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Sample records for highly stable engineered

  1. Highly stable organic field-effect transistors with engineered gate dielectrics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kippelen, Bernard; Wang, Cheng-Yin; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Yun, Minseong; Singh, Ankit K.; Dindar, Amir; Choi, Sangmoo; Graham, Samuel

    2016-11-01

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) have the potential to lead to low-cost flexible displays, wearable electronics, and sensors. While recent efforts have focused greatly on improving the maximum charge mobility that can be achieved in such devices, studies about the stability and reliability of such high performance devices are relatively scarce. In this talk, we will discuss the results of recent studies aimed at improving the stability of OFETs under operation and their shelf lifetime. In particular, we will focus on device architectures where the gate dielectric is engineered to act simultaneously as an environmental barrier layer. In the past, our group had demonstrated solution-processed top-gate OFETs using TIPS-pentacene and PTAA blends as a semiconductor layer with a bilayer gate dielectric layer of CYTOP/Al2O3, where the oxide layer was fabricated by atomic layer deposition, ALD. Such devices displayed high operational stability with little degradation after 20,000 on/off scan cycles or continuous operation (24 h), and high environmental stability when kept in air for more than 2 years, with unchanged carrier mobility. Using this stable device geometry, simple circuits and sensors operating in aqueous conditions were demonstrated. However, the Al2O3 layer was found to degrade due to corrosion under prolonged exposure in aqueous solutions. In this talk, we will report on the use of a nanolaminate (NL) composed of Al2O3 and HfO2 by ALD to replace the Al2O3 single layer in the bilayer gate dielectric use in top-gate OFETs. Such OFETs were found to operate under harsh condition such as immersion in water at 95 °C. This work was funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Bay Area Photovoltaics Consortium (BAPVC) under Award Number DE-EE0004946.

  2. Engineering of Hollow Core-Shell Interlinked Carbon Spheres for Highly Stable Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; He, Bin; Zhang, Xiang-Qian; Lu, An-Hui

    2015-08-25

    We report engineered hollow core-shell interlinked carbon spheres that consist of a mesoporous shell, a hollow void, and an anchored carbon core and are expected to be ideal sulfur hosts for overcoming the shortage of Li-S batteries. The hollow core-shell interlinked carbon spheres were obtained through solution synthesis of polymer spheres followed by a pyrolysis process that occurred in the hermetical silica shell. During the pyrolysis, the polymer sphere was transformed into the carbon core and the carbonaceous volatiles were self-deposited on the silica shell due to the blocking effect of the hermetical silica shell. The gravitational force and the natural driving force of lowering the surface energy tend to interlink the carbon core and carbon/silica shell, resulting in a core-shell interlinked structure. After the SiO2 shell was etched, the mesoporous carbon shell was generated. When used as the sulfur host for Li-S batteries, such a hierarchical structure provides access to Li(+) ingress/egress for reactivity with the sulfur and, meanwhile, can overcome the limitations of low sulfur loading and a severe shuttle effect in solid carbon-supported sulfur cathodes. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy images provide visible evidence that sulfur is well-encapsulated in the hollow void. Importantly, such anchored-core carbon nanostructures can simultaneously serve as a physical buffer and an electronically connecting matrix, which helps to realize the full potential of the active materials. Based on the many merits, carbon-sulfur cathodes show a high utilization of sulfur with a sulfur loading of 70 wt % and exhibit excellent cycling stability (i.e., 960 mA h g(-1) after 200 cycles at a current density of 0.5 C).

  3. Stable Beginnings in Engineering Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Mary E.; Hammer, David

    2016-01-01

    Novel Engineering activities are premised on the integration of engineering and literacy: students identify and engineer solutions to problems that arise for fictional characters in stories they read for class. There are advantages to this integration, for both engineering and literacy goals of instruction: the stories provide ''clients'' to…

  4. Combination of FACS and homologous recombination for the generation of stable and high-expression engineered cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Chen, Xuesi; Tang, Wenying; Li, Zhenyi; Liu, Jin; Gao, Feng; Sang, Jianli

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, cell line generation requires several months and involves screening of over several hundred cell clones for high productivity before dozens are selected as candidate cell lines. Here, we have designed a new strategy for the generation of stable and high-expression cell lines by combining homologous recombination (HR) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). High expression was indicated by the expression of secreted green fluorescent protein (SEGFP). Parental cell lines with the highest expression of SEGFP were then selected by FACS and identified by stability analysis. Consequently, HR vectors were constructed using the cassette for SEGFP as the HR region. After transfecting the HR vector, the cells with negative SEGFP expression were enriched by FACS. The complete exchange between SEGFP and target gene (TNFR-Fc) cassettes was demonstrated by DNA analysis. Compared with the traditional method, by integrating the cassette containing the gene of interest into the pre-selected site, the highest producing cells secreted a more than 8-fold higher titer of target protein. Hence, this new strategy can be applied to isolated stable cell lines with desirable expression of any gene of interest. The stable cell lines can rapidly produce proteins for researching protein structure and function and are even applicable in drug discovery.

  5. CDR-restricted engineering of native human scFvs creates highly stable and soluble bifunctional antibodies for subcutaneous delivery

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Brian J; McDonnell, Barry; Tam, Amy Sze Pui; Chang, Lijun; Steven, John; Broadbent, Ian D; Gao, Huilan; Kieras, Elizabeth; Alley, Jennifer; Luxenberg, Deborah; Edmonds, Jason; Fitz, Lori J; Miao, Wenyan; Whitters, Matthew J; Medley, Quintus G; Guo, Yongjing J; Darmanin-Sheehan, Alfredo; Autin, Bénédicte; Shúilleabháin, Deirdre Ní; Cummins, Emma; King, Amy; Krebs, Mark RH; Grace, Christopher; Hickling, Timothy P; Boisvert, Angela; Zhong, Xiaotian; McKenna, Matthew; Francis, Christopher; Olland, Stephane; Bloom, Laird; Paulsen, Janet; Somers, Will; Jensen, Allan; Lin, Laura; Finlay, William JJ; Cunningham, Orla

    2013-01-01

    While myriad molecular formats for bispecific antibodies have been examined to date, the simplest structures are often based on the scFv. Issues with stability and manufacturability in scFv-based bispecific molecules, however, have been a significant hindrance to their development, particularly for high-concentration, stable formulations that allow subcutaneous delivery. Our aim was to generate a tetravalent bispecific molecule targeting two inflammatory mediators for synergistic immune modulation. We focused on an scFv-Fc-scFv format, with a flexible (A4T)3 linker coupling an additional scFv to the C-terminus of an scFv-Fc. While one of the lead scFvs isolated directly from a naïve library was well-behaved and sufficiently potent, the parental anti-CXCL13 scFv 3B4 required optimization for affinity, stability, and cynomolgus ortholog cross-reactivity. To achieve this, we eschewed framework-based stabilizing mutations in favor of complementarity-determining region (CDR) mutagenesis and re-selection for simultaneous improvements in both affinity and thermal stability. Phage-displayed 3B4 CDR-mutant libraries were used in an aggressive “hammer-hug” selection strategy that incorporated thermal challenge, functional, and biophysical screening. This approach identified leads with improved stability and >18-fold, and 4,100-fold higher affinity for both human and cynomolgus CXCL13, respectively. Improvements were exclusively mediated through only 4 mutations in VL-CDR3. Lead scFvs were reformatted into scFv-Fc-scFvs and their biophysical properties ranked. Our final candidate could be formulated in a standard biopharmaceutical platform buffer at 100 mg/ml with <2% high molecular weight species present after 7 weeks at 4 °C and viscosity <15 cP. This workflow has facilitated the identification of a truly manufacturable scFv-based bispecific therapeutic suitable for subcutaneous administration. PMID:23995618

  6. Engineering stable cytoplasmic intrabodies with designed specificity.

    PubMed

    Donini, Marcello; Morea, Veronica; Desiderio, Angiola; Pashkoulov, Dimitre; Villani, Maria Elena; Tramontano, Anna; Benvenuto, Eugenio

    2003-07-04

    Many attempts have been made to develop antibody fragments that can be expressed in the cytoplasm ("intrabodies") in a stable and functional form. The recombinant antibody fragment scFv(F8) is characterised by peculiarly high in vitro stability and functional folding in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cytoplasm. To dissect the relative contribution of different scFv(F8) regions to cytoplasmic stability and specificity we designed and constructed five chimeric molecules (scFv-P1 to P5) in which several groups of residues important for antigen binding in the poorly stable anti-hen egg lysozyme (HEL) scFv(D1.3) were progressively grafted onto the scFv(F8) scaffold. All five chimeric scFvs were expressed in a soluble form in the periplasm and cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. All the periplasmic oxidised forms and the scFv(P3) extracted from the cytoplasm in reducing conditions had HEL binding affinities essentially identical (K(d)=15nM) to that of the cognate scFv(D1.3) fragment (K(d)=16nM). The successful grafting of the antigen binding properties of D1.3 onto the scFv(F8) opens the road to the exploitation of this molecule as a scaffold for the reshaping of intrabodies with desired specificities to be targeted to the cytoplasm.

  7. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  8. Highly Stable and Active Catalyst for Sabatier Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Jianli; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active Ru/TiO2 catalysts for Sabatier reaction have been developed. The catalysts have shown to be stable under repeated shutting down/startup conditions. When the Ru/TiO2 catalyst is coated on the engineered substrate Fe-CrAlY felt, activity enhancement is more than doubled when compared with an identically prepared engineered catalyst made from commercial Degussa catalyst. Also, bimetallic Ru-Rh/TiO2 catalysts show high activity at high throughput.

  9. Cytocompatible and water stable ultrafine protein fibers for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qiuran

    This dissertation proposal focuses on the development of cytocompatible and water stable protein ultrafine fibers for tissue engineering. The protein-based ultrafine fibers have the potential to be used for biomedicine, due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, similarity to natural extracellular matrix (ECM) in physical structure and chemical composition, and superior adsorption properties due to their high surface to volume ratio. However, the current technologies to produce the protein-based ultrafine fibers for biomedical applications still have several problems. For instance, the current electrospinning and phase separation technologies generate scaffolds composed of densely compacted ultrafine fibers, and cells can spread just on the surface of the fiber bulk, and hardly penetrate into the inner sections of scaffolds. Thus, these scaffolds can merely emulate the ECM as a two dimensional basement membrane, but are difficult to mimic the three dimensional ECM stroma. Moreover, the protein-based ultrafine fibers do not possess sufficient water stability and strength for biomedical applications, and need modifications such as crosslinking. However, current crosslinking methods are either high in toxicity or low in crosslinking efficiency. To solve the problems mentioned above, zein, collagen, and gelatin were selected as the raw materials to represent plant proteins, animal proteins, and denatured proteins in this dissertation. A benign solvent system was developed specifically for the fabrication of collagen ultrafine fibers. In addition, the gelatin scaffolds with a loose fibrous structure, high cell-accessibility and cell viability were produced by a novel ultralow concentration phase separation method aiming to simulate the structure of three dimensional (3D) ECM stroma. Non-toxic crosslinking methods using citric acid as the crosslinker were also developed for electrospun or phase separated scaffolds from these three proteins, and proved to be

  10. High-Order Energy Stable WENO Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, Nail K.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    A new third-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially NonOscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference scheme for scalar and vector linear hyperbolic equations with piecewise continuous initial conditions is developed. The new scheme is proven to be stable in the energy norm for both continuous and discontinuous solutions. In contrast to the existing high-resolution shock-capturing schemes, no assumption that the reconstruction should be total variation bounded (TVB) is explicitly required to prove stability of the new scheme. A rigorous truncation error analysis is presented showing that the accuracy of the 3rd-order ESWENO scheme is drastically improved if the tuning parameters of the weight functions satisfy certain criteria. Numerical results show that the new ESWENO scheme is stable and significantly outperforms the conventional third-order WENO finite difference scheme of Jiang and Shu in terms of accuracy, while providing essentially nonoscillatory solutions near strong discontinuities.

  11. Highly stable high-rate discriminator for nuclear counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, J. J.; Howard, R. H.; Rudnick, S. J.

    1969-01-01

    Pulse amplitude discriminator is specially designed for nuclear counting applications. At very high rates, the threshold is stable. The output-pulse width and the dead time change negligibly. The unit incorporates a provision for automatic dead-time correction.

  12. Vegetation engineers marsh morphology through multiple competing stable states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marani, Marco; Da Lio, Cristina; D'Alpaos, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    Marshes display impressive biogeomorphic features, such as zonation, a mosaic of extensive vegetation patches of rather uniform composition, exhibiting sharp transitions in the presence of extremely small topographic gradients. Although generally associated with the accretion processes necessary for marshes to keep up with relative sea level rise, competing environmental constraints, and ecologic controls, zonation is still poorly understood in terms of the underlying biogeomorphic mechanisms. Here we find, through observations and modeling interpretation, that zonation is the result of coupled geomorphological-biological dynamics and that it stems from the ability of vegetation to actively engineer the landscape by tuning soil elevation within preferential ranges of optimal adaptation. We find multiple peaks in the frequency distribution of observed topographic elevation and identify them as the signature of biologic controls on geomorphodynamics through competing stable states modulated by the interplay of inorganic and organic deposition. Interestingly, the stable biogeomorphic equilibria correspond to suboptimal rates of biomass production, a result coherent with recent observations. The emerging biogeomorphic structures may display varying degrees of robustness to changes in the rate of sea level rise and sediment availability, with implications for the overall resilience of marsh ecosystems to climatic changes.

  13. Stable magnesium peroxide at high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Lobanov, Sergey S.; Zhu, Qiang; Holtgrewe, Nicholas; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Oganov, Artem R.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    Rocky planets are thought to comprise compounds of Mg and O as these are among the most abundant elements, but knowledge of their stable phases may be incomplete. MgO is known to be remarkably stable to very high pressure and chemically inert under reduced condition of the Earth’s lower mantle. However, in exoplanets oxygen may be a more abundant constituent. Here, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction in laser-heated diamond anvil cells, we show that MgO and oxygen react at pressures above 96 GPa and T = 2150 K with the formation of I4/mcm MgO2. Raman spectroscopy detects the presence of a peroxide ion (O22−) in the synthesized material as well as in the recovered specimen. Likewise, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy confirms that the recovered sample has higher oxygen content than pure MgO. Our finding suggests that MgO2 may be present together or instead of MgO in rocky mantles and rocky planetary cores under highly oxidized conditions. PMID:26323635

  14. Stable Lithium Argon compounds under high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofeng; Hermann, Andreas; Peng, Feng; Lv, Jian; Wang, Yanchao; Wang, Hui; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    High pressure can fundamentally alter the bonding patterns of chemical elements. Its effects include stimulating elements thought to be “inactive” to form unexpectedly stable compounds with unusual chemical and physical properties. Here, using an unbiased structure search method based on CALYPSO methodology and density functional total energy calculations, the phase stabilities and crystal structures of Li−Ar compounds are systematically investigated at high pressure up to 300 GPa. Two unexpected LimArn compounds (LiAr and Li3Ar) are predicted to be stable above 112 GPa and 119 GPa, respectively. A detailed analysis of the electronic structure of LiAr and Li3Ar shows that Ar in these compounds attracts electrons and thus behaves as an oxidizing agent. This is markedly different from the hitherto established chemical reactivity of Ar. Moreover, we predict that the P4/mmm phase of Li3Ar has a superconducting transition temperature of 17.6 K at 120 GPa. PMID:26582083

  15. High stable remote photoelectric receiver for interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongxing; Zhu, Pengfei; Tan, Jiubin; Hu, Pengcheng; Fan, Zhigang

    2017-03-01

    A high sensitive and high stable remote photoelectric receiver has been developed to reduce noise and phase delay drift caused by thermal pollution and environmental interference. The phase delay drift model is analyzed and built based on a traditional photoelectric receiver. According to the model, a new mechanical isolation structure and a temperature control system are designed to keep the photoelectric receiver in a low constant temperature. Comparison experiments with traditional bias voltage compensation method and temperature control method are carried out between photoelectric receivers. The results verify that the output voltage fluctuation of photoelectric receiver used is reduced by 65% while the phase drift between measurement and reference photoelectric receivers decreases from 1.05° to 0.02°.

  16. Exotic stable cesium polynitrides at high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Feng; Han, Yunxia; Liu, Hanyu; Yao, Yansun

    2015-01-01

    New polynitrides containing metastable forms of nitrogen are actively investigated as potential high-energy-density materials. Using a structure search method based on the CALYPSO methodology, we investigated the stable stoichiometries and structures of cesium polynitrides at high pressures. Along with the CsN3, we identified five new stoichiometric compounds (Cs3N, Cs2N, CsN, CsN2, and CsN5) with interesting structures that may be experimentally synthesizable at modest pressures (i.e., less than 50 GPa). Nitrogen species in the predicted structures have various structural forms ranging from single atom (N) to highly endothermic molecules (N2, N3, N4, N5, N6) and chains (N∞). Polymeric chains of nitrogen were found in the high-pressure C2/c phase of CsN2. This structure contains a substantially high content of single N-N bonds that exceeds the previously known nitrogen chains in pure forms, and also exhibit metastability at ambient conditions. We also identified a very interesting CsN crystal that contains novel N44− anion. To our best knowledge, this is the first time a charged N4 species being reported. Results of the present study suggest that it is possible to obtain energetic polynitrogens in main-group nitrides under high pressure. PMID:26581175

  17. Exotic stable cesium polynitrides at high pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Peng, Feng; Han, Yunxia; Liu, Hanyu; ...

    2015-11-19

    New polynitrides containing metastable forms of nitrogen are actively investigated as potential high energy-density materials. Using a structure search method based on the CALYPSO methodology, we investigated the stable stoichiometries and structures of cesium polynitrides at high pressures. Along with the CsN3, we identified five new stoichiometric compounds (Cs3N, Cs2N, CsN, CsN2, and CsN5) with interesting structures that may be experimentally synthesizable at modest pressures (i.e., less than 50 GPa). Nitrogen species in the predicted structures have various structural forms ranging from single atom (N) to highly endothermic molecules (N2, N3 , N4, N5, N6) and chains (N∞). Polymeric chainsmore » of nitrogen were found in the high-pressure C2/c phase of CsN2. This structure contains a substantially high content of single N-N bonds that exceeds the previously known nitrogen chains in pure forms, and also exhibit metastability at ambient conditions. We also identified a very interesting CsN crystal that contains novel N44- anion. In conclusion, to our best knowledge, this is the first time a charged N4 species being reported. Results of the present study suggest that it is possible to obtain energetic polynitrogens in main-group nitrides under high pressure.« less

  18. Towards highly stable polymer electronics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolka, Mark; Nasrallah, Iyad; Broch, Katharina; Sadhanala, Aditya; Hurhangee, Michael; McCulloch, Iain; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-11-01

    Due to their ease of processing, organic semiconductors are promising candidates for applications in high performance flexible displays and fast organic electronic circuitry. Recently, a lot of advances have been made on organic semiconductors exhibiting surprisingly high performance and carrier mobilities exceeding those of amorphous silicon. However, there remain significant concerns about their operational and environmental stability, particularly in the context of applications that require a very high level of threshold voltage stability, such as active-matrix addressing of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays. Here, we report a novel technique for dramatically improving the operational stress stability, performance and uniformity of high mobility polymer field-effect transistors by the addition of specific small molecule additives to the polymer semiconductor film. We demonstrate for the first time polymer FETs that exhibit stable threshold voltages with threshold voltage shifts of less than 1V when subjected to a constant current operational stress for 1 day under conditions that are representative for applications in OLED active matrix displays. The approach constitutes in our view a technological breakthrough; it also makes the device characteristics independent of the atmosphere in which it is operated, causes a significant reduction in contact resistance and significantly improves device uniformity. We will discuss in detail the microscopic mechanism by which the molecular additives lead to this significant improvement in device performance and stability.

  19. Exotic stable cesium polynitrides at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Feng; Han, Yunxia; Liu, Hanyu; Yao, Yansun

    2015-11-19

    New polynitrides containing metastable forms of nitrogen are actively investigated as potential high energy-density materials. Using a structure search method based on the CALYPSO methodology, we investigated the stable stoichiometries and structures of cesium polynitrides at high pressures. Along with the CsN3, we identified five new stoichiometric compounds (Cs3N, Cs2N, CsN, CsN2, and CsN5) with interesting structures that may be experimentally synthesizable at modest pressures (i.e., less than 50 GPa). Nitrogen species in the predicted structures have various structural forms ranging from single atom (N) to highly endothermic molecules (N2, N3 , N4, N5, N6) and chains (N). Polymeric chains of nitrogen were found in the high-pressure C2/c phase of CsN2. This structure contains a substantially high content of single N-N bonds that exceeds the previously known nitrogen chains in pure forms, and also exhibit metastability at ambient conditions. We also identified a very interesting CsN crystal that contains novel N44- anion. In conclusion, to our best knowledge, this is the first time a charged N4 species being reported. Results of the present study suggest that it is possible to obtain energetic polynitrogens in main-group nitrides under high pressure.

  20. High Performance Arcjet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, Elliot B.; Ivanov, Alexey Nikolayevich; Nikolayev, Yuri Vyacheslavovich

    1994-01-01

    This effort sought to exploit advanced single crystal tungsten-tantalum alloy material for fabrication of a high strength, high temperature arcjet anode. The use of this material is expected to result in improved strength, temperature resistance, and lifetime compared to state of the art polycrystalline alloys. In addition, the use of high electrical and thermal conductivity carbon-carbon composites was considered, and is believed to be a feasible approach. Highly conductive carbon-carbon composite anode capability represents enabling technology for rotating-arc designs derived from the Russian Scientific Research Institute of Thermal Processes (NIITP) because of high heat fluxes at the anode surface. However, for US designs the anode heat flux is much smaller, and thus the benefits are not as great as in the case of NIITP-derived designs. Still, it does appear that the tensile properties of carbon-carbon can be even better than those of single crystal tungsten alloys, especially when nearly-single-crystal fibers such as vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) are used. Composites fabricated from such materials must be coated with a refractory carbide coating in order to ensure compatibility with high temperature hydrogen. Fabrication of tungsten alloy single crystals in the sizes required for fabrication of an arcjet anode has been shown to be feasible. Test data indicate that the material can be expected to be at least the equal of W-Re-HfC polycrystalline alloy in terms of its tensile properties, and possibly superior. We are also informed by our colleagues at Scientific Production Association Luch (NP0 Luch) that it is possible to use Russian technology to fabricate polycrystalline W-Re-HfC or other high strength alloys if desired. This is important because existing engines must rely on previously accumulated stocks of these materials, and a fabrication capability for future requirements is not assured.

  1. Polymeric foams stable at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Harrison, E. S.; Delano, C. B.

    1976-01-01

    Crosslinked poly(N-arylenebenzimidazoles) are stable up to 370 C. Polymers are made by mixing appropriate stoichiometric amounts of tetramine and aromatic dicarboxylic acid anhydride with phenol or alkyl-substituted phenol.

  2. Ethylammonium nitrate in high temperature stable microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Zech, Oliver; Thomaier, Stefan; Kolodziejski, Agnes; Touraud, Didier; Grillo, Isabelle; Kunz, Werner

    2010-07-15

    The increasing number of publications reflects the still growing interest in nonaqueous microemulsions containing room-temperature ionic liquids. Recently, we characterized microemulsions composed of the room-temperature ionic liquid ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) as polar phase, dodecane as continuous phase and 1-hexadecyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ([C(16)mim][Cl]), an IL that exhibits surfactant properties, and decanol as cosurfactant at ambient temperature. We demonstrate here the high thermal stability of these microemulsions. Along an experimental path, no phase change could be observed visually within a temperature range between 30 degrees C and 150 degrees C. The microemulsions are characterized with quasi-elastic light scattering measurements at ambient temperature and temperature dependent small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments between 30 degrees C and 150 degrees C. DLS measurements at ambient temperature indicate a swelling of the formed structures with increasing amount of EAN up to a certain threshold. The SANS experiments were performed below this threshold. The data evaluation of such concentrated systems like microemulsions is possible with the "generalized indirect Fourier transformation" method (GIFT). We evaluated the small angle scattering data via the GIFT method, for comparison we also applied the model of Teubner and Strey (TS) which was often used to describe scattering curves of microemulsions. The GIFT method gives good fits throughout the experimental path, while the TS model gives relatively poor fits. Both, light scattering and SANS results are in agreement with the existence of EAN droplets stabilized by surfactant with dodecane as continuous phase along the whole investigated temperature range. Moreover, these results clearly demonstrate the possibility to formulate high temperature stable microemulsions with ionic liquids at ambient pressure.

  3. High-Order Energy Stable WENO Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, Nail K.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    A third-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference scheme developed by Yamaleev and Carpenter was proven to be stable in the energy norm for both continuous and discontinuous solutions of systems of linear hyperbolic equations. Herein, a systematic approach is presented that enables 'energy stable' modifications for existing WENO schemes of any order. The technique is demonstrated by developing a one-parameter family of fifth-order upwind-biased ESWENO schemes; ESWENO schemes up to eighth order are presented in the appendix. New weight functions are also developed that provide (1) formal consistency, (2) much faster convergence for smooth solutions with an arbitrary number of vanishing derivatives, and (3) improved resolution near strong discontinuities.

  4. Producing air-stable monolayers of phosphorene and their defect engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Jiajie; Gai, Xin; Yang, Jiong; Wang, Xibin; Yu, Zongfu; Choi, Duk-Yong; Luther-Davies, Barry; Lu, Yuerui

    2016-01-01

    It has been a long-standing challenge to produce air-stable few- or monolayer samples of phosphorene because thin phosphorene films degrade rapidly in ambient conditions. Here we demonstrate a new highly controllable method for fabricating high quality, air-stable phosphorene films with a designated number of layers ranging from a few down to monolayer. Our approach involves the use of oxygen plasma dry etching to thin down thick-exfoliated phosphorene flakes, layer by layer with atomic precision. Moreover, in a stabilized phosphorene monolayer, we were able to precisely engineer defects for the first time, which led to efficient emission of photons at new frequencies in the near infrared at room temperature. In addition, we demonstrate the use of an electrostatic gate to tune the photon emission from the defects in a monolayer phosphorene. This could lead to new electronic and optoelectronic devices, such as electrically tunable, broadband near infrared lighting devices operating at room temperature.

  5. Producing air-stable monolayers of phosphorene and their defect engineering

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jiajie; Gai, Xin; Yang, Jiong; Wang, Xibin; Yu, Zongfu; Choi, Duk-Yong; Luther-Davies, Barry; Lu, Yuerui

    2016-01-01

    It has been a long-standing challenge to produce air-stable few- or monolayer samples of phosphorene because thin phosphorene films degrade rapidly in ambient conditions. Here we demonstrate a new highly controllable method for fabricating high quality, air-stable phosphorene films with a designated number of layers ranging from a few down to monolayer. Our approach involves the use of oxygen plasma dry etching to thin down thick-exfoliated phosphorene flakes, layer by layer with atomic precision. Moreover, in a stabilized phosphorene monolayer, we were able to precisely engineer defects for the first time, which led to efficient emission of photons at new frequencies in the near infrared at room temperature. In addition, we demonstrate the use of an electrostatic gate to tune the photon emission from the defects in a monolayer phosphorene. This could lead to new electronic and optoelectronic devices, such as electrically tunable, broadband near infrared lighting devices operating at room temperature. PMID:26794866

  6. Compact, Highly Stable Ion Atomic Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John

    2008-01-01

    A mercury-ion clock now at the breadboard stage of development (see figure) has a stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock: In tests, the clock exhibited an Allan deviation of between 2 x 10(exp -13) and 3 x 10(exp -13) at a measurement time of 1 second, averaging to about 10(exp -15) at 1 day. However, the clock occupies a volume of only about 2 liters . about a hundredth of the volume of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling parts of the apparatus are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein only a getter pump is used to maintain the vacuum. Hence, this apparatus is a prototype of a generation of small, potentially portable high-precision clocks for diverse ground- and space-based navigation and radio science applications. Furthermore, this new ion-clock technology is about 100 times more stable and precise than the rubidium atomic clocks currently in use in the NAV STAR GPS Earth-orbiting satellites. In this clock, mercury ions are shuttled between a quadrupole and a 16-pole linear radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, the ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a Hg-202 radio-frequency-discharge ultraviolet lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions resonant at frequency of about 40.507 GHz are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at that frequency. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling caused by wall collisions inherent to gas-cell clocks. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave- resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. The basic ion-shuttling, two-trap scheme as described thus far is not new: it has been the basis of designs of prior larger clocks. The novelty of the present development lies in major redesigns of its physics package (the ion traps and the vacuum and optical subsystems) to effect

  7. Engineering Environmentally-Stable Proteases to Specifically Neutralize Protein Toxins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    agents , such as Soman and Sarin . 2. Linkage to binding molecules Conjugating an antibody (or any other binding module) with an initiating protease...to develop the tools and principles necessary to engineer subtilisin proteases which specifically target and deactivate biological warfare agent (BWA...warfare agent (BWA) toxins. We have engineered and evolved subtilisin proteases to specifically target and deactivate BoNT, SEB, ricin, and B

  8. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    DOE PAGES

    Close, Devin W.; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S.; ...

    2015-05-08

    In this paper, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction ofmore » high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.« less

  9. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Devin W.; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.

    2015-05-08

    In this paper, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.

  10. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering.

    PubMed

    Close, Devin W; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Traore, Daouda A K; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C; Waldo, Geoffery S; Payne, Riley J; Rucker, Joseph B; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.

  11. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  12. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  13. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  14. Super Stable Ferroelectrics with High Curie Point.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhipeng; Lu, Chengjia; Wang, Yuhang; Yang, Sinuo; Yu, Yuying; He, Hongliang

    2016-04-07

    Ferroelectric materials are of great importance in the sensing technology due to the piezoelectric properties. Thermal depoling behavior of ferroelectrics determines the upper temperature limit of their application. So far, there is no piezoelectric material working above 800 °C available. Here, we show Nd2Ti2O7 with a perovskite-like layered structure has good resistance to thermal depoling up to 1400 °C. Its stable behavior is because the material has only 180° ferroelectric domains, complex structure change at Curie point (Tc) and their sintering temperature is below their Tc, which avoided the internal stresses produced by the unit cell volume change at Tc. The phase transition at Tc shows a first order behavior which involving the tilting and rotation of the octahedron. The Curie - Weiss temperature is calculated, which might explain why the thermal depoling starts at about 1400 °C.

  15. Super Stable Ferroelectrics with High Curie Point

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhipeng; Lu, Chengjia; Wang, Yuhang; Yang, Sinuo; Yu, Yuying; He, Hongliang

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials are of great importance in the sensing technology due to the piezoelectric properties. Thermal depoling behavior of ferroelectrics determines the upper temperature limit of their application. So far, there is no piezoelectric material working above 800 °C available. Here, we show Nd2Ti2O7 with a perovskite-like layered structure has good resistance to thermal depoling up to 1400 °C. Its stable behavior is because the material has only 180° ferroelectric domains, complex structure change at Curie point (Tc) and their sintering temperature is below their Tc, which avoided the internal stresses produced by the unit cell volume change at Tc. The phase transition at Tc shows a first order behavior which involving the tilting and rotation of the octahedron. The Curie – Weiss temperature is calculated, which might explain why the thermal depoling starts at about 1400 °C. PMID:27053338

  16. Stable xenon nitride at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Feng; Wang, Yanchao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Yunwei; Ma, Yanming

    2015-09-01

    Nitrides in many ways are fascinating since they often appear as superconductors, high-energy density, and hard materials. Though there exist a large variety of nitrides, noble gas nitrides are missing in nature. Pursuit of noble gas nitrides has therefore become the subject of topical interests, but remains as a great challenge since molecular nitrogen (N2, a major form of nitrogen) and noble gases are both inert systems and do not interact at normal conditions. We show through a first-principles swarm-structure search that high pressure enables a direct interaction of N2 and xenon (Xe) above 146 GPa. The resultant Xe nitride has a peculiar stoichiometry of XeN6, possessing a high-energy density of approximately 2.4 kJg -1, rivaling that of the modern explosives. Structurally, XeN6 is intriguing with the appearance of chaired N6 hexagons and unusually high 12-coordination of Xe bonded with N. Our work opens up the possibility of achieving Xe nitride with superior high-energy density whose formation is long sought as impossible.

  17. Frequency stable high power lasers in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of a laser heterodyne gravity wave antenna that would operate in solar orbit with a one million kilometer path length is discussed. Laser technology that would be appropriate for operation of this space-based gravity wave detector is also discussed. The rapid progress in diode laser coupled with the energy storage and potentially sub-Hertz linewidths of solid state lasers, and the possibility of efficient frequency conversion by nonlinear optical techniques defines a technology that is appropriate for laser interferometry in space. The present status of diode-laser-pumped, solid state lasers is summarized and future progress is projected in areas of linewidth control, high average power, operating efficiency, and operational lifetimes that are essential for space-based applications.

  18. Enabling High Efficiency Ethanol Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, J.; Confer, K.

    2011-03-01

    Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to explore the potential to improve the energy efficiency of spark-ignited engines operating on ethanol-gasoline blends. By taking advantage of the fuel properties of ethanol, such as high compression ratio and high latent heat of vaporization, it is possible to increase efficiency with ethanol blends. Increasing the efficiency with ethanol-containing blends aims to remove a market barrier of reduced fuel economy with E85 fuel blends, which is currently about 30% lower than with petroleum-derived gasoline. The same or higher engine efficiency is achieved with E85, and the reduction in fuel economy is due to the lower energy density of E85. By making ethanol-blends more efficient, the fuel economy gap between gasoline and E85 can be reduced. In the partnership between Delphi and ORNL, each organization brought a unique and complementary set of skills to the project. Delphi has extensive knowledge and experience in powertrain components and subsystems as well as overcoming real-world implementation barriers. ORNL has extensive knowledge and expertise in non-traditional fuels and improving engine system efficiency for the next generation of internal combustion engines. Partnering to combine these knowledge bases was essential towards making progress to reducing the fuel economy gap between gasoline and E85. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout the project. Meetings were held regularly, usually on a bi-weekly basis, with additional reports, presentations, and meetings as necessary to maintain progress. Delphi provided substantial hardware support to the project by providing components for the single-cylinder engine experiments, engineering support for hardware modifications, guidance for operational strategies on engine research, and hardware support by providing a flexible multi-cylinder engine to be used for optimizing engine efficiency with ethanol-containing fuels.

  19. High Stability Engine Control (HISTEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Southwick, Robert D.; Gallops, George W.

    1996-01-01

    Future aircraft turbine engines, both commercial and military, must be able to successfully accommodate expected increased levels of steady-state and dynamic engine-face distortion. The current approach of incorporating a sufficient component design stall margin to tolerate these increased levels of distortion would significantly reduce performance. The objective of the High Stability Engine Control (HISTEC) program is to design, develop, and flight demonstrate an advanced, high-stability, integrated engine control system that uses measurement-based, real-time estimates of distortion to enhance engine stability. The resulting distortion tolerant control reduces the required design stall margin, with a corresponding increase in performance and decrease in fuel burn. The HISTEC concept, consisting of a Distortion Estimation System and a Stability Management Control, has been designed and developed. The Distortion Estimation System uses a small number of high-response pressure sensors at the engine face to calculate indicators of the type and extent of distortion in real time. The Stability Management Control, through direct control of the fan and compressor pressure ratio, accommodates the distortion by transiently increasing the amount of stall margin available based on information from the Distortion Estimation System. Simulation studies have shown the HISTEC distortion tolerant control is able to successfully estimate and accommodate time-varying distortion. Currently, hardware and software systems necessary for flight demonstration of the HISTEC concept are being designed and developed. The HISTEC concept will be flight tested in early 1997.

  20. Tunable, Highly Stable Lasers for Coherent Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Hale, Charley P.; EEpagnier, David M.

    2006-01-01

    Practical space-based coherent laser radar systems envisioned for global winds measurement must be very efficient and must contend with unique problems associated with the large platform velocities that the instruments experience in orbit. To compensate for these large platform-induced Doppler shifts in space-based applications, agile-frequency offset-locking of two single-frequency Doppler reference lasers was thoroughly investigated. Such techniques involve actively locking a frequency-agile master oscillator (MO) source to a comparatively static local oscillator (LO) laser, and effectively producing an offset between MO (the lidar slave oscillator seed source, typically) and heterodyne signal receiver LO that lowers the bandwidth of the receiver data-collection system and permits use of very high-quantum-efficiency, reasonably- low-bandwidth heterodyne photoreceiver detectors and circuits. Recent work on MO/LO offset locking has focused on increasing the offset locking range, improving the graded-InGaAs photoreceiver performance, and advancing the maturity of the offset locking electronics. A figure provides a schematic diagram of the offset-locking system.

  1. Stable, inflatable life raft for high seas rescue operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, J. H., Jr.; Harrison, F.; Marak, R.; Radnofsky, M. I.

    1971-01-01

    Raft is easily deployed and highly maneuverable in water. It has false bottom of water ballast containers attached to underside, making it exceptionally stable platform from which swimmers can operate. Raft is attachable to external moorings.

  2. High School Teachers' Conceptions of Engineers and Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoh, Yin Kiong

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a workshop activity the author has carried out with 80 high school science teachers to enable them to overcome their stereotypical perceptions of engineers and engineering. The activity introduced them to the biographies of prominent women in engineering, and raised their awareness of these female engineers' contributions to…

  3. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  4. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  5. A prototype stable RNA identification cassette for monitoring plasmids of genetically engineered microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedenstierna, K. O.; Lee, Y. H.; Yang, Y.; Fox, G. E.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype stable RNA identification cassette for monitoring genetically engineered plasmids carried by strains of Escherichia coli has been developed. The cassette consists of a Vibrio proteolyticus 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene surrounded by promoters and terminators from the rrnB operon of Escherischia coli. The identifier RNA is expressed and successfully processed so that approximately 30% of the 5S rRNA isolated from either whole cells or 70S ribosomes is of the V. proteolyticus type. Cells carrying the identifier are readily detectable by hybridization. Accurate measurements show that the identification cassette has little effect on fitness compared to a strain containing an analogous plasmid carrying wild type E. coli 5S rRNA, and the V. proteolyticus 5S rRNA gene is not inactivated after prolonged growth. These results demonstrate the feasibility of developing small standardized identification cassettes that can utilize already existing highly sensitive rRNA detection methods. Cassettes of this type could in principle be incorporated into either the engineered regions of recombinant plasmids or their hosts.

  6. Highly thermal-stable ferromagnetism by a natural composite.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tianyu; Gou, Junming; Hu, Shanshan; Liu, Xiaolian; Wu, Chen; Ren, Shuai; Zhao, Hui; Xiao, Andong; Jiang, Chengbao; Ren, Xiaobing; Yan, Mi

    2017-01-18

    All ferromagnetic materials show deterioration of magnetism-related properties such as magnetization and magnetostriction with increasing temperature, as the result of gradual loss of magnetic order with approaching Curie temperature TC. However, technologically, it is highly desired to find a magnetic material that can resist such magnetism deterioration and maintain stable magnetism up to its TC, but this seems against the conventional wisdom about ferromagnetism. Here we show that a Fe-Ga alloy exhibits highly thermal-stable magnetization up to the vicinity of its TC, 880 K. Also, the magnetostriction shows nearly no deterioration over a very wide temperature range. Such unusual behaviour stems from dual-magnetic-phase nature of this alloy, in which a gradual structural-magnetic transformation occurs between two magnetic phases so that the magnetism deterioration is compensated by the growth of the ferromagnetic phase with larger magnetization. Our finding may help to develop highly thermal-stable ferromagnetic and magnetostrictive materials.

  7. Highly thermal-stable ferromagnetism by a natural composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tianyu; Gou, Junming; Hu, Shanshan; Liu, Xiaolian; Wu, Chen; Ren, Shuai; Zhao, Hui; Xiao, Andong; Jiang, Chengbao; Ren, Xiaobing; Yan, Mi

    2017-01-01

    All ferromagnetic materials show deterioration of magnetism-related properties such as magnetization and magnetostriction with increasing temperature, as the result of gradual loss of magnetic order with approaching Curie temperature TC. However, technologically, it is highly desired to find a magnetic material that can resist such magnetism deterioration and maintain stable magnetism up to its TC, but this seems against the conventional wisdom about ferromagnetism. Here we show that a Fe-Ga alloy exhibits highly thermal-stable magnetization up to the vicinity of its TC, 880 K. Also, the magnetostriction shows nearly no deterioration over a very wide temperature range. Such unusual behaviour stems from dual-magnetic-phase nature of this alloy, in which a gradual structural-magnetic transformation occurs between two magnetic phases so that the magnetism deterioration is compensated by the growth of the ferromagnetic phase with larger magnetization. Our finding may help to develop highly thermal-stable ferromagnetic and magnetostrictive materials.

  8. High Efficiency Engine Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Kruiswyk

    2010-07-13

    Caterpillar's Product Development and Global Technology Division carried out a research program on waste heat recovery with support from DOE (Department of Energy) and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The objective of the program was to develop a new air management and exhaust energy recovery system that would demonstrate a minimum 10% improvement in thermal efficiency over a base heavy-duty on-highway diesel truck engine. The base engine for this program was a 2007 C15 15.2L series-turbocharged on-highway truck engine with a LPL (low-pressure loop) exhaust recirculation system. The focus of the program was on the development of high efficiency turbomachinery and a high efficiency turbocompound waste heat recovery system. The focus of each area of development was as follows: (1) For turbine stages, the focus was on investigation and development of technologies that would improve on-engine exhaust energy utilization compared to the conventional radial turbines in widespread use today. (2) For compressor stages, the focus was on investigating compressor wheel design parameters beyond the range typically utilized in production, to determine the potential efficiency benefits thereof. (3) For turbocompound, the focus was on the development of a robust bearing system that would provide higher bearing efficiencies compared to systems used in turbocompound power turbines in production. None of the turbocharger technologies investigated involved addition of moving parts, actuators, or exotic materials, thereby increasing the likelihood of a favorable cost-value tradeoff for each technology. And the turbocompound system requires less hardware addition than competing bottoming cycle technologies, making it a more attractive solution from a cost and packaging standpoint. Main outcomes of the program are as follows: (1) Two turbine technologies that demonstrated up to 6% improvement in turbine efficiency on gas stand and 1-3% improvement in thermal efficiency in

  9. Highly Stable Silver Nanoplates for Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensing

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Chuanbo; Lu, Zhenda; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, ying; Cheng, Quan; Yin, Yadong

    2012-01-01

    An SPR biosensor was developed by employing highly stable Au-protected Ag nanoplates (NP) as enhancers (see picture). Superior performance was achieved by depositing a thin and uniform coating of Au on the Ag surface while minimizing disruptive galvanic replacement and retaining the strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the silver nanoplates.

  10. A novel approach for monitoring genetically engineered microorganisms by using artificial, stable RNAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitulle, C.; Hedenstierna, K. O.; Fox, G. E.

    1995-01-01

    Further improvements in technology for efficient monitoring of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) in the environment are needed. Technology for monitoring rRNA is well established but has not generally been applicable to GEMs because of the lack of unique rRNA target sequences. In the work described herein, it is demonstrated that a deletion mutant of a plasmid-borne Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA gene continues to accumulate to high levels in Escherichia coli although it is no longer incorporated into 70S ribosomes. This deletion construct was subsequently modified by mutagenesis to create a unique recognition site for the restriction endonuclease BstEII, into which new sequences could be readily inserted. Finally, a novel 17-nucleotide identifier sequence from Pennisetum purpureum was embedded into the construct to create an RNA identification cassette. The artificial identifier RNA, expressed from this cassette in vivo, accumulated in E. coli to levels comparable to those of wild-type 5S rRNA without being seriously detrimental to cell survival in laboratory experiments and without entering the ribosomes. These results demonstrate that artificial, stable RNAs containing sequence segments remarkably different from those present in any known rRNA can be designed and that neither the deleted sequence segment nor ribosome incorporation is essential for accumulation of an RNA product.

  11. Multifunctional and stable bone mimic proteinaceous matrix for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong-Eun; Yun, Ye-Rang; Jang, Jun-Hyeog; Yang, Sung-Hee; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Wall, Ivan B; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won

    2015-07-01

    Biomaterial surface design with biomimetic proteins holds great promise for successful regeneration of tissues including bone. Here we report a novel proteinaceous hybrid matrix mimicking bone extracellular matrix that has multifunctional capacity to promote stem cell adhesion and osteogenesis with excellent stability. Osteocalcin-fibronectin fusion protein holding collagen binding domain was networked with fibrillar collagen, featuring bone extracellular matrix mimic, to provide multifunctional and structurally-stable biomatrices. The hybrid protein, integrated homogeneously with collagen fibrillar networks, preserved structural stability over a month. Biological efficacy of the hybrid matrix was proven onto tethered surface of biopolymer porous scaffolds. Mesenchymal stem cells quickly anchored to the hybrid matrix, forming focal adhesions, and substantially conformed to cytoskeletal extensions, benefited from the fibronectin adhesive domains. Cells achieved high proliferative capacity to reach confluence rapidly and switched to a mature and osteogenic phenotype more effectively, resulting in greater osteogenic matrix syntheses and mineralization, driven by the engineered osteocalcin. The hybrid biomimetic matrix significantly improved in vivo bone formation in calvarial defects over 6 weeks. Based on the series of stimulated biological responses in vitro and in vivo the novel hybrid proteinaceous composition will be potentially useful as stem cell interfacing matrices for osteogenesis and bone regeneration.

  12. Ear-Shaped Stable Auricular Cartilage Engineered from Extensively Expanded Chondrocytes in an Immunocompetent Experimental Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Pomerantseva, Irina; Bichara, David A.; Tseng, Alan; Cronce, Michael J.; Cervantes, Thomas M.; Kimura, Anya M.; Neville, Craig M.; Roscioli, Nick; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Randolph, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Advancement of engineered ear in clinical practice is limited by several challenges. The complex, largely unsupported, three-dimensional auricular neocartilage structure is difficult to maintain. Neocartilage formation is challenging in an immunocompetent host due to active inflammatory and immunological responses. The large number of autologous chondrogenic cells required for engineering an adult human-sized ear presents an additional challenge because primary chondrocytes rapidly dedifferentiate during in vitro culture. The objective of this study was to engineer a stable, human ear-shaped cartilage in an immunocompetent animal model using expanded chondrocytes. The impact of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) supplementation on achieving clinically relevant expansion of primary sheep chondrocytes by in vitro culture was determined. Chondrocytes expanded in standard medium were either combined with cryopreserved, primary passage 0 chondrocytes at the time of scaffold seeding or used alone as control. Disk and human ear-shaped scaffolds were made from porous collagen; ear scaffolds had an embedded, supporting titanium wire framework. Autologous chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in sheep after 2 weeks of in vitro incubation. The quality of the resulting neocartilage and its stability and retention of the original ear size and shape were evaluated at 6, 12, and 20 weeks postimplantation. Neocartilage produced from chondrocytes that were expanded in the presence of bFGF was superior, and its quality improved with increased implantation time. In addition to characteristic morphological cartilage features, its glycosaminoglycan content was high and marked elastin fiber formation was present. The overall shape of engineered ears was preserved at 20 weeks postimplantation, and the dimensional changes did not exceed 10%. The wire frame within the engineered ear was able to withstand mechanical forces during wound healing and neocartilage

  13. Ear-Shaped Stable Auricular Cartilage Engineered from Extensively Expanded Chondrocytes in an Immunocompetent Experimental Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Pomerantseva, Irina; Bichara, David A; Tseng, Alan; Cronce, Michael J; Cervantes, Thomas M; Kimura, Anya M; Neville, Craig M; Roscioli, Nick; Vacanti, Joseph P; Randolph, Mark A; Sundback, Cathryn A

    2016-02-01

    Advancement of engineered ear in clinical practice is limited by several challenges. The complex, largely unsupported, three-dimensional auricular neocartilage structure is difficult to maintain. Neocartilage formation is challenging in an immunocompetent host due to active inflammatory and immunological responses. The large number of autologous chondrogenic cells required for engineering an adult human-sized ear presents an additional challenge because primary chondrocytes rapidly dedifferentiate during in vitro culture. The objective of this study was to engineer a stable, human ear-shaped cartilage in an immunocompetent animal model using expanded chondrocytes. The impact of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) supplementation on achieving clinically relevant expansion of primary sheep chondrocytes by in vitro culture was determined. Chondrocytes expanded in standard medium were either combined with cryopreserved, primary passage 0 chondrocytes at the time of scaffold seeding or used alone as control. Disk and human ear-shaped scaffolds were made from porous collagen; ear scaffolds had an embedded, supporting titanium wire framework. Autologous chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in sheep after 2 weeks of in vitro incubation. The quality of the resulting neocartilage and its stability and retention of the original ear size and shape were evaluated at 6, 12, and 20 weeks postimplantation. Neocartilage produced from chondrocytes that were expanded in the presence of bFGF was superior, and its quality improved with increased implantation time. In addition to characteristic morphological cartilage features, its glycosaminoglycan content was high and marked elastin fiber formation was present. The overall shape of engineered ears was preserved at 20 weeks postimplantation, and the dimensional changes did not exceed 10%. The wire frame within the engineered ear was able to withstand mechanical forces during wound healing and neocartilage

  14. Highly thermal-stable ferromagnetism by a natural composite

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tianyu; Gou, Junming; Hu, Shanshan; Liu, Xiaolian; Wu, Chen; Ren, Shuai; Zhao, Hui; Xiao, Andong; Jiang, Chengbao; Ren, Xiaobing; Yan, Mi

    2017-01-01

    All ferromagnetic materials show deterioration of magnetism-related properties such as magnetization and magnetostriction with increasing temperature, as the result of gradual loss of magnetic order with approaching Curie temperature TC. However, technologically, it is highly desired to find a magnetic material that can resist such magnetism deterioration and maintain stable magnetism up to its TC, but this seems against the conventional wisdom about ferromagnetism. Here we show that a Fe–Ga alloy exhibits highly thermal-stable magnetization up to the vicinity of its TC, 880 K. Also, the magnetostriction shows nearly no deterioration over a very wide temperature range. Such unusual behaviour stems from dual-magnetic-phase nature of this alloy, in which a gradual structural-magnetic transformation occurs between two magnetic phases so that the magnetism deterioration is compensated by the growth of the ferromagnetic phase with larger magnetization. Our finding may help to develop highly thermal-stable ferromagnetic and magnetostrictive materials. PMID:28098145

  15. High-field, high-current-density, stable superconducting magnets for fusion machines

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, J.W.; Dresner, L.; Lubell, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Designs for large fusion machines require high-performance superconducting magnets to reduce cost or increase machine performance. By employing force-flow cooling, cable-in-conduit conductor configuration, and NbTi superconductor, it is now possible to design superconducting magnets that operate a high fields (8-12 T) with high current densities (5-15 kA/cm/sup 2/ over the winding pack) in a stable manner. High current density leads to smaller, lighter, and thus less expensive coils. The force-flow cooling provides confined helium, full conductor insulation, and a rigid winding pack for better load distribution. The cable-in-conduit conductor configuration ensures a high stability margin for the magnet. The NbTi superconductor has reached a good engineering material standard. Its strain-insensitive critical parameters are particularly suitable for complex coil windings of a stellarator machine. The optimization procedure for such a conductor design, developed over the past decade, is summarized here. If desired a magnet built on the principles outlines in this paper can be extended to a field higher than the design value without degrading its stability by simply lowering the operating temperature below 4.2 K. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Research on stable, high-efficiency, amorphous silicon multijunction modules

    SciTech Connect

    Catalano, A.; Bennett, M.; Chen, L.; D'Aiello, R.; Fieselmann, B.; Li, Y.; Newton, J.; Podlesny, R.; Yang, L. . Thin Film Div.)

    1992-08-01

    This report describes work to demonstrate a multijunction module with a stabilized'' efficiency (600 h, 50{degrees}C, AM1.5) of 10.5%. Triple-junction devices and modules using a-Si:H alloys with carbon and germanium were developed to meet program goals. ZnO was used to provide a high optical transmission front contact. Proof of concept was obtained for several important advances deemed to be important for obtaining high (12.5%) stabilized efficiency. They were (1) stable, high-quality a-SiC:H devices and (2) high-transmission, textured ZnO. Although these developments were not scaled up and included in modules, triple-junction module efficiencies as high as 10.85% were demonstrated. NREL measured 9.62% and 9.00% indoors and outdoors, respectively. The modules are expected to lose no more than 20% of their initial performance. 28 refs.

  17. High frequency dynamic engine simulation. [TF-30 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerman, J. A.; Fischer, K. E.; Mclaughlin, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    A digital computer simulation of a mixed flow, twin spool turbofan engine was assembled to evaluate and improve the dynamic characteristics of the engine simulation to disturbance frequencies of at least 100 Hz. One dimensional forms of the dynamic mass, momentum and energy equations were used to model the engine. A TF30 engine was simulated so that dynamic characteristics could be evaluated against results obtained from testing of the TF30 engine at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Dynamic characteristics of the engine simulation were improved by modifying the compression system model. Modifications to the compression system model were established by investigating the influence of size and number of finite dynamic elements. Based on the results of this program, high frequency engine simulations using finite dynamic elements can be assembled so that the engine dynamic configuration is optimum with respect to dynamic characteristics and computer execution time. Resizing of the compression systems finite elements improved the dynamic characteristics of the engine simulation but showed that additional refinements are required to obtain close agreement simulation and actual engine dynamic characteristics.

  18. High Precision Ti stable Isotope Measurement of Terrestrial Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, M. A.; Dauphas, N.; Williams, H. M.; Burton, K. W.; Nowell, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Advances in multi-collection plasma source mass spectrometry have allowed the determination of stable isotope composition of transition metals to address questions relevant to both high and low temperature geochemistry. However, titanium has received only very limited attention. Here we present a new technique allowing the determination of the stable isotope composition of titanium in geological samples (d49Ti or deviation of the 49Ti/47Ti ratio from the OL-Ti in-house standard of reference) using double-spike methodology and high-resolution MC-ICP-MS. We have carried out a range analytical tests for a wide spectrum of samples matrices to demonstrate a external reproducibility of ±0.02‰ on the d49Ti while using as little as 150ng of natural Ti for a single analysis. We have analysed a comprehensive selection of mantle-derived samples covering a range of geodynamic contexts (MORB, IAB, OIB, adakites, eclogites, serpentines) and geographical distribution (MORB: Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Southwest Indian Ridge and Eastern Pacific Ridge; IAB: New Britain reference suite and Marianas Arc). The samples show a very limited range from -0.06‰ to +0.04‰ with a main mode at +0.004‰ relative to the OL-Ti standard. Average values for MORB, IAB and eclogites are similar within uncertainty and thus argue for limited mobility of Ti during subduction zone processes and homogeneity of the Ti stable isotope composition of the upper mantle. However, preliminary data for more evolved igneous rocks suggest that they display heavier Ti stable isotope compositions, which may reflect the removal of isotopically light Ti as a function of Fe-Ti oxide crystallisation. This is in good agreement with Ti being present in 5-fold and 6-fold coordination in basaltic melts and preferential uptake of 6-folded Ti by Ti-bearing oxides [1]. This dataset will be complemented by analysis of abyssal peridotites to confirm the homogeneity of the mantle as well as data for a range of ferromanganese crusts

  19. Stable highly hydrophobic and oleophilic meshes for oil water separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingjun; Cui, Zhe; Xiao, Yi; Chen, Qingmin

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes a simple method for fabricating both highly hydrophobic and oleophilic meshes by coating thin fluoro-containing films. The static contact angle of such meshes is greater than 150° for water, and close to 0° for kerosene, xylene and toluene. These meshes can separate water from oil effectively without resorting to any extra power or chemical agent. Moreover, they exhibited stable water resisting, anti-chemical erosion and anti-hot aging properties. It promises as a candidate for the separation of oil and water.

  20. Highly Reflective Multi-stable Electrofluidic Display Pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shu

    Electronic papers (E-papers) refer to the displays that mimic the appearance of printed papers, but still owning the features of conventional electronic displays, such as the abilities of browsing websites and playing videos. The motivation of creating paper-like displays is inspired by the truths that reading on a paper caused least eye fatigue due to the paper's reflective and light diffusive nature, and, unlike the existing commercial displays, there is no cost of any form of energy for sustaining the displayed image. To achieve the equivalent visual effect of a paper print, an ideal E-paper has to be a highly reflective with good contrast ratio and full-color capability. To sustain the image with zero power consumption, the display pixels need to be bistable, which means the "on" and "off" states are both lowest energy states. Pixel can change its state only when sufficient external energy is given. There are many emerging technologies competing to demonstrate the first ideal E-paper device. However, none is able to achieve satisfactory visual effect, bistability and video speed at the same time. Challenges come from either the inherent physical/chemical properties or the fabrication process. Electrofluidic display is one of the most promising E-paper technologies. It has successfully demonstrated high reflectivity, brilliant color and video speed operation by moving colored pigment dispersion between visible and invisible places with electrowetting force. However, the pixel design did not allow the image bistability. Presented in this dissertation are the multi-stable electrofluidic display pixels that are able to sustain grayscale levels without any power consumption, while keeping the favorable features of the previous generation electrofluidic display. The pixel design, fabrication method using multiple layer dry film photoresist lamination, and physical/optical characterizations are discussed in details. Based on the pixel structure, the preliminary

  1. A high performance thermoacoustic engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijani, M. E. H.; Spoelstra, S.

    2011-11-01

    In thermoacoustic systems heat is converted into acoustic energy and vice versa. These systems use inert gases as working medium and have no moving parts which makes the thermoacoustic technology a serious alternative to produce mechanical or electrical power, cooling power, and heating in a sustainable and environmentally friendly way. A thermoacoustic Stirling heat engine is designed and built which achieves a record performance of 49% of the Carnot efficiency. The design and performance of the engine is presented. The engine has no moving parts and is made up of few simple components.

  2. Metal Acetylacetonate Series in Interface Engineering for Full Low-Temperature-Processed, High-Performance, and Stable Planar Perovskite Solar Cells with Conversion Efficiency over 16% on 1 cm(2) Scale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Xu, Leiming; Feng, Xiyuan; Jie, Jiansheng; He, Zhubing

    2017-02-14

    A series of metal acetylacetonates produced by a full low-temperature (below 100 °C) process are successfully employed to obtain both "multistable" and high-performance planar-inverted perovskite solar cells. All the three kinds of champion cells in small area exhibit over 18% in conversion-efficiency with negligible hysteresis, along with above 16% in conversion-efficiency for planar PSCs in an aperture area of over 1 cm(2) .

  3. Shelf-stable food through high dose irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaček, V.; Svobodová, V.; Bartoníček, B.; Rosmus, J.; Čamra, M.

    2004-09-01

    Irradiation of food with high doses (radappertization) is a way, how to prepare shelf-stable ready-to-eat food. The radappertization process requires that the food be heated at first to an internal temperature of at least 75°C to inactivate autolytic enzyme, which could cause the spoilage during storage without refrigeration. In order to prevent radiation induced changes in sensory properties (off flavors, odors, undesirable color change, etc.) the food was vacuum packed and irradiated in frozen state at -30°C or less to a minimum dose of 35 kGy. Such products have characteristics of fresh food prepared for eating even if they are stored for long time under tropical conditions. The wholesomeness (safety for consumption) has been confirmed during 40 years of testing. Within the NRI Řež 10 kinds of shelf-stable meat products have been prepared. The meat was cooked, vacuum packed in SiO x-containing pouch, freezed in liquid nitrogen and irradiated with electron beam accelerator. The microbial, chemical, and organoleptic properties have been tested.

  4. Highly stable thin film transistors using multilayer channel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Pradipta K.; Wang, Zhenwei; Anjum, D. H.; Hedhili, M. N.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2015-03-01

    We report highly stable gate-bias stress performance of thin film transistors (TFTs) using zinc oxide (ZnO)/hafnium oxide (HfO2) multilayer structure as the channel layer. Positive and negative gate-bias stress stability of the TFTs was measured at room temperature and at 60 °C. A tremendous improvement in gate-bias stress stability was obtained in case of the TFT with multiple layers of ZnO embedded between HfO2 layers compared to the TFT with a single layer of ZnO as the semiconductor. The ultra-thin HfO2 layers act as passivation layers, which prevent the adsorption of oxygen and water molecules in the ZnO layer and hence significantly improve the gate-bias stress stability of ZnO TFTs.

  5. Highly stable thin film transistors using multilayer channel structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, Pradipta K.; Wang, Zhenwei; Anjum, D. H.; Hedhili, M. N.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2015-03-09

    We report highly stable gate-bias stress performance of thin film transistors (TFTs) using zinc oxide (ZnO)/hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) multilayer structure as the channel layer. Positive and negative gate-bias stress stability of the TFTs was measured at room temperature and at 60 °C. A tremendous improvement in gate-bias stress stability was obtained in case of the TFT with multiple layers of ZnO embedded between HfO{sub 2} layers compared to the TFT with a single layer of ZnO as the semiconductor. The ultra-thin HfO{sub 2} layers act as passivation layers, which prevent the adsorption of oxygen and water molecules in the ZnO layer and hence significantly improve the gate-bias stress stability of ZnO TFTs.

  6. High- and low-temperature-stable thermite composition for producing high-pressure, high-velocity gases

    DOEpatents

    Halcomb, Danny L.; Mohler, Jonathan H.

    1990-10-16

    A high- and low-temperature-stable thermite composition for producing high-pressure and high-velocity gases comprises an oxidizable metal, an oxidizing reagent, and a high-temperature-stable gas-producing additive selected from the group consisting of metal carbides and metal nitrides.

  7. New method for preparing more stable microcapsules for the entrapment of genetically engineered cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Man-Yan; Yu, Yao-Ting; Chang, T M S

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we studied a new preparation method of microcapsules for entrapment of genetically engineered cells. Polyvinyl alcohol microcapsules having well defined shape, high mechanical strength, good biochemical and permeability properties were prepared by using low temperature physical cross-linking method. Comparing with currently used alginate-polylysine-alginate microcapsules, polyvinyl alcohol microcapsules have much higher mechanical strength. The low temperature physical crosslinking procedure of polyvinyl alcohol is nontoxic to the genetically engineered E. coli DH5alpha cell, which attained high activity in decomposing and metabolizing urea in vitro studies.

