crystal structure and a revision of the previous experimental data. Measurement of proton pumping stoichiometry is challenging because, even in isolated mitochondria, it is difficult to measure the proton motive force while simultaneously measuring the redox potentials of the NADH/NAD+ and ubiquinol/ubiquinone pools. Here we employ a new method to quantify the proton motive force in living cells from the redox poise of the bc1 complex measured using multiwavelength cell spectroscopy and show that the correct stoichiometry for complex I is 4H+/2e− in mouse and human cells at high and physiological proton motive force. PMID:23306206

  19. A Family of L-band SRF Cavities for High Power Proton Driver Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer, Frank Marhauser

    2009-05-01

    Recent global interest in high duty factor or CW superconducting linacs with high average beam power highlights the need for robust and reliable SRF structures capable of delivering high average RF power to the beam with moderate HOM damping, low interception of halo and good efficiency. Potential applications include proton or H- drivers for spallation neutron sources, neutrino physics, waste transmutation, subcritical reactors, and high-intensity high-energy physics experiments. We describe a family of SRF cavities with a range of Betas capable of transporting beam currents in excess of 10 mA CW with large irises for minimal interception of halo and HOM and power couplers capable of supporting high average power operation. Goals include an efficient cell shape, high packing factor for efficient real-estate gradient and strong HOM damping to ensure stable beam operation,

  20. High-Temperature Proton-Conducting Ceramics Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali; Dynys, Frederick W.; Berger, M. H.

    2005-01-01

    High-temperature protonic conductors (HTPC) are needed for hydrogen separation, hydrogen sensors, fuel cells, and hydrogen production from fossil fuels. The HTPC materials for hydrogen separation at high temperatures are foreseen to be metal oxides with the perovskite structure A(sup 2+)B(sup 4+)C(sup 2-, sub 3) and with the trivalent cation (M(sup 3+)) substitution at the B(sup 4+)-site to introduce oxygen vacancies. The high affinity for hydrogen ions (H(sup +)) is advantageous for protonic transport, but it increases the reactivity toward water (H2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2), which can lead to premature membrane failure. In addition, there are considerable technological challenges related to the processing of HTPC materials. The high melting point and multi-cation chemistry of HTPC materials creates difficulties in in achieving high-density, single-phase membranes by solid-state sintering. The presence of secondary phases and grain-boundary interfaces are detrimental to the protonic conduction and environmental stability of polycrystalline HTPC materials.

  1. Highly enantioselective proton-initiated polycyclization of polyenes.

    PubMed

    Surendra, Karavadhi; Corey, E J

    2012-07-25

    This report describes the synthesis of a range of chiral polycyclic molecules (tricyclic to pentacyclic) from achiral polyene precursors by enantioselective proton-initiated polycyclization promoted by the 1:1 complex of o,o'-dichloro-BINOL and SbCl(5). Excellent yields (ca. 90% per ring formed) and enantioselectivety (20:1 to 50:1) were obtained. The process is practical as well as efficient, because the chiral ligand is both readily prepared from R,R- or S,S-BINOL and easily recovered from the reaction mixture by extraction.

  2. High-power, high-efficiency FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1989-04-01

    High power, high efficiency FELs require tapering, as the particles loose energy, so as to maintain resonance between the electromagnetic wave and the particles. They also require focusing of the particles (usually done with curved pole faces) and focusing of the electromagnetic wave (i.e. optical guiding). In addition, one must avoid transverse beam instabilities (primarily resistive wall) and longitudinal instabilities (i.e sidebands). 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Nanostructure-based proton exchange membrane for fuel cell applications at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Junsheng; Wang, Zhengbang; Li, Junrui; Pan, Mu; Tang, Haolin

    2014-02-01

    As a clean and highly efficient energy source, the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has been considered an ideal alternative to traditional fossil energy sources. Great efforts have been devoted to realizing the commercialization of the PEMFC in the past decade. To eliminate some technical problems that are associated with the low-temperature operation (such as catalyst poisoning and poor water management), PEMFCs are usually operated at elevated temperatures (e.g., > 100 degrees C). However, traditional proton exchange membrane (PEM) shows poor performance at elevated temperature. To achieve a high-performance PEM for high temperature fuel cell applications, novel PEMs, which are based on nanostructures, have been developed recently. In this review, we discuss and summarize the methods for fabricating the nanostructure-based PEMs for PEMFC operated at elevated temperatures and the high temperature performance of these PEMs. We also give an outlook on the rational design and development of the nanostructure-based PEMs.

  4. PULSED POWER APPLICATIONS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Pulsed power technology has been applied in particle accelerators and storage rings for over four decades. It is most commonly used in injection, extraction, beam manipulation, source, and focusing systems. These systems belong to the class of repetitive pulsed power. In this presentation, we review and discuss the history, present status, and future challenge of pulsed power applications in high intensity proton accelerators and storage rings.

  5. A comprehensive and efficient daily quality assurance for PBS proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Actis, O; Meer, D; König, S; Weber, D C; Mayor, A

    2017-03-07

    There are several general recommendations for quality assurance (QA) measures, which have to be performed at proton therapy centres. However, almost each centre uses a different therapy system. In particular, there is no standard procedure for centres employing pencil beam scanning and each centre applies a specific QA program. Gantry 2 is an operating therapy system which was developed at PSI and relies on the most advanced technological innovations. We developed a comprehensive daily QA program in order to verify the main beam characteristics to assure the functionality of the therapy delivery system and the patient safety system. The daily QA program entails new hardware and software solutions for a highly efficient clinical operation. In this paper, we describe a dosimetric phantom used for verifying the most critical beam parameters and the software architecture developed for a fully automated QA procedure. The connection between our QA software and the database allows us to store the data collected on a daily basis and use it for trend analysis over longer periods of time. All the data presented here have been collected during a time span of over two years, since the beginning of the Gantry 2 clinical operation in 2013. Our procedure operates in a stable way and delivers the expected beam quality. The daily QA program takes only 20 min. At the same time, the comprehensive approach allows us to avoid most of the weekly and monthly QA checks and increases the clinical beam availability.

  6. A comprehensive and efficient daily quality assurance for PBS proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Actis, O.; Meer, D.; König, S.; Weber, D. C.; Mayor, A.

    2017-03-01

    There are several general recommendations for quality assurance (QA) measures, which have to be performed at proton therapy centres. However, almost each centre uses a different therapy system. In particular, there is no standard procedure for centres employing pencil beam scanning and each centre applies a specific QA program. Gantry 2 is an operating therapy system which was developed at PSI and relies on the most advanced technological innovations. We developed a comprehensive daily QA program in order to verify the main beam characteristics to assure the functionality of the therapy delivery system and the patient safety system. The daily QA program entails new hardware and software solutions for a highly efficient clinical operation. In this paper, we describe a dosimetric phantom used for verifying the most critical beam parameters and the software architecture developed for a fully automated QA procedure. The connection between our QA software and the database allows us to store the data collected on a daily basis and use it for trend analysis over longer periods of time. All the data presented here have been collected during a time span of over two years, since the beginning of the Gantry 2 clinical operation in 2013. Our procedure operates in a stable way and delivers the expected beam quality. The daily QA program takes only 20 min. At the same time, the comprehensive approach allows us to avoid most of the weekly and monthly QA checks and increases the clinical beam availability.

  7. The practical Pomeron for high energy proton collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, R. B.; Barlow, R. J.; Molson, J. G.; Serluca, M.; Toader, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present a model which describes proton scattering data from ISR to Tevatron energies, and which can be applied to collimation in high energy accelerators, such as the LHC and FCC. Collimators remove beam halo particles, so that they do not impinge on vulnerable regions of the machine, such as the superconducting magnets and the experimental areas. In simulating the effect of the collimator jaws it is crucial to model the scattering of protons at small momentum transfer t, as these protons can subsequently survive several turns of the ring before being lost. At high energies these soft processes are well described by Pomeron exchange models. We study the behaviour of elastic and single-diffractive dissociation cross sections over a wide range of energy, and show that the model can be used as a global description of the wide variety of high energy elastic and diffractive data presently available. In particular it models low mass diffraction dissociation, where a rich resonance structure is present, and thus predicts the differential and integrated cross sections in the kinematical range appropriate to the LHC. We incorporate the physics of this model into the beam tracking code MERLIN and use it to simulate the resulting loss maps of the beam halo lost in the collimators in the LHC.

  8. High Efficiency Room Air Conditioner

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    This project was undertaken as a CRADA project between UT-Battelle and Geberal Electric Company and was funded by Department of Energy to design and develop of a high efficiency room air conditioner. A number of novel elements were investigated to improve the energy efficiency of a state-of-the-art WAC with base capacity of 10,000 BTU/h. One of the major modifications was made by downgrading its capacity from 10,000 BTU/hr to 8,000 BTU/hr by replacing the original compressor with a lower capacity (8,000 BTU/hr) but high efficiency compressor having an EER of 9.7 as compared with 9.3 of the original compressor. However, all heat exchangers from the original unit were retained to provide higher EER. The other subsequent major modifications included- (i) the AC fan motor was replaced by a brushless high efficiency ECM motor along with its fan housing, (ii) the capillary tube was replaced with a needle valve to better control the refrigerant flow and refrigerant set points, and (iii) the unit was tested with a drop-in environmentally friendly binary mixture of R32 (90% molar concentration)/R125 (10% molar concentration). The WAC was tested in the environmental chambers at ORNL as per the design rating conditions of AHAM/ASHRAE (Outdoor- 95F and 40%RH, Indoor- 80F, 51.5%RH). All these modifications resulted in enhancing the EER of the WAC by up to 25%.

  9. Improvement of energy-conversion efficiency from laser to proton beam in a laser-foil interaction.

    PubMed

    Nodera, Y; Kawata, S; Onuma, N; Limpouch, J; Klimo, O; Kikuchi, T

    2008-10-01

    Improvement of energy-conversion efficiency from laser to proton beam is demonstrated by particle simulations in a laser-foil interaction. When an intense short-pulse laser illuminates the thin-foil target, the foil electrons are accelerated around the target by the ponderomotive force. The hot electrons generate a strong electric field, which accelerates the foil protons, and the proton beam is generated. In this paper a multihole thin-foil target is proposed in order to increase the energy-conversion efficiency from laser to protons. The multiholes transpiercing the foil target help to enhance the laser-proton energy-conversion efficiency significantly. Particle-in-cell 2.5-dimensional ( x, y, vx, vy, vz) simulations present that the total laser-proton energy-conversion efficiency becomes 9.3% for the multihole target, though the energy-conversion efficiency is 1.5% for a plain thin-foil target. The maximum proton energy is 10.0 MeV for the multihole target and is 3.14 MeV for the plain target. The transpiercing multihole target serves as a new method to increase the energy-conversion efficiency from laser to ions.

  10. A conserved asparagine in a P-type proton pump is required for efficient gating of protons.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, Kira; Wielandt, Alex G; Buch-Pedersen, Morten J; Palmgren, Michael G

    2013-04-05

    The minimal proton pumping machinery of the Arabidopsis thaliana P-type plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase isoform 2 (AHA2) consists of an aspartate residue serving as key proton donor/acceptor (Asp-684) and an arginine residue controlling the pKa of the aspartate. However, other important aspects of the proton transport mechanism such as gating, and the ability to occlude protons, are still unclear. An asparagine residue (Asn-106) in transmembrane segment 2 of AHA2 is conserved in all P-type plasma membrane H(+)-ATPases. In the crystal structure of the plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, this residue is located in the putative ligand entrance pathway, in close proximity to the central proton donor/acceptor Asp-684. Substitution of Asn-106 resulted in mutant enzymes with significantly reduced ability to transport protons against a membrane potential. Sensitivity toward orthovanadate was increased when Asn-106 was substituted with an aspartate residue, but decreased in mutants with alanine, lysine, glutamine, or threonine replacement of Asn-106. The apparent proton affinity was decreased for all mutants, most likely due to a perturbation of the local environment of Asp-684. Altogether, our results demonstrate that Asn-106 is important for closure of the proton entrance pathway prior to proton translocation across the membrane.

  11. A Conserved Asparagine in a P-type Proton Pump Is Required for Efficient Gating of Protons*

    PubMed Central

    Ekberg, Kira; Wielandt, Alex G.; Buch-Pedersen, Morten J.; Palmgren, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    The minimal proton pumping machinery of the Arabidopsis thaliana P-type plasma membrane H+-ATPase isoform 2 (AHA2) consists of an aspartate residue serving as key proton donor/acceptor (Asp-684) and an arginine residue controlling the pKa of the aspartate. However, other important aspects of the proton transport mechanism such as gating, and the ability to occlude protons, are still unclear. An asparagine residue (Asn-106) in transmembrane segment 2 of AHA2 is conserved in all P-type plasma membrane H+-ATPases. In the crystal structure of the plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase, this residue is located in the putative ligand entrance pathway, in close proximity to the central proton donor/acceptor Asp-684. Substitution of Asn-106 resulted in mutant enzymes with significantly reduced ability to transport protons against a membrane potential. Sensitivity toward orthovanadate was increased when Asn-106 was substituted with an aspartate residue, but decreased in mutants with alanine, lysine, glutamine, or threonine replacement of Asn-106. The apparent proton affinity was decreased for all mutants, most likely due to a perturbation of the local environment of Asp-684. Altogether, our results demonstrate that Asn-106 is important for closure of the proton entrance pathway prior to proton translocation across the membrane. PMID:23420846

  12. High Efficiency IMM Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharps, P.; Cho, B.; Chumney, D.; Cornfeild, A.; Guzie, B.; Hazlett, D.; Lin, Y.; Mackos, C.; Patel, P.; Stan, M.; Steinfeldt, J.; Tourino, C.

    2014-08-01

    We review the status of currently available commercial multi-junction cells, review options for next generation high efficiency cell architectures, and present the latest developments on the inverted metamorphic multi- junction (IMM) solar cell. Over 20,000 IMM cells have been prototyped to date, and efficiencies of up to 37% have been measured. We present the most recent performance data, including the response to particle radiation. The IMM cell can be used in a number of rigid or flexible configurations, and considerable effort is currently focused on cell packaging and panel integration. We discuss several design options, including a "drop in" replacement for the current 29.5% ZTJ cell technology. We will also address the reliability and cost of the IMM cell.

  13. High Efficiency Germanium Immersion Gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmenko, P J; Davis, P J; Little, S L; Little, L M; Bixler, J V

    2006-05-01

    We have fabricated several germanium immersion gratings by single crystal, single point diamond flycutting on an ultra-precision lathe. Use of a dead sharp tool produces groove corners less than 0.1 micron in radius and consequently high diffraction efficiency. We measured first order efficiencies in immersion of over 80% at 10.6 micron wavelength. Wavefront error was low averaging 0.06 wave rms (at 633 nm) across the full aperture. The grating spectral response was free of ghosts down to our detection limit of 1 part in 10{sup 4}. Scatter should be low based upon the surface roughness. Measurement of the spectral line profile of a CO{sub 2} laser sets an upper bound on total integrated scatter of 0.5%.

  14. Towards Effective and Efficient Patient-Specific Quality Assurance for Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, X. Ronald.; Li, Yupeng; Mackin, Dennis; Li, Heng; Poenisch, Falk; Lee, Andrew K.; Mahajan, Anita; Frank, Steven J.; Gillin, Michael T.; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    An intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) patient-specific quality assurance (PSQA) program based on measurement alone can be very time consuming due to the highly modulated dose distributions of IMPT fields. Incorporating independent dose calculation and treatment log file analysis could reduce the time required for measurements. In this article, we summarize our effort to develop an efficient and effective PSQA program that consists of three components: measurements, independent dose calculation, and analysis of patient-specific treatment delivery log files. Measurements included two-dimensional (2D) measurements using an ionization chamber array detector for each field delivered at the planned gantry angles with the electronic medical record (EMR) system in the QA mode and the accelerator control system (ACS) in the treatment mode, and additional measurements at depths for each field with the ACS in physics mode and without the EMR system. Dose distributions for each field in a water phantom were calculated independently using a recently developed in-house pencil beam algorithm and compared with those obtained using the treatment planning system (TPS). The treatment log file for each field was analyzed in terms of deviations in delivered spot positions from their planned positions using various statistical methods. Using this improved PSQA program, we were able to verify the integrity of the data transfer from the TPS to the EMR to the ACS, the dose calculation of the TPS, and the treatment delivery, including the dose delivered and spot positions. On the basis of this experience, we estimate that the in-room measurement time required for each complex IMPT case (e.g., a patient receiving bilateral IMPT for head and neck cancer) is less than 1 h using the improved PSQA program. Our experience demonstrates that it is possible to develop an efficient and effective PSQA program for IMPT with the equipment and resources available in the clinic. PMID:25867000

  15. High-power proton linac for transmuting the long-lived fission products in nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    High power proton linacs are being considered at Los Alamos as drivers for high-flux spallation neutron sources that can be used to transmute the troublesome long-lived fission products in defense nuclear waste. The transmutation scheme being studied provides a high flux (> 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2}{minus}s) of thermal neutrons, which efficiently converts fission products to stable or short-lived isotopes. A medium-energy proton linac with an average beam power of about 110 MW can burn the accumulated Tc99 and I129 inventory at the DOE's Hanford Site within 30 years. Preliminary concepts for this machine are described. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Efficient and stable proton acceleration by irradiating a two-layer target with a linearly polarized laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Chen, J. E.; He, X. T.; Ma, W. J.; Bin, J. H.; Schreiber, J.; Tajima, T.; Habs, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report an efficient and stable scheme to generate ˜200 MeV proton bunch by irradiating a two-layer targets (near-critical density layer+solid density layer with heavy ions and protons) with a linearly polarized Gaussian pulse at intensity of 6.0×1020 W/cm2. Due to self-focusing of laser and directly accelerated electrons in the near-critical density layer, the proton energy is enhanced by a factor of 3 compared to single-layer solid targets. The energy spread of proton is also remarkably reduced. Such scheme is attractive for applications relevant to tumor therapy.

  17. A simple, high efficiency, high resolution spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Samuel C.

    2012-09-01

    A simple concept is described that uses volume phase holographic gratings as polarizing dispersers for a high efficiency, high resolution spectropolarimeter. Although the idea has previously been mentioned in the literature as possible, such a concept has not been explored in detail. Performance analysis is presented for a VPHG spectropolarimeter concept that could be utilized for both solar and night-time astronomy. Instrumental peak efficiency can approach 100% with spectral dispersions permitting R~200,000 spectral resolution with diffraction limited telescopes. The instrument has 3-channels: two dispersed image planes with orthogonal polarization and an undispersed image plane. The concept has a range of versatility where it could be configured (with appropriate half-wave plates) for slit-fed spectroscopy or without slits for snapshot/hyperspectral/tomographic spectroscopic imaging. Multiplex gratings could also be used for the simultaneous recording of two separate spectral bands or multiple instruments could be daisy chained with beam splitters for further spectral coverage.

  18. Electron-Proton and High Energy Telescopes for Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivasrao R.; Grunau, Jan; Boden, Sebastian; Steinhagen, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Boettcher, Stephan; Rodríguez-Pacheco, Javier; Seimetz, Lars; Schuster, Bjoern; Kulemzin, Alexander; Wetzel, Moritz; Ravanbakhsh, Ali

    2013-04-01

    The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) suite for ESA's Solar Orbiter will provide key measurements to address particle acceleration at and near the Sun. The EPD suite consists of five sensors (STEIN, SIS, EPT, LET and HET). The University of Kiel in Germany is responsible for the design, development, and build of EPT and HET which are presented here. The Electron Proton Telescope (EPT) is designed to cleanly separate and measure electrons in the energy range from 20 - 400 keV and protons from 20 - 7000 keV. The Solar Orbiter EPT electron measurements from 20 - 400 keV will cover the gap with some overlap between suprathermal electrons measured by STEIN and high energy electrons measured by HET. The proton measurements from 20 -7000 keV will cover the gap between STEIN and LET. The Electron and Proton Telescope relies on the magnet/foil-technique. The High-Energy Telescope (HET) on ESA's Solar Orbiter mission, will measure electrons from 300 keV up to about 30 MeV, protons from 10 -100 MeV, and heavy ions from ~20 to 200 MeV/nuc. Thus, HET covers the energy range which is of specific interest for studies of the space environment and will perform the measurements needed to understand the origin of high-energy events at the Sun which occasionally accelerate particles to such high energies that they can penetrate the Earth's atmosphere and be measured at ground level (ground-level events). These measurement capabilities are reached by a combination of solid-state detectors and a scintillator calorimeter which allows use of the dE/dx vs. total E technique for particle identification and energy measurement. The upper limits on energy listed above refer to particles (ions) stopping in the scintillator and careful modeling of HET properties will allow discrimination of forward/backward penetrating particles in a wider energy range. Here we present the current development status of EPT-HET units focusing on the test and calibration results obtained with the demonstration

  19. Laser-induced generation of ultraintense proton beams for high energy-density science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badziak, J.; Antici, P.; Fuchs, J.; Jabłoński, S.; Mancic, A.; Parys, P.; Rosiński, M.; Suchańska, R.; Szydłowski, A.; Wołowski, J.

    2008-06-01

    Basic properties of high-current high-intensity ion beam generation using laser-induced skin-layer ponderomotive acceleration (SLPA) are discussed. The results of a recent experiment, in which 0.35-ps laser pulse of intensity up to 2×1019 W/cm2 irradiated a thin (1-3 μm) PS (plastic) or Au/PS target (PS covered by 0.1-0.2 μm Au front layer), are presented. It is shown that multi-MA proton beams of current densities >1 TA/cm2 and intensities > 1018 W/cm2 at the source can be produced when the laser-target interaction conditions approach the SLPA requirements. The proton beam parameters as well as the laser-protons energy conversion efficiency substantially depend on the target structure and can be significantly increased with the use of a double-layer Au/PS target. A prospect for the application of SLPA-driven proton beams in ICF fast ignition research is outlined.

  20. High efficiency motor rewind study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. K.; Spee, R.

    1991-02-01

    The objective of performing this work was to evaluate a new technology used for rewinding electric motors. Motor performance evaluation was conducted at the motor test facility at Oregon State University. The test program consisted of comparing new high efficiency motor technology and standard rewind technology with the Unity-Plus system. The Unity-Plus configuration exhibited reduced efficiency over the complete load range compared to the other motors. Appropriately sized capacitors connected to the terminals of the conventional induction motor produced the same power factor improvement as the Unity-Plus system. Torque production and torque pulsation were very similar for all systems. The Unity-Plus configuration drew lower starting currents but the duration of the starting transient was increased. Motor temperature rise was about the same for all systems. Noise levels were about the same in all systems. Although determination of time to failure was not undertaken, the expected lifetime of the Unit-Plus system is probably less due to higher capacitor stress and higher insulation stress. The investigation concludes that a conventional induction motor with terminal capacitors is the most acceptable way of obtaining good efficiency and power factor and the Unity-Plus system cannot be recommended on the basis of any of the evaluation criteria used in this study.

  1. High-efficiency photoionization detector

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.F.

    1981-05-12

    A high efficiency photoionization detector using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36 +- 0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20/sup 0/C.

  2. Improved efficiency in Monte Carlo simulation for passive-scattering proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, J. Ramos; Perl, J.; Schuemann, J.; Shin, J.; Paganetti, H.; Faddegon, B.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to improve the computational efficiency of Monte Carlo simulations when tracking protons through a proton therapy treatment head. Two proton therapy facilities were considered, the Francis H Burr Proton Therapy Center (FHBPTC) at the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Crocker Lab eye treatment facility used by University of California at San Francisco (UCSFETF). The computational efficiency was evaluated for phase space files scored at the exit of the treatment head to determine optimal parameters to improve efficiency while maintaining accuracy in the dose calculation. For FHBPTC, particles were split by a factor of 8 upstream of the second scatterer and upstream of the aperture. The radius of the region for Russian roulette was set to 2.5 or 1.5 times the radius of the aperture and a secondary particle production cut (PC) of 50 mm was applied. For UCSFETF, particles were split a factor of 16 upstream of a water absorber column and upstream of the aperture. Here, the radius of the region for Russian roulette was set to 4 times the radius of the aperture and a PC of 0.05 mm was applied. In both setups, the cylindrical symmetry of the proton beam was exploited to position the split particles randomly spaced around the beam axis. When simulating a phase space for subsequent water phantom simulations, efficiency gains between a factor of 19.9±0.1 and 52.21±0.04 for the FHTPC setups and 57.3±0.5 for the UCSFETF setups were obtained. For a phase space (PHSP) used as input for simulations in a patient geometry, the gain was a factor of 78.6±7.5. Lateral-dose curves in water were within the accepted clinical tolerance of 2%, with statistical uncertainties of 0.5% for the two facilities. For the patient geometry and by considering the 2% and 2mm criteria, 98.4% of the voxels showed a gamma index lower than unity. An analysis of the dose distribution resulted in systematic deviations below of 0.88% for 20% of the voxels with dose of 20% of

  3. Improved efficiency in Monte Carlo simulation for passive-scattering proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Méndez, J.; Perl, J.; Schümann, J.; Shin, J.; Paganetti, H.; Faddegon, B.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to improve the computational efficiency of Monte Carlo simulations when tracking protons through a proton therapy treatment head. Two proton therapy facilities were considered, the Francis H Burr Proton Therapy Center (FHBPTC) at the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Crocker Lab eye treatment facility used by University of California at San Francisco (UCSFETF). The computational efficiency was evaluated for phase space files scored at the exit of the treatment head to determine optimal parameters to improve efficiency while maintaining accuracy in the dose calculation. For FHBPTC, particles were split by a factor of 8 upstream of the second scatterer and upstream of the aperture. The radius of the region for Russian roulette was set to 2.5 or 1.5 times the radius of the aperture and a secondary particle production cut (PC) of 50 mm was applied. For UCSFETF, particles were split a factor of 16 upstream of a water absorber column and upstream of the aperture. Here, the radius of the region for Russian roulette was set to 4 times the radius of the aperture and a PC of 0.05 mm was applied. In both setups, the cylindrical symmetry of the proton beam was exploited to position the split particles randomly spaced around the beam axis. When simulating a phase space for subsequent water phantom simulations, efficiency gains between a factor of 19.9  ±  0.1 and 52.21  ±  0.04 for the FHTPC setups and 57.3  ±  0.5 for the UCSFETF setups were obtained. For a phase space used as input for simulations in a patient geometry, the gain was a factor of 78.6  ±  7.5. Lateral-dose curves in water were within the accepted clinical tolerance of 2%, with statistical uncertainties of 0.5% for the two facilities. For the patient geometry and by considering the 2% and 2mm criteria, 98.4% of the voxels showed a gamma index lower than unity. An analysis of the dose distribution resulted in systematic deviations below of 0.88% for 20% of the

  4. On the high intensity aspects of AGS Booster proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Bleser, E.J.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Roser, T.; Shoji, Y.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-06-01

    Observations of high intensity effects on the proton performance of the AGS Booster are presented, including present operational limits and correction methods. The transverse emittances, optimum tune working points, damping of coherent transverse oscillations and correction of stopband resonances through third-order are discussed in addition to the observed tune spread due to space charge forces. The initial longitudinal phase space distribution, capture and acceleration parameters and measurements are also given. Operational tools and strategies relevant to the high intensity setup are mentioned.

  5. On the high intensity aspects of AGS Booster proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Bleser, E.J.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Roser, T.; Shoji, Y.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of high intensity effects on the proton performance of the AGS Booster are presented, including present operational limits and correction methods. The transverse emittances, optimum tune working points, damping of coherent transverse oscillations and correction of stopband resonances through third-order are discussed in addition to the observed tune spread due to space charge forces. The initial longitudinal phase space distribution, capture and acceleration parameters and measurements are also given. Operational tools and strategies relevant to the high intensity setup are mentioned.

  6. High temperature effects on electron and proton circuits of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Thomas D; Zhang, Ru

    2010-08-01

    Photosynthesis is sensitive to high temperature with reversible declines during moderate stress and irreversible damage with more severe stress. While many studies have focused on the irreversible damage, the reversible changes can tell how photosynthesis tolerates high temperature. Knowing how high temperature is tolerated could lead to ways of extending high temperature tolerance. New analytical methods have been used to probe electron and proton circuits of intact leaves at high temperature. Combined with previous work with isolated systems, it appears that there is a large change in redox distribution among thylakoid components. Photosystem I becomes more reduced but photosystem II and the stroma become more oxidized. Several lines of evidence support the existence of significant cyclic electron flow at high temperature. It is hypothesized that these changes allow for adenosine tri-phosphate homeostasis and maintenance of an energy gradient across the thylakoid membrane, helping to keep it from suffering irreversible damage at high temperature.

  7. Enhancing laser-driven proton acceleration by using micro-pillar arrays at high drive energy.

    PubMed

    Khaghani, Dimitri; Lobet, Mathieu; Borm, Björn; Burr, Loïc; Gärtner, Felix; Gremillet, Laurent; Movsesyan, Liana; Rosmej, Olga; Toimil-Molares, Maria Eugenia; Wagner, Florian; Neumayer, Paul

    2017-09-12

    The interaction of micro- and nano-structured target surfaces with high-power laser pulses is being widely investigated for its unprecedented absorption efficiency. We have developed vertically aligned metallic micro-pillar arrays for laser-driven proton acceleration experiments. We demonstrate that such targets help strengthen interaction mechanisms when irradiated with high-energy-class laser pulses of intensities ~10(17-18) W/cm(2). In comparison with standard planar targets, we witness strongly enhanced hot-electron production and proton acceleration both in terms of maximum energies and particle numbers. Supporting our experimental results, two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show an increase in laser energy conversion into hot electrons, leading to stronger acceleration fields. This opens a window of opportunity for further improvements of laser-driven ion acceleration systems.

  8. High temperature polymers for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einsla, Brian Russel

    Novel proton exchange membranes (PEMs) were investigated that show potential for operating at higher temperatures in both direct methanol (DMFC) and H 2/air PEM fuel cells. The need for thermally stable polymers immediately suggests the possibility of heterocyclic polymers bearing appropriate ion conducting sites. Accordingly, monomers and random disulfonated poly(arylene ether) copolymers containing either naphthalimide, benzoxazole or benzimidazole moieties were synthesized via direct copolymerization. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) was varied by simply changing the ratio of disulfonated monomer to nonsulfonated monomer in the copolymerization step. Water uptake and proton conductivity of cast membranes increased with IEC. The water uptake of these heterocyclic copolymers was lower than that of comparable disulfonated poly(arylene ether) systems, which is a desirable improvement for PEMs. Membrane electrode assemblies were prepared and the initial fuel cell performance of the disulfonated polyimide and polybenzoxazole (PBO) copolymers was very promising at 80°C compared to the state-of-the-art PEM (NafionRTM); nevertheless these membranes became brittle under operating conditions. Several series of poly(arylene ether)s based on disodium-3,3'-disulfonate-4,4 '-dichlorodiphenylsulfone (S-DCDPS) and a benzimidazole-containing bisphenol were synthesized and afforded copolymers with enhanced stability. Selected properties of these membranes were compared to separately prepared miscible blends of disulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymers and polybenzimidazole (PBI). Complexation of the sulfonic acid groups with the PBI structure reduced water swelling and proton conductivity. The enhanced proton conductivity of NafionRTM membranes has been proposed to be due to the aggregation of the highly acidic side-chain sulfonic acid sites to form ion channels. A series of side-chain sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymers based on methoxyhydroquinone was

  9. High latitude proton precipitation and light-ion density profiles during the magnetic storm initial phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of precipitating protons and light ion densities by experiments on OGO-4 indicate that widespread proton precipitation occurs in predawn hours during the magnetic storm initial phase from the latitude of the high-latitude ion trough, or plasmapause , up to Lambda 75 deg. A softening of the proton spectrum is apparent as the plasmapause is approached. The separation of the low-latitude precipitation boundaries for 7.3 kev and 23.8 kev protons is approximately 1 deg, compared with a 3.6 deg separation which has been computed using the formulas of Gendrin and Eather and Carovillano. Consideration of probable proton drift morphology leads to the conclusion that protons ase injected in predawn hours, with widespread precipitation occurring in the region outside the plasmapause. Protons less energetic than approximately 7 kev drift eastward, while the more energetic protons drift westward, producing the observed dawn-dusk asymmetry for the lower-energy protons.

  10. Machine learning applied to proton radiography of high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nicholas F. Y.; Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Ratan, Naren; Sadler, James; Levy, Matthew C.; Trines, Raoul; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Proton radiography is a technique extensively used to resolve magnetic field structures in high-energy-density plasmas, revealing a whole variety of interesting phenomena such as magnetic reconnection and collisionless shocks found in astrophysical systems. Existing methods of analyzing proton radiographs give mostly qualitative results or specific quantitative parameters, such as magnetic field strength, and recent work showed that the line-integrated transverse magnetic field can be reconstructed in specific regimes where many simplifying assumptions were needed. Using artificial neural networks, we demonstrate for the first time 3D reconstruction of magnetic fields in the nonlinear regime, an improvement over existing methods, which reconstruct only in 2D and in the linear regime. A proof of concept is presented here, with mean reconstruction errors of less than 5% even after introducing noise. We demonstrate that over the long term, this approach is more computationally efficient compared to other techniques. We also highlight the need for proton tomography because (i) certain field structures cannot be reconstructed from a single radiograph and (ii) errors can be further reduced when reconstruction is performed on radiographs generated by proton beams fired in different directions.

  11. Machine learning applied to proton radiography of high-energy-density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nicholas F Y; Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Ratan, Naren; Sadler, James; Levy, Matthew C; Trines, Raoul; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Proton radiography is a technique extensively used to resolve magnetic field structures in high-energy-density plasmas, revealing a whole variety of interesting phenomena such as magnetic reconnection and collisionless shocks found in astrophysical systems. Existing methods of analyzing proton radiographs give mostly qualitative results or specific quantitative parameters, such as magnetic field strength, and recent work showed that the line-integrated transverse magnetic field can be reconstructed in specific regimes where many simplifying assumptions were needed. Using artificial neural networks, we demonstrate for the first time 3D reconstruction of magnetic fields in the nonlinear regime, an improvement over existing methods, which reconstruct only in 2D and in the linear regime. A proof of concept is presented here, with mean reconstruction errors of less than 5% even after introducing noise. We demonstrate that over the long term, this approach is more computationally efficient compared to other techniques. We also highlight the need for proton tomography because (i) certain field structures cannot be reconstructed from a single radiograph and (ii) errors can be further reduced when reconstruction is performed on radiographs generated by proton beams fired in different directions.

