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Sample records for highly synchronized cell

  1. High-order synchronization of hair cell bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Michael; Molzon, Adrian; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Wook; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2016-12-01

    Auditory and vestibular hair cell bundles exhibit active mechanical oscillations at natural frequencies that are typically lower than the detection range of the corresponding end organs. We explore how these noisy nonlinear oscillators mode-lock to frequencies higher than their internal clocks. A nanomagnetic technique is used to stimulate the bundles without an imposed mechanical load. The evoked response shows regimes of high-order mode-locking. Exploring a broad range of stimulus frequencies and intensities, we observe regions of high-order synchronization, analogous to Arnold Tongues in dynamical systems literature. Significant areas of overlap occur between synchronization regimes, with the bundle intermittently flickering between different winding numbers. We demonstrate how an ensemble of these noisy spontaneous oscillators could be entrained to efficiently detect signals significantly above the characteristic frequencies of the individual cells.

  2. High-order synchronization of hair cell bundles

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael; Molzon, Adrian; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Ji-wook; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Auditory and vestibular hair cell bundles exhibit active mechanical oscillations at natural frequencies that are typically lower than the detection range of the corresponding end organs. We explore how these noisy nonlinear oscillators mode-lock to frequencies higher than their internal clocks. A nanomagnetic technique is used to stimulate the bundles without an imposed mechanical load. The evoked response shows regimes of high-order mode-locking. Exploring a broad range of stimulus frequencies and intensities, we observe regions of high-order synchronization, analogous to Arnold Tongues in dynamical systems literature. Significant areas of overlap occur between synchronization regimes, with the bundle intermittently flickering between different winding numbers. We demonstrate how an ensemble of these noisy spontaneous oscillators could be entrained to efficiently detect signals significantly above the characteristic frequencies of the individual cells. PMID:27974743

  3. Highly Synchronized Expression of Lineage-Specific Genes during In Vitro Hepatic Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ghosheh, Nidal; Olsson, Björn; Edsbagge, Josefina; Küppers-Munther, Barbara; Van Giezen, Mariska; Asplund, Annika; Andersson, Tommy B.; Björquist, Petter; Carén, Helena; Simonsson, Stina; Sartipy, Peter; Synnergren, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells- (hPSCs-) derived hepatocytes have the potential to replace many hepatic models in drug discovery and provide a cell source for regenerative medicine applications. However, the generation of fully functional hPSC-derived hepatocytes is still a challenge. Towards gaining better understanding of the differentiation and maturation process, we employed a standardized protocol to differentiate six hPSC lines into hepatocytes and investigated the synchronicity of the hPSC lines by applying RT-qPCR to assess the expression of lineage-specific genes (OCT4, NANOG, T, SOX17, CXCR4, CER1, HHEX, TBX3, PROX1, HNF6, AFP, HNF4a, KRT18, ALB, AAT, and CYP3A4) which serve as markers for different stages during liver development. The data was evaluated using correlation and clustering analysis, demonstrating that the expression of these markers is highly synchronized and correlated well across all cell lines. The analysis also revealed a distribution of the markers in groups reflecting the developmental stages of hepatocytes. Functional analysis of the differentiated cells further confirmed their hepatic phenotype. Taken together, these results demonstrate, on the molecular level, the highly synchronized differentiation pattern across multiple hPSC lines. Moreover, this study provides additional understanding for future efforts to improve the functionality of hPSC-derived hepatocytes and thereby increase the value of related models. PMID:26949401

  4. Producing Newborn Synchronous Mammalian Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Helmstetter, Charles E.; Thornton, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    A method and bioreactor for the continuous production of synchronous (same age) population of mammalian cells have been invented. The invention involves the attachment and growth of cells on an adhesive-coated porous membrane immersed in a perfused liquid culture medium in a microgravity analog bioreactor. When cells attach to the surface divide, newborn cells are released into the flowing culture medium. The released cells, consisting of a uniform population of synchronous cells are then collected from the effluent culture medium. This invention could be of interest to researchers investigating the effects of the geneotoxic effects of the space environment (microgravity, radiation, chemicals, gases) and to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies involved in research on aging and cancer, and in new drug development and testing.

