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Sample records for highly ionized gas

  1. Highly ionized atoms in cooling gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, R. J.; Chevalier, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The ionization of low density gas cooling from a high temperature was calculated. The evolution during the cooling is assumed to be isochoric, isobaric, or a combination of these cases. The calculations are used to predict the column densities and ultraviolet line luminosities of highly ionized atoms in cooling gas. In a model for cooling of a hot galactic corona, it is shown that the observed value of N(N V) can be produced in the cooling gas, while the predicted value of N(Si IV) falls short of the observed value by a factor of about 5. The same model predicts fluxes of ultraviolet emission lines that are a factor of 10 lower than the claimed detections of Feldman, Brune, and Henry. Predictions are made for ultraviolet lines in cooling flows in early-type galaxies and clusters of galaxies. It is shown that the column densities of interest vary over a fairly narrow range, while the emission line luminosities are simply proportional to the mass inflow rate.

  2. Highly ionized gas in the Galactic halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    1994-01-01

    We reexamine the values of electron density n(sub e) and gas pressure P/k in the interstellar medium (ISM) of the Galactic halo, as inferred from C IV emission and absorption lines and using current C IV atomic data. In a homogeneous model with 4.7 less than or equal to log T less than or equal to 5.3, the data are consistent with 0.01 less than or equal to n(sub e) less than or equal to 0.02/cu cm and 2200 less than or equal to P/k less than or equal to 3700/cu cm K, a factor of 2-3 higher than advocated by Martin & Bowyer (1990) and comparable to the thermal pressure in the disk. If some of the C IV absorption arises from nonemitting, photoionized gas, then the inferred density and pressure will increase accordingly. The volume filling factor for homogeneous models ranges from 0.5% to 5%. Because of the constraints arising from filling factor and radiated power, most of the C IV must arise from gas near the peak of the cooling curve, at log t less than or equal to 5.6. We relate both emission-line and absorption-line observations to recent models in which turbulent mixing layers and isobarically cooling supernova remnants (SNRs) provide significant amounts of halo gas at approximately 10(exp 5.3) K and process 20-40 solar mass/yr with a power of approximately 10(exp 41) ergs/sec. Since the observed C IV and N V absorption scale heights have been reported to differ, at 4.9 kpc and 1.6 kpc, respectively, we examine inhomogeneous models with different exponential scale heights of T, P, and SN energy input. The ISM may change its character with distance above the Galactic plane, as superbubbles and mixing layers dominate over isolated SNRs as the source of the C IV. For appropiate scale heights, the midplane pressure is twice the homogeneous values quoted above. The O IV lambda 1034 diffuse emission line, which can be used as a temperature diagnostic of the hot gas, is predicted to be comparable in strength to that of C IV lambda 1549 (approximately 6000 photons

  3. Highly Ionized Gas as a Diagnostic of the Inner NLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, M. J.; Mullaney, J.; Jin, C.; Davies, R.

    2010-05-01

    The spectra of AGN, from the ultraviolet to the near infrared, exhibit emission lines covering a wide range of ionization states, from neutral species such as [O i] λ 6300, up to [Fe iv] λ 5303. Here we report on some recent studies of the properties of highly ionized lines (HILs), plus two case studies of individual objects. Future IFU observations at high spatial and good spectral resolution will probe the excitation and kinematics of the gas in the zone between the extended NLR and unresolved BLR. Multi-component SED fitting can be used to link the source of photoionization with the strengths and ratios of the HILs.

  4. Gentle protein ionization assisted by high-velocity gas flow.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengxiang; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng; Hawkridge, Adam M; Muddiman, David C

    2005-10-01

    Gentle protein electrospray ionization is achieved using the high-velocity gas flow of an air amplifier to improve desolvation in conventional ESI and generate intact folded protein ions in the gas phase. Comparisons are made between the ESI spectra of a number of model proteins, including ubiquitin, cytochrome c, lysozyme, and myoglobin, over a range of pH values under optimized conditions, with and without using an air amplifier to achieve high-velocity gas flow. Previously reported increased ion signals are confirmed. In addition, the peaks recorded using the air amplifier are shown to be narrower, corresponding to more complete desolvation. Significant changes in the charge-state distribution also are observed, with a shift to lower charge state at high-velocity flow. The relationship between the observed charge-state distribution and protein conformation was explored by comparing the charge-state shifts and the distributions of charge states for proteins that are or are not stable in their native conformations in low pH solutions. The data suggest retention of native or nativelike protein conformations using the air amplifier in all cases examined. This is explained by a mechanism in which the air amplifier rapidly creates small droplets from the original large ESI droplets and these microdroplets then desolvate without a significant decrease in pH, resulting in retention of the folded protein conformations. Furthermore, the holoform of ionized myoglobin is visible at pH 3.5, a much lower value than the minimum needed to see this form in conventional ESI. These results provide evidence for the importance of the conditions used in the desolvation process for the preservation of the protein conformation and suggest that the conditions achieved when using high-velocity gas flows to assist droplet evaporation and ion desolvation are much gentler than those in conventional ESI experiments.

  5. The highly ionized, high-velocity gas in NGC 6231

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Derck

    2017-02-01

    It is well known that clusters of massive stars are influenced by the presence of strong winds, that they are sources of diffuse X-rays from shocked gas, and that this gas can be vented into the surrounding region or the halo through the champagne effect. However, the details of how these different environments interact and evolve are far from complete. This paper attributes the broad C IVλλ1500 absorption features (extending to -1900 km s-1) that are seen in the spectra of main sequence B stars in NGC 6231 to gas in the cluster environment and not the B stars themselves. It is shown that the presence of a WC star, WR 79, in the cluster makes this gas detectable because its wind enriches the cluster gas with carbon. Given the available data, it is not clear whether the absorbing gas is simply the far wind of WR 79 or a collective cluster wind enriched by carbon from the wind of WR 79. If it is simply due to the wind, then this wind must flow, unimpeded for more than 2 pc, suggesting that the inner region of the cluster is nearly devoid of obstructing material. If it is actually a collective wind from the cluster, then we could be witnessing an important stage of galactic feedback. In either case, the observations provide a unique and significant piece to the puzzle of how massive, open clusters evolve.

  6. Properties of the highly ionized disk and halo gas toward two distant high-latitude stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) intermediate -resolution observations of S III, Si III, Al III, Si IV, C IV, and N V absorption along the sight lines to HD 18100 (l = 217.9 deg, b = -62.7, d = 3.1 kpc, z = -2.8 kpc) and HD 100340 (l = 258.9 deg, b = +61.2 deg, d = 5.3 kpc, z = 4.6 kpc) are presented. These small science aperture spectra have resolutions ranging from 11 to 20 km/s full width at half maximum (FWHM) and S/N from 30 to 65 per diode substep. Strong absorption by moderately and highly ionized gas is seen in each direction. The absorption in the direction of the south Galactic polar region (HD 18100) is kinematically simple, while the absorption in the direction of north Galactic polar region (HD 100304) is kinematically complex. In each case the absorption by the highly ionized gas lies within the velocity range of absorption by neutral and weakly ionized gas. Along each sight line, the velocity dispersion determined from the unsaturated absorption lines increases with the energy required to create each ion. The logarithmic column densities for Al III, Si IV, C IV, and N V are log N(atoms/sq cm = 12.71, 13.10, 13.58, and 12.75 toward HD 18100 and log N = 12.88, 13.31, 13.83, and 13.04 toward HD 100340. Average ionic ratios among these species are very similar along the two sight lines. Differences in profile shape between the absorption for AL II, Si IV, C IV, and N V provide additional support for the claim of Savage, Sembach, & Cardelli (1994) that there exists two types of highly ionized gas in the interstellar medium. One type of highly ionized gas is responsible for the structured Si IV absorption and part of the C IV absorption. In this gas N(C IV)/N(Si IV) approximately 3.0 and N(C IV)/N(N V) greater than 6. The absorption by this gas seems to be associated with some type of self-regulating interface or mixing layer between the warm and hot interstellar medium. The other type of highly ionized gas is responsible for most of the N V

  7. Gas ionization induced by a high speed plasma injection in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Obayashi, T.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Gas ionization induced by a fast plasma injection has been observed with the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) Experiment on Spacelab-1. When an impulsive high-density plasma was injected from the orbiter, waves near the lower-hybrid frequency were enhanced, and the surrounding gas drifting with the orbiter was ionized for several tens of milliseconds after the plasma injection. The long-duration gas ionization was observed only when the plasma flux incoming to the orbiter cargo bay and the orbital velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field were relatively large. This effect has been explained by the concept of critical velocity ionization (CVI) for the gas drifting with the orbiter, although the gas velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field was less than the Alfven critical velocity.

  8. Ionization processes in combined high-voltage nanosecond - laser discharges in inert gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Shneider, Mikhail; PU Team

    2016-09-01

    Remote control of plasmas induced by laser radiation in the atmosphere is one of the challenging issues of free space communication, long-distance energy transmission, remote sensing of the atmosphere, and standoff detection of trace gases and bio-threat species. Sequences of laser pulses, as demonstrated by an extensive earlier work, offer an advantageous tool providing access to the control of air-plasma dynamics and optical interactions. The avalanche ionization induced in a pre-ionized region by infrared laser pulses where investigated. Pre-ionization was created by an ionization wave, initiated by high-voltage nanosecond pulse. Then, behind the front of ionization wave extra avalanche ionization was initiated by the focused infrared laser pulse. The experiment was carried out in argon. It is shown that the gas pre-ionization inhibits the laser spark generation under low pressure conditions.

  9. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    SciTech Connect

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Walz, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-06-17

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. In our research, we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m-1, over ~20 cm. Lastly, the results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.

  10. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    DOE PAGES

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; ...

    2016-06-17

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. In our research, we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by upmore » to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m-1, over ~20 cm. Lastly, the results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.« less

  11. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    PubMed Central

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Walz, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. Here we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ∼150 GV m−1, over ∼20 cm. The results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources. PMID:27312720

  12. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report.

  13. Towards high-resolution laser ionization spectroscopy of the heaviest elements in supersonic gas jet expansion

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, R.; Barzakh, A.; Bastin, B.; Beerwerth, R.; Block, M.; Creemers, P.; Grawe, H.; de Groote, R.; Delahaye, P.; Fléchard, X.; Franchoo, S.; Fritzsche, S.; Gaffney, L. P.; Ghys, L.; Gins, W.; Granados, C.; Heinke, R.; Hijazi, L.; Huyse, M.; Kron, T.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lecesne, N.; Loiselet, M.; Lutton, F.; Moore, I. D.; Martínez, Y.; Mogilevskiy, E.; Naubereit, P.; Piot, J.; Raeder, S.; Rothe, S.; Savajols, H.; Sels, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Thomas, J-C; Traykov, E.; Van Beveren, C.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K.; Zadvornaya, A.

    2017-01-01

    Resonant laser ionization and spectroscopy are widely used techniques at radioactive ion beam facilities to produce pure beams of exotic nuclei and measure the shape, size, spin and electromagnetic multipole moments of these nuclei. However, in such measurements it is difficult to combine a high efficiency with a high spectral resolution. Here we demonstrate the on-line application of atomic laser ionization spectroscopy in a supersonic gas jet, a technique suited for high-precision studies of the ground- and isomeric-state properties of nuclei located at the extremes of stability. The technique is characterized in a measurement on actinium isotopes around the N=126 neutron shell closure. A significant improvement in the spectral resolution by more than one order of magnitude is achieved in these experiments without loss in efficiency. PMID:28224987

  14. Towards high-resolution laser ionization spectroscopy of the heaviest elements in supersonic gas jet expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, R.; Barzakh, A.; Bastin, B.; Beerwerth, R.; Block, M.; Creemers, P.; Grawe, H.; de Groote, R.; Delahaye, P.; Fléchard, X.; Franchoo, S.; Fritzsche, S.; Gaffney, L. P.; Ghys, L.; Gins, W.; Granados, C.; Heinke, R.; Hijazi, L.; Huyse, M.; Kron, T.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lecesne, N.; Loiselet, M.; Lutton, F.; Moore, I. D.; Martínez, Y.; Mogilevskiy, E.; Naubereit, P.; Piot, J.; Raeder, S.; Rothe, S.; Savajols, H.; Sels, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Thomas, J.-C.; Traykov, E.; van Beveren, C.; van den Bergh, P.; van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K.; Zadvornaya, A.

    2017-02-01

    Resonant laser ionization and spectroscopy are widely used techniques at radioactive ion beam facilities to produce pure beams of exotic nuclei and measure the shape, size, spin and electromagnetic multipole moments of these nuclei. However, in such measurements it is difficult to combine a high efficiency with a high spectral resolution. Here we demonstrate the on-line application of atomic laser ionization spectroscopy in a supersonic gas jet, a technique suited for high-precision studies of the ground- and isomeric-state properties of nuclei located at the extremes of stability. The technique is characterized in a measurement on actinium isotopes around the N=126 neutron shell closure. A significant improvement in the spectral resolution by more than one order of magnitude is achieved in these experiments without loss in efficiency.

  15. High-Ionization Gas Associated with a Supershell Surrounding the Perseus OB1 Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauth, D. C.; Howk, J. C.; Sembach, K. R.; Lauroesch, J. T.; Meyer, D. M.

    2002-05-01

    We present Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of high-ionization interstellar absorption toward HD 14434, an O5.5 V star in the Per OB1 Association. This star lies in the direction of the H I supershell GS139-03-69 (Heiles 1979, ApJ, 229, 533). In addition, a supershell-like bubble is detected from WHAM maps of the Perseus arm (Madsen, Haffner, & Reynolds astro-ph/0112232). We detect intermediate velocity interstellar Si IV and C IV absorption centered at VLSR = -73 km s-1, while low-ionization Perseus arm gas is detected at approximately -50 km s-1. Neither N V nor O VI is detected at these velocities, although Fe III, a tracer of warm ionized gas, is seen. The column densities in the -73 km s-1 component are log N(C IV}) = 13.93 +/- 0.02, log N(Si IV}) = 13.35 +/- 0.02, log N(N V}) <= 12.65, and log N(O VI}) <= 13.32. The observed C IV/Si IV ratio of 3.8 +/- 0.3 is similar to the Galactic average. Analysis of the C IV and Si IV line widths yields a temperature of T ~ 12,000 K for this component. No C IV or Si IV is produced via collisions at such low temperatures. We explore two models for the origins of the intermediate velocity C IV and Si IV absorption: photoionization or non-equilibrium collisional processes. Either of these could be related to the origins of the high-ionization gas with a supershell. This work is based on data obtained for the Guaranteed Time Team by the NASA-CNES-CSA FUSE mission. Financial support has been provided by NASA contract NAS5-32985.

  16. Highly ionized atoms in cooling gas. [in model for cooling of hot Galactic corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, Richard J.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    1986-01-01

    The ionization of low density gas cooling from a high temperature was calculated. The evolution during the cooling is assumed to be isochoric, isobaric, or a combination of these cases. The calculations are used to predict the column densities and ultraviolet line luminosities of highly ionized atoms in cooling gas. In a model for cooling of a hot galactic corona, it is shown that the observed value of N(N V) can be produced in the cooling gas, while the predicted value of N(Si IV) falls short of the observed value by a factor of about 5. The same model predicts fluxes of ultraviolet emission lines that are a factor of 10 lower than the claimed detections of Feldman, Bruna, and Henry. Predictions are made for ultraviolet lines in cooling flows in early-type galaxies and clusters of galaxies. It is shown that the column densities of interest vary over a fairly narrow range, while the emission line luminosities are simply proportional to the mass inflow rate.

  17. High performance mini-gas chromatography-flame ionization detector system based on micro gas chromatography column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jianhai; Ning, Zhanwu; Zhang, Yanni; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was a very important measure for preventing environmental pollution, therefore, a mini gas chromatography (GC) flame ionization detector (FID) system integrated with a mini H2 generator and a micro GC column was developed for environmental VOC monitoring. In addition, the mini H2 generator was able to make the system explode from far away due to the abandoned use of a high pressure H2 source. The experimental result indicates that the fabricated mini GC FID system demonstrated high repeatability and very good linear response, and was able to rapidly monitor complicated environmental VOC samples.

  18. Determination of nitrogen monoxide in high purity nitrogen gas with an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, K.

    1985-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometric (API-MS) method was studied for the determination of residual NO in high purity N2 gas. The API-MS is very sensitive to NO, but the presence of O2 interferes with the NO measurement. Nitrogen gas in cylinders as sample gas was mixed with NO standard gas and/or O2 standard gas, and then introduced into the API-MS. The calibration curves of NO and O2 has linearity in the region of 0 - 2 ppm, but the slopes changed with every cylinder. The effect of O2 on NO+ peak was additive and proportional to O2 concentration in the range of 0 - 0.5 ppm. The increase in NO+ intensity due to O2 was (0.07 - 0.13)%/O2, 1 ppm. Determination of NO and O2 was carried out by the standard addition method to eliminate the influence of variation of slopes. The interference due to O2 was estimated from the product of the O2 concentration and the ratio of slope A to Slope B. Slope A is the change in the NO+ intensity with the O2 concentration. Slope B is the intensity with O2 concentration.

  19. High-ionization Gas in Active Galactic Nuclei: Line Profiles and Physical Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodíguez-Ardila, A.; Riffel, R.; Mazzalay, X.; Portilla, J. G.

    2012-08-01

    SOAR/Goodman spectroscopy is employed to detect the coronal lines [Fe VII] 3759, 5159, and 6087 Å, [Ne V] 3423 Å and [Fe X] 6083 Å, the former three suitable to determine the temperature and density of the high-ionization gas. The spectra allow us to fully characterize the profiles of the most conspicuous lines (asymmetries, shifts from the centroid position and line width). The combined results allow us to detect signatures of outflows in the coronal gas and thus set up constrains on the origin of the CLs in AGNs. In addition, AO GEMINI/NIFS IFU spectroscopy is used to study the coronal gas morphology at spatial scales of a few parsecs in the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. We found that the gas distribution is rather inhomogeneous and asymmetric. From the comparison of the CL [Mg VIII] with the VLA 6 cm radio emission we found evidence that the CL gas kinematics and morphology is strongly related to the radio jet morphology. All above results allow us to confirm the role that coronal lines have to trace outflows at the inner tens of parsecs of AGNs.

  20. Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Huston, Gregg C.

    1992-01-01

    A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatrography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by UV photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the UV photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector.

  1. The Connection Between Reddening, Gas Covering Fraction, and the Escape of Ionizing Radiation at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Naveen A.; Steidel, Charles C.; Pettini, Max; Bogosavljević, Milan; Shapley, Alice E.

    2016-09-01

    Using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed z∼ 3 galaxies, we establish an empirical relationship between reddening (E(B-V)), neutral gas covering fraction ({f}{{cov}}({{H}} {{I}})), and the escape of ionizing (Lyman continuum, LyC) photons. Our sample includes 933 galaxies at z∼ 3,121 of which have deep spectroscopic observations (≳ 7 hr) at 850≲ {λ }{{rest}}≲ 1300 Å with the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrograph on Keck. The high covering fraction of outflowing optically thick {{H}} {{I}} indicated by the composite spectra of these galaxies implies that photoelectric absorption, rather than dust attenuation, dominates the depletion of LyC photons. By modeling the composite spectra as the combination of an unattenuated stellar spectrum including nebular continuum emission with one that is absorbed by {{H}} {{I}} and reddened by a line-of-sight extinction, we derive an empirical relationship between E(B-V) and {f}{{cov}}({{H}} {{I}}). Galaxies with redder UV continua have larger covering fractions of {{H}} {{I}} characterized by higher line-of-sight extinctions. We develop a model which connects the ionizing escape fraction with E(B-V), and which may be used to estimate the ionizing escape fraction for an ensemble of galaxies. Alternatively, direct measurements of the escape fraction for our sample allow us to constrain the intrinsic LyC-to-UV flux density ratio to be < S(900 \\mathring{{A}} )/S(1500 \\mathring{{A}} ){> }{{int}}≳ 0.20, a value that favors stellar population models that include weaker stellar winds, a flatter initial mass function, and/or binary evolution. Last, we demonstrate how the framework discussed here may be used to assess the pathways by which ionizing radiation escapes from high-redshift galaxies. Based on data obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous

  2. The Properties and the Evolution of the Highly Ionized Gas in MR 2251-178

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaspi, Shai; Netzer, hagai; Chelouche, Doron; George, Ian M.; Nandra, Kirpal; Turner, T. J.

    2004-01-01

    We present the first XMM-Newton observations of the radio-quiet quasar MR 2251-178 obtained in 2000 and 2002. The EPIC-pn spectra show a power-law continuum with a slope of Gamma = 1.6 at high energies absorbed by at least two warm absorbers (WAs) intrinsic to the source. The underlying continuum in the earlier observation shows a soft excess at low X-ray energies which can be modeled as an additional power-law with Gamma = 2.9. The spectra also show a weak narrow iron K alpha emission line. The high-resolution grating spectrum obtained in 2002 shows emission lines from N VI, O VII, O VIII, Ne IX, and Ne X, as well as absorption lines from the low-ionization ions of O III, O IV, and O V, and other confirmed and suspected weaker absorption lines. The O III - O V lines are consistent with the properties of the emission line gas observed as extended optical (O III) emission in this source. The signal-to-noise of the 2000 grating data is too low to detect any lines. We suggest a model for the high-resolution spectrum which consist of two or three warm-absorber (WA) components. The two-components model has a high-ionization WA with a column density of 10(exp 21.5)-10 (exp 21.8) sq cm and a low-ionization absorber with a column density of 10(exp 20.3) sq cm. In the three-components model we add a lower ionization component that produces the observed iron M-shell absorption lines. We investigate the spectral variations in MR 2251-178 over a period of 8.5 years using data from ASCA, BeppoSAX, and XMM-Newton. All X-ray observations can be fitted with the above two power laws and the two absorbers. The observed luminosity variations seems to correlate with variations in the soft X-ray continuum. The 8.5 year history of the source suggests a changing X-ray absorber due to material that enters and disappears from the line-of-sight on timescales of several months. We also present, for the first time, the entire FUSE spectrum of MR 2251-178. We detect emission from N III, C III

  3. High S/N Observations of Low-Ionization Gas Through the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. M.; Roth, K. C.; Savage, B. D.; Lu, L.

    1993-12-01

    Optical absorption-line studies of extragalactic objects can now provide a sensitive probe of low-ionization gas over the full extent of the Galactic halo. Such work is particularly pertinent to a better understanding of the distances, metallicities, and sky coverage of the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) primarily observed in H I 21 cm emission. We have recently obtained high S/N, high resolution (20 km s(-1) ) KPNO 4-m echelle observations of the Ca II absorption toward the QSO 1821+643, the Seyfert galaxy Mkn 231, and SN 1993J in the galaxy M81. We detect a weak (W_lambda ~30 m Angstroms) Ca II component at an LSR velocity of -140 km s(-1) toward 1821+643 that corresponds to the Outer Arm H I HVC Complex. In the case of Mkn 231, we find no evidence of high-velocity Ca II absorption despite the location of this sightline near H I HVC Complex C. Our Ca II observations toward SN 1993J are especially exceptional in quality (S/N~500) and reveal absorption due to the Galactic halo, the disk of M81, and intergalactic material in the M81 group. Although the M81 disk gas dominates the absorption in the velocity region encompassing HVC Complex C, we do find a high-velocity component at +228 km s(-1) in Ca II that has also been seen in Mg II absorption with HST (Bowen et al. 1994, Ap. J. (Letters), in press). Our echelle spectra of SN 1993J also reveal detections of other interstellar atoms and molecules such as Ti II, Ca I, and CH(+) \\@. The Ti II measurement is particularly interesting in that it represents the first detection of Ti II toward an extragalactic object and indicates a Ti II scale height of about 1200 pc which is somewhat less than expected from observations of Ti II toward halo stars.

  4. FUSE and STIS Observations of Highly Ionized Gas along the Line of Sight towards HD 116852

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, A. J.; Savage, B. D.; Fabian, D.; Richter, P.; Sembach, K. R.; Meyer, D. M.; Lauroesch, J.; Howk, J. C.

    2002-05-01

    We present Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of high ion interstellar ultraviolet absorption along the sight line to HD 116852. At a distance of 4.8 kpc, HD 116852 is an O9 III star lying in the low Galactic halo, -1.3 kpc from the plane of the Galaxy in the direction l = 304.9o, b = -6.1o. The sight line passes underneath the Sagittarius-Carina and the Norma-Centaurus spiral arms. The STIS E140H grating observations provide high-resolution (FWHM ≈ 2.7 km s-1) spectra of the resonance doublets of Si 4, C 4 and N 5. These data are complemented by medium-resolution (FWHM ≈ 20 km s-1) FUSE spectra of O 6. We find evidence for three distinct types of absorbing gas present in the data. First, two narrow absorption components are resolved in the Si 4 and \\ion {C}{4} profiles, at approximate LSR velocities of -36 and -10 km s-1. These narrow components appear to be produced in gas associated with the Norma and Sagittarius spiral arms, at approximate z-distances of -1.0 and -0.5 kpc respectively. The temperature of the gas in in these narrow components, as implied by their b-values, suggests that the gas is photoionized. The ratio of C 4 to Si 4 in these narrow components is low compared to the Galactic average. Second, we detect an intermediate-width component in C 4 and Si 4, at +17 km s-1, which we propose could arise at the conductive interface at the boundary between a dense cloud and the surrounding medium. Finally, a broad collisionally ionized component of gas responsible for producing the smooth N 5 and O 6 profiles is observed; such absorption is also present to a lesser degree in the profiles of Si 4 and \\ion {C}{4}. The broad O 6 absorption is observed at a velocity displaced from the C 4 profile by almost 20 km s-1, an amount large enough to suggest that the two ions may not co-exist in the same physical location. If these two ions do exist together, then the ratio N(C 4)/N(O 6) is

  5. Ionized gas kinematics at high resolution. IV. Star formation and a rotating core in the Medusa (NGC 4194)

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Sara C.; Lacy, John; Turner, Jean; Greathouse, Thomas; Neff, Susan

    2014-05-20

    NGC 4194 is a post-merger starburst known as The Medusa for its striking tidal features. We present here a detailed study of the structure and kinematics of ionized gas in the central 0.65 kpc of the Medusa. The data include radio continuum maps with resolution up to 0.''18 (35 pc) and a 12.8 μm [Ne II] data cube with spectral resolution ∼4 km s{sup –1}: the first high-resolution, extinction-free observations of this remarkable object. The ionized gas has the kinematic signature of a core in solid-body rotation. The starburst has formed a complex of bright compact H II regions, probably excited by deeply embedded super star clusters, but none of these sources is a convincing candidate for a Galactic nucleus. The nuclei of the merger partners that created the Medusa have not yet been identified.

  6. Ionized Gas Kinematics at High Resolution. IV. Star Formation and a Rotating Core in the Medusa (NGC 4194)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Sara C.; Lacy, John; Turner, Jean; Greathouse, Thomas; Neff, Susan

    2014-05-01

    NGC 4194 is a post-merger starburst known as The Medusa for its striking tidal features. We present here a detailed study of the structure and kinematics of ionized gas in the central 0.65 kpc of the Medusa. The data include radio continuum maps with resolution up to 0.''18 (35 pc) and a 12.8 μm [Ne II] data cube with spectral resolution ~4 km s-1: the first high-resolution, extinction-free observations of this remarkable object. The ionized gas has the kinematic signature of a core in solid-body rotation. The starburst has formed a complex of bright compact H II regions, probably excited by deeply embedded super star clusters, but none of these sources is a convincing candidate for a Galactic nucleus. The nuclei of the merger partners that created the Medusa have not yet been identified.

  7. Ionized Gas Kinematics at High Resolution. IV. Star Formation and a Rotating Core in the Medusa (NGC 4194)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Sara C.; Lacy, John; Neff, Susan Gale; Turner, Jean; Greathouse, Thomas; Neff, Susan

    2014-01-01

    NGC 4194 is a post-merger starburst known as The Medusa for its striking tidal features.We present here a detailed study of the structure and kinematics of ionized gas in the central 0.65 kpc of the Medusa. The data include radio continuum maps with resolution up to 0".18 (35 pc) and a 12.8 micron [Ne II] data cube with spectral resolution approx. 4 km/s: the first high-resolution, extinction-free observations of this remarkable object. The ionized gas has the kinematic signature of a core in solid-body rotation. The starburst has formed a complex of bright compact H II regions, probably excited by deeply embedded super star clusters, but none of these sources is a convincing candidate for a Galactic nucleus. The nuclei of the merger partners that created the Medusa have not yet been identified.

  8. Highly ionized gas absorption in the disk and halo toward HD 167756 at 3.5 kilometers per second resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Cardelli, Jason A.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of interstellar Si IV, C IV, and N V absorption lines along the 4 kpc path to the inner Galaxy star HD 167756 at z = -0.85 kpc are presented. The spectra were obtained with the echelle mode of Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and have signal-to-noise ratios ranging from 23 to 38. The high resolution of the measurements full width at half maximum (FWHM = 3.5 km/s) results in fully resolved line profiles for the highly ionized gas absorption. The measurements provide information on the column density per unit velocity, N(v), as a function of velocity for Si IV, C IV, and N V. The C IV and N V profiles extend from -70 to +70 km/s, while the Si IV profiles extend from -40 to +70 km/s. The integrated logarithmic column densities are long N(Si IV) = 13.09 +/- 0.02, log N(C IV) = 13.83 +/- 0.02, and log N(N V) = 13.56 +/- 0.03. The N V profile is broad, asymmetric, and featureless, while the Si IV profile contains narrow absorption components near V(sub LSR) = -19, 0, +20, and +52 km/s with Doppler spread parameters, b about = 10-12 km/s. The C IV profile contains both broad and narrow structure. The high ion feature near +52 km/s is also detected in the low-ionization lines of Ca II, O I, Si II, and Fe II. The other narrow Si IV and C IV components occur within several km/s of components seen in low-ionization species. The sight line contains at least two types of highly ionized gas. One type gives rise to a broad N V profile, and the other results in the more structured Si IV profile. The C IV profile contains contributions from both types of highly ionized gas. The broad but asymmetric N V profile is well represented by a large Galactic scale height gas which is participating in Galactic rotation and has a combination of thermal and turbulent broadening with b(sub tot) about = 42 km/s. The C IV to N V abundance ratio of 1.0 +/- 0.3 for the gas implies T about 1.6 x 10(exp 5) K or about 8 x 10

  9. Present-day Galactic Evolution: Low-metallicity, Warm, Ionized Gas Inflow Associated with High-velocity Cloud Complex A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, K. A.; Haffner, L. M.; Wakker, B. P.; Hill, Alex. S.; Madsen, G. J.; Duncan, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    The high-velocity cloud Complex A is a probe of the physical conditions in the Galactic halo. The kinematics, morphology, distance, and metallicity of Complex A indicate that it represents new material that is accreting onto the Galaxy. We present Wisconsin Hα Mapper kinematically resolved observations of Complex A over the velocity range of -250 to -50 km s-1 in the local standard of rest reference frame. These observations include the first full Hα intensity map of Complex A across (\\mathit {l, b}) = (124{^\\circ }, 18{^\\circ }) to (171°, 53°) and deep targeted observations in Hα, [S II] λ6716, [N II] λ6584, and [O I] λ6300 toward regions with high H I column densities, background quasars, and stars. The Hα data imply that the masses of neutral and ionized material in the cloud are similar, both being greater than 106 M ⊙. We find that the Bland-Hawthorn & Maloney model for the intensity of the ionizing radiation near the Milky Way is consistent with the known distance of the high-latitude part of Complex A and an assumed cloud geometry that puts the lower-latitude parts of the cloud at a distance of 7-8 kpc. This compatibility implies a 5% ionizing photon escape fraction from the Galactic disk. We also provide the nitrogen and sulfur upper abundance solutions for a series of temperatures, metallicities, and cloud configurations for purely photoionized gas; these solutions are consistent with the sub-solar abundances found by previous studies, especially for temperatures above 104 K or for gas with a high fraction of singly ionized nitrogen and sulfur.

  10. Double ionization effect in electron accelerations by high-intensity laser pulse interaction with a neutral gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandan Gupta, Devki

    2013-11-01

    We study the effect of laser-induced double-ionization of a helium gas (with inhomogeneous density profile) on vacuum electron acceleration. For enough laser intensity, helium gas can be found doubly ionized and it strengthens the divergence of the pulse. The double ionization of helium gas can defocus the laser pulse significantly, and electrons are accelerated by the front of the laser pulse in vacuum and then decelerated by the defocused trail part of the laser pulse. It is observed that the electrons experience a very low laser-intensity at the trailing part of the laser pulse. Hence, there is not much electron deceleration at the trailing part of the pulse. We found that the inhomogeneity of the neutral gas reduced the rate of tunnel ionization causing less defocusing of the laser pulse and thus the electron energy gain is reduced.

  11. Highly ionized gas in the Gum nebula and elsewhere - A comparison of IUE and Copernicus satellite results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, Richard J.; Savage, Blair D.

    1992-01-01

    The data from six high-dispersion IUE echelle spectra are averaged in order to obtain an interstellar absorption line spectrum with an S/N of about 30 and a resolution of about 25 km/s. The interstellar lines of C IV and Si IV are very strong and broad and N V is detected. The profiles for these species and Al III are compared to the Copernicus satellite profiles for O VI. The high ionization lines toward HD 64760 are much stronger and broader than those recorded toward Zeta Pup and Gamma super 2 Vel, the two exciting stars of the Gum nebula. The profiles for Al III and Si IV are similar and considerably narrower than the O VI profile. An origin in photoionized Gum nebula gas is suggested as the most likely explanation for Al III and Si IV. The C IV profile has a high positive velocity wing extending to approximately +80 km/s, which is similar in appearance to the positive velocity portion of the O VI profile. It is inferred that a substantial part of the observed C IV has an origin in the collisionally ionized gas most likely rsponsible for the O VI.

  12. Miniaturized gas ionization sensors using carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Modi, Ashish; Koratkar, Nikhil; Lass, Eric; Wei, Bingqing; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2003-07-10

    Gas sensors operate by a variety of fundamentally different mechanisms. Ionization sensors work by fingerprinting the ionization characteristics of distinct gases, but they are limited by their huge, bulky architecture, high power consumption and risky high-voltage operation. Here we report the fabrication and successful testing of ionization microsensors featuring the electrical breakdown of a range of gases and gas mixtures at carbon nanotube tips. The sharp tips of nanotubes generate very high electric fields at relatively low voltages, lowering breakdown voltages several-fold in comparison to traditional electrodes, and thereby enabling compact, battery-powered and safe operation of such sensors. The sensors show good sensitivity and selectivity, and are unaffected by extraneous factors such as temperature, humidity, and gas flow. As such, the devices offer several practical advantages over previously reported nanotube sensor systems. The simple, low-cost, sensors described here could be deployed for a variety of applications, such as environmental monitoring, sensing in chemical processing plants, and gas detection for counter-terrorism.

  13. Ionization in nearby interstellar gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.; Fowler, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Due to dielectric recombination, neutral magnesium represents an important tracer for the warm low-density gas around the solar system. New Mg I 2852 absorption-line data from IUE are presented, including detections in a few stars within 40 pc of the sun. The absence of detectable Mg I in Alpha CMa and other stars sets limits on the combined size and electron density of the interstellar cloud which gives rise to the local interstellar wind. For a cloud radius greater than 1 pc and density of 0.1/cu cm, the local cloud has a low fractional ionization, n(e)/n(tot) less than 0.05, if magnesium is undepleted, equilibrium conditions prevail, the cloud temperature is 11,750 K, and 80 percent of the magnesium in the sightline is Mg II.

  14. Dust and Ionized Gas in Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul

    1995-05-01

    stellar component in the centre (assuming trailing spiral arms). These findings are clear signatures of an acquisition of a companion galaxy. The radial emission-line intensity profile peaks much more strongly towards the centre than the stellar light profile does, suggesting a powerful nuclear ionization source. In Chapter 2 we present deep surface photometry of NGC 1275, the central dominant galaxy of the Perseus cluster. This peculiar galaxy features two distinct filamentary systems, 3000 km s^-1 apart in velocity space. The "host"-galaxy NGC 1275 is associated with the low-velocity system, whereas the nature of the high-velocity system is still controversial. We find that prominent dust absorption features of NGC 1275 have the same distribution on the sky as the high-velocity system of ionized gas. Hence, the dust patches are most probably associated with the high-velocity system. However, our analysis of the extinction properties of the dust patches shows that the dust is well within NGC 1275, implying that the high-velocity system has moved approximately halfway through NGC 1275. We have also found many blue star clusters in our images of NGC 1275, for which we discuss the origin and nature by comparing colour-magnitude diagrams with theoretical population models. We suggest that the blue star clusters have been formed in a cooling flow in the central part of the X-ray-emitting gas of the Perseus cluster of galaxies. Chapter 3 presents the CCD broad-band photometry of the sample ellipticals. Radial profiles of the surface brightness, colours, and characteristics of the detailed isophotal shape are derived. In addition, we show that fitting power-laws to the outer radial intensity profiles of elliptical galaxies is an excellent tool for determining the sky background for CCD photometry. Chapter 4 presents colour-index images and narrow-band images of the H-alpha+[N II]-emitting gas to derive the distribution and amount of dust and ionized gas for the sample

  15. Enhanced Stability of Electrohydrodynamic Jets through Gas Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkut, Sibel; Saville, Dudley A.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical predictions of the nonaxisymmetric instability growth rate of an electrohydrodynamic jet based on the measured total current overestimate experimental values. We show that this apparent discrepancy is the result of gas ionization in the surrounding gas and its effect on the surface charge density of the jet. As a result of gas ionization, a sudden drop in the instability growth rate occurs below a critical electrode separation, yielding highly stable jets that can be used for nano- to microscale printing.

  16. Enhanced stability of electrohydrodynamic jets through gas ionization.

    PubMed

    Korkut, Sibel; Saville, Dudley A; Aksay, Ilhan A

    2008-01-25

    Theoretical predictions of the nonaxisymmetric instability growth rate of an electrohydrodynamic jet based on the measured total current overestimate experimental values. We show that this apparent discrepancy is the result of gas ionization in the surrounding gas and its effect on the surface charge density of the jet. As a result of gas ionization, a sudden drop in the instability growth rate occurs below a critical electrode separation, yielding highly stable jets that can be used for nano- to microscale printing.

  17. Highly-Ionized Gas in the Galactic Halo: A FUSE Survey of O 6 Absorption toward 22 Halo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsargo, J.; Sembach, K. R.; Howk, J. C.; Savage, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectra of 22 Galactic halo stars are studied to determine the amount of O 6 in the Galactic halo between ~0.3 and ~10 kpc from the Galactic mid-plane. Strong O 6 λ 1031.93 absorption was detected toward 21 stars, and a reliable 3 σ upper limit was obtained toward HD 97991. The weaker member of the O 6 doublet at 1037.62 Å could be studied toward only six stars. The observed columns are reasonably consistent with a patchy exponential O 6 distribution with a mid-plane density of 1.7x10-8 cm-3 and scale height between 2.3 and 4 kpc. We do not see clear signs of strong high-velocity components in O 6 absorption along the Galactic sight lines, which indicates the general absence of high velocity O 6 within 2-5 kpc of the Galactic mid-plane. The correlation between the H 1 and O 6 intermediate velocity absorption is also poor. The O 6 velocity dispersions are much larger than the value of ~18 km/s expected from thermal broadening for gas at T ~ 3x105 K, the temperature at which O 6 is expected to reach its peak abundance in collisional ionization equilibrium. Turbulence, inflow, and outflow must have an effect on the shape of the O 6 profiles. Kinematical comparisons of O 6 with Ar 1 reveal that 9 of 21 sight lines are closely aligned in LSR velocity (|Δ VLSR| <=5 km/s ), while 8 of 21 exhibit significant velocity differences (|Δ VLSR| >= 15 km/s ). This dual behavior may indicate the presence of two different types of O 6-bearing environments toward the Galactic sight lines. Comparison of O 6 with other highly-ionized species suggests that the high ions are produced primarily by cooling hot gas in the Galactic fountain flow, and that turbulent mixing also has a significant contribution. The role of turbulent mixing is most important toward sight lines that sample supernova remnants like Loop I and IV. We are also able to show that the O 6 enhancement toward the Galactic center region that was observed in the FUSE

  18. Coupling of gas chromatography and electrospray ionization high resolution mass spectrometry for the analysis of anabolic steroids as trimethylsilyl derivatives in human urine.

    PubMed

    Cha, Eunju; Jeong, Eun Sook; Cha, Sangwon; Lee, Jaeick

    2017-04-29

    In this study, gas chromatography (GC) was interfaced with high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) with electrospray ionization source (ESI) and the relevant parameters were investigated to enhance the ionization efficiency. In GC-ESI, the distances (x-, y- and z) and angle between the ESI needle, GC capillary column and MS orifice were set to 7 (x-distance), 4 (y-distance), and 1 mm (z-distance). The ESI spray solvent, acid modifier and nebulizer gas flow were methanol, 0.1% formic acid and 5 arbitrary units, respectively. Based on these results, analytical conditions for GC-ESI/HRMS were established. In particular, the results of spray solvent flow indicated a concentration-dependent mechanism (peak dilution effect), and other parameters also greatly influenced the ionization performance. The developed GC-ESI/HRMS was then applied to the analysis of anabolic steroids as trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives in human urine to demonstrate its application. The ionization profiles of TMS-derivatized steroids were investigated and compared with those of underivatized steroids obtained from gas chromatography-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (GC-ESI/MS) and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS). The steroids exhibited ionization profiles based on their structural characteristics, regardless of the analyte phase or derivatization. Groups I and II with conjugated or unconjugated keto functional groups at C3 generated the [M+H](+) and [M+H-TMS](+) ions, respectively. On the other hand, Groups III and IV gave rise to the characteristic fragment ions [M+H-TMS-H2O](+) and [M+H-2TMS-H2O](+), corresponding to loss of a neutral TMS·H2O moiety from the protonated molecular ion by in-source dissociation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to successfully ionize and analyze steroids as TMS derivatives using ESI coupled with GC. The present system has enabled the ionization of TMS derivatives under ESI conditions and

  19. IONIZED GAS KINEMATICS AT HIGH RESOLUTION. V. [Ne ii], MULTIPLE CLUSTERS, HIGH EFFICIENCY STAR FORMATION, AND BLUE FLOWS IN HE 2–10

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Sara; Turner, Jean; Lacy, John; Greathouse, Thomas

    2015-11-20

    We measured the 12.8 μm [Ne ii] line in the dwarf starburst galaxy He 2–10 with the high-resolution spectrometer TEXES on the NASA IRTF. The data cube has a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of ∼1″ and a total velocity resolution, including thermal broadening, of ∼5 km s{sup −1}. This makes it possible to compare the kinematics of individual star-forming clumps and molecular clouds in the three dimensions of space and velocity, and allows us to determine star formation efficiencies. The kinematics of the ionized gas confirm that the starburst contains multiple dense clusters. From the M/R of the clusters and the ≃30%–40% star formation efficiencies, the clusters are likely to be bound and long lived, like globulars. Non-gravitational features in the line profiles show how the ionized gas flows through the ambient molecular material, as well as a narrow velocity feature, which we identify with the interface of the H ii region and a cold dense clump. These data offer an unprecedented view of the interaction of embedded H ii regions with their environment.

  20. The distribution of warm ionized gas in NGC 891

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, Richard J.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Hester, J. Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Narrow-band imaging is presented of the edge-on spiral NGC 891 in the H-alpha and S II 6716, 6731 A forbidden lines. Emission from H II regions confined to the plane of the galaxy and from diffuse gas up to about 4 kpc off the plane is readily detected. The full radial extent of the diffuse emission in the plane is about 30 kpc. NGC 891 is found to have a surface density of diffuse ionized gas twice the Galactic value, a thicker ionized gas layer, and a larger surface density of ionized gas relative to neutral gas. These are interpreted as consequences of a relatively high level of star formation in this galaxy. Other star formation tracers indicate the same conclusion. Many vertical H-alpha filaments, or 'worms,' extending to over 2 kpc off the plane of the galaxy are seen. These worms are interpreted in terms of chimney models for the interstellar media of spirals.

  1. The Kinematics of the Ionized Gas in IC 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, Joshua C.; Wilcots, Eric M.

    2005-02-01

    We present the results of a WIYN integral field unit study of the kinematics of the ionized gas in IC 10, a dwarf irregular starburst galaxy in the Local Group. Though the velocity field of the ionized gas closely matches that of the H I, there are several kinematically interesting features in the galaxy. The diffuse ionized gas in the galaxy exhibits larger Hα line widths than the bright complexes. In one case this is due to an infusion of energy into the gas associated with the radio superbubble discovered by Yang & Skillman. We find that the amount of energy in this region is consistent with their hypothesis that the region contains 10 supernova remnants. We also detect a high-velocity (70 km s-1) expanding shell in the ionized gas, which is likely driven by three confirmed Wolf-Rayet stars that are located within the shell. Extrapolating from Hunter's initial mass function, we find that the central starburst region contains approximately equal energy contributions from stellar winds and supernovae (SNe), suggesting that SNe are just beginning to play a significant role in shaping the kinematics of the ionized gas. However, all of this energy cannot be easily accounted for in the kinematics of the gas. We detect an energetic flow of gas (3×1052 ergs), which we believe originates from the starburst region. We also detect a high-velocity (70 km s-1) feature not coincident with any structure in our Hα image. This feature, along with the flow and shell, can account for the energy produced by stellar wind and SNe. The flow resembles one discovered by Wilcots & Thurow in NGC 4214; together they suggest that the porosity of the interstellar medium contributes significantly to the high velocity of some portion of the ionized gas in irregular galaxies.

  2. COMPLETE IONIZATION OF THE NEUTRAL GAS: WHY THERE ARE SO FEW DETECTIONS OF 21 cm HYDROGEN IN HIGH-REDSHIFT RADIO GALAXIES AND QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, S. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2012-11-10

    From the first published z {approx}> 3 survey of 21 cm absorption within the hosts of radio galaxies and quasars, Curran et al. found an apparent dearth of cool neutral gas at high redshift. From a detailed analysis of the photometry, each object is found to have a {lambda} = 1216 A continuum luminosity in excess of L {sub 1216} {approx} 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}, a critical value above which 21 cm has never been detected at any redshift. At these wavelengths, and below, hydrogen is excited above the ground state so that it cannot absorb in 21 cm. In order to apply the equation of photoionization equilibrium, we demonstrate that this critical value also applies to the ionizing ({lambda} {<=} 912 A) radiation. We use this to show, for a variety of gas density distributions, that upon placing a quasar within a galaxy of gas, there is always an ultraviolet luminosity above which all of the large-scale atomic gas is ionized. While in this state, the hydrogen cannot be detected or engage in star formation. Applying the mean ionizing photon rate of all of the sources searched, we find, using canonical values for the gas density and recombination rate coefficient, that the observed critical luminosity gives a scale length (3 kpc) similar that of the neutral hydrogen (H I) in the Milky Way, a large spiral galaxy. Thus, this simple yet physically motivated model can explain the critical luminosity (L {sub 912} {approx} L {sub 1216} {approx} 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}), above which neutral gas is not detected. This indicates that the non-detection of 21 cm absorption is not due to the sensitivity limits of current radio telescopes, but rather that the lines of sight to the quasars, and probably the bulk of the host galaxies, are devoid of neutral gas.

  3. Evaluation of gas chromatography - electron ionization - full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Mol, Hans G J; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-09-07

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50-500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg(-1)) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD <10% was obtained in most cases. Linearity was demonstrated for the range ≤5-250 μg kg(-1). The pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive alternative to GC

  4. Laboratory simulation of cometary neutral gas ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tsuey-Fen; Rahman, H. U.; White, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    The laboratory simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with a comet is used to study the cometary neural gas ionization. The experiment is carried out in the UCR T-1 facility with an ice ball as the comet model. Photographs and data are taken with a variety of values of the solar wind velocity, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and comet configurations. The results show that the cometary neutral gas ionization depends on both the velocity of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field. The plasma cloud surrounding the comet is visible only when the solar wind velocity and IMF are both above certain minimum values. This velocity dependent phenomena is explained by Alfven's critical ionization velocity effect. The critical magnetic field may be explained by assuming two stream lower hybrid instability as a triggering mechanism for the ionization of the neutral gas by plasma flow. Critical upper and lower limits for the magnetic field, required by anomalous ionization, are also derived that satisfy the experimental observations.

  5. Deposition profile of Ti film inside a trench and its correlation with gas-phase ionization in high-pressure magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Nafarizal, N.; Takada, N.; Nakamura, K.; Sago, Y.; Sasaki, K.

    2006-11-15

    This article reports the relationship between the degree of ionization of Ti in the gas phase and the thickness profile of Ti film inside a trench in magnetron sputtering deposition. A conventional magnetron sputtering plasma source was used for depositing Ti films inside trenches formed on rf-biased SiO{sub 2} substrates. It was found that a high bottom coverage was obtained when a high gas pressure and a long distance between the target and the substrate were employed for the deposition. On the other hand, at a short distance between the target and the substrate, the bottom coverage was small and was almost independent of the gas pressure. The deposition profile was compared with the spatial distributions of Ti and Ti{sup +} densities measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging spectroscopy. The LIF results revealed that the density ratio of Ti{sup +} to Ti in the downstream region increased with the gas pressure up to 0.3, while in the upstream region, it was small (<0.05) and was roughly constant with the gas pressure. In the case with the enhanced density ratio of 0.3, the flux ratio of Ti{sup +} to Ti was estimated to be 4.4. Hence, it was concluded that, with a high gas pressure and a long distance between the target and substrate, the deposition profile with a high bottom coverage was obtained by accelerating Ti{sup +} toward the bottom of the trench. The high-pressure magnetron sputtering discharge is useful for enhancing the degree of ionization and the bottom coverage.

  6. The distribution of ionized gas in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, L. M.; Sadler, E. M.; Zeilinger, W. W.; Bertin, G.; Bertola, F.; Danzinger, J.; Dejonghe, H.; Saglia, R. P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.

    1993-12-01

    We present and discuss H-alpha+(N II) imaging observations of fifteen nearby elliptical and SO galaxies with extended optical emission lines. The morphology of the emitting regions suggests that the ionized gas usually lies in a disk which is often geometrically decoupled from the stellar body, as expected in a triaxial galaxy. The presence of a gaseous disk makes these galaxies suitable for testing their gravitational field in a straightforward way. The presence of dust in many of the disks, together with the observed morphological properties, suggests that the ionized gas in most of these galaxies is more closely associated with the cold Interstellar Medium (ISM) than with the hot X-ray component. The mass of ionized gas in the galaxies studied here is typically 10-100 times that in a 'normal' early-type galaxy of similar optical luminosity. These appear to be galaxies where an unusually high fraction of the cold gas has been ionized, rather than unusually gas-rich systems in an overall sense. The extra ionizing source may be related to an active nucleus, since the continuum radio emission from these galaxies is typically 10-15 times more powerful than in 'normal' ellipticals of the smae optical luminosity.

  7. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, J.K.

    1989-11-14

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs.

  8. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0.degree. to 30.degree. C.

  9. GAS IONIZING AND COMPRESSING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Little, E.M.; Thomson, D.B.; Josephson, V.; Scott, F.R.

    1961-08-22

    A device is described for producing high energy gaseous plasmas. The device consists of a unitary refractory vessel having tapered end portions, a cylindrical middle portion, and means for spontaneously generating oppositely propelled plasma masses from the tapered end portions to a collision zone in the cylindrical middle portion. The means come from the spontaneous generation of diverging magnetic fields in the end portions and an axial magnetic field in the cylindrical portion. (AEC)

  10. Gas-Liquid Correlation of Ionization Energies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    ions and water. The threshold and reorganization energies of the hydrated electron are calculated from threshold energies of anions and their absorption...hydroxide ions and water. The threshold and reorganization energies of the hydrated electron are calculated from threshold energies of anions and their...threshold energy of the hydrated electron. 2. Free energy of emission and gas-phase ionization Consider the photoelectron emission by an aqueous

  11. The PRIME Lab gas ionization detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knies, David L.; Elmore, David

    1994-06-01

    A gas ionization detection system was built for optimal identification of AMS radionuclides, in particular 10Be and 36Cl. For 36Cl, a combination of 1) the difference in arrival times for electrons at two anode plates and 2) a novel split anode plate has led to a reduction in misidentified 36S. A peak-stabilizing routine incorporated in the data acquisition system has allowed us to run at higher counting rates. Changing to propane gas has reduced random signal amplitude shifts.

  12. Laboratory and Ambient Measurements of Oxidized Organic Compounds in the Gas Phase Using Nitrate Ion Chemical Ionization Coupled with High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Krechmer, J.; Lambe, A. T.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Nowak, J. B.; Kimmel, J.; Kroll, J. H.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) is a widely used technique for molecular level characterization of inorganic and organic gas phase species. Here we present laboratory and ambient measurements of gaseous organic compounds by means of a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) using nitrate ion (NO3-) chemistry, which recently has proven capable of selectively detecting oxidized organic molecules in the gas-phase via clustering with NO3- and its high order clusters. Such low and extremely low volatility organic compounds (LVOC, ELVOC) have an important role in particulate phase chemistry and formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The HR-ToF-CIMS was deployed during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the forest site in Centreville, AL (June 1 - July 15, 2013), where emissions were dominated by biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), occasionally mixing with anthropogenic emissions. During SOAS, the HR-ToF-CIMS detected oxidation products of both isoprene (typically C5 LVOC) and terpenes (typically C10 ELVOC). The isoprene-related LVOC showed a diurnal cycle with a day time peak, while two groups of terpene ELVOC were identified, one peaking at night and one peaking during the day. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analyses are applied to the dataset to further interpret these observations. The effect of anthropogenic pollution on the biogenic-dominated environment was also investigated during periods of elevated nitrous and sulfur dioxide levels. To further aid in interpretation of the SOAS dataset, oxidized organic molecules were produced via OH and O3 initiated oxidation of biogenic gas-phase precursors in targeted laboratory studies and detected using the HR-ToF-CIMS. Spectra were obtained in these studies over a range of simulated atmospheric conditions.

  13. Viscosity Coefficient Curve Fits for Ionized Gas Species Grant Palmer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Viscosity coefficient curve fits for neutral gas species are available from many sources. Many do a good job of reproducing experimental and computational chemistry data. The curve fits are usually expressed as a function of temperature only. This is consistent with the governing equations used to derive an expression for the neutral species viscosity coefficient. Ionized species pose a more complicated problem. They are subject to electrostatic as well as intermolecular forces. The electrostatic forces are affected by a shielding phenomenon where electrons shield the electrostatic forces of positively charged ions beyond a certain distance. The viscosity coefficient for an ionized gas species is a function of both temperature and local electron number density. Currently available curve fits for ionized gas species, such as those presented by Gupta/Yos, are a function of temperature only. What they did was to assume an electron number density. The problem is that the electron number density they assumed was unrealistically high. The purpose of this paper is two-fold. First, the proper expression for determining the viscosity coefficient of an ionized species as a function of both temperature and electron number density will be presented. Then curve fit coefficients will be developed using the more realistic assumption of an equilibrium electron number density. The results will be compared against previous curve fits and against highly accurate computational chemistry data.

  14. Picosecond ionization dynamics in femtosecond filaments at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaohui; Patwardhan, Gauri; Schrauth, Samuel; Zhu, Daiwei; Popmintchev, Tenio; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Levis, Robert J.; Gaeta, Alexander L.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the plasma dynamics inside a femtosecond-pulse-induced filament generated in an argon gas for a wide range of pressures up to 60 bar. At higher pressures, we observe ionization immediately following a pulse, with up to a threefold increase in the electron density within 30 ps after the filamentary propagation of a femtosecond pulse. Our study suggests that this picosecond evolution can be attributed to collisional ionization including Penning and associative ionizations and electron-impact ionization of excited atoms generated during the pulse. The dominance of excited atoms over ionized atoms at the end of the pulse also indicates an intrapulse inhibition of avalanche ionization. This delayed ionization dynamics provides evidence for diagnosing atomic and molecular excitation and ionization in intense laser interaction with high-pressure gases.

  15. The distribution of warm ionized gas in NGC 891

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, R.J.; Kulkarni, S.R.; Hester, J.J. Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-03-01

    Narrow-band imaging is presented of the edge-on spiral NGC 891 in the H-alpha and S II 6716, 6731 A forbidden lines. Emission from H II regions confined to the plane of the galaxy and from diffuse gas up to about 4 kpc off the plane is readily detected. The full radial extent of the diffuse emission in the plane is about 30 kpc. NGC 891 is found to have a surface density of diffuse ionized gas twice the Galactic value, a thicker ionized gas layer, and a larger surface density of ionized gas relative to neutral gas. These are interpreted as consequences of a relatively high level of star formation in this galaxy. Other star formation tracers indicate the same conclusion. Many vertical H-alpha filaments, or 'worms,' extending to over 2 kpc off the plane of the galaxy are seen. These worms are interpreted in terms of chimney models for the interstellar media of spirals. 19 refs.

  16. HIGH-TEMPERATURE IONIZATION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Desch, Steven J.; Turner, Neal J.

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the abundances of electrons and ions in the hot (≳500 K), dusty parts of protoplanetary disks, treating for the first time the effects of thermionic and ion emission from the dust grains. High-temperature ionization modeling has involved simply assuming that alkali elements such as potassium occur as gas-phase atoms and are collisionally ionized following the Saha equation. We show that the Saha equation often does not hold, because free charges are produced by thermionic and ion emission and destroyed when they stick to grain surfaces. This means the ionization state depends not on the first ionization potential of the alkali atoms, but rather on the grains’ work functions. The charged species’ abundances typically rise abruptly above about 800 K, with little qualitative dependence on the work function, gas density, or dust-to-gas mass ratio. Applying our results, we find that protoplanetary disks’ dead zone, where high diffusivities stifle magnetorotational turbulence, has its inner edge located where the temperature exceeds a threshold value ≈1000 K. The threshold is set by ambipolar diffusion except at the highest densities, where it is set by Ohmic resistivity. We find that the disk gas can be diffusively loaded onto the stellar magnetosphere at temperatures below a similar threshold. We investigate whether the “short-circuit” instability of current sheets can operate in disks and find that it cannot, or works only in a narrow range of conditions; it appears not to be the chondrule formation mechanism. We also suggest that thermionic emission is important for determining the rate of Ohmic heating in hot Jupiters.

  17. Determination of red blood cell fatty acid profiles: Rapid and high-confident analysis by chemical ionization-gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schober, Yvonne; Wahl, Hans Günther; Renz, Harald; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Cellular fatty acid (FA) profiles have been acknowledged as biomarkers in various human diseases. Nevertheless, common FA analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) requires long analysis time. Hence, there is a need for feasible methods for high throughput analysis in clinical studies. FA was extracted from red blood cells (RBC) and derivatized to fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). A method using gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) with ammonia-induced chemical ionization (CI) was developed for the analysis of FA profiles in human RBC. We compared this method with classical single GC-MS using electron impact ionization (EI). The FA profiles of 703 RBC samples were determined by GC-MS/MS. In contrast to EI ammonia-induced CI resulted in adequate amounts of molecular ions for further fragmentation of FAME. Specific fragments for confident quantification and fragmentation were determined for 45 FA. The GC-MS/MS method has a total run time of 9min compared to typical analysis times of up to 60min in conventional GC-MS. Intra and inter assay variations were <10% for all FA analyzed. Analysis of RBC FA composition revealed an age-dependent increase of the omega-3 eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid, and a decline of the omega-6 linoleic acid with a corresponding rise of the omega-3 index. The combination of ammonia-induced CI and tandem mass spectrometry after GC separation allows for high-throughput, robust and confident analysis of FA profiles in the clinical laboratory.

  18. Ionized gas at the edge of the central molecular zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, W. D.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Pineda, J. L.; Velusamy, T.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Wiesemeyer, H.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The edge of the central molecular zone (CMZ) is the location where massive dense molecular clouds with large internal velocity dispersions transition to the surrounding more quiescent and lower CO emissivity region of the Galaxy. Little is known about the ionized gas surrounding the molecular clouds and in the transition region. Aims: We determine the properties of the ionized gas at the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E using observations of N+ and C+. Methods: We observed a small portion of the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E with spectrally resolved [C ii] 158 μm and [N ii] 205 μm fine structure lines at six positions with the GREAT instrument on SOFIA and in [C ii] using Herschel HIFI on-the-fly strip maps. We use the [N ii] spectra along with a radiative transfer model to calculate the electron density of the gas and the [C ii] maps to illuminate the morphology of the ionized gas and model the column density of CO-dark H2. Results: We detect two [C ii] and [N ii] velocity components, one along the line of sight to a CO molecular cloud at - 207 km s-1 associated with Sgr E and the other at -174 km s-1 outside the edge of another CO cloud. From the [N ii] emission we find that the average electron density is in the range of ~5 to 21 cm-3 for these features. This electron density is much higher than that of the disk's warm ionized medium, but is consistent with densities determined for bright diffuse H ii nebula. The column density of the CO-dark H2 layer in the -207 km s-1 cloud is ~1-2 × 1021 cm-2 in agreement with theoretical models. The CMZ extends further out in Galactic radius by ~7 to 14 pc in ionized gas than it does in molecular gas traced by CO. Conclusions: The edge of the CMZ likely contains dense hot ionized gas surrounding the neutral molecular material. The high fractional abundance of N+ and high electron density require an intense EUV field with a photon flux of order 106 to 107 photons cm-2 s-1, and/or efficient proton charge exchange with

  19. Development of a High-Resolution H3O+ Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Gas-phase Hydrocarbons and its Application During the 2015 SONGNEX Aircraft Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, A.; Yuan, B.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Stark, H.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometers (ToF-CIMS) using H3O+ reagent ion chemistry (PTR-MS) are a relatively new technique in detection of gas-phase hydrocarbons, and recent improvements in instrument sensitivity, mass resolution, and ease of field deployment have expanded their use in atmospheric chemistry. The comparatively low-energy H3O+ ionization technique is ideal for measuring complex mixtures of hydrocarbons, and, compared to conventional quadrupole PTRMS, the newest generation of ToF-CIMS measure many more species simultaneously and with a sensitivity that is as high as a quadrupole PTR-MS. We describe here the development of a commercially available ToF CIMS into an H3O+CIMS suitable for deployment on aircraft, and its application during an aircraft campaign studying emissions from oil and natural gas extraction industry. We provide an overview of instrument development and specifications, including design, characterization, and field operation. We then discuss data processing and interpretation. First, we investigate determination of intensities of poorly resolved peaks. The mass resolution of the present instrument (m/Δm ~4500) enables separate analysis of many isobaric peaks, but peaks are also frequently not fully resolved. Using results from laboratory tests, we quantify how the accuracy can be limited by the overlap in neighboring peaks, and compare to theoretical predictions from literature. We then briefly describe our method for quality assurance of reported compounds, and correction for background and humidity effects. Finally, we present preliminary results from the first field deployment of this instrument during the Spring 2015 SONGNEX aircraft campaign. This campaign sampled emissions from oil and natural gas extraction regions and associated infrastructure in the Western and Central United States. We will highlight results that illustrate (1) new scientific capability from improved mass resolution, which

  20. Turbulence in the ionized gas of the Orion nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, S. J.; Medina, S.-N. X.; Henney, W. J.

    2016-12-01

    In order to study the nature, origin, and impact of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the ionized gas of the Orion nebula, we apply a variety of statistical techniques to observed velocity cubes. The cubes are derived from high resolving power (R ≈ 40 000) longslit spectroscopy of optical emission lines that span a range of ionizations. From velocity channel analysis (VCA), we find that the slope of the velocity power spectrum is consistent with predictions of Kolmogorov theory between scales of 8 and 22 arcsec (0.02 to 0.05 pc). The outer scale, which is the dominant scale of density fluctuations in the nebula, approximately coincides with the autocorrelation length of the velocity fluctuations that we determine from the second-order velocity structure function. We propose that this is the principal driving scale of the turbulence, which originates in the autocorrelation length of dense cores in the Orion molecular filament. By combining analysis of the non-thermal linewidths with the systematic trends of velocity centroid versus ionization, we find that the global champagne flow and smaller scale turbulence each contribute in equal measure to the total velocity dispersion, with respective root-mean-square widths of 4-5 km s-1. The turbulence is subsonic and can account for only one half of the derived variance in ionized density, with the remaining variance provided by density gradients in photoevaporation flows from globules and filaments. Intercomparison with results from simulations implies that the ionized gas is confined to a thick shell and does not fill the interior of the nebula.