  8. Fusion to a highly stable consensus albumin binding domain allows for tunable pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Steven A; Gibbs, Alan C; Conk, Michelle; Yi, Fang; Maguire, Diane; Kane, Colleen; O'Neil, Karyn T

    2015-10-01

    A number of classes of proteins have been engineered for high stability using consensus sequence design methods. Here we describe the engineering of a novel albumin binding domain (ABD) three-helix bundle protein. The resulting engineered ABD molecule, called ABDCon, is expressed at high levels in the soluble fraction of Escherichia coli and is highly stable, with a melting temperature of 81.5°C. ABDCon binds human, monkey and mouse serum albumins with affinity as high as 61 pM. The solution structure of ABDCon is consistent with the three-helix bundle design and epitope mapping studies enabled a precise definition of the albumin binding interface. Fusion of a 10 kDa scaffold protein to ABDCon results in a long terminal half-life of 60 h in mice and 182 h in cynomolgus monkeys. To explore the link between albumin affinity and in vivo exposure, mutations were designed at the albumin binding interface of ABDCon yielding variants that span an 11 000-fold range in affinity. The PK properties of five such variants were determined in mice in order to demonstrate the tunable nature of serum half-life, exposure and clearance with variations in albumin binding affinity.

  9. Study on stable and meta-stable carbides in a high speed steel for rollers during tempering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Qu, Hong-wei; Liu, Li-gang; Sun, Yan-liang; Zhang, Yue; Yang, Qing-xiang

    2013-02-01

    A high speed steel (HSS) was studied for rollers in this work. The steel was quenched at 1150°C and tempered at 520°C. The phase structures of the steel were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the hardness of specimens was measured. The volume fraction of carbides was counted by Image-Pro Plus software. The typical microstructures were observed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). Stable and meta-stable carbides were deduced by removing the existing phases one by one in the Fe-C equilibrium calculation. It is found that the precipitated carbides are bulk-like MC, long stripe-like M2C, fishbone-like M6C, and daisy-like M7C3 during the tempering process. The stable carbides are MC and M6C, but the meta-stable ones are M2C, M7C3, and M3C.

  10. New High in Engineering Degree Production. Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Department of Higher Education (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Several of the state's key industry sectors depend heavily on employees with advanced scientific, analytic and technical knowledge. Among the fields closely related to these sectors, engineering degrees have posted the largest gain. This paper presents details on the following facts: (1) 2009 represented a record high for engineering degrees; (2)…

  11. High Strength and Thermally Stable Nanostructured Magnesium Alloys and Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuan-Wei

    Magnesium and its alloys are currently in the spotlight of global research because of the need to limit energy consumption and reduce the environmental impact. In particular, their low densities compared to other structural metals make them a very attractive alternative in the automobile and aerospace industries. However, their low strength compared to other structural materials (e.g. Al and steels) has limited their widespread application. This dissertation presents the results of developing and investigation of a high strength nanostructured magnesium-aluminum alloy and composite. The nanostructured magnesium alloy is prepared by cryomilling and consolidated by spark-plasma-sintering. Focused ion beam is used to prepare micropillars with different diameters ranging from 1.5 to 8 mum and micro-compression test is conducted by nanoindenter in order to evaluate the mechanical properties. The yield strength obtained in the present study is around three times higher than conventional magnesium alloys (120 MPa vs. 370 MPa). The yield strength of the nanostructured magnesium alloy is further improved through hot extrusion, resulting in a yield strength of 550 MPa and an ultimate strength of 580 MPa. The nanostructured magnesium alloy exhibits a strong size-dependence, and a significant improvement in strength is observed when the pillar diameter is reduced to below 3.5 mum. The deformation mechanisms of the compressed pillars were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The size-induced strengthening is attributed to a less number of dislocation sources along with a higher activity of non-basal deformation mechanisms. We have also developed a high strength and thermally stable nanostructured magnesium composite by adding diamantane. A yield strength of 500 MPa is achieved, moreover, excellent thermal stability is demonstrated in the magnesium alloy containing diamantanes. The strength and grain size are thermally stable after annealing at 400°C for 100

  12. Highly stable, extremely high-temperature, nonvolatile memory based on resistance switching in polycrystalline Pt nanogaps

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroya; Shinomura, Yuma; Kashiwabara, Shota; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Naitoh, Yasuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Highly stable, nonvolatile, high-temperature memory based on resistance switching was realized using a polycrystalline platinum (Pt) nanogap. The operating temperature of the memory can be drastically increased by the presence of a sharp-edged Pt crystal facet in the nanogap. A short distance between the facet edges maintains the nanogap shape at high temperature, and the sharp shape of the nanogap densifies the electric field to maintain a stable current flow due to field migration. Even at 873 K, which is a significantly higher temperature than feasible for conventional semiconductor memory, the nonvolatility of the proposed memory allows stable ON and OFF currents, with fluctuations of less than or equal to 10%, to be maintained for longer than eight hours. An advantage of this nanogap scheme for high-temperature memory is its secure operation achieved through the assembly and disassembly of a Pt needle in a high electric field. PMID:27725705

  13. Highly stable, extremely high-temperature, nonvolatile memory based on resistance switching in polycrystalline Pt nanogaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suga, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroya; Shinomura, Yuma; Kashiwabara, Shota; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Naitoh, Yasuhisa

    2016-10-01

    Highly stable, nonvolatile, high-temperature memory based on resistance switching was realized using a polycrystalline platinum (Pt) nanogap. The operating temperature of the memory can be drastically increased by the presence of a sharp-edged Pt crystal facet in the nanogap. A short distance between the facet edges maintains the nanogap shape at high temperature, and the sharp shape of the nanogap densifies the electric field to maintain a stable current flow due to field migration. Even at 873 K, which is a significantly higher temperature than feasible for conventional semiconductor memory, the nonvolatility of the proposed memory allows stable ON and OFF currents, with fluctuations of less than or equal to 10%, to be maintained for longer than eight hours. An advantage of this nanogap scheme for high-temperature memory is its secure operation achieved through the assembly and disassembly of a Pt needle in a high electric field.

  14. High-Order Entropy Stable Formulations for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Fisher, Travis C.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic approach is presented for developing entropy stable (SS) formulations of any order for the Navier-Stokes equations. These SS formulations discretely conserve mass, momentum, energy and satisfy a mathematical entropy inequality. They are valid for smooth as well as discontinuous flows provided sufficient dissipation is added at shocks and discontinuities. Entropy stable formulations exist for all diagonal norm, summation-by-parts (SBP) operators, including all centered finite-difference operators, Legendre collocation finite-element operators, and certain finite-volume operators. Examples are presented using various entropy stable formulations that demonstrate the current state-of-the-art of these schemes.

  15. Stable high conductivity ceria/bismuth oxide bilayered electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsman, E.D.; Jayaweera, P.; Jiang, N.; Lowe, D.M.; Pound, B.G.

    1997-01-01

    The authors have developed a high conductivity bilayered ceria/bismuth oxide anolyte/electrolyte that uses the Po{sub 2} gradient to obtain stability at the anolyte-electrolyte interface and reduced electronic conduction due to the electrolyte region. Results in terms of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) performance and stability are presented. These results include a 90 to 160 mV increase in open-circuit potential, depending on temperature, with the bilayered structure as compared to SOFCs fabricated from a single ceria layer. An open-circuit potential of >1.0 V was obtained at 500 C with the bilayered structure. This increase in open-circuit potential is obtained without any measurable increase in cell resistance and is stable for over 1,400 h of testing, under both open-circuit and maximum power conditions. Moreover, SOFCs fabricated from the bilayered structure result in a 33% greater power density as compared to cells with a single ceria electrolyte layer.

  16. Progress Toward a Compact, Highly Stable Ion Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John; Chung, Sang

    2009-01-01

    There was an update on the subject of two previous NASA Tech Briefs articles: Compact, Highly Stable Ion Clock (NPO-43075), Vol. 32, No. 5 (May 2008), page 63; and Neon as a Buffer Gas for a Mercury-Ion Clock (NPO-42919), Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 62. To recapitulate: A developmental miniature mercury-ion clock has stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling components are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein a getter pump maintains the partial vacuum, and the evacuated tube is backfilled with mercury vapor in a neon buffer gas. There was progress in the development of the clock, with emphasis on the design, fabrication, pump-down, and bake-out of the vacuum tube (based on established practice in the travelingwave- tube-amplifier industry) and the ability of the tube to retain a vacuum after a year of operation. Other developments include some aspects of the operation of mercury-vapor source (a small appendage oven containing HgO) so as to maintain the optimum low concentration of mercury vapor, and further efforts to miniaturize the vacuum and optical subsystems to fit within a volume of 2 L.

  17. Engineering in High School: Implementing TMMW & TPE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordoloi, Kiron C.; Cole, Joseph D.

    1979-01-01

    The success of two engineering and technology-oriented secondary school programs is discussed. Also presented is the Man Made World and the Technology-People-Environment at two suburban high schools. (BB)

  18. Creating an Efficient Methanol-Stable Biocatalyst by Protein and Immobilization Engineering Steps towards Efficient Biosynthesis of Biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Gihaz, Shalev; Weiser, Diána; Dror, Adi; Sátorhelyi, Péter; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Poppe, László; Fishman, Ayelet

    2016-11-23

    Two ternary sol-gel matrices, an octyltriethoxysilane-based aliphatic matrix and a phenyltriethoxysilane (PTEOS)-based aromatic matrix, were used to immobilize a methanol-stable variant of lipase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T6 for the synthesis of biodiesel from waste oil. Superior thermal stability of the mutant versus the wildtype in methanol was confirmed by intrinsic protein fluorescence measurements. The influence of skim milk and soluble E. coli lysate proteins as bulking and stabilizing agents in conjunction with sol-gel entrapment were investigated. E. coli lysate proteins were better stabilizing agents of the purified lipase mutant than skim milk, as evidenced by reverse engineering of the aromatic-based system. This was also shown for commercial Candida antarctica lipase B (CaLB) and Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase (TLL). Uniform, dense, and nonaggregated particles imaged by scanning electron microscopy and a small particle size of 13 μm pertaining to the system comprising PTEOS and E. coli lysate proteins correlated well with high esterification activity. Combining protein and immobilization engineering resulted in a durable biocatalyst with efficient recycling ability and high biodiesel conversion rates.

  19. Assuring quality in high-consequence engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, Marcey L.; Kolb, Rachel R.

    2014-03-01

    In high-consequence engineering organizations, such as Sandia, quality assurance may be heavily dependent on staff competency. Competency-dependent quality assurance models are at risk when the environment changes, as it has with increasing attrition rates, budget and schedule cuts, and competing program priorities. Risks in Sandia's competency-dependent culture can be mitigated through changes to hiring, training, and customer engagement approaches to manage people, partners, and products. Sandia's technical quality engineering organization has been able to mitigate corporate-level risks by driving changes that benefit all departments, and in doing so has assured Sandia's commitment to excellence in high-consequence engineering and national service.

  20. A stable high-order perturbation of surfaces method for numerical simulation of diffraction problems in triply layered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Youngjoon; Nicholls, David P.

    2017-02-01

    The accurate numerical simulation of linear waves interacting with periodic layered media is a crucial capability in engineering applications. In this contribution we study the stable and high-order accurate numerical simulation of the interaction of linear, time-harmonic waves with a periodic, triply layered medium with irregular interfaces. In contrast with volumetric approaches, High-Order Perturbation of Surfaces (HOPS) algorithms are inexpensive interfacial methods which rapidly and recursively estimate scattering returns by perturbation of the interface shape. In comparison with Boundary Integral/Element Methods, the stable HOPS algorithm we describe here does not require specialized quadrature rules, periodization strategies, or the solution of dense non-symmetric positive definite linear systems. In addition, the algorithm is provably stable as opposed to other classical HOPS approaches. With numerical experiments we show the remarkable efficiency, fidelity, and accuracy one can achieve with an implementation of this algorithm.

  1. Finite element solution for energy conservation using a highly stable explicit integration algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Manhardt, P. D.

    1972-01-01

    Theoretical derivation of a finite element solution algorithm for the transient energy conservation equation in multidimensional, stationary multi-media continua with irregular solution domain closure is considered. The complete finite element matrix forms for arbitrarily irregular discretizations are established, using natural coordinate function representations. The algorithm is embodied into a user-oriented computer program (COMOC) which obtains transient temperature distributions at the node points of the finite element discretization using a highly stable explicit integration procedure with automatic error control features. The finite element algorithm is shown to posses convergence with discretization for a transient sample problem. The condensed form for the specific heat element matrix is shown to be preferable to the consistent form. Computed results for diverse problems illustrate the versatility of COMOC, and easily prepared output subroutines are shown to allow quick engineering assessment of solution behavior.

  2. High efficiency and stable white OLED using a single emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jian

    2016-01-18

    The ultimate objective of this project was to demonstrate an efficient and stable white OLED using a single emitter on a planar glass substrate. The focus of the project is on the development of efficient and stable square planar phosphorescent emitters and evaluation of such class of materials in the device settings. Key challenges included improving the emission efficiency of molecular dopants and excimers, controlling emission color of emitters and their excimers, and improving optical and electrical stability of emissive dopants. At the end of this research program, the PI has made enough progress to demonstrate the potential of excimer-based white OLED as a cost-effective solution for WOLED panel in the solid state lighting applications.

  3. High concentrations of STOP protein induce a microtubule super-stable state.

    PubMed

    Job, D; Rauch, C T; Margolis, R L

    1987-10-14

    We have previously shown that mammalian brain crude extracts contained two classes of stable microtubules: "cold stable" and "super-stable" microtubules. We now find that both species are generated by a single protein factor (STOP protein) in a dose dependent manner. These results show that STOP protein action can be extreme, inducing resistance to -80 degrees C or to sonication and that no other factor seems to be required to account for the various subclasses of highly stable microtubules in brain. Finally, the rapid procedure described for the preparation of purified "super-stable microtubules" should be useful for the obtention of fractions with high STOP protein activity.

  4. High temperature NASP engine seal development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Melis, Matthew E.; Orletski, Dirk; Test, Mark G.

    1991-01-01

    Key to the development of advanced hypersonic engines such as those being considered for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) is the development and evaluation of high temperature, flexible seals that must seal the many feet of gaps between the articulating and stationary engine panels. Recent seal progress made at NASA-Lewis is reviewed in the areas of seal concept maturation, test rig development, and performance tests. A test fixture was built at NASA capable of subjecting candidate 3 ft long seals to engine simulated temperatures (up to 1500 F), pressures (up to 100 psi), and engine wall distortions (up to 0.15 in only 18 in span). Leakage performance test results at high temperatures are presented for an innovative high temperature, flexible ceramic wafer seal. Also described is a joint Pratt and Whitney/NASA planned test program to evaluate thermal performance of a braided rope seal under engine simulated heat flux rates (up to 400 Btu/sq ft s), and supersonic flow conditions. These conditions are produced by subjecting the seal specimen to hydrogen oxygen rocket exhaust that flows tangent to the specimen.

  5. High temperature dynamic engine seal technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Machinchick, Michael; Mutharasan, Rajakkannu; Du, Guang-Wu; Ko, Frank; Sirocky, Paul J.; Miller, Jeffrey H.

    1992-01-01

    Combined cycle ramjet/scramjet engines being designed for advanced hypersonic vehicles, including the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), require innovative high temperature dynamic seals to seal the sliding interfaces of the articulated engine panels. New seals are required that will operate hot (1200 to 2000 F), seal pressures ranging from 0 to 100 psi, remain flexible to accommodate significant sidewall distortions, and resist abrasion over the engine's operational life. This report reviews the recent high temperature durability screening assessments of a new braided rope seal concept, braided of emerging high temperature materials, that shows promise of meeting many of the seal demands of hypersonic engines. The paper presents durability data for: (1) the fundamental seal building blocks, a range of candidate ceramic fiber tows; and for (2) braided rope seal subelements scrubbed under engine simulated sliding, temperature, and preload conditions. Seal material/architecture attributes and limitations are identified through the investigations performed. The paper summarizes the current seal technology development status and presents areas in which future work will be performed.

  6. Efficient and stable near infrared emitters using band gap engineered quantum dots for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Bridgette Renee

    Synthetic chemistry of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals has been a major area for materials chemistry and this field has advanced dramatically. Emphasis in terms of materials development has gradually shifted from simple composition with regular dot-shape to complex composition/morphologies. One of the present frontiers is "band gap engineering in solution". Band gap engineering refers to the control of the behavior of the photo-generated carriers, both electrons and holes, by means of epitaxial growth of various semiconductors with different band structures, often referred to as complex heterostructures. Potential uses for these complex heterostructures exist as emitters for biomedical labeling, quantum dot (QD)-based lasers, light emitting diodes (LEDs), electroluminescent devices, and solar cells. To date, band gap engineering in solution is much less developed. This direction is expected to yield nanocrystals with properties otherwise not available from the corresponding individual materials. By using what is known about monomer activities, ligand effects, noncoordinating solvents, and SILAR growth methods, it is now possible to controllably synthesize high quality complex semiconductor nanocrystals. In this research, we modified a solution-based epitaxial growth method to synthesize nanomaterials with unusual type II band offsets. More specifically, novel SILAR synthesis of CdSe/CdTe type II core/shell, CdS/CdSe/CdTe type II quantum well, and water soluble CdSe/CdTe/ZnSe nanocrystals are described. In all systems, a new concept of "thermal cycling" of the reaction temperature was incorporated to control the size and size/shape distribution of the nanocrystals. In addition, a controlled etching methodology was developed for use as an analytical tool to determine information about the surface chemistry and structure. Details on the syntheses, optical properties, and stability, of these complex materials will be described.

  7. Single phase synthesis of highly stable copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandni, Pandey, O. P.; Chudasama, Bhupendra

    2013-06-01

    In this article, we report the effect of different reducing agents on the formation of crystallographic phase of copper nanoparticles and its stability in air. Single phase copper nanoparticles are formed by the chemical reduction of Cu(OAc)2 in the presence of weak (oleylamine) and strong (PVP, NaBH4) reducing agents. When Cu(OAc)2 is reduced with weak reducing agent oleylamine, copper nanoparticles are reoxidized to CuO and Cu2O. To prevent this, a strong reducing and capping agent (NaBH4+PVP) is essential for the formation of stable copper nanoparticles. The phase formation is studied by XRD and UV-visible spectroscopy.

  8. Highly stable explicit technique for stiff reaction-transport PDEs

    SciTech Connect

    Aro, C. J., LLNL

    1996-12-01

    The numerical simulation of chemically reacting flows is a topic that has attracted a great deal of current research. At the heart of numerical reactive flow simulations are large sets of coupled, nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). Due to the stiffness that is usually present, explicit time differencing schemes are not used despite their inherent simplicity and efficiency on parallel and vector machines, since these schemes require prohibitively small numerical stepsizes. Implicit time differencing schemes, although possessing good stability characteristics, introduce a great deal of computational overhead necessary to solve the simultaneous algebraic system at each timestep. This paper proposes an algorithm based on a preconditioned time differencing scheme. The algorithm is explicit and permits a large stable time step. A study of the algorithm's performance on a parallel architecture is presented.

  9. Interfacial engineering of solution-processed Ni nanochain-SiOx (x < 2) cermets towards thermodynamically stable, anti-oxidation solar selective absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaobai; Wang, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Qinglin; Liu, Jifeng

    2016-04-01

    Cermet solar thermal selective absorber coatings are an important component of high-efficiency concentrated solar power (CSP) receivers. The oxidation of the metal nanoparticles in cermet solar absorbers is a great challenge for vacuum-free operation. Recently, we have demonstrated that oxidation is kinetically retarded in solution processed, high-optical-performance Ni nanochain-SiOx cermet system compared to conventional Ni-Al2O3 system when annealed in air at 450-600 °C for several hours. However, for long-term, high-temperature applications in CSP systems, thermodynamically stable antioxidation behavior is highly desirable, which requires new mechanisms beyond kinetically reducing the oxidation rate. Towards this goal, in this paper, we demonstrate that pre-operation annealing of Ni nanochain-SiOx cermets at 900 °C in N2 forms the thermodynamically stable orthorhombic phase of NiSi at the Ni/SiOx interfaces, leading to self-terminated oxidation at 550 °C in air due to this interfacial engineering. In contrast, pre-operation annealing at a lower temperature of 750 °C in N2 (as conducted in our previous work) cannot achieve interfacial NiSi formation directly, and further annealing in air at 450-600 °C for >4 h only leads to the formation of the less stable (metastable) hexagonal phase of NiSi. Therefore, the high-temperature pre-operation annealing is critical to form the desirable orthorhombic phase of NiSi at Ni/SiOx interfaces towards thermodynamically stable antioxidation behavior. Remarkably, with this improved interfacial engineering, the oxidation of 80-nm-diameter Ni nanochain-SiOx saturates after annealing at 550 °C in air for 12 h. Additional annealing at 550 °C in air for as long as 20 h (i.e., 32 h air annealing at >550 °C in total) has almost no further impact on the structural or optical properties of the coatings, the latter being very sensitive to any interfacial changes due to the localized surface plasmon resonances of the metal

  10. A converging route towards very high frequency, mechanically flexible, and performance stable integrated electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecavelier des Etangs-Levallois, Aurélien; Chen, Zhenkun; Lesecq, Marie; Lepilliet, Sylvie; Tagro, Yoann; Danneville, François; Robillard, Jean-François; Hoel, Virginie; Troadec, David; Gloria, Daniel; Raynaud, Christine; Ratajczak, Jacek; Dubois, Emmanuel

    2013-04-01

    The ability to realize flexible circuits integrating sensing, signal processing, and communicating capabilities is of central importance for the development of numerous nomadic applications requiring foldable, stretchable, and large area electronics. A key challenge is, however, to combine high electrical performance (i.e., millimeter wave, low noise electronics) with mechanical flexibility required for chip form adaptivity in addition to highly stable electrical performance upon deformation. Here, we describe a solution based on ultimate thinning and transfer onto a plastic foil of high frequency CMOS devices initially processed on conventional silicon-on-insulator wafers. We demonstrate a methodology relying on neutral plane engineering to provide high performance stability upon bending, by locating the active layer, i.e., the transistor channel, at the neutral fiber of the flexible system. Following this strategy, record frequency performance of flexible n-MOSFETs, featuring fT/fMAX of 120/145 GHz, is reported with relative variations limited to less than 5% even under aggressive bending on cylinders with curvature radii down to 12.5 mm.

  11. Impact of an Engineering Case Study in a High School Pre-Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutz, Eugene; Shafer, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Students at an all-girls high school who were enrolled in an introduction to engineering course were presented an engineering case study to determine if the case study affected their attitudes toward engineering and their abilities to solve engineering problems. A case study on power plants was implemented during a unit on electrical engineering.…

  12. Highly stable tetrathiafulvalene radical dimers in [3]catenanes

    SciTech Connect

    Spruell, Jason M.; Coskun, Ali; Friedman, Douglas C.; Forgan, Ross S.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Trabolsi, Ali; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Barin, Gokhan; Paxton, Walter F.; Dey, Sanjeev K.; Olson, Mark A.; Benítez, Diego; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Colvin, Michael T.; Carmielli, Raanan; Caldwell, Stuart T.; Rosair, Georgina M.; Hewage, Shanika Gunatilaka; Duclairoir, Florence; Seymour, Jennifer L.; Slawin, Alexandra M.Z.; Goddard, III, William A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Cooke, Graeme; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2010-12-03

    Two [3]catenane 'molecular flasks' have been designed to create stabilized, redox-controlled tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) dimers, enabling their spectrophotometric and structural properties to be probed in detail. The mechanically interlocked framework of the [3]catenanes creates the ideal arrangement and ultrahigh local concentration for the encircled TTF units to form stable dimers associated with their discrete oxidation states. These dimerization events represent an affinity umpolung, wherein the inversion in electronic affinity replaces the traditional TTF-bipyridinium interaction, which is over-ridden by stabilizing mixed-valence (TTF){sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}+} and radical-cation (TTF{sup {sm_bullet}+}){sub 2} states inside the 'molecular flasks.' The experimental data, collected in the solid state as well as in solution under ambient conditions, together with supporting quantum mechanical calculations, are consistent with the formation of stabilized paramagnetic mixed-valence dimers, and then diamagnetic radical-cation dimers following subsequent one-electron oxidations of the [3]catenanes.

  13. High-Order Entropy Stable Finite Difference Schemes for Nonlinear Conservation Laws: Finite Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing stable and robust high-order finite difference schemes requires mathematical formalism and appropriate methods of analysis. In this work, nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference methods with formal boundary closures for conservation laws. Particular emphasis is placed on the entropy stability of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A newly derived entropy stable weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite difference method is used to simulate problems with shocks and a conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference approach is used to approximate viscous terms.

  14. Stable superconducting magnet. [high current levels below critical temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, R. W. (Inventor)

    1967-01-01

    Operation of a superconducting magnet is considered. A method is described for; (1) obtaining a relatively high current in a superconducting magnet positioned in a bath of a gas refrigerant; (2) operating a superconducting magnet at a relatively high current level without training; and (3) operating a superconducting magnet containing a plurality of turns of a niobium zirconium wire at a relatively high current level without training.

  15. New technique for fabrication of low loss high temperature stable high reflectivity FBG sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailov, Stephen J.; Grobnic, Dan; Walker, Robert B.; Hnatovsky, Cyril A.; Ding, Huimin; Coulas, David; Lu, Ping

    2016-05-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) arrays in silica based optical fibers are increasingly used in applications involving system monitoring in extreme high temperature environments. Where operational temperatures are < 600 °C, traditional UVlaser inscribed FBGs are not appropriate since the induced Type I index change is erased. Instead two competing FBG technologies exist: 1) regenerative FBGs resulting from high temperature annealing of a UV-laser written grating in a hydrogen loaded fiber and 2) FBGs written with femtosecond infrared pulse duration radiation (fs-IR), either using the point-by-point method or using the phase mask approach. Regenerative gratings possess low reflectivity and are cumbersome to produce, requiring high temperature processing in an oxygen free environment. Multiple pulse Type II femtosecond IR laser induced gratings made with a phase mask, while having very good thermal stability, also tend to have high insertion loss (~ 1dB/grating) limiting the number of gratings that can be concatenated in a sensor array. Recently it has been shown that during multiple pulse type II thermally stable fs-IR FBG production, two competing process occur: an initial induced fs-IR type I FBG followed by a thermally stable high insertion loss type II FBG. In this paper, we show that if only a type I FBG is written using type II intensity conditions but limited numbers of pulses and then annealed above 600 °C, the process results in a type II grating that is stable up to 1000 °C with very low insertion loss ideal for an FBG sensor array.

  16. High rate and stable cycling of lithium metal anode

    DOE PAGES

    Qian, Jiangfeng; Henderson, Wesley A.; Xu, Wu; ...

    2015-02-20

    Lithium (Li) metal is an ideal anode material for rechargeable batteries. However, dendritic Li growth and limited Coulombic efficiency (CE) during repeated Li deposition/stripping processes have prevented the application of this anode in rechargeable Li metal batteries, especially for use at high current densities. Here, we report that the use of highly concentrated electrolytes composed of ether solvents and the lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) salt enables the high rate cycling of a Li metal anode at high CE (up to 99.1 %) without dendrite growth. With 4 M LiFSI in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) as the electrolyte, a Li|Li cell can be cycledmore » at high rates (10 mA cm-2) for more than 6000 cycles with no increase in the cell impedance, and a Cu|Li cell can be cycled at 4 mA cm-2 for more than 1000 cycles with an average CE of 98.4%. These excellent high rate performances can be attributed to the increased solvent coordination and increased availability of Li+ concentration in the electrolyte. Lastly, further development of this electrolyte may lead to practical applications for Li metal anode in rechargeable batteries. The fundamental mechanisms behind the high rate ion exchange and stability of the electrolytes also shine light on the stability of other electrochemical systems.« less

  17. High rate and stable cycling of lithium metal anode

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Jiangfeng; Henderson, Wesley A.; Xu, Wu; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Engelhard, Mark H.; Borodin, Oleg; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-02-20

    Lithium (Li) metal is an ideal anode material for rechargeable batteries. However, dendritic Li growth and limited Coulombic efficiency (CE) during repeated Li deposition/stripping processes have prevented the application of this anode in rechargeable Li metal batteries, especially for use at high current densities. Here, we report that the use of highly concentrated electrolytes composed of ether solvents and the lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) salt enables the high rate cycling of a Li metal anode at high CE (up to 99.1 %) without dendrite growth. With 4 M LiFSI in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) as the electrolyte, a Li|Li cell can be cycled at high rates (10 mA cm-2) for more than 6000 cycles with no increase in the cell impedance, and a Cu|Li cell can be cycled at 4 mA cm-2 for more than 1000 cycles with an average CE of 98.4%. These excellent high rate performances can be attributed to the increased solvent coordination and increased availability of Li+ concentration in the electrolyte. Lastly, further development of this electrolyte may lead to practical applications for Li metal anode in rechargeable batteries. The fundamental mechanisms behind the high rate ion exchange and stability of the electrolytes also shine light on the stability of other electrochemical systems.

  18. Pulse Detonation Engines for High Speed Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2002-01-01

    Revolutionary concepts in propulsion are required in order to achieve high-speed cruise capability in the atmosphere and for low cost reliable systems for earth to orbit missions. One of the advanced concepts under study is the air-breathing pulse detonation engine. Additional work remains in order to establish the role and performance of a PDE in flight applications, either as a stand-alone device or as part of a combined cycle system. In this paper, we shall offer a few remarks on some of these remaining issues, i.e., combined cycle systems, nozzles and exhaust systems and thrust per unit frontal area limitations. Currently, an intensive experimental and numerical effort is underway in order to quantify the propulsion performance characteristics of this device. In this paper, we shall highlight our recent efforts to elucidate the propulsion potential of pulse detonation engines and their possible application to high-speed or hypersonic systems.

  19. A High-Current, Stable Nonaqueous Organic Redox Flow Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Duan, Wentao; Huang, Jinhua; Zhang, Lu; Li, Bin; Reed, David; Xu, Wu; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2016-10-14

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries are promising in pursuit of high-energy storage systems owing to the broad voltage window, but currently are facing key challenges such as poor cycling stability and lack of suitable membranes. Here we report a new nonaqueous all-organic flow chemistry that demonstrates an outstanding cell cycling stability primarily because of high chemical persistency of the organic radical redox species and their good compatibility with the supporting electrolyte. A feasibility study shows that Daramic® and Celgard® porous separators can lead to high cell conductivity in flow cells thus producing remarkable cell efficiency and material utilization even at high current operations. This result suggests that the thickness and pore size are the key performance-determining factors for porous separators. With the greatly improved flow cell performance, this new flow system largely addresses the above mentioned challenges and the findings may greatly expedite the development of durable nonaqueous flow batteries.

  20. Tailored Materials for High Efficiency CIDI Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, G.J.; Jana, S.

    2012-03-30

    The overall goal of the project, Tailored Materials for High Efficiency Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines, is to enable the implementation of new combustion strategies, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), that have the potential to significantly increase the energy efficiency of current diesel engines and decrease fuel consumption and environmental emissions. These strategies, however, are increasing the demands on conventional engine materials, either from increases in peak cylinder pressure (PCP) or from increases in the temperature of operation. The specific objective of this project is to investigate the application of a new material processing technology, friction stir processing (FSP), to improve the thermal and mechanical properties of engine components. The concept is to modify the surfaces of conventional, low-cost engine materials. The project focused primarily on FSP in aluminum materials that are compositional analogs to the typical piston and head alloys seen in small- to mid-sized CIDI engines. Investigations have been primarily of two types over the duration of this project: (1) FSP of a cast hypoeutectic Al-Si-Mg (A356/357) alloy with no introduction of any new components, and (2) FSP of Al-Cu-Ni alloys (Alloy 339) by physically stirring-in various quantities of carbon nanotubes/nanofibers or carbon fibers. Experimental work to date on aluminum systems has shown significant increases in fatigue lifetime and stress-level performance in aluminum-silicon alloys using friction processing alone, but work to demonstrate the addition of carbon nanotubes and fibers into aluminum substrates has shown mixed results due primarily to the difficulty in achieving porosity-free, homogeneous distributions of the particulate. A limited effort to understand the effects of FSP on steel materials was also undertaken during the course of this project. Processed regions were created in high-strength, low-alloyed steels up to 0.5 in

  1. Monolithic amplifier with stable, high resistance feedback element and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, Paul

    1998-08-11

    A monolithic amplifier includes a stable, high resistance feedback circuit and a dynamic bias circuit. The dynamic bias circuit is formed with active elements matched to those in the amplifier and feedback circuit to compensate for variations in the operating and threshold voltages thereby maintaining a stable resistance in the feedback circuit.

  2. Monolithic amplifier with stable, high resistance feedback element and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    O`Connor, P.

    1998-08-11

    A monolithic amplifier includes a stable, high resistance feedback circuit and a dynamic bias circuit. The dynamic bias circuit is formed with active elements matched to those in the amplifier and feedback circuit to compensate for variations in the operating and threshold voltages thereby maintaining a stable resistance in the feedback circuit. 11 figs.

  3. Highly Thermally Stable Microstructure in Mg Fabricated Via Powder Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J.; Imai, H.; Chen, B.; Ye, X.; Umeda, J.; Kondoh, K.

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate a fascinating microstructure that ensures Mg has a high thermal stability. This is achieved by fabricating the Mg sample via powder rolling followed by powder metallurgy method. It is found that after Mg powders are pretreated for 15 rolling passes at room temperature and then consolidated by using spark plasma sintering, the Mg specimen exhibits a much finer grain structure. Such a grain structure then shows a super high thermal stability. Worthy of note is that many fractions of tensile twins were presented in the Mg specimen and survived a heat treatment at 500°C. After the heat treatment, the microhardness of the sample remained almost unchanged. The finding then gives rise to the possibility of using Mg as structural material at elevated temperatures.

  4. Highly Stable Sodium Batteries Enabled by Functional Ionic Polymer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Choudhury, Snehashis; Xu, Jun; Nath, Pooja; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A

    2017-01-23

    A sodium metal anode protected by an ion-rich polymeric membrane exhibits enhanced stability and high-Columbic efficiency cycling. Formed in situ via electropolymerization of functional imidazolium-type ionic liquid monomers, the polymer membrane protects the metal against parasitic reactions with electrolyte and, for fundamental reasons, inhibits dendrite formation and growth. The effectiveness of the membrane is demonstrated using direct visualization of sodium electrodeposition.

  5. High rate and stable cycling of lithium metal anode

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jiangfeng; Henderson, Wesley A.; Xu, Wu; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Engelhard, Mark; Borodin, Oleg; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium metal is an ideal battery anode. However, dendrite growth and limited Coulombic efficiency during cycling have prevented its practical application in rechargeable batteries. Herein, we report that the use of highly concentrated electrolytes composed of ether solvents and the lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide salt enables the high-rate cycling of a lithium metal anode at high Coulombic efficiency (up to 99.1%) without dendrite growth. With 4 M lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide in 1,2-dimethoxyethane as the electrolyte, a lithium|lithium cell can be cycled at 10 mA cm−2 for more than 6,000 cycles, and a copper|lithium cell can be cycled at 4 mA cm−2 for more than 1,000 cycles with an average Coulombic efficiency of 98.4%. These excellent performances can be attributed to the increased solvent coordination and increased availability of lithium ion concentration in the electrolyte. Further development of this electrolyte may enable practical applications for lithium metal anode in rechargeable batteries. PMID:25698340

  6. Bioblendstocks that Enable High Efficiency Engine Designs

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Robert L.; Fioroni, Gina M.; Ratcliff, Matthew A.; Zigler, Bradley T.; Farrell, John

    2016-11-03

    The past decade has seen a high level of innovation in production of biofuels from sugar, lipid, and lignocellulose feedstocks. As discussed in several talks at this workshop, ethanol blends in the E25 to E50 range could enable more highly efficient spark-ignited (SI) engines. This is because of their knock resistance properties that include not only high research octane number (RON), but also charge cooling from high heat of vaporization, and high flame speed. Emerging alcohol fuels such as isobutanol or mixed alcohols have desirable properties such as reduced gasoline blend vapor pressure, but also have lower RON than ethanol. These fuels may be able to achieve the same knock resistance benefits, but likely will require higher blend levels or higher RON hydrocarbon blendstocks. A group of very high RON (>150) oxygenates such as dimethyl furan, methyl anisole, and related compounds are also produced from biomass. While providing no increase in charge cooling, their very high octane numbers may provide adequate knock resistance for future highly efficient SI engines. Given this range of options for highly knock resistant fuels there appears to be a critical need for a fuel knock resistance metric that includes effects of octane number, heat of vaporization, and potentially flame speed. Emerging diesel fuels include highly branched long-chain alkanes from hydroprocessing of fats and oils, as well as sugar-derived terpenoids. These have relatively high cetane number (CN), which may have some benefits in designing more efficient CI engines. Fast pyrolysis of biomass can produce diesel boiling range streams that are high in aromatic, oxygen and acid contents. Hydroprocessing can be applied to remove oxygen and consequently reduce acidity, however there are strong economic incentives to leave up to 2 wt% oxygen in the product. This oxygen will primarily be present as low CN alkyl phenols and aryl ethers. While these have high heating value, their presence in diesel fuel

  7. Highly polarized light from stable ordered magnetic fields in GRB 120308A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundell, C. G.; Kopač, D.; Arnold, D. M.; Steele, I. A.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Harrison, R. M.; Smith, R. J.; Guidorzi, C.; Virgili, F. J.; Melandri, A.; Japelj, J.

    2013-12-01

    After the initial burst of γ-rays that defines a γ-ray burst (GRB), expanding ejecta collide with the circumburst medium and begin to decelerate at the onset of the afterglow, during which a forward shock travels outwards and a reverse shock propagates backwards into the oncoming collimated flow, or `jet'. Light from the reverse shock should be highly polarized if the jet's magnetic field is globally ordered and advected from the central engine, with a position angle that is predicted to remain stable in magnetized baryonic jet models or vary randomly with time if the field is produced locally by plasma or magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. Degrees of linear polarization of P ~ 10 per cent in the optical band have previously been detected in the early afterglow, but the lack of temporal measurements prevented definitive tests of competing jet models. Hours to days after the γ-ray burst, polarization levels are low (P < 4 per cent), when emission from the shocked ambient medium dominates. Here we report the detection of P = per cent in the immediate afterglow of Swift γ-ray burst GRB 120308A, four minutes after its discovery in the γ-ray band, decreasing to P = per cent over the subsequent ten minutes. The polarization position angle remains stable, changing by no more than 15 degrees over this time, with a possible trend suggesting gradual rotation and ruling out plasma or magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. Instead, the polarization properties show that GRBs contain magnetized baryonic jets with large-scale uniform fields that can survive long after the initial explosion.

  8. A Highly Stable d-Amino Acid Oxidase of the Thermophilic Bacterium Rubrobacter xylanophilus

    PubMed Central

    Furukawara, Makoto; Omae, Keishi; Tadokoro, Namiho; Saito, Yayoi; Abe, Katsumasa; Kera, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    d-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a biotechnologically attractive enzyme that can be used in a variety of applications, but its utility is limited by its relatively poor stability. A search of a bacterial genome database revealed a gene encoding a protein homologous to DAO in the thermophilic bacterium Rubrobacter xylanophilus (RxDAO). The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli was a monomeric protein containing noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide as a cofactor. This protein exhibited oxidase activity against neutral and basic d-amino acids and was significantly inhibited by a DAO inhibitor, benzoate, but not by any of the tested d-aspartate oxidase (DDO) inhibitors, thus indicating that the protein is DAO. RxDAO exhibited higher activities and affinities toward branched-chain d-amino acids, with the highest specific activity toward d-valine and catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) toward d-leucine. Substrate inhibition was observed in the case of d-tyrosine. The enzyme had an optimum pH range and temperature of pH 7.5 to 10 and 65°C, respectively, and was stable between pH 5.0 and pH 8.0, with a T50 (the temperature at which 50% of the initial enzymatic activity is lost) of 64°C. No loss of enzyme activity was observed after a 1-week incubation period at 30°C. This enzyme was markedly inactivated by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride but not by thiol-modifying reagents and diethyl pyrocarbonate, which are known to inhibit certain DAOs. These results demonstrated that RxDAO is a highly stable DAO and suggested that this enzyme may be valuable for practical applications, such as the determination and quantification of branched-chain d-amino acids, and as a scaffold to generate a novel DAO via protein engineering. PMID:25217016

  9. Highly polarized light from stable ordered magnetic fields in GRB 120308A.

    PubMed

    Mundell, C G; Kopač, D; Arnold, D M; Steele, I A; Gomboc, A; Kobayashi, S; Harrison, R M; Smith, R J; Guidorzi, C; Virgili, F J; Melandri, A; Japelj, J

    2013-12-05

    After the initial burst of γ-rays that defines a γ-ray burst (GRB), expanding ejecta collide with the circumburst medium and begin to decelerate at the onset of the afterglow, during which a forward shock travels outwards and a reverse shock propagates backwards into the oncoming collimated flow, or 'jet'. Light from the reverse shock should be highly polarized if the jet's magnetic field is globally ordered and advected from the central engine, with a position angle that is predicted to remain stable in magnetized baryonic jet models or vary randomly with time if the field is produced locally by plasma or magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. Degrees of linear polarization of P ≈ 10 per cent in the optical band have previously been detected in the early afterglow, but the lack of temporal measurements prevented definitive tests of competing jet models. Hours to days after the γ-ray burst, polarization levels are low (P < 4 per cent), when emission from the shocked ambient medium dominates. Here we report the detection of P =28(+4)(-4) per cent in the immediate afterglow of Swift γ-ray burst GRB 120308A, four minutes after its discovery in the γ-ray band, decreasing to P = 16(+5)(-4) per cent over the subsequent ten minutes. The polarization position angle remains stable, changing by no more than 15 degrees over this time, with a possible trend suggesting gradual rotation and ruling out plasma or magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. Instead, the polarization properties show that GRBs contain magnetized baryonic jets with large-scale uniform fields that can survive long after the initial explosion.

  10. Fuels for high-compression engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, Stanwood W

    1926-01-01

    From theoretical considerations one would expect an increase in power and thermal efficiency to result from increasing the compression ratio of an internal combustion engine. In reality it is upon the expansion ratio that the power and thermal efficiency depend, but since in conventional engines this is equal to the compression ratio, it is generally understood that a change in one ratio is accompanied by an equal change in the other. Tests over a wide range of compression ratios (extending to ratios as high as 14.1) have shown that ordinarily an increase in power and thermal efficiency is obtained as expected provided serious detonation or preignition does not result from the increase in ratio.

  11. High temperature NASP engine seal development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This video details research being conducted at the Lewis Research Center on high temperature engine seal design for the National Aerospace Plane. To maximize the speed, the jets on the NASP extract oxygen from the air rather than carry large liquid fuel tanks; this creates temperatures within the jet of over 5000 F. To prevent these potentially explosive gases from escaping, researchers are developing new technologies for use in the engine seals. Two examples explained are the ceramic wafer seal and the braided ceramic rope seal. Computer simulations and laboratory footage are used to illustrate the workings of these seals. Benefits for other aerospace and industrial applications, as well as for the space shuttle, are explored.

  12. Conductive MOF electrodes for stable supercapacitors with high areal capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheberla, Dennis; Bachman, John C.; Elias, Joseph S.; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Shao-Horn, Yang; Dincă, Mircea

    2016-10-01

    Owing to their high power density and superior cyclability relative to batteries, electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) have emerged as an important electrical energy storage technology that will play a critical role in the large-scale deployment of intermittent renewable energy sources, smart power grids, and electrical vehicles. Because the capacitance and charge-discharge rates of EDLCs scale with surface area and electrical conductivity, respectively, porous carbons such as activated carbon, carbon nanotubes and crosslinked or holey graphenes are used exclusively as the active electrode materials in EDLCs. One class of materials whose surface area far exceeds that of activated carbons, potentially allowing them to challenge the dominance of carbon electrodes in EDLCs, is metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The high porosity of MOFs, however, is conventionally coupled to very poor electrical conductivity, which has thus far prevented the use of these materials as active electrodes in EDLCs. Here, we show that Ni3(2,3,6,7,10,11-hexaiminotriphenylene)2 (Ni3(HITP)2), a MOF with high electrical conductivity, can serve as the sole electrode material in an EDLC. This is the first example of a supercapacitor made entirely from neat MOFs as active materials, without conductive additives or other binders. The MOF-based device shows an areal capacitance that exceeds those of most carbon-based materials and capacity retention greater than 90% over 10,000 cycles, in line with commercial devices. Given the established structural and compositional tunability of MOFs, these results herald the advent of a new generation of supercapacitors whose active electrode materials can be tuned rationally, at the molecular level.

  13. Conductive MOF electrodes for stable supercapacitors with high areal capacitance.

    PubMed

    Sheberla, Dennis; Bachman, John C; Elias, Joseph S; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Shao-Horn, Yang; Dincă, Mircea

    2017-02-01

    Owing to their high power density and superior cyclability relative to batteries, electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) have emerged as an important electrical energy storage technology that will play a critical role in the large-scale deployment of intermittent renewable energy sources, smart power grids, and electrical vehicles. Because the capacitance and charge-discharge rates of EDLCs scale with surface area and electrical conductivity, respectively, porous carbons such as activated carbon, carbon nanotubes and crosslinked or holey graphenes are used exclusively as the active electrode materials in EDLCs. One class of materials whose surface area far exceeds that of activated carbons, potentially allowing them to challenge the dominance of carbon electrodes in EDLCs, is metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The high porosity of MOFs, however, is conventionally coupled to very poor electrical conductivity, which has thus far prevented the use of these materials as active electrodes in EDLCs. Here, we show that Ni3(2,3,6,7,10,11-hexaiminotriphenylene)2 (Ni3(HITP)2), a MOF with high electrical conductivity, can serve as the sole electrode material in an EDLC. This is the first example of a supercapacitor made entirely from neat MOFs as active materials, without conductive additives or other binders. The MOF-based device shows an areal capacitance that exceeds those of most carbon-based materials and capacity retention greater than 90% over 10,000 cycles, in line with commercial devices. Given the established structural and compositional tunability of MOFs, these results herald the advent of a new generation of supercapacitors whose active electrode materials can be tuned rationally, at the molecular level.

  14. Highly stable atom-tracking scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rerkkumsup, Pongpun; Aketagawa, Masato; Takada, Koji; Togawa, Yoichi; Thinh, Nguyen Tien; Kozuma, Yosuke

    2004-04-01

    In this article, we propose a technique for highly stabilized atom-tracking control of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip by referring to an atomic point on a regular crystalline surface. Our aim is to prevent jumping of the STM tip to neighboring atoms and to use it even in a noisy environment. Graphite crystal, whose lattice spacing is approximately 0.25 nm, was utilized as the reference. To improve the performance of the tracking controller against external disturbances, the influence of a disturbance on the STM under various environmental conditions was compared experimentally with the frequency response of the open-loop tracking system. The atom-tracking conditions required to avoid jumping of the STM tip are proposed and applied to the design of the tracking controller by referring to the results of the comparison. The new tracking controller consists of integrator, tracer, and limiter units. The integrator unit is designed to eliminate the steady-state error due to thermal drift. A phase-lag low-pass filter is utilized as the tracer unit to compensate for the dominant disturbance due to vibration/acoustic noise with a frequency lower than the cutoff frequency, fco, of the open-loop tracking system. To improve the phase margin condition of the controller at fco and to suppress the disturbance with a frequency higher than fco, the limiter is designed to include a phase-lead high-pass filter and a saturator whose output is less than one-half of the lattice spacing. The performance of the stabilizing technique, which is to combine the new tracking controller with enhanced STM stiffness, was evaluated using internal/external artificial disturbance generators. The experimental results show that the proposed method has a high capability for maintaining atom-tracking control without any jumping of the STM tip, even in a noisy environment.

  15. Stable electrolyte for high voltage electrochemical double-layer capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Ruther, Rose E.; Sun, Che -Nan; Holliday, Adam; Cheng, Shiwang; Delnick, Frank M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Nanda, Jagjit

    2016-12-28

    A simple electrolyte consisting of NaPF6 salt in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) can extend the voltage window of electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) to >3.5 V. DME does not passivate carbon electrodes at very negative potentials (near Na/Na+), extending the practical voltage window by about 1.0 V compared to standard, non-aqueous electrolytes based on acetonitrile. The voltage window is demonstrated in two- and three-electrode cells using a combination of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), charge-discharge cycling, and measurements of leakage current. DME-based electrolytes cannot match the high conductivity of acetonitrile solutions, but they can satisfy applications that demand high energy density at moderate power. The conductivity of NaPF6 in DME is comparable to commercial lithium-ion battery electrolytes and superior to most ionic liquids. Lastly, factors that limit the voltage window and EDLC energy density are discussed, and strategies to further boost energy density are proposed.

  16. Synthesis of high thermally-stable mesoporous alumina particles.

    PubMed

    Song, Lee-Hwa; Park, Seung Bin

    2010-01-01

    The mesoporous undoped and Si-doped alumina were prepared with an ultrasonic spray process, and found to have well-developed mesopore structures and large surface areas. The mesoporous Si-doped alumina has a high thermal stability up to 1473 K. Its surface area and pore volume were found to slowly decrease with increasing temperature. Mesoporous undoped alumina is transformed to gamma-alumina at 1073 K, whereas the amorphous nature of the pore walls of the Si-doped alumina is maintained up to 1073 K. When heat treatment was carried out at 1473 K for 2 h, the mesopore-networks of the undoped alumina collapsed, and then all the pore walls were converted into the alpha-alumina phase. In contrast, the mesoporosity of the Si-doped alumina persisted during heat treatment, and its pore walls were transformed to gamma-alumina. The decreases in the pore volume of the undoped alumina at 1073 K and 1473 K were found to be 36% and 99% respectively, but for the Si-doped alumina were only 24% and 36% respectively. The surface area of the undoped alumina at 1473 K was found to be 11 m2/g but that of the Si-doped samples at the same temperature is higher than 100 m2/g. Thus this mesoporous Si-doped alumina can be used as a catalytic support in reactions at high temperatures.

  17. Stable electrolyte for high voltage electrochemical double-layer capacitors

    DOE PAGES

    Ruther, Rose E.; Sun, Che -Nan; Holliday, Adam; ...

    2016-12-28

    A simple electrolyte consisting of NaPF6 salt in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) can extend the voltage window of electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) to >3.5 V. DME does not passivate carbon electrodes at very negative potentials (near Na/Na+), extending the practical voltage window by about 1.0 V compared to standard, non-aqueous electrolytes based on acetonitrile. The voltage window is demonstrated in two- and three-electrode cells using a combination of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), charge-discharge cycling, and measurements of leakage current. DME-based electrolytes cannot match the high conductivity of acetonitrile solutions, but they can satisfy applications that demand high energy density at moderate power.more » The conductivity of NaPF6 in DME is comparable to commercial lithium-ion battery electrolytes and superior to most ionic liquids. Lastly, factors that limit the voltage window and EDLC energy density are discussed, and strategies to further boost energy density are proposed.« less

  18. Research on stable, high efficiency amorphous silicon multijunction modules

    SciTech Connect

    Catalano, A.; Arya, R.R.; Bennett, M.; Chen, L.; D'Aiello, R.; Fieselmann, B.; Li, Y.; Newton, J.; Podlesny, R.; Wiedeman, S.; Yang, L. . Thin Film Div.)

    1992-02-01

    Improvements towards a goal of a 12.5% initial triple-junction module efficiency require the use of a wide gap top-layer for improved open circuit voltage, higher transmission from the transparent front contact and more highly transmitting doped layers. To address the first issue, there has been continued development of a-SiC:H with the utilization of several novel feedstocks to control the atomic structure of the solid. These films have transport properties superior to the best results reported for a-SiC:H. Preliminary results with devices exhibits a stability comparable to a-Si:H, while previous results with a-SiC:H have generally shown for higher rates of degradation. Module fabrication has been refined to the extent that comparable module and small area device efficiencies are readily obtained. Despite the high initial efficiencies (9%--10%) obtained in 935 cm{sup 2} modules employing devices with 4000{Angstrom} thick middle junctions, higher than expected rates of degradation were found. The cause of the anomalous degradation was traced to shunts present in the device arising from defects in the tin oxide coating. NREL degradation results of triple-junction modules showed stabilized performance of the initial efficiency for modules prepared during the period in which shunts were a problem. 20 refs.

  19. Ni-based nanoalloys: Towards thermally stable highly magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Palagin, Dennis Doye, Jonathan P. K.

    2014-12-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations have been used to demonstrate the possibility of preserving high spin states of the magnetic cores within Ni-based core-shell bimetallic nanoalloys over a wide range of temperatures. We show that, unlike the case of Ni–Al clusters, Ni–Ag clusters preserve high spin states (up to 8 μ{sub B} in case of Ni{sub 13}Ag{sub 32} cluster) due to small hybridization between the electronic levels of two species. Intriguingly, such clusters are also able to maintain geometrical and electronic integrity of their cores at temperatures up to 1000 K (e.g., for Ni{sub 7}Ag{sub 27} cluster). Furthermore, we also show the possibility of creating ordered arrays of such magnetic clusters on a suitable support by soft-landing pre-formed clusters on the surface, without introducing much disturbance in geometrical and electronic structure of the cluster. We illustrate this approach with the example of Ni{sub 13}Ag{sub 38} clusters adsorbed on the Si(111)–(7×7) surface, which, having two distinctive halves to the unit cell, acts as a selective template for cluster deposition.

  20. Development of Thermally Stable and Highly Fluorescent IR Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bu, Xiu R.

    2004-01-01

    Fluorophores are the core component in various optical applications such as sensors and probes. Fluorphores with low-energy or long wavelength emission, in particular, in NIR region, possess advantages of low interference and high sensitivity. In this study, we has explored several classes of imidazole-based compounds for NIR fluorescent properties and concluded: (1) thiazole-based imidazole compounds are fluorescent; (2) emission energy is tunable by additional donor groups; (3) they also possess impressive two- photon absorption properties; and (4) fluorescence emission can be induced by two- photon input. This report summarizes (1) synthesis of new series of fluorophore; (2) impact of electron-withdrawing groups on fluorescent property; (3) unique property of two-photon absorption; and (4) on-going development.

  1. Research on stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon multijunction modules

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A.; Chen, E.; Clough, R.; Glatfelter, T.; Guha, S.; Hammond, G.; Hopson, M.; Jackett, N.; Lycette, M.; Noch, J.; Palmer, T.; Pawlikiewicz, A.; Rosenstein, I.; Ross, R.; Wolf, D.; Xu, X.; Yang, J.; Younan, K.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the progress made during Phase 1 of research and development program to obtain high-efficiency amorphous silicon alloy multijunction modules. Using a large-area deposition system, double-and triple-junction cells were made on stainless steel substrates of over 1 ft{sup 2} area with Ag and ZnO predeposited back reflector. Modules of over 1 ft{sup 2} were produced with between 9.2% and 9.9 initial aperture-area efficiencies as measured under a USSC Spire solar simulator. Efficiencies as measured under the NREL Spire solar simulator were found to be typically 15% to 18% lower. The causes for this discrepancy are now being investigated. The modules show about 15% degradation after 600 hours of one-sun illumination at 50{degrees}C. To optimize devices for higher stabilized efficiency, a new method was developed by which the performance of single-junction cells after long-term, one-sun exposure at 50{degrees}C can be predicted by exposing cells to short-term intense light at different temperatures. This method is being used to optimize the component cells of the multijunction structure to obtain the highest light-degraded efficiency.

  2. High Fidelity Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    structure of the high speed jet. The turbulent Atomization in diesel engine sprays 9 !"# $ $"# % %"# &’$! ï...ARL-RP-0555 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory High Fidelity Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays by L Bravo...ARL-RP-0555 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory High Fidelity Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays by L

  3. Engineering the future with America's high school students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrance, M. A.; Jenner, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The number of students enrolled in engineering is declining while the need for engineers is increasing. One contributing factor is that most high school students have little or no knowledge about what engineering is, or what engineers do. To teach young students about engineering, engineers need good tools. This paper presents a course of study developed and used by the authors in a junior college course for high school students. Students learned about engineering through independent student projects, in-class problem solving, and use of career information resources. Selected activities from the course can be adapted to teach students about engineering in other settings. Among the most successful techniques were the student research paper assignments, working out a solution to an engineering problem as a class exercise, and the use of technical materials to illustrate engineering concepts and demonstrate 'tools of the trade'.

  4. Space Shuttle Main Engine Flies High

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A Space Shuttle Main Engine is being lowered onto its handler before its journey to the test complex at Stennis Space Center. This building is where partially assembled Space Shuttle Main Engines are received and prepared for testing.

  5. STABLE HIGH CONDUCTIVITY BILAYERED ELECTROLYTES FOR LOW TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2000-10-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are the future of energy production in America. They offer great promise as a clean and efficient process for directly converting chemical energy to electricity while providing significant environmental benefits (they produce negligible CO, HC, or NOx and, as a result of their high efficiency, produce about one-third less CO{sub 2} per kilowatt hour than internal combustion engines). Unfortunately, the current SOFC technology, based on a stabilized zirconia electrolyte, must operate in the region of 1000 C to avoid unacceptably high ohmic losses. These high temperatures demand (a) specialized (expensive) materials for the fuel cell interconnects and insulation, (b) time to heat up to the operating temperature and (c) energy input to arrive at the operating temperature. Therefore, if fuel cells could be designed to give a reasonable power output at lower temperatures tremendous benefits may be accrued, not the least of which is reduced cost. The problem is, at lower temperatures the conductivity of the conventional stabilized zirconia electrolyte decreases to the point where it cannot supply electrical current efficiently to an external load. The primary objectives of the proposed research is to develop a stable high conductivity (>0.05 S cm{sup -1} at 550 C) electrolyte for lower temperature SOFCs. This objective is specifically directed toward meeting the lowest (and most difficult) temperature criteria for the 21st Century Fuel Cell Program. Meeting this objective provides a potential for future transportation applications of SOFCs, where their ability to directly use hydrocarbon fuels could permit refueling within the existing transportation infrastructure. In order to meet this objective we are developing a functionally gradient bilayer electrolyte comprised of bismuth oxide on the air side and ceria on the fuel side. Bismuth oxide and doped ceria are among the highest ionic conducting electrolytes and in fact bismuth oxide based

  6. Highly Stable Conjugated Polyelectrolytes for Water-Based Hybrid Mode Electrochemical Transistors.

    PubMed

    Zeglio, Erica; Eriksson, Jens; Gabrielsson, Roger; Solin, Niclas; Inganäs, Olle

    2017-03-16

    Hydrophobic, self-doped conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) are introduced as highly stable active materials for organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs). The hydrophobicity of CPEs renders films very stable in aqueous solutions. The devices operate at gate voltages around zero and show no signs of degradation when operated for 10(4) cycles under ambient conditions. These properties make the produced OECTs ideal devices for applications in bioelectronics.

  7. 9. General view of engine between cylinders with high pressure ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. General view of engine between cylinders with high pressure cylinder on left and low pressure cylinder on right. - Carnegie Steel-Ohio Works, Steam Engines, 912 Salt Springs Road, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  8. Engineered Ceramic Insulators for High Field Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, J. A.

    2006-03-01

    High field magnet coils made from brittle A15 superconductors need to be rigidly contained by their support structure but yet be electrically insulated from it. Current insulators (end shoes, pole pieces, spacers, mandrels, etc.) are often made from coated metallic shapes that satisfy the mechanical and thermal requirements but are electrically unreliable. The insulating coating on the metal core too often chips or flakes, causing electrical shorts. Any replacement insulator materials must manage the thermal expansion mismatch to control the stress within the coil enabling the achievement of ultimate magnet performance. A novel ceramic insulator has been developed that eliminates the potential for shorting while maintaining high structural integrity and thermal performance. The insulator composition can be engineered to provide a thermal expansion that matches the coil expansion, minimizing detrimental stress on the superconductor. These ceramic insulators are capable of surviving high temperature heat treatments and are radiation resistant. The material can withstand high mechanical loads generated during magnet operation. These more robust insulators will lower the magnet production costs, which will help enable future devices to be constructed within budgetary restrictions.

  9. A stable high-speed rotational transmission system based on nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Kun; Yin, Hang; Wei, Ning; Chen, Zhen; Shi, Jiao

    2015-01-12

    A stable rotational transmission system is designed with a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based motor and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs)-based bearing. The system response is investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. It is found that the rotating motor can actuate the rotation of the inner tube in bearing because of the attraction between the two adjacent coaxial ends of motor and rotor (the inner tube in bearing). To have a stable nanostructure, each carbon atom on the adjacent ends of motor and rotor is bonded with a hydrogen atom. To obtain a stable high-speed rotational transmission system, both an armchair and a zigzag model are used in MD simulation. In each model, the motor with different diameters and rotational speeds is employed to examine the rotational transmission of corresponding DWCNTs. It is demonstrated that the long range van der Waals interaction between the adjacent ends of motor and rotor leads to a stable configuration of the adjacent ends, and further leads to a stable rotation of rotor when driven by a high-speed motor. As compared with the armchair model, the rotor in the zigzag model could reach a stable rotation mode much easier.

  10. A stable high-speed rotational transmission system based on nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Kun; Yin, Hang; Wei, Ning; Chen, Zhen; Shi, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    A stable rotational transmission system is designed with a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based motor and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs)-based bearing. The system response is investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. It is found that the rotating motor can actuate the rotation of the inner tube in bearing because of the attraction between the two adjacent coaxial ends of motor and rotor (the inner tube in bearing). To have a stable nanostructure, each carbon atom on the adjacent ends of motor and rotor is bonded with a hydrogen atom. To obtain a stable high-speed rotational transmission system, both an armchair and a zigzag model are used in MD simulation. In each model, the motor with different diameters and rotational speeds is employed to examine the rotational transmission of corresponding DWCNTs. It is demonstrated that the long range van der Waals interaction between the adjacent ends of motor and rotor leads to a stable configuration of the adjacent ends, and further leads to a stable rotation of rotor when driven by a high-speed motor. As compared with the armchair model, the rotor in the zigzag model could reach a stable rotation mode much easier.

  11. Generation of stable entanglement between two cavity mirrors by squeezed-reservoir engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-Jie; An, Jun-Hong; Yang, Wanli; Li, Yong

    2015-12-01

    The generation of quantum entanglement of macroscopic or mesoscopic bodies in mechanical motion is generally bounded by the thermal fluctuation exerted by their environments. Here we propose a scheme to establish stationary entanglement between two mechanically oscillating mirrors of a cavity. It is revealed that, by applying a broadband squeezed laser acting as a squeezed-vacuum reservoir to the cavity, a stable entanglement between the mechanical mirrors can be generated. Using the adiabatic elimination and master equation methods, we analytically find that the generated entanglement is essentially determined by the squeezing of the relative momentum of the mechanical mirrors, which is transferred from the squeezed reservoir through the cavity. Numerical verification indicates that our scheme is within the present experimental state of the art of optomechanics.