  12. High-efficiency photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Yang, H.T.; Zehr, S.W.

    1982-06-21

    High efficiency solar converters comprised of a two cell, non-lattice matched, monolithic stacked semiconductor configuration using optimum pairs of cells having bandgaps in the range 1.6 to 1.7 eV and 0.95 to 1.1 eV, and a method of fabrication thereof, are disclosed. The high band gap subcells are fabricated using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) to produce the required AlGaAs layers of optimized composition, thickness and doping to produce high performance, heteroface homojunction devices. The low bandgap subcells are similarly fabricated from AlGa(As)Sb compositions by LPE, MBE or MOCVD. These subcells are then coupled to form a monolithic structure by an appropriate bonding technique which also forms the required transparent intercell ohmic contact (IOC) between the two subcells. Improved ohmic contacts to the high bandgap semiconductor structure can be formed by vacuum evaporating to suitable metal or semiconductor materials which react during laser annealing to form a low bandgap semiconductor which provides a low contact resistance structure.

  13. Soft-proton exchange on magnesium-oxide-doped substrates: A route toward efficient and power-resistant nonlinear converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunghi, T.; Doutre, F.; Legoff, G.; Ayenew, G.; Tronche, H.; Tanzilli, S.; Baldi, P.; De Micheli, M.

    2017-07-01

    Despite their attractive features, integrated optical devices based on Congruent-melted Lithium Niobate (CLN) suffer from Photo-Refractive Damage (PRD). This light-induced refractive-index change hampers the use of CLN when high-power densities are in play, a typical regime in integrated optics. In bulk devices, the resistance to PRD can be largely improved by doping the lithium-niobate substrates with magnesium oxide. However, the fabrication of waveguides on MgO-doped substrates is not as straightforward as on CLN and either the resistance to PRD is strongly reduced by the waveguide fabrication process (as it happens in Ti-indiffused waveguides) or the nonlinear conversion efficiency is lowered (as it occurs in annealed-proton exchange). Here, we fabricate waveguides starting from MgO-doped substrates using the Soft-Proton Exchange (SPE) technique and we show that this combination represents a promising alternative. We demonstrate that, with a small adaptation of the exchange parameters, SPE allows producing MgO-doped LN refractive-index profiles almost identical to those produced in CLN without reducing the nonlinearity in the substrate. We also prove that the SPE does not affect substantially the resistance to PRD characteristics of MgO-doped substrates. Therefore, we think that SPE is the right recipe to outperform standard techniques and to fabricate robust and efficient waveguides for high-intensity-beam confinement.

  14. High-efficiency dielectrophoretic ratchet.

    PubMed

    Germs, Wijnand Chr; Roeling, Erik M; van Ijzendoorn, Leo J; Smalbrugge, Barry; de Vries, Tjibbe; Geluk, Erik Jan; Janssen, René A J; Kemerink, Martijn

    2012-10-01

    Brownian ratchets enable the use of thermal motion in performing useful work. They typically employ spatial asymmetry to rectify nondirected external forces that drive the system out of equilibrium (cf. running marbles on a shaking washboard). The major application foreseen for Brownian ratchets is high-selectivity fractionation of particle or molecule distributions. Here, we investigate the functioning of an important model system, the on/off ratchet for water-suspended particles, in which interdigitated finger electrodes can be switched on and off to create a time-dependent, spatially periodic but asymmetric potential. Surprisingly, we find that mainly dielectrophoretic rather than electrophoretic forces are responsible for the ratchet effect. This has major implications for the (a)symmetry of the ratchet potential and the settings needed for optimal performance. We demonstrate that by applying a potential offset the ratchet can be optimized such that its particle displacement efficiency reaches the theoretical upper limit corresponding to the electrode geometry and particle size. Efficient fractionation based on size selectivity is therefore not only possible for charged species, but also for uncharged ones, which greatly expands the applicability range of this type of Brownian ratchet.

  15. High efficiency shale oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, C.D.

    1992-07-18

    The overall project objective is to demonstrate the high efficiency of the Adams Counter-Current shale oil recovery process. The efficiency will first be demonstrated at bench-scale, in the current phase, after which the demonstration will be extended to the operation of a small pilot plant. Thus the immediate project objective is to obtain data on oil shale retorting operations in a small batch rotary kiln that will be representative of operations in the proposed continuous process pilot plant. Although an oil shale batch sample is sealed in the batch kiln from the start until the end of the run, the process conditions for the batch are the same as the conditions that an element of oil shale would encounter in a larger continuous process kiln. For example, similar conditions of heatup rate, oxidation of the residue and cool-down prevail for the element in both systems. This batch kiln is a unit constructed in a 1987 Phase I SBIR tar sand retorting project. The kiln worked fairly well in that project; however, the need for certain modifications was observed. These modifications are now underway to simplify the operation and make the data and analysis more exact. The second quarter agenda consisted of (a) kiln modifications; (b) sample preparation; and (c) Heat Transfer calibration runs (part of proposal task number 3 -- to be completed by the end of month 7).

  16. Los Alamos high-current proton storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, G. P.; Hardekopf, R. A.; Jason, A. J.; Clout, P. N.; Sawyer, G. A.

    1985-05-01

    The Proton Storage Ring (PSR), whose installation was recently completed at Los Alamos, is a fast-cycling high-current accumulator designed to produce intense 800 MeV proton pulses for driving a spallation neutron source. The ring converts long beam pulses from the LAMPF linear accelerator into short bunches well matched to requirements of a high-resolution neutron-scattering materials science program. The initial performance goal for this program is to provide 100-(MU)A average current at the neutron production target within a 12-Hz pulse rate. Operation at 20 (MU)A is scheduled for September 1985, with full intensity within the next year. The storage ring was originally designed to function in a second mode in which six 1-ns bunches are accumulated and separately extracted every LAMPF macropulse. Implementation of this mode, which would serve a fast-neutron nuclear-physics program, was deferred in favor of initial concentration on the neutron-scattering program. The PSR design and status is summarized. Unique machine features include high peak current, two-step charge-stripping injection, a low-impedance buncher amplifier to counter beam-loading, and a high-repetition-rate strip-line extraction kicker.

  17. High efficiency laser spectrum conditioner

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Norman R.

    1980-01-01

    A high efficiency laser spectrum conditioner for generating a collinear parallel output beam containing a predetermined set of frequencies from a multifrequency laser. A diffraction grating and spherical mirror are used in combination, to disperse the various frequencies of the input laser beam and direct these frequencies along various parallel lines spatially separated from one another to an apertured mask. Selection of the desired frequencies is accomplished by placement of apertures at locations on the mask where the desired frequencies intersect the mask. A recollimated parallel output beam with the desired set of frequencies is subsequently generated utilizing a mirror and grating matched and geometrically aligned in the same manner as the input grating and mirror.

  18. High intensity proton operation at the Brookhaven AGS accelerator complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, L.A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bleser, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Onillon, E.; Reece, R.K.; Roser, T.; Soukas, A.

    1994-08-01

    With the completion of the AGS rf upgrade, and the implementation of a transition {open_quotes}jump{close_quotes}, all of accelerator systems were in place in 1994 to allow acceleration of the proton intensity available from the AGS Booster injector to AGS extraction energy and delivery to the high energy users. Beam commissioning results with these new systems are presented. Progress in identifying and overcoming other obstacles to higher intensity are given. These include a careful exploration of the stopband strengths present on the AGS injection magnetic porch, and implementation of the AGS single bunch transverse dampers throughout the acceleration cycle.

  19. High efficiency ozone generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Karlson, E.L.

    1990-01-09

    This final report entails research prepared to verify the workings and the efficiency of producing ozone with the ELK'' Ozone Generator, which operates at an elevated gas pressure of up to 20 MPA (3000 psi) and is an improvement of the corona discharge ozone generator. The increased pressure produces an increase in the density of oxygen gas fed into the generator. This, in turn, leads to an increased yield of ozone in the ozone oxygen gas mixture leaving the generator. The design of this new ozone generator incorporates a novel positioning of the dielectric to preserve its mechanical integrity at high operating pressures and also incorporates a novel heat removal technique. A large number of ozone production runs have been made at different pressures. Large populations of data such as, temperature points throughout the generator, gas flow, cooling water flow parameters, operating gas pressure, ozone concentration, and data on the dielectric cooling, have been compiled and fed into our computer. This new data indicates not only that high pressures used in a controlled fashion will produce more ozone per watt hour but also indicates what problems exist when pressures are increased, such as the generation of high temperatures not only in the area of ozone generation but within the dielectric. The data also shows the necessary residence time for maximum ozone production at a particular pressure, voltage, temperature and electrode spacing. 14 refs., 22 figs.

  20. Femtosecond laser driven high-flux highly collimated MeV-proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiuchi, M.; Daido, H.; Yogo, A.; Orimo, S.; Ogura, K.; Ma, J.; Sagisaka, A.; Mori, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kiriyama, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Bulanov, S. V.; Choi, Il Woo; Yu, Tae Jun; Shung, Jae Hee; Jeong, Tae Moon; Ko, Do-Kyeong; Lee, Jongmin; Kim, Hyung Taek; Hong, Kyung-Ham

    2008-06-24

    Highlly collimated energetic protons whose energies are up to 4 MeV are generated by an intense femtosecond Titanium Sappheire laser pulse interacting with a 7.5, 12.5, and 25 {mu}m-thick Polyimide tape target and 5 {mu}m-thick copper target. We find no clear difference on the proton spectra from 7.5, 12.5, and 25 {mu}m Polyimide tape target. The highest conversion efficiency from laser energy into protons of {approx}3% is observed with a 7.5 {mu}m thick Polyimide target. The quality of the proton beam is good enough to obtain a clear projection image of a mesh having 10 {mu}m line and space structure, installed into the passage of the beam. We obtain clear vertical lines on the proton intensity profiles from the copper target, which are considered to be transferred from the surface of the copper target. From it, we can restrict the size of the proton emitting region to be {approx}20 {mu}m.

  1. Post-acceleration of laser driven protons with a compact high field linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Turchetti, Giorgio; Bolton, Paul R.

    2013-05-01

    We present a start-to-end 3D numerical simulation of a hybrid scheme for the acceleration of protons. The scheme is based on a first stage laser acceleration, followed by a transport line with a solenoid or a multiplet of quadrupoles, and then a post-acceleration section in a compact linac. Our simulations show that from a laser accelerated proton bunch with energy selection at ~ 30MeV, it is possible to obtain a high quality monochromatic beam of 60MeV with intensity at the threshold of interest for medical use. In the present day experiments using solid targets, the TNSA mechanism describes accelerated bunches with an exponential energy spectrum up to a cut-off value typically below ~ 60MeV and wide angular distribution. At the cut-off energy, the number of protons to be collimated and post-accelerated in a hybrid scheme are still too low. We investigate laser-plasma acceleration to improve the quality and number of the injected protons at ~ 30MeV in order to assure efficient post-acceleration in the hybrid scheme. The results are obtained with 3D PIC simulations using a code where optical acceleration with over-dense targets, transport and post-acceleration in a linac can all be investigated in an integrated framework. The high intensity experiments at Nara are taken as a reference benchmarks for our virtual laboratory. If experimentally confirmed, a hybrid scheme could be the core of a medium sized infrastructure for medical research, capable of producing protons for therapy and x-rays for diagnosis, which complements the development of all optical systems.

  2. A brief history of high power RF proton linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    The first mention of linear acceleration was in a paper by G. Ising in 1924 in which he postulated the acceleration of positive ions induced by spark discharges which produced electric fields in gaps between a series of {open_quotes}drift tubes{close_quotes}. Ising apparently was not able to demonstrate his concept, most likely due to the limited state of electronic devices. Ising`s work was followed by a seminal paper by R. Wideroe in 1928 in which he demonstrated the first linear accelerator. Wideroe was able to accelerate sodium or potassium ions to 50 keV of energy using drift tubes connected alternately to high frequency waves and to ground. Nuclear physics during this period was interested in accelerating protons, deuterons, electrons and alpha particles and not heavy ions like sodium or potassium. To accelerate the light ions required much higher frequencies than available at that time. So linear accelerators were not pursued heavily at that time. Research continued during the 1930s but the development of high frequency RF tubes for radar applications in World War 2 opened the potential for RF linear accelerators after the war. The Berkeley laboratory of E. 0. Lawrence under the leadership of Luis Alvarez developed a new linear proton accelerator concept that utilized drift tubes that required a full RF period to pass through as compared to the earlier concepts. This development resulted in the historic Berkeley 32 MeV proton linear accelerator which incorporated the {open_quotes}Alvarez drift tube{close_quotes} as the basic acceleration scheme using surplus 200 MHz radar components.

  3. Monomers of the Neurospora plasma membrane H+-ATPase catalyze efficient proton translocation.

    PubMed

    Goormaghtigh, E; Chadwick, C; Scarborough, G A

    1986-06-05

    Liposomes prepared by sonication of asolectin were fractionated by glycerol density gradient centrifugation, and the small liposomes contained in the upper region of the gradients were used for reconstitution of purified, radiolabeled Neurospora plasma membrane H+-ATPase molecules by our previously published procedures. The reconstituted liposomes were then subjected to two additional rounds of glycerol density gradient centrifugation, which separate the H+-ATPase-bearing proteoliposomes from ATPase-free liposomes by virtue of their greater density. The isolated H+-ATPase-bearing proteoliposomes in two such preparations exhibited a specific H+-ATPase activity of about 11 mumol of Pi liberated/mg of protein/min, which was approximately doubled in the presence of nigericin plus K+, indicating that a large percentage of the H+-ATPase molecules in both preparations were capable of generating a transmembrane protonic potential difference sufficient to impede further proton translocation. Importantly, quantitation of the number of 105,000-dalton ATPase monomers and liposomes in the same preparations by radioactivity determination and counting of negatively stained images in the electron microscope indicated ATPase monomer to liposome ratios of 0.97 and 1.06. Because every liposome in the preparations must have had at least one ATPase monomer, these ratios indicate that very few of the liposomes had more than one, and simple calculations show that the great majority of active ATPase molecules in the preparations must have been present as proton-translocating monomers. The results thus clearly demonstrate that 105,000-dalton monomers of the Neurospora plasma membrane H+-ATPase can catalyze efficient ATP hydrolysis-driven proton translocation.

  4. Muon reconstruction efficiency and momentum resolution of the ATLAS experiment in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text] TeV in 2010.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abajyan, T; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdel Khalek, S; Abdelalim, A A; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Agustoni, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Allbrooke, B M M; Allison, L J; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Angelidakis, S; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Apolle, R; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Arutinov, D; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Astbury, A; Atkinson, M; Auerbach, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Axen, D; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baccaglioni, G; Bacci, C; Bach, A M; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Backus Mayes, J; Badescu, E; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, S; Balek, P; Balli, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, Sw; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartsch, V; Basye, A; Bates, R L; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beale, S; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bedikian, S; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Beloborodova, O L; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez Garcia, J A; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Bertella, C; Bertolucci, F; Besana, M I; Besjes, G J; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianchini, L; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Bierwagen, K; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Bittner, B; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blackburn, D; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Boddy, C R; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boek, T T; Boelaert, N; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Bolnet, N M; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borri, M; Borroni, S; Bortfeldt, J; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boterenbrood, H; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boutouil, S; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Branchini, P; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brazzale, S F; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brendlinger, K; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Bristow, T M; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Broggi, F; Bromberg, C; Bronner, J; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Bryngemark, L; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Bucci, F; Buchanan, J; Buchholz, P; Buckingham, R M; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Bugge, L; Bulekov, O; Bundock, A C; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgess, T; Burke, S; Busato, E; Büscher, V; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Buttinger, W; Byszewski, M; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Caloi, R; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Camacho Toro, R; Camarri, P; Cameron, D; Caminada, L M; Caminal Armadans, R; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Cantero, J; Cantrill, R; Cao, T; Capeans Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capriotti, D; Capua, M; Caputo, R; Cardarelli, R; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carminati, L; Caron, S; Carquin, E; Carrillo-Montoya, G D; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cascella, M; Caso, C; Castaneda-Miranda, E; Castelli, A; Castillo Gimenez, V; Castro, N F; Cataldi, G; Catastini, P; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Cattani, G; Caughron, S; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Ceradini, F; Cerio, B; Cerqueira, A S; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Cerutti, F; Cervelli, A; Cetin, S A; Chafaq, A; Chakraborty, D; Chalupkova, I; Chan, K; Chang, P; Chapleau, B; Chapman, J D; Chapman, J W; Charlton, D G; Chavda, V; Chavez Barajas, C A; Cheatham, S; Chekanov, S; Chekulaev, S V; Chelkov, G A; Chelstowska, M A; Chen, C; Chen, H; Chen, S; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Cheng, Y; Cheplakov, A; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Chernyatin, V; Cheu, E; Cheung, S L; Chevalier, L; Chiarella, V; Chiefari, G; Childers, J T; Chilingarov, A; Chiodini, G; Chisholm, A S; Chislett, R T; Chitan, A; Chizhov, M V; Choudalakis, G; Chouridou, S; Chow, B K B; Christidi, I A; Christov, A; Chromek-Burckhart, D; Chu, M L; Chudoba, J; Ciapetti, G; Ciftci, A K; Ciftci, R; Cinca, D; Cindro, V; Ciocio, A; Cirilli, M; Cirkovic, P; Citron, Z H; Citterio, M; Ciubancan, M; Clark, A; Clark, P J; Clarke, R N; Clemens, J C; Clement, B; Clement, C; Coadou, Y; Cobal, M; Coccaro, A; Cochran, J; Coelli, S; Coffey, L; Cogan, J G; Coggeshall, J; Colas, J; Cole, S; Colijn, A P; Collins, N J; Collins-Tooth, C; Collot, J; Colombo, T; Colon, G; Compostella, G; Conde Muiño, P; Coniavitis, E; Conidi, M C; Consonni, S M; Consorti, V; Constantinescu, S; Conta, C; Conti, G; Conventi, F; Cooke, M; Cooper, B D; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cooper-Smith, N J; Copic, K; Cornelissen, T; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Corso-Radu, A; Cortes-Gonzalez, A; Cortiana, G; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Côté, D; Cottin, G; Courneyea, L; Cowan, G; Cox, B E; Cranmer, K; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Crescioli, F; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; Cuciuc, C-M; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T; Cummings, J; Curatolo, M; Curtis, C J; Cuthbert, C; Czirr, H; Czodrowski, P; Czyczula, Z; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; D'Orazio, A; Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M J Da; Via, C Da; Dabrowski, W; Dafinca, A; Dai, T; Dallaire, F; Dallapiccola, C; Dam, M; Damiani, D S; Daniells, A C; Danielsson, H O; Dao, V; Darbo, G; Darlea, G L; Darmora, S; Dassoulas, J A; Davey, W; Davidek, T; Davidson, N; Davies, E; Davies, M; Davignon, O; Davison, A R; Davygora, Y; Dawe, E; Dawson, I; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R K; De, K; de Asmundis, R; De Castro, S; De Cecco, S; de Graat, J; De Groot, N; de Jong, P; De La Taille, C; De la Torre, H; De Lorenzi, F; De Nooij, L; De Pedis, D; De Salvo, A; De Sanctis, U; De Santo, A; De Vivie De Regie, J B; De Zorzi, G; Dearnaley, W J; Debbe, R; Debenedetti, C; Dechenaux, B; Dedovich, D V; Degenhardt, J; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; Delemontex, T; Deliyergiyev, M; Dell'Acqua, A; Dell'Asta, L; Della Pietra, M; Della Volpe, D; Delmastro, M; Delsart, P A; Deluca, C; Demers, S; Demichev, M; Demilly, A; Demirkoz, B; Denisov, S P; Derendarz, D; Derkaoui, J E; Derue, F; Dervan, P; Desch, K; Deviveiros, P O; Dewhurst, A; DeWilde, B; Dhaliwal, S; Dhullipudi, R; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Donato, C; Di Girolamo, A; Di Girolamo, B; Di Luise, S; Di Mattia, A; Di Micco, B; Di Nardo, R; Di Simone, A; Di Sipio, R; Diaz, M A; Diehl, E B; Dietrich, J; Dietzsch, T A; Diglio, S; Yagci, K Dindar; Dingfelder, J; Dinut, F; Dionisi, C; Dita, P; Dita, S; Dittus, F; Djama, F; Djobava, T; do Vale, M A B; Do Valle Wemans, A; Doan, T K O; Dobos, D; Dobson, E; Dodd, J; Doglioni, C; Doherty, T; Dohmae, T; Doi, Y; Dolejsi, J; Dolezal, Z; Dolgoshein, B A; Donadelli, M; Donini, J; Dopke, J; Doria, A; Anjos, A Dos; Dotti, A; Dova, M T; Doyle, A T; Dris, M; Dubbert, J; Dube, S; Dubreuil, E; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duda, D; Dudarev, A; Dudziak, F; Duflot, L; Dufour, M-A; Duguid, L; Dührssen, M; Dunford, M; Duran Yildiz, H; Düren, M; Dwuznik, M; Ebke, J; Eckweiler, S; Edson, W; Edwards, C A; Edwards, N C; Ehrenfeld, W; Eifert, T; Eigen, G; Einsweiler, K; Eisenhandler, E; Ekelof, T; El Kacimi, M; Ellert, M; Elles, S; Ellinghaus, F; Ellis, K; Ellis, N; Elmsheuser, J; Elsing, M; Emeliyanov, D; Enari, Y; Endner, O C; Engelmann, R; Engl, A; Erdmann, J; Ereditato, A; Eriksson, D; Ernst, J; Ernst, M; Ernwein, J; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ertel, E; Escalier, M; Esch, H; Escobar, C; Curull, X Espinal; Esposito, B; Etienne, F; Etienvre, A I; Etzion, E; Evangelakou, D; Evans, H; Fabbri, L; Fabre, C; Facini, G; Fakhrutdinov, R M; Falciano, S; Fang, Y; Fanti, M; Farbin, A; Farilla, A; Farooque, T; Farrell, S; Farrington, S M; Farthouat, P; Fassi, F; Fassnacht, P; Fassouliotis, D; Fatholahzadeh, B; Favareto, A; Fayard, L; Federic, P; Fedin, O L; Fedorko, W; Fehling-Kaschek, M; Feligioni, L; Feng, C; Feng, E J; Feng, H; Fenyuk, A B; Ferencei, J; Fernando, W; Ferrag, S; Ferrando, J; Ferrara, V; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrari, R; Ferreira de Lima, D E; Ferrer, A; Ferrere, D; Ferretti, C; Ferretto Parodi, A; Fiascaris, M; Fiedler, F; Filipčič, A; Filthaut, F; Fincke-Keeler, M; Finelli, K D; Fiolhais, M C N; Fiorini, L; Firan, A; Fischer, J; Fisher, M J; Fitzgerald, E A; Flechl, M; Fleck, I; Fleischmann, P; Fleischmann, S; Fletcher, G T; Fletcher, G; Flick, T; Floderus, A; Flores Castillo, L R; Florez Bustos, A C; Flowerdew, M J; Fonseca Martin, T; Formica, A; Forti, A; Fortin, D; Fournier, D; Fox, H; Francavilla, P; Franchini, M; Franchino, S; Francis, D; Franklin, M; Franz, S; Fraternali, M; Fratina, S; French, S T; Friedrich, C; Friedrich, F; Froidevaux, D; Frost, J A; Fukunaga, C; Fullana Torregrosa, E; Fulsom, B G; Fuster, J; Gabaldon, C; Gabizon, O; Gabrielli, A; Gabrielli, A; Gadatsch, S; Gadfort, T; Gadomski, S; Gagliardi, G; Gagnon, P; Galea, C; Galhardo, B; Gallas, E J; Gallo, V; Gallop, B J; Gallus, P; Gan, K K; Gandrajula, R P; Gao, Y S; Gaponenko, A; Garay Walls, F M; Garberson, F; García, C; García Navarro, J E; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Gardner, R W; Garelli, N; Garonne, V; Gatti, C; Gaudio, G; Gaur, B; Gauthier, L; Gauzzi, P; Gavrilenko, I L; Gay, C; Gaycken, G; Gazis, E N; Ge, P; Gecse, Z; Gee, C N P; Geerts, D A A; Geich-Gimbel, Ch; Gellerstedt, K; Gemme, C; Gemmell, A; Genest, M H; Gentile, S; George, M; George, S; Gerbaudo, D; Gershon, A; Ghazlane, H; Ghodbane, N; Giacobbe, B; Giagu, S; Giangiobbe, V; Gianotti, F; Gibbard, B; Gibson, A; Gibson, S M; Gilchriese, M; Gillam, T P S; Gillberg, D; Gillman, A R; Gingrich, D M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M P; Giordano, R; Giorgi, F M; Giovannini, P; Giraud, P F; Giugni, D; Giuliani, C; Giunta, M; Gjelsten, B K; Gkialas, I; Gladilin, L K; Glasman, C; Glatzer, J; Glazov, A; Glonti, G L; Goblirsch-Kolb, M; Goddard, J R; Godfrey, J; Godlewski, J; Goebel, M; Goeringer, C; Goldfarb, S; Golling, T; Golubkov, D; Gomes, A; Gomez Fajardo, L S; Gonçalo, R; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J; Gonella, L; González de la Hoz, S; Gonzalez Parra, G; Gonzalez Silva, M L; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Goodson, J J; Goossens, L; Gorbounov, P A; Gordon, H A; Gorelov, I; Gorfine, G; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Gorišek, A; Gornicki, E; Goshaw, A T; Gössling, C; Gostkin, M I; Gough Eschrich, I; Gouighri, M; Goujdami, D; Goulette, M P; Goussiou, A G; Goy, C; Gozpinar, S; Graber, L; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grafström, P; Grahn, K-J; Gramstad, E; Grancagnolo, F; Grancagnolo, S; Grassi, V; Gratchev, V; Gray, H M; Gray, J A; Graziani, E; Grebenyuk, O G; Greenshaw, T; Greenwood, Z D; Gregersen, K; Gregor, I M; Grenier, P; Griffiths, J; Grigalashvili, N; Grillo, A A; Grimm, K; Grinstein, S; Gris, Ph; Grishkevich, Y V; Grivaz, J-F; Grohs, J P; Grohsjean, A; Gross, E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Groth-Jensen, J; Grybel, K; Guescini, F; Guest, D; Gueta, O; Guicheney, C; Guido, E; Guillemin, T; Guindon, S; Gul, U; Gunther, J; Guo, J; Gutierrez, P; Guttman, N; Gutzwiller, O; Guyot, C; Gwenlan, C; Gwilliam, C B; Haas, A; Haas, S; Haber, C; Hadavand, H K; Haefner, P; Hajduk, Z; Hakobyan, H; Hall, D; Halladjian, G; Hamacher, K; Hamal, P; Hamano, K; Hamer, M; Hamilton, A; Hamilton, S; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hanawa, K; Hance, M; Handel, C; Hanke, P; Hansen, J R; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, P H; Hansson, P; Hara, K; Hard, A S; Harenberg, T; Harkusha, S; Harper, D; Harrington, R D; Harris, O M; Hartert, J; Hartjes, F; Haruyama, T; Harvey, A; Hasegawa, S; Hasegawa, Y; Hassani, S; Haug, S; Hauschild, M; Hauser, R; Havranek, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R J; Hawkins, A D; Hayakawa, T; Hayashi, T; Hayden, D; Hays, C P; Hayward, H S; Haywood, S J; Head, S J; Heck, T; Hedberg, V; Heelan, L; Heim, S; Heinemann, B; Heisterkamp, S; Hejbal, J; Helary, L; Heller, C; Heller, M; Hellman, S; Hellmich, D; Helsens, C; Henderson, J; Henderson, R C W; Henke, M; Henrichs, A; Henriques Correia, A M; Henrot-Versille, S; Hensel, C; Herbert, G H; Hernandez, C M; Hernández Jiménez, Y; Herrberg-Schubert, R; Herten, G; Hertenberger, R; Hervas, L; Hesketh, G G; Hessey, N P; Hickling, R; Higón-Rodriguez, E; Hill, J C; Hiller, K H; Hillert, S; Hillier, S J; Hinchliffe, I; Hines, E; Hirose, M; Hirschbuehl, D; Hobbs, J; Hod, N; Hodgkinson, M C; Hodgson, P; Hoecker, A; Hoeferkamp, M R; Hoffman, J; Hoffmann, D; Hofmann, J I; Hohlfeld, M; Holmgren, S O; Holzbauer, J L; Hong, T M; Hooft van Huysduynen, L; Hostachy, J-Y; Hou, S; Hoummada, A; Howard, J; Howarth, J; Hrabovsky, M; Hristova, I; Hrivnac, J; Hryn'ova, T; Hsu, P J; Hsu, S-C; Hu, D; Hu, X; Hubacek, Z; Hubaut, F; Huegging, F; Huettmann, A; Huffman, T B; Hughes, E W; Hughes, G; Huhtinen, M; Hülsing, T A; Hurwitz, M; Huseynov, N; Huston, J; Huth, J; Iacobucci, G; Iakovidis, G; Ibragimov, I; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Idarraga, J; Iengo, P; Igonkina, O; Ikegami, Y; Ikematsu, K; Ikeno, M; Iliadis, D; Ilic, N; Ince, T; Ioannou, P; Iodice, M; Iordanidou, K; Ippolito, V; Irles Quiles, A; Isaksson, C; Ishino, M; Ishitsuka, M; Ishmukhametov, R; Issever, C; Istin, S; Ivashin, A V; Iwanski, W; Iwasaki, H; Izen, J M; Izzo, V; Jackson, B; Jackson, J N; Jackson, P; Jaekel, M R; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jakobsen, S; Jakoubek, T; Jakubek, J; Jamin, D O; Jana, D K; Jansen, E; Jansen, H; Janssen, J; Jantsch, A; Janus, M; Jared, R C; Jarlskog, G; Jeanty, L; Jeng, G-Y; Jen-La Plante, I; Jennens, D; Jenni, P; Jentzsch, J; Jeske, C; Jež, P; Jézéquel, S; Jha, M K; Ji, H; Ji, W; Jia, J; Jiang, Y; Jimenez Belenguer, M; Jin, S; Jinnouchi, O; Joergensen, M D; Joffe, D; Johansen, M; Johansson, K E; Johansson, P; Johnert, S; Johns, K A; Jon-And, K; Jones, G; Jones, R W L; Jones, T J; Jorge, P M; Joshi, K D; Jovicevic, J; Ju, X; Jung, C A; Jungst, R M; Jussel, P; Juste Rozas, A; Kabana, S; Kaci, M; Kaczmarska, A; Kadlecik, P; Kado, M; Kagan, H; Kagan, M; Kajomovitz, E; Kalinin, S; Kama, S; Kanaya, N; Kaneda, M; Kaneti, S; Kanno, T; Kantserov, V A; Kanzaki, J; Kaplan, B; Kapliy, A; Kar, D; Karakostas, K; Karnevskiy, M; Kartvelishvili, V; Karyukhin, A N; Kashif, L; Kasieczka, G; Kass, R D; Kastanas, A; Kataoka, Y; Katzy, J; Kaushik, V; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kawamura, G; Kazama, S; Kazanin, V F; Kazarinov, M Y; Keeler, R; Keener, P T; Kehoe, R; Keil, M; Keller, J S; Keoshkerian, H; Kepka, O; Kerševan, B P; Kersten, S; Kessoku, K; Keung, J; Khalil-Zada, F; Khandanyan, H; Khanov, A; Kharchenko, D; Khodinov, A; Khomich, A; Khoo, T J; Khoriauli, G; Khoroshilov, A; Khovanskiy, V; Khramov, E; Khubua, J; Kim, H; Kim, S H; Kimura, N; Kind, O; King, B T; King, M; King, R S B; King, S B; Kirk, J; Kiryunin, A E; Kishimoto, T; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, T; Kittelmann, T; Kiuchi, K; Kladiva, E; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kleinknecht, K; Klemetti, M; Klier, A; Klimek, P; Klimentov, A; Klingenberg, R; Klinger, J A; Klinkby, E B; Klioutchnikova, T; Klok, P F; Kluge, E-E; Kluit, P; Kluth, S; Kneringer, E; Knoops, E B F G; Knue, A; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Kocian, M; Kodys, P; Koenig, S; Koetsveld, F; Koevesarki, P; Koffas, T; Koffeman, E; Kogan, L A; Kohlmann, S; Kohn, F; Kohout, Z; Kohriki, T; Koi, T; Kolanoski, H; Koletsou, I; Koll, J; Komar, A A; Komori, Y; Kondo, T; Köneke, K; König, A C; Kono, T; Kononov, A I; Konoplich, R; Konstantinidis, N; Kopeliansky, R; Koperny, S; Köpke, L; Kopp, A K; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korol, A A; Korolkov, I; Korolkova, E V; Korotkov, V A; Kortner, O; Kortner, S; Kostyukhin, V V; Kotov, S; Kotov, V M; Kotwal, A; Kourkoumelis, C; Kouskoura, V; Koutsman, A; Kowalewski, R; Kowalski, T Z; Kozanecki, W; Kozhin, A S; Kral, V; Kramarenko, V A; Kramberger, G; Krasny, M W; Krasznahorkay, A; Kraus, J K; Kravchenko, A; Kreiss, S; Kretzschmar, J; Kreutzfeldt, K; Krieger, N; Krieger, P; Kroeninger, K; Kroha, H; Kroll, J; Kroseberg, J; Krstic, J; Kruchonak, U; Krüger, H; Kruker, T; Krumnack, N; Krumshteyn, Z V; Kruse, A; Kruse, M C; Kubota, T; Kuday, S; Kuehn, S; Kugel, A; Kuhl, T; Kukhtin, V; Kulchitsky, Y; Kuleshov, S; Kuna, M; Kunkle, J; Kupco, A; Kurashige, H; Kurata, M; Kurochkin, Y A; Kus, V; Kuwertz, E S; Kuze, M; Kvita, J; Kwee, R; La Rosa, A; La Rotonda, L; Labarga, L; Lablak, S; Lacasta, C; Lacava, F; Lacey, J; Lacker, H; Lacour, D; Lacuesta, V R; Ladygin, E; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lagouri, T; Lai, S; Laier, H; Laisne, E; Lambourne, L; Lampen, C L; Lampl, W; Lançon, E; Landgraf, U; Landon, M P J; Lang, V S; Lange, C; Lankford, A J; Lanni, F; Lantzsch, K; Lanza, A; Laplace, S; Lapoire, C; Laporte, J F; Lari, T; Larner, A; Lassnig, M; Laurelli, P; Lavorini, V; Lavrijsen, W; Laycock, P; Le Dortz, O; Le Guirriec, E; Le Menedeu, E; LeCompte, T; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Lee, H; Lee, J S H; Lee, S C; Lee, L; Lefebvre, G; Lefebvre, M; Legendre, M; Legger, F; Leggett, C; Lehmacher, M; Lehmann Miotto, G; Leister, A G; Leite, M A L; Leitner, R; Lellouch, D; Lemmer, B; Lendermann, V; Leney, K J C; Lenz, T; Lenzen, G; Lenzi, B; Leonhardt, K; Leontsinis, S; Lepold, F; Leroy, C; Lessard, J-R; Lester, C G; Lester, C M; Levêque, J; Levin, D; Levinson, L J; Lewis, A; Lewis, G H; Leyko, A M; Leyton, M; Li, B; Li, B; Li, H; Li, H L; Li, S; Li, X; Liang, Z; Liao, H; Liberti, B; Lichard, P; Lie, K; Liebal, J; Liebig, W; Limbach, C; Limosani, A; Limper, M; Lin, S C; Linde, F; Lindquist, B E; Linnemann, J T; Lipeles, E; Lipniacka, A; Lisovyi, M; Liss, T M; Lissauer, D; Lister, A; Litke, A M; Liu, D; Liu, J B; Liu, K; Liu, L; Liu, M; Liu, M; Liu, Y; Livan, M; Livermore, S S A; Lleres, A; Merino, J Llorente; Lloyd, S L; Lo Sterzo, F; Lobodzinska, E; Loch, P; Lockman, W S; Loddenkoetter, T; Loebinger, F K; Loevschall-Jensen, A E; Loginov, A; Loh, C W; Lohse, T; Lohwasser, K; Lokajicek, M; Lombardo, V P; Long, R E; Lopes, L; Lopez Mateos, D; Lorenz, J; Lorenzo Martinez, N; Losada, M; Loscutoff, P; Losty, M J; Lou, X; Lounis, A; Loureiro, K F; Love, J; Love, P A; Lowe, A J; Lu, F; Lubatti, H J; Luci, C; Lucotte, A; Ludwig, D; Ludwig, I; Ludwig, J; Luehring, F; Lukas, W; Luminari, L; Lund, E; Lundberg, J; Lundberg, O; Lund-Jensen, B; Lundquist, J; Lungwitz, M; Lynn, D; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Ma, H; Ma, L L; Maccarrone, G; Macchiolo, A; Maček, B; Machado Miguens, J; Macina, D; Mackeprang, R; Madar, R; Madaras, R J; Maddocks, H J; Mader, W F; Madsen, A; Maeno, M; Maeno, T; Magnoni, L; Magradze, E; Mahboubi, K; Mahlstedt, J; Mahmoud, S; Mahout, G; Maiani, C; Maidantchik, C; Maio, A; Majewski, S; Makida, Y; Makovec, N; Mal, P; Malaescu, B; Malecki, Pa; Malecki, P; Maleev, V P; Malek, F; Mallik, U; Malon, D; Malone, C; Maltezos, S; Malyshev, V M; Malyukov, S; Mamuzic, J; Mandelli, L; Mandić, I; Mandrysch, R; Maneira, J; Manfredini, A; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L; Manjarres Ramos, J A; Mann, A; Manning, P M; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Mansoulie, B; Mantifel, R; Mapelli, L; March, L; Marchand, J F; Marchese, F; Marchiori, G; Marcisovsky, M; Marino, C P; Marques, C N; Marroquim, F; Marshall, Z; Marti, L F; Marti-Garcia, S; Martin, B; Martin, B; Martin, J P; Martin, T A; Martin, V J; Martin Dit Latour, B; Martinez, H; Martinez, M; Martin-Haugh, S; Martyniuk, A C; Marx, M; Marzano, F; Marzin, A; Masetti, L; Mashimo, T; Mashinistov, R; Masik, J; Maslennikov, A L; Massa, I; Massol, N; Mastrandrea, P; Mastroberardino, A; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Matsushita, T; Mättig, P; Mättig, S; Mattravers, C; Maurer, J; Maxfield, S J; Maximov, D A; Mazini, R; Mazur, M; Mazzaferro, L; Mazzanti, M; Mc Kee, S P; McCarn, A; McCarthy, R L; McCarthy, T G; McCubbin, N A; McFarlane, K W; Mcfayden, J A; Mchedlidze, G; Mclaughlan, T; McMahon, S J; McPherson, R A; Meade, A; Mechnich, J; Mechtel, M; Medinnis, M; Meehan, S; Meera-Lebbai, R; Meguro, T; Mehlhase, S; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meineck, C; Meirose, B; Melachrinos, C; Mellado Garcia, B R; Meloni, F; Mendoza Navas, L; Mengarelli, A; Menke, S; Meoni, E; Mercurio, K M; Meric, N; Mermod, P; Merola, L; Meroni, C; Merritt, F S; Merritt, H; Messina, A; Metcalfe, J; Mete, A S; Meyer, C; Meyer, C; Meyer, J-P; Meyer, J; Meyer, J; Michal, S; Middleton, R P; Migas, S; Mijović, L; Mikenberg, G; Mikestikova, M; Mikuž, M; Miller, D W; Mills, W J; Mills, C; Milov, A; Milstead, D A; Milstein, D; Minaenko, A A; Moya, M Miñano; Minashvili, I A; Mincer, A I; Mindur, B; Mineev, M; Ming, Y; Mir, L M; Mirabelli, G; Mitrevski, J; Mitsou, V A; Mitsui, S; Miyagawa, P S; Mjörnmark, J U; Moa, T; Moeller, V; Mohapatra, S; Mohr, W; Moles-Valls, R; Molfetas, A; Mönig, K; Monini, C; Monk, J; Monnier, E; Montejo Berlingen, J; Monticelli, F; Monzani, S; Moore, R W; Mora Herrera, C; Moraes, A; Morange, N; Morel, J; Moreno, D; Moreno Llácer, M; Morettini, P; Morgenstern, M; Morii, M; Moritz, S; Morley, A K; Mornacchi, G; Morris, J D; Morvaj, L; Möser, N; Moser, H G; Mosidze, M; Moss, J; Mount, R; Mountricha, E; Mouraviev, S V; Moyse, E J W; Mudd, R D; Mueller, F; Mueller, J; Mueller, K; Mueller, T; Mueller, T; Muenstermann, D; Munwes, Y; Murillo Quijada, J A; Murray, W J; Mussche, I; Musto, E; Myagkov, A G; Myska, M; Nackenhorst, O; Nadal, J; Nagai, K; Nagai, R; Nagai, Y; Nagano, K; Nagarkar, A; Nagasaka, Y; Nagel, M; Nairz, A M; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, T; Nakano, I; Namasivayam, H; Nanava, G; Napier, A; Narayan, R; Nash, M; Nattermann, T; Naumann, T; Navarro, G; Neal, H A; Nechaeva, P Yu; Neep, T J; Negri, A; Negri, G; Negrini, M; Nektarijevic, S; Nelson, A; Nelson, T K; Nemecek, S; Nemethy, P; Nepomuceno, A A; Nessi, M; Neubauer, M S; Neumann, M; Neusiedl, A; Neves, R M; Nevski, P; Newcomer, F M; Newman, P R; Nguyen, D H; Nguyen Thi Hong, V; Nickerson, R B; Nicolaidou, R; Nicquevert, B; Niedercorn, F; Nielsen, J; Nikiforou, N; Nikiforov, A; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolic-Audit, I; Nikolics, K; Nikolopoulos, K; Nilsson, P; Ninomiya, Y; Nisati, A; Nisius, R; Nobe, T; Nodulman, L; Nomachi, M; Nomidis, I; Norberg, S; Nordberg, M; Novakova, J; Nozaki, M; Nozka, L; Nuncio-Quiroz, A-E; Nunes Hanninger, G; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Brien, B J; O'Neil, D C; O'Shea, V; Oakes, L B; Oakham, F G; Oberlack, H; Ocariz, J; Ochi, A; Ochoa, M I; Oda, S; Odaka, S; Odier, J; Ogren, H; Oh, A; Oh, S H; Ohm, C C; Ohshima, T; Okamura, W; Okawa, H; Okumura, Y; Okuyama, T; Olariu, A; Olchevski, A G; Olivares Pino, S A; Oliveira, M; Oliveira Damazio, D; Oliver Garcia, E; Olivito, D; Olszewski, A; Olszowska, J; Onofre, A; Onyisi, P U E; Oram, C J; Oreglia, M J; Oren, Y; Orestano, D; Orlando, N; Oropeza Barrera, C; Orr, R S; Osculati, B; Ospanov, R; Otero Y Garzon, G; Ottersbach, J P; Ouchrif, M; Ouellette, E A; Ould-Saada, F; Ouraou, A; Ouyang, Q; Ovcharova, A; Owen, M; Owen, S; Ozcan, V E; Ozturk, N; Pacheco Pages, A; Padilla Aranda, C; Pagan Griso, S; Paganis, E; Pahl, C; Paige, F; Pais, P; Pajchel, K; Palacino, G; Paleari, C P; Palestini, S; Pallin, D; Palma, A; Palmer, J D; Pan, Y B; Panagiotopoulou, E; Panduro Vazquez, J G; Pani, P; Panikashvili, N; Panitkin, S; Pantea, D; Papadelis, A; Papadopoulou, Th D; Papageorgiou, K; Paramonov, A; Paredes Hernandez, D; Park, W; Parker, M A; Parodi, F; Parsons, J A; Parzefall, U; Pashapour, S; Pasqualucci, E; Passaggio, S; Passeri, A; Pastore, F; Pastore, Fr; Pásztor, G; Pataraia, S; Patel, N D; Pater, J R; Patricelli, S; Pauly, T; Pearce, J; Pedersen, M; Pedraza Lopez, S; Pedraza Morales, M I; Peleganchuk, S V; Pelikan, D; Peng, H; Penning, B; Penson, A; Penwell, J; Perez Cavalcanti, T; Perez Codina, E; Pérez García-Estañ, M T; Perez Reale, V; Perini, L; Pernegger, H; Perrino, R; Perrodo, P; Peshekhonov, V D; Peters, K; Peters, R F Y; Petersen, B A; Petersen, J; Petersen, T C; Petit, E; Petridis, A; Petridou, C; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, F; Petschull, D; Petteni, M; Pezoa, R; Phan, A; Phillips, P W; Piacquadio, G; Pianori, E; Picazio, A; Piccaro, E; Piccinini, M; Piec, S M; Piegaia, R; Pignotti, D T; Pilcher, J E; Pilkington, A D; Pina, J; Pinamonti, M; Pinder, A; Pinfold, J L; Pingel, A; Pinto, B; Pizio, C; Pleier, M-A; Pleskot, V; Plotnikova, E; Plucinski, P; Poblaguev, A; Poddar, S; Podlyski, F; Poettgen, R; Poggioli, L; Pohl, D; Pohl, M; Polesello, G; Policicchio, A; Polifka, R; Polini, A; Polychronakos, V; Pomeroy, D; Pommès, K; Pontecorvo, L; Pope, B G; Popeneciu, G A; Popovic, D S; Poppleton, A; Portell Bueso, X; Pospelov, G E; Pospisil, S; Potrap, I N; Potter, C J; Potter, C T; Poulard, G; Poveda, J; Pozdnyakov, V; Prabhu, R; Pralavorio, P; Pranko, A; Prasad, S; Pravahan, R; Prell, S; Pretzl, K; Price, D; Price, J; Price, L E; Prieur, D; Primavera, M; Proissl, M; Prokofiev, K; Prokoshin, F; Protopapadaki, E; Protopopescu, S; Proudfoot, J; Prudent, X; Przybycien, M; Przysiezniak, H; Psoroulas, S; Ptacek, E; Pueschel, E; Puldon, D; Purohit, M; Puzo, P; Pylypchenko, Y; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quarrie, D R; Quayle, W B; Quilty, D; Raas, M; Radeka, V; Radescu, V; Radloff, P; Ragusa, F; Rahal, G; Rajagopalan, S; Rammensee, M; Rammes, M; Randle-Conde, A S; Randrianarivony, K; Rangel-Smith, C; Rao, K; Rauscher, F; Rave, T C; Ravenscroft, T; Raymond, M; Read, A L; Rebuzzi, D M; Redelbach, A; Redlinger, G; Reece, R; Reeves, K; Reinsch, A; Reisinger, I; Relich, M; Rembser, C; Ren, Z L; Renaud, A; Rescigno, M; Resconi, S; Resende, B; Reznicek, P; Rezvani, R; Richter, R; Richter-Was, E; Ridel, M; Rieck, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Rimoldi, A; Rinaldi, L; Rios, R R; Ritsch, E; Riu, I; Rivoltella, G; Rizatdinova, F; Rizvi, E; Robertson, S H; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Robinson, D; Robinson, J E M; Robson, A; Rocha de Lima, J G; Roda, C; Roda Dos Santos, D; Roe, A; Roe, S; Røhne, O; Rolli, S; Romaniouk, A; Romano, M; Romeo, G; Romero Adam, E; Rompotis, N; Roos, L; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Rosbach, K; Rose, A; Rose, M; Rosenbaum, G A; Rosendahl, P L; Rosenthal, O; Rossetti, V; Rossi, E; Rossi, L P; Rotaru, M; Roth, I; Rothberg, J; Rousseau, D; Royon, C R; Rozanov, A; Rozen, Y; Ruan, X; Rubbo, F; Rubinskiy, I; Ruckstuhl, N; Rud, V I; Rudolph, C; Rudolph, M S; Rühr, F; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Rumyantsev, L; Rurikova, Z; Rusakovich, N A; Ruschke, A; Rutherfoord, J P; Ruthmann, N; Ruzicka, P; Ryabov, Y F; Rybar, M; Rybkin, G; Ryder, N C; Saavedra, A F; Saddique, A; Sadeh, I; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sadykov, R; Safai Tehrani, F; Sakamoto, H; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Saleem, M; Salek, D; Salihagic, D; Salnikov, A; Salt, J; Salvachua Ferrando, B M; Salvatore, D; Salvatore, F; Salvucci, A; Salzburger, A; Sampsonidis, D; Sanchez, A; Sánchez, J; Sanchez Martinez, V; Sandaker, H; Sander, H G; Sanders, M P; Sandhoff, M; Sandoval, T; Sandoval, C; Sandstroem, R; Sankey, D P C; Sansoni, A; Santoni, C; Santonico, R; Santos, H; Santoyo Castillo, I; Sapp, K; Saraiva, J G; Sarangi, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sarrazin, B; Sarri, F; Sartisohn, G; Sasaki, O; Sasaki, Y; Sasao, N; Satsounkevitch, I; Sauvage, G; Sauvan, E; Sauvan, J B; Savard, P; Savinov, V; Savu, D O; Sawyer, C; Sawyer, L; Saxon, D H; Saxon, J; Sbarra, C; Sbrizzi, A; Scannicchio, D A; Scarcella, M; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schaefer, D; Schaelicke, A; Schaepe, S; Schaetzel, S; Schäfer, U; Schaffer, A C; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scharf, V; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Scherzer, M I; Schiavi, C; Schieck, J; Schillo, C; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schmidt, E; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitt, C; Schmitt, S; Schneider, B; Schnellbach, Y J; Schnoor, U; Schoeffel, L; Schoening, A; Schorlemmer, A L S; Schott, M; Schouten, D; Schovancova, J; Schram, M; Schroeder, C; Schuh, N; Schroer, N; Schultens, M J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schulz, H; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwartzman, A; Schwegler, Ph; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwindling, J; Schwindt, T; Schwoerer, M; Sciacca, F G; Scifo, E; Sciolla, G; Scott, W G; Scutti, F; Searcy, J; Sedov, G; Sedykh, E; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Sekula, S J; Selbach, K E; Seliverstov, D M; Sellers, G; Seman, M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Serkin, L; Serre, T; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shan, L Y; Shank, J T; Shao, Q T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaw, K; Sherwood, P; Shimizu, S; Shimojima, M; Shin, T; Shiyakova, M; Shmeleva, A; Shochet, M J; Short, D; Shrestha, S; Shulga, E; Shupe, M A; Sicho, P; Sidoti, A; Siegert, F; Sijacki, Dj; Silbert, O; Silva, J; Silver, Y; Silverstein, D; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simard, O; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simioni, E; Simmons, B; Simoniello, R; Simonyan, M; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sipica, V; Siragusa, G; Sircar, A; Sisakyan, A N; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjölin, J; Sjursen, T B; Skinnari, L A; Skottowe, H P; Skovpen, K Yu; Skubic, P; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Sliwa, K; Smakhtin, V; Smart, B H; Smestad, L; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, K M; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snidero, G; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Sobie, R; Sodomka, J; Soffer, A; Soh, D A; Solans, C A; Solar, M; Solc, J; Soldatov, E Yu; Soldevila, U; Solfaroli Camillocci, E; Solodkov, A A; Solovyanov, O V; Solovyev, V; Soni, N; Sood, A; Sopko, V; Sopko, B; Sosebee, M; Soualah, R; Soueid, P; Soukharev, A M; South, D; Spagnolo, S; Spanò, F; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spiwoks, R; Spousta, M; Spreitzer, T; Spurlock, B; Denis, R D St; Stahlman, J; Stamen, R; Stanecka, E; Stanek, R W; Stanescu, C; Stanescu-Bellu, M; Stanitzki, M M; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Staszewski, R; Staude, A; Stavina, P; Steele, G; Steinbach, P; Steinberg, P; Stekl, I; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stern, S; Stewart, G A; Stillings, J A; Stockton, M C; Stoebe, M; Stoerig, K; Stoicea, G; Stonjek, S; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strang, M; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Strong, J A; Stroynowski, R; Stugu, B; Stumer, I; Stupak, J; Sturm, P; Styles, N A; Su, D; Subramania, Hs; Subramaniam, R; Succurro, A; Sugaya, Y; Suhr, C; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, Y; Suzuki, Y; Svatos, M; Swedish, S; Swiatlowski, M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Tackmann, K; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takahashi, Y; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tam, J Y C; Tamsett, M C; Tan, K G; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, S; Tanasijczuk, A J; Tani, K; Tannoury, N; Tapprogge, S; Tardif, D; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, C; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, W; Teinturier, M; Teischinger, F A; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Therhaag, J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thoma, S; Thomas, J P; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, P D; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Thomson, M; Thong, W M; Thun, R P; Tian, F; Tibbetts, M J; Tic, T; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Yu A; Timoshenko, S; Tiouchichine, E; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Toggerson, B; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Tonoyan, A; Topfel, C; Topilin, N D; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Tran, H L; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Triplett, N; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trovatelli, M; True, P; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiakiris, M; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsung, J-W; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tua, A; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuggle, J M; Tuna, A N; Turala, M; Turecek, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turra, R; Tuts, P M; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Uchida, K; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ughetto, M; Ugland, M; Uhlenbrock, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Urbaniec, D; Urquijo, P; Usai, G; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Vahsen, S; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Berg, R; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Geer, R; van der Graaf, H; Van Der Leeuw, R; van der Ster, D; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vannucci, F; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Veloso, F; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Virzi, J; Vitells, O; Viti, M; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, A; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; Volpini, G; von der Schmitt, H; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Vykydal, Z; Wagner, W; Wagner, P; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walch, S; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wall, R; Waller, P; Walsh, B; Wang, C; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, X; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Warsinsky, M; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watanabe, I; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, A T; Waugh, B M; Weber, M S; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weigell, P; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wendland, D; Weng, Z; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Werth, M; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; White, A; White, M J; White, R; White, S; Whitehead, S R; Whiteson, D; Whittington, D; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wijeratne, P A; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilhelm, I; Wilkens, H G; Will, J Z; Williams, E; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, W; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winkelmann, S; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Wittig, T; Wittkowski, J; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wong, W C; Wooden, G; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wraight, K; Wright, M; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wulf, E; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xiao, M; Xie, S; Xu, C; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, H; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yanush, S; Yao, L; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zaytsev, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zevi Della Porta, G; Zhang, D; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimin, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Živković, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    This paper presents a study of the performance of the muon reconstruction in the analysis of proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text] TeV at the LHC, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2010. This performance is described in terms of reconstruction and isolation efficiencies and momentum resolutions for different classes of reconstructed muons. The results are obtained from an analysis of [Formula: see text] meson and [Formula: see text] boson decays to dimuons, reconstructed from a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 40 pb[Formula: see text]. The measured performance is compared to Monte Carlo predictions and deviations from the predicted performance are discussed.

