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Sample records for highly specific detection

  1. Heterodyne method for high specificity gas detection.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Donaldson, R. W.; Gunter, W. D., Jr.; Jaynes, D. N.; Margozzi, A. P.; Deboo, G. J.; Mcclatchie, E. A.; Williams, K. G.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique for measuring trace quantities of gases. The technique involves the use of a reference cell (containing a known amount of the gas being sought) and a sample cell (containing an unknown amount of the same gas) wherein the gas densities are modulated. Light passing through the two cells in sequence is modulated in intensity at the vibrational-rotational lines characteristic of the absorption spectrum for the gas of interest. Since the absorption process is nonlinear, modulating the two absorption cells at two different frequencies gives rise to a heterodyning effect, which in turn introduces sum and difference frequencies in the detected signal. Measuring the ratio of the difference frequency signal for example, to the signal introduced by the reference cell provides a normalized measure of the amount of the gas in the sample cell. The readings produced are thereby independent of source intensity, window transparency, and detector sensitivity. Experimental evaluation of the technique suggests that it should be applicable to a wide range of gases, that it should be able to reject spurious signals due to unwanted gases, and that it should be sensitive to concentrations of the order of 10 to the minus 8th power when used with a sample cell of only 20 cm length.

  2. Highly sensitive and specific colorimetric detection of cancer cells via dual-aptamer target binding strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Fan, Daoqing; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Erkang

    2015-11-15

    Simple, rapid, sensitive and specific detection of cancer cells is of great importance for early and accurate cancer diagnostics and therapy. By coupling nanotechnology and dual-aptamer target binding strategies, we developed a colorimetric assay for visually detecting cancer cells with high sensitivity and specificity. The nanotechnology including high catalytic activity of PtAuNP and magnetic separation & concentration plays a vital role on the signal amplification and improvement of detection sensitivity. The color change caused by small amount of target cancer cells (10 cells/mL) can be clearly distinguished by naked eyes. The dual-aptamer target binding strategy guarantees the detection specificity that large amount of non-cancer cells and different cancer cells (10(4) cells/mL) cannot cause obvious color change. A detection limit as low as 10 cells/mL with detection linear range from 10 to 10(5) cells/mL was reached according to the experimental detections in phosphate buffer solution as well as serum sample. The developed enzyme-free and cost effective colorimetric assay is simple and no need of instrument while still provides excellent sensitivity, specificity and repeatability, having potential application on point-of-care cancer diagnosis.

  3. Highly specific SNP detection using 2D graphene electronics and DNA strand displacement

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Michael T.; Landon, Preston B.; Lee, Joon; Choi, Duyoung; Mo, Alexander H.; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2016-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene sequence are markers for a variety of human diseases. Detection of SNPs with high specificity and sensitivity is essential for effective practical implementation of personalized medicine. Current DNA sequencing, including SNP detection, primarily uses enzyme-based methods or fluorophore-labeled assays that are time-consuming, need laboratory-scale settings, and are expensive. Previously reported electrical charge-based SNP detectors have insufficient specificity and accuracy, limiting their effectiveness. Here, we demonstrate the use of a DNA strand displacement-based probe on a graphene field effect transistor (FET) for high-specificity, single-nucleotide mismatch detection. The single mismatch was detected by measuring strand displacement-induced resistance (and hence current) change and Dirac point shift in a graphene FET. SNP detection in large double-helix DNA strands (e.g., 47 nt) minimize false-positive results. Our electrical sensor-based SNP detection technology, without labeling and without apparent cross-hybridization artifacts, would allow fast, sensitive, and portable SNP detection with single-nucleotide resolution. The technology will have a wide range of applications in digital and implantable biosensors and high-throughput DNA genotyping, with transformative implications for personalized medicine. PMID:27298347

  4. Highly specific SNP detection using 2D graphene electronics and DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Michael T; Landon, Preston B; Lee, Joon; Choi, Duyoung; Mo, Alexander H; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2016-06-28

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene sequence are markers for a variety of human diseases. Detection of SNPs with high specificity and sensitivity is essential for effective practical implementation of personalized medicine. Current DNA sequencing, including SNP detection, primarily uses enzyme-based methods or fluorophore-labeled assays that are time-consuming, need laboratory-scale settings, and are expensive. Previously reported electrical charge-based SNP detectors have insufficient specificity and accuracy, limiting their effectiveness. Here, we demonstrate the use of a DNA strand displacement-based probe on a graphene field effect transistor (FET) for high-specificity, single-nucleotide mismatch detection. The single mismatch was detected by measuring strand displacement-induced resistance (and hence current) change and Dirac point shift in a graphene FET. SNP detection in large double-helix DNA strands (e.g., 47 nt) minimize false-positive results. Our electrical sensor-based SNP detection technology, without labeling and without apparent cross-hybridization artifacts, would allow fast, sensitive, and portable SNP detection with single-nucleotide resolution. The technology will have a wide range of applications in digital and implantable biosensors and high-throughput DNA genotyping, with transformative implications for personalized medicine.

  5. Highly specific SNP detection using 2D graphene electronics and DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Michael T; Landon, Preston B; Lee, Joon; Choi, Duyoung; Mo, Alexander H; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2016-06-28

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene sequence are markers for a variety of human diseases. Detection of SNPs with high specificity and sensitivity is essential for effective practical implementation of personalized medicine. Current DNA sequencing, including SNP detection, primarily uses enzyme-based methods or fluorophore-labeled assays that are time-consuming, need laboratory-scale settings, and are expensive. Previously reported electrical charge-based SNP detectors have insufficient specificity and accuracy, limiting their effectiveness. Here, we demonstrate the use of a DNA strand displacement-based probe on a graphene field effect transistor (FET) for high-specificity, single-nucleotide mismatch detection. The single mismatch was detected by measuring strand displacement-induced resistance (and hence current) change and Dirac point shift in a graphene FET. SNP detection in large double-helix DNA strands (e.g., 47 nt) minimize false-positive results. Our electrical sensor-based SNP detection technology, without labeling and without apparent cross-hybridization artifacts, would allow fast, sensitive, and portable SNP detection with single-nucleotide resolution. The technology will have a wide range of applications in digital and implantable biosensors and high-throughput DNA genotyping, with transformative implications for personalized medicine. PMID:27298347

  6. A novel and highly specific phage endolysin cell wall binding domain for detection of Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Kong, Minsuk; Sim, Jieun; Kang, Taejoon; Nguyen, Hoang Hiep; Park, Hyun Kyu; Chung, Bong Hyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-09-01

    Rapid, specific and sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial for public health and safety. Bacillus cereus is harmful as it causes foodborne illness and a number of systemic and local infections. We report a novel phage endolysin cell wall-binding domain (CBD) for B. cereus and the development of a highly specific and sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based B. cereus detection method using the CBD. The newly discovered CBD from endolysin of PBC1, a B. cereus-specific bacteriophage, provides high specificity and binding capacity to B. cereus. By using the CBD-modified SPR chips, B. cereus can be detected at the range of 10(5)-10(8) CFU/ml. More importantly, the detection limit can be improved to 10(2) CFU/ml by using a subtractive inhibition assay based on the pre-incubation of B. cereus and CBDs, removal of CBD-bound B. cereus, and SPR detection of the unbound CBDs. The present study suggests that the small and genetically engineered CBDs can be promising biological probes for B. cereus. We anticipate that the CBD-based SPR-sensing methods will be useful for the sensitive, selective, and rapid detection of B. cereus.

  7. A novel and highly specific phage endolysin cell wall binding domain for detection of Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Kong, Minsuk; Sim, Jieun; Kang, Taejoon; Nguyen, Hoang Hiep; Park, Hyun Kyu; Chung, Bong Hyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-09-01

    Rapid, specific and sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial for public health and safety. Bacillus cereus is harmful as it causes foodborne illness and a number of systemic and local infections. We report a novel phage endolysin cell wall-binding domain (CBD) for B. cereus and the development of a highly specific and sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based B. cereus detection method using the CBD. The newly discovered CBD from endolysin of PBC1, a B. cereus-specific bacteriophage, provides high specificity and binding capacity to B. cereus. By using the CBD-modified SPR chips, B. cereus can be detected at the range of 10(5)-10(8) CFU/ml. More importantly, the detection limit can be improved to 10(2) CFU/ml by using a subtractive inhibition assay based on the pre-incubation of B. cereus and CBDs, removal of CBD-bound B. cereus, and SPR detection of the unbound CBDs. The present study suggests that the small and genetically engineered CBDs can be promising biological probes for B. cereus. We anticipate that the CBD-based SPR-sensing methods will be useful for the sensitive, selective, and rapid detection of B. cereus. PMID:26043681

  8. Detection of pork adulteration by highly-specific PCR assay of mitochondrial D-loop.

    PubMed

    Karabasanavar, Nagappa S; Singh, S P; Kumar, Deepak; Shebannavar, Sunil N

    2014-02-15

    We describe a highly specific PCR assay for the authentic identification of pork. Accurate detection of tissues derived from pig (Sus scrofa) was accomplished by using newly designed primers targeting porcine mitochondrial displacement (D-loop) region that yielded an unique amplicon of 712 base pairs (bp). Possibility of cross-amplification was precluded by testing as many as 24 animal species (mammals, birds, rodent and fish). Suitability of PCR assay was confirmed in raw (n = 20), cooked (60, 80 and 100 °C), autoclaved (121 °C) and micro-oven processed pork. Sensitivity of detection of pork in other species meat using unique pig-specific PCR was established to be at 0.1%; limit of detection (LOD) of pig DNA was 10 pg (pico grams). The technique can be used for the authentication of raw, processed and adulterated pork and products under the circumstances of food adulteration related disputes or forensic detection of origin of pig species.

  9. Highly specific and sensitive electrochemical genotyping via gap ligation reaction and surface hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Zhang, Yan-Li; Xu, Xiangmin; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2009-02-25

    This paper developed a novel electrochemical genotyping strategy based on gap ligation reaction with surface hybridization detection. This strategy utilized homogeneous enzymatic reactions to generate molecular beacon-structured allele-specific products that could be cooperatively annealed to capture probes stably immobilized on the surface via disulfide anchors, thus allowing ultrasensitive surface hybridization detection of the allele-specific products through redox tags in close proximity to the electrode. Such a unique biphasic architecture provided a universal methodology for incorporating enzymatic discrimination reactions in electrochemical genotyping with desirable reproducibility, high efficiency and no interferences from interficial steric hindrance. The developed technique was demonstrated to show intrinsic high sensitivity for direct genomic analysis, and excellent specificity with discriminativity of single nucleotide variations.

  10. Novel fluorescently labeled peptide compounds for detection of oxidized low-density lipoprotein at high specificity.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Yamanaka, Hikaru; Oe, Keitaro; Yamazaki, Yoji; Ebina, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    The probes for specific detection of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in plasma and in atherosclerotic plaques are expected to be useful for the identification, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment for atherosclerosis. In this study, to develop a fluorescent peptide probe for specific detection of ox-LDL, we investigated the interaction of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled peptides with ox-LDL using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two heptapeptides (KWYKDGD and KP6) coupled through the ε-amino group of K at the N-terminus to FITC in the presence/absence of 6-amino-n-caproic acid (AC) linker to FITC--(FITC-AC)KP6 and (FITC)KP6--both bound with high specificity to ox-LDL in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, a tetrapeptide (YKDG) labeled with FITC at the N-terminus and a pentapeptide (YKDGK) coupled through the ε-amino group of K at the C-terminus to FITC did not bind selectively to ox-LDL. Furthermore, (FITC)KP6 and (FITC-AC)KP6 bound with high specificity to the protein in mouse plasma (probably ox-LDL fraction). These findings strongly suggest that (FITC)KP6 and (FITC-AC)KP6 may be effective novel fluorescent probes for specific detection of ox-LDL.

  11. Highly improved specificity for hybridization-based microRNA detection by controlled surface dissociation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye Ryeon; Lee, Jeong Min; Jung, Juyeon; Lee, Chang-Soo; Chung, Bong Hyun; Jung, Yongwon

    2014-01-01

    Poor specificity has been a lingering problem in many microRNA profiling methods, particularly surface hybridization-based methods such as microarrays. Here, we carefully investigated surface hybridization and dissociation processes of a number of sequentially similar microRNAs against nucleic acid capture probes. Single-base mismatched microRNAs were similarly hybridized to a complementary DNA capture probe and thereby poorly discriminated during conventional stringent hybridization. Interestingly, however, mismatched microRNAs showed significantly faster dissociation from the probe than the perfectly matched microRNA. Systematic analysis of various washing conditions clearly demonstrated that extremely high specificity can be obtained by releasing non-specific microRNAs from assay surfaces during a stringent and controlled dissociation step. For instance, compared with stringent hybridization, surface dissociation control provided up to 6-fold better specificity for Let-7a detection than for other Let-7 family microRNAs. In addition, a synthetically introduced single-base mismatch on miR206 was almost completely discriminated by optimized surface dissociation of captured microRNAs, while this mismatch was barely distinguished from target miR206 during stringent hybridization. Furthermore, a single dissociation condition was successfully used to simultaneously measure four different microRNAs with extremely high specificity using melting temperature-equalized capture probes. The present study on selective dissociation of surface bound microRNAs can be easily applied to various hybridization based detection methods for improved specificity.

  12. Prostate specific antigen detection using AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, B. S.; Wang, H. T.; Lele, T. P.; Tseng, Y.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Johnson, J. W.; Rajagopal, P.; Roberts, J. C.; Piner, E. L.; Linthicum, K. J.

    2007-09-01

    Antibody-functionalized Au-gated AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA). The PSA antibody was anchored to the gate area through the formation of carboxylate succinimdyl ester bonds with immobilized thioglycolic acid. The AlGaN /GaN HEMT drain-source current showed a rapid response of less than 5s when target PSA in a buffer at clinical concentrations was added to the antibody-immobilized surface. The authors could detect a wide range of concentrations from 10pg/mlto1μg/ml. The lowest detectable concentration was two orders of magnitude lower than the cutoff value of PSA measurements for clinical detection of prostate cancer. These results clearly demonstrate the promise of portable electronic biological sensors based on AlGaN /GaN HEMTs for PSA screening.

  13. Maltodextrin-based imaging probes detect bacteria in vivo with high sensitivity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xinghai; Lee, Seungjun; Wang, Zhirui; Kim, Dongin; Stubblefield, Bryan; Gilbert, Eric; Murthy, Niren

    2011-08-01

    The diagnosis of bacterial infections remains a major challenge in medicine. Although numerous contrast agents have been developed to image bacteria, their clinical impact has been minimal because they are unable to detect small numbers of bacteria in vivo, and cannot distinguish infections from other pathologies such as cancer and inflammation. Here, we present a family of contrast agents, termed maltodextrin-based imaging probes (MDPs), which can detect bacteria in vivo with a sensitivity two orders of magnitude higher than previously reported, and can detect bacteria using a bacteria-specific mechanism that is independent of host response and secondary pathologies. MDPs are composed of a fluorescent dye conjugated to maltohexaose, and are rapidly internalized through the bacteria-specific maltodextrin transport pathway, endowing the MDPs with a unique combination of high sensitivity and specificity for bacteria. Here, we show that MDPs selectively accumulate within bacteria at millimolar concentrations, and are a thousand-fold more specific for bacteria than mammalian cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MDPs can image as few as 105 colony-forming units in vivo and can discriminate between active bacteria and inflammation induced by either lipopolysaccharides or metabolically inactive bacteria.

  14. A Rapid In-Clinic Test Detects Acute Leptospirosis in Dogs with High Sensitivity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Kodjo, Angeli; Calleja, Christophe; Loenser, Michael; Lin, Dan; Lizer, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    A rapid IgM-detection immunochromatographic test (WITNESS® Lepto, Zoetis) has recently become available to identify acute canine leptospirosis at the point of care. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the test were evaluated by comparison with the microscopic agglutination assay (MAT), using a positive cut-off titer of ≥800. Banked serum samples from dogs exhibiting clinical signs and suspected leptospirosis were selected to form three groups based on MAT titer: (1) positive (n = 50); (2) borderline (n = 35); and (3) negative (n = 50). Using an analysis to weight group sizes to reflect French prevalence, the sensitivity and specificity were 98% and 93.5% (88.2% unweighted), respectively. This test rapidly identifies cases of acute canine leptospirosis with high levels of sensitivity and specificity with no interference from previous vaccination. PMID:27110562

  15. A Rapid In-Clinic Test Detects Acute Leptospirosis in Dogs with High Sensitivity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kodjo, Angeli; Calleja, Christophe; Loenser, Michael; Lin, Dan; Lizer, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    A rapid IgM-detection immunochromatographic test (WITNESS® Lepto, Zoetis) has recently become available to identify acute canine leptospirosis at the point of care. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the test were evaluated by comparison with the microscopic agglutination assay (MAT), using a positive cut-off titer of ≥800. Banked serum samples from dogs exhibiting clinical signs and suspected leptospirosis were selected to form three groups based on MAT titer: (1) positive (n = 50); (2) borderline (n = 35); and (3) negative (n = 50). Using an analysis to weight group sizes to reflect French prevalence, the sensitivity and specificity were 98% and 93.5% (88.2% unweighted), respectively. This test rapidly identifies cases of acute canine leptospirosis with high levels of sensitivity and specificity with no interference from previous vaccination. PMID:27110562

  16. Specific detection of Aspergillus parasiticus in wheat flour using a highly sensitive PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Sardiñas, Noelia; Vázquez, Covadonga; Gil-Serna, Jessica; González-Jaen, M Teresa; Patiño, Belén

    2010-06-01

    Aspergillus parasiticus is one of the most important aflatoxin-producing species that contaminates foodstuffs and beverages for human consumption. In this work, a specific and highly sensitive PCR protocol was developed to detect A. parasiticus using primers designed on the multicopy internal transcribed region of the rDNA unit (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA). The assay proved to be highly specific for A. parasiticus when tested on a wide range of related and other fungal species commonly found in commodities, and allowing discrimination from the closely related A. flavus. Accuracy of detection and quantification by conventional PCR were tested with genomic DNA obtained from wheat flour artificially contaminated with spore suspensions of known concentrations. Spore concentrations equal or higher than 10(6) spore/g could be detected by the assay directly without prior incubation of the samples. The assay described is suitable for incorporation in routine analyses at critical points of the food chain within HACCP strategies. PMID:20486001

  17. High Sensitivity and High Detection Specificity of Gold-Nanoparticle-Grafted Nanostructured Silicon Mass Spectrometry for Glucose Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Chia-Wen; Yang, Zhi-Jie

    2015-10-14

    Desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS) is a high-performance matrix-free mass spectrometry (MS) analysis method that involves using silicon nanostructures as a matrix for MS desorption/ionization. In this study, gold nanoparticles grafted onto a nanostructured silicon (AuNPs-nSi) surface were demonstrated as a DIOS-MS analysis approach with high sensitivity and high detection specificity for glucose detection. A glucose sample deposited on the AuNPs-nSi surface was directly catalyzed to negatively charged gluconic acid molecules on a single AuNPs-nSi chip for MS analysis. The AuNPs-nSi surface was fabricated using two electroless deposition steps and one electroless etching step. The effects of the electroless fabrication parameters on the glucose detection efficiency were evaluated. Practical application of AuNPs-nSi MS glucose analysis in urine samples was also demonstrated in this study.

  18. Aptamer-MIP hybrid receptor for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Pawan; Tamboli, Vibha; Harniman, Robert L; Estrela, Pedro; Allender, Chris J; Bowen, Jenna L

    2016-01-15

    This study reports the design and evaluation of a new synthetic receptor sensor based on the amalgamation of biomolecular recognition elements and molecular imprinting to overcome some of the challenges faced by conventional protein imprinting. A thiolated DNA aptamer with established affinity for prostate specific antigen (PSA) was complexed with PSA prior to being immobilised on the surface of a gold electrode. Controlled electropolymerisation of dopamine around the complex served to both entrap the complex, holding the aptamer in, or near to, it's binding conformation, and to localise the PSA binding sites at the sensor surface. Following removal of PSA, it was proposed that the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) cavity would act synergistically with the embedded aptamer to form a hybrid receptor (apta-MIP), displaying recognition properties superior to that of aptamer alone. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to evaluate subsequent rebinding of PSA to the apta-MIP surface. The apta-MIP sensor showed high sensitivity with a linear response from 100pg/ml to 100ng/ml of PSA and a limit of detection of 1pg/ml, which was three-fold higher than aptamer alone sensor for PSA. Furthermore, the sensor demonstrated low cross-reactivity with a homologous protein (human Kallikrein 2) and low response to human serum albumin (HSA), suggesting possible resilience to the non-specific binding of serum proteins.

  19. Label-Free Isothermal Amplification Assay for Specific and Highly Sensitive Colorimetric miRNA Detection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new method for the detection of miRNA in biological samples. This technology is based on the isothermal nicking enzyme amplification reaction and subsequent hybridization of the amplification product with gold nanoparticles and magnetic microparticles (barcode system) to achieve naked-eye colorimetric detection. This platform was used to detect a specific miRNA (miRNA-10b) associated with breast cancer, and attomolar sensitivity was demonstrated. The assay was validated in cell culture lysates from breast cancer cells and in serum from a mouse model of breast cancer. PMID:27713932

  20. Hydrogen peroxide detection with high specificity in living cells and inflamed tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Lei; Zhang, Chi; Lei, Qi; Hu, Ming-Ming; Feng, Jun; Shu, Hong-Bing; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection in biological systems is of significant importance, which act as critical second messenger in fundamental biological processes. Here, we report on a chemoselective fluorescent naphthylimide peroxide probe (NPP) for the H2O2 detection in vitro and in vivo. NPP is a phenylboronic acid-caged chromophore that selectively responds to H2O2 through a self-immolate mechanism. NPP exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity to H2O2 with distinctive fluorescence change due to the excellent two-photon excitation property, which permits the facile detection of inflammation produced H2O2 and offers chance to monitor the inflammatory stages in diseased cells. PMID:27482463

  1. Hydrogen peroxide detection with high specificity in living cells and inflamed tissues.

    PubMed

    Rong, Lei; Zhang, Chi; Lei, Qi; Hu, Ming-Ming; Feng, Jun; Shu, Hong-Bing; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection in biological systems is of significant importance, which act as critical second messenger in fundamental biological processes. Here, we report on a chemoselective fluorescent naphthylimide peroxide probe (NPP) for the H2O2 detection in vitro and in vivo. NPP is a phenylboronic acid-caged chromophore that selectively responds to H2O2 through a self-immolate mechanism. NPP exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity to H2O2 with distinctive fluorescence change due to the excellent two-photon excitation property, which permits the facile detection of inflammation produced H2O2 and offers chance to monitor the inflammatory stages in diseased cells.

  2. Immunohistochemistry is highly sensitive and specific for the detection of NRASQ61R mutation in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Massi, Daniela; Simi, Lisa; Sensi, Elisa; Baroni, Gianna; Xue, Gongda; Scatena, Cristian; Caldarella, Adele; Pinzani, Pamela; Fontanini, Gabriella; Carobbio, Alessandra; Urso, Carmelo; Mandalà, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Testing for NRAS is now integral part in the assessment of metastatic melanoma patients because there is evidence that NRAS-mutated patients may be sensitive to MEK inhibitors, and RAS mutation is a common mechanism of acquired resistance during treatment with BRAF inhibitors. This study evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of immunohistochemical analysis using an N-Ras (Q61R) antibody to detect the presence of the NRASQ61R mutation in melanoma patients. A total of 98 primary cutaneous melanomas that have undergone examination of NRAS mutation were retrieved from a multicentric database. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded melanoma tissues were analyzed for BRAF and NRAS mutations by independent, blinded observers using both conventional DNA molecular techniques and immunohistochemistry with the novel anti-human N-Ras (Q61R) monoclonal antibody (clone SP174). The antibody showed a sensitivity of 100% (14/14) and a specificity of 100% (83/83) for detecting the presence of an NRASQ61R mutation. Of the NRAS-mutated cases, none of the non-Q61R cases stained positive with the antibody (0/7). There were three cases with discordant NRAS mutational results. Additional molecular analysis confirmed the immunohistochemically obtained NRAS result in all cases, suggesting that a multiple analytical approach can be required to reach the correct sample classification. The reported immunohistochemical method is an accurate, rapid, and cost-effective method for detecting NRASQ61R mutation in melanoma patients, and represents a valuable supplement to traditional mutation testing. If validated in further studies, genetic testing would only be required for immunohistochemistry-negative patients to detect non-Q61R mutations.

  3. High-Resolution and Specific Detection of Bacteria on Complex Surfaces Using Nanoparticle Probes and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jun; Nielsen, Shaun; Joseph, Stephen; Thomas, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    The study of the interaction of bacteria with surfaces requires the detection of specific bacterial groups with high spatial resolution. Here, we describe a method to rapidly and efficiently add nanogold particles to oligonucleotide probes, which target bacterial ribosomal RNA. These nanogold-labeled probes are then used in an in situ hybridization procedure that ensures both cellular integrity and high specificity. Electron microscopy subsequently enables the visualization of specific cells with high local precision on complex surface structures. This method will contribute to an increased understanding of how bacteria interact with surface structures on a sub-micron scale. PMID:26018431

  4. High-resolution and specific detection of bacteria on complex surfaces using nanoparticle probes and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jun; Nielsen, Shaun; Joseph, Stephen; Thomas, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    The study of the interaction of bacteria with surfaces requires the detection of specific bacterial groups with high spatial resolution. Here, we describe a method to rapidly and efficiently add nanogold particles to oligonucleotide probes, which target bacterial ribosomal RNA. These nanogold-labeled probes are then used in an in situ hybridization procedure that ensures both cellular integrity and high specificity. Electron microscopy subsequently enables the visualization of specific cells with high local precision on complex surface structures. This method will contribute to an increased understanding of how bacteria interact with surface structures on a sub-micron scale.

  5. Development of a Highly Specific Fluorescence Immunoassay for Detection of Diisobutyl Phthalate in Edible Oil Samples.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiping; Wu, Panpan; Lai, Dan; Zheng, Shengwu; Chen, Yingshan; Eremin, Sergei A; Peng, Wei; Zhao, Suqing

    2015-10-28

    The diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP) hapten containing an amino group was synthesized successfully, and the polyclonal antibody against 4-amino phthalate-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was developed. On the basis of the polyclonal antibody, a rapid and sensitive indirect competitive fluorescence immunoassay (icFIA) has been established to detect DiBP in edible oil samples for the first time. Under the optimized conditions, the quantitative working range of the icFIA was from 10.47 to 357.06 ng/mL (R(2) = 0.991), exhibiting a detection limit of 5.82 ng/mL. In this assay, the specific results showed that other similar phthalates did not significantly interfere with the analysis, with the cross-reactivity less than 1.5%, except for that of DiBAP. Thereafter, DiBP contamination in edible oil samples was detected by icFIA, with the recovery being from 79 to 103%. Furthermore, the reliability of icFIA was validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Therefore, the developed icFIA is suitable for monitoring DiBP in some edible oil samples.

  6. Development of a Highly Specific Fluorescence Immunoassay for Detection of Diisobutyl Phthalate in Edible Oil Samples.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiping; Wu, Panpan; Lai, Dan; Zheng, Shengwu; Chen, Yingshan; Eremin, Sergei A; Peng, Wei; Zhao, Suqing

    2015-10-28

    The diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP) hapten containing an amino group was synthesized successfully, and the polyclonal antibody against 4-amino phthalate-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was developed. On the basis of the polyclonal antibody, a rapid and sensitive indirect competitive fluorescence immunoassay (icFIA) has been established to detect DiBP in edible oil samples for the first time. Under the optimized conditions, the quantitative working range of the icFIA was from 10.47 to 357.06 ng/mL (R(2) = 0.991), exhibiting a detection limit of 5.82 ng/mL. In this assay, the specific results showed that other similar phthalates did not significantly interfere with the analysis, with the cross-reactivity less than 1.5%, except for that of DiBAP. Thereafter, DiBP contamination in edible oil samples was detected by icFIA, with the recovery being from 79 to 103%. Furthermore, the reliability of icFIA was validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Therefore, the developed icFIA is suitable for monitoring DiBP in some edible oil samples. PMID:26449794

  7. Improved SERS-Active Nanoparticles with Various Shapes for CTC Detection without Enrichment Process with Supersensitivity and High Specificity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoxia; Xia, Yuanzhi; Huang, Youju; Li, Juan; Ruan, Huimin; Chen, Tianxiang; Luo, Liqiang; Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Aiguo

    2016-08-10

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have received more and more attention in medical biology and clinical practice, especially diagnosis, prognosis, and cancer treatment monitoring. The detection of CTCs within the large number of healthy blood cells is a big challenge due to their rarity, which requires a detection method with supersensitivity and high specificity. In this study, we developed three kinds of new nanoparticles with the function of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) based on spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), gold nanorods (AuNRs), and gold nanostars (AuNSs) with similar particle size, similar modifications, and different shapes for CTC detection without an enrichment process from the blood. The nanoparticles possess strong SERS signal due to modification of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA) (i.e., Raman reporter molecule), possess excellent specificity due to stabilization of reductive bovine serum albumin (rBSA) to reduce the nonspecific catching or uptake by healthy cells in blood, and possess high sensitivity due to conjugation of folic acid (FA) (i.e., a targeted ligand) to identify CTCs. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the results of detection demonstrate that these nanoparticles could all be utilized for CTC detection without enrichment process from the blood with high specificity, and the AuNS-MBA-rBSA-FA is the best one due to its supersensitivity, whose limit of detection (i.e., 1 cell/mL) is much lower than the currently reported lowest value (5 cells/mL). PMID:27434820

  8. 4H-SiC UV Photo Detector with Large Area and Very High Specific Detectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Feng; Shahid, Aslam; Franz, David; Xin, Xiaobin; Zhao, Jian H.; Zhao, Yuegang; Winer, Maurice

    2004-01-01

    Pt/4H-SiC Schottky photodiodes have been fabricated with the device areas up to 1 sq cm. The I-V characteristics and photo-response spectra have been measured and analyzed. For a 5 mm x 5 mm area device leakage current of 1 x 10(exp 15)A at zero bias and 1.2 x 10(exp 14)A at -IV have been established. The quantum efficiency is over 30% from 240nm to 320nm. The specific detectivity, D(sup *), has been calculated from the directly measured leakage current and quantum efficiency data and are shown to be higher than 10(exp 15) cmHz(sup 1/2)/W from 210nm to 350nm with a peak D(sup *) of 3.6 x 10(exp 15)cmH(sup 1/2)/W at 300nm.

  9. Label free and high specific detection of mercury ions based on silver nano-liposome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshini, Eepsita; Pradhan, Nilotpala; Pradhan, Arun K.; Pradhan, Pallavi

    2016-06-01

    Herein, we report an eco-friendly, mild and one-pot approach for synthesis of silver nanoparticles via a lipopeptide biosurfactant - CHBS. The biosurfactant forms liposome vesicles when dispersed in an aqueous medium. The amino acid groups of the biosurfactant assists in the reduction of Ag+ ions leading to the production of homogeneous silver nanoparticles, encapsulated within the liposome vesicle, as confirmed from TEM analysis. Rate of synthesis and size of particle were greatly dependent on pH and reaction temperature. Kinetic analysis suggests the involvement of an autocatalytic reaction and the observed rate constant (kobs) was found to decrease with temperature, suggesting faster reaction with increasing temperature. Furthermore, the silver nanoparticles served as excellent probes for highly selective and sensitive recognition of Hg2 + ions. Interaction with Hg2 + ions results in an immediate change in colour of nanoparticle solution form brownish red to milky white. With increasing Hg2 + ions concentration, a gradual disappearance of SPR peak was observed. A linear relationship (A420/660) with an R2 value of 0.97 was observed in the range of 20 to 100 ppm Hg2 + concentration. Hg2 + ions are reduced to their elemental forms which thereby interact with the vesicles, leading to aggregation and precipitation of particles. The detection method avoids the need of functionalizing ligands and favours Hg2 + detection in aqueous samples by visible range spectrophotometry and hence can be used for simple and rapid analysis.

  10. Enantiomer-specific high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection of methamphetamines in abusers' hair and urine.

    PubMed

    Al-Dirbashi, O; Wada, M; Kuroda, N; Inuduka, S; Nakashima, K

    1999-12-01

    Enantiomer-specific high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection using 4-(4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-benzoyl chloride as a fluorescence labeling reagent was applied to determine methamphetamine and its metabolites in abusers' hair and urine. Hair samples were segmentally analyzed based on 1 cm long segments. In four hair samples, only the S(+)-enantiomers of methamphetamine and its N-demethylated metabolite, S(+)-amphetamine were detected. Satisfactory correlation (r = 0.901) between the results of high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence and those of gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorous detection was obtained (n = 19). In an abuser's urine sample, the S(+)- and R(-)-enantiomers of methamphetamine, amphetamine and para-hydroxymethamphetamine were detected. The degree of N-demethylation of S(+)-methamphetamine into the corresponding metabolite of amphetamine was significantly higher than that of the R(-)-enantiomer.

  11. Detection, differentiation, and identification of botulinum neurotoxin serotypes C, CD, D, and DC by highly specific immunoassays and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hansbauer, Eva-Maria; Skiba, Martin; Endermann, Tanja; Weisemann, Jasmin; Stern, Daniel; Dorner, Martin B; Finkenwirth, Friedrich; Wolf, Jessica; Luginbühl, Werner; Messelhäußer, Ute; Bellanger, Laurent; Woudstra, Cédric; Rummel, Andreas; Fach, Patrick; Dorner, Brigitte G

    2016-09-21

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes C and D and their mosaic variants CD and DC cause severe cases of botulism in animal husbandry and wildlife. Epidemiological data on the exact serotype or toxin variant causing outbreaks are rarely available, mainly because of their high sequence identity and the lack of fast and specific screening tools to detect and differentiate the four similar toxins. To fill this gap, we developed four highly specific sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) able to detect and differentiate botulinum neurotoxins type BoNT/C, D, CD, and DC based on four distinct combinations of specific monoclonal antibodies targeting both conserved and divergent subdomains of the four toxins. Here, highly sensitive detection with detection limits between 2 and 24 pg mL(-1) was achieved. The ELISAs were extensively validated and results were compared with data obtained by quantitative real-time PCR using a panel of Clostridium botulinum strains, real sample materials from veterinary botulism outbreaks, and non-BoNT-producing Clostridia. Additionally, in order to verify the results obtained by ELISA screening, the new monoclonal antibodies were used for BoNT enrichment and subsequent detection (i) on a functional level by endopeptidase mass spectrometry (Endopep-MS) assays and (ii) on a protein sequence level by LC-MS/MS spectrometry. Based on all technical information gathered in the validation study, the four differentiating ELISAs turned out to be highly reliable screening tools for the rapid analysis of veterinary botulism cases and should aid future field investigations of botulism outbreaks and the acquisition of epidemiological data. PMID:27353114

  12. A universal probe design for colorimetric detection of single-nucleotide variation with visible readout and high specificity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueping; Zhou, Dandan; Shen, Huawei; Chen, Hui; Feng, Wenli; Xie, Guoming

    2016-02-02

    Single-nucleotide variation (SNV) is a crucial biomarker for drug resistance-related detection in cancer and bacterial infection. However, the unintended binding of DNA probes limits the specificity of SNV detection, and the need for redesigned sequences compromise the universality of SNV assay. Herein, we demonstrated a universal and low-cost assay for the colorimetric discrimination of drug-resistance related point mutation. By the use of a universal DNA probe and a split G-quadruplex, the signal could be recognized by naked eye at room temperature. The DNA probe was used as a signal reporter which not only improved the universality, but also enabled high specificity of probe hybridization. This assay was successfully applied in the detection of cancer-related SNV in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homologue (KRAS), and tuberculosis drug-resistance related point mutation in RNA polymerase beta subunit gene (rpoB) with high specificity and visible readout. This method was simple, rapid, high-throughput and effective, which was suitable for point-of-care applications.

  13. A universal probe design for colorimetric detection of single-nucleotide variation with visible readout and high specificity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueping; Zhou, Dandan; Shen, Huawei; Chen, Hui; Feng, Wenli; Xie, Guoming

    2016-01-01

    Single-nucleotide variation (SNV) is a crucial biomarker for drug resistance-related detection in cancer and bacterial infection. However, the unintended binding of DNA probes limits the specificity of SNV detection, and the need for redesigned sequences compromise the universality of SNV assay. Herein, we demonstrated a universal and low-cost assay for the colorimetric discrimination of drug-resistance related point mutation. By the use of a universal DNA probe and a split G-quadruplex, the signal could be recognized by naked eye at room temperature. The DNA probe was used as a signal reporter which not only improved the universality, but also enabled high specificity of probe hybridization. This assay was successfully applied in the detection of cancer-related SNV in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homologue (KRAS), and tuberculosis drug-resistance related point mutation in RNA polymerase beta subunit gene (rpoB) with high specificity and visible readout. This method was simple, rapid, high-throughput and effective, which was suitable for point-of-care applications. PMID:26830326

  14. [Determination of plasma theophylline in the newborn by high resolution gas chromatography and specific detection (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Berthou, F; Dréano, Y; Riche, C; Alix, D; Floch, H H

    1978-01-01

    The authors describe a micromethod for the determination of blood concentration of theophylline in premature newborn infants. The method includes the specificity of separation in gas phase chromatography on a glass capillary column, and the sensitivity of thermo-ionic detection. After addition of isobutyl-3-methyl-1-xanthine, which constitutes an internal standard, extraction is performed in acid pH, with the mixture dichloromethane-isopropanol. The derivation consists of an N-pentyl reaction. Analysis was carried out on a glass capillary column SE-30 measuring 75 m x 0.5 mm. The technic used is simple and rapid. Its application in pediatrics has been particularly studied; the limit of quantitative detection was 0.1 mg/l. The plasma sample may be 0.05 ml. The reproducibility is about 2% in usual therapeutic doses. The specificity of the method has been widely debated, in particular the stages of extraction, derivation, separation and detection. The authors are convinced that the analyses requiring systems of specific detection, more and more widely used, require a chromatographic apparatus with a high power of resolution; this is illustrated by an example.

  15. A rapid and highly specific immunofluorescence method to detect Escherichia coli O157:H7 in infected meat samples.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Baskar; Barizuddin, Syed; Wuliji, Tumen; El-Dweik, Majed

    2016-08-16

    Developing rapid and sensitive methods for the detection of pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 remains a major challenge in food safety. The present study attempts to develop an immunofluorescence technique that uses Protein-A-coated, magnetic beads as the platform. The immunofluorescence technique described here is a direct detection method in which E. coli O157:H7 cells are labeled with tetramethylrhodamine (TRITC) fluorescent dye. TRITC-labeled bacteria are captured by the desired antibody (Ab), which is immobilized on the Protein-A magnetic beads. Fluorescence of the captured cells is recorded in a fluorescence spectrophotometer, where the fluorescence values are shown to be directly proportional to the number of bacteria captured on the immunobead. The formation of an immunocomplex is evidenced by the fluorescence of the beads under microscopy. The Ab immobilization procedure is also evidenced by microscopy using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled Ab. The total experimental time, including preparation of the sample, is just 1h. The minimum bacterial concentration detected by this method is 1.2±0.06×10(3)CFUml(-1). The high specificity of this method was proved by using the specific monoclonal Ab (MAb) in the test. The proposed protocol was successfully validated with E. coli O157:H7-infected meat samples. This approach also opens the door for the detection of other bacterial pathogens using Protein-A magnetic beads as a detection platform. PMID:27209618

  16. Highly specific detection of thrombin using an aptamer-based suspension array and the interaction analysis via microscale thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanan; Liu, Nan; Ma, Xinhua; Li, Xiaoli; Ma, Jia; Li, Ya; Zhou, Zhijiang; Gao, Zhixian

    2015-04-21

    A novel aptamer-based suspension array detection platform was designed for the sensitive, specific and rapid detection of human α-thrombin as a model. Thrombin was first recognized by a 29-mer biotinylated thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) in solution. Then 15-mer TBA modified magnetic beads (MBs) captured the former TBA-thrombin to form an aptamer-thrombin-aptamer sandwich complex. The median fluorescence intensity obtained via suspension array technology was positively correlated with the thrombin concentration. The interactions between TBAs and thrombin were analyzed using microscale thermophoresis (MST). The dissociation constants could be respectively achieved to be 44.2 ± 1.36 nM (TBA1-thrombin) and 15.5 ± 0.637 nM (TBA2-thrombin), which demonstrated the high affinities of TBA-thrombin and greatly coincided with previous reports. Interaction conditions such as temperature, reaction time, and coupling protocol were optimized. The dynamic quantitative working range of the aptamer-based suspension array was 18.37-554.31 nM, and the coefficients of determination R(2) were greater than 0.9975. The lowest detection limit of thrombin was 5.4 nM. This method was highly specific for thrombin without being affected by other analogs and interfering proteins. The recoveries of thrombin spiked in diluted human serum were in the range 82.6-114.2%. This innovative aptamer-based suspension array detection platform not only exhibits good sensitivity based on MBs facilitating highly efficient separation and amplification, but also suggests high specificity by the selective aptamer binding, thereby suggesting the expansive application prospects in research and clinical fields.

  17. Specific detection of mercury(II) irons using AlGaAs/InGaAs high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chengyan; Zhang, Yang; Guan, Min; Cui, Lijie; Ding, Kai; Zhang, Bintian; Lin, Zhang; Huang, Feng; Zeng, Yiping

    2015-09-01

    As one of the most environmentally important cations, mercury(II) iron has the biological toxicity which impacts wild life ecology and human health heavily. A Hg2+ biosensor based on AlGaAs/InGaAs high electron mobility transistors with high sensitivity and short response time is demonstrated experimentally. To achieve highly specific detection of Hg2+, an one-end thiol-modified ssDNA with lots of T thymine is immobilized to the Au-coated gate area of the high electron mobility transistors by a covalent modification method. The introduction of Hg2+ to the gate of the high electron mobility transistors affects surface charges, which leads to a change in the concentration of the two-dimensional electron gas in the AlGaAs/InGaAs high electron mobility transistors. Thus, the saturation current curves can be shifted with the modification of the gate areas and varied concentrations of Hg2+. Under the bias of 100 mV, a detection limit for the Hg2+ as low as10 nM is achieved. Successful detection with minute quantity of the sample indicates that the sensor has great potential in practical screening for a wide population. In addition, the dimension of the active area of the sensor is 20×50 μm2 and that of the entire sensor chip is 1×2 mm2, which make the Hg2+ biosensor portable.

  18. Nanomechanics for specific biological detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Mar; Carrascosa, Laura G.; Tamayo, Javier; Calle, Ana; Lechuga, Laura M.

    2003-04-01

    Nanomechanical biosensors have emerged as a promising platform for specific biological. Among the advantages are direct detection without need of labelling with fluorescent or radioactive molecules, very high sensitivity, reduced sensor area, and suitability for integration using silicon technology. Here we have studied the immobilization of oligonucleotide monolayers by monitoring the microcantilever bending. Oligonucleotides were derivatized with thiol molecules for self-assembly on the gold-coated side of a microcantilever. The geometry of the binding and the surface density were studied by mixing derivatized oligonucleotides with spacer self-assembled monolayers and by controlling the oligonucleotide functional group form. These results are compared with fluoresencent and chemiluminescence techniques. Furthermore, we present the first results of direct pesticide detection with microcantilever-based biosensors. Herbicide DDT was detected by performing competitive assays, in which the cantilever was coated with a synthetic DDT hapten, and it was exposured to different rations between the monoclonal antibody and the DDT. A new technique is presented for the detection of the nanomechanical response for biosensing applications, in which the resonant frequency is measured with about two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity. The low quality factor of the microcantilever in liquid is increased up by using an active feedback control, in which the cantilever oscillation is amplified and delayed and it is used as a driving force. The technique has been applied for the detection of ethanol, proteins, and pathogens.

  19. Highly specific fluorescence detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity via photo-induced electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Tao, Mangjuan; Shi, Zhilu; Cheng, Rui; Zhang, Jing; Li, Baoxin; Jin, Yan

    2015-09-15

    Sensitive and reliable study of the activity of polynucleotide kinase (PNK) and its potential inhibitors is of great importance for biochemical interaction related to DNA phosphorylation as well as development of kinase-targeted drug discovery. To achieve facile and reliable detection of PNK activity, we report here a novel fluorescence method for PNK assay based on a combination of exonuclease cleavage reaction and photo-induced electron transfer (PIET) by using T4 PNK as a model target. The fluorescence of 3'-carboxyfluorescein-labeled DNA probe (FDNA) is effectively quenched by deoxyguanosines at the 5' end of its complementary DNA (cDNA) due to an effective PIET between deoxyguanosines and fluorophore. Whereas FDNA/cDNA hybrid is phosphorylated by PNK and then immediately cleaved by lambda exonuclease (λ exo), fluorescence is greatly restored due to the break of PIET. This homogeneous PNK activity assay does not require a complex design by taking advantage of the quenching ability of deoxyguanosines, making the proposed strategy facile and cost-effective. The activity of PNK can be sensitively detected in the range of 0.005 to 10 U mL(-1) with a detection limit of 2.1×10(-3) U mL(-1). Research on inhibition efficiency of different inhibitors demonstrated that it can be explored to evaluate inhibition capacity of inhibitors. The application for detection of PNK activity in complex matrix achieved satisfactory results. Therefore, this PIET strategy opens a promising avenue for studying T4 PNK activity as well as evaluating PNK inhibitors, which is of great importance for discovering kinase-targeted drugs. PMID:26050629

  20. Detection of lower limb deep venous thrombosis in asymptomatic high risk patients using a new radiolabelled thrombus specific agent

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, S.P.; Rahman, T.; Boyd S.J.

    1995-05-01

    Deep venous thrombosis is a serious consequence of major orthopaedic surgery and non invasive screening with either venous ultrasound or impedance plethysmography is unreliable for detecting or excluding DVT in this group. A new method of thrombus detection has been devised using Tc-99m labelled inhibited recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. The accuracy of scanning with this new radiopharmaceutical in asymptomatic high risk patients was evaluated using venography as the gold standard. 36 consecutive asymptomatic high risk patients (17 total hip, 19 total knee replacements) underwent both a contrast venogram on the operated leg and scintigraphic scan 7 days following operation. Scintigraphic imaging was performed at 4 hours post injection. For the purpose of this analysis, each venogram was divided into a proximal and a distal segment. Venograms were interpreted as being positive, negative or uninterpretable in each segment. Similar analysis of the scintigraphic scans was performed except that all segments were considered to be of diagnostic quality. 57 segments were able to be analysed. Of the 13 thrombosed segments (1 proximal, 12 calf), 12 had positive scans; in the 44 non thrombosed segments, 40 had negative scans. Thus in detecting lower limb thrombosis, scanning had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 91%. Scintigraphic scanning with this new radiopharmaceutical permits accurate detection of thrombus in high risk patients.

  1. Label-Free Electrical Immunosensor for Highly Sensitive and Specific Detection of Microcystin-LR in Water Samples.

    PubMed

    Tan, Feng; Saucedo, Nuvia Maria; Ramnani, Pankaj; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-08-01

    Microcystin-LR (MCLR) is one of the most commonly detected and toxic cyclic heptapeptide cyanotoxins released by cyanobacterial blooms in surface waters, for which sensitive and specific detection methods are necessary to carry out its recognition and quantification. Here, we present a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNTs)-based label-free chemiresistive immunosensor for highly sensitive and specific detection of MCLR in different source waters. MCLR was initially immobilized on SWCNTs modified interdigitated electrode, followed by incubation with monoclonal anti-MCLR antibody. The competitive binding of MCLR in sample solutions induced departure of the antibody from the antibody-antigen complexes formed on SWCNTs, resulting in change in the conductivity between source and drain of the sensor. The displacement assay greatly improved the sensitivity of the sensor compared with direct immunoassay on the same device. The immunosensor exhibited a wide linear response to log value of MCLR concentration ranging from 1 to 1000 ng/L, with a detection limit of 0.6 ng/L. This method showed good reproducibility, stability and recovery. The proposed method provides a powerful tool for rapid and sensitive monitoring of MCLR in environmental samples.

  2. Imaging of oxidation-specific epitopes with targeted nanoparticles to detect high-risk atherosclerotic lesions: progress and future directions.

    PubMed

    Briley-Saebo, Karen; Yeang, Calvin; Witztum, Joseph L; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2014-11-01

    Oxidation-specific epitopes (OSE) within developing atherosclerotic lesions are key antigens that drive innate and adaptive immune responses in atherosclerosis, leading to chronic inflammation. Oxidized phospholipids and malondialdehyde-lysine epitopes are well-characterized OSE present in human atherosclerotic lesions, particularly in pathologically defined vulnerable plaques. Using murine and human OSE-specific antibodies as targeting agents, we have developed radionuclide and magnetic resonance based nanoparticles, containing gadolinium, manganese or lipid-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide, to non-invasively image OSE within experimental atherosclerotic lesions. These methods quantitate plaque burden, allow detection of lesion progression and regression, plaque stabilization, and accumulation of OSE within macrophage-rich areas of the artery wall, suggesting they detect the most active lesions. Future studies will focus on using "natural" antibodies, lipopeptides, and mimotopes for imaging applications. These approaches should enhance the clinical translation of this technique to image, monitor, evaluate efficacy of novel therapeutic agents, and guide optimal therapy of high-risk atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:25297940

  3. Detection of prostate-specific antigen with biomolecule-gated AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia-dong; Cheng, Jun-jie; Miao, Bin; Wei, Xiao-wei; Xie, Jie; Zhang, Jin-cheng; Zhang, Zhi-qiang; Wu, Dong-min

    2014-07-01

    In order to improve the sensitivity of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) biosensors, a simple biomolecule-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMT structure was designed and successfully fabricated for prostate specific antigen (PSA) detection. UV/ozone was used to oxidize the GaN surface and then a 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTES) self-assembled monolayer was bound to the sensing region. This monolayer serves as a binding layer for attachment of the prostate specific antibody (anti-PSA). The biomolecule-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMT sensor shows a rapid and sensitive response when the target prostate-specific antigen in buffer solution was added to the antibody-immobilized sensing area. The current change showed a logarithm relationship against the PSA concentration from 0.1 pg/ml to 0.993 ng/ml. The sensitivity of 0.215% is determined for 0.1 pg/ml PSA solution. The above experimental result of the biomolecule-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMT biosensor suggested that this biosensor might be a useful tool for prostate cancer screening.

  4. Detection of four diabetes specific autoantibodies in a single radioimmunoassay: an innovative high-throughput approach for autoimmune diabetes screening

    PubMed Central

    Tiberti, C; Yu, L; Lucantoni, F; Panimolle, F; Spagnuolo, I; Lenzi, A; Eisenbarth, G S; Dotta, F

    2011-01-01

    Highly sensitive and specific radioimmunoassays have been validated for autoantibodies reacting with the four major autoantigens identified so far in autoimmune diabetes. However, the analysis of this large number of autoantigens has increased the costs and time necessary for complete autoantibody screenings. Our aim was to demonstrate that it is possible to detect the immunoreactivity against a combination of four different autoantigens by a single assay, this representing a rapid, low-cost first approach to evaluate humoral autoimmunity in diabetes. By using this novel multi-autoantigen radioimmunoassay (MAA), in subsequent steps we analysed 830 sera, 476 of known and 354 of unknown diabetes-specific immunoreactivity, collected from various groups of individuals including type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients, autoantibody-positive patients with a clinical diagnosis of type 2 diabetes (LADA), prediabetic subjects, individuals at risk to develop autoimmune diabetes, siblings of type 1 diabetic patients, coeliac patients and healthy control subjects. All sera reacting with one or more of the four autoantigens by single assays also resulted positive with MAA, as well as eight of 24 type 1 diabetic patients classified initially as autoantibody-negative at disease onset based on single autoantibody assays. In addition, MAA showed 92% sensitivity and 99% specificity by analysing 140 blinded sera from type 1 diabetic patients and control subjects provided in the 2010 Diabetes Autoantibody Standardization Program. MAA is the first combined method also able to evaluate, in addition to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and tyrosine phosphatase (IA)-2, insulin and islet beta-cell zinc cation efflux transporter (ZnT8) autoantibodies. It appears to be particularly appropriate as a first-line approach for large-scale population-based screenings of anti-islet autoimmunity. PMID:22059988

  5. A highly sensitive and specific method for the screening detection of genetically modified organisms based on digital PCR without pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wei; Zhu, Pengyu; Wang, Chenguang; Huang, Kunlun; Du, Zhixin; Tian, Wenying; Wang, Qin; Wang, Huiyu; Xu, Wentao; Zhu, Shuifang

    2015-01-01

    Digital PCR has developed rapidly since it was first reported in the 1990 s. It was recently reported that an improved method facilitated the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). However, to use this improved method, the samples must be pretreated, which could introduce inaccuracy into the results. In our study, we explored a pretreatment-free digital PCR detection method for the screening for GMOs. We chose the CaMV35s promoter and the NOS terminator as the templates in our assay. To determine the specificity of our method, 9 events of GMOs were collected, including MON810, MON863, TC1507, MIR604, MIR162, GA21, T25, NK603 and Bt176. Moreover, the sensitivity, intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory reproducibility of our detection method were assessed. The results showed that the limit of detection of our method was 0.1%, which was lower than the labeling threshold level of the EU. The specificity and stability among the 9 events were consistent, respectively. The intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory reproducibility were both good. Finally, the perfect fitness for the detection of eight double-blind samples indicated the good practicability of our method. In conclusion, the method in our study would allow more sensitive, specific and stable screening detection of the GMO content of international trading products. PMID:26239916

  6. A highly sensitive and specific method for the screening detection of genetically modified organisms based on digital PCR without pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wei; Zhu, Pengyu; Wang, Chenguang; Huang, Kunlun; Du, Zhixin; Tian, Wenying; Wang, Qin; Wang, Huiyu; Xu, Wentao; Zhu, Shuifang

    2015-08-04

    Digital PCR has developed rapidly since it was first reported in the 1990 s. It was recently reported that an improved method facilitated the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). However, to use this improved method, the samples must be pretreated, which could introduce inaccuracy into the results. In our study, we explored a pretreatment-free digital PCR detection method for the screening for GMOs. We chose the CaMV35s promoter and the NOS terminator as the templates in our assay. To determine the specificity of our method, 9 events of GMOs were collected, including MON810, MON863, TC1507, MIR604, MIR162, GA21, T25, NK603 and Bt176. Moreover, the sensitivity, intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory reproducibility of our detection method were assessed. The results showed that the limit of detection of our method was 0.1%, which was lower than the labeling threshold level of the EU. The specificity and stability among the 9 events were consistent, respectively. The intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory reproducibility were both good. Finally, the perfect fitness for the detection of eight double-blind samples indicated the good practicability of our method. In conclusion, the method in our study would allow more sensitive, specific and stable screening detection of the GMO content of international trading products.

  7. A highly sensitive and specific method for the screening detection of genetically modified organisms based on digital PCR without pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wei; Zhu, Pengyu; Wang, Chenguang; Huang, Kunlun; Du, Zhixin; Tian, Wenying; Wang, Qin; Wang, Huiyu; Xu, Wentao; Zhu, Shuifang

    2015-01-01

    Digital PCR has developed rapidly since it was first reported in the 1990s. It was recently reported that an improved method facilitated the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). However, to use this improved method, the samples must be pretreated, which could introduce inaccuracy into the results. In our study, we explored a pretreatment-free digital PCR detection method for the screening for GMOs. We chose the CaMV35s promoter and the NOS terminator as the templates in our assay. To determine the specificity of our method, 9 events of GMOs were collected, including MON810, MON863, TC1507, MIR604, MIR162, GA21, T25, NK603 and Bt176. Moreover, the sensitivity, intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory reproducibility of our detection method were assessed. The results showed that the limit of detection of our method was 0.1%, which was lower than the labeling threshold level of the EU. The specificity and stability among the 9 events were consistent, respectively. The intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory reproducibility were both good. Finally, the perfect fitness for the detection of eight double-blind samples indicated the good practicability of our method. In conclusion, the method in our study would allow more sensitive, specific and stable screening detection of the GMO content of international trading products. PMID:26239916

  8. High-throughput, low-cost, and event-specific polymerase chain reaction detection of herbicide tolerance in genetically modified soybean A2704-12.

    PubMed

    Ma, H; Li, H; Li, J; Wang, X F; Wei, P C; Li, L; Yang, J B

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an event-specific qualitative and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for detection of herbicide-tolerance genetically modified (GM) soybean A2704-12. The event-specific PCR primers were designed, based on the 5'-flanking integration sequence in the soybean genome, to amplify the 239-bp target fragment. Employing the same event-specific primers, qualitative PCR and real-time quantitative PCR detection methods were successfully developed. The results showed that the A2704-12 event could be specifically distinguished from other GM soybean events. In the qualitative PCR assay, the limit of detection was 0.05%, and in the real-time quantitative PCR assay, the limit of detection was less than 0.01%. Moreover, our genomic DNA (gDNA) extraction protocol is high-throughput, safe, and low-cost. The event-specific PCR assay system is cost-efficient by using SYBR Green I in real-time PCR, and by using the same primers in both the qualitative and quantitative PCR assays. We therefore developed a high-throughput, low-cost, and event-specific qualitative and quantitative PCR detection method for GM soybean A2704-12. The method would be useful for market supervision and management of GM soybean A2704-12 due to its high specificity and sensitivity. PMID:24615034

  9. Generation and purification of highly-specific antibodies for detecting post-translationally modified proteins in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arur, Swathi; Schedl, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications alter protein structure, affecting activity, stability, localization and/or binding partners. Antibodies that specifically recognize post-translationally modified proteins have a number of uses including immuno-cytochemistry and immuno-precipitation of the modified protein to purify protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid complexes. However, antibodies directed at modified sites on individual proteins are often non-specific. Here we describe a protocol to purify polyclonal antibodies that specifically detect the modified protein of interest. The approach uses iterative rounds of subtraction and affinity purification, using stringent washes to remove antibodies that recognize the unmodified protein and low sequence complexity epitopes containing the modified amino acid. Dot and western blots assays are employed to assess antibody preparation specificity. The approach is designed to overcome the common occurrence that a single round of subtraction and affinity purification is not sufficient to obtain a modified protein specific antibody preparation. One full round of antibody purification and specificity testing takes 6 days of discontinuous time. PMID:24457330

  10. Highly sensitive silicon nanowire biosensor with novel liquid gate control for detection of specific single-stranded DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Adam, Tijjani; Hashim, U

    2015-05-15

    The study demonstrates the development of a liquid-based gate-control silicon nanowire biosensor for detection of specific single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules. The sensor was fabricated using conventional photolithography coupled with an inductively coupled plasma dry etching process. Prior to the application of DNA to the device, its linear response to pH was confirmed by serial dilution from pH 2 to pH 14. Then, the sensor surface was silanized and directly aminated with (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane to create a molecular binding chemistry for biofunctionalization. The resulting Si‒O‒Si‒ components were functionalized with receptor ssDNA, which interacted with the targeted ssDNA to create a field across the silicon nanowire and increase the current. The sensor shows selectivity for the target ssDNA in a linear range from target ssDNA concentrations of 100 pM to 25 nM. With its excellent detection capabilities, this sensor platform is promising for detection of specific biomarkers and other targeted proteins. PMID:25453738

  11. Silicon photonic crystal microarrays for high throughput label-free detection of lung cancer cell line lysates with sensitivity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Gemmill, Robert M.; Chen, Ray T.

    2013-03-01

    Detection of biomolecules on microarrays based on label-free on-chip optical biosensors is very attractive since this format avoids complex chemistries caused by steric hindrance of labels. Application areas include the detection of cancers and allergens, and food-borne pathogens to name a few. We have demonstrated photonic crystal microcavity biosensors with high sensitivity down to 1pM concentrations (67pg/ml). High sensitivities were achieved by slow light engineering which reduced the radiation loss and increased the stored energy in the photonic crystal microcavity resonance mode. Resonances with high quality factor Q~26,760 in liquid ambient, coupled with larger optical mode volumes allowed enhanced interaction with the analyte biomolecules which resulted in sensitivities down to 10 cells per micro-liter to lung cancer cell lysates. The specificity of detection was ensured by multiplexed detections from multiple photonic crystal microcavities arrayed on the arms of a multimode interference power splitter. Specific binding interactions and control experiments were performed simultaneously at the same instant of time with the same 60 microliter sample volume. Specificity is further ensured by sandwich assay methods in the multiplexed experiment. Sandwich assay based amplification increased the sensitivity further resulting in the detection of lung cancer cell lysates down to concentrations of 2 cells per micro-liter. The miniaturization enabled by photonic crystal biosensors coupled with waveguide interconnected layout thus offers the potential of high throughput proteomics with high sensitivity and specificity.

  12. Highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection of specific DNA sequences with molecular beacons and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dongshan; Zhai, Kun; Xiang, Wenjun; Wang, Lianzhi

    2014-11-01

    A highly sensitive fluorescence method of quantitative detection for specific DNA sequence is developed based on molecular beacon (MB) and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I by synchronous fluorescence analysis. It is demonstrated by an oligonucleotide sequence of wild-type HBV (target DNA) as a model system. In this strategy, the fluorophore of MB is designed to be 6-carboxyfluorescein group (FAM), and the maximum excitation wavelength and maximum emission wavelength are both very close to that of SYBR Green I. In the presence of targets DNA, the MBs hybridize with the targets DNA and form double-strand DNA (dsDNA), the fluorophore FAM is separated from the quencher BHQ-1, thus the fluorophore emit fluorescence. At the same time, SYBR Green I binds to dsDNA, the fluorescence intensity of SYBR Green I is significantly enhanced. When targets DNA are detected by synchronous fluorescence analysis, the fluorescence peaks of FAM and SYBR Green I overlap completely, so the fluorescence signal of system will be significantly enhanced. Thus, highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection for DNA can be realized. Under the optimum conditions, the total fluorescence intensity of FAM and SYBR Green I exhibits good linear dependence on concentration of targets DNA in the range from 2×10(-11) to 2.5×10(-9)M. The detection limit of target DNA is estimated to be 9×10(-12)M (3σ). Compared with previously reported methods of detection DNA with MB, the proposed method can significantly enhance the detection sensitivity.

  13. Allele-specific duplex polymerase chain reaction to differentiate Mycobacterium abscessus subspecies and to detect highly clarithromycin-resistant isolates.

    PubMed

    Kim, H Y; Lee, S Y; Kim, B J; Kook, Y H

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of the structural differences of erm, we used a duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to differentiate Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus and subsp. massiliense isolates and to detect the point mutations of 23S rRNA gene that confer a high level of resistance to clarithromycin. Subsp. massiliense strains occupying almost half of the clinical isolates can be simply identified, and their clarithromycin susceptibility can be rapidly determined. PMID:27514964

  14. A highly sensitive and specific biosensor for ligation- and PCR-free detection of microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiqiang; Peng, Yanfen

    2011-05-15

    A highly sensitive microRNA (miRNA) biosensor for both ligation- and PCR-free detection of miRNAs is described in this work. The biosensor was made of a monolayer of long oligonucleotide capture probes (CPs) comprising of miRNA capturing segments at the top (3' termini) and detection probe capturing segments at the bottom (5' termini). Following hybridization with a target miRNA, a cocktail of Surveyor(®) and exonuclease I in pH 7.4 phosphate buffered saline was applied to the biosensor. Unhybridized CP strands and mismatched miRNA/CP duplexes were digested while complementarily hybridized ones remained intact. Thereafter, electrochemically activated glucose oxidase-tagged peptide nucleic acid detection probes (GOx-DP) were hybridized to the bottom segments of the CPs on the biosensor. The number of GOx molecules found at the biosensor surface coincides with the number of miRNA strands hybridized and therefore correlates directly to the concentration of the target miRNA. A detection limit of 10 fM and a linear current-concentration relationship up to 10 pM were attained under optimized conditions. The biosensor effectively eliminated the needs for chemical/biological ligation and PCR. It was showed that there is little cross-hybridization among closely related miRNA family members even at single-base-mismatched levels. Successful attempts were made in applying the biosensor to the detection of miRNAs in total RNA extracted from cell lines. PMID:21420848

  15. Rapid and specific detection of Salmonella in water samples using real-time PCR and High Resolution Melt (HRM) curve analysis.

    PubMed

    van Blerk, G N; Leibach, L; Mabunda, A; Chapman, A; Louw, D

    2011-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay combined with a pre-enrichment step for the specific and rapid detection of Salmonella in water samples is described. Following amplification of the invA gene target, High Resolution Melt (HRM) curve analysis was used to discriminate between products formed and to positively identify invA amplification. The real-time PCR assay was evaluated for specificity and sensitivity. The assay displayed 100% specificity for Salmonella and combined with a 16-18 h non-selective pre-enrichment step, the assay proved to be highly sensitive with a detection limit of 1.0 CFU/ml for surface water samples. The detection assay also demonstrated a high intra-run and inter-run repeatability with very little variation in invA amplicon melting temperature. When applied to water samples received routinely by the laboratory, the assay showed the presence of Salmonella in particularly surface water and treated effluent samples. Using the HRM based assay, the time required for Salmonella detection was drastically shortened to less than 24 h compared to several days when using standard culturing methods. This assay provides a useful tool for routine water quality monitoring as well as for quick screening during disease outbreaks.

  16. Highly specific and efficient primers for in-house multiplex PCR detection of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although sophisticated methodologies are available, the use of endpoint polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect 16S rDNA genes remains a good approach for estimating the incidence and prevalence of specific infections and for monitoring infections. Considering the importance of the early diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), the development of a sensitive and affordable method for identifying pathogens in clinical samples is needed. Highly specific and efficient primers for a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (m-PCR) system were designed in silico to detect the 16S rDNA genes of four bacteria that cause genital infections, and the PCR method was developed. Methods The Genosensor Probe Designer (GPD) (version 1.0a) software was initially used to design highly specific and efficient primers for in-house m-PCR. Single-locus PCR reactions were performed and standardised, and then primers for each locus in turn were added individually in subsequent amplifications until m-PCR was achieved. Amplicons of the expected size were obtained from each of the four bacterial gene fragments. Finally, the analytical specificity and limits of detection were tested. Results Because they did not amplify any product from non-STI tested species, the primers were specific. The detection limits for the Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum primer sets were 5.12 × 105, 3.9 × 103, 61.19 × 106 and 6.37 × 105 copies of a DNA template, respectively. Conclusions The methodology designed and standardised here could be applied satisfactorily for the simultaneous or individual detection of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum. This method is at least as efficient as other previously described methods; however, this method is more affordable for low-income countries. PMID:24997675

  17. A highly sensitive and selective competition assay for the detection of cysteine using mercury-specific DNA, Hg and Sybr Green I.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Gao, Shuli; Liu, Quanwen; Pan, Dun; Wang, Lihua; Ren, Shuzhen; Ding, Min; Chen, Jingwen; Liu, Gang

    2011-01-01

    We here report a rapid, sensitive, selective and label-free fluorescence detection method for cysteine (Cys). The conformation of mercury-specific DNA (MSD) changes from a random coil form to a hairpin structure in the presence of Hg2+ due to the formation of a thymine-Hg2+ -thymine (T-Hg2+ -T) complex. Cys can selectively coordinate with Hg2+ and extract it from the thymine-Hg2+ -thymine complex. The hairpin structure dehybridizes and the fluorescence intensity of Sybr Green I (SG) decreases upon addition of Cys because SG efficiently discriminates mercury-specific DNA and mercury-specific DNA/Hg2+ complex. The detection can be finished within 5 min with high sensitivity and selectivity. In addition, we can obtain variable dynamic ranges for Cys by changing the concentration of MSD/Hg2+.