  5. High Accuracy Time Transfer Synchronization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    HIGH ACCURACY TIME TRANSFER SYNCHRONIZATION Paul Wheeler, Paul Koppang, David Chalmers, Angela Davis, Anthony Kubik and William Powell U.S. Naval...Observatory Washington, DC 20392 Abstract In July 1994, the US Naval Observatory (USNO) Time Service System Engineering Division conducted a...field test to establish a baseline accuracy for two-way satellite time transfer synchro- nization. Three Hewlett-Packard model 5071 high performance

  6. Production of minimally disturbed synchronous cultures of hematopoietic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Maureen; Eward, Kathryn Leigh; Helmstetter, Charles E.; Edward, K. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    A method is describedforproducing sizable quantities of synchronously dividing, minimally disturbed mammalian cells. Cultures were grown immobilized on surfaces such that cell division within the population resulted in the continuous release of synchronous newborn cells. As judged by the quality and duration of synchronous growth, cell size distributions, and DNA compositions, newborn mouse L1210 cells grew with a very high level of synchrony without overt evidence of growth disturbances. The technology should be applicable to a variety of hematopoietic cells, as evidenced by similar results with human MOLT-4 and U937 cell lines.

  7. High accuracy time transfer synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Paul J.; Koppang, Paul A.; Chalmers, David; Davis, Angela; Kubik, Anthony; Powell, William M.

    1995-01-01

    In July 1994, the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) Time Service System Engineering Division conducted a field test to establish a baseline accuracy for two-way satellite time transfer synchronization. Three Hewlett-Packard model 5071 high performance cesium frequency standards were transported from the USNO in Washington, DC to Los Angeles, California in the USNO's mobile earth station. Two-Way Satellite Time Transfer links between the mobile earth station and the USNO were conducted each day of the trip, using the Naval Research Laboratory(NRL) designed spread spectrum modem, built by Allen Osborne Associates(AOA). A Motorola six channel GPS receiver was used to track the location and altitude of the mobile earth station and to provide coordinates for calculating Sagnac corrections for the two-way measurements, and relativistic corrections for the cesium clocks. This paper will discuss the trip, the measurement systems used and the results from the data collected. We will show the accuracy of using two-way satellite time transfer for synchronization and the performance of the three HP 5071 cesium clocks in an operational environment.

  8. Synchronization of replicons in Ehrlich ascites cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gekeler, V.; Probst, H. )

    1988-03-01

    Ehrlich ascites cells, in which replication units at the beginning of the S phase started and grew synchronously, were obtained by the following protocol: (1) selection of G{sub 1} cells by zonal centrifugation, (2) hypoxia for 12 h, (3) reaeration, (4) addition of cycloheximide (30 {mu}M) within the first minute after reoxygenation. Studies on the effectiveness of the different steps revealed: (i) G{sub 1} cells reoxygenated after 12 h of hypoxia traverse two succeeding cell cycles high synchronously. This was shown by monitoring the thymidine incorporation rate, the thymidine pulse-labeling index, and the mitotic index. (ii) Cycloheximide, like hypoxia, suppresses replicon initiation in Ehrlich ascites cells without interfering with DNA chain growth and DNA maturation. The reversibility of the suppression is less complete than in the case of hypoxia. This was shown by DNA fiber autoradiography and by analyzing the length distribution of pulse- or pulse/pulse-chase-labeled daughter DNA in alkaline sucrose gradients. The alkaline sedimentation patterns of daughter-strand DNA, pulse labeled immediately after the cycloheximide addition at the end of the elaborated protocol and 1 and 2 h later, indicated synchronous initiation and growth of a homogeneous population of DNA molecules to replicon-sized lengths.

  9. Specific cell cycle synchronization with butyrate and cell cycle analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable for many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. To explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells, we investigated the property of the cell cyc...

  10. Synchronization of Mammalian Cells and Nuclei by Centrifugal Elutriation.

    PubMed

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2017-01-01

    Synchronized populations of large numbers of cells can be obtained by centrifugal elutriation on the basis of sedimentation properties of small round particles, with minimal perturbation of cellular functions. The physical characteristics of cell size and sedimentation velocity are operative in the technique of centrifugal elutriation also known as counterstreaming centrifugation. The elutriator is an advanced device for increasing the sedimentation rate to yield enhanced resolution of cell separation. A random population of cells is introduced into the elutriation chamber of an elutriator rotor running in a specially designed centrifuge. By increasing step-by-step the flow rate of the elutriation fluid, successive populations of relatively homogeneous cell size can be removed from the elutriation chamber and used as synchronized subpopulations. For cell synchronization by centrifugal elutriation, early log S phase cell populations are most suitable where most of the cells are in G1 and S phase (>80 %). Apoptotic cells can be found in the early elutriation fractions belonging to the sub-Go window. Protocols for the synchronization of nuclei of murine pre-B cells and high-resolution centrifugal elutriation of CHO cells are given. The verification of purity and cell cycle positions of cells in elutriated fractions includes the measurement of DNA synthesis by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation and DNA content by propidium iodide flow cytometry.