  12. Combinatorial and high-throughput screening approaches for strain engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenshan; Jiang, Rongrong

    2015-03-01

    Microbes have long been used in the industry to produce valuable biochemicals. Combinatorial engineering approaches, new strain engineering tools derived from inverse metabolic engineering, have started to attract attention in recent years, including genome shuffling, error-prone DNA polymerase, global transcription machinery engineering (gTME), random knockout/overexpression libraries, ribosome engineering, multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE), customized optimization of metabolic pathways by combinatorial transcriptional engineering (COMPACTER), and library construction of "tunable intergenic regions" (TIGR). Since combinatorial approaches and high-throughput screening methods are fundamentally interconnected, color/fluorescence-based, growth-based, and biosensor-based high-throughput screening methods have been reviewed. We believe that with the help of metabolic engineering tools and new combinatorial approaches, plus effective high-throughput screening methods, researchers will be able to achieve better results on improving microorganism performance under stress or enhancing biochemical yield.

  13. Highly enriched multiply-labeled stable isotopic compounds as atmospheric tracers

    DOEpatents

    Goldblatt, M.; McInteer, B.B.

    1974-01-29

    Compounds multiply-labeled with stable isotopes and highly enriched in these isotopes are readily capable of detection in tracer experiments involving high dilutions. Thus, for example, /sup 13/C/sup 18/O/sub 2/ provides a useful tracer for following atmospheric pol lution produced as a result of fossil fuel burning. (Official Gazette)

  14. Stable overload conditions of high-temperature superconductors at alternating current injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovskii, V. R.

    2015-01-01

    The stability of alternating current injected into a high-temperature superconductor or into a current-carrying element on its basis is studied under weak cooling. The stability conditions of the current varying with time by a sinusoidal law are studied versus its frequency. It is shown that before unstable states set in, the peak values of the electric field intensity, current, and temperature in the superconductor are higher than the values determining a thermal electrodynamic stability boundary of the current permanently flowing through the superconductor—the so-called thermal quench current. It is found that ultimate stable alternating currents cause high stable thermal losses in superconductors; these losses being not considered in the modern theory of losses. Such stable conditions can be referred to as overload conditions. Analysis shows that there are characteristic times determining the time intervals within which alternating current is stable under overload conditions. Main thermoelectrodynamic mechanisms behind the existence of these intervals are formulated. They explain why the superconductor stable overheating and induced electric field reach high values before the injected alternating current becomes unstable. The existence of overload conditions considerably extends the application area of high-temperature superconductors.

  15. STABLE HIGH CONDUCTIVITY BILAYERED ELECTROLYTES FOR LOW TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Eric D. Wachsman; Keith L. Duncan

    2001-09-30

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are the future of energy production in America. They offer great promise as a clean and efficient process for directly converting chemical energy to electricity while providing significant environmental benefits (they produce negligible hydrocarbons, CO, or NO{sub x} and, as a result of their high efficiency, produce about one-third less CO{sub 2} per kilowatt hour than internal combustion engines). Unfortunately, the current SOFC technology, based on a stabilized zirconia electrolyte, must operate in the region of 1000 C to avoid unacceptably high ohmic losses. These high temperatures demand (a) specialized (expensive) materials for the fuel cell interconnects and insulation, (b) time to heat up to the operating temperature and (c) energy input to arrive at the operating temperature. Therefore, if fuel cells could be designed to give a reasonable power output at low to intermediate1 temperatures tremendous benefits may be accrued. At low temperatures, in particular, it becomes feasible to use ferritic steel for interconnects instead of expensive and brittle ceramic materials such as those based on LaCrO{sub 3}. In addition, sealing the fuel cell becomes easier and more reliable; rapid start-up is facilitated; thermal stresses (e.g., those caused by thermal expansion mismatches) are reduced; radiative losses ({approx}T{sup 4}) become minimal; electrode sintering becomes negligible and (due to a smaller thermodynamic penalty) the SOFC operating cycle (heating from ambient) would be more efficient. Combined, all these improvements further result in reduced initial and operating costs. The problem is, at lower temperatures the conductivity of the conventional stabilized zirconia electrolyte decreases to the point where it cannot supply electrical current efficiently to an external load. The primary objectives of the proposed research are to develop a stable high conductivity (> 0.05 S cm{sup -1} at {le} 550 C) electrolyte for lower

  16. High School Student Modeling in the Engineering Design Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentzer, Nathan; Huffman, Tanner; Thayer, Hilde

    2014-01-01

    A diverse group of 20 high school students from four states in the US were individually provided with an engineering design challenge. Students chosen were in capstone engineering courses and had taken multiple engineering courses. As students considered the problem and developed a solution, observational data were recorded and artifacts…

  17. Magnetic engineering of stable rod-shaped stem cell aggregates: circumventing the pitfall of self-bending.

    PubMed

    Du, V; Fayol, D; Reffay, M; Luciani, N; Bacri, J-C; Gay, C; Wilhelm, C

    2015-02-01

    A current challenge for tissue engineering while restoring the function of diseased or damaged tissue is to customize the tissue according to the target area. Scaffold-free approaches usually yield spheroid shapes with the risk of necrosis at the center due to poor nutrient and oxygen diffusion. Here, we used magnetic forces developed at the cellular scale by miniaturized magnets to create rod-shaped aggregates of stem cells that subsequently matured into a tissue-like structure. However, during the maturation process, the tissue-rods spontaneously bent and coiled into sphere-like structures, triggered by the increasing cell-cell adhesion within the initially non-homogeneous tissue. Optimisation of the intra-tissular magnetic forces successfully hindered the transition, in order to produce stable rod-shaped stem cells aggregates.

  18. Acoustically shielded exhaust system for high thrust jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, John P. (Inventor); Lee, Robert (Inventor); Majjigi, Rudramuni K. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A flade exhaust nozzle for a high thrust jet engine is configured to form an acoustic shield around the core engine exhaust flowstream while supplementing engine thrust during all flight conditions, particularly during takeoff. The flade airflow is converted from an annular 360.degree. flowstream to an arcuate flowstream extending around the lower half of the core engine exhaust flowstream so as to suppress exhaust noise directed at the surrounding community.

  19. Stable expression of silencing-suppressor protein enhances the performance and longevity of an engineered metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Naim, Fatima; Shrestha, Pushkar; Singh, Surinder P; Waterhouse, Peter M; Wood, Craig C

    2016-06-01

    Transgenic engineering of plants is important in both basic and applied research. However, the expression of a transgene can dwindle over time as the plant's small (s)RNA-guided silencing pathways shut it down. The silencing pathways have evolved as antiviral defence mechanisms, and viruses have co-evolved viral silencing-suppressor proteins (VSPs) to block them. Therefore, VSPs have been routinely used alongside desired transgene constructs to enhance their expression in transient assays. However, constitutive, stable expression of a VSP in a plant usually causes pronounced developmental abnormalities, as their actions interfere with endogenous microRNA-regulated processes, and has largely precluded the use of VSPs as an aid to stable transgene expression. In an attempt to avoid the deleterious effects but obtain the enhancing effect, a number of different VSPs were expressed exclusively in the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana alongside a three-step transgenic pathway for the synthesis of arachidonic acid (AA), an ω-6 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid. Results from independent transgenic events, maintained for four generations, showed that the VSP-AA-transformed plants were developmentally normal, apart from minor phenotypes at the cotyledon stage, and could produce 40% more AA than plants transformed with the AA transgene cassette alone. Intriguingly, a geminivirus VSP, V2, was constitutively expressed without causing developmental defects, as it acts on the siRNA amplification step that is not part of the miRNA pathway, and gave strong transgene enhancement. These results demonstrate that VSP expression can be used to protect and enhance stable transgene performance and has significant biotechnological application.

  20. 1-Dodecanethiol based highly stable self-assembled monolayers for germanium passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qi; Xu, Baojian; Ye, Lin; Di, Zengfeng; Huang, Shanluo; Du, Xiaowei; Zhang, Jishen; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong

    2015-10-01

    As a typical semiconductor material, germanium has the potential to replace silicon for future-generation microelectronics, due to its better electrical properties. However, the lack of stable surface state has limited its extensive use for several decades. In this work, we demonstrated highly stable self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Ge surface to prevent oxidization for further applications. After the pretreatment in hydrochloric acid, the oxide-free and Cl-terminated Ge could be further coated with 1-dodecanethiol (NDM) SAMs. The influence factors including reaction time, solvent component and reaction temperature were optimized to obtain stable passivated monolayer for oxidation resistance. Contact angle analysis, atomic force microscopy, ellipsometer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were performed to characterize the functionalized Ge surface respectively. Meanwhile, the reaction mechanism and stability of thiols SAMs on Ge (1 1 1) surface were investigated. Finally, highly stable passivated NDM SAMs on Ge surface could be formed through immersing oxide-free Ge in mixture solvent (water/ethanol, v/v = 1:1) at appropriately elevated temperature (∼80 °C) for 24 h. And the corresponding optimized passivated Ge surface was stable for more than 10 days even in water condition, which was much longer than the data reported and paved the way for the future practical applications of Ge.

  1. Highly stable covalent organic framework-Au nanoparticles hybrids for enhanced activity for nitrophenol reduction.

    PubMed

    Pachfule, Pradip; Kandambeth, Sharath; Díaz Díaz, David; Banerjee, Rahul

    2014-03-25

    Gold [Au(0)] nanoparticles immobilized into a stable covalent organic framework (COF) have been synthesized via the solution infiltration method. The as-synthesized Au(0)@TpPa-1 catalyst shows high recyclability and superior reactivity for nitrophenol reduction reaction than HAuCl4·3H2O.

  2. Air-stable ink for scalable, high-throughput layer deposition

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Benjamin D; Connor, Stephen T; Cui, Yi

    2014-02-11

    A method for producing and depositing air-stable, easily decomposable, vulcanized ink on any of a wide range of substrates is disclosed. The ink enables high-volume production of optoelectronic and/or electronic devices using scalable production methods, such as roll-to-roll transfer, fast rolling processes, and the like.

  3. Note: A new regulation method of stable operation of high power cathode ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C. C.; Xie, Y. H. Hu, C. D.; Xie, Y. L.; Liu, S.; Liang, L. Z.; Liu, Z. M.

    2015-05-15

    The hot cathode ion source will tend to be unstable when operated with high power and long pulse. In order to achieve stable operation, a new regulation method based on the arc power (discharge power) feedback control was designed and tested on the hot cathode ion source test bed with arc discharge and beam extraction. The results show that the new regulation method can achieve stable arc discharge and beam extraction. It verifies the success of feedback control of arc source with arc power.

  4. The a(4) Scheme-A High Order Neutrally Stable CESE Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung

    2009-01-01

    The CESE development is driven by a belief that a solver should (i) enforce conservation laws in both space and time, and (ii) be built from a nondissipative (i.e., neutrally stable) core scheme so that the numerical dissipation can be controlled effectively. To provide a solid foundation for a systematic CESE development of high order schemes, in this paper we describe a new high order (4-5th order) and neutrally stable CESE solver of a 1D advection equation with a constant advection speed a. The space-time stencil of this two-level explicit scheme is formed by one point at the upper time level and two points at the lower time level. Because it is associated with four independent mesh variables (the numerical analogues of the dependent variable and its first, second, and third-order spatial derivatives) and four equations per mesh point, the new scheme is referred to as the a(4) scheme. As in the case of other similar CESE neutrally stable solvers, the a(4) scheme enforces conservation laws in space-time locally and globally, and it has the basic, forward marching, and backward marching forms. Except for a singular case, these forms are equivalent and satisfy a space-time inversion (STI) invariant property which is shared by the advection equation. Based on the concept of STI invariance, a set of algebraic relations is developed and used to prove the a(4) scheme must be neutrally stable when it is stable. Numerically, it has been established that the scheme is stable if the value of the Courant number is less than 1/3

  5. Building a Framework for Engineering Design Experiences in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denson, Cameron D.; Lammi, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Denson and Lammi put forth a conceptual framework that will help promote the successful infusion of engineering design experiences into high school settings. When considering a conceptual framework of engineering design in high school settings, it is important to consider the complex issue at hand. For the purposes of this…

  6. Examining Gender Inequality in a High School Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riegle-Crumb, Catherine; Moore, Chelsea

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines gender inequality within the context of an upper-level high school engineering course recently offered in Texas. Data was collected from six high schools that serve students from a variety of backgrounds. Among the almost two hundred students who enrolled in this challenge-based engineering course, females constituted a clear…

  7. High efficiency stoichiometric internal combustion engine system

    DOEpatents

    Winsor, Richard Edward; Chase, Scott Allen

    2009-06-02

    A power system including a stoichiometric compression ignition engine in which a roots blower is positioned in the air intake for the engine to control air flow. Air flow is decreased during part power conditions to maintain the air-fuel ratio in the combustion chamber of the engine at stoichiometric, thus enabling the use of inexpensive three-way catalyst to reduce oxides of nitrogen. The roots blower is connected to a motor generator so that when air flow is reduced, electrical energy is stored which is made available either to the roots blower to temporarily increase air flow or to the system electrical load and thus recapture energy that would otherwise be lost in reducing air flow.

  8. [Construction of a stable genetically engineered microorganism for degrading HCH & methyl parathion and its characteristics].

    PubMed

    Lu, Peng; Hong, Yuan-Fan; Hong, Qing; Jiang, Xin; Li, Shun-Peng

    2008-07-01

    A GEM designated as BHC-A-mpd, capable of simultaneously degrading of methyl parathion (MP) and HCH was successfully constructed by random insertion of a methyl parathion hydrolase gene (mpd) into chromosome of a HCH-degrading strain BHC-A with the mini-Tn-transposon system. The growth and degrading characteristics of BHC-A-mpd was compared with the original strain BHC-A, and the result showed that there was no difference in this two aspects, A600 nm of BHC-A-mpd in LB medium could reach 2.5 in logarithmic period, which was the same as that of the original strain BHC-A.BHC-A-mpd showed the same HCH-degrading ability as BHC-A and could degrade 5 mg/L of gamma-HCH in 10 h. BHC-A-mpd showed high genetica stability and could degrade many kinds of organophosphorus pesticides. All these results indicated that BHC-A-mpd was a promising GEM in bioremediation of MP and HCH co-contaminated environment.

  9. Engineering High Assurance Distributed Cyber Physical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-15

    interact with the physical world have demonstrated the consequences of not adequately verifying the correctness of the software (such as Therac - 25 ...report02-3.pdf [4] Schmidt, D.C. "Guest Editor’s Introduction: Model-Driven Engineering," IEEE Computer 39 (2), pp. 25 -31, February, 2006. [5

  10. High Pressure Reverse Flow APS Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    A design and test demonstration effort was undertaken to evaluate the concept of the reverse flow engine for the APS engine application. The 1500 lb (6672 N) thrust engine was designed to operate on gaseous hydrogen and gaseous oxygen propellants at a mixture ratio of 4 and to achieve the objective performance of 435 sec (4266 Nsec/kg) specific impulse. Superimposed durability requirements called for a million-cycle capability with 50 hours duration. The program was undertaken as a series of tasks including the initial preliminary design, design of critical test components and finally, the design and demonstration of an altitude engine which could be used interchangeably to examine operating parameters as well as to demonstrate the capability of the concept. The program results are reported with data to indicate that all of the program objectives were met or exceeded within the course of testing on the program. The analysis effort undertaken is also reported in detail and supplemented with test data in some cases where prior definitions could not be made. The results are contained of these analyses as well as the test results conducted throughout the course of the program. Finally, the test data and analytical results were combined to allow recommendations for a flight weight design. This preliminary design effort is also detailed.

  11. STABLE HIGH CONDUCTIVITY BILAYERED ELECTROLYTES FOR LOW TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Eric D. Wachsman; Keith L. Duncan

    2002-03-31

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are the future of energy production in America. They offer great promise as a clean and efficient process for directly converting chemical energy to electricity while providing significant environmental benefits (they produce negligible hydrocarbons, CO, or NO{sub x} and, as a result of their high efficiency, produce about one-third less CO{sub 2} per kilowatt hour than internal combustion engines). Unfortunately, the current SOFC technology, based on a stabilized zirconia electrolyte, must operate in the region of 1000 C to avoid unacceptably high ohmic losses. These high temperatures demand (a) specialized (expensive) materials for the fuel cell interconnects and insulation, (b) time to heat up to the operating temperature and (c) energy input to arrive at the operating temperature. Therefore, if fuel cells could be designed to give a reasonable power output at low to intermediate temperatures tremendous benefits may be accrued. At low temperatures, in particular, it becomes feasible to use ferritic steel for interconnects instead of expensive and brittle ceramic materials such as those based on LaCrO{sub 3}. In addition, sealing the fuel cell becomes easier and more reliable; rapid startup is facilitated; thermal stresses (e.g., those caused by thermal expansion mismatches) are reduced; radiative losses ({approx}T{sup 4}) become minimal; electrode sintering becomes negligible and (due to a smaller thermodynamic penalty) the SOFC operating cycle (heating from ambient) would be more efficient. Combined, all these improvements further result in reduced initial and operating costs. The problem is, at lower temperatures the conductivity of the conventional stabilized zirconia electrolyte decreases to the point where it cannot supply electrical current efficiently to an external load. The primary objectives of the proposed research is to develop a stable high conductivity (> 0.05 S cm{sup -1} at {le} 550 C) electrolyte for lower

  12. Stable isotope and high precision concentration measurements confirm that all humans produce and exhale methane.

    PubMed

    Keppler, Frank; Schiller, Amanda; Ehehalt, Robert; Greule, Markus; Hartmann, Jan; Polag, Daniela

    2016-01-29

    Mammalian formation of methane (methanogenesis) is widely considered to occur exclusively by anaerobic microbial activity in the gastrointestinal tract. Approximately one third of humans, depending on colonization of the gut by methanogenic archaea, are considered methane producers based on the classification terminology of high and low emitters. In this study laser absorption spectroscopy was used to precisely measure concentrations and stable carbon isotope signatures of exhaled methane in breath samples from 112 volunteers with an age range from 1 to 80 years. Here we provide analytical evidence that volunteers exhaled methane levels were significantly above background (inhaled) air. Furthermore, stable carbon isotope values of the exhaled methane unambiguously confirmed that this gas was produced by all of the human subjects studied. Based on the emission and stable carbon isotope patterns of various age groups we hypothesize that next to microbial sources in the gastrointestinal tracts there might be other, as yet unidentified, processes involved in methane formation supporting the idea that humans might also produce methane endogenously in cells. Finally we suggest that stable isotope measurements of volatile organic compounds such as methane might become a useful tool in future medical research diagnostic programs.

  13. Stable high absorption metamaterial for wide-angle incidence of terahertz wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Qiujiao; Zeng, Zuoxun; Xiang, Dong; Lv, Tao; Zhang, Guangyong; Yang, Hongwu

    2014-04-01

    We propose a metamaterial based on metallic Jerusalem cross and cross-wire structures for realizing relatively stable high absorption with respect to the wide angle incidence of both polarized terahertz (THz) waves. Numerical simulations are carried out to verify the proposed absorber. For both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations, absorptions around 0.93 THz reach nearly up to unity under normal incidence and maintain above 97% over a wide incidence angle range. The THz absorber can be easily micro-fabricated due to a thickness about 40 times smaller than operating wavelength. The proposed metamaterial is a promising candidate as absorbing element in THz thermal imager, due to its wide angle, stable high absorption and very thin thickness.

  14. EngineSim: Turbojet Engine Simulator Adapted for High School Classroom Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Ruth A.

    2001-01-01

    EngineSim is an interactive educational computer program that allows users to explore the effect of engine operation on total aircraft performance. The software is supported by a basic propulsion web site called the Beginner's Guide to Propulsion, which includes educator-created, web-based activities for the classroom use of EngineSim. In addition, educators can schedule videoconferencing workshops in which EngineSim's creator demonstrates the software and discusses its use in the educational setting. This software is a product of NASA Glenn Research Center's Learning Technologies Project, an educational outreach initiative within the High Performance Computing and Communications Program.

  15. La Vida Robot - High School Engineering Program Combats Engineering Brain Drain

    ScienceCinema

    Cameron, Allan; Fredi, Lajvardi

    2016-07-12

    Carl Hayden High School has built an impressive reputation with its robotics club. At a time when interest in science, math and engineering is declining, the Falcon Robotics club has young people fired up about engineering. Their program in underwater robots (MATE) and FIRST robotics is becoming a national model, not for building robots, but for building engineers. Teachers Fredi Lajvardi and Allan Cameron will present their story (How kids 'from the mean streets of Phoenix took on the best from M.I.T. in the national underwater bot championship' - Wired Magazine, April 2005) and how every student needs the opportunity to 'do real engineering.'

  16. La Vida Robot - High School Engineering Program Combats Engineering Brain Drain

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Allan; Lajvardi, Fredi

    2006-03-15

    Carl Hayden High School has built an impressive reputation with its robotics club. At a time when interest in science, math and engineering is declining, the Falcon Robotics club has young people fired up about engineering. Their program in underwater robots (MATE) and FIRST robotics is becoming a national model, not for building robots, but for building engineers. Teachers Fredi Lajvardi and Allan Cameron will present their story (How kids 'from the mean streets of Phoenix took on the best from M.I.T. in the national underwater bot championship' - Wired Magazine, April 2005) and how every student needs the opportunity to 'do real engineering.'

  17. Biologically inspired highly efficient buoyancy engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akle, Barbar; Habchi, Wassim; Abdelnour, Rita; Blottman, John, III; Leo, Donald

    2012-04-01

    Undersea distributed networked sensor systems require a miniaturization of platforms and a means of both spatial and temporal persistence. One aspect of this system is the necessity to modulate sensor depth for optimal positioning and station-keeping. Current approaches involve pneumatic bladders or electrolysis; both require mechanical subsystems and consume significant power. These are not suitable for the miniaturization of sensor platforms. Presented in this study is a novel biologically inspired method that relies on ionic motion and osmotic pressures to displace a volume of water from the ocean into and out of the proposed buoyancy engine. At a constant device volume, the displaced water will alter buoyancy leading to either sinking or floating. The engine is composed of an enclosure sided on the ocean's end by a Nafion ionomer and by a flexible membrane separating the water from a gas enclosure. Two electrodes are placed one inside the enclosure and the other attached to the engine on the outside. The semi-permeable membrane Nafion allows water motion in and out of the enclosure while blocking anions from being transferred. The two electrodes generate local concentration changes of ions upon the application of an electrical field; these changes lead to osmotic pressures and hence the transfer of water through the semi-permeable membrane. Some aquatic organisms such as pelagic crustacean perform this buoyancy control using an exchange of ions through their tissue to modulate its density relative to the ambient sea water. In this paper, the authors provide an experimental proof of concept of this buoyancy engine. The efficiency of changing the engine's buoyancy is calculated and optimized as a function of electrode surface area. For example electrodes made of a 3mm diameter Ag/AgCl proved to transfer approximately 4mm3 of water consuming 4 Joules of electrical energy. The speed of displacement is optimized as a function of the surface area of the Nafion

  18. High temperature NASP engine seals: A technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Tong, Mike

    1991-01-01

    Progress in developing advanced high temperature engine seal concepts and related sealing technologies for advanced hypersonic engines are reviewed. Design attributes and issues requiring further development for both the ceramic wafer seal and the braided ceramic rope seal are examined. Leakage data are presented for these seals for engine simulated pressure and temperature conditions and compared to a target leakage limit. Basic elements of leakage flow models to predict leakage rates for each of these seals over the wide range of pressure and temperature conditions anticipated in the engine are also presented.

  19. Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development

    SciTech Connect

    Kakwani, R. M.; Winsor, R. E.; Ryan, III, T. W.; Schwalb, J. A.; Wahiduzzaman, S.; Wilson, Jr., R. P.

    1991-11-01

    The objectives of this program are to study combustion feasibility by running Series 149 engine tests at high speeds with a fuel injection and combustion system designed for coal-water-slurry (CWS). The following criteria will be used to judge feasibility: (1) engine operation for sustained periods over the load range at speeds from 600 to 1900 rpm. The 149 engine for mine-haul trucks has a rated speed of 1900 rpm; (2) reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate; (3) reasonable cost of the engine design concept and CWS fuel compared to future oil prices.

  20. Transcriptional Engineering of Microalgae: Prospects for High-Value Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Bajhaiya, Amit K; Ziehe Moreira, Javiera; Pittman, Jon K

    2017-02-01

    Microalgae are diverse microorganisms that are of interest as novel sources of metabolites for various industrial, nutritional, and pharmaceutical applications. Recent studies have demonstrated transcriptional engineering of some metabolic pathways. We propose here that transcriptional engineering could be a viable means to manipulate the biosynthesis of specific high-value metabolic products.

  1. A Stable High-Energy Electron Source from Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Baozhen; Liu, Cheng; Yan, Wenchao; Golovin, Grigory; Banerjee, Sudeep; Chen, Shouyuan; Haden, Daniel; Fruhling, Colton; Umstadter, Donald

    2016-10-01

    The stability of the electron source from laser wake-field acceleration (LWFA) is essential for applications, such as novel x-ray sources and fundamental experiments in high field physics. To obtain such a stable source, we used an optimal laser pulse and a novel gas nozzle. The high-power laser pulse on target was focused to a diffraction-limited spot by the use of adaptive wavefront correction and the pulse duration was transform limited by the use of spectral feedback control. An innovative design for the nozzle led to a stable, flat-top profile with diameters of 4 mm and 8 mm with a high Mach-number ( 6). In experiments to generate high-energy electron beams by LWFA, we were able to obtain reproducible results with beam energy of 800 MeV and charge >10 pC. Higher charge but broader energy spectrum resulted when the plasma density was increased. These developments have resulted in a laser-driven wakefield accelerator that is stable and robust. With this device, we show that narrowband high-energy x-rays beams can be generated by the inverse-Compton scattering process. This accelerator has also been used in recent experiments to study nonlinear effects in the interaction of high-energy electron beams with ultraintense laser pulses. This material is based upon work supported by NSF No. PHY-153700; US DOE, Office of Science, BES, # DE-FG02-05ER15663; AFOSR # FA9550-11-1-0157; and DHS DNDO # HSHQDC-13-C-B0036.

  2. Superior Thermally Stable and Nonflammable Porous Polybenzimidazole Membrane with High Wettability for High-Power Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Shi, Dingqin; Xia, Yonggao; Qiao, Lin; Li, Xianfeng; Zhang, Huamin

    2017-02-28

    Separators with high security, reliability, and rate capacity are in urgent need for the advancement of high power lithium ion batteries. The currently used porous polyolefin membranes are critically hindered by their low thermal stability and poor electrolyte wettability, which further lead to low rate capacity. Here we present a novel promising porous polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane with super high thermal stability and electrolyte wettability. The rigid structure and functional groups in the PBI chain enable membranes to be stable at temperature as high as 400 °C, and the unique flame resistance of PBI could ensure the high security of a battery as well. In particular, the prepared membrane owns 328% electrolyte uptake, which is more than two times higher than commercial Celgard 2325 separator. The unique combination of high thermal stability, high flame resistance and super high electrolyte wettability enable the PBI porous membranes to be highly promising for high power lithium battery.

  3. Novel Stable Compounds in the C-H-O Ternary System at High Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Gabriele; Oganov, Artem R.

    2016-01-01

    The chemistry of the elements is heavily altered by high pressure, with stabilization of many new and often unexpected compounds, the emergence of which can profoundly change models of planetary interiors, where high pressure reigns. The C-H-O system is one of the most important planet-forming systems, but its high-pressure chemistry is not well known. Here, using state-of-the-art variable-composition evolutionary searches combined with quantum-mechanical calculations, we explore the C-H-O system at pressures up to 400 GPa. Besides uncovering new stable polymorphs of high-pressure elements and known molecules, we predicted the formation of new compounds. A 2CH4:3H2 inclusion compound forms at low pressure and remains stable up to 215 GPa. Carbonic acid (H2CO3), highly unstable at ambient conditions, was predicted to form exothermically at mild pressure (about 1 GPa). As pressure rises, it polymerizes and, above 314 GPa, reacts with water to form orthocarbonic acid (H4CO4). This unexpected high-pressure chemistry is rationalized by analyzing charge density and electron localization function distributions, and implications for general chemistry and planetary science are also discussed. PMID:27580525

  4. Novel Stable Compounds in the C-H-O Ternary System at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Gabriele; Oganov, Artem R.

    2016-09-01

    The chemistry of the elements is heavily altered by high pressure, with stabilization of many new and often unexpected compounds, the emergence of which can profoundly change models of planetary interiors, where high pressure reigns. The C-H-O system is one of the most important planet-forming systems, but its high-pressure chemistry is not well known. Here, using state-of-the-art variable-composition evolutionary searches combined with quantum-mechanical calculations, we explore the C-H-O system at pressures up to 400 GPa. Besides uncovering new stable polymorphs of high-pressure elements and known molecules, we predicted the formation of new compounds. A 2CH4:3H2 inclusion compound forms at low pressure and remains stable up to 215 GPa. Carbonic acid (H2CO3), highly unstable at ambient conditions, was predicted to form exothermically at mild pressure (about 1 GPa). As pressure rises, it polymerizes and, above 314 GPa, reacts with water to form orthocarbonic acid (H4CO4). This unexpected high-pressure chemistry is rationalized by analyzing charge density and electron localization function distributions, and implications for general chemistry and planetary science are also discussed.

  5. A novel high-order, entropy stable, 3D AMR MHD solver with guaranteed positive pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derigs, Dominik; Winters, Andrew R.; Gassner, Gregor J.; Walch, Stefanie

    2016-07-01

    We describe a high-order numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solver built upon a novel non-linear entropy stable numerical flux function that supports eight travelling wave solutions. By construction the solver conserves mass, momentum, and energy and is entropy stable. The method is designed to treat the divergence-free constraint on the magnetic field in a similar fashion to a hyperbolic divergence cleaning technique. The solver described herein is especially well-suited for flows involving strong discontinuities. Furthermore, we present a new formulation to guarantee positivity of the pressure. We present the underlying theory and implementation of the new solver into the multi-physics, multi-scale adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulation code FLASH (http://flash.uchicago.edu)

  6. Temperature-stable polymeric fluid-loss reducer tolerant to high electrolyte contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Son, A.J.; Ballard, T.M.; Loftin, R.E.

    1984-09-01

    Drilling deep hot wells with water-based fluids has been limited by lack of additives that would maintain stable rheologies and fluid loss properties at elevated temperatures. The problem is accelerated when high chemical contaminants are encountered, such as salts of sodium, calcium, magnesium, etc. The copolymer of styrene and maleic anhydride is stable at temperatures over 400/sup 0/F and it functions as a rheology stabilizer but does not provide fluid loss control. A new synthetic polymer is now available which provides dual function of rheological stabilization and fluid loss control under such unfavorable conditions. The paper discusses the unique functionalities of the new breed of polymers, performance under drastic conditions of temperature and electrolyte contamination and field case histories.

  7. High precision long-term stable fiber-based optical synchronization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yurong; Wang, Xiaochao; Jiang, Youen; Qiao, Zhi; Li, Rao; Fan, Wei

    2016-10-01

    A fiber-based high precision long-term stable time synchronization system for multi-channel laser pulses is presented using fiber pulse stacker combined with high-speed optical-electrical conversion and electronics processing technology. This scheme is used to synchronize two individual lasers including a mode-lock laser and a time shaping pulse laser system. The relative timing jitter between two laser pulses achieved with this system is 970 fs (rms) in five minutes and 3.5 ps (rms) in five hours. The synchronization system is low cost and can work at over several tens of MHz repetition rate.

  8. High-Temperature Adhesives for Thermally Stable Aero-Assist Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberts, Kenneth; Ou, Runqing

    2013-01-01

    Aero-assist technologies are used to control the velocity of exploration vehicles (EVs) when entering Earth or other planetary atmospheres. Since entry of EVs in planetary atmospheres results in significant heating, thermally stable aero-assist technologies are required to avoid the high heating rates while maintaining low mass. Polymer adhesives are used in aero-assist structures because of the need for high flexibility and good bonding between layers of polymer films or fabrics. However, current polymer adhesives cannot withstand temperatures above 400 C. This innovation utilizes nanotechnology capabilities to address this need, leading to the development of high-temperature adhesives that exhibit high thermal conductivity in addition to increased thermal decomposition temperature. Enhanced thermal conductivity will help to dissipate heat quickly and effectively to avoid temperature rising to harmful levels. This, together with increased thermal decomposition temperature, will enable the adhesives to sustain transient high-temperature conditions.

  9. 60. 1901 STEAM ENGINE HOUSE LOOKING WEST. VISIBLE THROUGH HIGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. 1901 STEAM ENGINE HOUSE LOOKING WEST. VISIBLE THROUGH HIGH ARCHED PASSAGEWAYS AT LEFT (FORMER WINDOWS) IS 1902 STEAM TURBINE. - Boston Manufacturing Company, 144-190 Moody Street, Waltham, Middlesex County, MA

  10. Low pressure high speed Stirling air engine. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.A.

    1980-06-16

    The purpose of this project was to design, construct and test a simple, appropriate technology low pressure, high speed, wood-fired Stirling air engine of 100 W output. The final design was a concentric piston/displacer engine of 454 in. bore and 1 in. stroke with a rhombic drive mechanism. The project engine was ultimately completed and tested, using a propane burner for all tests as a matter of convenience. The 100 W aim was exceeded, at atmospheric pressure, over a wide range of engine speed with the maximum power being 112 W at 1150 rpm. A pressure can was constructed to permit pressurization; however the grant funds were running out, and the only pressurized power test attempted was unsuccessful due to seal difficulties. This was a disappointment because numerous tests on the 4 cubic inch engine suggested power would be more than doubled with pressurization at 25 psig. A manifold was designed and constructed to permit operation of the engine over a standard No. 40 pot bellied stove. The engine was run successfully, but at reduced speed and power, over this stove. The project engine started out being rather noisy in operation, but modifications ultimately resulted in a very quiet engine. Various other difficulties and their solutions also are discussed. (LCL)

  11. Highly Stable Wideband Microwave Extraction by Synchronizing Widely Tunable Optoelectronic Oscillator with Optical Frequency Comb

    PubMed Central

    Hou, D.; Xie, X. P.; Zhang, Y. L.; Wu, J. T.; Chen, Z. Y.; Zhao, J. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Optical frequency combs (OFCs), based on mode-locked lasers (MLLs), have attracted considerable attention in many fields over recent years. Among the applications of OFCs, one of the most challenging works is the extraction of a highly stable microwave with low phase noise. Many synchronisation schemes have been exploited to synchronise an electronic oscillator with the pulse train from a MLL, helping to extract an ultra-stable microwave. Here, we demonstrate novel wideband microwave extraction from a stable OFC by synchronising a single widely tunable optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) with an OFC at different harmonic frequencies, using an optical phase detection technique. The tunable range of the proposed microwave extraction extends from 2 GHz to 4 GHz, and in a long-term synchronisation experiment over 12 hours, the proposed synchronisation scheme provided a rms timing drift of 18 fs and frequency instabilities at 1.2 × 10−15/1 s and 2.2 × 10−18/10000 s. PMID:24336459

  12. Stable U(IV) complexes form at high-affinity mineral surface sites.

    PubMed

    Latta, Drew E; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Cook, Russell E; Kemner, Kenneth M; Boyanov, Maxim I

    2014-01-01

    Uranium (U) poses a significant contamination hazard to soils, sediments, and groundwater due to its extensive use for energy production. Despite advances in modeling the risks of this toxic and radioactive element, lack of information about the mechanisms controlling U transport hinders further improvements, particularly in reducing environments where U(IV) predominates. Here we establish that mineral surfaces can stabilize the majority of U as adsorbed U(IV) species following reduction of U(VI). Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron imaging analysis, we find that at low surface loading, U(IV) forms inner-sphere complexes with two metal oxides, TiO2 (rutile) and Fe3O4 (magnetite) (at <1.3 U nm(-2) and <0.037 U nm(-2), respectively). The uraninite (UO2) form of U(IV) predominates only at higher surface loading. U(IV)-TiO2 complexes remain stable for at least 12 months, and U(IV)-Fe3O4 complexes remain stable for at least 4 months, under anoxic conditions. Adsorbed U(IV) results from U(VI) reduction by Fe(II) or by the reduced electron shuttle AH2QDS, suggesting that both abiotic and biotic reduction pathways can produce stable U(IV)-mineral complexes in the subsurface. The observed control of high-affinity mineral surface sites on U(IV) speciation helps explain the presence of nonuraninite U(IV) in sediments and has important implications for U transport modeling.

  13. CF6 jet engine performance improvement: High pressure turbine roundness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. D.; Fasching, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    An improved high pressure turbine stator reducing fuel consumption in current CF6-50 turbofan engines was developed. The feasibility of the roundness and clearance response improvements was demonstrated. Application of these improvements will result in a cruise SFC reduction of 0.22 percent for new engines. For high time engines, the improved roundness and response characteristics results in an 0.5 percent reduction in cruise SFC. A basic life capability of the improved HP turbine stator in over 800 simulated flight cycles without any sign of significant distress is shown.

  14. Cf6 jet engine performance improvement: high pressure turbine roundness

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W.D.; Fasching, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    An improved high pressure turbine stator reducing fuel consumption in current CF6-50 turbofan engines was developed. The feasibility of the roundness and clearance response improvements was demonstrated. Application of these improvements will result in a cruise SFC reduction of 0.22 percent for new engines. For high time engines, the improved roundness and response characteristics results in an 0.5 percent reduction in cruise SFC. A basic life capability of the improved HP turbine stator in over 800 simulated flight cycles without any sign of significant distress is shown.

  15. Engineering of High-Toughness Carbon Nanotubes Hierarchically Laminated Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-27

    REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Jul-10 - Jul-11 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Program Title: ENGINEERING OF HIGH-TOUGHNESS CARBON NANOTUBES ...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Program Title: ENGINEERING OF HIGH-TOUGHNESS CARBON NANOTUBES ...Ashby plots can be attained (Fig. 2B). 5. New doping method of carbon nanotubes was developed. Funding Profile: (Give the fiscal year funding

  16. Miniaturized High Speed Controls for Turbine Engines (Fabrication and Test)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    AO/A-006 108 MINIATURIZED HIGH SPEED CONTROLS FOR TURBINE ENGINES (FABRICATION AND TEST ) D. G. Burnell, et al Colt lndustries, Incorporated Prepared...Speed Controlsma193-Ag97 for Turbine Engines (Fabrication and May 1973RIN ORD REugR 1974 Test ) 6.PRFRIA GOG EOTNME 7. AUTHOR(.) 6- CONTRACT OR GRANT... y asd Id..,tify by block numnb.) ’-This report summarizes the design and development of con- trol components and high speed fuel pump technology for

  17. A highly stable minimally processed plant-derived recombinant acetylcholinesterase for nerve agent detection in adverse conditions.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Yvonne J; Walker, Jeremy; Jiang, Xiaoming; Donahue, Scott; Robosky, Jason; Sack, Markus; Lees, Jonathan; Urban, Lori

    2015-08-13

    Although recent innovations in transient plant systems have enabled gram quantities of proteins in 1-2 weeks, very few have been translated into applications due to technical challenges and high downstream processing costs. Here we report high-level production, using a Nicotiana benthamiana/p19 system, of an engineered recombinant human acetylcholinesterase (rAChE) that is highly stable in a minimally processed leaf extract. Lyophylized clarified extracts withstand prolonged storage at 70 °C and, upon reconstitution, can be used in several devices to detect organophosphate (OP) nerve agents and pesticides on surfaces ranging from 0 °C to 50 °C. The recent use of sarin in Syria highlights the urgent need for nerve agent detection and countermeasures necessary for preparedness and emergency responses. Bypassing cumbersome and expensive downstream processes has enabled us to fully exploit the speed, low cost and scalability of transient production systems resulting in the first successful implementation of plant-produced rAChE into a commercial biotechnology product.

  18. A highly stable minimally processed plant-derived recombinant acetylcholinesterase for nerve agent detection in adverse conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Yvonne J.; Walker, Jeremy; Jiang, Xiaoming; Donahue, Scott; Robosky, Jason; Sack, Markus; Lees, Jonathan; Urban, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Although recent innovations in transient plant systems have enabled gram quantities of proteins in 1–2 weeks, very few have been translated into applications due to technical challenges and high downstream processing costs. Here we report high-level production, using a Nicotiana benthamiana/p19 system, of an engineered recombinant human acetylcholinesterase (rAChE) that is highly stable in a minimally processed leaf extract. Lyophylized clarified extracts withstand prolonged storage at 70 °C and, upon reconstitution, can be used in several devices to detect organophosphate (OP) nerve agents and pesticides on surfaces ranging from 0 °C to 50 °C. The recent use of sarin in Syria highlights the urgent need for nerve agent detection and countermeasures necessary for preparedness and emergency responses. Bypassing cumbersome and expensive downstream processes has enabled us to fully exploit the speed, low cost and scalability of transient production systems resulting in the first successful implementation of plant-produced rAChE into a commercial biotechnology product. PMID:26268538

  19. High-pressure phase of brucite stable at Earth's mantle transition zone and lower mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Andreas; Mookherjee, Mainak

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the high-pressure phase diagram of the hydrous mineral brucite, Mg(OH)2, using structure search algorithms and ab initio simulations. We predict a high-pressure phase stable at pressure and temperature conditions found in cold subducting slabs in Earth’s mantle transition zone and lower mantle. This prediction implies that brucite can play a much more important role in water transport and storage in Earth’s interior than hitherto thought. The predicted high-pressure phase, stable in calculations between 20 and 35 GPa and up to 800 K, features MgO6 octahedral units arranged in the anatase–TiO2 structure. Our findings suggest that brucite will transform from a layered to a compact 3D network structure before eventual decomposition into periclase and ice. We show that the high-pressure phase has unique spectroscopic fingerprints that should allow for straightforward detection in experiments. The phase also has distinct elastic properties that might make its direct detection in the deep Earth possible with geophysical methods.

  20. Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline and articles therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Mattes, Benjamin R.; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    2000-01-01

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  1. Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline and articles therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Mattes, Benjamin R.; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    1999-11-09

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (between 15% and 30% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  2. Alkali-stable high-pI isoelectric membranes for isoelectric trapping separations.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Sanjiv; Shave, Evan; Fleisher, Helen C; Nzeadibe, Kingsley; Busby, M Brent; Vigh, Gyula

    2004-07-01

    Alkali-stable, high-pI isoelectric membranes have been synthesized from quaternary ammonium derivatives of cyclodextrins and poly(vinyl alcohol), and bifunctional cross-linkers, such as glycerol-1,3-diglycidyl ether. The new, high-pI isoelectric membranes were successfully applied as cathodic membranes in isoelectric trapping separations in place of the hydrolytically more labile, polyacrylamide-based cathodic isoelectric membranes, and permitted the use of catholytes as alkaline as 1 M NaOH. The new high-pI isoelectric membranes have shown excellent mechanical stability, low electric resistance and long life times, even when subjected to electrophoresis with current densities as high as 80 mA/cm2.

  3. Grain boundary engineering of highly deformable ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Mecartney, M.L.

    2000-07-01

    Highly deformable ceramics can be created with the addition of intergranular silicate phases. These amorphous intergranular phases can assist in superplastic deformation by relieving stress concentrations and minimizing grain growth if the appropriate intergranular compositions are selected. Examples from 3Y-TZP and 8Y-CSZ ceramics are discussed. The grain boundary chemistry is analyzed by high resolution analytical TEM is found to have a strong influence on the cohesion of the grains both at high temperature and at room temperature. Intergranular phases with a high ionic character and containing large ions with a relatively weak bond strength appear to cause premature failure. In contrast, intergranular phases with a high degree of covalent character and similar or smaller ions than the ceramic and a high ionic bond strength are the best for grain boundary adhesion and prevention of both cavitation at high temperatures and intergranular fracture at room temperature.

  4. High variable mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, C. M.; Tu, W. H.; Weiss, A. H.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of an O2/H2 engine to operate over a range of high-propellant mixture ratios was previously shown to be advantageous in single stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles. The results are presented for the analysis of high-performance engine power cycles operating over propellant mixture ratio ranges of 12 to 6 and 9 to 6. A requirement to throttle up to 60 percent of nominal thrust was superimposed as a typical throttle range to limit vehicle acceleration as propellant is expended. The object of the analysis was to determine areas of concern relative to component and engine operability or potential hazards resulting from the operating requirements and ranges of conditions that derive from the overall engine requirements. The SSTO mission necessitates a high-performance, lightweight engine. Therefore, staged combustion power cycles employing either dual fuel-rich preburners or dual mixed (fuel-rich and oxygen-rich) preburners were examined. Engine mass flow and power balances were made and major component operating ranges were defined. Component size and arrangement were determined through engine layouts for one of the configurations evaluated. Each component is being examined to determine if there are areas of concern with respect to component efficiency, operability, reliability, or hazard. The effects of reducing the maximum chamber pressure were investigated for one of the cycles.

  5. Highly stable, efficient Tm-doped fiber laser—a potential scalpel for low invasive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, M.; Brojek, W.; Rybak, Z.; Sznelewski, P.; Mamajek, M.; Swiderski, J.

    2016-11-01

    We report an all-fiber, diode-pumped, continuous-wave Tm3+-doped fiber laser emitting 37.4 W of output power with a slope efficiency as high as 57% with respect to absorbed pump power at 790 nm. The laser operated at ~1.94 µm and the output beam quality factor M 2 was measured to be ~1.2. The output beam was very stable with power fluctuations  <1% measured over 1 h. The laser system is to be implemented as a scalpel for low-invasive soft-tissue surgery.

  6. Biomolecule-assisted synthesis of highly stable dispersions of water-soluble copper nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jing; Wu, Xue-dong; Xue, Qun-ji

    2013-01-15

    Water-soluble and highly stable dispersions of copper nanoparticles were obtained using a biomolecule-assisted synthetic method. Dopamine was utilized as both reducing and capping agent in aqueous medium. The successful formation of DA-stabilized copper particles was demonstrated by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Zeta potential measurement, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The mechanism of dopamine on the effective reduction and excellent stability of copper nanoparticles was also discussed. This facile biomolecule-assisted technique may provide a useful tool to synthesize other nanoparticles that have potential application in biotechnology.

  7. Stable, high-performance operation of a fiber-coupled superconducting nanowire avalanche photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Shigehito; Yabuno, Masahiro; Yamashita, Taro; Terai, Hirotaka

    2017-03-01

    We present a stable and high-performance fiber-coupled NbTiN superconducting nanowire avalanche photon detector (SNAP). We demonstrate afterpulse-free operation in serially connected two SNAPs (SC-2SNAP), even in the absence of a choke inductor, achieving a 7.7 times faster response speed than standard SSPDs. The SC-2SNAP device showed a system detection efficiency (SDE) of 81.0% with wide bias current margin, a dark count rate of 6.8 counts/s, and full width at half maximum timing jitter of 68 ps, operating at 2.3 K.

  8. Thermally Stable Ohmic Contacts on Silicon Carbide Developed for High- Temperature Sensors and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA aerospace program, in particular, requires breakthrough instrumentation inside the combustion chambers of engines for the purpose of, among other things, improving computational fluid dynamics code validation and active engine behavioral control (combustion, flow, stall, and noise). This environment can be as high as 600 degrees Celsius, which is beyond the capability of silicon and gallium arsenide devices. Silicon-carbide- (SiC-) based devices appear to be the most technologically mature among wide-bandgap semiconductors with the proven capability to function at temperatures above 500 degrees Celsius. However, the contact metalization of SiC degrades severely beyond this temperature because of factors such as the interdiffusion between layers, oxidation of the contact, and compositional and microstructural changes at the metal/semiconductor interface. These mechanisms have been proven to be device killers. Very costly and weight-adding packaging schemes that include vacuum sealing are sometimes adopted as a solution.

  9. A New, Highly Improved Two-Cycle Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesen, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    The figure presents a cross-sectional view of a supercharged, variable-compression, two-cycle, internal-combustion engine that offers significant advantages over prior such engines. The improvements are embodied in a combination of design changes that contribute synergistically to improvements in performance and economy. Although the combination of design changes and the principles underlying them are complex, one of the main effects of the changes on the overall engine design is reduced (relative to prior two-cycle designs) mechanical complexity, which translates directly to reduced manufacturing cost and increased reliability. Other benefits include increases in the efficiency of both scavenging and supercharging. The improvements retain the simplicity and other advantages of two-cycle engines while affording increases in volumetric efficiency and performance across a wide range of operating conditions that, heretofore have been accessible to four-cycle engines but not to conventionally scavenged two-cycle ones, thereby increasing the range of usefulness of the two-cycle engine into all areas now dominated by the four-cycle engine. The design changes and benefits are too numerous to describe here in detail, but it is possible to summarize the major improvements: Reciprocating Shuttle Inlet Valve The entire reciprocating shuttle inlet valve and its operating gear is constructed as a single member. The shuttle valve is actuated in a lost-motion arrangement in which, at the ends of its stroke, projections on the shuttle valve come to rest against abutments at the ends of grooves in a piston skirt. This shuttle-valve design obviates the customary complex valve mechanism, actuated from an engine crankshaft or camshaft, yet it is effective with every type of two-cycle engine, from small high-speed single cylinder model engines, to large low-speed multiple cylinder engines.

  10. High/variable mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, William H.; Beveridge, John H.

    1988-01-01

    A LOX/LH2 high/variable mixture ratio booster upper stage is described. The engine has high thrust-weight ratio as a booster and high specific impulse as an upper stage engine. Operation at high mixture ratio utilizes the propellants at high bulk density. The engine may use multiple turbopump-preburners for higher thrust ratings. The engine uses the full flow cycle to obtain minimum turbine inlet temperatures for a given chamber pressure and to avoid interpropellant shaft seals and other single point failure modes. A portion of the liquid hydrogen is used to regeneratively cool the thrust chamber assembly. The warmed hydrogen coolant is then used to drive the fuel boost turbopump. All propellants arrive at the gas-gas injector ready to burn. Shear mixing of the parallel flowing high velocity, low density fuel-rich gases with the high density, low velocity oxidizer-rich gases provides complete combustion with a modest chamber volume. Combustion stability is assured by the injection of the heated fuel-rich gases and the comparatively low volume ratio of the propellants before and after combustion. The high area ratio nozzle skirt is fitted with a low area ratio nozzle skirt insert for optimum low altitude performance. The overall engine characteristics make it a candidate for ALS, Shuttle-C, LRB, and SSTO applications.

  11. Metal organic framework-mediated synthesis of highly active and stable Fischer-Tropsch catalysts.

    PubMed

    Santos, Vera P; Wezendonk, Tim A; Jaén, Juan José Delgado; Dugulan, A Iulian; Nasalevich, Maxim A; Islam, Husn-Ubayda; Chojecki, Adam; Sartipi, Sina; Sun, Xiaohui; Hakeem, Abrar A; Koeken, Ard C J; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; Davidian, Thomas; Meima, Garry R; Sankar, Gopinathan; Kapteijn, Freek; Makkee, Michiel; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-03-05

    Depletion of crude oil resources and environmental concerns have driven a worldwide research on alternative processes for the production of commodity chemicals. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process for flexible production of key chemicals from synthesis gas originating from non-petroleum-based sources. Although the use of iron-based catalysts would be preferred over the widely used cobalt, manufacturing methods that prevent their fast deactivation because of sintering, carbon deposition and phase changes have proven challenging. Here we present a strategy to produce highly dispersed iron carbides embedded in a matrix of porous carbon. Very high iron loadings (>40 wt %) are achieved while maintaining an optimal dispersion of the active iron carbide phase when a metal organic framework is used as catalyst precursor. The unique iron spatial confinement and the absence of large iron particles in the obtained solids minimize catalyst deactivation, resulting in high active and stable operation.

  12. Highly transparent, flexible, and thermally stable superhydrophobic ORMOSIL aerogel thin films.

    PubMed

    Budunoglu, Hulya; Yildirim, Adem; Guler, Mustafa O; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2011-02-01

    We report preparation of highly transparent, flexible, and thermally stable superhydrophobic organically modified silica (ORMOSIL) aerogel thin films from colloidal dispersions at ambient conditions. The prepared dispersions are suitable for large area processing with ease of coating and being directly applicable without requiring any pre- or post-treatment on a variety of surfaces including glass, wood, and plastics. ORMOSIL films exhibit and retain superhydrophobic behavior up to 500 °C and even on bent flexible substrates. The surface of the films can be converted from superhydrophobic (contact angle of 179.9°) to superhydrophilic (contact angle of <5°) by calcination at high temperatures. The wettability of the coatings can be changed by tuning the calcination temperature and duration. The prepared films also exhibit low refractive index and high porosity making them suitable as multifunctional coatings for many application fields including solar cells, flexible electronics, and lab on papers.

  13. Metal organic framework-mediated synthesis of highly active and stable Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Vera P.; Wezendonk, Tim A.; Jaén, Juan José Delgado; Dugulan, A. Iulian; Nasalevich, Maxim A.; Islam, Husn-Ubayda; Chojecki, Adam; Sartipi, Sina; Sun, Xiaohui; Hakeem, Abrar A.; Koeken, Ard C. J.; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; Davidian, Thomas; Meima, Garry R.; Sankar, Gopinathan; Kapteijn, Freek; Makkee, Michiel; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    Depletion of crude oil resources and environmental concerns have driven a worldwide research on alternative processes for the production of commodity chemicals. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process for flexible production of key chemicals from synthesis gas originating from non-petroleum-based sources. Although the use of iron-based catalysts would be preferred over the widely used cobalt, manufacturing methods that prevent their fast deactivation because of sintering, carbon deposition and phase changes have proven challenging. Here we present a strategy to produce highly dispersed iron carbides embedded in a matrix of porous carbon. Very high iron loadings (>40 wt %) are achieved while maintaining an optimal dispersion of the active iron carbide phase when a metal organic framework is used as catalyst precursor. The unique iron spatial confinement and the absence of large iron particles in the obtained solids minimize catalyst deactivation, resulting in high active and stable operation.

  14. Engine panel seals for hypersonic engine applications: High temperature leakage assessments and flow modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Mutharasan, Rajakkannu; Du, Guang-Wu; Miller, Jeffrey H.; Ko, Frank

    1992-01-01

    A critical mechanical system in advanced hypersonic engines is the panel-edge seal system that seals gaps between the articulating horizontal engine panels and the adjacent engine splitter walls. Significant advancements in seal technology are required to meet the extreme demands placed on the seals, including the simultaneous requirements of low leakage, conformable, high temperature, high pressure, sliding operation. In this investigation, the seal concept design and development of two new seal classes that show promise of meeting these demands will be presented. These seals include the ceramic wafer seal and the braided ceramic rope seal. Presented are key elements of leakage flow models for each of these seal types. Flow models such as these help designers to predict performance-robbing parasitic losses past the seals, and estimate purge coolant flow rates. Comparisons are made between measured and predicted leakage rates over a wide range of engine simulated temperatures and pressures, showing good agreement.

  15. Compact and High Thrust Air Turbo Ram Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Kitahara, Kazuki; Inukai, Yasuo

    The Air Turbo Ramjet (ATR) is a combined cycle engine which performs like a turbojet engine at subsonic speeds and a ramjet at supersonic speeds and therefore the ATR is an attractive propulsion system for the wide operation range (e.g. Mach 0 to Mach 4). The ATR can provide a higher specific impulse than a solid fuel rocket engine and a higher thrust per frontal area than a turbojet engine. The major ATR components are the inlet, fan (compressor), turbine, gas generator, combustor and exhaust nozzle. In the ATR, the turbine drive gas is generated by a decomposed liquid or solid fuel gas generator. In order to carry heavier payloads and to attain shorter flight time, the compact and high thrust engine is required. In this study, the ram combustor with the double-staged flameholders and the fan with tandem blade were introduced to shorten the engine length and to increase the fan pressure ratio, respectively. Furthermore, the engine testing was carried out on sea level static condition to confirm the engine component integration technologies for the ATR propulsion system.

  16. Nuclear Structure at the Legnaro National Laboratories:. from High Intensity Stable to Radioactive Nuclear Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, G.

    2007-04-01

    To understand the properties of a nucleus, apart from establishing the interaction between its components, it is necessary to determine the arrangement of the nucleons, i.e. the structure of a nucleus. So far our knowledge about the structure of nuclei is mostly limited to nuclei close to the valley of stability, or nuclei with a deficiency of neutrons, which can be produced in fusion-evaporation reactions with stable beams and stable targets. Future perspectives in nuclear structure rely on radioactive ion beams (RIB) as well as on high intensity beams of stable ions (HISB). A world wide effort is presently going on in order to built the next generation radioactive ion beam facilities like the FAIR and the EURISOL projects. The LNL are contributing to such development through the design study of the EURISOL project as well as through the design and construction of the intermediate facility SPES. Concerning the instrumentation, particularly powerful is the combination of large acceptance spectrometers with highly segmented γ-detector arrays. An example is the CLARA γ-ray detector array coupled with the PRISMA spectrometer at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL). The physics aims achievable with such device complement studies performed with current radioactive beam (RIB) facilities. With this set-up we have recently investigated the stability of the N=50 shell closure. Here the comparison of the experimental data with shell model calculations seems to indicate a persistence of the N=50 shell gap down to Z=31. Also the study of proton rich nuclei can strongly benefit from the use of high intensity stable beams using fusion evaporation reactions at energies close to the Coulomb barrier. Future perspectives at LNL are based on an increase in intensity as well as on the availability of heavy ion species. Moreover a new ISOL facility (SPES) dedicated to the production and acceleration of radioactive neutron rich species is now under development at LNL. Among the new

  17. Very stable high molecular mass multiprotein complex with DNase and amylase activities in human milk.

    PubMed

    Soboleva, Svetlana E; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Verkhovod, Timofey D; Buneva, Valentina N; Sedykh, Sergey E; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2015-01-01

    For breastfed infants, human milk is more than a source of nutrients; it furnishes a wide array of proteins, peptides, antibodies, and other components promoting neonatal growth and protecting infants from viral and bacterial infection. It has been proposed that most biological processes are performed by protein complexes. Therefore, identification and characterization of human milk components including protein complexes is important for understanding the function of milk. Using gel filtration, we have purified a stable high molecular mass (~1000 kDa) multiprotein complex (SPC) from 15 preparations of human milk. Light scattering and gel filtration showed that the SPC was stable in the presence of high concentrations of NaCl and MgCl2 but dissociated efficiently under the conditions that destroy immunocomplexes (2 M MgCl2 , 0.5 M NaCl, and 10 mM DTT). Such a stable complex is unlikely to be a casual associate of different proteins. The relative content of the individual SPCs varied from 6% to 25% of the total milk protein. According to electrophoretic and mass spectrometry analysis, all 15 SPCs contained lactoferrin (LF) and α-lactalbumin as major proteins, whereas human milk albumin and β-casein were present in moderate or minor amounts; a different content of IgGs and sIgAs was observed. All SPCs efficiently hydrolyzed Plasmid supercoiled DNA and maltoheptaose. Some freshly prepared SPC preparations contained not only intact LF but also small amounts of its fragments, which appeared in all SPCs during their prolonged storage; the fragments, similar to intact LF, possessed DNase and amylase activities. LF is found in human epithelial secretions, barrier body fluids, and in the secondary granules of leukocytes. LF is a protein of the acute phase response and nonspecific defense against different types of microbial and viral infections. Therefore, LF complexes with other proteins may be important for its functions not only in human milk.

  18. Highly stable maintenance of a mouse artificial chromosome in human cells and mice.

    PubMed

    Kazuki, Kanako; Takehara, Shoko; Uno, Narumi; Imaoka, Natsuko; Abe, Satoshi; Takiguchi, Masato; Hiramatsu, Kei; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Kazuki, Yasuhiro

    2013-12-06

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) and mouse artificial chromosomes (MACs) display several advantages as gene delivery vectors, such as stable episomal maintenance that avoids insertional mutations and the ability to carry large gene inserts including the regulatory elements. Previously, we showed that a MAC vector developed from a natural mouse chromosome by chromosome engineering was more stably maintained in adult tissues and hematopoietic cells in mice than HAC vectors. In this study, to expand the utility for a gene delivery vector in human cells and mice, we investigated the long-term stability of the MACs in cultured human cells and transchromosomic mice. We also investigated the chromosomal copy number-dependent expression of genes on the MACs in mice. The MAC was stably maintained in human HT1080 cells in vitro during long-term culture. The MAC was stably maintained at least to the F8 and F4 generations in ICR and C57BL/6 backgrounds, respectively. The MAC was also stably maintained in hematopoietic cells and tissues derived from old mice. Transchromosomic mice containing two or four copies of the MAC were generated by breeding. The DNA contents were comparable to the copy number of the MACs in each tissue examined, and the expression of the EGFP gene on the MAC was dependent on the chromosomal copy number. Therefore, the MAC vector may be useful not only for gene delivery in mammalian cells but also for animal transgenesis.

  19. Energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine detailed design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thulin, R. D.; Howe, D. C.; Singer, I. D.

    1982-01-01

    The energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine is a single stage system based on technology advancements in the areas of aerodynamics, structures and materials to achieve high performance, low operating economics and durability commensurate with commercial service requirements. Low loss performance features combined with a low through-flow velocity approach results in a predicted efficiency of 88.8 for a flight propulsion system. Turbine airfoil durability goals are achieved through the use of advanced high-strength and high-temperature capability single crystal materials and effective cooling management. Overall, this design reflects a considerable extension in turbine technology that is applicable to future, energy efficient gas-turbine engines.