  1. Simultaneous resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization and electron avalanche ionization in gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2008-07-15

    Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and electron avalanche ionization (EAI) are measured simultaneously in Ar:Xe mixtures at different partial pressures of mixture components. A simple theory for combined REMPI+EAI in gas mixture is developed. It is shown that the REMPI electrons seed the avalanche process, and thus the avalanche process amplifies the REMPI signal. Possible applications are discussed.

  2. An advanced oxidation process using ionized gas for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Ju; Chung, Paul Gene; Kwak, Dong Heui; Kim, Lee Hyung; Kim, Min Jeong

    2010-01-01

    This study on removing non-degradable materials in wastewater focused primarily on advanced oxidation methods such as ozone, ozone/UV and ozone/H2O2. Wastewater treatment using an ionized gas from plasma has been actively progressing. The ionized gas involves reactive species such as O2+, O2- cluster, O radical and OH radical. Since the ionized gas method has such outstanding characteristics as relatively simple structures, non-calorification, non-toxicity and low electricity consumption, it evidently of interest as a new process. A series of experiments were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of ionized gas as a useful element for the diminution of nondegradable organic matters. On the other hand, a large amount of organic matters were changed to hydrophilic and the compounds containing aromatic functional group gradually decreased. The results implied that the ionized gas has been able to degrade the non-biodegradable organic matters. Therefore, the oxidation process by using an ionized gas process could be considered as an effective alternative unit in water and wastewater treatment plants.

  3. Ionized gas in the Irr galaxy IC 10: The emission spectrum and ionization sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipova, V. P.; Egorov, O. V.; Lozinskaya, T. A.; Moiseev, A. V.

    2011-02-01

    We present the observations of the Irr galaxy IC 10 at the 6-m SAO telescope with the panoramic Multi-Pupil Fiber Spectrograph (MPFS). Based on the results of these observations and our long-slit spectroscopy performed previously, we have investigated the ionized-gas emission spectrum in the region of intense star formation and refined the gas metallicity estimates. We show that the “diagnostic diagrams” constructed from our observations agree best with the new improved ionization models by Martin-Manjon et al. Using these models, we have determined the electron density and gas ionization parameter and ionizing-cluster characteristics, the age and mass, from the spectra of the investigated HII regions. The cluster ages and masses are shown to be within the ranges 2.5-5 Myr and (0.2-1) × 105 M ⊗, respectively.

  4. Laser induced avalanche ionization in gases or gas mixtures with resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization or femtosecond laser pulse pre-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B.

    2012-08-15

    The paper discusses the requirements for avalanche ionization in gas or gas mixtures initiated by REMPI or femtosecond-laser pre-ionization. Numerical examples of dependencies on partial composition for Ar:Xe gas mixture with REMPI of argon and subsequent classic avalanche ionization of Xe are presented.

  5. Hydration of Gas-Phase Ions Formed by Electrospray Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Cruz, Sandra E.; Klassen, John S.; Williams, Evan R.

    2005-01-01

    The hydration of gas-phase ions produced by electrospray ionization was investigated. Evidence that the hydrated ions are formed by two mechanisms is presented. First, solvent condensation during the expansion inside the electrospray source clearly occurs. Second, some solvent evaporation from more extensively solvated ions or droplets is apparent. To the extent that these highly solvated ions have solution-phase structures, then the final isolated gas-phase structure of the ion will be determined by the solvent evaporation process. This process was investigated for hydrated gramicidin S in a Fourier-transform mass spectrometer. Unimolecular dissociation rate constants of isolated gramicidin S ions with between 2 and 14 associated water molecules were measured. These rate constants increased from 16 to 230 s−1 with increasing hydration, with smaller values corresponding to magic numbers. PMID:10497808

  6. The rise of ionized gas in the Magellanic Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Michael; Barger, Kathleen; Smart, Brianna; Haffner, L. Matthew

    2017-01-01

    The Small and Large Magellanic Clouds are a pair of interacting galaxies near the Milky Way. Tidal interactions have stripped gas from these galaxies, leaving behind gaseous debris such as the Magellanic Stream. We explore the morphology and kinematics of the neutral and ionized hydrogen gas in the trailing stream traveling toward the Milky Way. This comparison provides us with insight into the physical processes that are affecting the gas flowing through the Galactic halo. This is done using mapped H-alpha emission-line spectroscopy, obtained with the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper (WHAM), and archival 21-cm HI observations of the Stream near the Magellanic Clouds. We found that the neutral and ionized gas spatially and kinematically trace each other. With a map of the ionized gas in hand, we will continue to study the survival of this tidal relic.

  7. Helium Ionization in the Diffuse Ionized Gas Surrounding UCH ii Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anish Roshi, D.; Churchwell, E.; Anderson, L. D.

    2017-04-01

    We present measurements of the singly ionized helium-to-hydrogen ratio ({n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+}) toward diffuse gas surrounding three ultracompact H ii (UCH ii) regions: G10.15-0.34, G23.46-0.20, and G29.96-0.02. We observe radio recombination lines of hydrogen and helium near 5 GHz using the GBT to measure the {n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+} ratio. The measurements are motivated by the low helium ionization observed in the warm ionized medium and in the inner Galaxy diffuse ionized regions. Our data indicate that the helium is not uniformly ionized in the three observed sources. Helium lines are not detected toward a few observed positions in sources G10.15-0.34 and G23.46-0.20, and the upper limits of the {n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+} ratio obtained are 0.03 and 0.05, respectively. The selected sources harbor stars of type O6 or hotter as indicated by helium line detection toward the bright radio continuum emission from the sources with mean {n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+} value 0.06 ± 0.02. Our data thus show that helium in diffuse gas located a few parsecs away from the young massive stars embedded in the observed regions is not fully ionized. We investigate the origin of the nonuniform helium ionization and rule out the possibilities (a) that the helium is doubly ionized in the observed regions and (b) that the low {n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+} values are due to additional hydrogen ionizing radiation produced by accreting low-mass stars. We find that selective absorption of ionizing photons by dust can result in low helium ionization but needs further investigation to develop a self-consistent model for dust in H ii regions.

  8. Influence of ionization on ultrafast gas-based nonlinear fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Chang, W; Nazarkin, A; Travers, J C; Nold, J; Hölzer, P; Joly, N Y; Russell, P St J

    2011-10-10

    We numerically investigate the effect of ionization on ultrashort high-energy pulses propagating in gas-filled kagomé-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibers by solving an established uni-directional field equation. We consider the dynamics of two distinct regimes: ionization induced blue-shift and resonant dispersive wave emission in the deep-UV. We illustrate how the system evolves between these regimes and the changing influence of ionization. Finally, we consider the effect of higher ionization stages.

  9. New design of high performance ionizing bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ronggang; Sun, Yurong

    2013-03-01

    This paper introduces a new design of DC-pulse ionizing bar to solve the problem of imbalance offset voltage for the AC ionizing bar, which is easily affected by the environment, as well as indicate the final tests. The new design mainly includes five parts: power supply circuit, main control unit, logic circuit, high frequency transformer unit, and feedback unit. The ionizing bar can automatically adjust the discharge voltage, pulse frequency and pulse width to balance the positive and negative ions. The final test results indicate that the DC ionizing bar owns good effect in electrostatic elimination.

  10. The ionization conditions in the Milky Way halo - Infalling gas toward the North Galactic Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, Laura

    1992-01-01

    Observations of gas in the Milky Way halo are studied with an eye toward the theoretical predictions of the Galactic Fountain model for the production of halo gas. Data are shown that indicate significant variations in the ionization conditions in infalling halo gas in the northern galactic hemisphere. Understanding the nature of Milky Way halo gas plays a critical role in interpreting QSO absorption lines in the investigation of galaxies at high redshift.

  11. Axisymmetric model of the ionized gas in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, R. H.; Simpson, J. P.; Haas, M. R.; Erickson, E. F.

    1991-01-01

    New ionization and thermal equilibrium models for the ionized gas in the Orion Nebula with an axisymmetric two-dimensional 'blister' geometry/density distribution are presented. The HII region is represented more realistically than in previous models, while the physical detail of the microphysics and radiative transfer of the earlier spherical modeling is maintained. The predicted surface brightnesses are compared with observations for a large set of lines at different positions to determine the best-fitting physical parameters. The model explains the strong singly ionized line emission along the lines of sight near the Trapezium.

  12. Shock-wave structure in a partially ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C. S.; Huang, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of a steady plane shock in a partially ionized gas has been investigated using the Boltzmann equation with a kinetic model as the governing equation and the discrete ordinate method as a tool. The effects of the electric field induced by the charge separation on the shock structure have also been studied. Although the three species of an ionized gas travel with approximately the same macroscopic velocity, the individual distribution functions are found to be very different. In a strong shock the atom distribution function may have double peaks, while the ion distribution function has only one peak. Electrons are heated up much earlier than ions and atoms in a partially ionized gas. Because the interactions of electrons with atoms and with ions are different, the ion temperature can be different from the atom temperature.

  13. High power gas laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Leland, Wallace T.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1981-01-01

    A high power output CO.sub.2 gas laser amplifier having a number of sections, each comprising a plurality of annular pumping chambers spaced around the circumference of a vacuum chamber containing a cold cathode, gridded electron gun. The electron beam from the electron gun ionizes the gas lasing medium in the sections. An input laser beam is split into a plurality of annular beams, each passing through the sections comprising one pumping chamber.

  14. Plasma induced by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization in inert gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2007-12-15

    We present a detailed model for the evolution of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) produced plasma during and after the ionizing laser pulse in inert gas (argon, as an example) at arbitrary pressures. Our theory includes the complete process of the REMPI plasma generation and losses, together with the changing gas thermodynamic parameters. The model shows that the plasma expansion follows a classical ambipolar diffusion and that gas heating results in a weak shock or acoustic wave. The gas becomes involved in the motion not only from the pressure gradient due to the heating, but also from the momentum transfer from the charged particles to gas atoms. The time dependence of the total number of electrons computed in theory matches closely with the results of coherent microwave scattering experiments.

  15. Novel analytical approach for brominated flame retardants based on the use of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry with emphasis in highly brominated congeners.

    PubMed

    Portolés, Tania; Sales, Carlos; Gómara, Belén; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Beltrán, Joaquim; Herrero, Laura; González, María José; Hernández, Félix

    2015-10-06

    The analysis of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) commonly relies on the use of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) operating in electron ionization (EI) and electron capture negative ionization (ECNI) modes using quadrupole, triple quadrupole, ion trap, and magnetic sector analyzers. However, these brominated contaminants are examples of compounds for which a soft and robust ionization technique might be favorable since they show high fragmentation in EI and low specificity in ECNI. In addition, the low limits of quantification (0.01 ng/g) required by European Commission Recommendation 2014/118/EU on the monitoring of traces of BFRs in food put stress on the use of highly sensitive techniques/methods. In this work, a new approach for the extremely sensitive determination of BFRs taking profit of the potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) combined with GC and triple quadrupole (QqQ) mass analyzer is proposed. The objective was to explore the potential of this approach for the BFRs determination in samples at pg/g levels, taking marine samples and a cream sample as a model. Ionization and fragmentation behavior of 14 PBDEs (congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two novel BFRs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), in the GC-APCI-MS system has been investigated. The formation of highly abundant (quasi) molecular ion was the main advantage observed in relation to EI. Thus, a notable improvement in sensitivity and specificity was observed when using it as precursor ion in tandem MS. The improved detectability (LODs < 10 fg) achieved when using APCI compared to EI has been demonstrated, which is especially relevant for highly brominated congeners. Analysis of samples from an intercomparison exercise and samples from the marine field showed the potential of this approach for the reliable identification and quantification at very low

  16. Miniature triaxial metastable ionization detector for gas chromatographic trace analysis of extraterrestrial volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.; Kojiro, D. R.; Carle, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a miniature metastable ionization detector featuring an unconventional electrode configuration, whose performance characteristics parallel those of traditional design. The ionization detector is to be incorporated in a flight gas chromatograph (GC) for use in the Space Shuttle. The design of the detector is discussed, taking into account studies which verified the sensitivity of the detector. The triaxial design of the detector is compared with a flat-plate style. The obtained results show that the principal goal of developing a miniature, highly sensitive ionization detector for flight applications was achieved. Improved fabrication techniques will utilize glass-to-metal seals and brazing procedures.

  17. Ionization of NO at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1991-01-01

    Space vehicles flying through the atmosphere at high speed are known to excite a complex set of chemical reactions in the atmospheric gases, ranging from simple vibrational excitation to dissociation, atom exchange, electronic excitation, ionization, and charge exchange. Simple arguments are developed for the temperature dependence of the reactions leading to ionization of NO, including the effect of vibrational electronic thermal nonequilibrium. NO ionization is the most important source of electrons at intermediate temperatures and at higher temperatures provides the trigger electrons that ionize atoms. Based on these arguments, recommendations are made for formulae which fit observed experimental results, and which include a dependence on both a heavy particle temperature and different vibration electron temperatures. In addition, these expressions will presumably provide the most reliable extrapolation of experimental results to much higher temperatures.

  18. Laserspray ionization, a new atmospheric pressure MALDI method for producing highly charged gas-phase ions of peptides and proteins directly from solid solutions.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah; Inutan, Ellen D; Herath, Thushani N; McEwen, Charles N

    2010-02-01

    The first example of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) process producing multiply charged mass spectra nearly identical to those observed with electrospray ionization (ESI) is presented. MALDI is noted for its ability to produce singly charged ions, but in the experiments described here multiply charged ions are produced by laser ablation of analyte incorporated into a common MALDI matrix, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, using standard solvent-based sample preparation protocols. Laser ablation is known to produce matrix clusters in MALDI provided a threshold energy is achieved. We propose that these clusters (liquid droplets) are highly charged, and under conditions that produce sufficient matrix evaporation, ions are field-evaporated from the droplets similarly to ESI. Because of the multiple charging, advanced mass spectrometers with limited mass-to-charge range can be used for protein characterization. Thus, using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer, low femtomole quantities of proteins produce full-range mass spectra at 100,000 mass resolution with <5-ppm mass accuracy and with 1-s acquisition. Furthermore, the first example of protein fragmentation using electron transfer dissociation with MALDI is presented.

  19. High pressure (>1 atm) electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2011-03-01

    High pressure electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has been performed by pressurizing a custom made ion source chamber with compressed air to a pressure higher than the atmospheric pressure. The ion source was coupled to a commercial time-of-flight mass spectrometer using a nozzle-skimmer arrangement. The onset voltage for the electrospray of aqueous solution was found to be independent on the operating pressure. The onset voltage for the corona discharge, however, increased with the rise of pressure following the Paschen's law. Thus, besides having more working gas for the desolvation process, gaseous breakdown could also be avoided by pressurizing the ESI ion source with air to an appropriate level. Stable electrospray ionization has been achieved for the sample solution with high surface tension such as pure water in both positive and negative ion modes. Fragmentation of labile compounds during the ionization process could also be reduced by optimizing the operating pressure of the ion source.

  20. Circumnuclear ionized gas in starburst nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

    1990-01-01

    In order to study kinematical properties of starburst nuclei (SBNs), researchers made high-resolution spectroscopy of fifteen SBNs in the H alpha region using an intensified Reticon system attached to the coude focus of the 188-cm reflector at the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory. The instrumental resolution is 21 km s(-1) Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM) at lambda sub H alpha. As for the archetypical SBN, Mrk 538 (=NGC 7714), researchers present high-resolution emission line profiles of several species of ions such as (OIII), (NII), (SII), and (OII). Main results and conclusions are summarized. It has been known that emission-line profiles of SBNs are symmetrical and narrow. However, this high-resolution spectroscopy shows that the observed emission-line profiles of the SBNs have the following asymmetrical patterns; blueward, redward, and double-peaked. It is known that such features have been observed for narrow line regions (NLRs) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). There is no remarkable correlation between the asymmetry index and the reddening indicator such as a Balmer decrement. Thus the line asymmetry is not attributed to inhomogeneous obscuration in the emitting regions. The observed FWHMs of the H alpha emission lines cover a range from 85 km s(-1) to 318 km s(-1) and are slightly larger than those of (NII) lambda 6584A emission except for the double-peaked SBNs. The FWHMs of H alpha emission show a good correlation with sin i (i is an inclination angle of galaxy). This correlation means that the FWHMs of the SBNs suffer significantly from rotational broadening. Mrk 52 is an anomalous SBN because it has narrow emission line widths for its high inclination angle (cf. Taniguchi 1987). From the above correlation, it is estimated that the intrinsic (i.e., rotation free) FWHMs of H alpha emission are about 50 km s(-1).

  1. Circumnuclear ionized gas in starburst nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

    1990-07-01

    In order to study kinematical properties of starburst nuclei (SBNs), researchers made high-resolution spectroscopy of fifteen SBNs in the H alpha region using an intensified Reticon system attached to the coude focus of the 188-cm reflector at the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory. The instrumental resolution is 21 km s(-1) Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM) at lambdaH alpha. As for the archetypical SBN, Mrk 538 (=NGC 7714), researchers present high-resolution emission line profiles of several species of ions such as (OIII), (NII), (SII), and (OII). Main results and conclusions are summarized. It has been known that emission-line profiles of SBNs are symmetrical and narrow. However, this high-resolution spectroscopy shows that the observed emission-line profiles of the SBNs have the following asymmetrical patterns; blueward, redward, and double-peaked. It is known that such features have been observed for narrow line regions (NLRs) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). There is no remarkable correlation between the asymmetry index and the reddening indicator such as a Balmer decrement. Thus the line asymmetry is not attributed to inhomogeneous obscuration in the emitting regions. The observed FWHMs of the H alpha emission lines cover a range from 85 km s(-1) to 318 km s(-1) and are slightly larger than those of (NII) lambda 6584A emission except for the double-peaked SBNs. The FWHMs of H alpha emission show a good correlation with sin i (i is an inclination angle of galaxy). This correlation means that the FWHMs of the SBNs suffer significantly from rotational broadening. Mrk 52 is an anomalous SBN because it has narrow emission line widths for its high inclination angle (cf. Taniguchi 1987). From the above correlation, it is estimated that the intrinsic (i.e., rotation free) FWHMs of H alpha emission are about 50 km s(-1).

  2. Ionizing gas breakdown waves in strong electric fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingbeil, R.; Tidman, D. A.; Fernsler, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A previous analysis by Albright and Tidman (1972) of the structure of an ionizing potential wave driven through a dense gas by a strong electric field is extended to include atomic structure details of the background atoms and radiative effects, especially, photoionization. It is found that photoionization plays an important role in avalanche propagation. Velocities, electron densities, and temperatures are presented as a function of electric field for both negative and positive breakdown waves in nitrogen.

  3. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Chen, C.H.; Willis, R.D.; Lehmann, B.E.; Kramer, S.D.

    1981-06-01

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective.

  4. Real-time gas and particle-phase organic acids measurement at a forest site using chemical ionization high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry during BEACHON-RoMBAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatavelli, L. R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Cubison, M.; Day, D. A.; Jayne, J.; Thornton, J. A.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    We present measurement of organic acids in gas and aerosol particles conducted in a ponderosa pine forest during July and August 2011 as part of the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study (BEACHON-RoMBAS; http://tinyurl.com/BEACHON-RoMBAS). The measurement technique is based on chemical ionization, high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry and utilizes a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor [MOVI-CI-HR-ToFMS; Yatavelli et al., AS&T, 2010] to collect sub-micron aerosol particles while simultaneously measuring the gas-phase composition. The collected particles are subsequently analyzed by temperature-programmed thermal desorption. The reagent ion chosen for this campaign is the acetate anion (CH3C(O)O-, m/z 59), which reacts selectively via proton transfer with compounds that are stronger gas-phase acids than acetic acid [Veres et al., IJMS, 2008]. Preliminary results show substantial particle-phase concentrations of biogenic oxidation products such as hydroxy-glutaric acid, pinic acid, pinonic acid, and hydroxy-pinonic acid along with numerous lower and higher molecular weight organic acids. Correlations of the organic acid concentrations with meteorological, gas and aerosol parameters measured by other instrumentation are investigated in order to understand the formation, transformation, and partitioning of gas and particle-phase organic acids in a forested environment dominated by terpenes.

  5. The Highly Ionized Circumgalactic Medium is Kinematically Uniform around Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Nikole M.; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Muzahid, Sowgat; Churchill, Christopher W.; Murphy, Michael T.; Charlton, Jane C.

    2017-01-01

    The circumgalactic medium (CGM) traced by O vi λ λ 1031,1037 doublet absorption has been found to concentrate along the projected major and minor axes of the host galaxies. This suggests that O vi traces accreting and outflowing gas, respectively, which are key components of the baryon cycle of galaxies. We investigate this further by examining the kinematics of 29 O vi absorbers associated with galaxies at 0.13< {z}{gal}< 0.66 as a function of galaxy color, inclination, and azimuthal angle. Each galaxy was imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the absorption was detected in COS/HST spectra of nearby (D< 200 kpc) background quasars. We use the pixel-velocity two-point correlation function to characterize the velocity spread of the absorbers, which is a method used previously for a sample of Mg ii absorber–galaxy pairs. The absorption velocity spread for O vi is more extended than Mg ii, which suggests that the two ions trace differing components of the CGM. Again, in contrast to Mg ii, the O vi absorption velocity spreads are similar regardless of galaxy color, inclination, and azimuthal angle. This indicates that the kinematics of the high-ionization gas is not strongly influenced by the current star formation activity in the galaxy. The kinematic homogeneity of O vi absorption and its tendency to be observed mainly along the projected galaxy major and minor axes is likely due to varying ionization conditions and gas densities about the galaxy. Gas in intermediate azimuthal angles may be ionized out of the O vi phase, possibly resulting in an azimuthal angle dependence of the distribution of gas in higher ionization states.

  6. High resolution UV resonance enhanced two-photon ionization spectroscopy with mass selection of biologically relevant molecules in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chervenkov, S.; Wang, P. Q.; Karaminkov, R.; Chakraborty, T.; Braun, Juergen E.; Neusser, Hans J.

    2005-04-01

    The high resolution Doppler-free resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy with mass selection of jet-cooled (2-12 K) molecular species is a powerful experimental method providing comprehensive information on both isolated molecules and molecular clusters. We have demonstrated for the first time that this technique can be applied to large molecules and provides detailed information on their conformational structure. It allows rotationally resolved (FWHM = 70 MHz) spectra of the vibronic bands of the S1<--S0 electronic transition of the studied molecular systems to be measured. A specially designed computer-assisted fitting routine based on genetic algorithms is used to determine their rotational constants in the ground and excited electronic states, respectively, and the transition moment ratio. To interpret the experimental information and to discriminate and unambiguously assign the observed approach to the study of the neurotransmitter molecule, ephedrine. The results elucidate the role of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds stabilizing the respective conformations and affecting their intrinsic properties.

  7. Equation of state for a partially ionized gas. II.

    PubMed

    Baker, George A

    2003-11-01

    The derivation of equations of state for fluid phases of a partially ionized gas or plasma is addressed from a fundamental point of view. A spherical cellular model is deduced for the hot curve limit (or ideal Fermi gas). Next the Coulomb interactions are added to the spherical cellular model for general ionic charge Z. Then an independent electron model within a Z electron cell plus several many-body effects are employed. Numerical examples of the theory for several elements (H, Li, N, Na, K, Ni, Rb, Pd, Cs, and Er) are reported. These results reduce in various limits of temperature and density to the expected behavior. They display electron, localization-delocalization phase transitions of liquid-gas character. In the higher Z elements, a second possible critical point has been found. The critical pressure, electron density and temperature for the lower-density critical points seem to obey power laws as a function of Z.

  8. New Automated and High-Throughput Quantitative Analysis of Urinary Ketones by Multifiber Exchange-Solid Phase Microextraction Coupled to Fast Gas Chromatography/Negative Chemical-Electron Ionization/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pacenti, Marco; Dugheri, Stefano; Traldi, Pietro; Degli Esposti, Filippo; Perchiazzi, Nicola; Franchi, Elena; Calamante, Massimo; Kikic, Ireneo; Alessi, Paolo; Bonacchi, Alice; Salvadori, Edoardo; Arcangeli, Giulio; Cupelli, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    The present research is focused on automation, miniaturization, and system interaction with high throughput for multiple and specific Direct Immersion-Solid Phase Microextraction/Fast Gas Chromatography analysis of the urinary ketones. The specific Mass Spectrometry instrumentation, capable of supporting such the automated changeover from Negative Chemical to Electron Ionization mode, as well as the automation of the preparation procedure by new device called MultiFiber Exchange, through change of the fibers, allowed a friendly use of mass spectrometry apparatus with a number of advantages including reduced analyst time and greater reproducibility (2.01–5.32%). The detection limits for the seven ketones were less than 0.004 mg/L. For an innovative powerful meaning in high-throughput routine, the generality of the structurally informative Mass Spectrometry fragmentation patterns together with the chromatographic separation and software automation are also investigated. PMID:20628512

  9. Residual-gas-ionization beam profile monitors in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, R.; Fite, J.; Jao, S.; Trabocchi, C.

    2010-05-02

    Four ionization profile monitors (IPMs) are in RHIC to measure vertical and horizontal beam profiles in the two rings. These work by measuring the distribution of electrons produced by beam ionization of residual gas. During the last two years both the collection accuracy and signal/noise ratio have been improved. An electron source is mounted across the beam pipe from the collector to monitor microchannel plate (MCP) aging and the signal electrons are gated to reduce MCP aging and to allow charge replenishment between single-turn measurements. Software changes permit simultaneous measurements of any number of individual bunches in the ring. This has been used to measure emittance growth rates on six bunches of varying intensities in a single store. Also the software supports FFT analysis of turn-by-turn profiles of a single bunch at injection to detect dipole and quadrupole oscillations.

  10. Characterization of fatty acid and triacylglycerol composition in animal fats using silver-ion and non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Lísa, Miroslav; Netušilová, Kateřina; Franěk, Lukáš; Dvořáková, Hana; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Holčapek, Michal

    2011-10-21

    Fatty acid (FA) and triacylglycerol (TG) composition of natural oils and fats intake in the diet has a strong influence on the human health and chronic diseases. In this work, non-aqueous reversed-phase (NARP) and silver-ion high-performance liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry detection and gas chromatography with flame-ionization detection (GC/FID) and mass spectrometry detection are used for the characterization of FA and TG composition in complex samples of animal fats from fallow deer, red deer, sheep, moufflon, wild boar, cock, duck and rabbit. The FA composition of samples is determined based on the GC/FID analysis of FA methyl esters. In total, 81 FAs of different acyl chain length, double bond (DB) number, branched/linear, cis-/trans- and DB positional isomers are identified. TGs in animal fats contain mainly monounsaturated and saturated FAs. High amounts of branched and trans-FAs are observed in the samples of ruminants. In NARP mode, individual TG species are separated including the separation of trans- and branched TGs. Silver-ion mode provides the separation of TG regioisomers, which enables the determination of their ratios. Great differences in the preference of unsaturated and saturated FAs in the sn-2 position on the glycerol skeleton are observed among individual animal fats. Unsaturated FAs are preferentially occupied in the sn-2 position in all animal samples except for wild boar with the strong preference of saturated FAs in the sn-2 position.

  11. Capillary atmospheric pressure electron capture ionization (cAPECI): a highly efficient ionization method for nitroaromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Derpmann, Valerie; Mueller, David; Bejan, Iustinian; Sonderfeld, Hannah; Wilberscheid, Sonja; Koppmann, Ralf; Brockmann, Klaus J; Benter, Thorsten

    2014-03-01

    We report on a novel method for atmospheric pressure ionization of compounds with elevated electron affinity (e.g., nitroaromatic compounds) or gas phase acidity (e.g., phenols), respectively. The method is based on the generation of thermal electrons by the photo-electric effect, followed by electron capture of oxygen when air is the gas matrix yielding O2(-) or of the analyte directly with nitrogen as matrix. Charge transfer or proton abstraction by O2(-) leads to the ionization of the analytes. The interaction of UV-light with metals is a clean method for the generation of thermal electrons at atmospheric pressure. Furthermore, only negative ions are generated and neutral radical formation is minimized, in contrast to discharge- or dopant assisted methods. Ionization takes place inside the transfer capillary of the mass spectrometer leading to comparably short transfer times of ions to the high vacuum region of the mass spectrometer. This strongly reduces ion transformation processes, resulting in mass spectra that more closely relate to the neutral analyte distribution. cAPECI is thus a soft and selective ionization method with detection limits in the pptV range. In comparison to standard ionization methods (e.g., PTR), cAPECI is superior with respect to both selectivity and achievable detection limits. cAPECI demonstrates to be a promising ionization method for applications in relevant fields as, for example, explosives detection and atmospheric chemistry.

  12. Earth’s Interaction Region: Plasma-Neutral Interactions in the Weakly Ionized gas of Earth’s High Latitude Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, Jeffrey; Hsu, Vicki

    2015-04-01

    The high-latitude regions of Earth’s upper atmosphere are strongly influenced by plasma-neutral interactions. These interactions couple electrodynamic processes of the ionosphere with hydrodynamic processes of the more abundant thermosphere neutral gas, consequently connecting the high-latitude upper atmosphere to distant regions of the geoplasma environment. This produces a complex spatial and temporal interplay of competing processes that results in a myriad of physical and chemical responses and a rich array of neutral and plasma morphologies that constitute the high-latitude thermosphere and ionosphere. The altitude extent from the lower thermosphere to the upper ionosphere (90km - 1000km) can be considered Earth’s space-atmosphere interaction region - likened to the solar chromosphere’s interaction region where radiative processes and hydrodynamic waves from the dense lower atmosphere produce a cold lower boundary that quickly transitions over a few 100 kilometers to neutral and plasma temperatures that are five times hotter. A thousand or more kilometers further in altitude, Earth's upper atmosphere becomes a hot, collisionless, geomagnetically controlled protonosphere whose neutral and plasma population originates from the thermosphere and ionosphere. A grand challenge in the study of Earth’s interaction region is how the collision-dominated thermosphere/ionosphere system exchanges energy, mass and momentum with the collisionless magnetosphere. This talk will focus primarily on collision-dominated processes of the high-latitude ionosphere and the electromagnetic energy transfer processes that lead to frictional heating of ions and neutrals, and plasma instability phenomenon that leads to extreme electron heating. Observations of the ionosphere response to these processes will be illustrated using incoherent scatter radar measurements. Relevance to the solar chromosphere will be identified where appropriate and outstanding issues in Earth

  13. Kinematics and ionization of extended gas in active galaxies. III. The extranuclear properties of NGC 1068

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, J.A.; Wilson, A.S.; Whittle, M.

    1987-08-01

    The kinematic and ionization structure of the extranuclear gas of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 has been investigated using a grid of 28 high- and seven low-dispersion long-slit spectra. The velocity field of most of the gas more than 15 arcsec from the nucleus is well described by a rotating disk with an approximately flat rotation curve. The kinematic line of nodes coincides with the major axis of the outermost continuum light, and the disk inclination derived from the axial ratio of the outer isophotes and the kinematic fit are broadly consistent. The progressive change of the position angle of the major axes of the brighter isophotes are evidently due to a superposition of oval or barlike distortions in the galactic plane. The observed ionization structure of the gas can be understood as a mixture of two disk components projected on top of each other. Much of the ionization pattern in the other disk may result from partial beaming of the ionizing continuum radiation as it escapes from the nucleus. 60 references.

  14. Stellar and ionized gas kinematics of the interacting Seyfert 1.9 galaxy NGC 2992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lorenzo, B.; Arribas, S.; Mediavilla, E.

    2001-11-01

    Integral field spectroscopy in the central 16''x 12'' (2.4 kpc x 1.8 kpc, if H0 = 75 km s-1 Mpc-1) of the Seyfert 1.9 galaxy NGC 2992 has been obtained using the fibre system INTEGRAL. The data are mainly used to study the stellar and ionized gas kinematics. In spite of the photometric disruptions in the outer parts (r > 6 kpc) produced by the interaction with its close companion (NGC 2993), the present stellar velocity field shows regular rotation. The ionized gas presents several kinematically distinct components. Apart from the outflowing component already reported by other authors, we found an additional (high ionization) kinematic component which seems to be associated with the boundaries of the figure-of-eight-shaped emission detected in the 6 cm radio map. We locate the hidden nucleus in the apex of the biconical structure defined by the [O iii] emission, coincident with the outflow origin and with the center of the dust lane. We do not find any clear evidence of direct influence of the interaction in the kinematics of the stars or the ionized gas in the circumnuclear region of NGC 2992.

  15. In-gas-cell laser ionization studies of plutonium isotopes at IGISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohjalainen, I.; Moore, I. D.; Kron, T.; Raeder, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Tomita, H.; Trautmann, N.; Voss, A.; Wendt, K.

    2016-06-01

    In-gas-cell resonance laser ionization has been performed on long-lived isotopes of Pu at the IGISOL facility, Jyväskylä. This initiates a new programme of research towards high-resolution optical spectroscopy of heavy actinide elements which can be produced in sufficient quantities at research reactors and transported to facilities elsewhere. In this work a new gas cell has been constructed for fast extraction of laser-ionized elements. Samples of 238-240,242Pu and 244Pu have been evaporated from Ta filaments, laser ionized, mass separated and delivered to the collinear laser spectroscopy station. Here we report on the performance of the gas cell through studies of the mass spectra obtained in helium and argon, before and after the radiofrequency quadrupole cooler-buncher. This provides valuable insight into the gas phase chemistry exhibited by Pu, which has been additionally supported by measurements of ion time profiles. The resulting monoatomic yields are sufficient for collinear laser spectroscopy. A gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis of the Pu samples shows a good agreement with the assay provided by the Mainz Nuclear Chemistry department.

  16. Comparison of Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Gas Chromatography-Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry to Traditional High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry for the Identification and Quantification of Halogenated Dioxins and Furans.

    PubMed

    Organtini, Kari L; Haimovici, Liad; Jobst, Karl J; Reiner, Eric J; Ladak, Adam; Stevens, Douglas; Cochran, Jack W; Dorman, Frank L

    2015-08-04

    The goal of this study was to qualify gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) as a reliable and valid technique for analysis of halogenated dioxins and furans that could be used in place of more traditional gas chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) analysis. A direct comparison of the two instrumental techniques was performed. APGC-MS/MS system sensitivity was demonstrated to be on the single femtogram level. The APGC-MS/MS analysis also demonstrated method detection limits (MDLs) in both sediment and fish that were 2-18 times lower than those determined for the GC-HRMS. Inlet conditions were established to prevent issues with sample carry-over, due largely to the enhanced sensitivity of this technique. Additionally, this work utilized direct injection for sample introduction through the split/splittless inlet. Finally, quantification of both sediment and fish certified reference materials were directly compared between the APGC-MS/MS and GC-HRMS. The APGC-MS/MS performed similarly to, if not better than, the GC-HRMS instrument in the analysis of these samples. This data is intended to substantiate APGC-MS/MS as a comparable technique to GC-HRMS for the analysis of dioxins and furans.

  17. A Pre-ionization System to Limit Neutral Gas in a Compact Toroid Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allfrey, Ian; Roche, Thomas; Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Garate, Eusebio; Gota, Hiroshi; Asai, Tomohiko; the TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    Fusion plasmas require long lifetimes and high temperatures, both of which are limited by particle loss, among other factors. Therefore, refueling a long-lived advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma in C-2U is necessary, and injecting a supersonic compact toroid (CT) is an effective means of introducing particles into the FRC core. However, neutral gas that trails the CT into the target chamber cools the FRC. Pre-ionization (PI) system assists the break down between electrodes of the CT injector (CTI), so the amount of introduced gas can be lowered by up to a factor of two, effectively increasing the ionization fraction; thus, reducing the amount of neutral gas in the system. Additionally, the PI decreases the delay in CTI breakdown so a highly reproducible operation is achievable. The PI system consists of a fast, high voltage, pulse discharge circuit coupled to a Teflon insulated semi-rigid coaxial cable inserted into the CTI. System details and experimental data will be presented, in addition to issues such as the introduction of impurities and pre-ionizer lifetime.

  18. Central 300 PC of the Galaxy Probed by the Infrared Spectra of H_3^+ and Co: I. Predominance of Warm and Diffuse Gas and High H_2 Ionization Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takeshi; Geballe, Thomas R.; Goto, Miwa; Usuda, Tomonori; Indriolo, Nick

    2016-06-01

    A low-resolution 2.0-2.5 μm survey of ˜500 very red point-like objects in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) of our Galaxy, initiated in 2008, has revealed many new bright objects with featureless spectra that are suitable for high resolution absorption spectroscopy of H_3^+ and CO. We now have altogether 48 objects mostly close to the Galactic plane located from 142 pc to the west of Sgr A* to 120 pc east allowing us to probe dense and diffuse gas by H_3^+ and dense gas by CO. Our observations demonstrate that the warm (˜250 K) and diffuse (≤100 cm-3) gas with a large column length (≥30 pc) initially observed toward the brightest star in the CMZ, GCS3-2 of the Quintuplet Cluster, exists throughout the CMZ with the surface filling factor of ˜ 100% dominating the region. The column densities of CO in the CMZ are found to be much less than those in the three foreground spiral arms except in the directions of Sgr B and Sgr E complexes and indicate that the volume filling factor of dense clouds of 10% previously estimated is a gross overestimate for the front half of the CMZ. Nevertheless the predominance of the newly found diffuse molecular gas makes the term "Central Molecular Zone" even more appropriate. The ultra-hot X-rays emitting plasma which some thought to dominate the region must be non existent except near the stars and SNRs. Recently the H_2 fraction f(H_2) in diffuse gas of the CMZ has been reported to be ˜0.6. If we use this value, the cosmic ray H_2 ionization rate ζ of a few times 10-15 s-1 reported earlier^b on the assumption of f(H_2)=1 needs to be increased by a factor of ˜3 since the value is approximately inversely proportional to f(H_2)^2. Geballe, T. R., Oka, T., Lambridges, E., Yeh, S. C. C., Schlegelmilch, B., Goto, M., Westrick, C. W., WI07 at the 70th ISMS, Urbana, IL, USA,2015 Oka, T., Geballe, T. R., Goto, M., Usuda, T., McCall, B. J. 2005, ApJ, 632, 882 Le Petit, F., Ruaud, M., Bron, E., Godard, B., Roueff, E., Languignon, D., Le

  19. Analysis of persistent organic pollutants at sub-femtogram levels using a high-power picosecond laser for multiphoton ionization in conjunction with gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Taiki; Fukazawa, Kodai; Fujimoto, Masatoshi; Imasaka, Totaro

    2012-01-01

    A low-energy, high-repetition-rate picosecond laser (40 µJ, 20 kHz, 258 nm) was used for multiphoton ionization (MPI) in gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry to quantitatively determine dioxins (DXNs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The sensitivity of the technique was compared with that obtained using a high-energy, low-repetition-rate femtosecond laser (86 µJ, 1 kHz, 261 nm). The limits of detection (LODs) for the picosecond laser were several femtograms for chlorinated DXNs with low numbers of chloro substituents, and were several times lower than values obtained using a femtosecond laser, although the LODs were increased, reaching values that were nearly identical to those for the femtosecond laser for octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (octaCDD) and octachlorodibenzofuran (octaCDF). The LODs were also measured for 16 PAHs specified by the United States Environmental Protection Agency; the values for half of these compounds were at sub-femtogram levels. The procedure was used to analyze a surface-water sample collected from a river.

  20. Analysis of aldehydes in beer by gas-diffusion microextraction: characterization by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Luís Moreira; Magalhães, Paulo Jorge; Valente, Inês Maria; Pacheco, João Grosso; Dostálek, Pavel; Sýkora, David; Rodrigues, José António; Barros, Aquiles Araújo

    2010-06-11

    In this work, a recently developed extraction technique for sample preparation aiming the analysis of volatile and semi-volatile compounds named gas-diffusion microextraction (GDME) is applied in the chromatographic analysis of aldehydes in beer. Aldehydes-namely acetaldehyde (AA), methylpropanal (MA) and furfural (FA)-were simultaneously extracted and derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), then the derivatives were separated and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with spectrophotometric detection (HPLC-UV). The identity of the eluted compounds was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass-spectrometry detection in the negative ion mode (HPLC-APCI-MS). The developed methodology showed good repeatability (ca. 5%) and linearity as well as good limits of detection (AA-12.3, FA-1.5 and MA 5.4microgL(-1)) and quantification (AA-41, FA-4.9 and MA 18microgL(-1)); it also appears to be competitive in terms of speed and cost of analysis.

  1. Highly-ionized species in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, J. H.; Hartmann, L. W.; Raymond, J. C.; Dupree, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    Interstellar absorption lines have been observed toward 25 stars with the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite. Results are presented for observations of interstellar lines of C III, C IV, N V, Si III, and Si IV. Strong lines of Si IV or C IV are seen toward 11 stars. The strengths of these lines are inconsistent with their formation in the same hot gas responsible for the interstellar O IV lines observed with the Copernicus ultraviolet spectrometer. Comparison with simple models of the ionization structures of H II regions around hot stars suggests that the observed column densities of Si III, Si IV, and C IV are in harmony with those expected in normal photoionized nebulae. The line of sight to HD 93250, and O3 V star near Eta Carinae, passes through highly ionized gas that shows features spanning 250 km/s in radial velocity. Stellar wind velocities are presented for 21 of the stars observed in this survey of interstellar absorption lines.

  2. Modeling of gas ionization and plasma flow in ablative pulsed plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tiankun; Wu, Zhiwen; Liu, Xiangyang; Xie, Kan; Wang, Ningfei; Cheng, Yue

    2016-12-01

    A one-dimensional model to study the gas ionization and plasma flow in ablative pulsed plasma thrusters(APPTs) is established in this paper. The discharge process of the APPT used in the LES-6 satellite is simulated to validate the model. The simulation results for the impulse bit and propellant utilization give values of 29.05 μN s and 9.56%, respectively, which are in good agreement with experimental results. To test the new ionization sub-model, the discharge process of a particular APPT, XPPT-1, is simulated, and a numerical result for the propellant utilization of 62.8% is obtained, which also agrees well with experiment. The gas ionization simulation results indicate that an APPT with a lower average propellant ablation rate and higher average electric field intensity between electrodes should have higher propellant utilization. The plasma density distribution between the electrodes of APPTs can also be obtained using the new model, and the numerical results show that the plasma generation and flow are discontinuous, which is in good agreement with past experimental results of high-speed photography. This model provides a new tool with which to study the physical mechanisms of APPTs and a reference for the design of high-performance APPTs.

  3. High-throughput analysis of bergamot essential oil by fast solid-phase microextraction-capillary gas chromatography-flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Quinto; Presti, Maria Lo; Costa, Rosaria; Dugo, Paola; Dugo, Giovanni; Mondello, Luigi

    2006-01-20

    The advantages of using a narrow-bore column in headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatographic (HS-SPME-GC) analysis are investigated. An automated rapid HS-SPME-GC method for the determination of volatile compounds in a complex sample (bergamot essential oil) was developed. A low-capacity (7 microm) SPME fibre was employed, enabling a short equilibration time (15 min). The absorbed volatile compounds were then separated in 12.5 min on a 10 m x 0.1 mm I.D. capillary. The fast GC method was characterized by relatively moderate GC parameters (head pressure: 173 kPa; temperature program rate: 12 degrees C/min). The employment of the low-capacity fibre also suited the reduced sample capacity of the capillary employed, hence column overloading was avoided. Analytical repeatibility was determined in terms of retention times (maximum RSD: 0.32%) and peak areas (maximum RSD: 9.80%). The results obtained were compared to those derived from a conventional HS-SPME-GC (a 30 microm SPME fibre and 0.25 mm I.D. capillary were used) application on the same sample. In this respect, a great reduction of analytical time was obtained both with regard to the conventional SPME equilibration and GC run times, which both required 50 min. Peak resolution was altogether comparable in both applications. Although a slight loss in terms of sensitivity was observed in the rapid approach (generally within the 25-50% range), this did not impair the detection of all peaks of interest. Finally, the selectivities of the 30 and 7 microm fibres were evaluated and, as expected, these were in good agreement.

  4. Highly ionized atoms toward HD 93521

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, Lyman, Jr.; Fitzpatrick, Edward L.

    1992-01-01

    Results are reported from the HST High Resolution Spectrograph observations of absorption features of C IV and Si IV in the spectrum of the high-latitude O star HD 93521 (l = 183 deg; b = 62 deg). A comparison of Si IV and C IV profiles showed that the FWHM of both features is about 50 km/sec, in contrast to the 7 km/sec found for one of the several S II features. The line centers for C IV and Si IV are at v = -67 km/sec and -60 km/sec, respectively. As the interval velocity decreases from 90 to 50 km/sec, the Si IV/C IV ratio of the column density per unit velocity interval increases from about 0.2 to 0.4. The result is qualitatively consistent with a fountain model of Shapiro and Benjamin (1991) if the slower gas has cooled and recombined more than the faster gas.

  5. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  6. Plasma channel created by ionization of gas by a surface wave

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalov, V. N.; Kuz’min, G. P.; Minaev, I. M. Rukhadze, A. A.; Tikhonevich, O. V.

    2015-09-15

    Conditions for gas ionization in the field of a slow surface wave excited by a microwave source are considered. The gas ionization rate and the plasma density distribution over the radius of the discharge tube were studied by the optical method. The experiments were conducted in a dielectric tube with a radius much smaller than the tube length, the gas pressure being ∼1–3 Torr. It is shown that the stationary distribution of the plasma density is determined by diffusion processes.

  7. Aerodynamic Effects in Weakly Ionized Gas: Phenomenology and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Svetozar

    2006-10-01

    Successful application of gas discharges in aerodynamics requires their efficient generation, sustaining and control at supersonic or hypersonic flow conditions. Wall-free plasma formations that meet the requirements may then act as time-controlled and space-localized actuators to modify the flow. Potential candidates for this challenging task are plasmas contained in open or linear-cavity microwave field structures. We present and discuss direct observations of aerodynamic effects activated or modified by wall-free discharges. Further, we compare two generic types of wall-free discharges. First group, applicable for inlet-type structures, consists of a periodic series of microwave-induced plasmoids generated in a linear cavity, using the outgoing wave from a microwave antenna and the reflected wave from a nearby on-axis concave reflector. The plasmoids are spaced at half-wavelength separations according to the standing-wave pattern. The plasmoids are enhanced by an ``effective focusing'' in the near field of the antenna (Fresnel region) as a result of diffraction effects and mode structure. Second group, applicable to supersonic and hypersonic boundary layers, are the surface microwave discharges enhanced by a structure of Hertz dipoles. Standard microwave discharge phenomenology, such as microwave breakdown, mode structure and plasma parameters, is revisited to present a quantitative interpretation of the observed effects. Special attention is given to complex phenomena specific to flow-plasma interaction (double electric layers, ionization waves, instabilities), which provide the physical basis for localized heating in the aerodynamic flow.

  8. Astronomical redshifts of highly ionized regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter M.

    2014-07-01

    Astronomical or cosmological redshifts are an observable property of extragalactic objects and have historically been wholly attributed to the recessional velocity of that object. The question of other, or intrinsic, components of the redshift has been highly controversial since it was first proposed. This paper investigates one theoretical source of intrinsic redshift that has been identified. The highly ionized regions of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSO) are, by definition, plasmas. All plasmas have electromagnetic scattering characteristics that could contribute to the observed redshift. To investigate this possibility, one region of a generalized AGN was selected, the so called Broad Line Region (BLR). Even though unresolvable with current instrumentation, physical estimates of this region have been published for years in the astronomical literature. These data, selected and then averaged, are used to construct an overall model that is consistent with the published data to within an order of magnitude. The model is then subjected to a theoretical scattering investigation. The results suggest that intrinsic redshifts, derivable from the characteristics of the ambient plasma, may indeed contribute to the overall observed redshift of these objects.

  9. Ionizing potential waves and high-voltage breakdown streamers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, N. W.; Tidman, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The structure of ionizing potential waves driven by a strong electric field in a dense gas is discussed. Negative breakdown waves are found to propagate with a velocity proportional to the electric field normal to the wavefront. This causes a curved ionizing potential wavefront to focus down into a filamentary structure, and may provide the reason why breakdown in dense gases propagates in the form of a narrow leader streamer instead of a broad wavefront.

  10. Ionized gas pressure correlates with star formation intensity in nearby starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tianxing; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Yang, Huan

    2016-06-01

    We estimate the electron density of the ionized gas and thus the thermal pressure in HII regions; and compare that to the SFR (star formation rate) surface density for a combined sample of about 40 green peas and Lyman Break Analogs at z < 0.30. The electron density of the ionized gas is measured from sulfur line ratio ([SII] 6716 / 6731). We find that the SFR surface density is correlated with the electron density and the thermal pressure in HII regions for the star-forming galaxies with SFR surface density above a certain threshold. This work shows quantitatively the correlation between SFR surface density and electron density and that between SFR surface density and the thermal pressure in HII regions for the nearby starburst galaxies. This is consistent with theoretical models of disks (e.g. Kim et al. (2011) if we assume that the thermal pressure in HII regions is comparable to the total diffuse gas pressure at the midplane of the diffuse neutral gas. It is also in agreement with the results from star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2.5. We might infer that the starburst galaxies at low-redshift (z < 0.3) share similar physical properties to the galaxies at high redshift (z ~ 2.5).

  11. HIGH PRESSURE GAS REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Ramage, R.W.

    1962-05-01

    A gas regulator operating on the piston and feedback principle is described. The device is particularly suitable for the delicate regulation of high pressure, i.e., 10,000 psi and above, gas sources, as well as being perfectly adaptable for use on gas supplies as low as 50 psi. The piston is adjustably connected to a needle valve and the movement of the piston regulates the flow of gas from the needle valve. The gas output is obtained from the needle valve. Output pressure is sampled by a piston feedback means which, in turn, regulates the movement of the main piston. When the output is other than the desired value, the feedback system initiates movement of the main piston to allow the output pressure to be corrected or to remain constant. (AEC)

  12. Imaging spectrophotometry of ionized gas in NGC 1068. I - Kinematics of the narrow-line region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Gerald; Bland, Jonathan; Tully, R. Brent

    1990-01-01

    The kinematics of collisionally excited forbidden N II 6548, 6583 across the inner 1 arcmin diameter of the nearby Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068 is mapped using an imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer and low-noise CCD. The stack of monochromatic images, which spatially resolved the high-velocity gas, was analyzed for kinematic and photometric content. Profiles agree well with previous long-slit work, and their complete spatial coverage makes it possible to constrain the gas volume distribution. It is found that the narrow-line region is distributed in a thick center-darkened, line-emitting cylinder that envelopes the collimated radio jet. Three distinct kinematic subsystems, of which the cylinder is composed, are discussed in detail. Detailed behavior of the emission-line profiles, at the few points in the NE quadrant with simple kinematics, argues that the ionized gas develops a significant component of motion perpendicular to the jet axis.

  13. Spatially resolved integral field spectroscopy of the ionized gas in IZw18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehrig, C.; Vílchez, J. M.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Hernández-Fernández, J. D.; Duarte Puertas, S.; Brinchmann, J.; Durret, F.; Kunth, D.

    2016-07-01

    We present a detailed 2D study of the ionized ionized interstellar medium (ISM) of IZw18 using new Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer-integral field unit (PMAS-IFU) optical observations. IZw18 is a high-ionization galaxy which is among the most metal-poor starbursts in the local Universe. This makes IZw18 a local benchmark for understanding the properties most closely resembling those prevailing at distant starbursts. Our IFU aperture (˜1.4 × 1.4 kpc2) samples the entire IZw18 main body and an extended region of its ionized gas. Maps of relevant emission lines and emission line ratios show that higher-excitation gas is preferentially located close to the north-west knot and thereabouts. We detect a Wolf-Rayet feature near the north-west knot. We derive spatially resolved and integrated physical-chemical properties for the ionized gas in IZw18. We find no dependence between the metallicity indicator R23 and the ionization parameter (as traced by [O III]/[O II]) across IZw18. Over ˜0.30 kpc2, using the [O III] λ4363 line, we compute Te[O III] values (˜15 000-25 000 K), and oxygen abundances are derived from the direct determinations of Te[O III]. More than 70 per cent of the higher-Te[O III] (≳22 000 K) spaxels are He IIλ4686-emitting spaxels too. From a statistical analysis, we study the presence of variations in the ISM physical-chemical properties. A galaxy-wide homogeneity, across hundreds of parsecs, is seen in O/H. Based on spaxel-by-spaxel measurements, the error-weighted mean of 12 + log(O/H) = 7.11 ± 0.01 is taken as the representative O/H for IZw18. Aperture effects on the derivation of O/H are discussed. Using our IFU data we obtain, for the first time, the IZw18 integrated spectrum.

  14. Electron impact ionization of the gas-phase sorbitol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshova, Irina; Markush, Pavlo; Zavilopulo, Anatoly; Shpenik, Otto

    2015-03-01

    Ionization and dissociative ionization of the sorbitol molecule by electron impact have been studied using two different experimental methods. In the mass range of m/ z = 10-190, the mass spectra of sorbitol were recorded at the ionizing electron energies of 70 and 30 eV. The ion yield curves for the fragment ions have been analyzed and the appearance energies of these ions have been determined. The relative total ionization cross section of the sorbitol molecule was measured using monoenergetic electron beam. Possible fragmentation pathways for the sorbitol molecule were proposed.

  15. Alfvén ionization in an MHD-gas interactions code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. D.; Diver, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical model of partially ionized plasmas is developed in order to capture their evolving ionization fractions as a result of Alfvén ionization (AI). The mechanism of, and the parameter regime necessary for, AI is discussed and an expression for the AI rate based on fluid parameters, from a gas-MHD model, is derived. This AI term is added to an existing MHD-gas interactions' code, and the result is a linear, 2D, two-fluid model that includes momentum transfer between charged and neutral species as well as an ionization rate that depends on the velocity fields of both fluids. The dynamics of waves propagating through such a partially ionized plasma are investigated, and it is found that AI has a significant influence on the fluid dynamics as well as both the local and global ionization fraction.

  16. Ionized gas outflows and global kinematics of low-z luminous star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arribas, S.; Colina, L.; Bellocchi, E.; Maiolino, R.; Villar-Martín, M.

    2014-08-01

    We study the kinematic properties of the ionised gas outflows and ambient interstellar medium (ISM) in a large and representative sample of local luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs) (58 systems, 75 galaxies) at galactic and sub-galactic (i.e., star-forming clumps) scales, thanks to integral field spectroscopy (IFS)-based high signal-to-noise integrated spectra. The velocity dispersion of the ionized ISM in U/LIRGs (⟨ σ ⟩ ~ 70 km s-1) is larger than in lower luminosity local star-forming galaxies (⟨ σ ⟩ ~ 25 km s-1). While for isolated disc LIRGs star formation appears to sustain turbulence, gravitational energy release associated with interactions and mergers plays an important role in driving σ in the U/LIRG range. We find that σ has a dependency on the star formation rate density (ΣSFR), which is weaker than expected if it were driven by the energy released by the starburst. The relatively small role of star formation (SF) driving the σ in U/LIRGs is reinforced by the lack of an increase in σ associated with high luminosity SF clumps. We also find that the impact of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) in ULIRGs is strong, increasing on average σ by a factor 1.5. Low-z U/LIRGs cover a range of velocity dispersion (σ ~ 30 to 100 km s-1) and star formation rate density (ΣSFR ~ 0.1 to 20 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2) similar to those of high-z SFGs. Moreover, the observed weak dependency of σ on ΣSFR for local U/LIRGs (σ ∝ ΣSFR+0.06) is in very good agreement with that measured in some high-z samples. The presence of ionized gas outflows in U/LIRGs seems universal based on the detection of a broad, usually blueshifted, Hα line. The observed dependency of the maximum velocity of the outflow (Vmax) on the star formation rate (SFR) is of the type Vmax(non - AGN) ∝ SFR(LIR)+ 0.24. We find that AGNs in U/LIRGs are able to generate faster (~×2) and more massive (~× 1.4) ionized gas outflows than pure starbursts. The derived ionized mass

  17. A reservoir of ionized gas in the galactic halo to sustain star formation in the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, J Christopher

    2011-11-18

    Without a source of new gas, our Galaxy would exhaust its supply of gas through the formation of stars. Ionized gas clouds observed at high velocity may be a reservoir of such gas, but their distances are key for placing them in the galactic halo and unraveling their role. We have used the Hubble Space Telescope to blindly search for ionized high-velocity clouds (iHVCs) in the foreground of galactic stars. We show that iHVCs with 90 ≤ |v(LSR)| ≲ 170 kilometers per second (where v(LSR) is the velocity in the local standard of rest frame) are within one galactic radius of the Sun and have enough mass to maintain star formation, whereas iHVCs with |v(LSR)| ≳ 170 kilometers per second are at larger distances. These may be the next wave of infalling material.

  18. Evaluation of Gas-filled Ionization Chamber Method for Radon Measurement at Two Reference Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Yatabe, Yoshinori; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-08-07

    For quality assurance, gas-filled ionization chamber method was tested at two reference facilities for radon calibration: EML (USA) and PTB (Germany). Consequently, the radon concentrations estimated by the ionization chamber method were in good agreement with the reference radon concentrations provided by EML as well as PTB.

  19. A Three Dimensional Beam Profile Monitor Based on Residual Gas Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.A.; Shapira, D.

    1998-11-04

    A three-dimensional beam profile monitor based on tracking the ionization of the residual gas molecules in the evacuated beam pipe is described. Tracking in position and time of the ions and electrons produced in the ionization enables simultaneous position sampling in three dimensions. Special features which make it possible to sample very low beam currents were employed.

  20. Collisions of fast multicharged ions in gas targets: Charge transfer and ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlachter, A. S.

    1981-05-01

    Measurements of cross sections for charge transfer and ionization of H2 and rare-gas targets were made with fast, highly stripped projectiles in charge states as high as 59+. An empirical scaling rule for electron-capture cross section in H2 valid at energies above 275 keV/amu was found. Similar scaling might exist for other target gases. Cross sections are generally in good agreement with theory. A scaling rule was found for electron loss from H in collisions with a fast highly stripped projectile, based on Olson's classical-trajectory Monte-Carlo calculations, and confirmed by measurements in an H2 target. A similar scaling rule was for net ionization of rare-gas targets, based on Olson's CTMC calculations and the independent-electron model. Measurements are essentially consistent with the scaled cross sections. Calculations and measurements of recoil-ion charge-state spectra show large cross sections for the production of highly charged slow recoil ions.

  1. LTC1877 High Efficiency Regulator Total Ionizing Dose Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy; Pellish, Jonathan; Boutte, Alvin

    2012-01-01

    This report presents total ionizing dose evaluation data for the Linear Technology Corporation LTC1877 high efficiency monolithic synchronous step-down regulator. Data sheet parameters were tracked as a function of ionizing dose up to a total of 20 krad(SiO2). Control devices were also used.

  2. Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Using a High Voltage Target Compared to Electrospray Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Arnaud; Bajic, Steve; Cabooter, Deirdre; Augustijns, Patrick; Cuyckens, Filip

    2017-02-01

    A new atmospheric pressure ionization (API) source, viz. UniSpray, was evaluated for mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of pharmaceutical compounds by head-to-head comparison with electrospray ionization (ESI) on the same high-resolution MS system. The atmospheric pressure ionization source is composed of a grounded nebulizer spraying onto a high voltage, cylindrical stainless steel target. Molecules are ionized in a similar fashion to electrospray ionization, predominantly producing protonated or deprotonated species. Adduct formation (e.g., proton and sodium adducts) and in-source fragmentation is shown to be almost identical between the two sources. The performance of the new API source was compared with electrospray by infusion of a mix of 22 pharmaceutical compounds with a wide variety of functional groups and physico-chemical properties (molecular weight, logP, and pKa) in more than 100 different conditions (mobile phase strength, solvents, pH, and flow rate). The new API source shows an intensity gain of a factor 2.2 compared with ESI considering all conditions on all compounds tested. Finally, some hypotheses on the ionization mechanism, similarities, and differences with ESI, are discussed.

  3. Miniaturized ionization gas sensors from single metal oxide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Ramirez, Francisco; Prades, Juan Daniel; Hackner, Angelika; Fischer, Thomas; Mueller, Gerhard; Mathur, Sanjay; Morante, Joan Ramon

    2011-02-01

    Gas detection experiments were performed with individual tin dioxide (SnO2) nanowires specifically configured to observe surface ion (SI) emission response towards representative analyte species. These devices were found to work at much lower temperatures (T≈280 °C) and bias voltages (V≈2 V) than their micro-counterparts, thereby demonstrating the inherent potential of individual nanostructures in building functional nanodevices. High selectivity of our miniaturized sensors emerges from the dissimilar sensing mechanisms of those typical of standard resistive-type sensors (RES). Therefore, by employing this detection principle (SI) together with RES measurements, better selectivity than that observed in standard metal oxide sensors could be demonstrated. Simplicity and specificity of the gas detection as well as low-power consumption make these single nanowire devices promising technological alternatives to overcome the major drawbacks of solid-state sensor technologies.

  4. Jet-driven outflows of ionized gas in the nearby radio galaxy 3C 293

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, E. K.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Morganti, R.; Tadhunter, C.; Bessiere, P.; Short, P.; Emonts, B. H. C.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Fast outflows of gas, driven by the interaction between the radio jets and interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy, are being observed in an increasing number of galaxies. One such example is the nearby radio galaxy 3C 293. In this paper we present integral field unit observations taken with OASIS on the William Herschel Telescope, enabling us to map the spatial extent of the ionized gas outflows across the central regions of the galaxy. The jet-driven outflow in 3C 293 is detected along the inner radio lobes with a mass outflow rate ranging from ˜0.05 to 0.17 M⊙ yr-1 (in ionized gas) and corresponding kinetic power of ˜0.5-3.5 × 1040 erg s-1. Investigating the kinematics of the gas surrounding the radio jets (i.e. not directly associated with the outflow), we find linewidths broader than 300 km s-1 up to 5 kpc in the radial direction from the nucleus (corresponding to 3.5 kpc in the direction perpendicular to the radio axis at maximum extent). Along the axis of the radio jet linewidths >400 km s-1 are detected out to 7 kpc from the nucleus and linewidths of >500 km s-1 at a distance of 12 kpc from the nucleus, indicating that the disturbed kinematics clearly extend well beyond the high surface brightness radio structures of the jets. This is suggestive of the cocoon structure seen in simulations of jet-ISM interaction and implies that the radio jets are capable of disturbing the gas throughout the central regions of the host galaxy in all directions.

  5. Positron Impact Ionization in Noble Gas Atoms and Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marler, J. P.

    2005-05-01

    Results are presented for absolute positronium formation and direct ionization by positron impact on Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, CO and O2 at energies from threshold up to 90 eV. The experiments use a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam and exploit the properties of positron orbits in a magnetic field [1]. Results for the noble gases are compared with theoretical predictions and with measurements obtained using a significantly different method [2]. Results for diatomic molecules are compared to other available measurements and theoretical calculations where available. There is generally good agreement between the experimental measurements, providing an important benchmark for theoretical calculations. Intriguing features in Ar and O2 will be discussed. [1] J.P. Sullivan, S.J. Gilbert, J.P. Marler, R.G. Greaves, S.J. Buckman and C.M. Surko., Phys. Rev. A. 66, 042708 (2002) [2] J.P. Marler, J.P. Sullivan and C.M. Surko, Phys. Rev. A (2005), in press.