  11. Bioreactor and methods for producing synchronous cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmstetter, Charles E. (Inventor); Thornton, Maureen (Inventor); Gonda, Steve (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are directed to a perfusion culture system in which a rotating bioreactor is used to grow cells in a liquid culture medium, while these cells are attached to an adhesive-treated porous surface. As a result of this arrangement and its rotation, the attached cells divide, with one cell remaining attached to the substrate, while the other cell, a newborn cell is released. These newborn cells are of approximately the same age, that are collected upon leaving the bioreactor. The populations of newborn cells collected are of synchronous and are minimally, if at all, disturbed metabolically.

  12. Flagellar Synchronization Is a Simple Alternative to Cell Cycle Synchronization for Ciliary and Flagellar Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Soumita

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an ideal model organism for studies of ciliary function and assembly. In assays for biological and biochemical effects of various factors on flagellar structure and function, synchronous culture is advantageous for minimizing variability. Here, we have characterized a method in which 100% synchronization is achieved with respect to flagellar length but not with respect to the cell cycle. The method requires inducing flagellar regeneration by amputation of the entire cell population and limiting regeneration time. This results in a maximally homogeneous distribution of flagellar lengths at 3 h postamputation. We found that time-limiting new protein synthesis during flagellar synchronization limits variability in the unassembled pool of limiting flagellar protein and variability in flagellar length without affecting the range of cell volumes. We also found that long- and short-flagella mutants that regenerate normally require longer and shorter synchronization times, respectively. By minimizing flagellar length variability using a simple method requiring only hours and no changes in media, flagellar synchronization facilitates the detection of small changes in flagellar length resulting from both chemical and genetic perturbations in Chlamydomonas. This method increases our ability to probe the basic biology of ciliary size regulation and related disease etiologies. IMPORTANCE Cilia and flagella are highly conserved antenna-like organelles that found in nearly all mammalian cell types. They perform sensory and motile functions contributing to numerous physiological and developmental processes. Defects in their assembly and function are implicated in a wide range of human diseases ranging from retinal degeneration to cancer. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an algal model system for studying mammalian cilium formation and function. Here, we report a simple synchronization method that allows detection of

  13. Mechanism of Highly Synchronized Bilateral Hippocampal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Toprani, S.; Tang, Y.; Vrabec, T.; Durand, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    In vivo studies of epileptiform discharges in the hippocampi of rodents have shown that bilateral seizure activity can sometimes be synchronized with very small delays (< 2 ms). This observed small time delay of epileptiform activity between the left and right CA3 regions is unexpected given the physiological propagation time across the hemispheres (> 6 ms). The goal of this study is to determine the mechanisms of this tight synchronization with in-vitro electrophysiology techniques and computer simulations. The hypothesis of a common source was first eliminated by using an in-vitro preparation containing both hippocampi with a functional ventral hippocampal commissure (VHC) and no other tissue. Next, the hypothesis that a noisy baseline could mask the underlying synchronous activity between the two hemispheres was ruled out by low noise in-vivo recordings and computer simulation of the noisy environment. Then we built a novel bilateral CA3 model to test the hypothesis that the phenomenon of very small left-to-right propagation delay of seizure activity is a product of epileptic cell network dynamics. We found that the commissural tract connectivity could decrease the delay between seizure events recorded from two sides while the activity propagated longitudinally along the CA3 layer thereby yielding delays much smaller than the propagation time between the two sides. The modeling results indicate that both recurrent and feedforward inhibition were required for shortening the bilateral propagation delay and depended critically on the length of the commissural fiber tract as well as the number of cells involved in seizure generation. These combined modeling/experimental studies indicate that it is possible to explain near perfect synchronization between the two hemispheres by taking into account the structure of the hippocampal network. PMID:24262205

  14. Mechanical communication in cardiac cell synchronized beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsan, Ido; Drori, Stavit; Lewis, Yair E.; Cohen, Shlomi; Tzlil, Shelly

    2016-05-01

    Cell-cell communication, which enables cells to coordinate their activity and is essential for growth, development and function, is usually ascribed a chemical or electrical origin. However, cells can exert forces and respond to environment elasticity and to mechanical deformations created by their neighbours. The extent to which this mechanosensing ability facilitates intercellular communication remains unclear. Here we demonstrate mechanical communication between cells directly for the first time, providing evidence for a long-range interaction that induces long-lasting alterations in interacting cells. We show that an isolated cardiac cell can be trained to beat at a given frequency by mechanically stimulating the underlying substrate. Deformations are induced using an oscillatory mechanical probe that mimics the deformations generated by a beating neighbouring cardiac cell. Unlike electrical field stimulation, the probe-induced beating rate is maintained by the cell for an hour after the stimulation stops, implying that long-term modifications occur within the cell. These long-term alterations provide a mechanism for cells that communicate mechanically to be less variable in their electromechanical delay. Mechanical coupling between cells therefore ensures that the final outcome of action potential pacing is synchronized beating. We further show that the contractile machinery is essential for mechanical communication.