  20. A study of monoclonal antibody-producing CHO cell lines: what makes a stable high producer?

    PubMed

    Chusainow, Janet; Yang, Yuan Sheng; Yeo, Jessna H M; Toh, Poh Choo; Asvadi, Parisa; Wong, Niki S C; Yap, Miranda G S

    2009-03-01

    Generating stable, high-producing cell lines for recombinant protein production requires an understanding of the potential limitations in the cellular machinery for protein expression. In order to increase our understanding of what makes a stable high producer, we have generated a panel of 17 recombinant monoclonal antibody expressing Chinese hamster ovary subclones (CHO-mAb) with specific productivities ranging between 3 and 75 pg cell(-1) day(-1) using the dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) expression system and compared the molecular features of these high- and low-producer clones. The relative heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) transgene copy numbers and mRNA levels were determined using real-time quantitative PCR (RT qPCR). We observed that not only higher transgene copy numbers and mRNA levels of both HC and LC were characteristic for the high-producer clones as compared to the low-producer clones but also a more favorable HC to LC transgene copy numbers ratio. By studying the long-term stability of the CHO-mAb subclones in the absence of methotrexate (MTX) selective pressure over 36 passages we observed a 35-92% decrease in volumetric productivity, primarily caused by a significant decrease in HC and LC mRNA levels with little change in the transgene copy numbers. Using Southern blot hybridization we analyzed the HC and LC transgene integration patterns in the host chromosome and their changes in course of gene amplification and long-term culturing. We observed that MTX-induced gene amplification caused chromosomal rearrangements resulting in clonal variability in regards to growth, productivity, and stability. No further obvious DNA rearrangements occurred during long-term culturing in the absence of MTX, indicating that other mechanisms were responsible for the decreased transcription efficiency. Our results implicate that the amplified transgene sequences were arranged in tandem repeats potentially triggering repeat-induced gene silencing. We hypothesize

  1. Carboxymethylated lignins with low surface tension toward low viscosity and highly stable emulsions of crude bitumen and refined oils.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Ogunkoya, Dolanimi; Fang, Tiegang; Willoughby, Julie; Rojas, Orlando J

    2016-11-15

    Kraft and organosolv lignins were subjected to carboxymethylation to produce fractions that were soluble in water, displayed a minimum surface tension as low as 34mN/m (25°C) and a critical aggregation concentration of ∼1.5wt%. The carboxymethylated lignins (CML), which were characterized in terms of their degree of substitution ((31)P NMR), elemental composition, and molecular weight (GPC), were found suitable in the formulation of emulsions with bitumens of ultra-high viscosity, such as those from the Canadian oil sands. Remarkably, the interfacial features of the CML enabled fuel emulsions that were synthesized in a very broad range of internal phase content (30-70%). Cryo-replica transmission electron microscopy, which was used here the first time to assess the morphology of the lignin-based emulsions, revealed the droplets of the emulsion stabilized with the modified lignin. The observed drop size (diameters<2μm) was confirmed by light scattering, which revealed a normal size distribution. Such characteristics led to stable emulsified systems that are amenable for a wide range of applications. Emulsification with CML afforded bitumen emulsions with very high colloidal stability (no change was noted for over one month) and with a strong shear thinning behavior. Both features indicate excellent prospects for storage, transport and spraying, which are relevant in operations for power generation, which also take advantage of the high heating value of the emulsion components. The ability of CML to stabilize emulsions and to contribute in their combustion was tested with light fuels (kerosene, diesel, and jet fuel) after formulation of high internal phase systems (70% oil) that enabled operation of a fuel engine. A significant finding is that under certain conditions and compared to the respective pure fuel, combustion of the O/W emulsions stabilized by CML presented lower NOx and CO emissions and maintained a relatively high combustion efficiency. The results

  2. High Pressure Regenerative Turbine Engine: 21st Century Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. E.; Laganelli, A. L.; Senick, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A novel semi-closed cycle gas turbine engine was demonstrated and was found to meet the program goals. The proof-of-principle test of the High Pressure Regenerative Turbine Engine produced data that agreed well with models, enabling more confidence in designing future prototypes based on this concept. Emission levels were significantly reduced as predicted as a natural attribute of this power cycle. Engine testing over a portion of the operating range allowed verification of predicted power increases compared to the baseline.

  3. Tuning calcite morphology and growth acceleration by a rational design of highly stable protein-mimetics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chunlong; Qi, Jiahui; Tao, Jinhui; Zuckermann, Ronald; De Yoreo, James J.

    2014-09-05

    In nature, proteins play a significant role in biomineral formation. One of the ultimate goals of bioinspired materials science is to develop highly stable synthetic molecules that mimic the function of these natural proteins by controlling crystal formation. Here, we demonstrate that both the morphology and the degree of acceleration or inhibition observed during growth of calcite in the presence of peptoids can be rationally tuned by balancing the electrostatic interactions (EI) and hydrophobic interactions (HI), with HI playing the dominant role. While either strong EI or HI inhibit growth and suppress (104) face expression, correlations between peptoid-crystal binding energies and observed changes in calcite growth indicate moderate EI allow peptoids to weakly adsorb while moderate HI cause disruption of surface-adsorbed water layers, leading to growth acceleration with retained expression of (104) faces. This study provides fundamental principles for designing peptoids as crystallization promoters, and offers a straightforward screening method based on macroscopic crystal morphology. Because peptoids are sequence-specific, highly stable, and easily synthesized, peptoid-enhanced crystallization offers a broad range of potential applications.

  4. [High-sensitivity troponin in patients with stable coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    van 't Hof, Arnoud W J

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of more sensitive markers of myocardial necrosis, it was shown that the diagnosis of (acute) myocardial infarction could be improved. However, many patients without myocardial infarction have elevated troponin levels (low sensitivity), resulting in additional diagnostic testing and longer admission times to find the cause of the troponin rise. Elevated troponin levels in these patients were found to have limited diagnostic but strong prognostic value. This led to studies assessing the value of high-sensitivity troponin in patients with stable disease, e.g. coronary artery disease, or even in patients without apparent (clinical) disease. These studies consistently showed a strong association with long-term (cardiac) mortality. What is the value for the general physician in daily practice? Although troponin levels may help in finding (healthy?) patients at higher risk, it remains unclear whether interventions (medication, lifestyle) are more (cost-)effective in this high-risk subgroup. The role of troponin levels as a prognostic marker in stable patients therefore remains to be determined.

  5. High Stability Engine Control (HISTEC) Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Southwick, Robert D.; Gallops, George W.; Kerr, Laura J.; Kielb, Robert P.; Welsh, Mark G.; DeLaat, John C.; Orme, John S.

    1998-01-01

    The High Stability Engine Control (HISTEC) Program, managed and funded by the NASA Lewis Research Center, is a cooperative effort between NASA and Pratt & Whitney (P&W). The program objective is to develop and flight demonstrate an advanced high stability integrated engine control system that uses real-time, measurement-based estimation of inlet pressure distortion to enhance engine stability. Flight testing was performed using the NASA Advanced Controls Technologies for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) F-15 aircraft at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The flight test configuration, details of the research objectives, and the flight test matrix to achieve those objectives are presented. Flight test results are discussed that show the design approach can accurately estimate distortion and perform real-time control actions for engine accommodation.

  6. High-Efficiency and Air-Stable Perovskite Quantum Dots Light-Emitting Diodes with an All-Inorganic Heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhifeng; Li, Ying; Zhang, Yuantao; Chen, Yongsheng; Li, Xinjian; Wu, Di; Xu, Tingting; Shan, Chongxin; Du, Guotong

    2017-01-11

    Perovskite light-emitting diodes (PeLEDs), because of its fundamental scientific importance and practical applications in the fields of low-cost light source or display applications, have drawn worldwide attention in recent years. However, PeLEDs available today suffer from a compromise in their emission efficiency and operation stability. In this study, we designed and fabricated a stacking all-inorganic multilayer structure by using inorganic perovskite CsPbBr3 quantum dots (QDs) as the emissive layer and inorganic n-type MgZnO and p-type MgNiO as the carrier injectors, respectively. Through energy band engineering of carrier injectors by Mg incorporation and their thickness optimization, PeLEDs with maximum luminance of 3809 cd/m(2), luminous efficiency of 2.25 cd/A, and external quantum efficiency of 2.39% have been realized, which are much better than most PeLEDs from CH3NH3PbBr3 films, and comparable with the highest results reported on CsPbBr3 QDs LEDs. More importantly, the unencapsulated PeLEDs in a continuous current mode demonstrate a remarkable operation stability against water and oxygen degradation. After a continuous operation for 10 h under a dc bias (10.0 V), nearly 80% of the original efficiency of the PeLEDs has been retained, greatly superior to reference and other previously reported devices constructed with conventional organic carrier injectors. Our results obtained open possibilities for the design and development of high-efficiency and air-stable PeLEDs that are not dependent on expensive and less-stable organic carrier injectors.

  7. Facile and green synthesis of highly stable L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Upadhyay, Lata Sheo Bachan

    2016-11-01

    A simple eco-friendly method for L-cysteine capped copper nanoparticles (CCNPs) synthesis in aqueous solution has been developed. Glucose and L-cysteine were used as reducing agent and capping/functionalizing agent, respectively. Different parameters such as capping agent concentration, pH, reaction temperature, and reducing agent concentration were optimized during the synthesis. The L-cysteine capped copper nanoparticle were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Particle size and zeta potential analyser, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Spherical shaped cysteine functionalized/capped copper nanoparticles with an average size of 40 nm were found to be highly stable at room temperature (RT) for a period of 1 month

  8. “A novel highly stable and injectable hydrogel based on a conformationally restricted ultrashort peptide”

    PubMed Central

    Thota, Chaitanya Kumar; Yadav, Nitin; Chauhan, Virander Singh

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructures including hydrogels based on peptides containing non protein amino acids are being considered as platform for drug delivery because of their inherent biocompatibility and additional proteolytic stability. Here we describe instantaneous self-assembly of a conformationally restricted dipeptide, LeuΔPhe, containing an α,β-dehydrophenylalanine residue into a highly stable and mechanically strong hydrogel, under mild physiological aqueous conditions. The gel successfully entrapped several hydrophobic and hydrophilic drug molecules and released them in a controlled manner. LeuΔPhe was highly biocompatible and easily injectable. Administration of an antineoplastic drug entrapped in the gel in tumor bearing mice significantly controlled growth of tumors. These characteristics make LeuΔPhe an attractive candidate for further development as a delivery platform for various biomedical applications. PMID:27507432

  9. Dimensionally stable ultralightweight silicon optics for both cryogenic and high-energy laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, William A.; Jacoby, Marc T.

    2001-03-01

    Silicon offers significant advantages over other optical substrate materials such as beryllium, silicon carbide and glass for both cryogenic and high-energy laser applications. Silicon is quickly and inexpensively super-polishable (surface figure < (lambda) 10 p-v at (lambda) equals 632.8 nm; surface roughness < 5 angstroms rms), has superior thermal properties at cryogenic temperatures, and can be lightweighted. This paper updates our progress towards producing dimensionally stable ultra-lightweight silicon optics for both cryogenic instruments and high-energy infrared laser systems. We review cryogenic figure test results for three-inch diameter coupons, present analysis results for a half-meter diameter silicon foam-core mirror and tell how these results apply to a Silicon Lightweight Demonstration Mirror, and describe optics being designed for an Offner Relay System.

  10. Ladder polymers for use as high temperature stable resins or coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An object of the invention is to synthesize a new class of ladder and partial ladder polymers. In accordance with the invention, the new class of ladder and partial ladder polymers are synthesized by polymerizing a bis-dienophile with a bis-diene. Another object of the invention is to provide a fabricated, electrically conducting, void free composite comprising the new class of the ladder and partial ladder polymers described above. The novelty of the invention relates to a new class of ladder and partial ladder polymers and a process for synthesizing these polymers. These polymers are soluble in common organic solvents and are characterized with a unique dehydration property at temperatures of 300 to 400 C to provide thermo-oxidatively stable pentiptycene units along the polymeric backbone. These polymers are further characterized with high softening points and good thermo-oxidative stability properties. Thus these polymers have potential as processable, matrix resins for high temperature composite applications.

  11. Stable dynamics in forced systems with sufficiently high/low forcing frequency.

    PubMed

    Bartuccelli, M; Gentile, G; Wright, J A

    2016-08-01

    We consider parametrically forced Hamiltonian systems with one-and-a-half degrees of freedom and study the stability of the dynamics when the frequency of the forcing is relatively high or low. We show that, provided the frequency is sufficiently high, Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) theorem may be applied even when the forcing amplitude is far away from the perturbation regime. A similar result is obtained for sufficiently low frequency, but in that case we need the amplitude of the forcing to be not too large; however, we are still able to consider amplitudes which are outside of the perturbation regime. In addition, we find numerically that the dynamics may be stable even when the forcing amplitude is very large, well beyond the range of validity of the analytical results, provided the frequency of the forcing is taken correspondingly low.

  12. Discovery of microRNAs of the stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) by high-throughput sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (Linnaeus), is a serious ectoparasite affecting animal production and health of both animals and humans. Stable fly control relies largely on chemical insecticides; however, the development of insecticide resistance, as well as environmental considerations, requir...

  13. EVALUATION OF A LOW FRICTION - HIGH EFFICIENCY ROLLER BEARING ENGINE

    SciTech Connect

    Kolarik, Robert V. II; Shattuck, Charles W.; Copper, Anthony P.

    2009-06-30

    This Low Friction (High Efficiency Roller Bearing) Engine (LFE) report presents the work done by The Timken Company to conduct a technology demonstration of the benefits of replacing hydrodynamic bearings with roller bearings in the crankshaft and camshaft assemblies of an internal combustion engine for the purpose of collecting data sufficient to prove merit. The engines in the present study have been more extensively converted to roller bearings than any previous studies (40 needle roller bearings per engine) to gain understanding of the full potential of application of bearing technology. The project plan called for comparative testing of a production vehicle which was already respected for having demonstrated low engine friction levels with a rollerized version of that engine. Testing was to include industry standard tests for friction, emissions and fuel efficiency conducted on instrumented dynamometers. Additional tests for fuel efficiency, cold start resistance and other measures of performance were to be made in the actual vehicle. Comparative measurements of noise, vibration and harshness (NVH), were planned, although any work to mitigate the suspected higher NVH level in the rollerized engine was beyond the scope of this project. Timken selected the Toyota Avalon with a 3.5L V-6 engine as the test vehicle. In an attempt to minimize cost and fabrication time, a ‘made-from’ approach was proposed in which as many parts as possible would be used or modified from production parts to create the rollerized engine. Timken commissioned its test partner, FEV Engine Technology, to do a feasibility study in which they confirmed that using such an approach was possible to meet the required dimensional restrictions and tolerances. In designing the roller bearing systems for the crank and cam trains, Timken utilized as many production engine parts as possible. The crankshafts were produced from production line forgings, which use Timken steel, modified with special

  14. A wearable, highly stable, strain and bending sensor based on high aspect ratio graphite nanobelts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaferdov, A. V.; Savu, R.; Rackauskas, T. A.; Rackauskas, S.; Canesqui, M. A.; de Lara, D. S.; Setti, G. O.; Joanni, E.; de Trindade, G. M.; Lima, U. B.; de Souza, A. S.; Moshkalev, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    A simple and scalable method was developed for the fabrication of wearable strain and bending sensors, based on high aspect ratio (length/thickness ˜103) graphite nanobelt thin films deposited by a modified Langmuir-Blodgett technique onto flexible polymer substrates. The sensing mechanism is based on the changes in contact resistance between individual nanobelts upon substrate deformation. Very high sensor response stability for more than 5000 strain-release cycles and a device power consumption as low as 1 nW were achieved. The device maximum stretchability is limited by the metal electrodes and the polymer substrate; the maximum strain that could be applied to the polymer used in this work was 40%. Bending tests carried out for various radii of curvature demonstrated distinct sensor responses for positive and negative curvatures. The graphite nanobelt thin flexible films were successfully tested for acoustic vibration and heartbeat sensing.

  15. A wearable, highly stable, strain and bending sensor based on high aspect ratio graphite nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Alaferdov, A V; Savu, R; Rackauskas, T A; Rackauskas, S; Canesqui, M A; de Lara, D S; Setti, G O; Joanni, E; de Trindade, G M; Lima, U B; de Souza, A S; Moshkalev, S A

    2016-09-16

    A simple and scalable method was developed for the fabrication of wearable strain and bending sensors, based on high aspect ratio (length/thickness ∼10(3)) graphite nanobelt thin films deposited by a modified Langmuir-Blodgett technique onto flexible polymer substrates. The sensing mechanism is based on the changes in contact resistance between individual nanobelts upon substrate deformation. Very high sensor response stability for more than 5000 strain-release cycles and a device power consumption as low as 1 nW were achieved. The device maximum stretchability is limited by the metal electrodes and the polymer substrate; the maximum strain that could be applied to the polymer used in this work was 40%. Bending tests carried out for various radii of curvature demonstrated distinct sensor responses for positive and negative curvatures. The graphite nanobelt thin flexible films were successfully tested for acoustic vibration and heartbeat sensing.

  16. High energy density propulsion systems and small engine dynamometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Scope and Method of Study. This study investigates all possible methods of powering small unmanned vehicles, provides reasoning for the propulsion system down select, and covers in detail the design and production of a dynamometer to confirm theoretical energy density calculations for small engines. Initial energy density calculations are based upon manufacturer data, pressure vessel theory, and ideal thermodynamic cycle efficiencies. Engine tests are conducted with a braking type dynamometer for constant load energy density tests, and show true energy densities in excess of 1400 WH/lb of fuel. Findings and Conclusions. Theory predicts lithium polymer, the present unmanned system energy storage device of choice, to have much lower energy densities than other conversion energy sources. Small engines designed for efficiency, instead of maximum power, would provide the most advantageous method for powering small unmanned vehicles because these engines have widely variable power output, loss of mass during flight, and generate rotational power directly. Theoretical predictions for the energy density of small engines has been verified through testing. Tested values up to 1400 WH/lb can be seen under proper operating conditions. The implementation of such a high energy density system will require a significant amount of follow-on design work to enable the engines to tolerate the higher temperatures of lean operation. Suggestions are proposed to enable a reliable, small-engine propulsion system in future work. Performance calculations show that a mature system is capable of month long flight times, and unrefueled circumnavigation of the globe.

  17. A stable solution-processed polymer semiconductor with record high-mobility for printed transistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Yan; Tan, Huei Shuan; Guo, Yunlong; Di, Chong-An; Yu, Gui; Liu, Yunqi; Lin, Ming; Lim, Suo Hon; Zhou, Yuhua; Su, Haibin; Ong, Beng S

    2012-01-01

    Microelectronic circuits/arrays produced via high-speed printing instead of traditional photolithographic processes offer an appealing approach to creating the long-sought after, low-cost, large-area flexible electronics. Foremost among critical enablers to propel this paradigm shift in manufacturing is a stable, solution-processable, high-performance semiconductor for printing functionally capable thin-film transistors - fundamental building blocks of microelectronics. We report herein the processing and optimisation of solution-processable polymer semiconductors for thin-film transistors, demonstrating very high field-effect mobility, high on/off ratio, and excellent shelf-life and operating stabilities under ambient conditions. Exceptionally high-gain inverters and functional ring oscillator devices on flexible substrates have been demonstrated. This optimised polymer semiconductor represents a significant progress in semiconductor development, dispelling prevalent skepticism surrounding practical usability of organic semiconductors for high-performance microelectronic devices, opening up application opportunities hitherto functionally or economically inaccessible with silicon technologies, and providing an excellent structural framework for fundamental studies of charge transport in organic systems.

  18. A stable solution-processed polymer semiconductor with record high-mobility for printed transistors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Yan; Tan, Huei Shuan; Guo, Yunlong; Di, Chong-An; Yu, Gui; Liu, Yunqi; Lin, Ming; Lim, Suo Hon; Zhou, Yuhua; Su, Haibin; Ong, Beng S.

    2012-01-01

    Microelectronic circuits/arrays produced via high-speed printing instead of traditional photolithographic processes offer an appealing approach to creating the long-sought after, low-cost, large-area flexible electronics. Foremost among critical enablers to propel this paradigm shift in manufacturing is a stable, solution-processable, high-performance semiconductor for printing functionally capable thin-film transistors — fundamental building blocks of microelectronics. We report herein the processing and optimisation of solution-processable polymer semiconductors for thin-film transistors, demonstrating very high field-effect mobility, high on/off ratio, and excellent shelf-life and operating stabilities under ambient conditions. Exceptionally high-gain inverters and functional ring oscillator devices on flexible substrates have been demonstrated. This optimised polymer semiconductor represents a significant progress in semiconductor development, dispelling prevalent skepticism surrounding practical usability of organic semiconductors for high-performance microelectronic devices, opening up application opportunities hitherto functionally or economically inaccessible with silicon technologies, and providing an excellent structural framework for fundamental studies of charge transport in organic systems. PMID:23082244

  19. High pressure versus high intensity noninvasive ventilation in stable hypercapnic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Patrick B; Brignall, Kate; Moxham, John; Polkey, Michael I; Davidson, A Craig; Hart, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Background High-intensity (high-pressure and high backup rate) noninvasive ventilation has recently been advocated for the management of stable hypercapnic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the relative contributions of high inspiratory pressure and high backup rate to ventilator adherence and physiological outcome have not been investigated. Methods Patients with stable hypercapnic COPD (daytime PaCO2 > 6 kPa) and nocturnal hypoventilation were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated to high-pressure and high backup rate (high-intensity) and high-pressure and low backup rate (high-pressure) for a 6-week period. At the end of the first treatment period, patients were switched to the alternative treatment. The primary outcome measure was mean nightly ventilator usage. Results Twelve patients were recruited, with seven completing the 12-week trial protocol. The mean patient age was 71 ± 8 years, with a forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) of 50% ± 13% and FEV1 of 32% ± 12%. The baseline PaCO2 and PaO2 were 8.6 ± 1.7 kPa and 7.3 ± 1.4 kPa, respectively. There was no significant difference demonstrated in mean nightly ventilator usage between the high-intensity and high-pressure groups (difference of 4 minutes; 95% confidence interval −45 to 53; P = 0.9). Furthermore, there were no differences in any of the secondary endpoints, with the exception of the respiratory domain of the Severe Respiratory Insufficiency questionnaire, which was lower in the high-intensity arm than in the high-pressure arm (57 ± 11 versus 69 ± 16; P < 0.05). Conclusion There was no additional benefit, in terms of night-time ventilator adherence or any of the other measured parameters, demonstrated by addition of a high backup rate to high-pressure noninvasive ventilation. These data suggest that it is the high-pressure component of the high-intensity noninvasive ventilation approach that plays the important therapeutic role in

  20. Engineering high-performance vertical cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, K.L.; Hou, H.Q.; Hietala, V.M.; Choquette, K.D.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    The cw and high-speed performance of vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes (VCSELs) are affected by both electrical and optical issues arising from the geometry and fabrication of these devices. Structures with low resistance semiconductor mirrors and Al-oxide confinement layers address these issues and have produced record performance including 50% power conversion efficiency and modulation bandwidths up to 20 GHz at small bias currents.

  1. A Very Stable High Throughput Taylor Cone-jet in Electrohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morad, M. R.; Rajabi, A.; Razavi, M.; Sereshkeh, S. R. Pejman

    2016-12-01

    A stable capillary liquid jet formed by an electric field is an important physical phenomenon for formation of controllable small droplets, power generation and chemical reactions, printing and patterning, and chemical-biological investigations. In electrohydrodynamics, the well-known Taylor cone-jet has a stability margin within a certain range of the liquid flow rate (Q) and the applied voltage (V). Here, we introduce a simple mechanism to greatly extend the Taylor cone-jet stability margin and produce a very high throughput. For an ethanol cone-jet emitting from a simple nozzle, the stability margin is obtained within 1 kV for low flow rates, decaying with flow rate up to 2 ml/h. By installing a hemispherical cap above the nozzle, we demonstrate that the stability margin could increase to 5 kV for low flow rates, decaying to zero for a maximum flow rate of 65 ml/h. The governing borders of stability margins are discussed and obtained for three other liquids: methanol, 1-propanol and 1-butanol. For a gravity-directed nozzle, the produced cone-jet is more stable against perturbations and the axis of the spray remains in the same direction through the whole stability margin, unlike the cone-jet of conventional simple nozzles.

  2. Palladium nanosheets as highly stable and effective contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Liming; Chen, Mei; Sun, Xiaolian; Rong, Pengfei; Zheng, Nanfeng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    A stable and efficient contrast agent is highly desirable for photoacoustic (PA) imaging applications. Recently gold nanostructures have been widely reported and studied for PA imaging and photothermal therapy. However, the structures of the nonspherical gold nanoparticles are easily destroyed after laser irradiation and thus may fail to complete the intended tasks. In this study, we propose to apply palladium nanosheets (PNSs), with strong optical absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) region, as a new class of exogenous PA contrast agents. PA and ultrasound (US) images were acquired sequentially by a portable and fast photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system with a hand-held transducer. Significant and long-lasting imaging enhancement in SCC7 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma was successfully observed in mice by PAT over time after tail vein administration of PNSs. The morphology and functional perfusion of the tumors were delineated in PA images due to the nanoparticle accumulation. PAT of the main organs was also conducted ex vivo to trace the fate of PNSs, which was further validated by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). No obvious toxic effect was observed by in vitro MTT assay and ex vivo histological examination 7 days after PNS administration. With the combination of a portable imaging instrument and signal specificity, PNSs might be applied as stable and effective agents for photoacoustic cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment guidance.

  3. Highly Stable and Conductive Microcapsules for Enhancement of Joule Heating Performance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nanocarbons show great promise for establishing the next generation of Joule heating systems, but suffer from the limited maximum temperature due to precociously convective heat dissipation from electrothermal system to surrounding environment. Here we introduce a strategy to eliminate such convective heat transfer by inserting highly stable and conductive microcapsules into the electrothermal structures. The microcapsule is composed of encapsulated long-chain alkanes and graphene oxide/carbon nanotube hybrids as core and shell material, respectively. Multiform carbon nanotubes in the microspheres stabilize the capsule shell to resist volume-change-induced rupture during repeated heating/cooling process, and meanwhile enhance the thermal conductance of encapsulated alkanes which facilitates an expeditious heat exchange. The resulting microcapsules can be homogeneously incorporated in the nanocarbon-based electrothermal structures. At a dopant of 5%, the working temperature can be enhanced by 30% even at a low voltage and moderate temperature, which indicates a great value in daily household applications. Therefore, the stable and conductive microcapsule may serve as a versatile and valuable dopant for varieties of heat generation systems. PMID:27002594

  4. Synthesis, tailoring and characterization of silica nanoparticles containing a highly stable ruthenium complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wencel, D.; Dolan, C.; Barczak, M.; Keyes, T. E.; McDonagh, C.

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and characterization of sol-gel silica nanoparticles (NPs) derived from tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and from tetraethoxysilane and methyltriethoxysilane (TEOS-MTEOS) in which is encapsulated, an in-house synthesized, stable oxygen-sensitive ruthenium complex, ruthenium (II) (bis-2,2-bipyridyl)-2(4-carboxylphenyl) imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline. These NPs were characterized using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis. The spherical, stable and monodispersed NPs have been prepared using the Stöber method. It was found that the addition of prehydrolyzed MTEOS-based sol prepared in an acidic environment to the reaction mixture containing TEOS NPs synthesized for 6 h produced material with increased porosity when compared to pure silica NPs. Oxygen sensitivity, stability, photobleaching and leaching have been characterized. The hybrid NPs exhibit enhanced O2 sensitivity but a high degree of leaching when compared to pure silica NPs, which have minimum O2 sensitivity and no leaching.

  5. A Very Stable High Throughput Taylor Cone-jet in Electrohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Morad, M R; Rajabi, A; Razavi, M; Sereshkeh, S R Pejman

    2016-12-05

    A stable capillary liquid jet formed by an electric field is an important physical phenomenon for formation of controllable small droplets, power generation and chemical reactions, printing and patterning, and chemical-biological investigations. In electrohydrodynamics, the well-known Taylor cone-jet has a stability margin within a certain range of the liquid flow rate (Q) and the applied voltage (V). Here, we introduce a simple mechanism to greatly extend the Taylor cone-jet stability margin and produce a very high throughput. For an ethanol cone-jet emitting from a simple nozzle, the stability margin is obtained within 1 kV for low flow rates, decaying with flow rate up to 2 ml/h. By installing a hemispherical cap above the nozzle, we demonstrate that the stability margin could increase to 5 kV for low flow rates, decaying to zero for a maximum flow rate of 65 ml/h. The governing borders of stability margins are discussed and obtained for three other liquids: methanol, 1-propanol and 1-butanol. For a gravity-directed nozzle, the produced cone-jet is more stable against perturbations and the axis of the spray remains in the same direction through the whole stability margin, unlike the cone-jet of conventional simple nozzles.

  6. High-buffering capacity, hydrolytically stable, low-pI isoelectric membranes for isoelectric trapping separations.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Sanjiv; Shave, Evan; Vigh, Gyula

    2004-10-01

    Hydrolytically stable, low-pI isoelectric membranes have been synthesized from low-pI ampholytic components, poly(vinyl alcohol), and a bifunctional cross-linker, glycerol-1,3-diglycidyl ether. The low-pI ampholytic components used contain one amino group and at least two weakly acidic functional groups. The acidic functional groups are selected such that the pI value of the ampholytic component is determined by the pK(a) values of the acidic functional groups. When the concentration of the ampholytic component incorporated into the membrane is higher than a required minimum value, the pI of the membrane becomes independent of variations in the actual incorporation rate of the ampholytic compound. The new, low-pI isoelectric membranes have been successfully used as anodic membranes in isoelectric trapping separations with pH < 1.5 anolytes and replaced the hydrolytically less stable polyacrylamide-based isoelectric membranes. The new low-pI isoelectric membranes have excellent mechanical stability, low electric resistance, good buffering capacity, and long life time, even when used with as much as 50 W power and current densities as high as 33 mA/cm(2) during the isoelectric trapping separations.

  7. A Very Stable High Throughput Taylor Cone-jet in Electrohydrodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Morad, M. R.; Rajabi, A.; Razavi, M.; Sereshkeh, S. R. Pejman

    2016-01-01

    A stable capillary liquid jet formed by an electric field is an important physical phenomenon for formation of controllable small droplets, power generation and chemical reactions, printing and patterning, and chemical-biological investigations. In electrohydrodynamics, the well-known Taylor cone-jet has a stability margin within a certain range of the liquid flow rate (Q) and the applied voltage (V). Here, we introduce a simple mechanism to greatly extend the Taylor cone-jet stability margin and produce a very high throughput. For an ethanol cone-jet emitting from a simple nozzle, the stability margin is obtained within 1 kV for low flow rates, decaying with flow rate up to 2 ml/h. By installing a hemispherical cap above the nozzle, we demonstrate that the stability margin could increase to 5 kV for low flow rates, decaying to zero for a maximum flow rate of 65 ml/h. The governing borders of stability margins are discussed and obtained for three other liquids: methanol, 1-propanol and 1-butanol. For a gravity-directed nozzle, the produced cone-jet is more stable against perturbations and the axis of the spray remains in the same direction through the whole stability margin, unlike the cone-jet of conventional simple nozzles. PMID:27917956

  8. White organic light-emitting diodes with high efficiency and stable color coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Lee, Nam Heon; Song, Jun-Ho; Hwang, Do Hoon

    2004-10-01

    We report the fabrication and the characterization of white organic light-emitting diodes that exhibit high efficiency and very stable color coordinates over the wide range of bias voltages. The blue-emitting layer of 1,4-bis(2,2-diphenyl vinyl)benzene (DPVBi) is sandwiched between the red-emitting layers in which red fluorescent dyes of 4-dicyanomethylene-2-methyl-6-[2-(2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-1H,5H-benzo[i,j]quinolizin-8-yl)vinyl]-4H-pyran) (DCM2) are doped into the hole-transporting layer of 4,4"bis[N-(1-napthyl)-N-phenyl-amino]-biphenyl (α-NPD) and the electron-transporting layer of tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3). The device structure is ITO/PEDOT:PSS/α-NPD(50 nm)/α-NPD:DCM2 (5 nm, 0.2 %)/DPVBi(10 nm)/Alq3:DCM2(5 nm, 0.2 %)/Alq3(40 nm)/LiF(0.5 nm)/Al. The partial energy transfer from the blue layer to the nearby red layers results in white light emission with the stable color coordinates of (0.36, 0.37). The device shows the luminous efficiency of about 3.6 lm/W at 100 cd/m2 and the maximum luminance of 40,650 cd/m2 at the bias of 12 V.

  9. Highly Stable and Conductive Microcapsules for Enhancement of Joule Heating Performance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaoliang; Jin, Jidong; Xu, Guang-Kui; Zou, Jianli; Wais, Ulrike; Beckett, Alison; Heil, Tobias; Higgins, Sean; Guan, Lunhui; Wang, Ying; Shchukin, Dmitry

    2016-04-26

    Nanocarbons show great promise for establishing the next generation of Joule heating systems, but suffer from the limited maximum temperature due to precociously convective heat dissipation from electrothermal system to surrounding environment. Here we introduce a strategy to eliminate such convective heat transfer by inserting highly stable and conductive microcapsules into the electrothermal structures. The microcapsule is composed of encapsulated long-chain alkanes and graphene oxide/carbon nanotube hybrids as core and shell material, respectively. Multiform carbon nanotubes in the microspheres stabilize the capsule shell to resist volume-change-induced rupture during repeated heating/cooling process, and meanwhile enhance the thermal conductance of encapsulated alkanes which facilitates an expeditious heat exchange. The resulting microcapsules can be homogeneously incorporated in the nanocarbon-based electrothermal structures. At a dopant of 5%, the working temperature can be enhanced by 30% even at a low voltage and moderate temperature, which indicates a great value in daily household applications. Therefore, the stable and conductive microcapsule may serve as a versatile and valuable dopant for varieties of heat generation systems.

  10. Highly stable solution processed metal-halide perovskite lasers on nanoimprinted distributed feedback structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Philipp; Stulz, Mareike; Kapp, Dorothee; Abzieher, Tobias; Paetzold, Ulrich W.; Quintilla, Aina; Howard, Ian A.; Kalt, Heinz; Lemmer, Uli

    2016-10-01

    We report on the performance and stability of distributed feedback lasers based on the solution-processed methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3). The CH3NH3PbI3 layers are processed via solution-casting in ambient atmosphere onto nanoimprinted second order Bragg gratings. This way, we achieve highly polarized surface-emitted lasing at room temperature with a linewidth of less than 0.2 nm and a laser threshold of 120 kW/cm2. The lasing is stable; no change in the laser emission within 15 h of pulsed excitation with a repetition rate of 1 kHz (corresponding to >5 × 107 pulses) is observed, exceeding the stability achieved for solution processed organic semiconductor lasers. Furthermore, adjustment of the grating period allowed the lasing wavelength to be varied over the entire bandwidth of the amplified spontaneous emission (between 781 and 794 nm). The fabrication process of nanoimprinting followed by solution-casting of the gain material demonstrates that stable CH3NH3PbI3 lasers are compatible with scalable production technologies and offers a route towards electrically pumped diode architectures.

  11. Jet engine powers large, high-temperature wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benham, T. F.; Mulliken, S. R.

    1967-01-01

    Wind tunnel for large component testing uses a jet engine with afterburner to provide high temperatures /1200 degrees to 2000 degrees F/ and controlled high velocity gas. This economical wind tunnel can accommodate parts ten feet by ten feet or larger, and is a useful technique for qualitative information.

  12. A New Approach for Constructing Highly Stable High Order CESE Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung

    2010-01-01

    A new approach is devised to construct high order CESE schemes which would avoid the common shortcomings of traditional high order schemes including: (a) susceptibility to computational instabilities; (b) computational inefficiency due to their local implicit nature (i.e., at each mesh points, need to solve a system of linear/nonlinear equations involving all the mesh variables associated with this mesh point); (c) use of large and elaborate stencils which complicates boundary treatments and also makes efficient parallel computing much harder; (d) difficulties in applications involving complex geometries; and (e) use of problem-specific techniques which are needed to overcome stability problems but often cause undesirable side effects. In fact it will be shown that, with the aid of a conceptual leap, one can build from a given 2nd-order CESE scheme its 4th-, 6th-, 8th-,... order versions which have the same stencil and same stability conditions of the 2nd-order scheme, and also retain all other advantages of the latter scheme. A sketch of multidimensional extensions will also be provided.

  13. Immobilization of actinides in stable mineral type and ceramic materials (high temperature synthesis)

    SciTech Connect

    Starkov, O.; Konovalov, E.

    1996-05-01

    Alternative vitrification technologies are being developed in the world for the immobilization of high radioactive waste in materials with improved thermodynamic stability, as well as improved chemical and thermal stability and stability to radiation. Oxides, synthesized in the form of analogs to rock-forming minerals and ceramics, are among those materials that have highly stable properties and are compatible with the environment. In choosing the appropriate material, we need to be guided by its geometric stability, the minimal number of cations in the structure of the material and the presence of structural elements in the mineral that are isomorphs of uranium and thorium, actinoids found in nature. Rare earth elements, yttrium, zirconium and calcium are therefore suitable. The minerals listed in the table (with the exception of the zircon) are pegatites by origin, i.e. they are formed towards the end of the magma crystallization of silicates form the residual melt, enriched with Ta, Nb, Ti, Zr, Ce, Y, U and Th. Uranium and thorium in the form of isomorphic admixtures form part of the lattice of the mineral. These minerals, which are rather simple in composition and structure and are formed under high temperatures, may be viewed as natural physio-chemical systems that are stable and long-lived in natural environments. The similarity of the properties of actinoids and lanthanoids plays an important role in the geochemistry of uranium and thorium; however, uranium (IV) is closer to the {open_quotes}heavy{close_quotes} group of lanthanoids (the yttrium group) while thorium (IV) is closer to the {open_quotes}light{close_quotes} group (the cerium group). That is why rare earth minerals contain uranium and thorium in the form of isomorphic admixtures.

  14. Ultra High Bypass Ratio Low Noise Engine Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, W. N., III

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify engine cycle and technologies needed for a regional aircraft which could be capable of achieving a 10 EPNdB reduction in community noise level relative to current FAR36 Stage 3 limits. The study was directed toward 100-passenger regional aircraft with engine configurations in the 15,000 pound thrust class. The study focused on Ultra High Bypass Ratio (UHBR) cycles due to low exhaust jet velocities and reduced fan tip speeds. The baseline engine for this study employed a gear-driven, 1000 ft/sec tip speed fan and had a cruise bypass ratio of 14:1. A revised engine configuration employing fan and turbine design improvements are predicted to be 9.2 dB below current takeoff limits and 12.8 dB below current approach limits. An economic analysis was also done by estimating Direct Operating Cost (DOC).

  15. Minimized thermal conductivity in highly stable thermal barrier W/ZrO2 multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Florian; Major, Anna; Eberl, Christian; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    Nanoscale thin-film multilayer materials are of great research interest since their large number of interfaces can strongly hinder phonon propagation and lead to a minimized thermal conductivity. When such materials provide a sufficiently small thermal conductivity and feature in addition also a high thermal stability, they would be possible candidates for high-temperature applications such as thermal barrier coatings. For this article, we have used pulsed laser deposition in order to fabricate thin multilayers out of the thermal barrier material ZrO2 in combination with W, which has both a high melting point and high density. Layer thicknesses were designed such that bulk thermal conductivity is governed by the low value of ZrO2, while ultrathin W blocking layers provide a high number of interfaces. By this phonon scattering, reflection and shortening of mean free path lead to a significant reduction in overall thermal conductivity even below the already low value of ZrO2. In addition to this, X-ray reflectivity measurements were taken showing strong Bragg peaks even after annealing such multilayers at 1300 K. Those results identify W/ZrO2 multilayers as desired thermally stable, low-conductivity materials.

  16. Thermally Stable Nanocatalyst for High Temperature Reactions: Pt-Mesoporous Silica Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Sang Hoon; Park, J.Y.; Tsung, C.-K.; Yamada, Y.; Yang, P.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-10-25

    Recent advances in colloidal synthesis enabled the precise control of size, shape and composition of catalytic metal nanoparticles, allowing their use as model catalysts for systematic investigations of the atomic-scale properties affecting catalytic activity and selectivity. The organic capping agents stabilizing colloidal nanoparticles, however, often limit their application in high-temperature catalytic reactions. Here we report the design of a high-temperature stable model catalytic system that consists of Pt metal core coated with a mesoporous silica shell (Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2}). While inorganic silica shells encaged the Pt cores up to 750 C in air, the mesopores directly accessible to Pt cores made the Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles as catalytically active as bare Pt metal for ethylene hydrogenation and CO oxidation. The high thermal stability of Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles permitted high-temperature CO oxidation studies, including ignition behavior, which was not possible for bare Pt nanoparticles because of their deformation or aggregation. The results suggest that the Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are excellent nanocatalytic systems for high-temperature catalytic reactions or surface chemical processes, and the design concept employed in the Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} core-shell catalyst can be extended to other metal-metal oxide compositions.

  17. Highly Uniform and Reproducible Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering on Air-stable Metallic Glassy Nanowire Array

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xue; Shao, Yang; Tang, Yao; Yao, Ke-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanostructures with both high sensitivity as well as high reproducibility has always been difficult and costly for routine SERS detection. Here we demonstrate air-stable metallic glassy nanowire arrays (MGNWAs), which were prepared by a cheap and rapid die nanoimprinting technique, could exhibit high SERS enhancement factor (EF) as well as excellent reproducibility. It shows that Pd40.5Ni40.5P19 MGNWA with nanowires of 55 nm in diameter and 100 nm in pitch possesses high SERS activity with an EF of 1.1 × 105, which is 1–3 orders of magnitudes higher than that of the reported crystal Ni-based nanostructures, and an excellent reproducibility with a relative standard deviation of 9.60% measured by 121 points over an area of 100 μm*100 μm. This method offers an easy, rapid, and low-cost way to prepare highly sensitive and reproducible SERS substrates and makes the SERS more practicable. PMID:25060646

  18. Electrochemical Deposition of Azobenzene-Containing Network Films with High-Contrast and Stable Photoresponse.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruiyang; Zhan, Xuepeng; Yao, Liang; Chen, Qidai; Xie, Zengqi; Ma, Yuguang

    2016-04-01

    To fabricate stable photoresponsive films and devices, a cross-linked network that firmly fixes the position of the chromophores is an ideal structure, because aggregation and/or phase separation effects of chromophores in matrix can be effectively restrained in such robust films. Herein, the in situ electrochemical deposition (ED) of azo-based precursors containing multielectroactive carbazole units is utilized to construct highly cross-linked photoresponsive films. 2-(4-(9,9-bis(6-(9H-carbazol-9-yl)hexyl)-9H-fluoren-2-yl)phenyl)-1-(4-(9,9-bis(6-(9H-carbazol-9-yl)hexyl)-9H-fluoren-7-yl)phenyl)diazene (BFCzAzo) with high solvability in electrolyte solution, high electroactivity, and highly efficient photoresponsive ability is synthesized by Suzuki coupling reaction as a kind of ED precursor. A highly cross-linked photoresponsive film is fabricated by ED method using BFCzAzo as ED precursor. The film can be patterned in large area by irradiation with interfering laser beam (355 nm), and the pattern possesses excellent thermal stability and insoluble ability in both organic and inorganic solvents. Excellent reversibility of the nanostructures is demonstrated by irradiation with 550 nm laser beam.

  19. Test results of the highly instrumented Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnaughey, H. V.; Leopard, J. L.; Lightfoot, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Test results of a highly instrumented Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are presented. The instrumented engine, when combined with instrumented high pressure turbopumps, contains over 750 special measurements, including flowrates, pressures, temperatures, and strains. To date, two different test series, accounting for a total of sixteen tests and 1,667 seconds, have been conducted with this engine. The first series, which utilized instrumented turbopumps, characterized the internal operating environment of the SSME for a variety of operating conditions. The second series provided system-level validation of a high pressure liquid oxygen turbopump that had been retrofitted with a fluid-film bearing in place of the usual pump-end ball bearings. Major findings from these two test series are highlighted in this paper. In addition, comparisons are made between model predictions and measured test data.

  20. Fabrication of highly stable microfiber structures via high-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose coating for device and sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linghui; Jin, Long; Li, Jie; Ran, Yang; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate a cost-effective approach to fabricate stable microfiber structures taking advantage of high-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose (H-HPC) coating. The microfibers are bent, twisted, or coiled to form desired geometries, and then the segments in contact are coated to resist the existing bending or twisting stresses to stabilize the structures. Coated devices including a twisted Sagnac interferometer, a ring resonator, and a Fabry-Perot cavity have been exhibited. Measured result suggests that the coated structures are highly stable over 20 days. The thin, low-index coating material allows for a strong evanescent-field interaction between the mode field and ambient solution. As an example, the coated twisted Sagnac interferometer can act as a refractive-index sensor with a sensitivity as high as 2600 nm/RIU. The present technique is greatly beneficial for long-term working of microfiber devices and sensors and offers a possible approach for the development of integrated microphotonic devices and platforms.

  1. Hamiltonian Engineering for High Fidelity Quantum Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Hugo; Baksic, Alexandre; Clerk, Aashish

    High-fidelity gates and operations are crucial to almost every aspect of quantum information processing. In recent experiments, fidelity is mostly limited by unwanted couplings with states living out of the logical subspace. This results in both leakage and phase errors. Here, we present a general method to deal simultaneously with both these issues and improve the fidelity of quantum gates and operations. Our method is applicable to a wide variety of systems. As an example, we can correct gates for superconducting qubits, improve coherent state transfer between a single NV centre electronic spin and a single nitrogen nuclear spin, improve control over a nuclear spin ensemble, etc. Our method is intimately linked to the Magnus expansion. By modifying the Magnus expansion of an initially given Hamiltonian Hi, we find analytically additional control Hamiltonians Hctrl such that Hi +Hctrl leads to the desired gate while minimizing both leakage and phase errors.

  2. Facet engineering of high power single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Levi, Moshe; Shamay, Moshe; Tesler, Renana; Rappaport, Noam; Don, Yaroslav; Karni, Yoram; Schnitzer, Itzhak; Sicron, Noam; Shusterman, Sergey

    2011-03-01

    The ever increasing demand for high-power, high-reliability operation of single emitters at 9xx nm wavelengths requires the development of laser diodes with improved facet regions immune to both catastrophic and wear-out failure modes. In our study, we have evaluated several laser facet definition technologies in application to 90 micron aperture single emitters in asymmetric design (In)GaAs/AlGaAs based material emitting at 915, 925 and 980nm. A common epitaxy and emitter design makes for a straightforward comparison of the facet technologies investigated. Our study corroborates a clear trend of increasing difficulty in obtaining reliable laser operation from 980nm down to 915nm. At 980nm, one can employ dielectric facet passivation with a pre-clean cycle delivering a device lifetime in excess of 3,000 hours at increasing current steps. At 925nm, quantum-well intermixing can be used to define non-absorbing mirrors giving good device reliability, albeit with a large efficiency penalty. Vacuum cleaved emitters have delivered excellent reliability at 915nm, and can be expected to perform just as well at 925 and 980nm. Epitaxial regrowth of laser facets is under development and has yet to demonstrate an appreciable reliability improvement. Only a weak correlation between start-of-life catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) levels and reliability was established. The optimized facet design has delivered maximum powers in excess of 19 MW/sq.cm (rollover limited) and product-grade 980nm single emitters with a slope efficiency of >1 W/A and a peak efficiency of >60%. The devices have accumulated over 1,500 hours of CW operation at 11W. A fiber-coupled device emits 10W ex-fiber with 47% efficiency.

  3. Sensitive and selective detection of copper ions with highly stable polyethyleneimine-protected silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhiqin; Cai, Na; Du, Yi; He, Yan; Yeung, Edward S

    2014-01-07

    Copper is a highly toxic environmental pollutant with bioaccumulative properties. Therefore, sensitive Cu(2+) detection is very important to prevent over-ingestion, and visual detection using unaugmented vision is preferred for practical applications. In this study, hyperbranched polyethyleneimine-protected silver nanoclusters (hPEI-AgNCs) were successfully synthesized using a facile, one-pot reaction under mild conditions. The hPEI-AgNCs were very stable against extreme pH, ionic strength, temperature, and photoillumination and could act as sensitive and selective Cu(2+) sensing nanoprobes in aqueous solutions with a 10 nM limit of detection. In addition, hPEI-AgNCs-doped agarose hydrogels were developed as an instrument-free and regenerable platform for visual Cu(2+) and water quality monitoring.

  4. Highly stable tandem solar cell monolithically integrating dye-sensitized and CIGS solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Sang Youn; Park, Se Jin; Joo, Oh-Shim; Jun, Yongseok; Min, Byoung Koun; Hwang, Yun Jeong

    2016-08-01

    A highly stable monolithic tandem solar cell was developed by combining the heterogeneous photovoltaic technologies of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) and solution-processed CuInxGa1-xSeyS1-y (CIGS) thin film solar cells. The durability of the tandem cell was dramatically enhanced by replacing the redox couple from to [Co(bpy)3]2+ /[Co(bpy)3]3+), accompanied by a well-matched counter electrode (PEDOT:PSS) and sensitizer (Y123). A 1000 h durability test of the DSSC/CIGS tandem solar cell in ambient conditions resulted in only a 5% decrease in solar cell efficiency. Based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and photoelectrochemical cell measurement, the enhanced stability of the tandem cell is attributed to minimal corrosion by the cobalt-based polypyridine complex redox couple.

  5. Stable high-spectral-flatness mid-infrared supercontinuum generation in Tm-doped fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Guanghui; Zhang, Bin; Yang, Weiqiang; Yin, Ke; Hou, Jing

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate a stable high-spectral-flatness mid-infrared (mid-IR) supercontinuum (SC) generation in a thulium-doped fiber amplifier (TDFA) with an average output power of 2.32 W in a spectral band of ∼(1875-2700 nm). A 1550 nm distributed feedback (DFB) pulsed laser diode (LD) with repetition rate of 600 kHz and pulse width of 900 ps was used as the seed source. The measured long term stability of SC output power is less than 1.1% rms (root mean square) at the average output power of 2.32 W. The measured slope efficiency from the 793 nm pump power of the TDFA to the total SC output power is ∼14%. The output SC has a 6 dB spectral flatness in the wavelength ranging from 1955 to 2505 nm (550 nm span) at the average output power of 2.32 W.

  6. Highly stable water-soluble platinum nanoparticles stabilized by hydrophilic N-heterocyclic carbenes.

    PubMed

    Baquero, Edwin A; Tricard, Simon; Flores, Juan Carlos; de Jesús, Ernesto; Chaudret, Bruno

    2014-11-24

    Controlling the synthesis of stable metal nanoparticles in water is a current challenge in nanochemistry. The strategy presented herein uses sulfonated N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands to stabilize platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) in water, under air, for an indefinite time period. The particles were prepared by thermal decomposition of a preformed molecular Pt complex containing the NHC ligand and were then purified by dialysis and characterized by TEM, high-resolution TEM, and spectroscopic techniques. Solid-state NMR studies showed coordination of the carbene ligands to the nanoparticle surface and allowed the determination of a (13)C-(195)Pt coupling constant for the first time in a nanosystem (940 Hz). Additionally, in one case a novel structure was formed in which platinum(II) NHC complexes form a second coordination sphere around the nanoparticle.

  7. Highly stable tandem solar cell monolithically integrating dye-sensitized and CIGS solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Sang Youn; Park, Se Jin; Joo, Oh-Shim; Jun, Yongseok; Min, Byoung Koun; Hwang, Yun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    A highly stable monolithic tandem solar cell was developed by combining the heterogeneous photovoltaic technologies of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) and solution-processed CuInxGa1-xSeyS1-y (CIGS) thin film solar cells. The durability of the tandem cell was dramatically enhanced by replacing the redox couple from to [Co(bpy)3]2+ /[Co(bpy)3]3+), accompanied by a well-matched counter electrode (PEDOT:PSS) and sensitizer (Y123). A 1000 h durability test of the DSSC/CIGS tandem solar cell in ambient conditions resulted in only a 5% decrease in solar cell efficiency. Based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and photoelectrochemical cell measurement, the enhanced stability of the tandem cell is attributed to minimal corrosion by the cobalt-based polypyridine complex redox couple. PMID:27489138

  8. Pt monolayer shell on nitrided alloy core — A path to highly stable oxygen reduction catalyst

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Jue; Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Sasaki, Kotaro; ...

    2015-07-22

    The inadequate activity and stability of Pt as a cathode catalyst under the severe operation conditions are the critical problems facing the application of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Here we report on a novel route to synthesize highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts by depositing Pt monolayer on a nitrided alloy core. The prepared PtMLPdNiN/C catalyst retains 89% of the initial electrochemical surface area after 50,000 cycles between potentials 0.6 and 1.0 V. By correlating electron energy-loss spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyses with electrochemical measurements, we found that the significant improvement of stability of themore » PtMLPdNiN/C catalyst is caused by nitrogen doping while reducing the total precious metal loading.« less

  9. Highly stable polyaniline-poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) nanoparticles for sensing of amines.

    PubMed

    Li, Ligui; Ferng, Lin-Huei; Yang, Catherine; Ji, Hai-Feng

    2014-09-01

    Sensing technology is the key of intelligent packaging. A variety of different sensing systems for indicating freshness through intelligent packaging have been presented. Polyaniline (PANI) can change its color reversibly through the acid-base reaction with reactive compounds and has been widely used in different kinds of sensors. However, because PANI is insoluble in common organic solvents, this limits its practical usage in many applications. In this work, a highly stable polyaniline-poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PANI:PSS) colloid has been developed as a facile colorimetric sensor of volatile amines. The results showed the PANI:PSS colloid is quite sensitive to changes in pH. When PANI:PSS colloids were homogenously deposited on filter paper, the paper are used as a sensor to detect triethylamine (TEA) vapor. The green color of the test paper changed to blue at a TEA concentration as low as 188 ppm.

  10. Highly selective and stable florescent sensor for Cd(II) based on poly (azomethine-urethane).

    PubMed

    Kaya, İsmet; Kamacı, Musa

    2013-01-01

    In this study a kind of poly(azomethine-urethane); (E)-4-((2 hydroxyphenylimino) methyl)-2-methoxyphenyl 6-acetamidohexylcarbamate (HDI-co-3-DHB-2-AP) was prepared as in the literature and employed as a new fluorescent probe for detection of Cd(II) concentration. The photoluminescence (PL) measurements were carried out in the presence of several kinds of heavy metals. HDI-co-3-DHB-2-AP gave a linearly and highly stable response against Cd(II) as decreasing a new emission peak at 562 nm. Possible interferences of other ions were found too low. Detection limit of the sensor was found as 8.86 × 10(-4) mol L(-1). Resultantly, HDI-co-3- DHB-2-AP could be effectively used as an optical Cd(II) sensor.

  11. Novel Stable Gel Polymer Electrolyte: Toward a High Safety and Long Life Li-Air Battery.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jin; Liu, Xizheng; Guo, Shaohua; Zhu, Kai; Xue, Hailong; Zhou, Haoshen

    2015-10-28

    Nonaqueous Li-air battery, as a promising electrochemical energy storage device, has attracted substantial interest, while the safety issues derived from the intrinsic instability of organic liquid electrolytes may become a possible bottleneck for the future application of Li-air battery. Herein, through elaborate design, a novel stable composite gel polymer electrolyte is first proposed and explored for Li-air battery. By use of the composite gel polymer electrolyte, the Li-air polymer batteries composed of a lithium foil anode and Super P cathode are assembled and operated in ambient air and their cycling performance is evaluated. The batteries exhibit enhanced cycling stability and safety, where 100 cycles are achieved in ambient air at room temperature. The feasibility study demonstrates that the gel polymer electrolyte-based polymer Li-air battery is highly advantageous and could be used as a useful alternative strategy for the development of Li-air battery upon further application.

  12. Nanostructured recombinant cytokines: A highly stable alternative to short-lived prophylactics.

    PubMed

    Torrealba, Débora; Parra, David; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Vallejos-Vidal, Eva; Yero, Daniel; Gibert, Isidre; Villaverde, Antonio; Garcia-Fruitós, Elena; Roher, Nerea

    2016-11-01

    Cytokines have been widely used as adjuvants and therapeutic agents in treatments of human diseases. Despite their recognized potential as drugs, the medical use of cytokines has considerable drawbacks, mainly related to their low stability and short half-life. Such intrinsic limitations imply the administration of high doses, often prompting toxicity, undesirable side effects and greater production costs. Here, we describe a new category of mechanically stable nanostructured cytokines (TNFα and CCL4/MIP-1β) that resist harsh physicochemical conditions in vitro (pH and temperature), while maintaining functionality. These bio-functional materials are produced in recombinant cell factories through cost-effective and fully scalable processes. Notably, we demonstrate their prophylactic potential in vivo showing they protect zebrafish from a lethal infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  13. Pt monolayer shell on nitrided alloy core — A path to highly stable oxygen reduction catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jue; Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Su, Dong; Yang, Tae -Hyun; Park, Gu -Gon; Zhang, Chengxu; Chen, Guangyu; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2015-07-22

    The inadequate activity and stability of Pt as a cathode catalyst under the severe operation conditions are the critical problems facing the application of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Here we report on a novel route to synthesize highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts by depositing Pt monolayer on a nitrided alloy core. The prepared PtMLPdNiN/C catalyst retains 89% of the initial electrochemical surface area after 50,000 cycles between potentials 0.6 and 1.0 V. By correlating electron energy-loss spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyses with electrochemical measurements, we found that the significant improvement of stability of the PtMLPdNiN/C catalyst is caused by nitrogen doping while reducing the total precious metal loading.

  14. Investigation of red blood cell antigens with highly fluorescent and stable semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Patrícia Maria Albuquerque; Santos, Beate Saegesser; de Menezes, Frederico Duarte; de Carvalho Ferreira, Ricardo; Barjas-Castro, Maria Lourdes; Castro, Vagner; Lima, Paulo Roberto Moura; Fontes, Adriana; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2005-01-01

    We report a new methodology for red blood cell antigen expression determination by a simple labeling procedure employing luminescent semiconductor quantum dots. Highly luminescent and stable core shell cadmium sulfide/cadmium hydroxide colloidal particles are obtained, with a predominant size of 9 nm. The core-shell quantum dots are functionalized with glutaraldehyde and conjugated to a monoclonal anti-A antibody to target antigen-A in red blood cell membranes. Erythrocyte samples of blood groups A+, A2+, and O+ are used for this purpose. Confocal microscopy images show that after 30 min of conjugation time, type A+ and A2+ erythrocytes present bright emission, whereas the O+ group cells show no emission. Fluorescence intensity maps show different antigen expressions for the distinct erythrocyte types. The results obtained strongly suggest that this simple labeling procedure may be employed as an efficient tool to investigate quantitatively the distribution and expression of antigens in red blood cell membranes.

  15. Formation of High-Beta Plasma and Stable Confinement of Toroidal Electron Plasma in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Haruhiko

    2010-11-01

    The Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device is a laboratory magnetosphere generated by a levitated superconducting magnet. The goals of RT-1 are to realize stable formation of ultra high-beta plasma suitable for burning advanced fusion fuels, and confinement of toroidal non-neutral plasmas including antimatter particles. RT- 1 has produced high-beta plasma in the magnetospheric configuration. The effects of coil levitation and geomagnetic field compensation [Y. Yano et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 4, 039] resulted drastic improvements of the plasma properties, and a maximum local beta value exceeded 70%. Because plasma is generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) in the present experiment, the plasma pressure is mainly due to hot electrons, whose bremsstrahlung was observed with an x-ray CCD camera. The pressure profiles have rather steep gradient near the superconducting coil in the strong field region. The decay rates of magnetic probe and interferometer signals have different time constants, suggesting multiple temperature components. The energy confinement time estimated from the input RF power and stored magnetic energy is on the order of 1s, which is comparable to the decay time constant of the density of hot electron component. Pure electron plasma experiments are also conducted in RT-1. Radial profiles of electrostatic potential and electron density showed that the plasma rigidly rotates in the toroidal direction in the stable confinement phase. Long time confinement of toroidal non- neutral plasma for more than 300s and inward particle diffusion to strong field regions, caused by the activation of the diocotron (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability, have been realized [Z. Yoshida et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235004].

  16. High-surface Thermally Stable Mesoporous Gallium Phosphates Constituted by Nanoparticles as Primary Building Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    V Parvulescu; V Parvulescu; D Ciuparu; C Hardacre; H Garcia

    2011-12-31

    In constant, search for micro/mesoporous materials, gallium phosphates, have attracted continued interest due to the large pore size reported for some of these solids in comparison with analogous aluminum phosphates. However up to now, the porosity of gallium phosphates collapsed upon template removal or exposure to the ambient moisture. In the present work, we describe high-surface thermally stable mesoporous gallium phosphates synthesized from gallium propoxide and PCl{sub 3} and different templating agents such as amines (dipropylamine, piperidine and aminopiperidine) and quaternary ammonium salts (C{sub 16}H{sub 33}(CH{sub 3})3NBr and C{sub 16}PyCl). These highly reactive precursors have so far not been used as gallium and phosphate sources for the synthesis of gallophosphates. Conceptually, our present synthetic procedure is based on the fast formation of gallium phosphate nanoparticles via the reaction of gallium propoxide with PCl{sub 3} and subsequent construction of the porous material with nanoparticles as building blocks. The organization of the gallophosphate nanoparticles in stable porous structures is effected by the templates. Different experimental procedures varying the molar composition of the sol-gel, pH and the pretreatment of gallium precursor were assayed, most of them leading to satisfactory materials in terms of thermal stability and porosity. In this way, a series of gallium phosphates with surface are above 200 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, and narrow pore size from 3 to 6 nm and remarkable thermal stability (up to 550 C) have been prepared. In some cases, the structure tends to show some periodicity and regularity as determined by XRD. The remarkable stability has allowed us to test the catalytic activity of gallophosphates for the aerobic oxidation of alkylaromatics with notable good results. Our report reopens the interest for gallophosphates in heterogeneous catalysis.

  17. High-End Computing Challenges in Aerospace Design and Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, F. Ronald

    2004-01-01

    High-End Computing (HEC) has had significant impact on aerospace design and engineering and is poised to make even more in the future. In this paper we describe four aerospace design and engineering challenges: Digital Flight, Launch Simulation, Rocket Fuel System and Digital Astronaut. The paper discusses modeling capabilities needed for each challenge and presents projections of future near and far-term HEC computing requirements. NASA's HEC Project Columbia is described and programming strategies presented that are necessary to achieve high real performance.

  18. How Stable Is Stable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baehr, Marie

    1994-01-01

    Provides a problem where students are asked to find the point at which a soda can floating in some liquid changes its equilibrium between stable and unstable as the soda is removed from the can. Requires use of Newton's first law, center of mass, Archimedes' principle, stable and unstable equilibrium, and buoyant force position. (MVL)

  19. The High Stability Engine Control (HISTEC) Program: Flight Demonstration Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Southwick, Robert D.; Gallops, George W.; Orme, John S.

    1998-01-01

    Future aircraft turbine engines, both commercial and military, must be able to accommodate expected increased levels of steady-state and dynamic engine-face distortion. The current approach of incorporating sufficient design stall margin to tolerate these increased levels of distortion would significantly reduce performance. The objective of the High Stability Engine Control (HISTEC) program is to design, develop, and flight-demonstrate an advanced, integrated engine control system that uses measurement-based estimates of distortion to enhance engine stability. The resulting distortion tolerant control reduces the required design stall margin, with a corresponding increase in performance and decrease in fuel burn. The HISTEC concept has been developed and was successfully flight demonstrated on the F-15 ACTIVE aircraft during the summer of 1997. The flight demonstration was planned and carried out in two phases, the first to show distortion estimation, and the second to show distortion accommodation. Post-flight analysis shows that the HISTEC technologies are able to successfully estimate and accommodate distortion, transiently setting the stall margin requirement on-line and in real-time. This allows the design stall margin requirement to be reduced, which in turn can be traded for significantly increased performance and/or decreased weight. Flight demonstration of the HISTEC technologies has significantly reduced the risk of transitioning the technology to tactical and commercial engines.