  6. A sensitive gas chromatography detector based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionization by a dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Ansgar T; Last, Torben; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2017-02-03

    In this work, we present a novel concept for a gas chromatography detector utilizing an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization which is initialized by a dielectric barrier discharge. In general, such a detector can be simple and low-cost, while achieving extremely good limits of detection. However, it is non-selective apart from the use of chemical dopants. Here, a demonstrator manufactured entirely from fused silica capillaries and printed circuit boards is shown. It has a size of 75×60×25mm(3) and utilizes only 2W of power in total. Unlike other known discharge detectors, which require high-purity helium, this detector can theoretically be operated using any gas able to form stable ion species. Here, purified air is used. With this setup, limits of detection in the low parts-per-billion range have been obtained for acetone.

  7. Observations of extended and counterrotating disks of ionized gas in S0 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen; Jullien-Dettmar, Marlies; Barteldrees, Andreas

    1990-01-01

    While many E/S0 galaxies have been found to show emission line spectra in their nuclear regions, the question of the presence and nature of extended disks of ionized gas in these galaxies has been addressed only in recent years. Typically the ionized gas is detected in the inner region on a scale of approx. 1 kpc (e.g., Phillips et al. 1986, Caldwell 1984). Here researchers present evidence that the disks of ionized gas of at least some S0 galaxies are much more extended than previously believed. In addition, with the detection of the counterrotation of gas and stars in NGC 7007 they strengthen the basis for arguments that the source of gas in S0 galaxies is external

  8. Cosmic ray studies with a gas Cherenkov counter in association with an ionization spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Arens, J. F.; Siohan, F.; Yodh, G. B.; Simon, M.; Spiegelhauer, H.

    1980-01-01

    The results from a balloon-borne gas Cherenkov counter (threshold 16.5 GeV/nucleon) and an ionization spectrometer are presented. The gas Cherenkov counter provides an absolute energy distribution for the response of the calorimeter for 5 or = Z 26 nuclei of cosmic rays. The contribution of scintillation to the gas Cherenkov pulse height was obtained by independently selecting particles below the gas Cherenkov threshold using the ionization spectrometer. Energy spectra were derived by minimizing the chi squared between Monte Carlo simulted data and flight data. Best fit power laws, dN/dE = AE-gamma, were determined for C, N, O, Ne, Mg, and Si. The power laws, all consistent with E (-2.7) are not good fits to the data. A better fit is obtained using the spectrum derived from the spectrometer. The data from the ionization calorimeter and the gas Cherenkov are thus completely self-consistent.

  9. Femtosecond interferometry of propagation of a laminar ionization front in a gas

    SciTech Connect

    Gizzi, L. A.; Giulietti, A.; Giulietti, D.; Labate, L.; Tomassini, P.; Galimberti, M.; Koester, P.; Martin, Ph.; Ceccotti, T.; De Oliveira, P.; Monot, P.

    2006-09-15

    We use optical interferometry to investigate ultrafast ionization induced by an intense, ultrashort laser pulse propagating in a helium gas. Besides standard phase shift information, our interferograms show a localized region of fringe visibility depletion (FVD) that moves along the laser propagation axis at luminal velocity. We find that such a loss of visibility can be quantitatively explained by the ultrafast change of refractive index due to the field ionization of the gas in the laser pulse width. We demonstrate that by combining the post facto phase shift distribution with the probe pulse transit effect in the ionizing region, the analysis of the observed FVD yields significant information on the ultrafast dynamics of propagation of the ionization front in the gas.

  10. Shock Structure Analysis and Aerodynamics in a Weakly Ionized Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saeks, R.; Popovic, S.; Chow, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is analyzed using an electrofluid dynamics model composed of classical conservation laws and Gauss Law. A viscosity model is included to correctly model the spatial scale of the shock structure, and quasi-neutrality is not assumed. A detailed analysis of the structure of a shock wave propagating in a weakly ionized gas is presented, together with a discussion of the physics underlying the key features of the shock structure. A model for the flow behind a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is developed and used to analyze the effect of the ionization on the aerodynamics and performance of a two-dimensional hypersonic lifting body.

  11. Gas kinematics and ionization along the extended sight line to HD 116852

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sembach, Kenneth R.; Savage, Blair D.

    1994-01-01

    We present Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph intermediate observations of the interstellar medium toward HD 116852, a low halo star at a distance of 4.8 kpc (z = -1.3 kpc) in the direction l = 304. deg 9, b = 16.deg 1. The small science aperture observations have signal-to-noise ratios ranging from 30 to 90 and resolutions of 11 to 18 km/s (FWHM). We confirm the optical MK classification of this star through an analysis of its ultraviolet photosperic and stellar wind profiles. We detect interstellar lines of Al III, Si IV, C IV, and N V together with lines of C I, C I*, C I**, Si II, Ge II, P II, and Ni II. We convert the Mg II, P II, S II, Al III, Si IV, C IV, and N V profiles into measure of apparent column density as a function of LSR velocity. Gas scale height, velocity dispersion, and differential Galactic rotation effects govern the profile shapes. A simple computer model of the expected sight line column density profiles for the low and high ion species indicates that the gas velocity dispersions and scale heights increase as the ionization level of the gas increases. We find scale heigts H greater than or = 1 kpc for the high ions, which are comparable to the z-distance of the star, whereas we find H approximatley = 0.6 to 0.7 kpc for A1 III and H approximatley 0.1 kpc for P II and Ge II. An enhancement in the Al II profile near -15 km/s accounts for approximately 25% of the A1 III column along the sight line and probably arises within gas located approximately 500 pc below the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm link. Portions of the broad underlying A1 III distribution are associated with the higher ionization lines, perhaps in conductive interfaces. The presence of N V and the column density ratios of Si IV, C IV, and N V favor the interpretation that much of the high ion absorption is produced by collisional ionization in gas with T = 1-3 x 10(exp 5) K. An enhancement near -35 km/s in both the Si IV and C IV profiles may be due to an outflow from the Norma

  12. Detection of trace levels of triclopyr using capillary gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Begley, P; Foulger, B E

    1988-04-01

    Triclopyr, after esterification, is shown to be a suitable candidate for detection by gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry forming a characteristic carboxylate anion which offers a high detection sensitivity. A detection limit of 70 fg reaching the ionizer is indicated. Low backgrounds and an absence of chemical interferences are shown for vegetation extracts, using a simple method of extraction and derivatisation. A similar behaviour is demonstrated for 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T.

  13. The kinematics of Milky Way halo gas. I - Observations of low-ionization species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, Laura

    1989-01-01

    Ultraviolet interstellar line day observed with the IUE toward 70 halo stars and four extragalactic sight lines are analyzed in a study of the large-scale kinematic properties of the Milky Way halo gas. The motions of the low-ionization gas is focused on. Large systematic velocities are found, and a pronounced asymmetry in the absorption characteristics of halo gas toward the Galactic poles is indicated. In the north, substantial amounts of material are falling toward the disk at velocities up to about 120 km/s in the most extreme case. Toward the south, low-ionization material shows no extreme or systematic motions.

  14. Investigating the Diffuse Ionized Gas in the Magellanic Stream with Mapped WHAM Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Brianna; Haffner, L. Matthew; Barger, Kathleen; Hernandez, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We present early stages of an Hα survey of the Magellanic Stream using the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM). While the neutral component of the Stream may extend 200° across the sky (Nidever et al. 2010), its ionized gas has not yet been studied in detail. Fox et al. 2014 find that the tidal debris in the Magellanic System contains twice as much ionized gas as neutral and may extend 30° away from the H I emission. However, such absorption-line studies are not sensitive to the overall morphology of the ionized gas. Using targeted Hα emission observations of the Magellanic Stream, Barger et al. 2015 find that although the warm ionized gas tracks the neutral gas, it often spans a few degrees away from the H I emission at slightly offset velocities. Using WHAM's unprecedented sensitivity to diffuse emission (~ 10s of mR) and its velocity resolution (12 km/s) to isolate Stream emission, we are now conducting the first full Hα survey of its ionized component. Here we present early results, including spatial and kinematic comparisons to the well-established neutral profile of the Stream. WHAM research and operations are supported through NSF Award AST-1108911.

  15. Prediction of Shock Wave Structure in Weakly Ionized Gas Flow by Solving MGD Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Z. T.; Oviedo-Rojas, Ruben; Chow, Alan; Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the recent research results of shockwave structure predictions using a new developed code. The modified Rankine-Hugoniot relations across a standing normal shock wave are discussed and adopted to obtain jump conditions. Coupling a electrostatic body force to the Burnett equations, the weakly ionized flow field across the shock wave was solved. Results indicated that the Modified Rankine-Hugoniot equations for shock wave are valid for a wide range of ionization fraction. However, this model breaks down with small free stream Mach number and with large ionization fraction. The jump conditions also depend on the value of free stream pressure, temperature and density. The computed shock wave structure with ionization provides results, which indicated that shock wave strength may be reduced by existence of weakly ionized gas.

  16. Measurements of ultrafast laser-driven ionization and extreme gas nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedpour, Sina; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Wahlstrand, Jared; Milchberg, Howard

    2013-10-01

    A 2D spectral interferometry method for measuring high laser field phenomena such as laser-driven ionization and high field nonlinearity is introduced. The method is based on Single-shot Supercontinuum Spectral Interferometry, in which a chirped supercontinuum is used to probe the time-dependent refractive index induced by a pump pulse. A thin gas target ensures uniform intensity and minimizes refraction of the probe beam due to refractive index gradients. An imaging spectrometer allows measurement of the spatial dependence of the response along one direction. To measure in 2D, a motorized mirror scans the probe beam across the spectrometer slit. The technique has 3 micron spatial and 5 fs temporal resolution. The effective interaction length is measured interferometrically, allowing absolute calibration of the refractive index change. We present measurements of the absolute ionization rates of noble and molecular gases and their high field nonlinear response. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Office of Naval Research, the National Science Foundation, and the Dept. of Energy.

  17. Theoretical and Experimental Research of Capabilities of MHD Technology to Control Gas Flow with Non-Equilibrium Ionization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    experimental research of capabilities of using of MHD technology to control gas flow with non-equilibrium ionization. Cold gas flows will be considered, where...and MHD generator will be developed. Requirements to ionizer, MHD generator and flow parameters at which self- sustained operational mode of ionizer and...MHD generator is realized will be formulated. Possibilities of using of MHD control in gas-dynamical systems will be considered. Traditional use of

  18. Gas-phase chemiluminescence and chemi-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fontijn, A.

    1985-01-01

    The phenomena of chemiluminescence (or more broadly chemi-excitation) and chemi-ionization have major similarities from a fundamental kinetic and dynamic point of view. However, since the former has primarily been investigated using optical spectroscopic techniques and the latter largely by mass spectroscopic (and other gaseous electronic) methods, the two phenomena have apparently never, explicitly been discussed together in one volume. In addition to a number of review articles on each individual subject, several meetings and books have had chemiluminescence and bioluminescence as their theme and those have been dominated by condensed phase work. On the other hand, chemi-ionization is often discussed in the contest of gaseous electronics, plasma chemistry and combustion. It is the goal of this book to present a more unified understanding of the two phenomena.

  19. The Contribution of Field OB Stars to the Ionization of the Diffuse Ionized Gas in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopes, Charles G.; Walterbos, René A. M.

    2000-10-01

    We present a study of the ionizing stars associated with the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) and H II regions in the nearby spiral galaxy M33. We compare our Schmidt Hα image to the far-ultraviolet (FUV, 1520 Å) image from the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT). The Hα/FUV ratio is higher in H II regions than in the DIG, suggesting an older population of ionizing stars in the DIG. Assuming ionization equilibrium, we convert the Hα flux to the number of Lyman continuum photons NLyc. When compared to models of evolving stellar populations, the NLyc/FUV ratio in H II regions is consistent with a young burst, while the DIG ratio resembles an older burst population, or a steady state population built up by constant star formation, which is probably a more accurate description of the stellar population in the field. The UIT data is complemented with archival FUV and optical images of a small portion of the disk of M33 obtained with WFPC2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These images overlap low- and mid-luminosity H II regions as well as DIG, so we can investigate the stellar population in these environments. Using the HST FUV and optical photometry, we assign spectral types to the stars observed in DIG and H II regions. The photometry indicates that ionizing stars are present in the DIG. We compare the predicted ionizing flux with the amount required to produce the observed Hα emission, and we find that field OB stars in the HST images can account for 40%+/-12% of the ionization of the DIG, while the stars in H II regions can provide 107%+/-26% of the Hα luminosity of the H II regions. Due to the limited coverage of the HST data, we cannot determine if stars outside the HST fields ionize some of the DIG located in the HST fields, nor can we determine if photons from stars inside the HST fields leak out of the area covered by the HST fields. We do not find any correlation between leakage of ionizing photons and Hα luminosity for the H II regions in our HST

  20. The Massive Stellar Population in the Diffuse Ionized Gas of M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoopes, Charles G.; Walterbos, Rene A. M.

    1995-01-01

    We compare Far-UV, H alpha, and optical broadband images of the nearby spiral galaxy M33, to investigate the massive stars associated with the diffuse ionized gas. The H-alpha/FUV ratio is higher in HII regions than in the DIG, possibly indicating that an older population ionizes the DIG. The broad-band colors support this conclusion. The HII region population is consistent with a young burst, while the DIG colors resemble an older population with constant star formation. Our results indicate that there may be enough massive field stars to ionize the DIG, without the need for photon leakage from HII regions.

  1. HST/COS Observations of Ionized Gas Accretion at the Disk–Halo Interface of M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Peek, J. E. G.; Werk, J. K.; Putman, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    We report the detection of accreting ionized gas at the disk–halo interface of the nearby galaxy M33. We analyze Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph absorption-line spectra of seven ultraviolet-bright stars evenly distributed across the disk of M33. We find Si iv absorption components consistently redshifted relative to the bulk M33's ISM absorption along all the sightlines. The Si iv detection indicates an enriched, disk-wide, ionized gas inflow toward the disk. This inflow is most likely multi-phase as the redshifted components can also be observed in ions with lower ionization states (e.g., S ii, P ii, Fe ii, Si ii). Kinematic modeling of the inflow is consistent with an accreting layer at the disk–halo interface of M33, which has an accretion velocity of {110}-20+15 {km} {{{s}}}-1 at a distance of {1.5}-1.0+1.0 kpc above the disk. The modeling indicates a total mass of ∼3.9 × 107 M⊙ for the accreting material at the disk–halo interface on the near side of the M33 disk, with an accretion rate of ∼2.9 M⊙ yr‑1. The high accretion rate and the level of metal enrichment suggest the inflow is likely to be the fallback of M33 gas from a galactic fountain and/or the gas pulled loosed during a close interaction between M31 and M33. Our study of M33 is the first to unambiguously reveal the existence of a disk-wide, ionized gas inflow beyond the Milky Way, providing a better understanding of gas accretion in the vicinity of a galaxy disk.

  2. Observations of feedback from radio-quiet quasars - II. Kinematics of ionized gas nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guilin; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Nesvadba, Nicole P. H.; Liu, Xin

    2013-12-01

    The prevalence and energetics of quasar feedback is a major unresolved problem in galaxy formation theory. In this paper, we present Gemini Integral Field Unit observations of ionized gas around 11 luminous, obscured, radio-quiet quasars at z ˜ 0.5 out to ˜15 kpc from the quasar; specifically, we measure the kinematics and morphology of [O III] λ5007 Å emission. The round morphologies of the nebulae and the large line-of-sight velocity widths (with velocities containing 80 per cent of the emission as high as 103 km s-1) combined with relatively small velocity difference across them (from 90 to 520 km s-1) point towards wide-angle quasi-spherical outflows. We use the observed velocity widths to estimate a median outflow velocity of 760 km s-1, similar to or above the escape velocities from the host galaxies. The line-of-sight velocity dispersion declines slightly towards outer parts of the nebulae (by 3 per cent kpc-1 on average). The majority of nebulae show blueshifted excesses in their line profiles across most of their extents, signifying gas outflows. For the median outflow velocity, we find dot{E}_kin between 4 × 1044 and 3 × 1045 erg s-1 and dot{M} between 2 × 103 and 2 × 104 M⊙ yr-1. These values are large enough for the observed quasar winds to have a significant impact on their host galaxies. The median rate of converting bolometric luminosity to kinetic energy of ionized gas clouds is ˜2 per cent. We report four new candidates for `superbubbles' - outflows that may have broken out of the denser regions of the host galaxy.

  3. Probing ionization conditions of Galactic halo gas using H-alpha observations of the Magellanic Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Kat; Madsen, Gregory J.; Fox, Andrew; Wakker, Bart P.; Bland-Hawthorn, Jonathan; Nidever, David L.; Lehner, Nicolas; Haffner, L. Matthew; Hill, Alex S.

    2017-01-01

    Galaxy interactions have greatly disturbed and redistributed the gas in the Magellanic System throughout the halos of the Milky Way. Using the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper (WHAM) telescope, we have completed the highest sensitivity and kinematically resolved emission-line survey of the entire Magellanic Stream. These observations enable us to determine how the ionization conditions change over 100-degrees across the sky, including the region below the South Galactic Pole. We explore the sources of that ionization and find that photoionization from the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds is insufficient to explain the observed H-alpha emission. We further investigate whether energetic processes associated with the Milky Way's center or interactions with the halo could provide the remaining ionization. The gas in the Magellanic Steam could supply enough gas to maintain or even boost the star formation in the Milky Way, but only if it can survive the journey to the Galaxy's disk.

  4. Construction of a fast ionization chamber for high-rate particle identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. Y.; Ahn, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chipps, K. A.; Manning, B.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Strauss, S. Y.

    2014-07-01

    A new gas-filled ionization chamber for high count rate particle identification has been constructed and commissioned at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). To enhance the response time of the ionization chamber, a design utilizing a tilted entrance window and tilted electrodes was adopted, which is modified from an original design by Kimura et al. [1]. A maximum counting rate of 700 , 000 particles per second has been achieved. The detector has been used for several radioactive beam measurements performed at the HRIBF.

  5. Pulsed Discharge Helium Ionization Detector for Highly Sensitive Aquametry.

    PubMed

    Mowry, Curtis D; Pimentel, Adam S; Sparks, Elizabeth S; Moorman, Matthew W; Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Manginell, Ronald P

    2016-01-01

    Trace moisture quantitation is crucial in medical, civilian and military applications. Current aquametry technologies are limited by the sample volume, reactivity, or interferences, and/or instrument size, weight, power, cost, and complexity. We report for the first time on the use of a pulsed discharge helium ionization detector (PDHID-D2) (∼196 cm(3)) for the sensitive (limit of detection, 0.047 ng; 26 ppm), linear (r(2) >0.99), and rapid (< 2 min) quantitation of water using a small (0.2 - 5.0 μL) volume of liquid or gas. The relative humidity sensitivity was 0.22% (61.4 ppmv) with a limit of detection of less than 1 ng moisture with gaseous samples. The sensitivity was 10 to 100 to fold superior to competing technologies without the disadvantages inherent to these technologies. The PDHID-D2, due to its small footprint and low power requirement, has good size, weight, and power-portability (SWAPP) factors. The relatively low cost (∼$5000) and commercial availability of the PDHID-D2 makes our technique applicable to highly sensitive aquametry.

  6. Investigation of ionized metal flux in enhanced high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Hubicka, Zdenek; Cada, Martin; Drache, Steffen; Hippler, Rainer; Tichy, Milan

    2014-04-21

    The metal ionized flux fraction and production of double charged metal ions Me{sup 2+} of different materials (Al, Cu, Fe, Ti) by High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) operated with and without a pre-ionization assistance is compared in the paper. The Electron Cyclotron Wave Resonance (ECWR) discharge was employed as the pre-ionization agent providing a seed of charge in the idle time of HiPIMS pulses. A modified grid-free biased quartz crystal microbalance was used to estimate the metal ionized flux fraction ξ. The energy-resolved mass spectrometry served as a complementary method to distinguish particular ion contributions to the total ionized flux onto the substrate. The ratio between densities of doubly Me{sup 2+} and singly Me{sup +} charged metal ions was determined. It is shown that ECWR assistance enhances Me{sup 2+} production with respect of absorbed rf-power. The ECWR discharge also increases the metal ionized flux fraction of about 30% especially in the region of lower pressures. Further, the suppression of the gas rarefaction effect due to enhanced secondary electron emission of Me{sup 2+} was observed.

  7. Ionization heating in rare-gas clusters under intense XUV laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Arbeiter, Mathias; Fennel, Thomas

    2010-07-15

    The interaction of intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser pulses ({lambda}=32 nm, I=10{sup 11}-10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) with small rare-gas clusters (Ar{sub 147}) is studied by quasiclassical molecular dynamics simulations. Our analysis supports a very general picture of the charging and heating dynamics in finite samples under short-wavelength radiation that is of relevance for several applications of free-electron lasers. First, up to a certain photon flux, ionization proceeds as a series of direct photoemission events producing a jellium-like cluster potential and a characteristic plateau in the photoelectron spectrum as observed in Bostedt et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 133401 (2008)]. Second, beyond the onset of photoelectron trapping, nanoplasma formation leads to evaporative electron emission with a characteristic thermal tail in the electron spectrum. A detailed analysis of this transition is presented. Third, in contrast to the behavior in the infrared or low vacuum ultraviolet range, the nanoplasma energy capture proceeds via ionization heating, i.e., inner photoionization of localized electrons, whereas collisional heating of conduction electrons is negligible up to high laser intensities. A direct consequence of the latter is a surprising evolution of the mean energy of emitted electrons as function of laser intensity.

  8. A mobile mass spectrometer for comprehensive on-line analysis of trace and bulk components of complex gas mixtures: parallel application of the laser-based ionization methods VUV single-photon ionization, resonant multiphoton ionization, and laser-induced electron impact ionization.

    PubMed

    Mühlberger, F; Zimmermann, R; Kettrup, A

    2001-08-01

    A newly developed compact and mobile time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) for on-line analysis and monitoring of complex gas mixtures is presented. The instrument is designed for a (quasi-)simultaneous application of three ionization techniques that exhibit different ionization selectivities. The highly selective resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) technique, using 266-nm UV laser pulses, is applied for selective and fragmentationless ionization of aromatic compounds at trace levels (parts-per-billion volume range). Mass spectra obtained using this technique show the chemical signature solely of monocyclic (benzene, phenols, etc.) and polycyclic (naphthalene, phenathrene, indol, etc.) aromatic species. Furthermore, the less selective but still fragmentationless single photon ionization (SPI) technique with 118-nm VUV laser pulses allows the ionization of compounds with an ionization potential below 10.5 eV. Mass spectra obtained using this technique show the profile of most organic compounds (aliphatic and aromatic species, like nonane, acetaldehyde, or pyrrol) and some inorganic compounds (e.g., ammonia, nitrogen monoxide). Finally, the nonselective ionization technique laser-induced electron-impact ionization (LEI) is applied. However, the sensitivity of the LEI technique is adjusted to be fairly low. Thus, the LEI signal in the mass spectra gives information on the inorganic bulk constituents of the sample (i.e., compounds such as water, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide). Because the three ionization methods (REMPI, SPI, LEI) exhibit largely different ionization selectivities, the isolated application of each method alone solely provides specific mass spectrometric information about the sample composition. Special techniques have been developed and applied which allow the quasi-parallel use of all three ionization techniques for on-line monitoring purposes. Thus, a comprehensive characterization of complex samples is feasible jointly using

  9. [Determination of acetanilide herbicide residues in tea by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with two different ionization techniques].

    PubMed

    Shen, Weijian; Xu, Jinzhong; Yang, Wenquan; Shen, Chongyu; Zhao, Zengyun; Ding, Tao; Wu, Bin

    2007-09-01

    An analytical method of solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with two different ionization techniques was established for simultaneous determination of 12 acetanilide herbicide residues in tea-leaves. Herbicides were extracted from tea-leaf samples with ethyl acetate. The extract was cleaned-up on an active carbon SPE column connected to a Florisil SPE column. Analytical screening was determined by the technique of gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode with either electron impact ionization (EI) or negative chemical ionization (NCI). It is reliable and stable that the recoveries of all herbicides were in the range from 50% to 110% at three spiked levels, 10 microg/kg, 20 microg/kg and 40 microg/kg, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were no more than 10.9%. The two different ionization techniques are complementary as more ion fragmentation information can be obtained from the EI mode while more molecular ion information from the NCI mode. By comparison of the two techniques, the selectivity of NCI-SIM was much better than that of EI-SIM method. The sensitivities of the both techniques were high, the limit of quantitative (LOQ) for each herbicide was no more than 2.0 microg/kg, and the limit of detection (LOD) with NCI-SIM technique was much lower than that of EI-SIM when analyzing herbicides with several halogen atoms in the molecule.

  10. Determination of Hexachlorocyclohexane by Gas Chromatography Combined with Femtosecond Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xixiang; Imasaka, Tomoko; Li, Adan; Imasaka, Totaro

    2016-12-01

    Structural isomers and enantiomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) were separated using a chiral column by gas chromatography and quantitatively determined by multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry using an ultraviolet femtosecond laser (200 and 267 nm) as the ionization source. The order of elution of the enantiomers (i.e., (+)-α-HCH and (-)-α-HCH) was predicted from stabilization energies calculated for the complexes using permethylated γ-cyclodextrin as the stationary phase of the column, and the results were compared with the experimental data. The molecular ions observed for HCH were weak, even though they can be ionized through a process of resonance enhanced two-photon ionization at 200 nm. This unfavorable result can be attributed to the dissociation of the molecular ion, as predicted from quantum chemical calculations.

  11. Cluster chemical ionization for improved confidence level in sample identification by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fialkov, Alexander B; Amirav, Aviv

    2003-01-01

    Upon the supersonic expansion of helium mixed with vapor from an organic solvent (e.g. methanol), various clusters of the solvent with the sample molecules can be formed. As a result of 70 eV electron ionization of these clusters, cluster chemical ionization (cluster CI) mass spectra are obtained. These spectra are characterized by the combination of EI mass spectra of vibrationally cold molecules in the supersonic molecular beam (cold EI) with CI-like appearance of abundant protonated molecules, together with satellite peaks corresponding to protonated or non-protonated clusters of sample compounds with 1-3 solvent molecules. Like CI, cluster CI preferably occurs for polar compounds with high proton affinity. However, in contrast to conventional CI, for non-polar compounds or those with reduced proton affinity the cluster CI mass spectrum converges to that of cold EI. The appearance of a protonated molecule and its solvent cluster peaks, plus the lack of protonation and cluster satellites for prominent EI fragments, enable the unambiguous identification of the molecular ion. In turn, the insertion of the proper molecular ion into the NIST library search of the cold EI mass spectra eliminates those candidates with incorrect molecular mass and thus significantly increases the confidence level in sample identification. Furthermore, molecular mass identification is of prime importance for the analysis of unknown compounds that are absent in the library. Examples are given with emphasis on the cluster CI analysis of carbamate pesticides, high explosives and unknown samples, to demonstrate the usefulness of Supersonic GC/MS (GC/MS with supersonic molecular beam) in the analysis of these thermally labile compounds. Cluster CI is shown to be a practical ionization method, due to its ease-of-use and fast instrumental conversion between EI and cluster CI, which involves the opening of only one valve located at the make-up gas path. The ease-of-use of cluster CI is analogous

  12. Cosmic ray studies with a gas Cerenkov counter in association with an ionization spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Arens, J. F.; Siohan, F.; Simon, M.; Spiegelhauer, H.; Yodh, G. B.

    1980-01-01

    The results from a balloon-borne gas Cerenkov counter (threshold 16.5 GeV/nuc) and an ionization spectrometer are presented. The gas Cerenkov counter provides an absolute energy calibration for the response of the calorimeter for the Z range of 5-26 nuclei of cosmic rays. The contribution of scintillation to the gas Cerenkov pulse height has been obtained by independently selecting particles below the gas Cerenkov threshold using the ionization spectrometer. Energy spectra were derived by minimizing the chi-squared between a Monte Carlo simulated data and flight data. Best fit power laws were determined for C, N, O, Ne, Mg, and Si. The power laws, all consistent with E exp-2.7, are not good fits to the data. A better fit is obtained using the spectrum derived from the spectrometer.

  13. [High Pressure Gas Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quintana, Rolando

    2002-01-01

    Four high-pressure gas tanks, the basis of this study, were especially made by a private contractor and tested before being delivered to NASA Kennedy Space Center. In order to insure 100% reliability of each individual tank the staff at KSC decided to again submit the four tanks under more rigorous tests. These tests were conducted during a period from April 10 through May 8 at KSC. This application further validates the predictive safety model for accident prevention and system failure in the testing of four high-pressure gas tanks at Kennedy Space Center, called Continuous Hazard Tracking and Failure Prediction Methodology (CHTFPM). It is apparent from the variety of barriers available for a hazard control that some barriers will be more successful than others in providing protection. In order to complete the Barrier Analysis of the system, a Task Analysis and a Biomechanical Study were performed to establish the relationship between the degree of biomechanical non-conformities and the anomalies found within the system on particular joints of the body. This relationship was possible to obtain by conducting a Regression Analysis to the previously generated data. From the information derived the body segment with the lowest percentage of non-conformities was the neck flexion with 46.7%. Intense analysis of the system was conducted including Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA), Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), and Barrier Analysis. These analyses resulted in the identification of occurrences of conditions, which may be becoming hazardous in the given system. These conditions, known as dendritics, may become hazards and could result in an accident, system malfunction, or unacceptable risk conditions. A total of 56 possible dendritics were identified. Work sampling was performed to observe the occurrence each dendritic. The out of control points generated from a Weighted c control chart along with a Pareto analysis indicate that the dendritics "Personnel not

  14. Ionization of highly excited helium atoms in an electric field

    SciTech Connect

    van de Water, W.; Mariani, D.R.; Koch, P.M.

    1984-11-01

    We present detailed measurements of ionization of highly excited triplet helium atoms in a static electric field. The atoms were prepared in states with energy E close to the saddle-point threshold E = -2(F(a.u.))/sup 1/2/. The electric field F was sufficiently strong for the states to be characterized by total spin S and absolute value of the magnetic quantum number M/sub L/. For M/sub L/ = 0 states the experiments measured ionization properties of adiabatic states. In another case, Vertical BarM/sub L/Vertical Bar = 2, they predominantly measured those of diabatic states. In both cases the ionization rate was found to be a highly nonmonotonic function of the field strength. The observations are analyzed in terms of a theory of the helium density of states in an electric field. A companion paper (D. A. Harmin, Phys. Rev. A 30, 2413 (1984)) develops in detail the general theory, which uses quantum defects to parametrize the effect of the core interaction. The agreement between measured and calculated ionization curves is good, indicating that the field ionization of a nonhydrogenic atom can now be understood in a detailed, quantitative, and predictive sense.

  15. Electron impact ionization of highly charged lithiumlike ions

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K L

    1992-10-01

    Electron impact ionization cross sections can provide valuable information about the charge-state and power balance of highly charged ions in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. In the present work, a novel technique based on x-ray measurements has been used to infer the ionization cross section of highly charged lithiumlike ions on the Livermore electron beam ion trap. In particular, a correspondence is established between an observed x ray and an ionization event. The measurements are made at one energy corresponding to approximately 2.3 times the threshold energy for ionization of lithiumlike ions. The technique is applied to the transition metals between Z=22 (titanium, Ti[sup 19+]) and Z=26 (iron, Fe[sup 23+]) and to Z=56 (barium, Ba[sup 53+]). The results for the transition metals, which have an estimated 17-33% uncertainty, are in good overall agreement with a relativistic distorted-wave calculation. However, less good agreement is found for barium, which has a larger uncertainty. Methods for properly accounting for the polarization in the x-ray intensities and for inferring the charge-state abundances from x-ray observations, which were developed for the ionization measurements, as well as an x-ray model that assists in the proper interpretation of the data are also presented.

  16. Properties of a weakly ionized NO gas sensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingyuan; Zhang, Yong Pan, Zhigang; Yang, Shuang; Shi, Jinghui; Li, Shengtao; Min, Daomin; Wang, Xiaohua; Liu, Dingxin; Yang, Aijun; Li, Xin

    2015-08-31

    Nitric oxide NO is one of the major targets for environmental monitoring, but the existing NO sensors are limited by their low sensitivity and narrow test range. Here, a NO gas sensor employing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was fabricated, and its properties in NO–N{sub 2} mixture were investigated from both emission and ionization. The current I{sub e} passing through the nanotubes cathode was found to decrease with increasing NO concentration and increase linearly in different slopes with the extracting voltage U{sub e}. It is shown that the Schottky barrier of the MWCNTs calculated by I{sub e} increased with NO concentration due to the adsorption of NO gas, which restrained the electron emission and consequently weakened the ionization. The positive ion currents I{sub c} passing through the collecting electrode at different voltages of U{sub e} were found to monotonically decrease with increasing NO concentration, which was induced by both of the reduced electron emission and the consumption of the two excited metastable states N{sub 2}(A{sup 3}∑{sub u}{sup +}) and N{sub 2}(a′{sup 1}∑{sub u}{sup −}) by NO. The sensor exhibited high sensitivity at the low temperature of 30 °C. The calculated conductivity was found to be able to take place of I{sub c} for NO detection in a wide voltage range of 80–150 V U{sub e}.

  17. Mapping the gas kinematics and ionization structure of four ultraluminous IRAS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilman, R. J.; Crawford, C. S.; Abraham, R. G.

    1999-10-01

    We present a study of the morphology, kinematics and ionization structure of the extended emission-line regions in four intermediate-redshift (0.118gas kinematics in the hyperluminous system IRAS F20460+1925 lack coherent structure, with a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) >1000kms-1 within 1arcsec of the nucleus, suggesting that any merger is well-advanced. Emission-line intensity ratios point to active galactic nucleus (AGN) photoionization for the excitation of this gas at the systemic velocity. An isolated blob ~8kpc from the nucleus with a much smaller velocity dispersion may lie in a structure similar to the photoionization cones seen in lower-luminosity objects. A second, spatially unresolved, narrow-line component is also present on nucleus, blueshifted by ~=990kms-1 from the systemic and plausibly powered by photoionizing shocks. IRAS F23060+0505 has more ordered kinematics, with a region of increased FWHM coincident with the blue half of a dipolar velocity field. The systemic velocity rotation curve is asymmetric in appearance, as a result either of the on-going merger or of nuclear dust obscuration. From a higher-resolution ISIS spectrum, we attribute the blue asymmetry in the narrow-line profiles to a spatially resolved nuclear outflow. Emission-line intensity ratios suggest shock+precursor ionization for the systemic component, consistent with the X-ray view of a heavily obscured AGN. The lower-luminosity objects IRAS F01217+0122 and F01003-2238 complete the sample. The former has a featureless velocity field with a high FWHM, a high-ionization AGN spectrum and a ~1Gyr old starburst continuum. IRAS F01003-2238 has a dipolar velocity field and an Hii region emission-line spectrum with a strong blue continuum. After correction for intrinsic extinction, the latter can be reproduced with ~107 O5 stars, sufficient to power the bolometric luminosity of the

  18. Ammonia quantitative analysis model based on miniaturized Al ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rongfei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, ammonia quantitative analysis based on miniaturized Al ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic model was proposed. Al plate anodic gas-ionization sensor was used to obtain the current-voltage (I-V) data. Measurement data was processed by non-linear bistable dynamics model. Results showed that the proposed method quantitatively determined ammonia concentrations. PMID:25975362

  19. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  20. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  1. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  2. Kinematics of the ionized gas in the Local Group irregular galaxy IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez-Gutiérrez, M.; Rosado, M.; Georgiev, L.; Borissova, J.; Kurtev, R.

    2001-01-01

    We present Hα and [S Ii] observations for the Local Group irregular galaxy IC 1613 using the PUMA scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. Our goal is to analyze the kinematics of the ionized gas in the complex sample of superbubbles located in the whole extension of our field (10\\arcmin ), which includes most of the optical emission of this galaxy, and to study the inter-relationship between young stellar associations and nebulae based on a previous study that we have made on the stellar associations of the central region of this galaxy. The ionized gas in this galaxy is distributed in classical H Ii regions and in a series of superbubbles (also called giant shells) covering a large fraction of the optical extent of the galaxy. We present a catalog of kinematical properties of both the H Ii regions of this galaxy and the superbubbles. We have also compared the kinematics of the ionized gas in H Ii regions to search for possible dynamic differences between neutral and ionized gas.

  3. Limitations of a residual gas ionization beam profile monitor for the SSC Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, R.; Nexsen, W.; Tsyganov, E.; Zinchenko, A.

    1992-11-01

    A residual gas ionization beam profile monitor for the superconducting Super Collider is considered in detail using the Monte Carlo simulation code. It is shown that a good spatial resolution could be obtained using a combination of strong electrical and magnetic fields.

  4. Ionized gas diagnostics from protoplanetary discs in the Orion nebula and the abundance discrepancy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa-Delgado, A.; Núñez-Díaz, M.; Esteban, C.; García-Rojas, J.; Flores-Fajardo, N.; López-Martín, L.; Tsamis, Y. G.; Henney, W. J.

    2012-10-01

    We present results from integral field spectroscopy of a field located near the Trapezium Cluster using the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer (PMAS). The observed field contains a variety of morphological structures: five externally ionized protoplanetary discs (also known as proplyds), the high-velocity jet HH 514 and a bowshock. Spatial distribution maps are obtained for different emission line fluxes, the c(Hβ) extinction coefficient, electron densities and temperatures, ionic abundances of different ions from collisionally excited lines (CELs), C2 + and O2 + abundances from recombination lines (RLs) and the abundance discrepancy factor of O2 +, ADF(O2 +). We distinguish the three most prominent proplyds (177-341, 170-337 and 170-334) and analyse their impact on the spatial distributions of the above mentioned quantities. We find that collisional de-excitation has a major influence on the line fluxes in the proplyds. If this is not properly accounted for then physical conditions deduced from commonly used line ratios will be in error, leading to unreliable chemical abundances for these objects. We obtain the intrinsic emission of the proplyds 177-341, 170-337 and 170-334 by a direct subtraction of the background emission, though the last two present some background contamination due to their small sizes. A detailed analysis of 177-341 spectra making use of suitable density diagnostics reveals the presence of high-density gas (3.8 × 105 cm-3) in contrast to the typical values observed in the background gas of the nebula (3800 cm-3). We also explore how the background subtraction could be affected by the possible opacity of the proplyd and its effect on the derivation of physical conditions and chemical abundances of the proplyd 177-341. We construct a physical model for the proplyd 177-341 finding a good agreement between the predicted and observed line ratios. Finally, we find that the use of reliable physical conditions returns an ADF(O2 +) about zero

  5. Transfer ionization in collisions with a fast highly charged ion.

    PubMed

    Voitkiv, A B

    2013-07-26

    Transfer ionization in fast collisions between a bare ion and an atom, in which one of the atomic electrons is captured by the ion whereas another one is emitted, crucially depends on dynamic electron-electron correlations. We show that in collisions with a highly charged ion a strong field of the ion has a very profound effect on the correlated channels of transfer ionization. In particular, this field weakens (strongly suppresses) electron emission into the direction opposite (perpendicular) to the motion of the ion. Instead, electron emission is redirected into those parts of the momentum space which are very weakly populated in fast collisions with low charged ions.

  6. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  7. Dust and ionized gas in active radio elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, D. A.; Sparks, W. B.; Macchetto, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present broad and narrow bandwidth imaging of three southern elliptical galaxies which have flat-spectrum active radio cores (NGC 1052, IC 1459 and NGC 6958). All three contain dust and extended low excitation optical line emission, particularly extensive in the case of NGC 1052 which has a large H alpha + (NII) luminosity. Both NGC 1052 and IC 1459 have a spiral morphology in emission-line images. All three display independent strong evidence that a merger or infall event has recently occurred, i.e., extensive and infalling HI gas in NGC 1052, a counter-rotating core in IC 1459 and Malin-Carter shells in NGC 6958. This infall event is the most likely origin for the emission-line gas and dust, and the authors are currently investigating possible excitation mechanisms (Sparks et al. 1990).

  8. Molecular and ionized gas kinematics in the GC Radio Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, N.; Lang, C. C.; Mills, E. A. C.; Ludovici, D.; Ott, J.; Morris, M. R.

    2017-01-01

    We present NH3 and H64α+H63α VLA observations of the Radio Arc region, including the M0.20 - 0.033 and G0.10 - 0.08 molecular clouds. These observations suggest the two velocity components of M0.20 - 0.033 are physically connected in the south. Additional ATCA observations suggest this connection is due to an expanding shell in the molecular gas, with the centroid located near the Quintuplet cluster. The G0.10 - 0.08 molecular cloud has little radio continuum, strong molecular emission, and abundant CH3OH masers, similar to a nearby molecular cloud with no star formation: M0.25+0.01. These features detected in G0.10 - 0.08 suggest dense molecular gas with no signs of current star formation.

  9. Measuring Ionization in Highly Compressed, Near-Degenerate Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doeppner, Tilo; Kraus, D.; Neumayer, P.; Bachmann, B.; Collins, G. W.; Divol, L.; Kritcher, A.; Landen, O. L.; Pak, A.; Weber, C.; Fletcher, L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Falcone, R. W.; Saunders, A.; Chapman, D.; Baggott, R.; Gericke, D. O.; Yi, A.

    2016-10-01

    A precise knowledge of ionization at given temperature and density is required to accurately model compressibility and heat capacity of materials at extreme conditions. We use x-ray Thomson scattering to characterize the plasma conditions in plastic and beryllium capsules near stagnation in implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility. We expect the capsules to be compressed to more than 20x and electron densities approaching 1025 cm-3, corresponding to a Fermi energy of 170 eV. Zinc Heα x-rays (9 keV) scattering at 120° off the plasma yields high sensitivity to K-shell ionization, while at the same time constraining density and temperature. We will discuss recent results in the context of ionization potential depression at these extreme conditions. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. An Ultra-Trace Analysis Technique for SF6 Using Gas Chromatography with Negative Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jong, Edmund C; Macek, Paul V; Perera, Inoka E; Luxbacher, Kray D; McNair, Harold M

    2015-07-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is widely used as a tracer gas because of its detectability at low concentrations. This attribute of SF6 allows the quantification of both small-scale flows, such as leakage, and large-scale flows, such as atmospheric currents. SF6's high detection sensitivity also facilitates greater usage efficiency and lower operating cost for tracer deployments by reducing quantity requirements. The detectability of SF6 is produced by its high molecular electronegativity. This property provides a high potential for negative ion formation through electron capture thus naturally translating to selective detection using negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NCI-MS). This paper investigates the potential of using gas chromatography (GC) with NCI-MS for the detection of SF6. The experimental parameters for an ultra-trace SF6 detection method utilizing minimal customizations of the analytical instrument are detailed. A method for the detection of parts per trillion (ppt) level concentrations of SF6 for the purpose of underground ventilation tracer gas analysis was successfully developed in this study. The method utilized a Shimadzu gas chromatography with negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry system equipped with an Agilent J&W HP-porous layer open tubular column coated with an alumina oxide (Al2O3) S column. The method detection limit (MDL) analysis as defined by the Environmental Protection Agency of the tracer data showed the method MDL to be 5.2 ppt.

  11. Gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (GC-API-MS): review.

    PubMed

    Li, Du-Xin; Gan, Lin; Bronja, Amela; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2015-09-03

    Although the coupling of GC/MS with atmospheric pressure ionization (API) has been reported in 1970s, the interest in coupling GC with atmospheric pressure ion source was expanded in the last decade. The demand of a "soft" ion source for preserving highly diagnostic molecular ion is desirable, as compared to the "hard" ionization technique such as electron ionization (EI) in traditional GC/MS, which fragments the molecule in an extensive way. These API sources include atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI), electrospray ionization (ESI) and low temperature plasma (LTP). This review discusses the advantages and drawbacks of this analytical platform. After an introduction in atmospheric pressure ionization the review gives an overview about the history and explains the mechanisms of various atmospheric pressure ionization techniques used in combination with GC such as APCI, APPI, APLI, ESI and LTP. Also new developments made in ion source geometry, ion source miniaturization and multipurpose ion source constructions are discussed and a comparison between GC-FID, GC-EI-MS and GC-API-MS shows the advantages and drawbacks of these techniques. The review ends with an overview of applications realized with GC-API-MS.

  12. Cosmic distribution of highly ionized metals and their physical conditions in the EAGLE simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmati, Alireza; Schaye, Joop; Crain, Robert A.; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2016-06-01

    We study the distribution and evolution of highly ionized intergalactic metals in the Evolution and Assembly of Galaxies and their Environment (EAGLE) cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations. EAGLE has been shown to reproduce a wide range of galaxy properties while its subgrid feedback was calibrated without considering gas properties. We compare the predictions for the column density distribution functions (CDDFs) and cosmic densities of Si IV, C IV, N V, O VI and Ne VIII absorbers with observations at redshift z = 0 to ˜6 and find reasonable agreement, although there are some differences. We show that the typical physical densities of the absorbing gas increase with column density and redshift, but decrease with the ionization energy of the absorbing ion. The typical metallicity increases with both column density and time. The fraction of collisionally ionized metal absorbers increases with time and ionization energy. While our results show little sensitivity to the presence or absence of AGN feedback, increasing/decreasing the efficiency of stellar feedback by a factor of 2 substantially decreases/increases the CDDFs and the cosmic densities of the metal ions. We show that the impact of the efficiency of stellar feedback on the CDDFs and cosmic densities is largely due to its effect on the metal production rate. However, the temperatures of the metal absorbers, particularly those of strong O VI, are directly sensitive to the strength of the feedback.

  13. Isobutane Made Practical as a Reagent Gas for Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsome, G. Asher; Steinkamp, F. Lucus; Giordano, Braden C.

    2016-11-01

    As a reagent gas for positive- and negative-mode chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI-MS), isobutane ( i-C4H10) produces superior analyte signal abundance to methane. Isobutane has never been widely adopted for CI-MS because it fouls the ion source more rapidly and produces positive CI spectra that are more strongly dependent on reagent gas pressure compared with methane. Isobutane was diluted to various concentrations in argon for use as a reagent gas with an unmodified commercial gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Analyte spectra were directly compared using methane, isobutane, and isobutane/argon mixtures. A mixture of 10% i-C4H10 in argon produced twice the positive-mode analyte signal of methane, equal to pure isobutane, and reduced spectral dependence on reagent gas pressure. Electron capture negative chemical ionization using 1% i-C4H10 in argon tripled analyte signal compared with methane and was reproducible, unlike pure isobutane. The operative lifetime of the ion source using isobutane/argon mixtures was extended exponentially compared with pure isobutane, producing stable and reproducible CI signal throughout. By diluting the reagent gas in an inert buffer gas, isobutane CI-MS experiments were made as practical to use as methane CI-MS experiments but with superior analytical performance.

  14. Diffuse gas in retired galaxies: nebular emission templates and constraints on the sources of ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Jonas; Woods, Tyrone E.; Gilfanov, Marat; Sarzi, Marc; Chen, Yan-Mei; Oh, Kyuseok

    2016-10-01

    We present emission-line templates for passively-evolving (`retired') galaxies, useful for investigation of the evolution of the interstellar medium in these galaxies, and characterization of their high-temperature source populations. The templates are based on high signal-to-noise (>800) co-added spectra (3700-6800 Å) of ˜11 500 gas-rich Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies devoid of star formation and active galactic nuclei. Stacked spectra are provided for the entire sample and sub-samples binned by mean stellar age. In our previous paper, Johansson et al., these spectra provided the first measurements of the He II 4686 Å line in passively-evolving galaxies, and the observed He II/Hβ ratio constrained the contribution of accreting white dwarfs (the `single-degenerate' scenario) to the Type Ia supernova rate. In this paper, the full range of unambiguously detected emission lines are presented. Comparison of the observed [O I] 6300 Å/Hα ratio with photoionization models further constrains any high-temperature single-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae (with 1.5 ≲ T/105 K ≲ 10) to ≲3-6 per cent of the observed rate in the youngest age bin (i.e. highest SN Ia rate). Hence, for the same temperatures, in the presence of an ambient population of post-asymptotic giant branch stars, we exclude additional high-temperature sources with a combined ionizing luminosity of ≈1.35 × 1030 L⊙/M⊙,* for stellar populations with mean ages of 1-4 Gyr. Furthermore, we investigate the extinction affecting both the stellar and nebular continuum. The latter shows about five times higher values. This contradicts isotropically distributed dust and gas that renders similar extinction values for both cases.

  15. Tracing kinematic (mis)alignments in CALIFA merging galaxies. Stellar and ionized gas kinematic orientations at every merger stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; García-Lorenzo, B.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; van de Ven, G.; Lyubenova, M.; Wild, V.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Sánchez, S. F.; Marquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Ziegler, B.; del Olmo, A.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; García-Benito, R.; Husemann, B.; Mast, D.; Kehrig, C.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Marino, R. A.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Walcher, C. J.; Vílchez, J. M.; Bomans, D. J.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; González Delgado, R. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; McIntosh, D. H.; Bekeraitė, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present spatially resolved stellar and/or ionized gas kinematic properties for a sample of 103 interacting galaxies, tracing all merger stages: close companions, pairs with morphological signatures of interaction, and coalesced merger remnants. In order to distinguish kinematic properties caused by a merger event from those driven by internal processes, we compare our galaxies with a control sample of 80 non-interacting galaxies. We measure for both the stellar and the ionized gas components the major (projected) kinematic position angles (PAkin, approaching and receding) directly from the velocity distributions with no assumptions on the internal motions. This method also allow us to derive the deviations of the kinematic PAs from a straight line (δPAkin). We find that around half of the interacting objects show morpho-kinematic PA misalignments that cannot be found in the control sample. In particular, we observe those misalignments in galaxies with morphological signatures of interaction. On the other hand, thelevel of alignment between the approaching and receding sides for both samples is similar, with most of the galaxies displaying small misalignments. Radial deviations of the kinematic PA orientation from a straight line in the stellar component measured by δPAkin are large for both samples. However, for a large fraction of interacting galaxies the ionized gas δPAkin is larger than the typical values derived from isolated galaxies (48%), indicating that this parameter is a good indicator to trace the impact of interaction and mergers in the internal motions of galaxies. By comparing the stellar and ionized gas kinematic PA, we find that 42% (28/66) of the interacting galaxies have misalignments larger than 16°, compared to 10% from the control sample. Our results show the impact of interactions in the motion of stellar and ionized gas as well as the wide the variety of their spatially resolved kinematic distributions. This study also provides a local

  16. Generation of naphthoquinone radical anions by electrospray ionization: solution, gas-phase, and computational chemistry studies.

    PubMed

    Vessecchi, Ricardo; Naal, Zeki; Lopes, José N C; Galembeck, Sérgio E; Lopes, Norberto P

    2011-06-02

    Radical anions are present in several chemical processes, and understanding the reactivity of these species may be described by their thermodynamic properties. Over the last years, the formation of radical ions in the gas phase has been an important issue concerning electrospray ionization mass spectrometry studies. In this work, we report on the generation of radical anions of quinonoid compounds (Q) by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The balance between radical anion formation and the deprotonated molecule is also analyzed by influence of the experimental parameters (gas-phase acidity, electron affinity, and reduction potential) and solvent system employed. The gas-phase parameters for formation of radical species and deprotonated species were achieved on the basis of computational thermochemistry. The solution effects on the formation of radical anion (Q(•-)) and dianion (Q(2-)) were evaluated on the basis of cyclic voltammetry analysis and the reduction potentials compared with calculated electron affinities. The occurrence of unexpected ions [Q+15](-) was described as being a reaction between the solvent system and the radical anion, Q(•-). The gas-phase chemistry of the electrosprayed radical anions was obtained by collisional-induced dissociation and compared to the relative energy calculations. These results are important for understanding the formation and reactivity of radical anions and to establish their correlation with the reducing properties by electrospray ionization analyses.

  17. Very metal-poor galaxies: ionized gas kinematics in nine objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, A. V.; Pustilnik, S. A.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2010-07-01

    The study of ionized gas morphology and kinematics in nine extremely metal-deficient (XMD) galaxies with the scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer on the Special Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) 6-m telescope is presented. Some of these very rare objects (with currently known range of O/H of 7.12 < 12 + log(O/H) < 7.65, or ) are believed to be the best proxies of `young' low-mass galaxies in the high-redshift Universe. One of the main goals of this study is to look for possible evidence of star formation (SF) activity induced by external perturbations. Recent results from HI mapping of a small subsample of XMD star-forming galaxies provided confident evidence for the important role of interaction-induced SF. Our observations provide complementary or new information that the great majority of the studied XMD dwarfs have strongly disturbed gas morphology and kinematics or the presence of detached components. We approximate the observed velocity fields by simple models of a rotating tilted thin disc, which allows us the robust detection of non-circular gas motions. These data, in turn, indicate the important role of current/recent interactions and mergers in the observed enhanced SF. As a by-product of our observations, we obtained data for two Low Surface Brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxies: Anon J012544+075957 that is a companion of the merger system UGC 993, and SAO 0822+3545 which shows off-centre, asymmetric, low star formation rate star-forming regions, likely induced by the interaction with the companion XMD dwarf HS 0822+3542. Based on observations obtained with the Special Astrophysical Observatory RAS 6-m telescope. E-mail: moisav@gmail.com (AVM); sap@sao.ru (SAP); akniazev@saao.ac.za (AYK)

  18. Qualitative Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses Using Amines as Chemical Ionization Reagent Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, James L.; Howard, Adam S.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia is a very useful chemical ionization (CI) reagent gas for the qualitative analyses of compounds by positive ion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). The gas is readily available, inexpensive, and leaves no carbon contamination in the MS source. Compounds of interest to our laboratory typically yield abundant protonated or ammoniated species, which are indicative of a compound's molecular weight. Nevertheless, some labile compounds fragment extensively by substitution and elimination reactions and yield no molecular weight information. In these cases, a CI reagent gas mixture of methylamine in methane prepared dynamically was found to be very useful in obtaining molecular weight data. Likewise, deuterated ammonia and deuterated methylamine are useful CI reagent gases for determining the exchangeable protons in organic compounds. Deuterated methylamine CI reagent gas is conveniently prepared by dynamically mixing small amounts of methylamine with excess deuterated ammonia.

  19. STS-39 Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) gas release from OV-103 payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A plume of nitrous oxide gas is released from a compressed gas canister mounted on the increased capacity adaptive payload carrier 1 (ICAPC-1) on the forward port side of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, payload bay (PLB). The gas release is part of the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiment conducted during STS-39. The Shuttle Pallet Satellite II (SPAS-II) 'parked' about two kilometers (km) away, is taking infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiometric spatial, spectral, and temporal measurements of the gas plumes. Surrounding the CIV ICAPC-1 are: the ICAPC-2 payload support subsystem, radiometer, and Langmuir probe also mounted on the port side; the Space Test Payload 1 (STP-1) multipurpose experiment support structure (MPESS) (just beyond gas beam); and the Air Force Program 675 (AFP-675) experiment support structure (ESS).

  20. High pressure synthesis gas fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Construction of the high pressure gas phase fermentation system is nearing completion. All non-explosion proof components will be housed separately in a gas-monitored plexiglas cabinet. A gas-monitoring system has been designed to ensure the safety of the operations in case of small or large accidental gas releases. Preliminary experiments investigating the effects of high pressure on Clostridium 1jungdahlii have shown that growth and CO uptake are not negatively affected and CO uptake by an increased total pressure of 100 psig at a syngas partial pressure of 10 psig.

  1. Drifting localization of ionization runaway: Unraveling the nature of anomalous transport in high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Ni, Pavel; Rauch, Albert

    2012-03-01

    The plasma over a magnetron's erosion ''racetrack'' is not azimuthally uniform but concentrated in distinct dense ionization zones which move in the ExB direction with about 10% of the electron ExB/B{sup 2} drift velocity. The ionization zones are investigated with a gated camera working in concert with a streak camera for Al, Nb, Cu, and W targets in Ar or Kr background gas. It is found that each ionization zone has a high plasma density edge, which is the origin of a plasma-generating electron jet leaving the target zone. Each region of strong azimuthal plasma density gradient generates an azimuthal electric field, which promotes the escape of magnetized electrons and the formation of electron jets and plasma flares. The phenomena are proposed to be caused by an ionization instability where each dense plasma zone exhibits a high stopping power for drifting high energy electrons, thereby enhancing itself.

  2. Ultralow-voltage field-ionization discharge on whiskered silicon nanowires for gas-sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Banan Sadeghian, Ramin; Islam, M Saif; Saif Islam, M

    2011-02-01

    Several hundred million volts per centimetre of electric-field strength are required to field-ionize gas species. Such fields are produced on sharp metallic tips under a bias of a few kilovolts. Here, we show that field ionization is possible at dramatically lower fields on semiconductor nanomaterials containing surface states, particularly with metal-catalysed whiskers grown on silicon nanowires. The low-voltage field-ionization phenomena observed here cannot be explained solely on the basis of the large field-amplification effect of suspended gold nanoparticles present on the whisker tips. We postulate that field penetration causes upward band-bending at the surface of exposed silicon containing surface states in the vicinity of the catalyst. Band-bending enables the valence electron to tunnel into the surface states at reduced fields. This work provides a basis for development of low-voltage ionization sensors. Although demonstrated on silicon, low-voltage field ionization can be detected on any sharp semiconductor tip containing proper surface states.

  3. Synthesis of refractory organic matter in the ionized gas phase of the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Kuga, Maïa; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Tissandier, Laurent

    2015-06-09

    In the nascent solar system, primitive organic matter was a major contributor of volatile elements to planetary bodies, and could have played a key role in the development of the biosphere. However, the origin of primitive organics is poorly understood. Most scenarios advocate cold synthesis in the interstellar medium or in the outer solar system. Here, we report the synthesis of solid organics under ionizing conditions in a plasma setup from gas mixtures (H2(O)-CO-N2-noble gases) reminiscent of the protosolar nebula composition. Ionization of the gas phase was achieved at temperatures up to 1,000 K. Synthesized solid compounds share chemical and structural features with chondritic organics, and noble gases trapped during the experiments reproduce the elemental and isotopic fractionations observed in primitive organics. These results strongly suggest that both the formation of chondritic refractory organics and the trapping of noble gases took place simultaneously in the ionized areas of the protoplanetary disk, via photon- and/or electron-driven reactions and processing. Thus, synthesis of primitive organics might not have required a cold environment and could have occurred anywhere the disk is ionized, including in its warm regions. This scenario also supports N2 photodissociation as the cause of the large nitrogen isotopic range in the solar system.

  4. Synthesis of refractory organic matter in the ionized gas phase of the solar nebula

    PubMed Central

    Kuga, Maïa; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Tissandier, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the nascent solar system, primitive organic matter was a major contributor of volatile elements to planetary bodies, and could have played a key role in the development of the biosphere. However, the origin of primitive organics is poorly understood. Most scenarios advocate cold synthesis in the interstellar medium or in the outer solar system. Here, we report the synthesis of solid organics under ionizing conditions in a plasma setup from gas mixtures (H2(O)−CO−N2−noble gases) reminiscent of the protosolar nebula composition. Ionization of the gas phase was achieved at temperatures up to 1,000 K. Synthesized solid compounds share chemical and structural features with chondritic organics, and noble gases trapped during the experiments reproduce the elemental and isotopic fractionations observed in primitive organics. These results strongly suggest that both the formation of chondritic refractory organics and the trapping of noble gases took place simultaneously in the ionized areas of the protoplanetary disk, via photon- and/or electron-driven reactions and processing. Thus, synthesis of primitive organics might not have required a cold environment and could have occurred anywhere the disk is ionized, including in its warm regions. This scenario also supports N2 photodissociation as the cause of the large nitrogen isotopic range in the solar system. PMID:26039983

  5. Escape fraction of ionizing photons from high-redshift galaxies in cosmological SPH simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2011-03-01

    Combing the three-dimensional radiative transfer (RT) calculation and cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, we study the escape fraction of ionizing photons (fesc) of high-redshift galaxies at z= 3-6. Our simulations cover the halo mass range of Mh= 109-1012 M⊙. We post-process several hundred simulated galaxies with the Authentic Radiative Transfer (ART) code to study the halo mass dependence of fesc. In this paper, we restrict ourselves to the transfer of stellar radiation from local stellar population in each dark matter halo. We find that the average fesc steeply decreases as the halo mass increases, with a large scatter for the lower-mass haloes. The low-mass haloes with Mh˜ 109 M⊙ have large values of fesc (with an average of ˜0.4), whereas the massive haloes with Mh˜ 1011 M⊙ show small values of fesc (with an average of ˜0.07). This is because in our simulations, the massive haloes show more clumpy structure in gas distribution, and the star-forming regions are embedded inside these clumps, making it more difficult for the ionizing photons to escape. On the other hand, in low-mass haloes, there are often conical regions of highly ionized gas due to the shifted location of young star clusters from the centre of dark matter halo, which allows the ionizing photons to escape more easily than in the high-mass haloes. By counting the number of escaped ionizing photons, we show that the star-forming galaxies can ionize the intergalactic medium at z= 3-6. The main contributor to the ionizing photons is the haloes with Mh≲ 1010 M⊙ owing to their high fesc. The large dispersion in fesc suggests that there may be various sizes of H II bubbles around the haloes even with the same mass in the early stages of reionization. We also examine the effect of UV background radiation field on fesc using simple, four different treatments of UV background.

  6. Studies of Flow in Ionized Gas: Historical Perspective, Contemporary Experiments, and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2007-04-23

    Since the first observations that a very small ionized fraction (order of 1 ppm) could strongly affect the gas flow, numerous experiments with partially or fully wall-free discharges have demonstrated the dispersion of shock waves, the enhancement of lateral forces in the flow, the prospects of levitation, and other aerodynamic effects with vast potential of application. A review of physical effects and observations are given along with current status of their interpretation. Special attention will be given to the physical problems of energy efficiency in generating wall-free discharges and the phenomenology of filamentary discharges. Comments and case examples are given on the current status of availability of necessary data for modelling and simulation of the aerodynamic phenomena in weakly ionized gas.

  7. Ion energies in high power impulse magnetron sputtering with and without localized ionization zones

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuchen; Tanaka, Koichi; Liu, Jason; Anders, André

    2015-03-23

    High speed imaging of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges has revealed that ionization is localized in moving ionization zones but localization disappears at high currents for high yield targets. This offers an opportunity to study the effect ionization zones have on ion energies. We measure that ions have generally higher energies when ionization zones are present, supporting the concept that these zones are associated with moving potential humps. We propose that the disappearance of ionization zones is caused by an increased supply of atoms from the target which cools electrons and reduces depletion of atoms to be ionized.

  8. Al III, Si IV, and C IV absorption toward zeta Ophiuchi: Evidence for photionized and collisionally ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sembach, Kenneth R.; Savage, Blair D.; Jenkins, Edward B.

    1994-01-01

    We present Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph observations at 3.5 km/s resolution and signal-to-noise ratios of 30 to 60 for the Al III, Si IV, and N V absorption lines in the far-ultraviolet spectrum of the O9.5 V star zeat Ophiuchi. The measurement reveal three types of highly ionized gas along the 140 pc line of sight. (1) Narrow components of Al III (b = 4.3 km/s, the mean value of (v(helio)) = -7.8 km/s; b = 3.2 km/s, the mean value of (v(sub helio)) = -14.4 km/s) and Si IV (b = 5.3 km/s, the mean value of (v(sub helio)) = -15.0 km/s) trace photionized gas in the expanding H II region surrounding zeta Oph. The observed magnitude and direction of the velocity offset between the Al III and Si IV profiles can be explained by models of H II regions that incorporate expansion. Narrow C IV absorption associated with the H II region is not detected. Predictions of the expected amounts of Si IV and C IV overestimate the column densities of these ions by factors of 30 and more than 10, respectively. The discrepancy may be due to the effects of elemental depletions in the gas and/or to the interaction of the stellar wind with surrounding matter. (2) Broad (b = 15 to 18 km/s) and weak Si IV and C IV absorption components are detected near the mean value of (v(sub helio)) = -26 km/s. The high-ionization species associated with these absorption components are probably produced by electron collisional ionization in a heated gas. This absorption may be physically related to the zeta Oph bow shock ot to a cloud complex situated within the local interstellar medium at d less than 60 pc. The C IV to Si IV column density ratio in this gas is 8, a factor of 6 less than conductive interface models predict, but this discrepancy may be removed by considering the effects of self-photoionization within the cooling gas in the model calculations. (3) A broad (b = 13 km/s) and weak C IV absorption feature detected at the mean value of (v(sub helio)) = -61 km/s is not seen in other

  9. The Vertical Structure of Diffuse Ionized Gas in Galactic Spiral Arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnarao, Dhanesh; Haffner, L. Matthew; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper provides the most sensitive velocity resolved observations of diffuse Hα, [S II] λ6716, and [N II] λ6584 emission in the Galaxy, tracing the warm (~8000K) ionized component of the interstellar medium. The vertical extent of this diffuse gas can directly impact the midplane pressure, influencing cold molecular clouds and star formation in the disk. Here, we analyze the vertical structure of the warm ionized medium around multiple spiral arm components of the Galaxy. Diffuse halo emission is isolated using longitude varying velocity channels guided by CO emission tracing cold molecular gas in the disk. We find exponential electron density squared (or emission measure) scale heights and analyze its behavior as a function of Galactocentric radius and the presence of cold molecular clouds and star forming regions in the disk. Statistical analysis of the behavior of [S II]/Hα and [N II]/Hα line ratios along some of these spiral arms disentangle the complex physical conditions of the warm ionized gas as a function of height and in-situ electron density. Some spiral arm sections, in particular the far Carina arm, have significantly larger (>3x) scale heights than previously studied arms that tend to increase as a function of Galactocentric radius.