  18. High throughput detection of miRNAs and gene-specific mRNA at the single-cell level by flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Porichis, Filippos; Hart, Meghan G.; Griesbeck, Morgane; Everett, Holly L.; Hassan, Muska; Baxter, Amy E.; Lindqvist, Madelene; Miller, Sara M.; Soghoian, Damien Z.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Reynolds, Susan; Norris, Brett; Mordecai, Scott K.; Nguyen, Quan; Lai, Chunfai; Kaufmann, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a method that uses fluorescent probes to detect specific nucleic acid sequences at the single cell level. Here we describe optimized protocols that exploit a highly sensitive FISH method based on branched DNA technology to detect mRNA and miRNA in human leukocytes. This technique can be multiplexed and combined with fluorescent antibody protein staining to addressa variety of questions in heterogeneous cell populations. We demonstrate antigen-specific upregulation of IFNγ and IL-2 mRNAs in HIV- and CMV-specific T cells. We show simultaneous detection of cytokine mRNA and corresponding protein in single cells. We apply this method to detect mRNAs for which flow antibodies against the corresponding proteins are poor or are not available. We use this technique to show modulation of a microRNA critical for T cell function, miR-155. We adapt this assay for simultaneous detection of mRNA and proteins by Image Stream technology. PMID:25472703

  19. High-throughput detection of miRNAs and gene-specific mRNA at the single-cell level by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Porichis, Filippos; Hart, Meghan G; Griesbeck, Morgane; Everett, Holly L; Hassan, Muska; Baxter, Amy E; Lindqvist, Madelene; Miller, Sara M; Soghoian, Damien Z; Kavanagh, Daniel G; Reynolds, Susan; Norris, Brett; Mordecai, Scott K; Nguyen, Quan; Lai, Chunfai; Kaufmann, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a method that uses fluorescent probes to detect specific nucleic acid sequences at the single-cell level. Here we describe optimized protocols that exploit a highly sensitive FISH method based on branched DNA technology to detect mRNA and miRNA in human leukocytes. This technique can be multiplexed and combined with fluorescent antibody protein staining to address a variety of questions in heterogeneous cell populations. We demonstrate antigen-specific upregulation of IFNγ and IL-2 mRNAs in HIV- and CMV-specific T cells. We show simultaneous detection of cytokine mRNA and corresponding protein in single cells. We apply this method to detect mRNAs for which flow antibodies against the corresponding proteins are poor or are not available. We use this technique to show modulation of a microRNA critical for T-cell function, miR-155. We adapt this assay for simultaneous detection of mRNA and proteins by ImageStream technology. PMID:25472703

  20. Highly Specific and Quick Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Feces and Gut Tissue of Cattle and Humans by Multiple Real-Time PCR Assays▿

    PubMed Central

    Imirzalioglu, Can; Dahmen, Heinrich; Hain, Torsten; Billion, Andre; Kuenne, Carsten; Chakraborty, Trinad; Domann, Eugen

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD) in cattle and may be associated with Crohn's disease (CD) in humans. It is the slowest growing of the cultivable mycobacteria, and culture from clinical, veterinary, food, or environmental specimens can take 4 months or even longer. Currently, the insertion element IS900 is used to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA. However, closely related IS900 elements are also present in other mycobacteria, thus limiting its specificity as a target. Here we describe the use of novel primer sets derived from the sequences of two highly specific single copy genes, MAP2765c and MAP0865, for the quantitative detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis within 6 h by using real-time PCR. Specificity of the target was established using 40 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates, 67 different bacterial species, and two intestinal parasites. Using the probes and methods described, we detected 27 (2.09%) M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-positive stool specimens from 1,293 individual stool samples by the use of either IS900 or probes deriving from the MAP2765c and MAP0865 genes described here. In general, bacterial load due to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was uniformly low in these samples and we estimated 500 to 5,000 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis bacteria per gram of stool in assay-positive samples. Thus, the methods described here are useful for rapid and specific detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in clinical samples. PMID:21430100

  1. Highly sensitive method for specific, brief, and economical detection of glycoproteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis by the synthesis of a new hydrazide derivative.

    PubMed

    Cong, Weitao; Zhou, Ayi; Liu, Zhiguo; Shen, Jiayi; Zhou, Xuan; Ye, Weijian; Zhu, Zhongxin; Zhu, Xinliang; Lin, Jianjun; Jin, Litai

    2015-02-01

    A new hydrazide derivative was synthesized and used for the first time as a specific, brief, and economical probe to selectively visualize glycoproteins in 1-D and 2-D sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with high sensitivity. The detection limit of the newly developed staining method is 2- and 4-fold higher than that of the widely used Pro-Q Emerald 300 and 488 stains, respectively. PMID:25565298

  2. Highly sensitive method for specific, brief, and economical detection of glycoproteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis by the synthesis of a new hydrazide derivative.

    PubMed

    Cong, Weitao; Zhou, Ayi; Liu, Zhiguo; Shen, Jiayi; Zhou, Xuan; Ye, Weijian; Zhu, Zhongxin; Zhu, Xinliang; Lin, Jianjun; Jin, Litai

    2015-02-01

    A new hydrazide derivative was synthesized and used for the first time as a specific, brief, and economical probe to selectively visualize glycoproteins in 1-D and 2-D sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with high sensitivity. The detection limit of the newly developed staining method is 2- and 4-fold higher than that of the widely used Pro-Q Emerald 300 and 488 stains, respectively.

  3. Target-aptamer binding triggered quadratic recycling amplification for highly specific and ultrasensitive detection of antibiotics at the attomole level.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Wang, Yu; Liu, Su; Yu, Jinghua; Xu, Wei; Guo, Yuna; Huang, Jiadong

    2015-05-14

    A novel electrochemical aptasensor for ultrasensitive detection of antibiotics by combining polymerase-assisted target recycling amplification with strand displacement amplification with the help of polymerase and nicking endonuclease has been reported. This work is the first time that target-aptamer binding triggered quadratic recycling amplification has been utilized for electrochemical detection of antibiotics.

  4. Blinded study determination of high sensitivity and specificity microchip electrophoresis–SSCP/HA to detect mutations in the p53 gene

    PubMed Central

    Hestekin, Christa N.; Lin, Jennifer S.; Senderowicz, Lionel; Jakupciak, John P.; O’Connell, Catherine; Rademaker, Alfred; Barron, Annelise E.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the genetic changes that lead to disease has grown and continues to grow at a rapid pace. However, there is a need for clinical devices that can be used routinely to translate this knowledge into the treatment of patients. Use in a clinical setting requires high sensitivity and specificity (>97%) in order to prevent misdiagnoses. Single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and heteroduplex analysis (HA) are two DNA-based, complementary methods for mutation detection that are inexpensive and relatively easy to implement. However, both methods are most commonly detected by slab gel electrophoresis, which can be labor-intensive, time-consuming, and often the methods are unable to produce high sensitivity and specificity without the use of multiple analysis conditions. Here we demonstrate the first blinded study using microchip electrophoresis-SSCP/HA. We demonstrate the ability of microchip electrophoresis-SSCP/HA to detect with 98% sensitivity and specificity >100 samples from the p53 gene exons 5–9 in a blinded study in an analysis time of less than 10 minutes. PMID:22002021

  5. Highly stable, fluorescence-labeled heptapeptides substituted with a D-amino acid for the specific detection of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in plasma.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Yamanaka, Hikaru; Oe, Keitaro; Yokoyama, Izumi; Yamazaki, Yoji; Ebina, Keiichi

    2015-03-01

    Probes that can detect oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in plasma and in atherosclerotic plaques can be useful for the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of atherosclerosis. Recently, we have reported that two heptapeptides (Lys-Trp-Tyr-Lys-Asp-Gly-Asp, KP6) coupled to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) through the ε-amino group of N-terminus Lys in the absence/presence of 6-amino-n-caproic acid (AC) linker to FITC-(FITC)KP6 and (FITC-AC)KP6-can be useful as fluorescent probes for the specific detection of ox-LDL. In this study, to develop the fluorescent peptides with high plasma stability for the specific detection of ox-LDL, we investigated the interaction of (FITC)KP6 and (FITC-AC)KP6 substituted with D-Lys at the N-terminus-(FITC)dKP6 and (FITC-AC)dKP6-with ox-LDL, and the in vitro stability of these peptides in mouse plasma. (FITC)dKP6 and (FITC-AC)dKP6 bound with high specificity to ox-LDL in a dose-dependent manner, and also to ox-LDL in the mouse plasma. Furthermore, (FITC)dKP6 was more stable than (FITC)KP6 in mouse plasma (102.1% versus 69.0% remained after 1 h). These findings strongly suggest that (FITC)dKP6 and (FITC-AC)dKP6 may be effective fluorescent probes with higher plasma stability than (FITC)KP6 and (FITC-AC)KP6 for the specific detection of ox-LDL.

  6. Pseudoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli detection using species-specific probes and high definition melt curve analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three assays were developed for molecular differentiation of Pseudoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli, causal agents of cucurbit and hop downy mildew, respectively, for detection of airborne sporangia and diagnosis of symptomatic leaf tissue. The assays were based on previously identified single nuc...

  7. Low-cost and highly efficient DNA biosensor for heavy metal ion using specific DNAzyme-modified microplate and portable glucometer-based detection mode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Tang, Ying; Teng, Liumei; Lu, Minghua; Tang, Dianping

    2015-06-15

    A simple and low-cost DNA sensing platform based on Pb(2+)-specific DNAzyme-modified microplate was successfully developed for highly sensitive monitoring of lead ion (Pb(2+), one kind of toxic heavy metal ion) in the environmental samples coupling with a portable personal glucometer (PGM)-based detection mode. The detection cell was first prepared simply by means of immobilizing the DNAzyme on the streptavidin-modified microplate. Gold nanoparticle labeled with single-stranded DNA and invertase (Enz-AuNP-DNA) was utilized as the signal-transduction tag to produce PGM substrate (glucose). Upon addition of lead ion into the microplate, the substrate strand of the immobilized DNAzyme was catalytically cleaved by target Pb(2+), and the newly generated single-strand DNA in the microplate could hybridize again with the single-stranded DNA on the Enz-AuNP-DNA. Accompanying with the Enz-AuNP-DNA, the carried invertase could convert sucrose into glucose. The as-produced glucose could be monitored by using a widely accessible PGM for in situ amplified digital readout. Based on Enz-AuNP-DNA amplification strategy, as low as 1.0 pM Pb(2+) could be detected under the optimal conditions. Moreover, the methodology also showed good reproducibility and high selectivity toward target Pb(2+) against other metal ions because of highly specific Pb(2+)-dependent DNAzyme, and was applicable for monitoring Pb(2+) in the naturally contaminated sewage and spiked drinking water samples.

  8. Low-cost and highly efficient DNA biosensor for heavy metal ion using specific DNAzyme-modified microplate and portable glucometer-based detection mode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Tang, Ying; Teng, Liumei; Lu, Minghua; Tang, Dianping

    2015-06-15

    A simple and low-cost DNA sensing platform based on Pb(2+)-specific DNAzyme-modified microplate was successfully developed for highly sensitive monitoring of lead ion (Pb(2+), one kind of toxic heavy metal ion) in the environmental samples coupling with a portable personal glucometer (PGM)-based detection mode. The detection cell was first prepared simply by means of immobilizing the DNAzyme on the streptavidin-modified microplate. Gold nanoparticle labeled with single-stranded DNA and invertase (Enz-AuNP-DNA) was utilized as the signal-transduction tag to produce PGM substrate (glucose). Upon addition of lead ion into the microplate, the substrate strand of the immobilized DNAzyme was catalytically cleaved by target Pb(2+), and the newly generated single-strand DNA in the microplate could hybridize again with the single-stranded DNA on the Enz-AuNP-DNA. Accompanying with the Enz-AuNP-DNA, the carried invertase could convert sucrose into glucose. The as-produced glucose could be monitored by using a widely accessible PGM for in situ amplified digital readout. Based on Enz-AuNP-DNA amplification strategy, as low as 1.0 pM Pb(2+) could be detected under the optimal conditions. Moreover, the methodology also showed good reproducibility and high selectivity toward target Pb(2+) against other metal ions because of highly specific Pb(2+)-dependent DNAzyme, and was applicable for monitoring Pb(2+) in the naturally contaminated sewage and spiked drinking water samples. PMID:25576929

  9. Generic and sequence-variant specific molecular assays for the detection of the highly variable Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3.

    PubMed

    Chooi, Kar Mun; Cohen, Daniel; Pearson, Michael N

    2013-04-01

    Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3) is an economically important virus, which is found in all grapevine growing regions worldwide. Its accurate detection in nursery and field samples is of high importance for certification schemes and disease management programmes. To reduce false negatives that can be caused by sequence variability, a new universal primer pair was designed against a divergent sequence data set, targeting the open reading frame 4 (heat shock protein 70 homologue gene), and optimised for conventional one-step RT-PCR and one-step SYBR Green real-time RT-PCR assays. In addition, primer pairs for the simultaneous detection of specific GLRaV-3 variants from groups 1, 2, 6 (specifically NZ-1) and the outlier NZ2 variant, and the generic detection of variants from groups 1 to 5 were designed and optimised as a conventional one-step multiplex RT-PCR assay using the plant nad5 gene as an internal control (i.e. one-step hexaplex RT-PCR). Results showed that the generic and variant specific assays detected in vitro RNA transcripts from a range of 1×10(1)-1×10(8) copies of amplicon per μl diluted in healthy total RNA from Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon. Furthermore, the assays were employed effectively to screen 157 germplasm and 159 commercial field samples. Thus results demonstrate that the GLRaV-3 generic and variant-specific assays are prospective tools that will be beneficial for certification schemes and disease management programmes, as well as biological and epidemiological studies of the divergent GLRaV-3 populations.

  10. Generic and sequence-variant specific molecular assays for the detection of the highly variable Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3.

    PubMed

    Chooi, Kar Mun; Cohen, Daniel; Pearson, Michael N

    2013-04-01

    Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3) is an economically important virus, which is found in all grapevine growing regions worldwide. Its accurate detection in nursery and field samples is of high importance for certification schemes and disease management programmes. To reduce false negatives that can be caused by sequence variability, a new universal primer pair was designed against a divergent sequence data set, targeting the open reading frame 4 (heat shock protein 70 homologue gene), and optimised for conventional one-step RT-PCR and one-step SYBR Green real-time RT-PCR assays. In addition, primer pairs for the simultaneous detection of specific GLRaV-3 variants from groups 1, 2, 6 (specifically NZ-1) and the outlier NZ2 variant, and the generic detection of variants from groups 1 to 5 were designed and optimised as a conventional one-step multiplex RT-PCR assay using the plant nad5 gene as an internal control (i.e. one-step hexaplex RT-PCR). Results showed that the generic and variant specific assays detected in vitro RNA transcripts from a range of 1×10(1)-1×10(8) copies of amplicon per μl diluted in healthy total RNA from Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon. Furthermore, the assays were employed effectively to screen 157 germplasm and 159 commercial field samples. Thus results demonstrate that the GLRaV-3 generic and variant-specific assays are prospective tools that will be beneficial for certification schemes and disease management programmes, as well as biological and epidemiological studies of the divergent GLRaV-3 populations. PMID:23313884

  11. Prostatic cancer surveillance following whole-gland high-intensity focused ultrasound: comparison of MRI and prostate-specific antigen for detection of residual or recurrent disease

    PubMed Central

    Punwani, S; Emberton, M; Walkden, M; Sohaib, A; Freeman, A; Ahmed, H; Allen, C; Kirkham, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective This retrospective study compares dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI with the serial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurement for detection of residual disease following whole-gland high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy of prostate cancer. Methods Patients in whom post-HIFU DCE-MRI was followed within 3 months by ultrasound-guided transrectal biopsy were selected from a local database. 26 patients met the study inclusion criteria. Serial PSA levels following HIFU and post-HIFU follow-up MRI were retrieved for each patient. Three radiologists unaware of other investigative results independently assessed post-HIFU MRI studies for the presence of cancer, scoring on a four-point scale (1, no disease; 2, probably no disease; 3, probably residual disease; and 4, residual disease). Sensitivity, specificity and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were performed for each reader, post-HIFU PSA nadir and pre-biopsy PSA level thresholds of >0.2 and >0.5 ng ml−1. Results The sensitivity of DCE-MRI for detection of residual disease for the three readers ranged between 73% and 87%, and the specificity between 73% and 82%. There was good agreement between readers (κ=0.69–0.77). The sensitivity and specificity of PSA thresholds was 60–87% and 73–100%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve was greatest for pre-biopsy PSA (0.95). Conclusion DCE-MRI performed following whole-gland HIFU has similar sensitivity and specificity and ROC performance to serial PSA measurements for detection of residual or recurrent disease. PMID:22253342

  12. Ultra-deep sequencing confirms immunohistochemistry as a highly sensitive and specific method for detecting BRAF V600E mutations in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rössle, Matthias; Sigg, Michèle; Rüschoff, Jan H; Wild, Peter J; Moch, Holger; Weber, Achim; Rechsteiner, Markus P

    2013-11-01

    The activating BRAF (V600) mutation is a well-established negative prognostic biomarker in metastatic colorectal carcinoma (CRC). A recently developed monoclonal mouse antibody (clone VE1) has been shown to detect reliably BRAF (V600E) mutated protein by immunohistochemistry (IHC). In this study, we aimed to compare the detection of BRAF (V600E) mutations by IHC, Sanger sequencing (SaS), and ultra-deep sequencing (UDS) in CRC. VE1-IHC was established in a cohort of 68 KRAS wild-type CRCs. The VE1-IHC was only positive in the three patients with a known BRAF (V600E) mutation as assessed by SaS and UDS. The test cohort consisted of 265 non-selected, consecutive CRC samples. Thirty-nine out of 265 cases (14.7%) were positive by VE1-IHC. SaS of 20 randomly selected IHC negative tumors showed BRAF wild-type (20/20). Twenty-four IHC-positive cases were confirmed by SaS (24/39; 61.5%) and 15 IHC-positive cases (15/39; 38.5%) showed a BRAF wild-type by SaS. UDS detected a BRAF (V600E) mutation in 13 of these 15 discordant cases. In one tumor, the mutation frequency was below our threshold for UDS positivity, while in another case, UDS could not be performed due to low DNA amount. Statistical analysis showed sensitivities of 100% and 63% and specificities of 95 and 100% for VE1-IHC and SaS, respectively, compared to combined results of SaS and UDS. Our data suggests that there is high concordance between UDS and IHC using the anti-BRAF(V600E) (VE1) antibody. Thus, VE1 immunohistochemistry is a highly sensitive and specific method in detecting BRAF (V600E) mutations in colorectal carcinoma.

  13. Synthesis of grafted phosphorylcholine polymer layers as specific recognition ligands for C-reactive protein focused on grafting density and thickness to achieve highly sensitive detection.

    PubMed

    Kamon, Yuri; Kitayama, Yukiya; Itakura, Akiko N; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2015-04-21

    We studied the effects of layer thickness and grafting density of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) thin layers as specific ligands for the highly sensitive binding of C-reactive protein (CRP). PMPC layer thickness was controlled by surface-initiated activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP). PMPC grafting density was controlled by utilizing mixed self-assembled monolayers with different incorporation ratios of the bis[2-(2-bromoisobutyryloxy)undecyl] disulfide ATRP initiator, as modulated by altering the feed molar ratio with (11-mercaptoundecyl)tetra(ethylene glycol). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize the modified surfaces. PMPC grafting densities were estimated from polymer thickness and the molecular weight obtained from sacrificial initiator during surface-initiated AGET ATRP. The effects of thickness and grafting density of the obtained PMPC layers on CRP binding performance were investigated using surface plasmon resonance employing a 10 mM Tris-HCl running buffer containing 140 mM NaCl and 2 mM CaCl2 (pH 7.4). Furthermore, the non-specific binding properties of the obtained layers were investigated using human serum albumin (HSA) as a reference protein. The PMPC layer which has 4.6 nm of thickness and 1.27 chains per nm(2) of grafting density showed highly sensitive CRP detection (limit of detection: 4.4 ng mL(-1)) with low non-specific HSA adsorption, which was improved 10 times than our previous report of 50 ng mL(-1). PMID:25783194

  14. Synthesis of grafted phosphorylcholine polymer layers as specific recognition ligands for C-reactive protein focused on grafting density and thickness to achieve highly sensitive detection.

    PubMed

    Kamon, Yuri; Kitayama, Yukiya; Itakura, Akiko N; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2015-04-21

    We studied the effects of layer thickness and grafting density of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) thin layers as specific ligands for the highly sensitive binding of C-reactive protein (CRP). PMPC layer thickness was controlled by surface-initiated activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP). PMPC grafting density was controlled by utilizing mixed self-assembled monolayers with different incorporation ratios of the bis[2-(2-bromoisobutyryloxy)undecyl] disulfide ATRP initiator, as modulated by altering the feed molar ratio with (11-mercaptoundecyl)tetra(ethylene glycol). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize the modified surfaces. PMPC grafting densities were estimated from polymer thickness and the molecular weight obtained from sacrificial initiator during surface-initiated AGET ATRP. The effects of thickness and grafting density of the obtained PMPC layers on CRP binding performance were investigated using surface plasmon resonance employing a 10 mM Tris-HCl running buffer containing 140 mM NaCl and 2 mM CaCl2 (pH 7.4). Furthermore, the non-specific binding properties of the obtained layers were investigated using human serum albumin (HSA) as a reference protein. The PMPC layer which has 4.6 nm of thickness and 1.27 chains per nm(2) of grafting density showed highly sensitive CRP detection (limit of detection: 4.4 ng mL(-1)) with low non-specific HSA adsorption, which was improved 10 times than our previous report of 50 ng mL(-1).

  15. A unique "turn-on" fluorescence signalling strategy for highly specific detection of ascorbic acid using carbon dots as sensing probe.

    PubMed

    Fong, Jessica Fung Yee; Chin, Suk Fun; Ng, Sing Muk

    2016-11-15

    Carbon dots (CDs) that showed strong blue fluorescence were successfully synthesised from sodium alginate via furnace pyrolysis. The single step pyrolytic synthesis was simple to perform while yielded CDs with high photostability, good water solubility and minimum by-products. In order to design the probe with "turn-on" sensing capability, the CDs were screened against a series of metal cations to first "turn-off" the fluorescence. It was found that ferric ions (Fe(3+)) were most responsive and effective in quenching the fluorescence of CDs. Based on this observation, the conditioning of the probe was performed to ensure the fluorescence was completely quenched, while not overloading the system with Fe(3+). At the optimised condition, the CDs-Fe(3+) mixture served as a highly specific detection probe for ascorbic acid (AA). The analytical potential of the probe was evaluated and showed a good linear range of response for AA concentration of 24-40μg/mL. The selectivity study against other possible co-existing species was carried out and proved that our unique "turn-on" fluorescence signalling strategy was highly effective and selective towards AA as the target analyte. The probe was demonstrated for quantification of AA in real samples, which was the commercially available vitamin C supplement. The result showed good accuracy with minimum deviation from standard method adopted for validation purpose. PMID:27290666

  16. The simultaneous detection of free and total prostate antigen in serum samples with high sensitivity and specificity by using the dual-channel surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhongxiu; Qin, Yun; Peng, Zhen; Chen, Shenghua; Chen, Shu; Deng, Chunyan; Xiang, Juan

    2014-12-15

    Free/total prostate antigen (f/t-PSA) ratio in serum as a promising parameter has been used to improve the differentiation of benign and malignant prostate disease. In order to obtain the accurate and reliable f/t-PSA ratio, the simultaneous detection of f-PSA and t-PSA with high sensitivity and specificity is required. In this work, the dual-channel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has been employed to meet the requirement. In one channel, t-PSA was directly measured with a linear range from 1.0 to 20.0 ng/mL. In another channel, due to the low concentration of f-PSA in serum, the asynchronous competitive inhibition immunoassay with f-PSA@Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) was developed. As expected, the detection sensitivity of f-PSA was greatly enhanced, and a linear correlation with wider linear range from 0.010 to 0.40 ng/mL was also achieved. On the other hand, a simple method was explored for significantly reducing the non-specific adsorption of co-existing proteins. On basis of this, the f/t-PSA ratios in serum samples from prostate cancer (PCa) or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients were measured. And it was found that there was significant difference between the distributions of f/t-PSA ratio in BPH patients (16.44±1.77%) and those in PCa patients (24.53±4.97%). This present work provides an effective method for distinguishing PCa from BPH, which lays a potential foundation for the early diagnosis of PCa.

  17. A highly specific and sensitive loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for the detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Ravan, Hadi; Amandadi, Mojdeh; Sanadgol, Nima

    2016-02-01

    E. coli O157:H7 is one of the most important foodborne pathogen that causes some human illnesses such as bloody diarrhea, hemolytic-uremic syndrome, and kidney failure. We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay with six special primers that target a highly specific 299-bp region of the Z3276 gene for the detection of E. coli O157:H7. Among 117 bacterial strains tested in this study, positive results were only obtained from E. coli O157:H7 strains. The sensitivity level of the Z3276-LAMP assay was determined to be 5 CFU/reaction tube in pure bacterial culture. Moreover, the LAMP assay was successfully applied to artificially contaminated ground beef with a sensitivity level of 10(3) CFU/mL without pre-enrichment and 10 CFU/mL after a 4-h pre-enrichment. In conclusion, the present LAMP assay would be a useful and powerful tool for the rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnosis of E. coli O157:H7 strains in resource limited laboratories.

  18. A highly specific and sensitive loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for the detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Ravan, Hadi; Amandadi, Mojdeh; Sanadgol, Nima

    2016-02-01

    E. coli O157:H7 is one of the most important foodborne pathogen that causes some human illnesses such as bloody diarrhea, hemolytic-uremic syndrome, and kidney failure. We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay with six special primers that target a highly specific 299-bp region of the Z3276 gene for the detection of E. coli O157:H7. Among 117 bacterial strains tested in this study, positive results were only obtained from E. coli O157:H7 strains. The sensitivity level of the Z3276-LAMP assay was determined to be 5 CFU/reaction tube in pure bacterial culture. Moreover, the LAMP assay was successfully applied to artificially contaminated ground beef with a sensitivity level of 10(3) CFU/mL without pre-enrichment and 10 CFU/mL after a 4-h pre-enrichment. In conclusion, the present LAMP assay would be a useful and powerful tool for the rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnosis of E. coli O157:H7 strains in resource limited laboratories. PMID:26724736

  19. Determination of pesticide residues in coconut water by liquid-liquid extraction and gas chromatography with electron-capture plus thermionic specific detection and solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Brito, N M; Navickiene, S; Polese, L; Jardim, E F G; Abakerli, R B; Ribeiro, M L

    2002-05-31

    Two simple methods were developed to determine 11 pesticides in coconut water, a natural isotonic drink rich in salts, sugars and vitamins consumed by the people and athletes. The first procedure involves solid-phase extraction using Sep-Pak Vac C18 disposable cartridges with methanol for elution. Isocratic analysis was carried out by means of high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection at 254 nm to analyse captan, chlorothalonil, carbendazim, lufenuron and diafenthiuron. The other procedure is based on liquid-liquid extraction with hexane-dichloromethane (1:1, v/v), followed by gas chromatographic analysis with effluent splitting to electron-capture detection for determination of endosulfan, captan, tetradifon and trichlorfon and thermionic specific detection for determination of malathion, parathion-methyl and monocrotophos. The methods were validated with fortified samples at different concentration levels (0.01-12.0 mg/kg). Average recoveries ranged from 75 to 104% with relative standard deviations between 1.4 and 11.5%. Each recovery analysis was repeated at least five times. Limits of detection ranged from 0.002 to 2.0 mg/kg. The analytical procedures were applied to 15 samples and no detectable amounts of the pesticides were found in any samples under the conditions described.

  20. Determination of pesticide residues in coconut water by liquid-liquid extraction and gas chromatography with electron-capture plus thermionic specific detection and solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Brito, N M; Navickiene, S; Polese, L; Jardim, E F G; Abakerli, R B; Ribeiro, M L

    2002-05-31

    Two simple methods were developed to determine 11 pesticides in coconut water, a natural isotonic drink rich in salts, sugars and vitamins consumed by the people and athletes. The first procedure involves solid-phase extraction using Sep-Pak Vac C18 disposable cartridges with methanol for elution. Isocratic analysis was carried out by means of high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection at 254 nm to analyse captan, chlorothalonil, carbendazim, lufenuron and diafenthiuron. The other procedure is based on liquid-liquid extraction with hexane-dichloromethane (1:1, v/v), followed by gas chromatographic analysis with effluent splitting to electron-capture detection for determination of endosulfan, captan, tetradifon and trichlorfon and thermionic specific detection for determination of malathion, parathion-methyl and monocrotophos. The methods were validated with fortified samples at different concentration levels (0.01-12.0 mg/kg). Average recoveries ranged from 75 to 104% with relative standard deviations between 1.4 and 11.5%. Each recovery analysis was repeated at least five times. Limits of detection ranged from 0.002 to 2.0 mg/kg. The analytical procedures were applied to 15 samples and no detectable amounts of the pesticides were found in any samples under the conditions described. PMID:12113343

  1. High specific heat superconducting composite

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1979-01-01

    A composite superconductor formed from a high specific heat ceramic such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium-aluminum oxide and a conventional metal conductor such as copper or aluminum which are insolubly mixed together to provide adiabatic stability in a superconducting mode of operation. The addition of a few percent of insoluble gadolinium-aluminum oxide powder or gadolinium oxide powder to copper, increases the measured specific heat of the composite by one to two orders of magnitude below the 5.degree. K. level while maintaining the high thermal and electrical conductivity of the conventional metal conductor.

  2. Development of a Highly Sensitive and Specific Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Based on Recombinant Matrix Protein for Detection of Avian Pneumovirus Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Baldev R.; Cameron, Kjerstin T.; Seal, Bruce S.; Goyal, Sagar M.; Halvorson, David A.; Njenga, M. Kariuki

    2000-01-01

    The matrix (M) protein of avian pneumovirus (APV) was evaluated for its antigenicity and reliability in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for diagnosis of APV infection, a newly emergent disease of turkeys in United States. Sera from APV-infected turkeys consistently contained antibodies to a 30-kDa protein (M protein). An ELISA based on recombinant M protein generated in Escherichia coli was compared with the routine APV ELISA that utilizes inactivated virus as antigen. Of 34 experimentally infected turkeys, 33 (97.1%) were positive by M protein ELISA whereas only 18 (52.9%) were positive by routine APV ELISA 28 days after infection. None of the serum samples from 41 uninfected experimental turkeys were positive by M protein ELISA. Of 184 field sera from turkey flocks suspected of having APV infection, 133 (72.3%) were positive by M protein ELISA whereas only 99 (53.8%) were positive by routine APV ELISA. Twelve serum samples, which were negative by M protein ELISA but positive by routine APV ELISA, were not reactive with either recombinant M protein or denatured purified APV proteins by Western analysis. This indicates that the samples had given false-positive results by routine APV ELISA. The M protein ELISA was over six times more sensitive than virus isolation (11.5%) in detecting infections from samples obtained from birds showing clinical signs of APV infection. Taken together, these results show that ELISA based on recombinant M protein is a highly sensitive and specific test for detecting antibodies to APV. PMID:11060061

  3. Method for site-specific detection of m6A nucleoside presence in RNA based on high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Golovina, Anna Y; Dzama, Margarita M; Petriukov, Kirill S; Zatsepin, Timofei S; Sergiev, Petr V; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Dontsova, Olga A

    2014-02-01

    Chemical landscape of natural RNA species is decorated with the large number of modified nucleosides. Some of those could easily be detected by reverse transcription, while others permit only high-performance liquid chromatography or mass-spectrometry detection. Presence of m(6)A nucleoside at a particular position of long RNA molecule is challenging to observe. Here we report an easy and high-throughput method for detection of m(6)A nucleosides in RNA based on high-resolution melting analysis. The method relies on the previous knowledge of the modified nucleoside position at a particular place of RNA and allows rapid screening for conditions or genes necessary for formation of that modification. PMID:24265225

  4. Circulating cell-free DNA has a high degree of specificity to detect exon 19 deletions and the single-point substitution mutation L858R in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meifang; Lei, Huaiding; Luo, Guoshi; Liu, Xianjun; Xiong, Chang; Liu, Dan; Liu, Jie; Tang, Yijun

    2016-01-01

    Detection of an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation in circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is a noninvasive method to collect genetic information to guide treatment of lung cancer with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, the association between cfDNA and detection of EGFR mutations in tumor tissue remains unclear. Here, a meta-analysis was performed to determine whether cfDNA could serve as a substitute for tissue specimens for the detection of EGFR mutations. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and areas under the curve of cfDNA were 0.60, 0.94, and 0.9208 for the detection of EGFR mutations, 0.64, 0.99, and 0.9583 for detection of the exon 19 deletion, and 0.57, 0.99, and 0.9605 for the detection of the L858R mutation, respectively. Our results showed that cfDNA has a high degree of specificity to detect exon 19 deletions and L858R mutation. Due to its high specificity and noninvasive characteristics, cfDNA analysis presents a promising method to screen for mutations in NSCLC and predict patient response to EGFR-TKI treatment, dynamically assess treatment outcome, and facilitate early detection of resistance mutations. PMID:27081078

  5. Molecules for Fluorescence Detection of Specific Chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Steve

    2008-01-01

    A family of fluorescent dye molecules has been developed for use in on-off fluorescence detection of specific chemicals. By themselves, these molecules do not fluoresce. However, when exposed to certain chemical analytes in liquid or vapor forms, they do fluoresce (see figure). These compounds are amenable to fixation on or in a variety of substrates for use in fluorescence-based detection devices: they can be chemically modified to anchor them to porous or non-porous solid supports or can be incorporated into polymer films. Potential applications for these compounds include detection of chemical warfare agents, sensing of acidity or alkalinity, and fluorescent tagging of proteins in pharmaceutical research and development. These molecules could also be exploited for use as two-photon materials for photodynamic therapy in the treatment of certain cancers and other diseases. A molecule in this family consists of a fluorescent core (such as an anthracene or pyrene) attached to two end groups that, when the dye is excited by absorption of light, transfer an electron to the core, thereby quenching the fluorescence. The end groups can be engineered so that they react chemically with certain analytes. Upon reaction, electrons on the end groups are no longer available for transfer to the core and, consequently, the fluorescence from the core is no longer quenched. The chemoselectivity of these molecules can be changed by changing the end groups. For example, aniline end groups afford a capability for sensing acids or acid halides (including those contained in chemical warfare agents). Pyridine or bipyridyl end groups would enable sensing of metal ions. Other chemicals that can be selectively detected through suitable choice of end groups include glucose and proteins. Moreover, the fluorescent cores can be changed to alter light-absorption and -emission characteristics: anthracene cores fluoresce at wavelengths around 500 nm, whereas perylene cores absorb and emit at

  6. Sensitive electrochemical aptamer cytosensor for highly specific detection of cancer cells based on the hybrid nanoelectrocatalysts and enzyme for signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Duanping; Lu, Jing; Zhong, Yuwen; Yu, Yanyan; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Beibei; Chen, Zuanguang

    2016-01-15

    Human cancer is becoming a leading cause of death in the world and the development of a straightforward strategy for early detection of cancer is urgently required. Herein, a sandwich-type electrochemical aptamer cytosensor was developed for detection of human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) based on the hybrid nanoelectrocatalysts and enzyme for signal amplification. The thiolated TLS11a aptamers were used as a selective bio-recognition element, attached to the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface. Meanwhile, the electrochemical nanoprobes were fabricated through the G-quadruplex/hemin/aptamer complexes and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) immobilized on the surfaces of Au@Pd core-shell nanoparticle-modified magnetic Fe3O4/MnO2 beads (Fe3O4/MnO2/Au@Pd). After the target cells were captured, the hybrid nanoprobes were further assembled to form an aptamer-cell-nanoprobes sandwich-like system on the electrode surface. Then, hybrid Fe3O4/MnO2/Au@Pd nanoelectrocatalysts, G-quadruplex/hemin HRP-mimicking DNAzymes and the natural HRP enzyme efficiently catalyzed the oxidation of hydroquinone (HQ) with H2O2, amplifying the electrochemical signals and improving the detection sensitivity. This electrochemical cytosensor delivered a wide detection range of 1×10(2)-1×10(7)cellsmL(-1), high sensitivity with a low detection limit of 15cellsmL(-1), good selectivity and repeatability. Finally, an electrochemical reductive desorption method was performed to break gold-thiol bond and desorb the components on the AuNPs/GCE for regenerating the cytosensor. These results have demonstrated that the electrochemical cytosensor has the potential to be a feasible tool for cost-effective cancer cell detection in early cancer diagnosis.

  7. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1996-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  8. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1996-06-11

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidation state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  9. Detection of RNA from a Novel West Nile-like Virus and High Prevalence of an Insect-specific Flavivirus in Mosquitoes in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Farfan-Ale, Jose A.; Loroño-Pino, Maria A.; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E.; Hovav, Einat; Powers, Ann M.; Lin, Ming; Dorman, Karin S.; Platt, Kenneth B.; Bartholomay, Lyric C.; Soto, Victor; Beaty, Barry J.; Lanciotti, Robert S.; Blitvich, Bradley J.

    2009-01-01

    As part of our ongoing surveillance efforts for West Nile virus (WNV) in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico, 96,687 mosquitoes collected from January through December 2007 were assayed by virus isolation in mammalian cells. Three mosquito pools caused cytopathic effect. Two isolates were orthobunyaviruses (Cache Valley virus and Kairi virus) and the identity of the third infectious agent was not determined. A subset of mosquitoes was also tested by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using WNV-, flavivirus-, alphavirus-, and orthobunyavirus-specific primers. A total of 7,009 Culex quinquefasciatus in 210 pools were analyzed. Flavivirus RNA was detected in 146 (70%) pools, and all PCR products were sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of one PCR product was most closely related (71–73% identity) with homologous regions of several other flaviviruses, including WNV, St. Louis encephalitis virus, and Ilheus virus. These data suggest that a novel flavivirus (tentatively named T’Ho virus) is present in Mexico. The other 145 PCR products correspond to Culex flavivirus, an insect-specific flavivirus first isolated in Japan in 2003. Culex flavivirus was isolated in mosquito cells from approximately one in four homogenates tested. The genomic sequence of one isolate was determined. Surprisingly, heterogeneous sequences were identified at the distal end of the 5′ untranslated region. PMID:19141845

  10. Specific detection of methionine 27 mutation in histone 3 variants (H3K27M) in fixed tissue from high-grade astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Bechet, Denise; Gielen, Gerrit G H; Korshunov, Andrey; Pfister, Stefan M; Rousso, Caterina; Faury, Damien; Fiset, Pierre-Olivier; Benlimane, Naciba; Lewis, Peter W; Lu, Chao; David Allis, C; Kieran, Mark W; Ligon, Keith L; Pietsch, Torsten; Ellezam, Benjamin; Albrecht, Steffen; Jabado, Nada

    2014-11-01

    Studies in pediatric high-grade astrocytomas (HGA) by our group and others have uncovered recurrent somatic mutations affecting highly conserved residues in histone 3 (H3) variants. One of these mutations leads to analogous p.Lys27Met (K27M) mutations in both H3.3 and H3.1 variants, is associated with rapid fatal outcome, and occurs specifically in HGA of the midline in children and young adults. This includes diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (80 %) and thalamic or spinal HGA (>90 %), which are surgically challenging locations with often limited tumor material available and critical need for specific histopathological markers. Here, we analyzed formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from 143 pediatric HGA and 297 other primary brain tumors or normal brain. Immunohistochemical staining for H3K27M was compared to tumor genotype, and also compared to H3 tri-methylated lysine 27 (H3K27me3) staining, previously shown to be drastically decreased in samples carrying this mutation. There was a 100 % concordance between genotype and immunohistochemical analysis of H3K27M in tumor samples. Mutant H3K27M was expressed in the majority of tumor cells, indicating limited intra-tumor heterogeneity for this specific mutation within the limits of our dataset. Both H3.1 and H3.3K27M mutants were recognized by this antibody while non-neoplastic elements, such as endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells or lymphocytes, did not stain. H3K27me3 immunoreactivity was largely mutually exclusive with H3K27M positivity. These results demonstrate that mutant H3K27M can be specifically identified with high specificity and sensitivity using an H3K27M antibody and immunohistochemistry. Use of this antibody in the clinical setting will prove very useful for diagnosis, especially in the context of small biopsies in challenging midline tumors and will help orient care in the context of the extremely poor prognosis associated with this mutation. PMID:25200321

  11. High-sensitivity and specificity of laser-induced autofluorescence spectra for detection of colorectal cancer with an artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwek, L. C.; Fu, Sheng; Chia, T. C.; Diong, C. H.; Tang, C. L.; Krishnan, S. M.

    2005-07-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) has been used in various clinical research for the prediction and classification of data in cancer disease. Previous research in this direction focused on the correlation between various input parameters such as age, antigen, and size of tumor growth. Recently, laser-induced autofluorescence (LIAF) techniques have been shown to be a useful noninvasive early diagnostic tool for various cancer diseases. We report on a successful application of ANN to in vitro LIAF spectra. We show that classification of tumor samples with ANN can be done with high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Thus a combination of LIAF techniques and ANN can provide a robust method for clinical diagnosis.

  12. High Speed Edge Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  13. High Speed Edge Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  14. MassARRAY Spectrometry Is More Sensitive than PreTect HPV-Proofer and Consensus PCR for Type-Specific Detection of High-Risk Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Cervical Cancer▿

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Partha; Chandna, Puneet; Bamezai, R. N. K.; Siddiqi, Maqsood; Saranath, Dhananjaya; Lear, Adrian; Ratnam, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Type-specific detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) is indicated for better risk stratification and clinical management of women testing positive for HPV and for epidemiologic surveillance. MassARRAY spectrometry (MassARRAY; Sequenom) is a novel method for type-specific detection of 15 high-risk oncogenic HPV types: HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -39, -45, -51, -52, -56, -58, -59, -66, -68, and -73. PreTect HPV-Proofer (Proofer; Norchip) is a type-specific assay that detects E6/E7 mRNA from five high-risk oncogenic HPV types: HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, and -45. The performance of these tests for type-specific identification of HPV was assessed with cervical specimens from 192 cases of cervical cancer in comparison with consensus MY09/MY11 PCR followed by nucleotide sequencing (consensus PCR). The overall HPV detection rates were 94.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91.7, 97.9), 83.3% (95% CI, 78.1, 88.5), and 86.5% (95% CI, 81.7, 91.3) for MassARRAY, Proofer, and consensus PCR, respectively. All tests were negative in six (3.1%) of the 192 cases. Considering only the specimens that contained at least one of the five types targeted by Proofer, the detection rates were 96.6%, 91.4%, and 86.9% for MassARRAY, Proofer, and consensus PCR, respectively. MassARRAY detected multiple infections in 14.1%, Proofer detected multiple infections in 3.6%, and consensus PCR failed to detect any multiple infections. The agreement was highest at 86.0% (kappa = 0.76) between MassARRAY and Proofer and lowest at 81.8% (kappa = 0.69) between Proofer and consensus PCR. In conclusion, MassARRAY is a highly sensitive and accurate method for type-specific detection of oncogenic HPV in cervical cancer, with Proofer showing impressive performance. PMID:21813716

  15. MassARRAY spectrometry is more sensitive than PreTect HPV-Proofer and consensus PCR for type-specific detection of high-risk oncogenic human papillomavirus genotypes in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Basu, Partha; Chandna, Puneet; Bamezai, R N K; Siddiqi, Maqsood; Saranath, Dhananjaya; Lear, Adrian; Ratnam, Sam

    2011-10-01

    Type-specific detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) is indicated for better risk stratification and clinical management of women testing positive for HPV and for epidemiologic surveillance. MassARRAY spectrometry (MassARRAY; Sequenom) is a novel method for type-specific detection of 15 high-risk oncogenic HPV types: HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -39, -45, -51, -52, -56, -58, -59, -66, -68, and -73. PreTect HPV-Proofer (Proofer; Norchip) is a type-specific assay that detects E6/E7 mRNA from five high-risk oncogenic HPV types: HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, and -45. The performance of these tests for type-specific identification of HPV was assessed with cervical specimens from 192 cases of cervical cancer in comparison with consensus MY09/MY11 PCR followed by nucleotide sequencing (consensus PCR). The overall HPV detection rates were 94.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91.7, 97.9), 83.3% (95% CI, 78.1, 88.5), and 86.5% (95% CI, 81.7, 91.3) for MassARRAY, Proofer, and consensus PCR, respectively. All tests were negative in six (3.1%) of the 192 cases. Considering only the specimens that contained at least one of the five types targeted by Proofer, the detection rates were 96.6%, 91.4%, and 86.9% for MassARRAY, Proofer, and consensus PCR, respectively. MassARRAY detected multiple infections in 14.1%, Proofer detected multiple infections in 3.6%, and consensus PCR failed to detect any multiple infections. The agreement was highest at 86.0% (kappa = 0.76) between MassARRAY and Proofer and lowest at 81.8% (kappa = 0.69) between Proofer and consensus PCR. In conclusion, MassARRAY is a highly sensitive and accurate method for type-specific detection of oncogenic HPV in cervical cancer, with Proofer showing impressive performance.

  16. IsoDOT Detects Differential RNA-isoform Expression/Usage with respect to a Categorical or Continuous Covariate with High Sensitivity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Liu, Yufeng; Crowley, James J.; Chen, Ting-Hued; Zhou, Hua; Chu, Haitao; Huang, Shunping; Kuan, Pei-Fen; Li, Yuan; Miller, Darla R.; Shaw, Ginger D.; Wu, Yichao; Zhabotynsky, Vasyl; McMillan, Leonard; Zou, Fei; Sullivan, Patrick F.; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a statistical method named IsoDOT to assess differential isoform expression (DIE) and differential isoform usage (DIU) using RNA-seq data. Here isoform usage refers to relative isoform expression given the total expression of the corresponding gene. IsoDOT performs two tasks that cannot be accomplished by existing methods: to test DIE/DIU with respect to a continuous covariate, and to test DIE/DIU for one case versus one control. The latter task is not an uncommon situation in practice, e.g., comparing the paternal and maternal alleles of one individual or comparing tumor and normal samples of one cancer patient. Simulation studies demonstrate the high sensitivity and specificity of IsoDOT. We apply IsoDOT to study the effects of haloperidol treatment on the mouse transcriptome and identify a group of genes whose isoform usages respond to haloperidol treatment. PMID:26617424

  17. Incorporation of the fluoride induced Si-O bond cleavage and functionalized gold nanoparticle aggregation into one colorimetric probe for highly specific and sensitive detection of fluoride.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie-Fang; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Zhong-Mian; Liu, Jing-Fu

    2014-04-11

    A highly selective and sensitive probe was developed for the field test of F(-) in environmental waters. The probe was fabricated by anchoring 4-mercaptopyridine (MPD) on AuNPs via Au-S interaction to form MPD-AuNPs, and further assembling 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) on the surface of MPD-AuNPs. The hydrolysis and cross-link of APTMS resulted in a thin monolayer of Si-O-Si protecting layer to encapsulated MPD-AuNPs. In the assay, F(-) reacted with Si-O bond and thus destroyed the outer protecting layer of the probe, and further triggered the aggregation of internal MPD-AuNPs by forming N-H-F hydrogen bond. The F(-) induced aggregation of functionalized AuNPs gave rise to significant solution color switch from red to blue, which facilitated visual assay of F(-) in the range of 1.0-7.0 μg mL(-1) by naked eyes. The probe is able to discriminate F(-) from a wide range of environmentally dominant ions, thus it can be applied to detect F(-) in drinkable water with satisfactory results that is agreed well with that of using ion chromatography.

  18. Sensitive, fast, and specific immunoassays for methyltestosterone detection.

    PubMed

    Kong, Na; Song, Shanshan; Peng, Juan; Liu, Liqiang; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai

    2015-04-29

    An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) and an immunochromatographic strip assay using a highly specific monoclonal antibody, were developed to detect methyltestosterone (MT) residues in animal feed. The optimized icELISA had a half-inhibition concentration value of 0.26 ng/mL and a limit of detection value of 0.045 ng/mL. There was no cross-reactivity with eight analogues, revealing high specificity for MT. Based on icELISA results, the recovery rate of MT in animal feed was 82.4%-100.6%. The results were in accordance with those obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The developed immunochromatographic strip assay, as the first report for MT detection, had a visual cut-off value of 1 ng/mL in PBS, 2.5 ng/g in fish feed, and 2.5 ng/g in pig feed. Therefore, these immunoassays are useful and fast tools for MT residue detection in animal feed.

  19. Analytical bioconjugates, aptamers, enable specific quantitative detection of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Ahn, Ji-Young; Lee, Kyeong-Ah; Um, Hyun-Ju; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Sun Park, Tae; Min, Jiho; Kim, Yang-Hoon

    2015-06-15

    As a major human pathogen in the Listeria genus, Listeria monocytogenes causes the bacterial disease listeriosis, which is a serious infection caused by eating food contaminated with the bacteria. We have developed an aptamer-based sandwich assay (ABSA) platform that demonstrates a promising potential for use in pathogen detection using aptamers as analytical bioconjugates. The whole-bacteria SELEX (WB-SELEX) strategy was adopted to generate aptamers with high affinity and specificity against live L. monocytogenes. Of the 35 aptamer candidates tested, LMCA2 and LMCA26 reacted to L. monocytogenes with high binding, and were consequently chosen as sensing probes. The ABSA platform can significantly enhance the sensitivity by employing a very specific aptamer pair for the sandwich complex. The ABSA platform exhibited a linear response over a wide concentration range of L. monocytogenes from 20 to 2×10(6) CFU per mL and was closely correlated with the following relationship: y=9533.3x+1542.3 (R(2)=0.99). Our proposed ABSA platform also provided excellent specificity for the tests to distinguish L. monocytogenes from other Listeria species and other bacterial genera (3 Listeria spp., 4 Salmonella spp., 2 Vibrio spp., 3 Escherichia coli and 3 Shigella spp.). Improvements in the sensitivity and specificity have not only facilitated the reliable detection of L. monocytogenes at extremely low concentrations, but also allowed for the development of a 96-well plate-based routine assay platform for multivalent diagnostics.

  20. Specific Pathogen Detection Using Bioorthogonal Chemistry and Diagnostic Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Liong, Monty; Fernandez-Suarez, Marta; Issadore, David; Min, Changwook; Tassa, Carlos; Reiner, Thomas; Fortune, Sarah M.; Toner, Mehmet; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    The development of faster and more sensitive detection methods capable of identifying specific bacterial types and strains has remained a longstanding clinical challenge. Thus to date, the diagnosis of bacterial infections continues to rely on the performance of time-consuming cultures. Here, we demonstrate the use of bioorthogonal chemistry for magnetically labeling specific pathogens to enable their subsequent detection by nuclear magnetic resonance. Antibodies against a bacterial target of interest were first modified with trans-cyclooctene and then coupled to tetrazine-modified magnetic nanoprobes, directly on the bacteria. This labeling method was verified using surface plasmon resonance as well as by using a miniaturized diagnostic magnetic resonance device capable of highly specific detection of Staphylococcus aureus. Compared to other copper-free bioorthogonal chemistries, the cycloaddition reaction described displayed faster kinetics and yielded higher labeling efficiency. Considering the short assay times and the portability of the necessary instrumentation, it is feasible that this approach could be adapted for clinical use in resource-limited settings. PMID:22043803

  1. Linear-After-The-Exponential (LATE)-PCR: primer design criteria for high yields of specific single-stranded DNA and improved real-time detection.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Kenneth E; Sanchez, J Aquiles; Rice, John E; Wangh, Lawrence J

    2005-06-14

    Traditional asymmetric PCR uses conventional PCR primers at unequal concentrations to generate single-stranded DNA. This method, however, is difficult to optimize, often inefficient, and tends to promote nonspecific amplification. An alternative approach, Linear-After-The-Exponential (LATE)-PCR, solves these problems by using primer pairs deliberately designed for use at unequal concentrations. The present report systematically examines the primer design parameters that affect the exponential and linear phases of LATE-PCR amplification. In particular, we investigated how altering the concentration-adjusted melting temperature (Tm) of the limiting primer (TmL) relative to that of the excess primer (TmX) affects both amplification efficiency and specificity during the exponential phase of LATE-PCR. The highest reaction efficiency and specificity were observed when TmL - TmX 5 degrees C. We also investigated how altering TmX relative to the higher Tm of the double-stranded amplicon (TmA) affects the rate and extent of linear amplification. Excess primers with TmX closer to TmA yielded higher rates of linear amplification and stronger signals from a hybridization probe. These design criteria maximize the yield of specific single-stranded DNA products and make LATE-PCR more robust and easier to implement. The conclusions were validated by using primer pairs that amplify sequences within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene, mutations of which are responsible for cystic fibrosis.

  2. Development of a highly sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of phenylethanolamine A in tissue and feed samples and confirmed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Cao, Biyun; He, Guangzhao; Yang, Hong; Chang, Huafang; Li, Shuqun; Deng, Anping

    2013-10-15

    Phenylethanolamine A (PA) is a new emerged β-adrenergic agonist illegally used as feed additives for growth promotion. In this study, a highly sensitive and specific indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of PA in tissue and feed samples was developed and confirmed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). By reduction of nitryl group to amino group, the PA derivative was synthesized and coupled to carrier proteins with diazobenzidine method. The antisera obtained from four immunized rabbits were characterized in terms of sensitivity and specificity. All antisera displayed high sensitivity with IC50 values lower than 0.48 ng mL(-1). The most sensitive ELISA was established with IC50 and limit of detection (LOD) values of 0.049 ng mL(-1) and 0.003 ng mL(-1), respectively. The cross-reactivity (CR) values of the antisera with three frequently used β-adrenergic agonists (clenbuterol, salbutamol and ractopamine) were lesser than 0.39%; there was no CR of the antisera with other six compounds including two structurally related substances (isoproterenol, phenylephrine). To investigate the accuracy and precision of the assay, swine kidney, liver, meat and feed samples were fortified with PA at different content and analyzed by ELISA. Acceptable recovery rates of 92.2-113.7% and intra-assay coefficients of variation of 3.8-10.9% (n=3) were achieved. Seven spiked samples were simultaneously analyzed by ELISA and LC-MS/MS. There was a high correlation coefficient of 0.9956 (n=7) between the two methods. The proposed ELISA proven to be a feasible quantitative/screening method for PA analysis in tissue and feed samples with the properties of high sensitivity and specificity, high sample throughput and low expensive.

  3. Specific and ultrasensitive ciprofloxacin detection by responsive photonic crystal sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Wang, Yong; Yu, Li-Ping

    2014-09-15

    A new approach for specific and ultrasensitive measurement of ciprofloxacin has been developed by integrating ternary complexes into responsive photonic crystal (RPC). Tryptophan was first immobilized within the polyacrylamide hydrogel substrates of RPC. The determination of ciprofloxacin was via the existence of zinc(II) ions that function as a 'bridge' to form specific tryptophan-zinc(II)-ciprofloxacin complexes step by step, which resulted in a stepwise red-shift of the diffraction wavelength. A maximum wavelength shift from 798 to 870 nm for ciprofloxacin was observed when the RPC film was immersed in 10(-4)M ciprofloxacin. A linear relationship has been obtained between the Δλ of diffraction peak and logarithm of ciprofloxacin concentration at pH 5.0 in the range of 10(-10) to 10(-4)M. And the least detectable concentration in present work is about 5 × 10(-11)M. The results demonstrated that the as-designed ternary complexes-based RPC sensor exhibited high sensitivity, satisfactory specificity and excellent recoverability for sensing of ciprofloxacin in aqueous media and were validated by detecting ciprofloxacin in the eye-drop sample. PMID:25127388

  4. Flanking-sequence exponential anchored–polymerase chain reaction amplification: a sensitive and highly specific method for detecting retroviral integrant–host–junction sequences

    PubMed Central

    Pule, MA; Rousseau, A; Vera, J; Heslop, HE; Brenner, MK; Vanin, EF

    2009-01-01

    Background Retroviral vectors are regularly used to transduce stem cells and their derivatives for experimental and therapeutic purposes. Because these vectors integrate semi-randomly into the cellular genome, analysis of integranated retroviral DNA/host cell DNA junctions (IHJ) facilitates clonality studies of engrafted cells, allowing their differentiation, survival and fate to be tracked. In the case of any adverse events, IHJ analysis can allow the identification of potentially oncogenic integration sites. At present, most measures to assess IHJ are complex, insensitive and may be subject to IHJ selection bias inherent to the technology used. Methods We have developed and validated a simple but effective technique for generating libraries of IHJ, which we term flanking-sequence exponential anchored–polymerase chain reaction (FLEA-PCR). Flanking-sequence random anchoring is used as an alternative to restriction enzyme digestion and cassette ligation to allow consistent detection of IHJ and decrease bias. Results Individual clones from plasmid libraries can be sequenced and assembled using custom-written software, and FLEA-PCR smears can be analyzed by capillary electrophoresis after digestion with restriction enzymes. Discussion This approach can readily analyze complex mixtures of IHJ, allowing localization of these sequences to their genomic sites. This approach should simplify analysis of retroviral integration. PMID:18821360

  5. Highly specific and rapid immuno-fluorescent visualization and detection of E. coli O104:H4 with protein-A coated magnetic beads based LST-MUG assay.

    PubMed

    Barizuddin, Syed; Balakrishnan, Baskar; Stringer, R Cody; Dweik, Majed

    2015-08-01

    A method combining immunomagnetic separation and fluorescent sensing was developed to detect Escherichia coli (E. coli) O104:H4. The antibody specific to E. coli O104:H4 was immobilized on protein A-coated magnetic beads. This protein-A-anti E. coli O104:H4 complex was used to bind Fluorescein IsoThioCyanate (FITC) labeled E. coli O104:H4 antigen (whole cell) on it. The goal was to achieve a fluorescently detectable protein-A-anti E. coli O104:H4-E. coli O104:H4 complex on the magnetic beads. Fluorescent microscopy was used to image the magnetic beads. The resulting fluorescence on the beads was due to the FITC labeled antigen binding on the protein-A-anti E. coli O104:H4 immobilized magnetic beads. This visually proves the antigen-antibody binding. The fluorescent imaging results were obtained in 2 h if the minimum available bacteria in the sample were at least 10(5) CFU/ml. If no fluorescence was observed on the magnetic beads during fluorescent imaging, it indicates the bacterial concentration in the sample to be too low for it to have bound to the magnetic beads and hence no detection was possible. To detect bacterial concentration less than 10(5) CFU/ml in the sample, an additional step was required for detection. The magnetic bead complex was added to the LST-MUG (lauryl sulfate tryptose-4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-glucuronide), a signaling reporter. The E. coli O104:H4 grows in LST-MUG and releases β-glucuronidase enzyme. This enzyme cleaves the MUG substrate that produces 4-methylumbelliferone, a highly fluorescent species. This fluorescence was detected using a spectrofluorometer. The emission peak in the fluorescent spectrum was found to be at 450 nm. The lower and upper detection range for this LST-MUG assay was found to be 2.05×10(5)-4.09×10(8) CFU/ml. The results for the LST-MUG assay for concentrations below 10(5) CFU/ml were ascertained in 8h. The advantages of this technique include the specific detection of bacteria without an enrichment step and

  6. Target-triggered three-way junction structure and polymerase/nicking enzyme synergetic isothermal quadratic DNA machine for highly specific, one-step, and rapid microRNA detection at attomolar level.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Xu, Feng; Zhao, Yongxi; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-08-19

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in many biological processes and are regarded as promising cancer biomarkers. Herein, a highly specific, one-step, and rapid miRNAs detection strategy with attomolar sensitivity has been developed on the basis of a target-triggered three-way junction (3-WJ) structure and polymerase/nicking enzyme synergetic isothermal quadratic DNA machine (ESQM). To this end, 3-WJ probes (primer and template) are designed to selectively recognize target miRNA and form the stable 3-WJ structure to trigger ESQM, resulting in a high quadratic amplified signal. A high specificity is demonstrated by the excellent discrimination of even single-base mismatched homologous sequences with mismatched bases in varied locations (close to the 3'-end, the 5'-end, and the middle). In addition, a low detection limit down to 2 amol was achieved within 30 min. This sensitivity is much higher than those of most linear amplification-based approaches and is even comparable to those of some exponential amplification-based methods. Furthermore, the applicability of this method in complex samples was demonstrated by the analysis of cancer cell small RNA extracts, results of which were in good agreement with those obtained by a commercial miRNA kit and previously published data. The miRNA with a 3' end modification (2'-O-methylation), such as plant miRNA, was also successfully detected, confirming the good universality of the proposed strategy. It is worthwhile to point out that several well-established methods using miRNA as primer for polymerization reaction are of relatively poor performance in the analysis of these modified miRNA. Therefore, these merits endow the developed strategy with powerful implications for biological research and an effective diagnostic assay. PMID:25072308

  7. Specific Noncompetitive Immunoassay for HT-2 Mycotoxin Detection.

    PubMed

    Arola, Henri O; Tullila, Antti; Kiljunen, Harri; Campbell, Katrina; Siitari, Harri; Nevanen, Tarja K

    2016-02-16

    Here we demonstrate a novel homogeneous one-step immunoassay, utilizing a pair of recombinant antibody antigen-binding fragments (Fab), that is specific for HT-2 toxin and has a positive readout. Advantages over the conventional competitive immunoassay formats such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are the specificity, speed, and simplicity of the assay. Recombinant antibody HT2-10 Fab recognizing both HT-2 and T-2 toxins was developed from a phage display antibody library containing 6 × 10(7) different antibody clones. Specificity of the immunoassay was introduced by an anti-immune complex (IC) antibody binding the primary antibody-HT-2 toxin complex. When the noncompetitive immune complex assay was compared to the traditional competitive assay, an over 10-fold improvement in sensitivity was observed. Although the HT2-10 antibody has 100% cross-reactivity for HT-2 and T-2 toxins, the immune complex assay is highly specific for HT-2 alone. The assay performance with real samples was evaluated using naturally contaminated wheat reference material. The half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) value of the time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assay was 9.6 ng/mL, and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.38 ng/mL (19 μg/kg). The labeled antibodies can be predried to the assay vials, e.g., microtiter plate wells, and readout is ready in 10 min after the sample application.

  8. High Detectivity Graphene-Silicon Heterojunction Photodetector.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinming; Zhu, Miao; Du, Mingde; Lv, Zheng; Zhang, Li; Li, Yuanchang; Yang, Yao; Yang, Tingting; Li, Xiao; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Fang, Ying

    2016-02-01

    A graphene/n-type silicon (n-Si) heterojunction has been demonstrated to exhibit strong rectifying behavior and high photoresponsivity, which can be utilized for the development of high-performance photodetectors. However, graphene/n-Si heterojunction photodetectors reported previously suffer from relatively low specific detectivity due to large dark current. Here, by introducing a thin interfacial oxide layer, the dark current of graphene/n-Si heterojunction has been reduced by two orders of magnitude at zero bias. At room temperature, the graphene/n-Si photodetector with interfacial oxide exhibits a specific detectivity up to 5.77 × 10(13) cm Hz(1/2) W(-1) at the peak wavelength of 890 nm in vacuum, which is highest reported detectivity at room temperature for planar graphene/Si heterojunction photodetectors. In addition, the improved graphene/n-Si heterojunction photodetectors possess high responsivity of 0.73 A W(-1) and high photo-to-dark current ratio of ≈10(7) . The current noise spectral density of the graphene/n-Si photodetector has been characterized under ambient and vacuum conditions, which shows that the dark current can be further suppressed in vacuum. These results demonstrate that graphene/Si heterojunction with interfacial oxide is promising for the development of high detectivity photodetectors. PMID:26643577

  9. High Detectivity Graphene-Silicon Heterojunction Photodetector.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinming; Zhu, Miao; Du, Mingde; Lv, Zheng; Zhang, Li; Li, Yuanchang; Yang, Yao; Yang, Tingting; Li, Xiao; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Fang, Ying

    2016-02-01

    A graphene/n-type silicon (n-Si) heterojunction has been demonstrated to exhibit strong rectifying behavior and high photoresponsivity, which can be utilized for the development of high-performance photodetectors. However, graphene/n-Si heterojunction photodetectors reported previously suffer from relatively low specific detectivity due to large dark current. Here, by introducing a thin interfacial oxide layer, the dark current of graphene/n-Si heterojunction has been reduced by two orders of magnitude at zero bias. At room temperature, the graphene/n-Si photodetector with interfacial oxide exhibits a specific detectivity up to 5.77 × 10(13) cm Hz(1/2) W(-1) at the peak wavelength of 890 nm in vacuum, which is highest reported detectivity at room temperature for planar graphene/Si heterojunction photodetectors. In addition, the improved graphene/n-Si heterojunction photodetectors possess high responsivity of 0.73 A W(-1) and high photo-to-dark current ratio of ≈10(7) . The current noise spectral density of the graphene/n-Si photodetector has been characterized under ambient and vacuum conditions, which shows that the dark current can be further suppressed in vacuum. These results demonstrate that graphene/Si heterojunction with interfacial oxide is promising for the development of high detectivity photodetectors.

  10. Detection and Tracking of NY-ESO-1-Specific CD8+ T Cells by High-Throughput T Cell Receptor β (TCRB) Gene Rearrangements Sequencing in a Peptide-Vaccinated Patient.

    PubMed

    Miyai, Manami; Eikawa, Shingo; Hosoi, Akihiro; Iino, Tamaki; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Isobe, Midori; Uenaka, Akiko; Udono, Heiichiro; Nakajima, Jun; Nakayama, Eiichi; Kakimi, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive immunological evaluation is crucial for monitoring patients undergoing antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy. The identification and quantification of T cell responses is most important for the further development of such therapies. Using well-characterized clinical samples from a high responder patient (TK-f01) in an NY-ESO-1f peptide vaccine study, we performed high-throughput T cell receptor β-chain (TCRB) gene next generation sequencing (NGS) to monitor the frequency of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells. We compared these results with those of conventional immunological assays, such as IFN-γ capture, tetramer binding and limiting dilution clonality assays. We sequenced human TCRB complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) rearrangements of two NY-ESO-1f-specific CD8+ T cell clones, 6-8L and 2F6, as well as PBMCs over the course of peptide vaccination. Clone 6-8L possessed the TCRB CDR3 gene TCRBV11-03*01 and BJ02-01*01 with amino acid sequence CASSLRGNEQFF, whereas 2F6 possessed TCRBV05-08*01 and BJ02-04*01 (CASSLVGTNIQYF). Using these two sequences as models, we evaluated the frequency of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells in PBMCs ex vivo. The 6-8L CDR3 sequence was the second most frequent in PBMC and was present at high frequency (0.7133%) even prior to vaccination, and sustained over the course of vaccination. Despite a marked expansion of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells detected from the first through 6th vaccination by tetramer staining and IFN-γ capture assays, as evaluated by CDR3 sequencing the frequency did not increase with increasing rounds of peptide vaccination. By clonal analysis using 12 day in vitro stimulation, the frequency of B*52:01-restricted NY-ESO-1f peptide-specific CD8+ T cells in PBMCs was estimated as only 0.0023%, far below the 0.7133% by NGS sequencing. Thus, assays requiring in vitro stimulation might be underestimating the frequency of clones with lower proliferation potential. High-throughput TCRB sequencing using NGS

  11. SPECIES-SPECIFIC DETECTION OF HYDROCARBON UTILIZING BACTERIA. (R825810)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rapid detection and quantitative assessment of specific microbial species in environmental samples is desirable for monitoring changes in ecosystems and for tracking natural or introduced microbial species during bioremediation of contaminated sites. In the interests of develo...

  12. High Flux Isotope Reactor technical specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    This report gives technical specifications for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) on the following: safety limits and limiting safety system settings; limiting conditions for operation; surveillance requirements; design features; and administrative controls.

  13. Development and characterization of a highly specific and sensitive SYBR green reverse transcriptase PCR assay for detection of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus on the basis of sequence signatures.

    PubMed

    Medina, Rafael A; Rojas, Mark; Tuin, Astrid; Huff, Stephen; Ferres, Marcela; Martinez-Valdebenito, Constanza; Godoy, Paula; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fofanov, Yuriy; SantaLucia, John

    2011-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus showed that many diagnostic tests were unsuitable for detecting the novel virus isolates. In most countries the probe-based TaqMan assay developed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was used for diagnostic purposes. The substantial sequence data that became available during the course of the pandemic created the opportunity to utilize bioinformatics tools to evaluate the unique sequence properties of this virus for the development of diagnostic tests. We used a comprehensive computational approach to examine conserved 2009 H1N1 sequence signatures that are at least 20 nucleotides long and contain at least two mismatches compared to any other known H1N1 genome. We found that the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes contained sequence signatures that are highly conserved among 2009 H1N1 isolates. Based on the NA gene signatures, we used Visual-OMP to design primers with optimal hybridization affinity and we used ThermoBLAST to minimize amplification artifacts. This procedure resulted in a highly sensitive and discriminatory 2009 H1N1 detection assay. Importantly, we found that the primer set can be used reliably in both a conventional TaqMan and a SYBR green reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR assay with no loss of specificity or sensitivity. We validated the diagnostic accuracy of the NA SYBR green assay with 125 clinical specimens obtained between May and August 2009 in Chile, and we showed diagnostic efficacy comparable to the CDC assay. Our approach highlights the use of systematic computational approaches to develop robust diagnostic tests during a viral pandemic.