  5. High efficiency shale oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.C.

    1993-04-22

    The overall project objective is to demonstrate the high efficiency of the Adams Counter-Current shale oil recovery process. The efficiency will first be demonstrated on a small scale, in the current phase, after which the demonstration will be extended to the operation of a small pilot plant. Thus the immediate project objective is to obtain data on oil shale retorting operations in a small batch rotary kiln that will be representative of operations in the proposed continuous process pilot plant. Although an oil shale batch sample is sealed in the batch kiln from the start until the end of the run, the process conditions for the batch are the same as the conditions that an element of oil shale would encounter in a continuous process kiln. Similar chemical and physical conditions (heating, mixing, pyrolysis, oxidation) exist in both systems.The two most important data objectives in this phase of the project are to demonstrate (1) that the heat recovery projected for this project is reasonable and (2) that an oil shale kiln will run well and not plug up due to sticking and agglomeration. The following was completed this quarter. (1) Twelve pyrolysis runs were made on five different oil shales. All of the runs exhibited a complete absence of any plugging, tendency. Heat transfer for Green River oil shale in the rotary kiln was 84.6 Btu/hr/ft[sup 2]/[degrees]F, and this will provide for ample heat exchange in the Adams kiln. (2) One retorted residue sample was oxidized at 1000[degrees]F. Preliminary indications are that the ash of this run appears to have been completely oxidized. (3) Further minor equipment repairs and improvements were required during the course of the several runs.

  6. High efficiency shale oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The overall project objective is to demonstrate the high efficiency of the Adams Counter-Current shale oil recovery process. The efficiency will first be demonstrated at bench-scale, in the current phase, after which the demonstration will be extended to the operation of a small pilot plant. Thus the immediate project objective is to obtain data on oil shale retorting operations in a small batch rotary kiln that will be representative of operations in the proposed continuous process pilot plant. Although a batch oil shale sample will be sealed in the batch kiln from the start until the end of the run, the process conditions for the batch will be the same as the conditions that an element of oil shale would encounter in a large continuous process kiln. For example, similar conditions of heat-up rate (20 deg F/min during the pyrolysis), oxidation of the residue and cool-down will prevail for the element in both systems. This batch kiln is a unit constructed in a 1987 Phase I SBIR tar sand retorting project. The kiln worked fairly well in that project; however, the need for certain modifications was observed. These modifications are now underway to simplify the operation and make the data and analysis more exact. The agenda for the first three months of the project consisted of the first of nine tasks and was specified as the following four items: 1. Sample acquisition and equipment alteration: Obtain seven oil shale samples, of varying grade each 10 lb or more, and samples of quartz sand. Order equipment for kiln modification. 3. Set up and modify kiln for operation, including electric heaters on the ends of the kiln. 4. Connect data logger and make other repairs and changes in rotary batch kiln.

  7. High efficiency shale oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The overall project objective is to demonstrate the high efficiency of the Adams Counter-Current shale oil recovery process. The efficiency will first be demonstrated on a small scale, in the current phase, after which the demonstration will be extended to the operation of a small pilot plant. Thus the immediate project objective is to obtain data on oil shale retorting operations in a small batch rotary kiln that will be representative of operations in the proposed continuous process pilot plant. Although an oil shale batch sample is sealed in the batch kiln from the start until the end of the run, the process conditions for the batch are the same as the conditions that an element of oil shale would encounter in a continuous process kiln. Similar chemical and physical (heating, mixing) conditions exist in both systems. The two most important data objectives in this phase of the project are to demonstrate (1) that the heat recovery projected for this project is reasonable and (2) that an oil shale kiln will run well and not plug up due to sticking and agglomeration. The following was completed and is reported on this quarter: (1) A software routine was written to eliminate intermittently inaccurate temperature readings. (2) We completed the quartz sand calibration runs, resolving calibration questions from the 3rd quarter. (3) We also made low temperature retorting runs to identify the need for certain kiln modifications and kiln modifications were completed. (4) Heat Conductance data on two Pyrolysis runs were completed on two samples of Occidental oil shale.

  8. High-density scintillating glasses for a proton imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillman, I. J.; Dettmann, M. A.; Herrig, V.; Thune, Z. L.; Zieser, A. J.; Michalek, S. F.; Been, M. O.; Martinez-Szewczyk, M. M.; Koster, H. J.; Wilkinson, C. J.; Kielty, M. W.; Jacobsohn, L. G.; Akgun, U.

    2017-06-01

    High-density scintillating glasses are proposed for a novel proton-imaging device that can improve the accuracy of the hadron therapy. High-density scintillating glasses are needed to build a cost effective, compact calorimeter that can be attached to a gantry. This report summarizes the study on Europium, Terbium, and Cerium-doped scintillating glasses that were developed containing heavy elements such as Lanthanum, Gadolinium, and Tungsten. The density of the samples reach up to 5.9 g/cm3, and their 300-600 nm emission overlaps perfectly with the peak cathode sensitivity of the commercial photo detectors. The developed glasses do not require any special quenching and can be poured easily, which makes them a good candidate for production in various geometries. Here, the glass making conditions, preliminary tests on optical and physical properties of these scintillating, high-density, oxide glasses developed for a novel medical imaging application are reported.

  9. High Efficiency Cascade Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shuguang Deng, Seamus Curran, Igor Vasiliev

    2010-09-28

    This report summarizes the main work performed by New Mexico State University and University of Houston on a DOE sponsored project High Efficiency Cascade Solar Cells. The main tasks of this project include materials synthesis, characterization, theoretical calculations, organic solar cell device fabrication and test. The objective of this project is to develop organic nano-electronic-based photovoltaics. Carbon nanotubes and organic conjugated polymers were used to synthesize nanocomposites as the new active semiconductor materials that were used for fabricating two device architectures: thin film coating and cascade solar cell fiber. Chemical vapor deposition technique was employed to synthesized a variety of carbon nanotubes (single-walled CNT, doubled-walled CNT, multi-walled CNT, N-doped SWCNT, DWCNT and MWCNT, and B-doped SWCNT, DWCNT and MWCNT) and a few novel carbon structures (CNT-based nanolance, nanocross and supported graphene film) that have potential applications in organic solar cells. Purification procedures were developed for removing amorphous carbons from carbon nanotubes, and a controlled oxidation method was established for partial truncation of fullerene molecules. Carbon nanotubes (DWCNT and DWCNT) were functionalized with fullerenes and dyes covalently and used to form nanocomposites with conjugated polymers. Biologically synthesized Tellurium nanotubes were used to form composite with the conjugated polymers as well, which generated the highest reported optical limiting values from composites. Several materials characterization technique including SEM/TEM, Raman, AFM, UV-vis, adsorption and EDS were employed to characterize the physical and chemical properties of the carbon nanotubes, the functionalized carbon nanotubes and the nanocomposites synthesized in this project. These techniques allowed us to have a spectroscopic and morphological control of the composite formation and to understand the materials assembled. A parallel 136-CPU

  10. Optimized treatment planning using intensity and energy modulated proton and very-high energy electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeboah, Collins

    2002-09-01

    Intensity and energy modulated radiotherapy dose planning with protons and very-high energy (50--250 MeV) electron beams has been investigated. A general-purpose inverse treatment planning (ITP) system that can be applied to any combination of proton, electron and photon radiation modalities in therapy has been developed. The new ITP program uses a very fast proton dose calculation engine and employs one of the most efficient optimization algorithms currently available. First, the ITP program was employed to investigate intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) dose optimization for prostate cancer. The second application was to evaluate the potential of intensity-modulated very-high energy electron therapy (VHEET) for dose conformation. For an active proton beam delivery system the required energy resolution to reasonably implement energy modulation was found to be a function of the incident beams' energy spread and became coarser with increasing energy spread. For passive proton beam delivery systems the selection of the required depth resolution for inverse planning may not be critical as long as the depth resolution chosen is at least equal to FWHM/2 of the primary beam Bragg peak. In the study of the number of beam ports selected for IMPT treatment of the prostate, it was found that a maximum of three to four beams is required. Using proton beams for inverse planning of the prostate instead of photon beams gave the same or better target coverage while reducing the sensitive structure dose and normal tissue integral dose by up to 30% and 28% of the prescribed target dose, respectively. In evaluating the potential of VHEET beams for dose conformation, it was found that electron energies greater than 100 MeV are preferable for VHEET treatment of the prostate and that implementation of energy modulation in addition to intensity modulation has only a modest effect on the final dose distribution. VHEET treatment employing approximately nine beams was sufficient to

  11. The divide-and-conquer second-order proton propagator method based on nuclear orbital plus molecular orbital theory for the efficient computation of proton binding energies.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yusuke; Ikabata, Yasuhiro; Romero, Jonathan; Reyes, Andrés; Nakai, Hiromi

    2016-10-05

    An efficient computational method to evaluate the binding energies of many protons in large systems was developed. Proton binding energy is calculated as a corrected nuclear orbital energy using the second-order proton propagator method, which is based on nuclear orbital plus molecular orbital theory. In the present scheme, the divide-and-conquer technique was applied to utilize local molecular orbitals. This use relies on the locality of electronic relaxation after deprotonation and the electron-nucleus correlation. Numerical assessment showed reduction in computational cost without the loss of accuracy. An initial application to model a protein resulted in reasonable binding energies that were in accordance with the electrostatic environment and solvent effects.

  12. Proton conductivity of perfluorosulfonate ionomers at high temperature and high relative humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Bruno R.; Goulart, Cleverson A.; Santiago, Elisabete I.; Muccillo, R.; Fonseca, Fabio C.

    2014-03-03

    The proton transport properties of Nafion membranes were studied in a wide range of temperature by using an air-tight sample holder able to maintain the sample hydrated at high relative humidity. The proton conductivity of hydrated Nafion membranes continuously increased in the temperature range of 40–180 °C with relative humidity kept at RH = 100%. In the temperature range of 40–90 °C, the proton conductivity followed the Arrhenius-like thermal dependence. The calculated apparent activation energy E{sub a} values are in good agreement with proton transport via the structural diffusion in absorbed water. However, at higher measuring temperatures an upturn of the electrical conductivity was observed to be dependent on the thermal history of the sample.

  13. Hot spots and the hollowness of proton-proton interactions at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albacete, Javier L.; Soto-Ontoso, Alba

    2017-07-01

    We present a dynamical explanation of the hollowness effect observed in proton-proton scattering at √{ s} = 7 TeV. This phenomenon, not observed at lower energies, consists in a depletion of the inelasticity density at zero impact parameter of the collision. Our analysis is based on three main ingredients: we rely gluonic hot spots inside the proton as effective degrees of freedom for the description of the scattering process. Next we assume that some non-trivial correlation between the transverse positions of the hot spots inside the proton exists. Finally we build the scattering amplitude from a multiple scattering, Glauber-like series of collisions between hot spots. In our approach, the onset of the hollowness effect is naturally explained as due to the diffusion or growth of the hot spots in the transverse plane with increasing collision energy.

  14. High-energy proton radiation damage of high-purity germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pehl, R. H.; Varnell, L. S.; Metzger, A. E.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative studies of radiation damage in high-purity germanium gamma-ray detectors due to high-energy charged particles have been carried out; two 1.0 cm thick planar detectors were irradiated by 6 GeV/c protons. Under proton bombardment, degradation in the energy resolution was found to begin below 7 x 10 to the 7th protons/sq cm and increased proportionately in both detectors until the experiment was terminated at a total flux of 5.7 x 10 to the 8th protons/sq cm, equivalent to about a six year exposure to cosmic-ray protons in space. At the end of the irradiation, the FWHM resolution measured at 1332 keV stood at 8.5 and 13.6 keV, with both detectors of only marginal utility as a spectrometer due to the severe tailing caused by charge trapping. Annealing these detectors after proton damage was found to be much easier than after neutron damage.

  15. High-energy proton radiation damage of high-purity germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pehl, R. H.; Varnell, L. S.; Metzger, A. E.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative studies of radiation damage in high-purity germanium gamma-ray detectors due to high-energy charged particles have been carried out; two 1.0 cm thick planar detectors were irradiated by 6 GeV/c protons. Under proton bombardment, degradation in the energy resolution was found to begin below 7 x 10 to the 7th protons/sq cm and increased proportionately in both detectors until the experiment was terminated at a total flux of 5.7 x 10 to the 8th protons/sq cm, equivalent to about a six year exposure to cosmic-ray protons in space. At the end of the irradiation, the FWHM resolution measured at 1332 keV stood at 8.5 and 13.6 keV, with both detectors of only marginal utility as a spectrometer due to the severe tailing caused by charge trapping. Annealing these detectors after proton damage was found to be much easier than after neutron damage.

  16. Towards highly efficient water photoelectrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elavambedu Prakasam, Haripriya

    ethylene glycol resulted in remarkable growth characteristics of titania nanotube arrays, hexagonal closed packed up to 1 mm in length, with tube aspect ratios of approximately 10,000. For the first time, complete anodization of the starting titanium foil has been demonstrated resulting in back to back nanotube array membranes ranging from 360 mum--1 mm in length. The nanotubes exhibited growth rates of up to 15 mum/hr. A detailed study on the factors affecting the growth rate and nanotube dimensions is presented. It is suggested that faster high field ionic conduction through a thinner barrier layer is responsible for the higher growth rates observed in electrolytes containing ethylene glycol. Methods to fabricate free standing, titania nanotube array membranes ranging in thickness from 50 microm--1000 mum has also been an outcome of this dissertation. In an effort to combine the charge transport properties of titania with the light absorption properties of iron (III) oxide, films comprised of vertically oriented Ti-Fe-O nanotube arrays on FTO coated glass substrates have been successfully synthesized in ethylene glycol electrolytes. Depending upon the Fe content the bandgap of the resulting films varied from about 3.26 to 2.17 eV. The Ti-Fe oxide nanotube array films demonstrated a photocurrent of 2 mA/cm2 under global AM 1.5 illumination with a 1.2% (two-electrode) photoconversion efficiency, demonstrating a sustained, time-energy normalized hydrogen evolution rate by water splitting of 7.1 mL/W·hr in a 1 M KOH solution with a platinum counter electrode under an applied bias of 0.7 V. The Ti-Fe-O material architecture demonstrates properties useful for hydrogen generation by water photoelectrolysis and, more importantly, this dissertation demonstrates that the general nanotube-array synthesis technique can be extended to other ternary oxide compositions of interest for water photoelectrolysis.

  17. Phenomenological analysis of fission induced by high-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simbel, M. H.

    1989-06-01

    High-energy proton induced fission is studied in the framework of a two-step model. In the first step, the projectile penetrates the target nucleus, knocks out few nucleons and leaves the residual nucleus with a spectrum of excitation energies depending upon the number of projectile-nucleon collisions. This stage is described in terms of a simplified version of Glauber's multiple-scattering theory. The second stage in which the residual nucleus fissions, is treated by assuming phenomenological expressions for the dependence of the fission probability on excitation energy which take into account the onset of fragmentation at a certain “crack” energy. Comparison with experimental data suggests that high energy fission of heavy nuclei proceeds in a way similar to low-energy fission. Light nuclei, however, require a more violent fission mechanism.