  15. Collective cell movement promotes synchronization of coupled genetic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Uriu, Koichiro; Morelli, Luis G

    2014-07-15

    Collective cell movement is a crucial component of embryonic development. Intercellular interactions regulate collective cell movement by allowing cells to transfer information. A key question is how collective cell movement itself influences information flow produced in tissues by intercellular interactions. Here, we study the effect of collective cell movement on the synchronization of locally coupled genetic oscillators. This study is motivated by the segmentation clock in zebrafish somitogenesis, where short-range correlated movement of cells has been observed. We describe the segmentation clock tissue by a Voronoi diagram, cell movement by the force balance of self-propelled and repulsive forces between cells, the dynamics of the direction of self-propelled motion, and the synchronization of genetic oscillators by locally coupled phase oscillators. We find that movement with a correlation length of about 2 ∼ 3 cell diameters is optimal for the synchronization of coupled oscillators. Quantification of cell mixing reveals that this short-range correlation of cell movement allows cells to exchange neighbors most efficiently. Moreover, short-range correlated movement strongly destabilizes nonuniform spatial phase patterns, further promoting global synchronization. Our theoretical results suggest that collective cell movement may enhance the synchronization of the segmentation clock in zebrafish somitogenesis. More generally, collective cell movement may promote information flow in tissues by enhancing cell mixing and destabilizing spurious patterns.

  16. Collective Cell Movement Promotes Synchronization of Coupled Genetic Oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Uriu, Koichiro; Morelli, Luis G.

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell movement is a crucial component of embryonic development. Intercellular interactions regulate collective cell movement by allowing cells to transfer information. A key question is how collective cell movement itself influences information flow produced in tissues by intercellular interactions. Here, we study the effect of collective cell movement on the synchronization of locally coupled genetic oscillators. This study is motivated by the segmentation clock in zebrafish somitogenesis, where short-range correlated movement of cells has been observed. We describe the segmentation clock tissue by a Voronoi diagram, cell movement by the force balance of self-propelled and repulsive forces between cells, the dynamics of the direction of self-propelled motion, and the synchronization of genetic oscillators by locally coupled phase oscillators. We find that movement with a correlation length of about 2 ∼ 3 cell diameters is optimal for the synchronization of coupled oscillators. Quantification of cell mixing reveals that this short-range correlation of cell movement allows cells to exchange neighbors most efficiently. Moreover, short-range correlated movement strongly destabilizes nonuniform spatial phase patterns, further promoting global synchronization. Our theoretical results suggest that collective cell movement may enhance the synchronization of the segmentation clock in zebrafish somitogenesis. More generally, collective cell movement may promote information flow in tissues by enhancing cell mixing and destabilizing spurious patterns. PMID:25028893

  17. Flow cytometry analysis of cell cycle and specific cell synchronization with butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable in many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. The possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells was explored and the properties of butyrate-induced cell ...

  18. Synchronized renal tubular cell death involves ferroptosis.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas; Skouta, Rachid; Himmerkus, Nina; Mulay, Shrikant R; Dewitz, Christin; De Zen, Federica; Prokai, Agnes; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Krombach, Fritz; Welz, Patrick-Simon; Weinlich, Ricardo; Vanden Berghe, Tom; Vandenabeele, Peter; Pasparakis, Manolis; Bleich, Markus; Weinberg, Joel M; Reichel, Christoph A; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Stockwell, Brent R; Green, Douglas R; Krautwald, Stefan

    2014-11-25

    Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3)-mediated necroptosis is thought to be the pathophysiologically predominant pathway that leads to regulated necrosis of parenchymal cells in ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), and loss of either Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) or caspase-8 is known to sensitize tissues to undergo spontaneous necroptosis. Here, we demonstrate that renal tubules do not undergo sensitization to necroptosis upon genetic ablation of either FADD or caspase-8 and that the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) does not protect freshly isolated tubules from hypoxic injury. In contrast, iron-dependent ferroptosis directly causes synchronized necrosis of renal tubules, as demonstrated by intravital microscopy in models of IRI and oxalate crystal-induced acute kidney injury. To suppress ferroptosis in vivo, we generated a novel third-generation ferrostatin (termed 16-86), which we demonstrate to be more stable, to metabolism and plasma, and more potent, compared with the first-in-class compound ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1). Even in conditions with extraordinarily severe IRI, 16-86 exerts strong protection to an extent which has not previously allowed survival in any murine setting. In addition, 16-86 further potentiates the strong protective effect on IRI mediated by combination therapy with necrostatins and compounds that inhibit mitochondrial permeability transition. Renal tubules thus represent a tissue that is not sensitized to necroptosis by loss of FADD or caspase-8. Finally, ferroptosis mediates postischemic and toxic renal necrosis, which may be therapeutically targeted by ferrostatins and by combination therapy.