  20. Protein engineering by highly parallel screening of computationally designed variants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mark G. F.; Seo, Moon-Hyeong; Nim, Satra; Corbi-Verge, Carles; Kim, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Current combinatorial selection strategies for protein engineering have been successful at generating binders against a range of targets; however, the combinatorial nature of the libraries and their vast undersampling of sequence space inherently limit these methods due to the difficulty in finely controlling protein properties of the engineered region. Meanwhile, great advances in computational protein design that can address these issues have largely been underutilized. We describe an integrated approach that computationally designs thousands of individual protein binders for high-throughput synthesis and selection to engineer high-affinity binders. We show that a computationally designed library enriches for tight-binding variants by many orders of magnitude as compared to conventional randomization strategies. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of our approach in a proof-of-concept study and successfully obtain low-nanomolar binders using in vitro and in vivo selection systems. PMID:27453948

  1. Integrated Design Methodology for Highly Reliable Liquid Rocket Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuratani, Naoshi; Aoki, Hiroshi; Yasui, Masaaki; Kure, Hirotaka; Masuya, Goro

    The Integrated Design Methodology is strongly required at the conceptual design phase to achieve the highly reliable space transportation systems, especially the propulsion systems, not only in Japan but also all over the world in these days. Because in the past some catastrophic failures caused some losses of mission and vehicle (LOM/LOV) at the operational phase, moreover did affect severely the schedule delays and cost overrun at the later development phase. Design methodology for highly reliable liquid rocket engine is being preliminarily established and investigated in this study. The sensitivity analysis is systematically performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of this methodology, and to clarify and especially to focus on the correlation between the combustion chamber, turbopump and main valve as main components. This study describes the essential issues to understand the stated correlations, the need to apply this methodology to the remaining critical failure modes in the whole engine system, and the perspective on the engine development in the future.

  2. High-Temperature Magnetic Bearings for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are the subject of a new NASA Lewis Research Center and U.S. Army thrust with significant industry participation, and coordination with other Government agencies. The NASA/Army emphasis is on high-temperature applications for future gas turbine engines. Magnetic bearings could increase the reliability and reduce the weight of these engines by eliminating the lubrication system. They could also increase the DN (diameter of the bearing times rpm) limit on engine speed and allow active vibration cancellation systems to be used--resulting in a more efficient, "more electric" engine. Finally, the Integrated High-Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) Program, a joint Department of Defense/industry program, identified a need for a hightemperature (as high as 1200 F) magnetic bearing that could be demonstrated in a phase III engine. This magnetic bearing is similar to an electric motor. It has a laminated rotor and stator made of cobalt steel. Wound around the stator are a series of electrical wire coils that form a series of electric magnets around the circumference. The magnets exert a force on the rotor. A probe senses the position of the rotor, and a feedback controller keeps it in the center of the cavity. The engine rotor, bearings, and case form a flexible structure that contains a large number of modes. The bearing feedback controller, which could cause some of these modes to become unstable, could be adapted to varying flight conditions to minimize seal clearances and monitor the health of the system. Cobalt steel has a curie point greater than 1700 F, and copper wire has a melting point beyond that. Therefore, practical limitations associated with the maximum magnetic field strength in the cobalt steel and the stress in the rotating components limit the temperature to about 1200 F. The objective of this effort is to determine the limits in temperature and speed of a magnetic bearing operating in an engine. Our approach is to use our in

  3. High heat transfer oxidizer heat exchanger design and analysis. [RL10-2B engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmiec, Thomas D.; Kanic, Paul G.; Peckham, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    The RL10-2B engine, a derivative of the RL10, is capable of multimode thrust operation. This engine operates at two low thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), which is approximately 1 to 2% of full thrust, and pumped idle (PI), which is 10% of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient engine thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank pre-pressurization and maneuver thrust for low-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-2B engine during the low thrust operating modes can be accomplished by using a heat exchanger to supply gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector. The oxidizer heat exchanger (OHE) vaporizes the liquid oxygen using hydrogen as the energy source. The design, concept verification testing and analysis for such a heat exchanger is discussed. The design presented uses a high efficiency compact core to vaporize the oxygen, and in the self-contained unit, attenuates any pressure and flow oscillations which result from unstable boiling in the core. This approach is referred to as the high heat transfer design. An alternative approach which prevents unstable boiling of the oxygen by limiting the heat transfer is referred to as the low heat transfer design and is reported in Pratt & Whitney report FR-19135-2.

  4. Research of high power and stable laser in portable Raman spectrometer based on SHINERS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yongsheng; Yin, Yu; Wu, Yulin; Ni, Xuxiang; Zhang, Xiuda; Yan, Huimin

    2013-08-01

    The intensity of Raman light is very weak, which is only from 10-12 to 10-6 of the incident light. In order to obtain the required sensitivity, the traditional Raman spectrometer tends to be heavy weight and large volume, so it is often used as indoor test device. Based on the Shell-Isolated Nanoparticle-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SHINERS) method, Raman optical spectrum signal can be enhanced significantly and the portable Raman spectrometer combined with SHINERS method will be widely used in various fields. The laser source must be stable enough and able to output monochromatic narrow band laser with stable power in the portable Raman spectrometer based on the SHINERS method. When the laser is working, the change of temperature can induce wavelength drift, thus the power stability of excitation light will be affected, so we need to strictly control the working temperature of the laser, In order to ensure the stability of laser power and output current, this paper adopts the WLD3343 laser constant current driver chip of Wavelength Electronics company and MCU P89LPC935 to drive LML - 785.0 BF - XX laser diode(LD). Using this scheme, the Raman spectrometer can be small in size and the drive current can be constant. At the same time, we can achieve functions such as slow start, over-current protection, over-voltage protection, etc. Continuous adjustable output can be realized under control, and the requirement of high power output can be satisfied. Max1968 chip is adopted to realize the accurate control of the laser's temperature. In this way, it can meet the demand of miniaturization. In term of temperature control, integral truncation effect of traditional PID algorithm is big, which is easy to cause static difference. Each output of incremental PID algorithm has nothing to do with the current position, and we can control the output coefficients to avoid full dose output and immoderate adjustment, then the speed of balance will be improved observably. Variable

  5. Efficient Methods for Stable Distributions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    are used, corresponding to the common values used in digital signal processing. Five new functions for discrete/quantized stable distributions were...written. • sgendiscrete generates discrete stable random variates. It works by generating continuous stable random variables using the Chambers- Mallows ...with stable distributions. It allows engineers and scientists to analyze data and work with stable distributions within the common matlab environment

  6. A simple and highly stable free-flow electrophoresis device with thermoelectric cooling system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian; Guo, Cheng-Gang; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Kong, Fan-Zhi; Shen, Qiao-Yi; Yang, Cheng-Zhang; Li, Jun; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Jin, Xin-Qiao

    2013-12-20

    Complex assembly, inconvenient operations, poor control of Joule heating and leakage of solution are still fundamental issues greatly hindering application of free-flow electrophoresis (FFE) for preparative purpose in bio-separation. To address these issues, a novel FFE device was developed based on our previous work. Firstly, a new mechanical structure was designed for compact assembly of separation chamber, fast removal of air bubble, and good anti-leakage performance. Secondly, a highly efficient thermoelectric cooling system was used for dispersing Joule heating for the first time. The systemic experiments revealed the three merits: (i) 3min assembly without any liquid leakage, 80 times faster than pervious FFE device designed by us or commercial device (4h); (ii) 5s removing of air bubble in chamber, 1000-fold faster than a normal one (2h or more) and (iii) good control of Joule heating by the cooling system. These merits endowed the device high stable thermo- and hydro-dynamic flow for long-term separation even under high electric field of 63V/cm. Finally, the developed device was used for up to 8h continuous separation of 5mg/mL fuchsin acid and purification of three model proteins of phycocyanin, myoglobin and cytochrome C, demonstrating the applicability of FFE. The developed FFE device has evident significance to the studies on stem cell, cell or organelle proteomics, and protein complex as well as micro- or nano-particles.

  7. Sub-0.5 V Highly Stable Aqueous Salt Gated Metal Oxide Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungjun; Lee, SeYeong; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Ilseop; Lee, Won-June; Kim, Sohee; Lee, Byung-Geun; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Yoon, Myung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Recently, growing interest in implantable bionics and biochemical sensors spurred the research for developing non-conventional electronics with excellent device characteristics at low operation voltages and prolonged device stability under physiological conditions. Herein, we report high-performance aqueous electrolyte-gated thin-film transistors using a sol-gel amorphous metal oxide semiconductor and aqueous electrolyte dielectrics based on small ionic salts. The proper selection of channel material (i.e., indium-gallium-zinc-oxide) and precautious passivation of non-channel areas enabled the development of simple but highly stable metal oxide transistors manifested by low operation voltages within 0.5 V, high transconductance of ~1.0 mS, large current on-off ratios over 107, and fast inverter responses up to several hundred hertz without device degradation even in physiologically-relevant ionic solutions. In conjunction with excellent transistor characteristics, investigation of the electrochemical nature of the metal oxide-electrolyte interface may contribute to the development of a viable bio-electronic platform directly interfacing with biological entities in vivo. PMID:26271456

  8. Characterization of stratification for an opaque highly stable magnetorheological fluid using vertical axis inductance monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lei; Choi, Young-Tai; Liao, Chang-Rong; Wereley, Norman M.

    2015-05-01

    A key requirement for the commercialization of various magnetorheological fluid (MRF)-based applications is sedimentation stability. In this study, a high viscosity linear polysiloxane (HVLP), which has been used for shock absorbers in heavy equipment, is proposed as a new carrier fluid in highly stable MRFs. The HVLP is known to be a thixotropic (i.e., shear thinning) fluid that shows very high viscosity at very low shear rate and low viscosity at higher shear rate. In this study, using the shear rheometer, the significant thixotropic behavior of the HVLP was experimentally confirmed. In addition, a HVLP carrier fluid-based MRF (HVLP MRF) with 26 vol. % was synthesized and its sedimentation characteristics were experimentally investigated. But, because of the opacity of the HVLP MRF, no mudline can be visually observed. Hence, a vertical axis inductance monitoring system (VAIMS) applied to a circular column of fluid was used to evaluate sedimentation behavior by correlating measured inductance with the volume fraction of dispersed particles (i.e., Fe). Using the VAIMS, Fe concentration (i.e., volume fraction) was monitored for 28 days with a measurement taken every four days, as well as one measurement after 96 days to characterize long-term sedimentation stability. Finally, the concentration of the HVLP MRF as a function of the depth in the column and time, as well as the concentration change versus the depth in the column, are presented and compared with those of a commercially available MRF (i.e., Lord MRF-126CD).

  9. Sub-0.5 V Highly Stable Aqueous Salt Gated Metal Oxide Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungjun; Lee, Seyeong; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Ilseop; Lee, Won-June; Kim, Sohee; Lee, Byung-Geun; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Yoon, Myung-Han

    2015-08-01

    Recently, growing interest in implantable bionics and biochemical sensors spurred the research for developing non-conventional electronics with excellent device characteristics at low operation voltages and prolonged device stability under physiological conditions. Herein, we report high-performance aqueous electrolyte-gated thin-film transistors using a sol-gel amorphous metal oxide semiconductor and aqueous electrolyte dielectrics based on small ionic salts. The proper selection of channel material (i.e., indium-gallium-zinc-oxide) and precautious passivation of non-channel areas enabled the development of simple but highly stable metal oxide transistors manifested by low operation voltages within 0.5 V, high transconductance of ~1.0 mS, large current on-off ratios over 107, and fast inverter responses up to several hundred hertz without device degradation even in physiologically-relevant ionic solutions. In conjunction with excellent transistor characteristics, investigation of the electrochemical nature of the metal oxide-electrolyte interface may contribute to the development of a viable bio-electronic platform directly interfacing with biological entities in vivo.

  10. Super-Stable, Highly Monodisperse Plasmonic Nanocrystals with 500 Gold Atoms: Au~500(SR)~120

    SciTech Connect

    Kumara, Chanaka; Zuo, Xiaobing; Ilavsky, Dr. Jan; Chapman, Karena; Cullen, David A; Dass, Amala

    2014-01-01

    Determining the composition of plasmonic nanoparticles is challenging due to a deficiency in tools capable of accurately evaluating the number of atoms. Mass spectrometry plays a significant role in determining nanoparticle composition at the atomic level. Significant progress has been made in understanding ultra-small gold nanoparticles, like Au25(SR)18 and Au38(SR)24, with a Au core diameter of 0.97 and 1.3 nm, respectively. However, progress in small plasmonic nanoparticles (2 - 5 nm) is currently challenging, due in part to limitations in synthesizing monodisperse nanoparticles. Here, we report a plasmonic nanocrystal that is highly monodisperse, with an unprecedented variation of less than 20 gold atoms. The composition of the super-stable plasmonic nanocrystals at 115 kDa was determined to contain Au500 10SR120 3. The Au~500 system, named Faraduarate-500, is the largest size to be characterized using high resolution ESI mass spectrometry. Atomic pair distribution function (PDF) data shows that the local atomic structure is consistent with a face-centered cubic (fcc) or Marks decahedral arrangement. High resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images show that the diameter is 2.4 0.1 nm. The radius of gyration measured by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), is 1.05 0.05 nm, and the size and the shape of SAXS molecular envelope are in agreement with TEM and PDF measurements.

  11. High temperature stable Li-ion battery separators based on polyetherimides with improved electrolyte compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    l'Abee, Roy; DaRosa, Fabien; Armstrong, Mark J.; Hantel, Moritz M.; Mourzagh, Djamel

    2017-03-01

    We report (electro-)chemically stable, high temperature resistant and fast wetting Li-ion battery separators produced through a phase inversion process using novel polyetherimides (PEI) based on bisphenol-aceton diphthalic anhydride (BPADA) and para-phenylenediamine (pPD). In contrast to previous studies using PEI based on BPADA and meta-phenylenediamine (mPD), the separators reported herein show limited swelling in electrolytes and do not require fillers to render sufficient mechanical strength and ionic conductivity. In this work, the produced 15-25 μm thick PEI-pPD separators show excellent electrolyte compatibility, proven by low degrees of swelling in electrolyte solvents, low contact angles, fast electrolyte wicking and high electrolyte uptake. The separators cover a tunable range of morphologies and properties, leading to a wide range of ionic conductivities as studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) demonstrated dimensional stability up to 220 °C. Finally, single layer graphite/lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide (NMC) pouch cells were assembled using this novel PEI-pPD separator, showing an excellent capacity retention of 89.3% after 1000 1C/2C cycles, with a mean Coulombic efficiency of 99.77% and limited resistance build-up. We conclude that PEI-pPD is a promising new material candidate for high performance separators.

  12. High-performance diesel engines power high-speed hydrofoil catamaran

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The speed of any sea-water craft is dependent on the design of its engine. Mitsubishi Heavy industries has developed a high-speed, fully submerged, super shuttle 400 hydrofoil catamaran ferry, which uses high-performance diesel engines to reach speeds up to 45 knots. The twin-hull design with V section forms permits the use of wide hydrofoils, allowing substantial lifting power. Each of the 16-cylinder engines has a maximum continuous output of 2100 kW at a maximum speed of 2000 r/min. Each catamaran section holds two engines driving a Mitsubishi MWJ-5000A waterjet through a combining reduction gear. 3 figs.

  13. Neurofilaments form a Highly Stable Stationary Cytoskeleton After Reaching a Critical Level in Axons

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Aidong; Sasaki, Takahiro; Rao, Mala V.; Kumar, Asok; Kanumuri, Vivek; Dunlop, David S.; Liem, Ronald K.; Nixon, Ralph A.

    2009-01-01

    The ultrastructural view of the axonal cytoskeleton as an extensively crosslinked network of neurofilaments (NFs) and other cytoskeletal polymers contrasts with the dynamic view suggested by axonal transport studies on cytoskeletal elements. Here we reconcile these perspectives by showing that neurons form a large NF network along axons which is unequivocally stationary, metabolically stable, and maintained by NFs and non-filamentous subunit assemblies undergoing slow transport by intermittent rapid movements and pauses. In mouse primary cortical neurons transfected with EGFP-NFL, formation of this stationary NF network requires a critical level of NFs, which explains its absence in NF-poor developing neurons studied previously. Most NFs at proximal axon regions were in a stationary structure coexisting with a smaller pool of moving EGFP-NFL assemblies that were mainly non-filamentous. Distally along the same axon, EGFP-labeled NFL was much less abundant and we detected only short filaments moving bidirectionally by slow transport (rapid movements and pauses) as previously described. In living mice, >25% of radiolabeled newly synthesized NFs remained in optic axons after slowly transport NFs had exited. Retained NF remained fixed over several months in a non-uniform distribution and exhibited exceptionally slow turnover (t 1/2 > 2.5 months), implying that, at steady state, >90% of NFs in mature optic axons comprise the stationary cytoskeleton and <10% are undergoing slow transport. These findings reconcile in vitro and in vivo axonal transport observations, showing that slowly transport NFs or subunit oligomers are precursors to a highly stable stationary cytoskeletal network that supports mature axons. PMID:19741138

  14. An effective method for the preparation of high temperature stable anatase TiO2 photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, Rachel; Synnott, Damian W.; McCormack, Declan E.; Pillai, Suresh C.

    2016-05-01

    An efficient, rapid and straightforward method for the preparation of nitrogen and fluorine (N, F) codoped high temperature stable anatase using a microwave pre-treatment is reported. Using a single source, ammonium fluoride (NH4F) for both nitrogen and fluorine, effective doping of the precursor titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) was possible. These samples were characterised for their structural and optical properties using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform IR (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. In terms of the anatase to rutile transition enhancement using a novel microwave assisted technique, the sample prepared in a composition of 1:8 TiO2: NH4F at 1200 °C was seen to be most effective, having stable anatase present at 57.1% compared to undoped TiO2 being 100% rutile from 900 °C. This method involves the production of ammonium oxofluorotitanates (NH4TiOF3) at low temperatures. The inclusion of these intermediates greatly reduces the particle size growth and delays the anatase to rutile transition. The photocatalytic activity of these materials was studied by analysing the degradation of an organic dye, rhodamine 6G as a model system and the rate constant was calculated by pseudo-first-order kinetics. These results showed that the doped sample (0.0225 min-1) was three times more active than the undoped sample (0.0076 min-1) and over seven times faster than the commercial TiO2 photocatalyst standard Degussa P-25 calcined at 1200 °C (0.0030 min-1). The formation of intermediate compounds, oxofluorotitanates, was identified as the major reason for a delay in the anatase to rutile transition.

  15. High School Student Information Access and Engineering Design Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentzer, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Developing solutions to engineering design problems requires access to information. Research has shown that appropriately accessing and using information in the design process improves solution quality. This quasi-experimental study provides two groups of high school students with a design problem in a three hour design experience. One group has…

  16. Promoting Engineering Education among High School and Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goonatilake, Rohitha; Bachnak, Rafic A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent decline of students pursuing engineering degree programs is a great concern for many higher education authorities including Federal and State governments. Existing programs in high schools have not yet produced the desired results. Consequently, a number of initiatives to remedy this situation have been proposed and implemented. One such…

  17. HI-TIE: The University, the High School, and Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Robert C.; Maxwell, Lee M.

    1975-01-01

    Describes four years experience at Colorado State University with courses introducing high school students to engineering, including a Fortran IV computer programming course in which tapings of actual campus classroom sessions, supplemented with homework assignments, class roles, quizzes, and examinations were used. Benefits of the transitional…

  18. Implementing Concepts of Pharmaceutical Engineering into High School Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmel, Howard; Hirsch, Linda S.; Simon, Laurent; Burr-Alexander, Levelle; Dave, Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    The Research Experience for Teachers was designed to help high school science teachers develop skills and knowledge in research, science and engineering with a focus on the area of pharmaceutical particulate and composite systems. The experience included time for the development of instructional modules for classroom teaching. Results of the…

  19. Synthesis and characterization of thermally stable palladium-based composite membranes for high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu El Hawa, Hani W.

    In this thesis, the inert gas leak evolution problem in electroless-plated palladium-based composite membranes has been revisited. Palladium was doped with a higher melting point element such as ruthenium or platinum and the rate of increase of the nitrogen leak in the temperature range of 500-600 ºC was determined. The results showed that doping Pd with Pt or Ru significantly reduces the leak growth rate compared to a pure Pd membrane by almost one order of magnitude. The addition of Ru to Pd was sufficient to lower the leak growth rate, though the hydrogen permeance stability was not improved. The Pd-Pt alloy membrane, despite having a lower hydrogen permeance, had a stable hydrogen flux at higher temperatures. The influence of high temperature annealing (> 640 ºC) on the thermal stability of pure Pd composite membranes was also investigated in order to correlate between thermal stability and microstructural evolution. Pure Pd composite membranes were subjected to different high temperature annealing processes. It was found that employing such heat treatments improved the thermal stability of the membranes when operated at lower temperatures; evidenced by a suppression of the rate at which hydrogen selectivity towards nitrogen declined over time. SEM images of the microstructural evolution as a function of temperature revealed that porosity, which is typically present in as-deposited electroless plated films, is significantly reduced after heat treatment. Thermal stability was also evaluated in actual steam methane reforming (SMR) environments. Thin film (˜5.0 microm thick) Pd-Ru and Pd-Au composite membranes were fabricated and used to carry out SMR over commercial Ni or Ru based catalysts at temperatures > 480 °C and pressures up to 2.9 MPa. The conversions obtained (≥ 80%) were significantly higher than the thermodynamic equilibrium predicted (< 35%) for the feed composition at these process conditions. The long term operation (> 500 hours) revealed the

  20. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, Lewis J. H.; Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.; Vasilow, Theodore R.; Bratton, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators.

  1. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, L.J.H.; Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.; Vasilow, T.R.; Bratton, R.J.

    1997-11-11

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators. 4 figs.

  2. Ultra-small, highly stable, and membrane-impermeable fluorescent nanosensors for oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu-dong; Stolwijk, Judith A.; Sperber, Michaela; Meier, Robert J.; Wegener, Joachim; Wolfbeis, Otto S.

    2013-09-01

    We report on the preparation of ultra-small fluorescent nanosensors for oxygen via a one-pot approach. The nanoparticles have a hydrophobic core capable of firmly hosting hydrophobic luminescent oxygen probes. Their surface is composed of a dense and long-chain poly(ethylene glycol) shell, which renders them cell-membrane impermeable but yet highly sensitive to oxygen, and also highly stable in aqueous solutions and cell culture media. These features make them potentially suitable for sensing oxygen in extracellular fluids such as blood, interstitial and brain fluid, in (micro) bioreactors and micro- or nanoscale fluidic devices. Four kinds of nanosensors are presented, whose excitation spectra cover a wide spectral range (395-630 nm), thus matching many common laser lines, and with emission maxima ranging from 565 to 800 nm, thereby minimizing interference from background luminescence of biomatter. The unquenched lifetimes are on the order of 5.8-234 μs, which—in turn—enables lifetime imaging and additional background separation via time-gated methods.

  3. Purification of Ovine Respiratory Complex I Results in a Highly Active and Stable Preparation.

    PubMed

    Letts, James A; Degliesposti, Gianluca; Fiedorczuk, Karol; Skehel, Mark; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2016-11-18

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the largest (∼1 MDa) and the least characterized complex of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Because of the ease of sample availability, previous work has focused almost exclusively on bovine complex I. However, only medium resolution structural analyses of this complex have been reported. Working with other mammalian complex I homologues is a potential approach for overcoming these limitations. Due to the inherent difficulty of expressing large membrane protein complexes, screening of complex I homologues is limited to large mammals reared for human consumption. The high sequence identity among these available sources may preclude the benefits of screening. Here, we report the characterization of complex I purified from Ovis aries (ovine) heart mitochondria. All 44 unique subunits of the intact complex were identified by mass spectrometry. We identified differences in the subunit composition of subcomplexes of ovine complex I as compared with bovine, suggesting differential stability of inter-subunit interactions within the complex. Furthermore, the 42-kDa subunit, which is easily lost from the bovine enzyme, remains tightly bound to ovine complex I. Additionally, we developed a novel purification protocol for highly active and stable mitochondrial complex I using the branched-chain detergent lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol. Our data demonstrate that, although closely related, significant differences exist between the biochemical properties of complex I prepared from ovine and bovine mitochondria and that ovine complex I represents a suitable alternative target for further structural studies.

  4. Stable support based on highly graphitic carbon xerogel for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hong; Zhang, Huamin; Ma, Yuanwei; Xu, Ting; Zhong, Hexiang; Wang, Meiri

    Highly graphitic carbon xerogel (GCX) is prepared by the modified sol-gel polymerization process using cobalt nitrate as the catalyst, followed by high temperature treatment at 1800 °C. The as-prepared GCX is explored as a stable support for Pt in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results of N 2 sorption measurement and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) reveal that GCX has a better mesoporous structure and a preferably higher degree of graphitization, compared with the commercial XC-72 carbon black. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image indicates that Pt nanoparticles are well dispersed on GCX and exhibit relatively narrow size distribution. Accelerated aging test (AAT) based on potential cycling is used to investigate the durability of the as-prepared Pt/GCX in comparison with the commercial Pt/C. Electrochemical analysis demonstrates that the catalyst with GCX as a support exhibits an alleviated degradation rate of electrochemical active surface area (39% for Pt/GCX and 53% for Pt/C). The results of single cell durability tests indicate that the voltage loss of Pt/GCX at 100 mA cm -2 is about 50% lower than that of Pt/C. GCX is expected to be a corrosion resistant electrocatalyst support.

  5. Stable amorphous georgeite as a precursor to a high-activity catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat, Simon A.; Smith, Paul J.; Wells, Peter P.; Chater, Philip A.; Carter, James H.; Morgan, David J.; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta M.; Wagner, Jakob B.; Davies, Thomas E.; Lu, Li; Bartley, Jonathan K.; Taylor, Stuart H.; Spencer, Michael S.; Kiely, Christopher J.; Kelly, Gordon J.; Park, Colin W.; Rosseinsky, Matthew J.; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2016-03-01

    Copper and zinc form an important group of hydroxycarbonate minerals that include zincian malachite, aurichalcite, rosasite and the exceptionally rare and unstable—and hence little known and largely ignored—georgeite. The first three of these minerals are widely used as catalyst precursors for the industrially important methanol-synthesis and low-temperature water-gas shift (LTS) reactions, with the choice of precursor phase strongly influencing the activity of the final catalyst. The preferred phase is usually zincian malachite. This is prepared by a co-precipitation method that involves the transient formation of georgeite; with few exceptions it uses sodium carbonate as the carbonate source, but this also introduces sodium ions—a potential catalyst poison. Here we show that supercritical antisolvent (SAS) precipitation using carbon dioxide (refs 13, 14), a process that exploits the high diffusion rates and solvation power of supercritical carbon dioxide to rapidly expand and supersaturate solutions, can be used to prepare copper/zinc hydroxycarbonate precursors with low sodium content. These include stable georgeite, which we find to be a precursor to highly active methanol-synthesis and superior LTS catalysts. Our findings highlight the value of advanced synthesis methods in accessing unusual mineral phases, and show that there is room for exploring improvements to established industrial catalysts.

  6. Hyper-stable organo-Eu(III) luminophore under high temperature for photo-industrial application.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Ayako; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Seki, Tomohiro; Ito, Hajime; Fushimi, Koji; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-04-14

    Novel organo-Eu(III) luminophores, Eu(hfa)x(CPO)y and Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y (hfa: hexafluoroacetylacetonate, CPO: 4-carboxyphenyl diphenyl phosphine oxide, TCPO: 4,4',4″-tricarboxyphenyl phosphine oxide), were synthesized by the complexation of Eu(III) ions with hfa moieties and CPO or TCPO ligands. The thermal and luminescent stabilities of the luminophores are extremely high. The decomposition temperature of Eu(hfa)x(CPO)y and Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y were determined as 200 and 450 °C, respectively. The luminescence of Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y under UV light irradiation was observed even at a high temperature, 400 °C. The luminescent properties of Eu(hfa)x(CPO)y and Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y were estimated from emission spectra, quantum yields and lifetime measurements. The energy transfer efficiency from hfa moieties to Eu(III) ions in Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y was 59%. The photosensitized luminescence of hyper-stable Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y at 400 °C is demonstrated for future photonic applications.

  7. Does viviparity evolve in cold climate reptiles because pregnant females maintain stable (not high) body temperatures?

    PubMed

    Shine, Richard

    2004-08-01

    Viviparity (live bearing) has evolved from egg laying (oviparity) in many lineages of lizards and snakes, apparently in response to occupancy of cold climates. Explanations for this pattern have focused on the idea that behaviorally thermoregulating (sun-basking) pregnant female reptiles can maintain higher incubation temperatures for their embryos than would be available in nests under the soil surface. This is certainly true at very high elevations, where only viviparous species occur. However, comparisons of nest and lizard temperatures at sites close to the upper elevational limit for oviparous reptiles (presumably, the selective environment where the transition from oviparity to viviparity actually occurs) suggest that reproductive mode has less effect on mean incubation temperatures than on the diel distribution of those temperatures. Nests of the oviparous scincid lizard Bassiana duperreyi showed smooth diel cycles of heating and cooling. In contrast, body temperatures of the viviparous scincid Eulamprus heatwolei rose abruptly in the morning, were high and stable during daylight hours, and fell abruptly at night. Laboratory incubation experiments mimicking these patterns showed that developmental rates of eggs and phenotypic traits of hatchling B. duperreyi were sensitive to this type of thermal variance as well as to mean temperature. Hence, diel distributions as well as mean incubation temperatures may have played an important role in the selective forces for viviparity. More generally, variances as well as mean values of abiotic factors may constitute significant selective forces on life-history evolution.

  8. Miniaturizable Ion-Selective Arrays Based on Highly Stable Polymer Membranes for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Mònica; Lugo, Roberto; Tahirbegi, Islam Bogachan; Samitier, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) is the most common polymer matrix used in the fabrication of ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). However, the surfaces of PVC-based sensors have been reported to show membrane instability. In an attempt to overcome this limitation, here we developed two alternative methods for the preparation of highly stable and robust ion-selective sensors. These platforms are based on the selective electropolymerization of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), where the sulfur atoms contained in the polymer covalently interact with the gold electrode, also permitting controlled selective attachment on a miniaturized electrode in an array format. This platform sensor was improved with the crosslinking of the membrane compounds with poly(ethyleneglycol) diglycidyl ether (PEG), thus also increasing the biocompatibility of the sensor. The resulting ISE membranes showed faster signal stabilization of the sensor response compared with that of the PVC matrix and also better reproducibility and stability, thus making these platforms highly suitable candidates for the manufacture of robust implantable sensors. PMID:24999717

  9. Development of catalytically active and highly stable catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekeun; Xie, Tianyuan; Jung, Wonsuk; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Ganesan, Prabhu; Popov, Branko N.

    2015-01-01

    Novel procedures are developed for the synthesis of highly stable carbon composite catalyst supports (CCCS-800 °C and CCCS-1100 °C) and an activated carbon composite catalyst support (A-CCCS). These supports are synthesized through: (i) surface modification with acids and inclusion of oxygen groups, (ii) metal-catalyzed pyrolysis, and (iii) chemical leaching to remove excess metal used to dope the support. The procedure results in increasing carbon graphitization and inclusion of non-metallic active sites on the support surface. Catalytic activity of CCCS indicates an onset potential of 0.86 V for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with well-defined kinetic and mass-transfer regions and ∼2.5% H2O2 production in rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) studies. Support stability studies at 1.2 V constant potential holding for 400 h indicate high stability for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS catalyst with a cell potential loss of 27 mV at 800 mA cm-2 under H2-air, 32% mass activity loss, and 30% ECSA loss. Performance evaluation in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell shows power densities (rated) of 0.18 and 0.23 gPt kW-1 for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS and 30% Pt/CCCS-800 °C catalysts, respectively. The stabilities of various supports developed in this study are compared with those of a commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  10. Mesoporous graphene-like nanobowls as Pt electrocatalyst support for highly active and stable methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zaoxue; He, Guoqiang; Jiang, Zhifeng; Wei, Wei; Gao, Lina; Xie, Jimin

    2015-06-01

    Mesoporous graphene-like nanobowls (GLBs) with high surface area of 1091 m2 g-1, high pore volume of 2.7 cm3 g-1 and average pore diameter of 9.8 nm are synthesized through template method. The GLBs with inherent excellent electrical conductivity and chemical inertia show the properties of well mass transfer, poison resistance and stable loading of smaller Pt particles. Therefore, the Pt/GLB catalyst shows much higher activity and stability than that of commercial Pt/C (TKK) for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). Therein, the peak current density on Pt/GLB (2075 mA mgPt-1) for MOR is 2.87 times that of commercial Pt/C (723 mA mgPt-1); and the onset potential for the MOR on the former is negatively shifted about 160 mV compared with that on the latter. The catalytic performances of the Pt/GLB are also better than those of the Pt loading on mesoporous amorphous carbon nanobowls (Pt/BLC), indicating promotion effect of graphite on Pt catalytic performance.

  11. Highly Stable Amine Functionalized Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Designed for Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI)

    PubMed Central

    Arami, Hamed; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a promising medical imaging technology that uses iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) as clinically safe tracers. The core and hydrodynamic size of these NPs determine the signal intensity and spatial resolution in MPI, whilst their monodispersity when preserved during the biomedical applications, generates a consistently high quality MPI image. Using an effective process to coat the synthesized NPs with amine terminated PEG molecules, we show by dynamic light scattering (DLS) that they are water-soluble with long-term stability in biological media such as phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and sodium bicarbonate buffers and Dulbecco’s modified Eagle medium (DMEM) enriched with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Further, using magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS), to measure the particle response function (PRF), defined as the derivative of the magnetization of the nanoparticles, we predict the MPI performance of these nanoparticles at a driving field frequency of 25 kHz. The MPS efficacy of the functionalized nanoparticles was also monitored over time, and both signal intensity and resolution remained unchanged even after seven days of incubation. This is attributed to the dominant contribution of the Néel relaxation mechanism of the monodisperse and highly stable nanoparticles, which was preserved through the incubation period. PMID:25554710

  12. Hyper-stable organo-EuIII luminophore under high temperature for photo-industrial application

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Ayako; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Seki, Tomohiro; Ito, Hajime; Fushimi, Koji; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Novel organo-EuIII luminophores, Eu(hfa)x(CPO)y and Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y (hfa: hexafluoroacetylacetonate, CPO: 4-carboxyphenyl diphenyl phosphine oxide, TCPO: 4,4′,4″-tricarboxyphenyl phosphine oxide), were synthesized by the complexation of EuIII ions with hfa moieties and CPO or TCPO ligands. The thermal and luminescent stabilities of the luminophores are extremely high. The decomposition temperature of Eu(hfa)x(CPO)y and Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y were determined as 200 and 450 °C, respectively. The luminescence of Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y under UV light irradiation was observed even at a high temperature, 400 °C. The luminescent properties of Eu(hfa)x(CPO)y and Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y were estimated from emission spectra, quantum yields and lifetime measurements. The energy transfer efficiency from hfa moieties to EuIII ions in Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y was 59%. The photosensitized luminescence of hyper-stable Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y at 400 °C is demonstrated for future photonic applications. PMID:27074731

  13. A stable 1D multigroup high-order low-order method

    DOE PAGES

    Yee, Ben Chung; Wollaber, Allan Benton; Haut, Terry Scot; ...

    2016-07-13

    The high-order low-order (HOLO) method is a recently developed moment-based acceleration scheme for solving time-dependent thermal radiative transfer problems, and has been shown to exhibit orders of magnitude speedups over traditional time-stepping schemes. However, a linear stability analysis by Haut et al. (2015 Haut, T. S., Lowrie, R. B., Park, H., Rauenzahn, R. M., Wollaber, A. B. (2015). A linear stability analysis of the multigroup High-Order Low-Order (HOLO) method. In Proceedings of the Joint International Conference on Mathematics and Computation (M&C), Supercomputing in Nuclear Applications (SNA) and the Monte Carlo (MC) Method; Nashville, TN, April 19–23, 2015. American Nuclear Society.)more » revealed that the current formulation of the multigroup HOLO method was unstable in certain parameter regions. Since then, we have replaced the intensity-weighted opacity in the first angular moment equation of the low-order (LO) system with the Rosseland opacity. Furthermore, this results in a modified HOLO method (HOLO-R) that is significantly more stable.« less

  14. A stable 1D multigroup high-order low-order method

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Ben Chung; Wollaber, Allan Benton; Haut, Terry Scot; Park, HyeongKae

    2016-07-13

    The high-order low-order (HOLO) method is a recently developed moment-based acceleration scheme for solving time-dependent thermal radiative transfer problems, and has been shown to exhibit orders of magnitude speedups over traditional time-stepping schemes. However, a linear stability analysis by Haut et al. (2015 Haut, T. S., Lowrie, R. B., Park, H., Rauenzahn, R. M., Wollaber, A. B. (2015). A linear stability analysis of the multigroup High-Order Low-Order (HOLO) method. In Proceedings of the Joint International Conference on Mathematics and Computation (M&C), Supercomputing in Nuclear Applications (SNA) and the Monte Carlo (MC) Method; Nashville, TN, April 19–23, 2015. American Nuclear Society.) revealed that the current formulation of the multigroup HOLO method was unstable in certain parameter regions. Since then, we have replaced the intensity-weighted opacity in the first angular moment equation of the low-order (LO) system with the Rosseland opacity. Furthermore, this results in a modified HOLO method (HOLO-R) that is significantly more stable.

  15. Highly Stable and Effective Doping of Graphene by Selective Atomic Layer Deposition of Ruthenium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsu; Kim, Ki-Ju; Lee, Seung-Joon; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Cho, Seong-Yong; Kim, Min-Sik; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Bum

    2017-01-11

    The sheet resistance of graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition is found to be significantly reduced by the selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Ru onto defect sites such as wrinkles and grain boundaries. With 200 ALD cycles, the sheet resistance is reduced from ∼500 to <50 Ω/sq, and the p-type carrier density is drastically increased from 10(13) to 10(15) cm(-2). At the same time, the carrier mobility is reduced from ∼670 to less than 100 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). This doping of graphene proved to be very stable, with the electrical properties remaining unchanged over eight weeks of measurement. Selective deposition of Ru on defect sites also makes it possible to obtain a graphene film that is both highly transparent and electrically conductive (e.g., a sheet resistance of 125 Ω/sq with 92% optical transmittance at 550 nm). Highly doped graphene layers achieved by Ru ALD are therefore expected to provide a viable basis for transparent conducting electrodes.

  16. Synchronizing Photography For High-Speed-Engine Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, K. S.

    1989-01-01

    Light flashes when shaft reaches predetermined angle. Synchronization system facilitates visualization of flow in high-speed internal-combustion engines. Designed for cinematography and holographic interferometry, system synchronizes camera and light source with predetermined rotational angle of engine shaft. 10-bit resolution of absolute optical shaft encoder adapted, and 2 to tenth power combinations of 10-bit binary data computed to corresponding angle values. Pre-computed angle values programmed into EPROM's (erasable programmable read-only memories) to use as angle lookup table. Resolves shaft angle to within 0.35 degree at rotational speeds up to 73,240 revolutions per minute.

  17. Highly stable and imperceptible electronics utilizing photoactivated heterogeneous sol-gel metal-oxide dielectrics and semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jeong-Wan; Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kang, Jin-Gu; Kim, Myung-Gil; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Ko, Hyungduk; Kim, Jiwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Sung Kyu

    2015-02-18

    Incorporation of Zr into an AlOx matrix generates an intrinsically activated ZAO surface enabling the formation of a stable semiconducting IGZO film and good interfacial properties. Photochemically annealed metal-oxide devices and circuits with the optimized sol-gel ZAO dielectric and IGZO semiconductor layers demonstrate the high performance and electrically/mechanically stable operation of flexible electronics fabricated via a low-temperature solution process.

  18. Highly selective and stable carbon dioxide uptake in polyindole-derived microporous carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Muhammad; Tiwari, Jitendra N; Kemp, K Christain; Yousuf, Muhammad; Kim, Kwang S

    2013-05-21

    Adsorption with solid sorbents is considered to be one of the most promising methods for the capture of carbon dioxide (CO₂) from power plant flue gases. In this study, microporous carbon materials used for CO₂ capture were synthesized by the chemical activation of polyindole nanofibers (PIF) at temperatures from 500 to 800 °C using KOH, which resulted in nitrogen (N)-doped carbon materials. The N-doped carbon materials were found to be microporous with an optimal adsorption pore size for CO₂ of 0.6 nm and a maximum (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) BET surface area of 1185 m(2) g(-1). The PIF activated at 600 °C (PIF6) has a surface area of 527 m(2) g(-1) and a maximum CO₂ storage capacity of 3.2 mmol g(-1) at 25 °C and 1 bar. This high CO₂ uptake is attributed to its highly microporous character and optimum N content. Additionally, PIF6 material displays a high CO₂ uptake at low pressure (1.81 mmol g(-1) at 0.2 bar and 25 °C), which is the best low pressure CO₂ uptake reported for carbon-based materials. The adsorption capacity of this material remained remarkably stable even after 10 cycles. The isosteric heat of adsorption was calculated to be in the range of 42.7-24.1 kJ mol(-1). Besides the excellent CO₂ uptake and stability, PIF6 also exhibits high selectivity values for CO₂ over N₂, CH₄, and H₂ of 58.9, 12.3, and 101.1 at 25 °C, respectively, and these values are significantly higher than reported values.

  19. Stable Plastid Transformation for High-Level Recombinant Protein Expression: Promises and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Meili; Li, Yongfei; Xue, Xiaochang; Wang, Xianfeng; Long, Jiangang

    2012-01-01

    Plants are a promising expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. However, low protein productivity remains a major obstacle that limits extensive commercialization of whole plant and plant cell bioproduction platform. Plastid genetic engineering offers several advantages, including high levels of transgenic expression, transgenic containment via maternal inheritance, and multigene expression in a single transformation event. In recent years, the development of optimized expression strategies has given a huge boost to the exploitation of plastids in molecular farming. The driving forces behind the high expression level of plastid bioreactors include codon optimization, promoters and UTRs, genotypic modifications, endogenous enhancer and regulatory elements, posttranslational modification, and proteolysis. Exciting progress of the high expression level has been made with the plastid-based production of two particularly important classes of pharmaceuticals: vaccine antigens, therapeutic proteins, and antibiotics and enzymes. Approaches to overcome and solve the associated challenges of this culture system that include low transformation frequencies, the formation of inclusion bodies, and purification of recombinant proteins will also be discussed. PMID:23093835

  20. Engineering biosynthesis of high-value compounds in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Ellis C; Kelly, Steven

    2016-10-04

    The photosynthetic, autotrophic lifestyle of plants and algae position them as ideal platform organisms for sustainable production of biomolecules. However, their use in industrial biotechnology is limited in comparison to heterotrophic organisms, such as bacteria and yeast. This usage gap is in part due to the challenges in generating genetically modified plants and algae and in part due to the difficulty in the development of synthetic biology tools for manipulating gene expression in these systems. Plant and algal metabolism, pre-installed with multiple biosynthetic modules for precursor compounds, bypasses the requirement to install these pathways in conventional production organisms, and creates new opportunities for the industrial production of complex molecules. This review provides a broad overview of the successes, challenges and future prospects for genetic engineering in plants and algae for enhanced or de novo production of biomolecules. The toolbox of technologies and strategies that have been used to engineer metabolism are discussed, and the potential use of engineered plants for industrial manufacturing of large quantities of high-value compounds is explored. This review also discusses the routes that have been taken to modify the profiles of primary metabolites for increasing the nutritional quality of foods as well as the production of specialized metabolites, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals. As the universe of high-value biosynthetic pathways continues to expand, and the tools to engineer these pathways continue to develop, it is likely plants and algae will become increasingly valuable for the biomanufacturing of high-value compounds.

  1. High-pressure fuel injection system for diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshi, Y.

    1986-01-21

    This patent describes a high-pressure fuel injection system for a diesel engine. This system consists of: (a) main pumps for injecting fuel each located at one of cylinders of the engine and formed with a fuel injecting port, a discharge valve located in a path connecting the first injected fuel space with the fuel injecting port. The discharge valve is opened when the fuel to be injected reaches a predetermined pressure level. A first injection timing fuel space fluidly connected with the first injected fuel space through a movable shuttle is filled with injection timing fuel, and a plunger varies the volume of the first injection timing fuel space; (b) a metering and distributing pump formed with injection fuel outputs and injection timing fuel outlets corresponding in number to the cylinders of the engine for discharging fuel in timed relation to the rotation of the engine; (c) fuel metering valves for metering fuel flowing into the second injected fuel space and second injection timing fuel space respectively; (d) pipes for fluidly connecting the first injected fuel space and first injection timing fuel space of the main pump for injecting fuel with the injected fuel outlets and injection timing fuel outlets of the metering and distributing pump respectively; and (e) a rocker arm mechanism for driving the plunger of the main pump for injecting fuel in timed relation to the rotation of the engine.

  2. High-alcohol microemulsion fuel performance in a diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    West, B.H.; Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    Incidence of methanol use in diesel engines is increasing rapidly due to the potential to reduce both diesel particulate emissions and petroleum consumption. Because simple alcohols and conventional diesel fuel are normally immiscible, most tests to date have used neat to near-neat alcohol, or blends incorporating surfactants or other alcohols. Alcohol's poor ignition quality usually necssitates the use of often expensive cetane enhancers, full-time glow plugs, or spark assist. Reported herein are results of screening tests of clear microemulsion and micellar fuels which contain 10 to 65% C{sub 1}--C{sub 4} alcohol. Ignition performance and NO emissions were measured for clear, stable fuel blends containing alcohols, diesel fuel and additives such as alkyl nitrates, acrylic acids, and several vegetable oil derivatives. Using a diesel engine calibrated with reference fuels, cetane numbers for fifty four blends were estimated. The apparent cetane numbers ranged from around 20 to above 50 with the majority between 30 and 45. Emissions of nitric oxide were measured for a few select fuels and were found to be 10 to 20% lower than No. 2 diesel fuel. 36 refs., 87 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Effects of Professional Development on Infusing Engineering Design into High School Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Zanj Kano

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of professional development (PD) on the infusion of engineering design into high school curricula. Four inservice teachers with backgrounds in physics, chemistry, industrial education, math, and electrical engineering participated in the 2006 National Center of Engineering and Technology…

  4. Highly Stable Evolution of Earth's Future Orbit despite Chaotic Behavior of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeebe, Richard E.

    2015-09-01

    Due to the chaotic nature of the solar system, the question of its dynamic long-term stability can only be answered in a statistical sense, for instance, based on numerical ensemble integrations of nearby orbits. Destabilization of the inner planets, including catastrophic encounters and/or collisions involving the Earth, has been suggested to be initiated through a large increase in Mercury’s eccentricity ({e}{M}), with an estimated probability of ˜1%. However, it has recently been shown that the statistics of numerical solar system integrations are sensitive to the accuracy and type of numerical algorithm. Here, I report results from computationally demanding ensemble integrations (N = 1600 with slightly different initial conditions) at unprecedented accuracy based on the full equations of motion of the eight planets and Pluto over 5 Gyr, including contributions from general relativity. The standard symplectic algorithm used for long-term integrations produced spurious results for highly eccentric orbits and during close encounters, which were hence integrated with a suitable Bulirsch-Stoer algorithm, specifically designed for these situations. The present study yields odds for a large increase in Mercury’s eccentricity that are less than previous estimates. Strikingly, in two solutions, Mercury continued on highly eccentric orbits (after reaching {e}{M} values >0.93) for 80-100 Myr before colliding with Venus or the Sun. Most importantly, none of the 1600 solutions led to a close encounter involving the Earth or a destabilization of Earth’s orbit in the future. I conclude that Earth’s orbit will be dynamically highly stable for billions of years in the future, despite the chaotic behavior of the solar system.

  5. High-resolution profiling of the stable isotopes of water in unsaturated coal waste rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, S. Lee; Hendry, M. Jim; Carey, Sean K.

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of the rate of water migration through unsaturated mine waste rock dumps is an essential element in assessing the chemical loading from these landforms; yet our understanding of how water moves into, through and out of waste rock is incomplete. To further understand the rates and magnitude of percolation through waste rock, deep high-resolution (every 0.1-4.5 m) depth profiles of the stable isotopes of water (δ2H and δ18O) at two coal waste rock dumps and a natural alluvial deposit down-gradient of one of the dumps were collected in the Elk Valley, British Columbia, Canada. The profiles were generated using vapor equilibrium techniques applied to continuous core samples collected using dry sonic drilling methods. Elevated core temperatures (up to 80 °C) were measured during sonic coring. The isotopic values of pore waters measured in the core samples were corrected for water loss to the atmosphere attributed to the elevated core temperatures. The average isotopic composition of the core samples were compared to water collected from rock drains discharging from the base of the dumps. The results indicate that high-resolution profiles of δ2H and δ18O can be measured to depths of 86 m in coal waste rock dumps and, based on the seasonal cycles in the isotopic composition of recharging water, can be used to characterize the migration of recharge water within these dumps. These profiles also suggest that recharge into these dumps occurs from both rain as well as snow melt and may be as high as 400-600 mm/yr (60-75% of annual precipitation). Combined with the relatively low volumetric water contents of these dumps (5-10%) the rates of water migration through the dumps are tens of meters each year.

  6. Highly Stable Operation of Lithium Metal Batteries Enabled by the Formation of a Transient High Concentration Electrolyte Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Mei, Donghai; Engelhard, Mark H.; Cartmell, Samuel S.; Polzin, Bryant; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Xu, Wu

    2016-02-08

    Lithium (Li) metal has been extensively investigated as an anode for rechargeable battery applications due to its ultrahigh specific capacity and the lowest redox potential. However, significant challenges including dendrite growth and low Coulombic efficiency are still hindering the practical applications of rechargeable Li metal batteries. Here, we demonstrate that long-term cycling of Li metal batteries can be realized by the formation of a transient high concentration electrolyte layer near the surface of Li metal anode during high rate discharge process. The highly concentrated Li+ ions in this transient layer will immediately solvate with the available solvent molecules and facilitate the formation of a stable and flexible SEI layer composed of a poly(ethylene carbonate) framework integrated with other organic/inorganic lithium salts. This SEI layer largely suppresses the corrosion of Li metal anode by free organic solvents and enables the long-term operation of Li metal batteries. The fundamental findings in this work provide a new direction for the development and operation of Li metal batteries that could be operated at high current densities for a wide range of applications.

  7. 21. VIEW TO NORTHWEST, ENGINE/PUMP HOUSE EXTENSION, HIGH PRESSURE PISTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW TO NORTHWEST, ENGINE/PUMP HOUSE EXTENSION, HIGH PRESSURE PISTON OF STEAM ENGINE NO. 4; CONTROL PANEL MOUNTED ON THE ENGINE; FLOOR VALVES CONTROL THE STEAM. - Deer Island Pumping Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  8. Engine having a high pressure hydraulic system and low pressure lubricating system

    DOEpatents

    Bartley, Bradley E.; Blass, James R.; Gibson, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    An engine includes a high pressure hydraulic system having a high pressure pump and at least one hydraulically-actuated device attached to an engine housing. A low pressure engine lubricating system is attached to the engine housing and includes a circulation conduit fluidly connected to an outlet from the high pressure pump.

  9. Benghalensin, a highly stable serine protease from the latex of medicinal plant Ficus benghalensis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anurag; Kumari, Moni; Jagannadham, M V

    2009-12-09

    A serine protease was purified to homogeneity from the latex of medicinal plant Ficus benghalensis by a single step procedure using anion exchange chromatography. The enzyme, named benghalensin, has a molecular mass of 47 kDa (MALDI-TOF and SDS-PAGE). The purified protein is a glycoprotein, and the enzymatic activity is solely inhibited by PMSF and chymostatin, indicating that the enzyme belongs to the serine protease class. The isoelectric point of the enzyme is pH 4.4 with optimum pH and temperature of pH 8.0 and 55 degrees C respectively. The extinction coefficient (epsilon(1%)(280)) of the enzyme is 29.25, and the molecular structure consists of 17 tryptophan, 31 tyrosine and 09 cysteine residues. Peptide mass fingerprinting and de novo sequencing of tryptic-digested fragments of the protein did not find any putative conserved domains in BLAST analysis. The enzyme is stable and retains full activity over a broad range of pH and temperature or prolonged storage at 4 degrees C. Simple purification, high yield and stability enable exploration of the protein for structure-function relationship studies as well as other applications.

  10. A highly-active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; ...

    2016-02-19

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superiormore » activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm–2 and 100 mA cm–2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Lastly, phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation.« less

  11. A highly-active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I.; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-02-19

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superior activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm–2 and 100 mA cm–2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Lastly, phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation.

  12. Phase restructuring in transition metal dichalcogenides for highly stable energy storage

    DOE PAGES

    Leng, Kai; Chen, Zhongxin; Zhao, Xiaoxu; ...

    2016-09-16

    Achieving homogeneous phase transition and uniform charge distribution is essential for good cycle stability and high capacity when phase conversion materials are used as electrodes. Herein, we show that chemical lithiation of bulk 2H-MoS2 distorts its crystalline domains in three primary directions to produce mosaic-like 1T' nanocrystalline domains, which improve phase and charge uniformity during subsequent electrochemical phase conversion. 1T'-LixMoS2, a macroscopic dense material with interconnected nanoscale grains, shows excellent cycle stability and rate capability in a lithium rechargeable battery compared to bulk or exfoliated-restacked MoS2. Transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the interconnected MoS2 nanocrystals created during the phasemore » change process are reformable even after multiple cycles of galvanostatic charging/discharging, which allows them to play important roles in the long term cycling performance of the chemically intercalated TMD materials. Finally, these studies shed light on how bulk TMDs can be processed into quasi-2D nanophase material for stable energy storage.« less

  13. A highly active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I.; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-01-01

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superior activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm−2 and 100 mA cm−2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation. PMID:26892437

  14. (Un)folding of a high-temperature stable polyalanine helix from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Volker; Rossi, Mariana; Tkatchenko, Alex; Scheffler, Matthias

    2010-03-01

    Peptides in vacuo offer a unique, well-defined testbed to match experiments directly against first-principles approaches that predict the intramolecular interactions that govern peptide and protein folding. In this respect, the polyalanine-based peptide Ac-Ala15-LysH^+ is particularly interesting, as it is experimentally known to form helices in vacuo, with stable secondary structure up to 750 K [1]. Room-temperature folding and unfolding timescales are usually not accessible by direct first-principles simulations, but this high T scale allows a rare direct first-principles view. We here use van der Waals corrected [2] density functional theory in the PBE generalized gradient approximation as implemented in the all-electron code FHI-aims [3] to show by Born-Oppenheimer ab initio molecular dynamics that Ac-Ala15-LysH^+ indeed unfolds rapidly (within a few ps) at T=800 K and 1000 K, but not at 500 K. We show that the structural stability of the α helix at 500 K is critically linked to a correct van der Waals treatment, and that the designed LysH^+ ionic termination is essential for the observed helical secondary structure. [1] M. Kohtani et al., JACS 126, 7420 (2004). [2] A. Tkatchenko, M. Scheffler, PRL 102, 073005 (2009). [3] V. Blum et al, Comp. Phys. Comm. 180, 2175 (2009).

  15. Stable droplet generator for a high brightness laser produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokhodov, A.; Krivokorytov, M.; Sidelnikov, Yu.; Krivtsun, V.; Medvedev, V.; Bushuev, V.; Koshelev, K.; Glushkov, D.; Ellwi, S.

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of the low-melting liquid metal droplets generation based on excited Rayleigh jet breakup. We discuss on the operation of the industrial and in-house designed and manufactured dispensing devices for the droplets generation. Droplet diameter can be varied in the range of 30-90 μm. The working frequency of the droplets, velocity, and the operating temperature were in the ranges of 20-150 kHz, 4-15 m/s, and up to 250 °C, respectively. The standard deviations for the droplet center of mass position both their diameter σ < 1 μm at the distance of 45 mm from the nozzle. Stable operation in the long-term (over 1.5 h) was demonstrated for a wide range of the droplet parameters: diameters, frequencies, and velocities. Physical factors affecting the stability of the generator operation have been identified. The technique for droplet synchronization, allowing using the droplet as a target for laser produced plasma, has been created; in particular, the generator has been successfully used in a high brightness extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light source. The operation with frequency up to 8 kHz was demonstrated as a result of the experimental simulation, which can provide an average brightness of the EUV source up to ˜1.2 kW/mm2 sr.

  16. A highly stable nonbiofouling surface with well-packed grafted zwitterionic polysulfobetaine for plasma protein repulsion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung; Liao, Shih-Chieh; Higuchi, Akon; Ruaan, Ruoh-Chyu; Chu, Chih-Wei; Chen, Wen-Yih

    2008-05-20

    An ideal nonbiofouling surface for biomedical applications requires both high-efficient antifouling characteristics in relation to biological components and long-term material stability from biological systems. In this study we demonstrate the performance and stability of an antifouling surface with grafted zwitterionic sulfobetaine methacrylate (SBMA). The SBMA was grafted from a bromide-covered gold surface via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization to form well-packed polymer brushes. Plasma protein adsorption on poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (polySBMA) grafted surfaces was measured with a surface plasmon resonance sensor. It is revealed that an excellent stable nonbiofouling surface with grafted polySBMA can be performed with a cycling test of the adsorption of three model proteins in a wide range of various salt types, buffer compositions, solution pH levels, and temperatures. This work also demonstrates the adsorption of plasma proteins and the adhesion of platelets from human blood plasma on the polySBMA grafted surface. It was found that the polySBMA grafted surface effectively reduces the plasma protein adsorption from platelet-poor plasma solution to a level superior to that of adsorption on a surface terminated with tetra(ethylene glycol). The adhesion and activation of platelets from platelet-rich plasma solution were not observed on the polySBMA grafted surface. This work further concludes that a surface with good hemocompatibility can be achieved by the well-packed surface-grafted polySBMA brushes.

  17. Research on stable, high-efficiency, large-area amorphous silicon based modules -- Task B

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, K.W.; Willet, D.R. )

    1990-10-01

    This report documents progress in developing a stable, high- efficiency, four-terminal hybrid tandem module. The module consists of a semi-transparent, thin-film silicon:hydrogen alloy (TFS) top circuit and a copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}) bottom circuit. Film deposition and patterning processes were successfully extended to 0.4-m{sup 2} substrates. A 33.2-W (8.4% efficient) module with a 3970-cm{sup 2} aperture area and a white back reflector was demonstrated; without the back reflector, the module produced 30.2 W (7.6% efficient). Placing a laminated, 31.6-W, 8.1%-efficient CuInSe{sub 2} module underneath this TFS module, with an air gap between the two, produces 11.2 W (2.9% efficient) over a 3883-cm{sup 2} aperture area. Therefore, the four-terminal tandem power output is 41.4 W, translating to a 10.5% aperture-area efficiency. Subsequently, a 37.8-W (9.7% aperture-area efficiency) CuInSe{sub 2} module was demonstrated with a 3905-cm{sup 2} aperture area. Future performances of single-junction and tandem modules of this size were modeled, and predicted power outputs exceed 50 W (13% efficient) for CuInSe{sub 2} and 65 W (17% efficient) for TFS/CuInSe{sub 2} tandem modules.

  18. Mechanically stable, high aspect ratio, multifilar, wound, ribbon-type conductor and method for manufacturing same

    DOEpatents

    Cottingham, James G.

    1987-01-01

    A mechanically stable, wound, multifilar, ribbon-type conductor having a cross-sectional aspect ratio which may be greater than 12:1, comprising a plurality of conductive strands wound to form a flattened helix containing a plastic strip into which the strands have been pressed so as to form a bond between the strip and the strands. The bond mechanically stabilizes the conductor under tension, preventing it from collapsing into a tubular configuration. In preferred embodiments the plastic strip may be polytetrafluoroethylene, and the conductive strands may be formed from a superconductive material. Conductors in accordance with the present invention may be manufactured by winding a plurality of conductive strands around a hollow mandrel; the cross-section of a hollow mandrel; the cross-section of the mandrel continuously varying from substantially circular to a high aspect ratio elipse while maintaining a constant circumference. The wound conductive strands are drawn from the mandrel as a multifilar helix while simultaneously a plastic strip is fed through the hollow mandrel so that it is contained within the helix as it is withdrawn from the mandrel. The helical conductor is then compressed into a ribbon-like form and the strands are bonded to the plastic strip by a combination of heat and pressure.

  19. Mechanically stable, high aspect ratio, multifilar, wound, ribbon-type conductor and method for manufacturing same

    DOEpatents

    Cottingham, James G.

    1987-11-03

    A mechanically stable, wound, multifilar, ribbon-type conductor having a cross-sectional aspect ratio which may be greater than 12:1, comprising a plurality of conductive strands wound to form a flattened helix containing a plastic strip into which the strands have been pressed so as to form a bond between the strip and the strands. The bond mechanically stabilizes the conductor under tension, preventing it from collapsing into a tubular configuration. In preferred embodiments the plastic strip may be polytetrafluoroethylene, and the conductive strands may be formed from a superconductive material. Conductors in accordance with the present invention may be manufactured by winding a plurality of conductive strands around a hollow mandrel; the cross-section of a hollow mandrel; the cross-section of the mandrel continuously varying from substantially circular to a high aspect ratio elipse while maintaining a constant circumference. The wound conductive strands are drawn from the mandrel as a multifilar helix while simultaneously a plastic strip is fed through the hollow mandrel so that it is contained within the helix as it is withdrawn from the mandrel. The helical conductor is then compressed into a ribbon-like form and the strands are bonded to the plastic strip by a combination of heat and pressure.

  20. Phase Restructuring in Transition Metal Dichalcogenides for Highly Stable Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Leng, Kai; Chen, Zhongxin; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Tang, Wei; Tian, Bingbing; Nai, Chang Tai; Zhou, Wu; Loh, Kian Ping

    2016-09-28

    Achieving homogeneous phase transition and uniform charge distribution is essential for good cycle stability and high capacity when phase conversion materials are used as electrodes. Herein, we show that chemical lithiation of bulk 2H-MoS2 distorts its crystalline domains in three primary directions to produce mosaic-like 1T' nanocrystalline domains, which improve phase and charge uniformity during subsequent electrochemical phase conversion. 1T'-LixMoS2, a macroscopic dense material with interconnected nanoscale grains, shows excellent cycle stability and rate capability in a lithium rechargeable battery compared to bulk or exfoliated-restacked MoS2. Transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the interconnected MoS2 nanocrystals created during the phase change process are reformable even after multiple cycles of galvanostatic charging/discharging, which allows them to play important roles in the long term cycling performance of the chemically intercalated TMD materials. These studies shed light on how bulk TMDs can be processed into quasi-2D nanophase material for stable energy storage.