  18. Efficiency and reliability assessments of retrofitted high-efficiency motors

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, John S.; Otaduy, P.J.; Dueck, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    The majority of electric-motor applications are pumps, fans, blowers, and certain compressors that follow the load torque pattern described in this paper. It has been known for many years that simply replacing the old motor with a high-efficiency motor might not produce the expected efficiency gain. This paper suggests the calculations for the effective efficiency and temperature rise of the high-efficiency motor. The reliability in terms of temperature rise, downsizing, power factor, harmonics, mechanical structure, etc., are discussed.

  19. High efficiency, long life terrestrial solar panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, T.; Khemthong, S.; Ling, R.; Olah, S.

    1977-01-01

    The design of a high efficiency, long life terrestrial module was completed. It utilized 256 rectangular, high efficiency solar cells to achieve high packing density and electrical output. Tooling for the fabrication of solar cells was in house and evaluation of the cell performance was begun. Based on the power output analysis, the goal of a 13% efficiency module was achievable.

  20. High-efficiency wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, L. A.; Myers, W. N.

    1980-01-01

    Vertical axis wind turbine incorporates several unique features to extract more energy from wind increasing efficiency 20% over conventional propeller driven units. System also features devices that utilize solar energy or chimney effluents during periods of no wind.

  1. Proton-driven electromagnetic instabilities in high-speed solar wind streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham-Shrauner, B.; Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Electromagnetic instabilities of the field-aligned, right-hand circularly polarized magnetosonic wave and the left-hand circularly polarized Alfven wave driven by two drifted proton components are analyzed for model parameters determined from Imp 7 solar wind proton data measured during high-speed flow conditions. Growth rates calculated using bi-Lorentzian forms for the main and beam proton as well as core and halo electron velocity distributions do not differ significantly from those calculated using bi-Maxwellian forms. Using distribution parameters determined from 17 measured proton spectra, we show that considering the uncertainties the magnetosonic wave may be linearly stable and the Alfven wave is linearly unstable. Because proton velocity distribution function shapes are observed to persist for times long compared to the proton gyroperiod, the latter result suggests that linear stability theory fails for proton-driven ion cyclotron waves in the high-speed solar wind.

  2. Proton-driven electromagnetic instabilities in high-speed solar wind streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham-Shrauner, B.; Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Electromagnetic instabilities of the field-aligned, right-hand circularly polarized magnetosonic wave and the left-hand circularly polarized Alfven wave driven by two drifted proton components are analyzed for model parameters determined from Imp 7 solar wind proton data measured during high-speed flow conditions. Growth rates calculated using bi-Lorentzian forms for the main and beam proton as well as core and halo electron velocity distributions do not differ significantly from those calculated using bi-Maxwellian forms. Using distribution parameters determined from 17 measured proton spectra, we show that considering the uncertainties the magnetosonic wave may be linearly stable and the Alfven wave is linearly unstable. Because proton velocity distribution function shapes are observed to persist for times long compared to the proton gyroperiod, the latter result suggests that linear stability theory fails for proton-driven ion cyclotron waves in the high-speed solar wind.

  3. High efficiency turbine blade coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Gallis, Michail A.

    2014-06-01

    The development of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) that exhibit lower thermal conductivity through better control of electron beam - physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processing is of prime interest to both the aerospace and power industries. This report summarizes the work performed under a two-year Lab-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project (38664) to produce lower thermal conductivity, graded-layer thermal barrier coatings for turbine blades in an effort to increase the efficiency of high temperature gas turbines. This project was sponsored by the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Investment Area. Therefore, particular importance was given to the processing of the large blades required for industrial gas turbines proposed for use in the Brayton cycle of nuclear plants powered by high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). During this modest (~1 full-time equivalent (FTE)) project, the processing technology was developed to create graded TBCs by coupling ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) with substrate pivoting in the alumina-YSZ system. The Electron Beam - 1200 kW (EB-1200) PVD system was used to deposit a variety of TBC coatings with micron layered microstructures and reduced thermal conductivity below 1.5 W/m.K. The use of IBAD produced fully stoichiometric coatings at a reduced substrate temperature of 600°C and a reduced oxygen background pressure of 0.1 Pa. IBAD was also used to successfully demonstrate the transitioning of amorphous PVD-deposited alumina to the -phase alumina required as an oxygen diffusion barrier and for good adhesion to the substrate Ni2Al3 bondcoat. This process replaces the time consuming thermally grown oxide formation required before the YSZ deposition. In addition to the process technology, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo plume modeling and spectroscopic characterization of the PVD plumes were performed. The project consisted of five tasks. These included the

  4. Towards high efficiency heliostat fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbes, Florian; Wöhrbach, Markus; Gebreiter, Daniel; Weinrebe, Gerhard

    2017-06-01

    CSP power plants have great potential to substantially contribute to world energy supply. To set this free, cost reductions are required for future projects. Heliostat field layout optimization offers a great opportunity to improve field efficiency. Field efficiency primarily depends on the positions of the heliostats around the tower, commonly known as the heliostat field layout. Heliostat shape also influences efficiency. Improvements to optical efficiency results in electricity cost reduction without adding any extra technical complexity. Due to computational challenges heliostat fields are often arranged in patterns. The mathematical models of the radial staggered or spiral patterns are based on two parameters and thus lead to uniform patterns. Optical efficiencies of a heliostat field do not change uniformly with the distance to the tower, they even differ in the northern and southern field. A fixed pattern is not optimal in many parts of the heliostat field, especially when used as large scaled heliostat field. In this paper, two methods are described which allow to modify field density suitable to inconsistent field efficiencies. A new software for large scale heliostat field evaluation is presented, it allows for fast optimizations of several parameters for pattern modification routines. It was used to design a heliostat field with 23,000 heliostats, which is currently planned for a site in South Africa.

  5. Cryo-SEM of hydrated high temperature proton exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Kelly A; More, Karren Leslie; Walker, Larry R; Benicewicz, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Alternative energy technologies, such as high temperature fuel cells and hydrogen pumps, rely on proton exchange membranes (PEM). A chemically and thermally stable PEM with rapid proton transport is sol-gel phosphoric acid (PA)-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes. It is believed that the key to the high ionic conductivity of PA-doped PBI membranes is related to the gel morphology. However, the gel structure and general morphology of this PA-doped PBI membrane has not been widely investigated. In an effort to understand the gel morphology, two SEM sample preparation methodologies have been developed for PA-doped PBI membranes. Due to the high vacuum environment of conventional SEM, the beam-sensitivity of these membranes was reduced with a mild 120 C heat treatment to remove excess water without structural rearrangement (as verified from wide angle X-ray scattering). Cryo-SEM has also been implemented for both initial and heated membranes. Cryo-SEM is known to prevent dehydration of the specimen and reduce beam-sensitivity. The SEM cross-section image (Fig. 1A) of the heated samples exhibit 3{micro}m spheroidal features that are elongated in the direction of the casting blade. These features are distorted to 2{micro}m under conventional SEM conditions (Fig. 1B). The fine-scale gel morphology image (Fig. 2) is composed of 65nm diameter domains and 30nm walls, which resembles a cellular structure. In the future, the PA-doped PBI membranes will be cryo-microtomed and cryotransferred for elemental analysis in a TEM.

  6. Advanced treatment planning methods for efficient radiation therapy with laser accelerated proton and ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Laser plasma acceleration can potentially replace large and expensive cyclotrons or synchrotrons for radiotherapy with protons and ions. On the way toward a clinical implementation, various challenges such as the maximum obtainable energy still remain to be solved. In any case, laser accelerated particles exhibit differences compared to particles from conventional accelerators. They typically have a wide energy spread and the beam is extremely pulsed (i.e., quantized) due to the pulsed nature of the employed lasers. The energy spread leads to depth dose curves that do not show a pristine Bragg peak but a wide high dose area, making precise radiotherapy impossible without an additional energy selection system. Problems with the beam quantization include the limited repetition rate and the number of accelerated particles per laser shot. This number might be too low, which requires a high repetition rate, or it might be too high, which requires an additional fluence selection system to reduce the number of particles. Trying to use laser accelerated particles in a conventional way such as spot scanning leads to long treatment times and a high amount of secondary radiation produced when blocking unwanted particles. Methods: The authors present methods of beam delivery and treatment planning that are specifically adapted to laser accelerated particles. In general, it is not necessary to fully utilize the energy selection system to create monoenergetic beams for the whole treatment plan. Instead, within wide parts of the target volume, beams with broader energy spectra can be used to simultaneously cover multiple axially adjacent spots of a conventional dose delivery grid as applied in intensity modulated particle therapy. If one laser shot produces too many particles, they can be distributed over a wider area with the help of a scattering foil and a multileaf collimator to cover multiple lateral spot positions at the same time. These methods are called axial and

  7. Advanced treatment planning methods for efficient radiation therapy with laser accelerated proton and ion beams.

    PubMed

    Schell, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J

    2010-10-01

    Laser plasma acceleration can potentially replace large and expensive cyclotrons or synchrotrons for radiotherapy with protons and ions. On the way toward a clinical implementation, various challenges such as the maximum obtainable energy still remain to be solved. In any case, laser accelerated particles exhibit differences compared to particles from conventional accelerators. They typically have a wide energy spread and the beam is extremely pulsed (i.e., quantized) due to the pulsed nature of the employed lasers. The energy spread leads to depth dose curves that do not show a pristine Bragg peak but a wide high dose area, making precise radiotherapy impossible without an additional energy selection system. Problems with the beam quantization include the limited repetition rate and the number of accelerated particles per laser shot. This number might be too low, which requires a high repetition rate, or it might be too high, which requires an additional fluence selection system to reduce the number of particles. Trying to use laser accelerated particles in a conventional way such as spot scanning leads to long treatment times and a high amount of secondary radiation produced when blocking unwanted particles. The authors present methods of beam delivery and treatment planning that are specifically adapted to laser accelerated particles. In general, it is not necessary to fully utilize the energy selection system to create monoenergetic beams for the whole treatment plan. Instead, within wide parts of the target volume, beams with broader energy spectra can be used to simultaneously cover multiple axially adjacent spots of a conventional dose delivery grid as applied in intensity modulated particle therapy. If one laser shot produces too many particles, they can be distributed over a wider area with the help of a scattering foil and a multileaf collimator to cover multiple lateral spot positions at the same time. These methods are called axial and lateral

  8. High Energy Efficiency Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Edward McCullough; Patrick Dhooge; Jonathan Nimitz

    2003-12-31

    This project determined the performance of a new high efficiency refrigerant, Ikon B, in a residential air conditioner designed to use R-22. The refrigerant R-22, used in residential and small commercial air conditioners, is being phased out of production in developed countries beginning this year because of concerns regarding its ozone depletion potential. Although a replacement refrigerant, R-410A, is available, it operates at much higher pressure than R-22 and requires new equipment. R-22 air conditioners will continue to be in use for many years to come. Air conditioning is a large part of expensive summer peak power use in many parts of the U.S. Previous testing and computer simulations of Ikon B indicated that it would have 20 - 25% higher coefficient of performance (COP, the amount of cooling obtained per energy used) than R-22 in an air-cooled air conditioner. In this project, a typical new R-22 residential air conditioner was obtained, installed in a large environmental chamber, instrumented, and run both with its original charge of R-22 and then with Ikon B. In the environmental chamber, controlled temperature and humidity could be maintained to obtain repeatable and comparable energy use results. Tests with Ikon B included runs with and without a power controller, and an extended run for several months with subsequent analyses to check compatibility of Ikon B with the air conditioner materials and lubricant. Baseline energy use of the air conditioner with its original R-22 charge was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. After changeover to Ikon B and a larger expansion orifice, energy use was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. Ikon B proved to have about 19% higher COP at 90 deg F and about 26% higher COP at 100 deg F versus R-22. Ikon B had about 20% lower cooling capacity at 90 deg F and about 17% lower cooling capacity at 100 deg F versus R-22 in this system. All results over multiple runs were within 1% relative standard deviation (RSD). All of these

  9. High duty factor plasma generator for CERN's Superconducting Proton Linac.

    PubMed

    Lettry, J; Kronberger, M; Scrivens, R; Chaudet, E; Faircloth, D; Favre, G; Geisser, J-M; Küchler, D; Mathot, S; Midttun, O; Paoluzzi, M; Schmitzer, C; Steyaert, D

    2010-02-01

    CERN's Linac4 is a 160 MeV linear accelerator currently under construction. It will inject negatively charged hydrogen ions into CERN's PS-Booster. Its ion source is a noncesiated rf driven H(-) volume source directly inspired from the one of DESY and is aimed to deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 0.4 ms at a 2 Hz repetition rate. The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) project is part of the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. It consists of an extension of Linac4 up to 5 GeV and is foreseen to deliver protons to a future 50 GeV synchrotron (PS2). For the SPL high power option (HP-SPL), the ion source would deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 1.2 ms and operate at a 50 Hz repetition rate. This significant upgrade motivates the design of the new water cooled plasma generator presented in this paper. Its engineering is based on the results of a finite element thermal study of the Linac4 H(-) plasma generator that identified critical components and thermal barriers. A cooling system is proposed which achieves the required heat dissipation and maintains the original functionality. Materials with higher thermal conductivity are selected and, wherever possible, thermal barriers resulting from low pressure contacts are removed by brazing metals on insulators. The AlN plasma chamber cooling circuit is inspired from the approach chosen for the cesiated high duty factor rf H(-) source operating at SNS.

  10. High efficiency stationary hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hynek, S.; Fuller, W.; Truslow, S.

    1995-09-01

    Stationary storage of hydrogen permits one to make hydrogen now and use it later. With stationary hydrogen storage, one can use excess electrical generation capacity to power an electrolyzer, and store the resultant hydrogen for later use or transshipment. One can also use stationary hydrogen as a buffer at fueling stations to accommodate non-steady fueling demand, thus permitting the hydrogen supply system (e.g., methane reformer or electrolyzer) to be sized to meet the average, rather than the peak, demand. We at ADL designed, built, and tested a stationary hydrogen storage device that thermally couples a high-temperature metal hydride to a phase change material (PCM). The PCM captures and stores the heat of the hydriding reaction as its own heat of fusion (that is, it melts), and subsequently returns that heat of fusion (by freezing) to facilitate the dehydriding reaction. A key component of this stationary hydrogen storage device is the metal hydride itself. We used nickel-coated magnesium powder (NCMP) - magnesium particles coated with a thin layer of nickel by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Magnesium hydride can store a higher weight fraction of hydrogen than any other practical metal hydride, and it is less expensive than any other metal hydride. We designed and constructed an experimental NCM/PCM reactor out of 310 stainless steel in the form of a shell-and-tube heat exchanger, with the tube side packed with NCMP and the shell side filled with a eutectic mixture of NaCL, KCl, and MgCl{sub 2}. Our experimental results indicate that with proper attention to limiting thermal losses, our overall efficiency will exceed 90% (DOE goal: >75%) and our overall system cost will be only 33% (DOE goal: <50%) of the value of the delivered hydrogen. It appears that NCMP can be used to purify hydrogen streams and store hydrogen at the same time. These prospects make the NCMP/PCM reactor an attractive component in a reformer-based hydrogen fueling station.

  11. Protonation process of conjugated polyelectrolytes on enhanced power conversion efficiency in the inverted polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chao; Hu, Rong; Ren, He; Hu, Xiaowen; Wang, Shu; Gong, Xiong; Cao, Yong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, two conjugated polyelectrolytes, polythiophene derivative (PTP) and poly[(9,9-bis [6‧-N, N, N-trimethylammonium] hexyl)-fluorenylene-phenylene] dibromide (PFP), are utilized to modify the surface properties of ZnO electron extraction layer (EEL) in the inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs). Both higher short-circuit current densities and larger open-circuit voltages were observed from the inverted PSCs with ZnO/PFP or ZnO/PTP as compared with those only with ZnO EEL. The protonation process for PTP and PFP in solution is distinguished. Overall, more than 40% enhanced power conversion efficiency (PCE) from the inverted PSCs with ZnO/PFP, in which the PFP could be fully ionized in deionized water, and more than 30% enhanced PCE from the inverted PSCs with ZnO/PTP, as the case that the PTP could not be fully ionized in deionized water, as compared with the inverted PSCs with ZnO EEL were observed, respectively. These results demonstrate that the conjugated polyelectrolytes play an important role in enhancement of device performance of inverted PSCs and that the protonation process of the conjugated polyelectrolytes is critical to the modification for EEL in PSCs.

  12. Indication of change of phase in high-multiplicity proton-proton events at LHC in string percolation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, I.; Téllez, A. Fernandez; Ghosh, Premomoy

    2015-10-01

    We analyze high-multiplicity proton-proton (p p ) collision data in the framework of the string percolation model that has been successful in describing several phenomena of multiparticle production, including the signatures of recent discovery of strongly interacting partonic matter, the quark-gluon plasma, in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Our study in terms of the ratio of shear viscosity and entropy density (η /s ) and the [Lattice Quantum Chromodinamics (LQCD)] predicted signature of QCD change of phase, in terms of the effective number of degrees of freedom (ɛ /T4), reiterates the possibility of a strongly interacting collective medium in these events.

  13. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  14. Efficient and stable proton acceleration by irradiating a two-layer target with a linearly polarized laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Chen, J. E.; He, X. T.; Ma, W. J.; Bin, J. H.; Schreiber, J.; Tajima, T.; Habs, D.

    2013-01-15

    We report an efficient and stable scheme to generate {approx}200 MeV proton bunch by irradiating a two-layer targets (near-critical density layer+solid density layer with heavy ions and protons) with a linearly polarized Gaussian pulse at intensity of 6.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Due to self-focusing of laser and directly accelerated electrons in the near-critical density layer, the proton energy is enhanced by a factor of 3 compared to single-layer solid targets. The energy spread of proton is also remarkably reduced. Such scheme is attractive for applications relevant to tumor therapy.

  15. Multifractal analysis of high resolution solar wind proton density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Carbone, Francesco; Leonardis, Ersilia; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Šafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdenek

    2017-03-01

    The solar wind is a highly turbulent medium, with a high level of field fluctuations throughout a broad range of scales. These include an inertial range where a turbulent cascade is assumed to be active. The solar wind cascade shows intermittency, which however may depend on the wind conditions. Recent observations have shown that ion-scale magnetic turbulence is almost self-similar, rather than intermittent. A similar result was observed for the high resolution measurements of proton density provided by the spacecraft Spektr-R. Intermittency may be interpreted as the result of the multifractal properties of the turbulent cascade. In this perspective, this paper is devoted to the description of the multifractal properties of the high resolution density measurements. In particular, we have used the standard coarse-graining technique to evaluate the generalized dimensions Dq , and from these the multifractal spectrum f (α) , in two ranges of scale. A fit with the p-model for intermittency provided a quantitative measure of multifractality. Such indicator was then compared with alternative measures: the width of the multifractal spectrum, the peak of the kurtosis, and its scaling exponent. The results indicate that the small-scale fluctuations are multifractal, and suggest that different measures of intermittency are required to fully understand the small scale cascade.

  16. High efficiency ground data transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    It is demonstrated that state-of-the-art communications technology can be implemented and reliably operated on a global basis to increase the transmission rates and efficiencies on circuits with bandwidths greater than the typical speech channel. Optimization is affected by optimum clock recovery procedures, multilevel pulse amplitude modulation, single sideband amplitude modulation, transversal filter equalizers, data scrambling, and active compensation for phase instability.

  17. Improvement of proton exchange membrane fuel cell overall efficiency by integrating heat-to-electricity conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chungang; Wang, Shuxin; Zhang, Lianhong; Hu, S. Jack

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have shown to be well suited for distributed power generation due to their excellent performance. However, a PEMFC produces a considerable amount of heat in the process of electrochemical reaction. It is desirable to use thermal energy for electricity generation in addition to heating applications. Based on the operating characteristics of a PEMFC, an advanced thermal energy conversion system using "ocean thermal energy conversion" (OTEC) technology is applied to exploit the thermal energy of the PEMFC for electricity generation. Through this combination of technology, this unique PEMFC power plant not only achieves the combined heat and power efficiency, but also adequately utilizes heat to generate more valuable electricity. Exergy analysis illustrates the improvement of overall efficiency and energy flow distribution in the power plant. Analytical results show that the overall efficiency of the PEMFC is increased by 0.4-2.3% due to the thermal energy conversion (TEC) system. It is also evident that the PEMFC should operate within the optimal load range by balancing the design parameters of the PEMFC and of the TEC system.

  18. Highly Efficient Freestyle Magnetic Nanoswimmer.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianlong; Li, Jinxing; Morozov, Konstantin I; Wu, Zhiguang; Xu, Tailin; Rozen, Isaac; Leshansky, Alexander M; Li, Longqiu; Wang, Joseph

    2017-08-09

    The unique swimming strategies of natural microorganisms have inspired recent development of magnetic micro/nanorobots powered by artificial helical or flexible flagella. However, as artificial nanoswimmers with unique geometries are being developed, it is critical to explore new potential modes for kinetic optimization. For example, the freestyle stroke is the most efficient of the competitive swimming strokes for humans. Here we report a new type of magnetic nanorobot, a symmetric multilinked two-arm nanoswimmer, capable of efficient "freestyle" swimming at low Reynolds numbers. Excellent agreement between the experimental observations and theoretical predictions indicates that the powerful "freestyle" propulsion of the two-arm nanorobot is attributed to synchronized oscillatory deformations of the nanorobot under the combined action of magnetic field and viscous forces. It is demonstrated for the first time that the nonplanar propulsion gait due to the cooperative "freestyle" stroke of the two magnetic arms can be powered by a plane oscillatory magnetic field. These two-arm nanorobots are capable of a powerful propulsion up to 12 body lengths per second, along with on-demand speed regulation and remote navigation. Furthermore, the nonplanar propulsion gait powered by the consecutive swinging of the achiral magnetic arms is more efficient than that of common chiral nanohelical swimmers. This new swimming mechanism and its attractive performance opens new possibilities in designing remotely actuated nanorobots for biomedical operation at the nanoscale.

  19. High-efficiency solar concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.; Dorman, J.

    1976-01-01

    A new type of solar concentrator is presented using liquid lenses and simple translational tracking mechanism. The concentrator achieves a 100:1 nominal concentration ratio and is compared in performance with a flat-plate collector having two sheets of glazing and non-selective coating. The results of the thermal analysis show that higher temperatures can be obtained with the concentrator than is possible with the non-concentrator flat-plate type. Furthermore, the thermal efficiency far exceeds that of the comparative flat-plate type for all operating conditions.

  20. High-efficiency solar concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.; Dorman, J.

    1980-01-01

    A new type of solar concentrator is presented using liquid lenses and simple translational tracking mechanism. The concentrator achieves a 100:1 nominal concentration ratio and is compared in performance with a flat-plate collector having two sheets of glazing and non-selective coating. The results of the thermal analysis show that higher temperatures can be obtained with the concentrator than is possible with the non-concentrator flat-plate type. Furthermore, the thermal efficiency far exceeds that of the comparative flat-plate type for all operating conditions.

  1. High efficiency thermionic converter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, F. N.; Sommer, A. H.; Balestra, C. L.; Briere, T. R.; Lieb, D.; Oettinger, P. E.; Goodale, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Research in thermionic energy conversion technology is reported. The objectives were to produce converters suitable for use in out of core space reactors, radioisotope generators, and solar satellites. The development of emitter electrodes that operate at low cesium pressure, stable low work function collector electrodes, and more efficient means of space charge neutralization were investigated to improve thermionic converter performance. Potential improvements in collector properties were noted with evaporated thin film barium oxide coatings. Experiments with cesium carbonate suggest this substance may provide optimum combinations of cesium and oxygen for thermionic conversion.

  2. Proton-air collisions in a model of soft interactions at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotsman, E.; Levin, E.; Maor, U.

    2013-12-01

    We evaluate both the Pomeron interactions and the inelastic Gribov corrections to the Glauber-Gribov formula, which is used to extract proton-proton cross sections from proton-air collisions at high energies. We demonstrate that these corrections are compatible with the errors for proton-air cross sections measured at ultrahigh energies in cosmic ray experiments. We present the results of a calculation of these cross sections based on our model for the soft interactions at high energies, which provides a good description of available accelerator data, including that for LHC energies.

  3. Space-charge compensation in high-intensity proton rings

    SciTech Connect

    A. Burov, G.W. Foster and V.D. Shiltsev

    2000-09-21

    Recently, it was proposed to use negatively charged electron beams for compensation of beam-beam effects due to protons in the Tevatron collider. The authors show that a similar compensation is possible in space-charge dominated low energy proton beams. The idea has a potential of several-fold increase of the FNAL Booster beam brightness. Best results will be obtained using three electron lenses around the machine circumference, using co-moving electron beam with time structure and profile approximately matched to the proton beam. This technique, if feasible, will be more cost effective than the straightforward alternative of increasing the energy of the injection linac.

  4. Single-Event Upsets Caused by High-Energy Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. E.; Nichols, D. K.; Smith, L. S.; Soli, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    Heavy secondary ions do not significantly alter device responses. Conclusion that external reaction products cause no significant alteration of single-event-upset response based on comparison of data obtained from both lidded and unlidded devices and for proton beams impinging at angles ranging from 0 degrees to 180 degrees with respect to chip face. Study also found single-event-upset cross section increases only modestly as proton energy increased to 590 MeV, characteristic of maximum energies expected in belts of trapped protons surrounding Earth and Jupiter.

  5. Polarization Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, D.J.; Annand, J.R.M.; Mamyan, V.H.; Aniol, K.A.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Camsonne, A.; Laveissiere, G.; Bosted, P.; Paschke, K.; Calarco, J.R.; Chang, G.C.; Horn, T.; Savvinov, N.; Chang, T.-H.; Danagoulian, A.; Nathan, A.M.; Roedelbronn, M.; Chen, J.-P.

    2005-06-24

    Compton scattering from the proton was investigated at s=6.9 GeV{sup 2} and t=-4.0 GeV{sup 2} via polarization transfer from circularly polarized incident photons. The longitudinal and transverse components of the recoil proton polarization were measured. The results are in disagreement with a prediction of perturbative QCD based on a two-gluon exchange mechanism, but agree well with a prediction based on a reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.

  6. Efficient hydrogen storage and production using a catalyst with an imidazoline-based, proton-responsive ligand

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Lin; Onishi, Naoya; Murata, Kazuhisa; ...

    2016-12-28

    A series of new imidazoline-based iridium complexes has been developed for hydrogenation of CO2 and dehydrogenation of formic acid. One of the proton-responsive complexes bearing two –OH groups at ortho and para positions on a coordinating pyridine ring (3 b) can catalyze efficiently the chemical fixation of CO2 and release H2 under mild conditions in aqueous media without using organic additives/solvents. Notably, hydrogenation of CO2 can be efficiently carried out under CO2 and H2 at atmospheric pressure in basic water by 3 b, achieving a turnover frequency of 106 h–1 and a turnover number of 7280 at 25 °C, whichmore » are higher than ever reported. Furthermore, highly efficient CO-free hydrogen production from formic acid in aqueous solution employing the same catalyst under mild conditions has been achieved, thus providing a promising potential H2-storage system in water.« less

  7. Efficient hydrogen storage and production using a catalyst with an imidazoline-based, proton-responsive ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin; Onishi, Naoya; Murata, Kazuhisa; Hirose, Takuji; Muckerman, James T.; Fujita, Etsuko; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2016-12-28

    A series of new imidazoline-based iridium complexes has been developed for hydrogenation of CO2 and dehydrogenation of formic acid. One of the proton-responsive complexes bearing two –OH groups at ortho and para positions on a coordinating pyridine ring (3 b) can catalyze efficiently the chemical fixation of CO2 and release H2 under mild conditions in aqueous media without using organic additives/solvents. Notably, hydrogenation of CO2 can be efficiently carried out under CO2 and H2 at atmospheric pressure in basic water by 3 b, achieving a turnover frequency of 106 h–1 and a turnover number of 7280 at 25 °C, which are higher than ever reported. Furthermore, highly efficient CO-free hydrogen production from formic acid in aqueous solution employing the same catalyst under mild conditions has been achieved, thus providing a promising potential H2-storage system in water.

  8. Efficient Hydrogen Storage and Production Using a Catalyst with an Imidazoline-Based, Proton-Responsive Ligand.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Onishi, Naoya; Murata, Kazuhisa; Hirose, Takuji; Muckerman, James T; Fujita, Etsuko; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2017-03-22

    A series of new imidazoline-based iridium complexes has been developed for hydrogenation of CO2 and dehydrogenation of formic acid. One of the proton-responsive complexes bearing two -OH groups at ortho and para positions on a coordinating pyridine ring (3 b) can catalyze efficiently the chemical fixation of CO2 and release H2 under mild conditions in aqueous media without using organic additives/solvents. Notably, hydrogenation of CO2 can be efficiently carried out under CO2 and H2 at atmospheric pressure in basic water by 3 b, achieving a turnover frequency of 106 h(-1) and a turnover number of 7280 at 25 °C, which are higher than ever reported. Moreover, highly efficient CO-free hydrogen production from formic acid in aqueous solution employing the same catalyst under mild conditions has been achieved, thus providing a promising potential H2 -storage system in water. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of highly efficient coherent optical sources was reviewed. This work has focused on nonlinear frequency conversion of the highly coherent output of the non-planar ring laser oscillators developed earlier in the program, and includes high efficiency second harmonic generation and the operation of optical parametric oscillators for wavelength diversity and tunability.

  10. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of highly efficient coherent optical sources is reviewed. This work focusses on nonlinear frequency conversion of the highly coherent output of the Non-Planar Ring Laser Oscillators developed earlier in the program, and includes high efficiency second harmonic generation and the operation of optical parametric oscillators for wavelength diversity and tunability.

  11. SU-C-207A-01: A Novel Maximum Likelihood Method for High-Resolution Proton Radiography/proton CT

    SciTech Connect

    Collins-Fekete, C; Schulte, R; Beaulieu, L; Seco, J

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Multiple Coulomb scattering is the largest contributor to blurring in proton imaging. Here we tested a maximum likelihood least squares estimator (MLLSE) to improve the spatial resolution of proton radiography (pRad) and proton computed tomography (pCT). Methods: The object is discretized into voxels and the average relative stopping power through voxel columns defined from the source to the detector pixels is optimized such that it maximizes the likelihood of the proton energy loss. The length spent by individual protons in each column is calculated through an optimized cubic spline estimate. pRad images were first produced using Geant4 simulations. An anthropomorphic head phantom and the Catphan line-pair module for 3-D spatial resolution were studied and resulting images were analyzed. Both parallel and conical beam have been investigated for simulated pRad acquisition. Then, experimental data of a pediatric head phantom (CIRS) were acquired using a recently completed experimental pCT scanner. Specific filters were applied on proton angle and energy loss data to remove proton histories that underwent nuclear interactions. The MTF10% (lp/mm) was used to evaluate and compare spatial resolution. Results: Numerical simulations showed improvement in the pRad spatial resolution for the parallel (2.75 to 6.71 lp/cm) and conical beam (3.08 to 5.83 lp/cm) reconstructed with the MLLSE compared to averaging detector pixel signals. For full tomographic reconstruction, the improved pRad were used as input into a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction algorithm. The Catphan pCT reconstruction based on the MLLSE-enhanced projection showed spatial resolution improvement for the parallel (2.83 to 5.86 lp/cm) and conical beam (3.03 to 5.15 lp/cm). The anthropomorphic head pCT displayed important contrast gains in high-gradient regions. Experimental results also demonstrated significant improvement in spatial resolution of the pediatric head radiography. Conclusion: The

  12. Direct Versus Diffusive Access of High-Energy Solar Protons Into the High-Latitude Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouznetsov, Alexei; Knudsen, David; Spanswick, Emma; Donovan, Eric

    During solar proton events (SPEs), large fluxes of energetic protons spreading throughout the interplanetary medium (IPM)have access to the upper polar atmosphere where they play important roles in physical and chemical processes. We examine the relation between SPEs as detected through ionospheric absorption measured by the NORSTAR riometer network on one hand, and the proton fluxes measured outside the magnetosphere by the SOHO satellite on the other. We find a high correlation between SOHO fluxes and absorptions in some type of events (those having insignificant electron precipitation and background radio noise) and at given time intervals (within tens of hours following times of maximum flux ) but not others. By using a numerical simulation of high-energy proton propagation through the earth's magnetosphere we show that the flux of SPE particles reaching the upper atmosphere depends strongly on the angular distribution of the source population outside of the magnetosphere. Early in SP events, protons follow solar magnetic field lines and their distributions tend to be highly anisotropic(1), and the strong angular dependence decreases the correlation between IPM fluxes and polar cap absorption. As individual events evolve, flux angular distributions of IPM protons tend to be more isotropic(1) due to encounters with randomly distributed fields of magnetic clouds in the interplanetary medium (obtained closed solution of non-steady-state diffusion equation in P1-approximation allows us to estimate the dynamics of angular modulation). It is only when this diffusive isotropization occurs that we see strong correlations (correlation coefficients of up to 0.98) between IPM fluxes observed at SOHO and the polar cap absorptions observed by the NORSTAR riometers. We aim to use these observations to construct and validate a realistic transport model that will map proton fluxes originating outside the magnetosphere to those incident on the upper atmosphere, and vice versa

  13. The Quest for Spinning Glue in High-Energy Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Surrow, Bernd

    2007-10-26

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a spin physics program colliding transverse or longitudinal polarized proton beams at {radical}(s) = 200-500 GeV to gain a deeper insight into the spin structure and dynamics of the proton. These studies provide fundamental tests of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD).One of the main objectives of the STAR spin physics program is the determination of the polarized gluon distribution function through a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, A{sub LL}, for various processes. Recent results will be shown on the measurement of A{sub LL} for inclusive jet production, neutral pion production and charged pion production at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV.

  14. The Quest for Spinning Glue in High-Energy Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrow, Bernd

    2007-10-01

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a spin physics program colliding transverse or longitudinal polarized proton beams at √s = 200-500 GeV to gain a deeper insight into the spin structure and dynamics of the proton. These studies provide fundamental tests of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). One of the main objectives of the STAR spin physics program is the determination of the polarized gluon distribution function through a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, for various processes. Recent results will be shown on the measurement of ALL for inclusive jet production, neutral pion production and charged pion production at √s = 200 GeV.

  15. The quest for spinning glue in high-energy polarized proton-proton collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrow, B.

    2008-05-01

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a spin physics program colliding transverse or longitudinal polarized proton beams at s√ = 200 - 500 GeV to gain a deeper insight into the spin structure and dynamics of the proton. These studies provide fundamental tests of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). One of the main objectives of the STAR spin physics program is the determination of the polarized gluon distribution function through a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, for various processes. Recent results will be shown on the measurement of ALL for inclusive jet production, neutral pion production and charged pion production at s√ = 200 GeV.