  14. Patient-Specific Early Seizure Detection from Scalp EEG

    PubMed Central

    Minasyan, Georgiy R.; Chatten, John B.; Chatten, Martha Jane; Harner, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Develop a method for automatic detection of seizures prior to or immediately after clinical onset using features derived from scalp EEG. Methods This detection method is patient-specific. It uses recurrent neural networks and a variety of input features. For each patient we trained and optimized the detection algorithm for two cases: 1) during the period immediately preceding seizure onset, and 2) during the period immediately following seizure onset. Continuous scalp EEG recordings (duration 15 – 62 h, median 25 h) from 25 patients, including a total of 86 seizures, were used in this study. Results Pre-onset detection was successful in 14 of the 25 patients. For these 14 patients, all of the testing seizures were detected prior to seizure onset with a median pre-onset time of 51 sec and false positive rate was 0.06/h. Post-onset detection had 100% sensitivity, 0.023/hr false positive rate and median delay of 4 sec after onset. Conclusions The unique results of this study relate to pre-onset detection. Significance Our results suggest that reliable pre-onset seizure detection may be achievable for a significant subset of epilepsy patients without use of invasive electrodes. PMID:20461014

  15. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  16. Detection and Description of Soils with Specific Nematode Suppressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Soils with specific suppressiveness to plant-parasitic nematodes are of interest to define the mechanisms that regulate population density. Suppressive soils prevent nematodes from establishing and from causing disease, and they diminish disease severity after initial nematode damage in continuous culturing of a host. A range of non-specific and specific soil treatments, followed by infestation with a target nematode, have been employed to identify nematode-suppressive soils. Biocidal treatments, soil transfer tests, and baiting approaches together with observations of the plant-parasitic nematode in the root zone of susceptible host plants have improved the understanding of nematode-suppressive soils. Techniques to demonstrate specific soil suppressiveness against plant-parasitic nematodes are compared in this review. The overlap of studies on soil suppressiveness with recent advances in soil health and quality is briefly discussed. The emphasis is on methods (or criteria) used to detect and identify soils that maintain specific soil suppressiveness to plant-parasitic nematodes. While biocidal treatments can detect general and specific soil suppressiveness, soil transfer studies, by definition, apply only to specific soil suppressiveness. Finally, potential strategies to exploit suppressive soils are presented. PMID:19262851

  17. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project (LDRD) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There were two primary objectives for the work performed under this project. The first was to take advantage of capabilities and facilities at Los Alamos to produce the radionuclide {sup 32}Si in unusually high specific activity. The second was to combine the radioanalytical expertise at Los Alamos with the expertise at the University of California to develop methods for the application of {sup 32}Si in biological oceanographic research related to global climate modeling. The first objective was met by developing targetry for proton spallation production of {sup 32}Si in KCl targets and chemistry for its recovery in very high specific activity. The second objective was met by developing a validated field-useable, radioanalytical technique, based upon gas-flow proportional counting, to measure the dynamics of silicon uptake by naturally occurring diatoms.

  18. Development of High Specific Strength Envelope Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Keiji; Sano, Masa-Aki; Kakuta, Yoshiaki

    Progress in materials technology has produced a much more durable synthetic fabric envelope for the non-rigid airship. Flexible materials are required to form airship envelopes, ballonets, load curtains, gas bags and covering rigid structures. Polybenzoxazole fiber (Zylon) and polyalirate fiber (Vectran) show high specific tensile strength, so that we developed membrane using these high specific tensile strength fibers as a load carrier. The main material developed is a Zylon or Vectran load carrier sealed internally with a polyurethane bonded inner gas retention film (EVOH). The external surface provides weather protecting with, for instance, a titanium oxide integrated polyurethane or Tedlar film. The mechanical test results show that tensile strength 1,000 N/cm is attained with weight less than 230g/m2. In addition to the mechanical properties, temperature dependence of the joint strength and solar absorptivity and emissivity of the surface are measured. 

  19. Electrical detection of specific versus non-specific binding events in breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Benjamin C.; Clark, Michael; Burkhead, Thomas; Sethu, Palaniappan; Rai, Shesh; Kloecker, Goetz; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2012-10-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patient blood samples offers a desirable alternative to invasive tissue biopsies for screening of malignant carcinomas. A rigorous CTC detection method must identify CTCs from millions of other formed elements in blood and distinguish them from healthy tissue cells also present in the blood. CTCs are known to overexpress surface receptors, many of which aid them in invading other tissue, and these provide an avenue for their detection. We have developed carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film devices to specifically detect these receptors in intact cells. The CNT sidewalls are functionalized with antibodies specific to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), a marker overexpressed by breast and other carcinomas. Specific binding of EpCAM to anti-EpCAM antibodies causes a change in the local charge environment of the CNT surface which produces a characteristic electrical signal. Two cell lines were tested in the device: MCF7, a mammary adenocarcinoma line which overexpresses EpCAM, and MCF10A, a non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial line which does not. Introduction of MCF7s caused significant changes in the electrical conductance of the devices due to specific binding and associated charge environment change near the CNT sidewalls. Introduction of MCF10A displays a different profile due to purely nonspecific interactions. The profile of specific vs. nonspecific interaction signatures using carbon based devices will guide development of this diagnostic tool towards clinical sample volumes with wide variety of markers.

  20. Electromagnetic properties of high specific surface minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Katherine Anne

    Interparticle electrical forces play a dominant role in the behaviour of high specific surface minerals, such as clays. This fact encourages the use of small electromagnetic perturbations to assess the microscale properties of these materials. Thus, this research focuses on using electromagnetic waves to understand fundamental particle-particle and particle-fluid interactions, and fabric formation in high specific surface mineral-fluid mixtures (particle size <~1 μm). Topics addressed in this study include: the role of specific surface and double layer phenomena in the engineering behaviour of clay-water-electrolyte mixtures; the interplay between surface conduction, double layer polarization, and interfacial polarization; the relationship between fabric, permittivity, shear wave velocity, and engineering properties in soft slurries; and the effect of ferromagnetic impurities on electromagnetic measurements. The critical role of specific surface on the engineering properties of fine-grained soils is demonstrated through fundamental principles and empirical correlations. Afterwards, the effect of specific surface on the electromagnetic properties of particulate materials is studied using simple microscale analyses of conduction and polarization phenomena in particle-fluid mixtures, and corroborated by experimentation. These results clarify the relative importance of specific surface, water content, electrolyte type, and ionic concentration on the electrical properties of particulate materials. The sensitivity of electromagnetic parameters to particle orientation is addressed in light of the potential assessment of anisotropy in engineering properties. It is shown that effective conductivity measurements provide a robust method to determine electrical anisotropy in particle-fluid mixtures. However, real relative dielectric measurements at frequencies below 1 MHz are unreliable due to electrode effects (especially in highly conductive mixtures). The relationship

  1. Isotope-specific detection of low density materials with mono-energetic (gamma)-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J

    2009-03-16

    The first demonstration of isotope-specific detection of a low-Z, low density object, shielded by a high-Z and high density material using mono-energetic gamma-rays is reported. Isotope-specific detection of LiH shielded by Pb and Al is accomplished using the nuclear resonance fluorescence line of {sup 7}Li at 0.478 MeV. Resonant photons are produced via laser-based Compton scattering. The detection techniques are general and the confidence level obtained is shown to be superior to that yielded by conventional x-ray/{gamma}-ray techniques in these situations.

  2. Enhancing allele-specific PCR for specifically detecting short deletion and insertion DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiran; Rollin, Joseph A; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2010-02-01

    Allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) has been widely used for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism. But there are some challenges in using AS-PCR for specifically detecting DNA variations with short deletions or insertions. The challenges are associated with designing selective allele-specific primers as well as the specificity of AS-PCR in distinguishing some types of single base-pair mismatches. In order to address such problems and enhance the applicability of AS-PCR, a general primer design method was developed to create a multiple base-pair mismatch between the primer 3'-terminus and the template DNA. This approach can destabilize the primer-template complex more efficiently than does a single base-pair mismatch, and can dramatically increase the specificity of AS-PCR. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, the method of primer design was applied in colony PCR for identifying plasmid DNA deletion or insertion mutants after site-directed mutagenesis. As anticipated, multiple base-pair mismatches achieved much more specific PCR amplification than single base-pair mismatches. Therefore, with the proposed primer design method, the detection of short nucleotide deletion and insertion mutations becomes simple, accurate and more reliable.

  3. Can Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Detect Species Specific Biochemicals ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Daughtry, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    Discrimination of a few plants scattered among many plants is a goal common to detection of agricultural weeds, invasive plant species and illegal Cannabis clandestinely grown outdoors, the subject of this research. Remote sensing technology provides an automated, computer based, land cover classification capability that holds promise for improving upon the existing approaches to Cannabis detection. In this research, we investigated whether hyperspectral reflectance of recently harvested, fully turgid Cannabis leaves and buds depends upon the concentration of the psychoactive ingredient Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) that, if present at sufficient concentration, presumably would allow species-specific identification of Cannabis.

  4. Wp specific methylation of highly proliferated LCLs.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Shim, Sung-Mi; Nam, Hye-Young; Kim, Joon-Woo; Han, Bok-Ghee; Lee, Suman

    2007-06-29

    The epigenetic regulation of viral genes may be important for the life cycle of EBV. We determined the methylation status of three viral promoters (Wp, Cp, Qp) from EBV B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by pyrosequencing. Our pyrosequencing data showed that the CpG region of Wp was methylated, but the others were not. Interestingly, Wp methylation was increased with proliferation of LCLs. Wp methylation was as high as 74.9% in late-passage LCLs, but 25.6% in early-passage LCLs. From two Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines, Wp specific hypermethylation was also found (>80%). Interestingly, the expression of EBNA2 gene which located directly next to Wp was associated with its methylation. Our data suggested that Wp specific methylation may be important for the indicator of the proliferation status of LCLs, and the epigenetic viral gene regulation of EBNA2 gene by Wp should be further defined possibly with other biological processes.

  5. Wp specific methylation of highly proliferated LCLs

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Shim, Sung-Mi; Nam, Hye-Young; Kim, Joon-Woo; Han, Bok-Ghee; Lee, Suman . E-mail: suman@cha.ac.kr

    2007-06-29

    The epigenetic regulation of viral genes may be important for the life cycle of EBV. We determined the methylation status of three viral promoters (Wp, Cp, Qp) from EBV B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by pyrosequencing. Our pyrosequencing data showed that the CpG region of Wp was methylated, but the others were not. Interestingly, Wp methylation was increased with proliferation of LCLs. Wp methylation was as high as 74.9% in late-passage LCLs, but 25.6% in early-passage LCLs. From two Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines, Wp specific hypermethylation was also found (>80%). Interestingly, the expression of EBNA2 gene which located directly next to Wp was associated with its methylation. Our data suggested that Wp specific methylation may be important for the indicator of the proliferation status of LCLs, and the epigenetic viral gene regulation of EBNA2 gene by Wp should be further defined possibly with other biological processes.

  6. Investigation of contactless detection using a giant magnetoresistance sensor for detecting prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuecheng; Zhi, Shaotao; Lei, Chong; Zhou, Yong

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a contactless detection method for detecting prostate specific antigen with a giant magnetoresistance sensor. In contactless detection case, the prostate specific antigen sample preparation was separated from the sensor that prevented the sensor from being immersed in chemical solvents, and made the sensor implementing in immediately reuse without wash. Experimental results showed that applied an external magnetic field in a range of 50 Oe to 90 Oe, Dynabeads with a concentration as low as 0.1 μg/mL can be detected by this system and could give an approximate quantitation to the logarithmic of Dynabeads concentration. Sandwich immunoassay was employed for preparing PSA samples. The PSA capture was implemented on a gold film modified with a self-assembled monolayer and using biotinylated secondary antibody against PSA and streptavidinylated Dynabeads. With DC magnetic field in the range of 50 to 90 Oe, PSA can be detected with a detection limit as low as 0.1 ng/mL. Samples spiked with different concentrations of PSA can be distinguished clearly. Due to the contactless detection method, the detection system exhibited advantages such as convenient manipulation, reusable, inexpensive, small weight. So, this detection method was a promising candidate in biomarker detection, especially in point of care detection. PMID:27379844

  7. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Ott, Martin A.; Fowler, Malcolm; Heaton, Richard C.

    2003-10-28

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity Cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  8. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Ott, Martin A.; Fowler, Malcolm; Heaton, Richard C.

    2002-12-03

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  9. Mechanisms of visual threat detection in specific phobia.

    PubMed

    Weierich, Mariann R; Treat, Teresa A

    2015-01-01

    People with anxiety or stress-related disorders attend differently to threat-relevant compared with non-threat stimuli, yet the temporal mechanisms of differential allocation of attention are not well understood. We investigated two independent mechanisms of temporal processing of visual threat by comparing spider-phobic and non-fearful participants using a rapid serial visual presentation task. Consistent with prior literature, spider phobics, but not non-fearful controls, displayed threat-specific facilitated detection of spider stimuli relative to negative stimuli and neutral stimuli. Further, signal detection analyses revealed that facilitated threat detection in spider-phobic participants was driven by greater sensitivity to threat stimulus features and a trend towards a lower threshold for detecting spider stimuli. However, phobic participants did not display reliably slowed temporal disengagement from threat-relevant stimuli. These findings advance our understanding of threat feature processing that might contribute to the onset and maintenance of symptoms in specific phobia and disorders that involve visual threat information more generally.

  10. Species-specific real-time PCR assay for the detection of Streptococcus suis from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; McGee, Lesley; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Moïsi, Jennifer; Beall, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    A real-time polymerase chain reaction was developed to detect all known strains of Streptococcus suis. The assay was highly specific, and sensitivity was <10 copies/assay for S. suis detection from clinical samples. PMID:27041105

  11. Nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction cancer detection method

    DOEpatents

    Belinsky, Steven A.; Palmisano, William A.

    2007-05-08

    A molecular marker-based method for monitoring and detecting cancer in humans. Aberrant methylation of gene promoters is a marker for cancer risk in humans. A two-stage, or "nested" polymerase chain reaction method is disclosed for detecting methylated DNA sequences at sufficiently high levels of sensitivity to permit cancer screening in biological fluid samples, such as sputum, obtained non-invasively. The method is for detecting the aberrant methylation of the p16 gene, O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene, Death-associated protein kinase gene, RAS-associated family 1 gene, or other gene promoters. The method offers a potentially powerful approach to population-based screening for the detection of lung and other cancers.

  12. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell has been designed and tested to deliver high capacity at a C/1.5 discharge rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet made at a discharge rate this high in the 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters, performance, and future test plans are described.

  13. Biosensor for dengue virus detection: sensitive, rapid, and serotype specific.

    PubMed

    Baeumner, Antje J; Schlesinger, Nicole A; Slutzki, Naomi S; Romano, Joseph; Lee, Eun Mi; Montagna, Richard A

    2002-03-15

    A serotype-specific RNA biosensor was developed for the rapid detection of Dengue virus (serotypes 1-4) in blood samples. After RNA amplification, the biosensor allows the rapid detection of Dengue virus RNA in only 15 min. In addition, the biosensor is portable, inexpensive, and very easy to use, making it an ideal detection system for point-of-care and field applications. The biosensor is coupled to the isothermal nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) technique with which small amounts of virus RNA are amplified using a simple water bath. During the NASBA reaction, a generic sequence is attached to all RNA molecules as described earlier (Wu, S. J.; Lee, E. M.; Putvatana, R.; Shurtliff, R. N.; Porter, K R.; Suharyono, W.; Watt, D. M.; King, C. C.; Murphy, G. S.; Hayes, C. G.; Romano, J. W. J. Clin. Microbiol. 2001, 39, 2794-2798.). It has been shown earlier that Dengue virus can be detected specifically using two DNA probes: a first probe hybridized with the attached generic sequence and, therefore, bound to every amplified RNA molecule; and a second probe either bound to all four Dengue virus serotypes or chosen to be specific for only one serotype. These probes were utilized in the biosensor described in this publication. For a generic Dengue virus biosensor, the second probe is complementary to a conserved region found in all Dengue serotypes. For identification of the individual Dengue virus serotypes, four serotype-specific probes were developed (Wu, S. J.; Lee, E. M.; Putvatana, R.; Shurtiff, R. N.; Porter, K. R.; Suharyono, W.; Watt, D. M.; King, C. C.; Murphy, G. S.; Hayes, C. G.; Romano, J. W. J. Clin. Microbiol. 2001, 39, 2794-2798.). The biosensor is a membrane-based DNA/RNA hybridization system using liposome amplification. The generic DNA probe (reporter probe) is coupled to the outside of dye-encapsulating liposomes. The conserved or Dengue serotype specific probes (capture probes) are immobilized on a polyethersulfone membrane strip

  14. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provide and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  15. Allele-Specific DNA Methylation Detection by Pyrosequencing®.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Lasse Sommer; Johansen, Jens Vilstrup; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays important roles in healthy as well as diseased cells, by influencing the transcription of genes. In spite the fact that human somatic cells are diploid, most of the currently available methods for the study of DNA methylation do not provide information on the methylation status of individual alleles of genes. This information may be of importance in many situations. In particular, in cancer both alleles of tumour suppressor genes generally need to be inactivated for a phenotypic effect to be observed. Here, we present a simple and cost-effective protocol for allele-specific DNA methylation detection based on Pyrosequencing(®) of methylation-specific PCR (MSP) products including a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the amplicon. PMID:26103906

  16. Detection device for high explosives

    DOEpatents

    Grey, A.E.; Partin, J.K.; Stone, M.L.; Von Wandruszka, R.M.; Reagen, W.K.; Ingram, J.C.; Lancaster, G.D.

    1992-10-20

    A portable fiber optic detector is described that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by electrostatically attracting the target chemical to an aromatic compound coating on an optical fiber. Attaching the target chemical to the coated fiber reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator. 5 figs.

  17. Detection device for high explosives

    DOEpatents

    Grey, Alan E.; Partin, Judy K.; Stone, Mark L.; Von Wandruszka, Ray M.; Reagen, William K.; Ingram, Jani C.; Lancaster, Gregory D.

    1992-01-01

    A portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by electrostatically attracting the target chemical to an aromatic compound coating on an optical fiber. Attaching the target chemical to the coated fiber reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  18. PCR-specific detection of recently described Lotmaria passim (Trypanosomatidae) in Chilean apiaries.

    PubMed

    Arismendi, Nolberto; Bruna, Alex; Zapata, Nelson; Vargas, Marisol

    2016-02-01

    The recently described trypanosome Lotmaria passim is currently considered the most predominant trypanosomatid in honey bees worldwide and could be a factor in honey bee declines. For a specific and quick detection of this pathogen, we developed primers based on the SSU rRNA and gGAPDH genes for the detection of L. passim in Chilean honey beehives. PCR products amplified and sequenced for these primers shared 99-100% identity with other sequences of L. passim. The designed primers were specific and we were able to detect a high prevalence (40-90%) of L. passim in bee hives distributed throughout Chile. Our described PCR-based method offers a feasible and specific detection of L. passim in any honey bee samples. PMID:26721451

  19. A high-throughput multiplex method adapted for GMO detection.

    PubMed

    Chaouachi, Maher; Chupeau, Gaëlle; Berard, Aurélie; McKhann, Heather; Romaniuk, Marcel; Giancola, Sandra; Laval, Valérie; Bertheau, Yves; Brunel, Dominique

    2008-12-24

    A high-throughput multiplex assay for the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMO) was developed on the basis of the existing SNPlex method designed for SNP genotyping. This SNPlex assay allows the simultaneous detection of up to 48 short DNA sequences (approximately 70 bp; "signature sequences") from taxa endogenous reference genes, from GMO constructions, screening targets, construct-specific, and event-specific targets, and finally from donor organisms. This assay avoids certain shortcomings of multiplex PCR-based methods already in widespread use for GMO detection. The assay demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity. The results suggest that this assay is reliable, flexible, and cost- and time-effective for high-throughput GMO detection.

  20. Nanostructured materials detect epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase and carcinoembryonic antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; Surdu-Bob, Carmen Cristina; Badulescu, Marius

    2015-09-01

    New nanostructured materials based on thin films of Cu and Ni deposited on textile material (veil), as well as gold nanostructured microspheres were used for the design of new stochastic sensors. The stochastic sensors were able to detect simultaneously a panel of biomarkers comprising epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase, and carcinoembryonic antigen from whole blood samples with high reliabilities - recovery tests higher than 97.00%, with a RSD (%) lower than 0.1%. The stochastic sensors had shown high sensitivities and low determination levels for the detection of the proposed panel of biomarkers making early detection of lung cancer possible by fast screening of whole blood.

  1. Rapid and specific SPRi detection of L. pneumophila in complex environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Foudeh, Amir M; Trigui, Hana; Mendis, Nilmini; Faucher, Sebastien P; Veres, Teodor; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2015-07-01

    Legionellosis is a very devastating disease worldwide mainly due to unpredictable outbreaks in man-made water systems. Developing a highly specific and sensitive rapid detection system that detects only metabolically active bacteria is a main priority for water quality assessment. We previously developed a versatile technique for sensitive and specific detection of synthetic RNA. In the present work, we further investigated the performance of the developed biosensor for detection of Legionella pneumophila in complex environmental samples, particularly those containing protozoa. The specificity and sensitivity of the detection system were verified using total RNA extracted from L. pneumophila in spiked water co-cultured with amoebae. We demonstrated that the expression level of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is extremely dependent on the environmental conditions. The presence of amoebae with L. pneumophila, especially in nutrition-deprived samples, increased the amount of L. pneumophila 15-fold after 1 week as measured through the expression of 16s rRNA. Using the developed surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) detection method, we were also able to successfully detect L. pneumophila within 3 h, both in the presence and absence of amoebae in the complex environmental samples obtained from a cooling water tower. These findings suggest that the developed biosensing system is a viable method for rapid, real-time and effective detection not only for L. pneumophila in environmental samples but also to assess the risk associated with the use of water contaminated with other pathogens. PMID:25935681

  2. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell was designed and tested to deliver high capacity at steady discharge rates up to and including a C rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet of any type in a 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters and performance are described. Also covered is an episode of capacity fading due to electrode swelling and its successful recovery by means of additional activation procedures.

  3. Non-specific sensor arrays for chemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kevin; Minor, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Non-specific chemical sensor arrays have been the subject of considerable research efforts over the past thirty years with the idea that, by analogy to vertebrate olfaction, they are potentially capable of rendering complex chemical assessments with relatively modest logistical footprints. However, the actual implementation of such devices in challenging "real world" scenarios has arguably continued to fall short of these expectations. This work examines the inherent limitations of such devices for complex chemical sensing scenarios, placing them on a continuum between simple univariate sensors and complex multivariate analytical instrumentation and analyzing their utility in general-purpose chemical detection and accurate chemical sensing in the presence of unknown "unknowns." Results with simulated and acquired data sets are presented with discussion of the implications in development of chemical sensor arrays suitable for complex scenarios.

  4. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  5. Can Sample-Specific Simulations Help Detect Low Base-Rate Taxonicity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Steven R. H.; Amir, Nader; Bau, Jinn Jonp

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined the role of the sample-specific simulations (SSS; A. M. Ruscio & J. Ruscio, 2002; J. Ruscio & A. M. Ruscio, 2004) procedure in detecting low base-rate taxa that might otherwise prove elusive. The procedure preserved key distributional characteristics for moderate to high base-rate taxa, but it performed inadequately for low…

  6. Immunological-based assays for specific detection of shrimp viruses.

    PubMed

    Chaivisuthangkura, Parin; Longyant, Siwaporn; Sithigorngul, Paisarn

    2014-02-12

    Among shrimp viral pathogens, white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and yellow head virus (YHV) are the most lethal agents, causing serious problems for both the whiteleg shrimp, Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei, and the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus (Penaeus) monodon. Another important virus that infects P. vannamei is infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV), which induces the white discoloration of affected muscle. In the cases of taura syndrome virus and Penaeus stylirostris densovirus (PstDNV; formerly known as infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus), their impacts were greatly diminished after the introduction of tolerant stocks of P. vannamei. Less important viruses are Penaeus monodon densovirus (PmDNV; formerly called hepatopancreatic parvovirus), and Penaeus monodon nucleopolyhedrovirus (PemoNPV; previously called monodon baculovirus). For freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus and extra small virus are considered important viral pathogens. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to the shrimp viruses described above have been generated and used as an alternative tool in various immunoassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, dot blotting, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Some of these MAbs were further developed into immunochromatographic strip tests for the detection of WSSV, YHV, IMNV and PemoNPV and into a dual strip test for the simultaneous detection of WSSV/YHV. The strip test has the advantages of speed, as the result can be obtained within 15 min, and simplicity, as laboratory equipment and specialized skills are not required. Therefore, strip tests can be used by shrimp farmers for the pond-side monitoring of viral infection. PMID:24567913

  7. Immunological-based assays for specific detection of shrimp viruses

    PubMed Central

    Chaivisuthangkura, Parin; Longyant, Siwaporn; Sithigorngul, Paisarn

    2014-01-01

    Among shrimp viral pathogens, white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and yellow head virus (YHV) are the most lethal agents, causing serious problems for both the whiteleg shrimp, Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei, and the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus (Penaeus) monodon. Another important virus that infects P. vannamei is infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV), which induces the white discoloration of affected muscle. In the cases of taura syndrome virus and Penaeus stylirostris densovirus (PstDNV; formerly known as infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus), their impacts were greatly diminished after the introduction of tolerant stocks of P. vannamei. Less important viruses are Penaeus monodon densovirus (PmDNV; formerly called hepatopancreatic parvovirus), and Penaeus monodon nucleopolyhedrovirus (PemoNPV; previously called monodon baculovirus). For freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus and extra small virus are considered important viral pathogens. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to the shrimp viruses described above have been generated and used as an alternative tool in various immunoassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, dot blotting, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Some of these MAbs were further developed into immunochromatographic strip tests for the detection of WSSV, YHV, IMNV and PemoNPV and into a dual strip test for the simultaneous detection of WSSV/YHV. The strip test has the advantages of speed, as the result can be obtained within 15 min, and simplicity, as laboratory equipment and specialized skills are not required. Therefore, strip tests can be used by shrimp farmers for the pond-side monitoring of viral infection. PMID:24567913

  8. Measuring Specific Heats at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan W.; Zoltan, Andrew; Wood, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Flash apparatus for measuring thermal diffusivities at temperatures from 300 to 1,000 degrees C modified; measures specific heats of samples to accuracy of 4 to 5 percent. Specific heat and thermal diffusivity of sample measured. Xenon flash emits pulse of radiation, absorbed by sputtered graphite coating on sample. Sample temperature measured with thermocouple, and temperature rise due to pulse measured by InSb detector.

  9. Sensitivity and Specificity of Histoplasma Antigen Detection by Enzyme Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Lauren; Cook, Audrey; Hanzlicek, Andrew; Harkin, Kenneth; Wheat, Joseph; Goad, Carla; Kirsch, Emily

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of an antigen enzyme immunoassay (EIA) on urine samples for the diagnosis of histoplasmosis in dogs. This retrospective medical records review included canine cases with urine samples submitted for Histoplasma EIA antigen assay between 2007 and 2011 from three veterinary institutions. Cases for which urine samples were submitted for Histoplasma antigen testing were reviewed and compared to the gold standard of finding Histoplasma organisms or an alternative diagnosis on cytology or histopathology. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and the kappa coefficient and associated confidence interval were calculated for the EIA-based Histoplasma antigen assay. Sixty cases met the inclusion criteria. Seventeen cases were considered true positives based on identification of the organism, and 41 cases were considered true negatives with an alternative definitive diagnosis. Two cases were considered false negatives, and there were no false positives. Sensitivity was 89.47% and the negative predictive value was 95.35%. Specificity and the positive predictive value were both 100%. The kappa coefficient was 0.9207 (95% confidence interval, 0.8131-1). The Histoplasma antigen EIA test demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity for the diagnosis of histoplasmosis in dogs.

  10. Reassessing the detection of B-virus-specific serum antibodies.

    PubMed

    Katz, David; Shi, Wei; Wildes, Martin J; Krug, Peter W; Hilliard, Julia K

    2012-12-01

    B virus, a natural pathogen of macaques, can cause a fatal zoonotic disease in humans. Serologic screening of macaques by titration ELISA (tELISA, screening test) and by Western blot analysis (WBA, confirmatory test) is one of the principle measures to prevent human infection. Here we slightly modified these 2 tests and reevaluated their correlation. We developed a high-throughput tELISA and used it to screen 278 sera simultaneously against the homologous BV antigen and the heterologous antigens of Papiine herpesvirus 2 and Human herpesvirus 1. More sera (35.6%) were positive by the BV-ELISA than by the HVP2-ELISA (21.6%) or HSV1-ELISA (19.8%). The superiority of the homologous tELISA over the heterologous tELISA was prominent in low-titer sera. WBA confirmed only 21% of the tELISA-positive sera with low or intermediate antibody titers. These sera might have contained antibodies to conformational epitopes that could not be detected by WBA, in which denatured antigens are used, but that could be detected by tELISA, which detects both linear and conformational epitopes. WBA confirmed 82% of the tELISA high-titer sera. However, WBA defined the remaining 18% of sera, which were negative by tELISA, as nonnegative. This finding can be attributed to the difficulties encountered with the subjective interpretation of results by WBA. Together, the current results indicate the inadequacy of WBA as a confirmatory assay for sera with low antibody titers.

  11. Genetically modified organisms in food-screening and specific detection by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Vollenhofer, S; Burg, K; Schmidt, J; Kroath, H

    1999-12-01

    PCR methods for the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) were developed that can be used for screening purposes and for specific detection of glyphosate-tolerant soybean and insect-resistant maize in food. Primers were designed to amplify parts of the 35S promoter derived from Cauliflower Mosaic Virus, the NOS terminator derived from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and the antibiotic marker gene NPTII (neomycin-phosphotransferase II), to allow for general screening of foods. PCR/hybridization protocols were established for the detection of glyphosate-tolerant RoundUp Ready soybean and insect-resistant Bt-maize. Besides hybridization, confirmation of the results using restriction analysis was also possible. The described methods enabled a highly sensitive and specific detection of GMOs and thus provide a useful tool for routine analysis of raw and processed food products.

  12. Detection of a novel minisatellite-specific DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Collick, A; Jeffreys, A J

    1990-01-01

    We describe the detection of a ubiquitous DNA-binding protein which appears to interact specifically with tandem-repeated minisatellites. The murine 40 kd protein, which we term Msbp-1, was found to be present in all mouse tissues tested. This protein was bound specifically and with high affinity by double-stranded DNA containing a repeat sequence related to the minisatellite 'core' sequence, and binding required the presence of multiple repeat units. Corresponding minisatellite-specific DNA-binding proteins could also be detected in species ranging from Drosophila to man. This analysis represents the first direct evidence that minisatellites can function as a specific recognition signal for an endogenous DNA-binding protein. Images PMID:2308848

  13. Characterization of Antibodies for Grain-Specific Gluten Detection.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Girdhari M; Rallabhandi, Prasad; Williams, Kristina M; Pahlavan, Autusa

    2016-03-01

    Gluten ingestion causes immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergy or celiac disease in sensitive individuals, and a strict gluten-free diet greatly limits food choices. Immunoassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are used to quantify gluten to ensure labeling compliance of gluten-free foods. Anti-gluten antibodies may not exhibit equal affinity to gluten from wheat, rye, and barley. Moreover, because wheat gluten is commonly used as a calibrator in ELISA, accurate gluten quantitation from rye and barley contaminated foods may be compromised. Immunoassays utilizing grain-specific antibodies and calibrators may help improve gluten quantitation. In this study, polyclonal antibodies raised against gluten-containing grain-specific peptides were characterized for their immunoreactivity to gluten from different grain sources. Strong immunoreactivity to multiple gluten polypeptides from wheat, rye, and barley was observed in the range 34 to 43 kDa with anti-gliadin, 11 to 15 and 72 to 95 kDa with anti-secalin, and 30 to 43 kDa with anti-hordein peptide antibodies, respectively. Minimal or no cross-reactivity with gluten from other grains was observed among these antibodies. The anti-consensus peptide antibody raised against a repetitive amino acid sequence of proline and glutamine exhibited immunoreactivity to gluten from wheat, rye, barley, and oat. The antibodies exhibited similar immunoreactivity with most of the corresponding grain cultivars by ELISA. The high specificity and minimal cross-reactivity of grain-specific antibodies suggest their potential use in immunoassays for accurate gluten quantitation.

  14. Giant magnetoresistive sensor array for sensitive and specific multiplexed food allergen detection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Elaine; Nadeau, Kari C; Wang, Shan X

    2016-06-15

    Current common allergen detection methods, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and dip-stick methods, do not provide adequate levels of sensitivity and specificity for at-risk allergic patients. A method for performing highly sensitive and specific detection of multiple food allergens is thus imperative as food allergies are becoming increasingly recognized as a major healthcare concern, affecting an estimated 4% of the total population. We demonstrate first instance of sensitive and specific multiplexed detection of major peanut allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, and wheat allergen Gliadin using giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor arrays. Commercialized ELISA kits for Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 report limits of detection (LODs) at 31.5 ng/mL and 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. In addition, the 96-well-based ELISA developed in-house for Gliadin was found to have a LOD of 40 ng/mL. Our multiplexed GMR-based assay demonstrates the ability to perform all three assays on the same chip specifically and with sensitivities at LODs about an order of magnitude lower than those of 96-well-based ELISAs. LODs of GMR-based assays developed for Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Gliadin were 7.0 ng/mL, 0.2 ng/mL, and 1.5 ng/mL, respectively, with little to no cross-reactivity. These LODs are clinically important as some patients could react strongly against such low allergen levels. Given the limitations of current industrial detection technology, multiplexed GMR-based assays provide a method for highly sensitive and specific simultaneous detection of any combination of food-product allergens, thus protecting allergic patients from life-threatening events, including anaphylaxis, by unintentional consumption.

  15. Giant magnetoresistive sensor array for sensitive and specific multiplexed food allergen detection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Elaine; Nadeau, Kari C; Wang, Shan X

    2016-06-15

    Current common allergen detection methods, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and dip-stick methods, do not provide adequate levels of sensitivity and specificity for at-risk allergic patients. A method for performing highly sensitive and specific detection of multiple food allergens is thus imperative as food allergies are becoming increasingly recognized as a major healthcare concern, affecting an estimated 4% of the total population. We demonstrate first instance of sensitive and specific multiplexed detection of major peanut allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, and wheat allergen Gliadin using giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor arrays. Commercialized ELISA kits for Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 report limits of detection (LODs) at 31.5 ng/mL and 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. In addition, the 96-well-based ELISA developed in-house for Gliadin was found to have a LOD of 40 ng/mL. Our multiplexed GMR-based assay demonstrates the ability to perform all three assays on the same chip specifically and with sensitivities at LODs about an order of magnitude lower than those of 96-well-based ELISAs. LODs of GMR-based assays developed for Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Gliadin were 7.0 ng/mL, 0.2 ng/mL, and 1.5 ng/mL, respectively, with little to no cross-reactivity. These LODs are clinically important as some patients could react strongly against such low allergen levels. Given the limitations of current industrial detection technology, multiplexed GMR-based assays provide a method for highly sensitive and specific simultaneous detection of any combination of food-product allergens, thus protecting allergic patients from life-threatening events, including anaphylaxis, by unintentional consumption. PMID:26859787

  16. High specific activity platinum-195m

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Du, Miting; Beets, Arnold L.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    2004-10-12

    A new composition of matter includes .sup.195m Pt characterized by a specific activity of at least 30 mCi/mg Pt, generally made by method that includes the steps of: exposing .sup.193 Ir to a flux of neutrons sufficient to convert a portion of the .sup.193 Ir to .sup.195m Pt to form an irradiated material; dissolving the irradiated material to form an intermediate solution comprising Ir and Pt; and separating the Pt from the Ir by cation exchange chromatography to produce .sup.195m Pt.

  17. An Energy efficient application specific integrated circuit for electrocardiogram feature detection and its potential for ambulatory cardiovascular disease detection.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhaumik, Basabi

    2016-03-01

    A novel algorithm based on forward search is developed for real-time electrocardiogram (ECG) signal processing and implemented in application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for QRS complex related cardiovascular disease diagnosis. The authors have evaluated their algorithm using MIT-BIH database and achieve sensitivity of 99.86% and specificity of 99.93% for QRS complex peak detection. In this Letter, Physionet PTB diagnostic ECG database is used for QRS complex related disease detection. An ASIC for cardiovascular disease detection is fabricated using 130-nm CMOS high-speed process technology. The area of the ASIC is 0.5 mm(2). The power dissipation is 1.73 μW at the operating frequency of 1 kHz with a supply voltage of 0.6 V. The output from the ASIC is fed to their Android application that generates diagnostic report and can be sent to a cardiologist through email. Their ASIC result shows average failed detection rate of 0.16% for six leads data of 290 patients in PTB diagnostic ECG database. They also have implemented a low-leakage version of their ASIC. The ASIC dissipates only 45 pJ with a supply voltage of 0.9 V. Their proposed ASIC is most suitable for energy efficient telemetry cardiovascular disease detection system. PMID:27284458

  18. An Energy efficient application specific integrated circuit for electrocardiogram feature detection and its potential for ambulatory cardiovascular disease detection.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhaumik, Basabi

    2016-03-01

    A novel algorithm based on forward search is developed for real-time electrocardiogram (ECG) signal processing and implemented in application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for QRS complex related cardiovascular disease diagnosis. The authors have evaluated their algorithm using MIT-BIH database and achieve sensitivity of 99.86% and specificity of 99.93% for QRS complex peak detection. In this Letter, Physionet PTB diagnostic ECG database is used for QRS complex related disease detection. An ASIC for cardiovascular disease detection is fabricated using 130-nm CMOS high-speed process technology. The area of the ASIC is 0.5 mm(2). The power dissipation is 1.73 μW at the operating frequency of 1 kHz with a supply voltage of 0.6 V. The output from the ASIC is fed to their Android application that generates diagnostic report and can be sent to a cardiologist through email. Their ASIC result shows average failed detection rate of 0.16% for six leads data of 290 patients in PTB diagnostic ECG database. They also have implemented a low-leakage version of their ASIC. The ASIC dissipates only 45 pJ with a supply voltage of 0.9 V. Their proposed ASIC is most suitable for energy efficient telemetry cardiovascular disease detection system.

  19. An Energy efficient application specific integrated circuit for electrocardiogram feature detection and its potential for ambulatory cardiovascular disease detection

    PubMed Central

    Bhaumik, Basabi

    2016-01-01

    A novel algorithm based on forward search is developed for real-time electrocardiogram (ECG) signal processing and implemented in application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for QRS complex related cardiovascular disease diagnosis. The authors have evaluated their algorithm using MIT-BIH database and achieve sensitivity of 99.86% and specificity of 99.93% for QRS complex peak detection. In this Letter, Physionet PTB diagnostic ECG database is used for QRS complex related disease detection. An ASIC for cardiovascular disease detection is fabricated using 130-nm CMOS high-speed process technology. The area of the ASIC is 0.5 mm2. The power dissipation is 1.73 μW at the operating frequency of 1 kHz with a supply voltage of 0.6 V. The output from the ASIC is fed to their Android application that generates diagnostic report and can be sent to a cardiologist through email. Their ASIC result shows average failed detection rate of 0.16% for six leads data of 290 patients in PTB diagnostic ECG database. They also have implemented a low-leakage version of their ASIC. The ASIC dissipates only 45 pJ with a supply voltage of 0.9 V. Their proposed ASIC is most suitable for energy efficient telemetry cardiovascular disease detection system. PMID:27284458

  20. A highly specific test for periodicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ansmann, Gerrit

    2015-11-15

    We present a method that allows to distinguish between nearly periodic and strictly periodic time series. To this purpose, we employ a conservative criterion for periodicity, namely, that the time series can be interpolated by a periodic function whose local extrema are also present in the time series. Our method is intended for the analysis of time series generated by deterministic time-continuous dynamical systems, where it can help telling periodic dynamics from chaotic or transient ones. We empirically investigate our method's performance and compare it to an approach based on marker events (or Poincaré sections). We demonstrate that our method is capable of detecting small deviations from periodicity and outperforms the marker-event-based approach in typical situations. Our method requires no adjustment of parameters to the individual time series, yields the period length with a precision that exceeds the sampling rate, and its runtime grows asymptotically linear with the length of the time series.

  1. Can hyperspectral remote sensing detect species specific biochemicals?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Discrimination of a few plants scattered among many plants is a goal common to detection of agricultural weeds and invasive species. Detection of clandestinely grown Cannabis sativa L. is in many ways a special case of weed detection. Remote sensing technology provides an automated, computer based,...

  2. Sequence-specific DNA detection at 10 fM by electromechanical signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Esfandiari, Leyla; Lorenzini, Michael; Kocharyan, Gayane; Monbouquette, Harold G; Schmidt, Jacob J

    2014-10-01

    Target DNA fragments at 10 fM concentration (approximately 6 × 10(5) molecules) were detected against a DNA background simulating the noncomplementary genomic DNA present in real samples using a simple, PCR-free, optics-free approach based on electromechanical signal transduction. The development of a rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective nucleic acid detection platform is highly desired for a range of diverse applications. We previously described a potentially low-cost device for sequence-specific nucleic acid detection based on conductance change measurement of a pore blocked by electrophoretically mobilized bead-(peptide nucleic acid probe) conjugates upon hybridization with target nucleic acid. Here, we demonstrate the operation of our device with longer DNA targets, and we describe the resulting improvement in the limit of detection (LOD). We investigated the detection of DNA oligomers of 110, 235, 419, and 1613 nucleotides at 1 pM to 1 fM and found that the LOD decreased as DNA length increased, with 419 and 1613 nucleotide oligomers detectable down to 10 fM. In addition, no false positive responses were obtained with noncomplementary, control DNA fragments of similar length. The 1613-base DNA oligomer is similar in size to 16S rRNA, which suggests that our device may be useful for detection of pathogenic bacteria at clinically relevant concentrations based on recognition of species-specific 16S rRNA sequences.

  3. High Sensitivity deflection detection of nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Sanii, Babak; Ashby, Paul

    2009-10-28

    A critical limitation of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) is the lack of a high-sensitivity position detection mechanism. We introduce a noninterferometric optical approach to determine the position of nanowires with a high sensitivity and bandwidth. Its physical origins and limitations are determined by Mie scattering analysis. This enables a dramatic miniaturization of detectable cantilevers, with attendant reductions to the fundamental minimum force noise in highly damping environments. We measure the force noise of an 81{+-}9??nm radius Ag{sub 2}Ga nanowire cantilever in water at 6{+-}3??fN/{radical}Hz.

  4. Detection of nucleotide-specific CRISPR/Cas9 modified alleles using multiplex ligation detection

    PubMed Central

    KC, R.; Srivastava, A.; Wilkowski, J. M.; Richter, C. E.; Shavit, J. A.; Burke, D. T.; Bielas, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome-editing has emerged as a powerful tool to create mutant alleles in model organisms. However, the precision with which these mutations are created has introduced a new set of complications for genotyping and colony management. Traditional gene-targeting approaches in many experimental organisms incorporated exogenous DNA and/or allele specific sequence that allow for genotyping strategies based on binary readout of PCR product amplification and size selection. In contrast, alleles created by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair of double-stranded DNA breaks generated by Cas9 are much less amenable to such strategies. Here we describe a novel genotyping strategy that is cost effective, sequence specific and allows for accurate and efficient multiplexing of small insertion-deletions and single-nucleotide variants characteristic of CRISPR/Cas9 edited alleles. We show that ligation detection reaction (LDR) can be used to generate products that are sequence specific and uniquely detected by product size and/or fluorescent tags. The method works independently of the model organism and will be useful for colony management as mutant alleles differing by a few nucleotides become more prevalent in experimental animal colonies. PMID:27557703

  5. A simple molecular beacon with duplex-specific nuclease amplification for detection of microRNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingcun; Zhang, Jiangyan; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhao, Likun; Cheng, Yongqiang; Li, Zhengping

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene activity, promoting or inhibiting cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with many diseases. Therefore, it is essential to establish a simple, rapid and sensitive miRNA detection method. In this paper, based on a simple molecular beacon (MB) and duplex-specific nuclease (DSN), we developed a target recycling amplification method for miRNA detection. By controlling the number of stem bases to 5, the MB probe used in this method can be prevented from hydrolysis by DSN without special modification. This assay is direct and simple to quantitatively detect miRNA with high sensitivity and specificity. The MB probe design provides a new strategy for nuclease-based amplification reaction.

  6. Specific PCR detection of tiger, leopard, and lion ingredients from test samples.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jijuan; Xu, Junyi; Liu, Ran; Yu, Ke; Wang, Changwen

    2011-01-01

    A PCR method was developed for specific detection of tiger, leopard, and lion DNA from test specimens for inspection and quarantine or for law-enforced animal protection. Three pairs of specific primers were designed based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of tiger, leopard, and lion and used in the PCR testing. To mimic the effect of food processing on the sensitivity of the test, the tiger muscle and bovine bonemeal powder samples were treated at 133 degrees C for 30 min. At this processing condition, the method was sensitive enough to detect as low as 0.05% of tiger-derived ingredients from the mixed bonemeal powders. The data demonstrate that our PCR method is convenient and economic, with high sensitivity and repeatability, and can be used to detect and identify tiger, leopard, and lion ingredients from various test samples.

  7. Sequence-specific fluorescence detection of DNA by polyamide-thiazole orange conjugates.

    PubMed

    Fechter, Eric J; Olenyuk, Bogdan; Dervan, Peter B

    2005-11-30

    Fluorescent methods to detect specific double-stranded DNA sequences without the need for denaturation may be useful in the field of genetics. Three hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamides 2-4 that target their respective sequences 5'-WGGGWW-3', 5'-WGGCCW-3', and 5'-WGWWCW-3' (W = A or T) were conjugated to thiazole orange dye at the C-termini to examine their fluorescence properties in the presence and absence of match duplex DNA. The conjugates fluoresce weakly in the absence of DNA but showed significant enhancement (>1000-fold) upon the addition of 1 equiv of match DNA and only slight enhancement with the addition of mismatch DNA. The polyamide-dye conjugates bound specific DNA sequences with high affinity (Ka > 10(8) M(-1)) and unwound the DNA duplex through intercalation (unwinding angle, phi, approximately 8 degrees). This new class of polyamides provides a method to specifically detect DNA sequences without denaturation.

  8. Evaluation of Luminex xTAG Gastrointestinal Pathogen Analyte-Specific Reagents for High-Throughput, Simultaneous Detection of Bacteria, Viruses, and Parasites of Clinical and Public Health Importance

    PubMed Central

    Navidad, Jose F.; Griswold, David J.; Gradus, M. Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Acute diarrheal disease (ADD) can be caused by a range of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Conventional diagnostic methods, such as culture, microscopy, biochemical assays, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), are laborious and time-consuming and lack sensitivity. Combined, the array of tests performed on a single specimen can increase the turnaround time (TAT) significantly. We validated a 19plex laboratory-developed gastrointestinal pathogen panel (GPP) using Luminex xTAG analyte-specific reagents (ASRs) to simultaneously screen directly in fecal specimens for diarrhea-causing pathogens, including bacteria (Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli [ETEC], Shiga toxin-producing E. coli [STEC], E. coli O157:H7, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia enterocolitica, and toxigenic Clostridium difficile), parasites (Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium spp., and Entamoeba histolytica), and viruses (norovirus GI and GII, adenovirus 40/41, and rotavirus A). Performance characteristics of GPP ASRs were determined using 48 reference isolates and 254 clinical specimens. Stool specimens from individuals with diarrhea were tested for pathogens using conventional and molecular methods. Using the predictive methods as standards, the sensitivities of the GPP ASRs were 100% for adenovirus 40/41, norovirus, rotavirus A, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia enterocolitica, Entamoeba histolytica, Cryptosporidium spp., and E. coli O157:H7; 95% for Giardia lamblia; 94% for ETEC and STEC; 93% for Shigella spp.; 92% for Salmonella spp.; 91% for C. difficile A/B toxins; and 90% for Campylobacter jejuni. The overall comparative performance of the GPP ASRs with conventional methods in clinical samples was 94.5% (range, 90% to 97%), with 99% (99.0% to 99.9%) specificity. Implementation of the GPP ASRs enables our public health laboratory to offer highly sensitive and specific screening and identification of the major ADD-causing pathogens

  9. Evaluation of Luminex xTAG gastrointestinal pathogen analyte-specific reagents for high-throughput, simultaneous detection of bacteria, viruses, and parasites of clinical and public health importance.

    PubMed

    Navidad, Jose F; Griswold, David J; Gradus, M Stephen; Bhattacharyya, Sanjib

    2013-09-01

    Acute diarrheal disease (ADD) can be caused by a range of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Conventional diagnostic methods, such as culture, microscopy, biochemical assays, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), are laborious and time-consuming and lack sensitivity. Combined, the array of tests performed on a single specimen can increase the turnaround time (TAT) significantly. We validated a 19plex laboratory-developed gastrointestinal pathogen panel (GPP) using Luminex xTAG analyte-specific reagents (ASRs) to simultaneously screen directly in fecal specimens for diarrhea-causing pathogens, including bacteria (Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli [ETEC], Shiga toxin-producing E. coli [STEC], E. coli O157:H7, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia enterocolitica, and toxigenic Clostridium difficile), parasites (Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium spp., and Entamoeba histolytica), and viruses (norovirus GI and GII, adenovirus 40/41, and rotavirus A). Performance characteristics of GPP ASRs were determined using 48 reference isolates and 254 clinical specimens. Stool specimens from individuals with diarrhea were tested for pathogens using conventional and molecular methods. Using the predictive methods as standards, the sensitivities of the GPP ASRs were 100% for adenovirus 40/41, norovirus, rotavirus A, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia enterocolitica, Entamoeba histolytica, Cryptosporidium spp., and E. coli O157:H7; 95% for Giardia lamblia; 94% for ETEC and STEC; 93% for Shigella spp.; 92% for Salmonella spp.; 91% for C. difficile A/B toxins; and 90% for Campylobacter jejuni. The overall comparative performance of the GPP ASRs with conventional methods in clinical samples was 94.5% (range, 90% to 97%), with 99% (99.0% to 99.9%) specificity. Implementation of the GPP ASRs enables our public health laboratory to offer highly sensitive and specific screening and identification of the major ADD-causing pathogens.

  10. A highly automated moving object detection package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, J.-M.; Holman, M.; Scholl, H.; Kavelaars, J.; Gladman, B.

    2004-01-01

    With the deployment of large CCD mosaic cameras and their use in large-scale surveys to discover Solar system objects, there is a need for fast detection algorithms that can handle large data loads in a nearly automatic way. We present here an algorithm that we have developed. Our approach, by using two independent detection algorithms and combining the results, maintains high efficiency while producing low false-detection rates. These properties are crucial in order to reduce the operator time associated with searching these huge data sets. We have used this algorithm on two different mosaic data sets obtained using the CFH12K camera at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). Comparing the detection efficiency and false-detection rate of each individual algorithm with the combination of both, we show that our approach decreases the false detection rate by a factor of a few hundred to a thousand, while decreasing the `limiting magnitude' (where the detection rate drops to 50 per cent) by only 0.1-0.3 mag. The limiting magnitude is similar to that of a human operator blinking the images. Our full pipeline also characterizes the magnitude efficiency of the entire system by implanting artificial objects in the data set. The detection portion of the package is publicly available.

  11. Cellulose antibody films for highly specific evanescent wave immunosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Andreas; Bock, Daniel; Jaworek, Thomas; Kaul, Sepp; Schulze, Matthais; Tebbe, H.; Wegner, Gerhard; Seeger, Stefan

    1996-01-01

    For the production of recognition elements for evanescent wave immunosensors optical waveguides have to be coated with ultrathin stable antibody films. In the present work non amphiphilic alkylated cellulose and copolyglutamate films are tested as monolayer matrices for the antibody immobilization using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. These films are transferred onto optical waveguides and serve as excellent matrices for the immobilization of antibodies in high density and specificity. In addition to the multi-step immobilization of immunoglobulin G(IgG) on photochemically crosslinked and oxidized polymer films, the direct one-step transfer of mixed antibody-polymer films is performed. Both planar waveguides and optical fibers are suitable substrates for the immobilization. The activity and specificity of immobilized antibodies is controlled by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. As a result reduced non-specific interactions between antigens and the substrate surface are observed if cinnamoylbutyether-cellulose is used as the film matrix for the antibody immobilization. Using the evanescent wave senor (EWS) technology immunosensor assays are performed in order to determine both the non-specific adsorption of different coated polymethylmethacrylat (PMMA) fibers and the long-term stability of the antibody films. Specificities of one-step transferred IgG-cellulose films are drastically enhanced compared to IgG-copolyglutamate films. Cellulose IgG films are used in enzymatic sandwich assays using mucine as a clinical relevant antigen that is recognized by the antibodies BM2 and BM7. A mucine calibration measurement is recorded. So far the observed detection limit for mucine is about 8 ng/ml.

  12. HIGH ENERGY POLARIZATION OF BLAZARS: DETECTION PROSPECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Fields, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  13. Direct molecule-specific glucose detection by Raman spectroscopy based on photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuan; Zhang, Alissa Y; Wheeler, Damon A; Bond, Tiziana C; Gu, Claire; Li, Yat

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the first step toward the development of a glucose biosensor based on Raman spectroscopy and a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) probe. Historically, it has been very challenging to detect glucose directly by Raman spectroscopy due to its inherently small Raman scattering cross-section. In this work, we report the first quantitative glucose Raman detection in the physiological concentration range (0-25 mM) with a low laser power (2 mW), a short integration time (30 s), and an extremely small sampling volume (~50 nL) using the highly sensitive liquid-filled PCF probe. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate the molecular specificity of this technique in the presence of a competing sugar, such as fructose. High sensitivity, flexibility, reproducibility, low cost, small sampling volume, and in situ remote sensing capability make PCF a very powerful platform for potential glucose detection based on Raman spectroscopy. PMID:22120042

  14. Mass Spectrometry Detection of Isolevuglandin Adduction to Specific Protein Residues

    PubMed Central

    Charvet, Casey D.; Pikuleva, Irina A.

    2014-01-01

    The aging process seems to be associated with oxidative stress and hence increased production of lipid peroxidation products, including isolevuglandins (isoLGs). The latter are highly reactive γ-ketoaldehydes which can form covalent adducts with primary amino groups of enzymes and proteins and alter the properties of these biomolecules. Yet, little is currently known about amino acid-containing compounds affected by isoLG modification in different age-related pathological processes. To facilitate the detection of these biomolecules, we developed a strategy in which the purified enzyme (or protein) of interest is first treated with authentic isoLG in vitro to evaluate whether it contains reactive lysine residues prone to modification with isoLGs. The data obtained serve as a basis for making the “GO/NO GO” decision as to whether to pursue a further search of this isoLG modification in a biological sample. In this chapter, we describe the conditions for the in vitro isoLG modification assay and how to use mass spectrometry to identify the isoLG-modified peptides and amino acid residues. Our studies were carried out on cytochrome P450 27A1, an important metabolic enzyme, and utilized iso[4]levuglandin E2 as a prototypical isoLG. The isoLG-treated cytochrome P450 was subjected to proteolysis followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for peptide separation and analysis by Mascot, a proteomics search engine, for the presence of modified peptides. The developed protocol could be applied to characterization of other enzymes/proteins and other types of unconventional post-translational protein modification. PMID:25323515

  15. Viral detection by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Nakaya, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    We applied a high-throughput sequencing platform, Ion PGM, for viral detection in fecal samples from adult cows collected in Hokkaido, Japan. Random RT-PCR was performed to amplify RNA extracted from 0.25 ml of fecal specimens (N = 8), and more than 5 μg of cDNA was synthesized. Unbiased high-throughput sequencing using the 318 v2 semiconductor chip of these eight samples yielded 57-580 K (average: 270 K, after data analysis) reads in a single run. As a result, viral genome sequences were detected in each specimen. In addition to bacteriophage, mammal- and insect-derived viruses, partial genome sequences of plant, algal, and protozoal viruses were detected. Thus, this metagenomic analysis of fecal specimens could be useful to comprehensively understand viral populations of the intestine and food sources in animals. PMID:25287501

  16. Viral detection by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Nakaya, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    We applied a high-throughput sequencing platform, Ion PGM, for viral detection in fecal samples from adult cows collected in Hokkaido, Japan. Random RT-PCR was performed to amplify RNA extracted from 0.25 ml of fecal specimens (N = 8), and more than 5 μg of cDNA was synthesized. Unbiased high-throughput sequencing using the 318 v2 semiconductor chip of these eight samples yielded 57-580 K (average: 270 K, after data analysis) reads in a single run. As a result, viral genome sequences were detected in each specimen. In addition to bacteriophage, mammal- and insect-derived viruses, partial genome sequences of plant, algal, and protozoal viruses were detected. Thus, this metagenomic analysis of fecal specimens could be useful to comprehensively understand viral populations of the intestine and food sources in animals.

  17. Event-specific quantitative detection of nine genetically modified maizes using one novel standard reference molecule.

    PubMed

    Yang, Litao; Guo, Jinchao; Pan, Aihu; Zhang, Haibo; Zhang, Kewei; Wang, Zhengming; Zhang, Dabing

    2007-01-10

    With the development of genetically modified organism (GMO) detection techniques, the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique has been the mainstay for GMO detection, and real-time PCR is the most effective and important method for GMO quantification. An event-specific detection strategy based on the unique and specific integration junction sequences between the host plant genome DNA and the integrated gene is being developed for its high specificity. This study establishes the event-specific detection methods for TC1507 and CBH351 maizes. In addition, the event-specific TaqMan real-time PCR detection methods for another seven GM maize events (Bt11, Bt176, GA21, MON810, MON863, NK603, and T25) were systematically optimized and developed. In these PCR assays, the fluorescent quencher, TAMRA, was dyed on the T-base of the probe at the internal position to improve the intensity of the fluorescent signal. To overcome the difficulties in obtaining the certified reference materials of these GM maizes, one novel standard reference molecule containing all nine specific integration junction sequences of these GM maizes and the maize endogenous reference gene, zSSIIb, was constructed and used for quantitative analysis. The limits of detection of these methods were 20 copies for these different GM maizes, the limits of quantitation were about 20 copies, and the dynamic ranges for quantification were from 0.05 to 100% in 100 ng of DNA template. Furthermore, nine groups of the mixed maize samples of these nine GM maize events were quantitatively analyzed to evaluate the accuracy and precision. The accuracy expressed as bias varied from 0.67 to 28.00% for the nine tested groups of GM maize samples, and the precision expressed as relative standard deviations was from 0.83 to 26.20%. All of these indicated that the established event-specific real-time PCR detection systems and the reference molecule in this study are suitable for the identification and quantification of these GM

  18. Event-specific quantitative detection of nine genetically modified maizes using one novel standard reference molecule.

    PubMed

    Yang, Litao; Guo, Jinchao; Pan, Aihu; Zhang, Haibo; Zhang, Kewei; Wang, Zhengming; Zhang, Dabing

    2007-01-10

    With the development of genetically modified organism (GMO) detection techniques, the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique has been the mainstay for GMO detection, and real-time PCR is the most effective and important method for GMO quantification. An event-specific detection strategy based on the unique and specific integration junction sequences between the host plant genome DNA and the integrated gene is being developed for its high specificity. This study establishes the event-specific detection methods for TC1507 and CBH351 maizes. In addition, the event-specific TaqMan real-time PCR detection methods for another seven GM maize events (Bt11, Bt176, GA21, MON810, MON863, NK603, and T25) were systematically optimized and developed. In these PCR assays, the fluorescent quencher, TAMRA, was dyed on the T-base of the probe at the internal position to improve the intensity of the fluorescent signal. To overcome the difficulties in obtaining the certified reference materials of these GM maizes, one novel standard reference molecule containing all nine specific integration junction sequences of these GM maizes and the maize endogenous reference gene, zSSIIb, was constructed and used for quantitative analysis. The limits of detection of these methods were 20 copies for these different GM maizes, the limits of quantitation were about 20 copies, and the dynamic ranges for quantification were from 0.05 to 100% in 100 ng of DNA template. Furthermore, nine groups of the mixed maize samples of these nine GM maize events were quantitatively analyzed to evaluate the accuracy and precision. The accuracy expressed as bias varied from 0.67 to 28.00% for the nine tested groups of GM maize samples, and the precision expressed as relative standard deviations was from 0.83 to 26.20%. All of these indicated that the established event-specific real-time PCR detection systems and the reference molecule in this study are suitable for the identification and quantification of these GM

  19. Methods for detection, identification and specification of listerias

    SciTech Connect

    Bochner, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to differential carbon source metabolism in the genus Listeria, metabolic, biochemical, immunological and genetic procedures to measure said differential carbon source metabolism and the use of these produces to detect, isolate and/or distinguish species of the genus Listeria as well as detect, isolate and/or distinguish strains of species of Listeria. The present invention also contemplates test kits and enrichment media to facilitate these procedures.

  20. Detection of artifacts from high energy bursts in neonatal EEG.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sourya; Biswas, Arunava; Mukherjee, Jayanta; Majumdar, Arun Kumar; Majumdar, Bandana; Mukherjee, Suchandra; Singh, Arun Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Detection of non-cerebral activities or artifacts, intermixed within the background EEG, is essential to discard them from subsequent pattern analysis. The problem is much harder in neonatal EEG, where the background EEG contains spikes, waves, and rapid fluctuations in amplitude and frequency. Existing artifact detection methods are mostly limited to detect only a subset of artifacts such as ocular, muscle or power line artifacts. Few methods integrate different modules, each for detection of one specific category of artifact. Furthermore, most of the reference approaches are implemented and tested on adult EEG recordings. Direct application of those methods on neonatal EEG causes performance deterioration, due to greater pattern variation and inherent complexity. A method for detection of a wide range of artifact categories in neonatal EEG is thus required. At the same time, the method should be specific enough to preserve the background EEG information. The current study describes a feature based classification approach to detect both repetitive (generated from ECG, EMG, pulse, respiration, etc.) and transient (generated from eye blinking, eye movement, patient movement, etc.) artifacts. It focuses on artifact detection within high energy burst patterns, instead of detecting artifacts within the complete background EEG with wide pattern variation. The objective is to find true burst patterns, which can later be used to identify the Burst-Suppression (BS) pattern, which is commonly observed during newborn seizure. Such selective artifact detection is proven to be more sensitive to artifacts and specific to bursts, compared to the existing artifact detection approaches applied on the complete background EEG. Several time domain, frequency domain, statistical features, and features generated by wavelet decomposition are analyzed to model the proposed bi-classification between burst and artifact segments. A feature selection method is also applied to select the

  1. Procedure for detecting underground utilities with specific shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristic, Aleksandar; Vrtunski, Milan; Govedarica, Miro; Bugarinovic, Zeljko

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays GPR technology is acknowledged as a reliable, fast, non-destructive remote sensing technology whose area of applications is wider every day. One of its most common applications is underground utility detection. Not only it is possible to detect the utility in the field, but using certain algorithms utilities which haven't been detected in the field can be detected in radargrams. There is a number of procedures for automated detection of utility in the radargrams. Further, there are procedures that can estimate certain parameters such as propagation velocity, diameter or even characteristics of the material. However, the majority of these procedures is designed to detect cylindrical shape utilities, which, in a radargram, are represented with hyperbolic reflection. According to geometry of hyperbola, utility parameters can be estimated. In this paper we present a procedure that is designed to estimate characteristics of non-cylindrical utilities. It is worth mentioning that these utilities are not so rare. Some underground tanks and sewage collectors are among them. Heat line is consisted of two insulated pipes of the same diameter, often placed in a concrete channel and covered with plates made from reinforced concrete. Therefore, it can be considered as non-cylindrical utility and such structure has characteristic signature in a radargram. The main idea of the proposed procedure is to detect this signature, and then, based on standardized parameters for the heat lines, to estimate the diameter of the pipes. The proposed procedure is based on artificial neural network. As a training set we made a number of radargrams collected on different locations which contain heat lines of various dimensions. Pipe diameters were in a range from 65 to 250 mm. 400MHz antenna was used since the depth hasn't exceeded 2m. After the network is trained it is validated using radargrams that haven't been used in the training set. Further tests were done with radargrams that

  2. A reusable sensor for the label-free detection of specific oligonucleotides by surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nöll, Gilbert; Su, Qiang; Heidel, Björn; Yu, Yaming

    2014-01-01

    The development of a reusable molecular beacon (MB)-based sensor for the label-free detection of specific oligonucleotides using surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) as the readout method is described. The MBs are chemisorbed at planar gold surfaces serving as fluorescence quenching units. Target oligonucleotides of 24 bases can be detected within a few minutes at high single-mismatch discrimination rates.

  3. Identification and characterization of species-specific nanobodies for the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in milk.

    PubMed

    Tu, Zhui; Chen, Qi; Li, Yanping; Xiong, Yonghua; Xu, Yang; Hu, Na; Tao, Yong

    2016-01-15

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM), one of the eight species belonging to the genus Listeria, is pathogenic for both humans and animals. In this study, two novel LM-specific clones, designated L5-78 and L5-79, were isolated from a phage display antibody library that was derived from the variable domain of heavy-chain antibodies (VHHs) of non-immunized alpaca. These two clones were expressed, purified, and characterized. Results showed that both isolated VHHs recognize three serotypes (1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b), which are responsible for more than 95% of documented human listeriosis cases. The recombinant VHHs possess high thermal stability, pH tolerance, and urea resistance. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on the VHH clone L5-79 and a monoclonal antibody was developed to detect LM in pasteurized milk, with a detection limit of 1 × 10(4) colony-forming units (CFU)/ml. These findings indicated that the species-specific VHHs could be directly isolated from the non-immunized library with a properly designed panning strategy and VHH could be a new source for possible diagnosis/detection of foodborne pathogens in food because it was shown to be highly specific and stable. PMID:26456330

  4. Method for detecting pathogens attached to specific antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S.; Fuller, Christopher K.

    2005-01-25

    The use of impedance measurements to detect the presence of pathogens attached to antibody-coated beads. In a fluidic device antibodies are immobilized on a surface of a patterned interdigitated electrode. Pathogens in a sample fluid streaming past the electrode attach to the immobilized antibodies, which produces a change in impedance between two adjacent electrodes, which impedance change is measured and used to detect the presence of a pathogen. To amplify the signal, beads coated with antibodies are introduced and the beads would stick to the pathogen causing a greater change in impedance between the two adjacent electrodes.

  5. Sensitivity and specificity of PS/AA-modified nanoparticles used in malaria detection.

    PubMed

    Thiramanas, Raweewan; Jangpatarapongsa, Kulachart; Asawapirom, Udom; Tangboriboonrat, Pramuan; Polpanich, Duangporn

    2013-07-01

    Polystyrene (PS) nanoparticle (NP) copolymerized with acrylic acid (AA) and coloured monomer, i.e. 2,3,6,7-tetra(2,2'-bithiophene)-1,4,5,8-naphthalenetetracarboxylic-N,N'-di(2-methylallyl)-bisimide (ALN8T), was synthesized via the miniemulsion polymerization. Before applying for malaria antigen detection, the blue NP was conjugated with human polyclonal malaria IgG antibody (Ab) specific to Plasmodium falciparum. For the conjugation, three methods, i.e. physical adsorption, covalent coupling and affinity binding via streptavidin (SA) and biotin interaction, were employed. The optimum ratio of Ab to NPs used in each immobilization procedure and the latex agglutination test based on the reaction between Ab conjugated NPs and malaria patient plasma were investigated. All Ab-latex conjugates provided the high sensitivity for the detection of P. falciparum malaria plasma. The highest specificity to P. falciparum was obtained from using Ab-NPs conjugated via the SA-biotin interaction.