  10. Fluctuations in microwave background radiation due to secondary ionization of the intergalactic gas in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunyayev, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Secondary heating and ionization of the intergalactic gas at redshifts z approximately 10-30 could lead to the large optical depth of the Universe for Thomson scattering and could smooth the primordial fluctuations formed at z approximately 1500. It is shown that the gas motions connected with the large scale density perturbations at z approximately 10-15 must lead to the generation of secondary fluctuations of microwave background. The contribution of the rich clusters of galaxies and young galaxies to the fluctuations of microwave background is also estimated.

  11. Breakdown voltage reduction by field emission in multi-walled carbon nanotubes based ionization gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saheed, M. Shuaib M.; Muti Mohamed, Norani; Arif Burhanudin, Zainal

    2014-03-24

    Ionization gas sensors using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are demonstrated. The sharp tips of the nanotubes generate large non-uniform electric fields at relatively low applied voltage. The enhancement of the electric field results in field emission of electrons that dominates the breakdown mechanism in gas sensor with gap spacing below 14 μm. More than 90% reduction in breakdown voltage is observed for sensors with MWCNT and 7 μm gap spacing. Transition of breakdown mechanism, dominated by avalanche electrons to field emission electrons, as decreasing gap spacing is also observed and discussed.

  12. Nuclear signal simulation applied to gas ionizing chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Coulon, Romain; Dumazert, Jonathan

    2015-07-01

    Particle transport codes used in detector simulation allow the calculation of the energy deposited by charged particles produced following an interaction. The pulses temporal shaping is more and more used in nuclear measurement into pulse shape analysis techniques. A model is proposed in this paper to simulate the pulse temporal shaping and the associated noise level thanks to the output track file PTRAC provides by Monte-Carlo particle transport codes. The model has been dedicated to ion chambers and more especially for High Pressure Xenon chambers HPXe where the pulse shape analysis can resolve some issues regarding with this technology as the ballistic deficit phenomenon. The model is fully described and an example is presented as a validation of such full detector simulation. (authors)

  13. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Rojeski, Ronald A.

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  14. Ionization Processes in the Atmosphere of Titan (Research Note). III. Ionization by High-Z Nuclei Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronoff, G.; Mertens, C.; Lilensten, J.; Desorgher, L.; Fluckiger, E.; Velinov, P.

    2011-01-01

    Context. The Cassini-Huygens mission has revealed the importance of particle precipitation in the atmosphere of Titan thanks to in-situ measurements. These ionizing particles (electrons, protons, and cosmic rays) have a strong impact on the chemistry, hence must be modeled. Aims. We revisit our computation of ionization in the atmosphere of Titan by cosmic rays. The high-energy high-mass ions are taken into account to improve the precision of the calculation of the ion production profile. Methods. The Badhwahr and O Neill model for cosmic ray spectrum was adapted for the Titan model. We used the TransTitan model coupled with the Planetocosmics model to compute the ion production by cosmic rays. We compared the results with the NAIRAS/HZETRN ionization model used for the first time for a body that differs from the Earth. Results. The cosmic ray ionization is computed for five groups of cosmic rays, depending on their charge and mass: protons, alpha, Z = 8 (oxygen), Z = 14 (silicon), and Z = 26 (iron) nucleus. Protons and alpha particles ionize mainly at 65 km altitude, while the higher mass nucleons ionize at higher altitudes. Nevertheless, the ionization at higher altitude is insufficient to obscure the impact of Saturn s magnetosphere protons at a 500 km altitude. The ionization rate at the peak (altitude: 65 km, for all the different conditions) lies between 30 and 40/cu cm/s. Conclusions. These new computations show for the first time the importance of high Z cosmic rays on the ionization of the Titan atmosphere. The updated full ionization profile shape does not differ significantly from that found in our previous calculations (Paper I: Gronoff et al. 2009, 506, 955) but undergoes a strong increase in intensity below an altitude of 400 km, especially between 200 and 400 km altitude where alpha and heavier particles (in the cosmic ray spectrum) are responsible for 40% of the ionization. The comparison of several models of ionization and cosmic ray spectra (in

  15. Improved gas chromatography-flame ionization detector analytical method for the analysis of epoxy fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Mubiru, Edward; Shrestha, Kshitij; Papastergiadis, Antonios; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2013-11-29

    In this study an improved method for analysis of epoxy fatty acids is reported. Data obtained from analysis of polar fatty acids has previously been presented, but due to the high number of compounds that co-elute in the polar fraction, the resultant chromatograms are complex which may lead to compromising the accuracy of the data. A three steps separation of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) by solid-phase extraction (SPE) on a silica gel column to remove hydroxy fatty acid interferences was proposed. This approach is opposed to a two step separation procedure that has been often used to prevent analytical interferences caused by non-altered fatty acids. A gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) equipped with a polar CP-Sil 88™ column was used. Quantification was based on the use of methyl nonadecanoate (C19:0), as an internal standard. Individual mono epoxy fatty acids were well separated without co-eluting compounds. The optimized method was finally applied to screen epoxy fatty acids in 37 fresh oil samples. Results obtained for the total epoxy fatty acids were in the range 0.03-2mgg(-1) of oil with repeatability coefficient of variation (CV) ranging from 2.8 to 9.9% for duplicate analysis showing that the results obtained are repeatable.

  16. Photoionization and High Density Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, T.; Bautista, M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present results of calculations using the XSTAR version 2 computer code. This code is loosely based on the XSTAR v.1 code which has been available for public use for some time. However it represents an improvement and update in several major respects, including atomic data, code structure, user interface, and improved physical description of ionization/excitation. In particular, it now is applicable to high density situations in which significant excited atomic level populations are likely to occur. We describe the computational techniques and assumptions, and present sample runs with particular emphasis on high density situations.

  17. Femtosecond Dynamics and Multiphoton Ionization driven with an Intense High Order Harmonic Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tilborg, Jeroen; Allison, Tom; Wright, Travis; Hertlein, Marc; Falcone, Roger; Liu, Yanwei; Merdji, Hamed; Belkacem, Ali

    2009-05-01

    We have constructed a high intensity high order harmonic source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab delivering ˜10^9 extreme ultraviolet photons/shot on a gas target and used it to observe multiphoton ionization and conduct femtosecond EUV-pump IR-probe experiments. Following excitation by 20-25 eV photons, we observed that the excited ethylene cation (H2C-CH2)^+ experienced isomerization to the ethylidene configuration (HC-CH3)^+ in 50±25 fs, followed by an H2 stretch motion. Experimental data and analysis from several experiments as well as a future outlook of our efforts will be presented.

  18. Femtosecond dynamics and multiphoton ionization driven with an intense high order harmonic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tilborg, J.; Allison, T. K.; Wright, T. W.; Hertlein, M. P.; Liu, Y.; Merdji, H.; Falcone, R. W.; Belkacem, A.

    2009-11-01

    We have constructed a high intensity high order harmonic source delivering ~ 109 extreme ultraviolet photons/shot on a gas target and used it to observe multiphoton ionization and conduct femtosecond EUV-pump IR-probe experiments. Following excitation by 20-25 eV photons, we observed that the excited ethylene cation (H2C-CH2)+ experienced isomerization to the ethylidene configuration (HC-CHs)+ in 50±25 fs, followed by an H2 stretch motion. Experimental data and analysis from several other performed and planned experiments will be presented as well.

  19. High pressure synthesis gas fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The construction of the high pressure gas phase fermentation system has been completed. Photographs of the various components of the system are presented, along with an operating procedure for the equipment.

  20. INTEGRAL-FIELD STELLAR AND IONIZED GAS KINEMATICS OF PECULIAR VIRGO CLUSTER SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cortés, Juan R.; Hardy, Eduardo; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P. E-mail: ehardy@nrao.cl

    2015-01-01

    We present the stellar and ionized gas kinematics of 13 bright peculiar Virgo cluster galaxies observed with the DensePak Integral Field Unit at the WIYN 3.5 m telescope in order to look for kinematic evidence that these galaxies have experienced gravitational interactions or gas stripping. Two-dimensional maps of the stellar velocity V, stellar velocity dispersion σ, and the ionized gas velocity (Hβ and/or [O III]) are presented for the galaxies in the sample. The stellar rotation curves and velocity dispersion profiles are determined for 13 galaxies, and the ionized gas rotation curves are determined for 6 galaxies. Misalignments between the optical and kinematical major axes are found in several galaxies. While in some cases this is due to a bar, in other cases it seems to be associated with gravitational interaction or ongoing ram pressure stripping. Non-circular gas motions are found in nine galaxies, with various causes including bars, nuclear outflows, or gravitational disturbances. Several galaxies have signatures of kinematically distinct stellar components, which are likely signatures of accretion or mergers. For all of our galaxies, we compute the angular momentum parameter λ {sub R}. An evaluation of the galaxies in the λ {sub R} ellipticity plane shows that all but two of the galaxies have significant support from random stellar motions, and have likely experienced gravitational interactions. This includes some galaxies with very small bulges and truncated/compact Hα morphologies, indicating that such galaxies cannot be fully explained by simple ram pressure stripping, but must have had significant gravitational encounters. Most of the sample galaxies show evidence for ICM-ISM stripping as well as gravitational interactions, indicating that the evolution of a significant fraction of cluster galaxies is likely strongly impacted by both effects.

  1. Ionization-induced blueshift of high-peak-power guided-wave ultrashort laser pulses in hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A. B.; Serebryannikov, E. E.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2007-11-15

    Ionization-induced change in the refractive index of a gas is shown to give rise to a substantial spectral blueshift of megawatt light pulses transmitted through a gas-filled hollow photonic-crystal fiber (PCF). This effect suggests the ways of controlling not only the rate, but also the sign of the soliton frequency shift for high-peak-power ultrashort light pulses guided in hollow PCFs filled with Raman-active ionizing gases.

  2. Multiple ionization of atoms by highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu; Shevelko, V. P.

    2015-06-01

    A method is suggested for quickly and easily estimating multiple ionization (MI) cross sections of heavy atoms colliding with highly charged ions, using the independent-particle model (IPM). One-electron ionization probabilities p(b) are calculated using the geometrical model for p(0) values at zero impact parameter b and the relativistic Born approximation for one-electron ionization cross sections. Numerical results of MI cross sections are presented for Ne and Ar atoms colliding with Ar8+, Fe20+, Au24+, Bi67+ and U90+ ions at energies 1 MeV u{}-1-10 GeV u{}-1and compared with available experimental data and CTMC (classical trajectory Monte Carlo) calculations. The present method of calculation describes experimental dependencies of MI cross sections on the number of ejected electrons m within a factor of two to three. Numerical calculations show that at intermediate ion energies E = 1 - 10 MeV u{}-1, the contribution of MI cross sections to the total, i.e. summed over all m values, is quite large ˜35% and decreases with increasing energy.

  3. The use of ionization electron columns for space-charge compensation in high intensity proton accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kapin, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    We discuss a recent proposal to use strongly magnetized electron columns created by beam ionization of the residual gas for compensation of space charge forces of high intensity proton beams in synchrotrons and linacs. The electron columns formed by trapped ionization electrons in a longitudinal magnetic field that assures transverse distribution of electron space charge in the column is the same as in the proton beam. Electrostatic electrodes are used to control the accumulation and release of the electrons. Ions are not magnetized and drift away without affecting the compensation. Possible technical solution for the electron columns is presented. We also discuss the first numerical simulation results for space-charge compensation in the FNAL Booster and results of relevant beam studies in the Tevatron.

  4. The Use of Ionization Electron Columns for Space-Charge Compensation in High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kapin, V.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2009-01-22

    We discuss a recent proposal to use strongly magnetized electron columns created by beam ionization of the residual gas for compensation of space charge forces of high intensity proton beams in synchrotrons and linacs. The electron columns formed by trapped ionization electrons in a longitudinal magnetic field that assures transverse distribution of electron space charge in the column is the same as in the proton beam. Electrostatic electrodes are used to control the accumulation and release of the electrons. Ions are not magnetized and drift away without affecting the compensation. Possible technical solution for the electron columns is presented. We also discuss the first numerical simulation results for space-charge compensation in the FNAL Booster and results of relevant beam studies in the Tevatron.

  5. Far-IR spectroscopy of the galactic center: Neutral and ionized gas in the central 10 pc of the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, D. J.; Watson, D. M.; Townes, C. H.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Hollenbach, D.; Lester, D. F.; Werner, M.; Storey, J. W. V.

    1983-01-01

    The 3P1 - 3P2 fine structure line emission from neutral atomic oxygen at 63 microns in the vicinity of the galactic center was mapped. The emission is extended over more than 4' (12 pc) along the galactic plane, centered on the position of Sgr A West. The line center velocities show that the O I gas is rotating around the galactic center with an axis close to that of the general galactic rotation, but there appear also to be noncircular motions. The rotational velocity at R is approximately 1 pc corresponds to a mass within the central pc of about 3 x 10(6) solar mass. Between 1 and 6 pc from the center the mass is approximately proportional to radius. The (O I) line probability arises in a predominantly neutral, atomic region immediately outside of the ionized central parsec of out galaxy. Hydrogen densities in the (O I) emitting region are 10(3) to 10(6) cm(-3) and gas temperatures are or = 100 K. The total integrated luminosity radiated in the line is about 10(5) solar luminosity, and is a substantial contribution to the cooling of the gas. Photoelectric heating or heating by ultraviolet excitation of H2 at high densities (10(5) cm(-3)) are promising mechanisms for heating of the gas, but heating due to dissipation of noncircular motions of the gas may be an alternative possibility. The 3P1 - 3P0 fine structure line of (O III) at 88 microns toward Sgr A West was also detected. The (O III) emission comes from high density ionized gas (n 10(4) cm(-3)), and there is no evidence for a medium density region (n 10(3) cm(-3)), such as the ionized halo in Sgr A West deduced from radio observations. This radio halo may be nonthermal, or may consist of many compact, dense clumps of filaments on the inner edges of neutral condensations at R or = 2 pc.

  6. Ionization steps and phase-space metamorphoses in the pulsed microwave ionization of highly excited hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bayfield, J.E.; Luie, S.Y.; Perotti, L.C.; Skrzypkowski, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    As the peak electric field of the microwave pulse is increased, steps in the classical microwave ionization probability of the highly excited hydrogen atom are produced by phase-space metamorphosis. They arise from new layers of Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) islands being exposed as KAM surfaces are destroyed. Both quantum numerical calculations and laboratory experiments exhibit the ionization steps, showing that such metamorphoses influence pulsed semiclassical systems. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Ionized Gas in E/S0 Galaxies with Dust Lanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funes, Jose G.; J., S.; Finkelman, I.; Borsch, N.; Vaisanen, P.; Kniazev, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present results from an ongoing program to study the properties of dust and ionized gas in E/S0 galaxies with dust lanes. Our observational program comprises of H-alpha and broad-band images obtained with the SAAO 1.9m, the VATT 1.8m and the 1m telescope on WO. A detailed analysis of 30 galaxies shows the presence of a diffusely distributed ionized gas component in most objects. The extended gas morphology is typically smooth and closely follows the dust structure, with a clear correlation between the mass of both components. The dust content in each galaxy is estimated by measuring the extinction by the extragalactic dust in the dark lanes. The derived extinction law is used to correct the measured colors for intrinsic dust extinction and the data are fitted with a stellar population synthesis model. We find that the line-emission and colors of most objects are consistent with the presence of an “old” stellar population ( 10 Gyr) and a small fraction of a “young” population ( 10- 100 Myr). The younger stellar population may have formed at a later stage of the evolution of the galaxy through either a merger event or a secondary star-formation burst. Strong evidence for the external origin of the ISM is provided by the apparent inclination of the dust and ionized gas disks with respect to the galactic plane in a large fraction of our sample galaxies. Further spectroscopic observations will be obtained to study the gaseous disks dynamics and to characterize the underlying stellar populations for evidence of multiple phases of star formation and assembly history.

  8. Multiple ionization of rare gas atoms irradiated with intense VUV radiation.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, H; de Castro, A R B; Gürtler, P; Laarmann, T; Laasch, W; Schulz, J; Möller, T

    2005-01-21

    The interaction of intense vacuum-ultraviolet radiation from a free-electron laser with rare gas atoms is investigated. The ionization products of xenon and argon atomic beams are analyzed with time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. At 98 nm wavelength and approximately 10(13) W/cm(2) multiple charged ions up to Xe6+ (Ar4+) are detected. From the intensity dependence of multiple charged ion yields the mechanisms of multiphoton processes were derived. In the range of approximately 10(12)-10(13) W/cm(2) the ionization is attributed to sequential multiphoton processes. The production of multiple charged ions saturates at 5-30 times lower power densities than at 193 and 564 nm wavelength, respectively.

  9. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Fingerprinting the Macondo Oil Spill.

    PubMed

    Lobodin, Vladislav V; Maksimova, Ekaterina V; Rodgers, Ryan P

    2016-07-05

    We report the first application of a new mass spectrometry technique (gas chromatography combined to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry, GC/APCI-MS/MS) for fingerprinting a crude oil and environmental samples from the largest accidental marine oil spill in history (the Macondo oil spill, the Gulf of Mexico, 2010). The fingerprinting of the oil spill is based on a trace analysis of petroleum biomarkers (steranes, diasteranes, and pentacyclic triterpanes) naturally occurring in crude oil. GC/APCI enables soft ionization of petroleum compounds that form abundant molecular ions without (or little) fragmentation. The ability to operate the instrument simultaneously in several tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) modes (e.g., full scan, product ion scan, reaction monitoring) significantly improves structural information content and sensitivity of analysis. For fingerprinting the oil spill, we constructed diagrams and conducted correlation studies that measure the similarity between environmental samples and enable us to differentiate the Macondo oil spill from other sources.

  10. Highly ionized disc and transient outflows in the Seyfert galaxy IRAS 18325-5926

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasawa, K.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Reynolds, C. S.; Miniutti, G.; Tombesi, F.

    2016-08-01

    We report on strong X-ray variability and the Fe K-band spectrum of the Seyfert galaxy IRAS 18325-5926 obtained from the 2001 XMM-Newton EPIC pn observation with a duration of ~120 ks. While the X-ray source is highly variable, the 8-10 keV band shows larger variability than that of the lower energies. Amplified 8-10 keV flux variations are associated with two prominent flares of the X-ray source during the observation. The Fe K emission is peaked at 6.6 keV with moderate broadening. It is likely to originate from a highly ionized disc with an ionization parameter of log ξ ≃ 3. The Fe K line flux responds to the main flare, which supports its disc origin. A short burst of the Fe line flux has no relation to the continuum brightness, for which we have no clear explanation. We also find transient, blueshifted Fe K absorption features that can be identified with high-velocity (~0.2c) outflows of highly ionized gas, as found in other active galaxies. The deepest absorption feature appears only briefly (~1 h) at the onset of the main flare and disappears when the flare declines. The rapid evolution of the absorption spectrum makes this source peculiar among the active galaxies with high-velocity outflows. Another detection of the absorption feature also precedes the other flare. The variability of the absorption feature partly accounts for the excess variability in the 8-10 keV band where the absorption feature appears. Although no reverberation measurement is available, the black hole mass of ~2 × 106M⊙ is inferred from the X-ray variability. When this mass is assumed, the black hole is accreting at around the Eddington limit, which may fit the highly ionized disc and strong outflows observed in this galaxy.

  11. High efficiency gas burner

    DOEpatents

    Schuetz, Mark A.

    1983-01-01

    A burner assembly provides for 100% premixing of fuel and air by drawing the air into at least one high velocity stream of fuel without power assist. Specifically, the nozzle assembly for injecting the fuel into a throat comprises a plurality of nozzles in a generally circular array. Preferably, swirl is imparted to the air/fuel mixture by angling the nozzles. The diffuser comprises a conical primary diffuser followed by a cusp diffuser.

  12. High-efficiency electron ionizer for a mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Darrach, Murray R. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides an improved electron ionizer for use in a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The improved electron ionizer includes a repeller plate that ejects sample atoms or molecules, an ionizer chamber, a cathode that emits an electron beam into the ionizer chamber, an exit opening for excess electrons to escape, at least one shim plate to collimate said electron beam, extraction apertures, and a plurality of lens elements for focusing the extracted ions onto entrance apertures.

  13. Ionized gas outflow in the isolated S0 galaxy NGC 4460

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, Alexei; Karachentsev, Igor; Kaisin, Serafim

    2010-04-01

    We used integral-field and long-slit spectroscopy to study a bright extended nebulosity recently discovered in the isolated lenticular galaxy NGC 4460 during an Hα survey of nearby galaxies. An analysis of archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey, GALEX and Hubble Space Telescope images indicates that current star formation is entirely concentrated in the central kiloparsec of the galaxy disc. The observed ionized gas parameters (morphology, kinematics and ionization state) can be explained by a gas outflow above the plane of the galaxy, caused by star formation in the circumnuclear region. Galactic wind parameters in NGC 4460 (outflow velocity, total kinetic energy) are several times smaller, compared with the known galactic wind in NGC 253, which is explained by the substantially lower total star formation rate. We discuss the cause of the star formation processes in NGC 4460 and in two other known isolated lenticular (S0) and elliptical (E) galaxies of the Local Volume: NGC 404 and 855. We provide evidence suggesting that the feeding of isolated galaxies by intergalactic gas on a cosmological time-scale is a steady process without significant variations. Based on observations collected with the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences, which is operated under the financial support of the Science Department of Russia (registration number 01-43). E-mail: moisav@gmail.com

  14. The Ionized Gas and Nuclear Environment in NGC 3783. IV; Variability and Modeling of the 900 ks CHANDRA Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netzer, Hagai; Kaspi, Shai; Behar, Ehud; Brandt, W. N.; Chelouche, Doron; George, Ian M.; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Gabel, Jack R.; Hamann, Frederick W.; George, Steven B.

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the 900 ks spectrum of NGC3783 obtained by Chandra in 2000-2001 (Kaspi et al. 2002). We split the data in various ways to look for time dependent and luminosity dependent spectral variations. This analysis, the measured equivalent widths of a large number of X-ray lines, and our photoionization calculations, lead us to the following conclusions: 1) NGC 3783 fluctuated in luminosity, by a factor N 1.5, during individual 170 ks observations. The fluctuations were not associated with significant spectral variations. 2) On a longer time scale, of 20-120 days, we discovered two very different spectral shapes that are noted the high state and the low state spectra. The observed changes between the two can be described as the appearance and disappearance of a soft continuum component. The spectral variations are not related, in a simple way, to the brightening or the fading of the short wavelength continuum, as observed in other objects. NGC3783 seems to be the first AGN to show this unusual behavior. 3) The appearance of the soft continuum component is consistent with beeing the only spectral variation and there is no need to invoke changes in the absorber s opacity. In particular, all absorption lines with reliable measurements show the same equivalent width, within the observational uncertainties, during high and low states. 4) Photoionization model calculations show that a combination of three ionization components, each split into two kinematic components, explain very well the intensity of almost all absorption lines and the bound-free absorption. The components span a large range of ionization and a total column of about 3 x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter Moreover, all components are thermally stable and are situated on the vertical branch of the stability curve.. This means that they are in pressure equilibrium and perhaps occupy the same volume of space. This is the first detection of such a multi-component equilibrium gas in

  15. WARM IONIZED GAS REVEALED IN THE MAGELLANIC BRIDGE TIDAL REMNANT: CONSTRAINING THE BARYON CONTENT AND THE ESCAPING IONIZING PHOTONS AROUND DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, K. A.; Haffner, L. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J. E-mail: haffner@astro.wisc.edu

    2013-07-10

    The Magellanic System includes some of the nearest examples of galaxies disturbed by galaxy interactions. These interactions have redistributed much of their gas into the halos of the Milky Way (MW) and the Magellanic Clouds. We present Wisconsin H{alpha} Mapper kinematically resolved observations of the warm ionized gas in the Magellanic Bridge over the velocity range of +100 to +300 km s{sup -1} in the local standard of rest reference frame. These observations include the first full H{alpha} intensity map and the corresponding intensity-weighted mean velocity map of the Magellanic Bridge across (l, b) = (281 Degree-Sign .5, -30 Degree-Sign .0) to (302. Degree-Sign 5, -46. Degree-Sign 7). Using the H{alpha} emission from the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC)-Tail and the Bridge, we estimate that the mass of the ionized material is between (0.7-1.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, compared to 3.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} for the neutral mass over the same region. The diffuse Bridge is significantly more ionized than the SMC-Tail, with an ionization fraction of 36%-52% compared to 5%-24% for the Tail. The H{alpha} emission has a complex multiple-component structure with a velocity distribution that could trace the sources of ionization or distinct ionized structures. We find that incident radiation from the extragalactic background and the MW alone are insufficient to produced the observed ionization in the Magellanic Bridge and present a model for the escape fraction of the ionizing photons from both the SMC and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). With this model, we place an upper limit of 4.0% for the average escape fraction of ionizing photons from the LMC and an upper limit of 5.5% for the SMC. These results, combined with the findings of a half a dozen other studies for dwarf galaxies in different environments, provide compelling evidence that only a small percentage of the ionizing photons escape from dwarf galaxies in the present epoch to

  16. THE CURIOUS CASE OF GLASS I: HIGH IONIZATION AND VARIABILITY OF DIFFERENT TYPES

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Andrew J.; Richter, Matthew J.; Carr, John S.; Najita, Joan R.; Moerchen, Margaret M.; Doppmann, Greg W.; Seifahrt, Andreas

    2013-02-20

    Our Spitzer IRS observation of the infrared companion Glass Ib revealed fine-structure emission with high ionization ([Ne III]/[Ne II] = 2.1 and [S IV]/[S III] = 0.6) that indicates that the gas is likely illuminated by hard radiation. While models suggest that extreme-ultraviolet radiation could be present in T Tauri stars, this is the first detection of [S IV] and such a high [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratio in a young star. We also find that Glass Ib displays the molecules HCN, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O in emission. Here we investigate the Glass I binary system and consider possible mechanisms that may have caused the high ionization, whether from an outflow or disk irradiation. We also model the spectral energy distributions of Glass Ia and Ib to test if the system is a young member of the Chameleon I star-forming region, and we consider other possible classifications for the system. We find that Glass Ib is highly variable, showing changes in continuum strength and emission features at optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared wavelengths. The optical light curve indicates that a central stellar component in Glass Ib became entirely visible for 2.5 years beginning in mid-2002 and possibly displayed periodic variability with repeated, short-period dimming during that time. As the fine-structure emission was not detected in observations before or after our Spitzer IRS observation, we explore whether the variable nature of Glass Ib is related to the gas being highly ionized, possibly due to variable accretion or an X-ray flare.

  17. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, John F.

    1989-01-01

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor.

  18. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1989-08-22

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

  19. Internally heated membrane interfaced to a gas chromatography flame ionization detector.

    PubMed

    Kanu, A Bakarr; Thomas, C L P

    2013-07-15

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) mixtures in aqueous solutions have been investigated using a simple and efficient all-in-one on-line sampling, isolation, enrichment and pre-concentration internally heated membrane connected to a gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID). In our previous study with the internally heated membrane, no GC column was used in the instrument. In this new study, we introduce a GC column in the instrument design and this makes it possible for mixtures to be investigated. This new experimental design enabled high resolution separation of analyte mixtures capable of being adsorbed, diffused, and desorbed from the device for detection with an FID. With the new design we present data from investigation of competitive adsorption effects on the membrane. The data showed that analyte adsorption and diffusion onto the membrane can be affected when mixtures of analytes are introduced. The application of multiple linear regressions approach to the data enabled us to correct for the problem of competitive adsorption. Analyte adsorption and diffusion was affected by the diffusion coefficients of the analytes; the higher the diffusion coefficient the better the extraction from the membrane. Increasing the sampling time from 1 to 4 min increases the response by 77%. The sampling time responses were linear up to 4 min sampling time. Above 4 min sampling time, the data deviate from linearity. The effect of adding salt to standards has no effect on analyte absorption onto the membrane. The detection limits for key VOCs studied with an internal standard calibration ranged from 0.2 to 194 ng cm(-3).

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, EXPLOSIVES DETECTION TECHNOLOGY, SRI INSTRUMENTS, MODEL 8610C, GAS CHROMATOGRAPH/THERMIONIC IONIZATION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SRI Model 86 1 OC gas chromatograph (GC) is a transportable instrument that can provide on-site analysis of soils for explosives. Coupling this transportable gas chromatograph with a thermionic ionization detector (TID) allows for the determination of explosives in soil matri...

  1. Interrelated structures of the transport shock and collisional relaxation layer in a multitemperature, multilevel ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinolo, A. R.; Clarke, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The gas dynamic structures of the transport shock and the downstream collisional relaxation layer are evaluated for partially ionized monatomic gases. Elastic and inelastic collisional nonequilibrium effects are taken into consideration. Three electronic levels are accounted for in the microscopic model of the atom. Nonequilibrium processes with respect to population of levels and species plus temperature are considered. By using an asymptotic technique the shock morphology is found on a continuum flow basis. The asymptotic procedure gives two distinct layers in which the nonequilibrium effects to be considered are different. A transport shock appears as the inner solution to an outer collisional relaxation layer in which the gas reaches local equilibrium. A family of numerical examples is displayed for different flow regimes. Argon and helium models are used in these examples.

  2. Turbulent Dynamo in a Conducting Fluid and a Partially Ionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Siyao; Lazarian, A.

    2016-12-01

    By following the Kazantsev theory and taking into account both microscopic and turbulent diffusion of magnetic fields, we develop a unified treatment of the kinematic and nonlinear stages of a turbulent dynamo process, and we study the dynamo process for a full range of magnetic Prandtl number P m and ionization fractions. We find a striking similarity between the dependence of dynamo behavior on P m in a conducting fluid and { R } (a function of ionization fraction) in a partially ionized gas. In a weakly ionized medium, the kinematic stage is largely extended, including not only exponential growth but a new regime of dynamo characterized by a linear-in-time growth of magnetic field strength, and the resulting magnetic energy is much higher than the kinetic energy carried by viscous-scale eddies. Unlike the kinematic stage, the subsequent nonlinear stage is unaffected by microscopic diffusion processes and has a universal linear-in-time growth of magnetic energy with the growth rate as a constant fraction 3/38 of the turbulent energy transfer rate, showing good agreement with earlier numerical results. Applying the analysis to the first stars and galaxies, we find that the kinematic stage is able to generate a field strength only an order of magnitude smaller than the final saturation value. But the generation of large-scale magnetic fields can only be accounted for by the relatively inefficient nonlinear stage and requires longer time than the free-fall time. It suggests that magnetic fields may not have played a dynamically important role during the formation of the first stars.

  3. Propagation direction reversal of ionization zones in the transition between high and low current magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Lab for Materials Processing and Die & Mold Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China; Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; Yang, Yuchen; Liu, Jason; Liu, Lin; Anders, André

    2014-12-11

    Past research has revealed the propagation of dense, asymmetric ionization zones in both high and low current magnetron discharges. Here we report about the direction reversal of ionization zone propagation as observed with fast cameras. At high currents, zones move in the E B direction with velocities of 103 to 104 m/s. However at lower currents, ionization zones are observed to move in the opposite, the -E B direction, with velocities ~;; 103 m/s. It is proposed that the direction reversal is associated with the local balance of ionization and supply of neutrals in the ionization zone.

  4. Dust and ionized gas in elliptical galaxies: Signatures of merging collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul; Dejong, Teije

    1993-01-01

    Traditionally elliptical galaxies were thought to be essentially devoid of interstellar matter. However, recent advances in instrumental sensitivity have caused a renaissance of interest in dust and gas in - or associated with - elliptical galaxies. In particular, the technique of co-adding IRAS survey scans has led to the detection of more than half of all ellipticals with BT less than 11 mag. in the Revised Shapley-Ames catalog, indicating the presence of 10(exp 7) - 10(exp 8) solar mass of cold interstellar matter (Jura et al. 1987). In addition, CCD multi-color surface photometry shows dust patches in about 30 percent of the cases studied to date (e.g., Veron-Cetty & Veron 1988). Thorough study of the gas and dust in ellipticals is important to (1) determine its origin (mass-loss from late-type stars, merging collisions with other galaxies or accretion inflows from cooling X-ray gas), and (2) investigate the 3-D shape of ellipticals, as can be derived from the orientation of the dust lanes and the 2-D velocity field of the gas. An important result of our comprehensive CCD imaging program is that a relevant fraction (approximately 40 percent) of the sample objects exhibits dust patches within extended H-alpha+(NII) line-emitting filaments. This common occurrence can be easily accounted for if the dust and gas have an external origin, i.e., mergers or interactions with gas-rich galaxies. Evidence supporting this suggestion: (1) the ionized gas is usually dynamically decoupled from the stellar velocity field (see, e.g., Sharples et al. 1983, Bertola & Bettoni 1988); (2) it is shown in a companion paper (Goudfrooij et al. 1992) that internal stellar mass loss alone can not account for the dust content of elliptical galaxies.

  5. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Techniques for Measurements of Gas-Phase Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, J. B.; Neuman, J. A.; Yoshida, K.; Ryerson, T. B.; Huey, L. G.; Tanner, D. J.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Hubler, G.; Fortin, T. J.; Sueper, D. J.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2005-12-01

    Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) can be a highly selective technique with fast time response for measuring many atmospheric trace gases (e.g., hydroxyl radical (OH), sulfuric acid (H2SO4), nitric acid (HNO3)). CIMS is highly versatile and has been used under a wide variety of conditions with many different ion-molecule detection schemes, even for detecting the same molecule. Because of its high proton affinity (853.6 kJ/mol), ammonia (NH3) is another ideal candidate for detection by CIMS. NH3, the dominant gas-phase base in the atmosphere, is a precursor of ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfates, compounds that are important constituents of airborne fine particulate matter that affect air quality. The characterization of three NH3 CIMS instruments: an atmospheric pressure ionization instrument and a low-pressure flow tube reactor instrument, both utilizing protonated ethanol cluster ion chemistry, and a different low-pressure flow tube reactor instrument using protonated acetone dimer ion chemistry, is presented here. Instrument performance is assessed using ambient data from both ground-based and airborne field programs to examine detection sensitivity, background signal, and time response. Laboratory characterization of different inlet materials is also presented. All three instruments used PFA Teflon sampling inlets. Instrumental backgrounds were determined by scrubbing NH3 from ambient air using silicon phosphates that release phosphoric acid when exposed to ambient levels of humidity. Standard addition calibrations were performed using NH3 permeation devices whose output was determined via 185nm optical absorption. Regardless of CIMS technique or ion chemistry used, the observed detection sensitivities were all adequate for detecting changes in NH3 at the 10 pptv level on a 1s timescale. The time responses, defined by a 1/e2 decay in the calibration signal, ranged from 5s to 45s for the different sampling inlet configurations and are rapid enough

  6. Extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly ionized oxygen and fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegg, D. J.; Griffin, P. M.; Haselton, H. H.; Laubert, R.; Mowat, J. R.; Thoe, R. S.; Peterson, R. S.; Sellin, I. A.

    1974-01-01

    The foil-excitation method has been used to study the extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly ionized oxygen and fluorine. Several previously unreported lines in heliumlike fluorine are reported and other newly reported lines in heliumlike oxygen have been measured to higher accuracy. Included in the measurements are certain heliumlike oxygen transitions of significance in interpretation of solar-flare spectral observations. The wavelength determinations are usually in good agreement with calculated results which includes relativistic corrections, but discrepancies arise when nonrelativistic calculations are used. A comparison of the present results and those recently obtained by theta-pinch and laser-induced plasma sources is made for both heliumlike and lithiumlike ions; a few discrepancies occur, with results in most cases in better agreement with relativistically corrected calculations. Certain unidentified lines in the spectra may be attributable to radiative transitions between quartet states of lithiumlike ions.

  7. Forbidden line emission from highly ionized atoms in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    Considerable interest in the observation of forbidden spectral lines from highly ionized atoms in tokamak plasmas is related to the significance of such observations for plasma diagnostic applications. Atomic data for the elements Ti Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Kr have been published by Feldman et al. (1980) and Bhatia et al. (1980). The present investigation is concerned with collisional excitation rate coefficients and radiative decay rates, which are interpolated for ions of elements between calcium, and krypton and for levels of the 2s2 2pk, 2s 2p(k+1), and 2p(k+2) configurations, and for the O I, N I, C I, B I, and Be I isoelectronic sequences. The provided interpolated atomic data can be employed to calculate level populations and relative line intensities for ions of the considered sequences, taking into account levels of the stated configurations. Important plasma diagnostic information provided by the forbidden lines includes the ion temperature

  8. Scintillation luminescence for high-pressure xenon gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Hasebe, N.; Igarashi, T.; Kobayashi, M.-N.; Miyachi, T.; Miyajima, M.; Okada, H.; Okudaira, O.; Tezuka, C.; Yokoyama, E.; Doke, T.; Shibamura, E.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Ulin, S. E.; Vlasik, K. F.

    2004-09-01

    Scintillation and ionization yields in xenon gas for 5.49MeV alpha-particles were measured in the range of pressure from 0.35 to 3.7MPa and the electric field strength (E) over the number density of xenon atoms (N), E/N from 0 to 5×10-18Vcm2. When our data are normalized at the data point measured by Saito et al., the number of scintillation photons is 2.3×105 while the number of ionization electrons is 2.0×105 at 2.6MPa and at 3.7×10-18Vcm2. The scintillation and ionization yields of xenon doped with 0.2% hydrogen, High-Pressure Xenon gas[H2-0.2%], at 2.6MPa was also measured. Scintillation yield of the Xe-H2 mixture gas is 80% as high as that of pure xenon. It is found that the scintillation yield is luminous enough to generate a trigger pulse of the high-pressure xenon time projection chamber, which is expected as a promising MeV Compton gamma-ray camera.

  9. Interplay of mulitphoton and tunneling ionization in short-wavelength-driven high-order harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Gkortsas, Vasileios-Marios; Bhardwaj, Siddharth; Lai, Chien-Jen; Hong, Kyung-Han; Falcao-Filho, Edilson L.; Kaertner, Franz X.

    2011-07-15

    High-order harmonic generation efficiency is theoretically modeled and compared with experiments using 400 and 800 nm driver pulses. It is shown that, for a short drive wavelength and a Keldysh parameter larger than 1, the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov (ADK) ionization model does not give a good agreement between theory and experiment. Since the ADK ionization model only accounts for tunnel ionization, it underestimates the yield of low-order harmonics from the wings of the driver pulse. In contrast, the Yudin-Ivanov ionization model [Phys. Rev. A 64, 013409 (2001)], which accounts for both tunnel and multiphoton ionization, gives much better agreement with the experimental results.

  10. The COS-Halos Survey: Origins of the Highly Ionized Circumgalactic Medium of Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Fox, Andrew J.; Oppenheimer, Benjamin; Tumlinson, Jason; Tripp, Todd M.; Lehner, Nicolas; McQuinn, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    The total contribution of diffuse halo gas to the galaxy baryon budget strongly depends on its dominant ionization state. In this paper, we address the physical conditions in the highly ionized circumgalactic medium (CGM) traced by {{O}} {{VI}} absorption lines observed in COS-Halos spectra. We analyze the observed ionic column densities, absorption-line widths and relative velocities, along with the ratios of {{N}} {{V}}/{{O}} {{VI}} for 39 fitted Voigt profile components of O vi. We compare these quantities with the predictions given by a wide range of ionization models. Photoionization models that include only extragalactic UV background radiation are ruled out; conservatively, the upper limits to {{N}} {{V}}/{{O}} {{VI}} and measurements of {N}{{O}{{VI}}} imply unphysically large path lengths ≳100 kpc. Furthermore, very broad {{O}} {{VI}} absorption (b > 40 km s-1) is a defining characteristic of the CGM of star-forming L* galaxies. We highlight two possible origins for the bulk of the observed {{O}} {{VI}}: (1) highly structured gas clouds photoionized primarily by local high-energy sources or (2) gas radiatively cooling on large scales behind a supersonic wind. Approximately 20% of circumgalactic O vi does not align with any low-ionization state gas within ±50 km s-1 and is found only in halos with {M}{halo} < 1012 {M}⊙ . We suggest that this type of unmatched O vi absorption traces the hot corona itself at a characteristic temperature of {10}5.5 K. We discuss the implications of these very distinct physical origins for the dynamical state, gas cooling rates, and total baryonic content of L* gaseous halos.

  11. A new, sensitive, high resolution Raman detector based on ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. W.; Omenetto, N.; Winefordner, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    A novel detection method for weak pulsed or cw Raman fluxes is described. The detector is based upon the production of Raman scatter with a tunable pulsed or cw dye laser, collecting a large fraction of the Raman scatter and transferring it efficiently into an ionization detector containing a metal (M) vapor, such as Li. The resonance ionization detector (RID) is simultaneously illuminated by a second dye laser. When the second laser is tuned to an excited state transition of the metal vapor M and when the first laser is at such a wavelength that the Raman scatter appears at the ground state absorption transition of the metal, then a current will be produced in the RID which is proportional to the Raman scatter intensity. Both the production and collection of this current can be made very efficient (approaching 100%) and should result in improved sensitivity compared to conventional dispersive or FT Raman techniques. The new approach should be much less sensitive to scatter, should have a spectral resolution better than 0.1 cm -1 and should allow Raman scatter measurements to be made at wavenumbers below 100 cm -1 and under certain conditions to 0.01 cm -1. The approach should be especially useful in highly scattering environments like Ag-sols in surface enhanced Raman and should be useful for detection of ultratrace levels of drugs and metabolites in biological fluids. The Raman-RID approach should also be useful for resonance Raman since laser scatter and molecular fluorescence should have minimal effects.

  12. High order harmonic generation in dual gas multi-jets

    SciTech Connect

    Tosa, Valer E-mail: calin.hojbota@itim-cj.ro; Hojbota, Calin E-mail: calin.hojbota@itim-cj.ro

    2013-11-13

    High order harmonic generation (HHG) in gas media suffers from a low conversion efficiency that has its origins in the interaction of the atom/molecule with the laser field. Phase matching is the main way to enhance the harmonic flux and several solutions have been designed to achieve it. Here we present numerical results modeling HHG in a system of multi-jets in which two gases alternate: the first gas jet (for example Ne) generates harmonics and the second one which ionizes easier, recover the phase matching condition. We obtain configurations which are experimentally feasible with respect to pressures and dimensions of the jets.

  13. Construction of a versatile high precision ambient ionization source for direct analysis and imaging.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Jason S; Hawkridge, Adam M; Muddiman, David C

    2008-10-01

    The design and construction of a high precision ambient ionization source matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (MALDESI) are described in full detail, including a complete parts list. The computer controlled high precision motion control system and high repetition rate Explorer laser are demonstrated during MALDESI-FT-ICR analysis of peptides and proteins ranging from 1 to 17 kDa. The high stability ionization source platform described herein demonstrates both the advantages of the new MALDESI source and versatility for application to numerous desorption and ionization techniques.

  14. Analysis of pesticide residues by fast gas chromatography in combination with negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Húsková, Renáta; Matisová, Eva; Hrouzková, Svetlana; Svorc, Lubomír

    2009-08-28

    A combination of fast GC with narrow-bore column and bench top quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) detector in negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode (with methane as reagent gas) is set up and utilized for the ultratrace analysis of 25 selected pesticides. The observed pesticides, belonging to the endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), were from different chemical classes. A comparative study with electron impact (EI) ionization was also carried out (both techniques in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode). The programmed temperature vaporizer (PTV) injector in solvent vent mode and narrow-bore column (15mx0.15mm I.D.x0.15microm film of 5% diphenyl 95% dimethylsiloxane stationary phase) were used for effective and fast separation. Heptachlor (HPT) as internal standard (I.S.) was applied for the comparison of results obtained from absolute and normalized peak areas. Non-fatty food matrices were investigated. Fruit (apple - matrix-matched standards; orange, strawberry, plum - real samples) and vegetable (lettuce - real sample) extracts were prepared by a quick and effective QuEChERS sample preparation technique. Very good results were obtained for the characterization of fast GC-NCI-MS method analysing EDCs pesticides. Analyte response was linear from 0.01 to 150microgkg(-1) with the R(2) values in the range from 0.9936 to 1.0000 (calculated from absolute peak areas) and from 0.9956 to 1.0000 (calculated from peak areas normalized to HPT). Instrument limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) were found at pgmL(-1) level and for the majority of analytes were up to three orders of magnitude lower for NCI compared to EI mode. In both ionization modes, repeatability of measurements expressed as relative standard deviation (RSDs) was less than 10% which is in very good agreement with the criterion of European Union.

  15. Producing highly charged ions without solvent using laserspray ionization: a total solvent-free analysis approach at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beixi; Lietz, Christopher B; Inutan, Ellen D; Leach, Samantha M; Trimpin, Sarah

    2011-06-01

    First examples of highly charged ions in mass spectrometry (MS) produced from the solid state without using solvent during either sample preparation or mass measurement are reported. Matrix material, matrix/analyte homogenization time and frequency, atmospheric pressure (AP) to vacuum inlet temperature, and mass analyzer ion trap conditions are factors that influence the abundance of the highly charged ions created by laserspray ionization (LSI). LSI, like matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), uses laser ablation of a matrix/analyte mixture from a surface to produce ions. Preparing the matrix/analyte sample without the use of solvent provides the ability to perform total solvent-free analysis (TSA) consisting of solvent-free ionization and solvent-free gas-phase separation using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) MS. Peptides and small proteins such as non-β-amyloid components of Alzheimer's disease and bovine insulin are examples in which LSI and TSA were combined to produce multiply charged ions, similar to electrospray ionization, but without the use of solvent. Advantages using solvent-free LSI and IMS-MS include simplicity, rapid data acquisition, reduction of sample complexity, and the potential for an enhanced effective dynamic range. This is achieved by more inclusive ionization and improved separation of mixture components as a result of multiple charging.

  16. High-quality electron beams from beam-driven plasma accelerators by wakefield-induced ionization injection.

    PubMed

    Martinez de la Ossa, A; Grebenyuk, J; Mehrling, T; Schaper, L; Osterhoff, J

    2013-12-13

    We propose a new and simple strategy for controlled ionization-induced trapping of electrons in a beam-driven plasma accelerator. The presented method directly exploits electric wakefields to ionize electrons from a dopant gas and capture them into a well-defined volume of the accelerating and focusing wake phase, leading to high-quality witness bunches. This injection principle is explained by example of three-dimensional particle-in-cell calculations using the code OSIRIS. In these simulations a high-current-density electron-beam driver excites plasma waves in the blowout regime inside a fully ionized hydrogen plasma of density 5×10(17)cm-3. Within an embedded 100  μm long plasma column contaminated with neutral helium gas, the wakefields trigger ionization, trapping of a defined fraction of the released electrons, and subsequent acceleration. The hereby generated electron beam features a 1.5 kA peak current, 1.5  μm transverse normalized emittance, an uncorrelated energy spread of 0.3% on a GeV-energy scale, and few femtosecond bunch length.

  17. A Desorbed Gas Molecular Ionization Mechanism for Arcing Onset in Solar Arrays Immersed in a Low-Density Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, J.; Vayner, B.; Ferguson, D.; Degroot, W.

    2002-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have hypothesized that the onset of Solar Array Arc (SAA) initiation in low-density space plasmas is caused by a desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanism. Indeed past investigations performed at the NASA Glenn Plasma Interaction Facility tend to not only support the desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanism, but have gone as far as identifying the crucial molecular species that must be present for molecular ion dominated process to occur. When electrical breakdown occurs at a triple junction site on a solar array panel, a quasi-neutral plasma cloud is ejected. Assuming the main component of the expelled plasma cloud by weight is due to water vapor, the fastest process available is due to HO molecules and OH(+) ions, or more succinctly, dissociative molecular-ion dominated recombination processes: H2O(+) + e(-) yields H* + OH*. Recently published spectroscopic observations of solar array arc spectra in ground tests have revealed the well-known molecular OH band (302 to 309nm), as well as the molecular SiH band (387nm peak), and the molecular CH band (432nm peak). Note that the OH band is observed in emission arcs where water vapor is present. Strong atomic lines were also observed for H(sub beta) at 486nm and H(sub alpha) at 656.3nm in prior ground testing. Independent supporting evidence of desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanisms also come from measurements of arc current pulse widths at different capacitances. We will revisit an earlier first order approximation demonstrating the dependence of arc current pulse widths on the square root of the capacitance. The simple arc current pulse width model will be then be used to estimate the temperature of the arc plasma (currently believed to be somewhere in the range of 3 to 5 eV). The current paper then seeks to extend the outlined work by including numerous vacuum chamber measurements obtained with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A small solar array was mounted inside the vacuum

  18. Determination of residual epichlorohydrin in sevelamer hydrochloride by static headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Kaliaperumal; Arularasu, Govindasamy T; Devaraj, Perumalsamy; Pillai, Karnam Chandrasekara

    2010-01-01

    A sensitive static headspace gas chromatographic method was developed and validated for the determination of residual epichlorohydrin (ECH) in sevelamer hydrochloride (SVH) drug substance. This method utilized a Phenomenex Zebron ZB-WAX GC column, helium as carrier gas with flame ionization detection. The critical experimental parameters, such as, headspace vial incubation time and incubation temperature were studied and optimized. The method was validated as per United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) and International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines in terms of detection limit (DL), quantitation limit (QL), linearity, precision, accuracy, specificity and robustness. A linear range from 0.30 to 10 Îg/mL was obtained with the coefficient of determination (r(2)) 0.999. The DL and QL of ECH were 0.09 Îg/mL and 0.30 Îg/mL, respectively. The recovery obtained for ECH was between 91.7 and 96.6%. Also, the specificity of the method was proved through gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This method was applied successfully to determine the content of residual ECH in SVH bulk drug.

  19. Identifying Extraplanar Diffuse Ionized Gas in a Sample of MaNGA Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Ryan J.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency with which galaxies convert gas into stars is driven by the continuous cycle of accretion and feedback processes within the circumgalactic medium. Extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (eDIG) can provide insights into the tumultuous processes that govern the evolution of galactic disks because eDIG emission traces both inflowing and outflowing gas. With the help of state-of-the-art, spatially-resolved spectroscopy from MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), we developed a computational method to identify eDIG based on the strength of and spatial extent of optical emission lines for a diverse sample of 550 nearby galaxies. This sample includes roughly half of the MaNGA galaxies that will become publicly available in summer 2016 as part of the Thirteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We identified signatures of eDIG in 8% of the galaxies in this sample, and we found that these signatures are particularly common among galaxies with active star formation and inclination angles >45 degrees. Our analysis of the morphology, incidence, and kinematics of eDIG has important implications for current models of accretion and feedback processes that regulate star formation in galaxies. We acknowledge support from the Astrophysics REU program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the National Astronomy Consortium, and The Grainger Foundation.

  20. Measurement of photon flux with a miniature gas ionization chamber in a Material Testing Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmentel, D.; Filliatre, P.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Carcreff, H.

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTR) are crucial for the design of the experimental devices and the prediction of the temperature of the hosted samples. Nuclear heating in MTR materials (except fuel) is mainly due to the energy deposition by the photon flux. Therefore, the photon flux is a key input parameter for the computer codes which simulate nuclear heating and temperature reached by samples/devices under irradiation. In the Jules Horowitz MTR under construction at the CEA Cadarache, the maximal expected nuclear heating levels will be about 15 to 18 W g-1 and it will be necessary to assess this parameter with the best accuracy. An experiment was performed at the OSIRIS reactor to combine neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating measurements to improve the knowledge of the nuclear heating in MTR. There are few appropriate sensors for selective measurement of the photon flux in MTR even if studies and developments are ongoing. An experiment, called CARMEN-1, was conducted at the OSIRIS MTR and we used in particular a gas ionization chamber based on miniature fission chamber design to measure the photon flux. In this paper, we detail Monte-Carlo simulations to analyze the photon fluxes with ionization chamber measurements and we compare the photon flux calculations to the nuclear heating measurements. These results show a good accordance between photon flux measurements and nuclear heating measurement and allow improving the knowledge of these parameters.

  1. Measurement of the first Townsend ionization coefficient in a methane-based tissue-equivalent gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, A. R.; Gonçalves, J. A. C.; Mangiarotti, A.; Botelho, S.; Bueno, C. C.

    2017-03-01

    Tissue-equivalent gases (TEGs), often made of a hydrocarbon, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide, have been employed in microdosimetry for decades. However, data on the first Townsend ionization coefficient (α) in such mixtures are scarce, regardless of the chosen hydrocarbon. In this context, measurements of α in a methane-based tissue-equivalent gas (CH4 - 64.4%, CO2 - 32.4%, and N2 - 3.2%) were performed in a uniform field configuration for density-normalized electric fields (E/N) up to 290 Td. The setup adopted in our previous works was improved for operating at low pressures. The modifications introduced in the apparatus and the experimental technique were validated by comparing our results of the first Townsend ionization coefficient in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane with those from the literature and Magboltz simulations. The behavior of α in the methane-based TEG was consistent with that observed for pure methane. All the experimental results are included in tabular form in the Supplementary material.

  2. Interrelated structures of the transport shock and collisional relaxation layer in a multitemperature, multilevel ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinolo, A. R.; Clarke, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    The gas dynamic structures of the transport shock and the downstream collisional relaxation layer are evaluated for partially ionized monatomic gases. Elastic and inelastic collisional nonequilibrium effects are taken into consideration. In the microscopic model of the atom, three electronic levels are accounted for. By using an asymptotic technique, the shock morphology is found on a continuum flow basis. This procedure gives two distinct layers in which the nonequilibrium effects to be considered are different. A transport shock appears as the inner solution to an outer collisional relaxation layer. The results show four main interesting points: (1) on structuring the transport shock, ionization and excitation rates must be included in the formulation, since the flow is not frozen with respect to the population of the different electronic levels; (2) an electron temperature precursor appears at the beginning of the transport shock; (3) the collisional layer is rationally reduced to quadrature for special initial conditions, which (4) are obtained from new Rankine-Hugoniot relations for the inner shock.

  3. Determination of ibogaine in plasma by gas chromatography--chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ley, F R; Jeffcoat, A R; Thomas, B F

    1996-02-02

    Ibogaine is naturally occurring indole alkaloid that is currently being considered as a treatment medication for drug dependence. Although there have been a variety of investigations regarding the mechanisms of action and pharmacology of ibogaine, relatively little has been reported regarding quantitative methods. Because of the paucity of analytical methodologies, studies involving the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of ibogaine have also been limited. A method is described for the determination of ibogaine levels in plasma by gas chromatography -- methane chemical ionization mass spectrometry. [13C2H3]Ibogaine was synthesized and used as an internal standard to control for recovery during sample preparation. The assay requires one ml of plasma and is shown to be a selective and sensitive means of ibogaine quantitation.

  4. Rapid measurement of phytosterols in fortified food using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Duong, Samantha; Strobel, Norbert; Buddhadasa, Saman; Stockham, Katherine; Auldist, Martin; Wales, Bill; Orbell, John; Cran, Marlene

    2016-11-15

    A novel method for the measurement of total phytosterols in fortified food was developed and tested using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. Unlike existing methods, this technique is capable of simultaneously extracting sterols during saponification thus significantly reducing extraction time and cost. The rapid method is suitable for sterol determination in a range of complex fortified foods including milk, cheese, fat spreads, oils and meat. The main enhancements of this new method include accuracy and precision, robustness, cost effectiveness and labour/time efficiencies. To achieve these advantages, quantification and the critical aspects of saponification were investigated and optimised. The final method demonstrated spiked recoveries in multiple matrices at 85-110% with a relative standard deviation of 1.9% and measurement uncertainty value of 10%.

  5. Dispersion of seed vapor and gas ionization in an MHD second stage combustor and channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.

    1992-07-01

    An approach is introduced for the simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic system consisting of a second stage combustor, a convergent nozzle, and a channel. The simulation uses an Argonne integral combustion flow computer code and another Argonne channel computer code to predict flow, thermal and electric properties in the seed particle laden reacting flow in the system. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for gaseous and condensed phases. The channel code is a multigrid three-dimensional computer code for compressible flow subject to magnetic and electric interactions. Results of this study suggests that (1) the processes of seed particle evaporation, seed vapor dispersion, and gas ionization in the reacting flow are critical to the evaluation of the downstream channel performance and (2) particle size, loading, and inlet profile have strong effects on wall deposition and plasma temperature development.

  6. Dispersion of seed vapor and gas ionization in an MHD second stage combustor and channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.

    1992-01-01

    An approach is introduced for the simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic system consisting of a second stage combustor, a convergent nozzle, and a channel. The simulation uses an Argonne integral combustion flow computer code and another Argonne channel computer code to predict flow, thermal and electric properties in the seed particle laden reacting flow in the system. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for gaseous and condensed phases. The channel code is a multigrid three-dimensional computer code for compressible flow subject to magnetic and electric interactions. Results of this study suggests that (1) the processes of seed particle evaporation, seed vapor dispersion, and gas ionization in the reacting flow are critical to the evaluation of the downstream channel performance and (2) particle size, loading, and inlet profile have strong effects on wall deposition and plasma temperature development.

  7. Determination of selected fatty acids in dried sweat spot using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Kanďár, Roman; Drábková, Petra; Andrlová, Lenka; Kostelník, Adam; Čegan, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    A method is described for the determination of fatty acids in dried sweat spot and plasma samples using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. Plasma and dried sweat spot samples were obtained from a group of blood donors. The sweat was collected from each volunteer during exercise. Sweat was spotted onto collection paper containing butylated hydroxytoluene. Fatty acids were derivatized with acetyl chloride in methanol to form methyl esters of fatty acids. The fatty acids in dried sweat spot samples treated with butylated hydroxytoluene and stored at -20°C were stable for 3 months. Our results indicate that sweat contains, among fatty acids with short chain, also fatty acids with long chain and unsaturated fatty acids. Linear relationships between percentage content of selected fatty acids in dried sweat spot and plasma were observed.

  8. Self-detection of x-ray Fresnel transmissivity using photoelectron-induced gas ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Stoupin, Stanislav

    2016-01-25

    Electric response of an x-ray mirror enclosed in a gas flow ionization chamber was studied under the conditions of total external reflection for hard x-rays. It is shown that the electric response of the system as a function of the incidence angle is defined by x-ray Fresnel transmissivity and photon-electron attenuation properties of the mirror material. A simple interpretation of quantum yield of the system is presented. The approach could serve as a basis for non-invasive in situ diagnostics of hard x-ray optics, easy access to complementary x-ray transmissivity data in x-ray reflectivity experiments, and might also pave the way to advanced schemes for angle and energy resolving x-ray detectors.

  9. Identification of volatiles by headspace gas chromatography with simultaneous flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Yeatman, Dustin Tate; Shan, Xiaoqin; Kahl, Joseph H

    2013-10-01

    Volatiles are frequently abused as inhalants. The methods used for identification are generally nonspecific if analyzed concurrently with ethanol or require an additional analytical procedure that employs mass spectrometry. A previously published technique utilizing a capillary flow technology splitter to simultaneously quantitate and confirm ethyl alcohol by flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection after headspace sampling and gas chromatographic separation was evaluated for the detection of inhalants. Methanol, isopropanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, isoamyl alcohol, isobutyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol, 1,1-difluoroethane, 1,1,1-trifluoroethane, 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (Norflurane, HFC-134a), chloroethane, trichlorofluoromethane (Freon®-11), dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon®-12), dichlorofluoromethane (Freon®-21), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon®-22) and 1,2-dichlorotetrafluoroethane (Freon®-114) were validated for qualitative identification by this method. The validation for qualitative identification included evaluation of matrix effects, sensitivity, carryover, specificity, repeatability and ruggedness/robustness.

  10. Dispersion of seed vapor and gas ionization in an MHD second stage combustor and channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S. L.; Lottes, S. A.; Bouillard, J. X.

    An approach is introduced for the simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic system consisting of a second stage combustor, a convergent nozzle, and a channel. The simulation uses an Argonne integral combustion flow computer code and another Argonne channel computer code to predict flow, thermal and electric properties in the seed particle laden reacting flow in the system. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for gaseous and condensed phases. The channel code is a multigrid three-dimensional computer code for compressible flow subject to magnetic and electric interactions. Results of this study suggests that (1) the processes of seed particle evaporation, seed vapor dispersion, and gas ionization in the reacting flow are critical to the evaluation of the downstream channel performance, and (2) particle size, loading, and inlet profile have strong effects on wall deposition and plasma temperature development.

  11. Accurate Structure Parameters for Tunneling Ionization Rates of Gas-Phase Linear Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Li, Jian-Ke; Wang, Guo-Li; Li, Peng-Cheng; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2017-03-01

    In the molecular Ammosov–Delone–Krainov (MO-ADK) model of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 033402], the ionization rate depends on the structure parameters of the molecular orbital from which the electron is removed. We determine systematically and tabulate accurate structure parameters of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) for 123 gas-phase linear molecules by solving time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials which are constructed numerically using the modified Leeuwen–Baerends (LBα) model. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11664035, 11674268, 11465016, 11364038, 11364039, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20116203120001 and the Basic Scientific Research Foundation for Institution of Higher Learning of Gansu Province

  12. Self-detection of x-ray Fresnel transmissivity using photoelectron-induced gas ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoupin, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    Electric response of an x-ray mirror enclosed in a gas flow ionization chamber was studied under the conditions of total external reflection for hard x-rays. It is shown that the electric response of the system as a function of the incidence angle is defined by x-ray Fresnel transmissivity and photon-electron attenuation properties of the mirror material. A simple interpretation of quantum yield of the system is presented. The approach could serve as a basis for non-invasive in situ diagnostics of hard x-ray optics, easy access to complementary x-ray transmissivity data in x-ray reflectivity experiments, and might also pave the way to advanced schemes for angle and energy resolving x-ray detectors.

  13. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rondo, L; Ehrhart, S; Kürten, A; Adamov, A; Bianchi, F; Breitenlechner, M; Duplissy, J; Franchin, A; Dommen, J; Donahue, N M; Dunne, E M; Flagan, R C; Hakala, J; Hansel, A; Keskinen, H; Kim, J; Jokinen, T; Lehtipalo, K; Leiminger, M; Praplan, A; Riccobono, F; Rissanen, M P; Sarnela, N; Schobesberger, S; Simon, M; Sipilä, M; Smith, J N; Tomé, A; Tröstl, J; Tsagkogeorgas, G; Vaattovaara, P; Winkler, P M; Williamson, C; Wimmer, D; Baltensperger, U; Kirkby, J; Kulmala, M; Petäjä, T; Worsnop, D R; Curtius, J

    2016-03-27

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  14. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-03-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  15. Highly Elliptical Orbits for Arctic observations: Assessment of ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichtchenko, L. D.; Nikitina, L. V.; Trishchenko, A. P.; Garand, L.