  1. Phase restructuring in transition metal dichalcogenides for highly stable energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, Kai; Chen, Zhongxin; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Tang, Wei; Tian, Bingbing; Nai, Chang Tai; Zhou, Wu; Loh, Kian Ping

    2016-09-16

    Achieving homogeneous phase transition and uniform charge distribution is essential for good cycle stability and high capacity when phase conversion materials are used as electrodes. Herein, we show that chemical lithiation of bulk 2H-MoS2 distorts its crystalline domains in three primary directions to produce mosaic-like 1T' nanocrystalline domains, which improve phase and charge uniformity during subsequent electrochemical phase conversion. 1T'-LixMoS2, a macroscopic dense material with interconnected nanoscale grains, shows excellent cycle stability and rate capability in a lithium rechargeable battery compared to bulk or exfoliated-restacked MoS2. Transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the interconnected MoS2 nanocrystals created during the phase change process are reformable even after multiple cycles of galvanostatic charging/discharging, which allows them to play important roles in the long term cycling performance of the chemically intercalated TMD materials. Finally, these studies shed light on how bulk TMDs can be processed into quasi-2D nanophase material for stable energy storage.

  2. Highly stable antibacterial silver nanoparticles as selective fluorescent sensor for Fe³⁺ ions.

    PubMed

    Makwana, Bharat A; Vyas, Disha J; Bhatt, Keyur D; Jain, Vinod K; Agrawal, Yadvendra K

    2015-01-05

    Calix[4]resorcinarene polyhydrazide (CPH) protected water dispersible fluorescent silver nanaoparticles (AgNps) were prepared by one-pot method using water soluble CPH and AgNO₃. (CPH) bearing hydrazide group on its periphery acts as a reducing agent and its web type of structure as a stabilizing agent for the formation of calix protected silver nanoparticles (CPH-AgNps). CPH-AgNps were found to be highly stable over 120 days at room temperature and at varied pH. CPH-AgNps were characterized by UV/Vis-spectroscopy, particle size analyzer (PSA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Duly characterized nanoparticles were explored for their application as sensitive and selective fluorescent chemosensors for various metal ions. It was found that nanoparticles were selective and sensitive only for Fe(3+) ions with the linear range of detection from 0.1 μM to 10 μM. CPH-AgNps were also found to exhibit good antimicrobial activity when compared with standard Chloramphenicol. The selectivity and antimicrobial activity of CPH-AgNps suggests its potential use as a sensor for Fe(III) ions in ecosystems prone to industrial pollution and as an antimicrobial agent in biological applications.

  3. Highly enhanced and temporally stable field emission from MWCNTs grown on aluminum coated silicon substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sreekanth, M.; Ghosh, S. Patra, R.; Srivastava, P.

    2015-06-15

    In this work, a detailed field emission study of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) grown on Si and Al coated Si substrates is reported. Morphological and microstructural studies of the films show higher entanglement of CNTs in the case of CNT/Si film as compared to CNT/Al/Si film. Raman studies show that the defect mediated peak (D) is substantially suppressed as compared to graphitic peak (G) resulting in significant reduction in I{sub D}/I{sub G} value in CNT/Al/Si film. Field emission (FE) current density of CNT/Al/Si film (∼25 mA/cm{sup 2}) is significantly higher as compared to that of CNT/Si film (∼1.6 mA/cm{sup 2}). A substantial improvement in temporal stability is also observed in CNT/Al/Si film. This enhancement in field emission current is attributed to strong adhesion between substrate and CNTs, low work function, high local field enhancement factor at the CNT tips and less entanglement of CNTs grown on Al/Si. The temporally stable CNT/Al/Si cold cathode can be a potential candidate to replace conventional electron sources in prototype devices.

  4. Aluminum-Doped Zinc Oxide as Highly Stable Electron Collection Layer for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingyue; Shen, Heping; Zhang, Ye; Li, Xin; Zhao, Xiaochong; Tai, Meiqian; Li, Jingfeng; Li, Jianbao; Li, Xin; Lin, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Although low-temperature, solution-processed zinc oxide (ZnO) has been widely adopted as the electron collection layer (ECL) in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) because of its simple synthesis and excellent electrical properties such as high charge mobility, the thermal stability of the perovskite films deposited atop ZnO layer remains as a major issue. Herein, we addressed this problem by employing aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) as the ECL and obtained extraordinarily thermally stable perovskite layers. The improvement of the thermal stability was ascribed to diminish of the Lewis acid-base chemical reaction between perovskite and ECL. Notably, the outstanding transmittance and conductivity also render AZO layer as an ideal candidate for transparent conductive electrodes, which enables a simplified cell structure featuring glass/AZO/perovskite/Spiro-OMeTAD/Au. Optimization of the perovskite layer leads to an excellent and repeatable photovoltaic performance, with the champion cell exhibiting an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.94 V, a short-circuit current (Jsc) of 20.2 mA cm(-2), a fill factor (FF) of 0.67, and an overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 12.6% under standard 1 sun illumination. It was also revealed by steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence that the AZO/perovskite interface resulted in less quenching than that between perovskite and hole transport material.

  5. Low-power catalytic gas sensing using highly stable silicon carbide microheaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley-Trochimczyk, Anna; Rao, Ameya; Long, Hu; Zettl, Alex; Carraro, Carlo; Maboudian, Roya

    2017-04-01

    A robust silicon carbide (SiC) microheater is used for stable low-power catalytic gas sensing at high operating temperatures, where previously developed low-power polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) microheaters are unstable. The silicon carbide microheater has low power consumption (20 mW to reach 500 °C) and exhibits an order of magnitude lower resistance drift than the polysilicon microheater after continuously heating at 500 °C for 100 h and during temperature increases up to 650 °C. With the deposition of platinum nanoparticle-loaded boron nitride aerogel, the SiC microheater-based catalytic gas sensor detects propane with excellent long-term stability while exhibiting fast response and recovery time (~1 s). The sensitivity is not affected by humidity, nor during 10% duty cycling, which yields a power consumption of only 2 mW with frequent data collection (every 2 s). With a simple change of heater material from silicon to SiC, the microheater and resulting catalytic gas sensor element show significant performance improvement.

  6. Stable, high-performance operation of a fiber-coupled superconducting nanowire avalanche photon detector.

    PubMed

    Miki, Shigehito; Yabuno, Masahiro; Yamashita, Taro; Terai, Hirotaka

    2017-03-20

    Recent progress in the development of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SSPD or SNSPD) has delivered excellent performance, and has had a great impact on a range of research fields. Significant efforts are being made to further improve the technology, and a primary concern remains to resolve the trade-offs between detection efficiency (DE), timing jitter, and response speed. We present a stable and high-performance fiber-coupled niobium titanium nitride superconducting nanowire avalanche photon detector (SNAP) that resolves these trade-offs. Autocorrelation function measurement revealed an afterpulse-free operation in serially connected two SNAP (SC-2SNAP), even in the absence of a choke inductor, achieving a 7.65 times faster response speed than standard SSPDs. The SC-2SNAP device showed a system detection efficiency (SDE) of 81.0% with wide bias current margin, a dark count rate of 6.8 counts/s, and full width at half maximum timing jitter of 68 ps, operating in a practical Gifford-McMahon cryocooler system.

  7. A high throughput mechanical screening device for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Hou, Chieh; Meloni, Gregory R; Cosgrove, Brian D; Dodge, George R; Mauck, Robert L

    2014-06-27

    Articular cartilage enables efficient and near-frictionless load transmission, but suffers from poor inherent healing capacity. As such, cartilage tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking both compositional and mechanical properties of native tissue in order to provide effective repair materials for the treatment of damaged or degenerated joint surfaces. However, given the large number design parameters available (e.g. cell sources, scaffold designs, and growth factors), it is difficult to conduct combinatorial experiments of engineered cartilage. This is particularly exacerbated when mechanical properties are a primary outcome, given the long time required for testing of individual samples. High throughput screening is utilized widely in the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly and cost-effectively assess the effects of thousands of compounds for therapeutic discovery. Here we adapted this approach to develop a high throughput mechanical screening (HTMS) system capable of measuring the mechanical properties of up to 48 materials simultaneously. The HTMS device was validated by testing various biomaterials and engineered cartilage constructs and by comparing the HTMS results to those derived from conventional single sample compression tests. Further evaluation showed that the HTMS system was capable of distinguishing and identifying 'hits', or factors that influence the degree of tissue maturation. Future iterations of this device will focus on reducing data variability, increasing force sensitivity and range, as well as scaling-up to even larger (96-well) formats. This HTMS device provides a novel tool for cartilage tissue engineering, freeing experimental design from the limitations of mechanical testing throughput.

  8. A High Throughput Mechanical Screening Device for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Hou, Chieh; Meloni, Greg R.; Cosgrove, Brian D.; Dodge, George R.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage enables efficient and near-frictionless load transmission, but suffers from poor inherent healing capacity. As such, cartilage tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking both compositional and mechanical properties of native tissue in order to provide effective repair materials for the treatment of damaged or degenerated joint surfaces. However, given the large number design parameters available (e.g. cell sources, scaffold designs, and growth factors), it is difficult to conduct combinatorial experiments of engineered cartilage. This is particularly exacerbated when mechanical properties are a primary outcome given the long time required for testing of individual samples. High throughput screening is utilized widely in the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly and cost-effectively assess the effects of thousands of compounds for therapeutic discovery. Here we adapted this approach to develop a high throughput mechanical screening (HTMS) system capable of measuring the mechanical properties of up to 48 materials simultaneously. The HTMS device was validated by testing various biomaterials and engineered cartilage constructs and by comparing the HTMS results to those derived from conventional single sample compression tests. Further evaluation showed that the HTMS system was capable of distinguishing and identifying ‘hits’, or factors that influence the degree of tissue maturation. Future iterations of this device will focus on reducing data variability, increasing force sensitivity and range, as well as scaling-up to even larger (96-well) formats. This HTMS device provides a novel tool for cartilage tissue engineering, freeing experimental design from the limitations of mechanical testing throughput. PMID:24275442

  9. Trends in high power laser applications in civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wignarajah, Sivakumaran; Sugimoto, Kenji; Nagai, Kaori

    2005-03-01

    This paper reviews the research and development efforts made on the use of lasers for material processing in the civil engineering industry. Initial investigations regarding the possibility of using lasers in civil engineering were made in the 1960s and '70s, the target being rock excavation. At that time however, the laser powers available were too small for any practical application utilization. In the 1980's, the technology of laser surface cleaning of historically important structures was developed in Europe. In the early 1990s, techniques of laser surface modification, including glazing and coloring of concrete, roughening of granite stones, carbonization of wood were pursued, mainly in Japan. In the latter part of the decade, techniques of laser decontamination of concrete surfaces in nuclear facilities were developed in many countries, and field tests were caried out in Japan. The rapid advances in development of diode lasers and YAG lasers with high power outputs and efficiencies since the late 1990's have led to a revival of worldwide interest in the use of lasers for material processing in civil engineering. The authors believe that, in the next 10 years or so, the advent of compact high power lasers is likely to lead to increased use of lasers of material processing in the field of civil engineering.

  10. High-Speed Visualisation of Combustion in Modern Gasoline Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, W.; Nauwerck, A.; Han, K.-M.; Pfeil, J.; Velji, A.; Spicher, U.

    2006-07-01

    Today research and development in the field of gasoline engines have to face a double challenge: on the one hand, fuel consumption has to be reduced, while on the other hand, ever more stringent emission standards have to be fulfilled. The development of engines with its complexity of in-cylinder processes requires modern development tools to exploit the full potential in order to reduce fuel consumption. Especially optical, non-intrusive measurement techniques will help to get a better understanding of the processes. With the presented high-speed visualisation system the electromagnetic radiation from combustion in the UV range is collected by an endoscope and transmitted to a visualisation system by 10, 000 optical fibres. The signal is projected to 1, 920 photomultipliers, which convert the optical into electric signals with a maximum temporal resolution of 200 kHz. This paper shows the systematic application of flame diagnostics in modern combustion systems. For this purpose, a single-cylinder SI engine has been modified for a spray guided combustion strategy as well as for HCCI. The characteristics of flame propagation in both combustion modes were recorded and correlated with thermodynamic analyses. In case of the spray guided GDI engine, high pressure fuel injection was applied and evaluated.

  11. High-resolution quantitative imaging of mammalian and bacterial cells using stable isotope mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lechene, Claude; Hillion, Francois; McMahon, Greg; Benson, Douglas; Kleinfeld, Alan M; Kampf, J Patrick; Distel, Daniel; Luyten, Yvette; Bonventre, Joseph; Hentschel, Dirk; Park, Kwon Moo; Ito, Susumu; Schwartz, Martin; Benichou, Gilles; Slodzian, Georges

    2006-01-01

    Background Secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is an important tool for investigating isotopic composition in the chemical and materials sciences, but its use in biology has been limited by technical considerations. Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS), which combines a new generation of SIMS instrument with sophisticated ion optics, labeling with stable isotopes, and quantitative image-analysis software, was developed to study biological materials. Results The new instrument allows the production of mass images of high lateral resolution (down to 33 nm), as well as the counting or imaging of several isotopes simultaneously. As MIMS can distinguish between ions of very similar mass, such as 12C15N- and 13C14N-, it enables the precise and reproducible measurement of isotope ratios, and thus of the levels of enrichment in specific isotopic labels, within volumes of less than a cubic micrometer. The sensitivity of MIMS is at least 1,000 times that of 14C autoradiography. The depth resolution can be smaller than 1 nm because only a few atomic layers are needed to create an atomic mass image. We illustrate the use of MIMS to image unlabeled mammalian cultured cells and tissue sections; to analyze fatty-acid transport in adipocyte lipid droplets using 13C-oleic acid; to examine nitrogen fixation in bacteria using 15N gaseous nitrogen; to measure levels of protein renewal in the cochlea and in post-ischemic kidney cells using 15N-leucine; to study DNA and RNA co-distribution and uridine incorporation in the nucleolus using 15N-uridine and 81Br of bromodeoxyuridine or 14C-thymidine; to reveal domains in cultured endothelial cells using the native isotopes 12C, 16O, 14N and 31P; and to track a few 15N-labeled donor spleen cells in the lymph nodes of the host mouse. Conclusion MIMS makes it possible for the first time to both image and quantify molecules labeled with stable or radioactive isotopes within subcellular compartments. PMID:17010211

  12. High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, A.; Parsley, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    Vehicle/engine analysis studies have identified the High/Dual Mixture Ratio O2/H2 Engine cycle as a leading candidate for an advanced Single Stage to Orbit (SSTO) propulsion system. This cycle is designed to allow operation at a higher than normal O/F ratio of 12 during liftoff and then transition to a more optimum O/F ratio of 6 at altitude. While operation at high mixture ratios lowers specific impulse, the resultant high propellant bulk density and high power density combine to minimize the influence of atmospheric drag and low altitude gravitational forces. Transition to a lower mixture ratio at altitude then provides improved specific impulse relative to a single mixture ratio engine that must select a mixture ratio that is balanced for both low and high altitude operation. This combination of increased altitude specific impulse and high propellant bulk density more than offsets the compromised low altitude performance and results in an overall mission benefit. Two areas of technical concern relative to the execution of this dual mixture ratio cycle concept are addressed. First, actions required to transition from high to low mixture ratio are examined, including an assessment of the main chamber environment as the main chamber mixture ratio passes through stoichiometric. Secondly, two approaches to meet a requirement for high turbine power at high mixture ratio condition are examined. One approach uses high turbine temperature to produce the power and requires cooled turbines. The other approach incorporates an oxidizer-rich preburner to increase turbine work capability via increased turbine mass flow.

  13. Diesel Combustion and Emission Using High Boost and High Injection Pressure in a Single Cylinder Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Yuzo; Kunishima, Eiji; Asaumi, Yasuo; Aihara, Yoshiaki; Odaka, Matsuo; Goto, Yuichi

    Heavy-duty diesel engines have adopted numerous technologies for clean emissions and low fuel consumption. Some are direct fuel injection combined with high injection pressure and adequate in-cylinder air motion, turbo-intercooler systems, and strong steel pistons. Using these technologies, diesel engines have achieved an extremely low CO2 emission as a prime mover. However, heavy-duty diesel engines with even lower NOx and PM emission levels are anticipated. This study achieved high-boost and lean diesel combustion using a single cylinder engine that provides good engine performance and clean exhaust emission. The experiment was done under conditions of intake air quantity up to five times that of a naturally aspirated (NA) engine and 200MPa injection pressure. The adopted pressure booster is an external supercharger that can control intake air temperature. In this engine, the maximum cylinder pressure was increased and new technologies were adopted, including a monotherm piston for endurance of Pmax =30MPa. Moreover, every engine part is newly designed. As the boost pressure increases, the rate of heat release resembles the injection rate and becomes sharper. The combustion and brake thermal efficiency are improved. This high boost and lean diesel combustion creates little smoke; ISCO and ISTHC without the ISNOx increase. It also yields good thermal efficiency.

  14. Highly stable layered double hydroxide colloids: a direct aqueous synthesis route from hybrid polyion complex micelles.

    PubMed

    Layrac, Géraldine; Destarac, Mathias; Gérardin, Corine; Tichit, Didier

    2014-08-19

    Aqueous suspensions of highly stable Mg/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoparticles were obtained via a direct and fully colloidal route using asymmetric poly(acrylic acid)-b-poly(acrylamide) (PAA-b-PAM) double hydrophilic block copolymers (DHBCs) as growth and stabilizing agents. We showed that hybrid polyion complex (HPIC) micelles constituted of almost only Al(3+) were first formed when mixing solutions of Mg(2+) and Al(3+) cations and PAA3000-b-PAM10000 due to the preferential complexation of the trivalent cations. Then mineralization performed by progressive hydroxylation with NaOH transformed the simple DHBC/Al(3+) HPIC micelles into DHBC/aluminum hydroxide colloids, in which Mg(2+) ions were progressively introduced upon further hydroxylation leading to the Mg-Al LDH phase. The whole process of LDH formation occurred then within the confined environment of the aqueous complex colloids. The hydrodynamic diameter of the DHBC/LDH colloids could be controlled: it decreased from 530 nm down to 60 nm when the metal complexing ratio R (R = AA/(Mg + Al)) increased from 0.27 to 1. This was accompanied by a decrease of the average size of individual LDH particles as R increased (for example from 35 nm at R = 0.27 down to 17 nm at R = 0.33), together with a progressive favored intercalation of polyacrylate rather than chloride ions in the interlayer space of the LDH phase. The DHBC/LDH colloids have interesting properties for biomedical applications, that is, high colloidal stability as a function of time, stability in phosphate buffered saline solution, as well as the required size distribution for sterilization by filtration. Therefore, they could be used as colloidal drug delivery systems, especially for hydrosoluble negatively charged drugs.

  15. A family of compact high order coupled time-space unconditionally stable vertical advection schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarié, Florian; Debreu, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Recent papers by Shchepetkin (2015) and Lemarié et al. (2015) have emphasized that the time-step of an oceanic model with an Eulerian vertical coordinate and an explicit time-stepping scheme is very often restricted by vertical advection in a few hot spots (i.e. most of the grid points are integrated with small Courant numbers, compared to the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition, except just few spots where numerical instability of the explicit scheme occurs first). The consequence is that the numerics for vertical advection must have good stability properties while being robust to changes in Courant number in terms of accuracy. An other constraint for oceanic models is the strict control of numerical mixing imposed by the highly adiabatic nature of the oceanic interior (i.e. mixing must be very small in the vertical direction below the boundary layer). We examine in this talk the possibility of mitigating vertical Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) restriction, while avoiding numerical inaccuracies associated with standard implicit advection schemes (i.e. large sensitivity of the solution on Courant number, large phase delay, and possibly excess of numerical damping with unphysical orientation). Most regional oceanic models have been successfully using fourth order compact schemes for vertical advection. In this talk we present a new general framework to derive generic expressions for (one-step) coupled time and space high order compact schemes (see Daru & Tenaud (2004) for a thorough description of coupled time and space schemes). Among other properties, we show that those schemes are unconditionally stable and have very good accuracy properties even for large Courant numbers while having a very reasonable computational cost.

  16. Instrument for stable high temperature Seebeck coefficient and resistivity measurements under controlled oxygen partial pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Sharma, Peter Anand

    2015-04-28

    The transport properties of ceramic materials strongly depend on oxygen activity, which is tuned by changing the partial oxygen pressure (pO2) prior to and during measurement. Within, we describe an instrument for highly stable measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity at temperatures up to 1300 K with controlled oxygen partial pressure. An all platinum construction is used to avoid potential materials instabilities that can cause measurement drift. Two independent heaters are employed to establish a small temperature gradient for Seebeck measurements, while keeping the average temperature constant and avoiding errors associated with pO2-induced drifts in thermocouple readings. Oxygen equilibriummore » is monitored using both an O2 sensor and the transient behavior of the resistance as a proxy. A pO2 range of 10-25–100 atm can be established with appropriate gas mixtures. Seebeck measurements were calibrated against a high purity platinum wire, Pt/Pt–Rh thermocouple wire, and a Bi2Te3 Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material. To demonstrate the utility of this instrument for oxide materials we present measurements as a function of pO2 on a 1 % Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal, and show systematic changes in properties consistent with oxygen vacancy defect chemistry. Thus, an approximately 11% increase in power factor over a pO2 range of 10-19–10-8 atm at 973 K for the donor-doped single crystals is observed.« less

  17. Instrument for stable high temperature Seebeck coefficient and resistivity measurements under controlled oxygen partial pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Sharma, Peter Anand

    2015-04-28

    The transport properties of ceramic materials strongly depend on oxygen activity, which is tuned by changing the partial oxygen pressure (pO2) prior to and during measurement. Within, we describe an instrument for highly stable measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity at temperatures up to 1300 K with controlled oxygen partial pressure. An all platinum construction is used to avoid potential materials instabilities that can cause measurement drift. Two independent heaters are employed to establish a small temperature gradient for Seebeck measurements, while keeping the average temperature constant and avoiding errors associated with pO2-induced drifts in thermocouple readings. Oxygen equilibrium is monitored using both an O2 sensor and the transient behavior of the resistance as a proxy. A pO2 range of 10-25–100 atm can be established with appropriate gas mixtures. Seebeck measurements were calibrated against a high purity platinum wire, Pt/Pt–Rh thermocouple wire, and a Bi2Te3 Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material. To demonstrate the utility of this instrument for oxide materials we present measurements as a function of pO2 on a 1 % Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal, and show systematic changes in properties consistent with oxygen vacancy defect chemistry. Thus, an approximately 11% increase in power factor over a pO2 range of 10-19–10-8 atm at 973 K for the donor-doped single crystals is observed.

  18. Investigation of High-Performance Fuels in Multicylinder and in Single-Cylinder Engines at High and Cruising Engine Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Arthur H.; Nelson, R. Lee; Richard, Paul H.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to compare the knock-limited performance of a 20-percent triptane blend in 28-K fuel with that of 28-R and 33-R fuels at high engine speeds, cruising speeds, and two compression ratios in an K-1830-94 multicylinder engine, Data were obtained with the standard compression ratio of 6.7 and with a compression ratio of 3.0, The three fuels were investigated at engine speeds of 1800, 2250, 2600, and 2800 rpm at high and low blower ratios. A carburetor-air temperature of approximate1y 100 deg F was maintained for the multicylinder-engine runs, Data were obtained on a single R-1830-94 cylinder engine as a means of checking the multicylinder data at the higher speeds. A satisfactory correlation between average mixture temperature and knock-limited manifold pressure was obtained by plotting knock-limited manifold pressure against average mixture temperature for the whole range of engine speeds at constant carburetor air temperature and cylinder-head temperature. The single-cylinder knock-limited performance based on charge-air flow matched that of the multicylinder engine within 6 percent under all the conditions except for 28-R fuel at 2800 rpm; these curves differed from each other by 11 percent in the rich region. The knock rating of 33-R fuel was found to be a little higher than that of the 20-percent triptane blend and 26-R fuel at high mixture temperatures (above 210 deg F) and lean mixtures. The 33-R fuel exhibited rich knock limits appreciably lower than the 20-percent triptane blend, Increasing the compression ratio from 6.7 to 8.0 lowered the knock-limited manifold pressure for all fuels approximately 15 to 18 inches of mercury absolute in the cruising range and 20 to 28 inches of mercury absolute at higher engine speeds. Brake specific fuel consumption was reduced 7 to 9 percent by the increase in compression ratio from 6.7 to 8,0,

  19. Energy efficient engine: High pressure turbine uncooled rig technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    Results obtained from testing five performance builds (three vane cascades and two rotating rigs of the Energy Efficient Engine uncooled rig have established the uncooled aerodynamic efficiency of the high-pressure turbine at 91.1 percent. This efficiency level was attained by increasing the rim speed and annulus area (AN(2)), and by increasing the turbine reaction level. The increase in AN(2) resulted in a performance improvement of 1.15 percent. At the design point pressure ratio, the increased reaction level rig demonstrated an efficiency of 91.1 percent. The results of this program have verified the aerodynamic design assumptions established for the Energy Efficient Engine high-pressure turbine component.

  20. An airline study of advanced technology requirements for advanced high speed commercial transport engines. 1: Engine design study assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sallee, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    The advanced technology requirements for an advanced high speed commercial tranport engine are presented. The results of the phase 1 study effort cover the following areas: (1) statement of an airline's major objectives for future transport engines, (2) airline's method of evaluating engine proposals, (3) description of an optimum engine for a long range subsonic commercial transport including installation and critical design features, (4) discussion of engine performance problems and experience with performance degradation, (5) trends in engine and pod prices with increasing technology and objectives for the future, (6) discussion of the research objectives for composites, reversers, advanced components, engine control systems, and devices to reduce the impact of engine stall, and (7) discussion of the airline objectives for noise and pollution reduction.

  1. The high education of optical engineering in East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xu; Liu, Xiangdong; Wang, Xiaoping; Bai, Jian; Liu, Yuling

    2014-07-01

    The history and the development of the high education in the field of optical engineering in the area of East China will be presented in the paper. The overall situation of research and human resource training in optics and photonics will also be reviewed, it shows that China needs lots of talents and experts in this field to support the world optical industry in East China.

  2. Technology Transfer Challenges for High-Assurance Software Engineering Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Penix, John; Markosian, Lawrence Z.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe our experience with the challenges thar we are currently facing in our effort to develop advanced software verification and validation tools. We categorize these challenges into several areas: cost benefits modeling, tool usability, customer application domain, and organizational issues. We provide examples of challenges in each area and identrfj, open research issues in areas which limit our ability to transfer high-assurance software engineering tools into practice.

  3. Graphene Folding in Si Rich Carbon Nanofibers for Highly Stable, High Capacity Li-Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Fei, Ling; Williams, Brian P; Yoo, Sang H; Kim, Jangwoo; Shoorideh, Ghazal; Joo, Yong Lak

    2016-03-02

    Silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs) wrapped by graphene in carbon nanofibers were obtained via electrospinning and subsequent thermal treatment. In this study, water-soluble poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with low carbon yield is selected to make the process water-based and to achieve a high silicon yield in the composite. It was also found that increasing the amount of graphene helps keep the PVA fiber morphology after carbonization, while forming a graphene network. The fiber SEM and HRTEM images reveal that micrometer graphene is heavily folded into sub-micron scale fibers during electrospinning, while Si NPs are incorporated into the folds with nanospace in between. When applied to lithium-ion battery anodes, the Si/graphene/carbon nanofiber composites show a high reversible capacity of ∼2300 mAh g(-1) at a charging rate of 100 mA/g and a stable capacity of 1191 mAh g(-1) at 1 A/g after more than 200 cycles. The interconnected graphene network not only ensures the excellent conductivity but also serves as a buffering matrix for the mechanic stress caused by volume change; the nanospace between Si NPs and folded graphene provides the space needed for volume expansion.

  4. Topology-Guided Design and Syntheses of Highly Stable Mesoporous Porphyrinic Zirconium Metal-Organic Frameworks with High Surface Area

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, TF; Feng, DW; Chen, YP; Zou, LF; Bosch, M; Yuan, S; Wei, ZW; Fordham, S; Wang, KC; Zhou, HC

    2015-01-14

    Through a topology-guided strategy, a series of Zr-6-containing isoreticular porphyrinic metalorganic frameworks (MOFs), PCN-228, PCN-229, and PCN-230, with ftw-a topology were synthesized using the extended porphyrinic linkers. The bulky porphyrin ring ligand effectively prevents the network interpenetration which often appears in MOFs with increased linker length. The pore apertures of the structures range from 2.5 to 3.8 nm, and PCN-229 demonstrates the highest porosity and BET surface area among the previously reported Zr-MOFs. Additionally, by changing the relative direction of the terminal phenyl rings, this series replaces a Zr-8 cluster with a smaller Zr-6 cluster in a topologically identical framework. The high connectivity of the Zr-6 cluster yields frameworks with enhanced stability despite high porosity and ultralarge linker. As a representative example, PCN-230, constructed with the most extended porphyrinic linker, shows excellent stability in aqueous solutions with pH values ranging from 0 to 12 and demonstrates one of the highest pH tolerances among all porphyrinic MOFs. This work not only presents a successful example of rational design of MOFs with desired topology, but also provides a strategy for construction of stable mesoporous MOFs.

  5. Topology-guided design and syntheses of highly stable mesoporous porphyrinic zirconium metal-organic frameworks with high surface area

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tian -Fu; Feng, Dawei; Chen, Ying -Pin; Zou, Lanfang; Bosch, Mathieu; Yuan, Shuai; Wei, Zhangwen; Fordham, Stephen; Wang, Kecheng; Zhou, Hong -Cai

    2015-01-14

    Through a topology-guided strategy, a series of Zr₆-containing isoreticular porphyrinic metal–organic frameworks (MOFs), PCN-228, PCN-229, and PCN-230, with ftw-a topology were synthesized using the extended porphyrinic linkers. The bulky porphyrin ring ligand effectively prevents the network interpenetration which often appears in MOFs with increased linker length. The pore apertures of the structures range from 2.5 to 3.8 nm, and PCN-229 demonstrates the highest porosity and BET surface area among the previously reported Zr-MOFs. Additionally, by changing the relative direction of the terminal phenyl rings, this series replaces a Zr₈ cluster with a smaller Zr₆ cluster in a topologically identical framework. The high connectivity of the Zr₆ cluster yields frameworks with enhanced stability despite high porosity and ultralarge linker. As a representative example, PCN-230, constructed with the most extended porphyrinic linker, shows excellent stability in aqueous solutions with pH values ranging from 0 to 12 and demonstrates one of the highest pH tolerances among all porphyrinic MOFs. This work not only presents a successful example of rational design of MOFs with desired topology, but also provides a strategy for construction of stable mesoporous MOFs.

  6. Highly Sensitive and Long Term Stable Electrochemical Microelectrodes for Implantable Glucose Monitoring Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Liangliang

    A miniature wireless implantable electrochemical glucose system for continuous glucose monitoring with good selectivity, sensitivity, linearity and long term stability was developed. First, highly sensitive, long-term stable and reusable planar H2O2 microelectrodes have been fabricated by microlithography. These electrodes composed of a 300 nm Pt black layer situated on a 5 um thick Au layer, provide effective protection to the underlying chromium adhesion layer. Using repeated cyclic voltammetric sweeps in flowing buffer solution, highly sensitive Pt black working electrodes were realized with five-decade linear dynamic range and low detection limit (10 nM) for H2O2 at low oxidation potentials. Second, a highly sensitive, low cost and flexible microwire biosensor was described using 25-mum thick gold wire as working electrode together with 125-mum thick Pt/Ir and Ag wires as counter and reference electrode, embedded within a PDMS-filled polyethylene tube. Surface area and activity of sensor was enhanced by converting gold electrode to nanoporous configuration followed by electrodeposition of platinum black. Glucose oxidase based biosensors by electrodeposition of poly(o-phenylenediamine) and glucose oxidase on the working electrode, displayed a higher glucose sensitivity (1.2 mA mM-1 cm-2) than highest literature reported. In addition it exhibits wide detection range (up to 20 mM) and selectivity (>95%). Third, novel miniaturized and flexible microelectrode arrays with 8 of 25 mum electrodes displayed the much needed 3D diffusion profiles similar to a single 25 mum microelectrode, but with one order increase in current levels. These microelectrode arrays displayed a H2O2 sensitivity of 13 mA mM-1 cm-2, a wide dynamic range of 100 nM to 10 mM, limit of detection of 10 nM. These microwire based edge plane microsensors incorporated flexibility, miniaturization and low operation potential are an promising approach for continuous in vivo metabolic monitoring. Fourth

  7. Unusually high stable carbon isotopic values of methane from low organic carbon Mars analog hypersaline environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, C. A.; Poole, J. A.; Tazaz, A.; Chanton, J.; Bebout, B.

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by the Mars rovers’ findings of past hypersaline environments and the discovery of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, we examined methanogenesis in hypersaline ponds in Baja California Sur and in the Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge in northern California. Methane-rich bubbles were observed to be released from below gypsum/halite crusts in these environments. The stable carbon isotopic composition of these bubbles ranged from about -30 to -40 ‰. Methane with these relatively high isotopic values would typically be considered non-biogenic, however incubations of crust and sediments samples over time resulted in the production of methane. We therefore undertook a series of measurements aimed at understanding the isotopic composition of methane in these environments. The concentrations and isotopic composition of the particulate organic carbon (POC) in these environments were measured. POC content was low (relative to most methane-producing sedimentary environments), generally less than 1%, and always less than 2% of the total mass. The isotopic composition of the POC ranged from -13 to -22 ‰. To determine the substrates used by the methanogens, 13C-labeled trimethylamine (TMA), monomethylamine, methanol, acetate and bicarbonate were added to incubation vials and the methane produced was monitored for 13C content. The main substrates used by the methanogens in these hypersaline environments were the non-competitive substrates, the methylamines and methanol. When unlabeled, but isotopically known, TMA was added to incubation vials in varying concentrations, the isotopic composition of the methane produced also varied. Little, if any, difference in the isotopic composition between the TMA and methane occurred at the lowest TMA concentration (10 µM final concentration). The lowest methane δ13C values (and so greatest fractionation between methane and TMA) occurred when the most TMA was added (1000 µM final concentration). This change in the

  8. High-resolution nitrogen stable isotope sclerochronology of bivalve shell carbonate-bound organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillikin, David P.; Lorrain, Anne; Jolivet, Aurélie; Kelemen, Zita; Chauvaud, Laurent; Bouillon, Steven

    2017-03-01

    Nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ15N) of organic material have successfully been used to track food-web dynamics, nitrogen baselines, pollution, and nitrogen cycling. Extending the δ15N record back in time has not been straightforward due to a lack of suitable substrates in which δ15N records are faithfully preserved, thus sparking interest in utilizing skeletal carbonate-bound organic matter (CBOM) in mollusks, corals, and foraminifera. Here we test if calcite Pecten maximus shells from the Bay of Brest and the French continental shelf can be used as an archive of δ15N values over a large environmental gradient and at a high temporal resolution (approximately weekly). Bulk CBOM δ15N values from the growing tip of shells collected over a large nitrogen isotope gradient were strongly correlated with adductor muscle tissue δ15N values (R2 = 0.99, n = 6, p < 0.0001). We were able to achieve weekly resolution (on average) over the growing season from sclerochronological profiles of three shells, which showed large seasonal variations up to 3.4‰. However, there were also large inter-specimen differences (up to 2.5‰) between shells growing at the same time and location. Generally, high-resolution shell δ15N values follow soft-tissue δ15N values, but soft-tissues integrate more time, hence soft-tissue data are more time-averaged and smoothed. Museum-archived shells from the 1950s, 1965, and 1970s do not show a large difference in δ15N values through time despite expected increasing N loading to the Bay over this time, which could be due to anthropogenic N sources with contrasting values. Compiling shell CBOM δ15N data from several studies suggests that the offset between soft-tissue and shell δ15N values (Δtissue-shell) differs between calcite and aragonite shells. We hypothesize that this difference is caused by differences in amino acids used in constructing the different minerals, which should be specific to the CaCO3 polymorph being constructed. Future

  9. A highly sensitive and stable glucose biosensor using thymine-based polycations into laponite hydrogel films.

    PubMed

    Paz Zanini, Veronica I; Gavilán, Maximiliano; López de Mishima, Beatriz A; Martino, Débora M; Borsarelli, Claudio D

    2016-04-01

    A series of glucose bioelectrodes were prepared by glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilization into laponite hydrogel films containing DNA bioinspired polycations made of vinylbenzyl thymine (VBT) and vinylbenzyl triethylammonium chloride (VBA) with general formulae (VBT)m(VBA)n](n+)≈25 with m=0, 1 and n=2, 4, 8, deposited onto glassy carbon electrode. The bioelectrodes were characterized by chronoamperometry, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Results indicated that the electrochemical properties of the laponite hydrogel films were largely improved by the incorporation of thymine-based polycations, being proportional to the positive charge density of the polycation molecule. After incorporation of glucose oxidase, the sensitivity of the bioelectrode to glucose increased with the positive charge density of the polycation. Additionally, the presence of the vinylbenzyl thymine moiety played a role in the long-term stability and reproducibility of the bioelectrode signal. As a consequence, the [(VBT)(VBA)8](8+)≈25 was the most appropriate polycation for bioelectrode preparation and glucose sensing, with a specific sensitivity of se=176 mA mmol(-1)Lcm(-2)U(-1), almost two-order of magnitude larger than other laponite immobilized GOx bioelectrodes reported elsewhere. These features were confirmed by testing the bioelectrode for a selective determination of glucose in powder milk and blood serum samples without interference of either ascorbic or uric acids under the experimental conditions. The present study demonstrates the suitability of DNA bioinspired water-soluble polycations [(VBT)m(VBA)n](n+)≈25 for enzyme immobilization like GOx into laponite hydrogels, and the preparation of highly sensitive and stable bioelectrodes on glassy carbon surface.

  10. High fluorescent and stable semiconductor quantum dots for red blood cells labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Farias, Patricia M. A.; Santos, Beate S.; de Menezes, Frederico D.; Ferreira, Ricardo; Fontes, Adriana; Cesar, Carlos L.; Barjas Castro, Maria L.; Castro, Vagner; Lima, Paulo R. M.

    2005-04-01

    We present a simple and efficient method for marking living human red blood cells using CdS (Cadmium Sulfide) quantum dots (QDs). The nanocrystals were obtained via colloidal synthesis in aqueous medium with final pH=7 using sodium polyphosphate as the stabilizing agent. The methodology implementation is simple, do not requires additional capping layers nor narrow size QDs distribution. The synthesized nanoparticles were conjugated to monoclonal A anti-body. The resulting conjugates QDs/anti-A were incubated with human erythrocytes of blood groups A and O for 30 min at 37°C. The living cells in contact with the quantum dots maintained their properties for several days showing the low level of citotoxicity of the quantum dots. The conjugation of CdS QDs/anti-A show simultaneous red and green fluorescence when excited with 543 and 488 nm respectively. The efficiency of the conjugation QDs/anti-body to the erythrocytes, for each system, was monitored by confocal microscopy. The comparative analysis of the micrographs was done with the luminescence intensity maps of the samples obtained under constant capture conditions, such as, pinhole, filters, beam splitters and photomultiplier gain. The conjugates QDs/anti-A intensely marked group A erythrocytes and did not show any luminescence for group O erythrocytes, showing the sensitivity of the labeling procedure. In conclusion, we show the viability of the use of high luminescent and stable quantum dots as fluorescent labels for human erythrocytes with a methodology of simple implementation and the possibility to use them to distinguish different blood groups.

  11. Highly Active and Stable Large Catalase Isolated from a Hydrocarbon Degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324

    PubMed Central

    Vatsyayan, Preety; Goswami, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    A hydrocarbon degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324 produces a high level of extremely active and stable cellular large catalase (CAT) during growth on n-hexadecane to combat the oxidative stress caused by the hydrocarbon degrading metabolic machinery inside the cell. A 160-fold purification with specific activity of around 66 × 105 U mg−1 protein was achieved. The native protein molecular mass was 368 ± 5 kDa with subunit molecular mass of nearly 90 kDa, which indicates that the native CAT protein is a homotetramer. The isoelectric pH (pI) of the purified CAT was 4.2. BLAST aligned peptide mass fragments of CAT protein showed its highest similarity with the catalase B protein from other fungal sources. CAT was active in a broad range of pH 4 to 12 and temperature 25°C to 90°C. The catalytic efficiency (Kcat/Km) of 4.7 × 108 M−1 s−1 within the studied substrate range and alkaline pH stability (half-life, t1/2 at pH 12~15 months) of CAT are considerably higher than most of the extensively studied catalases from different sources. The storage stability (t1/2) of CAT at physiological pH 7.5 and 4°C was nearly 30 months. The haem was identified as haem b by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS/MS). PMID:27057351

  12. Mount Aragats as a stable electron accelerator for atmospheric high-energy physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Ashot; Hovsepyan, Gagik; Mnatsakanyan, Eduard

    2016-03-01

    Observation of the numerous thunderstorm ground enhancements (TGEs), i.e., enhanced fluxes of electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons detected by particle detectors located on the Earth's surface and related to the strong thunderstorms above it, helped to establish a new scientific topic—high-energy physics in the atmosphere. Relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) are believed to be a central engine initiating high-energy processes in thunderstorm atmospheres. RREAs observed on Mount Aragats in Armenia during the strongest thunderstorms and simultaneous measurements of TGE electron and gamma-ray energy spectra proved that RREAs are a robust and realistic mechanism for electron acceleration. TGE research facilitates investigations of the long-standing lightning initiation problem. For the last 5 years we were experimenting with the "beams" of "electron accelerators" operating in the thunderclouds above the Aragats research station. Thunderstorms are very frequent above Aragats, peaking in May-June, and almost all of them are accompanied with enhanced particle fluxes. The station is located on a plateau at an altitude 3200 asl near a large lake. Numerous particle detectors and field meters are located in three experimental halls as well as outdoors; the facilities are operated all year round. All relevant information is being gathered, including data on particle fluxes, fields, lightning occurrences, and meteorological conditions. By the example of the huge thunderstorm that took place at Mount Aragats on August 28, 2015, we show that simultaneous detection of all the relevant data allowed us to reveal the temporal pattern of the storm development and to investigate the atmospheric discharges and particle fluxes.

  13. Molecular isotopic engineering (MIE): industrial manufacture of naproxen of predetermined stable carbon-isotopic compositions for authenticity and security protection and intellectual property considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasper, J. P.; Farina, P.; Pearson, A.; Mezes, P. S.; Sabatelli, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular Isotopic Engineering (MIE) is the directed stable-isotopic synthesis of chemical products for reasons of product identification and of product security, and also for intellectual property considerations. We report here a generally excellent correspondence between the observed and predicted stable carbon-isotopic (δ13C) results for a successful directed synthesis of racemic mixture from its immediate precursors. The observed results are readily explained by the laws of mass balance and isotope mass balance. Oxygen- and hydrogen isotopic results which require an additional assessment of the effects of O and H exchange, presumably due to interaction with water in the reaction solution, are addressed elsewhere. A previous, cooperative study with the US FDA-DPA showed that individual manufacturers of naproxen could readily be differentiated by their stable-isotopic provenance (δ13C, δ18O, and δD ref. 1). We suggest that MIE can be readily employed in the bio/pharmaceutical industry without alteration of present manufacturing processes other than isotopically selecting and/or monitoring reactants and products.

  14. Synthesis of highly stable sub-8 nm TiO2 nanoparticles and their multilayer electrodes of TiO2/MWNT for electrochemical applications.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Md Nasim; Gallant, Betar M; Shah, Nisarg J; Shao-Horn, Yang; Hammond, Paula T

    2013-10-09

    Next-generation electrochemical energy storage for integrated microsystems and consumer electronic devices requires novel electrode materials with engineered architectures to meet the requirements of high performance, low cost, and robustness. However, conventional electrode fabrication processes such as doctor blading afford limited control over the electrode thickness and structure at the nanoscale and require the incorporation of insulating binder and other additives, which can promote agglomeration and reduce active surface area, limiting the inherent advantages attainable from nanoscale materials. We have engineered a route for the synthesis of highly stable, sub-8 nm TiO2 nanoparticles and their subsequent incorporation with acid-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) into nanostructured electrodes using aqueous-based layer-by-layer electrostatic self-assembly. Using this approach, binder-free thin film electrodes with highly controllable thicknesses up to the micrometer scale were developed with well-dispersed, nonagglomerated TiO2 nanoparticles on MWNTs. Upon testing in an Li electrochemical half-cell, these electrodes demonstrate high capacity (>150 mAh/gel(ectrode) at 0.1 A/gel(ectrode)), good rate capability (>100 mAh/gel(ectrode) up to 1 A/g(electrode)) and nearly no capacity loss up to 200 cycles for electrodes with thicknesses up to 1480 nm, indicating their promise as thin-film negative electrodes for future Li storage applications.

  15. Engineering of alpha1-antitrypsin variants selective for subtilisin-like proprotein convertases PACE4 and PC6: importance of the P2' residue in stable complex formation of the serpin with proprotein convertase.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Akihiko; Kanie, Hiroki; Makise, Hirotaka; Yuasa, Keizo; Nagahama, Masami; Matsuda, Yoshiko

    2007-04-01

    Furin and PACE4, members of the subtilisin-like proprotein convertase (SPC) family, have been implicated in the metastatic progression of certain tumors in addition to the activation of viral coat proteins and bacterial toxins, indicating that these enzymes are potential targets for therapeutic agents. Alpha1-Antitrypsin Portland is an engineered alpha1-antitrypsin designed as a furin-specific inhibitor and has been used as a tool in the functional analysis of furin. In this work, we engineered rat alpha1-antitrypsin to create a PACE4-specific inhibitor. Substituting Arg-Arg-Arg-Arg for Ala-Val-Pro-Met(352) at P4-P1 and Ala for Leu(354) at P2' created a potent PACE4- and PC6-specific inhibitor. This variant (RRRRSA) formed an SDS- and heat-stable serpin/proteinase complex with PACE4 or PC6 and inhibited both enzyme activities. The RRRRSA variant was efficiently cleaved by furin without formation of the stable complex. This is the first report of a highly selective protein-based inhibitor of PACE4 and PC6. This inhibitor will be useful in delineating the roles of PACE4 and PC6 localized in the extracellular matrix.

  16. A Systematic Methodology for Constructing High-Order Energy-Stable WENO Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, Nail K.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    A third-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference scheme developed by Yamaleev and Carpenter (AIAA 2008-2876, 2008) was proven to be stable in the energy norm for both continuous and discontinuous solutions of systems of linear hyperbolic equations. Herein, a systematic approach is presented that enables \\energy stable" modifications for existing WENO schemes of any order. The technique is demonstrated by developing a one-parameter family of fifth-order upwind-biased ESWENO schemes; ESWENO schemes up to eighth order are presented in the appendix. New weight functions are also developed that provide (1) formal consistency, (2) much faster convergence for smooth solutions with an arbitrary number of vanishing derivatives, and (3) improved resolution near strong discontinuities.

  17. A Systematic Methodology for Constructing High-Order Energy Stable WENO Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, Nail K.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    A third-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially Non{Oscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference scheme developed by Yamaleev and Carpenter [1] was proven to be stable in the energy norm for both continuous and discontinuous solutions of systems of linear hyperbolic equations. Herein, a systematic approach is presented that enables "energy stable" modifications for existing WENO schemes of any order. The technique is demonstrated by developing a one-parameter family of fifth-order upwind-biased ESWENO schemes; ESWENO schemes up to eighth order are presented in the appendix. New weight functions are also developed that provide (1) formal consistency, (2) much faster convergence for smooth solutions with an arbitrary number of vanishing derivatives, and (3) improved resolution near strong discontinuities.

  18. Stable isotope paleoaltimetry of high relief terrain: An atmospheric dynamics perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galewsky, J.

    2008-12-01

    Stable isotope ratios in rain and snow from mountainous regions show a strong correlation with altitude. To the extent that these isotopic ratios are preserved in the geological record, they may provide a powerful constraint on the surface uplift history of mountain belts. Existing interpretive frameworks for paleoaltimetry are based on linear regressions of modern precipitation isotope transects or on a Rayleigh distillation model of air parcel ascent along a moist adiabatic temperature lapse rate. Neither of these frameworks accounts for the fully nonlinear dynamics of airflow over high-relief terrain, which predicts substantial deviations from the moist-adiabatic ascent model under common atmospheric conditions. The Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF), a numerical weather prediction model, has been modified to include a simplified isotope physics parameterization and has been used to explore the links between topography, atmospheric state, and precipitation isotopes. The controlling nondimensional parameter for atmospheric flow over terrain is Nh/U, where N is the Brunt-Vaisala frequency, a measure of atmospheric stability, h is the orogen- scale relief, and U is the horizontal wind speed. When Nh/U<1, winds can flow directly over topography and WRF precipitation isotopes match those predicted by the moist-adiabatic Rayleigh model. When Nh/U>1, the winds are blocked by the topography and are deflected around it. In these cases, the maximum elevation of condensation is much lower than the range crest, and precipitation isotopes are consequently substantially less depleted than predicted by the moist adiabatic Rayleigh model. Furthermore, the along-strike length of an orogen is shown to exert a strong influence on precipitation isotopes in blocked flow regimes because of the dynamical link between terrain length and atmospheric flow blocking. Terrain- blocked atmospheric conditions are common, especially in regions of high relief, but their impact on the

  19. Stable isotope paleoaltimetry of high relief terrain: An atmospheric dynamics and landscape evolution perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galewsky, J.

    2009-04-01

    Stable isotope ratios in rain and snow from mountainous regions show a strong correlation with altitude. To the extent that these isotopic ratios are preserved in the geological record, they may provide a powerful constraint on the surface uplift history of mountain belts. Existing interpretive frameworks for paleoaltimetry are based on linear regressions of modern precipitation isotope transects or on a Rayleigh distillation model of air parcel ascent along a moist adiabatic temperature lapse rate. Neither of these frameworks accounts for the fully nonlinear dynamics of airflow over high-relief terrain, which predicts substantial deviations from the moist-adiabatic ascent model under common atmospheric conditions. The Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF), a numerical weather prediction model, has been modified to include a simplified isotope physics parameterization and has been used to explore the links between topography, atmospheric state, and precipitation isotopes. The controlling nondimensional parameter for atmospheric flow over terrain is Nh/U, where N is the Brunt-Vaisala frequency, a measure of atmospheric stability, h is the orogen- scale relief, and U is the horizontal wind speed. When Nh/U<1, winds can flow directly over topography and WRF precipitation isotopes match those predicted by the moist-adiabatic Rayleigh model. When Nh/U>1, the winds are blocked by the topography and are deflected around it. In these cases, the maximum elevation of condensation is much lower than the range crest, and precipitation isotopes are consequently substantially less depleted than predicted by the moist adiabatic Rayleigh model. Furthermore, the along-strike length of an orogen and the presence of valleys are shown to exert a strong influence on precipitation isotopes in blocked flow regimes because of the dynamical link between terrain length and atmospheric flow blocking. Terrain- blocked atmospheric conditions are common, especially in regions of high relief

  20. Potassium Stable Isotopic Compositions Measured by High-Resolution MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Leah E.; Lloyd, Nicholas S.; Ellam, Robert M.; Simon, Justin I.

    2012-01-01

    Potassium isotopic (K-41/K-39) compositions are notoriously difficult to measure. TIMS measurements are hindered by variable fractionation patterns throughout individual runs and too few isotopes to apply an internal spike method for instrumental mass fractionation corrections. Internal fractionation corrections via the K-40/K-39 ratio can provide precise values but assume identical K-40/K-39 ratios (e.g. 0.05% (1sigma) in [1]); this is appropriate in some cases (e.g. identifying excess K-41) but not others (e.g., determining mass fractionation effects and metrologically traceable isotopic abundances). SIMS analyses have yielded measurements with 0.25% precisions (1sigma) [2]. ICP-MS analyses are significantly affected by interferences from molecular species such as Ar-38H(+) and Ar-40H(+) and instrument mass bias. Single collector ICP-MS instruments in "cold plasma" mode have yielded uncertainties as low as 2% (1sigma, e.g. [3]). Although these precisions may be acceptable for some concentration determinations, they do not resolve isotopic variation in terrestrial materials. Here we present data from a series of measurements made on the Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus multi-collector ICP-MS that demonstrate the ability to make K-41/K-39 ratio measurements with 0.07% precisions (1sigma). These data, collected on NIST K standards, indicate the potential for MC-ICP-MS measurements to look for K isotopic variations at the sub-permil level. The NEPTUNE Plus can sufficiently resolve 39K and 41K from the interfering 38ArH+ and 40ArH+ peaks in wet cold plasma and high-resolution mode. Measurements were made on small but flat, interference-free, plateaus (ca. 50 ppm by mass width for K-41). Although ICP-MS does not yield accurate K-41/K-39 values due to significant instrumental mass fractionation (ca. 6%), this bias can be sufficiently stable over the time required for several measurements so that relative K-41/K-39 values can be precisely determined via sample

  1. Stable isotopes and Digital Elevation Models to study nutrient inputs in high-Arctic lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calizza, Edoardo; Rossi, David; Costantini, Maria Letizia; Careddu, Giulio; Rossi, Loreto

    2016-04-01

    Ice cover, run-off from the watershed, aquatic and terrestrial primary productivity, guano deposition from birds are key factors controlling nutrient and organic matter inputs in high-Arctic lakes. All these factors are expected to be significantly affected by climate change. Quantifying these controls is a key baseline step to understand what combination of factors subtends the biological productivity in Arctic lakes and will drive their ecological response to environmental change. Basing on Digital Elevation Models, drainage maps, and C and N elemental content and stable isotope analysis in sediments, aquatic vegetation and a dominant macroinvertebrate species (Lepidurus arcticus Pallas 1973) belonging to Tvillingvatnet, Storvatnet and Kolhamna, three lakes located in North Spitsbergen (Svalbard), we propose an integrated approach for the analysis of (i) nutrient and organic matter inputs in lakes; (ii) the role of catchment hydro-geomorphology in determining inter-lake differences in the isotopic composition of sediments; (iii) effects of diverse nutrient inputs on the isotopic niche of Lepidurus arcticus. Given its high run-off and large catchment, organic deposits in Tvillingvatnet where dominated by terrestrial inputs, whereas inputs were mainly of aquatic origin in Storvatnet, a lowland lake with low potential run-off. In Kolhamna, organic deposits seem to be dominated by inputs from birds, which actually colonise the area. Isotopic signatures were similar between samples within each lake, representing precise tracers for studies on the effect of climate change on biogeochemical cycles in lakes. The isotopic niche of L. aricticus reflected differences in sediments between lakes, suggesting a bottom-up effect of hydro-geomorphology characterizing each lake on nutrients assimilated by this species. The presented approach proven to be an effective research pathway for the identification of factors subtending to nutrient and organic matter inputs and transfer

  2. High temperature stable WSi{sub x} ohmic contacts on GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Donovan, S.M.; Abernathy, C.R.; Ren, F.; Zolper, J.C.; Cole, M.W.; Zeitouny, A.; Eizenberg, M.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-06-01

    The authors have sputter-deposited 500--1200{angstrom} thick WSi{sub 0.45} metallization onto n{sup +} GaN (n{ge}10{sup 19}cm{sup {minus}3}) doped either during MOCVD growth or by direct Si{sup +} ion implantation (5{times}10{sup 15}cm{sup {minus}2}, 100 keV) activated by RTA at 1,100 C for 30 secs. In the epi samples R{sub C} values of {approximately}10{sup {minus}14}{Omega}cm{sup 2} were obtained, and were stable to {approximately}1000 C. The annealing treatments up to 600 C had little effect on the WSi{sub x}/GaN interface, but the {beta}-W{sub 2}N phase formed between 700--800 C, concomitant with a strong reduction in near-surface crystalline defects in the GaN. Spiking of the metallization down the threading and misfit dislocations was observed at 800 C, extending >5,000{angstrom} in some cases. This can create junction shorting in bipolar or thyristor devices, R{sub C} values of <10{sup {minus}6}{Omega}cm{sup 2} were obtained on the implanted samples for 950 C annealing, with values of after 1050 C anneals. The lower R{sub C} values compared to epi samples appear to be a result of the higher peak doping achieved. The authors observed wide spreads in R{sub C} values over a wafer surface, with the values on 950 C annealed material ranging from 10{sup {minus}7} to 10{sup {minus}4}{Omega}cm{sup 2}. There appear to be highly nonuniform doping regions in the GaN, perhaps associated with the high defect density in heteroepitaxial material, and this may contribute to the variations observed. They believe that near-surface stoichiometry is variable in much of the GaN currently produced due to the relative ease of preferential N{sub 2} loss and the common use of H{sub 2}-containing growth (and cool-down) ambients. Finally, the ohmic contact behavior of WSi{sub x} on abrupt and graded composition In{sub x}Al{sub 1{minus}x}N layers has been studied as a function of growth temperature, InN mole fraction (x = 0.5--1) and post WSi{sub x} deposition annealing treatment.

  3. Directed Molecular Evolution of an Engineered Gammaretroviral Envelope Protein with Dual Receptor Use Shows Stable Maintenance of Both Receptor Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Friis, Kristina Pagh; Iturrioz, Xavier; Thomsen, Jonas; Alvear-Perez, Rodrigo; Bahrami, Shervin; Llorens-Cortes, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have previously reported the construction of a murine leukemia virus-based replication-competent gammaretrovirus (SL3-AP) capable of utilizing the human G protein-coupled receptor APJ (hAPJ) as its entry receptor and its natural receptor, the murine Xpr1 receptor, with equal affinities. The apelin receptor has previously been shown to function as a coreceptor for HIV-1, and thus, adaptation of the viral vector to this receptor is of significant interest. Here, we report the molecular evolution of the SL3-AP envelope protein when the virus is cultured in cells harboring either the Xpr1 or the hAPJ receptor. Interestingly, the dual receptor affinity is maintained even after 10 passages in these cells. At the same time, the chimeric viral envelope protein evolves in a distinct pattern in the apelin cassette when passaged on D17 cells expressing hAPJ in three separate molecular evolution studies. This pattern reflects selection for reduced ligand-receptor interaction and is compatible with a model in which SL3-AP has evolved not to activate hAPJ receptor internalization. IMPORTANCE Few successful examples of engineered retargeting of a retroviral vector exist. The engineered SL3-AP envelope is capable of utilizing either the murine Xpr1 or the human APJ receptor for entry. In addition, SL3-AP is the first example of an engineered retrovirus retaining its dual tropism after several rounds of passaging on cells expressing only one of its receptors. We demonstrate that the virus evolves toward reduced ligand-receptor affinity, which sheds new light on virus adaptation. We provide indirect evidence that such reduced affinity leads to reduced receptor internalization and propose a novel model in which too rapid receptor internalization may decrease virus entry. PMID:26608314

  4. New rapid-curing, stable polyimide polymers with high-temperature strength and thermal stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, E. A.; Jones, J. F.; Kendrick, W. R.; Lubowitz, H. R.; Thorpe, R. S.; Wilson, E. R.

    1969-01-01

    Additive-type polymerization reaction forms thermally stable polyimide polymers, thereby eliminating the volatile matter attendant with the condensation reaction. It is based on the utilization of reactive alicyclic rings positioned on the ends of polyimide prepolymers having relatively low molecular weights.

  5. System for high throughput water extraction from soil material for stable isotope analysis of water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major limitation in the use of stable isotope of water in ecological studies is the time that is required to extract water from soil and plant samples. Using vacuum distillation the extraction time can be less than one hour per sample. Therefore, assembling a distillation system that can process m...

  6. Shelf-stable egg-based products processed by high pressure thermal sterilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Producing a thermally sterilized egg-based product with increased shelf life without losing the sensory and nutritional properties of the freshly prepared product is challenging. Until recently, all commercial shelf-stable egg-based products were sterilized using conventional thermal processing; how...

  7. Cytocompatible cross-linking of electrospun zein fibers for the development of water-stable tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiuran; Reddy, Narendra; Yang, Yiqi

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports a new method of cross-linking electrospun zein fibers using citric acid as a non-toxic cross-linker to enhance the water stability and cytocompatibility of zein fibers for tissue engineering and other medical applications. The electrospun structure has many advantages over other types of structures and protein-based biomaterials possess unique properties preferred for tissue engineering and other medical applications. However, ultrafine fiber matrices developed from proteins have poor mechanical properties and morphological stability in the aqueous environments required for medical applications. Efforts have been made to improve the water stability of electrospun protein scaffolds using cross-linking and other approaches, but the current methods have major limitations, such as cytotoxicity and low efficiency. In this research electrospun zein fibers were cross-linked with citric acid without using any toxic catalysts. The stability of the cross-linked fibers in phosphate-buffered saline and their ability to support the attachment, spreading and proliferation of mouse fibroblast cells were studied. The cross-linked electrospun fibers retained their ultrafine fibrous structure even after immersion in PBS at 37 degrees C for up to 15 days. Citric acid cross-linked electrospun zein scaffolds showed better attachment, spreading and proliferation of fibroblast cells than uncross-linked electrospun zein fibers, cross-linked zein films and electrospun polylactide fibers.

  8. Facile synthesis of highly stable a-Si by ion implantation of low-keV H isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Moutanabbir, O.; Scholz, R.; Goesele, U.; Terreault, B.

    2009-06-15

    It is experimentally shown that silicon is 'easily' amorphized by low-keV H ions at the relatively high temperature of 150 K and for an ion fluence equivalent to <1 DPA (displacement per atom). The a-Si layer is much more stable against recrystallization than a-Si produced by other ions and more stable against chemical modification than c-Si that is H-implanted at room temperature. These results are unexplained by the current atomic collision theory, including molecular-dynamics simulations, but they demonstrate the stabilizing effect of dangling bond passivation by H atoms in postulated, metastable, amorphous droplets.

  9. Uphill transport of rare-earth metals through a highly stable supported liquid membrane based on an ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Fukiko; Shimobori, Yousuke; Koyanagi, Yusuke; Shimojo, Kojiro; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a highly stable supported liquid membrane based on ionic liquids (ILs) for the separation of rare-earth metals, employing N,N-dioctyldiglycol amic acid as a mobile carrier. The quantitative transport of Y and Eu through the membrane was successfully attained, and separation from metal impurities, Zn, was efficiently accomplished. A membrane stable enough for long-term operation was constructible from imidazolium-based ILs having a longer alkyl chain, such as octyl or dodecyl groups in an imidazolium cation.

  10. Facile synthesis of highly stable a-Si by ion implantation of low-keV H isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutanabbir, O.; Scholz, R.; Gösele, U.; Terreault, B.

    2009-06-01

    It is experimentally shown that silicon is “easily” amorphized by low-keV H ions at the relatively high temperature of 150 K and for an ion fluence equivalent to <1 DPA (displacement per atom). The a-Si layer is much more stable against recrystallization than a-Si produced by other ions and more stable against chemical modification than c-Si that is H-implanted at room temperature. These results are unexplained by the current atomic collision theory, including molecular-dynamics simulations, but they demonstrate the stabilizing effect of dangling bond passivation by H atoms in postulated, metastable, amorphous droplets.