  16. SU-E-T-662: Quick and Efficient Daily QA for Compact PBS Proton Therapy Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, B; Syh, J; Ding, X; Syh, J; Song, X; Freund, D; Wu, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As proton therapy machines become widespread the need for a quick simple routine daily QA like that for linear accelerators becomes more important. Willis-Knighton has developed an accurate and efficient daily QA that can be performed in 15 minutes. Methods: A holder for a 2D ionization chamber array (MatriXX PT) was created that is indexed to the couch to allow for quick setup, lasers accuracy with respect to beam isocenter, and couch reproducibility. Image position/reposition was performed to check Isocentricity accuracy by placing BBs on the MatriXX. The couch coordinates are compared to that of commissioning. Laser positions were confirmed with the MatriXX isocenter. After IGRT, three beams were separately delivered according to setup. For the first beam, range shifter was inserted and dose at R90, field size, flatness and symmetry in X and Y direction was measured. R90 was used so any minor changes in the range shifter can be detected. For the open beam, dose at center of SOBP, flatness and symmetry in X and Y direction was measured. Field size was measured in ±X and ±Y direction at FWHM. This is measured so any variation in spot size will be detected. For the third beam additional solid water was added and dose at R50 was measured so that any variation in beam energy will be detected. Basic mechanical and safety checks were also performed. Results: Medical physicists were able to complete the daily QA and reduce the time by half to two-third from initial daily QA procedure. All the values measured were within tolerance of that of the baseline which was established from water tank and initial MatriXX measurements. Conclusion: The change in daily QA procedure resulted in quick and easy setup and was able to measure all the basic functionality of the proton therapy PBS.

  17. Determination of the efficiency of ethanol oxidation in a proton exchange membrane electrolysis cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altarawneh, Rakan M.; Majidi, Pasha; Pickup, Peter G.

    2017-05-01

    Products and residual ethanol in the anode and cathode exhausts of an ethanol electrolysis cell (EEC) have been analyzed by proton NMR and infrared spectrometry under a variety of operating conditions. This provides a full accounting of the fate of ethanol entering the cell, including the stoichiometry of the ethanol oxidation reaction (i.e. the average number of electrons transferred per ethanol molecule), product distribution and the crossover of ethanol and products through the membrane. The reaction stoichiometry (nav) is the key parameter that determines the faradaic efficiency of both EECs and direct ethanol fuel cells. Values determined independently from the product distribution, amount of ethanol consumed, and a simple electrochemical method based on the dependence of the current on the flow rate of the ethanol solution are compared. It is shown that the electrochemical method yields results that are consistent with those based on the product distribution, and based on the consumption of ethanol when crossover is accounted for. Since quantitative analysis of the cathode exhaust is challenging, the electrochemical method provides a valuable alternative for routine determination of nav, and hence the faradaic efficiency of the cell.

  18. An efficient procedure for assignment of the proton, carbon and nitrogen resonances in 13C/15N labeled nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Nikonowicz, E P; Pardi, A

    1993-08-20

    An efficient method is presented for the assignment of the proton, carbon, and nitrogen resonances in the NMR spectra of isotopically labeled nucleic acids. The assignment strategy starts by identifying all protons and carbons belonging to the same sugar ring through application of a set of 2D or 3D heteronuclear HCCH NMR experiments. Next the individual sugar rings are connected to their corresponding bases through intra-residue 1H-1H nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) observed in a 3D (1H, 13C, 1H) NOESY-HMQC experiment. Sequential NOE connectivities observed in this experiment are then used to assign each residue in the nucleotide sequence. The imino protons and nitrogens, and the cytidine amino protons and nitrogens, are assigned by 2D (15N, 1H) HMQC and 3D (1H, 15N, 1H) NOESY-HMQC experiments in H2O. This assignment procedure is illustrated on the 99% 13C/15N labeled RNA duplex r(GGCGCUUGCGUC)2. The application of these multi-dimensional heteronuclear magnetic resonance experiments enormously simplifies the resonance assignment of nucleic acids and allows assignment of many more protons, carbons and nitrogens than was possible using standard techniques on unlabeled molecules. Since a larger percentage of the protons can now be assigned by these experiments, much more NMR structural information can be obtained which will significantly extend the size limit for solution structure determinations of RNAs.

  19. High relaxivity Gd(III)-DNA gold nanostars: investigation of shape effects on proton relaxation.

    PubMed

    Rotz, Matthew W; Culver, Kayla S B; Parigi, Giacomo; MacRenaris, Keith W; Luchinat, Claudio; Odom, Teri W; Meade, Thomas J

    2015-03-24

    Gadolinium(III) nanoconjugate contrast agents (CAs) have distinct advantages over their small-molecule counterparts in magnetic resonance imaging. In addition to increased Gd(III) payload, a significant improvement in proton relaxation efficiency, or relaxivity (r1), is often observed. In this work, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a nanoconjugate CA created by covalent attachment of Gd(III) to thiolated DNA (Gd(III)-DNA), followed by surface conjugation onto gold nanostars (DNA-Gd@stars). These conjugates exhibit remarkable r1 with values up to 98 mM(-1) s(-1). Additionally, DNA-Gd@stars show efficient Gd(III) delivery and biocompatibility in vitro and generate significant contrast enhancement when imaged at 7 T. Using nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion analysis, we attribute the high performance of the DNA-Gd@stars to an increased contribution of second-sphere relaxivity compared to that of spherical CA equivalents (DNA-Gd@spheres). Importantly, the surface of the gold nanostar contains Gd(III)-DNA in regions of positive, negative, and neutral curvature. We hypothesize that the proton relaxation enhancement observed results from the presence of a unique hydrophilic environment produced by Gd(III)-DNA in these regions, which allows second-sphere water molecules to remain adjacent to Gd(III) ions for up to 10 times longer than diffusion. These results establish that particle shape and second-sphere relaxivity are important considerations in the design of Gd(III) nanoconjugate CAs.

  20. Time Exceedances for High Intensity Solar Proton Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Michael A.; Stauffer, Craig A.; Jordan, Thomas M.; Adam, James H., Jr.; Dietrich, William F.

    2011-01-01

    A model is presented for times during a space mission that specified solar proton flux levels are exceeded. This includes both total time and continuous time periods during missions. Results for the solar maximum and solar minimum phases of the solar cycle are presented and compared for a broad range of proton energies and shielding levels. This type of approach is more amenable to reliability analysis for spacecraft systems and instrumentation than standard statistical models.

  1. Efficient high density train operations

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Susanna P.; Evans, John A.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods for preventing low train voltages and managing interference, thereby improving the efficiency, reliability, and passenger comfort associated with commuter trains. An algorithm implementing neural network technology is used to predict low voltages before they occur. Once voltages are predicted, then multiple trains can be controlled to prevent low voltage events. Further, algorithms for managing inference are presented in the present invention. Different types of interference problems are addressed in the present invention such as "Interference. During Acceleration", "Interference Near Station Stops", and "Interference During Delay Recovery." Managing such interference avoids unnecessary brake/acceleration cycles during acceleration, immediately before station stops, and after substantial delays. Algorithms are demonstrated to avoid oscillatory brake/acceleration cycles due to interference and to smooth the trajectories of closely following trains. This is achieved by maintaining sufficient following distances to avoid unnecessary braking/accelerating. These methods generate smooth train trajectories, making for a more comfortable ride, and improve train motor reliability by avoiding unnecessary mode-changes between propulsion and braking. These algorithms can also have a favorable impact on traction power system requirements and energy consumption.

  2. High Efficiency Thermoelectric Generator: Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-25

    included: − material barriers such as thermal blankets, glass bubbles and aerogels , − encapsulation with high molecular weight gases (e.g. Xenon... aerogels impregnated with radiation scattering particles (investigated at the thermoelectric group in the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Thrust

  3. High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveros, S. J.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Hart, T. L.; Summers, D. J.

    2016-10-01

    The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the potential need for a collider beyond the LHC. A $10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored. Prior engineering studies for 233 and 270 km circumference tunnels were done for Illinois dolomite and Texas chalk signaling manageable tunneling costs. At a $p\\bar{p}$ the cross section for high mass states is of order 10x higher with antiproton collisions, where antiquarks are directly present rather than relying on gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. In our design the increased momentum acceptance (11 $\\pm$ 2.6 GeV/c) in a Fermilab-like antiproton source is used with septa to collect 12x more antiprotons in 12 channels. For stochastic cooling, 12 cooling systems would be used, each with one debuncher/momentum equalizer ring and two accumulator rings. One electron cooling ring would follow. Finally antiprotons would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with synchrotron damping.

  4. THE STABILITY AND ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PROTON CONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, K.

    2010-07-06

    The morphological and electrical properties of Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Ce{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} with x varying from 0 to 1 prepared by a modified Pechini method were investigated as potential high temperature proton conductors. Dense microstructures were achieved for all the samples upon sintering at 1500 C for 5 h. The phase structure analysis indicated that perovskite phase was formed for 0 {le} x {le} 0.2, while for x larger than 0.5, impurity phases of Sr{sub 2}CeO{sub 4} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} appeared. The tolerance to H{sub 2}O for the samples improved with the increase in Sr content when exposed to boiling water, while the electrical conductivity decreased from x = 0 to 1. However, the resistance to CO{sub 2} attack at elevated temperatures was not improved within the whole x range studied.

  5. HIGH PROTON CONDUCTIVITY OF MESOPOROUS Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hangyan; Maekawa, Hideki; Fujimaki, Yutaka; Kawada, Koutaro; Yamamura, Tsutomu

    Mesoporous Al2O3 was synthesized by the sol-gel method and the pore size was controlled over the range of 3-15nm. Proton conductivity of these samples was examined, which was as high as 0.004 S·cm-1 at 25°C. A systematic dependence of conductivity upon pore size was observed, in which the conductivity increased with increasing the pore size. Meanwhile the conductivity increased with increasing the humidity. Two peaks were observed in 1H NMR spectra, assigned to a "mobile" and an "immobile" proton, respectively. It can be seen that the conductivity of mesoporous-Al2O3 increased with increasing the "mobile" proton concentration. From TG-DTA measurement, proton species were categorized into three groups. It is suggested the group II protons have close relation with the NMR observed "mobile" protons.

  6. Determination of solar proton fluxes and energies at high solar latitudes by UV radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The latitudinal variation of the solar proton flux and energy causes a density increase at high solar latitudes of the neutral gas penetrating the heliosphere. Measurements of the neutral density by UV resonance radiation observations from interplanetary spacecraft thus permit deductions on the dependence of the solar proton flux on heliographic latitude. Using both the results of Mariner 10 measurements and of other off-ecliptic solar wind observations, the values of the solar proton fluxes and energies at polar heliographic latitudes are determined for several cases of interest. The Mariner 10 analysis, together with IPS results, indicate a significant decrease of the solar proton flux at polar latitudes.

  7. Generalized Chou-Yang Model and Meson-Proton Elastic Scattering at High Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Mohammad; Aleem, Fazal-E.; Rashid, Haris

    The various characteristics of meson-proton elastic scattering at high energies are explained by using the generalized Chou-Yang model which takes into consideration the anisotropic scattering of objects constituting pions(kaons) and protons. A new parametrization of the proton form factor consistent with the recent experimental data is proposed. It is then shown that all the data for meson-proton elastic scattering at 200 and 250 GeV/c are in agreement with theoretical computations. The physical picture of generalized Chou-Yang model which is based on multiple scattering theory is given in detail.

  8. Determination of solar proton fluxes and energies at high solar latitudes by UV radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The latitudinal variation of the solar proton flux and energy causes a density increase at high solar latitudes of the neutral gas penetrating the heliosphere. Measurements of the neutral density by UV resonance radiation observations from interplanetary spacecraft thus permit deductions on the dependence of the solar proton flux on heliographic latitude. Using both the results of Mariner 10 measurements and of other off-ecliptic solar wind observations, the values of the solar proton fluxes and energies at polar heliographic latitudes are determined for several cases of interest. The Mariner 10 analysis, together with IPS results, indicate a significant decrease of the solar proton flux at polar latitudes.

  9. Beam dynamic design of a high intensity injector for proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Wei-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Jia, Fang-Jian; He, Yuan; Wang, Zhi; Lu, Yuan-Rong

    2016-08-01

    A compact room-temperature injector is designed to accelerate 100 mA proton beam from 45 keV to 4.06 MeV for the proposed high intensity proton linac at State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics and Technology in Peking university. The main feature is that the Radio Frequency Quadruple (RFQ) and the Drift Tube linac (DTL) sections are merged in one piece at the total length of 276 cm. The beam is matched in transverse directions with an compact internal doublet instead of an external matching section in between. The design has reached a high average accelerating gradient up to 1.55 MV/m with transmission efficiency of 95.9% at the consideration of high duty factor operation. The operation frequency is chose to be 200 MHz due to the already available RF power source. The injector combines a 150 cm long 4-vanes RFQ internal section from 45 keV to 618 keV with a 126 cm long H-type DTL section to 4.06 MeV. In general the design satisfy the challenges of the project requirements. And the details are presented in this paper.

  10. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a {sup 22}Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm{sup 3}) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The

  11. The affect of erbium hydride on the conversion efficience to accelerated protons from ultra-shsort pulse laser irradiated foils

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, Dustin Theodore

    2008-01-01

    This thesis work explores, experimentally, the potential gains in the conversion efficiency from ultra-intense laser light to proton beams using erbium hydride coatings. For years, it has been known that contaminants at the rear surface of an ultra-intense laser irradiated thin foil will be accelerated to multi-MeV. Inertial Confinement Fusion fast ignition using proton beams as the igniter source requires of about 1016 protons with an average energy of about 3MeV. This is far more than the 1012 protons available in the contaminant layer. Target designs must include some form of a hydrogen rich coating that can be made thick enough to support the beam requirements of fast ignition. Work with computer simulations of thin foils suggest the atomic mass of the non-hydrogen atoms in the surface layer has a strong affect on the conversion efficiency to protons. For example, the 167amu erbium atoms will take less energy away from the proton beam than a coating using carbon with a mass of 12amu. A pure hydrogen coating would be ideal, but technologically is not feasible at this time. In the experiments performed for my thesis, ErH3 coatings on 5 μm gold foils are compared with typical contaminants which are approximately equivalent to CH1.7. It will be shown that there was a factor of 1.25 ± 0.19 improvement in the conversion efficiency for protons above 3MeV using erbium hydride using the Callisto laser. Callisto is a 10J per pulse, 800nm wavelength laser with a pulse duration of 200fs and can be focused to a peak intensity of about 5 x 1019W/cm2. The total number of protons from either target type was on the order of 1010. Furthermore, the same experiment was performed on the Titan laser, which has a 500fs pulse duration, 150J of energy and can be focused to about 3 x 1020 W/cm2. In this experiment 1012 protons were seen from both erbium hydride and

  12. High efficiency solar photovoltaic power module concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.

    1978-01-01

    The investigation of a preliminary concept for high efficiency solar power generation in space is presented. The concept was a synergistic combination of spectral splitting, tailored bandgap cells, high concentration ratios, and cool cell areas.

  13. High-Efficiency Power Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    One or more embodiments of the present invention pertain to an all solid-state microwave power module. The module includes a plurality of solid-state amplifiers configured to amplify a signal using a low power stage, a medium power stage, and a high power stage. The module also includes a power conditioner configured to activate a voltage sequencer (e.g., bias controller) when power is received from a power source. The voltage sequencer is configured to sequentially apply voltage to a gate of each amplifier and sequentially apply voltage to a drain of each amplifier.

  14. High-Efficiency Power Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    One or more embodiments of the present invention pertain to an all solid-state microwave power module. The module includes a plurality of solid-state amplifiers configured to amplify a signal using a low power stage, a medium power stage, and a high power stage. The module also includes a power conditioner configured to activate a voltage sequencer (e.g., bias controller) when power is received from a power source. The voltage sequencer is configured to sequentially apply voltage to a gate of each amplifier and sequentially apply voltage to a drain of each amplifier.

  15. Mass Ordering of Spectra from Fragmentation of Saturated Gluon States in High-Multiplicity Proton-Proton Collisions.

    PubMed

    Schenke, Björn; Schlichting, Sören; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

    2016-10-14

    The mass ordering of mean transverse momentum ⟨p_{T}⟩ and of the Fourier harmonic coefficient v_{2}(p_{T}) of azimuthally anisotropic particle distributions in high energy hadron collisions is often interpreted as evidence for the hydrodynamic flow of the matter produced. We investigate an alternative initial state interpretation of this pattern in high-multiplicity proton-proton collisions at the LHC. The QCD Yang-Mills equations describing the dynamics of saturated gluons are solved numerically with initial conditions obtained from the color-glass-condensate-based impact-parameter-dependent glasma model. The gluons are subsequently fragmented into various hadron species employing the well established Lund string fragmentation algorithm of the pythia event generator. We find that this initial state approach reproduces characteristic features of bulk spectra, in particular, the particle mass dependence of ⟨p_{T}⟩ and v_{2}(p_{T}).

  16. Mass Ordering of Spectra from Fragmentation of Saturated Gluon States in High-Multiplicity Proton-Proton Collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Schenke, Björn; Schlichting, Sören; Tribedy, Prithwish; ...

    2016-10-14

    The mass ordering of mean transverse momentummore » $$\\langle$$pT$$\\rangle$$ and of the Fourier harmonic coefficient v2 (pT) of azimuthally anisotropic particle distributions in high energy hadron collisions is often interpreted as evidence for the hydrodynamic flow of the matter produced. We investigate an alternative initial state interpretation of this pattern in high-multiplicity proton-proton collisions at the LHC. The QCD Yang-Mills equations describing the dynamics of saturated gluons are solved numerically with initial conditions obtained from the color-glass-condensate-based impact-parameter-dependent glasma model. The gluons are subsequently fragmented into various hadron species employing the well established Lund string fragmentation algorithm of the pythia event generator. Lastly, we find that this initial state approach reproduces characteristic features of bulk spectra, in particular, the particle mass dependence of $$\\langle$$pT$$\\rangle$$ and v2 (pT).« less

  17. Mass Ordering of Spectra from Fragmentation of Saturated Gluon States in High-Multiplicity Proton-Proton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenke, Björn; Schlichting, Sören; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

    2016-10-01

    The mass ordering of mean transverse momentum ⟨pT⟩ and of the Fourier harmonic coefficient v2(pT) of azimuthally anisotropic particle distributions in high energy hadron collisions is often interpreted as evidence for the hydrodynamic flow of the matter produced. We investigate an alternative initial state interpretation of this pattern in high-multiplicity proton-proton collisions at the LHC. The QCD Yang-Mills equations describing the dynamics of saturated gluons are solved numerically with initial conditions obtained from the color-glass-condensate-based impact-parameter-dependent glasma model. The gluons are subsequently fragmented into various hadron species employing the well established Lund string fragmentation algorithm of the pythia event generator. We find that this initial state approach reproduces characteristic features of bulk spectra, in particular, the particle mass dependence of ⟨pT⟩ and v2(pT).

  18. Spin-spin correlations in proton-proton collisions at high energy and threshold enhancements

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, G.F.

    1988-05-01

    The striking effects in the spin structure observed in elastic proton collisions and the Nuclear Transparency phenomenon recently discovered at BNL are described in terms of heavy quark threshold enhancements. The deviations from scaling laws and the broadening of the angular distributions at resonance are also consistent with the introduction of new degrees of freedom in the pp system. This implies new s-channel physics. Predictions are given for the spin effects in pp collisions near 18.5 GeV/c at large p/sub T//sup 2/ where new measurements are planned. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  19. High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier (HEMPA) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. Herbert

    2004-01-01

    This paper will focus on developing an exotic switching technique that enhances the DC-to-RF conversion efficiency of microwave power amplifiers. For years, switching techniques implemented in the 10 kHz to 30 MHz region have resulted in DC-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 90-95-percent. Currently amplifier conversion efficiency, in the 2-3 GHz region approaches, 10-20-percent. Using a combination of analytical modeling and hardware testing, a High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier was built that demonstrated conversion efficiencies four to five times higher than current state of the art.

  20. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps.

    PubMed

    Buch-Pedersen, M J; Pedersen, B P; Veierskov, B; Nissen, P; Palmgren, M G

    2009-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK(a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires.

  1. LATTICES FOR HIGH-POWER PROTON BEAM ACCELERATION AND SECONDARY BEAM COLLECTION AND COOLING.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG, S.; WEI, J.; BROWN, K.; GARDNER, C.; LEE, Y.Y.; LOWENSTEIN, D.; PEGGS, S.; SIMOS, N.

    2006-06-23

    Rapid cycling synchrotrons are used to accelerate high-intensity proton beams to energies of tens of GeV for secondary beam production. After primary beam collision with a target, the secondary beam can be collected, cooled, accelerated or decelerated by ancillary synchrotrons for various applications. In this paper, we first present a lattice for the main synchrotron. This lattice has: (a) flexible momentum compaction to avoid transition and to facilitate RF gymnastics (b) long straight sections for low-loss injection, extraction, and high-efficiency collimation (c) dispersion-free straights to avoid longitudinal-transverse coupling, and (d) momentum cleaning at locations of large dispersion with missing dipoles. Then, we present a lattice for a cooler ring for the secondary beam. The momentum compaction across half of this ring is near zero, while for the other half it is normal. Thus, bad mixing is minimized while good mixing is maintained for stochastic beam cooling.

  2. Final Report for "Modeling Electron Cloud Diagnostics for High-Intensity Proton Accelerators"

    SciTech Connect

    Seth A Veitzer

    2009-09-25

    Electron clouds in accelerators such as the ILC degrade beam quality and limit operating efficiency. The need to mitigate electron clouds has a direct impact on the design and operation of these accelerators, translating into increased cost and reduced performance. Diagnostic techniques for measuring electron clouds in accelerating cavities are needed to provide an assessment of electron cloud evolution and mitigation. Accurate numerical modeling of these diagnostics is needed to validate the experimental techniques. In this Phase I, we developed detailed numerical models of microwave propagation through electron clouds in accelerating cavities with geometries relevant to existing and future high-intensity proton accelerators such as Project X and the ILC. Our numerical techniques and simulation results from the Phase I showed that there was a high probability of success in measuring both the evolution of electron clouds and the effects of non-uniform electron density distributions in Phase II.

  3. A HIGH-LEVEL CALCULATION OF THE PROTON AFFINITY OF DIBORANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The experimental proton affinity of diborane (B2H6) is based on an unstable species, B2H,+, 4 which has been observed only at low temperatures. The present work calculates the proton 5 affinity of diborane using the Gaussian-3 method and other high-level compound ab initio 6 met...

  4. A HIGH-LEVEL CALCULATION OF THE PROTON AFFINITY OF DIBORANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The experimental proton affinity of diborane (B2H6) is based on an unstable species, B2H,+, 4 which has been observed only at low temperatures. The present work calculates the proton 5 affinity of diborane using the Gaussian-3 method and other high-level compound ab initio 6 met...

  5. Study of an improved Allyl Di-Glycol carbonate sheet for high energy proton detection.

    PubMed

    Ohguchi, H; Juto, N; Fujisaki, S; Migita, S; Koguchi, Y; Takada, M

    2006-01-01

    An allyl di-glycol carbonate (ADC) sheet which has been utilised as a neutron detector for personal dosimetry has recently been studied for its application as a device for radiation exposure control for astronauts in space, where protons are the dominant radiation. It is known that the fabrication process, modified by adding some kind of antioxidant to improve the sensitivity of ADC to high energy protons, causes a substantial increase in false tracks, which disturb the automatic counting of proton tracks using the auto-image analyser. This made clear the difficulty of fabricating ADC sheets which have sufficient sensitivity to high energy protons, while maintaining a good surface. In this study, we have tried to modify the fabrication process to improve the sensitivity to high energy protons without causing a deterioration of the surface condition of ADC sheets. We have successfully created fairly good products.

  6. Multicolor, High Efficiency, Nanotextured LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Jung Han; Arto Nurmikko

    2011-09-30

    We report on research results in this project which synergize advanced material science approaches with fundamental optical physics concepts pertaining to light-matter interaction, with the goal of solving seminal problems for the development of very high performance light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the blue and green for Solid State Lighting applications. Accomplishments in the duration of the contract period include (i) heteroepitaxy of nitrogen-polar LEDs on sapphire, (ii) heteroepitaxy of semipolar (11{bar 2}2) green LEDs on sapphire, (iii) synthesis of quantum-dot loaded nanoporous GaN that emits white light without phosphor conversion, (iv) demonstration of the highest quality semipolar (11{bar 2}2) GaN on sapphire using orientation-controlled epitaxy, (v) synthesis of nanoscale GaN and InGaN medium, and (vi) development of a novel liftoff process for manufacturing GaN thin-film vertical LEDs. The body of results is presented in this report shows how a solid foundation has been laid, with several noticeable accomplishments, for innovative research, consistent with the stated milestones.

  7. Flare vs. Shock Acceleration of High-energy Protons in Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies have presented evidence for a significant to dominant role for a flare-resident acceleration process for high-energy protons in large (“gradual”) solar energetic particle (SEP) events, contrary to the more generally held view that such protons are primarily accelerated at shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The new support for this flare-centric view is provided by correlations between the sizes of X-ray and/or microwave bursts and associated SEP events. For one such study that considered >100 MeV proton events, we present evidence based on CME speeds and widths, shock associations, and electron-to-proton ratios that indicates that events omitted from that investigation’s analysis should have been included. Inclusion of these outlying events reverses the study’s qualitative result and supports shock acceleration of >100 MeV protons. Examination of the ratios of 0.5 MeV electron intensities to >100 MeV proton intensities for the Grechnev et al. event sample provides additional support for shock acceleration of high-energy protons. Simply scaling up a classic “impulsive” SEP event to produce a large >100 MeV proton event implies the existence of prompt 0.5 MeV electron events that are approximately two orders of magnitude larger than are observed. While classic “impulsive” SEP events attributed to flares have high electron-to-proton ratios (≳5 × 105) due to a near absence of >100 MeV protons, large poorly connected (≥W120) gradual SEP events, attributed to widespread shock acceleration, have electron-to-proton ratios of ˜2 × 103, similar to those of comparably sized well-connected (W20-W90) SEP events.

  8. High-Efficiency Autonomous Coherent Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatt, Philip; Henderson, Sammy W.; Hannon, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    A useful measure of sensor performance is the transceiver system efficiency n (sub sys). Which consists of the antenna efficiency n (sub a) and optical and electronic losses. Typically, the lidar equation and the antenna efficiency are defined in terms of the telescope aperture area. However, during the assembly of a coherent transceiver, it is important to measure the system efficiency before the installation of the beamexpanding telescope (i.e., the untruncated-beam system efficiency). Therefore, to accommodate both truncated and untruncated beam efficiency measurements, we define the lidar equation and the antenna efficiency in terms of the beam area rather than the commonly used aperture area referenced definition. With a well-designed Gaussian-beam lidar, aperture area referenced system efficiencies of 15 to 20 % (23-31% relative to the beam area) are readily achievable. In this paper we compare the differences between these efficiency definitions. We then describe techniques by which high efficiency can be achieved, followed by a discussion several novel auto alignment techniques developed to maintain high efficiency.

  9. Structures of heterogeneous proton-bond dimers with a high dipole moment monomer: covalent vs electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Fridgen, Travis D

    2006-05-11

    A number of calculated structures of heterogeneous proton-bound dimers containing monomers such as acetonitrile, cyanamide, vinylene carbonate, and propiolactone, which have high dipole moments, are presented. These proton-bound dimers are predicted to have a structural anomaly pertaining to the bond distances between the central proton and the basic sites on each of the monomers. The monomers with the high dipole moments also have the larger proton affinity and, on the basis of difference in proton affinities, it would be expected that the proton would be closer to this monomer than the one with the lower proton affinity. However, the proton is found to lie substantially closer to the monomer with the lower proton affinity in most cases, unless the difference in proton affinity is too large. Simply stated, the difference in proton affinities is smaller than the difference in the affinity to form an ion-dipole complex for the two monomers and it is the larger affinity for the high dipole moment monomer (which also has the higher proton affinity) to form an ion-dipole complex that is responsible for the proton lying closer to the low proton affinity monomer. The bond distances between the central proton and the monomers are found to be related to the difference in proton affinity. It is found, though, that the proton-bound dimers can be grouped into two separate groups, one where the proton-bound dimer contains a high dipole moment monomer and one group where the proton-bound dimer does not contain a high dipole moment monomer. From these plots it has been determined that a high dipole moment monomer is one that has a dipole moment greater than 2.9 D.

  10. Pretreatment of rice straw by proton beam irradiation for efficient enzyme digestibility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bong; Kim, Jun Seok; Lee, Jong Ho; Kang, Seong Woo; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2011-08-01

    Biomass was pretreated with proton beam irradiation (PBI) in order to enhance enzyme digestibility. Rice straw and soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA)-treated rice straw were treated with 1-25 kGy doses of PBI at a beam energy of 45 MeV. The optimal doses of PBI for efficient sugar recovery were 15 and 3 kGy for rice straw and SAA-treated rice straw, respectively. When PBI was applied to rice straw at 15 kGy, the glucose conversion reached 68% of the theoretical maximum at 72 h. When 3 kGy of PBI was applied to SAA-treated rice straw, approximately 90% of the theoretical glucose conversion was obtained at 12 h compared to a 89% conversion at 48 h. After 2 h of enzymatic saccharification, the initial reaction rates of raw rice straw pretreated with 15 kGy of PBI and SAA-treated rice straw pretreated with 3 kGy of PBI were 1.4 × 10⁻⁴ and 9.7 × 10⁻⁴ g L⁻¹ s⁻¹, respectively. Further, the results of X-ray diffractometry support the effect of PBI on sugar recovery, whereas scanning electron microscopy images revealed a more rugged rice straw surface.

  11. High Efficiency Lithium-Thionyl Chloride Cell.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    AD-Al14 672 HONEYWELL POWER SOURCES CENTER HORSHAM PA F/S 10/3 HIGH EFFICIENCY LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE CELLo(U) APR 82 N DODDAPANEN! OAAK20-81-C...CHART NATIONAl BUREAU OF STANDARDS 1963 A Research and Development Technical Report DELET-TR-81-0381-3 HIGH EFFICIENCY LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE CELL...reverse aide it necessary and Identify by block number) Thionyl chloride , lithium , high discharge rates, low temperatures, catalysis, cyclic

  12. High repetition rate, multi-MeV proton source from cryogenic hydrogen jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, M.; Curry, C. B.; Göde, S.; Brack, F.-E.; Kim, J. B.; MacDonald, M. J.; Metzkes, J.; Obst, L.; Rehwald, M.; Rödel, C.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Schumaker, W.; Schramm, U.; Zeil, K.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2017-09-01

    We report on a high repetition rate proton source produced by high-intensity laser irradiation of a continuously flowing, cryogenic hydrogen jet. The proton energy spectra are recorded at 1 Hz for Draco laser powers of 6, 20, 40, and 100 TW. The source delivers ˜1013 protons/MeV/sr/min. We find that the average proton number over one minute, at energies sufficiently far from the cut-off energy, is robust to laser-target overlap and nearly constant. This work is therefore a first step towards pulsed laser-driven proton sources for time-resolved radiation damage studies and applications which require quasi-continuous doses at MeV energies.

  13. Highly-efficient high-power pumps for fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapontsev, V.; Moshegov, N.; Berezin, I.; Komissarov, A.; Trubenko, P.; Miftakhutdinov, D.; Berishev, I.; Chuyanov, V.; Raisky, O.; Ovtchinnikov, A.

    2017-02-01

    We report on high efficiency multimode pumps that enable ultra-high efficiency high power ECO Fiber Lasers. We discuss chip and packaged pump design and performance. Peak out-of-fiber power efficiency of ECO Fiber Laser pumps was reported to be as high as 68% and was achieved with passive cooling. For applications that do not require Fiber Lasers with ultimate power efficiency, we have developed passively cooled pumps with out-of-fiber power efficiency greater than 50%, maintained at operating current up to 22A. We report on approaches to diode chip and packaged pump design that possess such performance.

  14. Characterization of High-Intensity Laser Propagation in the Relativistic Transparent Regime through Measurements of Energetic Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Willingale, L.; Nagel, S. R.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Bellei, C.; Dangor, A. E.; Kaluza, M. C.; Kamperidis, C.; Kneip, S.; Krushelnick, K.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Nilson, P. M.; Najmudin, Z.; Clarke, R. J.; Heathcote, R.; Lopes, N.; Nazarov, W.

    2009-03-27

    Experiments were performed to investigate the propagation of a high intensity (I{approx}10{sup 21} W cm{sup -2}) laser in foam targets with densities ranging from 0.9n{sub c} to 30n{sub c}. Proton acceleration was used to diagnose the interaction. An improvement in proton beam energy and efficiency is observed for the lowest density foam (n{sub e}=0.9n{sub c}), compared to higher density foams. Simulations show that the laser beam penetrates deeper into the target due to its relativistic propagation and results in greater collimation of the ensuing hot electrons. This results in the rear surface accelerating electric field being larger, increasing the efficiency of the acceleration. Enhanced collimation of the ions is seen to be due to the self-generated azimuthal magnetic and electric fields at the rear of the target.

  15. Proton-induced failures in high-power field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, N. A.; Mitin, E. V.; Pashuk, V. V.; Tverskoy, M. G.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of 1000-MeV protons on high-power metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) manufactured using microelectronic technology has been studied. It is established that high-energy proton bombardment leads to breakdown of the gate insulator (oxide) in the MOSFET structure that results in a "catastrophic" failure of the device. A model explaining the appearance of these failures is proposed that is based on the formation of fast residual particles as a result of nuclear reactions between high-energy protons and nuclei of the semiconductor material.

  16. High-Precision Measurement of the Proton's Atomic Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiße, F.; Köhler-Langes, F.; Rau, S.; Hou, J.; Junck, S.; Kracke, A.; Mooser, A.; Quint, W.; Ulmer, S.; Werth, G.; Blaum, K.; Sturm, S.

    2017-07-01

    We report on the precise measurement of the atomic mass of a single proton with a purpose-built Penning-trap system. With a precision of 32 parts per trillion our result not only improves on the current CODATA literature value by a factor of 3, but also disagrees with it at a level of about 3 standard deviations.

  17. Proton-irradiation technology for high-frequency high-current silicon welding diode manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagov, P. B.; Drenin, A. S.; Zinoviev, M. A.

    2017-05-01

    Different proton irradiation regimes were tested to provide more than 20 kHz-frequency, soft reverse recovery “snap-less” behavior, low forward voltage drop and leakage current for 50 mm diameter 7 kA/400 V welding diode Al/Si/Mo structure. Silicon diode with such parameters is very suitable for high frequency resistance welding machines of new generation for robotic welding.