  6. Specific oligonucleotide primers for detection of lecithinase-positive Bacillus spp. by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Schraft, H; Griffiths, M W

    1995-01-01

    An assay based on the PCR has been developed to facilitate detection and identification of Bacillus cereus in foods. Three primers for the PCR have been designed within the sequence for cereolysin AB, a cytolytic determinant that encodes lecithin-hydrolyzing and hemolytic activities of B. cereus. With the PCR and hybridization, the specificity of the primers was tested with 39 isolates of the B. cereus group, with 17 other Bacillus spp., and with 21 non-Bacillus strains. Results demonstrate a high specificity of the three oligonucleotides for isolates of the B. cereus group. With a combined PCR-hybridization assay, the detection limit for B. cereus in artificially contaminated milk was 1 CFU/ml of milk. PMID:7887632

  7. Isotope-specific detection of low-density materials with laser-based monoenergetic gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Anderson, G A; Betts, S M; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Hall, J; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P J

    2010-02-01

    What we believe to be the first demonstration of isotope-specific detection of a low-Z and low density object shielded by a high-Z and high-density material using monoenergetic gamma rays is reported. The isotope-specific detection of LiH shielded by Pb and Al is accomplished using the nuclear resonance fluorescence line of L7i at 478 keV. Resonant photons are produced via laser-based Compton scattering. The detection techniques are general, and the confidence level obtained is shown to be superior to that yielded by conventional x-ray and gamma-ray techniques in these situations.

  8. Isotope-specific detection of low-density materials with laser-based monoenergetic gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Anderson, G A; Betts, S M; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Hall, J; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P J

    2010-02-01

    What we believe to be the first demonstration of isotope-specific detection of a low-Z and low density object shielded by a high-Z and high-density material using monoenergetic gamma rays is reported. The isotope-specific detection of LiH shielded by Pb and Al is accomplished using the nuclear resonance fluorescence line of L7i at 478 keV. Resonant photons are produced via laser-based Compton scattering. The detection techniques are general, and the confidence level obtained is shown to be superior to that yielded by conventional x-ray and gamma-ray techniques in these situations. PMID:20125719

  9. Specific PCR and real-time PCR assays for detection and quantitation of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma phoenicium'.

    PubMed

    Jawhari, Maan; Abrahamian, Peter; Sater, Ali Abdel; Sobh, Hana; Tawidian, Patil; Abou-Jawdah, Yusuf

    2015-02-01

    Almond witches' broom (AlmWB) is a fast-spreading lethal disease of almond, peach and nectarine associated with 'Candidatus Phytoplasma phoenicium'. The development of PCR and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays for the sensitive and specific detection of the phytoplasma is of prime importance for early detection of 'Ca. P. phoenicium' and for epidemiological studies. The developed qPCR assay herein uses a TaqMan(®) probe labeled with Black Hole Quencher Plus. The specificity of the PCR and that of the qPCR detection protocols were tested on 17 phytoplasma isolates belonging to 11 phytoplasma 16S rRNA groups, on samples of almond, peach, nectarine, native plants and insects infected or uninfected with the phytoplasma. The developed assays showed high specificity against 'Ca. P. phoenicium' and no cross-reactivity against any other phytoplasma, plant or insect tested. The sensitivity of the developed PCR and qPCR assays was similar to the conventional nested PCR protocol using universal primers. The qPCR assay was further validated by quantitating AlmWB phytoplasma in different hosts, plant parts and potential insect vectors. The highest titers of 'Ca. P. phoenicium' were detected in the phloem tissues of stems and roots of almond and nectarine trees, where they averaged from 10(5) to 10(6) genomic units per nanogram of host DNA (GU/ng of DNA). The newly developed PCR and qPCR protocols are reliable, specific and sensitive methods that are easily applicable to high-throughput diagnosis of AlmWB in plants and insects and can be used for surveys of potential vectors and alternative hosts.

  10. Detection of the specific binding on protein microarrays by oblique-incidence reflectivity difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Heng; Wen, Juan; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Kun; Li, Wei; Lu, Huibin; Zhou, Yueliang; Jin, Kuijuan; Ruan, Kangcheng; Yang, Guozhen

    2010-09-01

    The specific binding between Cy5-labeled goat anti-mouse Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mouse IgG with a concentration range from 625 to 104 µg ml - 1 has been detected successfully by the oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) method in each procedure of microarray fabrication. The experimental data prove that the OI-RD method can be employed not only to distinguish the different concentrations in label-free fashion but also to detect the antibody-antigen capture. In addition, the differential treatment of the OI-RD signals can decrease the negative influences of glass slide as the microarray upholder. Therefore the OI-RD technique has promising applications for the label-free and high-throughput detection of protein microarrays.

  11. Real-time PCR detection of telomerase activity using specific molecular beacon probes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Deming; Jin, Yawei; Yin, Yuji; Mi, Huaifeng; Shen, Hanxi

    2007-06-01

    Telomerase is a potentially important biomarker and a prognostic indicator of cancer. Several techniques for assessing telomerase activity, including the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) and its modified versions, have been developed. Of these methods, real-time quantitative TRAP (RTQ-TRAP) is considered the most promising. In this work, a novel RTQ-TRAP method is developed in which a telomeric repeats-specific molecular beacon is used. The use of the molecular beacon can improve the specificity of the RTQ-TRAP assay, making the method suitable for studying the overall processivity results and the turnover rate of telomerase. In addition, the real-time, closed-tube protocol used obviates the need for post-amplification procedures, reduces the risk of carryover contamination, and supports high throughput. Its performance in synthetic telomerase products and cell extracts suggests that the developed molecular beacon assay can further enhance the clinical utility of telomerase activity as a biomarker/indicator in cancer diagnosis and prognosis. The method also provides a novel approach to the specific detection of some particular gene sequences to which sequence-specific fluorogenic probes cannot be applied directly. Figure Real-time PCR detection of telomerase activity using specific molecular beacon probes.

  12. Aptamer-nanobody based ELASA for specific detection of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates.

    PubMed

    Rasoulinejad, Samaneh; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi

    2016-08-10

    Acinetobacter baumannii has turned into an important threat in nosocomial outbreak infections and multidrug resistance leading to high mortality rates in the 21st century. In recent years its mortality has increased by 15% which in part could be due to lack of a rapid and sensitive diagnostic test. In this work we introduced a new detection test for A. baumannii with two highly specific aptamer and nanobody molecules. High binding affinity DNA oligonucleotide aptamers toward A. baumannii were selected through 12 rounds of whole cell System Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment process (SELEX). The SELEX procedures was monitored by flow cytometry. The dissociation constant and binding efficiency of the selected aptamer Aci49 was 7.547±1:353pM and 47.50%, respectively. A sandwich enzyme linked aptamer sorbent assay (ELASA) was designed with the biotinylated Aci49 aptamer and our previously developed nanobody against biofilm associated protein (Bap). The assay system was optimized with A. baumannii (ATCC 19606) and 47 clinical isolates of A. baumannii were tested. The threshold of detection in sandwich ELASA process was10(3) CFU/ml. The sensitivity of test toward the clinical isolates was 95.47%. Our results reveal that the sandwich ELASA is sensitive and specific enough for the rapid detection of A. baumannii from clinical isolates. PMID:27234880

  13. Robust Detection of Rare Species Using Environmental DNA: The Importance of Primer Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Taylor M.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Young, Michael K.; Jane, Stephen F.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Whiteley, Andrew R.; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) is being rapidly adopted as a tool to detect rare animals. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) using probe-based chemistries may represent a particularly powerful tool because of the method’s sensitivity, specificity, and potential to quantify target DNA. However, there has been little work understanding the performance of these assays in the presence of closely related, sympatric taxa. If related species cause any cross-amplification or interference, false positives and negatives may be generated. These errors can be disastrous if false positives lead to overestimate the abundance of an endangered species or if false negatives prevent detection of an invasive species. In this study we test factors that influence the specificity and sensitivity of TaqMan MGB assays using co-occurring, closely related brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and bull trout (S. confluentus) as a case study. We found qPCR to be substantially more sensitive than traditional PCR, with a high probability of detection at concentrations as low as 0.5 target copies/µl. We also found that number and placement of base pair mismatches between the Taqman MGB assay and non-target templates was important to target specificity, and that specificity was most influenced by base pair mismatches in the primers, rather than in the probe. We found that insufficient specificity can result in both false positive and false negative results, particularly in the presence of abundant related species. Our results highlight the utility of qPCR as a highly sensitive eDNA tool, and underscore the importance of careful assay design. PMID:23555689

  14. Hepatitis C virus detection by single-round PCR specific for the terminal 3' noncoding region.

    PubMed

    Umlauft, F; Wong, D T; Oefner, P J; Underhill, P A; Cheung, R C; Wright, T L; Kolykhalov, A A; Gruenewald, K; Greenberg, H B

    1996-10-01

    A single-round PCR method with primers specific for the 3' noncoding region (NCR) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been developed. Using a double RNAzol-B extraction, a high-temperature reverse-transcription step with SuperScript II reverse transcriptase, and a 40-cycle two-temperature PCR with a TaqStart antibody hot-start procedure, we were able to detect a 92-nucleotide fragment of the recently discovered 98-nucleotide highly conserved sequence at the 3' terminus of the HCV genome. Direct sequencing of the PCR products confirmed the specificity of the PCR and demonstrated conservation in this region. Only one nucleotide change in 14 specimens was found. End point dilution titration of sera with known viral RNA titers showed the sensitivity of the single-round 3' NCR PCR to be comparable to those of the established nested 5' NCR assays (fewer than 25 HCV genome equivalents). To evaluate specificity and sensitivity, a panel of 116 serum samples characterized by nested 5'-end PCR, genotyping, and quantitative assays was tested. A high degree of concordance (96%) between the 3' NCR and 5' NCR PCR results was found. The sequence conservation at the 3' end of the HCV genome among common genotypes and the savings in time, labor, and reagents from a single-round PCR make this assay a useful addition to the detection systems available to identify and monitor HCV infection.

  15. High School Educational Specifications: Facilities Planning Standards. Edition I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson County School District R-1, Denver, CO.

    The Jefferson County School District (Colorado) has developed a manual of high school specifications for Design Advisory Groups and consultants to use for planning and designing the district's high school facilities. The specifications are provided to help build facilities that best meet the educational needs of the students to be served.…

  16. Multiplex Detection of Rare Mutations by Picoliter Droplet Based Digital PCR: Sensitivity and Specificity Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Zonta, Eleonora; Garlan, Fanny; Pécuchet, Nicolas; Perez-Toralla, Karla; Caen, Ouriel; Milbury, Coren; Didelot, Audrey; Fabre, Elizabeth; Blons, Hélène; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Taly, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    In cancer research, the accuracy of the technology used for biomarkers detection is remarkably important. In this context, digital PCR represents a highly sensitive and reproducible method that could serve as an appropriate tool for tumor mutational status analysis. In particular, droplet-based digital PCR approaches have been developed for detection of tumor-specific mutated alleles within plasmatic circulating DNA. Such an approach calls for the development and validation of a very significant quantity of assays, which can be extremely costly and time consuming. Herein, we evaluated assays for the detection and quantification of various mutations occurring in three genes often misregulated in cancers: the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and the Tumoral Protein p53 (TP53) genes. In particular, commercial competitive allele-specific TaqMan® PCR (castPCR™) technology, as well as TaqMan® and ZEN™ assays, have been evaluated for EGFR p.L858R, p.T790M, p.L861Q point mutations and in-frame deletions Del19. Specificity and sensitivity have been determined on cell lines DNA, plasmatic circulating DNA of lung cancer patients or Horizon Diagnostics Reference Standards. To show the multiplexing capabilities of this technology, several multiplex panels for EGFR (several three- and four-plexes) have been developed, offering new "ready-to-use" tests for lung cancer patients. PMID:27416070

  17. Site-Specific Detection and Management of Nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematode distribution varies significantly throughout a field and is highly correlated to soil texture and other edaphic factors. Field-wide application results in nematicides being applied to areas without nematodes and the application of sub-effective levels in areas with high nematode densities. ...

  18. Stand-alone rolling circle amplification combined with capillary electrophoresis for specific detection of small RNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Ni; Jablonowski, Carolyn; Jin, Hailing; Zhong, Wenwan

    2009-06-15

    Noncoding small RNAs play diverse, important biological roles through gene expression regulation. However, their low expression levels make it difficult to identify new small RNA species and study their functions, calling for the development of detection schemes with higher simplicity, sensitivity, and specificity. Herein, we reported a straightforward assay that combined the stand-alone rolling circle amplification (RCA) with capillary electrophoresis (CE) for specific and sensitive detection of small RNAs in biological samples. In order to enhance the overall reaction efficiency and simplify the procedure, RCA was not preceded with ligation, and a preformed circular probe was employed as the template for the target small RNA-primed isothermal amplification. The long RCA product was digested and analyzed by CE. Two DNA polymerases, the Phi29 and Bst, were compared for their detection performance. Bst is superior in the aspects of specificity, procedure simplicity, and reproducibility, while Phi29 leads to a 5-fold lower detection limit and is able to detect as low as 35 amol of the target small RNA. Coamplification of an internal standard with the target and employment of the RNase A digestion step allow accurate and reproducible quantification of low amounts of small RNA targets spiked into hundreds of nanograms of the plant total RNA extract with a recovery below 110% using either enzyme. Our assay can be adapted to a capillary array system for high-throughput screening of small RNA expression in biological samples. Also, the one-step isothermal process has the potential to conveniently amplify a very limited amount of the RNA samples, e.g., RNA extracted from only a few cells, inside the capillary column or on a microchip.

  19. Detection of a Specific Biomarker for Epstein-Barr Virus Using a Polymer-Based Genosensor

    PubMed Central

    Balvedi, Renata P. A.; Castro, Ana C. H.; Madurro, João M.; Brito-Madurro, Ana G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes methodology for direct and indirect detections of a specific oligonucleotide for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) using electrochemical techniques. The sequence of oligonucleotide probe (EBV1) revealed a high sequence identity (100%) with the EBV genome. For the development of the genosensor, EBV1 was grafted to the platform sensitized with poly(4-aminothiophenol). After that, the hybridization reaction was carried out with the complementary target (EBV2) on the modified electrode surface using ethidium bromide as DNA intercalator. The oxidation peak currents of ethidium bromide increased linearly with the values of the concentration of the complementary sequences in the range from 3.78 to 756 μmol·L−1. In nonstringent experimental conditions, this genosensor can detect 17.32 nmol·L−1 (three independent experiments) of oligonucleotide target, discriminating between complementary and non-complementary oligonucleotides, as well as differentiating one-base mismatch, as required for detection of genetic diseases caused by point mutations. The biosensor also displayed high specificity to the EBV target with elimination of interference from mix (alanine, glucose, uric acid, ascorbic acid, bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamate and glycine) and good stability (120 days). In addition, it was possible to observe differences between hybridized and non-hybridized surfaces through atomic force microscopy. PMID:24853286

  20. Use of monoclonal antibodies to detect specific mutations in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenying; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2016-07-01

    Treatment options for cancer patients have changed considerably in recent years with the introduction of variable gene mutation and targeted therapy. Although molecular testing for gene mutations remains the gold standard in assessing biopsy tissues for specific mutations and for subsequent therapy, recent developments have led to the use of highly specific monoclonal antibodies to detect mutated genes in tissue sections. Some of the early developments included antibodies against EGFR, but have expanded to include antibodies detecting mutated RAS, BRAF, and SDHx. Immunohistochemical detection of gene mutations using mutation-specific antibodies has the advantage of allowing the detailed visualization of protein distributions in situ and provides direct visualization of the heterogeneity in the distribution of targeted proteins. This review will discuss the use of selected mainly monoclonal antibodies targeting specific mutated molecules and indicate how the detection of these proteins can be used for chemotherapeutic purposes in targeting mutated genes. PMID:27083401

  1. Label-Free Detection of Ag+ Based on Gold Nanoparticles and Ag+-Specific DNA.

    PubMed

    Pu, Wendan; Zhao, Zhao; Wu, Liping; Liu, Yue; Zhao, Huawen

    2015-08-01

    A sensitive label-free method was presented for the determination of silver ion (Ag+) in this paper. Cytosine-rich DNA (C-DNA) was used as Ag+ specific DNA. Without Ag+ in the solution, fluorescence of fluorescein (FAM) is quenched by C-DNA stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in high salt environment. When Ag+ is present in the solution, however, Ag+-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine (C-Ag+-C) base pairs induced the C-DNA folding into a hairpin structure, which can not stabilize AuNPs in high salt environment, thus causing AuNPs aggregation. After centrifugation to remove the aggregated AuNPs, the quenching ability of the supernatant for FAM is decreased and the fluorescence intensity of solution increases with increasing the Ag+ concentration. Due to the highly specific interaction of the C-DNA towards Ag+ and the strong fluorescent quenching ability of AuNPs for FAM, the method has high selectivity and sensitivity for Ag+. Under the optimal conditions, the fluorescence intensity at 515 nm increased linearly with the concentration of Ag+ ranging from 15 nM to 700 nM, and the detection limit was determined as 6 nM based on 3 σ/slope. This method is simple, sensitive, and may be applied to other detection systems by selecting the appropriate DNA sequences. PMID:26369112

  2. Trace detection of specific viable bacteria using tetracysteine-tagged bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lina; Luan, Tian; Yang, Xiaoting; Wang, Shuo; Zheng, Yan; Huang, Tianxun; Zhu, Shaobin; Yan, Xiaomei

    2014-01-01

    Advanced methods are urgently needed to determine the identity and viability of trace amounts of pathogenic bacteria in a short time. Existing approaches either fall short in the accurate assessment of microbial viability or lack specificity in bacterial identification. Bacteriophages (or phages for short) are viruses that exclusively infect bacterial host cells with high specificity. As phages infect and replicate only in living bacterial hosts, here we exploit the strategy of using tetracysteine (TC)-tagged phage in combination with biarsenical dye to the discriminative detection of viable target bacteria from dead target cells and other viable but nontarget bacterial cells. Using recombinant M13KE-TC phage and Escherichia coli ER2738 as a model system, distinct differentiation between individual viable target cells from dead target cells was demonstrated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. As few as 1% viable E. coli ER2738 can be accurately quantified in a mix with dead E. coli ER2738 by flow cytometry. With fluorescence microscopic measurement, specific detection of as rare as 1 cfu/mL original viable target bacteria was achieved in the presence of a large excess of dead target cells and other viable but nontarget bacterial cells in 40 mL artificially contaminated drinking water sample in less than 3 h. This TC-phage-FlAsH approach is sensitive, specific, rapid, and simple, and thus shows great potential in water safety monitoring, health surveillance, and clinical diagnosis of which trace detection and identification of viable bacterial pathogens is highly demanded.

  3. Detection of cancer-specific epigenomic changes in biofluids: powerful tools in biomarker discovery and application.

    PubMed

    Nogueira da Costa, André; Herceg, Zdenko

    2012-12-01

    The genetic and epigenetic material originating from tumour that can be found in body fluids of individuals with cancer harbours tumour-specific alterations and represents an attractive target for biomarker discovery. Epigenetic changes (DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs) are present ubiquitously in virtually all types of human malignancies and may appear in early cancer development, and thus they provide particularly attractive markers with broad applications in diagnostics. In addition, because changes in the epigenome may constitute a signature of specific exposure to certain risk factors, they have the potential to serve as highly specific biomarkers for risk assessment. While reliable detection of cancer-specific epigenetic changes has proven to be technically challenging, a substantial progress has been made in developing the methodologies that allow an efficient and sensitive detection of epigenomic changes using the material originating from body fluids. In this review we discuss the application of epigenomics as a tool for biomarker research, with the focus on the analysis of DNA methylation in biofluids.

  4. A Rapid and Specific Method for the Detection of Indole in Complex Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Cynthia; Gonzales, Christopher; Okhuysen, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Indole, a bacterial product of tryptophan degradation, has a variety of important applications in the pharmaceutical industry and is a biomarker in biological and clinical specimens. Yet, specific assays to quantitate indole are complex and require expensive equipment and a high level of training. Thus, indole in biological samples is often estimated using the simple and rapid Kovács assay, which nonspecifically detects a variety of commonly occurring indole analogs. We demonstrate here a sensitive, specific, and rapid method for measuring indole in complex biological samples using a specific reaction between unsubstituted indole and hydroxylamine. We compared the hydroxylamine-based indole assay (HIA) to the Kovács assay and confirmed that the two assays are capable of detecting microgram amounts of indole. However, the HIA is specific to indole and does not detect other naturally occurring indole analogs. We further demonstrated the utility of the HIA in measuring indole levels in clinically relevant biological materials, such as fecal samples and bacterial cultures. Mean and median fecal indole concentrations from 53 healthy adults were 2.59 mM and 2.73 mM, respectively, but varied widely (0.30 mM to 6.64 mM) among individuals. We also determined that enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain H10407 produces 3.3 ± 0.22 mM indole during a 24-h period in the presence of 5 mM tryptophan. The sensitive and specific HIA should be of value in a variety of settings, such as the evaluation of various clinical samples and the study of indole-producing bacterial species in the gut microbiota. PMID:26386049

  5. High voltage spark carbon fiber detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    The pulse discharge technique was used to determine the length and density of carbon fibers released from fiber composite materials during a fire or aircraft accident. Specifications are given for the system which uses the ability of a carbon fiber to initiate spark discharge across a high voltage biased grid to achieve accurate counting and sizing of fibers. The design of the system was optimized, and prototype hardware proved satisfactory in laboratory and field tests.

  6. High resolution detection system of capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Li Qiang; Shi, Yan; Zheng, Hua; Lu, Zu Kang

    2007-12-01

    The capillary electrophoresis (CE) with laser induced fluorescence detection (LIFD) system was founded according to confocal theory. The 3-D adjustment of the exciting and collecting optical paths was realized. The photomultiplier tube (PMT) is used and the signals are processed by a software designed by ourselves. Under computer control, high voltage is applied to appropriate reservoirs and to inject and separate DNA samples respectively. Two fluorescent dyes Thiazole Orange (TO) and SYBR Green I were contrasted. With both of the dyes, high signals-to-noise images were obtained with the CE-LIFD system. The single-bases can be distinguished from the electrophoretogram and high resolution of DNA sample separation was obtained.

  7. ULTRASENSITIVE HIGH-TEMPERATURE SELECTIVE GAS DETECTION USING PIEZOELECTRIC MICROCANTILEVERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Y. Shih; Tejas Patil; Qiang Zhao; Yi-Shi Chiu; Wei-Heng Shih

    2004-03-05

    We have obtained very promising results in the Phase I study. Specifically, for temperature effects, we have established that piezoelectric cantilever sensors could retain their resonance peak strength at high temperatures, i.e., the Q values of the resonance peaks remained above 10 even when the temperature was very close to the Curie temperature. This confirms that a piezoelectric cantilever sensor can be used as a sensor up to its Curie temperature. Furthermore, we have shown that the mass detection sensitivity remained unchanged at different temperatures. For selective gas detection, we have demonstrated selective NH{sub 3} detection using piezoelectric cantilever sensors coated with mesoporous SiO{sub 2}. For high-temperature sensor materials development, we have achieved highly oriented Sr-doped lead titanate thin films that possessed superior dielectric and ferroelectric properties. Such highly oriented films can be microfabricated into high-performance piezoelectric microcantilever sensors that can be used up to 490 C. We have accomplished the goal of Phase I study in exploring the various aspects of a high-temperature gas sensor. We propose to continue the study in Phase II to develop a sensor that is suitable for high-temperature applications using piezoelectrics with a high Curie temperature and by controlling the effects of temperature. The lead titanate based thin film developed in Phase I is good for applications up to 490 C. In phase II, we will develop lithium niobate thin film based cantilevers for applications up to 1000 C.

  8. Application of photostable quantum dots for indirect immunofluorescent detection of specific bacterial serotypes on small marine animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decho, Alan W.; Beckman, Erin M.; Chandler, G. Thomas; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro

    2008-06-01

    An indirect immunofluorescence approach was developed using semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystals to label and detect a specific bacterial serotype of the bacterial human pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus, attached to small marine animals (i.e. benthic harpacticoid copepods), which are suspected pathogen carriers. This photostable labeling method using nanotechnology will potentially allow specific serotypes of other bacterial pathogens to be detected with high sensitivity in a range of systems, and can be easily applied for sensitive detection to other Vibrio species such as Vibrio cholerae.

  9. Novel developments for improved detection of specific mRNAs by DNA chips.

    PubMed

    Pioch, Daniel; Schweder, Thomas; Jürgen, Britta

    2008-10-01

    Microarrays have revolutionized gene expression analysis as they allow for highly parallel monitoring of mRNA levels of thousands of genes in a single experiment. Since their introduction some 15 years ago, substantial progress has been achieved with regard to, e.g., faster or more sensitive analyses. In this review, interesting new approaches for a more sensitive detection of specific mRNAs will be highlighted. Particularly, the potential of electrical DNA chip formats that allow for faster mRNA analyses will be discussed.

  10. Space-time airborne disease mapping applied to detect specific behaviour of varicella in Valencia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Iftimi, Adina; Montes, Francisco; Santiyán, Ana Míguez; Martínez-Ruiz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Airborne diseases are one of humanity's most feared sicknesses and have regularly caused concern among specialists. Varicella is an airborne disease which usually affects children before the age of 10. Because of its nature, varicella gives rise to interesting spatial, temporal and spatio-temporal patterns. This paper studies spatio-temporal exploratory analysis tools to detect specific behaviour of varicella in the city of Valencia, Spain, from 2008 to 2013. These methods have shown a significant association between the spatial and the temporal component, confirmed by the space-time models applied to the data. High relative risk of varicella is observed in economically disadvantaged regions, areas less involved in vaccination programmes.

  11. Assessing Point-of-Care Device Specifications and Needs for Pathogen Detection in Emergencies and Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Gerald J.; Mecozzi, Daniel M.; Brock, T. Keith; Curtis, Corbin M.

    2012-01-01

    Background We assessed point-of-care device specifications and needs for pathogen detection in urgent care, emergencies, and disasters. Methods We surveyed American Association for Clinical Chemistry members and compared responses to those of disaster experts. Online SurveyMonkey questions covered performance characteristics, device design, pathogen targets, and other specifications. Results For disasters, respondents preferred direct sample collection with a disposable test cassette that stores biohazardous material (P<0.001). They identified methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, Vibrio cholerae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae as high priority pathogens. First responders were deemed the professional group who should perform POC testing in disasters (P<0.001). Conclusions Needs assessment now is requisite for competitive funding, so the results in this report will be useful to investigators preparing grant applications. Point-of-care devices used in disasters should address the needs of first responders, who give high priority to contamination-free whole-blood sampling, superior performance pathogen detection, and HIV-1/2 blood donor screening. There was surprising concordance of preferences among different professional groups, which presages formulation of global consensus guidelines to assist high impact preparedness. PMID:23049471

  12. Assessing Point-of-Care Device Specifications and Needs for Pathogen Detection in Emergencies and Disasters.

    PubMed

    Kost, Gerald J; Mecozzi, Daniel M; Brock, T Keith; Curtis, Corbin M

    2012-06-01

    BACKGROUND: We assessed point-of-care device specifications and needs for pathogen detection in urgent care, emergencies, and disasters. METHODS: We surveyed American Association for Clinical Chemistry members and compared responses to those of disaster experts. Online SurveyMonkey questions covered performance characteristics, device design, pathogen targets, and other specifications. RESULTS: For disasters, respondents preferred direct sample collection with a disposable test cassette that stores biohazardous material (P<0.001). They identified methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, Vibrio cholerae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae as high priority pathogens. First responders were deemed the professional group who should perform POC testing in disasters (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Needs assessment now is requisite for competitive funding, so the results in this report will be useful to investigators preparing grant applications. Point-of-care devices used in disasters should address the needs of first responders, who give high priority to contamination-free whole-blood sampling, superior performance pathogen detection, and HIV-1/2 blood donor screening. There was surprising concordance of preferences among different professional groups, which presages formulation of global consensus guidelines to assist high impact preparedness.

  13. Group-Specific Multiplex PCR Detection Systems for the Identification of Flying Insect Prey

    PubMed Central

    Sint, Daniela; Niederklapfer, Bettina; Kaufmann, Ruediger; Traugott, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The applicability of species-specific primers to study feeding interactions is restricted to those ecosystems where the targeted prey species occur. Therefore, group-specific primer pairs, targeting higher taxonomic levels, are often desired to investigate interactions in a range of habitats that do not share the same species but the same groups of prey. Such primers are also valuable to study the diet of generalist predators when next generation sequencing approaches cannot be applied beneficially. Moreover, due to the large range of prey consumed by generalists, it is impossible to investigate the breadth of their diet with species-specific primers, even if multiplexing them. However, only few group-specific primers are available to date and important groups of prey such as flying insects have rarely been targeted. Our aim was to fill this gap and develop group-specific primers suitable to detect and identify the DNA of common taxa of flying insects. The primers were combined in two multiplex PCR systems, which allow a time- and cost-effective screening of samples for DNA of the dipteran subsection Calyptratae (including Anthomyiidae, Calliphoridae, Muscidae), other common dipteran families (Phoridae, Syrphidae, Bibionidae, Chironomidae, Sciaridae, Tipulidae), three orders of flying insects (Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, Plecoptera) and coniferous aphids within the genus Cinara. The two PCR assays were highly specific and sensitive and their suitability to detect prey was confirmed by testing field-collected dietary samples from arthropods and vertebrates. The PCR assays presented here allow targeting prey at higher taxonomic levels such as family or order and therefore improve our ability to assess (trophic) interactions with flying insects in terrestrial and aquatic habitats. PMID:25525799

  14. A protein multiplex microarray substrate with high sensitivity and specificity

    PubMed Central

    Fici, Dolores A.; McCormick, William; Brown, David W.; Herrmann, John E.; Kumar, Vikram; Awdeh, Zuheir L.

    2010-01-01

    The problems that have been associated with protein multiplex microarray immunoassay substrates and existing technology platforms include: binding, sensitivity, a low signal to noise ratio, target immobilization and the optimal simultaneous detection of diverse protein targets. Current commercial substrates for planar multiplex microarrays rely on protein attachment chemistries that range from covalent attachment to affinity ligand capture, to simple adsorption. In this pilot study, experimental performance parameters for direct monoclonal mouse IgG detection were compared for available two and three dimensional slide surface coatings with a new colloidal nitrocellulose substrate. New technology multiplex microarrays were also developed and evaluated for the detection of pathogen specific antibodies in human serum and the direct detection of enteric viral antigens. Data supports the nitrocellulose colloid as an effective reagent with the capacity to immobilize sufficient diverse protein target quantities for increased specificory signal without compromising authentic protein structure. The nitrocellulose colloid reagent is compatible with the array spotters and scanners routinely used for microarray preparation and processing. More importantly, as an alternate to fluorescence, colorimetric chemistries may be used for specific and sensitive protein target detection. The advantages of the nitrocellulose colloid platform indicate that this technology may be a valuable tool for the further development and expansion of multiplex microarray immunoassays in both the clinical and research laborat environment. PMID:20974147

  15. Electrochemical detection of lung cancer specific microRNAs using 3D DNA origami nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuopeng; Su, Wenqiong; Li, Zonglin; Ding, Xianting

    2015-09-15

    Recent reports have indicated that aberrant expression of microRNAs is highly correlated with occurrence of lung cancer. Therefore, highly sensitive detection of lung cancer specific microRNAs provides an attractive approach in lung cancer early diagnostics. Herein, we designed 3D DNA origami structure that enables electrochemical detection of lung cancer related microRNAs. The 3D DNA origami structure is constituted of a ferrocene-tagged DNA of stem-loop structure combined with a thiolated tetrahedron DNA nanostructure at the bottom. The top portion hybridized with the lung cancer correlated microRNA, while the bottom portion was self-assembled on gold disk electrode surface, which was modified with gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and blocked with mercaptoethanol (MCH). The preparation process and the performance of the proposed electrochemical genosensor were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Under the optimal conditions, the developed genosensor had a detection limit of 10 pM and a good linearity with microRNA concentration ranging from 100 pM to 1 µM, which showed a great potential in highly sensitive clinical cancer diagnosis application.

  16. Trajectories for High Specific Impulse High Specific Power Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polsgrove, Tara; Adams, Robert B.; Brady, Hugh J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Flight times and deliverable masses for electric and fusion propulsion systems are difficult to approximate. Numerical integration is required for these continuous thrust systems. Many scientists are not equipped with the tools and expertise to conduct interplanetary and interstellar trajectory analysis for their concepts. Several charts plotting the results of well-known trajectory simulation codes were developed and are contained in this paper. These charts illustrate the dependence of time of flight and payload ratio on jet power, initial mass, specific impulse and specific power. These charts are intended to be a tool by which people in the propulsion community can explore the possibilities of their propulsion system concepts. Trajectories were simulated using the tools VARITOP and IPOST. VARITOP is a well known trajectory optimization code that involves numerical integration based on calculus of variations. IPOST has several methods of trajectory simulation; the one used in this paper is Cowell's method for full integration of the equations of motion. An analytical method derived in the companion paper was also evaluated. The accuracy of this method is discussed in the paper.

  17. Detection of biological macromolecules on a biochip dedicated to UV specific absorption.

    PubMed

    Robin, Kristelle; Reverchon, Jean-Luc; Mugherli, Laurent; Fromant, Michel; Plateau, Pierre; Benisty, Henri

    2009-02-15

    This work describes an ultraviolet biosensing technique based on specific molecular absorption detected with a previously developed spectrally selective aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) based detector. Light absorption signal of DNA and proteins, respectively at 260 nm and 280 nm, is used to image biochips. To allow detection of protein or DNA monolayers at the surface of a biochip, we develop contrast-enhancing multilayer substrates. We analyze them through models and experiments and validate the possibility of measuring absorptions of the order of 10(-3). These multilayer structures display a high reflectivity, and maximize the interaction of the electric field with the biological element at the chip surface. Optimization of the experimental absorption, which includes effects such as roughness of the biochip, spectral and angular resolution of the optics, illumination, etc., is carried out with an inorganic ultraviolet absorber (titanium dioxide) deposit. We obtained an induced absorption contrast enhanced by a factor of 4.0, conferring enough sensitivity to detect monolayers of DNA or proteins. Experimental results on an Escherichia coli histidine-tagged methionyl-tRNA synthetase protein before and after complexation with an anti-polyHis specific antibody validate our biosensing technique. This label-free optical method may be helpful in controlling biochip coatings, and subsequent biological coupling at the surface of a biochip.

  18. Detection, phenotyping, and quantification of antigen-specific T cells using a peptide-MHC dodecamer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Zeng, Xun; Sigal, Natalia; Lund, Peder J; Su, Laura F; Huang, Huang; Chien, Yueh-hsiu; Davis, Mark M

    2016-03-29

    Here we report a peptide-MHC (pMHC) dodecamer as a "next generation" technology that is a significantly more sensitive and versatile alternative to pMHC tetramers for the detection, isolation, and phenotypic analysis of antigen-specific T cells. In particular, dodecamers are able to detect two- to fivefold more antigen-specific T cells in both human and murine CD4(+)and CD8(+)αβ T-cell compartments compared with the equivalent tetramers. The low-affinity, tetramer-negative, dodecamer-positive T cells showed comparable effector cytokine responses as those of high-affinity, tetramer-positive T cells. Dodecamers are able to detect early stage CD4(+)CD8(+)double-positive thymocytes on which T-cell receptors are 10- to 30-fold less dense than mature T cells. Dodecamers also show utility in the analysis of γδ T cells and in cytometry by time-of-flight applications. This construct has a simple structure with a central scaffold protein linked to four streptavidin molecules, each having three pMHC ligands or other molecules. The dodecamer is straightforward and inexpensive to produce and is compatible with current tetramer technology and commercially available streptavidin conjugates. PMID:26979955

  19. Mining of novel species-specific primers for PCR detection of Listeria monocytogenes based on genomic approach.

    PubMed

    Tao, Tingting; Chen, Qiming; Bie, Xiaomei; Lu, Fengxia; Lu, Zhaoxin

    2015-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes in contaminated food is considered as a serious health threat for consumers due to its high mortality rate. The objective of this study was to obtain novel species-specific target-genes and primers for the molecular detection of L. monocytogenes using a comparative genomic approach. By comparative analysis of L. monocytogenes and non-L. monocytogenes genome sequences in the GenBank database with BLAST program, 26 specific target sequences were used as candidates and the primers were designed for L. monocytogenes species-specificity verification by using PCR assay. Finally, the three genes LMOf2365_0970, LMOf2365_2721 and mpl were identified to have L. monocytogenes species-specificity and be unique as detection targets for diagnostic application. The species-specific primer Lm8 of gene LMOf2365_0970, Lm13 of gene LMOf2365_2721 and Lm20 of gene mpl showed better specificity and sensitivity than the primers described previously. The PCR detection limits of the three specific primer sets were 430, 43, 4.3 fg/μL for genomic DNA, and 5 × 10(3), 50, 5 cfu/mL for pure culture of L. monocytogenes. There was no interference in specificity of detecting L. monocytogenes by co-culture with other foodborne pathogens in high concentration. Moreover, after 6-8 h of enrichment, L. monocytogenes in the artificially contaminated milk samples at an inoculum dose of 38 cfu/10 mL milk could be detected successfully with the studied three primers. Therefore, the three specific genes and primers can be applied to establish a novel rapid and accurate method for detecting L. monocytogenes in food materials. PMID:26354019

  20. Antibodies specific for nucleic acids and applications in genomic detection and clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zonglin; Leppla, Stephen H; Li, Baoguang; Elkins, Christopher A

    2014-09-01

    Detection of nucleic acids using antibodies is uncommon. This is in part because nucleic acids are poor immunogens and it is difficult to elicit antibodies having high affinity to each type of nucleic acid while lacking cross-reactivity to others. We describe the origins and applications of a variety of anti-nucleic acid antibodies, including ones reacting with modified nucleosides and nucleotides, single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA, RNA, DNA:RNA hybrids, locked-nucleic acids or peptide nucleic acid:nucleic acid hybrids. Carefully selected antibodies can be excellent reagents for detecting bacteria, viruses, small RNAs, microRNAs, R-loops, cancer cells, stem cells, apoptotic cells and so on. The detection may be sensitive, simple, rapid, specific, reproducible, quantitative and cost-effective. Current microarray and diagnostic methods that depend on cDNA or cRNA can be replaced by using antibody detection of nucleic acids. Therefore, development should be encouraged to explore new utilities and create a robust arsenal of new anti-nucleic acid antibodies.

  1. Aptamer-Functionalized Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles for Highly Sensitive Detection of Leukemia Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Juntao; Yang, Nuo; Hu, Zixi; Su, Jing; Zhong, Jianhong; Yang, Yang; Yu, Yating; Zhu, Jianmeng; Xue, Dabin; Huang, Yingying; Lai, Zongqiang; Huang, Yong; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2016-06-01

    A simple, highly sensitive method to detect leukemia cells has been developed based on aptamer-modified fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs). In this strategy, the amine-labeled Sgc8 aptamer was conjugated to carboxyl-modified FSNPs via amide coupling between amino and carboxyl groups. Sensitivity and specificity of Sgc8-FSNPs were assessed using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. These results showed that Sgc8-FSNPs detected leukemia cells with high sensitivity and specificity. Aptamer-modified FSNPs hold promise for sensitive and specific detection of leukemia cells. Changing the aptamer may allow the FSNPs to detect other types of cancer cells.

  2. Aptamer-Functionalized Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles for Highly Sensitive Detection of Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Juntao; Yang, Nuo; Hu, Zixi; Su, Jing; Zhong, Jianhong; Yang, Yang; Yu, Yating; Zhu, Jianmeng; Xue, Dabin; Huang, Yingying; Lai, Zongqiang; Huang, Yong; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2016-12-01

    A simple, highly sensitive method to detect leukemia cells has been developed based on aptamer-modified fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs). In this strategy, the amine-labeled Sgc8 aptamer was conjugated to carboxyl-modified FSNPs via amide coupling between amino and carboxyl groups. Sensitivity and specificity of Sgc8-FSNPs were assessed using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. These results showed that Sgc8-FSNPs detected leukemia cells with high sensitivity and specificity. Aptamer-modified FSNPs hold promise for sensitive and specific detection of leukemia cells. Changing the aptamer may allow the FSNPs to detect other types of cancer cells. PMID:27299653

  3. Detection of Bovine viral diarrhea virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in fresh colostrum: a modification of the virus neutralization test.

    PubMed

    Bedekovic, Tomislav; Mihaljevic, Zeljko; Jungic, Andreja; Lemo, Nina; Lojkic, Ivana; Cvetnic, Zeljko; Cac, Zeljko

    2013-03-01

    To eliminate cytotoxic effects of colostrum on cells, a modified virus neutralization test (VNT) for the detection of Bovine viral diarrhea virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in colostrum was developed. The new test was compared to the World Organization for Animal Health-recommended VNT and the results evaluated. The agreement of the new test compared to the standard VNT was determined to be 98%, whereas sensitivity and specificity of the modified VNT compared to the standard VNT were 100%. Bovine viral diarrhea virus-specific antibodies were detected in 42 sera samples and 38 colostrum samples. The antibody titers in serum and colostrum showed a high correlation (n = 56, r = 0.9719, P < 0.001). The modified virus neutralization technique described herein succeeds in eliminating cytotoxic effects and can be readily applied for the detection of specific antibodies against other infectious agents in colostrum. PMID:23417081

  4. A new specific method to detect cyanide in body fluids, especially whole blood, by fluorimetry.

    PubMed

    Felscher, D; Wulfmeyer, M

    1998-09-01

    This study shows a simple, rapid, and specific method for the quantitative determination of cyanide ion in body fluids, especially blood, by fluorimetry. It is based upon the transformation of cyanide ion into hydrocyanic acid, which then reacts with 2,3-naphthalenedialdehyde and taurine in a self-contained system. The 1-cyano-2-benzoisoindole derivate thus formed is suitable for fluorimetric measurement (lambdaEX = 418 nm; lambdaEM = 460 nm). The fluorescence intensity can be determined by spectrophotometry or by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection. The detection limit is 0.002 microg/mL. Linearity was excellent from 0.002 to 1 microg/mL for spectrophotometry and from 0.002 to 5 microg/mL for HPLC with fluorescence detection. The coefficient of variation for repeatability was 8% or less. Thiocyanate and sulfide did not interfere, even at high concentrations (200 microg/mL). The method was applicable to whole blood, so it should be suitable for both clinical and forensic purposes. PMID:9737330

  5. Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR)-Specific Monoclonal Antibody to Detect CD19-Specific T Cells in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Bipulendu; Maiti, Sourindra; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63). We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb) to detect CD19-specific CAR+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1) was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1) will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:23469246

  6. Detection of steroid 21-hydroxylase alleles using gene-specific PCR and a multiplexed ligation detection reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Day, D.J.; Barany, F.; Speiser, P.W.

    1995-09-01

    Steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency is the most common cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia, an inherited inability to synthesize cortisol that occurs in 1 in 10,000-15,000 births. Affected females are born with ambiguous genitalia, a condition that can be ameliorated by administering dexamethasone to the mother for most of gestation. Prenatal diagnosis is required for accurate treatment of affected females as well as for genetic counseling purposes. Approximately 95% of mutations causing this disorder result from recombinations between the gene encoding the 21-hydroxylase enzyme (CYP21) and a linked, highly homologous pseudogene (CYP21P). Approximately 20% of these mutations are gene deletions, and the remainder are gene conversions that transfer any of nine deleterious mutations from the CYP21P pseudogene to CYP21. We describe a methodology for genetic diagnosis of 21-hydroxylase deficiency that utilizes gene-specific PCR amplification in conjunction with thermostable DNA ligase to discriminate single nucleotide variations in a multiplexed ligation detection assay. The assay has been designed to be used with either fluorescent or radioactive detection of ligation products by electrophoresis on denaturing acrylamide gels and is readily adaptable for use in other disease systems. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Efficient and Specific Detection of Salmonella in Food Samples Using a stn-Based Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Method

    PubMed Central

    Srisawat, Mevaree; Panbangred, Watanalai

    2015-01-01

    The Salmonella enterotoxin (stn) gene exhibits high homology among S. enterica serovars and S. bongori. A set of 6 specific primers targeting the stn gene were designed for detection of Salmonella spp. using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method. The primers amplified target sequences in all 102 strains of 87 serovars of Salmonella tested and no products were detected in 57 non-Salmonella strains. The detection limit in pure cultures was 5 fg DNA/reaction when amplified at 65°C for 25 min. The LAMP assay could detect Salmonella in artificially contaminated food samples as low as 220 cells/g of food without a preenrichment step. However, the sensitivity was increased 100-fold (~2 cells/g) following 5 hr preenrichment at 35°C. The LAMP technique, with a preenrichment step for 5 and 16 hr, was shown to give 100% specificity with food samples compared to the reference culture method in which 67 out of 90 food samples gave positive results. Different food matrixes did not interfere with LAMP detection which employed a simple boiling method for DNA template preparation. The results indicate that the LAMP method, targeting the stn gene, has great potential for detection of Salmonella in food samples with both high specificity and high sensitivity. PMID:26543859

  8. Preparation of genosensor for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honorato Castro, Ana C.; França, Erick G.; de Paula, Lucas F.; Soares, Marcia M. C. N.; Goulart, Luiz R.; Madurro, João M.; Brito-Madurro, Ana G.

    2014-09-01

    An electrochemical genosensor was constructed for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus, based on graphite electrodes modified with poly(4-aminophenol) and incorporating a specific oligonucleotide probe. The modified electrode containing the probe was evaluated by differential pulse voltammetry, before and after incubation with the complementary oligonucleotide target. Detection was performed by monitoring oxidizable DNA bases (direct detection) or using ethidium bromide as indicator of the hybridization process (indirect detection). The device showed a detection limit for the oligonucleotide target of 2.61 nmol L-1. Indirect detection using ethidium bromide was promising in discriminating mismatches, which is a very desirable attribute for detection of disease-related point mutations. In addition, it was possible to observe differences between hybridized and non-hybridized surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

  9. Specific and sensitive detection of Trichomonas tenax by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Kikuta, N; Yamamoto, A; Fukura, K; Goto, N

    1997-03-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol was developed for specific detection of Trichomonas tenax by using a pair of primers designed for its 18S rRNA gene. The detection was specific for T. tenax, since no amplification was detected with DNAs from Trichomonas vaginalis, which belongs to the same genus as T. tenax, in addition to various species of oral protists, fungi and bacteria, and human leukocytes. This method had a detection limit of 100 fg for T. tenax genomic DNA and could detect T. tenax cells in dental plaque at a concentration of as low as 5 cells per PCR mixture. Direct detection from clinical dental plaque samples was also possible; therefore, the present PCR procedure could provide a simple and rapid detection method of T. tenax in dental plaque.

  10. Specific detection of the toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 gene using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Jaulhac, B; Prevost, G; Piemont, Y

    1991-08-01

    A rapid and specific assay for toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 gene (tst gene) detection in Staphylococcus aureus was developed using the polymerase chain reaction. A two-primer set and an oligonucleotide detection probe were synthesized. After 40 cycles of amplification, detection of a 160-bp amplified DNA fragment was carried out by agarose gel electrophoresis and Southern blot hybridization. This assay was sensitive since it was able to detect 1-10 bacteria. It was also specific since no amplification was documented with DNAs from enterotoxigenic S. aureus or Gram-negative bacteria devoid of the tst gene.

  11. Computed Tomography-Derived Fractional Flow Reserve in the Detection of Lesion-Specific Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rende; Li, Chenguang; Qian, Juying; Ge, Junbo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) is the gold standard for the determination of physiologic stenosis severity and the need for revascularization. FFR computed from standard acquired coronary computed tomographic angiography datasets (FFRCT) is an emerging technology which allows calculation of FFR using resting image data from coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). However, the diagnostic accuracy of FFRCT in the evaluation of lesion-specific myocardial ischemia remains to be confirmed, especially in patients with intermediate coronary stenosis. We performed an integrated analysis of data from 3 prospective, international, and multicenter trials, which assessed the diagnostic performance of FFRCT using invasive FFR as a reference standard. Three studies evaluating 609 patients and 1050 vessels were included. The total calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of FFRCT were 82.8%, 77.7%, 60.8%, 91.6%, and 79.2%, respectively, for the per-vessel analysis, and 89.4%, 70.5%, 69.7%, 89.7%, and 78.7%, respectively, for the per-patient analysis. Compared with CCTA alone, FFRCT demonstrated significantly improved accuracy (P < 0.001) in detecting lesion-specific ischemia. In patients with intermediate coronary stenosis, FFRCT remained both highly sensitive and specific with respect to the diagnosis of ischemia. In conclusion, FFRCT appears to be a reliable noninvasive alternative to invasive FFR, as it demonstrates high accuracy in the determination of anatomy and lesion-specific ischemia, which justifies the performance of additional randomized controlled trials to evaluate both the clinical benefits and the cost-effectiveness of FFRCT-guided coronary revascularization. PMID:26579804

  12. Improvement of Prostate Cancer Diagnosis by Detecting PSA Glycosylation-Specific Changes.

    PubMed

    Llop, Esther; Ferrer-Batallé, Montserrat; Barrabés, Sílvia; Guerrero, Pedro Enrique; Ramírez, Manel; Saldova, Radka; Rudd, Pauline M; Aleixandre, Rosa N; Comet, Josep; de Llorens, Rafael; Peracaula, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    New markers based on PSA isoforms have recently been developed to improve prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis. However, novel approaches are still required to differentiate aggressive from non-aggressive PCa to improve decision making for patients. PSA glycoforms have been shown to be differentially expressed in PCa. In particular, changes in the extent of core fucosylation and sialylation of PSA N-glycans in PCa patients compared to healthy controls or BPH patients have been reported. The objective of this study was to determine these specific glycan structures in serum PSA to analyze their potential value as markers for discriminating between BPH and PCa of different aggressiveness. In the present work, we have established two methodologies to analyze the core fucosylation and the sialic acid linkage of PSA N-glycans in serum samples from BPH (29) and PCa (44) patients with different degrees of aggressiveness. We detected a significant decrease in the core fucose and an increase in the α2,3-sialic acid percentage of PSA in high-risk PCa that differentiated BPH and low-risk PCa from high-risk PCa patients. In particular, a cut-off value of 0.86 of the PSA core fucose ratio, could distinguish high-risk PCa patients from BPH with 90% sensitivity and 95% specificity, with an AUC of 0.94. In the case of the α2,3-sialic acid percentage of PSA, the cut-off value of 30% discriminated between high-risk PCa and the group of BPH, low-, and intermediate-risk PCa with a sensitivity and specificity of 85.7% and 95.5%, respectively, with an AUC of 0.97. The latter marker exhibited high performance in differentiating between aggressive and non-aggressive PCa and has the potential for translational application in the clinic. PMID:27279911

  13. Improvement of Prostate Cancer Diagnosis by Detecting PSA Glycosylation-Specific Changes

    PubMed Central

    Llop, Esther; Ferrer-Batallé, Montserrat; Barrabés, Sílvia; Guerrero, Pedro Enrique; Ramírez, Manel; Saldova, Radka; Rudd, Pauline M.; Aleixandre, Rosa N.; Comet, Josep; de Llorens, Rafael; Peracaula, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    New markers based on PSA isoforms have recently been developed to improve prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis. However, novel approaches are still required to differentiate aggressive from non-aggressive PCa to improve decision making for patients. PSA glycoforms have been shown to be differentially expressed in PCa. In particular, changes in the extent of core fucosylation and sialylation of PSA N-glycans in PCa patients compared to healthy controls or BPH patients have been reported. The objective of this study was to determine these specific glycan structures in serum PSA to analyze their potential value as markers for discriminating between BPH and PCa of different aggressiveness. In the present work, we have established two methodologies to analyze the core fucosylation and the sialic acid linkage of PSA N-glycans in serum samples from BPH (29) and PCa (44) patients with different degrees of aggressiveness. We detected a significant decrease in the core fucose and an increase in the α2,3-sialic acid percentage of PSA in high-risk PCa that differentiated BPH and low-risk PCa from high-risk PCa patients. In particular, a cut-off value of 0.86 of the PSA core fucose ratio, could distinguish high-risk PCa patients from BPH with 90% sensitivity and 95% specificity, with an AUC of 0.94. In the case of the α2,3-sialic acid percentage of PSA, the cut-off value of 30% discriminated between high-risk PCa and the group of BPH, low-, and intermediate-risk PCa with a sensitivity and specificity of 85.7% and 95.5%, respectively, with an AUC of 0.97. The latter marker exhibited high performance in differentiating between aggressive and non-aggressive PCa and has the potential for translational application in the clinic. PMID:27279911

  14. Highly Sensitive Nanoparticle-based Multifunctional Biosensor for Antigen Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siavoshi, Salome

    Precise and selective positioning of nanoparticles gives rise to many applications where assembly of nano building blocks with different biological or chemical functionalization is necessary. One remarkable application is the simultaneous early detection of multiple biomarkers in the field of miniaturized multiplex biosensors. To enable multiplex detection of antigens, nanoparticles with various antibody coatings can be selectively assembled in trenches on different regions on a biochip so that they bind selectively to the specific antigen of interest. The presented work utilizes electric field assisted assembly techniques to assemble nanoparticles with various surface functionalization and coatings. Nanoparticles are assembled into pre-fabricated via and trench patterns generated on a PMMA coated gold surface, using electron-beam lithography. Two techniques have been developed for selective assembly of nanoparticles: sequential size-selective directed assembly and sequential site-selective assembly. Both selective assembly techniques provide fast and reproducible assembly over large areas while achieving high yield. The sequential size-selective assembly is a template-assisted technique where the selectivity is achieved by controlling the size of the nanopatterns and the size of the nanoparticles. The possibility of particle detachment and the factors affecting the sorting efficiency for this technique is studied. We show that a complete sorting can be achieved when the size of the vias is close to the diameter of the nanoparticles and the size distribution of the chosen nanoparticles do not overlap. In the site-selective assembly, the selectivity is achieved by having electrically isolated sites (regions) on the same chip. Electrophoresis is performed for each region in a step by step process. Selective assembly results, for up to four nanoparticles with various coating/functionalization are presented using the site-selective assembly technique. We use the

  15. Direct, Specific and Rapid Detection of Staphylococcal Proteins and Exotoxins Using a Multiplex Antibody Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Stieber, Bettina; Monecke, Stefan; Müller, Elke; Büchler, Joseph; Ehricht, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background S. aureus is a pathogen in humans and animals that harbors a wide variety of virulence factors and resistance genes. This bacterium can cause a wide range of mild to life-threatening diseases. In the latter case, fast diagnostic procedures are important. In routine diagnostic laboratories, several genotypic and phenotypic methods are available to identify S. aureus strains and determine their resistances. However, there is a demand for multiplex routine diagnostic tests to directly detect staphylococcal toxins and proteins. Methods In this study, an antibody microarray based assay was established and validated for the rapid detection of staphylococcal markers and exotoxins. The following targets were included: staphylococcal protein A, penicillin binding protein 2a, alpha- and beta-hemolysins, Panton Valentine leukocidin, toxic shock syndrome toxin, enterotoxins A and B as well as staphylokinase. All were detected simultaneously within a single experiment, starting from a clonal culture on standard media. The detection of bound proteins was performed using a new fluorescence reading device for microarrays. Results 110 reference strains and clinical isolates were analyzed using this assay, with a DNA microarray for genotypic characterization performed in parallel. The results showed a general high concordance of genotypic and phenotypic data. However, genotypic analysis found the hla gene present in all S. aureus isolates but its expression under given conditions depended on the clonal complex affiliation of the actual isolate. Conclusions The multiplex antibody assay described herein allowed a rapid and reliable detection of clinically relevant staphylococcal toxins as well as resistance- and species-specific markers. PMID:26624622

  16. Phage-Based Fluorescent Biosensor Prototypes to Specifically Detect Enteric Bacteria Such as E. coli and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Vinay, Manon; Franche, Nathalie; Grégori, Gérald; Fantino, Jean-Raphaël; Pouillot, Flavie; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Water safety is a major concern for public health and for natural environment preservation. We propose to use bacteriophages to develop biosensor tools able to detect human and animal pathogens present in water. For this purpose, we take advantage of the highly discriminating properties of the bacteriophages, which specifically infect their bacterial hosts. The challenge is to use a fluorescent reporter protein that will be synthesized, and thus detected, only once the specific recognition step between a genetically modified temperate bacteriophage and its bacterial host has occurred. To ensure the accuracy and the execution speed of our system, we developed a test that does not require bacterial growth, since a simple 1-hour infection step is required. To ensure a high sensitivity of our tool and in order to detect up to a single bacterium, fluorescence is measured using a portable flow cytometer, also allowing on-site detection. In this study, we have constructed and characterized several "phagosensor" prototypes using the HK620 bacteriophage and its host Escherichia coli TD2158 and we successfully adapted this method to Salmonella detection. We show that the method is fast, robust and sensitive, allowing the detection of as few as 10 bacteria per ml with no concentration nor enrichment step. Moreover, the test is functional in sea water and allows the detection of alive bacteria. Further development will aim to develop phagosensors adapted on demand to the detection of any human or animal pathogen that may be present in water. PMID:26186207

  17. Phage-Based Fluorescent Biosensor Prototypes to Specifically Detect Enteric Bacteria Such as E. coli and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Vinay, Manon; Franche, Nathalie; Grégori, Gérald; Fantino, Jean-Raphaël; Pouillot, Flavie; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Water safety is a major concern for public health and for natural environment preservation. We propose to use bacteriophages to develop biosensor tools able to detect human and animal pathogens present in water. For this purpose, we take advantage of the highly discriminating properties of the bacteriophages, which specifically infect their bacterial hosts. The challenge is to use a fluorescent reporter protein that will be synthesized, and thus detected, only once the specific recognition step between a genetically modified temperate bacteriophage and its bacterial host has occurred. To ensure the accuracy and the execution speed of our system, we developed a test that does not require bacterial growth, since a simple 1-hour infection step is required. To ensure a high sensitivity of our tool and in order to detect up to a single bacterium, fluorescence is measured using a portable flow cytometer, also allowing on-site detection. In this study, we have constructed and characterized several "phagosensor" prototypes using the HK620 bacteriophage and its host Escherichia coli TD2158 and we successfully adapted this method to Salmonella detection. We show that the method is fast, robust and sensitive, allowing the detection of as few as 10 bacteria per ml with no concentration nor enrichment step. Moreover, the test is functional in sea water and allows the detection of alive bacteria. Further development will aim to develop phagosensors adapted on demand to the detection of any human or animal pathogen that may be present in water.

  18. An ultrasensitive electrogenerated chemiluminescence-based immunoassay for specific detection of Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Dhiraj; Bastola, Pradip; Le, Linda; Paul, Amber M; Fernandez, Estefania; Diamond, Michael S; Miao, Wujian; Bai, Fengwei

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a globally emerging mosquito-transmitted flavivirus that can cause severe fetal abnormalities, including microcephaly. As such, highly sensitive, specific, and cost-effective diagnostic methods are urgently needed. Here, we report a novel electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL)-based immunoassay for ultrasensitive and specific detection of ZIKV in human biological fluids. We loaded polystyrene beads (PSB) with a large number of ECL labels and conjugated them with anti-ZIKV monoclonal antibodies to generate anti-ZIKV-PSBs. These anti-ZIKV-PSBs efficiently captured ZIKV in solution forming ZIKV-anti-ZIKV-PSB complexes, which were subjected to measurement of ECL intensity after further magnetic beads separation. Our results show that the anti-ZIKV-PSBs can capture as little as 1 PFU of ZIKV in 100 μl of saline, human plasma, or human urine. This platform has the potential for development as a cost-effective, rapid and ultrasensitive assay for the detection of ZIKV and possibly other viruses in clinical diagnosis, epidemiologic and vector surveillance, and laboratory research. PMID:27554037

  19. Recombinant antibodies for specific detection of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Mangayil, Rahul; Karp, Matti; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Santala, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Biological hydrogen production is based on activity of specific enzymes called hydrogenases. Hydrogenases are oxygen sensitive metalloenzymes containing Ni and/or Fe atoms at the active site, catalyzing reversible reduction of protons. Generally, [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases prefer proton reduction to molecular hydrogen, a potential energy carrier molecule that can be produced by bioprocesses in sustainable manner. Thus, monitoring tools have been developed to study the relationship between [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases and biohydrogen production in bioreactors at DNA and RNA levels. In the present study, novel molecular tools are introduced for quantitative monitoring of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases at the protein level. Aerobic and anaerobic biopanning (for inactive and active [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase, respectively) of phage displayed single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody libraries aided in isolating nine potential scFvs. The enriched antibodies demonstrated high specificity towards Clostridium spp. [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases allowing detection from pure and mixed cultures. Additionally, the antibodies showed different binding characteristics towards hydrogenase catalytic states, providing a possible means for functional detection of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases. From hydrogenase-antibody interaction studies we observed that though antibody binding reduced the enzyme catalytic activity, it facilitated to retain hydrogen evolution from oxygen exposed hydrogenases. PMID:27786270

  20. An ultrasensitive electrogenerated chemiluminescence-based immunoassay for specific detection of Zika virus

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Dhiraj; Bastola, Pradip; Le, Linda; Paul, Amber M.; Fernandez, Estefania; Diamond, Michael S.; Miao, Wujian; Bai, Fengwei

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a globally emerging mosquito-transmitted flavivirus that can cause severe fetal abnormalities, including microcephaly. As such, highly sensitive, specific, and cost-effective diagnostic methods are urgently needed. Here, we report a novel electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL)-based immunoassay for ultrasensitive and specific detection of ZIKV in human biological fluids. We loaded polystyrene beads (PSB) with a large number of ECL labels and conjugated them with anti-ZIKV monoclonal antibodies to generate anti-ZIKV-PSBs. These anti-ZIKV-PSBs efficiently captured ZIKV in solution forming ZIKV-anti-ZIKV-PSB complexes, which were subjected to measurement of ECL intensity after further magnetic beads separation. Our results show that the anti-ZIKV-PSBs can capture as little as 1 PFU of ZIKV in 100 μl of saline, human plasma, or human urine. This platform has the potential for development as a cost-effective, rapid and ultrasensitive assay for the detection of ZIKV and possibly other viruses in clinical diagnosis, epidemiologic and vector surveillance, and laboratory research. PMID:27554037

  1. Measuring the Electronic Properties of DNA-Specific Schottky Diodes Towards Detecting and Identifying Basidiomycetes DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periasamy, Vengadesh; Rizan, Nastaran; Al-Ta’Ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Tan, Yee Shin; Tajuddin, Hairul Annuar; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of semiconducting behavior of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has resulted in a large number of literatures in the study of DNA electronics. Sequence-specific electronic response provides a platform towards understanding charge transfer mechanism and therefore the electronic properties of DNA. It is possible to utilize these characteristic properties to identify/detect DNA. In this current work, we demonstrate a novel method of DNA-based identification of basidiomycetes using current-voltage (I-V) profiles obtained from DNA-specific Schottky barrier diodes. Electronic properties such as ideality factor, barrier height, shunt resistance, series resistance, turn-on voltage, knee-voltage, breakdown voltage and breakdown current were calculated and used to quantify the identification process as compared to morphological and molecular characterization techniques. The use of these techniques is necessary in order to study biodiversity, but sometimes it can be misleading and unreliable and is not sufficiently useful for the identification of fungi genera. Many of these methods have failed when it comes to identification of closely related species of certain genus like Pleurotus. Our electronics profiles, both in the negative and positive bias regions were however found to be highly characteristic according to the base-pair sequences. We believe that this simple, low-cost and practical method could be useful towards identifying and detecting DNA in biotechnology and pathology.

  2. Urinary BLCA1 is specific for urothelial cancer detection in Chinese ethnicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lujia; Feng, Chenchen; Ding, Guanxiong; Jiang, Haowen; Ding, Qiang; Wu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To study the potential of BLCA1 for detection of urothelial cancer including urinary bladder cancer (UBC) and upper tract urothelial cancer (UTUC). Method: An antibody for BLCA1 was generated and indirect ELISA was used to detect urinary BLCA1 level. Clinicopathological parameters were studied for the association with BLCA1 level. Urine samples from UBC and UTUC patients, together with cases with other urological disorders were collected and tested. Results: Urinary BLCA1 level in UBC and UTUC patients were significantly higher than that in normal controls. This was also proven when urothelial cancers were grouped as a whole, where as the level did not differ between UBC and UTUC samples. BLCA1 was also significantly higher in urothelial cancer samples compared to other urological disorders such as patients with long-dwelling catheter, glandular cystitis, BPH and other benign conditions. Cut-off value at 0.0009 OD/μg yielded a sensitivity of 92.7% and a specificity of 92.9% for UBC. Conclusion: Urinary BLCA1 is a promising marker for urothelial cancers including UBC and UTUC with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26770501

  3. Development of a Specific Latex Agglutination Test to Detect Antibodies of Enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Qin, Bo; Zhang, Jianhua; Xie, Wenhao; Liu, Xuehong; He, Tingting; Chen, Jinkun; Dong, Xuejun

    2015-10-01

    A latex agglutination test (LAT) was developed for the rapid detection of antibodies against the VP1 or VP1 proteins of Enterovirus 71 (EV71). The proteins of interest including prokaryotically expressed VP1 and two strains of anti-VP1 monoclonal antibody (McAb) against EV71 were covalently linked to carboxylated latex using ethyl-dimethyl-amino-propyl carbodiimide (EDC) to prepare sensitized latex beads. LAT was evaluated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as a reference test. The VP1-LAT showed a sensitivity of 87.0%, specificity of 88.9%, and an agreement ratio of 90.0% in detecting VP1 in 100 serum samples from experimentally infected mice, whereas these values were 86.8, 96.7, and 93.3%, respectively, for 608 clinical human serum samples. The VP1-LAT has advantages over other assays in terms of low cost, rapidity, chemical stability, high sensitivity, repeatability, and specificity. The LAT established in the present study is a rapid and simple test suitable for field monitoring of antibodies against VP1-EV71. PMID:26363276

  4. Measuring the Electronic Properties of DNA-Specific Schottky Diodes Towards Detecting and Identifying Basidiomycetes DNA

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Vengadesh; Rizan, Nastaran; Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Tan, Yee Shin; Tajuddin, Hairul Annuar; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of semiconducting behavior of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has resulted in a large number of literatures in the study of DNA electronics. Sequence-specific electronic response provides a platform towards understanding charge transfer mechanism and therefore the electronic properties of DNA. It is possible to utilize these characteristic properties to identify/detect DNA. In this current work, we demonstrate a novel method of DNA-based identification of basidiomycetes using current-voltage (I-V) profiles obtained from DNA-specific Schottky barrier diodes. Electronic properties such as ideality factor, barrier height, shunt resistance, series resistance, turn-on voltage, knee-voltage, breakdown voltage and breakdown current were calculated and used to quantify the identification process as compared to morphological and molecular characterization techniques. The use of these techniques is necessary in order to study biodiversity, but sometimes it can be misleading and unreliable and is not sufficiently useful for the identification of fungi genera. Many of these methods have failed when it comes to identification of closely related species of certain genus like Pleurotus. Our electronics profiles, both in the negative and positive bias regions were however found to be highly characteristic according to the base-pair sequences. We believe that this simple, low-cost and practical method could be useful towards identifying and detecting DNA in biotechnology and pathology. PMID:27435636

  5. An ultrasensitive electrogenerated chemiluminescence-based immunoassay for specific detection of Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Dhiraj; Bastola, Pradip; Le, Linda; Paul, Amber M; Fernandez, Estefania; Diamond, Michael S; Miao, Wujian; Bai, Fengwei

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a globally emerging mosquito-transmitted flavivirus that can cause severe fetal abnormalities, including microcephaly. As such, highly sensitive, specific, and cost-effective diagnostic methods are urgently needed. Here, we report a novel electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL)-based immunoassay for ultrasensitive and specific detection of ZIKV in human biological fluids. We loaded polystyrene beads (PSB) with a large number of ECL labels and conjugated them with anti-ZIKV monoclonal antibodies to generate anti-ZIKV-PSBs. These anti-ZIKV-PSBs efficiently captured ZIKV in solution forming ZIKV-anti-ZIKV-PSB complexes, which were subjected to measurement of ECL intensity after further magnetic beads separation. Our results show that the anti-ZIKV-PSBs can capture as little as 1 PFU of ZIKV in 100 μl of saline, human plasma, or human urine. This platform has the potential for development as a cost-effective, rapid and ultrasensitive assay for the detection of ZIKV and possibly other viruses in clinical diagnosis, epidemiologic and vector surveillance, and laboratory research.