    2014-12-01

    The ionizing radiation environment was analyzed for a variety of potential Highly Elliptical Orbits (HEOs) with orbital periods ranging from 6 h to 24 h suitable to continuously monitor the Arctic region. Several models available from the ESA Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) online tool were employed, including the new-generation AE9/AP9 model for trapped radiation. Results showed that the Total Ionizing Dose (TID) has a well-pronounced local minimum for the 14-h orbit, which is nearly identical to the overall minimum observed for the longest orbital period (24 h). The thickness of slab aluminum shielding required to keep the annual TID below 10, 5 and 3.33 krad (i.e. 150, 75 and 50 krad for 15 years of mission duration) for a 14-h orbit is 2.1, 2.7 and 3.1 mm respectively. The 16-h orbit requires an additional 0.5 mm of aluminum to achieve the same results, while the 24-h orbit requires less shielding in the order of 0.2-0.3 mm. Comparison between the AE8/AP8 and AE9/AP9 models was conducted for all selected orbits. Results demonstrated that differences ranged from -70% to +170% depending on orbit geometry. The vulnerability to the Single Event Effect (SEE) was compared for all orbits by modeling the Linear Energy Transfer (LET) for long-term conditions and for the 5 min “worst case” scenario. The analysis showed no preference among orbits with periods longer than 15 h, and in order to keep the 14-h orbit at the same level, the shielding should be increased by ∼33% or approximately by 1 mm. To keep the Single Event Upset (SEU) rate produced by the “worst case” event at the same order of magnitude as for the “statistical” long-term case, the thickness of aluminum should be as high as 22 mm. The overall conclusion from a space environment point of view is that all HEO orbits with periods equal to or longer than 14 h can be regarded as good candidates for operational missions. Therefore, selection of orbit should be based on other criteria

  16. THE KINEMATICS AND IONIZATION OF NUCLEAR GAS CLOUDS IN CENTAURUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Neumayer, Nadine E-mail: Ralph.Sutherland@anu.edu.au

    2013-03-20

    Neumayer et al. established the existence of a blueshifted cloud in the core of Centaurus A, within a few parsecs of the nucleus and close to the radio jet. We propose that the cloud has been impacted by the jet, and that it is in the foreground of the jet, accounting for its blueshifted emission on the southern side of the nucleus. We consider both shock excitation and photoionization models for the excitation of the cloud. Shock models do not account for the [Si VI] and [Ca VIII] emission line fluxes. However, X-ray observations indicate a source of ionizing photons in the core of Centaurus A; photoionization by the inferred flux incident on the cloud can account for the fluxes in these lines relative to Brackett-{gamma}. The power-law slope of the ionizing continuum matches that inferred from synchrotron models of the X-rays. The logarithm of the ionization parameter is -1.9, typical of that in Seyfert galaxies and consistent with the value proposed for dusty ionized plasmas. The model cloud density depends upon the Lorentz factor of the blazar and the inclination of our line of sight to the jet axis. For acute inclinations, the inferred density is consistent with expected cloud densities. However, for moderate inclinations of the jet to the line of sight, high Lorentz factors imply cloud densities in excess of 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} and very low filling factors, suggesting that models of the gamma-ray emission should incorporate jet Lorentz factors {approx}< 5.

  17. A detailed analysis of the high-resolution X-ray spectra of NGC 3516: variability of the ionized absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta, E. M.; Krongold, Y.; Jimenez-Bailon, E.; Nicastro, F.; Mathur, S.; Longinotti, A. L.

    2014-09-20

    The 1.5 Seyfert galaxy NGC 3516 presents a strong time variability in X-rays. We re-analyzed the nine observations performed in 2006 October by XMM-Newton and Chandra in the 0.3 to 10 keV energy band. An acceptable model was found for the XMM-Newton data fitting the EPIC-PN and RGS spectra simultaneously; later, this model was successfully applied to the contemporary Chandra high-resolution data. The model consists of a continuum emission component (power law + blackbody) absorbed by four ionized components (warm absorbers), and 10 narrow emission lines. Three absorbing components are warm, producing features only in the soft X-ray band. The fourth ionization component produces Fe XXV and Fe XXVI in the hard-energy band. We study the time response of the absorbing components to the well-detected changes in the X-ray luminosity of this source and find that the two components with the lower ionization state show clear opacity changes consistent with gas close to photoionization equilibrium. These changes are supported by the models and by differences in the spectral features among the nine observations. On the other hand, the two components with higher ionization state do not seem to respond to continuum variations. The response time of the ionized absorbers allows us to constrain their electron density and location. We find that one component (with intermediate ionization) must be located within the obscuring torus at a distance 2.7 × 10{sup 17} cm from the central engine. This outflowing component likely originated in the accretion disk. The three remaining components are at distances larger than 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} cm. Two of the absorbing components in the soft X-rays have similar outflow velocities and locations. These components may be in pressure equilibrium, forming a multi-phase medium, if the gas has metallicity larger than the solar one (≳ 5 Z {sub ☉}). We also search for variations in the covering factor of the ionized absorbers (although partial

  18. Development and validation of a gas chromatography-flame ionization detection method for quantifying sucrose in equine serum.

    PubMed

    Hewetson, Michael; Aaltonen, Kaisa; Tulamo, Riitta-Mari; Sankari, Satu

    2014-03-01

    A simple and accurate method for quantifying sucrose in equine serum that can be applied to sucrose permeability testing in the horse was developed and validated using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The assay provided an acceptable degree of linearity, accuracy, and precision at concentrations of sucrose as low as 2.34 μmol/l and as high as 20.45 μmol/l. Percentage recovery of sucrose from serum ranged from 89% to 102%; repeatability and intermediate precision (relative standard deviation) ranged from 3.6% to 6.7% and 4.1% to 9.3%, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.73 μmol/l. No interfering peaks were observed except lactose, which gave 2 peaks, one of which overlapped partially with sucrose. To evaluate the suitability of the method for quantifying sucrose in serum samples from horses with naturally occurring gastric ulceration, 10 horses with and without naturally occurring gastric ulceration were subjected to sucrose permeability testing. All horses demonstrated an increase in serum sucrose concentration over time following oral administration of sucrose; however, the increase from baseline was significant for horses with gastric ulceration at 45 min (P = 0.0082) and 90 min (P = 0.0082) when compared with healthy horses. It was concluded that gas chromatography with flame ionization detection is a valid method for quantifying sucrose in equine serum and can be applied directly to the analysis of sucrose in equine serum as part of a larger validation study aimed at developing a blood test for the diagnosis of gastric ulcers in horses.

  19. Plasma ionization frequency, edge-to-axis density ratio, and density on axis of a cylindrical gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Palacio Mizrahi, J. H.

    2014-06-15

    A rigorous derivation of expressions, starting from the governing equations, for the ionization frequency, edge-to-axis ratio of plasma density, plasma density at the axis, and radially averaged plasma density in a cylindrical gas discharge has been obtained. The derived expressions are simple and involve the relevant parameters of the discharge: Cylinder radius, axial current, and neutral gas pressure. The found expressions account for ion inertia, ion temperature, and changes in plasma ion collisionality.

  20. Simultaneous Determination of Cyanide and Thiocyanate in Plasma by Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass-Spectrometry (CI-GC-MS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-04

    ORIGINAL PAPER Simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocyanate in plasma by chemical ionization gas chromatography mass-spectrometry (CI-GC-MS...chemical ioniza- tion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for the simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocya- nate in plasma...Sample preparation for this analysis required essentially one-step by combining the reaction of cyanide and thiocyanate with pentafluorobenzyl bromide

  1. Determination of BROMATE AT PARTS-PER-TRILLION LEVELS BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY WITH NEGATIVE CHEMICAL IONIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ozonation of bromide-containing source waters produces bromate as a class 2B carcinogenic disinfection by-product. The present work describes the determination of bromate by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCIMS) following a bromate react...

  2. Dust trap formation in a non-self-sustained discharge with external gas ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Babichev, V. N.; Pal’, A. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Cherkovets, V. E.; Rerikh, V. K.; Taran, M. D.

    2015-11-15

    Results from numerical studies of a non-self-sustained gas discharge containing micrometer dust grains are presented. The non-self-sustained discharge (NSSD) was controlled by a stationary fast electron beam. The numerical model of an NSSD is based on the diffusion drift approximation for electrons and ions and self-consistently takes into account the influence of the dust component on the electron and ion densities. The dust component is described by the balance equation for the number of dust grains and the equation of motion for dust grains with allowance for the Stokes force, gravity force, and electric force in the cathode sheath. The interaction between dust grains is described in the self-consistent field approximation. The height of dust grain levitation over the cathode is determined and compared with experimental results. It is established that, at a given gas ionization rate and given applied voltage, there is a critical dust grain size above which the levitation condition in the cathode sheath cannot be satisfied. Simulations performed for the dust component consisting of dust grains of two different sizes shows that such grains levitate at different heights, i.e., size separation of dust drains levitating in the cathode sheath of an NSSD takes place.

  3. Diffuse Ionized Gas in the Magellanic System: Early Results from WHAM-South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haffner, L. Matthew; Madsen, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    From its new vantage point at CTIO, the Wisconsin Hα Mapper is poised to explore the full distribution and kinematics of diffuse plasma in extended gaseous structures near the Magellanic Clouds. Shaped by the interaction between the Clouds and the Milky Way, the Bridge, Stream, and Leading Arm gas complexes have been studied extensively in 21 cm emission and optical/UV absorption. With spectral resolution of 12 km/s, WHAM is able to separate optical emission from these structures and brighter local gas near vLSR 0 km/s. Combined with its unprecedented sensitivity to the limit of atmospheric line confusion ( 10s of mR), we are embarking on a survey of the ionized component of the Magellanic System with WHAM. With observations of the southern component of our all-sky survey nearly completed, we have begun to examine some emission features toward the Magellanic System. Here we present a sample of several regions observed recently with WHAM in Hα. WHAM was built and continues to operate with ongoing support from NSF. The research presented here is currently funded by award AST-0607512 and an International Program Development Fund from the University of Sydney.

  4. Signature of superradiance from a nitrogen-gas plasma channel produced by strong-field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guihua; Jing, Chenrui; Zeng, Bin; Xie, Hongqiang; Yao, Jinping; Chu, Wei; Ni, Jielei; Zhang, Haisu; Xu, Huailiang; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2014-03-01

    Recently, Yao et al. demonstrated the creation of coherent emissions in nitrogen gas with two-color (800 nm + 400 nm) ultrafast laser pulses [J. Yao, G. Li, C. Jing, B. Zeng, W. Chu, J. Ni, H. Zhang, H. Xie, C. Zhang, H. Li, H. Xu, S. L. Chin, Y. Cheng, and Z. Xu, New J. Phys. 15, 023046 (2013), 10.1088/1367-2630/15/2/023046]. Based on this two-color scheme, here we report on systematic investigation of temporal characteristics of the radiation emitted at 391 nm [N2+: B2Σu+(ν =0) -X2Σg+(ν =0)] by experimentally examining its temporal profiles with the increase of the plasma channel induced by the intense 800-nm femtosecond laser pulses at a nitrogen-gas pressure of ˜25 mbar. We reveal unexpected temporal profiles of the coherent emissions, which show significant superradiance signatures owing to the cooperation of an ensemble of excited N2+ molecules that are coherently radiating in phase. Our findings shed more light on the mechanisms behind the coherent laserlike emissions induced by strong-field ionization of molecules.

  5. Wavelength Scaling of High Harmonic Generation Close to the Multiphoton Ionization Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chien-Jen; Cirmi, Giovanni; Hong, Kyung-Han; Moses, Jeffrey; Huang, Shu-Wei; Granados, Eduardo; Keathley, Phillip; Bhardwaj, Siddharth; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2013-08-01

    We study the wavelength scaling of high harmonic generation efficiency with visible driver wavelengths in the transition between the tunneling and the multiphoton ionization regimes where the Keldysh parameter is around unity. Our experiment shows a less dramatic wavelength scaling of efficiency than the conventional case for near- and mid-IR driver wavelengths, and it is well explained by a generalized three-step model for increased Keldysh parameters that employs complex ionization times in addition to the nonadiabatic ionization. The complex ionization time is critical to avoid the divergence when replacing the quasistatic ionization model by the more general nonadiabatic ionization model. Together, the two modifications present a consistent description of the influence of the atomic potential on the rescattering process in the intermediate Keldysh regime.

  6. High-angular-momentum states as population traps in multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, M. P.; Noordam, L. D.; Muller, H. G.

    1993-01-01

    Resonant and nonresonant multiphoton ionization of xenon is studied using short, circularly polarized light pulses (100 fs, 597 nm, 22 TW/cm2). A pump-probe measurement shows that, although bound states are substantially populated, they do not enhance the ionization signal. The bound states do not ionize because their high angular momentum repels the wave functions from the nucleus. Ionization does occur through intermediate states in the continuum, in spite of a large energy mismatch, because these states have more energy and therefore suffer less from the centrifugal barrier.

  7. The susceptibility of TaOx-based memristors to high dose rate ionizing radiation and total ionizing dose

    DOE PAGES

    McLain, Michael Lee; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; ...

    2014-11-11

    This paper investigates the effects of high dose rate ionizing radiation and total ionizing dose (TID) on tantalum oxide (TaOx) memristors. Transient data were obtained during the pulsed exposures for dose rates ranging from approximately 5.0 ×107 rad(Si)/s to 4.7 ×108 rad(Si)/s and for pulse widths ranging from 50 ns to 50 μs. The cumulative dose in these tests did not appear to impact the observed dose rate response. Static dose rate upset tests were also performed at a dose rate of ~3.0 ×108 rad(Si)/s. This is the first dose rate study on any type of memristive memory technology. Inmore » addition to assessing the tolerance of TaOx memristors to high dose rate ionizing radiation, we also evaluated their susceptibility to TID. The data indicate that it is possible for the devices to switch from a high resistance off-state to a low resistance on-state in both dose rate and TID environments. The observed radiation-induced switching is dependent on the irradiation conditions and bias configuration. Furthermore, the dose rate or ionizing dose level at which a device switches resistance states varies from device to device; the enhanced susceptibility observed in some devices is still under investigation. As a result, numerical simulations are used to qualitatively capture the observed transient radiation response and provide insight into the physics of the induced current/voltages.« less

  8. High-rate axial-field ionization chamber for particle identification of radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, J.; Singh, Varinderjit; Visser, G.; Alexander, A.; Hudan, S.; Huston, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Chbihi, A.; Famiano, M.; Bischak, M. M.; deSouza, R. T.

    2016-11-01

    The design, construction and performance characteristics of a simple axial-field ionization chamber suitable for identifying ions in a radioactive beam are presented. Optimized for use with low-energy radioactive beams (< 5 MeV / A) the detector presents only three 0.5 μm/cm2 foils to the beam in addition to the detector gas. A fast charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) integrated into the detector design is also described. Coupling this fast CSA to the axial field ionization chamber produces an output pulse with a risetime of 60-70 ns and a fall time of 100 ns, making the detector capable of sustaining a relatively high rate and providing a time resolution of 6-8 ns. Tests with an α source establish the detector energy resolution as ∼ 8 % for an energy deposit of ∼3.5 MeV. The energy resolution with beams of 2.5 and 4.0 MeV/A 39K ions and the dependence of the energy resolution on beam intensity is measured. At an instantaneous rate of 3×105 ions/s the energy resolution has degraded to 14% with a pileup of 12%. The good energy resolution of this detector at rates up to 3×105 ions/s makes it an effective tool in the characterization of low-energy radioactive beams.

  9. Numerical models of steady-state and pulsating flows of self-ionizing gas in plasma accelerator channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinskii, K. V.; Kozlov, A. N.; Konovalov, V. S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper continues the series of numerical investigations of self-ionizing gas flows in plasma accelerator channels with an azimuthal magnetic field. The mathematical model is based on the equations of dynamics of a three-component continuous medium consisting of atoms, ions, and electrons; the model is supplemented with the equation of ionization and recombination kinetics within the diffusion approximation with account for photoionization and photorecombination. It also takes into account heat exchange, which in this case is caused by radiative heat conductance. Upon a short history of the issue, the proposed model, numerical methods, and results for steady-state and pulsating flows are described.

  10. High pressure synthesis gas fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to build and test a pressure fermentation system for the production of ethanol from synthesis gas. The fermenters, pumps, controls, and analytical system will be procured or fabricated and assembled in our laboratory. This system will then be used to determine the effects of high pressure on growth and ethanol production by clostridium ljungdahlii. The limits of cell concentration and mass transport relationships will be found in continuous stirred tank reactor and immobilized cell reactors. The minimum retention times and reactor volumes will be found for ethanol production in these reactors. Retention times of a few seconds are expected to result from these experiments. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. High resolution resonance ionization imaging detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Winefordner, James D.; Matveev, Oleg I.; Smith, Benjamin W.

    1999-01-01

    A resonance ionization imaging device (RIID) and method for imaging objects using the RIID are provided, the RIID system including a RIID cell containing an ionizable vapor including monoisotopic atoms or molecules, the cell being positioned to intercept scattered radiation of a resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1 from the object which is to be detected or imaged, a laser source disposed to illuminate the RIID cell with laser radiation having a wavelength .lambda..sub.2 or wavelengths .lambda..sub.2, .lambda..sub.3 selected to ionize atoms in the cell that are in an excited state by virtue of having absorbed the scattered resonance laser radiation, and a luminescent screen at the back surface of the RIID cell which presents an image of the number and position of charged particles present in the RIID cell as a result of the ionization of the excited state atoms. The method of the invention further includes the step of initially illuminating the object to be detected or imaged with a laser having a wavelength selected such that the object will scatter laser radiation having the resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1.

  12. Ionization monitor with improved ultra-high megohm resistor

    DOEpatents

    Burgess, Edward T.

    1988-11-05

    An ionization monitor measures extremely small currents using a resistor containing a beta emitter to generate ion-pairs which are collected as current when the device is used as a feedback resistor in an electrometer circuit. By varying the amount of beta emitter, the resistance of the resistor may be varied.

  13. IZI: INFERRING THE GAS PHASE METALLICITY (Z) AND IONIZATION PARAMETER (q) OF IONIZED NEBULAE USING BAYESIAN STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Guillermo A.; Kewley, Lisa; Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Dopita, Michael A.

    2015-01-10

    We present a new method for inferring the metallicity (Z) and ionization parameter (q) of H II regions and star-forming galaxies using strong nebular emission lines (SELs). We use Bayesian inference to derive the joint and marginalized posterior probability density functions for Z and q given a set of observed line fluxes and an input photoionization model. Our approach allows the use of arbitrary sets of SELs and the inclusion of flux upper limits. The method provides a self-consistent way of determining the physical conditions of ionized nebulae that is not tied to the arbitrary choice of a particular SEL diagnostic and uses all the available information. Unlike theoretically calibrated SEL diagnostics, the method is flexible and not tied to a particular photoionization model. We describe our algorithm, validate it against other methods, and present a tool that implements it called IZI. Using a sample of nearby extragalactic H II regions, we assess the performance of commonly used SEL abundance diagnostics. We also use a sample of 22 local H II regions having both direct and recombination line (RL) oxygen abundance measurements in the literature to study discrepancies in the abundance scale between different methods. We find that oxygen abundances derived through Bayesian inference using currently available photoionization models in the literature can be in good (∼30%) agreement with RL abundances, although some models perform significantly better than others. We also confirm that abundances measured using the direct method are typically ∼0.2 dex lower than both RL and photoionization-model-based abundances.

  14. Exploring atmospheric photooxidation with a new Gas Chromatograph Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (GC-ToF-CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Allen, H. M.; Teng, A.; Crounse, J.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric photooxidation is a fundamental process that effectively removes pollutants and greenhouse gases from the air we breathe. One way to explore these processes is to directly measure the stable intermediate oxidation products. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) has proven to be a powerful tool to sensitively detect with high time resolution photooxidation products in the atmosphere such as hydroperoxides, acids, nitrates, and other oxygenated volatile organic compounds. Despite the potential to elucidate atmospheric photooxidation in detail, field observations of such compounds are sparse. Here we present the development of a new Gas Chromatograph Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (GC-ToF-CIMS) for field deployment. Using low pressure gas chromatography and CF3O- ionization chemistry, the selective operation of a GC is combined with the sensitive, specific, and fast detection of a high-resolution ToF-CIMS. The combination of chromatographic separation and exact mass identification allows detecting isomer resolved photooxidation products. Direct measurements in the atmosphere of such isomer distributions are particularly interesting due to the broad range of their individual atmospheric lifetimes and impacts.

  15. High potential recovery -- Gas repressurization

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, M.P.

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate that small independent oil producers can use existing gas injection technologies, scaled to their operations, to repressurize petroleum reservoirs and increase their economic oil production. This report gives background information for gas repressurization technologies, the results of workshops held to inform small independent producers about gas repressurization, and the results of four gas repressurization field demonstration projects. Much of the material in this report is based on annual reports (BDM-Oklahoma 1995, BDM-Oklahoma 1996, BDM-Oklahoma 1997), a report describing the results of the workshops (Olsen 1995), and the four final reports for the field demonstration projects which are reproduced in the Appendix. This project was designed to demonstrate that repressurization of reservoirs with gas (natural gas, enriched gas, nitrogen, flue gas, or air) can be used by small independent operators in selected reservoirs to increase production and/or decrease premature abandonment of the resource. The project excluded carbon dioxide because of other DOE-sponsored projects that address carbon dioxide processes directly. Two of the demonstration projects, one using flue gas and the other involving natural gas from a deeper coal zone, were both technical and economic successes. The two major lessons learned from the projects are the importance of (1) adequate infrastructure (piping, wells, compressors, etc.) and (2) adequate planning including testing compatibility between injected gases and fluids, and reservoir gases, fluids, and rocks.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2 and VLA Observations of the Ionized Gas in the Dwarf Starburst Galaxy NGC 4214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John W.; Maíz-Apellániz, Jesús; Pickens, Christopher E.; Norman, Colin A.; Walborn, Nolan R.

    2000-12-01

    We present new Hα and [O III] λ5007 narrowband images of the starbursting dwarf galaxy NGC 4214, obtained with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera (WFPC2) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), together with VLA observations of the same galaxy. The HST images resolve features down to physical scales of 2-5 pc, revealing several young (<10 Myr) star-forming complexes of various ionized gas morphologies (compact knots, complete or fragmentary shells) and sizes (~10-200 pc). Our results are consistent with a uniform set of evolutionary trends: The youngest, smaller, filled regions that presumably are those just emerging from dense star-forming clouds tend to be of high excitation and are highly obscured. Evolved, larger shell-like regions have lower excitation and are less extincted owing to the action of stellar winds and supernovae. In at least one case we find evidence for induced star formation, which has led to a two-stage starburst. Age estimates based on W(Hα) measurements do not agree with those inferred from wind-driven shell models of expanding H II regions. The most likely explanation for this effect is the existence of an ~2 Myr delay in the formation of superbubbles caused by the pressure exerted by the high-density medium in which massive stars are born. We report the detection of a supernova remnant embedded in one of the two large H II complexes of NGC 4214. The dust in NGC 4214 is not located in a foreground screen but is physically associated with the warm ionized gas. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the NRAO Very Large Array. The HST observations were obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS5-26555. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  17. Self-injection and acceleration of electrons during ionization of gas atoms by a short laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K.P.

    2006-04-15

    Using a relativistic three-dimensional single-particle code, acceleration of electrons created during the ionization of nitrogen and oxygen gas atoms by a laser pulse has been studied. Barrier suppression ionization model has been used to calculate ionization time of the bound electrons. The energy gained by the electrons peaks for an optimum value of laser spot size. The electrons created near the tail do not gain sufficient energy for a long duration laser pulse. The electrons created at the tail of pulse escape before fully interacting with the trailing part of the pulse for a short duration laser pulse, which causes electrons to retain sufficient energy. If a suitable frequency chirp is introduced then energy of the electrons created at the tail of the pulse further increases.

  18. Observations of columnal recombination in the ionization tracks of energetic heavy nuclei in an argon-methane gas mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedenbeck, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of ionization signals resulting from the passage of energetic heavy nuclei through a gas mixture consisting of 95 mol percent Ar plus 5 mol percent CH4, at an absolute pressure of 3 atm are presented. The measurements take place under a uniform electric field perpendicular to the ionization track. The signals were compared to the calculated energy losses, with an assumption of proportionality between energy loss rate and ionization rate. Significant deviations from proportionality are found for energy loss rate grater than about 3000 MeV sq cm/g, while fractional deviations are found to be proportional to the energy loss rate (dE/dx) exp m, where m is equal to about two. These results are attributed to the columnal recombination.

  19. Testing a Dynamical Equilibrium Model of the Extraplanar Diffuse Ionized Gas in NGC 891

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Erin; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2016-12-01

    The observed scale heights of extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (eDIG) layers exceed their thermal scale heights by a factor of a few in the Milky Way and other nearby edge-on disk galaxies. Here, we test a dynamical equilibrium model of the eDIG layer in NGC 891, where we ask whether the thermal, turbulent, magnetic field, and cosmic-ray pressure gradients are sufficient to support the layer. In optical emission-line spectroscopy from the SparsePak integral field unit on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope, the Hα emission in position-velocity space suggests that the eDIG is found in a ring between galactocentric radii of {R}\\min ≤slant R≤slant 8 {kpc}, where {R}\\min ≥slant 2 {kpc}. We find that the thermal ({σ }{th}=11 km s-1) and turbulent ({σ }{turb}=25 km s-1) velocity dispersions are insufficient to satisfy the hydrostatic equilibrium equation given an exponential electron scale height of {h}z=1.0 {kpc}. Using a literature analysis of radio continuum observations from the CHANG-ES survey, we demonstrate that the magnetic field and cosmic-ray pressure gradients are sufficient to stably support the gas at R≥slant 8 kpc if the cosmic rays are sufficiently coupled to the system ({γ }{cr}=1.45). Thus, a stable dynamical equilibrium model is viable only if the eDIG is found in a thin ring around R = 8 kpc, and nonequilibrium models such as a galactic fountain flow are of interest for further study.

  20. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI‐APi‐TOF (Chemical Ionization‐Atmospheric Pressure interface‐Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI‐APi‐TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4‐H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self‐contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit. PMID:27610289

  1. Serum total testosterone: immunoassay compared with negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R L; Herold, D A

    1996-05-01

    We have developed an electron capture negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) procedure to quantify serum testosterone in the clinically relevant range 0.69-69.3 nmol/L and used this procedure to assess Ciba Corning Diagnostics ACS:180 testosterone immunoassay. The GC-MS method involves liquid-liquid extraction of serum samples and synthesis of a pentafluorobenzyloxime/silyl ether derivative of testosterone with excellent chromatographic and electron capturing properties. The ACS testosterone assay is the first fully automated nonradioactive testosterone immunoassay approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Patients' specimens (101, 57 males, 44 females) were analyzed by both techniques. A plot of the GC-MS (x) vs ACS (y) testosterone concentrations for men was linear (y = 1.07x + 0.19 nmol/L), showing excellent correlation (r2 = 0.98) between the two assays. Agreement of the two assays for female specimens was poor (y = 0.72x + 1.2 nmol/L), with a poor correlation (r2 = 0.31).

  2. Hα and [SII] Emission from Warm Ionized Gas in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Alex S.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Haffner, L. Matthew; Gostisha, Martin C.; Barger, Kathleen A.

    2014-06-01

    We present Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper [SII] λ6716 and Hα spectroscopic maps of the warm ionized medium (WIM) in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm at Galactic longitudes 310° < l < 345°. Using extinction-corrected Hα intensities (I_{{H} \\alpha }^c), we measure an exponential scale height of electron density squared in the arm of H_{n_e^2}= 0.30 \\, {kpc} (assuming a distance of 3.5 kpc), intermediate between that observed in the inner Galaxy and in the Perseus Arm. The [S II]/Hα line ratio is enhanced at large |z| and in sightlines with faint I_{{H} \\alpha }^c. We find that the [S II]/Hα line ratio has a power-law relationship with I_{{H} \\alpha }^c from a value of ≈1.0 at I_{{H} \\alpha }^c< 0.2 \\, {R} (Rayleighs) to a value of ≈0.08 at I_{{H} \\alpha }^c\\gtrsim 100 \\, {R}. The line ratio is better correlated with Hα intensity than with height above the plane, indicating that the physical conditions within the WIM vary systematically with electron density. We argue that the variation of the line ratio with height is a consequence of the decrease of electron density with height. Our results reinforce the well-established picture in which the diffuse Hα emission is due primarily to emission from in situ photoionized gas, with scattered light only a minor contributor.

  3. Ethanol analysis by headspace gas chromatography with simultaneous flame-ionization and mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Alford, Ilene; Yeatman, Dustin Tate; Shan, Xiaoqin

    2011-09-01

    Ethanol is the most frequently identified compound in forensic toxicology. Although confirmation involving mass spectrometry is desirable, relatively few methods have been published to date. A novel technique utilizing a Dean's Switch to simultaneously quantitate and confirm ethyl alcohol by flame-ionization (FID) and mass spectrometric (MS) detection after headspace sampling and gas chromatographic separation is presented. Using 100 μL of sample, the limits of detection and quantitation were 0.005 and 0.010 g/dL, respectively. The zero-order linear range (r(2) > 0.990) was determined to span the concentrations of 0.010 to 1.000 g/dL. The coefficient of variation of replicate analyses was less than 3.1%. Quantitative accuracy was within ±8%, ±6%, ±3%, and ±1.5% at concentrations of 0.010, 0.025, 0.080, and 0.300 g/dL, respectively. In addition, 1,1-difluoroethane was validated for qualitative identification by this method. The validated FID-MS method provides a procedure for the quantitation of ethyl alcohol in blood by FID with simultaneous confirmation by MS and can also be utilized as an identification method for inhalants such as 1,1-difluoroethane.

  4. Ionization of highly charged iodine ions near the Bohr velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xianming; Cheng, Rui; Lei, Yu; Sun, Yuanbo; Ren, Jieru; Liu, Shidong; Deng, Jiachuan; Zhao, Yongtao; Xiao, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the L-shell X-rays of iodine from the collisions of 3 MeV Iq+(q=15,20,22,25,26) ions with an iron target. It is found that the X-ray yield decreases with the increasing initial charge state. The energy of the subshell X-ray has a blue shift, which is independent of the projectile charge state. In addition, the relative intensity ratios of Lβ1,3,4 and Lβ2,15 to Lα1,2 X-ray are obtained and compared with the theoretical calculations. That they are larger than for a singly ionized atom can be understood by the multiple ionization effect of the outer-shell electrons.

  5. Behavioral Incapacitation from a High Dose of Ionizing Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    1983. (UNCLASSIFIED) SMcMillan, G., Falkenberg , S., and Thompson, WI Early behavioral effects of ionizing radiation on fou• r species pf subhuman...aspect of Os, collection of iformatlort, indudkg Suggestions for reducing ttds burden, to Wahs ton HeadQuarters Services Directoralte f r infomratlon...wiere employed at the AFRRI in 1981 when the research was completed. R . W. Young and C. G. Franz were investigators in the Behavioral Science Department

  6. Highly ionized xenon and volumetric weighting in restricted focal geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohaber, J.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2015-08-01

    The ionization of xenon atoms subjected to 42 fs, 800 nm pulses of radiation from a Ti:Sapphire laser was investigated. In our experiments, a maximum laser intensity of ˜ 2 × 10 15 W / cm 2 was used. Xenon ions were measured using a time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer having an entrance slit with dimensions of 12 μ m × 400 μ m . The observed yields Xe n + ( n = 1 - 7 ) were partially free of spatial averaging. The ion yields showed sequential and nonsequential multiple ionization and dip structures following saturation. To investigate the dip structures and to perform a comparison between experimental and simulated data, with the goal of clarifying the effects of residual spatial averaging, we derived a hybrid analytical-numerical solution for the integration kernel in restricted focal geometries. We simulated xenon ionization using Ammosov-Delone-Krainov and Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev theories and obtained agreement with the results of observations. Since a large number of experiments suffer from spatial averaging, the results presented are important to correctly interpret experimental data by taking into account spatial averaging.

  7. An approach toward quantification of organic compounds in complex environmental samples using high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia

    2013-01-07

    Quantitative analysis of individual compounds in complex mixtures using high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) is complicated by differences in the ionization efficiencies of analyte molecules in the mixture, resulting in signal suppression during ionization. However, the ability to obtain concentration estimates of compounds in an environmental sample is important for data interpretation and comparison. We introduce an approach for estimating mass concentrations of analytes observed in a multicomponent mixture by HR-ESI-MS, without prior separation. The approach relies on a calibration of the instrument using appropriate standards added to the mixture of studied analytes. An illustration of how the proposed calibration can be applied in practice is provided for aqueous extracts of isoprene photooxidation organic aerosol, with multifunctional organic acids standards. We show that the observed ion sensitivities in ESI-MS are positively correlated with the “adjusted mass,” defined as a product of the molecular mass and the H/C ratio in the molecule (adjusted mass = H/C x molecular mass). The correlation of the observed ESI sensitivity with adjusted mass is justified by considering trends of the physical and chemical properties of organic compounds that affect ionization in the positive ion mode, i.e., gas-phase basicity, polarizability, and molecular size.

  8. Rapid comprehensive characterization of crude oils by thermogravimetry coupled to fast modulated gas chromatography-single photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wohlfahrt, S; Fischer, M; Saraji-Bozorgzad, M; Matuschek, G; Streibel, T; Post, E; Denner, T; Zimmermann, R

    2013-09-01

    Comprehensive multi-dimensional hyphenation of a thermogravimetry device (i.e. a thermobalance) to gas chromatography and single photon ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TG-GC×SPI-MS) has been used to investigate two crude oil samples of different geographical origin. The source of the applied vacuum ultraviolet radiation is an electron beam pumped rare gas excimer lamp (EBEL). The soft photoionization favors the formation of molecular ions. Introduction of a fast, rapidly modulated gas chromatographic separation step in comparison with solely TG-SPI-MS enables strongly enhanced detection especially with such highly complex organic matrices as crude oil. In contrast with former TG-SPI-MS measurements, separation and identification of overlying substances is possible because of different GC retention times. The specific contribution of isobaric compounds to one mass signal is determined for alkanes, naphthalenes, alkylated benzenes, and other compounds.

  9. Multiphoton ionization of atoms and ions by high-intensity X-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Popruzhenko, S. B. Mur, V. D.; Popov, V. S.; Bauer, D.

    2009-06-15

    Coulomb corrections to the action function and rate of multiphoton ionization of atoms and ions in a strong linearly polarized electromagnetic field are calculated for high values of the Keldysh adiabaticity parameter. The Coulomb corrections significantly increase the ionization rate for atoms (by several orders of magnitude). An interpolation formula proposed for ionization rate is valid for arbitrary values of the adiabaticity parameter. The high accuracy of the formula is confirmed by comparison with the results of numerical calculations. The general case of elliptic polarization of laser radiation is also considered.

  10. Determination of phthalate esters in cosmetics by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection and mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiming; Wang, Chao; Wang, Xing; Hao, Nan; Liu, Juan

    2005-08-01

    A gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and mass spectrometric detection (MSD) method was developed to determine the six kinds of phthalate esters [dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-n-octyl phthalate (DOP)] in cosmetics (solid, cream and liquid cosmetics). The cosmetics were extracted with methanol by ultrasonic and then separated with high-speed centrifugation. The upper clear layer was dried and filtered through a 0.45 mum pore diameter filter. The filtrate was injected into GC-FID/GC-MS for detection. GC-FID chromatogram was applied for qualitative analysis, external standard method was used for quantitative analysis. Confirmation of phthalate presence was undertaken by GC-EI-MS. The recovery range of all phthalates were between 92.0 and 110.0% with relative standard deviations between 1.95 and 5.92%. The low detection limits of the method were: 0.1 ng for DMP, DEP, DBP and BBP, 0.5 ng for DEHP and DOP. The method had advantages of high precision and sensitivity, simplicity of pretreatment. The method can be used to test the six kinds of phthalate esters in cosmetics.

  11. Noise characteristics of the gas ionization cascade used in low vacuum scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tileli, Vasiliki; Thiel, Bradley L.; Knowles, W. Ralph; Toth, Milos

    2009-07-01

    The noise characteristics of gas cascade amplified electron signals in low vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) are described and analyzed. We derive expressions for each component contributing to the total noise culminating in a predictive, quantitative model that can be used for optimization of LVSEM operating parameters. Signal and noise behavior is characterized experimentally and used to validate the model. Under most operating conditions, the noise is dominated by the excess noise generated in the gas amplification cascade. At high gains, the excess noise increases proportionally with gain such that the signal-to-noise ratio is constant. The effects of several instrument operating parameters, including working distance, gas pressure, beam current, and detector bias, are condensed and presented in the form of a master curve.

  12. High quality electron beam acceleration by ionization injection in laser wakefields with mid-infrared dual-color lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ming; Luo, Ji; Chen, Min; Mori, Warren B.; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Hidding, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    For the laser wakefield acceleration, suppression of beam energy spread while keeping sufficient charge is one of the key challenges. In order to achieve this, we propose bichromatic laser ionization injection with combined laser wavelengths of 2.4 μ m and 0.8 μ m for wakefield excitation and triggering electron injection via field ionization, respectively. A laser pulse at 2.4 μ m wavelength enables one to drive an intense acceleration structure with a relatively low laser power. To further reduce the requirement of laser power, we also propose to use carbon dioxide as the working gas medium, where carbon acts as the injection element. Our three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that electron beams at the GeV energy level with both low energy spreads (around 1%) and high charges (several tens of picocoulomb) can be obtained by the use of this scheme with laser peak power totaling sub-100 TW.

  13. SDSS-IV MaNGA: the impact of diffuse ionized gas on emission-line ratios, interpretation of diagnostic diagrams and gas metallicity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Yan, Renbin; Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew; Haffner, L. Matthew; Walterbos, René; Maiolino, Roberto; Tremonti, Christy; Thomas, Daniel; Drory, Niv; Jones, Amy; Belfiore, Francesco; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Nitschelm, Christian; Andrews, Brett; Brinkmann, Jon; Brownstein, Joel R.; Cheung, Edmond; Li, Cheng; Law, David R.; Roman Lopes, Alexandre; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Storchi Bergmann, Thaisa; Simmons, Audrey

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse ionized gas (DIG) is prevalent in star-forming galaxies. Using a sample of 365 nearly face-on star-forming galaxies observed by Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO, we demonstrate how DIG in star-forming galaxies impacts the measurements of emission-line ratios, hence the interpretation of diagnostic diagrams and gas-phase metallicity measurements. At fixed metallicity, DIG-dominated low ΣHα regions display enhanced [S II]/Hα, [N II]/Hα, [O II]/Hβ and [O I]/Hα. The gradients in these line ratios are determined by metallicity gradients and ΣHα. In line ratio diagnostic diagrams, contamination by DIG moves H II regions towards composite or low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LI(N)ER)-like regions. A harder ionizing spectrum is needed to explain DIG line ratios. Leaky H II region models can only shift line ratios slightly relative to H II region models, and thus fail to explain the composite/LI(N)ER line ratios displayed by DIG. Our result favours ionization by evolved stars as a major ionization source for DIG with LI(N)ER-like emission. DIG can significantly bias the measurement of gas metallicity and metallicity gradients derived using strong-line methods. Metallicities derived using N2O2 are optimal because they exhibit the smallest bias and error. Using O3N2, R23, N2 = [N II]/Hα and N2S2Hα to derive metallicities introduces bias in the derived metallicity gradients as large as the gradient itself. The strong-line method of Blanc et al. (IZI hereafter) cannot be applied to DIG to get an accurate metallicity because it currently contains only H II region models that fail to describe the DIG.

  14. Identification of Guest-Host Inclusion Complexes in the Gas Phase by Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendes, De´bora C.; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan; Da Silva, Jose´ P.

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students follow a step-by-step procedure to prepare and study guest-host complexes in the gas phase using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Model systems are the complexes of hosts cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) and cucurbit[8]uril (CB8) with the guest 4-styrylpyridine (SP). Aqueous solutions of CB7 or CB8…

  15. Low-Frequency Observations of Galactic Supernova Remnants and the Distribution of Low-Density Ionized Gas in the Interstellar Medium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-15

    New long-wavelength observations of Galactic supernova remnants ( SNRs ) at 30.9 and 57.5 MHz are used to derive detailed low-frequency radio spectra...for 32 SNRs . Of these, approximately two-thirds show turnovers at low frequencies, implying the presence of a widespread, but inhomogeneous, ionized... SNRs and to constrain the physical properties of the ionized gas responsible for the absorption. Three generally accepted ionized components of the

  16. Scaling rule for target ionization by highly charged ions at low-to-intermediate velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Deveney, E. F.; Datz, S.; Desai, D. D.; Krause, H. F.; Sanders, J. M.; Vane, C. R.; Cocke, C. L.; Giese, J. P.

    1996-04-01

    Cross sections for ionization of He by highly charged Clq+, Cuq+, and Iq+ (q=6-10) impact at velocities from 1.6 to 3.1 a.u. were measured. These results are compared with other experimental and theoretical results available over a wide velocity range. A universal scaling rule for target ionization by nearly bare, highly charged ions at low to intermediate velocities (0.2-3.5 a.u.) is reported.

  17. Effect of high dose natural ionizing radiation on the immune system of the exposed residents of Ramsar Town, Iran.

    PubMed

    Attar, Massoud; Molaie Kondolousy, Yaghob; Khansari, Nemat

    2007-06-01

    Iran is one of several countries that has regions of high dose natural ionizing radiation. Two well-known villages in the suburb of Ramsar Town in the Caspian Sea strip, Taleshmahaleh and Chaparsar, have background radiation that is 13 times higher than normal. This radiation is the result of Radium 226 and Radon gas both of which are highly water soluble. While people living in these regions do not suffer from any major health problems, we decided to study the their immune responses to infection and inflammation in order to determine if their habitat affects their immune defense mechanisms as a way of compensating for their exposure to high dose environmental ionizing radiation. Our results showed that the total serum antioxidant level in the exposed people was significantly lower than the individuals not exposed to high dose natural ionizing radiation. The exposed individuals also had higher lymphocyte-induced IL-4 and IL-10 production, and lower IL-2 and IFN-gamma production. In addition, neutrophil NBT, phagocytosis, and locomotion were higher in the exposed group. In contrast, lymphocyte proliferation in response to PHA was unaffected. We conclude that the immune system of individuals exposed to high dose ionizing radiation has adapted to its environment by shifting from a Type 1 to a Type 2 response to promote anti-inflammation. This may be because inflammatory Type 1 responses generate more free radicals than Type 2 responses, in addition to the free radicals generated as a result of high environmental radiation. Thus, the serum total antioxidant level in the exposed residents was lower than the unexposed group.

  18. Resonant two-photon ionization of fluorene rare-gas van der Waals complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutwyler, Samuel; Even, Uzi; Jortner, Joshua

    1983-12-01

    Resonant two-photon ionization combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry was applied for the interrogation of the S0 → S1 electronic-vibrational excitations of van der Waals complexes of fluorene (FL) with rare-gas atoms and N2 in supersonic jets. Energy-resolved and mass-resolved spectra of FL ṡ Ne, FL ṡ Arn (n=1-3), FL ṡ Kr, FL ṡ Xe, and FL ṡ N2 were recorded over the energy range 0-800 cm-1 above the electronic origin of S1. The red microscopic spectral shifts of the electronic origins of FL ṡ R (R=Ar, Kr, and Xe) complexes are dominated by dispersive interactions, being proportional to the polarizability of R. The vibrational level structure of FL ṡ Rn (R=Ar, Kr, and Xe) complexes exhibits intramolecular vibrational excitations of FL, as well as intermolecular vibrations, which involve the relative motion of FL and R in the complex. The spectra of FL ṡ Ne and FL ṡ N2 reveal a rich vibrational structure in the vicinity of the electronic origin, indicating a substantial change of the nuclear configuration upon electronic excitation. Upper and lower bounds on the dissociation energies of FL ṡ R (R=Ne, Kr, and Xe) and FL ṡ Ar2 were inferred from the vibrational level structure in the mass-resolved spectra, where the disappearance of the signal of the parent van der Waals ion and the appearance of the ion signal of the fragments mark the onset of the vibrational predissociation process.

  19. Discovery of nine extended ionized gas clouds in a z = 0.4 cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Masafumi; Koyama, Yusei; Kodama, Tadayuki; Gu, Liyi; Nakata, Fumiaki; Hattori, Takashi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2015-02-01

    From deep Hα imaging data of Suprime-Cam/Subaru, we discovered nine extended ionized gas clouds (EIG) around galaxies in the Abell 851 cluster (A851) at z = 0.4. We surveyed a 30 × 25 arcmin region, and the EIGs were found only near the cluster center (<2.3 arcmin ∼ 750 kpc). The parent galaxies of the EIGs are star-forming or post-starburst galaxies, all of which are spectroscopically confirmed members of the cluster. Four out of the nine parent galaxies show distortion of stellar distribution in the disk, which can be a sign of recent interaction, and the interaction may have made the EIGs. On the other hand, six parent galaxies (one overlaps those exhibiting distortion) show Hα emission without stars, which implies ram pressure stripping. The spectrum of the brightest parent galaxy shows a post-starburst signature and resembles the Hα stripped galaxies found in the Coma cluster. Meanwhile, two brightest parent galaxies in A851 are more massive than the EIG parent galaxies in the Coma cluster. This is consistent with a “downsizing” of star-forming galaxies, though it is still within the statistical variance. We also analyzed Suprime-Cam data of another z=0.39 cluster, CL0024+17, but found no EIGs. The key difference between A851 and CL0024+17 would be the existence of a subcluster colliding with the main body of A851, in which six or seven out of the nine parent galaxies in A851 exist, and the fraction of EIGs in the subcluster is significantly higher than the main subcluster of A851 and CL0024+17.

  20. Discovery of Nine Extended Ionized Gas Clouds in a z = 0.4 Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Masafumi; Gu, Liyi; Koyama, Yusei; Nakata, Fumiaki; Kodama, Tadayuki; Hattori, Takashi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2015-02-01

    From deep Hα imaging data of Suprime-Cam/Subaru, we discovered nine extended ionized gas clouds (EIG) around galaxies in the Abell 851 cluster (A851) at z = 0.4. We surveyed a 30 × 25 arcmin region, and the EIGs were found only near the cluster center (\\lt 2.3 arcmin ˜ 750 kpc). The parent galaxies of the EIGs are star-forming or post-starburst galaxies, all of which are spectroscopically confirmed members of the cluster. Four out of the nine parent galaxies show distortion of stellar distribution in the disk, which can be a sign of recent interaction, and the interaction may have made the EIGs. On the other hand, six parent galaxies (one overlaps those exhibiting distortion) show Hα emission without stars, which implies ram pressure stripping. The spectrum of the brightest parent galaxy shows a post-starburst signature and resembles the Hα stripped galaxies found in the Coma cluster. Meanwhile, two brightest parent galaxies in A851 are more massive than the EIG parent galaxies in the Coma cluster. This is consistent with a “downsizing” of star-forming galaxies, though it is still within the statistical variance. We also analyzed Suprime-Cam data of another z=0.39 cluster, CL0024+17, but found no EIGs. The key difference between A851 and CL0024+17 would be the existence of a subcluster colliding with the main body of A851, in which six or seven out of the nine parent galaxies in A851 exist, and the fraction of EIGs in the subcluster is significantly higher than the main subcluster of A851 and CL0024+17.

  1. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs] in processed meat products using gas chromatography - flame ionization detector.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Olatunde S; Fatoki, Olalekan S; Opeolu, Beatrice O; Ximba, Bhekumusa J

    2014-08-01

    The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in smoked, grilled and boiled meats were determined using gas chromatography - flame ionization detector (GC-FID). PAHs in the processed meats were extracted in n-hexane after hydrolysis with methanolic KOH. Clean-up was achieved using solid phase extraction in neutral-Si/basic-Si/acidic-Si/neutral-Si frits. The fractions, benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkP), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), indeno[123-cd]pyrene (IP) and benzo[ghi]perylene (BghiP) were separated and quantified using GC-FID. The method and instrument limits of detections were 0.1, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3μg/kg and 0.5, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5μg/kg, respectively, for BkP, BaP, IP and BghiP. The method's recovery and precision generally varied between 83.69% and 94.25% with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 3.18-15.60%; and 90.38-96.71% with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.82-12.87% respectively. The concentration of BkP, BaP, IP and BghiP in smoked, grilled and boiled meat samples were ranged 0.64-31.54μg/kg, 0.07-7.04μg/kg, 0.09-15.03, 0.51-46.67μg/kg and 0.01-5.11μg/kg, respectively.

  2. Development of a highly-sensitive Penning ionization electron spectrometer using the magnetic bottle effect

    SciTech Connect

    Ota, Masahiro; Ishiguro, Yuki; Nakajima, Yutaro; Miyauchi, Naoya; Yamakita, Yoshihiro

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports on a highly-sensitive retarding-type electron spectrometer for a continuous source of electrons, in which the electron collection efficiency is increased by utilizing the magnetic bottle effect. This study demonstrates an application to Penning ionization electron spectroscopy using collisional ionization with metastable He*(2{sup 3}S) atoms. Technical details and performances of the instrument are presented. This spectrometer can be used for studies of functional molecules and assemblies, and exterior electron densities are expected to be selectively observed by the Penning ionization.

  3. Laser-induced resonance states as dynamic suppressors of ionization in high-frequency short pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Barash, Danny; Orel, Ann E.; Baer, Roi

    2000-01-01

    An adiabatic-Floquet formalism is used to study the suppression of ionization in short laser pulses. In the high-frequency limit the adiabatic equations involve only the pulse envelope where transitions are purely ramp effects. For a short-ranged potential having a single-bound state we show that ionization suppression is caused by the appearance of a laser-induced resonance state, which is coupled by the pulse ramp to the ground state and acts to trap ionizing flux. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  4. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Selected Emerging Brominated Flame Retardants in Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Surong; Niu, Yumin; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Bing; Du, Zhenxia

    2017-03-01

    Emerging brominated flame retardants (eBFRs) other than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and their derivatives in foods have been in focus in recent years due to their increasing production volumes, indefinite information on toxicities and the lack of data on occurrence in environments, foods as well as humans. In this study, gas chromatography was coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) for the analysis of six eBFRs in pork, chicken, egg, milk and fish. A short section of unpacked capillary column coupled to the end of the analytical column was applied to improve the chromatographic behaviors of high boiling point compounds. The method was comprehensively validated with method limit of quantification (mLOQ) lower than 8 pg/g wet weight (w.w.). Samples from Chinese Total Diet study were quantified following the validated APGC-MS/MS method. 2,3,4,5-pentabromo-6-ethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were most frequently detected in samples. The highest concentration was found in fish with 351.9 pg/g w.w. of PBT. This is the first report on the presence of PBT in food samples with non-ignorable concentrations and detection rate.

  5. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Selected Emerging Brominated Flame Retardants in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Surong; Niu, Yumin; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Bing; Du, Zhenxia

    2017-01-01

    Emerging brominated flame retardants (eBFRs) other than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and their derivatives in foods have been in focus in recent years due to their increasing production volumes, indefinite information on toxicities and the lack of data on occurrence in environments, foods as well as humans. In this study, gas chromatography was coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) for the analysis of six eBFRs in pork, chicken, egg, milk and fish. A short section of unpacked capillary column coupled to the end of the analytical column was applied to improve the chromatographic behaviors of high boiling point compounds. The method was comprehensively validated with method limit of quantification (mLOQ) lower than 8 pg/g wet weight (w.w.). Samples from Chinese Total Diet study were quantified following the validated APGC-MS/MS method. 2,3,4,5-pentabromo-6-ethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were most frequently detected in samples. The highest concentration was found in fish with 351.9 pg/g w.w. of PBT. This is the first report on the presence of PBT in food samples with non-ignorable concentrations and detection rate. PMID:28281659

  6. Determination of free amino compounds in betalainic fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography with flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Florian; Graneis, Stephan; Schreiter, Pat P-Y; Stintzing, Florian C; Carle, Reinhold

    2006-06-14

    Amino acids and amines are the precursors of betalains. Therefore, the profiles of free amino compounds in juices obtained from cactus pears [Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill. cv. Bianca, cv. Gialla, and cv. Rossa], pitaya fruits [Selenicereus megalanthus (K. Schumann ex Vaupel) Moran, Hylocereus polyrhizus (Weber) Britton & Rose, and Hylocereus undatus (Haworth) Britton & Rose], and in extracts from differently colored Swiss chard [Beta vulgaris L. ssp. cicla (L.) Alef. cv. Bright Lights] petioles and red and yellow beets (B. vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris var. conditiva Alef. cv. Burpee's Golden) were investigated for the first time. Amino compounds were derivatized with propyl chloroformate. While gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry was used for peak assignment, GC flame ionization detection was applied for quantification of individual compounds. Whereas proline was the major free amino compound of cactus pear and pitaya fruit juices, glutamine dominated in Swiss chard stems and beets, respectively. Interestingly, extremely high concentrations of dopamine were detected in Swiss chard stems and beets. Furthermore, the cleavage of betaxanthins caused by derivatization in alkaline reaction solutions is demonstrated for the first time. Amino acids and amines thus released might increase the actual free amino compound contents of the respective sample. To evaluate the contribution of betaxanthin cleavage to total amino acid and amine concentration, isolated betaxanthins were derivatized according to the "EZ:faast" method prior to quantification of the respective amino compounds released. On a molar basis, betaxanthin contribution to overall amino compound contents was always below 6.4%.

  7. Generation of highly vibrationally excited H2 and detection by 2+1 resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robie, Daniel C.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1990-02-01

    We report the first detection by optical means of highly vibrationally excited H2 X1Σ+g(vx=6-11). Vibrationally excited H2 was generated using a recently discovered hot-wire effect in H2 gas, and was detected in 40 bands with 2+1 resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization via the EF state (vEF=0-14). Rotational temperatures are in the range 200-650 K, well below that required for thermal excitation of the observed vibrational levels.

  8. Isolated high-harmonic XUV photon absorption and NIR strong-field tunnel ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, W. A.; Frassetto, F.; Froud, C. A.; Turcu, I. C. E.; King, R. B.; Calvert, C. R.; Nemeth, G. R. A. J.; Villoresi, P.; Poletto, L.; Springate, E.

    2012-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses with a duration of tens of femtoseconds initiate 4s-1 or 4p-1 photoionization of krypton, which populates highly excited satellite states through the electron correlation. The excited ions are then tunnel ionized to Kr2+4s-14p-1 or 4p-2 by a strong-field near-infrared (NIR) pulse of a similar duration. The XUV pulses are produced by high harmonic generation in a gas jet and we employ a state-of-the-art time-preserving monochromator to isolate individual XUV harmonic orders. An enhancement of the Kr2+ yield as a function of harmonic photon energy and XUV-pump NIR-probe delay is observed and compared with a two-step model, which allows the population of the satellite states to be inferred. Furthermore, relative 4s and 4p satellite excitation cross-sections are predicted at the photon energies studied. This proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates that isolated harmonics can be employed to pump specific electronic states, which will be highly complementary to synchrotron, attosecond and x-ray free-electron laser studies of complex systems.

  9. Vacuum surface flashover and high pressure gas streamers

    SciTech Connect

    Elizondo, J.M.; Krogh, M.L.; Smith, D.; Stolz, D.; Wright, S.N.; Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Vitello, P.; Tishchenko, N.

    1997-07-01

    Pre-breakdown current traces obtained during high pressure gas breakdown and vacuum surface flashover show similar signatures. The initial pre-breakdown current spike, a flat constant current phase, and the breakdown phase with voltage collapse and current surge differ mostly in magnitude. Given these similarities, a model, consisting of the initial current spike corresponding to a fast precursor streamer (ionization wave led by a photoionizing front), the flat current stage as the heating or glow phase, and the terminal avalanche and gap closure, is applied to vacuum surface flashover. A simple analytical approximation based on the resistivity changes induced in the vacuum and dielectric surface is presented. The approximation yields an excellent fit to pre-breakdown time delay vs applied field for previously published experimental data. A detailed kinetics model that includes surface and gas contributions is being developed based in the initial approximation.

  10. High-performance gas sensors with temperature measurement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Shengtao; Zhang, Jingyuan; Pan, Zhigang; Min, Daomin; Li, Xin; Song, Xiaoping; Liu, Junhua

    2013-01-01

    There are a number of gas ionization sensors using carbon nanotubes as cathode or anode. Unfortunately, their applications are greatly limited by their multi-valued sensitivity, one output value corresponding to several measured concentration values. Here we describe a triple-electrode structure featuring two electric fields with opposite directions, which enable us to overcome the multi-valued sensitivity problem at 1 atm in a wide range of gas concentrations. We used a carbon nanotube array as the first electrode, and the two electric fields between the upper and the lower interelectrode gaps were designed to extract positive ions generated in the upper gap, hence significantly reduced positive ion bombardment on the nanotube electrode, which allowed us to maintain a high electric field near the nanotube tips, leading to a single-valued sensitivity and a long nanotube life. We have demonstrated detection of various gases and simultaneously monitoring temperature, and a potential for applications. PMID:23405281

  11. Compact, high energy gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.; Stapleton, Robert E.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1976-08-03

    An electrically pumped gas laser amplifier unit having a disc-like configuration in which light propagation is radially outward from the axis rather than along the axis. The input optical energy is distributed over a much smaller area than the output optical energy, i.e., the amplified beam, while still preserving the simplicity of parallel electrodes for pumping the laser medium. The system may thus be driven by a comparatively low optical energy input, while at the same time, owing to the large output area, large energies may be extracted while maintaining the energy per unit area below the threshold of gas breakdown.

  12. On line high dose static position monitoring by ionization chamber detector for industrial gamma irradiators.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ary A; Vieira, Jose M; Hamada, Margarida M

    2010-01-01

    A 1 cm(3) cylindrical ionization chamber was developed to measure high doses on line during the sample irradiation in static position, in a (60)Co industrial plant. The developed ionization chamber showed to be suitable for use as a dosimeter on line. A good linearity of the detector was found between the dose and the accumulated charge, independently of the different dose rates caused by absorbing materials.

  13. Warm ionized gas in CALIFA early-type galaxies. 2D emission-line patterns and kinematics for 32 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.; Kehrig, C.; Vílchez, J. M.; Lehnert, M. D.; Sánchez, S. F.; Ziegler, B.; Breda, I.; Dos Reis, S. N.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Bomans, D. J.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Walcher, C. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; García-Benito, R.; Márquez, I.; Del Olmo, A.; Masegosa, J.; Mollá, M.; Marino, R. A.; González Delgado, R. M.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; CALIFA Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Context. The morphological, spectroscopic, and kinematical properties of the warm interstellar medium (wim) in early-type galaxies (ETGs) hold key observational constraints to nuclear activity and the buildup history of these massive, quiescent systems. High-quality integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data with a wide spectral and spatial coverage, such as those from the CALIFA survey, offer an unprecedented opportunity for advancing our understanding of the wim in ETGs. Aims: This article centers on a 2D investigation of the wim component in 32 nearby (≲150 Mpc) ETGs from CALIFA, complementing a previous 1D analysis of the same sample. Methods: The analysis presented here includes Hα intensity and equivalent width (EW) maps and radial profiles, diagnostic emission-line ratios, and ionized-gas and stellar kinematics. It is supplemented by τ-ratio maps, which are a more efficient means to quantify the role of photoionization by the post-AGB stellar component than alternative mechanisms (e.g., AGN, low-level star formation). Results: Confirming and strengthening our previous conclusions, we find that ETGs span a broad continuous sequence in the properties of their wim, exemplified by two characteristic classes. The first (type i) comprises systems with a nearly constant EW(Hα) in their extranuclear component, which quantitatively agrees with (but is no proof of) the hypothesis that photoionization by the post-AGB stellar component is the main driver of extended wim emission. The second class (type ii) stands for virtually wim-evacuated ETGs with a very low (≤0.5 Å), outwardly increasing EW(Hα). These two classes appear indistinguishable from one another by their LINER-specific emission-line ratios in their extranuclear component. Here we extend the tentative classification we proposed previously by the type i+, which is assigned to a subset of type i ETGs exhibiting ongoing low-level star-forming activity in their periphery. This finding along with faint

  14. Highly sensitive solids mass spectrometer uses inert-gas ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Mass spectrometer provides a recorded analysis of solid material surfaces and bulk. A beam of high-energy inert-gas ions bombards the surface atoms of a sample and converts a percentage into an ionized vapor. The mass spectrum analyzer separates the vapor ionic constituents by mass-to-charge ratio.

  15. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  16. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  17. Gas-Phase Synthesis of Singly and Multiply Charged Polyoxovanadate Anions Employing Electrospray Ionization and Collision Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Hasan, Naila M.; Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia

    2013-09-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) combined with in-source fragmentation and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments were used to generate a wide range of singly and multiply charged vanadium oxide cluster anions including VxOy n- and VxOyCln- ions (x = 1-14, y = 2-36, n = 1-3), protonated clusters, and ligand-bound polyoxovanadate anions. The cluster anions were produced by electrospraying a solution of tetradecavanadate, V14O36Cl(L)5 (L = Et4N+, tetraethylammonium), in acetonitrile. Under mild source conditions, ESI-MS generates a distribution of doubly and triply charged VxOyCln- and VxOyCl(L)(n-1)- clusters predominantly containing 14 vanadium atoms as well as their protonated analogs. Accurate mass measurement using a high-resolution LTQ/Orbitrap mass spectrometer (m/Δm = 60,000 at m/z 410) enabled unambiguous assignment of the elemental composition of the majority of peaks in the ESI-MS spectrum. In addition, high-sensitivity mass spectrometry allowed the charge state of the cluster ions to be assigned based on the separation of the major from the much less abundant minor isotope of vanadium. In-source fragmentation resulted in facile formation of smaller VxOyCl(1-2)- and VxOy (1-2)- anions. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments enabled systematic study of the gas-phase fragmentation pathways of the cluster anions originating from solution and from in-source CID. Surprisingly simple fragmentation patterns were obtained for all singly and doubly charged VxOyCl and VxOy species generated through multiple MS/MS experiments. In contrast, cluster anions originating directly from solution produced comparatively complex CID spectra. These results are consistent with the formation of more stable structures of VxOyCl and VxOy anions through low-energy CID. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that solution-phase synthesis of one precursor cluster anion combined with gas-phase CID is an efficient approach for the top-down synthesis of a

  18. The Townsend coefficient of ionization in atmospheric pressure rare gas plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvereva, G.

    2015-12-01

    In the work the influence of the processes characteristic for atmospheric pressure heavy inert gases discharge plasma on the value of the first Townsend ionization coefficient were investigated. Krypton plasma was considered. Calculations have shown that the greatest impact on the value of the first Townsend ionization coefficient has dissociative recombination of molecular ions, followed by descending influence processes occur: stepwise ionization, the electron-electron collisions and superelastic ones. The effect of these processes begins to appear at concentrations of electrons and excited particles higher than 1012 cm-3. At times shorter than the time of molecular ions formation, when dissociative recombination is absent, should expect a significant increase of the ionization coefficient.

  19. The analysis of high explosives by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: multiplexed detection of negative ion adducts.

    PubMed

    Mathis, John A; McCord, Bruce R

    2005-01-01

    The negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (ESI-MS) detection of adducts of high explosives with chloride, formate, acetate, and nitrate was used to demonstrate the gas-phase interaction of neutral explosives with these anions. The relative intensities of the adduct species were determined to compare the competitive formation of the selected high explosives and anions. The relative stability of the adduct species varies, yielding preferential formation of certain anionic adducts with different high explosives. To exploit this effect, an isocratic high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/ESI-MS method was developed and used for the simultaneous analysis of high explosives using two different techniques for the addition of the anionic additives; pre- and post-column. The results show that the pre-column approach provides similar results with improved selectivity for specific explosives. By detecting characteristic adduct species for each explosive, this method provides a qualitative and quantitative approach for the analysis and identification of high explosives.