  18. Oxidative phosphorylation efficiency, proton conductance and reactive oxygen species production of liver mitochondria correlates with body mass in frogs.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Damien; Salin, Karine; Dumet, Adeline; Romestaing, Caroline; Rey, Benjamin; Voituron, Yann

    2015-10-01

    Body size is a central biological parameter affecting most biological processes (especially energetics) and the mitochondrion is a key organelle controlling metabolism and is also the cell's main source of chemical energy. However, the link between body size and mitochondrial function is still unclear, especially in ectotherms. In this study, we investigated several parameters of mitochondrial bioenergetics in the liver of three closely related species of frog (the common frog Rana temporaria, the marsh frog Pelophylax ridibundus and the bull frog Lithobates catesbeiana). These particular species were chosen because of their differences in adult body mass. We found that mitochondrial coupling efficiency was markedly increased with animal size, which led to a higher ATP production (+70%) in the larger frogs (L. catesbeiana) compared with the smaller frogs (R. temporaria). This was essentially driven by a strong negative dependence of mitochondrial proton conductance on body mass. Liver mitochondria from the larger frogs (L. catesbeiana) displayed 50% of the proton conductance of mitochondria from the smaller frogs (R. temporaria). Contrary to our prediction, the low mitochondrial proton conductance measured in L. catesbeiana was not associated with higher reactive oxygen species production. Instead, liver mitochondria from the larger individuals produced significantly lower levels of radical oxygen species than those from the smaller frogs. Collectively, the data show that key bioenergetics parameters of mitochondria (proton leak, ATP production efficiency and radical oxygen species production) are correlated with body mass in frogs. This research expands our understanding of the relationship between mitochondrial function and the evolution of allometric scaling in ectotherms.

  19. Very High Efficiency Solar Cell Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, A.; Kirkpatrick, D.; Honsberg, C.; Moore, D.; Wanlass, M.; Emery, K.; Schwartz, R.; Carlson, D.; Bowden, S.; Aiken, D.; Gray, A.; Kurtz, S.; Kazmerski, L., et al

    2009-01-01

    The Very High Efficiency Solar Cell (VHESC) program is developing integrated optical system - PV modules for portable applications that operate at greater than 50% efficiency. We are integrating the optical design with the solar cell design, and have entered previously unoccupied design space. Our approach is driven by proven quantitative models for the solar cell design, the optical design, and the integration of these designs. Optical systems efficiency with an optical efficiency of 93% and solar cell device results under ideal dichroic splitting optics summing to 42.7 {+-} 2.5% are described.

  20. Nonhumidified High-Temperature Membranes Developed for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinder, James D.

    2005-01-01

    Fuel cells are being considered for a wide variety of aerospace applications. One of the most versatile types of fuel cells is the proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell. PEM fuel cells can be easily scaled to meet the power and space requirements of a specific application. For example, small 100-W PEM fuel cells are being considered for personal power for extravehicular activity suit applications, whereas larger PEM fuel cells are being designed for primary power in airplanes and in uninhabited air vehicles. Typically, PEM fuel cells operate at temperatures up to 80 C. To increase the efficiency and power density of the fuel cell system, researchers are pursuing methods to extend the operating temperature of the PEM fuel cell to 180 C. The most widely used membranes in PEM fuel cells are Nafion 112 and Nafion 117--sulfonated perfluorinated polyethers that were developed by DuPont. In addition to their relatively high cost, the properties of these membranes limit their use in a PEM fuel cell to around 80 C. The proton conductivity of Nafion membranes significantly decreases above 80 C because the membrane dehydrates. The useful operating range of Nafion-based PEM fuel cells can be extended to over 100 C if ancillary equipment, such as compressors and humidifiers, is added to maintain moisture levels within the membrane. However, the addition of these components reduces the power density and increases the complexity of the fuel cell system.

  1. High efficiency flat plate solar energy collector

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, R. F.

    1985-04-30

    A concentrating flat plate collector for the high efficiency collection of solar energy. Through an arrangement of reflector elements, incoming solar radiation, either directly or after reflection from the reflector elements, impinges upon both surfaces of a collector element.

  2. Multi Band Gap High Efficiency Converter (RAINBOW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.; Lewis, C.; Phillips, W.; Shields, V.; Stella, P.

    1997-01-01

    The RAINBOW multi band gap system represents a unique combination of solar cells, concentrators and beam splitters. RAINBOW is a flexible system which can readily expand as new high efficiency components are developed.

  3. Junior High Gets Energy Efficient VAV System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Minnesota's Isanti Junior High, designed with an energy efficient variable air volume system, is an innovative school selected for display at the 1977 Exhibition of School Architecture in Las Vegas. (Author/MLF)

  4. High-efficiency silicon solar cell research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.

    1984-01-01

    Progress reports on research in high-efficiency silicon solar cells were presented by eight contractors and JPL. The presentations covered the issues of Bulk and Surface Loss, Modeling, Measurements, and Proof of Concept.

  5. Measurements of the proton-air cross section with high energy cosmic ray experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Rasha

    2016-07-01

    Detecting Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) enables us to measure the proton-air inelastic cross section σinel p-air at energies that we are unable to access with particle accelerators. The proton-proton cross section σp-p is subsequently inferred from the proton-air cross section at these energies. UHECR experiments have been reportingon the proton-air inelastic cross section starting with the Fly's Eye in 1984 at √s =30 TeV and ending with the most recent result of the Telescope Array experiment at √s = 95 TeV in 2015. In this proceeding, I will summarize the most recent experimental results on the σinel p-air measurements from the UHECR experiments.

  6. High efficiency quantum cascade laser frequency comb

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Quanyong; Wu, Donghai; Slivken, Steven; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2017-01-01

    An efficient mid-infrared frequency comb source is of great interest to high speed, high resolution spectroscopy and metrology. Here we demonstrate a mid-IR quantum cascade laser frequency comb with a high power output and narrow beatnote linewidth at room temperature. The active region was designed with a strong-coupling between the injector and the upper lasing level for high internal quantum efficiency and a broadband gain. The group velocity dispersion was engineered for efficient, broadband mode-locking via four wave mixing. The comb device exhibits a narrow intermode beatnote linewidth of 50.5 Hz and a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 6.5% covering a spectral coverage of 110 cm−1 at λ ~ 8 μm. The efficiency is improved by a factor of 6 compared with previous demonstrations. The high power efficiency and narrow beatnote linewidth will greatly expand the applications of quantum cascade laser frequency combs including high-precision remote sensing and spectroscopy. PMID:28262834

  7. High efficiency quantum cascade laser frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Quanyong; Wu, Donghai; Slivken, Steven; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2017-03-01

    An efficient mid-infrared frequency comb source is of great interest to high speed, high resolution spectroscopy and metrology. Here we demonstrate a mid-IR quantum cascade laser frequency comb with a high power output and narrow beatnote linewidth at room temperature. The active region was designed with a strong-coupling between the injector and the upper lasing level for high internal quantum efficiency and a broadband gain. The group velocity dispersion was engineered for efficient, broadband mode-locking via four wave mixing. The comb device exhibits a narrow intermode beatnote linewidth of 50.5 Hz and a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 6.5% covering a spectral coverage of 110 cm‑1 at λ ~ 8 μm. The efficiency is improved by a factor of 6 compared with previous demonstrations. The high power efficiency and narrow beatnote linewidth will greatly expand the applications of quantum cascade laser frequency combs including high-precision remote sensing and spectroscopy.

  8. High efficiency quantum cascade laser frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Lu, Quanyong; Wu, Donghai; Slivken, Steven; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2017-03-06

    An efficient mid-infrared frequency comb source is of great interest to high speed, high resolution spectroscopy and metrology. Here we demonstrate a mid-IR quantum cascade laser frequency comb with a high power output and narrow beatnote linewidth at room temperature. The active region was designed with a strong-coupling between the injector and the upper lasing level for high internal quantum efficiency and a broadband gain. The group velocity dispersion was engineered for efficient, broadband mode-locking via four wave mixing. The comb device exhibits a narrow intermode beatnote linewidth of 50.5 Hz and a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 6.5% covering a spectral coverage of 110 cm(-1) at λ ~ 8 μm. The efficiency is improved by a factor of 6 compared with previous demonstrations. The high power efficiency and narrow beatnote linewidth will greatly expand the applications of quantum cascade laser frequency combs including high-precision remote sensing and spectroscopy.

  9. RHIC: The World's First High-Energy, Polarized-Proton Collider (423rd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Mei

    2007-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL has been colliding polarized proton at a beam energy of 100 billion electron volts (GeV) since 2001. In addition to reporting upon the progress of RHIC polarized-proton program, this talk will focus upon the mechanisms that cause the beam to depolarize and the strategies developed to overcome this. As the world first polarized-proton collider, RHIC is designed to collide polarized protons up to an energy of 250 GeV, thereby providing an unique opportunity to measure the contribution made by the gluon to a proton's spin and to study the spin structure of proton. Unlike other high-energy proton colliders, however, the challenge for RHIC is to overcome the mechanisms that cause partial or total loss of beam polarization, which is due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. In RHIC, two Siberian snakes have been used to avoid these spin depolarizing resonances, which are driven by vertical closed-orbit distortion and vertical betatron oscillations. As a result, polarized-proton beams have been accelerated to 100 GeV without polarization loss, although depolarization has been observed during acceleration from 100 GeV to 205 GeV.

  10. Effect of the orbital debris environment on the high-energy Van Allen proton belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konradi, Andrei

    1988-01-01

    The lifetimes of high-energy (greater than 55 MeV) protons in the Van Allen radiation belt are calculated, assuming that in time the protons will collide with and be absorbed by particulate orbiting material. The calculations are based on the NASA/DoD Civil Needs Database for orbital debris (Gaines, 1966) and moderate assumptions of future space traffic. It is found that the lifetimes of high-energy protons below 1500 km will decrease, leading to a noticeable redution in their fluxes.

  11. Effect of the orbital debris environment on the high-energy Van Allen proton belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konradi, Andrei

    1988-01-01

    The lifetimes of high-energy (greater than 55 MeV) protons in the Van Allen radiation belt are calculated, assuming that in time the protons will collide with and be absorbed by particulate orbiting material. The calculations are based on the NASA/DoD Civil Needs Database for orbital debris (Gaines, 1966) and moderate assumptions of future space traffic. It is found that the lifetimes of high-energy protons below 1500 km will decrease, leading to a noticeable redution in their fluxes.

  12. Carbon quantum dots with photo-generated proton property as efficient visible light controlled acid catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Ruihua; Kong, Weiqian; Liu, Juan; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Xing; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-12-01

    Developing light-driven acid catalyst will be very meaningful for the controlled-acid catalytic processes towards a green chemical industry. Here, based on scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and ΔpH testing, we demonstrate that the 5-10 nm carbon quantum dots (CQDs) synthesized by electrochemical ablation of graphite have strong light-induced proton properties under visible light in solution, which can be used as an acid catalyst. The 5-10 nm CQDs' catalytic activity is strongly dependent on the illumination intensity and the temperature of the reaction system. As an effective visible light driven and controlled acid-catalyst, 5-10 nm CQDs can catalyze a series of organic reactions (esterification, Beckmann rearrangement and aldol condensation) with high conversion (34.7-46.2%, respectively) in water solution under visible light, while the 1-4 nm CQDs and 10-2000 nm graphite do not have such excellent catalytic activity. The use of 5-10 nm CQDs as a light responsive and controllable photocatalyst is truly a novel application of carbon-based nanomaterials, which may significantly push research in the current catalytic industry, environmental pollution and energy issues.Developing light-driven acid catalyst will be very meaningful for the controlled-acid catalytic processes towards a green chemical industry. Here, based on scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and ΔpH testing, we demonstrate that the 5-10 nm carbon quantum dots (CQDs) synthesized by electrochemical ablation of graphite have strong light-induced proton properties under visible light in solution, which can be used as an acid catalyst. The 5-10 nm CQDs' catalytic activity is strongly dependent on the illumination intensity and the temperature of the reaction system. As an effective visible light driven and controlled acid-catalyst, 5-10 nm CQDs can catalyze a series of organic reactions (esterification, Beckmann rearrangement and aldol condensation) with high conversion (34

  13. Important loss mechanisms in high-efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sah, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify loss mechanisms in high efficiency silicon solar cells. The following were considered: (1) recombination loss mechanisms; (2) high efficiency cells; (3) very high efficiency cells; and (4) ultra high efficiency cells.

  14. Measurement of transmission efficiency for 400 MeV proton beam through collimator at Fermilab MuCool Test Area using Chromox-6 scintillation screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, M. R.; Chung, M.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Schwarz, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Torun, Y.; Yonehara, K.

    2013-06-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, feasibility studies of various types of RF cavities in a high magnetic field environment are in progress. As a unique approach, we have tested a RF cavity filled with a high pressure hydrogen gas with a 400 MeV proton beam in an external magnetic field (B = 3 T). Quantitative information about the number of protons passing through this cavity is an essential requirement of the beam test. The MTA is a flammable gas (hydrogen) hazard zone. Due to safety reasons, no active (energized) beam diagnostic instrument can be used. Moreover, when the magnetic field is on, current transformers (toroids) used for beam intensity measurements do not work due to the saturation of the ferrite material of the transformer. Based on these requirements, we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrumentation using a combination of a Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper describes details of the beam profile and position obtained from the CCD image with B = 0 T and B = 3 T, and for high and low intensity proton beams. A comparison is made with beam size obtained from multi-wires detector. Beam transmission efficiency through a collimator with a 4 mm diameter hole is measured by the toroids and CCD image of the scintillation screen. Results show that the transmission efficiency estimated from the CCD image is consistent with the toroid measurement, which enables us to monitor the beam transmission efficiency even in a high magnetic field environment.

  15. High-efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. A.; Blakers, A. W.; Shi, J.; Keller, E. M.; Wenham, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon solar cells are described which operate at energy conversion efficiencies independently measured at 18.7 percent under standard terrestrial test conditions (AM1.5, 100 mW/sq cm, 28 C). These are apparently the most efficient silicon cells fabricated to date. The high-efficiency results from a combination of high open-circuit voltage due to the careful attention paid to the passivation of the top surface of the cell, high fill factor due to the high open-circuit voltage and low parasitic resistance losses, and high short-circuit current density due to the use of shallow diffusions, a low grid coverage, and an optimized double layer antireflection coating.

  16. Effect of the orbital debris environment on the high-energy van allen proton belt.

    PubMed

    Konradi, A

    1988-12-02

    Orbital debris in the near-Earth environment has reached a number density sufficient for a significant collisional interaction with some of the long-lived high-energy protons in the radiation belt. As a result of a continuing buildup of a shell of man-made debris, the lifetimes of high-energy protons whose trajectories remain below 1500 kilometers will decrease to the point where in the next decades we can expect a noticeable reduction in their fluxes.

  17. NanoCapillary Network Proton Conducting Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen/Air Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pintauro, Peter

    2012-07-09

    The objective of this proposal is to fabricate and characterize a new class of NanoCapillary Network (NCN) proton conducting membranes for hydrogen/air fuel cells that operate under high temperature, low humidity conditions. The membranes will be intelligently designed, where a high density interconnecting 3-D network of nm-diameter electrospun proton conducting polymer fibers is embedded in an inert (uncharged) water/gas impermeable polymer matrix. The high density of fibers in the resulting mat and the high ion-exchange capacity of the fiber polymer will ensure high proton conductivity. To further enhance water retention, molecular silica will be added to the sulfonated polymer fibers. The uncharged matrix material will control water swelling of the high ion-exchange capacity proton conducting polymer fibers and will impart toughness to the final nanocapillary composite membrane. Thus, unlike other fuel cell membranes, the role of the polymer support matrix will be decoupled from that of the proton-conducting channels. The expected final outcome of this 5-year project is the fabrication of fuel cell membranes with properties that exceed the DOE’s technical targets, in particular a proton conductivity of 0.1 S/cm at a temperature less than or equal to120°C and 25-50% relative humidity.

  18. High Relaxivity Gd(III)–DNA Gold Nanostars: Investigation of Shape Effects on Proton Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Rotz, Matthew W.; Culver, Kayla S. B.; Parigi, Giacomo; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Luchinat, Claudio; Odom, Teri W.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Gadolinium(III) nanoconjugate contrast agents (CAs) have distinct advantages over their small-molecule counterparts in magnetic resonance imaging. In addition to increased Gd(III) payload, a significant improvement in proton relaxation efficiency, or relaxivity (r1), is often observed. In this work, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a nanoconjugate CA created by covalent attachment of Gd(III) to thiolated DNA (Gd(III)–DNA), followed by surface conjugation onto gold nanostars (DNA–Gd@stars). These conjugates exhibit remarkable r1 with values up to 98 mM−1 s−1. Additionally, DNA–Gd@stars show efficient Gd(III) delivery and biocompatibility in vitro and generate significant contrast enhancement when imaged at 7 T. Using nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion analysis, we attribute the high performance of the DNA–Gd@stars to an increased contribution of second-sphere relaxivity compared to that of spherical CA equivalents (DNA–Gd@spheres). Importantly, the surface of the gold nanostar contains Gd(III)–DNA in regions of positive, negative, and neutral curvature. We hypothesize that the proton relaxation enhancement observed results from the presence of a unique hydrophilic environment produced by Gd(III)–DNA in these regions, which allows second-sphere water molecules to remain adjacent to Gd(III) ions for up to 10 times longer than diffusion. These results establish that particle shape and second-sphere relaxivity are important considerations in the design of Gd(III) nanoconjugate CAs. PMID:25723190

  19. A high repetition rate transverse beam profile diagnostic for laser-plasma proton sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dover, Nicholas; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Sakaki, Hironao; Kando, Masaki; Nishitani, Keita

    2016-10-01

    The recently upgraded J-KAREN-P laser can provide PW peak power and intensities approaching 1022 Wcm-2 at 0.1 Hz. Scaling of sheath acceleration to such high intensities predicts generation of protons to near 100 MeV, but changes in electron heating mechanisms may affect the emitted proton beam properties, such as divergence and pointing. High repetition rate simultaneous measurement of the transverse proton distribution and energy spectrum are therefore key to understanding and optimising the source. Recently plastic scintillators have been used to measure online proton beam transverse profiles, removing the need for time consuming post-processing. We are therefore developing a scintillator based transverse proton beam profile diagnostic for use in ion acceleration experiments using the J-KAREN-P laser. Differential filtering provides a coarse energy spectrum measurement, and time-gating allows differentiation of protons from other radiation. We will discuss the design and implementation of the diagnostic, as well as proof-of-principle results from initial experiments on the J-KAREN-P system demonstrating the measurement of sheath accelerated proton beams up to 20 MeV.

  20. Ion Desorption Stability in Superconducting High Energy Physics Proton Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.

    1995-05-29

    In this paper we extend our previous analysis of cold beam tube vacuum in a superconducting proton collider to include ion desorption in addition to thermal desorption and synchrotron radiation induced photodesorption. The new ion desorption terms introduce the possibility of vacuum instability. This is similar to the classical room temperature case but now modified by the inclusion of ion desorption coefficients for cryosorbed (physisorbed) molecules which can greatly exceed the coefficients for tightly bound molecules. The sojourn time concept for physisorbed H{sub 2} is generalized to include photodesorption and ion desorption as well as the usually considered thermal desorption. The ion desorption rate is density dependent and divergent so at the onset of instability the sojourn time goes to zero. Experimental data are used to evaluate the H{sub 2} sojourn time for the conditions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the situation is found to be stable. The sojourn time is dominated by photodesorption for surface density s(H{sub 2}) less than a monolayer and by thermal deposition for s(H{sub 2}) greater than a monolayer. For a few percent of a monolayer, characteristic of a beam screen, the photodesorption rate exceeds ion desorption rate by more than two orders of magnitude. The photodesorption rate corresponds to a sojourn time of approximately 100 sec. The paper next turns to the evaluation of stability margins and inclusion of gases heavier than H{sub 2} (CO, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}), where ion desorption introduces coupling between molecular species. Stability conditions are worked out for a simple cold beam tube, a cold beam tube pumped from the ends and a cold beam tube with a co-axial perforated beam screen. In each case a simple inequality for stability of a single component is replaced by a determinant that must be greater than zero for a gas mixture. The connection with the general theory of feedback stability is made and it is shown that the gains

  1. Microfluidic chip for high efficiency DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yung-Chiang; Jan, Ming-Shiung; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Ju-Hwa; Cheng, Wang-Chin; Fan, Chia-Yu

    2004-04-01

    A high efficiency DNA extraction microchip was designed to extract DNA from lysed cells using immobilized beads and the solution flowing back and forth. This chip was able to increase the extraction efficiency by 2-fold when there was no serum. When serum existed in the solution, the extraction efficiency of immobilized beads was 88-fold higher than that of free beads. The extraction efficiency of the microchip was tested under different conditions and numbers of E. coli cells. When the number of E. coli cells was between 10(6) and 10(8) in 25 microl of whole blood, the extraction efficiency using immobilized beads was only slightly higher than that using free beads (10(0) to 10(1) fold). When the number of E. coli cells was in the range 10(4) to 10(6) in 25 microl of whole blood, the extraction efficiency of immobilized beads was greater than that of the free beads (10(1) to 10(2) fold). When the number of E. coli cells was lower, in the range 10(3) to 10(4) in 25 microl of whole blood, the extraction efficiency of immobilized beads was much higher than that of the free beads (10(2) to 10(3) fold). This study indicated that DNA could be efficiently extracted even when the number of bacterial cells was smaller (10(5) to 10(3)). This microfluidic extraction chip could find potential applications in rare sample genomic study.

  2. The future of high efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, J. C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Research approaches to obtain solar cell modules with 1 sun efficiencies of 20-30 percent at air mass 1 are now well understood. Such high efficiency modules should become available in the near future. It can be expected that these modules will be extensively used in terrestrial power generation, space power generation, and consumer electronics. To achieve practical module efficiencies significantly above 30 percent, it will be necessary to employ concepts other than spectral splitting, such as spectral compression and broad band detection. A major breakthrough in these areas is not anticipated at this time.

  3. High efficiency wraparound contact solar cells /HEWACS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillanders, M.; Opjorden, R.

    1980-01-01

    A cell technology, producing high efficiency wrap-around contact solar cells (HEWACS), with both electrical contacts on the back and AMO conversion efficiencies of almost 15%, is presented. A flow chart indicating the baseline process sequence along with the process changes is given. Tests checking for coating delamination and contact integrity, those measuring contact strength, and thermal cycle tests, successfully demonstrated that this cell technology is ready to be moved to the pilot production stage.

  4. Efficient synthesis of highly substituted tetrahydroindazolone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Scala, Angela; Piperno, Anna; Risitano, Francesco; Cirmi, Santa; Navarra, Michele; Grassi, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    A straightforward and efficient method for the synthesis of novel highly substituted and diversely functionalized indazolone derivatives has been developed. The transformation consists of a cyclocondensation of selected 1,3,3'-tricarbonyls with monosubstituted hydrazines. The starting β-triketones were prepared by an efficient chemo- and regioselective method under MW irradiation, exploiting the oxazolone chemistry. The reaction is easily accomplished under mild conditions and appears versatile, providing a synthetic diversification method with potential for drug-like compounds preparation.

  5. Increase in the efficiency of proton phototransfer in a micellar solution by means of a base-carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitsev, A.K.; Il'chev, Y.V.; Kuz'min, M.G.; Zaitsev, N.K.

    1986-02-01

    This paper focuses on the solution of attaining the maximum efficiency of proton phototransfer reactions and stabilizing the primary products of the photoreaction which are rich in energy. The authors investigated the protolytic reaction of 1-hydroxypyrene in CTAB micelles in the first singlet-excited state with the acetate anion. In the presence of the acetate anion in an aqueous micellar solution of CTAB, the efficiency of the protolytic reaction increases sharply. However, the value of the rate of the back reaction is close to the diffusion value.

  6. Design requirements for high-efficiency high concentration ratio space solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschenbach, H.; Patterson, R.

    1980-01-01

    A miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator system concept was developed for low cost, multikilowatt space solar arrays. The system imposes some requirements on solar cells which are new and different from those imposed for conventional applications. The solar cells require a circular active area of approximately 4 mm in diameter. High reliability contacts are required on both front and back surfaces. The back area must be metallurgically bonded to a heat sink. The cell should be designed to achieve the highest practical efficiency at 100 AMO suns and at 80 C. The cell design must minimize losses due to nonuniform illumination intensity and nonnormal light incidence. The primary radiation concern is the omnidirectional proton environment.

  7. Results on damage induced by high-energy protons in LYSO calorimeter crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissertori, G.; Luckey, D.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pauss, F.; Quittnat, M.; Wallny, R.; Glaser, M.

    2014-05-01

    Lutetium-Yttrium Orthosilicate doped with Cerium (LYSO), as a bright scintillating crystal, is a candidate for calorimetry applications in strong ionising-radiation fields and large high-energy hadron fluences are expected at the CERN Large Hadron Collider after the planned High-Luminosity upgrade. There, proton-proton collisions will produce fast hadron fluences up to ~ 5 ×1014cm-2 in the large-rapidity regions of the calorimeters. The performance of LYSO has been investigated, after exposure to different fluences of 24 GeV c-1 protons. Measured changes in optical transmission as a function of proton fluence are presented, and the evolution over time due to spontaneous recovery at room temperature is studied. The activation of materials will also be an issue in the described environment. Studies of the ambient dose induced by LYSO and its evolution with time, in comparison with other scintillating crystals, have also been performed through measurements and FLUKA simulations.

  8. High-energy monoenergetic proton bunch from laser interaction with a complex target

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Fengchao; Shen Baifei; Zhang Xiaomei; Jin Zhangying; Wen Meng; Ji Liangliang; Wang Wenpeng; Xu Jiancai; Yu, M. Y.; Cary, J.

    2009-09-15

    Generation of high-energy proton bunch in the interaction of a high-power laser pulse with a complex target consisting of a front horizontal slice adjoining a conventional heavy ion and proton double-layer slab is investigated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The laser pulse propagates along both sides of the slice. A large number of hot electrons are generated and accelerated by the surface ponderomotive force, and transported through the double layer, forming a backside sheath field which is considerably stronger and more localized than that produced by the electrons from a simple double layer. As a result, the protons in the proton layer can be accelerated to energies more than three times, and the energy spread halved, that from the simple double layer.

  9. Report of the Snowmass M6 Working Group on high intensity proton sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou and J. Wei

    2002-08-20

    The U.S. high-energy physics program needs an intense proton source, a 1-4 MW Proton Driver (PD), by the end of this decade. This machine will serve as a stand-alone facility that will provide neutrino superbeams and other high intensity secondary beams such as kaons, muons, neutrons, and anti-protons (cf. E1 and E5 group reports) and also serve as the first stage of a neutrino factory (cf. M1 group report). It can also be a high brightness source for a VLHC. Based on present accelerator technology and project construction experience, it is both feasible and cost-effective to construct a 1-4 MW Proton Driver. Two recent PD design studies have been made, one at FNAL and the other at the BNL. Both designed PD's for 1 MW proton beams at a cost of about U.S. $200M (excluding contingency and overhead) and both designs were upgradeable to 4 MW. An international collaboration between FNAL, BNL and KEK on high intensity proton facilities is addressing a number of key design issues. The superconducting (sc) RF cavities, cryogenics, and RF controls developed for the SNS can be directly adopted to save R&D efforts, cost, and schedule. PD studies are also actively being pursued at Europe and Japan.

  10. High-efficiency solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, Robert E. (Inventor); Cheng, Sheng (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency solid state power amplifier (SSPA) for specific use in a spacecraft is provided. The SSPA has a mass of less than 850 g and includes two different X-band power amplifier sections, i.e., a lumped power amplifier with a single 11-W output and a distributed power amplifier with eight 2.75-W outputs. These two amplifier sections provide output power that is scalable from 11 to 15 watts without major design changes. Five different hybrid microcircuits, including high-efficiency Heterostructure Field Effect Transistor (HFET) amplifiers and Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters have been developed for use within the SSPA. A highly efficient packaging approach enables the integration of a large number of hybrid circuits into the SSPA.

  11. Technology Development for High Efficiency Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Deep space optical communications is a significantly more challenging operational domain than near Earth space optical communications, primarily due to effects resulting from the vastly increased range between transmitter and receiver. The NASA Game Changing Development Program Deep Space Optical Communications Project is developing four key technologies for the implementation of a high efficiency telecommunications system that will enable greater than 10X the data rate of a state-of-the-art deep space RF system (Ka-band) for similar transceiver mass and power burden on the spacecraft. These technologies are a low mass spacecraft disturbance isolation assembly, a flight qualified photon counting detector array, a high efficiency flight laser amplifier and a high efficiency photon counting detector array for the ground-based receiver.

  12. Highly resolved proton matrix ENDOR of oriented photosystem II membranes in the S2 state.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hiroki; Mino, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    Proton matrix ENDOR was performed to investigate the protons close to the manganese cluster in oriented samples of photosystem II (PS II). Eight pairs of ENDOR signals were detected in oriented PS II membranes. At an angle of θ=0° between the membrane normal vector n and the external field H0, five pairs of ENDOR signals were exchangeable in D2O medium and three pairs were not exchangeable in D2O medium. The hyperfine splitting of 3.60MHz at θ=0° increased to 3.80MHz at θ=90°. The non-exchangeable signals with 1.73MHz hyperfine splitting at θ=0°, which were assigned to a proton in an amino acid residue, were not detected at θ=90° in oriented PS II or in non-oriented PS II. Highly resolved spectra show that only limited numbers of protons were detected by CW-ENDOR spectra, although many protons were located near the CaMn4O5 cluster. The detected exchangeable protons were proposed to arise from the protons belonging to the water molecules, labeled W1-W4 in the 1.9Å crystal structure, directly ligated to the CaMn4O5 cluster, and nearby amino-acid residue.

  13. Enhancement of the efficiency of photocatalytic reduction of protons to hydrogen via molecular assembly.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Zhu; Chen, Bin; Li, Zhi-Jun; Tung, Chen-Ho

    2014-07-15

    Conspectus One of the best solutions for meeting future energy demands is the conversion of water into hydrogen fuel using solar energy. The splitting of water into molecular hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2) using light involves two half-reactions: the oxidation of water to O2 and the reduction of protons to H2. To take advantage of the full range of the solar spectrum, researchers have extensively investigated artificial photosynthesis systems consisting of two photosensitizers and two catalysts with a Z-configuration: one photosensitizer-catalyst pair for H2 evolution and the other for O2 evolution. This type of complete artificial photosynthesis system is difficult to build and optimize; therefore, researchers typically study the reductive half-reaction and the oxidative half-reaction separately. To study the two half-reactions, researchers use a sacrificial electron donor to provide electrons for the reductive half-reaction, and a sacrificial electron acceptor to capture electrons for the oxidative half-reaction. After optimization, they can eliminate the added donors and acceptors as the two half reactions are coupled to a complete photocatalytic water spitting system. Most photocatalytic systems for the H2 evolution half-reaction consist of a photosensitizer, a catalyst, and a sacrificial electron donor. To promote photoinduced electron transfer and photocatalytic H2 production, these three components should be assembled together in a controlled manner. Researchers have struggled to design a photocatalytic system for H2 evolution that uses earth-abundant materials and is both efficient and durable. This Account reviews advances our laboratory has made in the development of new systems for photocatalytic H evolution that uses earth-abundant materials and is both efficient and durable. We used organometallic complexes and quantum-confined semiconductor nanocrystals (QDs) as photosensitizers, and [FeFe]-H2ase mimics and inorganic transition metal salts as catalysts

  14. H- Ion Sources for High Intensity Proton Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland Paul; Dudnikov, Vadim

    2015-02-20

    Existing RF Surface Plasma Sources (SPS) for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H+ and H- ion generation around 3 to 5 mA/cm2 per kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) SPS described here was developed to improve H- ion production efficiency, reliability and availability for pulsed operation as used in the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source . At low RF power, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm2 per kW of RF power at 13.56 MHz. Initial cesiation of the SPS was performed by heating cesium chromate cartridges by discharge as was done in the very first versions of the SPS. A small oven to decompose cesium compounds and alloys was developed and tested. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power 1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with 4 kW RF power in the plasma and 250 Gauss longitudinal magnetic field. The ratio of electron current to negative ion current was improved from 30 to 2. Stable generation of H- beam without intensity degradation was demonstrated in the aluminum nitride (AlN) discharge chamber for 32 days at high discharge power in an RF SPS with an external antenna. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. The extracted collector current can be increased significantly by optimizing the longitudinal magnetic field in the discharge chamber. While this project demonstrated the advantages of the pulsed version of the SA RF SPS as an upgrade to the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source, it led to a possibility for upgrades to CW machines like the many cyclotrons used for commercial applications. Four appendices contain important details of the work carried out under this grant.

  15. Mass Ordering of Spectra from Fragmentation of Saturated Gluon States in High-Multiplicity Proton-Proton Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schenke, Björn; Schlichting, Sören; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

    2016-10-14

    The mass ordering of mean transverse momentum $\\langle$pT$\\rangle$ and of the Fourier harmonic coefficient v2 (pT) of azimuthally anisotropic particle distributions in high energy hadron collisions is often interpreted as evidence for the hydrodynamic flow of the matter produced. We investigate an alternative initial state interpretation of this pattern in high-multiplicity proton-proton collisions at the LHC. The QCD Yang-Mills equations describing the dynamics of saturated gluons are solved numerically with initial conditions obtained from the color-glass-condensate-based impact-parameter-dependent glasma model. The gluons are subsequently fragmented into various hadron species employing the well established Lund string fragmentation algorithm of the pythia event generator. Lastly, we find that this initial state approach reproduces characteristic features of bulk spectra, in particular, the particle mass dependence of $\\langle$pT$\\rangle$ and v2 (pT).

  16. Measure Guideline. High Efficiency Natural Gas Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L.; Rose, W.

    2012-10-01

    This measure guideline covers installation of high-efficiency gas furnaces, including: when to install a high-efficiency gas furnace as a retrofit measure; how to identify and address risks; and the steps to be used in the selection and installation process. The guideline is written for Building America practitioners and HVAC contractors and installers. It includes a compilation of information provided by manufacturers, researchers, and the Department of Energy as well as recent research results from the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR) Building America team.

  17. Measure Guideline: High Efficiency Natural Gas Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L.; Rose, W.

    2012-10-01

    This Measure Guideline covers installation of high-efficiency gas furnaces. Topics covered include when to install a high-efficiency gas furnace as a retrofit measure, how to identify and address risks, and the steps to be used in the selection and installation process. The guideline is written for Building America practitioners and HVAC contractors and installers. It includes a compilation of information provided by manufacturers, researchers, and the Department of Energy as well as recent research results from the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR) Building America team.