  11. High-Fidelity Simulation in Biomedical and Aerospace Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Introduction / Background. Modeling and Simulation Challenges in Aerospace Engineering. Modeling and Simulation Challenges in Biomedical Engineering. Digital Astronaut. Project Columbia. Summary and Discussion.

  12. H4octapa: highly stable complexation of lanthanide(III) ions and copper(II).

    PubMed

    Kálmán, Ferenc Krisztián; Végh, Andrea; Regueiro-Figueroa, Martín; Tóth, Éva; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Tircsó, Gyula

    2015-03-02

    The acyclic ligand octapa(4-) (H4octapa = 6,6'-((ethane-1,2-diylbis((carboxymethyl)azanediyl))bis(methylene))dipicolinic acid) forms stable complexes with the Ln(3+) ions in aqueous solution. The stability constants determined for the complexes with La(3+), Gd(3+), and Lu(3+) using relaxometric methods are log KLaL = 20.13(7), log KGdL = 20.23(4), and log KLuL = 20.49(5) (I = 0.15 M NaCl). High stability constants were also determined for the complexes formed with divalent metal ions such as Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) (log KZnL = 18.91(3) and log KCuL = 22.08(2)). UV-visible and NMR spectroscopic studies and density functional theory (DFT) calculations point to hexadentate binding of the ligand to Zn(2+) and Cu(2+), the donor atoms of the acetate groups of the ligand remaining uncoordinated. The complexes formed with the Ln(3+) ions are nine-coordinated thanks to the octadentate binding of the ligand and the presence of a coordinated water molecule. The stability constants of the complexes formed with the Ln(3+) ions do not change significantly across the lanthanide series. A DFT investigation shows that this is the result of a subtle balance between the increased binding energies across the 4f period, which contribute to an increasing complex stability, and the parallel increase of the absolute values of the hydration free energies of the Ln(3+) ions. In the case of the [Ln(octapa)(H2O)](-) complexes the interaction between the amine nitrogen atoms of the ligand and the Ln(3+) ions is weakened along the lanthanide series, and therefore the increased electrostatic interaction does not overcome the increasing hydration energies. A detailed kinetic study of the dissociation of the [Gd(octapa)(H2O)](-) complex in the presence of Cu(2+) shows that the metal-assisted pathway is the main responsible for complex dissociation at pH 7.4 and physiological [Cu(2+)] concentration (1 μM).

  13. Stable high volumetric production of glycosylated human recombinant IFNalpha2b in HEK293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Loignon, Martin; Perret, Sylvie; Kelly, John; Boulais, Denise; Cass, Brian; Bisson, Louis; Afkhamizarreh, Fatemeh; Durocher, Yves

    2008-01-01

    Background Mammalian cells are becoming the prevailing expression system for the production of recombinant proteins because of their capacity for proper protein folding, assembly, and post-translational modifications. These systems currently allow high volumetric production of monoclonal recombinant antibodies in the range of grams per litre. However their use for large-scale expression of cytokines typically results in much lower volumetric productivity. Results We have engineered a HEK293 cell clone for high level production of human recombinant glycosylated IFNα2b and developed a rapid and efficient method for its purification. This clone steadily produces more than 200 mg (up to 333 mg) of human recombinant IFNα2b per liter of serum-free culture, which can be purified by a single-step cation-exchange chromatography following media acidification and clarification. This rapid procedure yields 98% pure IFNα2b with a recovery greater than 70%. Purified IFNα2b migrates on SDS-PAGE as two species, a major 21 kDa band and a minor 19 kDa band. N-terminal sequences of both forms are identical and correspond to the expected mature protein. Purified IFNα2b elutes at neutral pH as a single peak with an apparent molecular weight of 44,000 Da as determined by size-exclusion chromatography. The presence of intramolecular and absence of intermolecular disulfide bridges is evidenced by the fact that non-reduced IFNα2b has a greater electrophoretic mobility than the reduced form. Treatment of purified IFNα2b with neuraminidase followed by O-glycosidase both increases electrophoretic mobility, indicating the presence of sialylated O-linked glycan. A detailed analysis of glycosylation by mass spectroscopy identifies disialylated and monosialylated forms as the major constituents of purified IFNα2b. Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) shows that the glycans are linked to the expected threonine at position 106. Other minor glycosylated forms and non-sialylated species are

  14. Solar-powered rocket engine optimization for high specific impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, J. Bradley

    1993-11-01

    Hercules Aerospace is currently developing a solar-powered rocket engine (SPRE) design optimized for high specific impulse (Isp). The SPRE features a low loss geometry in its light-gathering cavity, which includes an integral secondary concentrator. The simple one-piece heat exchanger is made from refractory metal and/or ceramic open-celled foam. The foam's high surface-area-to-volume ratio will efficiently transfer the thermal energy to the hydrogen propellant. The single-pass flow of propellant through the heat exchanger further boosts thermal efficiency by regeneratively cooling surfaces near the entrance of the optical cavity. These surfaces would otherwise reradiate a significant portion of the captured solar energy back out of the solar entrance. Such design elements promote a high overall thermal efficiency and hence, a high operating Isp

  15. High Speed Balancing Applied to the T700 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J.; Lee, C.; Martin, M.

    1989-01-01

    The work performed under Contracts NAS3-23929 and NAS3-24633 is presented. MTI evaluated the feasibility of high-speed balancing for both the T700 power turbine rotor and the compressor rotor. Modifications were designed for the existing Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD) T53/T55 high-speed balancing system for balancing T700 power turbine rotors. Tests conducted under these contracts included a high-speed balancing evaluation for T700 power turbines in the Army/NASA drivetrain facility at MTI. The high-speed balancing tests demonstrated the reduction of vibration amplitudes at operating speed for both low-speed balanced and non-low-speed balanced T700 power turbines. In addition, vibration data from acceptance tests of T53, T55, and T700 engines were analyzed and a vibration diagnostic procedure developed.

  16. Math, Science, and Engineering Integration in a High School Engineering Course: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valtorta, Clara G.; Berland, Leema K.

    2015-01-01

    Engineering in K-12 classrooms has been receiving expanding emphasis in the United States. The integration of science, mathematics, and engineering is a benefit and goal of K-12 engineering; however, current empirical research on the efficacy of K-12 science, mathematics, and engineering integration is limited. This study adds to this growing…

  17. Construction of a stable genetically engineered rhamnolipid-producing microorganism for remediation of pyrene-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Cao, Li; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Ji; Li, Chao; Yan, Xin; Lou, Xu; Xia, Yali; Hong, Qing; Li, Shunpeng

    2012-09-01

    One rhamnolipid-producing bacterial strain named Pseudomonas aeruginosa BSFD5 was isolated and characterized. Its rhlABRI cassette including necessary genes for rhamnolipid synthesis was cloned and transformed into the chromosome of P. putida KT2440 by a new random transposon vector without introducing antibiotic-resistance marker, generating a genetically engineered microorganism named P. putida KT2440-rhlABRI, which could stably express the rhlABRI cassette and produce rhamnolipid at a yield of 1.68 g l(-1). In experiments using natural soil, it was shown that P. putida KT2440-rhlABRI could increase the dissolution of pyrene and thus promote its degradation by indigenous microorganisms. P. putida KT2440-rhlABRI thus demonstrated potential for enhancing the remediation of soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  18. CHO-S antibody titers >1 gram/liter using flow electroporation-mediated transient gene expression followed by rapid migration to high-yield stable cell lines.

    PubMed

    Steger, Krista; Brady, James; Wang, Weili; Duskin, Meg; Donato, Karen; Peshwa, Madhusudan

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, researchers have turned to transient gene expression (TGE) as an alternative to CHO stable cell line generation for early-stage antibody development. Despite advances in transfection methods and culture optimization, the majority of CHO-based TGE systems produce insufficient antibody titers for extensive use within biotherapeutic development pipelines. Flow electroporation using the MaxCyte STX Scalable Transfection System is a highly efficient, scalable means of CHO-based TGE for gram-level production of antibodies without the need for specialized expression vectors or genetically engineered CHO cell lines. CHO cell flow electroporation is easily scaled from milligram to multigram quantities without protocol reoptimization while maintaining transfection performance and antibody productivity. In this article, data are presented that demonstrate the reproducibility, scalability, and antibody production capabilities of CHO-based TGE using the MaxCyte STX. Data show optimization of posttransfection parameters such as cell density, media composition, and feed strategy that result in secreted antibody titers >1 g/L and production of multiple grams of antibody within 2 weeks of a single CHO-S cell transfection. In addition, data are presented to demonstrate the application of scalable electroporation for the rapid generation of high-yield stable CHO cell lines to bridge the gap between early- and late-stage antibody development activities.

  19. Facile thiol-ene thermal crosslinking reaction facilitated hole-transporting layer for highly efficient and stable perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhong'an; Zhu, Zonglong; Chueh, Chu -Chen; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K. -Y.

    2016-08-08

    A crosslinked organic hole-transporting layer (HTL) is developed to realize highly efficient and stable perovskite solar cells via a facile thiol-ene thermal reaction. This crosslinked HTL not only facilitates hole extraction from perovskites, but also functions as an effective protective barrier. Lastly, a high-performance (power conversion efficiency: 18.3%) device is demonstrated to show respectable photo and thermal stability without encapsulation.

  20. Engineering High-Fidelity Residue Separations for Selective Harvest

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin L. Kenney; Christopher T. Wright; Reed L. Hoskinson; J. Rochard Hess; David J. Muth, Jr.

    2006-07-01

    Composition and pretreatment studies of corn stover and wheat stover anatomical fractions clearly show that some corn and wheat stover anatomical fractions are of higher value than others as a biofeedstock. This premise, along with soil sustainability and erosion control concerns, provides the motivation for the selective harvest concept for separating and collecting the higher value residue fractions in a combine during grain harvest. This study recognizes the analysis of anatomical fractions as theoretical feedstock quality targets, but not as practical targets for developing selective harvest technologies. Rather, practical quality targets were established that identified the residue separation requirements of a selective harvest combine. Data are presented that shows that a current grain combine is not capable of achieving the fidelity of residue fractionation established by the performance targets. However, using a virtual engineering approach, based on an understanding of the fluid dynamics of the air stream separation, the separation fidelity can be significantly improved without significant changes to the harvester design. A virtual engineering model of a grain combine was developed and used to perform simulations of the residue separator performance. The engineered residue separator was then built into a selective harvest test combine, and tests performed to evaluate the separation fidelity. Field tests were run both with and without the residue separator installed in the test combine, and the chaff and straw residue streams were collected during harvest of Challis soft white spring wheat. The separation fidelity accomplished both with and without the residue separator was quantified by laboratory screening analysis. The screening results showed that the engineered baffle separator did a remarkable job of effecting high-fidelity separation of the straw and chaff residue streams, improving the chaff stream purity and increasing the straw stream yield.

  1. Advanced High-Temperature Engine Materials Technology Progresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced High Temperature Engine Materials Technology Program (HITEMP) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is to generate technology for advanced materials and structural analysis that will increase fuel economy, improve reliability, extend life, and reduce operating costs for 21st century civil propulsion systems. The primary focus is on fan and compressor materials (polymer-matrix composites - PMC's), compressor and turbine materials (superalloys, and metal-matrix and intermetallic-matrix composites - MMC's and IMC's), and turbine materials (ceramic-matrix composites - CMC's). These advanced materials are being developed in-house by Lewis researchers and on grants and contracts.

  2. An Engineering Research Program for High School Science Teachers: Year Two Changes and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJong, Brian P.; Yelamarthi, Kumar; Kaya, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    The research experiences for teachers program at Central Michigan University was initiated to team in-service and pre-service teachers with undergraduate engineering students and engineering faculty, in an engineering research setting. During the six-week program, teachers learn engineering concepts and develop high-school instructional material…

  3. High frequency data acquisition system for space shuttle main engine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewallen, Pat

    1987-01-01

    The high frequency data acquisition system developed for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) single engine test facility at the National Space Technology Laboratories is discussed. The real time system will provide engineering data for a complete set of SSME instrumentation (approx. 100 measurements) within 4 hours following engine cutoff, a decrease of over 48 hours from the previous analog tape based system.

  4. High temperature aircraft turbine engine bearing and lubrication system development

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D.H.; Chin, H.A.; Klenke, C.; Galbato, A.T.; Ragen, M.A.; Spitzer, R.F.

    1998-12-31

    Results are reported for a project sponsored by the US Air Force Wright Laboratories. The major emphasis of this project was the evaluation of bearing materials with improved corrosion resistance, high hot hardness, and high fracture toughness, intended to meet the requirements of the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technologies (IHPTET) Phase 2 engine. The project included material property studies on candidate bearing materials and lubricants which formed the selection basis for subscale and full-scale bearing rig verification tests. The carburizing stainless steel alloy Pyrowear 675 demonstrated significant fatigue life, fracture toughness, and corrosion resistance improvements relative to the M50 NiL baseline bearing material. The new Skylube 2 (MCS-2482) lubricant provided significant thermal degradation improvements with respect to the Skylube 600 (PWA-524, MIL-L-87100) lubricant. Two 130 mm bore Pyrowear 675 hybrid ball bearings with silicon nitride balls were run successfully for 231 hours with Skylube 2 lubricant at temperatures consistent with IHPTET 2 requirements.

  5. Infusing Engineering Design into High School STEM Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hynes, Morgan; Portsmore, Merredith; Dare, Emily; Milto, Elissa; Rogers, Chris; Hammer, David; Carberry, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The Tufts University Center for Engineering Education and Outreach (CEEO) strives to improve STEM education through engineering and believes every student should have the chance to engineer. Situated in Massachusetts, the first state to adopt engineering education at all levels in public schools (Massachusetts DOE, 2001), the CEEO supports the…

  6. A high-throughput immobilized bead screen for stable proteins and multi-protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lockard, Meghan A.; Listwan, Pawel; Pedelacq, Jean-Denis; Cabantous, Stéphanie; Nguyen, Hau B.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    We describe an in vitro colony screen to identify Escherichia coli expressing soluble proteins and stable, assembled multiprotein complexes. Proteins with an N-terminal 6His tag and C-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP) S11 tag are fluorescently labeled in cells by complementation with a coexpressed GFP 1–10 fragment. After partial colony lysis, the fluorescent soluble proteins or complexes diffuse through a supporting filtration membrane and are captured on Talon® resin metal affinity beads immobilized in agarose. Images of the fluorescent colonies convey total expression and the level of fluorescence bound to the beads indicates how much protein is soluble. Both pieces of information can be used together when selecting clones. After the assay, colonies can be picked and propagated, eliminating the need to make replica plates. We used the method to screen a DNA fragment library of the human protein p85 and preferentially obtained clones expressing the full-length ‘breakpoint cluster region-homology' and NSH2 domains. The assay also distinguished clones expressing stable multi-protein complexes from those that are unstable due to missing subunits. Clones expressing stable, intact heterotrimeric E.coli YheNML complexes were readily identified in libraries dominated by complexes of YheML missing the N subunit. PMID:21642284

  7. A high-throughput immobilized bead screen for stable proteins and multi-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Lockard, Meghan A; Listwan, Pawel; Pedelacq, Jean-Denis; Cabantous, Stéphanie; Nguyen, Hau B; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2011-07-01

    We describe an in vitro colony screen to identify Escherichia coli expressing soluble proteins and stable, assembled multiprotein complexes. Proteins with an N-terminal 6His tag and C-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP) S11 tag are fluorescently labeled in cells by complementation with a coexpressed GFP 1-10 fragment. After partial colony lysis, the fluorescent soluble proteins or complexes diffuse through a supporting filtration membrane and are captured on Talon(®) resin metal affinity beads immobilized in agarose. Images of the fluorescent colonies convey total expression and the level of fluorescence bound to the beads indicates how much protein is soluble. Both pieces of information can be used together when selecting clones. After the assay, colonies can be picked and propagated, eliminating the need to make replica plates. We used the method to screen a DNA fragment library of the human protein p85 and preferentially obtained clones expressing the full-length 'breakpoint cluster region-homology' and NSH2 domains. The assay also distinguished clones expressing stable multi-protein complexes from those that are unstable due to missing subunits. Clones expressing stable, intact heterotrimeric E.coli YheNML complexes were readily identified in libraries dominated by complexes of YheML missing the N subunit.

  8. High-efficiency stable transformation of the model fern species Ceratopteris richardii via microparticle bombardment.

    PubMed

    Plackett, Andrew R G; Huang, Liandong; Sanders, Heather L; Langdale, Jane A

    2014-05-01

    Ferns represent the most closely related extant lineage to seed plants. The aquatic fern Ceratopteris richardii has been subject to research for a considerable period of time, but analyses of the genetic programs underpinning developmental processes have been hampered by a large genome size, a lack of available mutants, and an inability to create stable transgenic lines. In this paper, we report a protocol for efficient stable genetic transformation of C. richardii and a closely related species Ceratopteris thalictroides using microparticle bombardment. Indeterminate callus was generated and maintained from the sporophytes of both species using cytokinin treatment. In proof-of-principle experiments, a 35S::β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression cassette was introduced into callus cells via tungsten microparticles, and stable transformants were selected via a linked hygromycin B resistance marker. The presence of the transgene in regenerated plants and in subsequent generations was validated using DNA-blot analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and GUS staining. GUS staining patterns in most vegetative tissues corresponded with constitutive gene expression. The protocol described in this paper yields transformation efficiencies far greater than those previously published and represents a significant step toward the establishment of a tractable fern genetic model.

  9. High-Q energy trapping of temperature-stable shear waves with Lamé cross-sectional polarization in a single crystal silicon waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabrizian, R.; Daruwalla, A.; Ayazi, F.

    2016-03-01

    A multi-port electrostatically driven silicon acoustic cavity is implemented that efficiently traps the energy of a temperature-stable eigen-mode with Lamé cross-sectional polarization. Dispersive behavior of propagating and evanescent guided waves in a ⟨100⟩-aligned single crystal silicon waveguide is used to engineer the acoustic energy distribution of a specific shear eigen-mode that is well known for its low temperature sensitivity when implemented in doped single crystal silicon. Such an acoustic energy trapping in the central region of the acoustic cavity geometry and far from substrate obviates the need for narrow tethers that are conventionally used for non-destructive and high quality factor (Q) energy suspension in MEMS resonators; therefore, the acoustically engineered waveguide can simultaneously serve as in-situ self-oven by passing large uniformly distributed DC currents through its body and without any concern about perturbing the mode shape or deforming narrow supports. Such a stable thermo-structural performance besides large turnover temperatures than can be realized in Lamé eigen-modes make this device suitable for implementation of ultra-stable oven-controlled oscillators. 78 MHz prototypes implemented in arsenic-doped single crystal silicon substrates with different resistivity are transduced by in- and out-of-plane narrow-gap capacitive ports, showing high Q of ˜43k. The low resistivity device shows an overall temperature-induced frequency drift of 200 ppm over the range of -20 °C to 80 °C, which is ˜15× smaller compared to overall frequency drift measured for the similar yet high resistivity device in the same temperature range. Furthermore, a frequency tuning of ˜2100 ppm is achieved in high resistivity device by passing 45 mA DC current through its body. Continuous operation of the device under such a self-ovenizing current over 10 days did not induce frequency instability or degradation in Q.

  10. Advanced High-Temperature Engine Materials Technology Progresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced High Temperature Engine Materials Technology Program (HITEMP) is to generate technology for advanced materials and structural analysis that will increase fuel economy, improve reliability, extend life, and reduce operating costs for 21st century civil propulsion systems. The primary focus is on fan and compressor materials (polymer-matrix composites--PMC's), compressor and turbine materials (superalloys, and metal-matrix and intermetallic-matrix composites--MMC's and IMC's) and turbine materials (ceramic-matrix composites--CMC's). These advanced materials are being developed by in-house researchers and on grants and contracts. NASA considers this program to be a focused materials and structures research effort that builds on our base research programs and supports component-development projects. HITEMP is coordinated with the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Program and the Department of Defense/NASA Integrated High-Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) Program. Advanced materials and structures technologies from HITEMP may be used in these future applications. Recent technical accomplishments have not only improved the state-of-the-art but have wideranging applications to industry. A high-temperature thin-film strain gage was developed to measure both dynamic and static strain up to 1100 C (2000 F). The gage's unique feature is that it is minimally intrusive. This technology, which received a 1995 R&D 100 Award, has been transferred to AlliedSignal Engines, General Electric Company, and Ford Motor Company. Analytical models developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center were used to study Textron Specialty Materials' manufacturing process for titanium-matrix composite rings. Implementation of our recommendations on tooling and processing conditions resulted in the production of defect free rings. In the Lincoln Composites/AlliedSignal/Lewis cooperative program, a composite compressor case is being manufactured with a Lewis

  11. LED light engine concept with ultra-high scalable luminance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelen, Christoph; de Boer, Dick; Bruls, Dominique; van der Eyden, Joost; Koole, Rolf; Li, Yun; Mirsadeghi, Mo; Vanbroekhoven, Vincent; Van den Bergh, John-John; Van de Voorde, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Although LEDs have been introduced successfully in many general lighting applications during the past decade, high brightness light source applications are still suffering from the limited luminance of LEDs. High power LEDs are generally limited in luminance to ca 100 Mnit (108 lm/m2sr) or less, while dedicated devices for projection may achieve luminance values up to ca 300 Mnit with phosphor converted green. In particular for high luminous flux applications with limited étendue, like in front projection systems, only very modest luminous flux values in the beam can be achieved with LEDs compared to systems based on discharge lamps. In this paper we introduce a light engine concept based on a light converter rod pumped with blue LEDs that breaks through the étendue and brightness limits of LEDs, enabling LED light source luminance values that are more than 4 times higher than what can be achieved with LEDs so far. In LED front projection systems, green LEDs are the main limiting factor. With our green light emitting modules, peak luminance values well above 1.2 Gnit have been achieved, enabling doubling of the screen brightness of LED based DLP projection systems, and even more when this technology is applied to other colors as well. This light source concept, introduced as the ColorSpark High Lumen Density (HLD) LED technology, enables a breakthrough in the performance of LED-based light engines not only for projection, where >2700 ANSI lm was demonstrated, but for a wide variety of high brightness applications.

  12. Systems Engineering Provides Successful High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Project

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V. Park; Emmanuel Ohene Opare, Jr.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes two Systems Engineering Studies completed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support development of the High Temperature Stream Electrolysis (HTSE) process. HTSE produces hydrogen from water using nuclear power and was selected by the Department of Energy (DOE) for integration with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The first study was a reliability, availability and maintainability (RAM) analysis to identify critical areas for technology development based on available information regarding expected component performance. An HTSE process baseline flowsheet at commercial scale was used as a basis. The NGNP project also established a process and capability to perform future RAM analyses. The analysis identified which components had the greatest impact on HTSE process availability and indicated that the HTSE process could achieve over 90% availability. The second study developed a series of life-cycle cost estimates for the various scale-ups required to demonstrate the HTSE process. Both studies were useful in identifying near- and long-term efforts necessary for successful HTSE process deployment. The size of demonstrations to support scale-up was refined, which is essential to estimate near- and long-term cost and schedule. The life-cycle funding profile, with high-level allocations, was identified as the program transitions from experiment scale R&D to engineering scale demonstration.

  13. Solution Chemistry Engineering toward High-Efficiency Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixin; Zhu, Kai

    2014-12-04

    Organic and inorganic hybrid perovskites (e.g., CH3NH3PbI3) have emerged as a revolutionary class of light-absorbing semiconductors that has demonstrated a rapid increase in efficiency within a few years of active research. Controlling perovskite morphology and composition has been found critical to developing high-performance perovskite solar cells. The recent development of solution chemistry engineering has led to fabrication of greater than 15-17%-efficiency solar cells by multiple groups, with the highest certified 17.9% efficiency that has significantly surpassed the best-reported perovskite solar cell by vapor-phase growth. In this Perspective, we review recent progress on solution chemistry engineering processes and various control parameters that are critical to the success of solution growth of high-quality perovskite films. We discuss the importance of understanding the impact of solution-processing parameters and perovskite film architectures on the fundamental charge carrier dynamics in perovskite solar cells. The cost and stability issues of perovskite solar cells will also be discussed.

  14. Zinc finger nuclease technology: A stable tool for high efficiency transformation in bloodstream form T. brucei.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Gabriela; Kangussu-Marcolino, Monica M; Doiron, Nicholas; Käser, Sandro; de Assis Burle-Caldas, Gabriela; DaRocha, Wanderson D; Teixeira, Santuza M; Roditi, Isabel

    2017-04-01

    In Trypanosoma brucei, the generation of knockout mutants is relatively easy compared to other organisms as transfection methods are well established. These methods have their limitations, however, when it comes to the generation of genome-wide libraries that require a minimum of several hundred thousand transformants. Double-strand breaks with the meganuclease ISce-I dramatically increase transformation efficiency, but are not widely in use as cell lines need to be generated de novo before each transfection. Here we show that zinc finger nucleases are a robust and stable tool that can enhance transformation in bloodstream forms by more than an order of magnitude.

  15. A high-powered siren for stable acoustic levitation of dense materials in the earth's gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammel, Paul M.; Croonquist, Arvid P.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1988-02-01

    Levitation of large dense samples (e.g., 1-cm diameter steel balls) has been performed in a 1-g environment. A siren was used to study the effects of reflector geometry and variable-frequency operation in order to attain stable acoustic positioning. The harmonic content and spatial distribution of the acoustic field have been investigated. The best stability was obtained with an open reflector system, using a flat lower reflector and a slightly concave upper reflector while operating at a frequency slightly below resonance.

  16. A high-powered siren for stable acoustic levitation of dense materials in the earth's gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammel, Paul M.; Croonquist, Arvid P.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1988-01-01

    Levitation of large dense samples (e.g., 1-cm diameter steel balls) has been performed in a 1-g environment. A siren was used to study the effects of reflector geometry and variable-frequency operation in order to attain stable acoustic positioning. The harmonic content and spatial distribution of the acoustic field have been investigated. The best stability was obtained with an open reflector system, using a flat lower reflector and a slightly concave upper reflector while operating at a frequency slightly below resonance.

  17. Complementary inverter using high mobility air-stable perylene di-imide derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Mang-mang; Bao, Zhenan; Erk, Peter; Koenemann, Martin; Gomez, Marcos

    2007-02-01

    The authors report the fabrication and electrical characterization of organic complementary inverters using pentacene as p-type material and our previously reported air-stable perylene di-imide derivatives tetrachloro-perylene-tetracarboxyldi-imide (TC-PTCDI) and N ,N'-bis(2-phenylethyl)perylene-3,4:9:10-bis-(dicarboximide) (BPE-PTCDI) as n-type materials. Both p- and n-type thin film transistors were integrated onto the same substrate using a top contact configuration. The corresponding inverters show good performance with gains about 12 and 10 for TC-PTCDI and BPE-PTCDI inverters, respectively.

  18. High Efficiency, Low Emissions Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Gravel, Roland; Maronde, Carl; Gehrke, Chris; Fiveland, Scott

    2010-10-30

    This is the final report of the High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) Research Program for the U.S. Department of Energy. Work under this co-funded program began in August 2005 and finished in July 2010. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate a low emission, high thermal efficiency engine system that met 2010 EPA heavy-duty on-highway truck emissions requirements (0.2g/bhp-hr NOx, 0.14g/bhp-hr HC and 0.01g/bhp-hr PM) with a thermal efficiency of 46%. To achieve this goal, development of diesel homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion was the chosen approach. This report summarizes the development of diesel HCCI combustion and associated enabling technologies that occurred during the HECC program between August 2005 and July 2010. This program showed that although diesel HCCI with conventional US diesel fuel was not a feasible means to achieve the program objectives, the HCCI load range could be increased with a higher volatility, lower cetane number fuel, such as gasoline, if the combustion rate could be moderated to avoid excessive cylinder pressure rise rates. Given the potential efficiency and emissions benefits, continued research of combustion with low cetane number fuels and the effects of fuel distillation are recommended. The operation of diesel HCCI was only feasible at part-load due to a limited fuel injection window. A 4% fuel consumption benefit versus conventional, low-temperature combustion was realized over the achievable operating range. Several enabling technologies were developed under this program that also benefited non-HCCI combustion. The development of a 300MPa fuel injector enabled the development of extended lifted flame combustion. A design methodology for minimizing the heat transfer to jacket water, known as precision cooling, will benefit conventional combustion engines, as well as HCCI engines. An advanced combustion control system based on cylinder pressure measurements was developed. A Well

  19. Engineered Coatings for Ni Alloys in High Temperature Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Elizabeth A.; Yang, James Y.; Kumar, Deepak; Was, Gary S.; Levi, Carlos G.

    2013-02-01

    Alloy 617 is a candidate material for the intermediate heat exchanger of the He-cooled very high temperature reactor. At target temperatures ≥1223 K (950 °C), low level impurities in the gas stream may cause carburization, decarburization, and/or oxidation of 617 with deleterious effects on its mechanical properties. The chromia scale formed naturally by 617 does not provide adequate protection in the expected environment. Alpha alumina offers a greater potential as an effective diffusion barrier with superior stability, but it requires modification of the alloy surface. This work explores two approaches to surface modification based on aluminizing, either alone or in combination with FeCrAlY cladding, followed by pre-oxidation to form alpha alumina. Both approaches yield coatings with promising diffusional stability on alloy 617. Initial corrosion studies in impure He environments reveal that the alpha alumina is stable and protects the underlying substrate in both carburizing and decarburizing environments.

  20. The Calibrations of Space Shuttle Main Engines High Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steward, Christopher S.

    1995-01-01

    Previously, high pressure transducers that were used on the Space Shuttles Main Engine (SSME) exhibited a severe drift after being tested on the SSME. The Experimental Testing Technology Division (ETTD) designed some new transducers that would not exhibit a severe drift over a short period of time. These transducers were calibrated at the Test Bed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). After the high pressure transducers were calibrated, the transducers were placed on the SSME and fired. The transducers were then sent to the NASA LaRC to be recalibrated. The main objectives of the recalibrations was to make sure that the transducers possessed the same qualities as they did before they were fired on the SSME. Other objectives of the project were to determine the stability of the transducers and to determine whether the transducers exhibited a severe drift.

  1. A Temperature-Stable Cryo-System for High-Temperature Superconducting MR In-Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, In-Tsang; Yang, Hong-Chang; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2013-01-01

    To perform a rat experiment using a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) surface resonator, a cryostat is essential to maintain the rat's temperature. In this work, a compact temperature-stable HTS cryo-system, keeping animal rectal temperature at 37.4°C for more than 3 hours, was successfully developed. With this HTS cryo-system, a 40-mm-diameter Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (Bi-2223) surface resonator at 77 K was demonstrated in a 3-Tesla MRI system. The proton resonant frequency (PRF) method was employed to monitor the rat's temperature. Moreover, the capacity of MR thermometry in the HTS experiments was evaluated by correlating with data from independent fiber-optic sensor temperature measurements. The PRF thermal coefficient was derived as 0.03 rad/°C and the temperature-monitoring architecture can be implemented to upgrade the quality and safety in HTS experiments. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the HTS surface resonator at 77 K was higher than that of a professionally made copper surface resonator at 300 K, which has the same geometry, by a 3.79-fold SNR gain. Furthermore, the temperature-stable HTS cryo-system we developed can obtain stable SNR gain in every scan. A temperature-stable HTS cryo-system with an external air-blowing circulation system is demonstrated. PMID:23637936

  2. A temperature-stable cryo-system for high-temperature superconducting MR in-vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, In-Tsang; Yang, Hong-Chang; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2013-01-01

    To perform a rat experiment using a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) surface resonator, a cryostat is essential to maintain the rat's temperature. In this work, a compact temperature-stable HTS cryo-system, keeping animal rectal temperature at 37.4°C for more than 3 hours, was successfully developed. With this HTS cryo-system, a 40-mm-diameter Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (Bi-2223) surface resonator at 77 K was demonstrated in a 3-Tesla MRI system. The proton resonant frequency (PRF) method was employed to monitor the rat's temperature. Moreover, the capacity of MR thermometry in the HTS experiments was evaluated by correlating with data from independent fiber-optic sensor temperature measurements. The PRF thermal coefficient was derived as 0.03 rad/°C and the temperature-monitoring architecture can be implemented to upgrade the quality and safety in HTS experiments. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the HTS surface resonator at 77 K was higher than that of a professionally made copper surface resonator at 300 K, which has the same geometry, by a 3.79-fold SNR gain. Furthermore, the temperature-stable HTS cryo-system we developed can obtain stable SNR gain in every scan. A temperature-stable HTS cryo-system with an external air-blowing circulation system is demonstrated.

  3. Young Engineers and Sciences (YES) - Mentoring High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, Daniel C.; Asbell, E.; Reiff, P. H.

    2008-09-01

    Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) is a community partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA) during the past 16 years. The YES program provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real world, research experiences in physical sciences (including space science) and engineering. YES consists of two parts: 1) an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems, attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics, computers and the Internet, careers, science ethics, and other topics; and select individual research projects to be completed during the academic year; and 2) a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their mentors during the academic year and earn honors credit. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. During these years, YES has developed a website for topics in space science from the perspective of high school students, including NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) (http://yesserver.space.swri.edu). High school science teachers participate in the workshop and develop space-related lessons for classroom presentation in the academic year. Student evaluations indicate the effectiveness of YES on their academic preparation and choice of college majors. Over the past 16 years, all YES graduates have entered college, several have worked for SwRI, one business has started, and three scientific publications have resulted. Acknowledgements. We acknowledge funding and support from the NASA MMS Mission, Texas Space Grant Consortium, Northside Independent School District, SwRI, and several local charitable foundations.

  4. High magnetic shear gain in a liquid sodium stable couette flow experiment A prelude to an alpha - omega dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, Stirling; Li, Jui; Finn, John; Pariev, Vladimir; Beckley, Howard; Si, Jiahe; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David; Slutz, James; Westrom, Zeb; Klein, Brianna

    2010-11-08

    The {Omega}-phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at NMIMT in cooperation with LANL has successfully demonstrated the production of a high toroidal field, B{sub {phi}} {approx_equal} 8 x B{sub r} from the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field, B{sub r}. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by rotational shear in stable Couette Row within liquid sodium at Rm {approx_equal} 120. The small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette Row is caused by Ekman Row where ({delta}v/v){sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -3}. This high {Omega}-gain in low turbulence flow contrasts with a smaller {Omega}-gain in higher turbulence, Helmholtz-unstable shear flows. This result supports the ansatz that large scale astrophysical magnetic fields are created within semi-coherent large scale motions in which turbulence plays a diffusive role that enables magnetic flux linkage.

  5. Fractional polymerization of a suspended planar bilayer creates a fluid, highly stable membrane for ion channel recordings.

    PubMed

    Heitz, Benjamin A; Jones, Ian W; Hall, Henry K; Aspinwall, Craig A; Saavedra, S Scott

    2010-05-26

    Suspended planar lipid membranes (or black lipid membranes (BLMs)) are widely used for studying reconstituted ion channels, although they lack the chemical and mechanical stability needed for incorporation into high-throughput biosensors and biochips. Lipid polymerization enhances BLM stability but is incompatible with ion channel function when membrane fluidity is required. Here, we demonstrate the preparation of a highly stable BLM that retains significant fluidity by using a mixture of polymerizable and nonpolymerizable phospholipids. Alamethicin, a voltage-gated peptide channel for which membrane fluidity is required for activity, was reconstituted into mixed BLMs prepared using bis-dienoyl phosphatidylcholine (bis-DenPC) and diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC). Polymerization yielded BLMs that retain the fluidity required for alamethicin activity yet are stable for several days as compared to a few hours prior to polymerization. Thus, these polymerized, binary composition BLMs feature both fluidity and long-term stability.

  6. Fractional Polymerization of a Suspended Planar Bilayer Creates a Fluid, Highly Stable Membrane for Ion Channel Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Heitz, Benjamin A.; Jones, Ian W.; Hall, Henry K.; Aspinwall, Craig A.; Saavedra, S. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Suspended planar lipid membranes (or black lipid membranes (BLMs)) are widely used for studying reconstituted ion channels, although they lack the chemical and mechanical stability needed for incorporation into high-throughput biosensors and biochips. Lipid polymerization enhances BLM stability but is incompatible with ion channel function when membrane fluidity is required. Here we demonstrate the preparation of a highly stable BLM that retains significant fluidity by using a mixture of polymerizable and nonpolymerizable phospholipids. Alamethicin, a voltage-gated peptide channel for which membrane fluidity is required for activity, was reconstituted into mixed BLMs prepared using bis-dienoyl phosphatidylcholine (bis-DenPC) and diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC)). Polymerization yielded BLMs that retain the fluidity required for alamethicin activity yet are stable for several days as compared to a few hours prior to polymerization. Thus these polymerized, binary composition BLMs feature both fluidity and long-term stability. PMID:20441163

  7. Orbital Transfer Vehicle Engine Technology High Velocity Ratio Diffusing Crossover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-01-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  8. Orbital transfer vehicle engine technology high velocity ratio diffusing crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-12-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  9. Partitioning of Evapotranspiration Using a Stable Water Isotope Technique in a High Temperature Agricultural Production System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Liang, L.; Wang, L.; Jenerette, D.; Grantz, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural production in the hot and arid low desert systems of southern California relies heavily on irrigation. A better understanding of how much and to what extent the irrigation water is transpired by crops relative to being lost through evaporation will contribute to better management of increasingly limited agricultural water resources. In this study, we examined the evapotranspiration (ET) partitioning over a field of forage sorghum (S. bicolor) during a growing season with several irrigation cycles. In several field campaigns we used continuous measurements of near-surface variations in the stable isotopic composition of water vapor (δ2H). We employed custom built transparent chambers coupled with a laser-based isotope analyzer and used Keeling plot and mass balance methods for surface flux partitioning. The preliminary results show that δT is more enriched than δE in the early growing season, and becomes less enriched than δE later in the season as canopy cover increases. There is an increase in the contribution of transpiration to ET as (1) leaf area index increases, and (2) as soil surface moisture declines. These results are consistent with theory, and extend these measurements to an environment that experiences extreme soil surface temperatures. The data further support the use of chamber based methods with stable isotopic analysis for characterization of ET partitioning in challenging field environments.

  10. Enthalpy and high temperature relaxation kinetics of stable vapor-deposited glasses of toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Deepanjan; Sadtchenko, Vlad

    2014-09-07

    Stable non-crystalline toluene films of micrometer and nanometer thicknesses were grown by vapor deposition at distinct rates and probed by fast scanning calorimetry. Fast scanning calorimetry is shown to be extremely sensitive to the structure of the vapor-deposited phase and was used to characterize simultaneously its kinetic stability and its thermodynamic properties. According to our analysis, transformation of vapor-deposited samples of toluene during heating with rates in excess 10{sup 5} K s{sup −1} follows the zero-order kinetics. The transformation rate correlates strongly with the initial enthalpy of the sample, which increases with the deposition rate according to sub-linear law. Analysis of the transformation kinetics of vapor-deposited toluene films of various thicknesses reveal a sudden increase in the transformation rate for films thinner than 250 nm. The change in kinetics seems to correlate with the surface roughness scale of the substrate. The implications of these findings for the formation mechanism and structure of vapor-deposited stable glasses are discussed.

  11. High frequency of centromere inactivation resulting in stable dicentric chromosomes of maize.

    PubMed

    Han, Fangpu; Lamb, Jonathan C; Birchler, James A

    2006-02-28

    Somatic chromosome spreads from maize (Zea mays L.) plants containing B-A translocation chromosomes undergoing the chromosome type breakage-fusion-bridge cycle were examined by FISH. The size and type of extra chromosomes varied among cells of the same individual. A collection of minichromosomes derived from the chromosome type breakage-fusion-bridge cycle was examined for the presence of stable dicentric chromosomes. Six of 23 chromosomes in the collection contained two regions with DNA sequences typical of centromeres. Functional analysis and immunolabeling of CENH3, the centromere-specific histone H3 variant, revealed only one functional centromere per chromosome, despite the duplicate centromere sequences. One plant was found with an inactive B centromere that had been translocated to the short arm of chromosome 9. The translocated centromere region appeared identical to that of a normal B chromosome. The inactivation of the centromeres was stable for at least four generations. By using dicentrics from dispensable chromosomes, centromere inactivation was found to be quite common under these circumstances.

  12. Study of a High Voltage Ion Engine Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Thomas A.; King, Roger J.; Mayer, Eric

    1996-01-01

    A complete laboratory breadboard version of a ion engine power converter was built and tested. This prototype operated on a line voltage of 80-120 Vdc, and provided output ratings of 1100 V at 1.8 kW, and 250 V at 20 mA. The high-voltage (HV) output voltage rating was revised from the original value of 1350 V at the beginning of the project. The LV output was designed to hold up during a 1-A surge current lasting up to 1 second. The prototype power converter included a internal housekeeping power supply which also operated from the line input. The power consumed in housekeeping was included in the overall energy budget presented for the ion engine converter. HV and LV output voltage setpoints were commanded through potentiometers. The HV converter itself reached its highest power efficiency of slightly over 93% at low line and maximum output. This would dip below 90% at high line. The no-load (rated output voltages, zero load current) power consumption of the entire system was less than 13 W. A careful loss breakdown shows that converter losses are predominately Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) conduction losses and HV rectifier snubbing losses, with the rectifier snubbing losses becoming predominant at high line. This suggests that further improvements in power efficiency could best be obtained by either developing a rectifier that was adequately protected against voltage overshoot with less snubbing, or by developing a pre-regulator to reduced the range of line voltage on the converter. The transient testing showed the converter to be fully protected against load faults, including a direct short-circuit from the HV output to the LV output terminals. Two currents sensors were used: one to directly detect any core ratcheting on the output transformer and re-initiate a soft start, and the other to directly detect a load fault and quickly shut down the converter for load protection. The finished converter has been extensively fault tested

  13. Triazine-Based Highly Stable AADD-Type Self-Complementary Quadruple Hydrogen-Bonded Systems Devoid of Prototropy.

    PubMed

    Kheria, Sanjeev; Rayavarapu, Suresh; Kotmale, Amol S; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Sanjayan, Gangadhar J

    2017-01-18

    A new class of 1,3,5-triazine-based quadruple hydrogen-bonded system featuring AADD-type self-complementary arrays has been developed and characterized. This system forms highly stable molecular duplex in non-polar solvent (Kdim >1.9×10(7)  m(-1) in CDCl3 ) without prototropy-related issues, raising its prospects for application in supramolecular polymer science.

  14. BiCMOS operational amplifier with precise and stable dc gain for high-frequency switched capacitor circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baschirotto, A.; Alini, R.; Castello, R.

    1991-07-01

    A novel approach in the design of high-frequency switched capacitor (SC) circuits is presented. It is based on the use of simple and fast amplifiers with low but precisely controlled gain value. The effect of the precisely known and stable opamp gain is compensated for by changing the capacitor values during the synthesis of the SC cell. An example of an opamp with these features and the synthesis of a biquadratic filter based on this approach are given.

  15. Develop high activity, low cost non-PGM fuel cell electrocatalyst and stable supports

    SciTech Connect

    Colon-Mercado, H. R.; Elvington, M. C.

    2016-09-28

    A unique approach has been developed to probe the non-PGM catalyst active site for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) for PEMFC. Iron based functionalities have been engineered into Metallic Organic Framework (MOF) catalysts to evaluate their impact on activity for the ORR. A series of FePhen@MOF catalysts have been synthesized with varying [Fe] to investigate the effect on electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties. The magnitude of the FeII/III redox couple and the electrochemical surface area are analyzed to determine if there is a correlation between [Fe] and the ORR onset potential and/or the relative number of active sites.

  16. Dopant's chemical coordination: a path for engineering high performance thermoelectric sodium cobaltate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadi, M. Hussein N.; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Engineered Na0.75CoO2 is considered a prime candidate to achieve high efficiency thermoelectric systems to generate electricity from waste heat. Our recent experiments on Mg doped Na0.75CoO2 demonstrated 50% enhancement in power factor at ambient. This motivated us to theoretically analyze the mechanisms behind simultaneous improvement of interdependent Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity. For this, we comprehensively studied the electronic and crystallographic structure of Na0.75CoO2 doped with 5 elements Mg, Sb, Zn, Ni and Eu. These elements represent wide variety of electronic configurations such as open d and f shells, closed d and s shells, combined with great variation in atomic mass. Systematic density functional calculations showed that the Ni and Zn were more stable when substituting Co with formation energy 2.35 eV, 2.08 eV. While Eu and Mg and Sb are more stable when it substitutes Na. In the case of Mg these results are consistent with Raman scattering measurement. This suggests that the doped Mg ions immobilize Na ions, reducing the resistivity by improving the mobility of carriers and thus enhancing the thermo-power. This work was supported by JSPS and Intersect.

  17. Unsteady pressure loads in a generic high speed engine model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Jones, Michael G.; Thurlow, Ernie M.

    1992-01-01

    Unsteady pressure loads were measured along the top interior wall of a generic high-speed engine (GHSE) model undergoing performance tests in the combustion-Heated Scramjet Test Facility at the Langley Research Center. Flow to the model inlet was simulated at 72000 ft and a flight Mach number of 4. The inlet Mach number was 3.5 with a total temperature and pressure of 1640 R and 92 psia. The unsteady pressure loads were measured with 5 piezoresistive gages, recessed into the wall 4 to 12 gage diameters to reduce incident heat flux to the diaphragms, and distributed from the inlet to the combustor. Contributors to the unsteady pressure loads included boundary layer turbulence, combustion noise, and transients generated by unstart loads. Typical turbulent boundary layer rms pressures in the inlet ranged from 133 dB in the inlet to 181 dB in the combustor over the frequency range from 0 to 5 kHz. Downstream of the inlet exist, combustion noise was shown to dominate boundary layer turbulence noise at increased heat release rates. Noise levels in the isolator section increased by 15 dB when the fuel-air ratio was increased from 0.37 to 0.57 of the stoichiometric ratio. Transient pressure disturbances associated with engine unstarts were measured in the inlet and have an upstream propagation speed of about 7 ft/sec and pressure jumps of at least 3 psia.

  18. High-Temperature Alloys for Automotive Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Titran, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Stirling engine is external-combustion engine that offers fuel economy, low emissions, low noise, and low vibrations. One of most critical areas in engine development concerns material selection for component parts. Alloys CG-27 and XF-818 identified capable of withstanding rigorous requirements of automotive Stirling engine. Alloys chosen for availability, performance, and manufacturability. Advanced iron-base alloys have potential for variety of applications, including stationary solar-power systems.

  19. High-Voltage LED Light Engine with Integrated Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Soer, Wouter

    2016-02-29

    LED luminaires have seen dramatic changes in cost breakdown over the past few years. The LED component cost, which until recently was the dominant portion of luminaire cost, has fallen to a level of the same order as the other luminaire components, such as the driver, housing, optics etc. With the current state of the technology, further luminaire performance improvement and cost reduction is realized most effectively by optimization of the whole system, rather than a single component. This project focuses on improving the integration between LEDs and drivers. Lumileds has developed a light engine platform based on low-cost high-power LEDs and driver topologies optimized for integration with these LEDs on a single substrate. The integration of driver and LEDs enables an estimated luminaire cost reduction of about 25% for targeted applications, mostly due to significant reductions in driver and housing cost. The high-power LEDs are based on Lumileds’ patterned sapphire substrate flip-chip (PSS-FC) technology, affording reduced die fabrication and packaging cost compared to existing technology. Two general versions of PSS-FC die were developed in order to create the desired voltage and flux increments for driver integration: (i) small single-junction die (0.5 mm2), optimal for distributed lighting applications, and (ii) larger multi-junction die (2 mm2 and 4 mm2) for high-power directional applications. Two driver topologies were developed: a tapped linear driver topology and a single-stage switch-mode topology, taking advantage of the flexible voltage configurations of the new PSS-FC die and the simplification opportunities enabled by integration of LEDs and driver on the same board. A prototype light engine was developed for an outdoor “core module” application based on the multi-junction PSS-FC die and the single-stage switch-mode driver. The light engine meets the project efficacy target of 128 lm/W at a luminous flux

  20. High School Engineering and Technology Education Integration through Design Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentzer, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    This study contextualized the use of the engineering design process by providing descriptions of how each element in a design process was integrated in an eleventh grade industry and engineering systems course. The guiding research question for this inquiry was: How do students engage in the engineering design process in a course where technology…

  1. Introducing High School Students and Science Teachers to Chemical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayles, Taryn Melkus; Aguirre, Fernando J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a summer institute for science teachers and their students in which the main goal was to increase enrollment in engineering and to encourage women and minority groups to increase their representation in the engineering workforce. Includes a description of typical chemical engineering jobs and general instruction in material balances,…

  2. Perceptions of Female High School Students on Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madara, Diana Starovoytova; Namango, Sitati

    2016-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that females are underrepresented in engineering worldwide, and Kenya is not an exception. Recent study at School of Engineering (SOE), Moi University (MU) established that engineering parity ration was found to be 1.68 %, meaning that for every 59 students admitted to MU there was only one student admitted to SOE.…

  3. Highly efficient 6-stroke engine cycle with water injection

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P; Conklin, James C

    2012-10-23

    A six-stroke engine cycle having improved efficiency. Heat is recovered from the engine combustion gases by using a 6-stroke engine cycle in which combustion gases are partially vented proximate the bottom-dead-center position of the fourth stroke cycle, and water is injected proximate the top-dead-center position of the fourth stroke cycle.

  4. Stable highly conductive ZnO via reduction of Zn vacancies

    SciTech Connect

    Look, D. C.; Droubay, T. C.; Chambers, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Growth of Ga-doped ZnO by pulsed laser deposition at 200 °C in an ambient of Ar and H2 produces a resistivity of ~ 1.5 x 10-4 Ω-cm, stable to 500 °C. Annealing on Zn foil reduces to ~ 1.2 x 10-4 Ω-cm, one of the lowest values ever reported. The key is reducing the Zn-vacancy acceptor concentration NA to 5 x 1019, only 3% of the Ga-donor concentration ND of 1.6 x 1021 cm-3, with ND and NA determined from a degenerate mobility theory. The plasmonic wavelength is 1060 nm, further bridging the gap between metals and semiconductors.

  5. Highly stable organic polymer field-effect transistor sensor for selective detection in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Knopfmacher, Oren; Hammock, Mallory L; Appleton, Anthony L; Schwartz, Gregor; Mei, Jianguo; Lei, Ting; Pei, Jian; Bao, Zhenan

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the susceptibility to degradation in both ambient and aqueous environments has prevented organic electronics from gaining rapid traction for sensing applications. Here we report an organic field-effect transistor sensor that overcomes this barrier using a solution-processable isoindigo-based polymer semiconductor. More importantly, these organic field-effect transistor sensors are stable in both freshwater and seawater environments over extended periods of time. The organic field-effect transistor sensors are further capable of selectively sensing heavy-metal ions in seawater. This discovery has potential for inexpensive, ink-jet printed, and large-scale environmental monitoring devices that can be deployed in areas once thought of as beyond the scope of organic materials.

  6. High-performance heterogeneous catalysis with surface-exposed stable metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ning; Xu, Yanhong; Jiang, Donglin

    2014-11-27

    Protection of metal nanoparticles from agglomeration is critical for their functions and applications. The conventional method for enhancing their stability is to cover them with passivation layers to prevent direct contact. However, the presence of a protective shell blocks exposure of the metal species to reactants, thereby significantly impeding the nanoparticles' utility as catalysts. Here, we report that metal nanoparticles can be prepared and used in a surface-exposed state that renders them inherently catalytically active. This strategy is realised by spatial confinement and electronic stabilisation with a dual-module mesoporous and microporous three-dimensional π-network in which surface-exposed nanoparticles are crystallised upon in situ reduction. The uncovered palladium nanoparticles serve as heterogeneous catalysts that are exceptionally active in water, catalyse unreactive aryl chlorides for straightforward carbon-carbon bond formation and are stable for repeated use in various types of cross couplings. Therefore, our results open new perspectives in developing practical heterogeneous catalysts.

  7. Stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon solar cells with low hydrogen content

    SciTech Connect

    Fortmann, C.M.; Hegedus, S.S. )

    1992-12-01

    Results and conclusions obtained during a research program of the investigation of amorphous silicon and amorphous silicon based alloy materials and solar cells fabricated by photo-chemical vapor and glow discharge depositions are reported. Investigation of the effects of the hydrogen content in a-si:H i-layers in amorphous silicon solar cells show that cells with lowered hydrogen content i-layers are more stable. A classical thermodynamic formulation of the Staebler-Wronski effect has been developed for standard solar cell operating temperatures and illuminations. Methods have been developed to extract a lumped equivalent circuit from the current voltage characteristic of a single junction solar cell in order to predict its behavior in a multijunction device.

  8. High frequency monitoring of stable isotopes in Red Butte Creek, Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulley-Cordova, C. L.; Bowen, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    For several decades hydrologists have recognized that the stable isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen can be used to distinguish different sources of water contributing to stream discharge. The majority of these 'isotope hydrograph separation' studies have shown that old water (water stored within the catchment prior to a precipitation event) is the dominant contributor to storm event runoff in most stream systems, with small contributions of new water (storm precipitation). Limited data from urban systems show a stronger response to storm precipitation, but the main contributor to the stream continues to be groundwater. Our research examines the relationship between urban and natural systems by conducting isotopic research on Red Butte Creek, a small creek in Salt Lake City. We hypothesize the balance of old and new water contributions to runoff are different in the natural and urban stream sections, and hypothesize there is a change in the balance of old and new water contributions throughout seasonal cycles.

  9. Nano- and Microstructure Engineering: An Effective Method for Creating High Efficiency Magnesium Silicide Based Thermoelectrics.

    PubMed

    Farahi, Nader; Prabhudev, Sagar; Botton, Gianluigi A; Salvador, James R; Kleinke, Holger

    2016-12-21

    Considering the effect of CO2 emission together with the depletion of fossil fuel resources on future generations, industries in particular the transportation sector are in deep need of a viable solution to follow the environmental regulation to limit the CO2 emission. Thermoelectrics may be a practical choice for recovering the waste heat, provided their conversion energy can be improved. Here, the high temperature thermoelectric properties of high purity Bi doped Mg2(Si,Sn) are presented. The samples Mg2Si1-x-ySnxBiy with x(Sn) ≥ 0.6 and y(Bi) ≥ 0.03 exhibited electrical conductivities and Seebeck coefficients of approximately 1000 Ω(-1) cm(-1) and -200 μV K(-1) at 773 K, respectively, attributable to a combination of band convergence and microstructure engineering through ball mill processing. In addition to the high electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient, the thermal conductivity of the solid solutions reached values below 2.5 W m(-1) K(-1) due to highly efficient phonon scattering from mass fluctuation and grain boundary effects. These properties combined for zT values of 1.4 at 773 K with an average zT of 0.9 between 400 and 773 K. The transport properties were both highly reproducible across several measurement systems and were stable with thermal cycling.

  10. Distribution of radioactive cesium and stable cesium in cattle kept on a highly contaminated area of Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Sato, Itaru; Okada, Keiji; Sasaki, Jun; Chida, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Miura, Kiyoshi; Kikuchi, Kaoru; Otani, Kumiko; Sato, Shusuke

    2015-07-01

    Radioactivity inspection of slaughtered cattle is generally conducted using a portion of the neck muscle; however, there is limited information about the distribution of radioactive cesium in cattle. In this study, therefore, we measured not only radioactive cesium but also stable cesium in various tissues of 19 cattle that had been kept in the area highly contaminated by the Fukushima nuclear accident. Skeletal muscles showed approximately 1.5-3.0 times higher concentration of radioactive cesium than internal organs. Radioactive cesium concentration in the tenderloin and top round was about 1.2 times as high as that in the neck muscle. The kidney showed the highest concentration of radioactive cesium among internal organs, whereas the liver was lowest. Radioactive cesium concentration in the blood was about 8% of that in the neck muscle. Characteristics of stable cesium distribution were almost the same as those of radioactive cesium. Correlation coefficient between radioactive cesium and stable cesium in tissues of individual cattle was 0.981 ± 0.012. When a suspicious level near 100 Bq/kg is detected in the neck of slaughtered cattle, re-inspection should be conducted using a different region of muscle, for example top round, to prevent marketing of beef that violates the Food Sanitation Act.

  11. High Magnetic Shear Gain in a Liquid Sodium Stable Couette Flow Experiment: A Prelude to an {alpha}-{Omega} Dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Beckley, Howard; Si, Jiahe; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David; Slutz, James; Westrom, Cebastian; Klein, Brianna; Schendel, Paul; Scharle, Cletus; McKinney, Travis; Ginanni, Rocky; Bentley, Ian; Mickey, Timothy; Ferrel, Regnar; Li, Hui; Pariev, Vladimir; Finn, John

    2011-04-29

    The {Omega} phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated a high toroidal field B{sub {phi}} that is {approx_equal}8xB{sub r}, where B{sub r} is the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by the rotational shear in stable Couette flow within liquid sodium at a magnetic Reynolds number Rm{approx_equal}120. Small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette flow is caused by Ekman flow at the end walls, which causes an estimated turbulence energy fraction of ({delta}v/v){sup 2{approx}}10{sup -3}.

  12. High intensity positive pressure ventilation and long term pulmonary function responses in severe stable COPD. A delicate and difficult balance.

    PubMed

    Esquinas, Antonio M; Petroianni, Angelo

    2014-06-01

    Method to improve minute ventilation (MV) during spontaneous breathing (SB) in stable severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a great clinical relevant in long term outcome. In this scenario, recommendations of early use of high-Intensity non-invasive Positive pressure Ventilation (HI-NPPV) or intelligent Volume Assured Pressure (iVAP) Support in Hypercapnic COPD have been proposed by safe therapeutics options. We analyze in this letter, Ekkernkamp et al. study that described the effect of HI-NPPV compared with SB on MV in patients receiving long-term treatment. We consider that interpretation of relationships between ABG, functional parameters, and respiratory mechanics reported need clarifications. Further prospective large clinical trials identifying the best mode of ventilation according to the characteristics in severe stable COPD are necessary to balance an effective approach and response on clinical symptoms and long-term effects.

  13. A facile synthesis of highly stable modified carbon nanotubes as efficient oxygen reduction reaction catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenmark, Theodore Axel

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) technology is an exciting alternative energy prospect, especially in the field of transportation. PEMFCs are three times as efficient as internal combustion (IC) engines and emit only water as a byproduct. The latter point is especially important in a day and age when climate change is upon us. However, platinum required to catalyze the sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) which takes place on the cathode of the PEMFC has rendered fuel cell automobiles economically unviable. Therefore, the pursuit of an inexpensive replacement for platinum has become an active research area. Herein, a facile synthetic process for modified carbon nanotubes for ORR catalysis is described. These nanotubes display catalytic activity via rotating disc electrode (RDE) analysis which, in some cases, equals that of a Pt/C standard.

  14. Long-Term Stable Organic Photodetectors with Ultra Low Dark Currents for High Detectivity Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielar, Marcin; Dhez, Olivier; Pecastaings, Gilles; Curutchet, Arnaud; Hirsch, Lionel

    2016-12-01

    Printed organic photodetectors can transform plastic, paper or glass into smart surfaces. This innovative technology is now growing exponentially due to the strong demand in human-machine interfaces. To date, only niche markets are targeted since organic sensors still present reduced performances in comparison with their inorganic counterparts. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to engineer a state-of-the-art organic photodetector approaching the performances of Si-based photodiodes in terms of dark current, responsivity and detectivity. Only three solution-processed layers and two low-temperature annealing steps are needed to achieve the performance that is significantly better than most of the organic photodetectors reported so far. We also perform a long-term ageing study. Lifetimes of over 14,000 hours under continuous operation are more than promising and demonstrate that organic photodetectors can reach a competitive level of stability for successful commercialization of this new and promising technology.

  15. Long-Term Stable Organic Photodetectors with Ultra Low Dark Currents for High Detectivity Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kielar, Marcin; Dhez, Olivier; Pecastaings, Gilles; Curutchet, Arnaud; Hirsch, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    Printed organic photodetectors can transform plastic, paper or glass into smart surfaces. This innovative technology is now growing exponentially due to the strong demand in human-machine interfaces. To date, only niche markets are targeted since organic sensors still present reduced performances in comparison with their inorganic counterparts. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to engineer a state-of-the-art organic photodetector approaching the performances of Si-based photodiodes in terms of dark current, responsivity and detectivity. Only three solution-processed layers and two low-temperature annealing steps are needed to achieve the performance that is significantly better than most of the organic photodetectors reported so far. We also perform a long-term ageing study. Lifetimes of over 14,000 hours under continuous operation are more than promising and demonstrate that organic photodetectors can reach a competitive level of stability for successful commercialization of this new and promising technology. PMID:28004819

  16. High satisfaction with direct switching from antimuscarinics to mirabegron in patients receiving stable antimuscarinic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chun-Hou; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mirabegron, which was the first β3-adrenoceptor agonist introduced for use in clinical practice, has been extensively evaluated in overactive bladder (OAB) patients in several phase II and III studies. However, most of the enrolled patients were treatment naive or had experienced a wash-out period before the introduction of mirabegron. No study has reported the treatment results of a direct switch from antimuscarinics to mirabegron, which may more commonly occur in clinical practice. This is an observational study to assess the therapeutic efficacy and safety of directly switching from antimuscarinics to mirabegron in patients with OAB receiving stable antimuscarinic treatment. Moreover, we sought to identify the patients who benefited more from the change. Patients aged ≥20 years with OAB receiving stable antimuscarinics for >3 months were enrolled. Antimuscarinics were discontinued in all patients and mirabegron 25 mg, once daily was initiated. Primary end-point was global response assessment (GRA) at 1 month after medication switching. Baseline parameters and parameters changed 1 month after medication switching were compared between patients with GRA ≥ 1 and GRA < 1. Of the 282 enrolled patients (209 men, 73 women; mean age, 74.4 years), 55.3% had better (GRA ≥ 1), 31.2% had similar (GRA = 0), and 10.3% had worse (GRA < 0) outcomes. The overall adverse events (AE) rate decreased from 24.1% to 12.8%. In overall patients, there was no significant improvement of OAB symptoms, but postvoid residual (PVR) urine decreased and voiding symptoms and quality of life index improved significantly. Patients with GRA ≥ 1 had significantly improved both storage and voiding symptoms. A total of 195 patients (69.1%) can maintain mirabegron without adding or resuming antimuscarinics for more than 3 months. Logistic regression analysis indicated that higher baseline OAB symptoms scores were predictor of satisfactory outcome. More than

  17. Enabling propulsion materials for high-speed civil transport engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.; Herbell, Thomas P.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Headquarters and LeRC have advocated an Enabling Propulsion Materials Program (EPM) to begin in FY-92. The High Speed Research Phase 1 program which began in FY-90 has focused on the environmental acceptability of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Studies by industry, including Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, GE Aircraft Engines, and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, and in-house studies by NASA concluded that NO(x) emissions and airport noise reduction can only be economically achieved by revolutionary advancements in materials technologies. This is especially true of materials for the propulsion system where the combustor is the key to maintaining low emissions, and the exhaust nozzle is the key to reducing airport noise to an acceptable level. Both of these components will rely on high temperature composite materials that can withstand the conditions imposed by commercial aircraft operations. The proposed EPM program will operate in conjunction with the HSR Phase 1 Program and the planned HSR Phase 2 program slated to start in FY-93. Components and subcomponents developed from advanced materials will be evaluated in the HSR Phase 2 Program.