  6. Macrophage-Specific Lipid-Based Nanoparticles Improve MRI Detection and Characterization of Human Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Michael J.; Frias, Juan C.; Amirbekian, Vardan; Briley-Saebo, Karen C.; Mani, Venkatesh; Samber, Daniel; Abbate, Antonio; Aguinaldo, Juan Gilberto S.; Massey, Davis; Fuster, Valentin; Vetrovec, George W.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We sought to determine if gadolinium (Gd)-containing lipid-based nanoparticles (NPs) targeting the macrophage scavenger receptor-B (CD36) improve magnetic resonance (MR) detection and characterization of human atherosclerosis. Background The ability to detect atherosclerosis with MR imaging using gadolinium Gd-containing lipid-based NPs targeting macrophages may enable early detection of high-risk lesions prior to an atherothrombotic event. Gd-containing lipid-based NPs targeting macrophages improved MR detection of murine atherosclerosis. Methods Gd-containing NPs, anti-CD36 NPs and Fc-NPs were created. Macrophages were incubated with fluorescent targeted and non-targeted NPs to determine uptake via confocal microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) quatified Gd uptake. Human aortic specimens were harvested at autopsy. Using a 1.5 T scanner, T1, T2, and PDW 3-dimensional scans were performed along with post-contrast scans after 24 h incubation. T1 and cluster analysis were performed and compared with immunohistopathology. Results The NPs had a mean diameter of 125 nm, 14,900 Gd-ions, and relaxivity was 37 mM-1s-1 at 1.5T and 37°C. Confocal microscopy and ICP-MS demonstrated significant in vitro macrophage uptake of targeted NPs while non-targeted NPs had minimal uptake. On T1 imaging, targeted NPs increased CNR by 52.5% which was significantly great than Fc-NPs (CNR increased 17.2%) and non-targeted NPs (CNR increased 18.7%) (p=0.001). Confocal fluorescent microscopy showed that NPs target resident macrophages while the untargeted NPs and Fc-NPs are found diffusely throughout the plaque. Targeted NPs had a greater signal intensity increase in the fibrous cap compared with (p<0.001) while non-targeted NPs and Fc-NPs had a greater increase in the lipid core (p<0.01). Conclusion Macrophage-specific (CD36) NPs bind human macrophages and improved MR detection and characterization of human aortic atherosclerosis. Thus, macrophage-specific

  7. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R; Barany, Francis; Soper, Steven A

    2012-09-21

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft(3)). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic

  8. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R; Barany, Francis; Soper, Steven A

    2012-09-21

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft(3)). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic

  9. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R.; Barany, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft3). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic system

  10. A nucleic acid strand displacement system for the multiplexed detection of tuberculosis-specific mRNA using quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliddon, H. D.; Howes, P. D.; Kaforou, M.; Levin, M.; Stevens, M. M.

    2016-05-01

    The development of rapid, robust and high performance point-of-care diagnostics relies on the advancement and combination of various areas of research. We have developed an assay for the detection of multiple mRNA molecules that combines DNA nanotechnology with fluorescent nanomaterials. The core switching mechanism is toehold-mediated strand displacement. We have used fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) as signal transducers in this assay, as they bring many benefits including bright fluorescence and multiplexing abilities. The resulting assay is capable of multiplexed detection of long RNA targets against a high concentration of background non-target RNA, with high sensitivity and specificity and limits of detection in the nanomolar range using only a standard laboratory plate reader. We demonstrate the utility of our QD-based system for the detection of two genes selected from a microarray-derived tuberculosis-specific gene expression signature. Levels of up- and downregulated gene transcripts comprising this signature can be combined to give a disease risk score, making the signature more amenable for use as a diagnostic marker. Our QD-based approach to detect these transcripts could pave the way for novel diagnostic assays for tuberculosis.The development of rapid, robust and high performance point-of-care diagnostics relies on the advancement and combination of various areas of research. We have developed an assay for the detection of multiple mRNA molecules that combines DNA nanotechnology with fluorescent nanomaterials. The core switching mechanism is toehold-mediated strand displacement. We have used fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) as signal transducers in this assay, as they bring many benefits including bright fluorescence and multiplexing abilities. The resulting assay is capable of multiplexed detection of long RNA targets against a high concentration of background non-target RNA, with high sensitivity and specificity and limits of detection in the nanomolar

  11. Rapid detection and quantification of specific proteins by immunodepletion and microfluidic separation

    PubMed Central

    Azadi, Glareh; Gustafson, Eric; Wessel, Gary M.; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2012-01-01

    Conventional immunoblotting techniques are labor intensive, time consuming and rely on the elution of target protein after depletion. Here we describe a new method for detection and quantification of proteins, independent of washing and elution. In this method, the target protein is first captured by immunodepletion with antibody coated microbeads. In the second step, both the supernatant after immunodepletion and the untreated protein sample are directly analyzed by microfluidic electrophoresis without further processing. Subsequently, the detection and quantification are performed comparing the electropherograms of these two samples. This method was tested using an Escherichia coli lysate with a FLAG-tagged protein and anti-FLAG magnetic beads. An incubation of as little as one minute was sufficient for detectable depletion (66%) by microchip electrophoresis. Longer incubation (up to 60 minutes) resulted in more depletion of the target band (82%). Our results show that only 19% of the target is recovered after elution from the beads. By eliminating multiple wash and elution steps, our method is faster, less labor intensive, and highly reproducible. Even in case of non-specific binding at low concentrations, the target protein can be easily identified. This work highlights the advantages of integrating immunodepletion techniques on a microfluidic platform. PMID:22539461

  12. Bactrian camel nanobody-based immunoassay for specific and sensitive detection of Cry1Fa toxin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pingyan; Li, Guanghui; Yan, Junrong; Hu, Yonghong; Zhang, Cunzheng; Liu, Xianjin; Wan, Yakun

    2014-12-15

    The variable domain of the heavy-chain-only antibody (VHH) or nanobody (Nb), derived from camelids, begins to play an important role on the detection of protein markers. In this study, we constructed a phage-displayed library of VHHs against Cry1Fa by immunizing a healthy Bactrian camel with Cry1Fa toxin. After a series of bio-panning and screening by phage display technology, three anti-Cry1Fa nanobodies (Nbs) with great difference in complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) were obtained and they were highly specific to Cry1Fa as well as showed full of activity when exposed to 70 °C for 3 h. Through modifying Nbs with Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP) and biotin, two Nbs which can recognize the different epitopes of Cry1Fa were determined and they were used to establish a novel sandwich immune ELISA based on biotin-SA interaction for Cry1Fa detection. The immunoassay exhibited a linear range from 1 to 100 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.88 ng/mL. The recoveries from spiked corn and soybean samples were ranged from 83.33 to 117.17%, with a coefficient of variation (C.V) less than 6.0%. All together, the proposed immunoassay will be a promising way for sensitive and accurate determination of Cry1Fa toxin. PMID:25448390

  13. High specific energy and specific power aluminum/air battery for micro air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindler, A.; Matthies, L.

    2014-06-01

    Micro air vehicles developed under the Army's Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology program generally need a specific energy of 300 - 550 watt-hrs/kg and 300 -550 watts/kg to operate for about 1 hour. At present, no commercial cell can fulfill this need. The best available commercial technology is the Lithium-ion battery or its derivative, the Li- Polymer cell. This chemistry generally provides around 15 minutes flying time. One alternative to the State-of-the Art is the Al/air cell, a primary battery that is actually half fuel cell. It has a high energy battery like aluminum anode, and fuel cell like air electrode that can extract oxygen out of the ambient air rather than carrying it. Both of these features tend to contribute to a high specific energy (watt-hrs/kg). High specific power (watts/kg) is supported by high concentration KOH electrolyte, a high quality commercial air electrode, and forced air convection from the vehicles rotors. The performance of this cell with these attributes is projected to be 500 watt-hrs/kg and 500 watts/kg based on simple model. It is expected to support a flying time of approximately 1 hour in any vehicle in which the usual limit is 15 minutes.

  14. Novel Bacteroides host strains for detection of human- and animal-specific bacteriophages in water.

    PubMed

    Wicki, Melanie; Auckenthaler, Adrian; Felleisen, Richard; Tanner, Marcel; Baumgartner, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    Bacteriophages active against specific Bacteroides host strains were shown to be suitable for detection of human faecal pollution. However, the practical application of this finding is limited because some specific host strains were restricted to certain geographic regions. In this study, novel Bacteroides host strains were isolated that discriminate human and animal faecal pollution in Switzerland. Two strains specific for bacteriophages present in human faecal contamination and three strains specific for bacteriophages indicating animal faecal contamination were evaluated. Bacteriophages infecting human strains were exclusively found in human wastewater, whereas animal strains detected bacteriophages only in animal waste. The newly isolated host strains could be used to determine the source of surface and spring water faecal contamination in field situations. Applying the newly isolated host Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron ARABA 84 for detection of bacteriophages allowed the detection of human faecal contamination in spring water.

  15. A high-throughput screening for phosphatases using specific substrates.

    PubMed

    Senn, Alejandro M; Wolosiuk, Ricardo A

    2005-04-01

    A high-throughput screening was developed for the detection of phosphatase activity in bacterial colonies. Unlike other methods, the current procedure can be applied to any phosphatase because it uses physiological substrates and detects the compelled product of all phosphatase reactions, that is, orthophosphate. In this method, substrates diffuse from a filter paper across a nitrocellulose membrane to bacterial colonies situated on the opposite face, and then reaction products flow back to the paper. Finally, a colorimetric reagent discloses the presence of orthophosphate in the filter paper. We validated the performance of this assay with several substrates and experimental conditions and with different phosphatases, including a library of randomly mutagenized rapeseed chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. This procedure could be extended to other enzymatic activities provided that an appropriate detection of reaction products is available.

  16. Rapid detection of human rotavirus using NSP4 gene specific reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Malik, Yashpal Singh; Sharma, Kuldeep; Kumar, Naveen; Shivachandra, Sathish B; Rawat, Vinita; Rakholia, Ritu; Ranjan, Rajeev; Ganesh, Balasubramanian; Parida, Manmohan

    2013-09-01

    The seasonal outbreaks of human rotavirus (RV) infection occur every winter. Most patients are diagnosed clinically by a rapid latex agglutination detection kit or polymerase chain reaction assays for RV from stool samples, but some problems have been reported on the specificity and sensitivity of such rapid detection assays. To ratify these issues, a sensitive, specific, simple, and rapid nucleic acid based diagnostic method is expected to be introduced and the reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) was developed to detect the RV in human stool samples by incubation at 60 °C for 1 h and amplification was confirmed by electrophoretic laddering, restriction enzyme digestion, and hydroxynapthol blue discoloration. The assay established in this study was found to detect only the RVs and no cross-reaction with other viruses, demonstrating its high specificity. By using serial samples dilution as template, the detection limit of LAMP was 10 times more than that of PCR. The results showed the potential clinical feasibility of RT-LAMP as a useful diagnostic tool for the detection of RV with high sensitivity in comparison to conventional RT-PCR.

  17. The evolutionary development of high specific impulse electric thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Hamley, John A.; Patterson, Michael J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Myers, Roger M.

    1992-01-01

    Electric propulsion flight and technology demonstrations conducted primarily by Europe, Japan, China, the U.S., and the USSR are reviewed. Evolutionary mission applications for high specific impulse electric thruster systems are discussed, and the status of arcjet, ion, and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters and associated power processor technologies are summarized.

  18. Open-Source Radiation Exposure Extraction Engine (RE3) with Patient-Specific Outlier Detection.

    PubMed

    Weisenthal, Samuel J; Folio, Les; Kovacs, William; Seff, Ari; Derderian, Vana; Summers, Ronald M; Yao, Jianhua

    2016-08-01

    We present an open-source, picture archiving and communication system (PACS)-integrated radiation exposure extraction engine (RE3) that provides study-, series-, and slice-specific data for automated monitoring of computed tomography (CT) radiation exposure. RE3 was built using open-source components and seamlessly integrates with the PACS. RE3 calculations of dose length product (DLP) from the Digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) headers showed high agreement (R (2) = 0.99) with the vendor dose pages. For study-specific outlier detection, RE3 constructs robust, automatically updating multivariable regression models to predict DLP in the context of patient gender and age, scan length, water-equivalent diameter (D w), and scanned body volume (SBV). As proof of concept, the model was trained on 811 CT chest, abdomen + pelvis (CAP) exams and 29 outliers were detected. The continuous variables used in the outlier detection model were scan length (R (2)  = 0.45), D w (R (2) = 0.70), SBV (R (2) = 0.80), and age (R (2) = 0.01). The categorical variables were gender (male average 1182.7 ± 26.3 and female 1047.1 ± 26.9 mGy cm) and pediatric status (pediatric average 710.7 ± 73.6 mGy cm and adult 1134.5 ± 19.3 mGy cm). PMID:26644157

  19. Open-Source Radiation Exposure Extraction Engine (RE3) with Patient-Specific Outlier Detection.

    PubMed

    Weisenthal, Samuel J; Folio, Les; Kovacs, William; Seff, Ari; Derderian, Vana; Summers, Ronald M; Yao, Jianhua

    2016-08-01

    We present an open-source, picture archiving and communication system (PACS)-integrated radiation exposure extraction engine (RE3) that provides study-, series-, and slice-specific data for automated monitoring of computed tomography (CT) radiation exposure. RE3 was built using open-source components and seamlessly integrates with the PACS. RE3 calculations of dose length product (DLP) from the Digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) headers showed high agreement (R (2) = 0.99) with the vendor dose pages. For study-specific outlier detection, RE3 constructs robust, automatically updating multivariable regression models to predict DLP in the context of patient gender and age, scan length, water-equivalent diameter (D w), and scanned body volume (SBV). As proof of concept, the model was trained on 811 CT chest, abdomen + pelvis (CAP) exams and 29 outliers were detected. The continuous variables used in the outlier detection model were scan length (R (2)  = 0.45), D w (R (2) = 0.70), SBV (R (2) = 0.80), and age (R (2) = 0.01). The categorical variables were gender (male average 1182.7 ± 26.3 and female 1047.1 ± 26.9 mGy cm) and pediatric status (pediatric average 710.7 ± 73.6 mGy cm and adult 1134.5 ± 19.3 mGy cm).

  20. Nucleotide sequences specific to Yersinia pestis and methods for the detection of Yersinia pestis

    DOEpatents

    McCready, Paula M.; Radnedge, Lyndsay; Andersen, Gary L.; Ott, Linda L.; Slezak, Thomas R.; Kuczmarski, Thomas A.; Motin, Vladinir L.

    2009-02-24

    Nucleotide sequences specific to Yersinia pestis that serve as markers or signatures for identification of this bacterium were identified. In addition, forward and reverse primers and hybridization probes derived from these nucleotide sequences that are used in nucleotide detection methods to detect the presence of the bacterium are disclosed.

  1. Nucleotide sequences specific to Brucella and methods for the detection of Brucella

    SciTech Connect

    McCready, Paula M.; Radnedge, Lyndsay; Andersen, Gary L.; Ott, Linda L.; Slezak, Thomas R.; Kuczmarski, Thomas A.

    2009-02-24

    Nucleotide sequences specific to Brucella that serves as a marker or signature for identification of this bacterium were identified. In addition, forward and reverse primers and hybridization probes derived from these nucleotide sequences that are used in nucleotide detection methods to detect the presence of the bacterium are disclosed.

  2. A Specific Qualitative Detection Method for Peanut (Arachis Hypogagea) in Foods Using Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A qualitative method for detection of peanuts in foods using polymerase chain reaction was developed. A universal primer pair CP 03-5 /CP 03-3 was designed to confirm the validity of the DNAs for PCR. The plant-specific amplified fragments were detected from 13 kinds of plants using the universal pr...

  3. A Specific Qualitative Detection Method for Peanut (Arachis Hypogaea) in Foods Using Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed a qualitative detection method for peanuts in foods using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We designed a universal primer pair CP 03-5’/ CP 03-3’ to confirm the validity of the DNAs for PCR. The plant specific amplified fragments were detected from 13 kinds of plants using the universal...

  4. Nucleotide sequences specific to Francisella tularensis and methods for the detection of Francisella tularensis

    DOEpatents

    McCready, Paula M.; Radnedge, Lyndsay; Andersen, Gary L.; Ott, Linda L.; Slezak, Thomas R.; Kuczmarski, Thomas A.; Vitalis, Elizabeth A

    2007-02-06

    Described herein is the identification of nucleotide sequences specific to Francisella tularensis that serves as a marker or signature for identification of this bacterium. In addition, forward and reverse primers and hybridization probes derived from these nucleotide sequences that are used in nucleotide detection methods to detect the presence of the bacterium are disclosed.

  5. Nucleotide sequences specific to Francisella tularensis and methods for the detection of Francisella tularensis

    DOEpatents

    McCready, Paula M.; Radnedge, Lyndsay; Andersen, Gary L.; Ott, Linda L.; Slezak, Thomas R.; Kuczmarski, Thomas A.; Vitalis, Elizabeth A

    2009-02-24

    Described herein is the identification of nucleotide sequences specific to Francisella tularensis that serves as a marker or signature for identification of this bacterium. In addition, forward and reverse primers and hybridization probes derived from these nucleotide sequences that are used in nucleotide detection methods to detect the presence of the bacterium are disclosed.

  6. New method and detection of high concentrations of monomethylarsonous acid detected in contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    McKnight-Whitford, Anthony; Chen, Baowei; Naranmandura, Hua; Zhu, Chen; Le, X Chris

    2010-08-01

    Monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII) was detected in groundwater from a former herbicide production plant in the USA. The site has total arsenic concentrations up to thousands of mg/L, representing one of the most severe cases of arsenic contamination ever reported. Structure-specific detection of MMAIII, along with arsenite (AsIII), arsenate (AsV), monomethylarsonic acid (MMAV), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV), was achieved using liquid chromatography separation with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry detection (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). To enable the electrospray of MMAIII and AsIII, dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was used to derivatize these trivalent arsenicals online, so that their complexes with DMSA could be detected using negative ionization ESI-MS/MS. The presence of MMAIII was verified using high resolution mass spectrometry to measure accurate mass, tandem mass spectrometry to monitor fragmentation, and three different separation techniques to resolve arsenic species. The measured accurate mass of the suspected MMAIII compound in a groundwater sample was 122.9607+/-0.0003 amu, which was in good agreement with the theoretical value and that of the MMAIII standard. Simultaneous monitoring of AsO+ at m/z 91 and SO+ at m/z 48 using HPLC-ICPMS operating in dynamic reaction cell mode ruled out possible confounding from any sulfur-containing arsenic compound. The concentrations of MMAIII found in the groundwater samples from a contaminated site were as high as 3.9-274 mg/L, the highest ever observed in the environment.

  7. Site-specific fab fragment biotinylation at the conserved nucleotide binding site for enhanced Ebola detection.

    PubMed

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-07-01

    The nucleotide binding site (NBS) is a highly conserved region between the variable light and heavy chains at the Fab domains of all antibodies, and a small molecule that we identified, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), binds specifically to this site. Fab fragment, with its small size and simple production methods compared to intact antibody, is good candidate for use in miniaturized diagnostic devices and targeted therapeutic applications. However, commonly used modification techniques are not well suited for Fab fragments as they are often more delicate than intact antibodies. Fab fragments are of particular interest for sensor surface functionalization but immobilization results in damage to the antigen binding site and greatly reduced activity due to their truncated size that allows only a small area that can bind to surfaces without impeding antigen binding. In this study, we describe an NBS-UV photocrosslinking functionalization method (UV-NBS(Biotin) in which a Fab fragment is site-specifically biotinylated with an IBA-EG11-Biotin linker via UV energy exposure (1 J/cm(2)) without affecting its antigen binding activity. This study demonstrates successful immobilization of biotinylated Ebola detecting Fab fragment (KZ52 Fab fragment) via the UV-NBS(Biotin) method yielding 1031-fold and 2-fold better antigen detection sensitivity compared to commonly used immobilization methods: direct physical adsorption and NHS-Biotin functionalization, respectively. Utilization of the UV-NBS(Biotin) method for site-specific conjugation to Fab fragment represents a proof of concept use of Fab fragment for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications with numerous fluorescent probes, affinity molecules and peptides.

  8. The detection of rotavirus specific antibody in colostrum and milk by ELISA.

    PubMed

    Ellens, D J; de Leeuw, P W; Straver, P J

    1978-01-01

    The blocking method of ELISA for the detection and titration of rotavirus-specific antibody in colostrum is described. The results obtained were positively correlated with those of a neutralizing antibody test. On one farm colostrum samples were obtained over a period of 18 months. No relationship was found between the titer of colostrum obtained shortly after calving, and the development of rotavirus-associated diarrhoea in calves. On a second farm only samples obtained during the calving season were tested. Within this restricted period high colostral antibody titers appeared to reduce the incidence of diarrhoea among calves and to delay the onset of rotavirus excretion in the faeces. These results are discussed in relation to the rapid decline in antibody content of colostrum after calving.

  9. Space-time airborne disease mapping applied to detect specific behaviour of varicella in Valencia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Iftimi, Adina; Montes, Francisco; Santiyán, Ana Míguez; Martínez-Ruiz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Airborne diseases are one of humanity's most feared sicknesses and have regularly caused concern among specialists. Varicella is an airborne disease which usually affects children before the age of 10. Because of its nature, varicella gives rise to interesting spatial, temporal and spatio-temporal patterns. This paper studies spatio-temporal exploratory analysis tools to detect specific behaviour of varicella in the city of Valencia, Spain, from 2008 to 2013. These methods have shown a significant association between the spatial and the temporal component, confirmed by the space-time models applied to the data. High relative risk of varicella is observed in economically disadvantaged regions, areas less involved in vaccination programmes. PMID:26530821

  10. Development of single dilution immunoassay to detect E2 protein specific classical swine fever virus antibody.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Barman, Nagendra N; Khatoon, Elina; Kumar, Sachin

    2016-04-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of a highly contagious disease in swine. The disease is endemic in different parts of the world and vaccination is the only way to protect pigs from CSFV infection. The virus surface protein E2 is the major immunogenic protein eliciting protective immunity against CSFV infection in swine. The whole virus antigen cannot differentiate CSFV from other pestiviruses as it cross reacts with border disease and bovine viral diarrhoea viruses. Commercial available ELISA is based on the whole CSFV particle and can lead to false positive results. Moreover, the available commercial ELISA is not cost effective. In the present study, a recombinant E2 protein based single serum dilution ELISA was developed which showed enhanced sensitivity, specificity and accuracy as compared to commercial CSFV detection ELISA. The recombinant E2 protein based ELISA could be an alternate to existing diagnostics against CSFV infection in pigs. PMID:27032503

  11. Highly specific protein-protein interactions, evolution and negative design.

    PubMed

    Sear, Richard P

    2004-12-01

    We consider highly specific protein-protein interactions in proteomes of simple model proteins. We are inspired by the work of Zarrinpar et al (2003 Nature 426 676). They took a binding domain in a signalling pathway in yeast and replaced it with domains of the same class but from different organisms. They found that the probability of a protein binding to a protein from the proteome of a different organism is rather high, around one half. We calculate the probability of a model protein from one proteome binding to the protein of a different proteome. These proteomes are obtained by sampling the space of functional proteomes uniformly. In agreement with Zarrinpar et al we find that the probability of a protein binding a protein from another proteome is rather high, of order one tenth. Our results, together with those of Zarrinpar et al, suggest that designing, say, a peptide to block or reconstitute a single signalling pathway, without affecting any other pathways, requires knowledge of all the partners of the class of binding domains the peptide is designed to mimic. This knowledge is required to use negative design to explicitly design out interactions of the peptide with proteins other than its target. We also found that patches that are required to bind with high specificity evolve more slowly than those that are required only to not bind to any other patch. This is consistent with some analysis of sequence data for proteins engaged in highly specific interactions.

  12. Benchmarking Procedures for High-Throughput Context Specific Reconstruction Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Maria P.; Pfau, Thomas; Sauter, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in high-throughput data acquisition has shifted the focus from data generation to processing and understanding of how to integrate collected information. Context specific reconstruction based on generic genome scale models like ReconX or HMR has the potential to become a diagnostic and treatment tool tailored to the analysis of specific individuals. The respective computational algorithms require a high level of predictive power, robustness and sensitivity. Although multiple context specific reconstruction algorithms were published in the last 10 years, only a fraction of them is suitable for model building based on human high-throughput data. Beside other reasons, this might be due to problems arising from the limitation to only one metabolic target function or arbitrary thresholding. This review describes and analyses common validation methods used for testing model building algorithms. Two major methods can be distinguished: consistency testing and comparison based testing. The first is concerned with robustness against noise, e.g., missing data due to the impossibility to distinguish between the signal and the background of non-specific binding of probes in a microarray experiment, and whether distinct sets of input expressed genes corresponding to i.e., different tissues yield distinct models. The latter covers methods comparing sets of functionalities, comparison with existing networks or additional databases. We test those methods on several available algorithms and deduce properties of these algorithms that can be compared with future developments. The set of tests performed, can therefore serve as a benchmarking procedure for future algorithms. PMID:26834640

  13. Benchmarking Procedures for High-Throughput Context Specific Reconstruction Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Maria P; Pfau, Thomas; Sauter, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in high-throughput data acquisition has shifted the focus from data generation to processing and understanding of how to integrate collected information. Context specific reconstruction based on generic genome scale models like ReconX or HMR has the potential to become a diagnostic and treatment tool tailored to the analysis of specific individuals. The respective computational algorithms require a high level of predictive power, robustness and sensitivity. Although multiple context specific reconstruction algorithms were published in the last 10 years, only a fraction of them is suitable for model building based on human high-throughput data. Beside other reasons, this might be due to problems arising from the limitation to only one metabolic target function or arbitrary thresholding. This review describes and analyses common validation methods used for testing model building algorithms. Two major methods can be distinguished: consistency testing and comparison based testing. The first is concerned with robustness against noise, e.g., missing data due to the impossibility to distinguish between the signal and the background of non-specific binding of probes in a microarray experiment, and whether distinct sets of input expressed genes corresponding to i.e., different tissues yield distinct models. The latter covers methods comparing sets of functionalities, comparison with existing networks or additional databases. We test those methods on several available algorithms and deduce properties of these algorithms that can be compared with future developments. The set of tests performed, can therefore serve as a benchmarking procedure for future algorithms.

  14. NAIP proteins are required for cytosolic detection of specific bacterial ligands in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Isabella; Tenthorey, Jeannette L; Nichols, Randilea D; Al Moussawi, Khatoun; Kang, James J; Kang, Chulho; Kazmierczak, Barbara I; Vance, Russell E

    2016-05-01

    NLRs (nucleotide-binding domain [NBD] leucine-rich repeat [LRR]-containing proteins) exhibit diverse functions in innate and adaptive immunity. NAIPs (NLR family, apoptosis inhibitory proteins) are NLRs that appear to function as cytosolic immunoreceptors for specific bacterial proteins, including flagellin and the inner rod and needle proteins of bacterial type III secretion systems (T3SSs). Despite strong biochemical evidence implicating NAIPs in specific detection of bacterial ligands, genetic evidence has been lacking. Here we report the use of CRISPR/Cas9 to generate Naip1(-/-) and Naip2(-/-) mice, as well as Naip1-6(Δ/Δ) mice lacking all functional Naip genes. By challenging Naip1(-/-) or Naip2(-/-) mice with specific bacterial ligands in vivo, we demonstrate that Naip1 is uniquely required to detect T3SS needle protein and Naip2 is uniquely required to detect T3SS inner rod protein, but neither Naip1 nor Naip2 is required for detection of flagellin. Previously generated Naip5(-/-) mice retain some residual responsiveness to flagellin in vivo, whereas Naip1-6(Δ/Δ) mice fail to respond to cytosolic flagellin, consistent with previous biochemical data implicating NAIP6 in flagellin detection. Our results provide genetic evidence that specific NAIP proteins function to detect specific bacterial proteins in vivo. PMID:27045008

  15. Practical Evaluation of Methods for Detection and Specificity of Autoantibodies to Extractable Nuclear Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Orton, Susan M.; Peace-Brewer, Amy; Schmitz, John L.; Freeman, Kristie; Miller, William C.; Folds, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Detection and specificity of autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) play a critical role in the diagnosis and management of autoimmune disease. Historically, the detection of these antibodies has employed double immunodiffusion (DID). Autoantibody specificity was correlated with diagnoses by this technique. Enzyme immunoassays have been developed by multiple manufacturers to detect and identify the specificity ENA autoantibodies. To address the relationship of ENA detection by DID and enzyme immunoassay, the performances of five immunoassays were compared. These included two DID and three enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISA) (both screening and individual antigen profile kits). The sample set included 83 ENA-positive, antinuclear-antibody (ANA)-positive specimens, 77 ENA-negative, ANA-positive specimens, and 20 ENA- and ANA-negative specimens. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by two methods: first, by using the in-house DID result as the reference standard, and second, by using latent class analysis, which evaluates each kit result independently. Overall, the results showed that the ELISA methods were more sensitive for detection of ENA autoantibodies than DID techniques, but presence and/or specific type of ENA autoantibody did not always correlate with the patient's clinical presentation. Regardless of the testing strategy an individual laboratory uses, clear communication with the clinical staff regarding the significance of a positive result is imperative. The laboratory and the clinician must both be aware of the sensitivity and specificity of each testing method in use in the clinical laboratory. PMID:15013979

  16. High sensitivity leak detection method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapatic R.

    1994-01-01

    An improved leak detection method is provided that utilizes the cyclic adsorption and desorption of accumulated helium on a non-porous metallic surface. The method provides reliable leak detection at superfluid helium temperatures. The zero drift that is associated with residual gas analyzers in common leak detectors is virtually eliminated by utilizing a time integration technique. The sensitivity of the apparatus of this disclosure is capable of detecting leaks as small as 1.times.10.sup.-18 atm cc sec.sup.-1.

  17. High sensitivity leak detection method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1994-09-06

    An improved leak detection method is provided that utilizes the cyclic adsorption and desorption of accumulated helium on a non-porous metallic surface. The method provides reliable leak detection at superfluid helium temperatures. The zero drift that is associated with residual gas analyzers in common leak detectors is virtually eliminated by utilizing a time integration technique. The sensitivity of the apparatus of this disclosure is capable of detecting leaks as small as 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]18] atm cc sec[sup [minus]1]. 2 figs.

  18. High specificity in plant leaf metabolic responses to arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Rabea; Baier, Markus C; Persicke, Marcus; Müller, Caroline

    2014-05-22

    The chemical composition of plants (phytometabolome) is dynamic and modified by environmental factors. Understanding its modulation allows to improve crop quality and decode mechanisms underlying plant-pest interactions. Many studies that investigate metabolic responses to the environment focus on single model species and/or few target metabolites. However, comparative studies using environmental metabolomics are needed to evaluate commonalities of chemical responses to certain challenges. We assessed the specificity of foliar metabolic responses of five plant species to the widespread, ancient symbiosis with a generalist arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus. Here we show that plant species share a large 'core metabolome' but nevertheless the phytometabolomes are modulated highly species/taxon-specifically. Such a low conservation of responses across species highlights the importance to consider plant metabolic prerequisites and the long time of specific plant-fungus coevolution. Thus, the transferability of findings regarding phytometabolome modulation by an identical AM symbiont is severely limited even between closely related species.

  19. Event-specific detection of seven genetically modified soybean and maizes using multiplex-PCR coupled with oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Zhu, Shuifang; Miao, Haizhen; Huang, Wensheng; Qiu, Minyan; Huang, Yan; Fu, Xuping; Li, Yao

    2007-07-11

    With the increasing development of genetically modified organism (GMO) detection techniques, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been the mainstay for GMO detection. An oligonucleotide microarray is a glass chip to the surface of which an array of oligonucleotides was fixed as spots, each containing numerous copies of a sequence-specific probe that is complementary to a gene of interest. So it is used to detect ten or more targets synchronously. In this research, an event-specific detection strategy based on the unique and specific integration junction sequences between the host plant genome DNA and the integrated gene is being developed for its high specificity using multiplex-PCR together with oligonucleotide microarray. A commercial GM soybean (GTS 40-3-2) and six GM maize events (MON810, MON863, Bt176, Bt11, GA21, and T25) were detected by this method. The results indicate that it is a suitable method for the identification of these GM soybean and maizes. PMID:17559227

  20. Event-specific detection of seven genetically modified soybean and maizes using multiplex-PCR coupled with oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Zhu, Shuifang; Miao, Haizhen; Huang, Wensheng; Qiu, Minyan; Huang, Yan; Fu, Xuping; Li, Yao

    2007-07-11

    With the increasing development of genetically modified organism (GMO) detection techniques, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been the mainstay for GMO detection. An oligonucleotide microarray is a glass chip to the surface of which an array of oligonucleotides was fixed as spots, each containing numerous copies of a sequence-specific probe that is complementary to a gene of interest. So it is used to detect ten or more targets synchronously. In this research, an event-specific detection strategy based on the unique and specific integration junction sequences between the host plant genome DNA and the integrated gene is being developed for its high specificity using multiplex-PCR together with oligonucleotide microarray. A commercial GM soybean (GTS 40-3-2) and six GM maize events (MON810, MON863, Bt176, Bt11, GA21, and T25) were detected by this method. The results indicate that it is a suitable method for the identification of these GM soybean and maizes.

  1. Development of A Sensitive and Specific Epitope-Blocking ELISA for Universal Detection of Antibodies to Human Enterovirus 71 Strains

    PubMed Central

    He, Fang; Kiener, Tanja K.; Lim, Xiao Fang; Tan, Yunrui; Raj, Kattur Venkatachalam Ashok; Tang, Manli; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Chen, Qingfeng; Kwang, Jimmy

    2013-01-01

    Background Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a common cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in young children. It is often associated with severe neurological diseases and mortalities in recent outbreaks across the Asia Pacific region. Currently, there is no efficient universal antibody test available to detect EV71 infections. Methodology/Principal Finding In the present study, an epitope-blocking ELISA was developed to detect specific antibodies to human EV71 viruses in human or animal sera. The assay relies on a novel monoclonal antibody (Mab 1C6) that specifically binds to capsid proteins in whole EV71 viruses without any cross reaction to any EV71 capsid protein expressed alone. The sensitivity and specificity of the epitope-blocking ELISA for EV71 was evaluated and compared to microneutralization using immunized animal sera to multiple virus genotypes of EV71 and coxsackieviruses. Further, 200 serum sample from human individuals who were potentially infected with EV71 viruses were tested in both the blocking ELISA and microneutralization. Results indicated that antibodies to EV71 were readily detected in immunized animals or human sera by the epitope blocking ELISA whereas specimens with antibodies to other enteroviruses yielded negative results. This assay is not only simpler to perform but also shows higher sensitivity and specificity as compared to microneutralization. Conclusion The epitope-blocking ELISA based on a unique Mab 1C6 provided highly sensitive and 100% specific detection of antibodies to human EV71 viruses in human sera. PMID:23383215

  2. Molecular characterization and specific detection of Anaplasma species (AP-sd) in sika deer and its first detection in wild brown bears and rodents in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Mohamed Abdallah Mohamed; Lee, Kyunglee; Taylor, Kyle; Nakao, Ryo; Sashika, Mariko; Shimozuru, Michito; Tsubota, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    A previously undescribed Anaplasma species (herein referred to as AP-sd) has been detected in sika deer, cattle and ticks in Japan. Despite being highly similar to some strains of A. phagocytophilum, AP-sd has never been detected in humans. Its ambiguous epidemiology and the lack of tools for its specific detection make it difficult to understand and interpret the prevalence of this Anaplasma species. We developed a method for specific detection, and examined AP-sd prevalence in Hokkaido wildlife. Our study included 250 sika deer (Cervus nippon yesoensis), 13 brown bears (Ursus arctos yesoensis) and 252 rodents including 138 (Apodemus speciosus), 45 (Apodemus argenteus), 42 (Myodes rufocanus) and 27 (Myodes rutilus) were collected from Hokkaido island, northern Japan, collected during 2010 to 2015. A 770 bp and 382 bp segment of the 16S rRNA and gltA genes, respectively, were amplified by nested PCR. Results were confirmed by cloning and sequencing of the positive PCR products. A reverse line blot hybridization (RLB) based on the 16S rRNA gene was then developed for the specific detection of AP-sd. The prevalence of AP-sd by nested PCR in sika deer was 51% (128/250). We detected this Anaplasma sp. for the first time in wild brown bears and rodents with a prevalence of 15% (2/13) and 2.4% (6/252), respectively. The sequencing results of the 16S rRNA and gltA gene amplicons were divergent from the selected A. phagocytophilum sequences in GenBank. Using a newly designed AP-sd specific probe for RLB has enabled us to specifically detect this Anaplasma species. Besides sika deer and cattle, wild brown bears and rodents were identified as potential reservoir hosts for AP-sd. This study provided a high throughput molecular method that specifically detects AP-sd, and which can be used to investigate its ecology and its potential as a threat to humans in Japan.

  3. Molecular characterization and specific detection of Anaplasma species (AP-sd) in sika deer and its first detection in wild brown bears and rodents in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Mohamed Abdallah Mohamed; Lee, Kyunglee; Taylor, Kyle; Nakao, Ryo; Sashika, Mariko; Shimozuru, Michito; Tsubota, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    A previously undescribed Anaplasma species (herein referred to as AP-sd) has been detected in sika deer, cattle and ticks in Japan. Despite being highly similar to some strains of A. phagocytophilum, AP-sd has never been detected in humans. Its ambiguous epidemiology and the lack of tools for its specific detection make it difficult to understand and interpret the prevalence of this Anaplasma species. We developed a method for specific detection, and examined AP-sd prevalence in Hokkaido wildlife. Our study included 250 sika deer (Cervus nippon yesoensis), 13 brown bears (Ursus arctos yesoensis) and 252 rodents including 138 (Apodemus speciosus), 45 (Apodemus argenteus), 42 (Myodes rufocanus) and 27 (Myodes rutilus) were collected from Hokkaido island, northern Japan, collected during 2010 to 2015. A 770 bp and 382 bp segment of the 16S rRNA and gltA genes, respectively, were amplified by nested PCR. Results were confirmed by cloning and sequencing of the positive PCR products. A reverse line blot hybridization (RLB) based on the 16S rRNA gene was then developed for the specific detection of AP-sd. The prevalence of AP-sd by nested PCR in sika deer was 51% (128/250). We detected this Anaplasma sp. for the first time in wild brown bears and rodents with a prevalence of 15% (2/13) and 2.4% (6/252), respectively. The sequencing results of the 16S rRNA and gltA gene amplicons were divergent from the selected A. phagocytophilum sequences in GenBank. Using a newly designed AP-sd specific probe for RLB has enabled us to specifically detect this Anaplasma species. Besides sika deer and cattle, wild brown bears and rodents were identified as potential reservoir hosts for AP-sd. This study provided a high throughput molecular method that specifically detects AP-sd, and which can be used to investigate its ecology and its potential as a threat to humans in Japan. PMID:26431688

  4. Alignment-Free Methods for the Detection and Specificity Prediction of Adenylation Domains.

    PubMed

    Agüero-Chapin, Guillermin; Pérez-Machado, Gisselle; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Santos, Miguel Machado; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-01-01

    Identifying adenylation domains (A-domains) and their substrate specificity can aid the detection of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) at genome/proteome level and allow inferring the structure of oligopeptides with relevant biological activities. However, that is challenging task due to the high sequence diversity of A-domains (~10-40 % of amino acid identity) and their selectivity for 50 different natural/unnatural amino acids. Altogether these characteristics make their detection and the prediction of their substrate specificity a real challenge when using traditional sequence alignment methods, e.g., BLAST searches. In this chapter we describe two workflows based on alignment-free methods intended for the identification and substrate specificity prediction of A-domains. To identify A-domains we introduce a graphical-numerical method, implemented in TI2BioP version 2.0 (topological indices to biopolymers), which in a first step uses protein four-color maps to represent A-domains. In a second step, simple topological indices (TIs), called spectral moments, are derived from the graphical representations of known A-domains (positive dataset) and of unrelated but well-characterized sequences (negative set). Spectral moments are then used as input predictors for statistical classification techniques to build alignment-free models. Finally, the resulting alignment-free models can be used to explore entire proteomes for unannotated A-domains. In addition, this graphical-numerical methodology works as a sequence-search method that can be ensemble with homology-based tools to deeply explore the A-domain signature and cope with the diversity of this class (Aguero-Chapin et al., PLoS One 8(7):e65926, 2013). The second workflow for the prediction of A-domain's substrate specificity is based on alignment-free models constructed by transductive support vector machines (TSVMs) that incorporate information of uncharacterized A-domains. The construction of the models was

  5. Alignment-Free Methods for the Detection and Specificity Prediction of Adenylation Domains.

    PubMed

    Agüero-Chapin, Guillermin; Pérez-Machado, Gisselle; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Santos, Miguel Machado; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-01-01

    Identifying adenylation domains (A-domains) and their substrate specificity can aid the detection of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) at genome/proteome level and allow inferring the structure of oligopeptides with relevant biological activities. However, that is challenging task due to the high sequence diversity of A-domains (~10-40 % of amino acid identity) and their selectivity for 50 different natural/unnatural amino acids. Altogether these characteristics make their detection and the prediction of their substrate specificity a real challenge when using traditional sequence alignment methods, e.g., BLAST searches. In this chapter we describe two workflows based on alignment-free methods intended for the identification and substrate specificity prediction of A-domains. To identify A-domains we introduce a graphical-numerical method, implemented in TI2BioP version 2.0 (topological indices to biopolymers), which in a first step uses protein four-color maps to represent A-domains. In a second step, simple topological indices (TIs), called spectral moments, are derived from the graphical representations of known A-domains (positive dataset) and of unrelated but well-characterized sequences (negative set). Spectral moments are then used as input predictors for statistical classification techniques to build alignment-free models. Finally, the resulting alignment-free models can be used to explore entire proteomes for unannotated A-domains. In addition, this graphical-numerical methodology works as a sequence-search method that can be ensemble with homology-based tools to deeply explore the A-domain signature and cope with the diversity of this class (Aguero-Chapin et al., PLoS One 8(7):e65926, 2013). The second workflow for the prediction of A-domain's substrate specificity is based on alignment-free models constructed by transductive support vector machines (TSVMs) that incorporate information of uncharacterized A-domains. The construction of the models was

  6. PCR amplification of the hrcV gene through specific primers for detecting Pseudomonas syringae pathovars.

    PubMed

    Vaseghi, Akbar; Bakhshinejad, Babak; Safaie, Naser; Parchin, Reza Ashrafi; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-02-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pathovars are important pathogens among phytopathogenic bacteria causing a variety of diseases in plants. These pathogens can rapidly disseminate in a large area leading to infection and destruction of plants. To prevent the incidence of the bacteria, appropriate detection methods should be employed. Routinely serological tests, being time-consuming and costly, are exploited to detect these pathogens in plants, soil, water and other resources. Over the recent years, DNA-based detection approaches which are stable, rapid, specific and reliable have been developed and sequence analysis of various genes are widely utilized to identify different strains of P. syringe. However, the greatest limitation of these genes is inability to detect numerous pathovars of P. syringae. Herein, by using bioinformatic analysis, we found the hrcV gene located at pathogenicity islands of bacterial genome with the potential of being used as a new marker for phylogenetic detection of numerous pathovars of P. syringae. Following design of specific primers to hrcV, we amplified a 440 bp fragment. Of 13 assayed pathovars, 11 were detected. Also, through experimental procedures and bioinformatic analysis it was revealed that the designed primers have the capacity to detect 19 pathovars. Our findings suggest that hrcV could be used as a gene with the merit of detecting more pathovars of P. syringae in comparison with other genes used frequently for detection purposes.

  7. A new highly specific buprenorphine immunoassay for monitoring buprenorphine compliance and abuse.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Stacy E F; Snyder, Marion L; Jarolim, Petr; Flood, James G

    2012-04-01

    Urine buprenorphine screening is utilized to assess buprenorphine compliance and to detect illicit use. Robust screening assays should be specific for buprenorphine without cross-reactivity with other opioids, which are frequently present in patients treated for opioid addiction and chronic pain. We evaluated the new Lin-Zhi urine buprenorphine enzyme immunoassay (EIA) as a potentially more specific alternative to the Microgenics cloned enzyme donor immunoassay (CEDIA) by using 149 urines originating from patients treated for chronic pain and opioid addiction. The EIA methodology offered specific detection of buprenorphine use (100%) (106/106) and provided superior overall agreement with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, 95% (142/149) and 91% (135/149) using 5 ng/mL (EIA[5]) and 10 ng/mL (EIA[10]) cutoffs, respectively, compared to CEDIA, 79% (117/149). CEDIA generated 27 false positives, most of which were observed in patients positive for other opioids, providing an overall specificity of 75% (79/106). CEDIA also demonstrated interference from structurally unrelated drugs, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine. CEDIA and EIA[5] yielded similar sensitivities, both detecting 96% (22/23) of positive samples from patients prescribed buprenorphine, and 88% (38/43) and 81% (35/43), respectively, of all positive samples (illicit and prescribed users). The EIA methodology provides highly specific and sensitive detection of buprenorphine use, without the potential for opioid cross-reactivity.

  8. The evolutionary development of high specific impulse electric thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Hamley, John A.; Patterson, Michael J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Myers, Roger M.

    1992-01-01

    Electric propulsion flight and technology demonstrations conducted in the USA, Europe, Japan, China, and USSR are reviewed with reference to the major flight qualified electric propulsion systems. These include resistojets, ion thrusters, ablative pulsed plasma thrusters, stationary plasma thrusters, pulsed magnetoplasmic thrusters, and arcjets. Evolutionary mission applications are presented for high specific impulse electric thruster systems. The current status of arcjet, ion, and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters and their associated power processor technologies are summarized.

  9. Method of preparing high specific activity platinum-195m

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Du, Miting; Beets, Arnold L.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    2004-06-15

    A method of preparing high-specific-activity .sup.195m Pt includes the steps of: exposing .sup.193 Ir to a flux of neutrons sufficient to convert a portion of the .sup.193 Ir to .sup.195m Pt to form an irradiated material; dissolving the irradiated material to form an intermediate solution comprising Ir and Pt; and separating the Pt from the Ir by cation exchange chromatography to produce .sup.195m Pt.

  10. Method for preparing high specific activity 177Lu

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Du, Miting; Beets, Arnold L.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    2004-04-06

    A method of separating lutetium from a solution containing Lu and Yb, particularly reactor-produced .sup.177 Lu and .sup.177 Yb, includes the steps of: providing a chromatographic separation apparatus containing LN resin; loading the apparatus with a solution containing Lu and Yb; and eluting the apparatus to chromatographically separate the Lu and the Yb in order to produce high-specific-activity .sup.177 Yb.

  11. Solar-powered rocket engine optimization for high specific impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, J. Bradley

    1993-11-01

    Hercules Aerospace is currently developing a solar-powered rocket engine (SPRE) design optimized for high specific impulse (Isp). The SPRE features a low loss geometry in its light-gathering cavity, which includes an integral secondary concentrator. The simple one-piece heat exchanger is made from refractory metal and/or ceramic open-celled foam. The foam's high surface-area-to-volume ratio will efficiently transfer the thermal energy to the hydrogen propellant. The single-pass flow of propellant through the heat exchanger further boosts thermal efficiency by regeneratively cooling surfaces near the entrance of the optical cavity. These surfaces would otherwise reradiate a significant portion of the captured solar energy back out of the solar entrance. Such design elements promote a high overall thermal efficiency and hence, a high operating Isp

  12. Highly Sensitive Colorimetric Detection of Ochratoxin A by a Label-Free Aptamer and Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Yunxia; Chen, Jiayi; Li, Cheng; Xie, Gang; Fu, Hailong; Ma, Zhihong; Lu, Anxiang

    2015-01-01

    A label-free aptamer-based assay for the highly sensitive and specific detection of Ochratoxin A (OTA) was developed using a cationic polymer and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The OTA aptamer was used as a recognition element for the colorimetric detection of OTA based on the aggregation of AuNPs by the cationic polymer. By spectroscopic quantitative analysis, the colorimetric assay could detect OTA down to 0.009 ng/mL with high selectivity in the presence of other interfering toxins. This study offers a new alternative in visual detection methods that is rapid and sensitive for OTA detection. PMID:26690477

  13. Design and Implementation of an On-Chip Patient-Specific Closed-Loop Seizure Onset and Termination Detection System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Bin Altaf, Muhammad Awais; Yoo, Jerald

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the design of an area- and energy-efficient closed-loop machine learning-based patient-specific seizure onset and termination detection algorithm, and its on-chip hardware implementation. Application- and scenario-based tradeoffs are compared and reviewed for seizure detection and suppression algorithm and system which comprises electroencephalography (EEG) data acquisition, feature extraction, classification, and stimulation. Support vector machine achieves a good tradeoff among power, area, patient specificity, latency, and classification accuracy for long-term monitoring of patients with limited training seizure patterns. Design challenges of EEG data acquisition on a multichannel wearable environment for a patch-type sensor are also discussed in detail. Dual-detector architecture incorporates two area-efficient linear support vector machine classifiers along with a weight-and-average algorithm to target high sensitivity and good specificity at once. On-chip implementation issues for a patient-specific transcranial electrical stimulation are also discussed. The system design is verified using CHB-MIT EEG database [1] with a comprehensive measurement criteria which achieves high sensitivity and specificity of 95.1% and 96.2%, respectively, with a small latency of 1 s. It also achieves seizure onset and termination detection delay of 2.98 and 3.82 s, respectively, with seizure length estimation error of 4.07 s. PMID:27093712

  14. Validation of an Immunodiagnostic Assay for Detection of 13 Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype-Specific Polysaccharides in Human Urine

    PubMed Central

    Huijts, Susanne M.; Wu, Kangjian; Souza, Victor; Passador, Sherry; Tinder, Chunyan; Song, Esther; Elfassy, Arik; McNeil, Lisa; Menton, Ronald; French, Roger; Callahan, Janice; Webber, Chris; Gruber, William C.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Jansen, Kathrin U.

    2012-01-01

    To improve the clinical diagnosis of pneumococcal infection in bacteremic and nonbacteremic community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), a Luminex technology-based multiplex urinary antigen detection (UAD) diagnostic assay was developed and validated. The UAD assay can simultaneously detect 13 different serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae by capturing serotype-specific S. pneumoniae polysaccharides (PnPSs) secreted in human urine. Assay specificity is achieved by capturing the polysaccharides with serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) on spectrally unique microspheres. Positivity for each serotype was based on positivity cutoff values calculated from a standard curve run on each assay plate together with positive- and negative-control urine samples. The assay is highly specific, since significant signals are detected only when each PnPS was paired with its homologous MAb-coated microspheres. Validation experiments demonstrated excellent accuracy and precision. The UAD assay and corresponding positivity cutoff values were clinically validated by assessing 776 urine specimens obtained from patients with X-ray-confirmed CAP. The UAD assay demonstrated 97% sensitivity and 100% specificity using samples obtained from patients with bacteremic, blood culture-positive CAP. Importantly, the UAD assay identified Streptococcus pneumoniae (13 serotypes) in a proportion of individuals with nonbacteremic CAP, a patient population for which the pneumococcal etiology of CAP was previously difficult to assess. Therefore, the UAD assay provides a specific, noninvasive, sensitive, and reproducible tool to support vaccine efficacy as well as epidemiological evaluation of pneumococcal disease, including CAP, in adults. PMID:22675155

  15. Detection of Leptospira-Specific Antibodies Using a Recombinant Antigen-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Halsey, Eric S.; Guevara, Carolina; Canal, Enrique; Hall, Eric; Maves, Ryan; Tilley, Drake H.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2013-01-01

    We produced three highly purified recombinant antigens rLipL32, rLipL41, and rLigA-Rep (leptospiral immunoglobulin-like A repeat region) for the detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The performance of these recombinant antigens was evaluated using 121 human sera. Among them, 63 sera were microscopic agglutination test (MAT)-confirmed positive sera from febrile patients in Peru, 22 sera were indigenous MAT-negative febrile patient sera, and 36 sera were from patients with other febrile diseases from Southeast Asia, where leptospirosis is also endemic. Combining the results of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG detection from these three antigens, the overall sensitivity is close to 90% based on the MAT. These results suggest that an ELISA using multiple recombinant antigens may be used as an alternative method for the detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies. PMID:24166046

  16. Nucleic acid spot hybridization based species-specific detection of Sclerotium rolfsii associated with collar rot disease of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius.

    PubMed

    Pravi, V; Jeeva, M L; Archana, P V

    2015-02-01

    Collar rot is one of the most destructive and prevalent disease of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius, resulting in heavy yield losses. The causative organism, Sclerotium rolfsii is a soil-borne polyphagous fungus characterized by prolific growth and ability to produce persistent sclerotia. The pathogen propagules surviving in soil and planting material are the major sources of inoculum. This study presents the suitability of DNA hybridization technique for species specific detection of S. rolfsii in soil and planting material. The detection limit of the probe was 10-15 pg of pure pathogen DNA. The developed probe was found to be highly specific and could be used for accurate identification of pathogen up to the species level. The protocol was standardized for detection of the pathogen in naturally infected field samples. PMID:25449141

  17. Breast density and mode of detection in relation to breast cancer specific survival: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine breast density in relation to breast cancer specific survival and to assess if this potential association was modified by mode of detection. An additional aim was to study whether the established association between mode of detection and survival is modified by breast density. Methods The study included 619 cases from a prospective cohort, The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Breast density estimated qualitatively, was analyzed in relation to breast cancer death, in non-symptomatic and symptomatic women, using Cox regression calculating hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals. Adjustments were made in several steps for; diagnostic age, tumour size, axillary lymph node involvement, grade, hormone receptor status, body mass index (baseline), diagnostic period, use of hormone replacement therapy at diagnosis and mode of detection. Detection mode in relation to survival was analyzed stratified for breast density. Differences in HR following different adjustments were analyzed by Freedmans%. Results After adjustment for age and other prognostic factors, women with dense, as compared to fatty breasts, had an increased risk of breast cancer death, HR 2.56:1.07-6.11, with a statistically significant trend over density categories, p = 0.04. In the stratified analysis, the effect was less pronounced in non-symptomatic women, HR 2.04:0.49-8.49 as compared to symptomatic, HR 3.40:1.06-10.90. In the unadjusted model, symptomatic women had a higher risk of breast cancer death, regardless of breast density. Analyzed by Freedmans%, age, tumour size, lymph nodes, grade, diagnostic period, ER and PgR explained 55.5% of the observed differences in mortality between non-symptomatic and symptomatic cases. Additional adjustment for breast density caused only a minor change. Conclusions High breast density at diagnosis may be associated with decreased breast cancer survival. This association appears to be stronger in women with

  18. Specific detection of avian pneumovirus (APV) US isolates by RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Shin, H J; Rajashekara, G; Jirjis, F F; Shaw, D P; Goyal, S M; Halvorson, D A; Nagaraja, K V

    2000-01-01

    This report details the development of an RT-PCR assay for the specific detection of US isolates of avian pneumovirus (APV). Of the several primer pairs tested, two sets of primers derived from the matrix gene of APV were able to specifically detect the viral RNA of APV. The nucleotide sequence comparison of the PCR products of APV isolates from Minnesota suggested that these viruses were closely related to the Colorado strain of APV, but were distinct from subtypes A and B European isolates of turkey APV (turkey rhinotracheitis: TRT). This M gene-based PCR was found to be very specific and sensitive. APV as low as 8 x 10(-5) TCID50 (0.0323 microg/ml) could be detected using this assay. In addition, the two primers were able to differentiate isolates from turkeys in Minnesota.

  19. Whole genome sequence analysis of unidentified genetically modified papaya for development of a specific detection method.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takumi; Noguchi, Akio; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Takasaki, Kazuto; Futo, Satoshi; Sakata, Kozue; Fukuda, Nozomi; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi; Tanaka, Hidenori; Akashi, Ryo; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko

    2016-08-15

    Identification of transgenic sequences in an unknown genetically modified (GM) papaya (Carica papaya L.) by whole genome sequence analysis was demonstrated. Whole genome sequence data were generated for a GM-positive fresh papaya fruit commodity detected in monitoring using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The sequences obtained were mapped against an open database for papaya genome sequence. Transgenic construct- and event-specific sequences were identified as a GM papaya developed to resist infection from a Papaya ringspot virus. Based on the transgenic sequences, a specific real-time PCR detection method for GM papaya applicable to various food commodities was developed. Whole genome sequence analysis enabled identifying unknown transgenic construct- and event-specific sequences in GM papaya and development of a reliable method for detecting them in papaya food commodities.

  20. Whole genome sequence analysis of unidentified genetically modified papaya for development of a specific detection method.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takumi; Noguchi, Akio; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Takasaki, Kazuto; Futo, Satoshi; Sakata, Kozue; Fukuda, Nozomi; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi; Tanaka, Hidenori; Akashi, Ryo; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko

    2016-08-15

    Identification of transgenic sequences in an unknown genetically modified (GM) papaya (Carica papaya L.) by whole genome sequence analysis was demonstrated. Whole genome sequence data were generated for a GM-positive fresh papaya fruit commodity detected in monitoring using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The sequences obtained were mapped against an open database for papaya genome sequence. Transgenic construct- and event-specific sequences were identified as a GM papaya developed to resist infection from a Papaya ringspot virus. Based on the transgenic sequences, a specific real-time PCR detection method for GM papaya applicable to various food commodities was developed. Whole genome sequence analysis enabled identifying unknown transgenic construct- and event-specific sequences in GM papaya and development of a reliable method for detecting them in papaya food commodities. PMID:27006240

  1. DNA detection on transistor arrays following mutation-specific enzymatic amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouthas, F.; Gentil, C.; Côte, D.; Bockelmann, U.

    2004-03-01

    An integrated array of silicon field-effect transistor structures is used for electronic detection of label-free DNA. Measurements of the dc current-voltage characteristics of the transistors gives us access to reproducible detection of single- and double-stranded DNA, locally adsorbed on the surface of the device. We combine this approach with allele-specific polymerase chain reaction, to test for the 35delG mutation, a frequent mutation related to prelingual nonsyndromic deafness.

  2. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  3. Multimode nondestructive detecting method for high-speed rail defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingjian; Cheng, Xingzhen; Wan, Guangnan; Liu, Ting; Fu, Ying; Wang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    It is very important to detect the surface defects of the high-speed rail for security concerns. A multimode detecting method, which integrates high resolution of optical image, high precision of photoacoustic detection and strong penetration of ultrasound detecting, is proposed for the rail defect detection. Utilizing the surface defect characteristics obtained from optical signal, the photoacoustic and ultrasound scanning region could be determined, and rail shallow and internal defect characteristics can be acquired subsequently. Eventually, fusing three modal signals mentioned above, the information of the entire rail defect, including type, extension trend and depth can be detected. It has been proved that the multimode method can improve the detecting efficiency, and enlarge the detection range in the meantime.

  4. Specific detection of benzimidazole resistance in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides from fruit crops by PCR-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wen-Hsin; Chung, Wen-Chuan; Peng, Mun-Tsu; Yang, Hong-Ren; Huang, Jenn-Wen

    2010-02-28

    Anthracnose diseases, caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, are a worldwide problem and are especially important in Taiwan owing to the severe economic damage they cause to tropical fruits that are grown for local consumption and export. Benzimidazoles are systemic fungicides widely used for controlling these diseases in Taiwan. Thirty-one isolates of C. gloeosporioides from mango and strawberry grown in Taiwan were examined for their sensitivity to benzimidazole fungicides. The responses of the isolates grown on benzimidazole-amended culture media were characterized as sensitive, moderately resistant, resistant or highly resistant. Analysis of point mutations in the beta-tubulin gene by DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments revealed a substitution of GCG for GAG at codon 198 in resistant and highly resistant isolates and a substitution of TAC for TTC at codon 200 in moderately resistant isolates. A set of specific primers, TubGF1 and TubGR, was designed to amplify a portion of the beta-tubulin gene for the detection of benzimidazole-resistant C. gloeosporioides. Bsh1236I restriction maps of the amplified beta-tubulin gene showed that the resistant isolate sequence, but not the sensitive isolate sequence, was cut. The PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was validated to detect benzimidazole-resistant and benzimidazole-sensitive C. gloeosporioides isolates recovered from avocado, banana, carambola, dragon fruit, grape, guava, jujube, lychee, papaya, passion fruit and wax apple. This method has the potential to become a valuable tool for monitoring the occurrence of benzimidazole-resistant C. gloeosporioides and for assessment of the need for alternative management practices.

  5. Immuno-PCR: Very sensitive antigen detection by means of specific antibody-DNA conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, T.; Smith, C.L.; Cantor, C.R. )

    1992-10-02

    An antigen detection system, termed immuno-polymerase chain reaction (immuno-PCR), was developed in which a specific DNA molecule is used as the marker. A streptavidin-protein A chimera that possesses tight and specific binding affinity both for biotin and immunoglobulin G was used to attach a biotinylated DNA specifically to antigen-monoclonal antibody complexes that had been immobilized on microtiter plate wells. Then, a segment of the attached DNA was amplified by PCR. Analysis of the PCR products by agarose gel electrophoresis after staining with ethidium bromide allowed as few as 580 antigen molecules to be readily and reproducibly detected. Direct comparison with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the use of a chimera-alkaline phosphatase conjugate demonstrates that enhancement in detection sensitivity was obtained with the use of immuno-PCR. Given the enormous amplification capability and specificity of PCR, this immuno-PCR technology has a sensitivity greater than any existing antigen detection system and, in principle, could be applied to the detection of single antigen molecules.

  6. Detection and quantification of male-specific fetal DNA in the serum of pregnant cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Lubna; Takano, Jun-Ichiro; Nagai, Yasushi; Otsuki, Junko; Sankai, Tadashi

    2015-02-01

    Because of their developmental similarities to humans, nonhuman primates are often used as a model to study fetal development for potential clinical applications in humans. The detection of fetal DNA in maternal plasma or serum offers a source of fetal genetic material for prenatal diagnosis. However, no such data have been reported for cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), an important model in biomedical research. We have developed a specific, highly sensitive PCR system for detecting and quantifying male-specific fetal DNA in pregnant cynomolgus monkeys. We used multiplex quantitative real-time PCR to analyze cell-free DNA in maternal blood serum obtained from 46 pregnant monkeys at gestational weeks 5, 12, and 22. The presence of SRY gene and DYS14 Y chromosomal sequences was determined in 28 monkeys with male-bearing pregnancies. According to confirmation of fetal sex at birth, the probe and primers for detecting the Y chromosomal regions at each time point revealed 100% specificity of the PCR test and no false-positive or false-negative results. Increased levels of the SRY-specific sequences (mean, 4706 copies/mL serum DNA; range, 1731 to 12,625) and DYS14-specific sequences (mean, 54,814 copies/mL serum DNA; range, 4175-131,250 copies) were detected at week 22. The SRY- and DYS14-specific probes appear to be an effective combination of markers in a multiplex PCR system. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe the detection of cell-free DNA in cynomolgus monkeys. PMID:25730760

  7. Methods for the Specific Detection and Quantitation of Amyloid-β Oligomers in Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Judith; Funke, Susanne Aileen

    2016-05-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation are fundamental features of the majority of neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia, and prion diseases. Proteinaceous deposits in the brain of the patient, e.g., amyloid plaques consisting of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and tangles composed of tau protein, are the hallmarks of AD. Soluble oligomers of Aβ and tau play a fundamental role in disease progression, and specific detection and quantification of the respective oligomeric proteins in cerebrospinal fluid may provide presymptomatically detectable biomarkers, paving the way for early diagnosis or even prognosis. Several studies on the development of techniques for the specific detection of Aβ oligomers were published, but some of the existing tools do not yet seem to be satisfactory, and the study results are contradicting. The detection of oligomers is challenging due to their polymorphous and unstable nature, their low concentration, and the presence of competing proteins and Aβ monomers in body fluids. Here, we present an overview of the current state of the development of methods for Aβ oligomer specific detection and quantitation. The methods are divided in the three subgroups: (i) enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), (ii) methods for single oligomer detection, and (iii) others, which are mainly biosensor based methods. PMID:27163804

  8. International multidimensional authenticity specification (IMAS) algorithm for detection of commercial pomegranate juice adulteration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Krueger, Dana; Durst, Robert; Lee, Rupo; Wang, David; Seeram, Navindra; Heber, David

    2009-03-25

    The pomegranate fruit ( Punica granatum ) has become an international high-value crop for the production of commercial pomegranate juice (PJ). The perceived consumer value of PJ is due in large part to its potential health benefits based on a significant body of medical research conducted with authentic PJ. To establish criteria for authenticating PJ, a new International Multidimensional Authenticity Specifications (IMAS) algorithm was developed through consideration of existing databases and comprehensive chemical characterization of 45 commercial juice samples from 23 different manufacturers in the United States. In addition to analysis of commercial juice samples obtained in the United States, data from other analyses of pomegranate juice and fruits including samples from Iran, Turkey, Azerbaijan, Syria, India, and China were considered in developing this protocol. There is universal agreement that the presence of a highly constant group of six anthocyanins together with punicalagins characterizes polyphenols in PJ. At a total sugar concentration of 16 degrees Brix, PJ contains characteristic sugars including mannitol at >0.3 g/100 mL. Ratios of glucose to mannitol of 4-15 and of glucose to fructose of 0.8-1.0 are also characteristic of PJ. In addition, no sucrose should be present because of isomerase activity during commercial processing. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry as > -25 per thousand assures that there is no added corn or cane sugar added to PJ. Sorbitol was present at <0.025 g/100 mL; maltose and tartaric acid were not detected. The presence of the amino acid proline at >25 mg/L is indicative of added grape products. Malic acid at >0.1 g/100 mL indicates adulteration with apple, pear, grape, cherry, plum, or aronia juice. Other adulteration methods include the addition of highly concentrated aronia, blueberry, or blackberry juices or natural grape pigments to poor-quality juices to imitate the color of pomegranate juice, which results in

  9. International multidimensional authenticity specification (IMAS) algorithm for detection of commercial pomegranate juice adulteration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Krueger, Dana; Durst, Robert; Lee, Rupo; Wang, David; Seeram, Navindra; Heber, David

    2009-03-25

    The pomegranate fruit ( Punica granatum ) has become an international high-value crop for the production of commercial pomegranate juice (PJ). The perceived consumer value of PJ is due in large part to its potential health benefits based on a significant body of medical research conducted with authentic PJ. To establish criteria for authenticating PJ, a new International Multidimensional Authenticity Specifications (IMAS) algorithm was developed through consideration of existing databases and comprehensive chemical characterization of 45 commercial juice samples from 23 different manufacturers in the United States. In addition to analysis of commercial juice samples obtained in the United States, data from other analyses of pomegranate juice and fruits including samples from Iran, Turkey, Azerbaijan, Syria, India, and China were considered in developing this protocol. There is universal agreement that the presence of a highly constant group of six anthocyanins together with punicalagins characterizes polyphenols in PJ. At a total sugar concentration of 16 degrees Brix, PJ contains characteristic sugars including mannitol at >0.3 g/100 mL. Ratios of glucose to mannitol of 4-15 and of glucose to fructose of 0.8-1.0 are also characteristic of PJ. In addition, no sucrose should be present because of isomerase activity during commercial processing. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry as > -25 per thousand assures that there is no added corn or cane sugar added to PJ. Sorbitol was present at <0.025 g/100 mL; maltose and tartaric acid were not detected. The presence of the amino acid proline at >25 mg/L is indicative of added grape products. Malic acid at >0.1 g/100 mL indicates adulteration with apple, pear, grape, cherry, plum, or aronia juice. Other adulteration methods include the addition of highly concentrated aronia, blueberry, or blackberry juices or natural grape pigments to poor-quality juices to imitate the color of pomegranate juice, which results in

  10. Application of fluorescent substrates to the in situ detection of prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Gooch, James; Daniel, Barbara; Frascione, Nunzianda

    2014-07-01

    The forensic identification of body fluids frequently presents an important source of genetic material and investigative interpretation. However, presumptive testing techniques presently employed in the discrimination of biological fluids are subject to criticism for poor specificity, lack of fluid localisation ability and detrimental effects on DNA recovery rates. The recognition of fluid-specific biomarkers by fluorogenic substrates may provide a novel resolution to these issues but research has yet to establish any pertinent in situ fluid detection applicability. This study therefore utilises a fluorogenic substrate (Mu-HSSKLQ-AFC) specific to the seminal protein prostate specific antigen in an effort to detect human semen deposited on a number of surfaces typical to criminal investigation. The ability of fluorescent fluorogenic substrates to simultaneously identify and visualise biological fluids in situ is demonstrated for the first time, whilst the production of complete STR profiles from fluid sources is also confirmed to be completely unaffected by substrate application.