  18. Highly efficient heralding of entangled single photons.

    PubMed

    Ramelow, Sven; Mech, Alexandra; Giustina, Marissa; Gröblacher, Simon; Wieczorek, Witlef; Beyer, Jörn; Lita, Adriana; Calkins, Brice; Gerrits, Thomas; Nam, Sae Woo; Zeilinger, Anton; Ursin, Rupert

    2013-03-25

    Single photons are an important prerequisite for a broad spectrum of quantum optical applications. We experimentally demonstrate a heralded single-photon source based on spontaneous parametric down-conversion in collinear bulk optics, and fiber-coupled bolometric transition-edge sensors. Without correcting for background, losses, or detection inefficiencies, we measure an overall heralding efficiency of 83%. By violating a Bell inequality, we confirm the single-photon character and high-quality entanglement of our heralded single photons which, in combination with the high heralding efficiency, are a necessary ingredient for advanced quantum communication protocols such as one-sided device-independent quantum key distribution.

  19. Interface modification for highly efficient organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steim, Roland; Choulis, Stelios A.; Schilinsky, Pavel; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2008-03-01

    We present highly efficient inverted polymer:fullerene bulk-heterojunction solar cells by incorporation of a nanoscale organic interfacial layer between the indium tin oxide (ITO) and the metal oxide electron-conducting layer. We demonstrate that stacking of solution-processed organic and metal oxide interfacial layers gives highly charged selective low ohmic cathodes. The incorporation of a polyoxyethylene tridecyl ether interfacial layer between ITO and solution-processed titanium oxide (TiOx) raised the power conversion efficiency of inverted organic photovoltaics to 3.6%, an improvement of around 15% in their performance over comparable devices without the organic interfacial layer.

  20. Proposal for superstructure based high efficiency photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, M.; Leburton, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    A novel class of cascade structures is proposed which features multijunction upper subcells, referred to as superstructure high-efficiency photovoltaics (SHEPs). The additional junctions enhance spectral response and improve radiation tolerance by reducing bulk recombination losses. This is important because ternary III-V alloys, which tend to have short minority-carrier diffusion lengths, are the only viable materials for the high-bandgap upper subcells required for cascade solar cells. Realistic simulations of AlGaAs SHEPs show that one-sun AM0 efficiencies in excess of 26 percent are possible.

  1. Advanced high efficiency wraparound contact solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.; Uno, F. M.; Thornhill, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A significant advancement in the development of thin high efficiency wraparound contact silicon solar cells has been made by coupling space and terrestrial processing procedures. Although this new method for fabricating cells has not been completely reduced to practice, some of the initial cells have delivered over 20 mW/sq cm when tested at 25 C under AMO intensity. This approach not only yields high efficiency devices, but shows promise of allowing complete freedom of choice in both the location and size of the wraparound contact pad area

  2. Advanced high efficiency wraparound contact solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.; Uno, F. M.; Thornhill, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A significant advancement in the development of thin high efficiency wraparound contact silicon solar cells has been made by coupling space and terrestrial processing procedures. Although this new method for fabricating cells has not been completely reduced to practice, some of the initial cells have delivered over 20 mW/sq cm when tested at 25 C under AMO intensity. This approach not only yields high efficiency devices, but shows promise of allowing complete freedom of choice in both the location and size of the wraparound contact pad area.

  3. Efficiency of analytical and sampling-based uncertainty propagation in intensity-modulated proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Wahl, N; Hennig, P; Wieser, H P; Bangert, M

    2017-06-26

    The sensitivity of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment plans to uncertainties can be quantified and mitigated with robust/min-max and stochastic/probabilistic treatment analysis and optimization techniques. Those methods usually rely on sparse random, importance, or worst-case sampling. Inevitably, this imposes a trade-off between computational speed and accuracy of the uncertainty propagation. Here, we investigate analytical probabilistic modeling (APM) as an alternative for uncertainty propagation and minimization in IMPT that does not rely on scenario sampling. APM propagates probability distributions over range and setup uncertainties via a Gaussian pencil-beam approximation into moments of the probability distributions over the resulting dose in closed form. It supports arbitrary correlation models and allows for efficient incorporation of fractionation effects regarding random and systematic errors. We evaluate the trade-off between run-time and accuracy of APM uncertainty computations on three patient datasets. Results are compared against reference computations facilitating importance and random sampling. Two approximation techniques to accelerate uncertainty propagation and minimization based on probabilistic treatment plan optimization are presented. Runtimes are measured on CPU and GPU platforms, dosimetric accuracy is quantified in comparison to a sampling-based benchmark (5000 random samples). APM accurately propagates range and setup uncertainties into dose uncertainties at competitive run-times (GPU [Formula: see text] min). The resulting standard deviation (expectation value) of dose show average global [Formula: see text] pass rates between 94.2% and 99.9% (98.4% and 100.0%). All investigated importance sampling strategies provided less accuracy at higher run-times considering only a single fraction. Considering fractionation, APM uncertainty propagation and treatment plan optimization was proven to be possible at constant time

  4. Efficiency of analytical and sampling-based uncertainty propagation in intensity-modulated proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, N.; Hennig, P.; Wieser, H. P.; Bangert, M.

    2017-07-01

    The sensitivity of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment plans to uncertainties can be quantified and mitigated with robust/min-max and stochastic/probabilistic treatment analysis and optimization techniques. Those methods usually rely on sparse random, importance, or worst-case sampling. Inevitably, this imposes a trade-off between computational speed and accuracy of the uncertainty propagation. Here, we investigate analytical probabilistic modeling (APM) as an alternative for uncertainty propagation and minimization in IMPT that does not rely on scenario sampling. APM propagates probability distributions over range and setup uncertainties via a Gaussian pencil-beam approximation into moments of the probability distributions over the resulting dose in closed form. It supports arbitrary correlation models and allows for efficient incorporation of fractionation effects regarding random and systematic errors. We evaluate the trade-off between run-time and accuracy of APM uncertainty computations on three patient datasets. Results are compared against reference computations facilitating importance and random sampling. Two approximation techniques to accelerate uncertainty propagation and minimization based on probabilistic treatment plan optimization are presented. Runtimes are measured on CPU and GPU platforms, dosimetric accuracy is quantified in comparison to a sampling-based benchmark (5000 random samples). APM accurately propagates range and setup uncertainties into dose uncertainties at competitive run-times (GPU ≤slant {5} min). The resulting standard deviation (expectation value) of dose show average global γ{3% / {3}~mm} pass rates between 94.2% and 99.9% (98.4% and 100.0%). All investigated importance sampling strategies provided less accuracy at higher run-times considering only a single fraction. Considering fractionation, APM uncertainty propagation and treatment plan optimization was proven to be possible at constant time complexity

  5. Influence of ridge filter material on the beam efficiency and secondary neutron production in a proton therapy system.

    PubMed

    Riazi, Zafar; Afarideh, Hossein; Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul

    2012-09-01

    In this work, the 3D proton dose profile is calculated in a homogenous water phantom using a Monte Carlo application developed with the Geant4 toolkit. The effect of the ridge filter material (for SOBP widths of 6, 9 and 12cm) on the homogeneity of the dose distribution, secondary neutron production and beam efficiency are investigated in a single ring wobbling irradiation system. The energy spectrum of secondary neutrons per primary proton at various locations around the phantom surface is calculated. The simulation revealed that most of the produced neutrons are released at slight angles which enable them to reach the patient and consequently to be hazardous. Also, the homogeneity of the dose distribution at the proximal edge of spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) field is deteriorated due to the scattering of protons in the ridge filter. It is found that for reducing the above mentioned destructive effects, usage of a PMMA ridge filter is better than Al one. For a similar value of 9cm water equivalent thickness, beam widening radius of Al at isocenter is twice of PMMA. Furthermore, for uniform irradiation of the target, the beam efficiency of the system for Al is less than of PMMA and also regarding to the secondary neutron production PMMA is a better choice. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. High throughput ab-intio modeling of proton transport in solid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, Janakiraman; Lin, Lianshan; Ganesh, Panchapakesan

    Solid oxide materials that can selectively transport protons have great potential for fuel cell applications. However several fundamental questions remain unanswered such as (a) How do the dopants organize at various dopant concentrations, (b) How spatial organization of dopants influence proton migration energy, (c) How disorder and strain in a material influence its ionic transport. In this work have developed an integrated high throughput framework to calculate proton transport properties by integrating open source packages (such as pymatgen, fireworks) The high throughput framework scales well on supercomputing clusters. We have used this framework to analyze over 100 perovskites compounds with over 12 different dopant atoms. These computational models enable us to obtain insights how the proton transport properties depend on host and dopant atoms. Further, we also perform ab-initio modeling to understand how dopants spatially organize at different dopant concentrations, and how this spatial organization affects proton conductivity. This analysis enabled us to obtain fundamental insights on why proton conductivity decreases in Y doped BaZrO3 at high dopant concentrations.

  7. Highly efficient white OLEDs for lighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murano, Sven; Burghart, Markus; Birnstock, Jan; Wellmann, Philipp; Vehse, Martin; Werner, Ansgar; Canzler, Tobias; Stübinger, Thomas; He, Gufeng; Pfeiffer, Martin; Boerner, Herbert

    2005-10-01

    The use of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) for large area general lighting purposes is gaining increasing interest during the recent years. Especially small molecule based OLEDs have already shown their potential for future applications. For white light emission OLEDs, power efficiencies exceeding that of incandescent bulbs could already be demonstrated, however additional improvements are needed to further mature the technology allowing for commercial applications as general purpose illuminating sources. Ultimately the efficiencies of fluorescent tubes should be reached or even excelled, a goal which could already be achieved in the past for green OLEDs.1 In this publication the authors will present highly efficient white OLEDs based on an intentional doping of the charge carrier transport layers and the usage of different state of the art emission principles. This presentation will compare white PIN-OLEDs based on phosphorescent emitters, fluorescent emitters and stacked OLEDs. It will be demonstrated that the reduction of the operating voltage by the use of intentionally doped transport layers leads to very high power efficiencies for white OLEDs, demonstrating power efficiencies of well above 20 lm/W @ 1000 cd/m2. The color rendering properties of the emitted light is very high and CRIs between 85 and 95 are achieved, therefore the requirements for standard applications in the field of lighting applications could be clearly fulfilled. The color coordinates of the light emission can be tuned within a wide range through the implementation of minor structural changes.

  8. High efficiency, variable geometry, centrifugal cryogenic pump

    SciTech Connect

    Forsha, M.D.; Nichols, K.E.; Beale, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    A centrifugal cryogenic pump has been developed which has a basic design that is rugged and reliable with variable speed and variable geometry features that achieve high pump efficiency over a wide range of head-flow conditions. The pump uses a sealless design and rolling element bearings to achieve high reliability and the ruggedness to withstand liquid-vapor slugging. The pump can meet a wide range of variable head, off-design flow requirements and maintain design point efficiency by adjusting the pump speed. The pump also has features that allow the impeller and diffuser blade heights to be adjusted. The adjustable height blades were intended to enhance the pump efficiency when it is operating at constant head, off-design flow rates. For small pumps, the adjustable height blades are not recommended. For larger pumps, they could provide off-design efficiency improvements. This pump was developed for supercritical helium service, but the design is well suited to any cryogenic application where high efficiency is required over a wide range of head-flow conditions.

  9. High-efficiency 20 W yellow VECSEL.

    PubMed

    Kantola, Emmi; Leinonen, Tomi; Ranta, Sanna; Tavast, Miki; Guina, Mircea

    2014-03-24

    A high-efficiency optically pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser emitting 20 W at a wavelength around 588 nm is demonstrated. The semiconductor gain chip emitted at a fundamental wavelength around 1170-1180 nm and the laser employed a V-shaped cavity. The yellow spectral range was achieved by intra-cavity frequency doubling using a LBO crystal. The laser could be tuned over a bandwidth of ~26 nm while exhibiting watt-level output powers. The maximum conversion efficiency from absorbed pump power to yellow output was 28% for continuous wave operation. The VECSEL's output could be modulated to generate optical pulses with duration down to 570 ns by directly modulating the pump laser. The high-power pulse operation is a key feature for astrophysics and medical applications while at the same time enables higher slope efficiency than continuous wave operation owing to decreased heating.

  10. Requirements for high-efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sah, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    Minimum recombination and low injection level are essential for high efficiency. Twenty percent AM1 efficiency requires a dark recombination current density of 2 x 10 to the minus 13th power A/sq cm and a recombination center density of less than 10 to the 10th power /cu cm. Recombination mechanisms at thirteen locations in a conventional single crystalline silicon cell design are reviewed. Three additional recombination locations are described at grain boundaries in polycrystalline cells. Material perfection and fabrication process optimization requirements for high efficiency are outlined. Innovative device designs to reduce recombination in the bulk and interfaces of single crystalline cells and in the grain boundary of polycrystalline cells are reviewed.

  11. High efficiency novel window air conditioner

    DOE PAGES

    Bansal, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the technical development of a high efficiency window air conditioner. In order to achieve higher energy efficiency ratio (EER), the original capacity of the R410A unit was downgraded by replacing the original compressor with a lower capacity but higher EER compressor, while all heat exchangers and the chassis from the original unit were retained. The other subsequent major modifications included – the AC fan motor being replaced with a brushless high efficiency electronically commuted motor (ECM) motor, the capillary tube being replaced with a needle valve to better control the refrigerant flow and refrigerant set points, andmore » R410A being replaced with drop-in environmentally friendly binary mixture of R32 (85% molar concentration)/R125 (15% molar concentration). All these modifications resulted in significant EER enhancement of the modified unit.« less

  12. High efficiency novel window air conditioner

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the technical development of a high efficiency window air conditioner. In order to achieve higher energy efficiency ratio (EER), the original capacity of the R410A unit was downgraded by replacing the original compressor with a lower capacity but higher EER compressor, while all heat exchangers and the chassis from the original unit were retained. The other subsequent major modifications included – the AC fan motor being replaced with a brushless high efficiency electronically commuted motor (ECM) motor, the capillary tube being replaced with a needle valve to better control the refrigerant flow and refrigerant set points, and R410A being replaced with drop-in environmentally friendly binary mixture of R32 (85% molar concentration)/R125 (15% molar concentration). All these modifications resulted in significant EER enhancement of the modified unit.

  13. Commissioning of the High Efficiency Total Absorption Spectrometer (HECTOR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reingold, C. S.; Simon, A.; Spyrou, A.; Naqvi, F.; Dombos, A.; Palmisano, A.; Anderson, T.; Henderson, S. L.; Moylan, S.; Seymour, C.; Skulski, M. A.; Smith, M. K.; Strauss, S. Y.; Vande Kolk, B.

    2016-09-01

    P-process nucleosynthesis occurs in supernovae where the s-process seeds are present, and is responsible for the production of proton-rich nuclei. Photons from SN explosions induce characteristic (γ,n), (γ,p), and (γ , α) reactions. These reactions are typically studied via the inverse reactions. For this purpose, the High Efficiency Total Absorption Spectrometer (HECTOR), a NaI(Tl) summing detector at the University of Notre Dame, was built. The array is designed to make precision cross section measurements for (p, γ) and (α , γ) reactions. HECTOR is composed of 16 separate NaI(Tl) crystals and 32 photomultiplier tubes read by a digital data acquisition system, with gain-matching and summing done offline. The efficiency of HECTOR is about 52.7 (2.0)% for a 60Co source. The commissioning run for HECTOR was performed via measurements of known resonances in the 27Al(p, γ)28Si reaction to determine the efficiency of the array. The first results from HECTOR will be presented, as well as future plans with the array. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. PHY1614442 and PHY1430152 (JINA-CEE).

  14. A Nuclear Interaction Model for Understanding Results of Single Event Testing with High Energy Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culpepper, William X.; ONeill, Pat; Nicholson, Leonard L.

    2000-01-01

    An internuclear cascade and evaporation model has been adapted to estimate the LET spectrum generated during testing with 200 MeV protons. The model-generated heavy ion LET spectrum is compared to the heavy ion LET spectrum seen on orbit. This comparison is the basis for predicting single event failure rates from heavy ions using results from a single proton test. Of equal importance, this spectra comparison also establishes an estimate of the risk of encountering a failure mode on orbit that was not detected during proton testing. Verification of the general results of the model is presented based on experiments, individual part test results, and flight data. Acceptance of this model and its estimate of remaining risk opens the hardware verification philosophy to the consideration of radiation testing with high energy protons at the board and box level instead of the more standard method of individual part testing with low energy heavy ions.

  15. Coulomb explosion effect and the maximum energy of protons accelerated by high-power lasers.

    PubMed

    Fourkal, E; Velchev, I; Ma, C-M

    2005-03-01

    The acceleration of light ions (protons) through the interaction of a high-power laser pulse with a double-layer target is theoretically studied by means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and a one-dimensional analytical model. It is shown that the maximum energy acquired by the accelerated light ions (protons) depends on the physical characteristics of a heavy-ion layer (electron-ion mass ratio and effective charge state of the ions). In our theoretical model, the hydrodynamic equations for both electron and heavy-ion species are solved and the test-particle approximation for the light ions (protons) is applied. The heavy-ion motion is found to modify the longitudinal electric field distribution, thus changing the acceleration conditions for the protons.

  16. Three-dimensional hydrogen microscopy using a high-energy proton probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollinger, G.; Reichart, P.; Datzmann, G.; Hauptner, A.; Körner, H.-J.

    2003-01-01

    It is a challenge to measure two-dimensional or three-dimensional (3D) hydrogen profiles on a micrometer scale. Quantitative hydrogen analyses of micrometer resolution are demonstrated utilizing proton-proton scattering at a high-energy proton microprobe. It has more than an-order-of-magnitude better position resolution and in addition higher sensitivity than any other technique for 3D hydrogen analyses. This type of hydrogen imaging opens plenty room to characterize microstructured materials, and semiconductor devices or objects in microbiology. The first hydrogen image obtained with a 10 MeV proton microprobe shows the hydrogen distribution of the microcapillary system being present in the wing of a mayfly and demonstrates the potential of the method.

  17. Laser generated proton beam focusing and high temperature isochoric heating of solid matter

    SciTech Connect

    Snavely, R. A.; Hatchett, S. P.; Key, M. H.; Langdon, A. B.; Lasinski, B. F.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Patel, P.; Town, R.; Wilks, S. C.; Zhang, B.; Akli, K.; Hey, D.; King, J.; Chen, Z.; Izawa, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Kodama, R.; Lei, A.; Tampo, M.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2007-09-15

    The results of laser-driven proton beam focusing and heating with a high energy (170 J) short pulse are reported. Thin hemispherical aluminum shells are illuminated with the Gekko petawatt laser using 1 {mu}m light at intensities of {approx}3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} and measured heating of thin Al slabs. The heating pattern is inferred by imaging visible and extreme-ultraviolet light Planckian emission from the rear surface. When Al slabs 100 {mu}m thick were placed at distances spanning the proton focus beam waist, the highest temperatures were produced at 0.94x the hemisphere radius beyond the equatorial plane. Isochoric heating temperatures reached 81 eV in 15 {mu}m thick foils. The heating with a three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of proton transport with self-consistent heating and proton stopping in hot plasma was modeled.

  18. AL ALTERNATIVE SCHEME FOR THE NEUTRINO FACTORY WITH A HIGH POWER PROTON DRIVER.

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO,A.G.

    2001-06-30

    We describe a scheme to produce an intense and collimated beam of neutrinos for the neutrino-oscillation experiment. The scheme feature is the presence of a Proton Driver that generates a proton beam at very large power (10mA x 15GeV), considerably higher than that proposed elsewhere for this application. With this scheme, because of the high intensity of the proton beam, to produce neutrinos at the same required rates, it is sufficient to collect {pi} and {mu} mesons only around a small angle and at reduced momentum spreads. This eliminates the need for the difficult longitudinal manipulations of the protons and mesons, and of the ionization cooling that still needs to be demonstrated. It is also shown, at the end of the paper, that the Neutrino Factory here proposed can also be used as an injector for a 1 x 1 TeV{sup 2} {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} collider at large luminosity.

  19. Application of optical emission spectroscopy to high current proton sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, G.; Mazzaglia, M.; Nicolosi, D.; Mascali, D.; Reitano, R.; Zaniol, B.; Celona, L.; Leonardi, O.; Leone, F.; Naselli, E.; Neri, L.; Torrisi, G.; Gammino, S.

    2017-07-01

    Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) represents a very reliable technique to carry out non-invasive measurements of plasma density and plasma temperature in the range of tens of eV. With respect to other diagnostics, it also can characterize the different populations of neutrals and ionized particles constituting the plasma. At INFN-LNS, OES techniques have been developed and applied to characterize the plasma generated by the Flexible Plasma Trap, an ion source used as "testbench" of the proton source built for European Spallation Source. This work presents the characterization of the parameters of a hydrogen plasma in different conditions of neutral pressure, microwave power and magnetic field profile, along with perspectives for further upgrades of the OES diagnostics system.

  20. FFAG-BASED HIGH-INTENSITY PROTON DRIVERS.

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO, A.G.

    2004-10-13

    This paper is the summary of a feasibility study of a Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) Accelerator for Protons in the one-to-few GeV energy range, and average beam power of several MWatt. The example they have adopted here is a beam energy of 1 GeV and an average power of 10 MWatt, but of course the same design approach can be used with other beam parameters. The design principles, merits and limitations of the FFAG accelerators have been described previously. In particular, more advanced techniques to minimize magnet dimension and field strength have been recently proposed. The design makes use of a novel concept by which it is possible to cancel chromatic effects, thus making betatron tunes and functions independent of the particle momentum, with an Adjusted Field Profile. The example given here assumes a pulsed mode of operation at the repetition rate of 1.0 kHz.

  1. Refractory oxide hosts for a high power, broadly tunable laser with high quantum efficiency and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Yok; Gonzalez, Roberto

    1986-01-01

    Refractory oxide crystals having high-quantum efficiency and high thermal stability for use as broadly tunable laser host materials. The crystals are formed by removing hydrogen from a single crystal of the oxide material to a level below about 10.sup.12 protons per cm.sup.3 and subsequently thermochemically reducing the oxygen content of the crystal to form sufficient oxygen anion vacancies so that short-lived F.sup.+ luminescence is produced when the crystal is optically excited.

  2. Refractory oxide hosts for a high power, broadly tunable laser with high quantum efficiency and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Yok; Gonzalez, R.

    1985-07-03

    Refractory oxide crystals having high-quantum efficiency and high thermal stability for use as broadly tunable laser host materials. The crystals are formed by removing hydrogen from a single crystal of the oxide material to a level below about 10/sup 12/ protons per cm/sup 3/ and subsequently thermochemically reducing the oxygen content of the crystal to form sufficient oxygen anion vacancies so that short-lived F/sup +/ luminescence is produced when the crystal is optically excited.

  3. 90° Neutron emission from high energy protons and lead ions on a thin lead target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Birattari, C.; Foglio Para, A.; Mitaroff, A.; Silari, M.; Ulrici, L.

    2002-01-01

    The neutron emission from a relatively thin lead target bombarded by beams of high energy protons/pions and lead ions was measured at CERN in one of the secondary beam lines of the Super Proton Synchrotron for radiation protection and shielding calculations. Measurements were performed with three different beams: 208Pb 82+ lead ions at 40 GeV/ c per nucleon and 158 GeV/ c per nucleon, and 40 GeV/ c mixed protons/pions. The neutron yield and spectral fluence per incident ion on target were measured at 90° with respect to beam direction. Monte-Carlo simulations with the FLUKA code were performed for the case of protons and pions and the results found in good agreement with the experimental data. A comparison between simulations and experiment for protons, pions and lead ions have shown that—for such high energy heavy ion beams—a reasonable estimate can be carried out by scaling the result of a Monte-Carlo calculation for protons by the projectile mass number to the power of 0.80-0.84.

  4. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1997-01-01

    UNH was assigned the responsibility to use their accelerator neutron measurements to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution. Direct accelerator-based measurements by UNH of the energy-dependent efficiencies for detecting neutrons with energies from 36 to 720 MeV in NaI were compared with Monte Carlo TASC calculations. The calculated TASC efficiencies are somewhat lower (by about 20%) than the accelerator results in the energy range 70-300 MeV. The measured energy-loss spectrum for 207 MeV neutron interactions in NaI were compared with the Monte Carlo response for 200 MeV neutrons in the TASC indicating good agreement. Based on this agreement, the simulation was considered to be sufficiently accurate to generate a neutron response library to be used by UNH in modifying the TASC fitting program to include a neutron component in the flare spectrum modeling. TASC energy-loss data on the 1991 June 11 flare was transferred to UNH. Also included appendix: Gamma-rays and neutrons as a probe of flare proton spectra: the solar flare of 11 June 1991.

  5. Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Alok M. Srivastava

    2005-09-30

    This is the Yearly Report of the Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps, Department of Energy (DOE). The overall goal of this three-year program is to develop novel hybrid phosphors by coating commercially available lamp phosphors with highly stable wide band-gap nanocrystalline phosphors (NCP). The novel hybrid phosphors will increase the efficiency of the fluorescent lamps by up to 32%, enabling total energy savings of 0.26 quads, the reduction in the U.S. energy bill by $6.5 billion and the reduction of the annual carbon emission by 4.1 billion kilogram. The prime technical approach is the development of NCP quantum-splitting phosphor (QSP) and ultra-violet emitting phosphors with quantum efficiencies exceeding that of the conventional phosphors at 185 nm. Our chief achievement, during the current contract period, pertains to the successful synthesis and characterization of coated phosphors. We demonstrated several synthesis techniques for the coating of micron sized commercial phosphors with quantum-splitting and UV emitting nanophosphors. We have also continued our fundamental investigations into the physical processes that determine the quantum efficiency of the nanophosphors and this has further helped codify a set of rules for the host lattice that support efficient quantum splitting and UV emission at room temperature. In this report we summarize the technical work completed under the Program, summarize our findings about the performance limits of the various technologies we investigated, and outline promising paths for future work.

  6. Innermost Van Allen Radiation Belt for High Energy Protons at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The high energy proton radiation belts of Saturn are energetically dominated by the source from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND), trapping of protons from beta decay of neutrons emitted from galactic cosmic ray nuclear interactions with the main rings. These belts were originally discovered in wide gaps between the A-ring, Janus/Epimetheus, Mimas, and Enceladus. The narrow F and G rings significant affected the CRAND protons but did not produce total depletion. Voyager 2 measurements subsequently revealed an outermost CRAND proton belt beyond Enceladus. Although the source rate is small, the trapping times limited by radial magnetospheric diffusion are very long, about ten years at peak measured flux inwards of the G ring, so large fluxes can accumulate unless otherwise limited in the trapping region by neutral gas, dust, and ring body interactions. One proposed final extension of the Cassini Orbiter mission would place perikrone in a 3000-km gap between the inner D ring and the upper atmosphere of Saturn. Experience with CRAND in the Earth's inner Van Allen proton belt suggests that a similar innermost belt might be found in this comparably wide region at Saturn. Radial dependence of magnetospheric diffusion, proximity to the ring neutron source, and northward magnetic offset of Saturn's magnetic equator from the ring plane could potentially produce peak fluxes several orders of magnitude higher than previously measured outside the main rings. Even brief passes through such an intense environment of highly penetrating protons would be a significant concern for spacecraft operations and science observations. Actual fluxes are limited by losses in Saturn's exospheric gas and in a dust environment likely comparable to that of the known CRAND proton belts. The first numerical model of this unexplored radiation belt is presented to determine limits on peak magnitude and radial profile of the proton flux distribution.

  7. Innermost Van Allen Radiation Belt for High Energy Protons at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The high energy proton radiation belts of Saturn are energetically dominated by the source from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND), trapping of protons from beta decay of neutrons emitted from galactic cosmic ray nuclear interactions with the main rings. These belts were originally discovered in wide gaps between the A-ring, Janus/Epimetheus, Mimas, and Enceladus. The narrow F and G rings significant affected the CRAND protons but did not produce total depletion. Voyager 2 measurements subsequently revealed an outermost CRAND proton belt beyond Enceladus. Although the source rate is small, the trapping times limited by radial magnetospheric diffusion are very long, about ten years at peak measured flux inwards of the G ring, so large fluxes can accumulate unless otherwise limited in the trapping region by neutral gas, dust, and ring body interactions. One proposed final extension of the Cassini Orbiter mission would place perikrone in a 3000-km gap between the inner D ring and the upper atmosphere of Saturn. Experience with CRAND in the Earth's inner Van Allen proton belt suggests that a similar innermost belt might be found in this comparably wide region at Saturn. Radial dependence of magnetospheric diffusion, proximity to the ring neutron source, and northward magnetic offset of Saturn's magnetic equator from the ring plane could potentially produce peak fluxes several orders of magnitude higher than previously measured outside the main rings. Even brief passes through such an intense environment of highly penetrating protons would be a significant concern for spacecraft operations and science observations. Actual fluxes are limited by losses in Saturn's exospheric gas and in a dust environment likely comparable to that of the known CRAND proton belts. The first numerical model of this unexplored radiation belt is presented to determine limits on peak magnitude and radial profile of the proton flux distribution.

  8. High Efficiency Solar Integrated Roof Membrane Product

    SciTech Connect

    Partyka, Eric; Shenoy, Anil

    2013-05-15

    This project was designed to address the Solar Energy Technology Program objective, to develop new methods to integrate photovoltaic (PV) cells or modules within a building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) application that will result in lower installed cost as well as higher efficiencies of the encapsulated/embedded PV module. The technology assessment and development focused on the evaluation and identification of manufacturing technologies and equipment capable of producing such low-cost, high-efficiency, flexible BIPV solar cells on single-ply roofing membranes.

  9. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy of 800 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sjue, S. K. L. Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A.

    2016-01-15

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the proton imaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Comparison with a series of static calibration images demonstrates the model’s accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.

  10. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy of 800 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjue, S. K. L.; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A.

    2016-01-01

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the proton imaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Comparison with a series of static calibration images demonstrates the model's accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.

  11. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy of 800 MeV.

    PubMed

    Sjue, S K L; Mariam, F G; Merrill, F E; Morris, C L; Saunders, A

    2016-01-01

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the proton imaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Comparison with a series of static calibration images demonstrates the model's accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.

  12. Highly efficient solid state magnetoelectric gyrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Chung Ming; Zhuang, Xin; Friedrichs, Daniel; Li, Jiefang; Erickson, Robert W.; Laletin, V.; Popov, M.; Srinivasan, G.; Viehland, D.

    2017-09-01

    An enhancement in the power-conversion-efficiency (η) of a magneto-electric (ME) gyrator has been found by the use of Mn-substituted nickel zinc ferrite. A trilayer gyrator of Mn-doped Ni0.8Zn0.2Fe2O3 and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 has η = 85% at low power conditions (˜20 mW/in3) and η ≥ 80% at high power conditions (˜5 W/in3). It works close to fundamental electromechanical resonance in both direct and converse modes. The value of η is by far the highest reported so far, which is due to the high mechanical quality factor (Qm) of the magnetostrictive ferrite. Such highly efficient ME gyrators with a significant power density could become important elements in power electronics, potentially replacing electromagnetic and piezoelectric transformers.

  13. Efficient circuit triggers high-current, high-voltage pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, E. D.

    1964-01-01

    Modified circuit uses diodes to effectively disconnect the charging resistors from the circuit during the discharge cycle. Result is an efficient parallel charging, high voltage pulse modulator with low voltage rating of components.

  14. High-Temperature High-Efficiency Solar Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Warren, Emily L.; Toberer, Eric S.

    2014-06-01

    Inspired by recent high-efficiency thermoelectric modules, we consider thermoelectrics for terrestrial applications in concentrated solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs). The STEG is modeled as two subsystems: a TEG, and a solar absorber that efficiently captures the concentrated sunlight and limits radiative losses from the system. The TEG subsystem is modeled using thermoelectric compatibility theory; this model does not constrain the material properties to be constant with temperature. Considering a three-stage TEG based on current record modules, this model suggests that 18% efficiency could be experimentally expected with a temperature gradient of 1000°C to 100°C. Achieving 15% overall STEG efficiency thus requires an absorber efficiency above 85%, and we consider two methods to achieve this: solar-selective absorbers and thermally insulating cavities. When the TEG and absorber subsystem models are combined, we expect that the STEG modeled here could achieve 15% efficiency with optical concentration between 250 and 300 suns.

  15. High-Temperature High-Efficiency Solar Thermoelectric Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Baranowski, LL; Warren, EL; Toberer, ES

    2014-03-01

    Inspired by recent high-efficiency thermoelectric modules, we consider thermoelectrics for terrestrial applications in concentrated solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs). The STEG is modeled as two subsystems: a TEG, and a solar absorber that efficiently captures the concentrated sunlight and limits radiative losses from the system. The TEG subsystem is modeled using thermoelectric compatibility theory; this model does not constrain the material properties to be constant with temperature. Considering a three-stage TEG based on current record modules, this model suggests that 18% efficiency could be experimentally expected with a temperature gradient of 1000A degrees C to 100A degrees C. Achieving 15% overall STEG efficiency thus requires an absorber efficiency above 85%, and we consider two methods to achieve this: solar-selective absorbers and thermally insulating cavities. When the TEG and absorber subsystem models are combined, we expect that the STEG modeled here could achieve 15% efficiency with optical concentration between 250 and 300 suns.

  16. High-efficiency silicon concentrator cell commercialization

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, R.A.; Swanson, R.M.

    1993-05-01

    This report summarizes the first phase of a forty-one month program to develop a commercial, high-efficiency concentrator solar cell and facility for manufacturing it. The period covered is November 1, 1990 to December 31, 1991. This is a joint program between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Sandia National Laboratories. (This report is also published by EPRI as EPRI report number TR-102035.) During the first year of the program, SunPower accomplished the following major objectives: (1) a new solar cell fabrication facility, which is called the Cell Pilot Line (CPL), (2) a baseline concentrator cell process has been developed, and (3) a cell testing facility has been completed. Initial cell efficiencies are about 23% for the baseline process. The long-range goal is to improve this efficiency to 27%.

  17. Methodologies for high efficiency perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Nam-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Since the report on long-term durable solid-state perovskite solar cell in 2012, perovskite solar cells based on lead halide perovskites having organic cations such as methylammonium CH3NH3PbI3 or formamidinium HC(NH2)2PbI3 have received great attention because of superb photovoltaic performance with power conversion efficiency exceeding 22 %. In this review, emergence of perovskite solar cell is briefly introduced. Since understanding fundamentals of light absorbers is directly related to their photovoltaic performance, opto-electronic properties of organo lead halide perovskites are investigated in order to provide insight into design of higher efficiency perovskite solar cells. Since the conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cell is found to depend significantly on perovskite film quality, methodologies for fabricating high quality perovskite films are particularly emphasized, including various solution-processes and vacuum deposition method.