  19. Synchronization dynamics of chemically coupled cells with activator-inhibitor pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guemkam Ghomsi, P.; Moukam Kakmeni, F. M.; Kofane, T. C.; Tchawoua, C.

    2014-08-01

    Systems of interacting cells containing an activator-inhibitor pathway, regulating naturally in their inner parts their end-product concentrations through a sequence of biochemical reactions with feedback-loops: an end-product inhibition of the first substrate, and an autocatalytic activation of the end-product through an allosteric enzyme-mediated reaction are investigated. The individual cells are considered to be identical and are described by nonlinear differential equations recently proposed following the concerted transition model. The chemical and electrical coupling types, realized by exchange of metabolites across concentration of the cells are used in order to analyze the onset of phase and complete synchronization in the biochemical system. It is found that depending on the coupling nature and the range of coupling strength, cells enter into different synchronization regimes going from low-quality to high-quality synchronization. The synchronization manifold's stability is analyzed. The results are supported by numerical simulations using indicators such as the conditional Lyapunov exponents and the rate of change of the Lyapunov function. The results indicate that the system cannot completely synchronize under the single action of the chemical coupling. The combined effect of both chemical and electrical couplings is found to be of capital importance in the onset of complete synchronization and high quality synchronization.

  20. Synchronizing stochastic circadian oscillators in single cells of Neurospora crassa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhaojie; Arsenault, Sam; Caranica, Cristian; Griffith, James; Zhu, Taotao; Al-Omari, Ahmad; Schüttler, Heinz-Bernd; Arnold, Jonathan; Mao, Leidong

    2016-10-01

    The synchronization of stochastic coupled oscillators is a central problem in physics and an emerging problem in biology, particularly in the context of circadian rhythms. Most measurements on the biological clock are made at the macroscopic level of millions of cells. Here measurements are made on the oscillators in single cells of the model fungal system, Neurospora crassa, with droplet microfluidics and the use of a fluorescent recorder hooked up to a promoter on a clock controlled gene-2 (ccg-2). The oscillators of individual cells are stochastic with a period near 21 hours (h), and using a stochastic clock network ensemble fitted by Markov Chain Monte Carlo implemented on general-purpose graphical processing units (or GPGPUs) we estimated that >94% of the variation in ccg-2 expression was stochastic (as opposed to experimental error). To overcome this stochasticity at the macroscopic level, cells must synchronize their oscillators. Using a classic measure of similarity in cell trajectories within droplets, the intraclass correlation (ICC), the synchronization surface ICC is measured on >25,000 cells as a function of the number of neighboring cells within a droplet and of time. The synchronization surface provides evidence that cells communicate, and synchronization varies with genotype.

  1. Synchronizing stochastic circadian oscillators in single cells of Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhaojie; Arsenault, Sam; Caranica, Cristian; Griffith, James; Zhu, Taotao; Al-Omari, Ahmad; Schüttler, Heinz-Bernd; Arnold, Jonathan; Mao, Leidong

    2016-01-01

    The synchronization of stochastic coupled oscillators is a central problem in physics and an emerging problem in biology, particularly in the context of circadian rhythms. Most measurements on the biological clock are made at the macroscopic level of millions of cells. Here measurements are made on the oscillators in single cells of the model fungal system, Neurospora crassa, with droplet microfluidics and the use of a fluorescent recorder hooked up to a promoter on a clock controlled gene-2 (ccg-2). The oscillators of individual cells are stochastic with a period near 21 hours (h), and using a stochastic clock network ensemble fitted by Markov Chain Monte Carlo implemented on general-purpose graphical processing units (or GPGPUs) we estimated that >94% of the variation in ccg-2 expression was stochastic (as opposed to experimental error). To overcome this stochasticity at the macroscopic level, cells must synchronize their oscillators. Using a classic measure of similarity in cell trajectories within droplets, the intraclass correlation (ICC), the synchronization surface ICC is measured on >25,000 cells as a function of the number of neighboring cells within a droplet and of time. The synchronization surface provides evidence that cells communicate, and synchronization varies with genotype. PMID:27786253