  11. High-Collection-Efficiency Fluorescence Detection Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanisco, Thomas; Cazorla, Maria; Swanson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A new fluorescence cell has been developed for the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of formaldehyde. The cell is used to sample a flow of air that contains trace concentrations of formaldehyde. The cell provides a hermetically sealed volume in which a flow of air containing formaldehyde can be illuminated by a laser. The cell includes the optics for transmitting the laser beam that is used to excite the formaldehyde and for collecting the resulting fluorescence. The novelty of the cell is its small size and simple design that provides a more robust and cheaper alternative to the state of the art. Despite its simplicity, the cell provides the same sensitivity to detection as larger, more complicated cells.

  12. Isolate-Specific Detection of Grapevine fanleaf virus from Xiphinema index Through DNA-Based Molecular Probes.

    PubMed

    Finetti-Sialer, M M; Ciancio, A

    2005-03-01

    ABSTRACT Tests with a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed on specimens of Xiphinema index collected from the rhizosphere of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV)-infected grapevines at Palagiano, Italy. A 1,157-bp fragment of the GFLV RNA-2 coat protein (CP) gene was amplified and sequenced. A fluorescent Scorpion probe was designed to detect a highly conserved CP region. A second region with isolate-specific multiple nucleotide polymorphisms was used to detect GFLV isolates using molecular beacons (MB). The Scorpion probe allowed quantitative estimation of GFLV RNA-2 in single nematodes, using a dilution series of a 692-nucleotide transcript of the CP gene. The assay allowed detection of GFLV RNA-2 in individual X. index, with a minimum template threshold of 800 fg or 2.8 x 10(6) RNA-2 molecules per nematode. The CP fragment used for GFLV detection with the Scorpion probe appeared highly conserved among isolates. The probes were tested against other GFLV isolates, which were recognized by the species-specific Scorpion probe and by the corresponding MB specific to the particular isolate. Both tests appeared useful as diagnostic tools or for studies on GFLV in acquisition, retention, and transmission experiments.

  13. Species-specific optical genosensors for the detection of mycotoxigenic Fusarium fungi in food samples.

    PubMed

    Peltomaa, Riikka; Vaghini, Silvia; Patiño, Belén; Benito-Peña, Elena; Moreno-Bondi, María C

    2016-09-01

    Plant-pathogenic Fusarium species, Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium proliferatum, are the major producers of fumonisins which are one of the most common mycotoxins found in maize. Herein, we report the development of specific and sensitive genosensors for detecting these two closely related Fusarium species in food samples. The sensors are based on species-specific capture and detection probes, which bind to the intergenic spacer region of rDNA (IGS). Oligonucleotide functionalized magnetic microbeads are used to capture the target DNA which is then detected using biotinylated detection probes and a streptavidin-coupled label. The developed genosensors had detection limits of 1.8 pM and 3.0 pM for F. proliferatum and F. verticillioides, respectively, using synthetic DNA targets. Furthermore, the biosensors were used to analyze natural fungal contamination of commercial maize samples. After amplification of the genomic DNA the sensors detected the presence of the fungi, in accordance with previous results obtained with PCR. No cross-reactivity between F. verticillioides and F. proliferatum, or other fungi species tested, was observed. The developed biosensors can provide a valuable tool to evaluate the potential for mycotoxin contamination in conditions where detection of mycotoxins directly is challenging. PMID:27543032

  14. On-chip microbial culture for the specific detection of very low levels of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bouguelia, Sihem; Roupioz, Yoann; Slimani, Sami; Mondani, Laure; Casabona, Maria G; Durmort, Claire; Vernet, Thierry; Calemczuk, Roberto; Livache, Thierry

    2013-10-21

    Microbial culture continues to be the most common protocol for bacterial detection and identification in medicine and agronomics. Using this process may take days to identify a specific pathogen for most bacterial strains. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) detection is an emerging alternative technology that can be used for the detection of bacteria using protein microarrays although typical limits of detection are in the range of 10(3)-10(6) cfu mL(-1), which is not compatible with most Food Safety regulation requirements. In this work, we combine concomitant "on-chip" microbial culture with sensitive SPR detection of bacteria thus allowing rapid specific detection of bacteria pathogens - including Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Escherichia coli O157:H7 - cultured on a protein microarray. This Culture-Capture-Measure (CCM) approach significantly decreases both the number of processing steps and the overall assay time for bacterial detection. Signal analysis of SPR responses allowed the fast and quantitative assessment of bacterial concentrations initially present in the sample as low as 2.8 ± 19.6 cfu per milliliter. Altogether, our results show how simple, easy-to-operate, fluidic-less and lo-tec microarrays can be used with unprocessed samples and yield - in a single assay - both qualitative and quantitative information regarding bacterial contamination.

  15. Gold nanoparticle-based lateral flow biosensor for rapid visual detection of Leishmania-specific DNA amplification products.

    PubMed

    Toubanaki, Dimitra K; Athanasiou, Evita; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2016-08-01

    Leishmaniasis is a disease, caused by Leishmania parasites, which infect humans and animals, posing a major social and economic burden worldwide. The need for accurate and sensitive disease diagnosis led to the widespread adoption of PCR amplification. Detection of the amplification products (i.e. gel electrophoresis) require time-consuming protocols performed by trained personnel, with high cost. Aim of the present study was the simplification of PCR product detection, using a nucleic acid lateral flow, combined with functionalized gold nanoparticles. Amplification reactions targeting kinetoplastid DNA of Leishmania spp were performed on canine blood samples and a positive signal was formed as a red test zone. The visual detection was completed in 20min. Extensive optimization enabled the detection of 100fmol of target DNA. Clinical samples of infected dog blood were analyzed with high specificity. Overall, the proposed lateral flow biosensor can be considered an appealing alternative platform for Leishmania-specific amplification products detection with low cost and attractive simplicity. PMID:27255490

  16. Electrochemical detection of point mutation based on surface hybridization assay conjugated allele-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Zhu, Jing; Li, Guiyin; Chen, Zhencheng; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2013-04-15

    In this work, we developed an electrochemical detection method based on allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) and surface hybridization assay technique for the point mutation detection. A high-fidelity Vent(R)™(exo⁻) DNA polymerase, which eliminated the 3'→5' proofreading exonuclease activity by genetical engineering, was used to discriminate and extend the detection probe that perfectly matched with mutant target DNA and generate a redox-active DNA replica which folded into a molecular beacon structure by intramolecular hybridization. After hybridized with capture probe modified on gold electrode by self-assembly reaction, the redox tags can be closed to electrode, resulting in a substantial current with the maximized sensitivity for point mutation analysis. However, when there is an allele mismatch in the wild target DNA, and so no the redox-active replica DNA can be obtained. In this case, no remarkable current signal can be trigged. The proposed approach has been successfully implemented for the identification of single base mutation at the -28 position in human β-globin gene with a detection limit of 0.5 fM, demonstrating that this method provides a highly specific, sensitive and cost-efficient approach for point mutation detection.

  17. Detection and quantification of drug-specific T cells in penicillin allergy.

    PubMed

    Rozieres, A; Hennino, A; Rodet, K; Gutowski, M-C; Gunera-Saad, N; Berard, F; Cozon, G; Bienvenu, J; Nicolas, J-F

    2009-04-01

    Drug allergic reactions presenting as maculo-papular exanthema (MPE) are mediated by drug-specific T cells. In this study, the frequency of circulating specific T cells was analyzed by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) enzyme-linked immunospot assay in 22 patients with an allergic MPE to amoxicillin (amox). Amox-specific circulating T cells were detected in 20/22 patients with frequencies ranging from 1 : 8000 to 1 : 30 000 circulating leucocytes. No reactivity was observed in 46 control patients, including 15 patients with immunoglobulin E-mediated allergy to amoxicillin, 11 patients with a history of drug-induced MPE but tolerant to amoxicillin and 20 healthy individuals. Furthermore, amox-specific T cells were still detectable several years after the occurrence of the allergic reaction even after strict drug avoidance. Finally, analysis of drug-specific T cells in one patient allergic to ticarcillin (a penicillin antibiotic distinct from amox) revealed the presence of IFN-gamma-producing T cells reactive to ticarcillin and several other betalactam antibiotics, suggesting that the IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay is able to detect T cell cross-reactivity against chemically related drugs. These findings confirm that drug-induced MPE is associated with the presence of specific T cells in blood and further suggest that the IFN-gamma ELISPOT is a sensitive assay which could improve the diagnosis of betalactam allergy. PMID:19154548

  18. Ultra-high sensitivity radiation detection apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Valentine, John D.; Markum, Francis; Zawadzki, Mary; Dickerman, Charles

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided to concentrate and detect very low levels of radioactive noble gases from the atmosphere. More specifically the invention provides a method and apparatus to concentrate xenon, krypton and radon in an organic fluid and to detect these gases by the radioactive emissions.

  19. Specific detection of unamplified mycobacterial DNA by use of fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots and magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Gazouli, M; Liandris, E; Andreadou, M; Sechi, L A; Masala, S; Paccagnini, D; Ikonomopoulos, J

    2010-08-01

    Here we present the development of a specific DNA detection method using fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic beads (MBs) for fast detection of Mycobacterium spp., dispensing with the need for DNA amplification. Two biotinylated oligonucleotide probes were used to recognize and detect specific complementary mycobacterial target DNA through a sandwich hybridization reaction. Cadmium selenite QDs conjugated with streptavidin and species-specific probes were used to produce a fluorescent signal. MBs conjugated with streptavidin and a genus-specific probe were used to isolate and concentrate the DNA targets. The application of the proposed method to isolated bacteria produced the expected result in all cases. The minimum detection limit of the assay was defined as 12.5 ng of DNA diluted in a sample volume of 20 microl. In order to obtain an indication of the method's performance with clinical samples, we applied the optimized assay to the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in DNA isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage specimens from patients with tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in DNA isolated from feces and paraffin-embedded tissues in comparison with culture, Ziehl-Neelsen staining, and real-time PCR. The concordance of these methods compared to the proposed method with regard to positive and negative samples varied between 53.84% and 87.23% and between 84.61% and 100%, respectively. The overall accuracy of the QD assay compared to real-time PCR was 70 to 90% depending on the type of clinical material. The proposed diagnostic assay offers a simple, rapid, specific, and cost-effective method for direct detection and identification of mycobacterial DNA in clinical samples. PMID:20554817

  20. Plate-specific gain map correction for the improvement of detective quantum efficiency in computed radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Schnell, Erich A.; Samei, Ehsan; Dobbins, James T.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to improve the noise power spectrum (NPS), and thus the detective quantum efficiency (DQE), of computed radiography (CR) images by correcting for spatial gain variations specific to individual imaging plates. CR devices have not traditionally employed gain-map corrections, unlike the case with flat-panel detectors, because of the multiplicity of plates used with each reader. The lack of gain-map correction has limited the DQE(f) at higher exposures with CR. This current work describes a feasible solution to generating plate-specific gain maps. Methods: Ten high-exposure open field images were taken with an RQA5 spectrum, using a sixth generation CR plate suspended in air without a cassette. Image values were converted to exposure, the plates registered using fiducial dots on the plate, the ten images averaged, and then high-pass filtered to remove low frequency contributions from field inhomogeneity. A gain-map was then produced by converting all pixel values in the average into fractions with mean of one. The resultant gain-map of the plate was used to normalize subsequent single images to correct for spatial gain fluctuation. To validate performance, the normalized NPS (NNPS) for all images was calculated both with and without the gain-map correction. Variations in the quality of correction due to exposure levels, beam voltage/spectrum, CR reader used, and registration were investigated. Results: The NNPS with plate-specific gain-map correction showed improvement over the noncorrected case over the range of frequencies from 0.15 to 2.5 mm{sup -1}. At high exposure (40 mR), NNPS was 50%-90% better with gain-map correction than without. A small further improvement in NNPS was seen from carefully registering the gain-map with subsequent images using small fiducial dots, because of slight misregistration during scanning. Further improvement was seen in the NNPS from scaling the gain map about the mean to account for different beam

  1. High-throughput variation detection and genotyping using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Cutler, D J; Zwick, M E; Carrasquillo, M M; Yohn, C T; Tobin, K P; Kashuk, C; Mathews, D J; Shah, N A; Eichler, E E; Warrington, J A; Chakravarti, A

    2001-11-01

    The genetic dissection of complex traits may ultimately require a large number of SNPs to be genotyped in multiple individuals who exhibit phenotypic variation in a trait of interest. Microarray technology can enable rapid genotyping of variation specific to study samples. To facilitate their use, we have developed an automated statistical method (ABACUS) to analyze microarray hybridization data and applied this method to Affymetrix Variation Detection Arrays (VDAs). ABACUS provides a quality score to individual genotypes, allowing investigators to focus their attention on sites that give accurate information. We have applied ABACUS to an experiment encompassing 32 autosomal and eight X-linked genomic regions, each consisting of approximately 50 kb of unique sequence spanning a 100-kb region, in 40 humans. At sufficiently high-quality scores, we are able to read approximately 80% of all sites. To assess the accuracy of SNP detection, 108 of 108 SNPs have been experimentally confirmed; an additional 371 SNPs have been confirmed electronically. To access the accuracy of diploid genotypes at segregating autosomal sites, we confirmed 1515 of 1515 homozygous calls, and 420 of 423 (99.29%) heterozygotes. In replicate experiments, consisting of independent amplification of identical samples followed by hybridization to distinct microarrays of the same design, genotyping is highly repeatable. In an autosomal replicate experiment, 813,295 of 813,295 genotypes are called identically (including 351 heterozygotes); at an X-linked locus in males (haploid), 841,236 of 841,236 sites are called identically.

  2. Efficiency Analysis of a High-Specific Impulse Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, David (Technical Monitor); Hofer, Richard R.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2004-01-01

    Performance and plasma measurements of the high-specific impulse NASA-173Mv2 Hall thruster were analyzed using a phenomenological performance model that accounts for a partially-ionized plasma containing multiply-charged ions. Between discharge voltages of 300 to 900 V, the results showed that although the net decrease of efficiency due to multiply-charged ions was only 1.5 to 3.0 percent, the effects of multiply-charged ions on the ion and electron currents could not be neglected. Between 300 to 900 V, the increase of the discharge current was attributed to the increasing fraction of multiply-charged ions, while the maximum deviation of the electron current from its average value was only +5/-14 percent. These findings revealed how efficient operation at high-specific impulse was enabled through the regulation of the electron current with the applied magnetic field. Between 300 to 900 V, the voltage utilization ranged from 89 to 97 percent, the mass utilization from 86 to 90 percent, and the current utilization from 77 to 81 percent. Therefore, the anode efficiency was largely determined by the current utilization. The electron Hall parameter was nearly constant with voltage, decreasing from an average of 210 at 300 V to an average of 160 between 400 to 900 V. These results confirmed our claim that efficient operation can be achieved only over a limited range of Hall parameters.

  3. Development of taxon-specific sequences of common wheat for the detection of genetically modified wheat.

    PubMed

    Iida, Mayu; Yamashiro, Satomi; Yamakawa, Hirohito; Hayakawa, Katsuyuki; Kuribara, Hideo; Kodama, Takashi; Furui, Satoshi; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Maitani, Tamio; Hino, Akihiro

    2005-08-10

    Qualitative and quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) systems aimed at the specific detection and quantification of common wheat DNA are described. Many countries have issued regulations to label foods that include genetically modified organisms (GMOs). PCR technology is widely recognized as a reliable and useful technique for the qualitative and quantitative detection of GMOs. Detection methods are needed to amplify a target GM gene, and the amplified results should be compared with those of the corresponding taxon-specific reference gene to obtain reliable results. This paper describes the development of a specific DNA sequence in the waxy-D1 gene for common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and the design of a specific primer pair and TaqMan probe on the waxy-D1 gene for PCR analysis. The primers amplified a product (Wx012) of 102 bp. It is indicated that the Wx012 DNA sequence is specific to common wheat, showing homogeneity in qualitative PCR results and very similar quantification accuracy along 19 distantly related common wheat varieties. In Southern blot and real-time PCR analyses, this sequence showed either a single or a low number of copy genes. In addition, by qualitative and quantitative PCR using wx012 primers and a wx012-T probe, the limits of detection of the common wheat genome were found to be about 15 copies, and the reproducibility was reliable. In consequence, the PCR system using wx012 primers and wx012-T probe is considered to be suitable for use as a common wheat-specific taxon-specific reference gene in DNA analyses, including GMO tests.

  4. Novel primers and PCR protocols for the specific detection and quantification of Sphingobium suberifaciens in situ

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pathogen causing corky root on lettuce, Sphingobium suberifaciens, is recalcitrant to standard epidemiological methods. Primers were selected from 16S rDNA sequences useful for the specific detection and quantification of S. suberifaciens. Conventional (PCR) and quantitative (qPCR) PCR protocols...

  5. The detection of specific biomolecular interactions with micro-Hall magnetic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manandhar, Pradeep; Chen, Kan-Sheng; Aledealat, Khaled; Mihajlović, Goran; Yun, C. Steven; Field, Mark; Sullivan, Gerard J.; Strouse, Geoffrey F.; Bryant Chase, P.; von Molnár, Stephan; Xiong, Peng

    2009-09-01

    The detection of reagent-free specific biomolecular interactions through sensing of nanoscopic magnetic labels provides one of the most promising routes to biosensing with solid-state devices. In particular, Hall sensors based on semiconductor heterostructures have shown exceptional magnetic moment sensitivity over a large dynamic field range suitable for magnetic biosensing using superparamagnetic labels. Here we demonstrate the capability of such micro-Hall sensors to detect specific molecular binding using biotin-streptavidin as a model system. We apply dip-pen nanolithography to selectively biotinylate the active areas of InAs micro-Hall devices with nanoscale precision. Specific binding of complementarily functionalized streptavidin-coated superparamagnetic beads to the Hall crosses occurs via molecular recognition, and magnetic detection of the assembled beads is achieved at room temperature using phase sensitive micro-Hall magnetometry. The experiment constitutes the first unambiguous demonstration of magnetic detection of specific biomolecular interactions with semiconductor micro-Hall sensors, and the selective molecular functionalization and resulting localized bead assembly demonstrate the possibility of multiplexed sensing of multiple target molecules using a single device with an array of micro-Hall sensors.

  6. Detection of influenza virus neuraminidase-specific antibodies by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Khan, M W; Gallagher, M; Bucher, D; Cerini, C P; Kilbourne, E D

    1982-07-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed for the titration of antibodies in human sera to influenza virus neuraminidase, employing partially purified N1 neuraminidase. Specificity of the test was demonstrated, and the test was more sensitive than either the conventional neuraminidase inhibition or plaque size reduction tests in detecting anti-neuraminidase antibody.

  7. Development of an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay to Detect Chicken Parvovirus Specific Antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report the development and application of an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay to detect parvovirus-specific antibodies in chicken sera. We used an approach previously described for other parvoviruses to clone and express viral structural proteins in insect cells from recombinant baculovirus...

  8. Development of Species-specific Primers for Rapid Detection of Phellinus linteus and P. baumii

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mun-Ok; Kim, Gi-Young; Nam, Byung-Hyouk; Jin, Cheng-Yun; Lee, Ki-Won; Park, Jae-Min; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2005-01-01

    Genus Phellinus taxonomically belongs to Aphyllophorales and some species of this genus have been used as a medicinal ingredients and Indian folk medicines. Especially, P. linteus and morphological-related species are well-known medicinal fungi that have various biological activities such as humoral and cell-mediated, anti-mutagenic, and anti-cancer activities. However, little is known about the rapid detection for complex Phellinus species. Therefore, this study was carried out to develop specific primers for the rapid detection of P. linteus and other related species. Designing the species-specific primers was done based on internal transcribed spacer sequence data. Each primer set detected specifically P. linteus (PL2/PL5R) and P. baumii (PB1/PB4R). These primer sets could be useful for the rapid detection of specific-species among unidentified Phellinus species. Moreover, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the ITS region with HaeIII was also useful for clarifying the relationship between each 5 Phellinus species. PMID:24049482

  9. 21 CFR 866.3332 - Reagents for detection of specific novel influenza A viruses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagents for detection of specific novel influenza A viruses. 866.3332 Section 866.3332 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3332 - Reagents for detection of specific novel influenza A viruses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reagents for detection of specific novel influenza A viruses. 866.3332 Section 866.3332 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3332 - Reagents for detection of specific novel influenza A viruses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reagents for detection of specific novel influenza A viruses. 866.3332 Section 866.3332 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3332 - Reagents for detection of specific novel influenza A viruses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reagents for detection of specific novel influenza A viruses. 866.3332 Section 866.3332 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3332 - Reagents for detection of specific novel influenza A viruses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reagents for detection of specific novel influenza A viruses. 866.3332 Section 866.3332 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  14. Target-specific capture enhances sensitivity of electrochemical detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mayank; Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Halford, Colin; Lewinski, Michael A; Landaw, Elliot M; Churchill, Bernard M; Haake, David A

    2011-12-01

    We report the concentration and purification of bacterial 16S rRNA by the use of a biotinylated DNA target-specific capture (TSC) probe. For both cultivated bacterial and urine specimens from urinary tract infection patients, TSC resulted in a 5- to 8-fold improvement in the sensitivity of bacterial detection in a 16S rRNA electrochemical sensor assay.

  15. Shotgun isotope array for rapid, substrate-specific detection of microorganisms in a microbial community.

    PubMed

    Tobino, Tomohiro; Kurisu, Futoshi; Kasuga, Ikuro; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2011-10-01

    The shotgun isotope array method has been proposed to be an effective new tool for use in substrate-specific microbe exploration without any prior knowledge of the community composition. Proof of concept was demonstrated by detection of acetate-degrading microorganisms in activated sludge and further verified by independent stable isotope probing (SIP).

  16. Detection of untreated mycobacteria by using polymerase chain reaction and specific DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Fries, J W; Patel, R J; Piessens, W F; Wirth, D F

    1991-01-01

    A method for specific identification of mycobacteria by using the polymerase chain reaction on organisms taken from liquid cultures, frozen suspensions, or colonies grown on Lowenstein-Jensen slants is presented. This direct detection of mycobacterial organisms has important implications for strain typing and diagnosis. Images PMID:1761699

  17. Epitope specificity determines pathogenicity and detectability in ANCA-associated vasculitis

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3) are detectable in >90% of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCA titers do not correlate well with disease activity. In vivo and in vi...

  18. High sensitivity and specificity of elevated cerebrospinal fluid kappa free light chains in suspected multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hassan-Smith, G; Durant, L; Tsentemeidou, A; Assi, L K; Faint, J M; Kalra, S; Douglas, M R; Curnow, S J

    2014-11-15

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis is routinely used in the diagnostic work-up of multiple sclerosis (MS), by detecting CSF-specific oligoclonal bands (OCB). More recently, several studies have reported CSF free light chains (FLC) as an alternative. We show that absolute CSF κFLC concentrations were highly sensitive - more than OCB testing - and specific for clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing remitting and primary progressive MS. Measurement of κFLC alone was sufficient. Our results suggest that CSF κFLC levels measured by nephelometry, if validated in a larger series, are a preferred test to OCB analysis in the diagnostic work-up of patients suspected of having MS.

  19. High Energy Electron Detection with ATIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Ahn, H.; Ampe, J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) balloon-borne ionization calorimeter is well suited to record and identify high energy cosmic ray electrons. The instrument was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN H2 bean-dine in September of 1999. We have simulated the performance of the instrument, and compare the simulations with actual high energy electron exposures at the CERN accelerator. Simulations and measurements do not compare exactly, in detail, but overall the simulations have predicted actual measured behavior quite well.

  20. Simultaneous, specific and real-time detection of biothreat and frequently encountered food-borne pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Woubit, Abdela Salah; Yehualaeshet, Teshome; Habtemariam, Tsegaye; Samuel, Temesgen

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial genera Escherichia, Salmonella, Shigella, Vibrio, Yersinia and Francisella include important food safety and biothreat agents causing food-related and other human illnesses worldwide. We aimed to develop rapid methods with the capability to simultaneously and differentially detect all six pathogens in one run. Our initial experiments to use previously reported sets of primers revealed non-specificity of some of the sequences when tested against a broader array of pathogens, or proved not optimal for simultaneous detection parameters. By extensive mining of the whole genome and protein databases of diverse closely and distantly related bacterial species and strains, we have identified unique genome regions, which we utilized to develop a detection platform. Twelve of the specific genomic targets we have identified to design the primers in F. tularensis ssp. tularensis, F. tularensis ssp. novicida, S. dysentriae, S. typhimurium, V. cholera, Y. pestis, and Y. pseudotuberculosis contained either hypothetical or putative proteins, the functions of which have not been clearly defined. Corresponding primer sets were designed from the target regions for use in real-time PCR assays to detect specific biothreat pathogens at species or strain levels. The primer sets were first tested by in-silico PCR against whole genome sequences of different species, sub-species, or strains and then by in vitro PCR against genomic DNA preparations from 23 strains representing six biothreat agents (E.coli O157:H7 strain EDL 933, Shigella dysentriae, Salmonella typhi, Francisella tularensis ssp. tularensis, Vibrio cholera, and Yersinia pestis) and six foodborne pathogens (Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella saintpaul, Shigella sonnei, Francisella novicida, Vibrio parahemolytica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis). Each pathogen was specifically identifiable at the genus and species levels. Sensitivity assays performed using purified DNA showed the lowest detection limit of 640 fg

  1. Stimulus-specific adaptation, habituation and change detection in the gaze control system.

    PubMed

    Gutfreund, Yoram

    2012-12-01

    This prospect article addresses the neurobiology of detecting and responding to changes or unexpected events. Change detection is an ongoing computational task performed by the brain as part of the broader process of saliency mapping and selection of the next target for attention. In the optic tectum (OT) of the barn owl, the probability of the stimulus has a dramatic influence on the neural response to that stimulus; rare or deviant stimuli induce stronger responses compared to common stimuli. This phenomenon, known as stimulus-specific adaptation, has recently attracted scientific interest because of its possible role in change detection. In the barn owl's OT, it may underlie the ability to orient specifically to unexpected events and is therefore opening new directions for research on the neurobiology of fundamental psychological phenomena such as habituation, attention, and surprise. PMID:22711216

  2. Patient non-specific algorithm for seizures detection in scalp EEG.

    PubMed

    Orosco, Lorena; Correa, Agustina Garcés; Diez, Pablo; Laciar, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder that affects about 1% of the population in the world. Seizure detection is an important component in both the diagnosis of epilepsy and seizure control. In this work a patient non-specific strategy for seizure detection based on Stationary Wavelet Transform of EEG signals is developed. A new set of features is proposed based on an average process. The seizure detection consisted in finding the EEG segments with seizures and their onset and offset points. The proposed offline method was tested in scalp EEG records of 24-48h of duration of 18 epileptic patients. The method reached mean values of specificity of 99.9%, sensitivity of 87.5% and a false positive rate per hour of 0.9.

  3. Rapid and Specific Detection of Salmonella spp. in Animal Feed Samples by PCR after Culture Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Löfström, Charlotta; Knutsson, Rickard; Axelsson, Charlotta Engdahl; Rådström, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A PCR procedure has been developed for routine analysis of viable Salmonella spp. in feed samples. The objective was to develop a simple PCR-compatible enrichment procedure to enable DNA amplification without any sample pretreatment such as DNA extraction or cell lysis. PCR inhibition by 14 different feed samples and natural background flora was circumvented by the use of the DNA polymerase Tth. This DNA polymerase was found to exhibit a high level of resistance to PCR inhibitors present in these feed samples compared to DyNAzyme II, FastStart Taq, Platinum Taq, Pwo, rTth, Taq, and Tfl. The specificity of the Tth assay was confirmed by testing 101 Salmonella and 43 non-Salmonella strains isolated from feed and food samples. A sample preparation method based on culture enrichment in buffered peptone water and DNA amplification with Tth DNA polymerase was developed. The probability of detecting small numbers of salmonellae in feed, in the presence of natural background flora, was accurately determined and found to follow a logistic regression model. From this model, the probability of detecting 1 CFU per 25 g of feed in artificially contaminated soy samples was calculated and found to be 0.81. The PCR protocol was evaluated on 155 naturally contaminated feed samples and compared to an established culture-based method, NMKL-71. Eight percent of the samples were positive by PCR, compared with 3% with the conventional method. The reasons for the differences in sensitivity are discussed. Use of this method in the routine analysis of animal feed samples would improve safety in the food chain. PMID:14711627

  4. Characterization of grain-specific peptide markers for the detection of gluten by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Katherine L; McGrath, Sara C; Callahan, John H; Ross, Mark M

    2014-06-25

    Global and targeted mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches were developed to discover, evaluate, and apply gluten peptide markers to detect low parts per million (ppm) wheat contamination of oats. Prolamins were extracted from wheat, barley, rye, and oat flours and then reduced, alkylated, and digested with chymotrypsin. The resulting peptides were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis and database matching. No peptide markers common to wheat, barley, and rye were identified that could be used for global gluten detection. However, many grain-specific peptide markers were identified, and a set of these markers was selected for gluten detection and grain differentiation. Wheat flour was spiked into gluten-free oat flour at concentrations of 1-100,000 ppm and analyzed to determine the lowest concentration at which the wheat "contaminant" could be confidently detected in the mixture. The same 2D ion trap instrument that was used for the global proteomics approach was used for the targeted proteomics approach, providing a seamless transition from target discovery to application. A powerful, targeted MS/MS method enabled detection of two wheat peptide markers at the 10 ppm wheat flour-in-oat flour concentration. Because gluten comprises approximately 10% of wheat flour protein, the reported wheat gluten-specific peptides can enable detection of approximately 1 ppm of wheat gluten in oats.

  5. Characterization of grain-specific peptide markers for the detection of gluten by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Katherine L; McGrath, Sara C; Callahan, John H; Ross, Mark M

    2014-06-25

    Global and targeted mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches were developed to discover, evaluate, and apply gluten peptide markers to detect low parts per million (ppm) wheat contamination of oats. Prolamins were extracted from wheat, barley, rye, and oat flours and then reduced, alkylated, and digested with chymotrypsin. The resulting peptides were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis and database matching. No peptide markers common to wheat, barley, and rye were identified that could be used for global gluten detection. However, many grain-specific peptide markers were identified, and a set of these markers was selected for gluten detection and grain differentiation. Wheat flour was spiked into gluten-free oat flour at concentrations of 1-100,000 ppm and analyzed to determine the lowest concentration at which the wheat "contaminant" could be confidently detected in the mixture. The same 2D ion trap instrument that was used for the global proteomics approach was used for the targeted proteomics approach, providing a seamless transition from target discovery to application. A powerful, targeted MS/MS method enabled detection of two wheat peptide markers at the 10 ppm wheat flour-in-oat flour concentration. Because gluten comprises approximately 10% of wheat flour protein, the reported wheat gluten-specific peptides can enable detection of approximately 1 ppm of wheat gluten in oats. PMID:24866027

  6. [Sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA Kit for the detection of antidobies to Junin virus].

    PubMed

    Pirozhkov, A P; Timofeev, M A; Borisevich, I V; Syromiatnikova, S I; Shatokhina, I V; Pantyukhov, V B; Kovalchuk, A V; Borisevich, S V

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work was to describe methodological approaches to determination of sensitivity and specificity of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit (ELISA Kit) for detection of the specific anti-Junin virus (JV) antibody. Comparison of ELISA to plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) showed direct relationship between antibody titers in the samples of serum of immunized animals, determined by either PRNT or ELISA methods. The obtained results provided an opportunity to form the panels of positive and negative serum samples to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA Kit. Sensitivity of the ELISA Kit was at least 98% when studying the samples of serum of immunized guinea pigs and rabbits (determined as positive in PRNT). The sensitivity of the ELISA Kit was at least 68% when studying the samples determined by PNRT as uncertain positive. The specificity was 98%. The specificity of the ELISA Kit was 98%.

  7. A Highly Sensitive, High-Throughput Assay for the Detection of Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hager, Karl; Hosono, Seiyu; Wise, Anastasia; Li, Peining; Rinder, Henry M.; Gruen, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Turner syndrome (TS) occurs when an X-chromosome is completely or partially deleted or when X-chromosomal mosaicism is present. Girls with TS benefit from early diagnosis and treatment with GH; however, many girls with TS are not detected until after 10 yr of age, resulting in delayed evaluation and treatment. Methods: We developed a high-throughput test for TS, based on a quantitative method of genotyping to detect X-chromosome abnormalities. This test uses pyrosequencing to quantitate relative allele strength (RAS) from single-nucleotide polymorphisms using 18 informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms markers that span the X-chromosome and one marker for the detection of Y-chromosome material. Results: Cutoff ranges for heterozygous, homozygous, or out-of-range RAS values were established from a cohort of 496 males and females. Positive TS scoring criteria were defined as the presence of homozygosity for all 18 markers or the presence of at least one out-of-range RAS value. To determine the validity of this rapid test for TS detection, we undertook a large-scale study using DNA from 132 females without TS and 74 females with TS for whom karyotypes were available. TS was identified with 96.0% sensitivity and 97.0% specificity in this cohort. We also tested buccal swab DNA from a group of 19 females without TS and 69 females with TS. In this group, TS was identified with 97.1% sensitivity and 84.2% specificity. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the validity of a high-throughput, pyrosequencing based test for the accurate detection of TS, providing a potential alternative to karyotype testing. PMID:21177792

  8. A multiplexed transcription activator-like effector system for detecting specific DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Honarmand, Ali; Mayall, Robert; George, Iain; Oberding, Lisa; Dastidar, Himika; Fegan, Jamie; Chaudhuri, Somshukla; Dole, Justin; Feng, Sharon; Hoang, Denny; Moges, Ruth; Osgood, Julie; Remondini, Taylor; van der Meulen, Wm Keith; Wang, Su; Wintersinger, Chris; Zaparoli Zucoloto, Amanda; Chatfield-Reed, Kate; Arcellana-Panlilio, Mayi; Nygren, Anders

    2014-12-19

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs), originating from the Xanthomonas genus of bacteria, bind to specific DNA sequences based on amino acid sequence in the repeat-variable diresidue (RVD) positions of the protein. By altering these RVDs, it has been shown that a TALE protein can be engineered to bind virtually any DNA sequence of interest. The possibility of multiplexing TALEs for the purposes of identifying specific DNA sequences has yet to be explored. Here, we demonstrate a system in which a TALE protein bound to a nitrocellulose strip has been utilized to capture purified DNA, which is then detected using the binding of a second distinct TALE protein conjugated to a protein tag that is then detected by a dot blot. This system provides a signal only when both TALEs bind to their respective sequences, further demonstrating the specificity of the TALE binding.

  9. A multiplexed transcription activator-like effector system for detecting specific DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Honarmand, Ali; Mayall, Robert; George, Iain; Oberding, Lisa; Dastidar, Himika; Fegan, Jamie; Chaudhuri, Somshukla; Dole, Justin; Feng, Sharon; Hoang, Denny; Moges, Ruth; Osgood, Julie; Remondini, Taylor; van der Meulen, Wm Keith; Wang, Su; Wintersinger, Chris; Zaparoli Zucoloto, Amanda; Chatfield-Reed, Kate; Arcellana-Panlilio, Mayi; Nygren, Anders

    2014-12-19

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs), originating from the Xanthomonas genus of bacteria, bind to specific DNA sequences based on amino acid sequence in the repeat-variable diresidue (RVD) positions of the protein. By altering these RVDs, it has been shown that a TALE protein can be engineered to bind virtually any DNA sequence of interest. The possibility of multiplexing TALEs for the purposes of identifying specific DNA sequences has yet to be explored. Here, we demonstrate a system in which a TALE protein bound to a nitrocellulose strip has been utilized to capture purified DNA, which is then detected using the binding of a second distinct TALE protein conjugated to a protein tag that is then detected by a dot blot. This system provides a signal only when both TALEs bind to their respective sequences, further demonstrating the specificity of the TALE binding. PMID:25524096

  10. Real-time PCR for specific detection of three phytoplasmas from the apple proliferation group.

    PubMed

    Mehle, Nataša; Nikolić, Petra; Gruden, Kristina; Ravnikar, Maja; Dermastia, Marina

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe a real-time PCR detection system for fast, reliable, specific, and sensitive detection and discrimination of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma mali', 'Ca. P. prunorum', and 'Ca. P. pyri' from the 16SrX (apple proliferation-AP) group. These phytoplasmas are causal agents of fruit tree diseases within the Rosaceae family, namely apple proliferation, European stone fruit yellows, and pear decline. The assays use (hydrolysis) TaqMan(®) minor groove binder probes. The panel of assays comprises the same set of primers and specific probes for species-specific amplification, and an additional set of primers and probe for 18S rRNA as an endogenous quality control of DNA extraction. The assays described can be used in routine phytoplasma surveys and in certification programmes.

  11. Rapid, specific detection of alphaviruses from tissue cultures using a replicon-defective reporter gene assay.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiangjiao; Zhu, Wuyang; Wang, Huanqin; Li, Jiandong; Zhang, Quanfu; He, Ying; Li, Jia; Fu, Juanjuan; Li, Dexin; Liang, Guodong

    2012-01-01

    We established a rapid, specific technique for detecting alphaviruses using a replicon-defective reporter gene assay derived from the Sindbis virus XJ-160. The pVaXJ expression vector containing the XJ-160 genome was engineered to form the expression vectors pVaXJ-EGFP expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) or pVaXJ-GLuc expressing Gaussia luciferase (GLuc). The replicon-defective reporter plasmids pVaXJ-EGFPΔnsp4 and pVaXJ-GLucΔnsp4 were constructed by deleting 1139 bp in the non-structural protein 4 (nsP4) gene. The deletion in the nsP4 gene prevented the defective replicons from replicating and expressing reporter genes in transfected BHK-21 cells. However, when these transfected cells were infected with an alphavirus, the non-structural proteins expressed by the alphavirus could act on the defective replicons in trans and induce the expression of the reporter genes. The replicon-defective plasmids were used to visualize the presence of alphavirus qualitatively or detect it quantitatively. Specificity tests showed that this assay could detect a variety of alphaviruses from tissue cultures, while other RNA viruses, such as Japanese encephalitis virus and Tahyna virus, gave negative results with this system. Sensitivity tests showed that the limit of detection (LOD) of this replicon-defective assay is between 1 and 10 PFU for Sindbis viruses. These results indicate that, with the help of the replicon-defective alphavirus detection technique, we can specifically, sensitively, and rapidly detect alphaviruses in tissue cultures. The detection technique constructed here may be well suited for use in clinical examination and epidemiological surveillance, as well as for rapid screening of potential viral biological warfare agents.

  12. A sensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor for specific detection of Enterobacteriaceae bacteria by Exonuclease III-assisted signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Luo, Caihui; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Wei; Yan, Li; Zhang, Decai; Ju, Huangxian; Ding, Shijia

    2013-10-15

    A specific and sensitive methodology was developed successfully for quantitative detection of Enterobacteriaceae bacteria by integrating Exonuclease III-assisted target recycling amplification with a simple electrochemical DNA biosensor. After target DNA hybridizes with capture DNA, Exonuclease III can selectively digest the capture DNA, which releases the target to undergo a new hybridization and cleavage cycle on sensor surface, leading to a successful target recycling. Finally, the left capture DNA is recognized by detection probe to produce the detectable signal, which decreases with the increasing target DNA concentration. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed strategy could detect target DNA down to 8.7 fM with a linear range from 0.01 pM to 1 nM, showing high sensitivity. Meanwhile, the sensing strategy was successfully used for detection of Enterobacteriaceae bacteria down to 40 CFU mL⁻¹ in milk samples. This strategy presented a simple, rapid and sensitive platform for Enterobacteriaceae bacteria detection and would become a versatile and powerful tool for food safety, biothreat detection and environmental monitoring.

  13. Detection of ocean color changes from high altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovis, W. A.; Forman, M. L.; Blaine, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    The detection of ocean color changes, thought to be due to chlorophyll concentrations and gelbstoffe variations, is attempted from high altitude (11.3km) and low altitude (0.3km). The atmospheric back scattering is shown to reduce contrast, but not sufficiently to obscure color change detection at high altitudes.

  14. Immuno-fluorescence based Vi capsular polysaccharide detection for specific recognition of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Satish K; Vinayaka, Aaydha C; Rishi, Dharam B; Rishi, Praveen; Suri, C Raman

    2014-09-01

    Typhoid fever is a life threatening bacterial infection that remains a major global health concern. This continued high burden associated with significant morbidity and mortality rate demands specific and rapid detection technique. This work reports a new sandwich type fluorescence immunoassay format using polymyxin B, a cationic receptor molecule, as a binder agent while anti-Vi antibody served as the capturing agent for specifically detecting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. Anti-Vi IgG antibody raised against Vi-BSA conjugate revealed affinity of 7.779nM(-1) signifying immunodominancy of O-acetyls groups in Vi polysaccharide. The detection limit of the developed assay was around 10(1) cellsmL(-1) of Vi expressing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) equal to 0.97. Positive response obtained for all the tested serovar Typhi clinical isolates as well as the pathogen spiked blood samples recommended specificity and accuracy of Vi antigen as a biomarker during typhoid fever. The intra- and inter-assay precision with Vi spiked samples were satisfactory revealing coefficient of variance (CV%) with a mean of 4.05% and 5.97% respectively. This may be the novel attempt and constructive report on the fluorescence based detection of Vi antigen of serovar Typhi in the epidemic as well as pandemic outbreaks.

  15. A novel method for sensitive and specific detection of DNA methylation biomarkers based on DNA restriction during PCR cycling.

    PubMed

    Kneip, Christoph; Schmidt, Bernd; Fleischhacker, Michael; Seegebarth, Anke; Lewin, Jörn; Flemming, Nadja; Seemann, Stefanie; Schlegel, Thomas; Witt, Christian; Liebenberg, Volker; Dietrich, Dimo

    2009-09-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism involved in fundamental biological processes such as development, imprinting, and carcino-genesis. For these reasons, DNA methylation represents a valuable source for cancer biomarkers. Methods for the sensitive and specific detection of methylated DNA are a prerequisite for the implementation of DNA biomarkers into clinical routine when early detection based on the analysis of body fluids is desired. Here, a novel technique is presented for the detection of DNA methylation biomarkers, based on real-time PCR of bisulfite-treated template with enzymatic digestion of background DNA during amplification using the heat-stable enzyme Tsp509I. An assay for the lung cancer methylation biomarker BARHL2 was used to show clinical and analytical performance of the method in comparison with methylation-specific PCR technology. Both technologies showed comparable performance when analyzing technical DNA mixtures and bronchial lavage samples from 75 patients suspected of having lung cancer. The results demonstrate that the approach is useful for sensitive and specific detection of a few copies of methylated DNA in samples with a high background of unmethylated DNA, such as in clinical samples from body fluids.

  16. Determination of levamisole in plasma and animal tissues by gas chromatography with thermionic specific detection.

    PubMed

    Woestenborghs, R; Michielsen, L; Heykants, J

    1981-06-12

    A rapid and sensitive method has been developed for the determination of the anthelmintic levamisole in plasma and tissues from man and animals. The procedure involves the extraction of the drug and its internal standard from the biological material at alkaline pH, back-extraction into sulphuric acid and re-extraction into the organic phase (heptane-isoamyl alcohol). Several extraction steps can be omitted, however, whenever the gas chromatographic background permits and some operations can be simplified using Clin ElutTM extraction tubes. The analyses were carried out by gas chromatography using a nitrogen-selective thermionic specific detector. The detection limit was 5 ng, contained in 1 ml of plasma or in 1 g of the various tissues, and recoveries were sufficiently high (79-86%). The method was applied to human plasma samples in a comprehensive bioavailability study of levamisole in healthy volunteers, and to plasma and tissues in a residue trial in cattle. The effect of the blood collection technique on the plasma levels was also studied and pointed to decreased plasma concentrations when Vacutainer tubes were used.

  17. Detection of Serotype-Specific Antibodies to the Four Dengue Viruses Using an Immune Complex Binding (ICB) ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Emmerich, Petra; Mika, Angela; Schmitz, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue virus (DENV) infections are preferentially diagnosed by detection of specific IgM antibodies, DENV NS1 antigen assays or by amplification of viral RNA in serum samples of the patients. The type-specific immunity to the four worldwide circulating DENV serotypes can be determined by neutralization assays. An alternative to the complicated neutralization assays would be helpful to study the serotype-specific immune response in people in DENV hyperendemic areas but also in subjects upon DENV vaccination. Methods In consecutive samples of patients with DENV-1- 4 infection type-specific antibodies were detected using an immune complex binding (ICB) ELISA. During incubation of serum samples and enzyme- labeled recombinant envelope domain III (EDIII) antigens immune complexes (ICs) are formed, which are simultaneously bound to a solid phase coated with an Fc–receptor (CD32). After a single washing procedure the bound labeled ICs can be determined. To further improve type-specific reactions high concentrations of competing heterologous unlabeled ED III proteins were added to the labeled antigens. Results Follow-up serum samples of 64 patients with RT-PCR confirmed primary DENV-1, -2, -3 or -4 infections were tested against four enzyme-labeled recombinant DENV EDIII antigens. Antibodies to the EDIII antigens were found in 55 patients (sensitivity 86%). A complete agreement between the serotype detected by PCR in early samples and the serotype-specific antibody in later samples was found. Type-specific anti-EDIII antibodies were first detected 9–20 days after onset of the disease. In 21% of the samples collected from people in Vietnam secondary infections with antibodies to two serotypes could be identified. Conclusions The data obtained with the ICB-ELISA show that after primary DENV infection the corresponding type-specific antibodies are detected in almost all samples collected at least two weeks after onset of the disease. The method will be of value

  18. A Very-High-Specific-Impulse Relativistic Laser Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kimura, Itsuro

    2008-04-28

    Characteristics of compact laser plasma accelerators utilizing high-power laser and thin-target interaction were reviewed as a potential candidate of future spacecraft thrusters capable of generating relativistic plasma beams for interstellar missions. Based on the special theory of relativity, motion of the relativistic plasma beam exhausted from the thruster was formulated. Relationships of thrust, specific impulse, input power and momentum coupling coefficient for the relativistic plasma thruster were derived. It was shown that under relativistic conditions, the thrust could be extremely large even with a small amount of propellant flow rate. Moreover, it was shown that for a given value of input power thrust tended to approach the value of the photon rocket under the relativistic conditions regardless of the propellant flow rate.

  19. Event-specific qualitative and quantitative PCR methods for the detection of genetically modified rapeseed Oxy-235.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Wu, Yuhua; Xiao, Ling; Lu, Changming

    2008-10-01

    Oxy-235 is an oxynil-tolerant genetically modified rapeseed approved for commercialized planting in Canada. The aim of this study was to establish event-specific qualitative and quantitative detection methods for Oxy-235. Both the 5'- and 3'-junction sequences spanning the plant DNA and the integrated gene construct of the Oxy-235 event were isolated, sequenced and analyzed. A 1298-bp deletion of the rapeseed genomic DNA that showed a high similarity to the mRNA sequence of Arabidopsis thaliana was found in the integration site of the insert DNA. Event-specific qualitative PCR methods were established, with one method producing a 105-bp product specific for the 5'-integration junction and the other method producing a 124-bp product specific for the 3'-junction. The absolute detection limits for the qualitative PCR were determined to be 100 initial template copies for the 5'-junction and ten for the 3'-junction. Quantitative methods were also developed that targeted both of the junction fragments. The limit of detection of the quantitative PCR analysis was ten initial template copies for either the 5'- or 3'-junction, while the limit of quantification was determined to be approximately 50 initial template copies. The real-time PCR systems so established were examined with two mixed rapeseed samples with known Oxy-235 contents and found to obtain the expected results.

  20. One-step, multiplexed fluorescence detection of microRNAs based on duplex-specific nuclease signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bin-Cheng; Liu, Yu-Qiang; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2012-03-21

    Traditional molecular beacons, widely applied for detection of nucleic acids, have an intrinsic limitation on sensitivity, as one target molecule converts only one beacon molecule to its fluorescent form. Herein, we take advantage of the duplex-specific nuclease (DSN) to create a new signal-amplifying mechanism, duplex-specific nuclease signal amplification (DSNSA), to increase the detection sensitivity of molecular beacons (Taqman probes). DSN nuclease is employed to recycle the process of target-assisted digestion of Taqman probes, thus, resulting in a significant fluorescence signal amplification through which one target molecule cleaves thousands of probe molecules. We further demonstrate the efficiency of this DSNSA strategy for rapid direct quantification of multiple miRNAs in biological samples. Our experimental results showed a quantitative measurement of sequence-specific miRNAs with the detection limit in the femtomolar range, nearly 5 orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional molecular beacons. This amplification strategy also demonstrated a high selectivity for discriminating differences between miRNA family members. Considering the superior sensitivity and specificity, as well as the multiplex and simple-to-implement features, this method promises a great potential of becoming a routine tool for simultaneously quantitative analysis of multiple miRNAs in tissues or cells, and supplies valuable information for biomedical research and clinical early diagnosis.

  1. Flanking sequence determination and event-specific detection of genetically modified wheat B73-6-1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junyi; Cao, Jijuan; Cao, Dongmei; Zhao, Tongtong; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Piqiao; Luan, Fengxia

    2013-05-01

    In order to establish a specific identification method for genetically modified (GM) wheat, exogenous insert DNA and flanking sequence between exogenous fragment and recombinant chromosome of GM wheat B73-6-1 were successfully acquired by means of conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL)-PCR strategies. Newly acquired exogenous fragment covered the full-length sequence of transformed genes such as transformed plasmid and corresponding functional genes including marker uidA, herbicide-resistant bar, ubiquitin promoter, and high-molecular-weight gluten subunit. The flanking sequence between insert DNA revealed high similarity with Triticum turgidum A gene (GenBank: AY494981.1). A specific PCR detection method for GM wheat B73-6-1 was established on the basis of primers designed according to the flanking sequence. This specific PCR method was validated by GM wheat, GM corn, GM soybean, GM rice, and non-GM wheat. The specifically amplified target band was observed only in GM wheat B73-6-1. This method is of high specificity, high reproducibility, rapid identification, and excellent accuracy for the identification of GM wheat B73-6-1. PMID:23449073

  2. Highly sensitive detection of dipicolinic acid with a water-dispersible terbium-metal organic framework.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Neha; Bhardwaj, Sanjeev; Mehta, Jyotsana; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Deep, Akash

    2016-12-15

    The sensitive detection of dipicolinic acid (DPA) is strongly associated with the sensing of bacterial organisms in food and many types of environmental samples. To date, the demand for a sensitive detection method for bacterial toxicity has increased remarkably. Herein, we investigated the DPA detection potential of a water-dispersible terbium-metal organic framework (Tb-MOF) based on the fluorescence quenching mechanism. The Tb-MOF showed a highly sensitive ability to detect DPA at a limit of detection of 0.04nM (linear range of detection: 1nM to 5µM) and also offered enhanced selectivity from other commonly associated organic molecules. The present study provides a basis for the application of Tb-MOF for direct, convenient, highly sensitive, and specific detection of DPA in the actual samples.

  3. Highly sensitive detection of dipicolinic acid with a water-dispersible terbium-metal organic framework.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Neha; Bhardwaj, Sanjeev; Mehta, Jyotsana; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Deep, Akash

    2016-12-15

    The sensitive detection of dipicolinic acid (DPA) is strongly associated with the sensing of bacterial organisms in food and many types of environmental samples. To date, the demand for a sensitive detection method for bacterial toxicity has increased remarkably. Herein, we investigated the DPA detection potential of a water-dispersible terbium-metal organic framework (Tb-MOF) based on the fluorescence quenching mechanism. The Tb-MOF showed a highly sensitive ability to detect DPA at a limit of detection of 0.04nM (linear range of detection: 1nM to 5µM) and also offered enhanced selectivity from other commonly associated organic molecules. The present study provides a basis for the application of Tb-MOF for direct, convenient, highly sensitive, and specific detection of DPA in the actual samples. PMID:27479046

  4. Development of a Specific Diagnostic System for Detecting Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus from Chinese Cabbage in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Rho, J Y

    2016-03-01

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) is a plant pathogenic virus transmitted mainly through its host Brassica spp. TYMV is originated from Europe. Its infection cases have been reported in Australia, Brazil, Turkey, and Japan. Symptoms similar to those of TYMV infections were also reported in Korea in 2012. In this study, we developed RT-PCR primer pairs that were highly sensitive for detecting TYMV. The developed RT-PCR primer pairs offered about 10-100 times stronger detection sensitivity compared to primer pairs previously used in Korea. As a result, a 491 bp TYMV-specific band was identified. The specific band was confirmed to be TYMV based on sequencing results and phylogenetic analysis. The RT-PCR primer pairs developed in this study can be used to rapidly and precisely diagnose TYMV in agricultural products such as Chinese cabbage and other crops infected by TYMV. PMID:26843703

  5. A graphene oxide-based FRET sensor for rapid and specific detection of unfolded collagen fragments.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiuxia; Fan, Jun; Zhang, Yuping; Chen, Hongli; Zhao, Yongqing; Xiao, Jianxi

    2016-05-15

    The unstructured collagen species plays a critical role in a variety of important biological processes as well as pathological conditions. In order to develop novel diagnosis and therapies for collagen-related diseases, it is essential to construct simple and efficient methods to detect unfolded collagen fragments. We therefore have designed a FITC-labeled collagen mimic triple helical peptide, whose adsorption on the surface of GO effectively quenches its fluorescence. The newly constructed GO/FITC-GPO complex specifically detects unstructured collagen fragments, but not fully folded triple helix species. The detection shows a clear preference for the collagen targets with complementary GPO-rich sequences. The conformation-sensitive, sequence-specific GO-based approach can be applied as an efficient biosensor for rapid detection of unfolded collagen fragments at nM level, and may have great potential in drug screening for inhibitors of unfolded collagen. It may provide a prototype to develop GO-based assays to detect other important unstructured proteins involved in diseases.

  6. Detection of neuroendocrine tumors using promoter-specific secreted Gaussia luciferase.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Alan Wei-Shun; Akerstrom, Victoria; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate detection of neuroendocrine (NE) tumors is critically important for better prognosis and treatment outcomes in patients. To demonstrate the efficacy of using an adenoviral vector for the detection of NE tumors, we have constructed a pair of adenoviral vectors which, in combination, can conditionally replicate and release Gaussia luciferase into the circulation after infecting the NE tumors. The expression of these two vectors is regulated upstream by an INSM1-promoter (insulinoma-associated-1) that is specifically active in NE tumors and developing NE tissues, but silenced in normal adult tissues. In order to retain the tumor-specificity of the INSM1 promoter, we have modified the promoter using the core insulator sequence from the chicken β-globin HS4 insulator and the neuronal restrictive silencing element (NRSE). This modified INSM1-promoter can retain NE tumor specificity in an adenoviral construct while driving a mutated adenovirus E1A gene (∆24E1A), the Metridia, or Gaussia luciferase gene. The in vitro cell line and mouse xenograft human tumor studies revealed the NE specificity of the INSM1-promoter in NE lung cancer, neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma, retinoblastoma, and insulinoma. When we combined the INSM1-promoter driven Gaussia luciferase with ∆24E1A, the co-infected NE tumor secreted higher levels of Gaussia luciferase as compared to the INSM1p-Gaussia virus alone. In a mouse subcutaneous xenograft tumor model, the combination viruses secreted detectable level of Gaussia luciferase after infecting an INSM1-positive NE lung tumor for ≥12 days. Therefore, the INSM1-promoter specific conditional replicating adenovirus represents a sensitive diagnostic tool to aid clinicians in the detection of NE tumors. PMID:26530405

  7. Specific detection of live Escherichia coli O157:H7 using tetracysteine-tagged PP01 bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lina; Song, Yiyi; Luan, Tian; Ma, Ling; Su, Liuqin; Wang, Shuo; Yan, Xiaomei

    2016-12-15

    Sensitive and rapid detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7, one of the most notorious bacterial pathogens, is urgently needed for public health protection. Yet, the existing methods are either lack of speed or limited in discriminating viable and dead cells. Using a recombinant bacteriophage, here we report the development of a rapid and sensitive method for live E. coli O157:H7 detection. First, the wild-type PP01 phage was engineered with a tetracysteine (TC)-tag fused with the small outer capsid (SOC) protein. Then, this PP01-TC phage was used to inoculate bacterial sample for 30min. Specific infection and rapid replication of PP01-TC phage in viable E. coli O157:H7 host cell yields a large number of progeny phages with capsids displaying TC tags that can be fluorescently labeled by a membrane permeable biarsenical dye (FlAsH). The bright green fluorescence of single E. coli O157:H7 cells can be readily detected by flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence microscopy. High specificity of the assay was verified with seven other bacterial strains. Practical application in E. coli O157:H7 detection in drinks was successfully demonstrated with artificially contaminated 100% apple juice. In less than three hours (including sample preconcentration) and with 40mL of sample volume, as low as 1cfu/mL E. coli O157:H7 can be detected in the presence of large excess of other nontarget bacteria via fluorescence microscopic measurement. The as-developed TC-PP01-FlAsH approach shows a great potential in the safeguard of liquid food products by providing rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of live E. coli O157:H7.

  8. Use of Specific rRNA Oligonucleotide Probes for Microscopic Detection of Mycobacterium avium Complex Organisms in Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Amand, Allison L. St.; Frank, Daniel N.; De Groote, Mary Ann; Pace, Norman R.

    2005-01-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are important environmental pathogens that are implicated in several chronic, idiopathic diseases. Diagnosis of MAC-based diseases is compromised by the need to cultivate these fastidious and slowly growing organisms in order to identify which mycobacterial species are present. Detection is particularly difficult when MAC is intracellular or embedded within mammalian tissues. We report on the development of culture-independent, in situ hybridization (ISH) assays for the detection of MAC in culture, sputum, and tissue. This assay includes a highly reliable technique for the permeabilization of mycobacterial cells within culture and tissues. We describe a set of rRNA-based oligonucleotide probes that specifically detect either M. intracellulare, the two M. avium subspecies associated with human disease, or all members of MAC. The results call into question the validity of ISH results derived by the use of other gene loci, such as IS900. PMID:15814959

  9. Sensitive and specific detection of pine nut (Pinus spp.) by real-time PCR in complex food products.

    PubMed

    Garino, Cristiano; De Paolis, Angelo; Coïsson, Jean Daniel; Bianchi, Daniela Manila; Decastelli, Lucia; Arlorio, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Pine nuts are a known source of food allergens and several cases of adverse immunological reaction after ingestion have been reported. To protect allergic consumers, methods to unequivocally detect the presence of pine nuts in complex matrices must be developed. A Taqman-based real time PCR method for the detection of Pinus spp. was set up. A homemade pesto spiked at known concentration of pine nut powder was used as model food. Moreover, DNA was purified from commercial foods declaring or not the presence of pine nuts. The method displayed a very high efficiency and specificity for the genus Pinus. The intrinsic LOD was 1pg of DNA, while the practical LOD evaluated on model foods was 0.1ppm of pine nuts powder, the lowest ever registered for the detection of food allergens via real-time PCR. Finally, the declared presence/absence of pine nut in commercial foods was confirmed.

  10. Specific dot-immunobinding assay for detection and enumeration of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    SciTech Connect

    Arredondo, R.; Jerez, C.A. )

    1989-08-01

    A specific and very sensitive dot-immunobinding assay for the detection and enumeration of the bioleaching microorganism Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was developed. Nitrocellulose spotted with samples was incubated with polyclonal antisera against whole T. ferrooxidans cells and then in {sup 125}I-labeled protein A or {sup 125}I-labeled goat antirabbit immunoglobulin G; incubation was followed by autoradiography. Since a minimum of 10{sup 3} cells per dot could be detected, the method offers the possibility of simultaneous processing of numerous samples in a short time to monitor the levels of T. ferrooxidans in bioleaching operations.

  11. Detection and identification of Entamoeba gingivalis by specific amplification of rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Kikuta, N; Yamamoto, A; Goto, N

    1996-12-01

    A pair of oligonucleotide primers were designed from the nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SrRNA) of the oral protozoan parasite Entamoeba gingivalis. The primers amplified a 1.4-kb DNA fragment by polymerase chain reaction and were specific for Entamoeba gingivalis but not for other protozoa, oral protists and bacteria, or human leukocytes. With this method, the DNA from as few as 30 cells of Entamoeba gingivalis could be detected. These results suggest that this approach is applicable to the detection and identification of Entamoeba gingivalis in the human oral cavity.

  12. Specific Dot-Immunobinding Assay for Detection and Enumeration of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo, Renato; Jerez, Carlos A.

    1989-01-01

    A specific and very sensitive dot-immunobinding assay for the detection and enumeration of the bioleaching microorganism Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was developed. Nitrocellulose spotted with samples was incubated with polyclonal antisera against whole T. ferrooxidans cells and then in 125I-labeled protein A or 125I-labeled goat antirabbit immunoglobulin G; incubation was followed by autoradiography. Since a minimum of 103 cells per dot could be detected, the method offers the possibility of simultaneous processing of numerous samples in a short time to monitor the levels of T. ferrooxidans in bioleaching operations. Images PMID:16347993

  13. Nanoporous ultra-high specific surface inorganic fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanehata, Masaki; Ding, Bin; Shiratori, Seimei

    2007-08-01

    Nanoporous inorganic (silica) nanofibres with ultra-high specific surface have been fabricated by electrospinning the blend solutions of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and colloidal silica nanoparticles, followed by selective removal of the PVA component. The configurations of the composite and inorganic nanofibres were investigated by changing the average silica particle diameters and the concentrations of colloidal silica particles in polymer solutions. After the removal of PVA by calcination, the fibre shape of pure silica particle assembly was maintained. The nanoporous silica fibres were assembled as a porous membrane with a high surface roughness. From the results of Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements, the BET surface area of inorganic silica nanofibrous membranes was increased with the decrease of the particle diameters. The membrane composed of silica particles with diameters of 15 nm showed the largest BET surface area of 270.3 m2 g-1 and total pore volume of 0.66 cm3 g-1. The physical absorption of methylene blue dye molecules by nanoporous silica membranes was examined using UV-vis spectrometry. Additionally, the porous silica membranes modified with fluoroalkylsilane showed super-hydrophobicity due to their porous structures.

  14. Plasmoid Thruster for High Specific-Impulse Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fimognari, Peter; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Lee, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A report discusses a new multi-turn, multi-lead design for the first generation PT-1 (Plasmoid Thruster) that produces thrust by expelling plasmas with embedded magnetic fields (plasmoids) at high velocities. This thruster is completely electrodeless, capable of using in-situ resources, and offers efficiencies as high as 70 percent at a specific impulse, I(sub sp), of up to 8,000 s. This unit consists of drive and bias coils wound around a ceramic form, and the capacitor bank and switches are an integral part of the assembly. Multiple thrusters may be gauged to inductively recapture unused energy to boost efficiency and to increase the repetition rate, which, in turn increases the average thrust of the system. The thruster assembly can use storable propellants such as H2O, ammonia, and NO, among others. Any available propellant gases can be used to produce an I(sub sp) in the range of 2,000 to 8,000 s with a single-stage thruster. These capabilities will allow the transport of greater payloads to outer planets, especially in the case of an I(sub sp) greater than 6,000 s.

  15. Behavior construction and refinement from high-level specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martignoni, Andrew J., III; Smart, William D.

    2004-12-01

    Mobile robots are excellent examples of systems that need to show a high level of autonomy. Often robots are loosely supervised by humans who are not intimately familiar with the inner workings of the robot. We cannot generally predict exact environmental conditions in which the robot will operate in advance. This means that the behavior must be adapted in the field. Untrained individuals cannot (and probably should not) program the robot to effect these changes. We need a system that will (a) allow re-tasking, and (b) allow adaptation of the behavior to the specific conditions in the field. In this paper we concentrate on (b). We will describe how to assemble controllers, based on high-level descriptions of the behavior. We will show how the behavior can be tuned by the human, despite not knowing how the code is put together. We will also show how this can be done automatically, using reinforcement learning, and point out the problems that must be overcome for this approach to work.

  16. Highly efficient site-specific transgenesis in cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transgenes introduced into cancer cell lines serve as powerful tools for identification of genes involved in cancer. However, the random nature of genomic integration site of a transgene highly influences the fidelity, reliability and level of its expression. In order to alleviate this bottleneck, we characterized the potential utility of a novel PhiC31 integrase-mediated site-specific insertion system (PhiC31-IMSI) for introduction of transgenes into a pre-inserted docking site in the genome of cancer cells. Methods According to this system, a “docking-site” was first randomly inserted into human cancer cell lines and clones with a single copy were selected. Subsequently, an “incoming” vector containing the gene of interest was specifically inserted in the docking-site using PhiC31. Results Using the Pc-3 and SKOV-3 cancer cell lines, we showed that transgene insertion is reproducible and reliable. Furthermore, the selection system ensured that all surviving stable transgenic lines harbored the correct integration site. We demonstrated that the expression levels of reporter genes, such as green fluorescent protein and luciferase, from the same locus were comparable among sister, isogenic clones. Using in vivo xenograft studies, we showed that the genetically altered cancer cell lines retain the properties of the parental line. To achieve temporal control of transgene expression, we coupled our insertion strategy with the doxycycline inducible system and demonstrated tight regulation of the expression of the antiangiogenic molecule sFlt-1-Fc in Pc-3 cells. Furthermore, we introduced the luciferase gene into the insertion cassette allowing for possible live imaging of cancer cells in transplantation assays. We also generated a series of Gateway cloning-compatible intermediate cassettes ready for high-throughput cloning of transgenes and demonstrated that PhiC31-IMSI can be achieved in a high throughput 96-well plate format. Conclusions The novel

  17. Highly sensitive digoxigenin-labelled DNA probe for the detection of potato spindle tuber viroid.

    PubMed

    Welnicki, M; Hiruki, C

    1992-09-01

    A molecular probe pSPAv6.2(+), with concatameric insert representing 6.2-times repeated copy of potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTV) RNA, was labelled with digoxigenin and used to detect PSTV by dot-blot hybridization assay. The probe was highly sensitive and specific, detecting as little as 2.5 pg of PSTV RNA. Both severe and mild PSTV strains were detectable in 64-512-times diluted crude extracts from infected tomato leaves, and potato leaves, sprouts, and seeds. For extraction of plant tissue three buffers were compared to determine the lowest non-specific background and the highest sensitivity. The results showed that the digoxigenin-labelled probe is as sensitive as the 32P-labelled probe and can replace radioactive techniques in PSTV detection. With such high sensitivity, the probe is also potentially useful for detecting the viroid in composite samples of mass-indexing programs.

  18. Human breast milk contains procathepsin D--detection by specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Vĕtvicka, V; Vágner, J; Baudys, M; Tang, J; Foundling, S I; Fusek, M

    1993-08-01

    The presence of the zymogen of cathepsin D in human milk was detected using antibodies specific for the proenzyme and by the proteolytic activity at low pH. The antibodies were raised against a synthetic propeptide of human cathepsin D and were tested using immunoprecipitations and western blots of samples from different breast cancer cell lines as well as cytosol fractions of human breast cancer tissues. In all experiments these antibodies recognized specifically procathepsin D. Procathepsin D from human milk was partially activated at low pH. The activity was monitored using hemoglobin 14C proteolytic assay, and it was abolished by pepstatin A--a specific inhibitor of aspartic proteinases. Western blots did not reveal presence of cathepsin B or cathepsin H. These data indicate specific secretion of cathepsin D in human breast milk.