  18. Interface engineering for high performance graphene electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Dae Yool; Yang, Sang Yoon; Park, Hamin; Shin, Woo Cheol; Oh, Joong Gun; Cho, Byung Jin; Choi, Sung-Yool

    2015-06-01

    A decade after the discovery of graphene flakes, exfoliated from graphite, we have now secured large scale and high quality graphene film growth technology via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. With the establishment of mass production of graphene using CVD, practical applications of graphene to electronic devices have gained an enormous amount of attention. However, several issues arise from the interfaces of graphene systems, such as damage/unintentional doping of graphene by the transfer process, the substrate effects on graphene, and poor dielectric formation on graphene due to its inert features, which result in degradation of both electrical performance and reliability in actual devices. The present paper provides a comprehensive review of the recent approaches to resolve these issues by interface engineering of graphene for high performance electronic devices. We deal with each interface that is encountered during the fabrication steps of graphene devices, from the graphene/metal growth substrate to graphene/high-k dielectrics, including the intermediate graphene/target substrate.

  19. Nb-doped SrTiO3 glass-ceramics as high temperature stable n-type oxide thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingner, Julian; Jakob, Gerhard; Letz, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Niobium doped SrTiO3 is known for its high potential as an oxide thermoelectric material and is one of the possible candidates for the n-type site in an oxidic thermoelectric module. The high thermal conductivity [1] and the lack of high-temperature stability of the oxygen vacancies [2] limit its properties in the ceramic systems. Glass-ceramics are intrinsic nano-structured systems and provide crystal phases densely embedded in a glass matrix which prevents the material from detoriation at high temperatures. In particular, the glass-matrix prevents an uncontrolled reoxidization as well as an uncontrolled grain growth therefore retaining the nano-structure even at high temperatures. Here, measurements and results of first glass-ceramic systems are presented, which show a low thermal conductivity due to the residue glass phase. Furthermore a stable thermal cycling up to 650 °C is demonstrated.

  20. Research on stable, high-efficiency, amorphous silicon multijunction modules. Annual subcontract report, 1 May 1991--30 April 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Catalano, A.; Bennett, M.; Chen, L.; D`Aiello, R.; Fieselmann, B.; Li, Y.; Newton, J.; Podlesny, R.; Yang, L.

    1992-08-01

    This report describes work to demonstrate a multijunction module with a ``stabilized`` efficiency (600 h, 50{degrees}C, AM1.5) of 10.5%. Triple-junction devices and modules using a-Si:H alloys with carbon and germanium were developed to meet program goals. ZnO was used to provide a high optical transmission front contact. Proof of concept was obtained for several important advances deemed to be important for obtaining high (12.5%) stabilized efficiency. They were (1) stable, high-quality a-SiC:H devices and (2) high-transmission, textured ZnO. Although these developments were not scaled up and included in modules, triple-junction module efficiencies as high as 10.85% were demonstrated. NREL measured 9.62% and 9.00% indoors and outdoors, respectively. The modules are expected to lose no more than 20% of their initial performance. 28 refs.

  1. Tribological study of a highly hydrolytically stable phenylboronic acid ester containing benzothiazolyl in mineral oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhipeng; Li, Xiufeng; Zhang, Yawen; Ren, Tianhui; Zhao, Yidong; Zeng, Xiangqiong; van der Heide, E.

    2014-07-01

    A novel long chain alkyl phenylboronic acid ester containing heterocyclic compound, bis (1-(benzothiazol-2-ylthio) propan-2-yl)-4-dodecylphenylboronic acid ester (DBBMT), was synthesized and characterized. The hydrolytic stability of the DBBMT was evaluated and the results show that DBBMT is of outstanding hydrolytic stability compared with normal borate esters, which indicates that the designed molecular structure, by introducing benzene ring to conjugate with the electron-deficient boron and the benzothiazole as a hinder group, is effective on obtaining a hydrolytically stable long chain alkyl phenylboronic acid ester. The tribological properties of DBBMT and ZDDP in mineral base oil were evaluated using a four-ball tribometer, which suggests that the DBBMT possesses comprehensive tribological properties and could be a potential candidate for the replacement of ZDDP. Furthermore, in order to understand the tribological behaviors, the worn surface was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The results indicate that the elements S, B, O and Fe perform complicated tribochemical reactions to form the compact tribological film composed of B2O3, FeS, Fe3O4 and FeSO4.

  2. Fully discrete energy stable high order finite difference methods for hyperbolic problems in deforming domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkar, Samira; Nordström, Jan

    2015-06-01

    A time-dependent coordinate transformation of a constant coefficient hyperbolic system of equations which results in a variable coefficient system of equations is considered. By applying the energy method, well-posed boundary conditions for the continuous problem are derived. Summation-by-Parts (SBP) operators for the space and time discretization, together with a weak imposition of boundary and initial conditions using Simultaneously Approximation Terms (SATs) lead to a provable fully-discrete energy-stable conservative finite difference scheme. We show how to construct a time-dependent SAT formulation that automatically imposes boundary conditions, when and where they are required. We also prove that a uniform flow field is preserved, i.e. the Numerical Geometric Conservation Law (NGCL) holds automatically by using SBP-SAT in time and space. The developed technique is illustrated by considering an application using the linearized Euler equations: the sound generated by moving boundaries. Numerical calculations corroborate the stability and accuracy of the new fully discrete approximations.

  3. Highly Stable and Sensitive Nucleic Acid Amplification and Cell-Phone-Based Readout.

    PubMed

    Kong, Janay E; Wei, Qingshan; Tseng, Derek; Zhang, Jingzi; Pan, Eric; Lewinski, Michael; Garner, Omai B; Ozcan, Aydogan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2017-03-02

    Key challenges with point-of-care (POC) nucleic acid tests include achieving a low-cost, portable form factor, and stable readout, while also retaining the same robust standards of benchtop lab-based tests. We addressed two crucial aspects of this problem, identifying a chemical additive, hydroxynaphthol blue, that both stabilizes and significantly enhances intercalator-based fluorescence readout of nucleic acid concentration, and developing a cost-effective fiber-optic bundle-based fluorescence microplate reader integrated onto a mobile phone. Using loop-mediated isothermal amplification on lambda DNA we achieve a 69-fold increase in signal above background, 20-fold higher than the gold standard, yielding an overall limit of detection of 25 copies/μL within an hour using our mobile-phone-based platform. Critical for a point-of-care system, we achieve a >60% increase in fluorescence stability as a function of temperature and time, obviating the need for manual baseline correction or secondary calibration dyes. This field-portable and cost-effective mobile-phone-based nucleic acid amplification and readout platform is broadly applicable to other real-time nucleic acid amplification tests by similarly modulating intercalating dye performance and is compatible with any fluorescence-based assay that can be run in a 96-well microplate format, making it especially valuable for POC and resource-limited settings.

  4. Stable and highly fluorescent europium(III) chelates for time-resolved immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Nchimi Nono, Katia; Syrjänpää, Markku; Charbonnière, Loïc J; Hovinen, Jari; Härmä, Harri

    2013-08-05

    Derivatives of 4-[2-(4-isothiocyanatophenyl)ethynyl]-2,6,-bis{[N,N-bis(carboxymethyl)-amino]methyl}pyridine europium(III) (1) bearing one (6) or two (7) additional iminodiacetate coordinating arms have been synthesized. 6 and 7 were significantly more stable than 1 as evidenced by competition experiments with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). While the luminescence quantum yield of 1 remained modest, the other two complexes displayed substantial luminescence efficiency. The introduction of a supplementary iminodiacetate arm in 6 brought important improvements to both the stability and the luminescence properties of the Eu complex. In contrast, although 7 is more luminescent than 1, the introduction of a second iminodiacetate coordinating arm brings no further benefit on the photophysical properties. The most promising results were obtained with the nine-dentate chelate 6 and its Eu complex, which was conjugated to biotin and applied within the frame of a bioaffinity immunoassay of human C-reactive protein.

  5. An overview of the VASIMR engine: High power space propulsion with RF plasma generation and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, F. R. Chang

    2001-10-01

    The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) is a high power, radio frequency-driven magnetoplasma rocket, capable of exhaust modulation at constant power. While the plasma is produced by a helicon discharge, the bulk of the energy is added in a separate downstream stage by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). Axial momentum is obtained by the adiabatic expansion of the plasma in a magnetic nozzle. Exhaust variation in the VASIMR is primarily achieved by the selective partitioning of the RF power to the helicon and ICRH systems, with the proper adjustment of the propellant flow. However, other complementary techniques are also being studied. Operational and performance considerations favor the light gases. The physics and engineering of this device have been under study since the late 1970s. A NASA-led, research effort, involving several terms in the United States, continues to explore the scientific and technological foundations of this concept. The research involves theory, experiment, engineering design, mission analysis, and technology development. Experimentally, high density, stable plasma discharges have been generated in Helium, Hydrogen and Deuterium, as well as mixtures of these gases. Key issues involve the optimization of the helicon discharge for high-density operation and the efficient coupling of ICRH to the plasma, prior to acceleration by the magnetic nozzle. Theoretically, the dynamics of the magnetized plasma are being studied from kinetic and fluid perspectives. Plasma acceleration by the magnetic nozzle and subsequent detachment has been demonstrated in numerical simulations. These results are presently undergoing experimental verification. A brisk technology development effort for space-qualified, compact, solid-state RF equipment, and high temperature superconducting magnets is under way in support of this project. A conceptual point design for an early space demonstrator on the International Space Station has been defined

  6. High-yield production of a stable Vero cell-based vaccine candidate against the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Fangye; Zhou, Jian; Ma, Lei; Song, Shaohui; Zhang, Xinwen; Li, Weidong; Jiang, Shude; Wang, Yue; Liao, Guoyang

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vero cell-based HPAI H5N1 vaccine with stable high yield. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable high yield derived from the YNVa H3N2 backbone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H5N1/YNVa has a similar safety and immunogenicity to H5N1delta. -- Abstract: Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses pose a global pandemic threat, for which rapid large-scale vaccine production technology is critical for prevention and control. Because chickens are highly susceptible to HPAI viruses, the supply of chicken embryos for vaccine production might be depleted during a virus outbreak. Therefore, developing HPAI virus vaccines using other technologies is critical. Meeting vaccine demand using the Vero cell-based fermentation process has been hindered by low stability and yield. In this study, a Vero cell-based HPAI H5N1 vaccine candidate (H5N1/YNVa) with stable high yield was achieved by reassortment of the Vero-adapted (Va) high growth A/Yunnan/1/2005(H3N2) (YNVa) virus with the A/Anhui/1/2005(H5N1) attenuated influenza vaccine strain (H5N1delta) using the 6/2 method. The reassorted H5N1/YNVa vaccine maintained a high hemagglutination (HA) titer of 1024. Furthermore, H5N1/YNVa displayed low pathogenicity and uniform immunogenicity compared to that of the parent virus.

  7. Engineering neural systems for high-level problem solving.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Jared; Reggia, James

    2016-07-01

    There is a long-standing, sometimes contentious debate in AI concerning the relative merits of a symbolic, top-down approach vs. a neural, bottom-up approach to engineering intelligent machine behaviors. While neurocomputational methods excel at lower-level cognitive tasks (incremental learning for pattern classification, low-level sensorimotor control, fault tolerance and processing of noisy data, etc.), they are largely non-competitive with top-down symbolic methods for tasks involving high-level cognitive problem solving (goal-directed reasoning, metacognition, planning, etc.). Here we take a step towards addressing this limitation by developing a purely neural framework named galis. Our goal in this work is to integrate top-down (non-symbolic) control of a neural network system with more traditional bottom-up neural computations. galis is based on attractor networks that can be "programmed" with temporal sequences of hand-crafted instructions that control problem solving by gating the activity retention of, communication between, and learning done by other neural networks. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach by showing that it can be applied successfully to solve sequential card matching problems, using both human performance and a top-down symbolic algorithm as experimental controls. Solving this kind of problem makes use of top-down attention control and the binding together of visual features in ways that are easy for symbolic AI systems but not for neural networks to achieve. Our model can not only be instructed on how to solve card matching problems successfully, but its performance also qualitatively (and sometimes quantitatively) matches the performance of both human subjects that we had perform the same task and the top-down symbolic algorithm that we used as an experimental control. We conclude that the core principles underlying the galis framework provide a promising approach to engineering purely neurocomputational systems for problem

  8. High stable suspension of magnetite nanoparticles in ethanol by using sono-synthesized nanomagnetite in polyol medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bastami, Tahereh Rohani; Entezari, Mohammad H.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The sonochemical synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles was carried out in EG without any surfactant. • The nanoparticles with sizes ∼24 nm were composed of small building blocks with sizes ∼2 nm. • The hydrophilic magnetite nanoparticles were stable in ethanol even after 8 months. • Ultrasonic intensity showed a crucial role on the obtained high stable magnetite nanoparticles in ethanol. - Abstract: The sonochemical synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles was carried out at relatively low temperature (80 °C) in ethylene glycol (EG) as a polyol solvent. The particle size was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The magnetite nanoparticles with an average size of 24 nm were composed of small building blocks with an average size of 2–3 nm and the particles exhibited nearly spherical shape. The surface characterization was investigated by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The stability of magnetite nanoparticles was studied in ethanol as a polar solvent. The nanoparticles showed an enhanced stability in ethanol which is due to the hydrophilic surface of the particles. The colloidal stability of magnetite nanoparticles in ethanol was monitored by UV–visible spectrophotometer. According to the results, the nanoparticles synthesized in 30 min of sonication with intensity of 35 W/cm{sup 2} (50%) led to a maximum stability in ethanol as a polar solvent with respect to the other applied intensities. The obtained magnetite nanoparticles were stable for more than12 months.

  9. Ultra-stable high-power mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator pumped by a super-fluorescent fiber source.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yaping; Xu, Jiangming; Wang, Peng; Li, Xiao; Zhou, Pu; Xu, Xiaojun

    2016-09-19

    The longterm stability of the laser system is very important in many applications. In this letter, an ultra-stable, broadband, mid-infrared (MIR) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by a super-fluorescent fiber source is demonstrated. An idler MIR output power of 11.3 W with excellent beam quality was obtained and the corresponding pump-to-idler conversion slope efficiency was 15.9%. Furthermore, during 1h measurement at full power operation, the peak-to-peak fluctuation of idler output power was less than 1.9% and the corresponding standard deviation was less than 0.4% RMS, which was much better than that of a traditional single mode fiber laser pumped OPO system (10.9% for peak-to-peak fluctuation and 1.8% RMS for the standard deviation) in another experiment for comparison. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration on a high-power, ultra-stable OPO system by using the modefree pump source, which offered an effective approach to achieve an ultra-stable MIR source and broadened the range of the super-fluorescent fiber source applications.

  10. Performance deterioration of commercial high-bypass ratio turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehalic, C. M.; Ziemianski, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The results of engine performance deterioration investigations based on historical data, special engine tests, and specific tests to define the influence of flight loads and component clearances on performance are presented. The results of analyses of several damage mechanisms that contribute to performance deterioration such as blade tip rubs, airfoil surface roughness and erosion, and thermal distortion are also included. The significance of these damage mechanisms on component and overall engine performance is discussed.

  11. Highly stable precious metal-free cathode catalyst for fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serov, Alexey; Workman, Michael J.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; McCool, Geoffrey; McKinney, Sam; Romero, Henry; Halevi, Barr; Stephenson, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst engineered for stability has been synthesized using the sacrificial support method (SSM). This catalyst was comprehensively characterized by physiochemical analyses and tested for performance and durability in fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). This catalyst, belonging to the family of Fe-N-C materials, is easily scalable and can be manufactured in batches up to 200 g. The fuel cell durability tests were performed in a single cell configuration at realistic operating conditions of 0.65 V, 1.25 atmgauge air, and 90% RH for 100 h. In-depth characterization of surface chemistry and morphology of the catalyst layer before and after durability tests were performed. The failure modes of the PGM-free electrodes were derived from structure-to-property correlations. It is suggested that under constant voltage operation, the performance loss results from degradation of the electrode pore structure, while under carbon corrosion accelerated test protocols the failure mode is catalyst corrosion.

  12. Dietary garlic (Allium sativum) lectins, ASA I and ASA II, are highly stable and immunogenic.

    PubMed

    Clement, Fatima; Venkatesh, Yeldur P

    2010-10-01

    The immunomodulatory proteins present in garlic have recently been shown to be identical to the garlic lectins ASA I and ASA II [Clement F, Pramod SN, Venkatesh YP. Int. Immunopharmacol. 2010; 10: 316-324]. In this study, the stability of garlic lectins as a function of pH, temperature and denaturants has been examined in relation to biological activity (hemagglutination and hagocytosis). Stability of garlic lectins in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) was assessed by their hemagglutination activity, immunoreactivity, and intactness by SDS-PAGE. Garlic lectins were moderately stable in SGF for up to 30 min; while they retained hemagglutination activities, immunoreactivity with the respective rabbit antiserum decreased immediately (0.5 min) to 10-30%. ASA I retained ~80% hemagglutination activity in the pH range 2-12; however, ASA II retained only 40% in the pH ranges 2-4 and 10-12. Garlic lectins exposed to 60 °C (30 min) and pepsin (1 and 2 min) retained hemagglutination and phagocytic activities. Urea (4M) and Gdn.HCl (2M) did not affect hemagglutination. The immunogenicity of garlic lectins upon oral feeding in BALB/c mice was examined. A lectin-specific serum IgG response was seen in mice comparable to the oral immunogen, phytohemagglutinin. The recovered lectin in feces of mice administered with garlic lectins showed antigenicity identical to that of the administered proteins. The stabilities of the garlic lectins, their ability to withstand the gastrointestinal passage, and their recognition by the immune system upon oral feeding reinforce the reported presence of natural antibodies to garlic proteins in normal human sera.

  13. Highly efficient synthesis of endomorphin-2 under thermodynamic control catalyzed by organic solvent stable proteases with in situ product removal.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiaxing; Sun, Honglin; He, Xuejun; Bai, Zhongzhong; He, Bingfang

    2013-02-01

    An efficient enzymatic synthesis of endomorphin-2 (EM-2) was achieved using organic solvent stable proteases in nonaqeous media, based on thermodynamic control and an in situ product removal methodology. The high stability of biocatalysts in organic solvents enabled the aleatoric modulation of the nonaqueous reaction media to shift thermodynamic equilibrium toward synthesis. Peptide Boc-Phe-Phe-NH2 was synthesized with a high yield of 96% by the solvent stable protease WQ9-2 in monophase medium with an economical molar ratio of the substrate of 1:1. The tetrapeptide Boc-Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2 was synthesized with a yield of 88% by another organic solvent tolerant protease PT121 from Boc-Tyr-Pro-OH and Phe-Phe-NH2 in an organic-aqueous biphasic system. The reaction-separation coupling in both enzymatic processes provides "driving forces" for the synthetic reactions and gives a high yield and high productivity without purification of the intermediate, thereby making the synthesis more amenable to scale-up.

  14. An airline study of advanced technology requirements for advanced high speed commercial transport engines. 2: Engine preliminary design assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sallee, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    The advanced technology requirements for an advanced high speed commercial transport engine are presented. The results of the phase 2 study effort cover the following areas: (1) general review of preliminary engine designs suggested for a future aircraft, (2) presentation of a long range view of airline propulsion system objectives and the research programs in noise, pollution, and design which must be undertaken to achieve the goals presented, (3) review of the impact of propulsion system unreliability and unscheduled maintenance on cost of operation, (4) discussion of the reliability and maintainability requirements and guarantees for future engines.

  15. Stable levitation of steel rotors using permanent magnets and high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, J. R.; Passmore, J. L.; Mulcahy, T. M.; Rossing, T. D.

    1994-07-01

    Individual freely spinning magnetic steel rotors were levitated by combining the attractive force between permanent magnets and the rotor with the repulsive force between high-temperature superconductors and the steel. The levitation force and stiffness of several configurations are presented, and the application of this levitation method to high-speed bearings is discussed.

  16. Stable and high-speed SiC bulk growth without dendrites by the HTCVD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, Yuichiro; Makino, Emi; Sugiyama, Naohiro; Kamata, Isaho; Hoshino, Norihiro; Kojima, Jun; Hara, Kazukuni; Tsuchida, Hidekazu

    2016-08-01

    We investigate growth conditions to obtain high-quality SiC bulk crystals by the High-Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition (HTCVD) method. Formation of dendrite crystals, which sometimes occurs on the growth front and degrades the material quality, is raised as an issue. We find that a bulk crystal growth under a high vertical temperature gradient, where the temperature of the back side of the bulk crystal is much lower than that of the crystal surface, suppresses the formation of dendrite crystals. Under growth conditions with a high temperature gradient, a very high-speed growth of 2.4 mm/h is achieved without the formation of dendrite crystals. Growth of a thick 4H-SiC bulk crystal without the dendrites is demonstrated and the quality of a grown crystal is evaluated.

  17. Energy Efficient Engine high pressure turbine component test performance report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timko, L. P.

    1984-01-01

    The high pressure turbine for the General Electric Energy Efficient Engine is a two stage design of moderate loading. Results of detailed system studies led to selection of this configuration as the most appropriate in meeting the efficiency goals of the component development program. To verify the design features of the high pressure turbine, a full scale warm air turbine test rig with cooling flows simulated was run. Prior to this testing, an annular cascade test was run to select vane unguided turn for the first stage nozzle. Results of this test showed that the base configuration exceeded the lower unguided turning configuration by 0.48 percent in vane kinetic energy efficiency. The air turbine test program, consisting of extensive mapping and cooling flow variation as well as design point evaluation, demonstrated a design point efficiency level of 90.0 percent based on the thermodynamic definition. In terms of General Electric cycle definition, this efficiency was 92.5 percent. Based on this test, it is concluded that efficiency goals for the Flight Propulsion System were met.

  18. In Vitro Engineering of High Modulus Cartilage-Like Constructs.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Scott; Seedhom, Bahaa B; Carey, Duane O; Bulpitt, Andy J; Treanor, Darren E; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    To date, the outcomes of cartilage repair have been inconsistent and have frequently yielded mechanically inferior fibrocartilage, thereby increasing the chances of damage recurrence. Implantation of constructs with biochemical composition and mechanical properties comparable to natural cartilage could be advantageous for long-term repair. This study attempted to create such constructs, in vitro, using tissue engineering principles. Bovine synoviocytes were seeded on nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate fiber scaffolds and cultured in chondrogenic medium for 4 weeks, after which uniaxial compressive loading was applied using an in-house bioreactor for 1 h per day, at a frequency of 1 Hz, for a further 84 days. The initial loading conditions, determined from the mechanical properties of the immature constructs after 4 weeks in chondrogenic culture, were strains ranging between 13% and 23%. After 56 days (sustained at 84 days) of loading, the constructs were stained homogenously with Alcian blue and for type-II collagen. Dynamic compressive moduli were comparable to the high end values for native cartilage and proportional to Alcian blue staining intensity. We suggest that these high moduli values were attributable to the bioreactor setup, which caused the loading regime to change as the constructs developed, that is, the applied stress and strain increased with construct thickness and stiffness, providing continued sufficient cell stimulation as further matrix was deposited. Constructs containing cartilage-like matrix with response to load similar to that of native cartilage could produce long-term effective cartilage repair when implanted.

  19. High Fidelity Simulation of Primary Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivey, Christopher; Bravo, Luis; Kim, Dokyun

    2014-11-01

    A high-fidelity numerical simulation of jet breakup and spray formation from a complex diesel fuel injector at ambient conditions has been performed. A full understanding of the primary atomization process in fuel injection of diesel has not been achieved for several reasons including the difficulties accessing the optically dense region. Due to the recent advances in numerical methods and computing resources, high fidelity simulations of atomizing flows are becoming available to provide new insights of the process. In the present study, an unstructured un-split Volume-of-Fluid (VoF) method coupled to a stochastic Lagrangian spray model is employed to simulate the atomization process. A common rail fuel injector is simulated by using a nozzle geometry available through the Engine Combustion Network. The working conditions correspond to a single orifice (90 μm) JP-8 fueled injector operating at an injection pressure of 90 bar, ambient condition at 29 bar, 300 K filled with 100% nitrogen with Rel = 16,071, Wel = 75,334 setting the spray in the full atomization mode. The experimental dataset from Army Research Lab is used for validation in terms of spray global parameters and local droplet distributions. The quantitative comparison will be presented and discussed. Supported by Oak Ridge Associated Universities and the Army Research Laboratory.

  20. Results of Summer Enrichment Program to Promote High School Students' Interest in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Brenda; McAnulty, Kate

    2014-01-01

    For more than thirty years, personnel from the University of Louisville J.B. Speed School of Engineering have presented a summer program targeting high school students historically underrepresented in engineering fields. INSPIRE provides these students with an introduction to careers in engineering and assists the students in planning their…

  1. Direct fired reciprocating engine and bottoming high temperature fuel cell hybrid

    DOEpatents

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Holcombe, Norman T.

    2006-02-07

    A system of a fuel cell bottoming an internal combustion engine. The engine exhaust gas may be combined in varying degrees with air and fed as input to a fuel cell. Reformer and oxidizers may be combined with heat exchangers to accommodate rich and lean burn conditions in the engine in peaking and base load conditions without producing high concentrations of harmful emissions.

  2. A Project-Based Engineering and Leadership Workshop for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Linda Sue; Pegg, Jerine; Wood, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Summer outreach programs provide pre-college participants an introduction to college life and exposure to engineering in an effort to raise the level of interest and bring more students into engineering fields. The Junior Engineering, Mathematics, and Science (JEMS) program is a project-based summer workshop in which teams of high school students…

  3. Bringing Engineering Design into High School Science Classrooms: The Heating/Cooling Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apedoe, Xornam S.; Reynolds, Birdy; Ellefson, Michelle R.; Schunn, Christian D.

    2008-01-01

    Infusing engineering design projects in K-12 settings can promote interest and attract a wide range of students to engineering careers. However, the current climate of high-stakes testing and accountability to standards leaves little room to incorporate engineering design into K-12 classrooms. We argue that design-based learning, the combination…

  4. Engaging High School and Engineering Students: A Multifaceted Outreach Program Based on a Mechatronics Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habash, Riadh W. Y.; Suurtamm, Christine

    2010-01-01

    If we aim to enhance the interest of students in engineering and therefore produce the best engineers, it is essential to strengthen the pipeline to high school education. This paper discusses several outreach activities undertaken by the Faculty of Engineering and Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa (UO), Ottawa, ON, Canada, to help the…

  5. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in surface water and ground water at selected sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ott, D.S.; Cecil, L.D.; Knobel, L.L.

    1994-01-01

    Relative stable isotopic ratios for hydrogen and oxygen compared to standard mean ocean water are presented for water from 4 surface-water sites and 38 ground-water sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The surface-water samples were collected monthly from March 1991 through April 1992 and after a storm event on June 18, 1992. The ground-water samples either were collected during 1991 or 1992. These data were collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's continuing hydrogeological investigations at the INEL. The relative isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen are reported as delta H-2 and as delta 0-18, respectively. The values in water from the four surface-water sites ranged from -143.0 to -122 and from -18.75 to -15.55, respec- tively. The values in water from the 38 ground- water sites ranged from -141.0 to -120.0 and from -18.55 to -14.95, respectively.

  6. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in surface water and ground water at selected sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.S.; Cecil, L.D.; Knobel, L.L.

    1994-11-01

    Relative stable isotopic ratios for hydrogen and oxygen compared to standard mean ocean water are presented for water from 4 surface-water sites and 38 ground-water sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The surface-water samples were collected monthly from March 1991 through April 1992 and after a storm event on June 18, 1992. The ground-water samples either were collected during 1991 or 1992. These data were collected as part of the US Geological Survey`s continuing hydrogeological investigations at the INEL. The relative isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen are reported as delta {sup 2}H ({delta}{sup 2}H) and as delta {sup 18}O ({delta}{sup 18}O), respectively. The values of {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O in water from the four surface-water sites ranged from -143.0 to -122 and from -18.75 to -15.55, respectively. The values of {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O in water from the 38 ground-water sites ranged from -141.0 to -120.0 and from -18.55 to -14.95, respectively.

  7. A Novel Multi-domain High Molecular, Salt-Stable Alkaline Xylanase from Alkalibacterium sp. SL3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guozeng; Wu, Jingjing; Yan, Renxiang; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiuyun

    2017-01-01

    A novel multi-domain high molecular xylanase coding gene (xynSL3) was cloned from Alkalibacterium sp. SL3, an alkaliphilic bacterial strain isolated from the sediment of soda lake Dabusu. The deduced XynSL3 is composed of a putative signal peptide, three tandem domains of carbohydrate binding module (CBM) family 22, a catalytic domain of glycosyl hydrolase (GH) family 10 and a domain of CBM9. XynSL3 shares the highest identity of 66% to a hypothetical protein from Alkalibacterium sp. AK22 and has low identities (33–45%) with other functionally characterized xylanases. The gene xynSL3 was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and the recombinant enzyme demonstrated some particular characteristics. Purified recombinant XynSL3 (rXynSL3) was highly active and stable over the neutral and alkaline pH ranges from 7.0 to 12.0, with maximum activity at pH 9.0 and around 45% activity at pH 12.0. It had an apparent temperature optimum of 55°C and was stable at 50°C. The rXynSL3 was highly halotolerant, retaining more than 60% activity with 3 M NaCl and was stable at up to a 4 M concentration of NaCl. The hydrolysis products of rXynSL3 from corncob xylan were mainly xylobiose and xylotetraose. The activity of rXynSL3 was enhanced by Ca2+ and it has strong resistance to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). This multi-domain, alkaline and salt-tolerant enzyme has great potential for basic research and industrial applications such as the biobleaching of paper pulp and production of xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS). PMID:28101084

  8. Highly efficient and stable cupronickel nanomesh electrode for flexible organic photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Jung; Song, Myungkwan; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Kim, Chang Su; Surabhi, Srivathsava; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Dae-Geun

    2016-11-01

    Advances in flexible optoelectronic devices have led to increasing need for developing high performance, low cost, and flexible transparent conducting electrodes. Copper-based electrodes have been unattainable due to the relatively thermal instability and poor oxidation resistance. Herein, we present oxidation-resistive CuNi nanomesh electrodes that exhibit a low sheet resistance of ∼7.5 Ω/□ and a high optical transmittance of ∼81% at 550 nm. Further, high long-term stability against the effects of oxidation, heat, and chemicals is exhibited by the CuNi nanomesh, in comparison with the behavior of a pure Cu nanomesh sample.

  9. Development of high resolution Michelson interferometer for stable phase-locked ultrashort pulse pair generation.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takumi; Komori, Kazuhiro; Goshima, Keishiro; Yamauchi, Shohgo; Morohashi, Isao; Sugaya, Takeyoshi; Ogura, Mutsuo; Tsurumachi, Noriaki

    2008-10-01

    We developed a high resolution Michelson interferometer with a two-frequency He-Ne laser positioning system in order to stabilize the relative phase of a pulse pair. The control resolution corresponded to a 12 as time resolution or a phase of 1.5 degrees at 900 nm. This high resolution Michelson interferometer can generate a phase-locked pulse pair either with a specific relative phase such as 0 or pi radians or with an arbitrary phase. Coherent control of an InAs self-assembled quantum dot was demonstrated using the high resolution Michelson interferometer with a microspectroscopy system.

  10. Pilot Scale Production of Highly Efficacious and Stable Enterovirus 71 Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng-Peng; Guo, Meng-Shin; Hsieh, Shih-Yang; Yang, Wen-Hsueh; Chao, Hsin-Ju; Wu, Chien-Long; Huang, Ju-Lan; Lee, Min-Shi; Hu, Alan Yung-Chi; Lin, Sue-Chen; Huang, Yu-Yun; Hu, Mei-Hua; Chow, Yen-Hung; Chiang, Jen-Ron; Chang, Jui-Yuan; Chong, Pele

    2012-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has caused several epidemics of hand, foot and mouth diseases (HFMD) in Asia and now is being recognized as an important neurotropic virus. Effective medications and prophylactic vaccine against EV71 infection are urgently needed. Based on the success of inactivated poliovirus vaccine, a prototype chemically inactivated EV71 vaccine candidate has been developed and currently in human phase 1 clinical trial. Principal Finding In this report, we present the development of a serum-free cell-based EV71 vaccine. The optimization at each step of the manufacturing process was investigated, characterized and quantified. In the up-stream process development, different commercially available cell culture media either containing serum or serum-free was screened for cell growth and virus yield using the roller-bottle technology. VP-SFM serum-free medium was selected based on the Vero cell growth profile and EV71 virus production. After the up-stream processes (virus harvest, diafiltration and concentration), a combination of gel-filtration liquid chromatography and/or sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation down-stream purification processes were investigated at a pilot scale of 40 liters each. Although the combination of chromatography and sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation produced extremely pure EV71 infectious virus particles, the overall yield of vaccine was 7–10% as determined by a VP2-based quantitative ELISA. Using chromatography as the downstream purification, the virus yield was 30–43%. To retain the integrity of virus neutralization epitopes and the stability of the vaccine product, the best virus inactivation was found to be 0.025% formalin-treatment at 37°C for 3 to 6 days. Furthermore, the formalin-inactivated virion vaccine candidate was found to be stable for >18 months at 4°C and a microgram of viral proteins formulated with alum adjuvant could induce strong virus-neutralizing antibody responses in mice, rats, rabbits, and

  11. Stable and highly persistent quinoxaline-centered metalloorganic radical anions: preparation, structural, spectroscopic, and computational investigations.

    PubMed

    Choua, Sylvie; Djukic, Jean-Pierre; Dalléry, Jérôme; Bieber, André; Welter, Richard; Gisselbrecht, Jean-Paul; Turek, Philippe; Ricard, Louis

    2009-01-05

    Coordination of diazines such as quinoxaline to transition metals stabilizes radical anions generated by chemical or electrochemical cathodic reduction. However, even though various sorts of radical anionic diazines have been subjected to spectroscopic investigations in the recent past, reports combining structural, solid-state electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and computational investigations of kinetically stable species are still missing. In this study, four radical anions derived from tricarbonylmanganese- and tricarbonylrhenium-bound quinoxaline chelates, embedded within a triple-decker architecture, have been prepared from neutral substrates by chemical reduction over alkaline metals (K, Rb); the electronic structure of the latter metalloorganic paramagnetic salts was investigated by the means of structural X-ray diffraction analysis, electrochemistry, solution and crystal EPR spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT). Unprecedented structures of three manganese-bound and one rhenium-bound quinoxaline-derived paramagnetic salts were obtained from solutions of the corresponding radical anions crystallized in the presence of cryptand 222. It is inferred from a comparative study of the structures of anionic and neutral quinoxaline complexes that reduction does not have any significant impact over the coordination mode of the metal centers and over the overall geometry of the triple-decker architecture. The most notable changes in the radical-anionic metalloorganic species, as compared to the neutral parent molecules, comprise a slight hapticity shift of the metal-bound benzyl moiety and a weak intraannular distortion of the quinoxalyl core. Single-crystal EPR experiments carried out with the rhenium and manganese compounds produced the respective anisotropic g tensor, which was found in each case to be essentially located at the quinoxalyl fragment. Computations, carried out using DFT methods (B3LYP-LANL2DZ and Becke-Perdew-TZP), corroborated the

  12. High-strength and thermally stable bulk nanolayered composites due to twin-induced interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shijian; Beyerlein, Irene J; Carpenter, John S; Kang, Keonwook; Wang, Jian; Han, Weizhong; Mara, Nathan A

    2013-01-01

    Bulk nanostructured metals can attribute both exceptional strength and poor thermal stability to high interfacial content, making it a challenge to utilize them in high-temperature environments. Here we report that a bulk two-phase bimetal nanocomposite synthesised via severe plastic deformation uniquely possesses simultaneous high-strength and high thermal stability. For a bimetal spacing of 10 nm, this composite achieves an order of magnitude increase in hardness of 4.13 GPa over its constituents and maintains it (4.07 GPa), even after annealing at 500 °C for 1 h. It owes this extraordinary property to an atomically well-ordered bimaterial interface that results from twin-induced crystal reorientation, persists after extreme strains and prevails over the entire bulk. This discovery proves that interfaces can be designed within bulk nanostructured composites to radically outperform previously prepared bulk nanocrystalline materials, with respect to both mechanical and thermal stability.

  13. Highly Selective and Stable Reduction of CO2 to CO by a Graphitic Carbon Nitride/Carbon Nanotube Composite Electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xunyu; Tan, Tze Hao; Ng, Yun Hau; Amal, Rose

    2016-08-16

    A stable and selective electrocatalyst for CO2 reduction was fabricated by covalently attaching graphitic carbon nitride onto multiwall carbon nanotubes (g-C3 N4 /MWCNTs). The as-prepared composite is able to reduce CO2 exclusively to CO with a maximum Faraday efficiency of 60 %, and no decay in the catalytic activity was observed even after 50 h of reaction. The enhanced catalytic activity towards CO2 reduction is attributed to the formation of active carbon-nitrogen bonds, high specific surface area, and improved material conductivity of the g-C3 N4 /MWCNT composite.

  14. A highly stable sodium solid-state electrolyte based on a dodeca/deca-borate equimolar mixture.

    PubMed

    Duchêne, L; Kühnel, R-S; Rentsch, D; Remhof, A; Hagemann, H; Battaglia, C

    2017-03-27

    Na2(B12H12)0.5(B10H10)0.5, a new solid-state sodium electrolyte is shown to offer high Na(+) conductivity of 0.9 mS cm(-1) at 20 °C, excellent thermal stability up to 300 °C, and a large electrochemical stability window of 3 V including stability towards sodium metal anodes, all essential prerequisites for a stable room-temperature 3 V all-solid-state sodium-ion battery.

  15. GRMHD formulation of highly super-Chandrasekhar magnetized white dwarfs: stable configurations of non-spherical white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata E-mail: bm@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2015-05-01

    The topic of magnetized super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs is in the limelight, particularly in the last few years, since our proposal of their existence. By full-scale general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) numerical analysis, we confirm in this work the existence of stable, highly magnetized, significantly super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs with mass more than 3 solar mass. While a poloidal field geometry renders the white dwarfs oblate, a toroidal field makes them prolate retaining an overall quasi-spherical shape, as speculated in our earlier work. These white dwarfs are expected to serve as the progenitors of over-luminous type Ia supernovae.

  16. Bulk and Stable Isotopic Compositions of Carbonate Minerals in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001: No Proof of High Formation Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the origin of carbonate minerals in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is crucial to evaluating the hypothesis that they contain traces of ancient Martian life. Using arguments based on chemical equilibria among carbonates and fluids, an origin at greater than 650 C (inimical to life) has been proposed. However, the bulk and stable isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals are open to multiple interpretations and so lend no particular support to a high-temperature origin. Other methods (possibly less direct) will have to be used to determine the formation temperature of the carbonates in ALH 84001.

  17. Highly selective luminescent sensing of picric acid based on a water-stable europium metal-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Tifeng; Zhu, Fengliang; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Wang, Zhiyu; Qian, Guodong

    2017-01-01

    A water-stable metal-organic framework (MOF) EuNDC has been synthesized for selective detection of the well-known contaminant and toxicant picric acid (PA) in aqueous solution. Due to the photo-induced electron transfer and self-absorption mechanism, EuNDC displayed rapid, selective and sensitive detection of PA with a detection limit of 37.6 ppb. Recyclability experiments revealed that EuNDC retains its initial luminescent intensity and same quenching efficiency in each cycle, suggesting high photostability and reusability for long-term sensing applications. The excellent detection performance of EuNDC makes it a promising PA sensing material for practical applications.

  18. Stable Josephson reference voltages between 0. 1 and 1. 3 V for high-precision voltage standards

    SciTech Connect

    Niemeyer, J.; Grimm, L.; Meier, W.; Hinken, J.H.; Vollmer, E.

    1985-12-01

    A new series array of 1440 Josephson tunnel junctions has been developed and tested as a reference voltage standard. It yields microwave induced quantized voltage steps up to 1.3 V. The steps are usually stable for more than 5 h with a microwave driving frequency of either 70 or 90 GHz. A high-resolution comparison of a constant voltage step at the 1-V level with the electromotive force of a saturated Weston cell is described. The comparison shows that the step voltage is constant to within +- 1 nV over the full step width.

  19. Stable Josephson reference voltages between 0.1 and 1.3 V for high precision voltage standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, J.; Grimm, L.; Meier, W.; Hinken, J. H.; Vollmer, E.

    1985-12-01

    A new series array of 1440 Josephson tunnel junctions has been developed and tested as a reference voltage standard. It yields microwave induced quantized voltage steps up to 1.3 V. The steps are usually stable for more than 5 h with a microwave driving frequency of either 70 or 90 GHz. A high-resolution comparison of a constant voltage step at the 1-V level with the electromotive force of a saturated Weston cell is described. The comparison shows that the step voltage is constant to within + or - 1 nV over the full step width.

  20. Stable long-time semiclassical description of zero-point energy in high-dimensional molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Garashchuk, Sophya; Rassolov, Vitaly A

    2008-07-14

    Semiclassical implementation of the quantum trajectory formalism [J. Chem. Phys. 120, 1181 (2004)] is further developed to give a stable long-time description of zero-point energy in anharmonic systems of high dimensionality. The method is based on a numerically cheap linearized quantum force approach; stabilizing terms compensating for the linearization errors are added into the time-evolution equations for the classical and nonclassical components of the momentum operator. The wave function normalization and energy are rigorously conserved. Numerical tests are performed for model systems of up to 40 degrees of freedom.

  1. Highly stable ultrabroadband mid-IR optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier optimized for superfluorescence suppression.

    PubMed

    Moses, J; Huang, S-W; Hong, K-H; Mücke, O D; Falcão-Filho, E L; Benedick, A; Ilday, F O; Dergachev, A; Bolger, J A; Eggleton, B J; Kärtner, F X

    2009-06-01

    We present a 9 GW peak power, three-cycle, 2.2 microm optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification source with 1.5% rms energy and 150 mrad carrier envelope phase fluctuations. These characteristics, in addition to excellent beam, wavefront, and pulse quality, make the source suitable for long-wavelength-driven high-harmonic generation. High stability is achieved by careful optimization of superfluorescence suppression, enabling energy scaling.

  2. Thermally stable yttrium-scandium oxide high-k dielectrics deposited by a solution process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenbing; Frost, Bradley; Peterson, Rebecca L.

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the thermal stability of electrical properties in ternary alloy (Y x Sc1-x )2O3 high-k oxides as a function of yttrium fraction, x. The yttrium-scandium oxide dielectric films are deposited using a facile ink-based process. The oxides have a stoichiometry-dependent relative dielectric constant of 26.0 to 7.7 at 100 kHz, low leakage current density of 10-8 A·cm-2, high breakdown field of 4 MVṡcm-1, and interface trap density of 1012 cm-2·eV-1 with silicon. Compared with binary oxides, ternary alloys exhibit less frequency dispersion of the dielectric constant and a higher crystallization temperature. After crystallization is induced through a 900 °C anneal, ternary (Y0.6Sc0.4)2O3 films maintain their low leakage current and high breakdown field. In contrast, the electrical performance of the binary oxides significantly degrades following the same treatment. The solution-processed ternary oxide dielectrics demonstrated here may be used as high-k gate insulators in complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technologies, in novel electronic material systems and devices, and in printed, flexible thin film electronics, and as passivation layers for high power devices. These oxides may also be used as insulators in fabrication process flows that require a high thermal budget.

  3. Engineered diamond nanopillars as mobile probes for high sensitivity metrology in fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrich, P.; de Las Casas, C. F.; Heremans, F. J.; Awschalom, D. D.; Aleman, B. J.; Ohno, K.; Lee, J. C.; Hu, E. L.

    2015-03-01

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center`s optical addressability and exceptional spin coherence properties at room temperature, along with diamond`s biocompatibility, has put this defect at the frontier of metrology applications in biological environments. To push the spatial resolution to the nanoscale, extensive research efforts focus on using NV centers embedded in nanodiamonds (NDs). However, this approach has been hindered by degraded spin coherence properties in NDs and the lack of a platform for spatial control of the nanoparticles in fluid. In this work, we combine the use of high quality diamond membranes with a top-down patterning technique to fabricate diamond nanoparticles with engineered and highly reproducible shape, size, and NV center density. We obtain NDs, easily releasable from the substrate into a water suspension, which contain single NV centers exhibiting consistently long spin coherence times (up to 700 μs). Additionally, we demonstrate highly stable, three-dimensional optical trapping of the nanoparticles within a microfluidic circuit. This level of control enables a bulk-like DC magnetic sensitivity and gives access to dynamical decoupling techniques on contactless, miniaturized diamond probes. This work was supported by DARPA, AFOSR, and the DIAMANT program.

  4. Engine having hydraulic and fan drive systems using a single high pressure pump

    DOEpatents

    Bartley, Bradley E.; Blass, James R.; Gibson, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    An engine comprises a hydraulic system attached to an engine housing that includes a high pressure pump and a hydraulic fluid flowing through at least one passageway. A fan drive system is also attached to the engine housing and includes a hydraulic motor and a fan which can move air over the engine. The hydraulic motor includes an inlet fluidly connected to the at least one passageway.

  5. Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development: Task 2, Market assessment and economic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    Based on the preliminary coal engine design developed, this task was conducted to identify the best opportunity(s) to enter the market with the future coal-fueled, high-speed diesel engine. The results of this market and economic feasibility assessment will be used to determine what specific heavy duty engine application(s) are most attractive for coal fuel, and also define basic economic targets for the engine to be competitive.

  6. Jet Engines as High-Capacity Vacuum Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojciechowski, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    Large diffuser operations envelope and long run times possible. Jet engine driven ejector/diffuser system combines two turbojet engines and variable-area-ratio ejector in two stages. Applications in such industrial proesses as handling corrosive fumes, evaporation of milk and fruit juices, petroleum distillation, and dehydration of blood plasma and penicillin.

  7. Synthesis of Highly Stable Silver-Loaded Vertical ZnO Nanowires Array and its Acetylene Sensing Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Abu Sadat Mohammad Iftekhar; Chung, Gwiy-Sang

    2016-09-01

    A silver-loaded one-dimensional (1D) vertical ZnO nanowires (NWs) array synthesized by a facile seed mediated hydrothermal-RF magnetron sputtering method has been investigated for the fabrication of a highly stable and reproducible acetylene (C2H2) gas sensor. Successful immobilization of silver nanoparticles (NPs) as a sensitizer on the ZnO NWs array significantly enhanced the C2H2 sensing properties and showed a stable sensing performance. The grown structure exhibited high response magnitude (30.8 at 1000ppm), short response time (43s) and excellent selectivity at 220∘C. The enhanced performance can probably be accounted for the effect of combining the highly orientated ZnO NWs and catalytically active silver-based network. The superior sensing features toward C2H2 along with broad detection range (1-1000ppm), outstanding stability and excellent reproducibility indicate that the sensor is a promising candidate for practical applications.

  8. Method of sealing a high performance automotive engine and engine assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenquist, G.A.

    1994-01-04

    A method of sealing a high performance internal combustion engine with a head gasket having a fire ring comprising providing a groove in the head or block generally concentric with each said combustion opening, each groove having a land area and a generally vertical wall, and positioning the gasket on the block so that when the head is torqued down, each groove receives a fire ring and compresses the wire ring thereof to provide a primary seal therewith at the land area, the wall engages the armor of the fire ring to form a secondary seal, and the head and block clamping surfaces engage the armor to clamp the armor. The head gasket has a main body of a first thickness including a central core and facing layers laminated to the core, and defines a plurality of combustion openings. A fire ring is disposed and secured in each combustion opening, each fire ring comprising a generally U-shaped armor having a pair of legs overlying and underlying the main body adjacent a combustion opening and a central body connecting the legs and ensheathing a wire ring for providing a combustion seal. In use, the combustion seal provides a labyrinth seal against the spaced surfaces of the groove and against a corner defined by the groove. 6 figs.

  9. Fully Copper-Exchanged High-Silica LTA Zeolites as Unrivaled Hydrothermally Stable NH3 -SCR Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Taekyung; Ahn, Nak Ho; Seo, Seungwan; Cho, Jung; Kim, Hyojun; Jo, Donghui; Park, Gi Tae; Kim, Pyung Soon; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bruce, Elliott L; Wright, Paul A; Nam, In-Sik; Hong, Suk Bong

    2017-03-13

    Diesel engine technology is still the most effective solution to meet tighter CO2 regulations in the mobility and transport sector. In implementation of fuel-efficient diesel engines, the poor thermal durability of lean nitrogen oxides (NOx ) aftertreatment systems remains as one major technical hurdle. Divalent copper ions when fully exchanged into high-silica LTA zeolites are demonstrated to exhibit excellent activity maintenance for NOx reduction with NH3 under vehicle simulated conditions even after hydrothermal aging at 900 °C, a critical temperature that the current commercial Cu-SSZ-13 catalyst cannot overcome owing to thermal deactivation. Detailed structural characterizations confirm the presence of Cu(2+) ions only at the center of single 6-rings that act not only as a catalytically active center, but also as a dealumination suppressor. The overall results render the copper-exchanged LTA zeolite attractive as a viable substitute for Cu-SSZ-13.

  10. Near-infrared roll-off-free electroluminescence from highly stable diketopyrrolopyrrole light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassi, Mauro; Buccheri, Nunzio; Rooney, Myles; Botta, Chiara; Bruni, Francesco; Giovanella, Umberto; Brovelli, Sergio; Beverina, Luca

    2016-09-01

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) operating in the near-infrared spectral region are gaining growing relevance for emerging photonic technologies, such as lab-on-chip platforms for medical diagnostics, flexible self-medicated pads for photodynamic therapy, night vision and plastic-based telecommunications. The achievement of efficient near-infrared electroluminescence from solution-processed OLEDs is, however, an open challenge due to the low photoluminescence efficiency of most narrow-energy-gap organic emitters. Diketopyrrolopyrrole-boron complexes are promising candidates to overcome this limitation as they feature extremely high photoluminescence quantum yield in the near-infrared region and high chemical stability. Here, by incorporating suitably functionalized diketopyrrolopyrrole derivatives emitting at ~760 nm in an active matrix of poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzothiadiazole) and without using complex light out-coupling or encapsulation strategies, we obtain all-solution-processed NIR-OLEDs with external quantum efficiency as high as 0.5%. Importantly, our test-bed devices show no efficiency roll-off even for high current densities and high operational stability, retaining over 50% of the initial radiant emittance for over 50 hours of continuous operation at 10 mA/cm2, which emphasizes the great applicative potential of the proposed strategy.

  11. Ultrastrong ductile and stable high-entropy alloys at small scales.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yu; Ma, Huan; Spolenak, Ralph

    2015-07-10

    Refractory high-entropy alloys (HEAs) are a class of emerging multi-component alloys, showing superior mechanical properties at elevated temperatures and being technologically interesting. However, they are generally brittle at room temperature, fail by cracking at low compressive strains and suffer from limited formability. Here we report a strategy for the fabrication of refractory HEA thin films and small-sized pillars that consist of strongly textured, columnar and nanometre-sized grains. Such HEA pillars exhibit extraordinarily high yield strengths of ∼ 10 GPa--among the highest reported strengths in micro-/nano-pillar compression and one order of magnitude higher than that of its bulk form--and their ductility is considerably improved (compressive plastic strains over 30%). Additionally, we demonstrate that such HEA films show substantially enhanced stability for high-temperature, long-duration conditions (at 1,100 °C for 3 days). Small-scale HEAs combining these properties represent a new class of materials in small-dimension devices potentially for high-stress and high-temperature applications.

  12. Ultrastrong ductile and stable high-entropy alloys at small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yu; Ma, Huan; Spolenak, Ralph

    2015-07-01

    Refractory high-entropy alloys (HEAs) are a class of emerging multi-component alloys, showing superior mechanical properties at elevated temperatures and being technologically interesting. However, they are generally brittle at room temperature, fail by cracking at low compressive strains and suffer from limited formability. Here we report a strategy for the fabrication of refractory HEA thin films and small-sized pillars that consist of strongly textured, columnar and nanometre-sized grains. Such HEA pillars exhibit extraordinarily high yield strengths of ~10 GPa--among the highest reported strengths in micro-/nano-pillar compression and one order of magnitude higher than that of its bulk form--and their ductility is considerably improved (compressive plastic strains over 30%). Additionally, we demonstrate that such HEA films show substantially enhanced stability for high-temperature, long-duration conditions (at 1,100 °C for 3 days). Small-scale HEAs combining these properties represent a new class of materials in small-dimension devices potentially for high-stress and high-temperature applications.

  13. Near-infrared roll-off-free electroluminescence from highly stable diketopyrrolopyrrole light emitting diodes

    PubMed Central

    Sassi, Mauro; Buccheri, Nunzio; Rooney, Myles; Botta, Chiara; Bruni, Francesco; Giovanella, Umberto; Brovelli, Sergio; Beverina, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) operating in the near-infrared spectral region are gaining growing relevance for emerging photonic technologies, such as lab-on-chip platforms for medical diagnostics, flexible self-medicated pads for photodynamic therapy, night vision and plastic-based telecommunications. The achievement of efficient near-infrared electroluminescence from solution-processed OLEDs is, however, an open challenge due to the low photoluminescence efficiency of most narrow-energy-gap organic emitters. Diketopyrrolopyrrole-boron complexes are promising candidates to overcome this limitation as they feature extremely high photoluminescence quantum yield in the near-infrared region and high chemical stability. Here, by incorporating suitably functionalized diketopyrrolopyrrole derivatives emitting at ~760 nm in an active matrix of poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzothiadiazole) and without using complex light out-coupling or encapsulation strategies, we obtain all-solution-processed NIR-OLEDs with external quantum efficiency as high as 0.5%. Importantly, our test-bed devices show no efficiency roll-off even for high current densities and high operational stability, retaining over 50% of the initial radiant emittance for over 50 hours of continuous operation at 10 mA/cm2, which emphasizes the great applicative potential of the proposed strategy. PMID:27677240

  14. Ultrastrong ductile and stable high-entropy alloys at small scales

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yu; Ma, Huan; Spolenak, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Refractory high-entropy alloys (HEAs) are a class of emerging multi-component alloys, showing superior mechanical properties at elevated temperatures and being technologically interesting. However, they are generally brittle at room temperature, fail by cracking at low compressive strains and suffer from limited formability. Here we report a strategy for the fabrication of refractory HEA thin films and small-sized pillars that consist of strongly textured, columnar and nanometre-sized grains. Such HEA pillars exhibit extraordinarily high yield strengths of ∼10 GPa—among the highest reported strengths in micro-/nano-pillar compression and one order of magnitude higher than that of its bulk form—and their ductility is considerably improved (compressive plastic strains over 30%). Additionally, we demonstrate that such HEA films show substantially enhanced stability for high-temperature, long-duration conditions (at 1,100 °C for 3 days). Small-scale HEAs combining these properties represent a new class of materials in small-dimension devices potentially for high-stress and high-temperature applications. PMID:26159936

  15. Highly stable carbon nanotube field emitters on small metal tips against electrical arcing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters that exhibit extremely high stability against high-voltage arcing have been demonstrated. The CNT emitters were fabricated on a sharp copper tip substrate that produces a high electric field. A metal mixture composed of silver, copper, and indium micro- and nanoparticles was used as a binder to attach CNTs to the substrate. Due to the strong adhesion of the metal mixture, CNTs were not detached from the substrate even after many intense arcing events. Through electrical conditioning of the as-prepared CNT emitters, vertically standing CNTs with almost the same heights were formed on the substrate surface and most of loosely bound impurities were removed from the substrate. Consequently, no arcing was observed during the normal operation of the CNT emitters and the emission current remained constant even after intentionally inducing arcing at current densities up to 70 mA/cm2. PMID:23953847

  16. High thermal stable and fast switching Ni-Ge-Te alloy for phase change memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liangliang; Wu, Liangcai; Zhu, Wenqing; Ji, Xinglong; Zheng, Yonghui; Song, Zhitang; Rao, Feng; Song, Sannian; Ma, Zhongyuan; Xu, Ling

    2015-12-01

    Ni-Ge-Te phase change material is proposed and investigated for phase change memory (PCM) applications. With Ni addition, the crystallization temperature, the data retention ability, and the crystallization speed are remarkably improved. The Ni-Ge-Te material has a high crystallization temperature (250 °C) and good data retention ability (149 °C). A reversible switching between SET and RESET state can be achieved by an electrical pulse as short as 6 ns. Up to ˜3 × 104 SET/RESET cycles are obtained with a resistance ratio of about two orders of magnitude. All of these demonstrate that Ni-Ge-Te alloy is a promising material for high speed and high temperature PCM applications.

  17. Multicatalytic colloids with highly scalable, adjustable, and stable functionalities in organic and aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghee; Cheong, Sanghyuk; Ahn, Yun Gyong; Ryu, Sook Won; Kim, Jai-Kyeong; Cho, Jinhan

    2016-03-01

    Despite a large number of developments of noble metal (or metal oxide) NP-based catalysts, it has been a great challenge to prepare high-performance recyclable catalysts with integrated functionalities that can be used in various solvent media. Here, we report on layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled multicatalysts with high catalytic performance, showing high dispersion and recycling stability in organic and aqueous media. The remarkable advantages of our approach are as follows. (i) Various metal or metal oxide NPs with desired catalytic performance can be easily incorporated into multilayered shells, forming densely packed arrays that allow one colloid to be used as a multicatalyst with highly integrated and controllable catalytic properties. (ii) Additionally, the dispersion stability of catalytic colloids in a desired solvent can be determined by the type of ultrathin outermost layer coating each colloid. (iii) Lastly, the covalent bonding between inorganic NPs and dendrimers within multilayer shells enhances the recycling stability of multicatalytic colloids. The resulting core-shell colloids including OA-Fe3O4 NPs, TOABr-Pd NPs, and OA-TiO2 NPs exhibited excellent performance in the oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and photocatalysis in aqueous media and in the Sonogashira coupling reaction (99% yield) in organic media. Given that the catalytic properties of recyclable colloids reported to date have entirely depended on the functionality of a single catalytic NP layer deposited onto colloids in selective solvent media, our approach provides a basis for the design and exploitation of high-performance recyclable colloids with integrated multicatalytic properties and high dispersion stability in a variety of solvents.Despite a large number of developments of noble metal (or metal oxide) NP-based catalysts, it has been a great challenge to prepare high-performance recyclable catalysts with integrated functionalities that can be used in various solvent

  18. High Temperature Stable Separator for Lithium Batteries Based on SiO2 and Hydroxypropyl Guar Gum

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Diogo Vieira; Loeffler, Nicholas; Kim, Guk-Tae; Passerini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    A novel membrane based on silicon dioxide (SiO2) and hydroxypropyl guar gum (HPG) as binder is presented and tested as a separator for lithium-ion batteries. The separator is made with renewable and low cost materials and an environmentally friendly manufacturing processing using only water as solvent. The separator offers superior wettability and high electrolyte uptake due to the optimized porosity and the good affinity of SiO2 and guar gum microstructure towards organic liquid electrolytes. Additionally, the separator shows high thermal stability and no dimensional-shrinkage at high temperatures due to the use of the ceramic filler and the thermally stable natural polymer. The electrochemical tests show the good electrochemical stability of the separator in a wide range of potential, as well as its outstanding cycle performance. PMID:26512701

  19. Kinetically Stable Lanthanide Complexes Displaying Exceptionally High Quantum Yields upon Long-Wavelength Excitation: Synthesis, Photophysical Properties, and Solution Speciation.

    PubMed

    Routledge, Jack D; Jones, Michael W; Faulkner, Stephen; Tropiano, Manuel

    2015-04-06

    We demonstrate how highly emissive, kinetically stable complexes can be prepared using the macrocyclic scaffold of DO3A bearing coordinating aryl ketones as highly effective sensitizing chromophores. In the europium complexes, high quantum yields (up to 18% in water) can be combined with long-wavelength excitation (370 nm). The behavior in solution upon variation of pH, studied by means of UV-vis absorption, emission, and NMR spectroscopies, reveals that the nature of the chromophore can give rise to pH-dependent behavior as a consequence of deprotonation adjacent to the carbonyl group. Knowledge of the molecular speciation in solution is therefore critical when assessing the luminescence properties of such complexes.

  20. Elevated Circulating Interleukin 33 Levels in Stable Renal Transplant Recipients at High Risk for Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Mansell, Holly; Soliman, Mahmoud; Elmoselhi, Hamdi; Shoker, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background The Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events calculator (CRCRTR-MACE) estimates the burden of cardiovascular risk in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Our recent study of 95 RTR reported the 7-year median risk of cardiovascular events (CVE) to be 9.97%, ranging from 1.93 to 84.27%. Nearly a third (28.4%) of the cohort was above 20% risk for a CVE. Since interleukins (ILs) as part of the inflammatory response may play a role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), we extended this study to identify which ILs are associated with high cardiovascular risk in this population. Methods Twenty-two ILs were measured by multiplexed fluorescent bead-based immunoassay in 95 RTR and 56 normal controls. Stepwise analysis after multivariate determination of significant demographic and inflammatory variables was performed between the high and low-CVD risk groups (which were arbitrarily set at scores <10% and ≥20%, respectively). Normalized data was presented as mean ± SD and non-normalized data as median (minimum–maximum). Significance was measured at <0.05. Results 27.5% of the low-risk and 31.3% of the high-risk groups had mean IL levels above the 95 percentile of the normal control levels. In the non-parametric analysis IL-6, 9, 16, 17 and 33 were significantly higher in the high-risk group compared to the control. Univariate analysis (UVA) of the high-risk group identified IL-33 as the only IL that remained significantly higher than the control and low-risk groups (p = 0.000). The percentage of patients with IL-33 levels above the 90 percentile of control value in the low and high-risk groups were 15.6% and 52.0%, respectively (p<0.002). UVA of factors significant to high IL-33 levels included estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), while diabetes mellitus, serum phosphorus, microalbuminuria and age also remained significant in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Circulating IL-33 level is positively associated with high CRCRTR-MACE score