  2. Weak correlation of starch and volume in synchronized photosynthetic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rading, M. Michael; Sandmann, Michael; Steup, Martin; Chiarugi, Davide; Valleriani, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    In cultures of unicellular algae, features of single cells, such as cellular volume and starch content, are thought to be the result of carefully balanced growth and division processes. Single-cell analyses of synchronized photoautotrophic cultures of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reveal, however, that the cellular volume and starch content are only weakly correlated. Likewise, other cell parameters, e.g., the chlorophyll content per cell, are only weakly correlated with cell size. We derive the cell size distributions at the beginning of each synchronization cycle considering growth, timing of cell division and daughter cell release, and the uneven division of cell volume. Furthermore, we investigate the link between cell volume growth and starch accumulation. This work presents evidence that, under the experimental conditions of light-dark synchronized cultures, the weak correlation between both cell features is a result of a cumulative process rather than due to asymmetric partition of biomolecules during cell division. This cumulative process necessarily limits cellular similarities within a synchronized cell population.

  3. High-fat feeding alters the clock synchronization to light.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Jorge; Pévet, Paul; Challet, Etienne

    2008-12-15

    High-fat feeding in rodents leads to metabolic abnormalities mimicking the human metabolic syndrome, including obesity and insulin resistance. These metabolic diseases are associated with altered temporal organization of many physiological functions. The master circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei controls most physiological functions and metabolic processes. Furthermore, under certain conditions of feeding (hypocaloric diet), metabolic cues are capable of altering the suprachiasmatic clock's responses to light. To determine whether high-fat feeding (hypercaloric diet) can also affect resetting properties of the suprachiasmatic clock, we investigated photic synchronization in mice fed a high-fat or chow (low-fat) diet for 3 months, using wheel-running activity and body temperature rhythms as daily phase markers (i.e. suprachiasmatic clock's hands). Compared with the control diet, mice fed with the high-fat diet exhibited increased body mass index, hyperleptinaemia, higher blood glucose, and increased insulinaemia. Concomitantly, high-fat feeding led to impaired adjustment to local time by photic resetting. At the behavioural and physiological levels, these alterations include slower rate of re-entrainment of behavioural and body temperature rhythms after 'jet-lag' test (6 h advanced light-dark cycle) and reduced phase-advancing responses to light. At a molecular level, light-induced phase shifts have been correlated, within suprachiasmatic cells, with a high induction of c-FOS, the protein product of immediate early gene c-fos, and phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases I/II (P-ERK). In mice fed a high-fat diet, photic induction of both c-FOS and P-ERK in the suprachiasmatic nuclei was markedly reduced. Taken together, the present data demonstrate that high-fat feeding modifies circadian synchronization to light.

  4. An integrated system for synchronous culture of animal cells under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Pérez, Elena; Hernández, Vanessa; Palomares, Laura A; Serrato, José A

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle has fundamental effects on cell cultures and their products. Tools to synchronize cultured cells allow the study of cellular physiology and metabolism at particular cell cycle phases. However, cells are most often arrested by methods that alter their homeostasis and are then cultivated in poorly controlled environments. Cell behavior could then be affected by the synchronization method and culture conditions used, and not just by the particular cell cycle phase under study. Moreover, only a few viable cells are recovered. Here, we designed an integrated system where a large number of cells from a controlled bioreactor culture is separated by centrifugal elutriation at high viabilities. In contrast to current elutriation methods, cells are injected directly from a bioreactor into an injection loop, allowing the introduction of a large number of cells into the separation chamber without stressful centrifugation. A low pulsation peristaltic pump increases the stability of the elutriation chamber. Using this approach, a large number of healthy cells at each cell cycle phase were obtained, allowing their direct inoculation into fully instrumented bioreactors. Hybridoma cells synchronized and cultured in this system behaved as expected for a synchronous culture.

  5. Microfluidic Device for Automated Synchronization of Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Madren, Seth M.; Hoffman, Michelle D.; Brown, Pamela J.B.; Kysela, David T.; Brun, Yves V.; Jacobson, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    We report the development of an automated microfluidic “baby machine” to synchronize the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus on-chip and to move the synchronized populations downstream for analysis. The microfluidic device is fabricated from three-layers of poly(dimethylsiloxane) and has integrated pumps and valves to control the movement of cells and media. This synchronization method decreases incubation time and media consumption and improves synchrony quality compared to the conventional plate-release technique. Synchronized populations are collected from the device at intervals as short as 10 min and at any time over four days. Flow cytometry and fluorescence cell tracking are used to determine synchrony quality, and cell populations synchronized in M2G and PYE media contain >70% and >80% swarmer cells, respectively. Our on-chip method overcomes limitations with conventional physical separation methods that consume large volumes of media, require manual manipulations, have lengthy incubation times, are limited to one collection, and lack precise temporal control of collection times. PMID:23030473

  6. Modeling cell-cycle synchronization during embryogenesis in Xenopus laevis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIsaac, R. Scott; Huang, K. C.; Sengupta, Anirvan; Wingreen, Ned