  19. High-throughput time-stretch microscopy with morphological and chemical specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Cheng; Ugawa, Masashi; Nozawa, Taisuke; Ideguchi, Takuro; Di Carlo, Dino; Ota, Sadao; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2016-03-01

    Particle analysis is an effective method in analytical chemistry for sizing and counting microparticles such as emulsions, colloids, and biological cells. However, conventional methods for particle analysis, which fall into two extreme categories, have severe limitations. Sieving and Coulter counting are capable of analyzing particles with high throughput, but due to their lack of detailed information such as morphological and chemical characteristics, they can only provide statistical results with low specificity. On the other hand, CCD or CMOS image sensors can be used to analyze individual microparticles with high content, but due to their slow charge download, the frame rate (hence, the throughput) is significantly limited. Here by integrating a time-stretch optical microscope with a three-color fluorescent analyzer on top of an inertial-focusing microfluidic device, we demonstrate an optofluidic particle analyzer with a sub-micrometer spatial resolution down to 780 nm and a high throughput of 10,000 particles/s. In addition to its morphological specificity, the particle analyzer provides chemical specificity to identify chemical expressions of particles via fluorescence detection. Our results indicate that we can identify different species of microparticles with high specificity without sacrificing throughput. Our method holds promise for high-precision statistical particle analysis in chemical industry and pharmaceutics.

  20. Coliform detection in cheese is associated with specific cheese characteristics, but no association was found with pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Trmčić, A; Chauhan, K; Kent, D J; Ralyea, R D; Martin, N H; Boor, K J; Wiedmann, M

    2016-08-01

    . monocytogenes. Although no association was found between coliform and Listeria spp. detection, Listeria spp. were significantly more likely to be detected in cheese with the washed type of rind. Our data provide information on specific risk factors for pathogen detection in cheese, which will facilitate development of risk-based strategies to control microbial food safety hazards in cheese, and suggest that generic coliform testing cannot be used to assess the safety of natural cheese. PMID:27289158

  1. Coliform detection in cheese is associated with specific cheese characteristics, but no association was found with pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Trmčić, A; Chauhan, K; Kent, D J; Ralyea, R D; Martin, N H; Boor, K J; Wiedmann, M

    2016-08-01

    . monocytogenes. Although no association was found between coliform and Listeria spp. detection, Listeria spp. were significantly more likely to be detected in cheese with the washed type of rind. Our data provide information on specific risk factors for pathogen detection in cheese, which will facilitate development of risk-based strategies to control microbial food safety hazards in cheese, and suggest that generic coliform testing cannot be used to assess the safety of natural cheese.

  2. Prostate-specific Antigen Density Variation Rate as a Potential Guideline Parameter for Second Prostate Cancer Detection Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gan-Sheng; Lyv, Jin-Xing; Li, Gang; Yan, Chun-Yin; Hou, Jian-Quan; Pu, Jin-Xian; Ding, Xiang; Huang, Yu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background: The diagnostic value of current prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests is challenged by the poor detection rate of prostate cancer (PCa) in repeat prostate biopsy. In this study, we proposed a novel PSA-related parameter named PSA density variation rate (PSADVR) and designed a clinical trial to evaluate its potential diagnostic value for detecting PCa on a second prostate biopsy. Methods: Data from 184 males who underwent second ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy 6 months after the first biopsy were included in the study. The subjects were divided into PCa and non-PCa groups according to the second biopsy pathological results. Prostate volume, PSA density (PSAD), free-total PSA ratio, and PSADVR were calculated according to corresponding formulas at the second biopsy. These parameters were compared using t-test or Mann-Whitney U-test between PCa and non-PCa groups, and receiver operating characteristic analysis were used to evaluate their predictability on PCa detection. Results: PCa was detected in 24 patients on the second biopsy. Mean values of PSA, PSAD, and PSADVR were greater in the PCa group than in the non-PCa group (8.39 μg/L vs. 7.16 μg/L, 0.20 vs. 0.16, 14.15% vs. −1.36%, respectively). PSADVR had the largest area under the curve, with 0.667 sensitivity and 0.824 specificity when the cutoff was 10%. The PCa detection rate was significantly greater in subjects with PSADVR >10% than PSADVR ≤10% (28.6% vs. 6.5%, P < 0.001). In addition, PSADVR was the only parameter in this study that showed a significant correlation with mid-to-high-risk PCa (r = 0.63, P = 0.03). Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that PSADVR improved the PCa detection rate on second biopsies, especially for mid-to-high-risk cancers requiring prompt treatment. PMID:27453228

  3. Device for detecting the specific gravity of a liquid. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Derouin, C.R.; Kerwin, W.J.; McCormick, J.B.; Bobbett, R.E.

    1980-11-18

    A device for detecting the specific gravity of a liquid and a device for detecting the state of charge of a liquid phase electrolyte battery are described. In one embodiment of the present invention, a change in the critical angle of total internal reflection is utilized to determine the index of refraction of the liquid to be measured. It is shown that the index of refraction of the liquid is a function of the specific gravity of the liquid. In applications for measuring the state of charge of a battery, the specific gravity is proportional to the state of charge of the battery. A change in intensity of rays intersecting an interface surface indicates the critical angle which is a direct indication of the specific gravity of the liquid and the state of charge of a battery. In another embodiment, a light beam is projected through a transparent medium and then through a portion of the liquid to be measured. A change in refraction due to a change in the index of refraction of the liquid produces a deflection of the beam which is measured by a detector. The magnitude of deflection of the beam is directly proportional to the specific gravity of the liquid and the state of charge of a battery.

  4. A nanoparticle label/immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor for rapid and sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ying-Ying; Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Wu, Hong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-06-15

    We present a nanoparticle (NP) label/immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor (IEB) for rapid and sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in human serum. This IEB integrates the immunochromatographic strip with the electrochemical detector for transducing quantitative signals. The NP label, made of CdSe@ZnS, serves as a signal-amplifier vehicle. A sandwich immunoreaction was performed on the immunochromatographic strip. The captured NP labels in the test zone were determined by highly sensitive stripping voltammetric measurement of the dissolved metallic component (cadmium) with a disposable-screen-printed electrode, which is embedded underneath the membrane of the test zone. Experimental parameters (e.g., immunoreaction time, the amount of anti-PSA-NP conjugations applied) and electrochemical detection conditions (e.g., preconcentration potential and time) were optimized using this biosensor for PSA detection. The analytical performance of this biosensor was evaluated with serum PSA samples according to the “figure-of-merits” (e.g., dynamic range, reproducibility, and detection limit). The results were validated with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and show high consistency. It is found that this biosensor is very sensitive with the detection limit of 0.02 ng/mL PSA and is quite reproducible. This method is rapid, clinically accurate, and less expensive than other diagnosis tools for PSA; therefore, this IEB coupled with a portable electrochemical analyzer shows great promise for simple, sensitive, quantitative point-of-care testing of disease-related protein biomarkers.

  5. A novel agglutination test for antigen-specific detection of platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Oliver; Agaylan, Ashraf; Borchert, Hans-Hubert; Aslan, Tunay; Bombard, Stéphane; Kiesewetter, Holger; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2006-10-15

    A simple and rapid antigen-specific assay for the identification antibodies to platelets is lacking, yet. Red-dyed polystyrene microbeads were coated with monoclonal antibodies to various platelet glycoprotein complexes, and used for the detection of platelet autoantibodies and alloantibodies. The results were largely identical with those obtained by monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigen assay (MAIPA). The new test is reliable yet less complex and time-consuming than the currently available assays, and it can be implemented in any routine laboratory. PMID:16933262

  6. A rapid method for detecting specific amplified PCR fragments in microtiter plates.

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, A; Ritter, E

    1996-01-01

    A simple method is presented to circumvent laborious and time consuming electrophoretic separations of specific PCR amplification products. Specific target DNA is amplified using nucleotides labelled with DIG-dUTP or biotin-dCTP. The labelled PCR products are separated from unincorporated nucleotides or oligonucleotides by using a positively charged DEAE cellulose matrix. Amplification products are visualized directly in the matrix using immunoenzymatic methods or streptavidin-conjugated enzymes. The detection process can be carried out within 2 h, allows the processing of large sample sizes and can potentially be automated. PMID:8774915

  7. A specific molecular beacon probe for the detection of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu Lin; McGoldrick, Christopher A; Yin, Deling; Zhao, Jing; Patel, Vini; Brannon, Marianne F; Lightner, Janet W; Krishnan, Koyamangalath; Stone, William L

    2012-06-01

    The small-molecule, water-soluble molecular beacon probe 1 is hydrolyzed by the lysate and living cells of human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP), resulting in strong green fluorescence. In contrast, probe 1 does not undergo significant hydrolysis in either the lysate or living cells of human nontumorigenic prostate cells (RWPE-1). These results, corroborated by UV-Vis spectroscopy and fluorescent microscopy, reveal that probe 1 is a sensitive and specific fluorogenic and chromogenic sensor for the detection of human prostate cancer cells among nontumorigenic prostate cells and that carboxylesterase activity is a specific biomarker for human prostate cancer cells.

  8. Site specific probability of passive acoustic detection of humpback whale calls from single fixed hydrophones.

    PubMed

    Helble, Tyler A; D'Spain, Gerald L; Hildebrand, John A; Campbell, Gregory S; Campbell, Richard L; Heaney, Kevin D

    2013-09-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammal calls is an increasingly important method for assessing population numbers, distribution, and behavior. A common mistake in the analysis of marine mammal acoustic data is formulating conclusions about these animals without first understanding how environmental properties such as bathymetry, sediment properties, water column sound speed, and ocean acoustic noise influence the detection and character of vocalizations in the acoustic data. The approach in this paper is to use Monte Carlo simulations with a full wave field acoustic propagation model to characterize the site specific probability of detection of six types of humpback whale calls at three passive acoustic monitoring locations off the California coast. Results show that the probability of detection can vary by factors greater than ten when comparing detections across locations, or comparing detections at the same location over time, due to environmental effects. Effects of uncertainties in the inputs to the propagation model are also quantified, and the model accuracy is assessed by comparing calling statistics amassed from 24,690 humpback units recorded in the month of October 2008. Under certain conditions, the probability of detection can be estimated with uncertainties sufficiently small to allow for accurate density estimates.

  9. Rapid and high-throughput detection of highly pathogenic bacteria by Ibis PLEX-ID technology.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Daniela; Sauer, Uschi; Housley, Roberta; Washington, Cicely; Sannes-Lowery, Kristin; Ecker, David J; Sampath, Rangarajan; Grunow, Roland

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we describe the identification of highly pathogenic bacteria using an assay coupling biothreat group-specific PCR with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) run on an Ibis PLEX-ID high-throughput platform. The biothreat cluster assay identifies most of the potential bioterrorism-relevant microorganisms including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei and pseudomallei, Brucella species, and Coxiella burnetii. DNA from 45 different reference materials with different formulations and different concentrations were chosen and sent to a service screening laboratory that uses the PCR/ESI-MS platform to provide a microbial identification service. The standard reference materials were produced out of a repository built up in the framework of the EU funded project "Establishment of Quality Assurances for Detection of Highly Pathogenic Bacteria of Potential Bioterrorism Risk" (EQADeBa). All samples were correctly identified at least to the genus level.

  10. Detection of mutation by allele-specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (AS-LAMP).

    PubMed

    Aonuma, Hiroka; Badolo, Athanase; Okado, Kiyoshi; Kanuka, Hirotaka

    2013-01-01

    For effective control of pathogen-transmitting mosquitoes, precise surveillance data of mosquito distribution are essential. Recently, an increase of insecticide resistance due to the kdr mutation in Anopheles gambiae, a mosquito that transmits the malaria parasite, has been reported. With the aim of developing a simple and effective method for surveying resistant mosquitoes, LAMP was applied to the allele-specific detection of the kdr gene in An. gambiae. Allele-specific LAMP (AS-LAMP) method successfully distinguished the kdr homozygote from the heterozygote and the wild type. The robustness of AS-LAMP suggests its usefulness for routine identification of insects, not only mosquitoes but also other vectors and agricultural pests. Here we describe the method of AS-LAMP to detect mutation in Anopheles mosquitoes. PMID:24026691

  11. [Immunochemical Detection of Azospirilla in Soil with Genus-Specific Antibodies].

    PubMed

    Shirokov, A A; Krasov, A I; Selivanov, N Yu; Burygin, G L; Shchegolev, S Yu; Matora, L Yu

    2015-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis and immunodiffusion analysis with antibodies to whole intact cells of the type strain of nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 revealed at least three conservative surface immunogenic proteins of azospirilla. Cross-reactions with these proteins made it possible to use the above antibodies for detection of azospirilla as a genus-specific probe conjugated with horseradish peroxidase as an enzymatic label. Direct immune-enzyme analysis of soil suspensions (typical chernozem, Saratov oblast) confirmed applicability of the conjugates based on genus-specific antibodies to the surface proteins of azospirilla for direct detection of this bacterial genus in environmental samples. These results provide a basis for broad application of this method for analysis of Azospirillum occurrence in soil.

  12. Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction Primers for the Detection of Plasmodiophora brassicae in Soil and Water.

    PubMed

    Faggian, R; Bulman, S R; Lawrie, A C; Porter, I J

    1999-05-01

    ABSTRACT The development of specific oligonucleotide primers for Plasmodiophora brassicae has led to a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection method for P. brassicae in soil and water. Initially, the PCR was used to amplify a section of the rDNA repeat. The PCR products were sequenced and the data used to design primers that were directed at the ribosomal RNA genes and internal transcribed spacer regions. Specificity was tested against more than 40 common soil organisms, host plants, and spore suspension contaminants, as well as P. brassicae isolates from around Australia and the world. Sensitivity was determined to be 0.1 fentograms (fg; 10(-15) g) for pure template and as low as 1,000 spores per g of potting mix. In soil, P. brassicae was detected in all soils where the inoculum was sufficient to result in clubroot symptoms. Also outlined is a simple method of DNA extraction from soil. PMID:18944752

  13. Sequence specific detection of bacterial 23S ribosomal RNA by TLR13

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Zhijian J

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) detect microbial infections and trigger innate immune responses. Among vertebrate TLRs, the role of TLR13 and its ligand are unknown. Here we show that TLR13 detects the 23S ribosomal RNA of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. A sequence containing 13 nucleotides near the active site of 23S rRNA ribozyme, which catalyzes peptide bond synthesis, was both necessary and sufficient to trigger TLR13-dependent interleukin-1β production. Single point mutations within this sequence destroyed the ability of the 23S rRNA to stimulate the TLR13 pathway. Knockout of TLR13 in mice abolished the induction of interleukin-1β and other cytokines by the 23S rRNA sequence. Thus, TLR13 detects bacterial RNA with exquisite sequence specificity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00102.001 PMID:23110254

  14. High-throughput detection method for influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Bartoszek, Allison E; Moran, Thomas M; Gorski, Jack; Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Navidad, Jose F; Thakar, Monica S; Malarkannan, Subramaniam

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus is a respiratory pathogen that causes a high degree of morbidity and mortality every year in multiple parts of the world. Therefore, precise diagnosis of the infecting strain and rapid high-throughput screening of vast numbers of clinical samples is paramount to control the spread of pandemic infections. Current clinical diagnoses of influenza infections are based on serologic testing, polymerase chain reaction, direct specimen immunofluorescence and cell culture (1,2). Here, we report the development of a novel diagnostic technique used to detect live influenza viruses. We used the mouse-adapted human A/PR/8/34 (PR8, H1N1) virus (3) to test the efficacy of this technique using MDCK cells (4). MDCK cells (10(4) or 5 x 10(3) per well) were cultured in 96- or 384-well plates, infected with PR8 and viral proteins were detected using anti-M2 followed by an IR dye-conjugated secondary antibody. M2 (5) and hemagglutinin (1) are two major marker proteins used in many different diagnostic assays. Employing IR-dye-conjugated secondary antibodies minimized the autofluorescence associated with other fluorescent dyes. The use of anti-M2 antibody allowed us to use the antigen-specific fluorescence intensity as a direct metric of viral quantity. To enumerate the fluorescence intensity, we used the LI-COR Odyssey-based IR scanner. This system uses two channel laser-based IR detections to identify fluorophores and differentiate them from background noise. The first channel excites at 680 nm and emits at 700 nm to help quantify the background. The second channel detects fluorophores that excite at 780 nm and emit at 800 nm. Scanning of PR8-infected MDCK cells in the IR scanner indicated a viral titer-dependent bright fluorescence. A positive correlation of fluorescence intensity to virus titer starting from 10(2)-10(5) PFU could be consistently observed. Minimal but detectable positivity consistently seen with 10(2)-10(3) PFU PR8 viral titers demonstrated the high

  15. Immunodiagnosis of Paracoccidioidomycosis due to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Using a Latex Test: Detection of Specific Antibody Anti-gp43 and Specific Antigen gp43

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Priscila Oliveira; Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Fernandes, Geisa Ferreira; da Silva, Silvia Helena Marques; Burger, Eva; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2015-01-01

    Background Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a life-threatening systemic disease and is a neglected public health problem in many endemic regions of Latin America. Though several diagnostic methods are available, almost all of them present with some limitations. Method/Principle Findings A latex immunoassay using sensitized latex particles (SLPs) with gp43 antigen, the immunodominant antigen of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, or the monoclonal antibody mAb17c (anti-gp43) was evaluated for antibody or antigen detection in sera, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from patients with PCM due to P. brasiliensis. The gp43-SLPs performed optimally to detect specific antibodies with high levels of sensitivity (98.46%, 95% CI 91.7–100.0), specificity (93.94%, 95% CI 87.3–97.7), and positive (91.4%) and negative (98.9%) predictive values. In addition, we propose the use of mAb17c-SLPs to detect circulating gp43, which would be particularly important in patients with immune deficiencies who fail to produce normal levels of immunoglobulins, achieving good levels of sensitivity (96.92%, 95% CI 89.3–99.6), specificity (88.89%, 95% CI 81.0–94.3), and positive (85.1%) and negative (97.8%) predictive values. Very good agreement between latex tests and double immune diffusion was observed for gp43-SLPs (k = 0.924) and mAb17c-SLPs (k = 0.850), which reinforces the usefulness of our tests for the rapid diagnosis of PCM in less than 10 minutes. Minor cross-reactivity occurred with sera from patients with other fungal infections. We successfully detected antigens and antibodies from CSF and BAL samples. In addition, the latex test was useful for monitoring PCM patients receiving therapy. Conclusions/Significance The high diagnostic accuracy, low cost, reduced assay time, and simplicity of this new latex test offer the potential to be commercialized and makes it an attractive diagnostic assay for use not only in clinics and medical mycology laboratories, but

  16. Construction of Specific Primers for Rapid Detection of South African Exportable Vegetable Macergens.

    PubMed

    Aremu, Bukola Rhoda; Babalola, Olubukola Oluranti

    2015-10-01

    Macergens are bacteria causing great damages to the parenchymatous tissues of vegetable both on the field and in transit. To effectively and rapidly investigate the diversity and distribution of these macergens, four specific primers were designed by retrieving 16S rDNA sequences of pectolytic bacteria from GenBank through the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). These were aligned using ClusterW via BioEdit and primers were designed using Primer3Plus platform. The size and primer location of each species and PCR product size were accurately defined. For specificity enhancement, DNA template of known macergens (Pectobacterium chrysanthermi) and fresh healthy vegetable were used. These primers yielded expected size of approximately 1100 bp product only when tested with known macergens and no amplicon with fresh healthy vegetable was detected. Rapid detection of macergens in rotten vegetable samples was then carried out using these primers. Nucleotide sequences of macergens identified were deposited into the GenBank and were assigned accession numbers. Hence, with these specific primers, macergens can be identified with minimal quantities of the vegetable tissues using molecular techniques, for future use of the quarantine section of the Agricultural Department of the country for quick and rapid detection of macergens before exportation. PMID:26437427

  17. Construction of Specific Primers for Rapid Detection of South African Exportable Vegetable Macergens

    PubMed Central

    Aremu, Bukola Rhoda; Babalola, Olubukola Oluranti

    2015-01-01

    Macergens are bacteria causing great damages to the parenchymatous tissues of vegetable both on the field and in transit. To effectively and rapidly investigate the diversity and distribution of these macergens, four specific primers were designed by retrieving 16S rDNA sequences of pectolytic bacteria from GenBank through the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). These were aligned using ClusterW via BioEdit and primers were designed using Primer3Plus platform. The size and primer location of each species and PCR product size were accurately defined. For specificity enhancement, DNA template of known macergens (Pectobacterium chrysanthermi) and fresh healthy vegetable were used. These primers yielded expected size of approximately 1100 bp product only when tested with known macergens and no amplicon with fresh healthy vegetable was detected. Rapid detection of macergens in rotten vegetable samples was then carried out using these primers. Nucleotide sequences of macergens identified were deposited into the GenBank and were assigned accession numbers. Hence, with these specific primers, macergens can be identified with minimal quantities of the vegetable tissues using molecular techniques, for future use of the quarantine section of the Agricultural Department of the country for quick and rapid detection of macergens before exportation. PMID:26437427

  18. Construction of Specific Primers for Rapid Detection of South African Exportable Vegetable Macergens.

    PubMed

    Aremu, Bukola Rhoda; Babalola, Olubukola Oluranti

    2015-09-30

    Macergens are bacteria causing great damages to the parenchymatous tissues of vegetable both on the field and in transit. To effectively and rapidly investigate the diversity and distribution of these macergens, four specific primers were designed by retrieving 16S rDNA sequences of pectolytic bacteria from GenBank through the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). These were aligned using ClusterW via BioEdit and primers were designed using Primer3Plus platform. The size and primer location of each species and PCR product size were accurately defined. For specificity enhancement, DNA template of known macergens (Pectobacterium chrysanthermi) and fresh healthy vegetable were used. These primers yielded expected size of approximately 1100 bp product only when tested with known macergens and no amplicon with fresh healthy vegetable was detected. Rapid detection of macergens in rotten vegetable samples was then carried out using these primers. Nucleotide sequences of macergens identified were deposited into the GenBank and were assigned accession numbers. Hence, with these specific primers, macergens can be identified with minimal quantities of the vegetable tissues using molecular techniques, for future use of the quarantine section of the Agricultural Department of the country for quick and rapid detection of macergens before exportation.

  19. Is Neural Activity Detected by ERP-Based Brain-Computer Interfaces Task Specific?

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Markus A.; Almeida, Inês; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) that are based on event-related potentials (ERPs) can estimate to which stimulus a user pays particular attention. In typical BCIs, the user silently counts the selected stimulus (which is repeatedly presented among other stimuli) in order to focus the attention. The stimulus of interest is then inferred from the electroencephalogram (EEG). Detecting attention allocation implicitly could be also beneficial for human-computer interaction (HCI), because it would allow software to adapt to the user’s interest. However, a counting task would be inappropriate for the envisaged implicit application in HCI. Therefore, the question was addressed if the detectable neural activity is specific for silent counting, or if it can be evoked also by other tasks that direct the attention to certain stimuli. Approach Thirteen people performed a silent counting, an arithmetic and a memory task. The tasks required the subjects to pay particular attention to target stimuli of a random color. The stimulus presentation was the same in all three tasks, which allowed a direct comparison of the experimental conditions. Results Classifiers that were trained to detect the targets in one task, according to patterns present in the EEG signal, could detect targets in all other tasks (irrespective of some task-related differences in the EEG). Significance The neural activity detected by the classifiers is not strictly task specific but can be generalized over tasks and is presumably a result of the attention allocation or of the augmented workload. The results may hold promise for the transfer of classification algorithms from BCI research to implicit relevance detection in HCI. PMID:27792781

  20. Bioaerosols laser-induced fluorescence provides specific robust signatures for standoff detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Simard, Jean-Robert; Déry, Bernard; Roy, Gilles; Lahaie, Pierre; Mathieu, Pierre; Ho, Jim; McFee, John

    2006-10-01

    One of today's primary security challenges is the emerging biological threat due to the increased accessibility to biological warfare technology and the limited efficiency of detection against such menace. At the end of the 90s, Defence R&D Canada developed a standoff bioaerosol sensor, SINBAHD, based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) with an excitation at 351 nm. This LIDAR system generates specific spectrally wide fluorescence signals originating from inelastic interactions with complex molecules forming the building blocks of most bioaerosols. This LIF signal is spectrally collected by a combination of a dispersive element and a range-gated ICCD that limits the spectral information within a selected atmospheric cell. The system can detect and classify bioaerosols in real-time, with the help of a data exploitation process based on a least-square fit of the acquired fluorescence signal by a linear combination of normalized spectral signatures. The detection and classification processes are hence directly dependant on the accuracy of these signatures to represent the intrinsic fluorescence of bioaerosols and their discrepancy. Comparisons of spectral signatures acquired at Suffield in 2001 and at Dugway in 2005 of bioaerosol simulants, Bacillius subtilis var globiggi (BG) and Erwinia herbicola (EH), having different origin, preparation protocol and/or dissemination modes, has been made and demonstrates the robustness of the obtained spectral signatures in these particular cases. Specific spectral signatures and their minimum detectable concentrations for different simulants/interferents obtained at the Joint Biological Standoff Detection System (JBSDS) increment II field demonstration trial, Dugway Proving Ground (DPG) in June 2005, are also presented.

  1. Specific detection of potentially allergenic kiwifruit in foods using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Hiromu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Hirao, Takashi; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Sakai, Shinobu; Watanabe, Takahiro; Matsuda, Rieko; Urisu, Atsuo; Maitani, Tamio

    2007-03-01

    Kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa and Actinidia chinensis) is allergenic to sensitive patients, and, under Japanese regulations, it is one of the food items that are recommended to be declared on food labeling as much as possible. To develop PCR-based methods for the detection of trace amounts of kiwifruit in foods, two primer pairs targeting the ITS-1 region of the Actinidia spp. were designed using PCR simulation software. On the basis of the known distribution of a major kiwifruit allergen (actinidin) within the Actinidia spp., as well as of reports on clinical and immunological cross-reactivities, one of the primer pairs was designed to detect all Actinidia spp. and the other to detect commercially grown Actinidia spp. (i.e., kiwifruit, Actinidia arguta, and their interspecific hybrids) except for Actinidia polygama. The specificity of the developed methods using the designed primer pairs was verified by performing PCR experiments on 8 Actinidia spp. and 26 other plants including fruits. The methods were considered to be specific enough to yield target-size products only from the target Actinidia spp. and to detect no target-size products from nontarget species. The methods were sensitive enough to detect 5-50 fg of Actinidia spp. DNA spiked in 50 ng of salmon testis DNA used as a carrier (1-10 ppm of kiwifruit DNA) and 1700 ppm (w/w) of fresh kiwifruit puree spiked in a commercial plain yogurt (corresponding to ca. 10 ppm of kiwifruit protein). These methods would be expected to be useful in the detection of hidden kiwifruit and its related species in processed foods.

  2. Development of specific scFv antibodies to detect neurocysticercosis antigens and potential applications in immunodiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Vanessa da Silva; Araújo, Thaise Gonçalves; Gonzaga, Henrique Tomaz; Nascimento, Rafael; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2013-01-01

    We have shown previously that detection of circulating antibodies against mimotopes selected by phage display were useful in neurocysticercosis diagnosis. However, circulating antigens may also be useful in patients' clinical follow-up. Therefore, we aimed to select novel combinatorial antibodies, single-chain variable fragment (scFv), which can be used for specific antigens with pre-defined affinity and specificity without prior immunization. A phage scFv antibody library was selected against Taenia solium mimotopes displayed on phages coupled in beads and total saline extract of T. solium metacestodes (S) immobilized on microtiter plate wells. After two rounds of selection, 96 phage clones were evolved and validated against each target by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and dot-blot, and three specific antibodies (B6, G10 and A4) were further characterized by sequencing and indirect immunofluorescence (IFI) assays. IFI revealed tegument staining for the B6, while the others showed a non-uniform staining in the whole parasite. The selected scFvs were used to capture their antigen targets that were elucidated through mass spectrometry, and used for antibody detection in NC patients' sera by ELISA, which achieved sensitivities greater than 97% and specificities above 95%. We have successfully developed scFv antibodies against important mimotopes used in NC diagnosis, and can be further explored to detect circulating antigens for clinical follow-up of patients with NC. Our strategy also highlighted the possibility of using this combinatorial approach to select, capture and characterize specific antigens to better understand this intriguing parasite infection and disease evolution.

  3. High specificity but low sensitivity of mutation-specific antibodies against EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bondgaard, Anna-Louise; Høgdall, Estrid; Mellemgaard, Anders; Skov, Birgit G

    2014-12-01

    Determination of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has a pivotal impact on treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A standardized test has not yet been approved. So far, Sanger DNA sequencing has been widely used. Its rather low sensitivity has led to the development of more sensitive methods including real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry with mutation-specific antibodies might be a promising detection method. We evaluated 210 samples with NSCLC from an unselected Caucasian population. Extracted DNA was analyzed for EGFR mutations by RT-PCR (Therascreen EGFR PCR kit, Qiagen, UK; reference method). For immunohistochemistry, antibodies against exon19 deletions (clone 6B6), exon21 mutations (clone 43B2) from Cell Signaling Technology (Boston, USA) and EGFR variantIII (clone 218C9) from Dako (Copenhagen, DK) were applied. Protein expression was evaluated, and staining score (multipum of intensity (graded 0-3) and percentages (0-100%) of stained tumor cells) was calculated. Positivity was defined as staining score >0. Specificity of exon19 antibody was 98.8% (95% confidence interval=95.9-99.9%) and of exon21 antibody 97.8% (95% confidence interval=94.4-99.4%). Sensitivity of exon19 antibody was 63.2% (95% confidence interval=38.4-83.7%) and of exon21 antibody was 80.0% (95% confidence interval=44.4-97.5%). Seven exon19 and four exon21 mutations were false negatives (immunohistochemistry negative, RT-PCR positive). Two exon19 and three exon21 mutations were false positive (immunohistochemistry positive, RT-PCR negative). One false positive exon21 mutation had staining score 300. The EGFR variantIII antibody showed no correlation to EGFR mutation status determined by RT-PCR or to EGFR immunohistochemistry. High specificity of the mutation-specific antibodies was demonstrated. However, sensitivity was low, especially for exon19 deletions, and thus these antibodies cannot yet be used as screening method for EGFR mutations in NSCLC

  4. High voltage and high specific capacity dual intercalating electrode Li-ion batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William C. (Inventor); Blanco, Mario (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides high capacity and high voltage Li-ion batteries that have a carbonaceous cathode and a nonaqueous electrolyte solution comprising LiF salt and an anion receptor that binds the fluoride ion. The batteries can comprise dual intercalating electrode Li ion batteries. Methods of the present invention use a cathode and electrode pair, wherein each of the electrodes reversibly intercalate ions provided by a LiF salt to make a high voltage and high specific capacity dual intercalating electrode Li-ion battery. The present methods and systems provide high-capacity batteries particularly useful in powering devices where minimizing battery mass is important.

  5. High Performance Organ-Specific Nuclear Medicine Imagers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Stan

    2006-04-01

    One of the exciting applications of nuclear science is nuclear medicine. Well-known diagnostic imaging tools such as PET and SPECT (as well as MRI) were developed as spin-offs of basic scientific research in atomic and nuclear physics. Development of modern instrumentation for applications in particle physics experiments offers an opportunity to contribute to development of improved nuclear medicine (gamma and positron) imagers, complementing the present set of standard imaging tools (PET, SPECT, MRI, ultrasound, fMRI, MEG, etc). Several examples of new high performance imagers developed in national laboratories in collaboration with academia will be given to demonstrate this spin-off activity. These imagers are designed to specifically image organs such as breast, heart, head (brain), or prostate. The remaining and potentially most important challenging application field for dedicated nuclear medicine imagers is to assist with cancer radiation treatments. Better control of radiation dose delivery requires development of new compact in-situ imagers becoming integral parts of the radiation delivery systems using either external beams or based on radiation delivery by inserting or injecting radioactive sources (gamma, beta or alpha emitters) into tumors.

  6. Streptococcal C5a peptidase is a highly specific endopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, P P; Prahbu, U; Dale, J B; Wexler, D E; Handley, J

    1992-01-01

    Compositional analysis of streptococcal C5a peptidase (SCPA) cleavage products from a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 20 C-terminal residues of C5a demonstrated that the target cleavage site is His-Lys rather than Lys-Asp, as previously suggested. A C5a peptide analog with Lys replaced by Gln was also subject to cleavage by SCPA. This confirmed that His-Lys rather than Lys-Asp is the scissile bond. Cleavage at histidine is unusual but is the same as that suggested for a peptidase produced by group B streptococci. Native C5 protein was also resistant to SCPA, suggesting that the His-Lys bond is inaccessible prior to proteolytic cleavage by C5 convertase. These experiments showed that the streptococcal C5a peptidase is highly specific for C5a and suggest that its function is not merely to process protein for metabolic consumption but to act primarily to eliminate this chemotactic signal from inflammatory foci. Images PMID:1452354

  7. Comparative study of fluorogenic and chromogenic media for specific detection of environmental isolates of thermotolerant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ramteke, Pramod W; Tewari, Suman

    2002-10-01

    In a field study 78 water samples were analysed employing Fluorocult Brilla Broth (BB) and its performance was compared with standard MPN procedure. Out of 78 water samples analysed 56 (71.7%) samples yielded positive reactions in BB whereas, 50 (64.1%) samples were positive by standard fecal coliform test. A comparative study of fluorogenic and chromogenic media containing substrate beta-D glucuronide for specific detection of environmental isolates of 313 thermotolerant E. coli has been undertaken. Five fluorogenic media were used: Fluorocult MacConkey agar (MCA), Fluorocult ECD agar (ECD), Fluorocult VRB agar (VRB), Fluorocult E. coli 0157:H7 agar (ECH7) and Fluorocult Brilla Broth (BB) and Chromogenic Chromocult agar (CCA). BB and CCA were found to be highly specific and sensitive media to detect E. coli as all E. coli yielded positive reaction on them. On ECH7 and ECD agar 67.5 and 64.9 of E. coli isolates gave positive reaction, respectively. Low sensitivity was observed in case of MCA and VRB agar in detecting E. coli. The performance of BB appears to be better when compared with standard MPN procedure employing MacConkey broth/Brilliant green bile broth in detecting E. coli in drinking water.

  8. Substrate-specific modifications on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as an artificial peroxidase for improving sensitivity in glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanping; Yu, Faquan

    2011-04-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MION) were recently found to act as a peroxidase with intrinsic advantages over natural counterparts. Their limited affinity toward catalysis substrates, however, dramatically reduces their utility. In this paper, some effective groups were screened out and conjugated on MION as substrate-specific modifications for improving MION's affinity to substrates and hence utility. Nanoparticles of four different superficial structures were synthesized and characterized by TEM, size, zeta potential and SQUID, and assayed for peroxidase activity. Glucose detection was selected as an application model system to evaluate the bonus thereof. Catalysis was found to follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Sulfhydryl groups incorporated on MION (SH-MION) notably improve the affinity toward a substrate (hydrogen peroxide) and so do amino groups (NH₂-MION) toward another substrate, proved by variation in the determined kinetic parameters. A synergistically positive effect was observed and an apparently elevated detection sensitivity and a significantly lowered detection limit of glucose were achieved when integrated with both sulfhydryl and amino groups (SH-NH₂-MION). Our findings suggest that substrate-specific surface modifications are a straightforward and robust strategy to improve MION peroxidase-like activity. The high activity extends magnetic nanoparticles to wide applications other than glucose detection. PMID:21368352

  9. Species Specific Bacterial Spore Detection Using Lateral-Flow Immunoassay with DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    A method of detecting bacterial spores incorporates (1) A method of lateral-flow immunoassay in combination with (2) A method based on the luminescence of Tb3+ ions to which molecules of dipicolinic acid (DPA) released from the spores have become bound. The present combination of lateral-flow immunoassay and DPA-triggered Tb luminescence was developed as a superior alternative to a prior lateral-flow immunoassay method in which detection involves the visual observation and/or measurement of red light scattered from colloidal gold nanoparticles. The advantage of the present combination method is that it affords both (1) High selectivity for spores of the species of bacteria that one seeks to detect (a characteristic of lateral-flow immunoassay in general) and (2) Detection sensitivity much greater (by virtue of the use of DPA-triggered Tb luminescence instead of gold nanoparticles) than that of the prior lateral-flow immunoassay method

  10. HIGH RESOLUTION RESISTIVITY LEAK DETECTION DATA PROCESSING & EVALUATION MEHTODS & REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOFIELD JS

    2007-10-04

    This document has two purposes: {sm_bullet} Describe how data generated by High Resolution REsistivity (HRR) leak detection (LD) systems deployed during single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval operations are processed and evaluated. {sm_bullet} Provide the basic review requirements for HRR data when Hrr is deployed as a leak detection method during SST waste retrievals.

  11. Tetrathiatriarylmethyl radical with a single aromatic hydrogen as a highly sensitive and specific superoxide probe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangping; Song, Yuguang; De Pascali, Francesco; Liu, Xiaoping; Villamena, Frederick A; Zweier, Jay L

    2012-12-01

    Superoxide (O(2)(•-)) plays crucial roles in normal physiology and disease; however, its measurement remains challenging because of the limited sensitivity and/or specificity of prior detection methods. We demonstrate that a tetrathiatriarylmethyl (TAM) radical with a single aromatic hydrogen (CT02-H) can serve as a highly sensitive and specific O(2)(•-) probe. CT02-H is an analogue of the fully substituted TAM radical CT-03 (Finland trityl) with an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) doublet signal due to its aromatic hydrogen. Owing to the neutral nature and negligible steric hindrance of the hydrogen, O(2)(•-) preferentially reacts with CT02-H at this site with production of the diamagnetic quinone methide via oxidative dehydrogenation. Upon reaction with O(2)(•-), CT02-H loses its EPR signal and this EPR signal decay can be used to quantitatively measure O(2)(•-). This is accompanied by a change in color from green to purple, with the quinone methide product exhibiting a unique UV-Vis absorbance (ε=15,900 M(-1) cm(-1)) at 540 nm, providing an additional O(2)(•-) detection method. More than five-fold higher reactivity of CT02-H for O(2)(•-) relative to CT-03 was demonstrated, with a second-order rate constant of 1.7×10(4) M(-1) s(-1) compared to 3.1×10(3) M(-1) s(-1) for CT-03. CT02-H exhibited high specificity for O(2)(•-) as evidenced by its inertness to other oxidoreductants. The O(2)(•-) generation rates detected by CT02-H from xanthine/xanthine oxidase were consistent with those measured by cytochrome c reduction but detection sensitivity was 10- to 100-fold higher. EPR detection of CT02-H enabled measurement of very low O(2)(•-) flux with a detection limit of 0.34 nM/min over 120 min. HPLC in tandem with electrochemical detection was used to quantitatively detect the stable quinone methide product and is a highly sensitive and specific method for measurement of O(2)(•-), with a sensitivity limit of ~2×10(-13) mol (10 nM with 20

  12. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, Madhukar L.

    1990-01-01

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents.

  13. A homogenous fluorescence quenching based assay for specific and sensitive detection of influenza virus A hemagglutinin antigen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longyan; Neethirajan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Influenza pandemics cause millions of deaths worldwide. Effective surveillance is required to prevent their spread and facilitate the development of appropriate vaccines. In this study, we report the fabrication of a homogenous fluorescence-quenching-based assay for specific and sensitive detection of influenza virus surface antigen hemagglutinins (HAs). The core of the assay is composed of two nanoprobes namely the glycan-conjugated highly luminescent quantum dots (Gly-QDs), and the HA-specific antibody-modified gold nanoparticle (Ab-Au NPs). When exposed to strain-specific HA, a binding event between the HA and the two nanoprobes takes place, resulting in the formation of a sandwich complex which subsequently brings the two nanoprobes closer together. This causes a decrease in QDs fluorescence intensity due to a non-radiative energy transfer from QDs to Au NPs. A resulting correlation between the targets HA concentrations and fluorescence changes can be observed. Furthermore, by utilizing the specific interaction between HA and glycan with sialic acid residues, the assay is able to distinguish HAs originated from viral subtypes H1 (human) and H5 (avian). The detection limits in solution are found to be low nanomolar and picomolar level for sensing H1-HA and H5-HA, respectively. Slight increase in assay sensitivity was found in terms of detection limit while exposing the assay in the HA spiked in human sera solution. We believe that the developed assay could serve as a feasible and sensitive diagnostic tool for influenza virus detection and discrimination, with further improvement on the architectures. PMID:25884789

  14. A Homogenous Fluorescence Quenching Based Assay for Specific and Sensitive Detection of Influenza Virus A Hemagglutinin Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Longyan; Neethirajan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Influenza pandemics cause millions of deaths worldwide. Effective surveillance is required to prevent their spread and facilitate the development of appropriate vaccines. In this study, we report the fabrication of a homogenous fluorescence-quenching-based assay for specific and sensitive detection of influenza virus surface antigen hemagglutinins (HAs). The core of the assay is composed of two nanoprobes namely the glycan-conjugated highly luminescent quantum dots (Gly-QDs), and the HA-specific antibody-modified gold nanoparticle (Ab-Au NPs). When exposed to strain-specific HA, a binding event between the HA and the two nanoprobes takes place, resulting in the formation of a sandwich complex which subsequently brings the two nanoprobes closer together. This causes a decrease in QDs fluorescence intensity due to a non-radiative energy transfer from QDs to Au NPs. A resulting correlation between the targets HA concentrations and fluorescence changes can be observed. Furthermore, by utilizing the specific interaction between HA and glycan with sialic acid residues, the assay is able to distinguish HAs originated from viral subtypes H1 (human) and H5 (avian). The detection limits in solution are found to be low nanomolar and picomolar level for sensing H1-HA and H5-HA, respectively. Slight increase in assay sensitivity was found in terms of detection limit while exposing the assay in the HA spiked in human sera solution. We believe that the developed assay could serve as a feasible and sensitive diagnostic tool for influenza virus detection and discrimination, with further improvement on the architectures. PMID:25884789

  15. Optimized Multiplex Detection of 7 KRAS Mutations by Taqman Allele-Specific qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Orue, Andrea; Rieber, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the KRAS mutational status of tumor samples is essential to manage patients with colorectal or lung cancer, since these mutations preclude treatment with monoclonal anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies. We report an inexpensive, rapid multiplex allele-specific qPCR method detecting the 7 most clinically relevant KRAS somatic mutations with concomitant amplification of non-mutated KRAS in tumor cells and tissues from CRC patients. Positive samples evidenced in the multiplex assay were further subjected to individual allele-specific analysis, to define the specific mutation. Reference human cancer DNA harbouring either G12A, G12C, G12D, G12R, G12S, G12V and G13D confirmed assay specificity with ≤1% sensitivity of mutant alleles. KRAS multiplex mutation analysis usefulness was also demonstrated with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) from CRC biopsies. Conclusion. Co-amplification of non-mutated DNA avoided false negatives from degraded samples. Moreover, this cost effective assay is compatible with mutation detection by DNA sequencing in FFPE tissues, but with a greater sensitivity when mutant DNA concentrations are limiting. PMID:27632281

  16. Localized surface plasmon fiber device coated with carbon nanotubes for the specific detection of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allsop, T.; Arif, R.; Neal, R.; Kalli, K.; Kundrát, V.; Rozhin, A.; Culverhouse, P.; Webb, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    We explored the potential of a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating working in conjunction with a recently developed localized surface plasmon (LSP) device (based upon a nanostructured thin film consisting of of nano-wires of platinum) with ultra-high sensitivity to changes in the surrounding index. The uncoated LSP sensor's transmission resonances exhibited a refractive index sensitivity of Δλ/Δn ~ -6200nm/RIU and ΔΙ/Δn ~5900dB/RIU, which is the highest reported spectral sensitivity of a fiber optic sensor to bulk index changes within the gas regime. The complete device provides the first demonstration of the chemically specific gas sensing capabilities of CNTs utilizing their optical characteristics. This is proven by investigating the spectral response of the sensor before and after the adhesion of CNTs to alkane gases along with carbon dioxide. The device shows a distinctive spectral response in the presence of gaseous CO2 over and above what is expected from general changes in the bulk refractive index. This fiber device yielded a limit of detection of 150ppm for CO2 at a pressure of one atmosphere. Additionally the adhered CNTs actually reduce sensitivity of the device to changes in bulk refractive index of the surrounding medium. The polarization properties of the LSP sensor resonances are also investigated and it is shown that there is a reduction in the overall azimuthal polarization after the CNTs are applied. These optical devices offer a way of exploiting optically the chemical selectivity of carbon nanotubes, thus providing the potential for real-world applications in gas sensing in many inflammable and explosive environments.

  17. Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Wolters, Tineke; Savage, Caroline J.; Cronin, Angel M.; O’Brien, M. Frank; Pettersson, Kim; Roobol, Monique J.; Aus, Gunnar; Scardino, Peter T.; Hugosson, Jonas; Schröder, Fritz H.; Lilja, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that changes in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) over time (ie, PSA velocity [PSAV]) aid prostate cancer detection. Some guidelines do incorporate PSAV cut points as an indication for biopsy. Objective To evaluate whether PSAV enhances prediction of biopsy outcome in a large, representative, population-based cohort. Design, setting, and participants There were 2742 screening-arm participants with PSA <3 ng/ml at initial screening in the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer in Rotterdam, Netherlands, or Göteborg, Sweden, and who were subsequently biopsied during rounds 2[en]6 due to elevated PSA. Measurements Total, free, and intact PSA and human kallikrein 2 were measured for 1[en]6 screening rounds at intervals of 2 or 4 yr. We created logistic regression models to predict prostate cancer based on age and PSA, with or without free-to-total PSA ratio (%fPSA). PSAV was added to each model and any enhancement in predictive accuracy assessed by area under the curve (AUC). Results and limitations PSAV led to small enhancements in predictive accuracy (AUC of 0.569 vs 0.531; 0.626 vs 0.609 if %fPSA was included), although not for high-grade disease. The enhancement depended on modeling a nonlinear relationship between PSAV and cancer. There was no benefit if we excluded men with higher velocities, which were associated with lower risk. These results apply to men in a screening program with elevated PSA; men with prior negative biopsy were not evaluated in this study. Conclusions In men with PSA of about ≥3 ng/ml, we found little justification for formal calculation of PSAV or for use of PSAV cut points to determine biopsy. Informal assessment of PSAV will likely aid clinical judgment, such as a sudden rise in PSA suggesting prostatitis, which could be further evaluated before biopsy. PMID:19682790

  18. A highly selective fluorescent probe for direct detection and isolation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Yogeswari; Kang, Nam-Young; Park, Sung-Jin; Alamudi, Samira Husen; Kim, Jun-Young; Sahu, Srikanta; Su, Dongdong; Lee, Jungyeol; Vendrell, Marc; Chang, Young-Tae

    2015-11-01

    Stem cell research has gathered immense attention in the past decade due to the remarkable ability of stem cells for self-renewal and tissue-specific differentiation. Despite having numerous advancements in stem cell isolation and manipulation techniques, there is a need for highly reliable probes for the specific detection of live stem cells. Herein we developed a new fluorescence probe (CDy9) with high selectivity for mouse embryonic stem cells. CDy9 allows the detection and isolation of intact stem cells with marginal impact on their function and capabilities. PMID:26115574

  19. Detection specificity studies of bacteriophage adhesin-coated long-period grating-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koba, Marcin; Śmietana, Mateusz; Brzozowska, Ewa; Górska, Sabina; Mikulic, Predrag; Cusano, Andrea; Bock, Wojtek J.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we present a label-free detection specificity study of an optical fiber long-period grating (LPG) biosensor working near the dispersion turning point of higher order cladding modes. The LPG sensor functionalized with bacteriophage adhesin is tested with specific and non-specific bacteria dry weight. We show that such biosensor is able to selectively bind, thus recognize different bacteria. We use bacteria dry weights of E. coli B as positive test and E. coli K12 and Salmonella enterica as negative tests. The resonance wavelength shift induced by E. coli B reaches over 90 nm, while for E. coli K12 and Salmonella enterica approximately 40 and 20 nm, respectively.

  20. Detection of subtle differences in analogous viral capsid proteins by allowing unrestricted specific interaction in solution competition ELISA.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu; Wang, Xin; Fang, Mujin; Xia, Ningshao; Zhao, Qinjian

    2016-10-01

    Assay artifacts were reported in plate-based immuoassays during the assessment of specific molecular interactions owing to the surface induced aggregation/conformational changes. To circumvent surface adsorption and associated artifacts, we used a solution competition ELISA by allowing unrestricted interaction between binding partners to occur in solution for better discrimination between epitopes with subtle differences. A difference of two orders of magnitude in binding to neutralizing antibodies for two truncated versions of the hepatitis E virus capsid protein was observed, while other assays showed comparable antigenicity with the same monoclonal antibodies. Discrimination of epitopes with high degree resemblance in analogous viral capsid proteins was demonstrated quantitatively based on their specific interactions. Therefore, the solution competition ELISA is a method of choice when the detection of subtle differences of two highly analogous proteins is desired. PMID:27321427

  1. Parallel optical read-out of micromechanical pillars applied to prostate specific membrane antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Tardivo, Martina; Toffoli, Valeria; Fracasso, Giulio; Borin, Daniele; Dal Zilio, Simone; Colusso, Andrea; Carrato, Sergio; Scoles, Giacinto; Meneghetti, Moreno; Colombatti, Marco; Lazzarino, Marco

    2015-10-15

    Micro and nanomechanical resonators represent a promising platform for proteins label-free detection because of their extreme sensitivity, fast response and low cost. Micro-pillars are columnar resonators that can be easily arranged in dense arrays of several thousand sensors in a squared mm. To exploit such a large density, however, a method for tracking independently micropillars resonance frequency is required. Here we present a detection method based on CCD imaging and software image analysis, which can measure the resonance frequency of tens of pillars in parallel. Acquiring simultaneously the frequency shift of up to 40 sensors and applying a proper statistical analysis, we were able to overcome the variability of the single measures improving the device sensitivity at low analyte concentration range. As a proof of concept, this method has been tested for the detection of a tumor marker, the Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA). Pillars have been functionalized with an antibody against PSMA. The tumor marker (PSMA) has been detected in a range of concentrations between 300 pM and 100 nM, in buffer and in diluted bovine serum. The sensitivity of our method was limited only by the affinity constant of the antigen-antibody recognition. Moreover, this detection technique demonstrated to be effective in the 1-6 nM range, which is the window of PSMA concentration of clinical interest.

  2. Production and characterization of highly specific monoclonal antibodies to D-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Seiichi; Matsuura, Yurino; Yonenaga, Yayoi; Tsuneura, Yumi; Aso, Mariko; Kurose, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Most of the functions of D-amino acids (D-AA) remain unclear because of little analytic methods for specific detection/determination. In this study, a highly specific monoclonal antibody to D-glutamic acid (D-Glu-MAb) was produced using a hybridoma method. Characterization of D-Glu-MAb by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed that it has high selectivity against D-Glu-glutaraldehyde (GA) conjugates, while no cross-reaction was observed when 38 other kinds of AA-GA conjugates were used. Moreover, subsequent indirect competitive ELISA disclosed that an epitope of D-Glu-MAb is a D-Glu-GA molecule in the conjugates, suggesting that D-Glu-MAb could be a useful tool to investigate the functional analysis of D-Glu in immunostaining.

  3. Automatic detection of high-Z materials in cargo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perticone, David; Eilbert, Richard; Gillett, Nick; McNabb, Ronald S., Jr.; Ozcandarli, Altan; Stillson, Jeffrey

    2010-08-01

    The United States Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) Cargo Advanced Automatic Radiography System (CAARS) was an advanced technology demonstration to detect high-Z materials (Z, the atomic number, >= 72) in full sized cargo systems such as a 74 foot length tractor-trailer. The L-3 CAARS was one of two CAARS prototypes developed and tested under the program. The L-3 system utilized MeV range dual-energy photons to determine Z and a sophisticated image processing based detection algorithm to accomplish the detection. This paper describes the L-3 CAARS hardware, the physics approach to measuring Z, and presents some results from the system.

  4. Detection of HIV type 1 gag-specific CD4(+) T cell responses in acutely infected infants.

    PubMed

    Ramduth, Danni; Thobakgale, Christina F; Mkhwanazi, Nompumelelo P; De Pierres, Chantal; Reddy, Sharon; van der Stok, Mary; Mncube, Zenele; Mphatswe, Wendy; Blanckenberg, Natasha; Cengimbo, Ayanda; Prendergast, Andrew; Tudor-Williams, Gareth; Dong, Krista; Jeena, Prakash; Coovadia, Hoosen M; Day, Cheryl L; Kiepiela, Photini; Goulder, Philip J R; Walker, Bruce D

    2008-02-01

    Multiple HIV-1-specific cytokine and proliferative responses by CD4(+) T cells have not been studied in acutely infected infants. Using an intracellular cytokine staining assay, 34 untreated clade C HIV-1-infected infants (2-102 days old) were assessed for IFN-gamma, 28/34 for IL-2, and 26/34 for TNF-alpha responses to all HIV-1 proteins. Responses were detected in 29%, 36%, and 15% of infants, respectively. Twelve of the original 34 infants were then studied longitudinally for 14 months to determine the effect of viral load on IFN-gamma Gag-specific responses: seven infants were treated for 1 year, stopped treatment, and resumed when CD4% was < 20 and five infants were treated only when the CD4% was <20. Following treatment cessation, there was an immediate increase in viral load followed by an increase in the magnitude of CD4(+) Gag-specific responses. Despite this, the majority of infants (54%) had to restart treatment by 24 months of age, indicating that the immune responses were antigen driven but not associated with protection. Among untreated infants HIV-specific CD4(+) responses were detected sporadically indicating a dysfunctional immune response in the face of constant exposure to high levels of viremia. PMID:18284325

  5. [Evaluation of sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of six qualitative serological methods for the detection of Helicobacter pylori antibodies].

    PubMed

    Doweck, J; Quintana, C; Barrios, A; Monastra, L; Lopetegui, G; Zerbo, O; Schenone, L; Giordano, A; Valero, J; Kogan, Z; Bartellini, M A; Corti, R

    1997-01-01

    Screening tests for IG g antibodies against Helicobacter pylori are usefull for a long follow up of patients who were well eradicated. The aim of this study was to determinate and compared sensibility, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of six qualitative serological tests for IG g antibodies detection in the diagnosis of H. Pylori infections. Between May and October 1996 52 patients (30 males and 22 females; median age 42.4 years, range 21-68) with H. Pylori infection assessed on two antral and two corpus biopsies by means of Giema stain and a rapid urease test were tested for IG g antibodies detection. The serological tests used were: Inmunocomb II (Orgenics) Enzimo Inmuno Assay Inmunoadsorbent qualitative, Flex Pack (Smith Kline Diagnostics, Abbott) inmunocromatographic cualitative, Pylori Stat test (Biowhittaker) Enzimo Inmuno Assay (ELISA) qualitative, Premier (Meridian Diagnostics) Enzimo Inmuno Assay ELISA) qualitative. Pyloristest (Orion Diagnóstica) latex aglutination qualitative, H. Pylori (Bio Tre) Enzimo Inmuno Assay cualitative. 10 healthy subjects with negative gastric biopsies and negative rapid ureasa test were used as control group. The six evaluated serological tests have a comparable sensibility (89-95%) and specificity (77-83%) for the diagnosis of HP infection. The presence of specific HP antibodies in infected patients revealed a strong correlation with the histological demonstration of the microrganisms. We can recommend this qualitative serological tests due to their high sensibility and specificity, simplicity and low cost.

  6. Allele-specific rpoB PCR assays for detection of rifampin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum smears.

    PubMed

    Mokrousov, Igor; Otten, Tatiana; Vyshnevskiy, Boris; Narvskaya, Olga

    2003-07-01

    We describe an allele-specific PCR assay to detect mutations in three codons of the rpoB gene (516, 526, and 531) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains; mutations in these codons are reported to account for majority of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates resistant to rifampin (RIF), a marker of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Three different allele-specific PCRs are carried out either directly with purified DNA (single-step multiplex allele-specific PCR), or with preamplified rpoB fragment (nested allele-specific PCR [NAS-PCR]). The method was optimized and validated following analysis of 36 strains with known rpoB sequence. A retrospective analysis of the 287 DNA preparations from epidemiologically unlinked RIF-resistant clinical strains from Russia, collected from 1996 to 2002, revealed that 247 (86.1%) of them harbored a mutation in one of the targeted rpoB codons. A prospective study of microscopy-positive consecutive sputum samples from new and chronic TB patients validated the method for direct analysis of DNA extracted from sputum smears. The potential of the NAS-PCR to control for false-negative results due to lack of amplification was proven especially useful in the study of these samples. The developed rpoB-PCR assay can be used in clinical laboratories to detect RIF-resistant and hence MDR M. tuberculosis in the regions with high burdens of the MDR-TB. PMID:12821473

  7. Use of tuf Sequences for Genus-Specific PCR Detection and Phylogenetic Analysis of 28 Streptococcal Species

    PubMed Central

    Picard, François J.; Ke, Danbing; Boudreau, Dominique K.; Boissinot, Maurice; Huletsky, Ann; Richard, Dave; Ouellette, Marc; Roy, Paul H.; Bergeron, Michel G.

    2004-01-01

    A 761-bp portion of the tuf gene (encoding the elongation factor Tu) from 28 clinically relevant streptococcal species was obtained by sequencing amplicons generated using broad-range PCR primers. These tuf sequences were used to select Streptococcus-specific PCR primers and to perform phylogenetic analysis. The specificity of the PCR assay was verified using 102 different bacterial species, including the 28 streptococcal species. Genomic DNA purified from all streptococcal species was efficiently detected, whereas there was no amplification with DNA from 72 of the 74 nonstreptococcal bacterial species tested. There was cross-amplification with DNAs from Enterococcus durans and Lactococcus lactis. However, the 15 to 31% nucleotide sequence divergence in the 761-bp tuf portion of these two species compared to any streptococcal tuf sequence provides ample sequence divergence to allow the development of internal probes specific to streptococci. The Streptococcus-specific assay was highly sensitive for all 28 streptococcal species tested (i.e., detection limit of 1 to 10 genome copies per PCR). The tuf sequence data was also used to perform extensive phylogenetic analysis, which was generally in agreement with phylogeny determined on the basis of 16S rRNA gene data. However, the tuf gene provided a better discrimination at the streptococcal species level that should be particularly useful for the identification of very closely related species. In conclusion, tuf appears more suitable than the 16S ribosomal RNA gene for the development of diagnostic assays for the detection and identification of streptococcal species because of its higher level of species-specific genetic divergence. PMID:15297518

  8. Detection of prostate specific antigen based on electrocatalytic platinum nanoparticles conjugated to a recombinant scFv antibody.

    PubMed

    Spain, Elaine; Gilgunn, Sarah; Sharma, Shikha; Adamson, Kellie; Carthy, Eadaoin; O'Kennedy, Richard; Forster, Robert J

    2016-03-15

    Highly sensitive and label free detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) still remains a challenge in prostate cancer diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a sensitive electrochemical immunosensor based on electrocatalytic platinum nanoparticles conjugated to a recombinant scFv antibody. Gold disc electrodes functionalised with a l-Cysteine (Cys) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) were used to covalently bind PSA specific monoclonal antibody (anti-PSA) using N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) chemistry. Immunosensing was completed using sandwich-type immunoreaction of the PSA-antigen (1-30 ng/mL) between anti-PSA immobilized on the l-Cys modified electrode using label free electrochemical impedance (EIS) technique. Furthermore, highly specific in-house generated scFv fragments as receptor proteins were utilised for one step site-directed immobilisation on the surface of platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs). To improve the sensitivity of the immunoassay, these scFV labelled electrocatalytic PtNPs were then used for covalent hybridisation to the PSA modified electrode and then applied in a hybridisation assay to determine the concentration of the PSA by measuring the faradaic current associated with reduction of peroxide in solution. Semi-log plots of the PSA concentration vs. faradaic current are linear from 1 to 30 ng/mL and pM concentrations can be detected without the need for molecular, e.g., PCR or NASBA, amplification. PMID:26513282

  9. Detection of Francisella tularensis-specific antibodies in patients with tularemia by a novel competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neekun; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Fujita, Osamu; Uda, Akihiko; Morikawa, Shigeru; Yamada, Akio; Tanabayashi, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    A novel competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) was developed and evaluated for detection of antibodies against Francisella tularensis in humans. The assay is based on the ability of serum antibodies to inhibit the binding of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide antigens. The assay was evaluated using serum samples of tularemia patients, inactivated F. tularensis-immunized rabbits, and F. tularensis-infected mice. Antibodies against F. tularensis were successfully detected in serum samples of tularemia patients as well as the immunized and infected animals. The cELISA method was compared to indirect ELISA (iELISA) and the commonly used microagglutination test (MA) using serum samples of 19 tularemia patients and 50 healthy individuals. The sensitivity and specificity of cELISA were 93.9 and 96.1%, respectively, in comparison to the iELISA. MA was less sensitive than cELISA with a sensitivity and specificity of only 81.8 and 98.0%, respectively. A high degree of correlation (R(2) = 0.8226) was observed between cELISA and iELISA results. The novel cELISA developed in this study appears to be highly sensitive and specific for serodiagnosis of human tularemia. The potential of the MAb-based cELISA to be used in both human and animal samples emphasizes its usefulness for serological survey of tularemia among multiple animal species. PMID:23114700

  10. Detection of Francisella tularensis-Specific Antibodies in Patients with Tularemia by a Novel Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neekun; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Fujita, Osamu; Uda, Akihiko; Morikawa, Shigeru; Yamada, Akio

    2013-01-01

    A novel competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) was developed and evaluated for detection of antibodies against Francisella tularensis in humans. The assay is based on the ability of serum antibodies to inhibit the binding of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide antigens. The assay was evaluated using serum samples of tularemia patients, inactivated F. tularensis-immunized rabbits, and F. tularensis-infected mice. Antibodies against F. tularensis were successfully detected in serum samples of tularemia patients as well as the immunized and infected animals. The cELISA method was compared to indirect ELISA (iELISA) and the commonly used microagglutination test (MA) using serum samples of 19 tularemia patients and 50 healthy individuals. The sensitivity and specificity of cELISA were 93.9 and 96.1%, respectively, in comparison to the iELISA. MA was less sensitive than cELISA with a sensitivity and specificity of only 81.8 and 98.0%, respectively. A high degree of correlation (R2 = 0.8226) was observed between cELISA and iELISA results. The novel cELISA developed in this study appears to be highly sensitive and specific for serodiagnosis of human tularemia. The potential of the MAb-based cELISA to be used in both human and animal samples emphasizes its usefulness for serological survey of tularemia among multiple animal species. PMID:23114700

  11. Detection of Francisella tularensis-specific antibodies in patients with tularemia by a novel competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neekun; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Fujita, Osamu; Uda, Akihiko; Morikawa, Shigeru; Yamada, Akio; Tanabayashi, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    A novel competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) was developed and evaluated for detection of antibodies against Francisella tularensis in humans. The assay is based on the ability of serum antibodies to inhibit the binding of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide antigens. The assay was evaluated using serum samples of tularemia patients, inactivated F. tularensis-immunized rabbits, and F. tularensis-infected mice. Antibodies against F. tularensis were successfully detected in serum samples of tularemia patients as well as the immunized and infected animals. The cELISA method was compared to indirect ELISA (iELISA) and the commonly used microagglutination test (MA) using serum samples of 19 tularemia patients and 50 healthy individuals. The sensitivity and specificity of cELISA were 93.9 and 96.1%, respectively, in comparison to the iELISA. MA was less sensitive than cELISA with a sensitivity and specificity of only 81.8 and 98.0%, respectively. A high degree of correlation (R(2) = 0.8226) was observed between cELISA and iELISA results. The novel cELISA developed in this study appears to be highly sensitive and specific for serodiagnosis of human tularemia. The potential of the MAb-based cELISA to be used in both human and animal samples emphasizes its usefulness for serological survey of tularemia among multiple animal species.

  12. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of prostate-specific antigen by using antibodies anchored on a DNA nanostructural scaffold.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Guobao; Song, Ping; Wang, Jingjing; Gao, Jimin; Lu, Jianxin; Fan, Chunhai; Zuo, Xiaolei

    2014-08-01

    The high occurrence of prostate cancer in men makes the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening test really important. More importantly, the recurrence rate after radical prostatectomy is high, whereas the traditional PSA immunoassay does not possess the sufficient high sensitivity for post-treatment PSA detection. In these assays, uncontrolled and random orientation of capture antibodies on the surface largely reduces their activity. Here, by exploiting the rapidly emerging DNA nanotechnology, we developed a DNA nanostructure based scaffold to precisely control the assembly of antibody monolayer. We demonstrated that the detection sensitivity was critically dependent on the nanoscale-spacing (nanospacing) of immobilized antibodies. In addition to the controlled assembly, we further amplified the sensing signal by using the gold nanoparticles, resulting in extremely high sensitivity and a low detection limit of 1 pg/mL. To test the real-world applicability of our nanoengineered electrochemical sensor, we evaluated the performance with 11 patients' serum samples and obtained consistent results with the "gold-standard" assays.

  13. Preparation and quantification of 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phospho(35S)sulfate with high specific activity

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, F.

    1988-07-01

    The synthesis and quantitation of the sulfate donor 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phospho(35S)sulfate (PAP35S), prepared from inorganic (35S)sulfate and ATP, were studied. An enzymatic transfer method based upon the quantitative transfer of (35S)sulfate from PAP35S to 2-naphthol and 4-methylumbelliferone by the action of phenolsulfotransferase activity from rat brain cytosol was also developed. The 2-naphthyl(35S)sulfate or 35S-methylumbelliferone sulfate formed was isolated by polystyrene bead chromatography. This method allows the detection of between 0.1 pmol and 1 nmol/ml of PAP35S. PAP35S of high specific activity (75 Ci/mmol) was prepared by incubating ATP and carrier-free Na2 35SO4 with a 100,000g supernatant fraction from rat spleen. The product was purified by ion-exchange chromatography. The specific activity and purity of PAP35S were estimated by examining the ratios of Km values for PAP35S of the tyrosyl protein sulfotransferase present in microsomes from rat cerebral cortex. The advantage and applications of these methods for the detection of femtomole amounts, and the synthesis of large scale quantities of PAP35S with high specific activity are discussed.

  14. Trajectory Specification for High-Capacity Air Traffic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell A.

    2004-01-01

    In the current air traffic management system, the fundamental limitation on airspace capacity is the cognitive ability of human air traffic controllers to maintain safe separation with high reliability. The doubling or tripling of airspace capacity that will be needed over the next couple of decades will require that tactical separation be at least partially automated. Standardized conflict-free four-dimensional trajectory assignment will be needed to accomplish that objective. A trajectory specification format based on the Extensible Markup Language is proposed for that purpose. This format can be used to downlink a trajectory request, which can then be checked on the ground for conflicts and approved or modified, if necessary, then uplinked as the assigned trajectory. The horizontal path is specified as a series of geodetic waypoints connected by great circles, and the great-circle segments are connected by turns of specified radius. Vertical profiles for climb and descent are specified as low-order polynomial functions of along-track position, which is itself specified as a function of time. Flight technical error tolerances in the along-track, cross-track, and vertical axes define a bounding space around the reference trajectory, and conformance will guarantee the required separation for a period of time known as the conflict time horizon. An important safety benefit of this regimen is that the traffic will be able to fly free of conflicts for at least several minutes even if all ground systems and the entire communication infrastructure fail. Periodic updates in the along-track axis will adjust for errors in the predicted along-track winds.

  15. A real time RT-PCR assay for the specific detection of Peste des petits ruminants virus.

    PubMed

    Batten, Carrie A; Banyard, Ashley C; King, Donald P; Henstock, Mark R; Edwards, Lorraine; Sanders, Anna; Buczkowski, Hubert; Oura, Chris C L; Barrett, Tom

    2011-02-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) causes a devastating disease of small ruminants present across much of Africa and Asia. Recent surveillance activities and phylogenetic analyses have suggested that the virus is an emerging problem as it is now being detected in areas previously free of the disease. As such, the virus not only is threatening small ruminant production and agricultural stability in the developing world, but also poses an economic threat to livestock in the European Union (EU) through introduction from European Turkey and North Africa. This report describes the development of a high throughput, rapid, real time RT-PCR method for the sensitive and specific detection of PPRV using robotic RNA extraction. This assay targets the nucleocapsid (N) gene of PPRV and has been shown to detect all four genetic lineages of PPRV in tissues, ocular and nasal swabs and blood samples collected in the field. The lowest detection limit achieved was approximately 10 genome copies/reaction, making this assay an ideal tool for the sensitive and rapid detection of PPRV in diagnostic laboratories.