  20. Simulation of ionization effects for high-density positron drivers in future plasma wakefield experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, D.L.; Dimitrov, D.A.; Cary, J.R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-05-12

    The plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) concept has been proposed as a potential energy doubler for present or future electron-positron colliders. Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the self-fields of the required electron beam driver can tunnel ionize neutral Li, leading to plasma wake dynamics differing significantly from that of a preionized plasma. It has also been shown, for the case of a preionized plasma, that the plasma wake of a positron driver differs strongly from that of an electron driver. We will present new PIC simulations, using the OOPIC code, showing the effects of tunneling ionization on the plasma wake generated by high-density positron drivers. The results will be compared to previous work on electron drivers with tunneling ionization and positron drivers without ionization. Parameters relevant to the energy doubler and the upcoming E-164x experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center will be considered.

  1. Electron gyroharmonic effects in ionization and electron acceleration during high-frequency pumping in the ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, B; Leyser, T B; Kosch, M; Rietveld, M T; Steen, A; Brändström, B U E; Aso, T

    2006-11-10

    Optical emissions and incoherent scatter radar data obtained during high-frequency electromagnetic pumping of the ionospheric plasma from the ground give data on electron energization in an energy range from 2 to 100 eV. Optical emissions at 4278 A from N2+ that require electrons with energies above the 18 eV ionization energy give the first images ever of pump-induced ionization of the thermosphere. The intensity at 4278 A is asymmetric around the ionospheric electron gyroharmonic, being stronger above the gyroresonance. This contrasts with emissions at 6300 A from O(1D) and of electron temperature enhancements, which have minima at the gyroharmonic but have no apparent asymmetry. This direct evidence of pump-induced ionization contradicts previous indirect evidence, which indicated that ionization is most efficiently produced when the pump frequency was below the gyroharmonic.

  2. Investigation of ionization-induced electron injection in a wakefield driven by laser inside a gas cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audet, T. L.; Hansson, M.; Lee, P.; Desforges, F. G.; Maynard, G.; Dobosz Dufrénoy, S.; Lehe, R.; Vay, J.-L.; Aurand, B.; Persson, A.; Gallardo González, I.; Maitrallain, A.; Monot, P.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Lundh, O.; Cros, B.

    2016-02-01

    Ionization-induced electron injection was investigated experimentally by focusing a driving laser pulse with a maximum normalized potential of 1.2 at different positions along the plasma density profile inside a gas cell, filled with a gas mixture composed of 99 %H2+1 %N2 . Changing the laser focus position relative to the gas cell entrance controls the accelerated electron bunch properties, such as the spectrum width, maximum energy, and accelerated charge. Simulations performed using the 3D particle-in-cell code WARP with a realistic density profile give results that are in good agreement with the experimental ones. The interest of this regime for optimizing the bunch charge in a selected energy window is discussed.

  3. Partially ionized gas flow and heat transfer in the separation, reattachment, and redevelopment regions downstream of an abrupt circular channel expansion.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Massier, P. F.; Roschke, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Heat transfer and pressure measurements obtained in the separation, reattachment, and redevelopment regions along a tube and nozzle located downstream of an abrupt channel expansion are presented for a very high enthalpy flow of argon. The ionization energy fraction extended up to 0.6 at the tube inlet just downstream of the arc heater. Reattachment resulted from the growth of an instability in the vortex sheet-like shear layer between the central jet that discharged into the tube and the reverse flow along the wall at the lower Reynolds numbers, as indicated by water flow visualization studies which were found to dynamically model the high-temperature gas flow. A reasonably good prediction of the heat transfer in the reattachment region where the highest heat transfer occurred and in the redevelopment region downstream can be made by using existing laminar boundary layer theory for a partially ionized gas. In the experiments as much as 90 per cent of the inlet energy was lost by heat transfer to the tube and the nozzle wall.

  4. Method of producing a high pressure gas

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.

    2006-07-18

    A method of producing a high pressure gas is disclosed and which includes providing a container; supplying the container with a liquid such as water; increasing the pressure of the liquid within the container; supplying a reactant composition such as a chemical hydride to the liquid under pressure in the container and which chemically reacts with the liquid to produce a resulting high pressure gas such as hydrogen at a pressure of greater than about 100 pounds per square inch of pressure; and drawing the resulting high pressure gas from the container.

  5. Large area neutron detector based on Li6 ionization chamber with integrated body-moderator of high density polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Chung, Kiwhan; Makela, Mark F.

    2009-06-30

    A detector was developed and funded by DHS to be a lower cost alternative to 3He detectors. A 6Li foil-lined ionization chamber was prepared with fill gas at one atmosphere and pulse mode operation. The high-density polyethylene (HOPE) body serves also as a neutron moderator. All electrodes, including high voltage bias supply, are hermetically sealed within the plastic slabs.

  6. The ionized gas at the centre of IC 10: a possible localized chemical pollution by Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Mesa-Delgado, A.; López-Martín, L.; Esteban, C.

    2011-03-01

    We present results from integral field spectroscopy with the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrograph at the 3.5-m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory of the intense star-forming region [HL90] 111 at the centre of the starburst galaxy IC 10. We have obtained maps with a spatial sampling of 1 × 1 arcsec2= 3.9× 3.9 pc2 of different emission lines and analysed the extinction, physical conditions, nature of the ionization and chemical abundances of the ionized gas, as well determined locally the age of the most recent star formation event. By defining several apertures, we study the main integrated properties of some regions within [HL90] 111. Two contiguous spaxels show an unambiguous detection of the broad He IIλ4686 emission line, this feature seems to be produced by a single late-type WN star. We also report a probable N and He enrichment in the precise spaxels where the Wolf-Rayet (WR) features are detected. The enrichment pattern is roughly consistent with that expected for the pollution of the ejecta of a single or a very small number of WR stars. Furthermore, this chemical pollution is very localized (˜2 arcsec ˜7.8 pc) and it should be difficult to detect in star-forming galaxies beyond the Local Volume. We also discuss the use of the most common empirical calibrations to estimate the oxygen abundances of the ionized gas in nearby galaxies from 2D spectroscopic data. The ionization degree of the gas plays an important role when applying these empirical methods, as they tend to give lower oxygen abundances with increasing ionization degree. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astrónomico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Plank Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).Visiting Astronomer at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  7. BAT AGN spectroscopic survey-II. X-ray emission and high-ionization optical emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berney, Simon; Koss, Michael; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Ricci, Claudio; Lamperti, Isabella; Schawinski, Kevin; Baloković, Mislav; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis; Gehrels, Neil; Harrison, Fiona; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ichikawa, Kohei; Mushotzky, Richard; Oh, Kyuseok; Stern, Daniel; Treister, Ezequiel; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the relationship between X-ray and optical line emission in 340 nearby (z ≃ 0.04) AGN selected above 10 keV using Swift BAT. We find a weak correlation between the extinction corrected [O III] and hard X-ray luminosity (L_[O III]^{int} ∝ L_{14-195}) with a large scatter (RPear = 0.64, σ = 0.62 dex) and a similarly large scatter with the intrinsic 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosities (RPear = 0.63, σ = 0.63 dex). Correlations of the hard X-ray fluxes with the fluxes of high-ionization narrow lines ([O III], He II, [Ne III] and [Ne V]) are not significantly better than with the low-ionization lines (H α, [S II]). Factors like obscuration or physical slit size are not found to be a significant part of the large scatter. In contrast, the optical emission lines show much better correlations with each other (σ = 0.3 dex) than with the X-ray flux. The inherent large scatter questions the common usage of narrow emission lines as AGN bolometric luminosity indicators and suggests that other issues such as geometrical differences in the scattering of the ionized gas or long-term AGN variability are important.

  8. Resonance ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the analysis of trace substances in complex gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Holger; Weickhardt, Christian; Boesl, Ulrich; Frey, Rüdiger

    1995-04-01

    The analysis of mixtures of technical gases still comprises a lot of problems: the large number of components with very different and often rapidly varying concentrations makes great demands on analytical methods. By use of conventional analytical methods, signals of trace substances may interfere with signals of main components, whereas small signals representing low concentrations are covered by signals of main substances. The resonant-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) makes use of excited intermediate states of molecules. As these states are characteristic of each substance, one or more components of interest can be ionized with high efficiency without interference of other molecules by using a special laser-wavelength. The combination of the above mentioned ionization method with a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer permits a very fast and sensitive detection of preselected trace substances. As ionization processes of higher order strongly depend on the laser intensity, there is no direct relation between ion signals and concentrations of exhaust components. Quantitative assessments are based on an especially developed calibration technique that makes use of internal standards. Applied under environmental aspects, this new analytical method helps to analyze a large number of components extracted from exhaust gases of combustion engines with high time resolution (<20 ms motor synchronously), high sensitivity (1 ppm) and high quantitative accuracy (more than 10%). A preliminary list of detectable compounds contains 30 substances.

  9. Impact ionization in N-polar AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Killat, N. E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk; Uren, M. J.; Kuball, M. E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk; Keller, S.; Kolluri, S.; Mishra, U. K.

    2014-08-11

    The existence of impact ionization as one of the open questions for GaN device reliability was studied in N-polar AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors. Electroluminescence (EL) imaging and spectroscopy from underneath the device gate contact revealed the presence of hot electrons in excess of the GaN bandgap energy even at moderate on-state bias conditions, enabling impact ionization with hole currents up to several hundreds of pA/mm. The detection of high energy luminescence from hot electrons demonstrates that EL analysis is a highly sensitive tool to study degradation mechanisms in GaN devices.

  10. Low-Ionization Emission Regions in Quasars: Gas Properties Probed with Broad O I and Ca II Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Y.; Kawara, K.; Oyabu, S.

    2008-01-01

    We have compiled the emission-line fluxes of O I λ8446, O I λ11287, and the near-infrared (IR) Ca II triplet (λ8579) observed in 11 quasars. These lines are considered to emerge from the same gas as do the Fe II lines in the low-ionized portion of the broad emission line region (BELR). The compiled quasars are distributed over wide ranges of redshift (0.06 <= z<= 1.08) and of luminosity (-29.8 <= MB <= - 22.1), thus providing a useful sample to investigate the line-emitting gas properties in various quasar environments. The measured line strengths and velocities, as functions of the quasar properties, are analyzed using photoionization model calculations. We found that the flux ratio between the Ca II triplet and O I λ8446 is hardly dependent on the redshift or luminosity, indicating similar gas densities in the emission region from quasar to quasar. On the other hand, a scatter of the O I λ11287/λ8446 ratios appears to imply the diversity of the ionization parameter. These facts invoke a picture of the line-emitting gases in quasars that have similar densities and are located at regions exposed to various ionizing radiation fluxes. The observed O I line widths are found to be remarkably similar over more than 3 orders of magnitude in luminosity, which indicates a kinematically determined location of the emission region and is in clear contrast to the case of H I lines. We also argue about the dust presence in the emission region since the region is suggested to be located near the dust sublimation point at the outer edge of the BELR.

  11. An ionization region model of the reactive Ar/O2 high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Lundin, D.; Brenning, N.; Raadu, M. A.; Huo, Chunqing; Minea, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    A new reactive ionization region model (R-IRM) is developed to describe the reactive Ar/O2 high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge with a titanium target. It is then applied to study the temporal behavior of the discharge plasma parameters such as electron density, the neutral and ion composition, the ionization fraction of the sputtered vapor, the oxygen dissociation fraction, and the composition of the discharge current. We study and compare the discharge properties when the discharge is operated in the two well established operating modes, the metal mode and the poisoned mode. Experimentally, it is found that in the metal mode the discharge current waveform displays a typical non-reactive evolution, while in the poisoned mode the discharge current waveform becomes distinctly triangular and the current increases significantly. Using the R-IRM we explore the current increase and find that when the discharge is operated in the metal mode Ar+ and Ti+ -ions contribute most significantly (roughly equal amounts) to the discharge current while in the poisoned mode the Ar+ -ions contribute most significantly to the discharge current and the contribution of O+ -ions, Ti+ -ions, and secondary electron emission is much smaller. Furthermore, we find that recycling of atoms coming from the target, that are subsequently ionized, is required for the current generation in both modes of operation. From the R-IRM results it is found that in the metal mode self-sputter recycling dominates and in the poisoned mode working gas recycling dominates. We also show that working gas recycling can lead to very high discharge currents but never to a runaway. It is concluded that the dominating type of recycling determines the discharge current waveform.

  12. A method for measuring the electron drift velocity in working gas using a Frisch-grid ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Huaiyong; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Luyu; Chen, Jinxiang; Zhang, Guohui

    2016-12-01

    A method for measuring the electron drift velocity in working gas is proposed. Based on the cathode and the anode signal waveforms of the Frisch-grid ionization chamber, the electron drift velocity is extracted. With this method, the electron drift velocities in Ar + 10% CH4, Ar + 3.5% CO2 and Kr + 2.7% CO2 gases have been measured and the results are compared with the existing measurements and the simulating results. Using this method, the electron drift velocity can be monitored throughout the experiment of charged particle without bothering the measurement of other parameters, such as the energy and orientation.

  13. A simple and sensitive quantitation of N,N-dimethyltryptamine by gas chromatography with surface ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Ishii, A; Seno, H; Suzuki, O; Hattori, H; Kumazawa, T

    1997-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) by gas chromatography (GC) with surface ionization detection (SID) is presented. Whole blood or urine, containing DMT and gramine (internal standard), was subjected to solid-phase extraction with a Sep-Pak C18 cartridge before analysis by GC-SID. The calibration curve was linear in the DMT range of 1.25-20 ng/mL blood or urine. The detection limit of DMT was about 0.5 ng/mL (10 pg on-column). The recovery of both DMT and gramine spiked in biological fluids was above 86%.

  14. Extraction of thymol, eucalyptol, menthol, and camphor residues from honey and beeswax. Determination by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Nozal, M J; Bernal, J L; Jiménez, J J; González, M J; Higes, M

    2002-04-19

    A gas chromatographic method to determine thymol, eucalyptol (cineole), menthol and camphor residues in honey and beeswax is proposed. To isolate the compounds, three methods involving liquid-liquid extraction with methylene chloride, distillation, or solid-phase extraction on octadecylsilica cartridges can be used. The GC separation is carried out on a 60 m x 0.53 mm Stabilwax DA capillary column, using a flame ionization detector. The method is applied to the analysis of natural honey and also honey and beeswax samples from beehives treated with the above compounds.

  15. The Physical Conditions of Atomic Gas at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeleman, Marcel

    In this thesis we provide insight into the chemical composition, physical conditions and cosmic distribution of atomic gas at high redshift. We study this gas in absorption against bright background quasars in absorption systems known as Damped Ly-alpha Systems (DLAs). These systems contain the bulk of the atomic gas at high redshift and are the likely progenitors of modern-day galaxies. In Chapter 2, we find that the atomic gas in DLAs obeys a mass-metallicity relationship that is similar to the mass-metallicity relationship seen in star-forming galaxies. The evolution of this relationship is linear with redshift, allowing for a planar equation to accurately describe this evolution, which provides a more stringent constraint on simulations modeling DLAs. Furthermore, the concomitant evolution of the mass-metallicity relationship of atomic gas and star-forming galaxies suggests an intimate link between the two. We next use a novel way to measure the physical conditions of the gas by using fine-structure line ratios of singly ionized carbon and silicon. By measuring the density of the upper and lower level states, we are able to determine the temperature, hydrogen density and electron density of the gas. We find that the conditions present in this high redshift gas are consistent with the conditions we see in the local interstellar medium (ISM). A few absorbers have higher than expected pressure, which suggests that they probe the ISM of star-forming galaxies. Finally in Chapter 4, we measure the cosmic neutral hydrogen density at redshifts below 1.6. Below this redshift, the Ly-alpha line of hydrogen is absorbed by the atmosphere, making detection difficult. Using the archive of the Hubble Space Telescope, we compile a comprehensive list of quasars for a search of DLAs at redshift below 1.6. We find that the incidence rate of DLAs and the cosmic neutral hydrogen density is smaller than previously measured, but consistent with the values both locally and at

  16. DENSITY OF WARM IONIZED GAS NEAR THE GALACTIC CENTER: LOW RADIO FREQUENCY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Subhashis

    2013-08-10

    We have observed the Galactic center (GC) region at 0.154 and 0.255 GHz with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. A total of 62 compact likely extragalactic (EG) sources are detected. Their scattering sizes decrease linearly with increasing angular distance from the GC up to about 1 Degree-Sign . The apparent scattering sizes of the sources are more than an order of magnitude less than predicted earlier by the NE2001 model of Galactic electron distribution within 359. Degree-Sign 5 < l < 0. Degree-Sign 5 and -0. Degree-Sign 5 < b < 0. Degree-Sign 5 (Hyperstrong Scattering Region) of the Galaxy. High free-free optical depths ({tau}) are observed toward most of the extended non-thermal sources within 0. Degree-Sign 6 from the GC. Significant variation of {tau} indicates that the absorbing medium is patchy at an angular scale of {approx}10' and n{sub e} is {approx}10 cm{sup -3}, which matches the NE2001 model. This model predicts the EG sources to be resolved out from 1.4 GHz interferometric surveys. However, out of 10 EG sources expected in the region, 8 likely EG are present in the 1.4 GHz catalog. Ionized interfaces of dense molecular clouds to the ambient medium are most likely responsible for strong scattering and low radio frequency absorption. However, dense GC clouds traced by CS J = 1-0 emission are found to have a narrow distribution of {approx}0. Degree-Sign 2 across the Galactic plane. Angular distribution of most EG sources seen through the so-called Hyperstrong Scattering Region are random in b, and typically {approx}7 out of 10 sources will not be seen through the dense molecular clouds, which explains why most of them are not scatter broadened at 1.4 GHz.

  17. Impact of electron ionization on the generation of high-order harmonics from molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Brener, S.; Moiseyev, N.; Ivanov, M. V.

    2003-08-01

    When the laser frequency is tuned to be equal to the molecular electronic excitation, high-order harmonics are generated due to the electronic dipole transitions between the corresponding two potential-energy surfaces (PES). A natural, often taken, choice is the PES of the field-free molecular system. In this special choice the ionization phenomenon is not considered. Only the effect of the dissociation is considered. The method we developed enables one to remain within the framework of the 2-PES approximation and yet to include also the ionization effect in the calculations of molecular high-order harmonic generation spectra. In this approach the coupling between the electronic and nuclear motions is taken into consideration by using coupled complex adiabatic PES. As an illustrative numerical example, we calculated the high harmonic generation (HHG) spectra of H{sub 2}{sup +} in a 730-nm laser with the intensity of 8.77x10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. The inclusion of the ionization in our approach not only enables the electrons to tunnel through the effective static potential barrier, but also apply an asymmetric force which accelerates the electron before ionization takes place. Therefore, indirectly the inclusion of the ionization by the laser field may lead eventually to an enhanced HHG spectra in comparison with the calculated one when the ''natural'' choice of the field-free 2PES is taken.

  18. Application of gas chromatography/flame ionization detector-based metabolite fingerprinting for authentication of Asian palm civet coffee (Kopi Luwak).

    PubMed

    Jumhawan, Udi; Putri, Sastia Prama; Yusianto; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2015-11-01

    Development of authenticity screening for Asian palm civet coffee, the world-renowned priciest coffee, was previously reported using metabolite profiling through gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). However, a major drawback of this approach is the high cost of the instrument and maintenance. Therefore, an alternative method is needed for quality and authenticity evaluation of civet coffee. A rapid, reliable and cost-effective analysis employing a universal detector, GC coupled with flame ionization detector (FID), and metabolite fingerprinting has been established for discrimination analysis of 37 commercial and non-commercial coffee beans extracts. gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) provided higher sensitivity over a similar range of detected compounds than GC/MS. In combination with multivariate analysis, GC/FID could successfully reproduce quality prediction from GC/MS for differentiation of commercial civet coffee, regular coffee and coffee blend with 50 wt % civet coffee content without prior metabolite details. Our study demonstrated that GC/FID-based metabolite fingerprinting can be effectively actualized as an alternative method for coffee authenticity screening in industries.

  19. Commercial intermediate pressure MALDI ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometer capable of producing highly charged laserspray ionization ions.

    PubMed

    Inutan, Ellen D; Wang, Beixi; Trimpin, Sarah

    2011-02-01

    The first examples of highly charged ions observed under intermediate pressure (IP) vacuum conditions are reported using laser ablation of matrix/analyte mixtures. The method and results are similar to those obtained at atmospheric pressure (AP) using laserspray ionization (LSI) and/or matrix assisted inlet ionization (MAII). Electrospray ionization (ESI), LSI, and MAII are methods operating at AP and have been shown, with or without the use of a voltage or a laser, to produce highly charged ions with very similar ion abundance and charge states. A commercial matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) mass spectrometry (MS) instrument (SYNAPT G2) was used for the IP developments. The necessary conditions for producing highly charged ions of peptides and small proteins at IP appear to be a pressure drop region and the use of suitable matrixes and laser fluence. Ionization to produce these highly charged ions under the low pressure conditions of IP does not require specific heating or a special inlet ion transfer region. However, under the current setup, ubiquitin is the highest molecular weight protein observed. These findings are in accord with the need to provide thermal energy in the pressure drop region, similar to LSI and MAII, to improve sensitivity and extend the types of compounds that produce highly charged ions. The practical utility of IP-LSI in combination with IMS-MS is demonstrated for the analysis of model mixtures composed of a lipid, peptides, and a protein. Further, endogenous multiply charged peptides are observed directly from delipified mouse brain tissue with drift time distributions that are nearly identical in appearance to those obtained from a synthesized neuropeptide standard analyzed by either LSI- or ESI-IMS-MS at AP. Efficient solvent-free gas-phase separation enabled by the IMS dimension separates the multiply charged peptides from lipids that remained on the delipified tissue. Lipid and peptide

  20. High-rangeability ultrasonic gas flowmeter for monitoring flare gas.

    PubMed

    Mylvaganam, K S

    1989-01-01

    A transit-time ultrasonic gas flowmeter for high-rangeability requirements, such as those encountered in flare-gas flow-metering, is presented. The concept of ray rescue angle for the orientation of the ultrasonic transducers in single-beam transit-time ultrasonic flowmeters is introduced to overcome the problem of ultrasonic beam drift in high-velocity flows. To overcome problems associated with noise at high velocities, a chirp signal is used. To preserve the accuracy of the meter at low velocities near zero flow, a combination of chirp and continuous-wave signals is used to interrogate the flow. Overall system performance is presented, based on results from extensive wind-tunnel tests.

  1. Comparison of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Electron Ionization and Negative-Ion Chemical Ionization for Analyses of Pesticides at Trace Levels in Atmospheric Samples

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Renata; Hall, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of detection limits of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode with both electron ionization (EI) and negative-ion chemical ionization (NCI) are presented for over 50 pesticides ranging from organochlorines (OCs), organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and pre-emergent herbicides used in the Canadian prairies (triallate, trifluralin, ethalfluralin). The developed GC-EI/SIM, GC-NCI/SIM, and GC-NCI/SRM are suitable for the determination of pesticides in air sample extracts at concentrations <100 pg μL−1 (<100 pg m−3 in air). No one method could be used to analyze the range of pre-emergent herbicides, OPs, and OCs investigated. In general GC-NCI/SIM provided the lowest method detection limits (MDLs commonly 2.5–10 pg μL−1) along with best confirmation (<25% RSD of ion ratio), while GC-NCI/SRM is recommended for use where added selectivity or confirmation is required (such as parathion-ethyl, tokuthion, carbofenothion). GC-EI/SRM at concentration <100 pg μL−1 was not suitable for most pesticides. GC-EI/SIM was more prone to interference issues than NCI methods, but gave good sensitivity (MDLs 1–10 pg μL−1) for pesticides with poor NCI response (OPs: sulfotep, phorate, aspon, ethion, and OCs: alachlor, aldrin, perthane, and DDE, DDD, DDT). PMID:19609395

  2. Potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source in gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the screening of urinary exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Raro, M; Portolés, T; Pitarch, E; Sancho, J V; Hernández, F; Garrostas, L; Marcos, J; Ventura, R; Segura, J; Pozo, O J

    2016-02-04

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis has been evaluated for the screening of 16 exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) in urine. The sample treatment is based on the strategy currently applied in doping control laboratories i.e. enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and derivatization to form the trimethylsilyl ether-trimethylsilyl enol ether (TMS) derivatives. These TMS derivatives are then analyzed by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using a triple quadrupole instrument (GC-QqQ MS/MS) under selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The APCI promotes soft ionization with very little fragmentation resulting, in most cases, in abundant [M + H](+) or [M + H-2TMSOH](+) ions, which can be chosen as precursor ions for the SRM transitions, improving in this way the selectivity and sensitivity of the method. Specificity of the transitions is also of great relevance, as the presence of endogenous compounds can affect the measurements when using the most abundant ions. The method has been qualitatively validated by spiking six different urine samples at two concentration levels each. Precision was generally satisfactory with RSD values below 25 and 15% at the low and high concentration level, respectively. Most the limits of detection (LOD) were below 0.5 ng mL(-1). Validation results were compared with the commonly used method based on the electron ionization (EI) source. EI analysis was found to be slightly more repeatable whereas lower LODs were found for APCI. In addition, the applicability of the developed method has been tested in samples collected after the administration of 4-chloromethandienone. The highest sensitivity of the APCI method for this compound, allowed to increase the period in which its administration can be detected.

  3. Battery-powered pulsed high density inductively coupled plasma source for pre-ionization in laboratory astrophysics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.; Bellan, Paul M.

    2015-07-01

    An electrically floating radiofrequency (RF) pre-ionization plasma source has been developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and to access new experimental regimes in the Caltech laboratory astrophysics experiments. The source uses a customized 13.56 MHz class D RF power amplifier that is powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 3-6 kV with the electrodes of the high voltage pulsed power experiments. The amplifier, which is capable of 3 kW output power in pulsed (<1 ms) operation, couples electrical energy to the plasma through an antenna external to the 1.1 cm radius discharge tube. By comparing the predictions of a global equilibrium discharge model with the measured scalings of plasma density with RF power input and axial magnetic field strength, we demonstrate that inductive coupling (rather than capacitive coupling or wave damping) is the dominant energy transfer mechanism. Peak ion densities exceeding 5 × 1019 m-3 in argon gas at 30 mTorr have been achieved with and without a background field. Installation of the pre-ionization source on a magnetohydrodynamically driven jet experiment reduced the breakdown time and jitter and allowed for the creation of hotter, faster argon plasma jets than was previously possible.

  4. Battery-powered pulsed high density inductively coupled plasma source for pre-ionization in laboratory astrophysics experiments.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Vernon H; Bellan, Paul M

    2015-07-01

    An electrically floating radiofrequency (RF) pre-ionization plasma source has been developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and to access new experimental regimes in the Caltech laboratory astrophysics experiments. The source uses a customized 13.56 MHz class D RF power amplifier that is powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 3-6 kV with the electrodes of the high voltage pulsed power experiments. The amplifier, which is capable of 3 kW output power in pulsed (<1 ms) operation, couples electrical energy to the plasma through an antenna external to the 1.1 cm radius discharge tube. By comparing the predictions of a global equilibrium discharge model with the measured scalings of plasma density with RF power input and axial magnetic field strength, we demonstrate that inductive coupling (rather than capacitive coupling or wave damping) is the dominant energy transfer mechanism. Peak ion densities exceeding 5 × 10(19) m(-3) in argon gas at 30 mTorr have been achieved with and without a background field. Installation of the pre-ionization source on a magnetohydrodynamically driven jet experiment reduced the breakdown time and jitter and allowed for the creation of hotter, faster argon plasma jets than was previously possible.

  5. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Wade C; Lewis, Charlotte R; Openshaw, Anna P; Farnsworth, Paul B

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  6. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Wade C.; Lewis, Charlotte R.; Openshaw, Anna P.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration.

  7. Deep high spectral resolution spectroscopy and chemical composition of ionized nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, C.; García-Rojas, J.; Mesa-Delgado, A.; Toribio San Cipriano, L.

    2014-01-01

    High spectral resolution spectroscopy has proved to be very useful for the advancement of chemical abundances studies in photoionized nebulae, such as H II regions and planetary nebulae (PNe). Classical analyses make use of the intensity of bright collisionally excited lines (CELs), which have a strong dependence on the electron temperature and density. By using high resolution spectrophotometric data, our group has led the determination of chemical abundances of some heavy element ions, mainly O++, O+, and C++ from faint recombination lines (RLs), allowing us to deblend them from other nearby emission lines or sky features. The importance of these lines is that their emissivity depends weakly on the temperature and density structure of the gas. The unresolved issue in this field is that recombination lines of heavy element ions give abundances that are about 2-3 times higher than those derived from CELs - in H II regions - for the same ion, and can even be a factor of 70 times higher in some PNe. This uncertainty puts into doubt the validity of face values of metallicity that we use as representative not only for ionized nebulae in the Local Universe, but also for star-forming dwarf and spiral galaxies at different redshifts. Additionally, high-resolution data can allow us to detect and deblend faint lines of neutron capture element ions in PNe. This information would introduce further restrictions to evolution models of AGBs and would help to quantify the chemical enrichment in s-elements produced by low and intermediate mass stars. The availability of an échelle spectrograph at the E-ELT will be of paramount interest to: (a) extend the studies of heavy-element recombination lines to low metallicity objects, (b) to extend abundance determinations of s-elements to planetary nebulae in the extragalactic domain and to bright Galactic and extragalactic H II regions.

  8. Metal-ligand redox reactions in gas-phase quaternary peptide-metal complexes by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaisar, T.; Gatlin, C. L.; Turecek, F.

    1997-03-01

    The dipeptides Phe-Leu, Leu-Phe, Leu-Ala, and Ala-Leu form quaternary complexes of the type [Cu(II)(peptide - 2H+M)bpy]+ in the gas phase when electrosprayed in the presence of Cu(II) salts, 2.2'-bipyridyl (bpy), and an alkali hydroxide (MOH). The gas-phase complexes decarboxylate on collisional activation at low ion kinetic energies. The resulting ions undergo unusual eliminations of neutral Na, K, and Rb, which depend on the peptide structure. The ionization energy of the decarboxylated Phe-Leu-Cu-bpy complex was bracketed at 4.2 eV. Other collision-induced dissociations also depend on the alkali metal ion and the peptide structure. Ab initio calculations on a model system are reported and used to discuss the electronic properties of the peptide complexes.

  9. H II Region G46.5-0.2: The Interplay between Ionizing Radiation, Molecular Gas, and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Li, Jin Zeng; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju

    2015-06-01

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey (13CO J = 1-0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive (12CO, 13CO, C18O J = 3-2, HCO+, and HCN J = 4-3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10‧ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.

  10. H ii REGION G46.5-0.2: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN IONIZING RADIATION, MOLECULAR GAS, AND STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Li, Jin Zeng; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju; Wu, Yuefang

    2015-06-15

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey ({sup 13}CO J = 1–0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive ({sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, C{sup 18}O J = 3–2, HCO{sup +}, and HCN J = 4–3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10′ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.

  11. Potential of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry for screening and quantification of hexabromocyclododecane.

    PubMed

    Sales, Carlos; Portolés, Tania; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Abad, Esteban; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Fiedler, Heidelore; Gómara, Belén; Beltrán, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    A fast method for the screening and quantification of hexabromocyclododecane (sum of all isomers) by gas chromatography using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC-APCI-QqQ) is proposed. This novel procedure makes use of the soft atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source, which results in less fragmentation of the analyte than by conventional electron impact (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) sources, favoring the formation of the [M - Br](+) ion and, thus, enhancing sensitivity and selectivity. Detection was based on the consecutive loses of HBr from the [M - Br](+) ion to form the specific [M - H5Br6](+) and [M - H4Br5](+) ions, which were selected as quantitation (Q) and qualification (q) transitions, respectively. Parameters affecting ionization and MS/MS detection were studied. Method performance was also evaluated; calibration curves were found linear from 1 pg/μL to 100 pg/μL for the total HBCD concentration; instrumental detection limit was estimated to be 0.10 pg/μL; repeatability and reproducibility, expressed as relative standard deviation, were better than 7% in both cases. The application to different real samples [polyurethane foam disks (PUFs), food, and marine samples] pointed out a rapid way to identify and allow quantification of this compound together with a number of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDE congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two other novel brominated flame retardants [i.e., decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE)] because of their presence in the same fraction when performing the usual sample treatment.

  12. Comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electron ionization for determination of N-nitrosamines in environmental water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenwen; Li, Xiaoshui; Huang, Huanfang; Zhu, Xuetao; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yuan; Cen, Kuang; Zhao, Lunshan; Liu, Xiuli; Qi, Shihua

    2017-02-01

    N-nitrosamines are trace organic contaminants of environmental concern when present in groundwater and river water due to their potent carcinogenicity. Therefore, N-nitrosamine analysis is increasingly in demand. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS), both with electron ionization (EI), were compared for analysis of nine N-nitrosamines extracted from environmental water matrices. A total of 20 fishpond water, river water, and groundwater samples from Sihui and Shunde, China were collected for a survey of N-nitrosamine concentrations in real water samples. Various solid-phase extraction (SPE) conditions and GC conditions were first examined for the pre-concentration and separation steps. The analysis of N-nitrosamines in environmental waters demonstrated that their quantification with GC-MS poses a challenge due to the occurrence of co-eluting interferences. Conversely, the use of GC-MS/MS increased selectivity because of the fragmentation generated from precursor ions in the 'multiple reaction monitoring' (MRM) mode, which is expected to extract target analytes from the environmental water matrix. Thus, the high performance of GC-MS/MS with EI was used to quantify nine N-nitrosamines in environmental waters with detection limits of 1.1-3.1 ng L(-1). N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) concentrations were in the range of N.D. to 258 ng L(-1). Furthermore, other N-nitrosamines, except N-nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA), N-nitroso-di-n-propylamine (NDPA) and N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP), were also detected. Our findings suggest that GC-MS/MS with EI would be widely applicable in identifying N-nitrosamines in environmental waters and can be used for routine monitoring of these chemicals.

  13. A high-frequency electrospray driven by gas volume charges

    SciTech Connect

    Lastochkin, Dmitri; Chang, H.-C.

    2005-06-15

    High-frequency (>10 kHz) ac electrospray is shown to eject volatile dielectric liquid drops by an entirely different mechanism from dc sprays. The steady dc Taylor conic tip is absent and continuous spraying of submicron drops is replaced by individual dynamic pinchoff events involving the entire drop. We attribute this spraying mechanism to a normal Maxwell force produced by an undispersed plasma cloud in front of the meniscus that produces a visible glow at the spherical tip. The volume charge within the cloud is formed by electron-induced gas ionization of the evaporated liquid and produces a large normal field that is much higher than the nominal applied field such that drop ejection occurs at a voltage (at high frequencies) that is as much as ten times lower than that for dc sprays. The ejection force is sensitive to the liquid properties (but not its electrolyte composition), the ac frequency and trace amounts of inert gases, which are believed to catalyze the ionization reactions. As electroneutral drops are ejected, due to the large (>100) ratio between individual drop ejection time and the ac frequency, this mechanism can produce large (microns) electroneutral drops at relatively low voltages.

  14. Gas Chromatography Coupled to Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry for Improvement of Data Reliability.

    PubMed

    Schwemer, Theo; Rüger, Christopher P; Sklorz, Martin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) offers the advantage of molecular ion information with low fragmentation. Hyphenating APCI to gas chromatography (GC) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) enables an improved characterization of complex mixtures. Data amounts acquired by this system are very huge, and existing peak picking algorithms are usually extremely time-consuming, if both gas chromatographic and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometric data are concerned. Therefore, automatic routines are developed that are capable of handling these data sets and further allow the identification and removal of known ionization artifacts (e.g., water- and oxygen-adducts, demethylation, dehydrogenation, and decarboxylation). Furthermore, the data quality is enhanced by the prediction of an estimated retention index, which is calculated simply from exact mass data combined with a double bond equivalent correction. This retention index is used to identify mismatched elemental compositions. The approach was successfully tested for analysis of semivolatile components in heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel as well as primary combustion particles emitted by a ship diesel research engine. As a result, 10-28% of the detected compounds, mainly low abundant species, classically assigned by using only the mass spectrometric information, were identified as not valid and removed. Although GC separation is limited by the slow acquisition rate of the FT-ICR MS (<1 Hz), a database driven retention time comparison, as commonly used for low resolution GC/MS, can be applied for revealing isomeric information.

  15. A combined segmented anode gas ionization chamber and time-of-flight detector for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, Petter; Petersson, Per; Rubel, Marek; Possnert, Göran

    2016-10-01

    A dedicated detector system for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis at the Tandem Laboratory of Uppsala University is presented. Benefits of combining a time-of-flight measurement with a segmented anode gas ionization chamber are demonstrated. The capability of ion species identification is improved with the present system, compared to that obtained when using a single solid state silicon detector for the full ion energy signal. The system enables separation of light elements, up to Neon, based on atomic number while signals from heavy elements such as molybdenum and tungsten are separated based on mass, to a sample depth on the order of 1 μm. The performance of the system is discussed and a selection of material analysis applications is given. Plasma-facing materials from fusion experiments, in particular metal mirrors, are used as a main example for the discussion. Marker experiments using nitrogen-15 or oxygen-18 are specific cases for which the described improved species separation and sensitivity are required. Resilience to radiation damage and significantly improved energy resolution for heavy elements at low energies are additional benefits of the gas ionization chamber over a solid state detector based system.

  16. Fuel cell with ionization membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A fuel cell is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas passing therethrough, and a cathode for receiving the ions generated by the ionization membrane. The ionization membrane may include one or more openings in the membrane with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of molecules within the gas to be ionized. Methods of manufacture are also provided.

  17. EFFECT OF COULOMB COLLISIONS ON THE GRAVITATIONAL SETTLING OF LOW AND HIGH FIRST IONIZATION POTENTIAL ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bo, Iselin M. Th.; Esser, Ruth; Lie-Svendsen, Oystein E-mail: ruth.esser@uit.no

    2013-05-20

    We model the effect of gravitational settling in the upper chromosphere on O, Fe, Si, and Ne, studying whether Coulomb collisions between ionized low First Ionization Potential (FIP) elements and protons is sufficient to cause abundance enhancements relative to oxygen. We find that low-FIP abundance enhancements comparable to observed values can be obtained provided the hydrogen ionization degree lies in the approximate range 10%-30%, which agrees with chromospheric models. Lower or higher hydrogen ionization causes the FIP-effect to become smaller or absent (depletion of all heavy elements). Iron must be almost fully ionized in order to become enriched relative to high-FIP elements, and this requires a high iron photoionization rate. The time scale necessary to produce the enrichment increases rapidly with increasing H ionization. For iron in a background from a semiempirical chromospheric model, with an H ion fraction of the order of 30%-40% in the upper chromosphere, 1-2 hr of settling is required to produce enhancements comparable to observations. The absolute abundance (relative to H), which monotonically decreases with time during settling, has by that time decreased by less than 50% in the same altitude region. With the same background conditions, the silicon abundance is more strongly enhanced by the settling than the iron abundance. The high-FIP element neon is depleted, relative to O and low-FIP elements, in the same background and altitude region where iron is enhanced, typically by 50% or more relative to O after 1-2 hr of settling.

  18. Characterization of the atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometric process obtained using a fused-silica emitter with the high voltage applied upstream

    PubMed

    Sjoberg; Nyholm; Markides

    2000-03-01

    The atmospheric pressure ionization process obtained when a mixture of methanol and water (90:10, v/v) also containing 50 microM sodium hydroxide is dispersed from a fused-silica emitter was studied. A combination of a high electric field and a nebulizer gas with the high voltage applied upstream in the liquid flow was utilized to facilitate the spray process. By comparing the dependences of the spray current and ion signals on the spray potential, it was found that electrical corona discharges were obtained for potentials higher than about 2.6 kV, which resulted in a mixed electrospray and chemical ionization process. By introducing vapour from a solvent, such as benzene or toluene, with a low ionization energy into the nebulizing gas, it was found that the appearance of the corresponding molecular ion was correlated with a change in the slope of the spray current-potential curve. This indicates that the breakpoints in the spray current-potential curves observed were correlated with the onsets of corona discharges. It was shown that the mixed ionization process gives rise to increased amounts of protonated solvent molecules and assists in the formation of sodiated adduct ions from an uncharged fatty acid methyl ester.

  19. Ngc7538 Irs1 - A Highly Collimated Ionized Wind Source Powered By Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandell, Goran H. L.; Wright, M.; Goss, W.; Corder, S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent images show that NGC7538 IRS1 is not a conventional Ultracompact or Hypercompact HII region, but is completely wind-excited (other broad recombination line hypercompact HII regions may be similar to IRS1). NGC 7538 IRS1 is a well studied young high-mass star (L 2 10^5 L_Sun).VLA images at 6 and 2 cm (Cambell 1984; ApJ, 282, L27) showed a compact bipolar core (lobe separation 0.2") with more extended faint lobes. Recombination line observations (Gaume et al. 1995, ApJ, 438, 776) show extremely wide line profiles indicating substantial mass motion of the ionized gas. We re-analyzed high angular resolution VLA archive data from 6 cm to 7 mm, and measured the flux from the compact core and the extended (1.5 - 2") bipolar lobes. We find that the compact core has a spectral index, alpha 0.6, which could be explained by an optically thick hypercompact core with a density gradient. However, the size of the core shrinks with increasing frequency; from 0.24" at 6 cm to 0.1" at 7 mm, consistent with that expected for a collimated jet (Reynolds 1986, ApJ, 304, 713). If we do a crude size correction so that we compare emission from the optically thick inner part of the jet for a set of 2 cm and 7 mm observations we get alpha 1.6, i.e. close to the optically thick value. BIMA and CARMA continuum observations at 3 mm show some dust excess, while. HCO+ J=1-0 observations combined with FCRAO single dish data show a clear inverse P Cygni profile towards IRS1. These observations confirm that IRS1 is heavily accreting with an accretion rate 2 10^-4 M_Sun/year, sufficient to quench the formation of an HII region.

  20. HF echoes from ionization potentially produced by high-altitude discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Symbalisty, E.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the authors report on recent radar measurements taken during the month of October 1994 with the LDG HF radar in the Ivory Coast, Africa as part of the International Equatorial Electrojet Year. The purpose of this experimental effort in part was to study the effects of thunderstorms on the ionosphere. At the same time, the authors decided to carry out a set of experiments of an exploratory nature to look for echoes that could potentially arise from ionization produced in the mesosphere. The two leading candidates for producing transient ionization in the mesosphere are meteors and high-altitude discharges. Each is discussed in the context of these measurements.

  1. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yajiang; Inhester, Ludger; Hanasaki, Kota; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2015-01-01

    We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging. PMID:26798806

  2. Drifting potential humps in ionization zones: The ``propeller blades'' of high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, André; Panjan, Matjaž; Franz, Robert; Andersson, Joakim; Ni, Pavel

    2013-09-01

    Ion energy distribution functions measured for high power impulse magnetron sputtering show features, such as a broad peak at several 10 eV with an extended tail, as well as asymmetry with respect to E ×B, where E and B are the local electric and magnetic field vectors, respectively. Here it is proposed that those features are due to the formation of a potential hump of several 10 V in each of the traveling ionization zones. Potential hump formation is associated with a negative-positive-negative space charge that naturally forms in ionization zones driven by energetic drifting electrons.

  3. Nature of the ionizing source of the nuclear gas in NGC 1052

    SciTech Connect

    Keel, W.C.; Miller, J.S.

    1983-03-15

    We examine the ionization and physical state of the emission-line region in the nucleus of elliptical galaxy NGC 1052. The (O III) lambda4363/lambda5007 ratio, frequently used as a diagnostic for ionization mechanisms, is very poorly determined because of difficulties in matching the underlying stellar continuum spectrum, which is unusual in having very strong lines for the galaxy luminosity. Within these limitations, we find the (O III) temperature to be only marginally compatible with shock models, and the overall emission spectrum to be better fitted by photoionization models with a very dilute flat-spectrum central source. In any event, the case for NGC 1052 as a shock-heated nucleus is not strong.

  4. ARE MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS AROUND HIGH-MASS STARS DRIVEN BY IONIZATION FEEDBACK?

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Klaassen, Pamela D.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Banerjee, Robi

    2012-11-20

    The formation of massive stars exceeding 10 M {sub Sun} usually results in large-scale molecular outflows. Numerical simulations, including ionization, of the formation of such stars show evidence for ionization-driven molecular outflows. Here we examine whether the outflows seen in these models reproduce the observations. We compute synthetic ALMA and CARMA maps of CO emission lines of the outflows, and compare their signatures to existing single-dish and interferometric data. We find that the ionization-driven models can only reproduce weak outflows around high-mass star-forming regions. We argue that expanding H II regions probably do not represent the dominant mechanism for driving observed outflows. We suggest instead that observed outflows are driven by the collective action of the outflows from the many lower-mass stars that inevitably form around young massive stars in a cluster.

  5. Charge Identification of Highly Ionizing Particles in Desensitized Nuclear Emulsion Using High Speed Read-Out System

    SciTech Connect

    Toshito, T.; Kodama, K.; Yusa, K.; Ozaki, M.; Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Aoki, S.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S.; Kanazawa, M.; Kanematsu, N.; Komori, M.; Sato, S.; Asai, M.; /Nagoya U. /Aichi U. of Education /Gunma U., Maebashi /JAXA, Sagamihara /KEK, Tsukuba /Kobe U. /Chiba, Natl. Inst. Rad. Sci. /SLAC /Toho U.

    2006-05-10

    We performed an experimental study of charge identification of heavy ions from helium to carbon having energy of about 290 MeV/u using an emulsion chamber. Emulsion was desensitized by means of forced fading (refreshing) to expand a dynamic range of response to highly charged particles. For the track reconstruction and charge identification, the fully automated high speed emulsion read-out system, which was originally developed for identifying minimum ionizing particles, was used without any modification. Clear track by track charge identification up to Z=6 was demonstrated. The refreshing technique has proved to be a powerful technique to expand response of emulsion film to highly ionizing particles.

  6. High Power Light Gas Helicon Plasma Source For VASMIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, J. P.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Glover, T. W.; Jacobson, V. T.; McCaskill, G. E.; Winter, D. S.; Baity, F. W.; Carter, M. D.; Goulding, R. H.

    2004-01-01

    The VASIMR space propulsion development effort relies on a high power (greater than 10kW) helicon source to produce a dense flowing plasma (H, D and He) target for ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) acceleration of the ions. Subsequent expansion in an expanding magnetic field (magnetic nozzle) converts ion lunetic energy to directed momentum. This plasma source must have critical features to enable an effective propulsion device. First, it must ionize most of the input neutral flux of gas, thus producing a plasma stream with a high degree of ionization for application of ICR power. This avoids propellant waste and potential power losses due to charge exchange. Next, the plasma stream must flow into a region of high magnetic field (approximately 0.5 T) for efficient ICR acceleration. Third, the ratio of input power to plasma flux must be low, providing an energy per ion-electron pair approaching 100 eV. Lastly, the source must be robust and capable of very long life-times (years). In our helicon experiment (VX-10) we have measured a ratio of input gas to plasma flux near 100%. The plasma flows from the helicon region (B approximately 0.1 T) into a region with a peak magnetic field of 0.8 T. The energy input per ion-electron pair has been measured at 300 plus or minus 100 eV. Recent results at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) show an enhanced efficiency mode of operation with a high power density, over 5 kW in a 5 cm diameter tube. Our helicon is presently 9 cm in diameter and operates up to 3.5 kW of input power. An upgrade to a power level of 10 kW is underway. Much of our recent work has been with a Boswell double-saddle antenna design. We are also converting the antenna design to a helical type. With these modifications, we anticipate an improvement in the ionization efficiency. This paper presents the results from scaling the helicon in the VX-10 device from 3.5 to 10 kW. We also compare the operation with a double-saddle to a helical antenna design. Finally, we

  7. Determination of volatile organic compounds in ambient air with gas chromatograph-flame ionization and ion trap detection

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Carley, R.J.; Kang, J.; Chen, J.; Stuart, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    Two new techniques are utilized to integrate the following three equipments: an Entech 2000 automated air concentrator, a Hewlett Packard gas chromatograph (GC) with flame ionization detector (FID) and an ion trap mass spectrometer detector (ITD). This combined analytical system is used to determine low ppb level volatile organic compounds (VOC) in ambient air. The first technique is to configure the inlet system of the GC, so that the pressure regulated flow control system of the GC injection port is used to control the flow of both the desorb gas of the automated air concentrator and the carrier gas of the GC column. The injection port still can be used to inject gas and liquid samples directly. The second technique is to split the effluent of GC column at a 1:1 ratio to the ITD and the FID. In this way, both FID and ITD data can be obtained for each analysis. For ambient air non-methane hydrocarbons monitoring, the FID detector is widely used. Oxygen containing and halogenated organic compounds cannot be differentiated by FID detector and would be quantified as coeluting hydrocarbons. However, volatile organic compounds other than target hydrocarbons can be identified by ITD. This analytical system is very valuable research tool for non-methane hydrocarbons and urban air toxic monitoring. The performances of this developed system have been presented.

  8. Final Report: Ionization chemistry of high temperature molecular fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E

    2007-02-26

    With the advent of coupled chemical/hydrodynamic reactive flow models for high explosives, understanding detonation chemistry is of increasing importance to DNT. The accuracy of first principles detonation codes, such as CHEETAH, are dependent on an accurate representation of the species present under detonation conditions. Ionic species and non-molecular phases are not currently included coupled chemistry/hydrodynamic simulations. This LDRD will determine the prevalence of such species during high explosive detonations, by carrying out experimental and computational investigation of common detonation products under extreme conditions. We are studying the phase diagram of detonation products such as H{sub 2}O, or NH{sub 3} and mixtures under conditions of extreme pressure (P > 1 GPa) and temperature (T > 1000K). Under these conditions, the neutral molecular form of matter transforms to a phase dominated by ions. The phase boundaries of such a region are unknown.

  9. High Sensitivity Analysis of Nanoliter Volumes of Volatile and Nonvolatile Compounds using Matrix Assisted Ionization (MAI) Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Khoa; Pophristic, Milan; Horan, Andrew J.; Johnston, Murray V.; McEwen, Charles N.

    2016-10-01

    First results are reported using a simple, fast, and reproducible matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) sample introduction method that provides substantial improvements relative to previously published MAI methods. The sensitivity of the new MAI methods, which requires no laser, high voltage, or nebulizing gas, is comparable to those reported for MALDI-TOF and n-ESI. High resolution full acquisition mass spectra having low chemical background are acquired from low nanoliters of solution using only a few femtomoles of analyte. The limit-of-detection for angiotensin II is less than 50 amol on an Orbitrap Exactive mass spectrometer. Analysis of peptides, including a bovine serum albumin digest, and drugs, including drugs in urine without a purification step, are reported using a 1 μL zero dead volume syringe in which only the analyte solution wetting the walls of the syringe needle is used in the analysis.

  10. Gas motions within high-velocity cloud Complex A reveal that it is dissolving into the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huey-You, Cannan; Barger, Kathleen; Nidever, David L.; Rueff, Katherine Meredith

    2017-01-01

    A massive gas cloud, known as Complex A, is headed towards our Galaxy. This high-velocity cloud is made up of 2 million solar masses of neutral and ionized hydrogen. This cloud is traveling through the Galactic halo, which causes a headwind that damages the cloud. Light escaping the Milky Way’s disk also hits the cloud and ionizes it. Using 21-cm radio observations from the Green Bank Telescope, we studied the motions of the gas. We found that diffuse gas is lagging behind the denser parts of the cloud. These motions suggest that gas is being stripped off the cloud and that it is dissolving into the Galactic halo. This disruptive process means that less gas will safely reach the disk of Milky Way and therefore the cloud will provide less gas for making future stars.

  11. Improved sensitivity by use of gas chromatography-positive chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for the analysis of drug related substances.

    PubMed

    Van Gansbeke, Wim; Polet, Michael; Hooghe, Fiona; Devos, Christophe; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2015-09-15

    In 2013, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) drastically lowered the minimum required performance levels (MRPLs) of most doping substances, demanding a substantial increase in sensitivity of the existing methods. For a number of compounds, conventional electron impact ionization gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS/MS) is often no longer sufficient to reach these MRPLs and new strategies are required. In this study, the capabilities of positive ion chemical ionization (PICI) GC-MS/MS are investigated for a wide range of drug related compounds of various classes by injection of silylated reference standards. Ammonia as PICI reagent gas had superior characteristics for GC-MS/MS purposes than methane. Compared to GC-EI-MS/MS, PICI (with ammonia as reagent gas) provided more selective ion transitions and consequently, increased sensitivity by an average factor of 50. The maximum increase (by factor of 500-1000) was observed in the analysis of stimulants, namely chlorprenaline, furfenorex and phentermine. In total, improved sensitivity was obtained for 113 out of 120 compounds. A new GC-PICI-MS/MS method has been developed and evaluated for the detection of a wide variety of exogenous doping substances and the quantification of endogenous steroids in urine in compliance with the required MRPLs established by WADA in 2013. The method consists of a hydrolysis and extraction step, followed by derivatization and subsequent 1μL pulsed splitless injection on GC-PICI-MS/MS (16min run). The increased sensitivity allows the set up of a balanced screening method that meets the requirements for both quantitative and qualitative compounds: sufficient capacity and resolution in combination with high sensitivity and short analysis time. This resulted in calibration curves with a wide linear range (e.g., 48-9600ng/mL for androsterone and etiochanolone; all r(2)>0.99) without compromising the requirements for the qualitative compounds.

  12. Measurement of neutral gas pressure in the D-module of GAMMA 10/PDX by using ASDEX type fast ionization gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimura, K.; Fukumoto, M.; Islam, M. M.; Islam, M. S.; Shimizu, K.; Fukui, K.; Ohuchi, M.; Nojiri, K.; Terakado, A.; Yoshikawa, M.; Ezumi, N.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.

    2016-11-01

    In the divertor simulation experiments in the GAMMA 10/PDX tandem mirror, pressure of the neutral gas was investigated by using a fast ionization gauge. The gauge was absolutely calibrated for hydrogen gas by using a capacitance manometer. Change of the gauge sensitivity due to the magnetic field of GAMMA 10/PDX was also evaluated. The typical gas pressure measured in detached plasma experiments was 0.1-10 Pa. The degree of plasma detachment determined from the reduction of heat flux was enhanced as the gas pressure increases. Rapid increase of the gas pressure under the plasma flow was also observed.

  13. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE DENSE NEUTRAL AND DIFFUSE IONIZED GAS IN THE THICK DISKS OF TWO EDGE-ON SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rueff, Katherine M.; Howk, J. Christopher; Pitterle, Marissa; Hirschauer, Alec S.; Fox, Andrew J.; Savage, Blair D.

    2013-03-15

    We present high-resolution, optical images (BVI + H{alpha}) of the multiphase interstellar medium (ISM) in the thick disks of the edge-on spiral galaxies NGC 4013 and NGC 4302. Our images from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Large Binocular Telescope, and WIYN 3.5 m telescope reveal an extensive population of filamentary dust absorption seen to z {approx}2-2.5 kpc. Many of these dusty thick disk structures have characteristics reminiscent of molecular clouds found in the Milky Way disk. Our H{alpha} images show that the extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in these galaxies is dominated by a smooth, diffuse component. The strongly filamentary morphologies of the dust absorption have no counterpart in the smoothly distributed H{alpha} emission. We argue that the thick disk DIG and dust-bearing filaments trace physically distinct phases of the thick disk ISM, the latter tracing a dense, warm or cold neutral medium. The dense, dusty matter in the thick disks of spiral galaxies is largely tracing matter ejected from the thin disk via energetic feedback from massive stars. The high densities of the gas may be a result of converging gas flows. This dense material fuels some thick disk star formation, as evidenced by the presence of thick disk H II regions.

  14. Ultrafast ionization and fragmentation dynamics of molecules at high x-ray intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Sang-Kil

    2016-05-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) open a new era in science and technology, offering many unique opportunities that have not been conceivable with conventional light sources. Because of their very high x-ray photon fluence within very short pulse duration, materials interacting with XFEL undergo significant radiation damage -- they possibly become highly ionized and then explode. To comprehend underlying physics, it is crucial to understand detailed ionization and fragmentation dynamics of atoms and molecules during intense XFEL pulses. We have developed the XMOLECULE toolkit to describe molecular x-ray-induced processes and to simulate radiation damage dynamics of molecules. In this talk, I will present a theoretical framework of XFEL-matter interaction, namely x-ray multiphoton absorption. Then I will discuss recent results of ultrafast x-ray-induced explosion of methyl iodide (CH3 I) molecules. Charge state distribution and kinetic energy releases of fragments are calculated to probe ionization and fragmentation dynamics, and compared with recent experimental results. It will be demonstrated that ionization of heavy-atom-containing molecules at high x-ray intensity is much enhanced in comparison with the isolated atomic case, due to ultrafast charge rearrangement during x-ray multiphoton absorption.

  15. Microchip sonic spray ionization.

    PubMed

    Pól, Jaroslav; Kauppila, Tiina J; Haapala, Markus; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Ketola, Raimo A; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2007-05-01

    The first microchip version of sonic spray ionization (SSI) as an atmospheric pressure ionization source for mass spectrometry (MS) is presented. The microchip used for SSI has recently been developed in our laboratory, and it has been used before as an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source. Now the ionization is achieved simply by applying high (sonic) speed nebulizer gas, without heat, corona discharge, or high voltage. The microchip SSI was applied to the analysis of tetra-N-butylammonium, verapamil, testosterone, angiotensin I, and ibuprofen. The limits of detection were in the range of 15 nM to 4 microM. The technique was found to be highly dependent on the position of the chip toward the mass spectrometer inlet, and on the gas and the sample solution flow rates. The microchip SSI provided dynamic linearity following a pattern similar to that used with electrospray, good quantitative repeatability (RSD=16%), and long-term signal stability.

  16. LOW-IONIZATION OUTFLOWS IN HIGH EDDINGTON RATIO QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; Plauchu-Frayn, Ilse; Del Olmo, Ascension

    2013-02-20

    The broad Mg II {lambda}2800 doublet has been frequently studied in connection with its potentially important role as a virial estimator of black hole mass in high-redshift quasars. An important task, therefore, is the identification of any line components that are likely related to broadening by non-virial motions. High signal-to-noise median composite spectra (binned in the {sup f}our-dimensional eigenvector 1'' context of Sulentic et al.) were constructed for the brightest 680 Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 quasars in the 0.4 {<=} z {<=} 0.75 range where both Mg II {lambda}2800 and H{beta} are recorded in the same spectra. Composite spectra representing 90% of the quasars confirm previous findings that FWHM(Mg II {lambda}2800) is about 20% narrower than FWHM(H{beta}). The situation is clearly different for the most extreme (Population A) sources, which are the highest Eddington radiators in the sample. In the median spectra of these sources, FWHM Mg II {lambda}2800 is equal to or greater than FWHM(H{beta}) and shows a significant blueshift relative to H{beta}. We interpret the Mg II {lambda}2800 blueshift as the signature of a radiation-driven wind or outflow in the highest accreting quasars. In this interpretation, the Mg II {lambda}2800 line width-affected by blueshifted emission-is unsuitable for virial mass estimation in Almost-Equal-To 10% of quasars.

  17. High gas pressure effects on yeast.

    PubMed

    Espinasse, V; Perrier-Cornet, J-M; Marecat, A; Gervais, P

    2008-11-01

    Dried microorganisms are particularly resistant to high hydrostatic pressure effects. However, exposure to high pressures of nitrogen proved to be effective in inactivating dried yeasts. In this study, we tried to elucidate this mechanism on Saccharomyces cerevisiae. High-pressure treatments were performed using different inert gases at 150 MPa and 25 degrees C with holding time values up to 12 months. The influence of cell hydration was also investigated. For fully hydrated cells, pressurized gases had little specific effect: cell inactivation was mainly due to compression effects. However, dried cells were sensitive to high pressure of gases. In this latter case, two inactivation kinetics were observed. For holding time up to 1 h, the inactivation rate increased to 4 log and was linked to a loss of membrane integrity and the presence of damage on the cell wall. In such case cell inactivation would be due to gas sorption and desorption phenomena which would rupture dried cells during a fast pressure release. Gas sorption would occur in cell lipid phases. For longer holding times, the inactivation rate increased more slightly due to compression effects and/or to a slower gas sorption. Water therefore played a key role in cell sensitivity to fast gas pressure release. Two hypotheses were proposed to explain this phenomenon: the rigidity of vitrified dried cells and the presence of glassy solid phases which would favor intracellular gas expansion. Our results showed that dried microorganisms can be ruptured and inactivated by a fast pressure release with gases.

  18. Integral Field Spectroscopy of Markarian 273: Mapping High-Velocity Gas Flows and an Off-Nucleus Seyfert 2 Nebula.

    PubMed

    Colina; Arribas; Borne

    1999-12-10

    Integral field optical spectroscopy with the INTEGRAL fiber-based system is used to map the extended ionized regions and gas flows in Mrk 273, one of the closest ultraluminous infrared galaxies. The Hbeta and [O iii] lambda5007 maps show the presence of two distinct regions separated by 4&arcsec; (3.1 kpc) along position angle (P.A.) 240 degrees. The northeastern region coincides with the optical nucleus of the galaxy and shows the spectral characteristics of LINERs. The southwestern region is dominated by [O iii] emission and is classified as a Seyfert 2. Therefore, in the optical, Mrk 273 is an ultraluminous infrared galaxy with a LINER nucleus and an extended off-nucleus Seyfert 2 nebula. The kinematics of the [O iii] ionized gas shows (1) the presence of highly disturbed gas in the regions around the LINER nucleus, (2) a high-velocity gas flow with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 2.4x103 km s-1, and (3) quiescent gas in the outer regions (at 3 kpc). We hypothesize that the high-velocity flow is the starburst-driven superwind generated in an optically obscured nuclear starburst and that the quiescent gas is directly ionized by a nuclear source, similar to the ionization cones typically seen in Seyfert galaxies.

  19. A numerical model of initial recombination for high-LET irradiation: Application to liquid-filled ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, P.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present a numerical model of initial recombination in media irradiated with high linear energy transfer (LET) ions, which relies on an amorphous track model of ionization of high LET particles, and diffusion, drift and recombination of ionized charge carriers. The model has fundamental applications for the study of recombination in non-polar liquids, as well as practical ones, like in modelling hadrontherapy dosimetry with ionization chambers. We have used it to study the response of liquid-filled ionization chambers to hadrontherapy beams: dependence of initial recombination on ion species, energy and applied external electric field.

  20. Uncovering the Spectral Energy Distribution in Active Galaxies Using High Ionization Mid-Infrared Emission Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melendez, M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Weaver, K. A.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    The shape of the spectral energy distribution of active galaxies in the EUV soft X-ray band (13.6 eV to 1 keV) is uncertain because obscuration by dust and gas can hamper our view of the continuum. To investigate the shape of the spectral energy distribution in this energy band, we have generated a set of photoionization models which reproduce the small dispersion found in correlations between high-ionization mid-infrared emission lines in a sample of hard X-ray selected AGN. Our calculations show that a broken power-law continuum model is sufficient to reproduce the [Ne V]14.32 microns/[Ne III], [Ne V]24.32 microns/[O IV]25.89 micron and [O IV] 25.89 microns/[Ne III] ratios, and does not require the addition of a "big bump" EUV model component. We constrain the EUV-soft X-ray slope, alpha(sub i), to be between 1.5 - 2.0 and derive a best fit of alpha(sub i) approx. 1.9 for Seyfert 1 galaxies, consistent with previous studies of intermediate redshift quasars. If we assume a blue bump model, most sources in our sample have derived temperatures between T(sub BB) = 10(exp 5.18) K to 10(exp 5.7) K, suggesting that the peak of this component spans a large range of energies extending from approx. (Lambda)600 A to > (Lambda)1900 A. In this case, the best fitting peak energy that matches the mid-infrared line ratios of Seyfert 1 galaxies occurs between approx. (Lambda)700-(Lambda)1000 A. Despite the fact that our results do not rule out the presence of an EUV bump, we conclude that our power-law model produces enough photons with energies > 4 Ry to generate the observed amount of mid-infrared emission in our sample of BAT AGN.