    2010-03-01

    A widely conserved aspect of embryogenesis is the ability to synchronize nuclear divisions post-fertilization. How is synchronization achieved? Given a typical protein diffusion constant of 10 μm^2sec, and an embryo length of 1mm, it would take diffusion many hours to propagate a signal across the embryo. Therefore, synchrony cannot be attained by diffusion alone. We hypothesize that known autocatalytic reactions of cell-cycle components make the embryo an ``active medium'' in which waves propagate much faster than diffusion, enforcing synchrony. We report on robust spatial synchronization of components of the core cell cycle circuit based on a mathematical model previously determined by in vitro experiments. In vivo, synchronized divisions are preceded by a rapid calcium wave that sweeps across the embryo. Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that increases in transient calcium levels lead to derepression of a negative feedback loop, allowing cell divisions to start. Preliminary results indicate a novel relationship between the speed of the initial calcium wave and the ability to achieve synchronous cell divisions.

  7. Large scale spontaneous synchronization of cell cycles in amoebae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segota, Igor; Boulet, Laurent; Franck, Carl

    2014-03-01

    Unicellular eukaryotic amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum are generally believed to grow in their vegetative state as single cells until starvation, when their collective aspect emerges and they differentiate to form a multicellular slime mold. While major efforts continue to be aimed at their starvation-induced social aspect, our understanding of population dynamics and cell cycle in the vegetative growth phase has remained incomplete. We show that substrate-growtn cell populations spontaneously synchronize their cell cycles within several hours. These collective population-wide cell cycle oscillations span millimeter length scales and can be completely suppressed by washing away putative cell-secreted signals, implying signaling by means of a diffusible growth factor or mitogen. These observations give strong evidence for collective proliferation behavior in the vegetative state and provide opportunities for synchronization theories beyond classic Kuramoto models.

  8. Synchronizing Photography For High-Speed-Engine Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, K. S.

    1989-01-01

    Light flashes when shaft reaches predetermined angle. Synchronization system facilitates visualization of flow in high-speed internal-combustion engines. Designed for cinematography and holographic interferometry, system synchronizes camera and light source with predetermined rotational angle of engine shaft. 10-bit resolution of absolute optical shaft encoder adapted, and 2 to tenth power combinations of 10-bit binary data computed to corresponding angle values. Pre-computed angle values programmed into EPROM's (erasable programmable read-only memories) to use as angle lookup table. Resolves shaft angle to within 0.35 degree at rotational speeds up to 73,240 revolutions per minute.

  9. Synchronous Occurrence of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Gray, Brian Allen; May, William Stratford

    2017-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) are hematologic malignancies that originate from different oligopotent progenitor stem cells, namely, common myeloid and lymphoid progenitor cells, respectively. Although blastic transformation of CML can occur in the lymphoid lineage and CML has been related to non-Hodgkin lymphoma on transformation, to our knowledge, de novo and synchronous occurrence of CML and MCL has not been reported. Herein, we report the first case of synchronous CML and MCL in an otherwise healthy 38-year-old man. Potential etiologies and pathological relationships between the two malignancies are explored, including the possibility that the downstream effects of BCR-ABL may link it to an overexpression of cyclin D1, which is inherent to the etiology of MCL. PMID:28270940

  10. Live-cell monitoring of periodic gene expression in synchronous human cells identifies Forkhead genes involved in cell cycle control.

    PubMed

    Grant, Gavin D; Gamsby, Joshua; Martyanov, Viktor; Brooks, Lionel; George, Lacy K; Mahoney, J Matthew; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C; Whitfield, Michael L

    2012-08-01

    We developed a system to monitor periodic luciferase activity from cell cycle-regulated promoters in synchronous cells. Reporters were driven by a minimal human E2F1 promoter with peak expression in G1/S or a basal promoter with six Forkhead DNA-binding sites with peak expression at G2/M. After cell cycle synchronization, luciferase activity was measured in live cells at 10-min intervals across three to four synchronous cell cycles, allowing unprecedented resolution of cell cycle-regulated gene expression. We used this assay to screen Forkhead transcription factors for control of periodic gene expression. We confirmed a role for FOXM1 and identified two novel cell cycle regulators, FOXJ3 and FOXK1. Knockdown of FOXJ3 and FOXK1 eliminated cell cycle-dependent oscillations and resulted in decreased cell proliferation rates. Analysis of genes regulated by FOXJ3 and FOXK1 showed that FOXJ3 may regulate a network of zinc finger proteins and that FOXK1 binds to the promoter and regulates DHFR, TYMS, GSDMD, and the E2F binding partner TFDP1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing analysis identified 4329 genomic loci bound by FOXK1, 83% of which contained a FOXK1-binding motif. We verified that a subset of these loci are activated by wild-type FOXK1 but not by a FOXK1 (H355A) DNA-binding mutant.