  18. Methodologies for high efficiency perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Nam-Gyu

    2016-06-01

    Since the report on long-term durable solid-state perovskite solar cell in 2012, perovskite solar cells based on lead halide perovskites having organic cations such as methylammonium CH3NH3PbI3 or formamidinium HC(NH2)2PbI3 have received great attention because of superb photovoltaic performance with power conversion efficiency exceeding 22 %. In this review, emergence of perovskite solar cell is briefly introduced. Since understanding fundamentals of light absorbers is directly related to their photovoltaic performance, opto-electronic properties of organo lead halide perovskites are investigated in order to provide insight into design of higher efficiency perovskite solar cells. Since the conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cell is found to depend significantly on perovskite film quality, methodologies for fabricating high quality perovskite films are particularly emphasized, including various solution-processes and vacuum deposition method.

  19. High efficiency electrotransformation of Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Welker, Dennis L; Hughes, Joanne E; Steele, James L; Broadbent, Jeff R

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether protocols allowing high efficiency electrotransformation of other lactic acid bacteria were applicable to five strains of Lactobacillus casei (12A, 32G, A2-362, ATCC 334 and BL23). Addition of 1% glycine or 0.9 M NaCl during cell growth, limitation of the growth of the cell cultures to OD600 0.6-0.8, pre-electroporation treatment of cells with water or with a lithium acetate (100 mM)/dithiothreitol (10 mM) solution and optimization of electroporation conditions all improved transformation efficiencies. However, the five strains varied in their responses to these treatments. Transformation efficiencies of 10(6) colony forming units μg(-1) pTRKH2 DNA and higher were obtained with three strains which is sufficient for construction of chromosomal gene knock-outs and gene replacements.

  20. High Efficiency, Low Emission Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Fricke, Brian A.; Sharma, Vishaldeep

    2016-08-01

    Supermarket refrigeration systems account for approximately 50% of supermarket energy use, placing this class of equipment among the highest energy consumers in the commercial building domain. In addition, the commonly used refrigeration system in supermarket applications is the multiplex direct expansion (DX) system, which is prone to refrigerant leaks due to its long lengths of refrigerant piping. This leakage reduces the efficiency of the system and increases the impact of the system on the environment. The high Global Warming Potential (GWP) of the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants commonly used in these systems, coupled with the large refrigerant charge and the high refrigerant leakage rates leads to significant direct emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Methods for reducing refrigerant leakage and energy consumption are available, but underutilized. Further work needs to be done to reduce costs of advanced system designs to improve market utilization. In addition, refrigeration system retrofits that result in reduced energy consumption are needed since the majority of applications address retrofits rather than new stores. The retrofit market is also of most concern since it involves large-volume refrigerant systems with high leak rates. Finally, alternative refrigerants for new and retrofit applications are needed to reduce emissions and reduce the impact on the environment. The objective of this Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Hill Phoenix is to develop a supermarket refrigeration system that reduces greenhouse gas emissions and has 25 to 30 percent lower energy consumption than existing systems. The outcomes of this project will include the design of a low emission, high efficiency commercial refrigeration system suitable for use in current U.S. supermarkets. In addition, a prototype low emission, high efficiency supermarket refrigeration system will be produced for

  1. High-speed high-efficiency photodetectors based on heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkov, V. I.

    Recent advances in the development of high-speed high-efficiency heterostructure photodetectors (HPs) are reviewed. It is noted that the performance of semiconductor photodetectors has been improved by forbidden bandwidth control. Various types of HPs are examined, including modifications of heterophotodiodes and detectors with internal amplification; avalanche photodiodes; bipolar phototransistors; and planar photoresistance devices and field-effect phototransistors. These devices are compared in terms of speed and efficiency.

  2. Nanopatterned Quantum Dot Lasers for High Speed, High Efficiency, Operation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-27

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Quantum dot (QD) active regions hold potential for realizing extremely high performance semiconductor diode lasers...2009 31-Dec-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Nanopatterned Quantum Dot Lasers for High Speed, High Efficiency...Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 quantum dots , nanopatterning, MOCVD, laser REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  3. Redistribution of components in the niobium-silicon system under high-temperature proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Afonin, N. N.; Logacheva, V. A. Khoviv, A. M.

    2011-12-15

    The redistribution of components in the niobium-silicon system during magnetron-assisted sputtering of niobium, vacuum annealing, and high-temperature proton irradiation is studied. It is established that, during magnetron-assisted sputtering followed by vacuum annealing, silicon penetrates through the metal film to the outer boundary of the film. Under high-temperature proton irradiation, the suppression of the diffusion of niobium into silicon is observed. This effect is attributed to the high concentration of radiation vacancies in the region of the Nb/Si interphase boundary.

  4. REPORT OF THE SNOWMASS M6 WORKING GROUP ON HIGH INTENSITY PROTON SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    CHOU,W.; WEI,J.

    2001-08-14

    The M6 working group had more than 40 active participants (listed in Section 4). During the three weeks at Snowmass, there were about 50 presentations, covering a wide range of topics associated with high intensity proton sources. The talks are listed in Section 5. This group also had joint sessions with a number of other working groups, including E1 (Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders), E5 (Fixed-Target Experiments), M1 (Muon Based Systems), T4 (Particle Sources), T5 (Beam dynamics), T7 (High Performance Computing) and T9 (Diagnostics). The M6 group performed a survey of the beam parameters of existing and proposed high intensity proton sources, in particular, of the proton drivers. The results are listed in Table 1. These parameters are compared with the requirements of high-energy physics users of secondary beams in Working Groups E1 and E5. According to the consensus reached in the E1 and E5 groups, the U.S. HEP program requires an intense proton source, a 1-4 MW Proton Driver, by the end of this decade.

  5. Hard X-ray bremsstrahlung production in solar flares by high-energy proton beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.; Brown, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility that solar hard X-ray bremsstrahlung is produced by acceleration of stationary electrons by fast-moving protons, rather than vice versa, as commonly assumed, was investigated. It was found that a beam of protons which involves 1836 times fewer particles, each having an energy 1836 times greater than that of the electrons in the equivalent electron beam model, has exactly the same bremsstrahlung yield for a given target, i.e., the mechanism has an energetic efficiency equal to that of conventional bremsstrahlung models. Allowance for the different degrees of target ionization appropriate to the two models (for conventional flare geometries) makes the proton beam model more efficient than the electron beam model, by a factor of order three. The model places less stringent constraints than a conventional electron beam model on the flare energy release mechanism. It is also consistent with observed X-ray burst spectra, intensities, and directivities. The altitude distribution of hard X-rays predicted by the model agrees with observations only if nonvertical injection of the protons is assumed. The model is inconsistent with gamma-ray data in terms of conventional modeling.

  6. White light generation by carbonyl based indole derivatives due to proton transfer: an efficient fluorescence sensor.

    PubMed

    Singla, Nidhi; Bhadram, Venkata Srinu; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Chowdhury, Papia

    2013-04-04

    The motivation of the present work is to understand the optical, chemical, and electrical aspects of the proton transfer mechanism of indole (I) and some carbonyl based indole derivatives: indole-3-carboxaldehyde (I3C) and indole-7-carboxaldehyde (I7C) for both powder form and their liquid solution. Structural information for indole derivatives (isolated molecule and in solution) is obtained with density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) methods. Calculated transition energies are used to generate UV-vis, FTIR, Raman, and NMR spectra which are later verified with the experimental spectra. The occurrence of different conformers [cis (N(c)), trans (N(t)), and zwitterion (Z*)] have been interpreted by Mulliken charge, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, and polarization versus electric field (P-E loop) studies. (1)H and (13)C NMR and molecular vibrational frequencies of the fundamental modes established the stability of Nc due to the presence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IHB) in the ground state (S0). Computed/experimental UV-vis absorption/emission studies reveal the creation of new species: zwitterion (Z*) and anion (A*) in the excited state (S1) due to excited state intramolecular and intermolecular proton transfer (ESI(ra)PT and ESI(er)PT). Increased electrical conductivity (σ(ac)) with temperature and increased ferroelectric polarization at higher field verifies proton conduction in I7C.

  7. Breeding for high water-use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Condon, A G; Richards, R A; Rebetzke, G J; Farquhar, G D

    2004-11-01

    There is a pressing need to improve the water-use efficiency of rain-fed and irrigated crop production. Breeding crop varieties with higher water-use efficiency is seen as providing part of the solution. Three key processes can be exploited in breeding for high water-use efficiency: (i) moving more of the available water through the crop rather than it being wasted as evaporation from the soil surface or drainage beyond the root zone or being left behind in the root zone at harvest; (ii) acquiring more carbon (biomass) in exchange for the water transpired by the crop, i.e. improving crop transpiration efficiency; (iii) partitioning more of the achieved biomass into the harvested product. The relative importance of any one of these processes will vary depending on how water availability varies during the crop cycle. However, these three processes are not independent. Targeting specific traits to improve one process may have detrimental effects on the other two, but there may also be positive interactions. Progress in breeding for improved water-use efficiency of rain-fed wheat is reviewed to illustrate the nature of some of these interactions and to highlight opportunities that may be exploited in other crops as well as potential pitfalls. For C3 species, measuring carbon isotope discrimination provides a powerful means of improving water-use efficiency of leaf gas exchange, but experience has shown that improvements in leaf-level water-use efficiency may not always translate into higher crop water-use efficiency or yield. In fact, the reverse has frequently been observed. Reasons for this are explored in some detail. Crop simulation modelling can be used to assess the likely impact on water-use efficiency and yield of changing the expression of traits of interest. Results of such simulations indicate that greater progress may be achieved by pyramiding traits so that potential negative effects of individual traits are neutralized. DNA-based selection techniques may

  8. Optimal conditions for high current proton irradiations at the university of Wisconsin's ion beam laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetteland, C. J.; Field, K. G.; Eiden, T. J.; Gerczak, T. J.; Maier, B. R.; Albakri, O.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-04-01

    The National Electrostatics Corporation's (NEC) Toroidal Volume Ion Source (TORVIS) source is known for exceptionally high proton currents with minimal service downtime as compared to traditional sputter sources. It has been possible to obtain over 150μA of proton current from the source, with over 70μA on the target stage. However, beam fluxes above ˜1×1017/m2-s may have many undesirable effects, especially for insulators. This may include high temperature gradients at the surface, sputtering, surface discharge, cracking or even disintegration of the sample. A series of experiments were conducted to examine the role of high current fluxes in a suite of ceramics and insulating materials. Results will show the optimal proton irradiation conditions and target mounting strategies needed to minimize unwanted macro-scale damage, while developing a procedure for conducting preliminary radiation experiments.

  9. Optimal conditions for high current proton irradiations at the university of Wisconsin's ion beam laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wetteland, C. J.; Field, K. G.; Gerczak, T. J.; Eiden, T. J.; Maier, B. R.; Albakri, O.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-04-19

    The National Electrostatics Corporation's (NEC) Toroidal Volume Ion Source (TORVIS) source is known for exceptionally high proton currents with minimal service downtime as compared to traditional sputter sources. It has been possible to obtain over 150{mu}A of proton current from the source, with over 70{mu}A on the target stage. However, beam fluxes above {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}/m2-s may have many undesirable effects, especially for insulators. This may include high temperature gradients at the surface, sputtering, surface discharge, cracking or even disintegration of the sample. A series of experiments were conducted to examine the role of high current fluxes in a suite of ceramics and insulating materials. Results will show the optimal proton irradiation conditions and target mounting strategies needed to minimize unwanted macro-scale damage, while developing a procedure for conducting preliminary radiation experiments.

  10. Creation of High Efficient Firefly Luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsu, Toru

    Firefly emits visible yellow-green light. The bioluminescence reaction is carried out by the enzyme luciferase. The bioluminescence of luciferase is widely used as an excellent tool for monitoring gene expression, the measurement of the amount of ATP and in vivo imaging. Recently a study of the cancer metastasis is carried out by in vivo luminescence imaging system, because luminescence imaging is less toxic and more useful for long-term assay than fluorescence imaging by GFP. However the luminescence is much dimmer than fluorescence. Then bioluminescence imaging in living organisms demands the high efficient luciferase which emits near infrared lights or enhances the emission intensity. Here I introduce an idea for creating the high efficient luciferase based on the crystal structure.

  11. Efficient High-Pressure State Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, Kenneth G.; Miller, Richard S.; Bellan, Josette

    1997-01-01

    A method is presented for a relatively accurate, noniterative, computationally efficient calculation of high-pressure fluid-mixture equations of state, especially targeted to gas turbines and rocket engines. Pressures above I bar and temperatures above 100 K are addressed The method is based on curve fitting an effective reference state relative to departure functions formed using the Peng-Robinson cubic state equation Fit parameters for H2, O2, N2, propane, methane, n-heptane, and methanol are given.

  12. High-efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    Fabrication and characterization of high-efficiency metal insulator, n-p (MINP) cells is described. Particular attention was paid to development of measurement methods for surface recombination and density of surface states. A modified Rosier test structure was used successfully for density of surface states. Silicon oxide and silicon nitride passivants were studied. Heat treatment after plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon nitride was shown to be beneficial. A more optimum emitter concentration profile was modeled.

  13. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser oscillators and nonlinear processes were investigated. A new generation on nonplanar oscillator was fabricated, and it is anticipated that passive linewidths will be pushed to the kilohertz regime. A number of diode-pumped laser transitions were demonstrated in the rod configuration. Second-harmonic conversion efficiencies as high as 15% are routinely obtained in a servo-locked external resonant doubling crystal at 15 mW cw input power levels at 1064 nm.

  14. High Efficiency Thermoelectric Materials and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kochergin, Vladimir (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Growth of thermoelectric materials in the form of quantum well super-lattices on three-dimensionally structured substrates provide the means to achieve high conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric module combined with inexpensiveness of fabrication and compatibility with large scale production. Thermoelectric devices utilizing thermoelectric materials in the form of quantum well semiconductor super-lattices grown on three-dimensionally structured substrates provide improved thermoelectric characteristics that can be used for power generation, cooling and other applications..

  15. High efficiency, long-life photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Lawrence; Montgomery, Eric; Jensen, Kevin; Collins, George; Marsden, David; Karimov, Rasul; Falce, Lou

    2017-03-01

    Research and development on high efficiency, robust, long-life photocathodes is in progress for accelerator, light source, and other commercial applications. The research is investigating detailed physics of photoemission and developing a computational capability to predict performance. Reservoir technology will significantly increase lifetime and allow recovery from many poisoning events. Better understanding of the physics will impact fabrication techniques to optimize performance. A production facility is under construction to provide improved photocathodes to users.

  16. Efficient High-Pressure State Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, Kenneth G.; Miller, Richard S.; Bellan, Josette

    1997-01-01

    A method is presented for a relatively accurate, noniterative, computationally efficient calculation of high-pressure fluid-mixture equations of state, especially targeted to gas turbines and rocket engines. Pressures above I bar and temperatures above 100 K are addressed The method is based on curve fitting an effective reference state relative to departure functions formed using the Peng-Robinson cubic state equation Fit parameters for H2, O2, N2, propane, methane, n-heptane, and methanol are given.

  17. High precision measurement of the proton charge radius: The PRad experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, Mehdi

    2013-11-01

    The recent high precision measurements of the proton charge radius performed at PSI from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift puzzled the hadronic physics community. A value of 0.8418 {+-} 0.0007 fm was extracted which is 7{sigma} smaller than the previous determinations obtained from electron-proton scattering experiments and based on precision spectroscopy of electronic hydrogen. An additional extraction of the proton charge radius from electron scattering at Mainz is also in good agreement with these "electronic" determinations. An independent measurement of the proton charge radius from unpolarized elastic ep scattering using a magnetic spectrometer free method was proposed and fully approved at Jefferson Laboratory in June 2012. This novel technique uses the high precision calorimeter HyCal and a windowless hydrogen gas target which makes possible the extraction of the charge radius at very forward angles and thus very low momentum transfer Q{sup 2} up to 10{sup -4} (GeV/c){sup 2} with an unprecedented sub-percent precision for this type of experiment. In this paper, after a review of the recent progress on the proton charge radius extraction and the new high precision experiment PRad will be presented.

  18. High precision measurement of the proton charge radius: The PRad experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, Mehdi; Collaboration: PRad Collaboration

    2013-11-07

    The recent high precision measurements of the proton charge radius performed at PSI from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift puzzled the hadronic physics community. A value of 0.8418 ± 0.0007 fm was extracted which is 7σ smaller than the previous determinations obtained from electron-proton scattering experiments and based on precision spectroscopy of electronic hydrogen. An additional extraction of the proton charge radius from electron scattering at Mainz is also in good agreement with these 'electronic' determinations. An independent measurement of the proton charge radius from unpolarized elastic ep scattering using a magnetic spectrometer free method was proposed and fully approved at Jefferson Laboratory in June 2012. This novel technique uses the high precision calorimeter HyCal and a windowless hydrogen gas target which makes possible the extraction of the charge radius at very forward angles and thus very low momentum transfer Q{sup 2} up to 10{sup −4} (GeV/c){sup 2} with an unprecedented sub-percent precision for this type of experiment. In this paper, after a review of the recent progress on the proton charge radius extraction and the new high precision experiment PRad will be presented.

  19. Propensity and risk assessment for solar particle events: Consideration of integral fluence at high proton energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Hayat, Matthew; Feiveson, Alan; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    For future space missions with longer duration, exposure to large solar particle events (SPEs) with high energy levels is the major concern during extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) on the lunar and Mars surface. The propensity for SPE occurrence with large proton fluence was estimated as a function of time within a solar cycle from a non-homogeneous Poisson model using the historical database for measurements of protons with energy >30 MeV, Φ30 . The database includes a continuous data set for the past 5 solar cycles. The resultant SPE risk analysis for a specific mission period was made for blood forming organ (BFO) dose ranging from its 5th to 95th percentile. In addition to the total particle intensity of SPEs, the detailed energy spectra of protons, especially at high energy levels, were recognized as extremely important for assessing the cancer risk associated with energetic particles for large events. Using all the recorded proton fluence of SPEs for energies >60 and >100 MeV, Φ60 and Φ100 , respectively, the expected numbers of SPEs abundant with high energy protons were estimated from the same non-homogeneous Poisson model and the representative cancer risk was analyzed. The dependencies of risk with different energy spectra, for e.g. between soft and hard SPEs, were evaluated. Finally, we describe approaches to improve radiation protection of astronauts and optimize mission planning for future space missions.

  20. Propensity and Risk Assessment for Solar Particle Events: Consideration of Integral Fluence at High Proton Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Hayat, Matthew J.; Feiveson, alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    For future space missions with longer duration, exposure to large solar particle events (SPEs) with high energy levels is the major concern during extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) on the lunar and Mars surface. The expected SPE propensity for large proton fluence was estimated from a non-homogeneous Poisson model using the historical database for measurements of protons with energy > 30 MeV, Phi(sub 30). The database includes a continuous data set for the past 5 solar cycles. The resultant SPE risk analysis for a specific mission period was made including the 95% confidence level. In addition to total particle intensity of SPE, the detailed energy spectra of protons especially at high energy levels were recognized as extremely important parameter for the risk assessment, since there remains a significant cancer risks from those energetic particles for large events. Using all the recorded proton fluence of SPEs for energies >60 and >100 MeV, Phi(sub 60) and Phi(sub 100), respectively, the expected propensities of SPEs abundant with high energy protons were estimated from the same non-homogeneous Poisson model and the representative cancer risk was analyzed. The dependencies of risk with different energy spectra, for e.g. between soft and hard SPEs, were evaluated. Finally, we describe approaches to improve radiation protection of astronauts and optimize mission planning for future space missions.

  1. Propensity and Risk Assessment for Solar Particle Events: Consideration of Integral Fluence at High Proton Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Hayat, Matthew J.; Feiveson, alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    For future space missions with longer duration, exposure to large solar particle events (SPEs) with high energy levels is the major concern during extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) on the lunar and Mars surface. The expected SPE propensity for large proton fluence was estimated from a non-homogeneous Poisson model using the historical database for measurements of protons with energy > 30 MeV, Phi(sub 30). The database includes a continuous data set for the past 5 solar cycles. The resultant SPE risk analysis for a specific mission period was made including the 95% confidence level. In addition to total particle intensity of SPE, the detailed energy spectra of protons especially at high energy levels were recognized as extremely important parameter for the risk assessment, since there remains a significant cancer risks from those energetic particles for large events. Using all the recorded proton fluence of SPEs for energies >60 and >100 MeV, Phi(sub 60) and Phi(sub 100), respectively, the expected propensities of SPEs abundant with high energy protons were estimated from the same non-homogeneous Poisson model and the representative cancer risk was analyzed. The dependencies of risk with different energy spectra, for e.g. between soft and hard SPEs, were evaluated. Finally, we describe approaches to improve radiation protection of astronauts and optimize mission planning for future space missions.

  2. Stimulation of mitochondrial proton conductance by hydroxynonenal requires a high membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Parker, Nadeene; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Brand, Martin D

    2008-04-01

    Mild uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, caused by a leak of protons back into the matrix, limits mitochondrial production of ROS (reactive oxygen species). This proton leak can be induced by the lipid peroxidation products of ROS, such as HNE (4-hydroxynonenal). HNE activates uncoupling proteins (UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3) and ANT (adenine nucleotide translocase), thereby providing a negative feedback loop. The mechanism of activation and the conditions necessary to induce uncoupling by HNE are unclear. We have found that activation of proton leak by HNE in rat and mouse skeletal muscle mitochondria is dependent on incubation with respiratory substrate. In the presence of HNE, mitochondria energized with succinate became progressively more leaky to protons over time compared with mitochondria in the absence of either HNE or succinate. Energized mitochondria must attain a high membrane potential to allow HNE to activate uncoupling: a drop of 10-20 mV from the resting value is sufficient to blunt induction of proton leak by HNE. Uncoupling occurs through UCP3 (11%), ANT (64%) and other pathways (25%). Our findings have shown that exogenous HNE only activates uncoupling at high membrane potential. These results suggest that both endogenous HNE production and high membrane potential are required before mild uncoupling will be triggered to attenuate mitochondrial ROS production.

  3. Bioblendstocks that Enable High Efficiency Engine Designs

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Robert L.; Fioroni, Gina M.; Ratcliff, Matthew A.; Zigler, Bradley T.; Farrell, John

    2016-11-03

    The past decade has seen a high level of innovation in production of biofuels from sugar, lipid, and lignocellulose feedstocks. As discussed in several talks at this workshop, ethanol blends in the E25 to E50 range could enable more highly efficient spark-ignited (SI) engines. This is because of their knock resistance properties that include not only high research octane number (RON), but also charge cooling from high heat of vaporization, and high flame speed. Emerging alcohol fuels such as isobutanol or mixed alcohols have desirable properties such as reduced gasoline blend vapor pressure, but also have lower RON than ethanol. These fuels may be able to achieve the same knock resistance benefits, but likely will require higher blend levels or higher RON hydrocarbon blendstocks. A group of very high RON (>150) oxygenates such as dimethyl furan, methyl anisole, and related compounds are also produced from biomass. While providing no increase in charge cooling, their very high octane numbers may provide adequate knock resistance for future highly efficient SI engines. Given this range of options for highly knock resistant fuels there appears to be a critical need for a fuel knock resistance metric that includes effects of octane number, heat of vaporization, and potentially flame speed. Emerging diesel fuels include highly branched long-chain alkanes from hydroprocessing of fats and oils, as well as sugar-derived terpenoids. These have relatively high cetane number (CN), which may have some benefits in designing more efficient CI engines. Fast pyrolysis of biomass can produce diesel boiling range streams that are high in aromatic, oxygen and acid contents. Hydroprocessing can be applied to remove oxygen and consequently reduce acidity, however there are strong economic incentives to leave up to 2 wt% oxygen in the product. This oxygen will primarily be present as low CN alkyl phenols and aryl ethers. While these have high heating value, their presence in diesel fuel

  4. Evaluating performance of high efficiency mist eliminators

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, Charles A.; Parsons, Michael S.; Giffin, Paxton K.

    2013-07-01

    Processing liquid wastes frequently generates off gas streams with high humidity and liquid aerosols. Droplet laden air streams can be produced from tank mixing or sparging and processes such as reforming or evaporative volume reduction. Unfortunately these wet air streams represent a genuine threat to HEPA filters. High efficiency mist eliminators (HEME) are one option for removal of liquid aerosols with high dissolved or suspended solids content. HEMEs have been used extensively in industrial applications, however they have not seen widespread use in the nuclear industry. Filtering efficiency data along with loading curves are not readily available for these units and data that exist are not easily translated to operational parameters in liquid waste treatment plants. A specialized test stand has been developed to evaluate the performance of HEME elements under use conditions of a US DOE facility. HEME elements were tested at three volumetric flow rates using aerosols produced from an iron-rich waste surrogate. The challenge aerosol included submicron particles produced from Laskin nozzles and super micron particles produced from a hollow cone spray nozzle. Test conditions included ambient temperature and relative humidities greater than 95%. Data collected during testing HEME elements from three different manufacturers included volumetric flow rate, differential temperature across the filter housing, downstream relative humidity, and differential pressure (dP) across the filter element. Filter challenge was discontinued at three intermediate dPs and the filter to allow determining filter efficiency using dioctyl phthalate and then with dry surrogate aerosols. Filtering efficiencies of the clean HEME, the clean HEME loaded with water, and the HEME at maximum dP were also collected using the two test aerosols. Results of the testing included differential pressure vs. time loading curves for the nine elements tested along with the mass of moisture and solid

  5. High performance polymer electrolytes based on main and side chain pyridine aromatic polyethers for high and medium temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geormezi, M.; Chochos, C. L.; Gourdoupi, N.; Neophytides, S. G.; Kallitsis, J. K.

    Novel aromatic polyether type copolymers bearing side chain polar pyridine rings as well as combination of main and side chain pyridine units have been evaluated as potential polymer electrolytes for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The advanced chemical and physicochemical properties of these new polymers with their high oxidative stability, mechanical integrity and high glass transition temperatures (T g's up to 270 °C) and decomposition temperatures (T d's up to 480 °C) make them promising candidates for high and medium temperature proton exchange membranes in fuel cells. These copolymers exhibit adequate proton conductivities up to 0.08 S cm -1 even at moderate phosphoric acid doping levels. An optimized terpolymer chemical structure has been developed, which has been effectively tested as high temperature phosphoric acid imbibed polymer electrolyte. MEA prepared out of the novel terpolymer chemical structure is approaching state of the art fuel cell operating performance (135 mW cm -2 with electrical efficiency 45%) at high temperatures (150-180 °C) despite the low phosphoric acid content (<200 wt%) and the low platinum loading (ca. 0.7 mg cm -2). Durability tests were performed affording stable performance for more than 1000 h.

  6. Polymer Composites for High-Temperature Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiuling; Liu, Yuxiu; Zhu, Lei

    Recent advances in composite proton-exchange membranes for fuel cell applications at elevated temperature and low relative humidity are briefly reviewed in this chapter. Although a majority of research has focused on new sulfonated hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon polymers and their blends to directly enhance high temperature performance, we emphasize on polymer/inorganic composite membranes with the aim of improving the mechanical strength, thermal stability, and proton conductivity, which depend on water retention at elevated temperature and low relative humidity conditions. The polymer systems include perfluoronated polymers such as Nafion, sulfonated poly(arylene ether)s, polybenzimidazoles (PBI)s, and many others. The inorganic proton conductors are silica, heteropolyacids (HPA)s, layered zirconium phosphates, and liquid phosphoric acid. Direct use of sol-gel silica requires pressurization of fuel cells to maintain 100% relative humidity for high proton conductivity above 100°C. Direct incorporation of HPAs such as phosphotungstic acid (PTA) into polyelectrolyte membranes is capable of improving both proton conductivity and fuel cell performance above 100°C; however, they tend to leach out of the membrane whenever fuel cell flooding happens. To prevent HPA leaching, amine-functionalized mesoporous silica is used to immobilize PTA in Nafion membranes, whose proton conductivity and fuel cell performance are discussed. Compared with Nafion, sulfonated poly(arylene ether)s such as sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone)s are cost-effective materials with excellent thermal and electrochemical stability. Their composites with HPAs show increased proton conductivity at elevated temperatures when fully hydrated. Organic/inorganic hybrid membranes from acid-doped PBIs and other polymers are also discussed.

  7. High-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares: Constraining the accelerated proton spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David; Dunphy, Philip P.; Mackinnon, Alexander L.

    1994-01-01

    Using a multi-component model to describe the gamma-ray emission, we investigate the flares of December 16, 1988 and March 6, 1989 which exhibited unambiguous evidence of neutral pion decay. The observations are then combined with theoretical calculations of pion production to constrain the accelerated proton spectra. The detection of pi(sup 0) emission alone can indicate much about the energy distribution and spectral variation of the protons accelerated to pion producing energies. Here both the intensity and detailed spectral shape of the Doppler-broadened pi(sup 0) decay feature are used to determine the spectral form of the accelerated proton energy distribution. The Doppler width of this gamma-ray emission provides a unique diagnostic of the spectral shape at high energies, independent of any normalisation. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this diagnostic has been used to constrain the proton spectra. The form of the energetic proton distribution is found to be severely limited by the observed intensity and Doppler width of the pi(sup 0) decay emission, demonstrating effectively the diagnostic capabilities of the pi(sup 0) decay gamma-rays. The spectral index derived from the gamma-ray intensity is found to be much harder than that derived from the Doppler width. To reconcile this apparent discrepancy we investigate the effects of introducing a high-energy cut-off in the accelerated proton distribution. With cut-off energies of around 0.5-0.8 GeV and relatively hard spectra, the observed intensities and broadening can be reproduced with a single energetic proton distribution above the pion production threshold.

  8. High neutronic efficiency, low current targets for accelerator-based BNCT applications

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1998-08-01

    The neutronic efficiency of target/filters for accelerator-based BNCT applications is measured by the proton current required to achieve a desirable neutron current at the treatment port (10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}/s). In this paper the authors describe two possible targeyt/filter concepts wihch minimize the required current. Both concepts are based on the Li-7 (p,n)Be-7 reaction. Targets that operate near the threshold energy generate neutrons that are close tothe desired energy for BNCT treatment. Thus, the filter can be extremely thin ({approximately} 5 cm iron). However, this approach has an extremely low neutron yield (n/p {approximately} 1.0({minus}6)), thus requiring a high proton current. The proposed solutino is to design a target consisting of multiple extremely thin targets (proton energy loss per target {approximately} 10 keV), and re-accelerate the protons between each target. Targets operating at ihgher proton energies ({approximately} 2.5 MeV) have a much higher yield (n/p {approximately} 1.0({minus}4)). However, at these energies the maximum neutron energy is approximately 800 keV, and thus a neutron filter is required to degrade the average neutron energy to the range of interest for BNCT (10--20 keV). A neutron filter consisting of fluorine compounds and iron has been investigated for this case. Typically a proton current of approximately 5 mA is required to generate the desired neutron current at the treatment port. The efficiency of these filter designs can be further increased by incorporating neutron reflectors that are co-axial with the neutron source. These reflectors are made of materials which have high scattering cross sections in the range 0.1--1.0 MeV.

  9. Pulsed Laser Deposition of High Temperature Protonic Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred W.; Berger, M. H.; Sayir, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition has been used to fabricate nanostructured BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3- sigma) films. Protonic conduction of fabricated BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) films was compared to sintered BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma). Sintered samples and laser targets were prepared by sintering BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) powders derived by solid state synthesis. Films 1 to 8 micron thick were deposited by KrF excimer laser on porous Al2O3 substrates. Thin films were fabricated at deposition temperatures of 700 to 950 C at O2 pressures up to 200 mTorr using laser pulse energies of 0.45 - 0.95 J. Fabricated films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and electrical impedance spectroscopy. Single phase BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) films with a columnar growth morphology are observed with preferred crystal growth along the [100] or [001] direction. Results indicate [100] growth dependence upon laser pulse energy. Electrical conductivity of bulk samples produced by solid state sintering and thin film samples were measured over a temperature range of 100 C to 900 C. Electrical conduction behavior was dependent upon film deposition temperature. Maximum conductivity occurs at deposition temperature of 900 oC; the electrical conductivity exceeds the sintered specimen. All other deposited films exhibit a lower electrical conductivity than the sintered specimen. Activation energy for electrical conduction showed dependence upon deposition temperature, it varied

  10. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P. Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2014-03-15

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, −2 to −4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup −3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  11. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Patil, D. S.; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-03-01

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20-40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, -2 to -4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30-40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600-1000 W of microwave power, 800-1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2-3.9) × 10-3 mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  12. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Mishra, L; Kewlani, H; Patil, D S; Mittal, K C

    2014-03-01

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20-40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, -2 to -4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30-40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600-1000 W of microwave power, 800-1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2-3.9) × 10(-3) mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  13. High efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sah, C. Tang

    1986-01-01

    A review of the entire research program since its inception ten years ago is given. The initial effort focused on the effects of impurities on the efficiency of silicon solar cells to provide figures of maximum allowable impurity density for efficiencies up to about 16 to 17%. Highly accurate experimental techniques were extended to characterize the recombination properties of the residual imputities in the silicon solar cell. A numerical simulator of the solar cell was also developed, using the Circuit Technique for Semiconductor Analysis. Recent effort focused on the delineation of the material and device parameters which limited the silicon efficiency to below 20% and on an investigation of cell designs to break the 20% barrier. Designs of the cell device structure and geometry can further reduce recombination losses as well as the sensitivity and criticalness of the fabrication technology required to exceed 20%. Further research is needed on the fundamental characterization of the carrier recombination properties at the chemical impurity and physical defect centers. It is shown that only single crystalline silicon cell technology can be successful in attaining efficiencies greater than 20%.

  14. High-efficiency organic electrophosphorescent devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Mark E.; Lamansky, Sergey; Djurovich, Peter; Murphy, Drew; Abdel-Razaq, Feras; Forrest, Stephen R.; Baldo, Marc A.; Burrows, Paul E.; Adachi, Chihaya; Zhou, Theodore X.; Michalski, Lech A.; Rajan, Kamala; Brown, Julie J.

    2001-02-01

    We have fabricated saturated red, orange, yellow and green OLEDs, utilizing phosphorescent dopants. Using phosphorescence based emitters we have eliminated the inherent 25% upper limit on emission observed for traditional fluorescence based systems. The quantum efficiencies of these devices are quite good, with measured external efficiencies > 15% and > 40 lum/W (green) in the best devices. The phosphorescent dopants in these devices are heavy metal containing molecules (i.e. Pt, and Ir), prepared as both metalloporphyrins and organometallic complexes. The high level of spin orbit coupling in these metal complexes gives efficient emission from triplet states. In addition to emission from the heavy metal dopant, it is possible to transfer the exciton energy to a fluorescent dye, by Forster energy transfer. The heavy metal dopant in this case acts as a sensitizer, utilizing both singlet and triplet excitons to efficiently pump a fluorescent dye. We discuss the important parameters in designing electrophosphorescent OLEDs as well as their strengths and limitations. Accelerated aging studies, on packaged devices, have shown that phosphorescence based OLEDs can have very long device lifetimes.