  1. Redox response of actinide materials to highly ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Cameron L.; Lang, Maik; Pray, John M.; Zhang, Fuxiang; Popov, Dmitry; Park, Changyong; Trautmann, Christina; Bender, Markus; Severin, Daniel; Skuratov, Vladimir A.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2015-01-01

    Energetic radiation can cause dramatic changes in the physical and chemical properties of actinide materials, degrading their performance in fission-based energy systems. As advanced nuclear fuels and wasteforms are developed, fundamental understanding of the processes controlling radiation damage accumulation is necessary. Here we report oxidation state reduction of actinide and analogue elements caused by high-energy, heavy ion irradiation and demonstrate coupling of this redox behaviour with structural modifications. ThO2, in which thorium is stable only in a tetravalent state, exhibits damage accumulation processes distinct from those of multivalent cation compounds CeO2 (Ce3+ and Ce4+) and UO3 (U4+, U5+ and U6+). The radiation tolerance of these materials depends on the efficiency of this redox reaction, such that damage can be inhibited by altering grain size and cation valence variability. Thus, the redox behaviour of actinide materials is important for the design of nuclear fuels and the prediction of their performance.

  2. Redox response of actinide materials to highly ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Cameron L; Lang, Maik; Pray, John M; Zhang, Fuxiang; Popov, Dmitry; Park, Changyong; Trautmann, Christina; Bender, Markus; Severin, Daniel; Skuratov, Vladimir A; Ewing, Rodney C

    2015-01-27

    Energetic radiation can cause dramatic changes in the physical and chemical properties of actinide materials, degrading their performance in fission-based energy systems. As advanced nuclear fuels and wasteforms are developed, fundamental understanding of the processes controlling radiation damage accumulation is necessary. Here we report oxidation state reduction of actinide and analogue elements caused by high-energy, heavy ion irradiation and demonstrate coupling of this redox behaviour with structural modifications. ThO2, in which thorium is stable only in a tetravalent state, exhibits damage accumulation processes distinct from those of multivalent cation compounds CeO2 (Ce(3+) and Ce(4+)) and UO3 (U(4+), U(5+) and U(6+)). The radiation tolerance of these materials depends on the efficiency of this redox reaction, such that damage can be inhibited by altering grain size and cation valence variability. Thus, the redox behaviour of actinide materials is important for the design of nuclear fuels and the prediction of their performance.

  3. Measure Guideline. High Efficiency Natural Gas Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L.; Rose, W.

    2012-10-01

    This measure guideline covers installation of high-efficiency gas furnaces, including: when to install a high-efficiency gas furnace as a retrofit measure; how to identify and address risks; and the steps to be used in the selection and installation process. The guideline is written for Building America practitioners and HVAC contractors and installers. It includes a compilation of information provided by manufacturers, researchers, and the Department of Energy as well as recent research results from the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR) Building America team.

  4. Measure Guideline: High Efficiency Natural Gas Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L.; Rose, W.

    2012-10-01

    This Measure Guideline covers installation of high-efficiency gas furnaces. Topics covered include when to install a high-efficiency gas furnace as a retrofit measure, how to identify and address risks, and the steps to be used in the selection and installation process. The guideline is written for Building America practitioners and HVAC contractors and installers. It includes a compilation of information provided by manufacturers, researchers, and the Department of Energy as well as recent research results from the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR) Building America team.

  5. The Cosmic Evolution of the Metallicity Distribution of Ionized Gas Traced by Lyman Limit Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Nicolas; O'Meara, John M.; Howk, J. Christopher; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Fumagalli, Michele

    2016-12-01

    We present the first results from our KODIAQ Z survey aimed at determining the metallicity distribution and physical properties of the z≳ 2 partial and full Lyman limit systems (pLLSs and LLSs; 16.2≤slant {log}{N}{{H}{{I}}}\\lt 19), which are probed of the interface regions between the intergalactic medium (IGM) and galaxies. We study 31 H i-selected pLLSs and LLSs at 2.3\\lt z\\lt 3.3 observed with Keck/HIRES in absorption against background QSOs. We compare the column densities of metal ions to H i and use photoionization models to assess the metallicity. The metallicity distribution of the pLLSs/LLSs at 2.3\\lt z\\lt 3.3 is consistent with a unimodal distribution peaking at [{{X}}/{{H}}]≃ -2. The metallicity distribution of these absorbers therefore evolves markedly with z since at z≲ 1 it is bimodal with peaks at [{{X}}/{{H}}]≃ -1.8 and -0.3. There is a substantial fraction (25%-41%) of pLLSs/LLSs with metallicities well below those of damped Lyα absorbers (DLAs) at any studied z from z≲ 1 to z˜ 2-4, implying reservoirs of metal-poor, cool, dense gas in the IGM/galaxy interface at all z. However, the gas probed by pLLSs and LLSs is rarely pristine, with a fraction of 3%-18% for pLLSs/LLSs with [{{X}}/{{H}}]≤slant -3. We find C/α enhancement in several pLLSs and LLSs in the metallicity range -2≲ [{{X}}/{{H}}]≲ -0.5, where C/α is 2-5 times larger than observed in Galactic metal-poor stars or high-redshift DLAs at similar metallicities. This is likely caused by preferential ejection of carbon from metal-poor galaxies into their surroundings.

  6. Coupling Kinetic and Hydrodynamic Models for Simulations of Gas Flows and Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, V. I.; Arslanbekov, R. R.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents adaptive kinetic/fluid models for simulations of gases and weakly ionized plasmas. We first describe a Unified Flow Solver (UFS), which combines Adaptive Mesh Refinement with automatic selection of kinetic or hydrodynamic models for different parts of flows. This Adaptive Mesh and Algorithm Refinement (AMAR) technique limits expensive atomistic-scale solutions only to the regions where they are needed. We present examples of plasma simulations with fluid models and describe kinetic solvers for electrons which are currently being incorporated into AMAR techniques for plasma simulations.

  7. The dynamics and structure of the ionized and neutral gas in the 30 Doradus nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, N. J.

    1981-08-01

    A variety of new optical observations have been made over the bright core of the supermassive H II region 30 Doradus and the ionized filamentary material surrounding this object. In addition, a more detailed analysis of previously published interstellar absorption and H I emission profiles has been undertaken. The velocity and density structure of this complex region is discussed and the new results analyzed here shown to be compatible to the model of 30 Doradus presented in Canto et al. (1980) and Meaburn (1980).

  8. Possible standoff detection of ionizing radiation using high-power THz electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Sprangle, Phillip; Romero-Talamas, Carlos A.; Rodgers, John; Pu, Ruifeng; Kashyn, Dmytro G.; Antonsen, Thomas M., Jr.; Granatstein, Victor L.

    2012-06-01

    Recently, a new method of remote detection of concealed radioactive materials was proposed. This method is based on focusing high-power short wavelength electromagnetic radiation in a small volume where the wave electric field exceeds the breakdown threshold. In the presence of free electrons caused by ionizing radiation, in this volume an avalanche discharge can then be initiated. When the wavelength is short enough, the probability of having even one free electron in this small volume in the absence of additional sources of ionization is low. Hence, a high breakdown rate will indicate that in the vicinity of this volume there are some materials causing ionization of air. To prove this concept a 0.67 THz gyrotron delivering 200-300 kW power in 10 microsecond pulses is under development. This method of standoff detection of concealed sources of ionizing radiation requires a wide range of studies, viz., evaluation of possible range, THz power and pulse duration, production of free electrons in air by gamma rays penetrating through container walls, statistical delay time in initiation of the breakdown in the case of low electron density, temporal evolution of plasma structure in the breakdown and scattering of THz radiation from small plasma objects. Most of these issues are discussed in the paper.

  9. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  10. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles and Identification of Capping Agent Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Karthick, V; Kumar, V Ganesh; Dhas, T Stalin; Govindaraju, K; Sinha, Sweta; Singaravelu, G

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized using leaf extract of Syzygium jambolanum and capping agent has been explored. The synthesized AuNPs have been characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and atomic force microscopic (AFM) analysis. The AuNPs show intense surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 528 nm and were found to be spherical and hexagonal in shape with particle size ranging from 20-30 nm. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to analyze the surface morphology of synthesized AuNPs. The capping ligand has been evaluated using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis.

  11. The KMOS AGN Survey at High redshift (KASHz): the prevalence and drivers of ionized outflows in the host galaxies of X-ray AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, C. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Mullaney, J. R.; Stott, J. P.; Swinbank, A. M.; Arumugam, V.; Bauer, F. E.; Bower, R. G.; Bunker, A. J.; Sharples, R. M.

    2016-02-01

    We present the first results from the KMOS (K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph) AGN (active galactic nuclei) Survey at High redshift (KASHz), a VLT/KMOS integral-field spectroscopic (IFS) survey of z ≳ 0.6 AGN. We present galaxy-integrated spectra of 89 X-ray AGN (L2-10 keV = 1042-1045 erg s-1), for which we observed [O III] (z ≈ 1.1-1.7) or Hα emission (z ≈ 0.6-1.1). The targets have X-ray luminosities representative of the parent AGN population and we explore the emission-line luminosities as a function of X-ray luminosity. For the [O III] targets, ≈50 per cent have ionized gas velocities indicative of gas that is dominated by outflows and/or highly turbulent material (i.e. overall line widths ≳600 km s-1). The most luminous half (i.e. LX > 6 × 1043 erg s-1) have a ≳2 times higher incidence of such velocities. On the basis of our results, we find no evidence that X-ray obscured AGN are more likely to host extreme kinematics than unobscured AGN. Our KASHz sample has a distribution of gas velocities that is consistent with a luminosity-matched sample of z < 0.4 AGN. This implies little evolution in the prevalence of ionized outflows, for a fixed AGN luminosity, despite an order-of-magnitude decrease in average star formation rates over this redshift range. Furthermore, we compare our Hα targets to a redshift-matched sample of star-forming galaxies and despite a similar distribution of Hα luminosities and likely star formation rates, we find extreme ionized gas velocities are up to ≈10 times more prevalent in the AGN-host galaxies. Our results reveal a high prevalence of extreme ionized gas velocities in high-luminosity X-ray AGN and imply that the most powerful ionized outflows in high-redshift galaxies are driven by AGN activity.

  12. The study of large biopolymer complexes in solution and the gas phase using electrospray ionization-FTICR mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Lei, Q.P.; Wu, Qinyuan; Hofstadler, A.

    1997-12-31

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) can transfer large biopolymers and many noncovalently bound complexes into the gas phase and to preserve specific noncovalent biomolecular associations for subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. Although a number of details of the ESI process remain a subject of debate, it is now incontestable that many weak associations can survive transfer to the gas phase and are stable for periods of at least seconds. In this presentation, the application of ESI-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry methods for the study of large biopolymers and their noncovalent complexes will be described. It will also be shown that competitive binding studies can be used to quickly establish relative binding affinities in solution, allowing combinatorial libraries to be rapidly screened. After measurements of the intact complex, dissociation studies can be conducted to probe the structure of the individual constituents of complexes. Studies comparing the relative stabilities of protein-ligand complexes in solution and desolvated in the gas phase will also be presented, and discussed from both fundamental and analytical perspectives.

  13. Determination of carbon number distributions of complex phthalates by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with ammonia chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Di Sanzo, Frank P; Lim, Peniel J; Han, Wenning W

    2015-01-01

    An assay method for phthalate esters with a complex mixture of isomer of varying carbon numbers, such as di-isononyl phthalate (DINP) and di-isodecyl phthalate (DIDP), using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) positive chemical ionization (PCI) with 5% ammonia in methane is described. GC-MS-PCI-NH3, unlike GC-MS electron ionization (EI) (GC-MS-EI) that produces generally m/z 149 ion as the main base peak and low intensity M(+) peaks, produces higher intensity (M + 1) ions that allow the determination of total (R + R') carbon number distributions based on the various R and R' alkyl groups of the di-esters moiety. The technique allows distinguishing among the various commercial DINP and DIDP plasticizers. The carbon number distributions are determined in the acceptable range of <0.1 mole percent to >85 mole percent (m/m). Several examples of analysis made on commercial DINP and DIDP are presented. The use of only 5% instead of 100% ammonia simplifies use of GC-MS-PCI-NH3 but still produces sufficient M + 1 ion intensities that are appropriate for the assay. In addition, use of low concentrations of ammonia mitigates potential safety aspects related to use of ammonia and provides less corrosion for the instrument hardware.

  14. Complexation of diazaperylene and bisisoquinoline with transition metal ions in the gas phase studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Starke, Ines; Kammer, Stefan; Grunwald, Nicolas; Schilde, Uwe; Holdt, Hans-Jürgen; Kleinpeter, Erich

    2008-01-01

    The complex formation of the ligands 1,12-diazaperylene (dap), 1,1'-bisisoquinoline (bis), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) with transition metal ions (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ru, Os, Re, Pd, Pt, Ag and Cd) in the gas phase has been studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. With the exception of Ru, Os, Fe, Ni and Cu, singly charged complexes [MLn](+) (n = 1,2) were observed. The complexes of dap and bis with Ru, Os, Fe and Ni ions, and the mixed ligand complexes with bpy and phen, are preferably of the doubly charged type [ML3]2+. In addition, collision-induced dissociation (CID) measurements were employed to evaluate the relative stabilities of these complexes. The CID experiments of mixed-ligand complexes which contain both dap and phen or dap and bpy exhibit preferential elimination of bpy, indicating that bpy is a weaker ligand than phen and dap.

  15. Continuous high-power gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.

    1979-01-01

    High power gas laser concepts are discussed with emphasis on the role that fluid mechanics has played in their development. Consideration is given to three types of systems: gasdynamic lasers, HF supersonic diffusion lasers, and electric discharge lasers. Flow effects and aerodynamic windows in such lasers are briefly described. Future directions of research are outlined.

  16. Hurricane risk mitigation - High Pressure Gas Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A worker pours concrete as part of a nitrogen risk mitigation project at the High Pressure Gas Facility at Stennis Space Center. The concrete slab will provide the foundation needed to place new pumps at the site and is part of ongoing hurricane-related mitigation work at Stennis.

  17. Electron Acceleration and Ionization Production in High-Power Heating Experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, E. V.; Pedersen, T.

    2012-12-01

    Recent ionospheric modification experiments with the 3.6 MW transmitter at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska led to discovery of artificial ionization descending from the nominal interaction altitude in the background F-region ionosphere by ~60-80 km. Artificial ionization production is indicated by significant 427.8 nm emissions from the 1st negative band of N2+ and the appearance of transmitter-induced bottomside traces in ionosonde data during the periods of most intense optical emissions. However, the exact mechanisms producing the artificial plasmas remain to be determined. Yet the only existing theoretical models explain the development of artificial plasma as an ionizing wavefront moving downward due to ionization by electrons accelerated by HF-excited strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) generated near the plasma resonance, where the pump frequency matches the plasma frequency. However, the observations suggest also the significance of interactions with upper hybrid and electron Bernstein waves near multiples of the electron gyrofrequency. We describe recent observations and discuss suitable acceleration mechanisms.

  18. Non-polar lipids characterization of Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) seed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with flame ionization/mass spectrometry detection and non-aqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Fanali, Chiara; Beccaria, Marco; Salivo, Simona; Tranchida, Peter; Tripodo, Giusy; Farnetti, Sara; Dugo, Laura; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-07-08

    A chemical characterization of major lipid components, namely, triacylglycerols, fatty acids and the unsaponifiable fraction, in a Quinoa seed lipids sample is reported. To tackle such a task, non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection was employed. The latter was interfaced with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the analysis of triacylglycerols. The main triacylglycerols (>10%) were represented by OLP, OOL and OLL (P = palmitoyl, O = oleoyl, L = linoleoyl); the latter was present in the oil sample at the highest percentage (18.1%). Furthermore, fatty acid methyl esters were evaluated by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. 89% of the total fatty acids was represented by unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters with the greatest percentage represented by linoleic and oleic acids accounting for approximately 48 and 28%, respectively. An extensive characterization of the unsaponifiable fraction of Quinoa seed lipids was performed for the first time, by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with dual mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection. Overall, 66 compounds of the unsaponifiable fraction were tentatively identified, many constituents of which (particularly sterols) were confirmed by using gas chromatography with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

  19. Graphene coated silica applied for high ionization matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: A novel approach for environmental and biomolecule analysis.

    PubMed

    Nasser Abdelhamid, Hani; Wu, Bo-Sgum; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2014-08-01

    The integration of nanotechnology with mass spectrometry for sensitive and selective detection of molecules is a hot/important field of research. Synthesis of graphene (G) coated with mesoporous silica (SiO2, G@SiO2) for mass spectrometric application has been demonstrated. For the first time, we proposed the significant role of surfactant that used during the synthesis of mesorporous silicate (SiO2) in mass spectrometry. It was noticed that G could initiate SiO2 via surfactants which work as initiators for further ionization. The porosity of SiO2 trapped the analytes that was released and ionized with the surfactant fragments. Undoubtedly, strong background interferences were present in the case of organic matrix, which greatly obscured the detection of low molecular weight compounds. G@SiO2 nanocomposite affords several advantages, such as the ability to detect small molecules (<500Da), high sample localization through silica mesoporosity, and high ionization efficiency over than G or conventional matrices. The high performance of G@SiO2 is not only due to the large surface area but also due to high desorption/ionization efficiency of inevitably surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, CATB). Unlike the conventional MALDI-MS, the G@SiO2-MS is capable of generating multiply charged polysaccharides. The present method was validated to detect surfactants with low limits of detection.

  20. RUNAWAY STARS AND THE ESCAPE OF IONIZING RADIATION FROM HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2012-08-20

    Approximately 30% of all massive stars in the Galaxy are runaways with velocities exceeding 30 km s{sup -1}. Their high speeds allow them to travel {approx}0.1-1 kpc away from their birthplace before they explode at the end of their several Myr lifetimes. At high redshift, when galaxies were much smaller than in the local universe, runaways could venture far from the dense inner regions of their host galaxies. From these large radii, and therefore low column densities, much of their ionizing radiation is able to escape into the intergalactic medium. Runaways may therefore significantly enhance the overall escape fraction of ionizing radiation, f{sub esc}, from small galaxies at high redshift. We present simple models of the high-redshift runaway population and its impact on f{sub esc} as a function of halo mass, size, and redshift. We find that the inclusion of runaways enhances f{sub esc} by factors of Almost-Equal-To 1.1-8, depending on halo mass, galaxy geometry, and the mechanism of runaway production, implying that runaways may contribute 50%-90% of the total ionizing radiation escaping from high-redshift galaxies. Runaways may therefore play an important role in reionizing the universe.

  1. A new approach for the study of gas-phase ion-ion reactions using electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Ogorzalek Loo, R R; Udseth, H R; Smith, R D

    1992-10-01

    A simple flow reactor which facilitates the study and application of ion-ion and ion-molecule reactions at near atmospheric pressures is reported. Reactant ions were generated by electrospray ionization and discharge ionization methods, although any ionization sources amenable to atmospheric pressure may be used. Ions of opposite charge are generated in spatially separate ion sources and are swept into capillary inlets where the flows are merged and where reaction(s) can occur. Among the reactions investigated were the partial neutralization of multiply protonated polypeptides and proteins such as melittin, bradykinin, cytochrome c, and myoglobin by reaction with discharge-generated anions, the partial neutralization of multiply charged anions of oligodeoxyadenylic acid (d(pA)3) by reaction with discharge-generated cations, the partial neutralization of bovine A-chain insulin anions by reaction with myoglobin [M+nH](n+) ions, and the reaction of multiply protonated melittin with discharge-generated cations. The cation-anion reactions generally resulted in a shift to lower charge (higher mass-to-charge ratio) in the products' charge state distributions and the transfer of solvent molecules to the macromolecule products. Multiply protonated melittin was detected in a less highly solvated state with the positive discharge in operation.

  2. An ionization region model of the reactive Ar/O2 high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Jon Tomas; Lundin, Daniel; Brenning, Nils; Raadu, Michel A.; Huo, Chunqing; Minea, Tiberiu

    2016-09-01

    A reactive ionization region model (R-IRM) is developed to describe the reactive Ar/O2 high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge with titanium target. We compare the discharge properties when the discharge is operated in the two well established operating modes, the metal mode and the poisoned mode. Experimentally, it is found that in the metal mode the discharge current waveform displays a typical non-reactive evolution, while in the poisoned mode the discharge current waveform becomes distinctly triangular and the current increases significantly. Using the R-IRM we find that when the discharge is operated in the metal mode Ar+ and Ti+-ions contribute most significantly (roughly equal amounts) to the discharge current while in the poisoned mode the Ar+-ions contribute most significantly to the discharge current while the contribution of O+-ions and secondary electron emission is much smaller. Furthermore, we find that recycling of ionized atoms coming from the target are required for the current generation in both modes of operation. In the metal mode self-sputter recycling dominates and in the poisoned mode working gas recycling dominates, and it is concluded that the dominating type of recycling determines the discharge current waveform.

  3. EXTREMELY BROAD RADIO RECOMBINATION MASER LINES TOWARD THE HIGH-VELOCITY IONIZED JET IN CEPHEUS A HW2

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Serra, I.; Patel, N.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Baez-Rubio, A.; Thum, C. E-mail: npatel@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: baezra@cab.inta-csic.es

    2011-05-10

    We present the first detection of the H40{alpha}, H34{alpha}, and H31{alpha} radio recombination lines (RRLs) at millimeter wavelengths toward the high-velocity ionized jet in the Cepheus A HW2 star-forming region. From our single-dish and interferometric observations, we find that the measured RRLs show extremely broad asymmetric line profiles with zero-intensity line widths of {approx}1100 km s{sup -1}. From the line widths, we estimate a terminal velocity for the ionized gas in the jet of {>=}500 km s{sup -1}, consistent with that obtained from the proper motions of the HW2 radio jet. The total integrated line-to-continuum flux ratios of the H40{alpha}, H34{alpha}, and H31{alpha} lines are 43, 229, and 280 km s{sup -1}, clearly deviating from LTE predictions. These ratios are very similar to those observed for the RRL masers toward MWC349A, suggesting that the intensities of the RRLs toward HW2 are affected by maser emission. Our radiative transfer modeling of the RRLs shows that their asymmetric profiles could be explained by maser emission arising from a bi-conical radio jet with a semi-opening angle of 18 deg., electron density distribution varying as r {sup -2.11}, and turbulent and expanding wind velocities of 60 and 500 km s{sup -1}.

  4. Kinematics of the ionized and molecular gas in nearby luminous infrared interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza-Cardiel, Javier; Beckman, John; Font, Joan; Rosado, Margarita; Camps-Fariña, Artemi; Borlaff, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    We have observed three luminous infrared galaxy systems which are pairs of interacting galaxies, with the Galaxy Hα Fabry-Perot system mounted on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, and combined the observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations of these systems in CO emission to compare the physical properties of the star formation regions and the molecular gas clouds, and specifically the internal kinematics of the star-forming regions. We identified 88 star-forming regions in the Hα emission data cubes, and 27 molecular cloud complexes in the CO emission data cubes. The surface densities of the star formation rate and the molecular gas are significantly higher in these systems than in non-interacting galaxies and the Galaxy, and are closer to the surface densities of the star formation rate and the molecular gas of extreme star-forming galaxies at higher redshifts. The large values of the velocity dispersion also show the enhanced gas surface density. The H II regions are situated on the SFR - σv envelope, and so are also in virial equilibrium. Since the virial parameter decreases with the surface densities of both the star formation rate and the molecular gas, we claim that the clouds presented here are gravitationally dominated rather than being in equilibrium with the external pressure.

  5. Formation and Fragmentation of Protonated Molecules after Ionization of Amino Acid and Lactic Acid Clusters by Collision with Ions in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Poully, Jean-Christophe; Vizcaino, Violaine; Schwob, Lucas; Delaunay, Rudy; Kocisek, Jaroslav; Eden, Samuel; Chesnel, Jean-Yves; Méry, Alain; Rangama, Jimmy; Adoui, Lamri; Huber, Bernd

    2015-08-03

    Collisions between O(3+) ions and neutral clusters of amino acids (alanine, valine and glycine) as well as lactic acid are performed in the gas phase, in order to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on these biologically relevant molecular systems. All monomers and dimers are found to be predominantly protonated, and ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on model systems indicate that for amino acids, this is due to proton transfer within the clusters after ionization. For lactic acid, which has a lower proton affinity than amino acids, a significant non-negligible amount of the radical cation monomer is observed. New fragment-ion channels observed from clusters, as opposed to isolated molecules, are assigned to the statistical dissociation of protonated molecules formed upon ionization of the clusters. These new dissociation channels exhibit strong delayed fragmentation on the microsecond time scale, especially after multiple ionization.

  6. Penning Ionization Electron Spectroscopy in Glow Discharge: A New Dimension for Gas Chromatography Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheverev, V. A.; Khromov, N. A.; Kojiro, D. R.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Admixtures to helium of 100 ppm and 5 ppm of nitrogen, and 100 ppm and 10 ppm of carbon monoxide were identified and measured in the helium discharge afterglow using an electrical probe placed into the plasma. For nitrogen and carbon monoxide gases, the measured electron energy spectra display distinct characteristic peaks (fingerprints). Location of the peaks on the energy scale is determined by the ionization energies of the analyte molecules. Nitrogen and carbon monoxide fingerprints were also observed in a binary mixture of these gases in helium, and the relative concentration analytes has been predicted. The technically simple and durable method is considered a good candidate for a number of analytical applications, and in particular, in GC and for analytical flight instrumentation.

  7. Gemini Near Infrared Field Spectrograph Observations of the Seyfert 2 Galaxy Mrk 573: In Situ Acceleration of Ionized and Molecular Gas off Fueling Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Travis C.; Machuca, C.; Diniz, M. R.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Riffel, R. A.; Schmitt, H. R.; Baron, F.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Straughn, A. N.; Revalski, M.; Pope, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    We present near-infrared and optical emission-line and stellar kinematics of the Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 573 using the Near-Infrared Field Spectrograph (NIFS) at Gemini North and Dual Imaging Spectrograph at Apache Point Observatory, respectively. By obtaining full kinematic maps of the infrared ionized and molecular gas and stellar kinematics in a ∼700 × 2100 pc2 circumnuclear region of Mrk 573, we find that kinematics within the Narrow-Line Region are largely due to a combination of both rotation and in situ acceleration of material originating in the host disk. Combining these observations with large-scale, optical long-slit spectroscopy that traces ionized gas emission out to several kpcs, we find that rotation kinematics dominate the majority of the gas. We find that outflowing gas extends to distances less than 1 kpc, suggesting that outflows in Seyfert galaxies may not be powerful enough to evacuate their entire bulges.

  8. High-resolution pulsed-field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy using multi-bunch synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.W.; Evans, M.; Ng, C.Y.; Heimann, P.

    1997-04-01

    BL9.0.2.2 is the newly constructed experimental End Station 2 at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline 9.0.2 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS). It is dedicated to the high resolution photoionization study of molecules of interest to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. This End Station is equipped with a high resolution scanning monochromator, which has been demonstrated to have a world record resolution of E/{delta}E=70,000. Taking the advantage of the high resolution ALS light, the authors have improved the energy resolution in threshold photoelectron spectroscopy (TPES) to 0.8 meV. The TPES is a popular technique for photoionization experiments at all synchrotron radiation facilities due to its high energy resolution as compared to that of traditional photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). TPES achieves higher energy resolution by preferentially detecting near zero kinetic energy photoelectrons resulting from threshold photoionization. However, the spectra obtained from the TPES technique generally are complicated by the simultaneous detection of electrons with nonzero kinetic energy, which are not fully discriminated against. On the other hand, the spectra obtained from pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy (PFI-PES) are completely free of the contamination from kinetic electrons. The PFI-PE technique basically involves the detection of the photoelectrons from field ionization of the very high-n Rydberg states, a few cm{sup {minus}1} below the ionization energy (IE), by applying a delayed pulsed electric field. Within a delay of a few microseconds, all the prompt electrons formed from direct ionization will escape from the photoionization region and will not be collected. The authors have recently overcome problems with energy resolution of an electron time-of-flight technique, and incorporated the PFI-PE technique with multi-bunch VUV synchrotron radiation.

  9. Cooled membrane for high sensitivity gas sampling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ruifen; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2014-04-18

    A novel sample preparation method that combines the advantages of high surface area geometry and cold surface effect was proposed to achieve high sensitivity gas sampling. To accomplish this goal, a device that enables the membrane to be cooled down was developed for sampling, and a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer was used for separation and quantification analysis. Method development included investigation of the effect of membrane temperature, membrane size, gas flow rate and humidity. Results showed that high sensitivity for equilibrium sampling, such as limonene sampling in the current study could be achieved by either cooling down the membrane and/or using a large volume extraction phase. On the other hand, for pre-equilibrium extraction, in which the extracted amount was mainly determined by membrane surface area and diffusion coefficient, high sensitivity could be obtained by using thinner membranes with a larger surface and/or a higher sampling flow rate. In addition, humidity showed no significant influence on extraction efficiency, due to the absorption property of the liquid extraction phase. Next, the limit of detection (LOD) was found, and the reproducibility of the developed cooled membrane gas sampling method was evaluated. Results showed that LODs with a membrane diameter of 19mm at room temperature sampling were 9.2ng/L, 0.12ng/L, 0.10ng/L for limonene, cinnamaldehyde and 2-pentadecanone, respectively. Intra- and inter-membrane sampling reproducibility revealed RSD% lower than 8% and 13%, respectively. Results uniformly demonstrated that the proposed cooled membrane device could serve as an alternative powerful tool for future gas sampling.

  10. Gas film disturbance characteristics analysis of high-speed and high-pressure dry gas seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuan; Jiang, Jinbo; Peng, Xudong

    2016-08-01

    The dry gas seal(DGS) has been widely used in high parameters centrifugal compressor, but the intense vibrations of shafting, especially in high-speed condition, usually result in DGS's failure. So the DGS's ability of resisting outside interference has become a determining factor of the further development of centrifugal compressor. However, the systematic researches of which about gas film disturbance characteristics of high parameters DGS are very little. In order to study gas film disturbance characteristics of high-speed and high-pressure spiral groove dry gas seal(S-DGS) with a flexibly mounted stator, rotor axial runout and misalignment are taken into consideration, and the finite difference method and analytical method are used to analyze the influence of gas film thickness disturbance on sealing performance parameters, what's more, the effects of many key factors on gas film thickness disturbance are systematically investigated. The results show that, when sealed pressure is 10.1MPa and seal face average linear velocity is 107.3 m/s, gas film thickness disturbance has a significant effect on leakage rate, but has relatively litter effect on open force; Excessively large excitation amplitude or excessively high excitation frequency can lead to severe gas film thickness disturbance; And it is beneficial to assure a smaller gas film thickness disturbance when the stator material density is between 3.1 g/cm3 to 8.4 g/cm3; Ensuring sealing performance while minimizing support axial stiffness and support axial damping can help to improve dynamic tracking property of dry gas seal. The proposed research provides the instruction to optimize dynamic tracking property of the DGS.

  11. Combined gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry of sphingolipids. I. Glucosyl sphingosine, ceramides and cerebrosides of the spleen in Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Oshima, M; Ariga, T; Murata, T

    1977-08-01

    Trimethylsilylated glucosyl sphingosine, ceramides and glucocerebrosides were analysed by combined gas chromatography (GC)-chemical ionization (CI) mass spectrometry. Isobutane, methane and ammonia were used as reactant gasses for chemical ionization. Essentially the same fragment ions were detected in the spectra with the different reactant gases. Purified glucocerebrosides isolated from the spleen of a patient with Gaucher's disease were clearly separated into their 8 molecular species by gas chromatography. Three other minor components were detected by spectrometry, and these 11 molecular species of glucocerbrosides from the spleen of the patient with Gaucher's disease have been analysed. The ceramides obtained by periodate oxidation and then alkaline reduction of the glucocerebrosides were also separated into 11 molecular species by GC-CI mass spectrometry. Molecular weight could be determined using the major fragment ion of m/e (M+-90) in the spectra of ceramides and cerebrosides. The chemical ionization method is useful for structural analysis and determination of the molecular species of sphingoglycolipids.

  12. Photon-electron-ion momentum transfer in high intensityIR laser pulse ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, Andre D.; Chelkowski, Szczefan; Corkum, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Photon momentum sharing between electrons and parent ions in high intensityIR multiphoton ionization requires going beyond the traditional perturbative dipole approximation. Using numerical solutions of the 2-D TDSE(Time dependent Schroedinger equation) for one electron atom models, we show that the radiation pressure on photoelectrons is sensitive to the ionization mechanism, either direct or by recollision. A complex electron-ion response is obtained due to the interplay between the Lorentz force and Coulomb attraction of the ion.The influence of the photon momentum sharing is shown to be discernible in IR high intensity atomic and/or molecular holographic patterns thus suggesting a new research subject in IR strong field physics.

  13. The merging dwarf galaxy UM 448: chemodynamics of the ionized gas from VLT integral field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, B. L.; Tsamis, Y. G.; Barlow, M. J.; Walsh, J. R.; Westmoquette, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Using Very Large Telescope/Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph optical integral field unit observations, we present a detailed study of UM 448, a nearby blue compact galaxy (BCG) previously reported to have an anomalously high N/O abundance ratio. New Technology Telescope/Superb-Seeing Imager images reveal a morphology suggestive of a merger of two systems of contrasting colour, whilst our Hα emission maps resolve UM 448 into three separate regions that do not coincide with the stellar continuum peaks. UM 448 exhibits complex emission line profiles, with most lines consisting of a narrow [full width at half-maximum (FWHM) ≲ 100 km s-1], central component, an underlying broad component (FWHM ˜ 150-300 km s-1) and a third, narrow blueshifted component. Radial velocity maps of all three components show signs of solid body rotation across UM 448, with a projected rotation axis that correlates with the continuum morphology of the galaxy. A spatially resolved, chemodynamical analysis, based on the [O iii] λλ4363, 4959, [N ii] λ6584, [S ii] λλ6716, 6731 and [Ne iii] λ3868 line maps, is presented. Whilst the eastern tail of UM 448 has electron temperatures (Te) that are typical of BCGs, we find a region within the main body of the galaxy where the narrow and broad [O iii] λ4363 line components trace temperatures differing by 5000 K and oxygen abundances differing by 0.4 dex. We measure spatially resolved and integrated ionic and elemental abundances for O, N, S and Ne throughout UM 448, and find that they do not agree, possibly due the flux weighting of Te from the integrated spectrum. This has significant implications for abundances derived from long-slit and integrated spectra of star-forming galaxies in the nearby and distant universe. A region of enhanced N/O ratio is indeed found, extended over a ˜0.6 kpc2 region within the main body of the galaxy. Contrary to previous studies, however, we do not find evidence for a large Wolf-Rayet (WR

  14. Total ionizing dose effects in high voltage devices for flash memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhangli; Hu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Zhengxuan; Shao, Hua; Chen, Ming; Bi, Dawei; Ning, Bingxu; Wang, Ru; Zou, Shichang

    2010-12-01

    The effect of size and substrate bias conditions after irradiation on the total ionizing dose response of high voltage devices for flash memory has been investigated. Different sensitivity of transistors with different gate width was observed, which is well known as the radiation induced narrow channel effect. A charge sharing model was used to explain this effect. The negative substrate bias voltage after irradiation showed considerable impact on the parasitic transistor's response by suppressing leakage current.

  15. Absorption-line Spectroscopy of Gravitationally Lensed Galaxies: Further Constraints on the Escape Fraction of Ionizing Photons at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leethochawalit, Nicha; Jones, Tucker A.; Ellis, Richard S.; Stark, Daniel P.; Zitrin, Adi

    2016-11-01

    The fraction of ionizing photons escaping from high-redshift star-forming galaxies is a key obstacle in evaluating whether galaxies were the primary agents of cosmic reionization. We previously proposed using the covering fraction of low-ionization gas, measured via deep absorption-line spectroscopy, as a proxy. We now present a significant update, sampling seven gravitationally lensed sources at 4 < z < 5. We show that the absorbing gas in our sources is spatially inhomogeneous, with a median covering fraction of 66%. Correcting for reddening according to a dust-in-cloud model, this implies an estimated absolute escape fraction of ≃19% ± 6%. With possible biases and uncertainties, collectively we find that the average escape fraction could be reduced to no less than 11%, excluding the effect of spatial variations. For one of our lensed sources, we have sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to demonstrate the presence of such spatial variations and scatter in its dependence on the Lyα equivalent width, consistent with recent simulations. If this source is typical, our lower limit to the escape fraction could be reduced by a further factor ≃2. Across our sample, we find a modest anticorrelation between the inferred escape fraction and the local star formation rate, consistent with a time delay between a burst and leaking Lyman continuum photons. Our analysis demonstrates considerable variations in the escape fraction, consistent with being governed by the small-scale behavior of star-forming regions, whose activities fluctuate over short timescales. This supports the suggestion that the escape fraction may increase toward the reionization era when star formation becomes more energetic and burst-like.

  16. Characterization of Nitrogen-Containing Species in Coal and Petroleum-Derived Products by Ammonia Chemical Ionization-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Veloski, Garret A.; Lynn, Ronald J.; Sprecher, Richard F.

    1997-01-01

    A coal-derived light distillate and a petroleum-derived residuum have been studied by high resolution mass spectrometry using both low-pressure ammonia chemical ionization and low-voltage electron impact ionization. A mass calibration mixture for use with ammonia chemical ionization has been developed. Selective ionization of the basic nitrogen-containing compounds by ammonia chemical ionization and compound type characterization of the resulting quasi-molecular species has been demonstrated. Several homologous series of nitrogen-containing compounds were identified in a basic extract by electron impact ionization and compared with quasimolecular analogs identified by ammonia chemical ionization.

  17. Toward Comprehensive Physical/Chemical Understanding of the Circumstellar Environments - Simultaneous Probing of Each of the Ionized/Atomic/Molecular Gas and Dust Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, Toshiya

    We propose to continue our successful investigations into simultaneous probing of each of the ionized/atomic/molecular gas and dust components in planetary nebulae using primarily far-IR broadband images and spatially-resolved spectroscopic data cubes obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory to enhance our understanding of the circumstellar environments. This research originally started as the Herschel Planetary Nebula Survey (HerPlaNS) - an open time 1 program of the Herschel Space Observatory - in which 11 high-excitation PNs were observed to study the nebular energetics that involves very hot X-ray emitting plasma to very cold dust grains, whose density ranges over 3 to 4 orders of magnitude and temperature ranges over 7 orders of magnitude. The HerPlaNS data include broadband maps, IFU spectral data cubes, and bolometer array spectral data cubes covering 50 to 670 microns. Because of the sheer volume and complexity of the data set, the original funding was exhausted almost exclusively to the initial data reduction and not much to the subsequent science analysis. However, we managed to perform a nearly full science analysis for one target, NGC 6781, for which the broadband maps confirm the nearly pole-on barrel structure of the amorphous carbonrich dust shell and the surrounding halo having temperatures of 26-40 K. We also demonstrated that spatially resolved far-IR line diagnostics would yield the (Te, ne) profiles, from which distributions of ionized, atomic, and molecular gases can be determined. Direct comparison of the dust and gas column mass maps constrained by the HerPlaNS data allowed to construct an empirical gas-to-dust mass ratio map, which shows a range of ratios with the median of 195 with a standard deviation of 110. The analysis also yielded estimates of the total mass of the shell to be 0.86 M_sun, consisting of 0.54 M_sun of ionized gas, 0.12 M_sun of atomic gas, 0.2 M_sun of molecular gas, and 0.004 M_sun of dust grains. These estimates

  18. The influence of desorption gas to high power microwave window multipactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Chao; Tang Chuanxiang; Liu Guozhi; Chen Changhua; Qiu Shi; Fang Jinyong; Hou Qin

    2008-09-15

    Gas desorbed by electrons plays a key role in multipactor saturation and final plasma breakdown at the vacuum side of the window in high power microwave systems. A multipactor model involving electron-neutral collision and ionization is established. When desorption gas pressure reaches 1 Torr, the electron impact energy apparently decreases, multipactor saturates at a lower surface charging field, and multipactor saturation meets easier, compared to vacuum. Experiments for different material windows of high power microwave, with the power of 1 GW, frequency of 9.4 GHz, and 20 ns single and multiple pulses was conducted. It was discovered that gas pressure rose prominently in the horn, when breakdown occurred. The increase in local gas pressure during the 20 ns pulse is estimated from the experiment to reach several Torr, a pressure that is consistent with the presented dynamic model.

  19. Ionization energy shift of characteristic K x-ray lines from high-Z materials for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Słabkowska, K.; Szymańska, E.; Polasik, M.; Pereira, N. R.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Seely, J. F.; Weber, B. V.; Schumer, J. W.

    2014-03-15

    The energy of the characteristic x-rays emitted by high atomic number atoms in a plasma that contains energetic electrons depends on the atom's ionization. For tungsten, the ionization energy shift of the L-lines has recently been used to diagnose the plasma's ionization; the change in energy of a K-line has been measured for iridium and observed for ytterbium. Here, we present detailed computations of the ionization energy shift to K-lines of these and an additional element, dysprosium; for these atoms, some K-lines nearly coincide in energy with K-edges of slightly lower Z atoms so that a change in transmission behind a K-edge filter betrays a change in energy. The ionization energy shift of such high-energy K-lines may enable a unique diagnostic when the plasma is inside an otherwise opaque enclosure such as hohlraums used on the National Ignition Facility.

  20. Headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (HS-GC-FID) for the determination of dissolved methane in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Beale, D J; Tjandraatmadja, G; Toifl, M; Goodman, N

    2014-01-01

    There is currently a need for a simple, accurate and reproducible method that quantifies the amount of dissolved methane in wastewater in order to realize the potential methane that can be recovered and account for any emissions. This paper presents such a method, using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection fitted with a GS-Gas PRO column coupled with a headspace auto sampler. A practical limit of detection for methane of 0.9 mg L(-1), with a retention time of 1.24 min, was obtained. It was found that the reproducibility and accuracy of the method increased significantly when samples were collected using an in-house constructed bailer sampling device and with the addition of 100 μL hydrochloric acid (HCl) and 25% sodium chloride (NaCl) and sonication for 30 min prior to analysis. Analysis of wastewater samples and wastewater sludge collected from a treatment facility were observed to range from 12.51 to 15.79 mg L(-1) (relative standard deviation (RSD) 8.1%) and 17.56 to 18.67 mg L(-1) (RSD 3.4%) respectively. The performance of this method was validated by repeatedly measuring a mid-level standard (n=8; 10 mg L(-1)), with an observed RSD of 4.6%.

  1. Nebular emission from AGN in the ultraviolet/optical: diagnostics of the ionizing source and gas properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltre, A.

    2016-08-01

    Spectroscopic studies of active galactic nuclei (AGN) are powerful means of probing the physical properties of the ionized gas within them. In particular, forthcoming facilities such as JWST and the E-ELT, will provide rest-frame ultraviolet and optical spectra of the very distant AGN. To lay the groundwork for the interpretation of these revolutionary datasets, we have recently computed new photoionization models of the narrow-line emitting regions (NLR) of AGN and combined them with similar models of the nebular emission from star-forming galaxies. In this talk, I will first describe how new ultraviolet and standard optical spectral diagnostics allow one to distinguish between nuclear activity and star formation. I will then explain how predictions of AGN nebular emission can be best used to understand the physical properties of the AGN NLR gas. In particular, I will present recent results from a study on one of the most comprehensive set of optical spectra (from VIMOS/VLT) sampling the rest-frame ultraviolet range of ~90 type 2 AGN (1.5 < z < 3), drawn from the z-COSMOS deep survey. To conclude, I will show how the implementation of AGN photoionization calculations in an innovative Bayesian fitting code can help us best interpret current, and future, spectro-photometric data on active galaxies.

  2. The MASSIVE Survey. VI. The Spatial Distribution and Kinematics of Warm Ionized Gas in the Most Massive Local Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Viraj; Greene, Jenny E.; Ma, Chung-Pei; Veale, Melanie; Ene, Irina; Davis, Timothy A.; Blakeslee, John P.; Goulding, Andy D.; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Nyland, Kristina; Thomas, Jens

    2017-03-01

    We present the first systematic investigation of the existence, spatial distribution, and kinematics of warm ionized gas as traced by the [O ii] 3727 Å emission line in 74 of the most massive galaxies in the local universe. All of our galaxies have deep integral-field spectroscopy from the volume- and magnitude-limited MASSIVE survey of early-type galaxies with stellar mass {log}({M}* /{M}ȯ )> 11.5 (M K < ‑25.3 mag) and distance D < 108 Mpc. Of the 74 galaxies in our sample, we detect warm ionized gas in 28, which yields a global detection fraction of 38 ± 6% down to a typical [O ii] equivalent width limit of 2 Å. MASSIVE fast rotators are more likely to have gas than MASSIVE slow rotators with detection fractions of 80 ± 10% and 28 ± 6%, respectively. The spatial extents span a wide range of radii (0.6–18.2 kpc; 0.1–4R e ), and the gas morphologies are diverse, with 17/28 ≈ 61 ± 9% being centrally concentrated, 8/28 ≈ 29 ± 9% exhibiting clear rotation out to several kiloparsecs, and 3/28 ≈ 11 ± 6% being extended but patchy. Three out of four fast rotators show kinematic alignment between the stars and gas, whereas the two slow rotators with robust kinematic measurements available exhibit kinematic misalignment. Our inferred warm ionized gas masses are roughly ∼105 M ⊙. The emission line ratios and radial equivalent width profiles are generally consistent with excitation of the gas by the old underlying stellar population. We explore different gas origin scenarios for MASSIVE galaxies and find that a variety of physical processes are likely at play, including internal gas recycling, cooling out of the hot gaseous halo, and gas acquired via mergers.

  3. Analysis of the unsaponifiable fraction of lipids belonging to various milk-types by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with dual mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection and with the support of high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry for structural elucidation.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Q; Salivo, Simona; Bonaccorsi, Ivana; Rotondo, Archimede; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2013-10-25

    The present investigation is focused on the use of a comprehensive two-dimensional GC (GC×GC) method, with dual mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection (MS/FID), for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the unsaponifiable fraction of milk lipids (cow butter, buffalo, ewe, and goat milks). The structure of many constituents (particularly sterols) was confirmed by using GC-high resolution time-of-flight MS. The GC×GC column set used consisted of a low-polarity first dimension, and a medium-polarity secondary one, both characterized by a high thermal stability. The use of dual detection enabled the attainment of both mass spectral information and relative % FID data. The complexity of the fingerprint, generated by the unsaponifiable fraction, justified the employment of the two-dimensional GC technology. However, it was two other GC×GC characteristics that contributed most to the attainment of promising results, namely sensitivity enhancement and the formation of group-type patterns. Because many milk lipid constituents were not contained in the MS databases employed, exact mass information proved to be valuable for identification purposes.

  4. SDSS IV MaNGA: Deep observations of extra-planar, diffuse ionized gas around late-type galaxies from stacked IFU spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A.; Kauffmann, G.; D'Souza, R.; Bizyaev, D.; Law, D.; Haffner, L.; Bahé, Y.; Andrews, B.; Bershady, M.; Brownstein, J.; Bundy, K.; Cherinka, B.; Diamond-Stanic, A.; Drory, N.; Riffel, R. A.; Sánchez, S. F.; Thomas, D.; Wake, D.; Yan, R.; Zhang, K.

    2017-03-01

    We have conducted a study of extra-planar diffuse ionized gas using the first year data from the MaNGA IFU survey. We have stacked spectra from 49 edge-on, late-type galaxies as a function of distance from the midplane of the galaxy. With this technique we can detect the bright emission lines Hα, Hβ, [O ii]λλ3726, 3729, [O iii]λ5007, [N ii]λλ6549, 6584, and [S ii]λλ6717, 6731 out to about 4 kpc above the midplane. With 16 galaxies we can extend this analysis out to about 9 kpc, i.e. a distance of 2Re, vertically from the midplane. In the halo, the surface brightnesses of the [O ii] and Hα emission lines are comparable, unlike in the disk where Hα dominates. When we split the sample by specific star-formation rate, concentration index, and stellar mass, each subsample's emission line surface brightness profiles and ratios differ, indicating that extra-planar gas properties can vary. The emission line surface brightnesses of the gas around high specific star-formation rate galaxies are higher at all distances, and the line ratios are closer to ratios characteristic of H ii regions compared with low specific star-formation rate galaxies. The less concentrated and lower stellar mass samples exhibit line ratios that are more like H ii regions at larger distances than their more concentrated and higher stellar mass counterparts. The largest difference between different subsamples occurs when the galaxies are split by stellar mass. We additionally infer that gas far from the midplane in more massive galaxies has the highest temperatures and steepest radial temperature gradients based on their [N ii]/Hα and [O ii]/Hα ratios between the disk and the halo. SDSS IV.

  5. Charge-distribution effect of imaging molecular structure by high-order above-threshold ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Bingbing; Fu Panming; Guo Yingchun; Zhang Bin; Zhao Zengxiu; Yan Zongchao

    2010-10-15

    Using a triatomic molecular model, we show that the interference pattern in the high-order above-threshold ionization (HATI) spectrum depends dramatically on the charge distribution of the molecular ion. Therefore the charge distribution can be considered a crucial factor for imaging a molecular geometric structure. Based on this study, a general destructive interference formula for each above-threshold ionization channel is obtained for a polyatomic molecule concerning the positions and charge values of each nuclei. Comparisons are made for the HATI spectra of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}. These results may shed light on imaging complex molecular structure by the HATI spectrum.

  6. High-resolution ion pulse ionization chamber with air filling for the 222Rn decays detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Etezov, R. A.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. The chamber is intended to register α-particles from the 222Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. The digital pulse processing method is proposed to improve the energy resolution of the ion pulse ionization chamber. An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV α-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure has been investigated and the results are presented.

  7. PHOTOIONIZATION OF HIGH-ALTITUDE GAS IN A SUPERNOVA-DRIVEN TURBULENT INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Kenneth; Hill, Alex S.; Haffner, L. Matthew; Reynolds, R. J.; Joung, M. Ryan; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Benjamin, Robert A.; Madsen, G. J.

    2010-10-01

    We investigate models for the photoionization of the widespread diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in galaxies. In particular, we address the long standing question of the penetration of Lyman continuum photons from sources close to the galactic midplane to large heights in the galactic halo. We find that recent hydrodynamical simulations of a supernova-driven interstellar medium (ISM) have low-density paths and voids that allow for ionizing photons from midplane OB stars to reach and ionize gas many kiloparsecs above the midplane. We find that ionizing fluxes throughout our simulation grids are larger than predicted by one-dimensional slab models, thus allowing for photoionization by O stars of low altitude neutral clouds in the Galaxy that are also detected in H{alpha}. In previous studies of such clouds, the photoionization scenario had been rejected and the H{alpha} had been attributed to enhanced cosmic ray ionization or scattered light from midplane H II regions. We do find that the emission measure distributions in our simulations are wider than those derived from H{alpha} observations in the Milky Way. In addition, the horizontally averaged height dependence of the gas density in the hydrodynamical models is lower than inferred in the Galaxy. These discrepancies are likely due to the absence of magnetic fields in the hydrodynamic simulations and we discuss how magnetohydrodynamic effects may reconcile models and observations. Nevertheless, we anticipate that the inclusion of magnetic fields in the dynamical simulations will not alter our primary finding that midplane OB stars are capable of producing high-altitude DIG in a realistic three-dimensional ISM.

  8. High pressure synthesis gas conversion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this research project is to build and test a high pressure fermentation system for the production of ethanol from synthesis gas. The fermenters, pumps, controls, and analytical system were procured or fabricated and assembled in our laboratory. This system was then used to determine the effects of high pressure on growth and ethanol production by Clostridium ljungdahlii. The limits of cell concentration and mass transport relationships were found in CSTR and immobilized cell reactors (ICR). The minimum retention times and reactor volumes were found for ethanol production in these reactors. A maximum operating pressure of 150 psig has been shown to be possible for C. ljungdahlli with the medium of Phillips et al. This medium was developed for atmospheric pressure operation in the CSTR to yield maximum ethanol concentrations and thus is not best for operation at elevated pressures. It is recommended that a medium development study be performed for C. ljungdahlii at increased pressure. Cell concentration, gas conversion and product concentration profiles were presented for C. ljungdahlii as a function of gas flow rate, the variable which affects bacterium performance the most. This pressure was chosen as a representative pressure over the 0--150 psig operating pressure range for the bacterium. Increased pressure negatively affected ethanol productivity probably due to the fact that medium composition was designed for atmospheric pressure operation. Medium development at increased pressure is necessary for high pressure development of the system.

  9. Use of relativistic rise in ionization chambers for measurement of high energy heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelmy, S. D.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.; Vogel, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A balloon-borne instrument has been constructed to measure the energy spectra of cosmic-ray heavy nuclei in the range of about 0.3 to about 100 GeV/amu. It makes use of the relativistic rise portion of the Bethe-Bloch curve in ionization chambers for energy determination in the 10- to 100-GeV/amu interval. The instrument consists of six layers of dual-gap ionization chambers for energy determination above 10 GeV/amu. Charge is determined with a NE114 scintillator and a Pilot 425 plastic Cerenkov counter. A CO2 gas Cerenkov detector (1 atm; threshold of 30 GeV/amu) calibrates the ion chambers in the relativistic rise region. The main emphasis of the instrument is the determination of the change of the ratio of Iron (26) to the Iron secondaries (21-25) in the energy range of 10 to 100 GeV/amu. Preliminary data from a balloon flight in the fall of 1982 from Palestine, TX is presented.

  10. KINEMATICS AND EXCITATION OF THE RAM PRESSURE STRIPPED IONIZED GAS FILAMENTS IN THE COMA CLUSTER OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Michitoshi; Yagi, Masafumi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Furusawa, Hisanori; Hattori, Takashi; Okamura, Sadanori

    2012-04-10

    We present the results of deep imaging and spectroscopic observations of very extended ionized gas (EIG) around four member galaxies of the Coma Cluster of galaxies: RB 199, IC 4040, GMP 2923, and GMP 3071. The EIGs were serendipitously found in an H{alpha} narrowband imaging survey of the central region of the Coma Cluster. The relative radial velocities of the EIGs with respect to the systemic velocities of the parent galaxies from which they emanate increase almost monotonically with the distance from the nucleus of the respective galaxies, reaching {approx} - 400 to - 800 km s{sup -1} at around 40-80 kpc from the galaxies. The one-sided morphologies and the velocity fields of the EIGs are consistent with the predictions of numerical simulations of ram pressure stripping. We found a very low velocity filament (v{sub rel} {approx} -1300 km s{sup -1}) at the southeastern edge of the disk of IC 4040. Some bright compact knots in the EIGs of RB 199 and IC 4040 exhibit blue continuum and strong H{alpha} emission. The equivalent widths of the H{alpha} emission exceed 200 A and are greater than 1000 Angstrom-Sign for some knots. The emission-line intensity ratios of the knots are basically consistent with those of sub-solar abundance H II regions. These facts indicate that intensive star formation occurs in the knots. Some filaments, including the low-velocity filament of the IC 4040 EIG, exhibit shock-like emission-line spectra, suggesting that shock heating plays an important role in ionization and excitation of the EIGs.

  11. Gas phase enantiomeric distinction of (R)- and (S)-aromatic hydroxy esters by negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a chiral reagent gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancel, Valérie; Sellier, Nicole; Lesage, Denis; Fournier, Françoise; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2004-10-01

    Negative ion chemical ionization (NICI) using a chiral reagent gas such as (2S,3S) butanediol (GSS) allows the differentiation of chiral [alpha] hydroxy esters (MR or MS). The distinction is significantly enhanced by using CID on the deprotonated hetero dimer [M + (GSS-H)]-. The contribution of a non covalent [M + (GSS-H)]- competitive form is very minor. In fact, a covalent form appears favored. To produce a covalent adduct ion, an enantioselectivity of the alkoxide attack on the electrophilic ester site to form a tetravalent adduct is suggested by the product ion abundances. This observed steric control is consistent with the one observed in solution (Cram-Felkin addition/reduction orientation). The dissociations under collision conditions of the product deprotonated diastereomeric compounds show a stereospecific effect in the elimination of alcohol from the tetravalent adduct ions rather than a regeneration of the deprotonated diol reagent as expected from non-covalent heterodimer. This study shows an orientation with a chiral compound that allows, from an analytical point of view, the distinction of enantiomers and the attribution of chirality in the gas phase under NICI conditions.

  12. A perspective on MALDI alternatives-total solvent-free analysis and electron transfer dissociation of highly charged ions by laserspray ionization.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2010-05-01

    Progress in research is hindered by analytical limitations, especially in biological areas in which sensitivity and dynamic range are critical to success. Inherent difficulties of characterization associated with complexity arising from heterogeneity of various materials including topologies (isomeric composition) and insolubility also limit progress. For this reason, we are developing methods for total solvent-free analysis by mass spectrometry consisting of solvent-free ionization followed by solvent-free gas-phase separation. We also recently constructed a novel matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) source that provides a simple, practical and sensitive way of producing highly charged ions by laserspray ionization (LSI) or singly charged ions commonly observed with MALDI by choice of matrix or matrix preparation. This is the first ionization source with such freedom-an extremely powerful analytical 'switch'. Multiply charged LSI ions allow molecules exceeding the mass-to-charge range of the instrument to be observed and permit for the first time electron transfer dissociation fragment ion analysis.

  13. Comparison of a gas chromatography-optical fibre (GC-OF) detector with a gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) for determination of alcoholic compounds in industrial atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lurdes I B; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P; Duarte, A C

    2008-07-15

    An analytical methodology based on an optical fibre detector coupled to gas chromatograph has been developed for the speciation of some volatile alcoholic compounds. This methodology combines the separation capability of gas chromatography with an optical fibre detector made of an optical fibre sensitized with a thin polymeric film of poly[methyl(3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)siloxane] (PMTFPS). The response of the detector has been characterized at 650 nm for nine different alcohols (allyl alcohol, n-propyl alcohol, sec-butyl alcohol, isobutyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol, isoamyl alcohol, methyl isobutyl carbinol, cyclohexanol and diacetone alcohol). An alternative method based on gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) was also used in order to evaluated the performance and compare the analytical results with the proposed method. The time of analysis, the analytical error and the analytical performance were similar for both methods. However, the analytical apparatus based on the GC-OF detector is much less expensive than the GC-FID and show high accuracy and suitability for actual monitoring on indoor atmospheres.

  14. The different origins of high- and low-ionization broad emission lines revealed by gravitational microlensing in the Einstein cross

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braibant, L.; Hutsemékers, D.; Sluse, D.; Anguita, T.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the kinematics and ionization structure of the broad emission line region of the gravitationally lensed quasar QSO2237+0305 (the Einstein cross) using differential microlensing in the high- and low-ionization broad emission lines. We combine visible and near-infrared spectra of the four images of the lensed quasar and detect a large-amplitude microlensing effect distorting the high-ionization CIV and low-ionization Hα line profiles in image A. While microlensing only magnifies the red wing of the Balmer line, it symmetrically magnifies the wings of the CIV emission line. Given that the same microlensing pattern magnifies both the high- and low-ionization broad emission line regions, these dissimilar distortions of the line profiles suggest that the high- and low-ionization regions are governed by different kinematics. Since this quasar is likely viewed at intermediate inclination, we argue that the differential magnification of the blue and red wings of Hα favors a flattened, virialized, low-ionization region whereas the symmetric microlensing effect measured in CIV can be reproduced by an emission line formed in a polar wind, without the need of fine-tuned caustic configurations. Based on observations made with the ESO-VLT, Paranal, Chile; Proposals 076.B-0197 and 076.B-0607 (PI: Courbin).

  15. Average ionization EOS model for high-Z plasmas and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoungkeun; Zhang, Lina; Samulyak, Roman; Parks, Paul

    2013-10-01

    A numerical model for average ionization EOS for high-Z plasmas undergoing multiple ionization processes has been developed based on the Zeldovich model. The corresponding software library has been implemented in FronTier, a hydrodynamic code that explicitly tracks material interfaces via the front tracking method, and verified with respect to solutions of coupled systems of Saha equations. FronTier with this EOS model has been used for simulations of the formation and implosion of plasma liners in the concept of Plasma Jet driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion (PJMIF) and the pellet ablation in tokamaks. We showed that in PJMIF simulations, atomic processes are responsible for significant pressure increases in self-imploding argon liners and the overall change of dynamics of the jet merger via a cascade of oblique shock waves. In pellet ablation simulations, the ablation rate of neon and argon pellets decreased due to ionization-induced energy sinks, and the ablation flow reached a double transonic state similar to that observed in deuterium pellets.

  16. Spectral measurements of electron temperature in nonequilibrium highly ionized He plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, O. V.; Chinnov, V. F.; Kavyrshin, D. I.; Ageev, A. G.

    2016-11-01

    It has been experimentally shown that highly ionized He arc plasma does not achieve local thermodynamic equilibrium expected for plasmas with electron concentrations above 1 × 1016 cm-3 like argon plasma. We have found that the reason for this deviation is strong nonisotropy of plasma. Triple electron recombination with temperatures of 2.5-3 eV is almost absent. Charged particles move from the arc (r = 1 mm) to chamber walls due to ambipolar diffusion creating ionization nonequilibrium over the excited states rendering Boltzmann distribution and Saha equation inapplicable for determining electron temperature. A method for determining electron temperature is suggested that is based on using the relative intensities of the atomic and ion lines. Its advantage lies in an energy gap between these lines’ states over 50 eV that reduces the influence of nonequilibrium on the result. This influence can be taken into account if the ionization energies of emitting states of atom and ion have close values. The suggested method can be expanded for any media including those with dimensional nonisotropy that have both atomic and ion lines in their emission spectra.

  17. High and Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Induce Different Secretome Profiles in a Human Skin Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Matzke, Melissa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Hu, Zeping; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-03-18

    It is postulated that secreted soluble factors are important contributors of bystander effect and adaptive responses observed in low dose ionizing radiation. Using multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based proteomics, we quantified the changes of skin tissue secretome – the proteins secreted from a full thickness, reconstituted 3-dimensional skin tissue model 48 hr after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. Overall, 135 proteins showed statistical significant difference between the sham (0 cGy) and any of the irradiated groups (3, 10 or 200 cGy) on the basis of Dunnett adjusted t-test; among these, 97 proteins showed a trend of downregulation and 9 proteins showed a trend of upregulation with increasing radiation dose. In addition, there were 21 and 8 proteins observed to have irregular trends with the 10 cGy irradiated group either having the highest or the lowest level among all three radiated doses. Moreover, two proteins, carboxypeptidase E and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 were sensitive to ionizing radiation, but relatively independent of radiation dose. Conversely, proteasome activator complex subunit 2 protein appeared to be sensitive to the dose of radiation, as rapid upregulation of this protein was observed when radiation doses were increased from 3, to 10 or 200 cGy. These results suggest that different mechanisms of action exist at the secretome level for low and high doses of ionizing radiation.

  18. The Effect of High-Dose Ionizing Radiation on the Astrobiological Model Lichen Circinaria gyrosa.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Rosa; Miller, Ana Zélia; Cubero, Beatriz; Martín-Cerezo, M Luisa; Raguse, Marina; Meeßen, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    The lichen Circinaria gyrosa is an astrobiological model defined by its high capacity of resistance to space conditions and to a simulated martian environment. Therefore, it became part of the currently operated BIOMEX experiment on board the International Space Station and the recent STARLIFE campaign to study the effects of four types of space-relevant ionizing radiation. The samples were irradiated with helium and iron ions at doses up to 2 kGy, with X-rays at doses up to 5 kGy and with γ rays at doses from 6 to 113 kGy. Results on C. gyrosa's resistance to simulated space ionizing radiation and its post-irradiation viability were obtained by (i) chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PSII), (ii) epifluorescence microscopy, (iii) confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and (iv) field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Results of photosynthetic activity and epifluorescence show no significant changes up to a dose of 1 kGy (helium ions), 2 kGy (iron ions), 5 kGy (X-rays)-the maximum doses applied for those radiation qualities-as well as a dose of 6 kGy of γ irradiation, which was the lowest dose applied for this low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Significant damage in a dose-related manner was observed only at much higher doses of γ irradiation (up to 113 kGy). These data corroborate the findings of the parallel STARLIFE studies on the effects of ionizing radiation on the lichen Circinaria gyrosa, its isolated photobiont, and the lichen Xanthoria elegans. Key Words: Simulated space ionizing radiation-Gamma rays-Extremotolerance-Lichens-Circinaria gyrosa-Photosynthetic activity. Astrobiology 17, 145-153.