  16. Sensitive and specific molecular detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, in the soil of tropical northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Harrington, Glenda; Watt, Felicity; Hill, Jason; Gal, Daniel; Currie, Bart J

    2007-11-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the cause of the severe disease melioidosis in humans and animals, is a gram-negative saprophyte living in soil and water of areas of endemicity such as tropical northern Australia and Southeast Asia. Infection occurs mainly by contact with wet contaminated soil. The environmental distribution of B. pseudomallei in northern Australia is still unclear. We developed and evaluated a direct soil B. pseudomallei DNA detection method based on the recently published real-time PCR targeting the B. pseudomallei type III secretion system. The method was evaluated by inoculating different soil types with B. pseudomallei dilution series and by comparing B. pseudomallei detection rate with culture-based detection rate for 104 randomly collected soil samples from the Darwin rural area in northern Australia. We found that direct soil B. pseudomallei DNA detection not only was substantially faster than culture but also proved to be more sensitive with no evident false-positive results. This assay provides a new tool to detect B. pseudomallei in soil samples in a fast and highly sensitive and specific manner and is applicable for large-scale B. pseudomallei environmental screening studies or in outbreak situations. Furthermore, analysis of the 104 collected soil samples revealed a significant association between B. pseudomallei-positive sites and the presence of animals at these locations and also with moist, reddish brown-to-reddish gray soils.

  17. Detection of HCV-Specific IFN-γ Responses in HCV Antibody and HCV RNA Negative Injecting Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Sacks-Davis, Rachel; Higgs, Peter; Aitken, Campbell; Moneer, Sarah; Suppiah, Vijay; Tracy, Lilly; Ffrench, Rosemary; Bowden, Scott; Drummer, Heidi; George, Jacob; Bharadwaj, Mandvi; Hellard, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Background: Detectable HCV-specific cellular immune responses in HCV antibody and RNA negative people who inject drugs (PWID) raise the question of whether some are resistant to HCV infection. Immune responses from people who have been exposed to hepatitis C virus (HCV) and remain anti-HCV negative are of interest for HCV vaccine development; however, limited research addresses this area. Objectives: In a cohort of HCV antibody and RNA negative PWID, we assessed whether the presence of HCV-specific IFN-γ responses or genetic associations provide any evidence of protection from HCV infection. Patients and Methods: One hundred and ninety-eight participants were examined longitudinally for clinical, behavioral, social, environmental and genetic characteristics (IFNL3 genotype [formally IL-28B] and HLA type). Sixty-one of the 198 participants were HCV antibody and RNA negative, with 53 able to be examined longitudinally for HCV-specific IFN-γ ELISpot T cell responses. Results: Ten of the 53 HCV antibody and RNA negative participants had detectable HCV-specific IFN-γ responses at baseline (18%). The magnitude of IFN-γ responses averaged 131 +/- 96 SFC/106 PBMC and the breadth was mean 1 +/- 1 pool positive. The specificity of responses were mainly directed to E2, NS4b and NS5b. Participants with (10) and without (43) HCV-specific IFN-γ responses did not differ in behavioral, clinical or genetic characteristics (P > 0.05). There was a larger proportion sharing needles (with 70%, without 49%, P = 0.320) and a higher incidence of HCV (with 35.1 per 100 py, 95% CI 14.6, 84.4, without 16.0 per 100 py, 95% CI 7.2, 35.6, P = 0.212) in those with IFN-γ responses, although not statistically significant. Half the participants with baseline IFN-γ responses became HCV RNA positive (5/10), with one of these participants spontaneously clearing HCV. The spontaneous clearer had high magnitude and broad Th1 responses, favorable IFNL3 genotype and favorable HLA types. Conclusions

  18. Interpretative comments specifically suggesting specialist referral increase the detection of familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Bender, Robert; Edwards, Glenn; McMahon, Jenny; Hooper, Amanda J; Watts, Gerald F; Burnett, John R; Bell, Damon A

    2016-08-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is an under-diagnosed inherited condition characterised by elevated low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol and premature coronary artery disease. The requesting general practitioner of individuals with extremely elevated LDL-cholesterol measured by St John of God Pathology receives an interpretative comment on the lipid results highlighting possible FH. We sought to determine whether specifically recommending referral to the regional Lipid Disorders Clinic (LDC) increased referral and FH detection rates. A prospective case-control study of individuals with LDL-cholesterol ≥6.5 mmol/L was conducted. All individuals received an interpretative comment highlighting the possibility of FH. The cases comment also suggested LDC referral, and a subset of cases received the LDC's fax number (fax-cases) in addition. There were 231 individuals with an LDL-cholesterol ≥6.5 mmol/L; 96 (42%) controls and 135 (58%) cases, of which 99 were fax-cases. Twenty-four (18%) cases were referred to clinic compared with eight (8%) controls (p = 0.035). After specialist review and genetic testing, four probable and four definite FH individuals were detected amongst controls, compared with seven possible, eight probable and nine definite FH amongst cases. Genetic testing was performed in 31 (94%) individuals, 13 (42%) had a causative mutation identified. Interpretative commenting specifically recommending specialist review augments the detection of FH in the community.

  19. Development of a fast ELISA for the specific detection of both leucomalachite green and malachite green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yousheng; Chen, Li; Hu, Kun; Yu, Wenjuan; Yang, Xianle; Lu, Liqun

    2015-04-01

    Malachite green (MG), a dye, is an antifungal agent that has been used to treat and prevent fish diseases. It is metabolized into reduced leucomalachite green forms (LMG) that may reside in fish muscles for a long period, thus being harmful to human health. The aim of this study was to develop a competitive and direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect MG and LMG specifically. The monoclonal antibody (mAb) to LMG was generated using a hybridoma technique. The obtained mAb showed good cross-reactivity (CR) to malachite green (MG), but not to crystal violet (CV) and Brilliant Green (BG). The mAb was used to develop a fast detecting ELISA of MG and LMG in fish. By introducing the conjugation LMG-HRP, the detection capability was 0.37 ng mL-1 for MG and LMG. The mean recovery from spiked grass carp tissues ranged from 76.2% to 82.9% and the coefficients of variation varied between 1.8% and 7.5%. The stable and efficient monoclonal cell line obtained is a sustainable source of sensitive and specific antibody to MG and LMG.

  20. Cloud-enabled microscopy and droplet microfluidic platform for specific detection of Escherichia coli in water.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Alexander; Linshiz, Gregory; Kravets, Ilia; Stawski, Nina; Hillson, Nathan J; Yarmush, Martin L; Marks, Robert S; Konry, Tania

    2014-01-01

    We report an all-in-one platform - ScanDrop - for the rapid and specific capture, detection, and identification of bacteria in drinking water. The ScanDrop platform integrates droplet microfluidics, a portable imaging system, and cloud-based control software and data storage. The cloud-based control software and data storage enables robotic image acquisition, remote image processing, and rapid data sharing. These features form a "cloud" network for water quality monitoring. We have demonstrated the capability of ScanDrop to perform water quality monitoring via the detection of an indicator coliform bacterium, Escherichia coli, in drinking water contaminated with feces. Magnetic beads conjugated with antibodies to E. coli antigen were used to selectively capture and isolate specific bacteria from water samples. The bead-captured bacteria were co-encapsulated in pico-liter droplets with fluorescently-labeled anti-E. coli antibodies, and imaged with an automated custom designed fluorescence microscope. The entire water quality diagnostic process required 8 hours from sample collection to online-accessible results compared with 2-4 days for other currently available standard detection methods.

  1. Interpretative comments specifically suggesting specialist referral increase the detection of familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Bender, Robert; Edwards, Glenn; McMahon, Jenny; Hooper, Amanda J; Watts, Gerald F; Burnett, John R; Bell, Damon A

    2016-08-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is an under-diagnosed inherited condition characterised by elevated low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol and premature coronary artery disease. The requesting general practitioner of individuals with extremely elevated LDL-cholesterol measured by St John of God Pathology receives an interpretative comment on the lipid results highlighting possible FH. We sought to determine whether specifically recommending referral to the regional Lipid Disorders Clinic (LDC) increased referral and FH detection rates. A prospective case-control study of individuals with LDL-cholesterol ≥6.5 mmol/L was conducted. All individuals received an interpretative comment highlighting the possibility of FH. The cases comment also suggested LDC referral, and a subset of cases received the LDC's fax number (fax-cases) in addition. There were 231 individuals with an LDL-cholesterol ≥6.5 mmol/L; 96 (42%) controls and 135 (58%) cases, of which 99 were fax-cases. Twenty-four (18%) cases were referred to clinic compared with eight (8%) controls (p = 0.035). After specialist review and genetic testing, four probable and four definite FH individuals were detected amongst controls, compared with seven possible, eight probable and nine definite FH amongst cases. Genetic testing was performed in 31 (94%) individuals, 13 (42%) had a causative mutation identified. Interpretative commenting specifically recommending specialist review augments the detection of FH in the community. PMID:27328651

  2. Two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography for the specific detection of hippurate hydrolysis by microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, J Y; Chen, K C; Hale, J; Totten, P A; Holmes, K K

    1986-01-01

    Glycine, one of the end products of hippurate hydrolysis by microorganisms, was detected by a rapid, specific technique utilizing two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. A loopful of growth of each organism from its suitable agar medium was washed, suspended, and incubated with 0.1% sodium hippurate for 30 min at 37 degrees C. The supernatant of the incubated suspension from each organism was then dansylated, and the dansyl derivatives were separated by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography on polyamide sheets. Glycine, a product of hippurate hydrolysis, was detected under UV light. This technique does not require prolonged incubation and was found to be more specific and reliable than the standard ninhydrin reaction. In addition, it is inexpensive and can be easily conducted in a clinical microbiological reference laboratory. By this method, 100% (22/22) of Campylobacter jejuni and 0% (0/9) of Campylobacter coli reference strains were positive. In addition, 100% (13/13) of group B streptococci, 100% (24/24) of group D streptococci, and 90% (18/20) of Gardenerella vaginalis clinical isolates were positive for hippurate hydrolysis. This method is useful for the identification to the species level of Campylobacter organisms and the biotyping of Gardnerella organisms and for the detection of hippurate hydrolysis by unknown microorganisms. Images PMID:3517036

  3. Preparation and characterization of specific monoclonal antibodies for the detection of adult worm infections in onchocerciasis.

    PubMed

    Cho-Ngwa, Fidelis; Daggfeldt, Annika; Titanji, Vincent P K; Grönvik, Kjell-Olov

    2005-12-01

    Suitable molecular tests for monitoring the viability of adult worms of Onchocerca in vivo are required to accelerate the development of new macrofilaricides in river blindness (onchocerciasis). Hence, three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were prepared and evaluated in a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for their abilities to detect circulating adult worm antigens in onchocercal bovine and human sera. The MAbs did not cross-react with a number of control antigens, which included extracts of Ascaris suum, Loa loa, and O. ochengi microfilariae. They were all IgG1 molecules. Their targets in O. ochengi total extract were a set of the same 15 polypeptides with apparent molecular weights of 21-220 Kda. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed their adult worm specificity and showed their binding to the hypodermis of the adult worm. The ELISA could detect as little as 100 pg/mL of the affinity-purified target antigens. It also detected the antigens with 94.1% specificity in 50 out of 56 infected bovine sera (90% sensitivity) and in 21 out of 43 infected human sera (48.8% sensitivity, which could go up to 72.1% on elimination of two skewed control cases). We conclude that the MAbs could be field tested and used in responder populations as described herein or employed as components of more sensitive assays for the evaluation of novel Onchocerca macrofilaricides.

  4. Selectivity and specificity of a chromogenic medium for detecting Vibrio parahaemolyticust.

    PubMed

    Su, Yi-Cheng; Duan, Jingyun; Wu, Wen-Hsin

    2005-07-01

    The thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose agar (TCBS) used in the most-probable-number method for detecting Vibrio parahaemolyticus cannot differentiate growth of V. parahaemolyticus from Vibrio vulnificus or Vibrio mimicus. This study examined the selectivity and specificity of Bio-Chrome Vibrio medium (BCVM), a chromogenic medium that detects V. parahaemolyticus on the basis of the formation of distinct purple colonies on the medium. A panel consisting of 221 strains of bacteria, including 179 Vibrio spp. and 42 non-Vibrio spp., were examined for their ability to grow and produce colored colonies on BCVM. Growth of Salmonella, Shigella, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Aeromonas was inhibited by both BCVM and TCBS. All 148 strains of V. parahaemolyticus grew on BCVM, and 145 of them produced purple colonies. The remaining 31 Vibrio spp., except one strain of Vibrio fluvialis, were either unable to grow or produced blue-green or white colonies on BCVM. Bio-Chrome Vibrio medium was capable of differentiating V. parahaemolyticus from other species, including V. vulnificus and V. mimicus. Further studies are needed to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of BCVM for detecting V. parahaemolyticus in foods.

  5. Development and testing of biosensors that quantitatively and specifically detect organic contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.; Keim, P.; Kuske, C.; Willardson, B.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project sought to develop a more sensitive and less expensive method of detecting organic contaminants. Assaying complex environmental samples for organic contaminant content is costly and labor intensive. This often limits extensive testing. Sensitive microbial biosensors that detect specific organic contaminants in complex waste mixtures without prior separation from other waste components have been developed. Some soil microbes degrade organic compounds that contaminate the environment. These bacteria sense minute quantities of particular organic compounds then respond by activating genes encoding enzymes that degrade these molecules. Genetic manipulation of these gene regulatory processes has been employed to develop unique biosensors that detect specific organic compounds using standard biochemical assays. Such biosensors allow rapid, sensitive testing of environmental samples for selected organic contaminants. The cost of biosensor assays is at least 100-fold less than present methods, allowing more rapid and extensive testing and site characterization.

  6. Rapid and sensitive detection of Sclerotium rolfsii associated with collar rot disease of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius by species-specific polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Pravi, V; Jeeva, M L; Archana, P V

    2014-09-01

    Collar rot disease caused by Sclerotium rolfsii is an economically important disease prevailing in all Amorphophallus growing areas. The pathogen propagules surviving in soil and planting material are the major sources of inoculum. A nested PCR assay has been developed for specific detection of S. rolfsii in soil and planting material. The PCR detection limit was 10 pg in conventional assay whereas 0.1 pg in nested assay. The primers designed were found to be highly specific and could be used for accurate identification of pathogen up to species level. The protocol was standardized for detection of the pathogen in artificially and naturally infected field samples. PMID:24788585

  7. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated. PMID:26274954

  8. Designing DNA interstrand lock for locus-specific methylation detection in a nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Insoon; Wang, Yong; Reagan, Corbin; Fu, Yumei; Wang, Michael X.; Gu, Li-Qun

    2013-10-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Locus-specific DNA methylation can be used as biomarkers in various diseases including cancer. Many methods have been developed for genome-wide methylation analysis, but molecular diagnotics needs simple tools to determine methylation states at individual CpG sites in a gene fragment. In this report, we utilized the nanopore single-molecule sensor to investigate a base-pair specific metal ion/nucleic acids interaction, and explored its potential application in locus-specific DNA methylation analysis. We identified that divalent Mercury ion (Hg2+) can selectively bind a uracil-thymine mismatch (U-T) in a dsDNA. The Hg2+ binding creates a reversible interstrand lock, called MercuLock, which enhances the hybridization strength by two orders of magnitude. Such MercuLock cannot be formed in a 5-methylcytosine-thymine mismatch (mC-T). By nanopore detection of dsDNA stability, single bases of uracil and 5-methylcytosine can be distinguished. Since uracil is converted from cytosine by bisulfite treatment, cytosine and 5'-methylcytosine can be discriminated. We have demonstrated the methylation analysis of multiple CpGs in a p16 gene CpG island. This single-molecule assay may have potential in detection of epigenetic cancer biomarkers in biofluids, with an ultimate goal for early diagnosis of cancer.

  9. A topology-oriented and tissue-specific approach to detect pleural thickenings from 3D CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerger, C.; Chaisaowong, K.; Knepper, A.; Kraus, T.; Aach, T.

    2009-02-01

    Pleural thickenings are caused by asbestos exposure and may evolve into malignant pleural mesothelioma. The detection of pleural thickenings is today mostly done by a visual inspection of CT data, which is time-consuming and underlies the physician's subjective judgment. We propose a new detection algorithm within our computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) system to automatically detect pleural thickenings within CT data. First, pleura contours are identified by thresholding and contour relaxation with a probabilistic model. Subsequently, the approach to automatically detect pleural thickenings is proposed as a two-step procedure. Step one; since pleural thickenings appear as fine-scale occurrences on the rather large-scale pleura contour, a surface-based smoothing algorithm is developed. Pleural thickenings are initially detected as the difference between the original contours and the resulting "healthy" model of the pleura. Step two; as pleural thickenings can expand into the surrounding thoracic tissue, a subsequent tissue-specific segmentation for the initially detected pleural thickenings is performed in order to separate pleural thickenings from the surrounding thoracic tissue. For this purpose, a probabilistic Hounsfield model for pleural thickenings as a mixture of Gaussian distributions has been constructed. The parameters were estimated by applying the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm. A model fitting technique in combination with the application of a Gibbs-Markov random field (GMRF) model then allows the tissuespecific segmentation of pleural thickenings with high precision. With these methods, a new approach is presented in order to assure a precise and reproducible detection of pleural mesothelioma in its early stage.

  10. Rapid and specific detection of Yam mosaic virus by reverse-transcription recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gonçalo; Bömer, Moritz; Nkere, Chukwuemeka; Kumar, P Lava; Seal, Susan E

    2015-09-15

    Yam mosaic virus (YMV; genus Potyvirus) is considered to cause the most economically important viral disease of yams (Dioscorea spp.) in West Africa which is the dominant region for yam production globally. Yams are a vegetatively propagated crop and the use of virus-free planting material forms an essential component of disease control. Current serological and PCR-based diagnostic methods for YMV are time consuming involving a succession of target detection steps. In this study, a novel assay for specific YMV detection is described that is based on isothermal reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-exoRPA). This test has been shown to be reproducible and able to detect as little as 14 pg/μl of purified RNA obtained from an YMV-infected plant, a sensitivity equivalent to that obtained with the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in current general use. The RT-exoRPA assay has, however, several advantages over the RT-PCR; positive samples can be detected in less than 30 min, and amplification only requires a single incubation temperature (optimum 37°C). These features make the RT-exoRPA assay a promising candidate for adapting into a field test format to be used by yam breeding programmes or certification laboratories.

  11. Rapid and specific detection of Yam mosaic virus by reverse-transcription recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gonçalo; Bömer, Moritz; Nkere, Chukwuemeka; Kumar, P Lava; Seal, Susan E

    2015-09-15

    Yam mosaic virus (YMV; genus Potyvirus) is considered to cause the most economically important viral disease of yams (Dioscorea spp.) in West Africa which is the dominant region for yam production globally. Yams are a vegetatively propagated crop and the use of virus-free planting material forms an essential component of disease control. Current serological and PCR-based diagnostic methods for YMV are time consuming involving a succession of target detection steps. In this study, a novel assay for specific YMV detection is described that is based on isothermal reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-exoRPA). This test has been shown to be reproducible and able to detect as little as 14 pg/μl of purified RNA obtained from an YMV-infected plant, a sensitivity equivalent to that obtained with the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in current general use. The RT-exoRPA assay has, however, several advantages over the RT-PCR; positive samples can be detected in less than 30 min, and amplification only requires a single incubation temperature (optimum 37°C). These features make the RT-exoRPA assay a promising candidate for adapting into a field test format to be used by yam breeding programmes or certification laboratories. PMID:26115609

  12. Selection of DNA aptamers against epidermal growth factor receptor with high affinity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deng-Liang; Song, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Zhi; Li, Xi-Lan; Zou, Yuan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Jie; Yao, Pei-Sen; Pan, Ru-Jun; Yang, Chaoyong James; Kang, De-Zhi

    2014-10-31

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1/c-ErbB1), is overexpressed in many solid cancers, such as epidermoid carcinomas, malignant gliomas, etc. EGFR plays roles in proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis of malignant cancer cells and is the ideal antigen for clinical applications in cancer detection, imaging and therapy. Aptamers, the output of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are DNA/RNA oligonucleotides which can bind protein and other substances with specificity. RNA aptamers are undesirable due to their instability and high cost of production. Conversely, DNA aptamers have aroused researcher's attention because they are easily synthesized, stable, selective, have high binding affinity and are cost-effective to produce. In this study, we have successfully identified DNA aptamers with high binding affinity and selectivity to EGFR. The aptamer named TuTu22 with Kd 56±7.3nM was chosen from the identified DNA aptamers for further study. Flow cytometry analysis results indicated that the TuTu22 aptamer was able to specifically recognize a variety of cancer cells expressing EGFR but did not bind to the EGFR-negative cells. With all of the aforementioned advantages, the DNA aptamers reported here against cancer biomarker EGFR will facilitate the development of novel targeted cancer detection, imaging and therapy.

  13. Detecting breast microcalcifications with high-field MRI.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Hendrik; Stehouwer, Bertine L; Bakker, Chris J G; Klomp, Dennis W J; van Diest, Paul J; Luijten, Peter R; Seevinck, Peter R; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Viergever, Max A; Veldhuis, Wouter B

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to detect microcalcifications in human whole breast specimens using high-field MRI. Four mastectomy specimens, obtained with approval of the institutional review board, were subjected to gradient-echo MRI acquisitions on a high-field MR scanner. The phase derivative was used to detect microcalcifications. The echo time and imaging resolution were varied to study the sensitivity of the proposed method. Computed tomography images of the mastectomy specimens and prior acquired mammography images were used to validate the results. A template matching algorithm was designed to detect microcalcifications automatically. The three spatial derivatives of the signal phase surrounding a field-perturbing object allowed three-dimensional localization, as well as the discrimination of diamagnetic field-perturbing objects, such as calcifications, and paramagnetic field-perturbing structures, e.g. blood. A longer echo time enabled smaller disturbances to be detected, but also resulted in shading as a result of other field-disturbing materials. A higher imaging resolution increased the detection sensitivity. Microcalcifications in a linear branching configuration that spanned over 8 mm in length were detected. After manual correction, the automatic detection tool identified up to 18 microcalcifications within the samples, which was in close agreement with the number of microcalcifications found on previously acquired in vivo mammography images. Microcalcifications can be detected by MRI in human whole breast specimens by the application of phase derivative imaging. PMID:24535752

  14. Preclinical and Clinical Performance of the Efoora Test, a Rapid Test for Detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Arens, Max Q.; Mundy, Linda M.; Amsterdam, Daniel; Barrett, J. Tom; Bigg, Dan; Bruckner, David; Hanna, Bruce; Prince, Harry; Purington, Timothy; Hanna, Todd; Hewitt, Ross; Kalinka, Carolyn; Koppes, Thomas; Maxwell, Sarz; Moe, Ardis; Doymaz, Mehmet; Poulter, Melinda; Saber-Tehrani, Maryam; Simard, Lorenzo; Wilkins-Carmody, Donna; Vidaver, John; Berger, Cheryl; Davis, Alan H.; Alzona, Mortimer T.

    2005-01-01

    Barriers to effective diagnostic testing for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can be reduced with simple, reliable, and rapid detection methods. Our objective was to determine the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of a new rapid, lateral-flow immunochromatographic HIV-1 antibody detection device. Preclinical studies were performed using seroconversion, cross-reaction, and interference panels, archived clinical specimens, and fresh whole blood. In a multicenter, prospective clinical trial, a four-sample matrix of capillary (fingerstick) whole-blood specimens and venous whole blood, plasma, and serum was tested for HIV-1 antibodies with the Efoora HIV rapid test (Efoora Inc., Buffalo Grove, IL) and compared with an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (Abbott Laboratories) licensed by the Food and Drug Administration. Western blot and nucleic acid test supplemental assays were employed to adjudicate discordant samples. Preclinical testing of seroconversion panels showed that antibodies were often detected earlier by the rapid test than by a reference EIA. No significant interference or cross-reactions were observed. Testing of 4,984 archived specimens yielded a sensitivity of 99.2% and a specificity of 99.7%. A prospective multicenter clinical study with 2,954 adult volunteers demonstrated sensitivity and specificity for the Efoora HIV rapid test of 99.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 99.3 and 99.98%) and 99.0% (95% CI, 98.5 and 99.4%), respectively. Reactive rapid HIV-1 antibody detection was confirmed in 99.6% of those with a known HIV infection (n = 939), 5.2% of those in the high-risk group (n = 1,003), and 0.1% of those in the low-risk group (n = 1,012). For 21 (0.71%) patients, there was discordance between the results of the rapid test and the confirmatory EIA/Western blot tests. We conclude that the Efoora HIV rapid test is a simple, rapid assay for detection of HIV-1 antibodies, with high sensitivity and specificity compared to a standardized

  15. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies. PMID:27775006

  16. L1 regularization facilitates detection of cell type-specific parameters in dynamical systems

    PubMed Central

    Steiert, Bernhard; Timmer, Jens; Kreutz, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: A major goal of drug development is to selectively target certain cell types. Cellular decisions influenced by drugs are often dependent on the dynamic processing of information. Selective responses can be achieved by differences between the involved cell types at levels of receptor, signaling, gene regulation or further downstream. Therefore, a systematic approach to detect and quantify cell type-specific parameters in dynamical systems becomes necessary. Results: Here, we demonstrate that a combination of nonlinear modeling with L1 regularization is capable of detecting cell type-specific parameters. To adapt the least-squares numerical optimization routine to L1 regularization, sub-gradient strategies as well as truncation of proposed optimization steps were implemented. Likelihood-ratio tests were used to determine the optimal regularization strength resulting in a sparse solution in terms of a minimal number of cell type-specific parameters that is in agreement with the data. By applying our implementation to a realistic dynamical benchmark model of the DREAM6 challenge we were able to recover parameter differences with an accuracy of 78%. Within the subset of detected differences, 91% were in agreement with their true value. Furthermore, we found that the results could be improved using the profile likelihood. In conclusion, the approach constitutes a general method to infer an overarching model with a minimum number of individual parameters for the particular models. Availability and Implementation: A MATLAB implementation is provided within the freely available, open-source modeling environment Data2Dynamics. Source code for all examples is provided online at http://www.data2dynamics.org/. Contact: bernhard.steiert@fdm.uni-freiburg.de PMID:27587694

  17. Sensitive and Specific Detection of Early Gastric Cancer Using DNA Methylation Analysis of Gastric Washes

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Kim, Hyun Soo; Castoro, Ryan J.; Chung, Woonbok; Estecio, Marcos R. H.; Kondo, Kimie; Guo, Yi; Ahmed, Saira S.; Toyota, Minoru; Itoh, Fumio; Suk, Ki Tae; Cho, Mee-Yon; Shen, Lanlan; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Aberrant DNA methylation is an early and frequent process in gastric carcinogenesis and could be useful for detection of gastric neoplasia. We hypothesized that methylation analysis of DNA recovered from gastric washes could be used to detect gastric cancer. Methods We studied 51 candidate genes in 7 gastric cancer cell lines and 24 samples (training set) and identified 6 for further studies. We examined the methylation status of these genes in a test set consisting of 131 gastric neoplasias at various stages. Finally, we validated the 6 candidate genes in a different population of 40 primary gastric cancer samples and 113 non-neoplastic gastric mucosa samples. Results 6 genes (MINT25, RORA, GDNF, ADAM23, PRDM5, MLF1) showed frequent differential methylation between gastric cancer and normal mucosa in the training, test and validation sets. GDNF and MINT25 were most sensitive molecular markers of early stage gastric cancer while PRDM5 and MLF1 were markers of a field defect. There was a close correlation (r=0.5 to 0.9, p=0.03 to 0.001) between methylation levels in tumor biopsy and gastric washes. MINT25 methylation had the best sensitivity (90%), specificity (96%), and area under the ROC curve (0.961) in terms of tumor detection in gastric washes. Conclusions These findings suggest MINT25 is a sensitive and specific marker for screening in gastric cancer. Additionally we have developed a new methodology for gastric cancer detection by DNA methylation in gastric washes. PMID:19375421

  18. Fluorescence biosensor based on CdTe quantum dots for specific detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa Nguyen, Thi; Dieu Thuy Ung, Thi; Hien Vu, Thi; Tran, Thi Kim Chi; Quyen Dong, Van; Khang Dinh, Duy; Liem Nguyen, Quang

    2012-09-01

    This report highlights the fabrication of fluorescence biosensors based on CdTe quantum dots (QDs) for specific detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus. The core biosensor was composed of (i) the highly luminescent CdTe/CdS QDs, (ii) chromatophores extracted from bacteria Rhodospirillum rubrum, and (iii) the antibody of β-subunit. This core part was linked to the peripheral part of the biosensor via a biotin-streptavidin-biotin bridge and finally connected to the H5N1 antibody to make it ready for detecting H5N1 avian influenza virus. Detailed studies of each constituent were performed showing the image of QDs-labeled chromatophores under optical microscope, proper photoluminescence (PL) spectra of CdTe/CdS QDs, chromatophores and the H5N1 avian influenza viruses.

  19. Site specific passive acoustic detection and densities of humpback whale calls off the coast of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helble, Tyler Adam

    Passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammal calls is an increasingly important method for assessing population numbers, distribution, and behavior. Automated methods are needed to aid in the analyses of the recorded data. When a mammal vocalizes in the marine environment, the received signal is a filtered version of the original waveform emitted by the marine mammal. The waveform is reduced in amplitude and distorted due to propagation effects that are influenced by the bathymetry and environment. It is important to account for these effects to determine a site-specific probability of detection for marine mammal calls in a given study area. A knowledge of that probability function over a range of environmental and ocean noise conditions allows vocalization statistics from recordings of single, fixed, omnidirectional sensors to be compared across sensors and at the same sensor over time with less bias and uncertainty in the results than direct comparison of the raw statistics. This dissertation focuses on both the development of new tools needed to automatically detect humpback whale vocalizations from single-fixed omnidirectional sensors as well as the determination of the site-specific probability of detection for monitoring sites off the coast of California. Using these tools, detected humpback calls are "calibrated" for environmental properties using the site-specific probability of detection values, and presented as call densities (calls per square kilometer per time). A two-year monitoring effort using these calibrated call densities reveals important biological and ecological information on migrating humpback whales off the coast of California. Call density trends are compared between the monitoring sites and at the same monitoring site over time. Call densities also are compared to several natural and human-influenced variables including season, time of day, lunar illumination, and ocean noise. The results reveal substantial differences in call densities

  20. A sensitive and specific PCR assay for the detection of Baylisascaris schroederi eggs in giant panda feces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Li, De-Sheng; Zhou, Xuan; Xie, Yue; Liang, Yi-Nan; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Yu, Hua; Chen, Shi-Jie; Yan, Yu-Bo; Gu, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Shu-Xian; Peng, Xue-Rong; Yang, Guang-You

    2013-10-01

    Baylisascaris schroederi is one of the most common intestinal nematodes in giant pandas. It can cause severe baylisascariasis which is highly infectious in its natural hosts. A rapid and reliable diagnosis of parasite infections is crucial to protect giant pandas, as well as for environmental monitoring and disease surveillance. Here, we established a specific PCR assay for B. schroederi detection which was targeting a 331-bp long fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene. Fifty fresh fecal samples collected from captive giant pandas were tested by the established PCR assay and the traditional flotation technique. DNA extracted from a single B. schroederi egg could be successfully amplified, while no cross-reactivity was found with DNA from Ancylostoma caninum eggs. The detection rate of the PCR assay was 68%, which was higher than that of the traditional egg flotation (46%). Our findings demonstrated that the PCR assay is sensitive and specific for the detection and identification of B. schroederi eggs. Therefore, it could become a useful tool for the investigation of B. schroederi infections in giant pandas.

  1. A sensitive and specific PCR assay for the detection of Baylisascaris schroederi eggs in giant panda feces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Li, De-Sheng; Zhou, Xuan; Xie, Yue; Liang, Yi-Nan; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Yu, Hua; Chen, Shi-Jie; Yan, Yu-Bo; Gu, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Shu-Xian; Peng, Xue-Rong; Yang, Guang-You

    2013-10-01

    Baylisascaris schroederi is one of the most common intestinal nematodes in giant pandas. It can cause severe baylisascariasis which is highly infectious in its natural hosts. A rapid and reliable diagnosis of parasite infections is crucial to protect giant pandas, as well as for environmental monitoring and disease surveillance. Here, we established a specific PCR assay for B. schroederi detection which was targeting a 331-bp long fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene. Fifty fresh fecal samples collected from captive giant pandas were tested by the established PCR assay and the traditional flotation technique. DNA extracted from a single B. schroederi egg could be successfully amplified, while no cross-reactivity was found with DNA from Ancylostoma caninum eggs. The detection rate of the PCR assay was 68%, which was higher than that of the traditional egg flotation (46%). Our findings demonstrated that the PCR assay is sensitive and specific for the detection and identification of B. schroederi eggs. Therefore, it could become a useful tool for the investigation of B. schroederi infections in giant pandas. PMID:23688803

  2. Development and Characterization of High-Efficiency, High-Specific Impulse Xenon Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Jacobson, David (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation presents research aimed at extending the efficient operation of 1600 s specific impulse Hall thruster technology to the 2000 to 3000 s range. Motivated by previous industry efforts and mission studies, the aim of this research was to develop and characterize xenon Hall thrusters capable of both high-specific impulse and high-efficiency operation. During the development phase, the laboratory-model NASA 173M Hall thrusters were designed and their performance and plasma characteristics were evaluated. Experiments with the NASA-173M version 1 (v1) validated the plasma lens magnetic field design. Experiments with the NASA 173M version 2 (v2) showed there was a minimum current density and optimum magnetic field topography at which efficiency monotonically increased with voltage. Comparison of the thrusters showed that efficiency can be optimized for specific impulse by varying the plasma lens. During the characterization phase, additional plasma properties of the NASA 173Mv2 were measured and a performance model was derived. Results from the model and experimental data showed how efficient operation at high-specific impulse was enabled through regulation of the electron current with the magnetic field. The electron Hall parameter was approximately constant with voltage, which confirmed efficient operation can be realized only over a limited range of Hall parameters.

  3. A Multiplexed Device Based on Tunable Nanoshearing for Specific Detection of Multiple Protein Biomarkers in Serum

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; van Leeuwen, Lara Michelle; Rauf, Sakandar; Shiddiky, Muhammad J. A.; Trau, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic flow based multiplexed devices have gained significant promise in detecting biomarkers in complex biological samples. However, to fully exploit their use in bioanalysis, issues such as (i) low sensitivity and (ii) high levels of nonspecific adsorption of non-target species have to be overcome. Herein, we describe a new multiplexed device for the sensitive detection of multiple protein biomarkers in serum by using an alternating current (ac) electrohydrodynamics (ac-EHD) induced surface shear forces based phenomenon referred to as nanoshearing. The tunable nature (via manipulation of ac field) of these nanoshearing forces can alter the capture performance of the device (e.g., improved fluid transport enhances number of sensor-target collisions). This can also selectively displace weakly (nonspecifically) bound molecules from the electrode surface (i.e., fluid shear forces can be tuned to shear away nonspecific species present in biological samples). Using this approach, we achieved sensitive (100 fg mL−1) naked eye detection of multiple protein targets spiked in human serum and a 1000-fold enhancement in comparison to hydrodynamic flow based devices for biomarker detection. We believe that this approach could potentially represent a clinical diagnostic tool that can be integrated into resource-limited settings for sensitive detection of target biomarkers using naked eye. PMID:25978807

  4. Selection of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) Specific Recombinant Monoclonal Phage Display Antibodies for Prey Detection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Monzó, César; Urbaneja, Alberto; Ximénez-Embún, Miguel; García-Fernández, Julia; García, José Luis; Castañera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Several recombinant antibodies against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most important pests in agriculture worldwide, were selected for the first time from a commercial phage display library of human scFv antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the selected recombinant antibodies were compared with that of a rabbit polyclonal serum raised in parallel using a wide range of arthropod species as controls. The selected recombinant monoclonal antibodies had a similar or greater specificity when compared with classical monoclonal antibodies. The selected recombinant antibodies were successfully used to detect the target antigen in the gut of predators and the scFv antibodies were sequenced and compared. These results demonstrate the potential for recombinant scFv antibodies to be used as an alternative to the classical monoclonal antibodies or even molecular probes in the post-mortem analysis studies of generalist predators. PMID:23272105

  5. Rapid and specific electrochemical detection of prostate cancer cells using an aperture sensor array.

    PubMed

    Moscovici, Mario; Bhimji, Alyajahan; Kelley, Shana O

    2013-03-01

    A rapid, simple and specific cancer cell counting sensor would allow for early detection and better disease management. We have developed a novel cell counting device that can specifically count 125 prostate cancer cells in both complex media with serum and a mixed cell population containing non-target cells within 15 min. The microfabricated glass chip with exposed gold apertures utilizes the anti-EpCAM antibody to selectively count prostate cancer cells via differential pulse voltammetry. The newly developed sensor exhibits excellent sensitivity and selectivity. The cells remain viable throughout the counting process and can be used for further analysis. This device could have utility for future applications in early stage cancer diagnosis.

  6. Remote detection of traces of high energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrovnikov, S. M.; Gorlov, E. V.; Zharkov, V. I.; Panchenko, Yu. N.

    2015-11-01

    The possibility of remote detection of traces of high energetic materials using laser fragmentation/laser-induced fluorescence (LF/LIF) method is studied. Experimental data on the remote visualization of traces of trinitrotoluene, hexogen, composition B, octogen, and tetryl obtained at a distance of 5 m with a scanning lidar detector of traces of high energetic materials are presented.

  7. SeaMon-HC Buoy. A specific real-time-lightweight-moored platform as a tool for fast hydrocarbon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera, C.; Rueda, M. J.; Moran, R.; Llerandi, C.; Llinas, O.

    2009-04-01

    The present paper-work describes the design, last development stages and the derived results from a specific buoy platform for fast hydrocarbon detection in seawater. Under the name of SeaMon-HC, (Patent No. P200302219/8) the buoy represents a very chief tool for coastal monitoring, mainly surrounding areas with a high oil-spill risk level, like harbours, off-shore fish farming, beaches and so on. Nowadays, the Macaronesian area has nine units working in real-time, under the frame of the Red ACOMAR Network. The main innovative aspect from this buoy is the detection system. It's based in polymer technology, working as a resistance, who increase its value when the pollutant on water surface is detected. The response time from the sensor is a direct function of the hydrocarbon volatility level. For hydrocarbons with high volatility levels (like petrol), the sensor needs less time (around 3 minutes) than others with less volatility such as oils. SeaMon-HC is an autonomous, modular, reusable and a very low-cost development integrated by four subsystems (SS): SS-Flotation (different materials and shapes available); SS-Sensors (hydrocarbon detector and additional sensors -up to 15-, to solve specific sensor configuration requirements); SS-Power Supply (equipped in its basic configuration with a couple of solar modules and two 12V batteries) and the SS-Communication (based on a RF or GSM/GPRS modem technology, with a selectable communication frequency). All SeaMon-HC units, as well the rest of the ODAS buoys who joint together the Red ACOMAR Network, works in real-time, sending the collected information to the control centre that manages the communications, providing data, in a useful form (as a web site), to diverse socio-economic important sectors which make an exhaustive use of the littoral in the Macaronesian region. The access to the information by the users is done through a specific GIS software application.

  8. Highly sensitive and specific novel biomarkers for the diagnosis of transitional bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Nandi, Sayantani; Tan, Tuan Zea; Ler, Siok Ghee; Chia, Kee Seng; Lim, Wei-Yen; Bütow, Zentia; Vordos, Dimitrios; De la Taille, Alexandre; Al-Haddawi, Muthafar; Raida, Manfred; Beyer, Burkhard; Ricci, Estelle; Colombel, Marc; Chong, Tsung Wen; Chiong, Edmund; Soo, Ross; Park, Mi Kyoung; Ha, Hong Koo; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2015-05-30

    Transitional bladder carcinoma (BCa) is prevalent in developed countries, particularly among men. Given that these tumors frequently recur or progress, the early detection and subsequent monitoring of BCa at different stages is critical. Current BCa diagnostic biomarkers are not sufficiently sensitive for substituting or complementing invasive cystoscopy. Here, we sought to identify a robust set of urine biomarkers for BCa detection. Using a high-resolution, mass spectrometry-based, quantitative proteomics approach, we measured, compared and validated protein variations in 451 voided urine samples from healthy subjects, non-bladder cancer patients and patients with non-invasive and invasive BCa. We identified five robust biomarkers: Coronin-1A, Apolipoprotein A4, Semenogelin-2, Gamma synuclein and DJ-1/PARK7. In diagnosing Ta/T1 BCa, these biomarkers achieved an AUC of 0.92 and 0.98, respectively, using ELISA and western blot data (sensitivity, 79.2% and 93.9%; specificity, 100% and 96.7%, respectively). In diagnosing T2/T3 BCa, an AUC of 0.94 and 1.0 was attained (sensitivity, 86.4% and 100%; specificity, 100%) using the same methods. Thus, our multiplex biomarker panel offers unprecedented accuracy for the diagnosis of BCa patients and provides the prospect for a non-invasive way to detect bladder cancer.

  9. Highly sensitive and specific novel biomarkers for the diagnosis of transitional bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Nandi, Sayantani; Tan, Tuan Zea; Ler, Siok Ghee; Chia, Kee Seng; Lim, Wei-Yen; Bütow, Zentia; Vordos, Dimitrios; De la Taille, Alexandre; Al-Haddawi, Muthafar; Raida, Manfred; Beyer, Burkhard; Ricci, Estelle; Colombel, Marc; Chong, Tsung Wen; Chiong, Edmund; Soo, Ross; Park, Mi Kyoung; Ha, Hong Koo; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2015-05-30

    Transitional bladder carcinoma (BCa) is prevalent in developed countries, particularly among men. Given that these tumors frequently recur or progress, the early detection and subsequent monitoring of BCa at different stages is critical. Current BCa diagnostic biomarkers are not sufficiently sensitive for substituting or complementing invasive cystoscopy. Here, we sought to identify a robust set of urine biomarkers for BCa detection. Using a high-resolution, mass spectrometry-based, quantitative proteomics approach, we measured, compared and validated protein variations in 451 voided urine samples from healthy subjects, non-bladder cancer patients and patients with non-invasive and invasive BCa. We identified five robust biomarkers: Coronin-1A, Apolipoprotein A4, Semenogelin-2, Gamma synuclein and DJ-1/PARK7. In diagnosing Ta/T1 BCa, these biomarkers achieved an AUC of 0.92 and 0.98, respectively, using ELISA and western blot data (sensitivity, 79.2% and 93.9%; specificity, 100% and 96.7%, respectively). In diagnosing T2/T3 BCa, an AUC of 0.94 and 1.0 was attained (sensitivity, 86.4% and 100%; specificity, 100%) using the same methods. Thus, our multiplex biomarker panel offers unprecedented accuracy for the diagnosis of BCa patients and provides the prospect for a non-invasive way to detect bladder cancer. PMID:25915536

  10. Highly sensitive and specific novel biomarkers for the diagnosis of transitional bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prashant; Nandi, Sayantani; Tan, Tuan Zea; Ler, Siok Ghee; Chia, Kee Seng; Lim, Wei-Yen; Bütow, Zentia; Vordos, Dimitrios; De laTaille, Alexandre; Al-Haddawi, Muthafar; Raida, Manfred; Beyer, Burkhard; Ricci, Estelle; Colombel, Marc; Chong, Tsung Wen; Chiong, Edmund; Soo, Ross; Park, Mi Kyoung; Ha, Hong Koo; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2015-01-01

    Transitional bladder carcinoma (BCa) is prevalent in developed countries, particularly among men. Given that these tumors frequently recur or progress, the early detection and subsequent monitoring of BCa at different stages is critical. Current BCa diagnostic biomarkers are not sufficiently sensitive for substituting or complementing invasive cystoscopy. Here, we sought to identify a robust set of urine biomarkers for BCa detection. Using a high-resolution, mass spectrometry-based, quantitative proteomics approach, we measured, compared and validated protein variations in 451 voided urine samples from healthy subjects, non-bladder cancer patients and patients with non-invasive and invasive BCa. We identified five robust biomarkers: Coronin-1A, Apolipoprotein A4, Semenogelin-2, Gamma synuclein and DJ-1/PARK7. In diagnosing Ta/T1 BCa, these biomarkers achieved an AUC of 0.92 and 0.98, respectively, using ELISA and western blot data (sensitivity, 79.2% and 93.9%; specificity, 100% and 96.7%, respectively). In diagnosing T2/T3 BCa, an AUC of 0.94 and 1.0 was attained (sensitivity, 86.4% and 100%; specificity, 100%) using the same methods. Thus, our multiplex biomarker panel offers unprecedented accuracy for the diagnosis of BCa patients and provides the prospect for a non-invasive way to detect bladder cancer. PMID:25915536

  11. Specific capture of the hydrolysate on magnetic beads for sensitive detecting plant vacuolar processing enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Cheng, Meng; Zeng, Lizhang; Liu, Weipeng; Zhang, Tao; Xing, Da

    2016-05-15

    Conventional plant protease detection always suffers from high background interference caused by the complex coloring metabolites in plant cells. In this study, a bio-modified magnetic beads-based strategy was developed for sensitive and quantitative detection of plant vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE) activity. Cleavage of the peptide substrate (ESENCRK-FITC) after asparagine residue by VPE resulted in the 2-cyano-6-amino-benzothiazole (CABT)-functionalized magnetic beads capture of the severed substrate CRK-FITC via a condensation reaction between CABT and cysteine (Cys). The catalytic activity was subsequently obtained by the confocal microscopy imaging and flow cytometry quantitative analysis. The sensor system integrated advantages of (i) the high efficient enrichment and separation capabilities of magnetic beads and (ii) the catalyst-free properties of the CABT-Cys condensation reaction. It exhibited a linear relationship between the fluorescence signal and the concentration of severed substrate in the range of 10-600 pM. The practical results showed that, compared with normal growth conditions, VPE activity was increased by 2.7-fold (307.2 ± 25.3 μM min(-1)g(-1)) upon cadmium toxicity stress. This platform effectively overcame the coloring metabolites-caused background interference, showing fine applicability for the detection of VPE activity in real samples. The strategy offers great sensitivity and may be further extended to other protease activity detection. PMID:26797250

  12. Highly sensitive amyloid detection enabled by thioflavin T dimers.

    PubMed

    Qin, Luoheng; Vastl, Julian; Gao, Jianmin

    2010-10-01

    Fluorescent molecules that specifically target amyloid structures are highly desirable for amyloid research. Herein, we show a dimeric design of thioflavin T improves its binding affinity to Abeta amyloid by up to 70 fold, while not sacrificing the specificity and the "light-up" feature upon amyloid binding.

  13. Bayesian Peptide Peak Detection for High Resolution TOF Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianqiu; Zhou, Xiaobo; Wang, Honghui; Suffredini, Anthony; Zhang, Lin; Huang, Yufei; Wong, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we address the issue of peptide ion peak detection for high resolution time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) data. A novel Bayesian peptide ion peak detection method is proposed for TOF data with resolution of 10 000–15 000 full width at half-maximum (FWHW). MS spectra exhibit distinct characteristics at this resolution, which are captured in a novel parametric model. Based on the proposed parametric model, a Bayesian peak detection algorithm based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling is developed. The proposed algorithm is tested on both simulated and real datasets. The results show a significant improvement in detection performance over a commonly employed method. The results also agree with expert’s visual inspection. Moreover, better detection consistency is achieved across MS datasets from patients with identical pathological condition. PMID:21544266

  14. Voltage spike detection in high field superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Orris, D.F.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    A measurement system for the detection of small magnetic flux changes in superconducting magnets, which are due to either mechanical motion of the conductor or flux jump, has been developed at Fermilab. These flux changes are detected as small amplitude, short duration voltage spikes, which are {approx}15mV in magnitude and lasts for {approx}30 {micro}sec. The detection system combines an analog circuit for the signal conditioning of two coil segments and a fast data acquisition system for digitizing the results, performing threshold detection, and storing the resultant data. The design of the spike detection system along with the modeling results and noise analysis will be presented. Data from tests of high field Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets at currents up to {approx}20KA will also be shown.

  15. A Highly Flexible, Automated System Providing Reliable Sample Preparation in Element- and Structure-Specific Measurements.

    PubMed

    Vorberg, Ellen; Fleischer, Heidi; Junginger, Steffen; Liu, Hui; Stoll, Norbert; Thurow, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Life science areas require specific sample pretreatment to increase the concentration of the analytes and/or to convert the analytes into an appropriate form for the detection and separation systems. Various workstations are commercially available, allowing for automated biological sample pretreatment. Nevertheless, due to the required temperature, pressure, and volume conditions in typical element and structure-specific measurements, automated platforms are not suitable for analytical processes. Thus, the purpose of the presented investigation was the design, realization, and evaluation of an automated system ensuring high-precision sample preparation for a variety of analytical measurements. The developed system has to enable system adaption and high performance flexibility. Furthermore, the system has to be capable of dealing with the wide range of required vessels simultaneously, allowing for less cost and time-consuming process steps. However, the system's functionality has been confirmed in various validation sequences. Using element-specific measurements, the automated system was up to 25% more precise compared to the manual procedure and as precise as the manual procedure using structure-specific measurements.

  16. Sensitivity and specificity of parallel or serial serological testing for detection of canine Leishmania infection.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Mauro Maciel de; Figueiredo, Fabiano Borges; Marcelino, Andreza Pain; Barbosa, José Ronaldo; Werneck, Guilherme Loureiro; Noronha, Elza Ferreira; Romero, Gustavo Adolfo Sierra

    2016-03-01

    In Brazil, human and canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) caused by Leishmania infantum has undergone urbanisation since 1980, constituting a public health problem, and serological tests are tools of choice for identifying infected dogs. Until recently, the Brazilian zoonoses control program recommended enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and indirect immunofluorescence assays (IFA) as the screening and confirmatory methods, respectively, for the detection of canine infection. The purpose of this study was to estimate the accuracy of ELISA and IFA in parallel or serial combinations. The reference standard comprised the results of direct visualisation of parasites in histological sections, immunohistochemical test, or isolation of the parasite in culture. Samples from 98 cases and 1,327 noncases were included. Individually, both tests presented sensitivity of 91.8% and 90.8%, and specificity of 83.4 and 53.4%, for the ELISA and IFA, respectively. When tests were used in parallel combination, sensitivity attained 99.2%, while specificity dropped to 44.8%. When used in serial combination (ELISA followed by IFA), decreased sensitivity (83.3%) and increased specificity (92.5%) were observed. Serial testing approach improved specificity with moderate loss in sensitivity. This strategy could partially fulfill the needs of public health and dog owners for a more accurate diagnosis of CVL. PMID:26910354

  17. Sensitivity and specificity of parallel or serial serological testing for detection of canine Leishmania infection

    PubMed Central

    de Arruda, Mauro Maciel; Figueiredo, Fabiano Borges; Marcelino, Andreza Pain; Barbosa, José Ronaldo; Werneck, Guilherme Loureiro; Noronha, Elza Ferreira; Romero, Gustavo Adolfo Sierra

    2016-01-01

    In Brazil, human and canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) caused byLeishmania infantum has undergone urbanisation since 1980, constituting a public health problem, and serological tests are tools of choice for identifying infected dogs. Until recently, the Brazilian zoonoses control program recommended enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and indirect immunofluorescence assays (IFA) as the screening and confirmatory methods, respectively, for the detection of canine infection. The purpose of this study was to estimate the accuracy of ELISA and IFA in parallel or serial combinations. The reference standard comprised the results of direct visualisation of parasites in histological sections, immunohistochemical test, or isolation of the parasite in culture. Samples from 98 cases and 1,327 noncases were included. Individually, both tests presented sensitivity of 91.8% and 90.8%, and specificity of 83.4 and 53.4%, for the ELISA and IFA, respectively. When tests were used in parallel combination, sensitivity attained 99.2%, while specificity dropped to 44.8%. When used in serial combination (ELISA followed by IFA), decreased sensitivity (83.3%) and increased specificity (92.5%) were observed. Serial testing approach improved specificity with moderate loss in sensitivity. This strategy could partially fulfill the needs of public health and dog owners for a more accurate diagnosis of CVL. PMID:26910354

  18. Detection of Otosclerosis-Specific Measles Virus Receptor (Cd46) Protein Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Csomor, Péter; Karosi, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    Genetic predisposition of otosclerosis has long been suspected, but unclarified. Unique coexpression pattern of measles virus receptor (CD46) splicing isoforms in the human otic capsule is assumed, since otosclerosis is a measles virus-associated organ-specific disease. In order to identify CD46 involved in the pathogenesis of otosclerosis, we used representative groups of histologically diagnosed otosclerotic, nonotosclerotic, and normal stapes footplates (n = 109). Consecutive histopathological examinations and CD46-specific Western blot analysis were performed. Normal and nonotosclerotic stapes footplates showed consistent expression of the conventional c, d, e, f, and l CD46 isoforms. In contrast, four novel isoforms (os1–4) translated as intact proteins were additionally detected in each otosclerotic specimen. The study herein presented provides evidence for the otosclerosis-associated expression pattern of CD46. This finding might explain the organ-specific, virus-associated and autoimmune-inflammatory pathogenesis of otosclerosis. Regarding our current knowledge, this is the first report that confirms the presence of four new disease-specific protein variants of CD46. PMID:23864959

  19. An Egg Apparatus-Specific Enhancer of Arabidopsis, Identified by Enhancer Detection1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Jefferson, Richard A.; Huttner, Eric; Moore, James M.; Gagliano, Wendy B.; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2005-01-01

    Despite a central role in angiosperm reproduction, few gametophyte-specific genes and promoters have been isolated, particularly for the inaccessible female gametophyte (embryo sac). Using the Ds-based enhancer-detector line ET253, we have cloned an egg apparatus-specific enhancer (EASE) from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The genomic region flanking the Ds insertion site was further analyzed by examining its capability to control gusA and GFP reporter gene expression in the embryo sac in a transgenic context. Through analysis of a 5′ and 3′ deletion series in transgenic Arabidopsis, the sequence responsible for egg apparatus-specific expression was delineated to 77 bp. Our data showed that this enhancer is unique in the Arabidopsis genome, is conserved among different accessions, and shows an unusual pattern of sequence variation. This EASE works independently of position and orientation in Arabidopsis but is probably not associated with any nearby gene, suggesting either that it acts over a large distance or that a cryptic element was detected. Embryo-specific ablation in Arabidopsis was achieved by transactivation of a diphtheria toxin gene under the control of the EASE. The potential application of the EASE element and similar control elements as part of an open-source biotechnology toolkit for apomixis is discussed. PMID:16258010

  20. Sensitivity and specificity of parallel or serial serological testing for detection of canine Leishmania infection.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Mauro Maciel de; Figueiredo, Fabiano Borges; Marcelino, Andreza Pain; Barbosa, José Ronaldo; Werneck, Guilherme Loureiro; Noronha, Elza Ferreira; Romero, Gustavo Adolfo Sierra

    2016-03-01

    In Brazil, human and canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) caused by Leishmania infantum has undergone urbanisation since 1980, constituting a public health problem, and serological tests are tools of choice for identifying infected dogs. Until recently, the Brazilian zoonoses control program recommended enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and indirect immunofluorescence assays (IFA) as the screening and confirmatory methods, respectively, for the detection of canine infection. The purpose of this study was to estimate the accuracy of ELISA and IFA in parallel or serial combinations. The reference standard comprised the results of direct visualisation of parasites in histological sections, immunohistochemical test, or isolation of the parasite in culture. Samples from 98 cases and 1,327 noncases were included. Individually, both tests presented sensitivity of 91.8% and 90.8%, and specificity of 83.4 and 53.4%, for the ELISA and IFA, respectively. When tests were used in parallel combination, sensitivity attained 99.2%, while specificity dropped to 44.8%. When used in serial combination (ELISA followed by IFA), decreased sensitivity (83.3%) and increased specificity (92.5%) were observed. Serial testing approach improved specificity with moderate loss in sensitivity. This strategy could partially fulfill the needs of public health and dog owners for a more accurate diagnosis of CVL.

  1. Specific detection of the floodwater mosquitoes Aedes sticticus and Aedes vexans DNA in predatory diving beetles.

    PubMed

    Vinnersten, Thomas Z Persson; Halvarsson, Peter; Lundström, Jan O

    2015-08-01

    Floodwater mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are associated with periodically flooded wet meadows, marshes, and swamps in floodplains of major rivers worldwide, and their larvae are abundant in the shallow parts of flooded areas. The nuisance caused by the blood-seeking adult female mosquitoes motivates mosquito control. Larviciding with Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis is considered the most environmentally safe method. However, some concern has been raised whether aquatic predatory insects could be indirectly affected by this reduction in a potential vital prey. Top predators in the temporary wetlands in the River Dalälven floodplains are diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), and Aedes sticticus and Ae. vexans are the target species for mosquito control. For detailed studies on this aquatic predator-prey system, we developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for detection of mosquito DNA in the guts of medium-sized diving beetles. Primers were designed for amplifying short mitochondrial DNA fragments of the cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (COI) gene in Ae. sticticus and Ae. vexans, respectively. Primer specificity was confirmed and half-life detectability of Ae. sticticus DNA in diving beetle guts was derived from a feeding and digestion experiment. The Ae. sticticus DNA within diving beetle guts was detected up to 12 h postfeeding, and half-life detectability was estimated to 5.6 h. In addition, field caught diving beetles were screened for Ae. sticticus and Ae. vexans DNA and in 14% of the diving beetles one or both mosquito species were detected, showing that these mosquito species are utilized as food by the diving beetles.

  2. Specific detection of the floodwater mosquitoes Aedes sticticus and Aedes vexans DNA in predatory diving beetles.

    PubMed

    Vinnersten, Thomas Z Persson; Halvarsson, Peter; Lundström, Jan O

    2015-08-01

    Floodwater mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are associated with periodically flooded wet meadows, marshes, and swamps in floodplains of major rivers worldwide, and their larvae are abundant in the shallow parts of flooded areas. The nuisance caused by the blood-seeking adult female mosquitoes motivates mosquito control. Larviciding with Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis is considered the most environmentally safe method. However, some concern has been raised whether aquatic predatory insects could be indirectly affected by this reduction in a potential vital prey. Top predators in the temporary wetlands in the River Dalälven floodplains are diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), and Aedes sticticus and Ae. vexans are the target species for mosquito control. For detailed studies on this aquatic predator-prey system, we developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for detection of mosquito DNA in the guts of medium-sized diving beetles. Primers were designed for amplifying short mitochondrial DNA fragments of the cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (COI) gene in Ae. sticticus and Ae. vexans, respectively. Primer specificity was confirmed and half-life detectability of Ae. sticticus DNA in diving beetle guts was derived from a feeding and digestion experiment. The Ae. sticticus DNA within diving beetle guts was detected up to 12 h postfeeding, and half-life detectability was estimated to 5.6 h. In addition, field caught diving beetles were screened for Ae. sticticus and Ae. vexans DNA and in 14% of the diving beetles one or both mosquito species were detected, showing that these mosquito species are utilized as food by the diving beetles. PMID:24895318

  3. Insect-specific flaviviruses, a worldwide widespread group of viruses only detected in insects.

    PubMed

    Calzolari, Mattia; Zé-Zé, Líbia; Vázquez, Ana; Sánchez Seco, Mari Paz; Amaro, Fátima; Dottori, Michele

    2016-06-01

    Several flaviviruses are important pathogens for humans and animals (Dengue viruses, Japanese encephalitis virus, Yellow-fever virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, West Nile virus). In recent years, numerous novel and related flaviviruses without known pathogenic capacity have been isolated worldwide in the natural mosquito population. However, phylogenetic studies have shown that genomic sequences of these viruses diverge from other flaviviruses. Moreover, these viruses seem to be exclusive of insects (they do not seem to grow on vertebrate cell lines), and were already defined as mosquito-only flaviviruses or insect-specific flaviviruses. At least eleven of these viruses were isolated worldwide, and sequences ascribable to other eleven putative viruses were detected in several mosquito species. A large part of the cycle of these viruses is not well known, and their persistence in the environment is poorly understood. These viruses are detected in a wide variety of distinct mosquito species and also in sandflies and chironomids worldwide; a single virus, or the genetic material ascribable to a virus, was detected in several mosquito species in different countries, often in different continents. Furthermore, some of these viruses are carried by invasive mosquitoes, and do not seem to have a depressive action on their fitness. The global distribution and the continuous detection of new viruses in this group point out the likely underestimation of their number, and raise interesting issues about their possible interactions with the pathogenic flaviviruses, and their influence on the bionomics of arthropod hosts. Some enigmatic features, as their integration in the mosquito genome, the recognition of their genetic material in DNA forms in field-collected mosquitoes, or the detection of the same virus in both mosquitoes and sandflies, indicate that the cycle of these viruses has unknown characteristics that could be of use to reach a deeper understanding of the cycle

  4. NDE detectability of fatigue type cracks in high strength alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, B. K.; Rummel, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    Specimens suitable for investigating the reliability of production nondestructive evaluation (NDE) to detect tightly closed fatigue cracks in high strength alloys representative of those materials used in spacecraft engine/booster construction were produced. Inconel 718 was selected as representative of nickel base alloys and Haynes 188 was selected as representative of cobalt base alloys used in this application. Cleaning procedures were developed to insure the reusability of the test specimens and a flaw detection reliability assessment of the fluorescent penetrant inspection method was performed using the test specimens produced to characterize their use for future reliability assessments and to provide additional NDE flaw detection reliability data for high strength alloys. The statistical analysis of the fluorescent penetrant inspection data was performed to determine the detection reliabilities for each inspection at a 90% probability/95% confidence level.

  5. Collaborative trial for the validation of event-specific PCR detection methods of genetically modified papaya Huanong No.1.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiaojun; Le, Huangying; Pan, Aihu; Xu, Junfeng; Li, Feiwu; Li, Xiang; Quan, Sheng; Guo, Jinchao; Yang, Litao

    2016-03-01

    For transferring the event-specific PCR methods of genetically modified papaya Huanong No.1 to other laboratories, we validated the previous developed PCR assays of Huanong No.1 according to the international standard organization (ISO) guidelines. A total of 11 laboratories participated and returned their test results in this trial. In qualitative PCR assay, the high specificity and limit of detection as low as 0.1% was confirmed. For the quantitative PCR assay, the limit of quantification was as low as 25 copies. The quantitative biases among ten blind samples were within the range between 0.21% and 10.04%. Furthermore, the measurement uncertainty of the quantitative PCR results was calculated within the range between 0.28% and 2.92% for these ten samples. All results demonstrated that the Huanong No.1 qualitative and quantitative PCR assays were creditable and applicable for identification and quantification of GM papaya Huanong No.1 in further routine lab analysis.

  6. Selection of DNA aptamers against epidermal growth factor receptor with high affinity and specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Deng-Liang; Song, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Zhi; Li, Xi-Lan; Zou, Yuan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Jie; Yao, Pei-Sen; Pan, Ru-Jun; Yang, Chaoyong James; Kang, De-Zhi

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • This is the first report of DNA aptamer against EGFR in vitro. • Aptamer can bind targets with high affinity and selectivity. • DNA aptamers are more stable, cheap and efficient than RNA aptamers. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high affinity with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high selectivity. - Abstract: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1/c-ErbB1), is overexpressed in many solid cancers, such as epidermoid carcinomas, malignant gliomas, etc. EGFR plays roles in proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis of malignant cancer cells and is the ideal antigen for clinical applications in cancer detection, imaging and therapy. Aptamers, the output of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are DNA/RNA oligonucleotides which can bind protein and other substances with specificity. RNA aptamers are undesirable due to their instability and high cost of production. Conversely, DNA aptamers have aroused researcher’s attention because they are easily synthesized, stable, selective, have high binding affinity and are cost-effective to produce. In this study, we have successfully identified DNA aptamers with high binding affinity and selectivity to EGFR. The aptamer named TuTu22 with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM was chosen from the identified DNA aptamers for further study. Flow cytometry analysis results indicated that the TuTu22 aptamer was able to specifically recognize a variety of cancer cells expressing EGFR but did not bind to the EGFR-negative cells. With all of the aforementioned advantages, the DNA aptamers reported here against cancer biomarker EGFR will facilitate the development of novel targeted cancer detection, imaging and therapy.

  7. Kinase detection with gallium nitride based high electron mobility transistors

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, Matthew S.; Bryan, Isaac; Sitar, Zlatko; Arellano, Consuelo; Xie, Jinqiao; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2013-01-01

    A label-free kinase detection system was fabricated by the adsorption of gold nanoparticles functionalized with kinase inhibitor onto AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). The HEMTs were operated near threshold voltage due to the greatest sensitivity in this operational region. The Au NP/HEMT biosensor system electrically detected 1 pM SRC kinase in ionic solutions. These results are pertinent to drug development applications associated with kinase sensing. PMID:23918992

  8. Kinase detection with gallium nitride based high electron mobility transistors.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Matthew S; Bryan, Isaac; Sitar, Zlatko; Arellano, Consuelo; Xie, Jinqiao; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2013-07-01

    A label-free kinase detection system was fabricated by the adsorption of gold nanoparticles functionalized with kinase inhibitor onto AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). The HEMTs were operated near threshold voltage due to the greatest sensitivity in this operational region. The Au NP/HEMT biosensor system electrically detected 1 pM SRC kinase in ionic solutions. These results are pertinent to drug development applications associated with kinase sensing.

  9. Kinase detection with gallium nitride based high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Matthew S.; Bryan, Isaac; Sitar, Zlatko; Arellano, Consuelo; Xie, Jinqiao; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2013-07-01

    A label-free kinase detection system was fabricated by the adsorption of gold nanoparticles functionalized with kinase inhibitor onto AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). The HEMTs were operated near threshold voltage due to the greatest sensitivity in this operational region. The Au NP/HEMT biosensor system electrically detected 1 pM SRC kinase in ionic solutions. These results are pertinent to drug development applications associated with kinase sensing.

  10. An Improved, high-throughput method for detection of bluetongue virus RNA in Culicodes midges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new rapid (less than 6 h from insect-to-results) high-throughput assay is reported that is sensitive and specific for detecting BTV RNA in Culicoides biting midges. Homogenization and extraction of nucleic acids from individual Culicoides specimens were performed in a 96-well plate format using sp...

  11. Specification of High Activity Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Washington, DC.

    The report is concerned with making recommendations for the specifications of gamma ray sources, which relate to the quantity of radioactive material and the radiation emitted. Primary consideration is given to sources in teletherapy and to a lesser extent those used in industrial radiography and in irradiation units used in industry and research.…

  12. System Specification for Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage

    SciTech Connect

    CALMUS, R.B.

    2000-12-27

    This specification establishes the system-level functional, performance, design, interface, and test requirements for Phase 1 of the IHLW Interim Storage System, located at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The IHLW canisters will be produced at the Hanford Site by a Selected DOE contractor. Subsequent to storage the canisters will be shipped to a federal geologic repository.

  13. Pyrosequencing reveals highly diverse and species-specific microbial communities in sponges from the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Lee, On On; Wang, Yong; Yang, Jiangke; Lafi, Feras F; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2011-04-01

    Marine sponges are associated with a remarkable array of microorganisms. Using a tag pyrosequencing technology, this study was the first to investigate in depth the microbial communities associated with three Red Sea sponges, Hyrtios erectus, Stylissa carteri and Xestospongia testudinaria. We revealed highly diverse sponge-associated bacterial communities with up to 1000 microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and richness estimates of up to 2000 species. Altogether, 26 bacterial phyla were detected from the Red Sea sponges, 11 of which were absent from the surrounding sea water and 4 were recorded in sponges for the first time. Up to 100 OTUs with richness estimates o