  19. Spatio-temporal optimization of a laser produced Al-plasma: Generation of highly ionized species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smijesh, N.; H. Rao, Kavya; Klemke, N.; Philip, R.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Sang, R. T.

    2016-11-01

    Laser produced plasmas are transient in nature, and their properties, which depend on the laser parameters as well as the material properties and the irradiation conditions, can be tailored for different applications. Highly ionized Al plasmas generated using 7 ns and negatively chirped 60 ps pulses are optimized for the purpose of generating Al IV and Al III, respectively. The plasma is optimized spatio-temporally for Al IV or Al III with irradiation energy as the control parameter using time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. Plasmas attuned for higher charged states could be utilized as a good alternative source for the generation of high order harmonics.

  20. Role of tunnel ionization in high harmonic generation from substituted benzenes.

    PubMed

    Austin, Dane R; McGrath, Felicity; Miseikis, Lukas; Wood, David; Hawkins, Peter; Johnson, Allan S; Vacher, Morgane; Mašín, Zdeněk; Harvey, Alex; Ivanov, Misha; Smirnova, Olga; Marangos, Jon P

    2016-12-16

    We theoretically study high-harmonic generation in toluene, ortho-xylene and fluorobenzene driven by a 1.8 μm ultrashort pulse. We find that the chemical substitutions have a strong influence on the amplitude and phase of the emission from the highest occupied molecular orbital, despite having a small influence on the orbital itself. We show that this influence is due to the tunnel ionization step, which depends critically on the sign and amplitude of the asymptotic part of the wave function. We discuss how these effects would manifest in phase-sensitive high-harmonic generation spectroscopy experiments.

  1. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G.; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2008-12-08

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm+ and Cm2+; parallel studies were carried out with La+/2+, Gd+/2+ and Lu+/2+. Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M+-O](M = Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO+ with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO+](M = Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electron-transfer reactions from neutrals to the MO2+ ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO]= 6.4+-0.2 eV; IE[CmO+]= 15.8+-0.4 eV; D[Cm-O]= 710+-45 kJ mol-1; D[Cm+-O]= 670+-40 kJ mol-1; and D[Cm2+-O]= 342+-55 kJ mol-1. Estimates for the M2+-O bond energies for M = Cm, La, Gd and Lu are all intermediate between D[N2-O]and D[OC-O]--i.e., 167 kJ mol-1< D[M2+-O]< 532 kJ mol-1 -- such that the four MO2+ ions fulfill the thermodynamic requirement for catalytic O-atom transport from N2O to CO. It was demonstrated that the kinetics are also favorable and that the CmO2+, LaO2+, GdO2+ and LuO2+ dipositive ions each catalyze the gas-phase oxidation of CO to CO2 by N2O. The CmO2+ ion appeared during the reaction of Cm+ with O2 when the intermediate, CmO+, was not collisionally cooled -- although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO2+ is a stable species.

  2. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron-ionization or resonance-enhanced-multi-photon-ionization for characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Otto, Stefan; Streibel, Thorsten; Erdmann, Sabrina; Klingbeil, Sophie; Schulz-Bull, Detlef; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-10-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), as a part of dissolved organic matter (DOM), are environmental pollutants of the marine compartment. This study investigates the origin of PAH, which is supposed to derive mainly from anthropogenic activities, and their alteration along the salinity gradient of the Baltic Sea. Pyrolysis in combination with gas chromatography and two mass selective detectors in one measurement cycle are utilized as a tool for an efficient trace analysis of such complex samples, by which it is possible to detect degradation products of high molecular structures. Along the north-south transect of the Baltic Sea a slightly rising trend for PAH is visible. Their concentration profiles correspond to the ship traffic as a known anthropogenic source, underlined by the value of special isomer ratios such as phenanthrene and anthracene (0.31-0.45) or pyrene and fluoranthene (0.44-0.53). The detection of naphthalene and the distribution of its alkylated representatives support this statement.

  3. Stimulation of high-frequency breakdown of gas in Uragan-3M torsatron by runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, I. K.; Tarasov, M. I.; Sitnikov, D. A.; Pashnev, V. K.; Lytova, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    In experiments on confinement and heating of plasma in the Uragan-3M torsatron, the method of high-frequency breakdown of the working gas is used. In these experiments, in conditions of a relatively stable magnetic field, the rf power supplied to the setup chamber has a frequency close to the ion-cyclotron frequency. Such a method of gas breakdown is not always sufficiently reliable. In our experiments, preliminary ionization of the working gas by the run-away electron beam is used for stabilizing the breakdown. This work contains the results of experiments on enhancement of the runaway electron beam and on the interaction of the runaway electron beam in the Uragan-3M torsatron with the HF electromagnetic pump field. This enables us to formulate a number of recommendations for using spontaneously formed beams of accelerated particles for stimulating the rf breakdown. Our results confirm the possibility of gas breakdown by runaway electrons.

  4. A high-performance matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer with collisional cooling.

    PubMed

    Loboda, A V; Ackloo, S; Chernushevich, I V

    2003-01-01

    A high-performance orthogonal time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer was developed specifically for use in combination with a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) source. The MALDI source features an ionization region containing a buffer gas with variable pressure. The source is interfaced to the TOF section via a collisional focusing ion guide. The pressure in the source influences the rate of cooling and allows control of ion fragmentation. The instrument provides uniform resolution up to 18,000 FWHM (full width at half maximum). Mass accuracy routinely achieved with a single-point internal recalibration is below 2 ppm for protein digest samples. The instrument is also capable of recording spectra of samples containing compounds with a broad range of masses while using one set of experimental conditions and without compromising resolution or mass accuracy.

  5. Adhesion improvement of carbon-based coatings through a high ionization deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broitman, E.; Hultman, L.

    2012-06-01

    The deposition of highly adherent carbon nitride (CNx) films using a pretreatment with two high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) power supplies in a master-slave configuration is reviewed. SKF3 (AISI 52100) steel substrates were pretreated in the environment of a high ionized Cr+Ar plasma in order to sputter clean the surface and implant Cr metal ions. CNx films were subsequently deposited at room temperature by DC magnetron sputtering from a high purity C target in a N2/Ar plasma discharge. All processing was done in an industrial-scale CemeCon CC800 coating system. A series of depositions were obtained with samples pretreated at different bias voltages (DC and pulsed). The adhesion of CNx films, evaluated by the Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C test, reaches strength quality HF1. Adhesion results are correlated to high resolution transmission electron microscopy observations confirming the formation of an optimal interfacial mixing layer of Cr and steel. The throwing power increase for HIPIMS coatings is associated to the higher ionization in the plasma discharge.

  6. Miniature Gas Chromatograph (GC): Penning Ionization Electron Spectroscopy (PIES) Instrument for the Trace Analyses of Extraterrestrial Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Sheverev, Valery A.; Holland, Paul M.; Takeuchi, Norishige

    2006-01-01

    In situ exploration of the solar system to identify its early chemistry as preserved in icy bodies and to look for compelling evidence of astrobiology will require new technology for chemical analysis. Chemical measurements in space flight environments highlight the need for a high level of positive identification of chemical compounds, since re-measurement by alternative techniques for confirmation will not be feasible. It also may not be possible to anticipate all chemical species that are observed, and important species may be present only at trace levels where they can be masked by complex chemical backgrounds. Up to now, the only techniques providing independent sample identification of GC separated components across a wide range of chemical species have been Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS). We describe here the development of a versatile and robust miniature GC detector based on Penning Ionization Electron Spectroscopy (PIES), for use with miniature GC systems being developed for planetary missions. PIES identifies the sample molecule through spectra related to its ionization potential. The combination of miniature GC technology with the primary identification capabilities of PIES provides an analytical approach ideal for planetary analyses.

  7. Studies on the Application of High Voltage Discharge Ionization and Ablation in Supersonic-Jets for the Generation of Intense Cluster Ion Beams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Ansgar

    Glow discharge and pulsed capacitor discharge ionization in supersonic expansions were investigated for the production of intense beams of molecular cluster ions from seeded and ablated compounds. A low cost high voltage high current pulser based on a triggered spark gap switch is described as a mean for ionization and ablation. Besides, details of the molecular beam apparatus and modified pulsed valve are given. Cluster cations rm (Ar)_ {n}^+, rm (CO_2) _{n}^{+}, rm (C_6H_6)_{n}^+ and rm (H_2O)_{n }^+ were produced by pulsed capacitor discharge ionization in the expansion region of a seeded free-jet. The observed cluster mass spectra (CMS) for Ar, rm C_6H_6 and H _2O show the characteristic features (magic numbers) of electron beam and photo ionized clusters under molecular flow conditions. Indications for the presence of magic numbers in the CMS of {(CO _2)_{n}^+} cluster ions at n = 20, 26, 30 and 34 similar to those found for rare gas clusters have been found. Cationic metal ligand complexes Cu(Toluene) _{rm n}^+, Cu(Acetone) _{rm n}^+, Cu(Methanol)_{rm n}^+ , Cu(Ethylether)_{rm n }^+, Cu(Water)_{ rm n}^+, Al(Water)_ {rm n}^+ were synthesized by ablation of the metal from metallic discharge electrodes in a discharge gas mixture of helium seeded with the ligand of choice. The CMS of the expanded plasmas show little background ion signal besides the metal-ligand species. Charge exchange processes in the expansion guarantee high ionization yields of the desired species and account for low backgrounds. Changes in the successive binding energy of Cu(Water)_ {rm n}^+ clusters n = 1-4 are clearly observed in the CMS as step formation. A similar pattern found in the Cu(Acetone)_{ rm n}^+ CMS suggests the same trend in the successive binding energy as known for water. Ablation from a Cr(acac)_3 in a copper matrix was employed for the synthesis of Cr(Acetone) _{rm n}^+ and Cr(Benzene)^+ complexes demonstrating the ability to use nonconducting compounds as a metal source

  8. High performance hand-held gas chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.M.

    1998-04-28

    The Microtechnology Center of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a high performance hand-held, real time detection gas chromatograph (HHGC) by Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technology. The total weight of this hand-held gas chromatograph is about five lbs., with a physical size of 8{close_quotes} x 5{close_quotes} x 3{close_quotes} including carrier gas and battery. It consumes about 12 watts of electrical power with a response time on the order of one to two minutes. This HHGC has an average effective theoretical plate of about 40k. Presently, its sensitivity is limited by its thermal sensitive detector at PPM. Like a conventional G.C., this HHGC consists mainly of three major components: (1) the sample injector, (2) the column, and (3) the detector with related electronics. The present HHGC injector is a modified version of the conventional injector. Its separation column is fabricated completely on silicon wafers by means of MEMS technology. This separation column has a circular cross section with a diameter of 100 pm. The detector developed for this hand-held GC is a thermal conductivity detector fabricated on a silicon nitride window by MEMS technology. A normal Wheatstone bridge is used. The signal is fed into a PC and displayed through LabView software.

  9. The susceptibility of TaOx-based memristors to high dose rate ionizing radiation and total ionizing dose

    SciTech Connect

    McLain, Michael Lee; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Mickel, Patrick R.; Hanson, Donald J.; McDonald, Joseph K.; Hughart, David Russell; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2014-11-11

    This paper investigates the effects of high dose rate ionizing radiation and total ionizing dose (TID) on tantalum oxide (TaOx) memristors. Transient data were obtained during the pulsed exposures for dose rates ranging from approximately 5.0 ×107 rad(Si)/s to 4.7 ×108 rad(Si)/s and for pulse widths ranging from 50 ns to 50 μs. The cumulative dose in these tests did not appear to impact the observed dose rate response. Static dose rate upset tests were also performed at a dose rate of ~3.0 ×108 rad(Si)/s. This is the first dose rate study on any type of memristive memory technology. In addition to assessing the tolerance of TaOx memristors to high dose rate ionizing radiation, we also evaluated their susceptibility to TID. The data indicate that it is possible for the devices to switch from a high resistance off-state to a low resistance on-state in both dose rate and TID environments. The observed radiation-induced switching is dependent on the irradiation conditions and bias configuration. Furthermore, the dose rate or ionizing dose level at which a device switches resistance states varies from device to device; the enhanced susceptibility observed in some devices is still under investigation. As a result, numerical simulations are used to qualitatively capture the observed transient radiation response and provide insight into the physics of the induced current/voltages.

  10. Pulsed discharge helium ionization detector : a new sensitive space detector for gas chromatography ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, C.; Cabane, M.; Coscia, D.; Coll, P.; Eugenie, J.; Brun, J. F.; Israel, G.

    2003-04-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is a powerful analytical technique which has been widely used in the exploration of other planetary atmospheres and surfaces. It was part of the scientific payloads devoted to in situ chemical analysis of the soil of Mars, the atmosphere of Venus, and it is currently present in the Huygens probe en route to explore Titan’s atmosphere as well as in the Rosetta lander probe to investigate a cometary nucleus. Obviously, since it was first used in a Viking probe (1976), space GC was improved to fulfil the more and more constraining scientific and space instrumental requirements. More particularly, the separation part, composed of chromatographic columns, was the subject of transformations which contributed to significantly improve the efficiency and the sensitivity of the technique. But on the other hand, space GC detectors remained relatively rudimentary systems, if one except the introduction of mass spectrometry coupled to GC, and they became the limiting factor to a better sensitivity of the whole instrument. In other words, much more sensitive space GC is now required to investigate the composition in organics of hostile environments, as can be the soil of Mars where concentration in organics could be limited to trace levels. That is the reason why, in order to overcome this limitation, we are currently leading a research and development program funded by the space French agency to develop a new type of space chromatographic detector which could meet the objectives of the future space GC : the pulsed discharge helium ionisation detector (PDHID). The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the compatibility of the analytical performances of PDHID with space exploration requirements, by presenting the results of a series of experiments led with a commercial version of PDHID. These results made us starting a program of miniaturisation of this type of detector to build a version compatible with space instrumentation requirements in terms of mass

  11. Coincidence studies of capture and ionization in highly charged Iq+-He and Uq+-He collisions at medium velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datz, S.; Hippler, R.; Andersen, L. H.; Dittner, P. F.; Knudsen, H.; Krause, H. F.; Miller, P. D.; Pepmiller, P. L.; Rosseel, T.; Schuch, R.; Stolterfoht, N.; Yamazaki, Y.; Vane, C. R.

    1990-04-01

    Electron capture and ionization processes were investigated for Iq+-He and Uq+-He collisions at incident energies 0.1-1.0 MeV/nucleon and for incident charge states q=5-44. Cross sections for single-electron capture, transfer ionization, single ionization, and double ionization were obtained using a projectile-ion recoil-ion coincidence technique. A pronounced interplay among the different electronic processes was observed. Cross sections for single ionization show a rather weak charge-state dependence, in disagreement with recent calculations of McKenzie and Olson [Phys. Rev. A 35, 2863 (1987)]. In a second experiment, photon recoil-ion coincidences were measured to obtain partial cross sections for capture into certain projectile n states. These measurements provide strong evidence that transfer ionization populates lower projectile n states than does single-electron capture. Zero-degree electron spectroscopy, coincident with charge capture for 0.5 MeV/nucleon U30+ projectiles revealed that the free electron in transfer ionization is released from the projectile to its continuum and from high-lying Rydberg states of the projectile.

  12. Reanalysis of high-resolution XMM-Newton data of V2491 Cygni using models of collisionally ionized hot absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balman, Ş.; Gamsızkan, Ç.

    2017-02-01

    Aims: We model spectral absorption features in data of the high-resolution XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer. Methods: We performed X-ray spectral analysis and modeling using the SRON software SPEX version 2.05.04. Results: We present a reanalysis of data obtained with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer of the classical nova V2491 Cyg from two different pointings, 40 d and 50 d after outburst. We aim to model absorption components in the high-resolution spectra independently of the continuum model. To model the complex absorption, we used hot collisionally ionized (in equilibrium) absorber models along with interstellar absorption (of gas and dust origin separately) that we discuss in the light of observations. For an adequate approximation and to facilitate the fitting procedures, we used a blackbody model for the continuum. We find blackbody temperatures in the range 61-91 eV (slightly variable over the two observations) that yield a white dwarf (WD) mass of 1.15-1.3 M⊙ assuming this range is the maximum temperature achieved during the H-burning phase. Our fits model the ionized absorption features simultaneously, thus calculating a global velocity shift for the absorption component in the data originating from the nova wind and/or ejecta as a result of collisionally ionized hot absorption. We derive two different hot-absorber components from our fits with blueshifts yielding 2900-3800 km s-1 for the first (day 40) and 2600-3600 km s-1 for the second observation 50 days after outburst that are consistent with ejecta or wind speeds. The two collisionally ionized hot-absorption components have temperatures kT1 ≃ 1.0-3.6 keV and kT2 ≃ 0.4-0.87 keV with rms velocities σv1 872 km s-1 and σv2 56 km s-1. These are consistent with shock temperatures in the X-ray wavelengths. V2491 Cyg shows signature of H-burning with underabundant carbon C/C⊙ = 0.3-0.5, and enhanced nitrogen N/N⊙ = 5-7 and oxygen O/O⊙ = 16-43. The high oxygen

  13. Gas-Phase Stability of G-quadruplex DNA Determined by Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Mazzitelli, Carolyn L.; Wang, Junmei; Smith, Suncerae I.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2007-01-01

    The relative gas-phase stabilities of seven quadruplex DNA structures, [d(TG4T)]4, [d(T2G3T)]4, [d(G4T4G4)]2, [d(T2AG3)2]2, d(T2AG3)4, d(T2G4)4, and d(G2T4)4, were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). MD simulations revealed that the G-quadruplexes maintained their structures in the gas phase although the G-quartets were distorted to some degree and ammonium ions, retained by [d(TG4T)]4 and [d(T2G3T)]4, played a key role in stabilizing the tetrad structure. Energy-variable collisional activated dissociation was used to assess the relative stabilities of each quadruplex based on E1/2 values, and the resulting order of relative stabilities was found to be [d(TG4T)]4 ≫ d(T2AG3)4 ∼ d(T2G4)4 > [d(T2G3T)]4 > [d(T2AG3)2]2 ∼ d(G2T4)4 ∼ [d(G4T4G4)]2. The stabilities from the E1/2 values generally paralleled the RMSD and relative free energies of the quadruplexes based on the MD energy analysis. One exception to the general agreement is [d(G4T4G4)]2 which had the lowest E1/2 value, but was determined to be the most stable quadruplex according to the free energy analysis and ranked fourth based on the RMSD comparison. This discrepancy is attributed to differences in the fragmentation pathway of the quadruplex. PMID:17719795

  14. High temperature surface protection. [10 gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.

    1978-01-01

    Alloys of the MCrAlX type are the basis for high temperature surface protection systems in gas turbines. M can be one or more of Ni, Co, or Fe and X denotes a reactive metal added to enhance oxide scale adherence. The selection and formation as well as the oxidation, hot corrosion and thermal fatigue performance of MCrAlX coatings are discussed. Coatings covered range from simple aluminides formed by pack cementation to the more advanced physical vapor deposition overlay coatings and developmental plasma spray deposited thermal barrier coatings.

  15. High explosives vapor detection by atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization/tandem mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G.

    1996-02-01

    The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of traces of high explosives is described. Particular emphasis is placed on use of the quadrupole ion trap as the type of tandem mass spectrometer. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge provides a simple, rugged, and efficient means for anion formation while the quadrupole ion trap provides for efficient tandem mass spectrometry. Mass selective ion accumulation and non-specific ion activation methods can be used to overcome deleterious effects arising from ion/ion interactions. Such interactions constitute the major potential technical barrier to the use of the ion trap for real-time monitoring of targeted compounds in uncontrolled and highly variable matrices. Tailored waveforms can be used to effect both mass selective ion accumulation and ion activation. Concatenated tailored waveforms allow for both functions in a single experiment thereby providing the capability for monitoring several targeted species simultaneously. The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with a state-of-the-art analytical quadrupole ion trap is a highly sensitive and specific detector for traces of high explosives. The combination is also small and inexpensive relative to virtually any other form of tandem mass spectrometry. The science and technology underlying the glow discharge/ion trap combination is sufficiently mature to form the basis for an engineering effort to make the detector portable. 85 refs.

  16. Seasonal variation of gastroprotective terpenoids in Maytenus robusta (Celastraceae) quantified by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID).

    PubMed

    Zermiani, Tailyn; Junior, Antonio A S; Ferreira, Renê A; Wagner, Theodoro M; Machado, Marina S; Cechinel-Filho, Valdir; Niero, Rivaldo

    2016-11-01

    The triterpenes friedelin (1), β-friedelinol (2) and 3,15-dioxo-21α-hydroxyfriedelane (3) in the aerial parts of Maytenus robusta, a Brazilian medicinal plant with antiulcer potential, were seasonally quantified by gas chromatography flame-ionization detection (GC-FID) using an external standard. The method was found to be linear, precise and sensitive. Compounds 1 and 2 were found in M. robusta leaves and branches, with highest concentrations in the leaves collected in autumn, i.e. 3.21 ± 0.16 and 12.60 ± 1.49 mg g-1 dry weight of 1 and 2, respectively. On the other hand, compound 3 was found only in the branches, with the highest concentrations in winter and autumn (0.21 ± 0.01 and 0.20 ± 0.02 mg g-1). The results allow to define the optimal season and plant parts for the collection of M. robusta as a phytotherapeutic drug.

  17. Quantitation of volatile oils in ground cumin by supercritical fluid extraction and gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Heikes, D L; Scott, B; Gorzovalitis, N A

    2001-01-01

    Ground cumin is used as a flavoring agent in a number of ethnic cuisines. The chemical entities, which primarily establish its characteristically pungent flavor, are found in the volatile oil of cumin. Fixed oils and carbohydrates tend to round out the harshness of the volatile oil components. However, the quantity of volatile oil is commonly the measure of the quality of this spice. For several decades, the spice industry has used a classical distillation procedure for the determination of volatile oil in cumin and other spices. However, the method is cumbersome and requires nearly 8 h to complete. Supercritical fluid extraction with capillary gas chromatography-flame ionization detection is utilized in the formulation of a rapid, accurate, and specific method for the determination of volatile oil in ground cumin. Samples are extracted in a static-dynamic mode with CO2 at 550 bar and 100 degrees C. Toluene is used as a static modifier addition. The extracted volatile oil, collected in toluene, is analyzed directly using tetradecane as the internal standard. Integration is performed as grouped peaks to include all chemical entities found in cumin volatile oil recovered from the official distillation procedure. Results from this procedure compare favorably with those obtained by the official procedure (coefficient of correlation = 0.995, 24 samples).

  18. Simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocyanate in plasma by chemical ionization gas chromatography mass-spectrometry (CI-GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Raj K; Oda, Robert P; Youso, Stephanie L; Petrikovics, Ilona; Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Rockwood, Gary A; Logue, Brian A

    2012-11-01

    An analytical method utilizing chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for the simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocyanate in plasma. Sample preparation for this analysis required essentially one-step by combining the reaction of cyanide and thiocyanate with pentafluorobenzyl bromide and simultaneous extraction of the product into ethyl acetate facilitated by a phase-transfer catalyst, tetrabutylammonium sulfate. The limits of detection for cyanide and thiocyanate were 1 μM and 50 nM, respectively. The linear dynamic range was from 10 μM to 20 mM for cyanide and from 500 nM to 200 μM for thiocyanate with correlation coefficients higher than 0.999 for both cyanide and thiocyanate. The precision, as measured by %RSD, was below 9 %, and the accuracy was within 15 % of the nominal concentration for all quality control standards analyzed. The gross recoveries of cyanide and thiocyanate from plasma were over 90 %. Using this method, the toxicokinetic behavior of cyanide and thiocyanate in swine plasma was assessed following cyanide exposure.

  19. Determination of benzene series compounds and chlorobenzenes in water sample by static headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongmei; Li, Tiejun; Sun, Xiumei; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Xiaoning; Zhong, Zhi; Guo, Yuanming

    2015-06-01

    A simple, efficient, solvent-free, and readily commercially available approach for the determination of eight benzene series compounds and 12 chlorobenzenes in water samples using the static headspace sampling and gas chromatography with flame ionization detection has been described in this paper. The proposed static headspace sampling method was initially optimized, and the optimum experimental conditions explored were 10 mL water sample containing 20% w/v sodium chloride placed in a 20 mL vial and stirred at 70°C for 43 min. The linearity of the method ranged from 1 to 200 μg/L for 20 analytes, with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.9962 and 0.9994. The limits of detection were in the μg/L level, ranging between 0.15 and 0.4 μg/L. The relative recoveries of spiked benzene series and chlorobenzenes with external calibration method at different concentration levels in pure, tap, and sea water samples were 84-113, 78-115 and 85-119%, respectively, with relative standard deviations of 3.8-6.8, 4.1-5.8, and 4.8-5.4% (n = 5), respectively. That this method can be successfully applied to the determination of benzene series compounds and chlorobenzenes in pure, tap, and sea water samples, simultaneously.

  20. Efficient generation of high beam-quality attosecond pulse with polarization-gating Bessel-Gauss beam from highly-ionized media.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Qingbin; Hong, Weiyi; Wang, Shaoyi; Wang, Zhe; Lu, Peixiang

    2012-07-02

    Single attosecond pulse generation with polarization gating Bessel-Gauss beam in relatively strongly-ionized media is investigated. The results show that Bessel-Gauss beam has the ability to suppress the spatial plasma dispersion effects caused by high density of free electrons, thus the laser field can maintain its spatial profile through highly-ionized medium. This indicates the use of Bessel-Gauss beam has advantages over Gaussian beam in high harmonic generation under high ionization conditions. In our scheme, significant improvement of spatiotemporal properties of harmonics is achieved and an isolated attosecond pulse with high beam quality is filtered out using polarization gating.

  1. Enhanced high harmonic generation driven by high-intensity laser in argon gas-filled hollow core waveguide.

    PubMed

    Cassou, Kevin; Daboussi, Sameh; Hort, Ondrej; Guilbaud, Olivier; Descamps, Dominique; Petit, Stéphane; Mével, Eric; Constant, Eric; Kazamias, Sophie

    2014-07-01

    We show that a significant enhancement of the photon flux produced by high harmonic generation can be obtained through guided configuration at high laser intensity largely above the saturation intensity. We identify two regimes. At low pressure, we observe an intense second plateau in the high harmonic spectrum in argon. At relatively high pressure, complex interplay between strongly time-dependent ionization processes and propagation effects leads to important spectral broadening without loss of spectral brightness. We show that the relevant parameter for this physical process is the product of laser peak power by gas pressure. We compare source performances with high harmonic generation using a gas jet in loose focusing geometry and conclude that the source developed is a good candidate for injection devices such as seeded soft x-ray lasers or free electron lasers in the soft x-ray range.

  2. Improvement of discharge pumping for pulsed high-pressure gas lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikin, Alexei A.; Galaktionov, Imar I.; Belov, Sergei N.; Kanatenko, Michael A.; Podmoshensky, Ivan V.

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents an upgrading technique using anisotropic-resistive (AR) electrodes and radionucide pre-ionization for discharge pumping of pulsed high-pressure gas lasers. Plutonium-238, polonium-210 and krypton-85 radionucide alpha and beta radiation sources were effectivelyused for pre-ionization in the volumetric discharge setup. These sources feature high stability, versatility and simplicity as compared to traditional UV irradiation and electron beam ionization techniques. The use of AR electrodes makes it possible to suppress efficiently electrode instabilities in volumetric discharges with various power modes of operation and to increase energy input in an active medium by a factor of 2-3 due to extended discharge duration in the volumetric phase. With the use of the AR cathode as an alternative to a metal one, a commercially available photo-ionization 2 laser gained two-fold increase in generation energy. It also showed a stable operation of the volumetric discharge in Ar, Kr, Xe mixtures with He at atmospheric pressure and allowed us to obtain generation in An, Kr!, Xe! spectral lines.

  3. Drifting localization of ionization runaway: Unraveling the nature of anomalous transport in high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Pavel; Rauch, Albert

    2011-12-04

    The plasma over the magnetron’s erosion “racetrack” is not azimuthally uniform but concentrated in distinct dense plasma zones which move in the {vector E}×{vector B} direction with about 10% of the electrons’ {vector E}×{vector B}/B{sup 2} drift velocity. The plasma zones are investigated with a gated camera working in concert with a streak camera for Al, Nb, Cu, and W targets in Ar or Kr background gas. It is found that each plasma zone has a high density edge which is the origin of a plasma-generating electron jet leaving the target zone. Each region of strong azimuthal density gradient generates an azimuthal electric field which promotes the escape of magnetized electrons and the formation of electron jets and plasma flares. The phenomena are proposed to be caused by an ionization instability where each dense plasma zone exhibits a high stopping power for drifting high energy electrons, thereby enhancing itself.

  4. Highly Ionized Iron Absorption Lines from Outflowing Gases in the X-ray Spectrum of NGC 1365

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risaliti, G.; Bianchi, S.; Matt, G.; Baldi, A.; Elvis, M.; Fabbiano, G.; Zezas, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present the discovery of four absorption lines in the X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365, at energies between 6.7 and 8.3 keV. The lines are detected with high statistical confidence (from >20 sigma for the strongest to -4 sigma for the weakest) in two XMM-Newton observations 60 ks long. We also detect the same lines, with a lower signal-to-noise ratio (but still >2 sigma for each line), in two previous shorter (-10 ks) XMM-Newton observations. The spectral analysis identifies these features as Fe XXV and Fe XXVI Kalpha and Kbeta lines, outflowing with velocities varying between -1000 and -5000 km/s among the observations. These are the highest quality detections of such lines so far. The high equivalent widths [EW (Kalpha) approximately 100 eV] and the Kalpha/Kbeta ratios imply that the lines are due to absorption of the AGN continuum by a highly ionized gas with column density NH-5?1023 cm(exp -2) at a distance of -(50-100)RS from the continuum source.

  5. Development of a gas-cylinder-free plasma desorption/ionization system for on-site detection of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Takahiro; Kakegawa, Ken; Aida, Mari; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Seto, Yasuo; Okino, Akitoshi

    2015-06-02

    A gas-cylinder-free plasma desorption/ionization system was developed to realize a mobile on-site analytical device for detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). In this system, the plasma source was directly connected to the inlet of a mass spectrometer. The plasma can be generated with ambient air, which is drawn into the discharge region by negative pressure in the mass spectrometer. High-power density pulsed plasma of 100 kW could be generated by using a microhollow cathode and a laboratory-built high-intensity pulsed power supply (pulse width: 10-20 μs; repetition frequency: 50 Hz). CWAs were desorbed and protonated in the enclosed space adjacent to the plasma source. Protonated sample molecules were introduced to the mass spectrometer by airflow through the discharge region. To evaluate the analytical performance of this device, helium and air plasma were directly irradiated to CWAs in the gas-cylinder-free plasma desorption/ionization system and the protonated molecules were analyzed by using an ion-trap mass spectrometer. A blister agent (nitrogen mustard 3) and nerve gases [cyclohexylsarin (GF), tabun (GA), and O-ethyl S-2-N,N-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX)] in solution in n-hexane were applied to the Teflon rod and used as test samples, after solvent evaporation. As a result, protonated molecules of CWAs were successfully observed as the characteristic ion peaks at m/z 204, 181, 163, and 268, respectively. In air plasma, the limits of detection were estimated to be 22, 20, 4.8, and 1.0 pmol, respectively, which were lower than those obtained with helium plasma. To achieve quantitative analysis, calibration curves were made by using CWA stimulant dipinacolyl methylphosphonate as an internal standard; straight correlation lines (R(2) = 0.9998) of the peak intensity ratios (target per internal standard) were obtained. Remarkably, GA and GF gave protonated dimer ions, and the ratios of the protonated dimer ions to the protonated

  6. Suzaku Observations of the Galactic Center: The Origin of Highly Ionized Iron Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, Yoshiaki; Koyama, Katsuji

    We have made long exposure observations ( 134 hours in total ) of the Galactic Center (GC) region with Suzaku, the 5th Japanese X-ray satellite. With the large effective area, high energy resolution, and low background of X-ray Imaging Spectrometers (XISs; CCD cameras on board Suzaku), we resolved the line complex near the energy of K-shell transitions of iron into 3 Kαlines, 6.4 keV (neutral), 6.7 keV (He-like) and 6.9 keV (H-like), and discovered 6 iron and nickel lines above 7 keV. The center energy of the He-like iron is determined very accurately to be 6680 ±1 ±5 eV, which favors the hot plasma origin with the predicted center energy of 6685 eV, rather than the charge exchange origin of 6666 eV. The line fluxes are uniformly distributed, in contrast to the clumpy structure of the molecular clouds. This fact is also against the charge exchange origin, because the flux of this process should trace the molecular clouds where donor electrons (neutral hydrogen) are rich. The electron temperature and ionization temperature are determined with the intensity ratio of the 7.9/6.7 keV and 6.9/6.7 keV lines, and are consistent with 6.5 keV, indicating a collisional ionization equilibrium plasma. We hence conclude that the origin of highly ionized iron lines is a hot thin plasma. We discovered five new extended objects from the GC region. They are probably supernova remnants or X-ray reflection nebulae. Further analysis of these objects will reveal the energy injection source of the Galactic center diffuse X-ray emission.

  7. Hardness assurance for proton direct ionization-induced SEEs using a high-energy proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Dodd, Paul E.; Doyle, Barney Lee; Trinczek, M.; Blackmore, E. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Reed, R. A.; Pellish, J. A.; LaBel, K. A.; Marshall, P. W.; Swanson, Scot E.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Van Deusen, Stuart B.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Martinez, Marino J.; Gordon, M. S.

    2014-11-06

    The low-energy proton energy spectra of all shielded space environments have the same shape. This shape is easily reproduced in the laboratory by degrading a high-energy proton beam, producing a high-fidelity test environment. We use this test environment to dramatically simplify rate prediction for proton direct ionization effects, allowing the work to be done at high-energy proton facilities, on encapsulated parts, without knowledge of the IC design, and with little or no computer simulations required. Proton direct ionization (PDI) is predicted to significantly contribute to the total error rate under the conditions investigated. Scaling effects are discussed using data from 65-nm, 45-nm, and 32-nm SOI SRAMs. These data also show that grazing-angle protons will dominate the PDI-induced error rate due to their higher effective LET, so PDI hardness assurance methods must account for angular effects to be conservative. As a result, we show that this angular dependence can be exploited to quickly assess whether an IC is susceptible to PDI.

  8. Hardness assurance for proton direct ionization-induced SEEs using a high-energy proton beam

    DOE PAGES

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; ...

    2014-11-06

    The low-energy proton energy spectra of all shielded space environments have the same shape. This shape is easily reproduced in the laboratory by degrading a high-energy proton beam, producing a high-fidelity test environment. We use this test environment to dramatically simplify rate prediction for proton direct ionization effects, allowing the work to be done at high-energy proton facilities, on encapsulated parts, without knowledge of the IC design, and with little or no computer simulations required. Proton direct ionization (PDI) is predicted to significantly contribute to the total error rate under the conditions investigated. Scaling effects are discussed using data frommore » 65-nm, 45-nm, and 32-nm SOI SRAMs. These data also show that grazing-angle protons will dominate the PDI-induced error rate due to their higher effective LET, so PDI hardness assurance methods must account for angular effects to be conservative. As a result, we show that this angular dependence can be exploited to quickly assess whether an IC is susceptible to PDI.« less

  9. Picosecond High Pressure Gas Switch experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cravey, W.R.; Freytag, E.K.; Goerz, D.A.; Poulsen, P.; Pincosy, P.A.

    1993-08-01

    A high Pressure Gas Switch has been developed and tested at LLNL. Risetimes on the order of 200 picoseconds have been observed at 1 kHz prf and 1 atmosphere pressures. Calculations show that switching closure times on the order of tens of picoseconds can be achieved at higher pressures and electric fields. A voltage hold-off of 1 MV/cm has been measured at 10 atmospheres and several MV/cm appears possible with the HPGS. With such high electric field levels, energy storage of tens of Joules in a reasonably sized package is achievable. Initial HPGS performance has been characterized using the WASP pulse generator at LLNL. A detailed description of the switch used for initial testing is given. Switch recovery times of 1-ms have been measured at 1 atmosphere. Data on the switching uniformity, voltage hold-off recovery, and pulse repeatability, is presented. In addition, a physics switch model is described and results are compared with experimental data. Modifications made to the WASP HV pulser in order to drive the HPGS will also be discussed. Recovery times of less than 1 ms were recorded without gas flow in the switch chambers. Low pressure synthetic air was used as the switch dielectric. Longer recovery times were required when it was necessary to over-voltage the switch.

  10. Development of High Temperature Gas Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of engine emissions is important for their monitoring and control. However, the ability to measure these emissions in-situ is limited. We are developing a family of high temperature gas sensors which are intended to operate in harsh environments such as those in an engine. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) The development of SiC-based semiconductor technology; and (2) Improvements in micromachining and microfabrication technology. These technologies are being used to develop point-contact sensors to measure gases which are important in emission control especially hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of this point-contact sensor technology. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. Of particular importance is sensor sensitivity, selectivity, and stability in long-term, high temperature operation. An overview is presented of each sensor type with an evaluation of its stage of development. It is concluded that this technology has significant potential for use in engine applications but further development is necessary.

  11. High speed exhaust gas recirculation valve

    SciTech Connect

    Fensom, Rod; Kidder, David J.

    2005-01-18

    In order to minimize pollutants such as Nox, internal combustion engines typically include an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve that can be used to redirect a portion of exhaust gases to an intake conduit, such as an intake manifold, so that the redirected exhaust gases will be recycled. It is desirable to have an EGR valve with fast-acting capabilities, and it is also desirable to have the EGR valve take up as little space as possible. An exhaust gas recirculation valve is provided that includes an exhaust passage tube, a valve element pivotally mounted within the exhaust passage tube, a linear actuator; and a gear train. The gear train includes a rack gear operatively connected to the linear actuator, and at least one rotatable gear meshing with the rack gear and operatively connected to the valve element to cause rotation of the valve element upon actuation of the linear actuator. The apparatus provides a highly compact package having a high-speed valve actuation capability.

  12. HIGH EFFICIENCY DESULFURIZATION OF SYNTHESIS GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kwang-Bok Yi; Anirban Mukherjee; Elizabeth J. Podlaha; Douglas P. Harrison

    2004-03-01

    Mixed metal oxides containing ceria and zirconia have been studied as high temperature desulfurization sorbents with the objective of achieving the DOE Vision 21 target of 1 ppmv or less H{sub 2}S in the product gas. The research was justified by recent results in this laboratory that showed that reduced CeO{sub 2}, designated CeOn (1.5 < n < 2.0), is capable of achieving the 1 ppmv target in highly reducing gas atmospheres. The addition of ZrO{sub 2} has improved the performance of oxidation catalysts and three-way automotive catalysts containing CeO{sub 2}, and was postulated to have similar beneficial effects on CeO{sub 2} desulfurization sorbents. An electrochemical method for synthesizing CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} mixtures was developed and the products were characterized by XRD and TEM during year 01. Nanocrystalline particles having a diameter of about 5 nm and containing from approximately 10 mol% to 80 mol% ZrO{sub 2} were prepared. XRD analysis showed the product to be a solid solution at low ZrO{sub 2} contents with a separate ZrO{sub 2} phase emerging at higher ZrO{sub 2} levels. Unfortunately, the quantity of CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} that could be prepared electrochemically was too small to permit desulfurization testing. Also during year 01 a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor was constructed for desulfurization testing. All components of the reactor and analytical systems that were exposed to low concentrations of H{sub 2}S were constructed of quartz, Teflon, or silcosteel. Reactor product gas composition as a function of time was determined using a Varian 3800 gas chromatograph equipped with a pulsed flame photometric detector (PFPD) for measuring low H{sub 2}S concentrations from approximately 0.1 to 10 ppmv, and a thermal conductivity detector (TCD) for higher concentrations of H{sub 2}S. Larger quantities of CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} mixtures from other sources, including mixtures prepared in this laboratory using a coprecipitation procedure, were obtained

  13. High-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry: Characterization, data management, and applications.

    PubMed

    Zühlke, Martin; Riebe, Daniel; Beitz, Toralf; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Andreotti, Sandro; Reinert, Knut; Zenichowski, Karl; Diener, Marc

    2016-12-01

    The combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry facilitates the two-dimensional separation of complex mixtures in the retention and drift time plane. The ion mobility spectrometer presented here was optimized for flow rates customarily used in high-performance liquid chromatography between 100 and 1500 μL/min. The characterization of the system with respect to such parameters as the peak capacity of each time dimension and of the 2D spectrum was carried out based on a separation of a pesticide mixture containing 24 substances. While the total ion current chromatogram is coarsely resolved, exhibiting coelutions for a number of compounds, all substances can be separately detected in the 2D plane due to the orthogonality of the separations in retention and drift dimensions. Another major advantage of the ion mobility detector is the identification of substances based on their characteristic mobilities. Electrospray ionization allows the detection of substances lacking a chromophore. As an example, the separation of a mixture of 18 amino acids is presented. A software built upon the free mass spectrometry package OpenMS was developed for processing the extensive 2D data. The different processing steps are implemented as separate modules which can be arranged in a graphic workflow facilitating automated processing of data.

  14. Downstream plasma transport and metal ionization in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Liang; Yu, He; Szott, Matthew M.; McLain, Jake T.; Ruzic, David N.

    2014-06-01

    Downstream plasma transport and ionization processes in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron were studied. The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of electron density (ne) and temperature (Te) were characterized with a 3D scanning triple Langmuir probe. Plasma expanded from the racetrack region into the downstream region, where a high ne peak was formed some time into the pulse-off period. The expansion speed and directionality towards the substrate increased with a stronger magnetic field (B), largely as a consequence of a larger potential drop in the bulk plasma region during a relatively slower sheath formation. The fraction of Cu ions in the deposition flux was measured on the substrate using a gridded energy analyzer. It increased with higher pulse voltage. With increased B field from 200 to 800 Gauss above racetrack, ne increased but the Cu ion fraction decreased from 42% to 16%. A comprehensive model was built, including the diffusion of as-sputtered Cu flux, the Cu ionization in the entire plasma region using the mapped ne and Te data, and ion extraction efficiency based on the measured plasma potential (Vp) distribution. The calculations matched the measurements and indicated the main causes of lower Cu ion fractions in stronger B fields to be the lower Te and inefficient ion extraction in a larger pre-sheath potential.

  15. The Effect of High-Dose Ionizing Radiation on the Astrobiological Model Lichen Circinaria gyrosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, Rosa; Zélia Miller, Ana; Cubero, Beatriz; Martín-Cerezo, M. Luisa; Raguse, Marina; Meeßen, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    The lichen Circinaria gyrosa is an astrobiological model defined by its high capacity of resistance to space conditions and to a simulated martian environment. Therefore, it became part of the currently operated BIOMEX experiment on board the International Space Station and the recent STARLIFE campaign to study the effects of four types of space-relevant ionizing radiation. The samples were irradiated with helium and iron ions at doses up to 2 kGy, with X-rays at doses up to 5 kGy and with γ rays at doses from 6 to 113 kGy. Results on C. gyrosa's resistance to simulated space ionizing radiation and its post-irradiation viability were obtained by (i) chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PSII), (ii) epifluorescence microscopy, (iii) confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and (iv) field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Results of photosynthetic activity and epifluorescence show no significant changes up to a dose of 1 kGy (helium ions), 2 kGy (iron ions), 5 kGy (X-rays) - the maximum doses applied for those radiation qualities - as well as a dose of 6 kGy of γ irradiation, which was the lowest dose applied for this low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Significant damage in a dose-related manner was observed only at much higher doses of γ irradiation (up to 113 kGy). These data corroborate the findings of the parallel STARLIFE studies on the effects of ionizing radiation on the lichen Circinaria gyrosa, its isolated photobiont, and the lichen Xanthoria elegans.

  16. Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation and the High Speed Civil Transport. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, D. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Jones, I. W.; Goldhagen, P.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is produced by extraterrestrial radiations incident on the Earth's atmosphere. These extraterrestrial radiations are of two sources: ever present galactic cosmic rays with origin outside the solar system and transient solar particle events that are at times very intense events associated with solar activity lasting several hours to a few days. Although the galactic radiation penetrating through the atmosphere to the ground is low in intensity, the intensity is more than two orders of magnitude greater at commercial aircraft altitudes. The radiation levels at the higher altitudes of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) are an additional factor of two higher. Ionizing radiation produces chemically active radicals in biological tissues that alter the cell function or result in cell death. Protection standards against low levels of ionizing radiation are based on limitation of excess cancer mortality or limitation of developmental injury resulting in permanent damage to the offspring during pregnancy. The crews of commercial air transport operations are considered as radiation workers by the EPA, the FAA, and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The annual exposures of aircrews depend on the latitudes and altitudes of operation and flight time. Flight hours have significantly increased since deregulation of the airline industry in the 1980's. The FAA estimates annual subsonic aircrew exposures to range from 0.2 to 9.1 mSv compared to 0.5 mSv exposure of the average nuclear power plant worker in the nuclear industry. The commercial aircrews of the HSCT may receive exposures above recently recommended allowable limits for even radiation workers if flying their allowable number of flight hours. An adequate protection philosophy for background exposures in HSCT commercial airtraffic cannot be developed at this time due to current uncertainty in environmental levels. In addition, if a large solar particle event

  17. In-Line Ozonation for Sensitive Air-Monitoring of a Mustard-Gas Simulant by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive method for real-time air-monitoring of mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, HD), which is a lethal blister agent, is proposed. Humidified air containing a HD simulant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2CEES), was mixed with ozone and then analyzed by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. Mass-spectral ion peaks attributable to protonated molecules of intact, monooxygenated, and dioxygenated 2CEES (MH(+), MOH(+), and MO(2)H(+), respectively) were observed. As ozone concentration was increased from zero to 30 ppm, the signal intensity of MH(+) sharply decreased, that of MOH(+) increased once and then decreased, and that of MO(2)H(+) sharply increased until reaching a plateau. The signal intensity of MO(2)H(+) at the plateau was 40 times higher than that of MH(+) and 100 times higher than that of MOH(+) in the case without in-line ozonation. Twenty-ppm ozone gas was adequate to give a linear calibration curve for 2CEES obtained by detecting the MO(2)H(+) signal in the concentration range up to 60 μg/m(3), which is high enough for hygiene management. In the low concentration range lower than 3 μg/m(3), which is equal to the short-term exposure limit for HD, calibration plots unexpectedly fell off the linear calibration curve, but 0.6-μg/m(3) vapor was actually detected with the signal-to-noise ratio of nine. Ozone was generated from instrumentation air by using a simple and inexpensive home-made generator. 2CEES was ozonated in 1-m extended sampling tube in only 1 s.

  18. In-Line Ozonation for Sensitive Air-Monitoring of a Mustard-Gas Simulant by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive method for real-time air-monitoring of mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, HD), which is a lethal blister agent, is proposed. Humidified air containing a HD simulant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2CEES), was mixed with ozone and then analyzed by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. Mass-spectral ion peaks attributable to protonated molecules of intact, monooxygenated, and dioxygenated 2CEES (MH+, MOH+, and MO2H+, respectively) were observed. As ozone concentration was increased from zero to 30 ppm, the signal intensity of MH+ sharply decreased, that of MOH+ increased once and then decreased, and that of MO2H+ sharply increased until reaching a plateau. The signal intensity of MO2H+ at the plateau was 40 times higher than that of MH+ and 100 times higher than that of MOH+ in the case without in-line ozonation. Twenty-ppm ozone gas was adequate to give a linear calibration curve for 2CEES obtained by detecting the MO2H+ signal in the concentration range up to 60 μg/m3, which is high enough for hygiene management. In the low concentration range lower than 3 μg/m3, which is equal to the short-term exposure limit for HD, calibration plots unexpectedly fell off the linear calibration curve, but 0.6-μg/m3 vapor was actually detected with the signal-to-noise ratio of nine. Ozone was generated from instrumentation air by using a simple and inexpensive home-made generator. 2CEES was ozonated in 1-m extended sampling tube in only 1 s.

  19. Ultra-trace level analysis of morpholine, cyclohexylamine, and diethylaminoethanol in steam condensate by gas chromatography with multi-mode inlet, and flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Luong, J; Shellie, R A; Cortes, H; Gras, R; Hayward, T

    2012-03-16

    Steam condensate water treatment is a vital and integral part of the overall cooling water treatment process. Steam condensate often contains varying levels of carbon dioxide and oxygen which acts as an oxidizer. Carbon dioxide forms corrosive carbonic acid when dissolved in condensed steam. To neutralize the harmful effect of the carbonic acid, volatile amine compounds such as morpholine, cyclohexylamine, and diethylaminoethanol are often employed as part of a strategy to control corrosion in the water treatment process. Due to the high stability of these compounds in a water matrix, the indirect addition of such chemicals into the process via steam condensate often results in their presence throughout the process and even into the final product. It is therefore important to understand the impact of these chemicals and their fate within a chemical plant. The ability to analyze such compounds by gas chromatography has historically been difficult due to the lack of chromatographic system inertness at the trace level concentrations especially in an aqueous matrix. Here a highly sensitive, practical, and reliable gas chromatographic approach is described for the determination of morpholine, cyclohexylamine, and diethylaminoethanol in steam condensate at the part-per-billion (ppb) levels. The approach does not require any sample enrichment or derivatization. The technique employs a multi-mode inlet operating in pulsed splitless mode with programmed inlet temperature for sample introduction, an inert base-deactivated capillary column for solute separation and flame ionization detection. Chromatographic performance was further enhanced by the incorporation of 2-propanol as a co-solvent. Detection limits for morpholine, cyclohexylamine, diethylaminoethanol were established to be 100 ppb (v/v), with relative standard deviations (RSD) of less than 6% at the 95% confidence level (n=20) and a percent recovery of 96% or higher for the solutes of interest over a range of 0

  20. Performance of a gas flow ionization detector filled with He-iso-C4H10 mixtures for STIM-T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, A. C.; Fraga, M. M. F. R.; Fonte, P.; Beasley, D. G.; Cruz, C.; Alves, L. C.; da Silva, R. C.

    2015-04-01

    A cylindrical gas flow ionization chamber has been developed for measuring particle energy in Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIM-T) experiments due to its ability to withstand the direct beam. The response of a He-iso-C4H10 filled ionization detector to 2 MeV H+ and He+ beams was studied. Different operating parameters, such as concentration of isobutane (in the range of 55-100%), anode voltage, amplifier shaping time, the geometry of the detector entrance canal and the solid angle of the detector, were investigated. The stable operating plateau and the anode voltage at which the best energy resolution is attained were also determined for every gas mixture. The best energy resolution achieved so far for 2 MeV H+ and He+ static beams was ∼1.3%, which is comparable to that of Si PIN diode detectors (in the range of 15-30 keV). Computed tomography (CT) was applied to a set of STIM projections acquired with the gas ionization chamber at the IST/CTN microprobe beam line in order to visualize the 3D-mass distribution in a test structure.

  1. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

  2. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Lowry, M.E.

    1994-03-29

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium. 3 figures.

  3. HIGH EFFICIENCY DESULFURIZATION OF SYNTHESIS GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Anirban Mukherjee; Kwang-Bok Yi; Elizabeth J. Podlaha; Douglas P. Harrison

    2001-11-01

    Mixed metal oxides containing CeO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} are being studied as high temperature desulfurization sorbents capable of achieving the DOE Vision 21 target of 1 ppmv of less H{sub 2}S. The research is justified by recent results in this laboratory that showed that reduced CeO{sub 2}, designated CeO{sub n} (1.5 < n < 2.0), is capable of achieving the 1 ppmv target in highly reducing gas atmospheres. The addition of ZrO{sub 2} has improved the performance of oxidation catalysts and three-way automotive catalysts containing CeO{sub 2}, and should have similar beneficial effects on CeO{sub 2} desulfurization sorbents. An electrochemical method for synthesizing CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} has been developed and the products have been characterized by XRD and TEM during year 01. Nanocrystalline particles having a diameter of about 5 nm and containing from approximately 10 mol% to 80 mol% ZrO{sub 2} have been prepared. XRD showed the product to be a solid solution at low ZrO{sub 2} contents with a separate ZrO{sub 2} phase emerging at higher ZrO{sub 2} levels. Phase separation did not occur when the solid solutions were heat treated at 700 C. A flow reactor system constructed of quartz and teflon has been constructed, and a gas chromatograph equipped with a pulsed flame photometric detector (PFPD) suitable for measuring sub-ppmv levels of H{sub 2}S has been purchased with LSU matching funds. Preliminary desulfurization tests using commercial CeO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} in highly reducing gas compositions has confirmed that CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} is more effective than CeO{sub 2} in removing H{sub 2}S. At 700 C the product H{sub 2}S concentration using CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} sorbent was near the 0.1 ppmv PFPD detection limit during the prebreakthrough period.

  4. Reactions of metal ions and their clusters in the gas phase using laser ionization: Fourier transform mass spectrometry. Progress report, February 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Freiser, B.S.

    1993-09-01

    This report focuses on progress in seven areas: (1) Gas-Phase Reactions of Fe(Benzyne){sup +} with Simple Alkyl Halides; (2) Photodissociation and Collision-Induced Dissociation of Molecular Ions From Methylphenol and Chloromethylphenol; (3) Isotopomer Differentiation Using Metal Ion Chemical Ionization Reagents; (4) Multiple Excitation Collisional Activation (MECA) in Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry; (5) Chemistry of Fe{sup +}-Arene Ions with Halobenzenes; (6) Gas-Phase Photodissociaton Study of Ag(Benzene){sup +} and Ag(Toluene){sup +}; and (7) Reactivity of Ti{sup 2+} and V{sup 2+} with Small Alkanes.

  5. The aerodynamics of bodies in a rarefied ionized gas with applications to spacecraft environmental dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, N. H.

    1981-01-01

    The objectives are to provide a parametric description of the electrostatic interaction of a mesosonic, collisionless plasma with conducting bodies on the order of 1 to 10 Debye lengths in size, and to extend this description to the satellite-ionospheric interaction, where possible. Experimental findings include: the wake of the geometrically complex body appears to be a linear superposition of the wakes of its simple geometric components; and vector ion flux measurements show converging ion streams at the wake axis and direct evidence of ion streams deflected from the wake axis by the positive space charge potential associated with the axial ion peak. The extension to the satellite-ionospheric interaction utilizes qualitative scaling and indicates that similar, but smaller amplitude, wake structures may be expected for small or highly charged bodies. However, for large bodies at small potentials, the structure may be diffused by the thermal ion motion and the dispersion resulting for space charge potentials.

  6. Changes in the Earth's ozonosphere due to ionization of high-latitude atmosphere by solar protons in October, 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivolutsky, A. A.; Kuminov, A. A.; v'yushkova, T. Yu.; Kuznetsov, S. N.; Myagkova, I. N.

    2004-11-01

    Using the data of the Russian KORONAS-F satellite and American GOES spacecraft on solar cosmic ray fluxes associated with powerful events which occurred on the Sun at the end of October - the beginning of November, 2003, calculations of ionization of high-latitude (70° N) atmosphere were carried out. The calculations have shown that the maximum values of ionization for the chosen latitude lie in the range of 50 70 km. The largest ionization was caused by the flare on November 28, 2003. Based on a numerical photochemical simulation it is shown that, as a result of intensification of catalytic cycles with participation of ozone-destroying NO and OH, the concentration of ozone decreased by 30% at ionization maximum altitudes.

  7. Gas related effects on multi-gap RPC performance in high luminosity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, P.; Wang, Y.; Guo, B.; Han, D.; Xie, B.; Li, Y.; Wang, F.

    2016-11-01

    The Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) is a new type of gas detector developed in recent years. It has excellent time resolution (better than 100 ps) and high efficiency (higher than 95%). This detector has been used to construct large-area time-of-flight (TOF) system in many nuclear and particle physics experiments. However, as a type of gaseous detector, the aging of the gas mixture under long-time exposure to ionizing radiation cannot be neglected. With the increase of accelerator luminosity, impurities in the gas mixture can be potentially dangerous for long-term operation of the MRPC. This has been observed in some experiments, for example with the RHIC-STAR muon telescope detector. The CBM-TOF, used for hadron identification, is proposed to be assembled with MRPCs. These counters have to stand particle fluxes as high as 25 kHz/cm2, and thus the gas pollution is a critical aspect to be studied. In order to better understand the gas quality's impact on the MRPC performance, a two-dimensional simulation based on the SIMPLE algorithm is carried out to imitate the distribution of impurities in a MRPC gas box. The preliminary results show that gas pollution grows stronger with the increase of the gas-flowing volume. In addition, we conducted a series of experiments with a 50 × 50 cm2, 8-gap MRPC prototype. The results match the simulation quite well. Gas pollution indeed has a severe impact on the MRPC performance, and further study can be very useful to reduce gas aging effects in high-luminosity experiments.

  8. The Supernova Remnant 3C 400.2: Kinematics of its Ionized Gas and Theoretical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrocio-Cruz, P.; de La Fuente, E.; Rosado, M.; Velázquez, P. F.

    2003-01-01

    3C 400.2 is a supernova remnant (SNR) with a complex morphology consisting of two overlapped shells of different diameters: a large shell at the southeast and a small shell at the northwest. High-resolution radio-continuum observations carried out by Dubner et al. (1994) suggested that this complex morphology could be due to the interaction of two SNRs. However, this view has been challenged by recent studies of the H I distribution around this SNR (Giacani et al. 1998) and by the confrontation of theoretical evolutionary models with the morphology at H alpha of this remnant (Velazquez et al. 2001). These recent results suggest that the double shell structure is produced by a single supernova explosion initially expanding into a dense medium encountering a lower density medium and producing a blowout. In this work we present the results of H alpha Fabry-Perot observations obtained with the PUMA equipment at the 2.1 m telescope of the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional at San Pedro Mártir, B. C., México. The kinematic results obtained can allow us to distinguish between those possibilities: two supernova explosions or one supernova explosion undergoing a blowout due to a density gradient.

  9. Ceramic high pressure gas path seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liotta, G. C.

    1987-01-01

    Stage 1 ceramic shrouds (high pressure turbine gas path seal) were developed for the GE T700 turbine helicopter engine under the Army/NASA Contract NAS3-23174. This contract successfully proved the viability and benefits of a Stage 1 ceramic shroud for production application. Stage 1 ceramic shrouds were proven by extensive component and engine testing. This Stage 1 ceramic shroud, plasma sprayed ceramic (ZrOs-BY2O3) and bond coating (NiCrAlY) onto a cast metal backing, offers significant engine performance improvement. Due to the ceramic coating, the amount of cooling air required is reduced 20% resulting in a 0.5% increase in horsepower and a 0.3% decrease in specific fuel consumption. This is accomplished with a component which is lower in cost than the current production shroud. Stage 1 ceramic shrouds will be introduced into field service in late 1987.

  10. High temperature coatings for gas turbines

    DOEpatents

    Zheng, Xiaoci Maggie

    2003-10-21

    Coating for high temperature gas turbine components that include a MCrAlX phase, and an aluminum-rich phase, significantly increase oxidation and cracking resistance of the components, thereby increasing their useful life and reducing operating costs. The aluminum-rich phase includes aluminum at a higher concentration than aluminum concentration in the MCrAlX alloy, and an aluminum diffusion-retarding composition, which may include cobalt, nickel, yttrium, zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, rhodium, cadmium, indium, cerium, iron, chromium, tantalum, silicon, boron, carbon, titanium, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, and combinations thereof, and particularly nickel and/or rhenium. The aluminum-rich phase may be derived from a particulate aluminum composite that has a core comprising aluminum and a shell comprising the aluminum diffusion-retarding composition.

  11. Localized traveling ionization zones and their importance for the high power impulse magnetron sputtering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maszl, Christian

    2016-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is a technique to deposit thin films with superior quality. A high ionization degree up to 90% and the natural occurence of high energetic metal ions are the reason why HiPIMS exceeds direct current magnetron sputtering in terms of coating quality. On the other hand HiPIMS suffers from a reduced efficiency, especially if metal films are produced. Therefore, a lot of research is done by experimentalists and theoreticians to clarify the transport mechanisms from target to substrate and to identify the energy source of the energetic metal ions. Magnetron plasmas are prone to a wide range of wave phenomena and instabilities. Especially, during HiPIMS at elevated power/current densities, symmetry breaks and self-organization in the plasma torus are observed. In this scenario localized travelling ionization zones with certain quasi-mode numbers are present which are commonly referred to as spokes. Because of their high rotation speed compared to typical process times of minutes their importance for thin film deposition was underestimated at first. Recent investigations show that spokes have a strong impact on particle transport, are probably the source of the high energetic metal ions and are therefore the essence of HiPIMS plasmas. In this contribution we will describe the current understanding of spokes, discuss implications for thin film synthesis and highlight open questions. This project is supported by the DFG (German Science Foundation) within the framework of the Coordinated Research Center SFB-TR 87 and the Research Department ``Plasmas with Complex Interactions'' at Ruhr-University Bochum.

  12. [Determination of four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Xia, Guanghui; Shen, Weijian; Yu, Keyao; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Rui; Shen, Chongyu; Zhao, Zengyun; Bian, Xiaohong; Xu, Jiyang

    2014-07-01

    A method was developed for the determination of four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCI/MS). The honey and royal jelly samples were treated with different preparation methods as the result of the different components. The honey sample was extracted with ethyl acetate and cleaned up with primary second amine, and the royal jelly sample was extracted with acetonitrile-water (1:1, v/v), and cleaned up with a C18 solid-phase extraction column. Finally, the extracts of the honey and royal jelly were analyzed by GC-NCI/MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode separately. External standard calibration method was used for quantification. The linearities of calibration curves of the four insecticides were good with the correlation coefficients greater than 0.99 in the range of 50-500 microg/L. The limits of the detection (LODs) of the four insecticides were in the range of 0.12- 5.0 microg/kg, and the limits of the quantification (LOQs) were in the range of 0.40-16.5 microg/kg. The recoveries of the four insecticides spiked in honey and royal jelly at three spiked levels (10, 15 and 20 microg/kg) were in the range of 78.2 -110.0%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were all below 14%. The sensitivity and selectivity of this method were good with no interfering peaks. The proposed method is simple quick and effective to analyze the four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly.

  13. Development and Validation of a Method for Alcohol Analysis in Brain Tissue by Headspace Gas Chromatography with Flame Ionization Detector.

    PubMed

    Chun, Hao-Jung; Poklis, Justin L; Poklis, Alphonse; Wolf, Carl E

    2016-10-01

    Ethanol is the most widely used and abused drug. While blood is the preferred specimen for analysis, tissue specimens such as brain serve as alternative specimens for alcohol analysis in post-mortem cases where blood is unavailable or contaminated. A method was developed using headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (HS-GC-FID) for the detection and quantification of ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, methanol and n-propanol in brain tissue specimens. Unfixed volatile-free brain tissue specimens were obtained from the Department of Pathology at Virginia Commonwealth University. Calibrators and controls were prepared from 4-fold diluted homogenates of these brain tissue specimens, and were analyzed using t-butanol as the internal standard. The chromatographic separation was performed with a Restek BAC2 column. A linear calibration was generated for all analytes (mean r(2) > 0.9992) with the limits of detection and quantification of 100-110 mg/kg. Matrix effect from the brain tissue was determined by comparing the slopes of matrix prepared calibration curves with those of aqueous calibration curves; no significant differences were observed for ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, methanol and n-propanol. The bias and the CVs for all volatile controls were ≤10%. The method was also evaluated for carryover, selectivity, interferences, bench-top stability and freeze-thaw stability. The HS-GC-FID method was determined to be reliable and robust for the analysis of ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, methanol and n-propanol concentrations in brain tissue, effectively expanding the specimen options for post-mortem alcohol analysis.

  14. DECIPHERING THE IONIZED