  11. Synchronization of Spontaneous Active Motility of Hair Cell Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tracy-Ying; Ji, Seung; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear exhibit an active process, believed to be crucial for achieving the sensitivity of auditory and vestibular detection. One of the manifestations of the active process is the occurrence of spontaneous hair bundle oscillations in vitro. Hair bundles are coupled by overlying membranes in vivo; hence, explaining the potential role of innate bundle motility in the generation of otoacoustic emissions requires an understanding of the effects of coupling on the active bundle dynamics. We used microbeads to connect small groups of hair cell bundles, using in vitro preparations that maintain their innate oscillations. Our experiments demonstrate robust synchronization of spontaneous oscillations, with either 1:1 or multi-mode phase-locking. The frequency of synchronized oscillation was found to be near the mean of the innate frequencies of individual bundles. Coupling also led to an improved regularity of entrained oscillations, demonstrated by an increase in the quality factor. PMID:26540409

  12. Synchronization of chromosome dynamics and cell division in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Thanbichler, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial cells have evolved a variety of regulatory circuits that tightly synchronize their chromosome replication and cell division cycles, thereby ensuring faithful transmission of genetic information to their offspring. Complex multicomponent signaling cascades are used to monitor the progress of cytokinesis and couple replication initiation to the separation of the two daughter cells. Moreover, the cell-division apparatus actively participates in chromosome partitioning and, particularly, in the resolution of topological problems that impede the segregation process, thus coordinating chromosome dynamics with cell constriction. Finally, bacteria have developed mechanisms that harness the cell-cycle-dependent positioning of individual chromosomal loci or the nucleoid to define the cell-division site and control the timing of divisome assembly. Each of these systems manages to integrate a complex set of spatial and temporal cues to regulate and execute critical steps in the bacterial cell cycle.

  13. Robust synchronization of coupled circadian and cell cycle oscillators in single mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Bieler, Jonathan; Cannavo, Rosamaria; Gustafson, Kyle; Gobet, Cedric; Gatfield, David; Naef, Felix

    2014-07-15

    Circadian cycles and cell cycles are two fundamental periodic processes with a period in the range of 1 day. Consequently, coupling between such cycles can lead to synchronization. Here, we estimated the mutual interactions between the two oscillators by time-lapse imaging of single mammalian NIH3T3 fibroblasts during several days. The analysis of thousands of circadian cycles in dividing cells clearly indicated that both oscillators tick in a 1:1 mode-locked state, with cell divisions occurring tightly 5 h before the peak in circadian Rev-Erbα-YFP reporter expression. In principle, such synchrony may be caused by either unidirectional or bidirectional coupling. While gating of cell division by the circadian cycle has been most studied, our data combined with stochastic modeling unambiguously show that the reverse coupling is predominant in NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, temperature, genetic, and pharmacological perturbations showed that the two interacting cellular oscillators adopt a synchronized state that is highly robust over a wide range of parameters. These findings have implications for circadian function in proliferative tissues, including epidermis, immune cells, and cancer.

  14. Cell cycle synchronization of canine ear fibroblasts for somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ok Jae; Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Hong, So Gun; Martinez-Conejero, Jose A; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2009-02-01

    Cycle synchronization of donor cells in the G0/G1 stage is a crucial step for successful somatic cell nuclear transfer. In the present report, we evaluated the effects of contact inhibition, serum starvation and the reagents - dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), roscovitine and cycloheximide (CHX) - on synchronization of canine fibroblasts at the G0/G1 stage. Ear fibroblast cells were collected from a beagle dog, placed into culture and used for analysis at passages three to eight. The population doubling time was 36.5 h. The proportion of G0/G1 cells was significantly increased by contact inhibition (77.1%) as compared with cycling cells (70.1%); however, extending the duration of culture did not induce further synchronization. After 24 h of serum starvation, cells were effectively synchronized at G0/G1 (77.1%). Although synchronization was further increased gradually after 24 h and even showed significant difference after 72 h (82.8%) of starvation, the proportion of dead cells also significantly increased after 24 h. The percentage of cells at the G0/G1 phase was increased (as compared with controls) after 72 h treatment with DMSO (76.1%) and after 48 h treatment with CHX (73.0%) or roscovitine (72.5%). However, the rate of cell death was increased after 24 and 72 h of treatment with DMSO and CHX, respectively. Thus, we recommend the use of roscovitine for cell cycle synchronization of canine ear fibroblasts as a preparatory step for SCNT.

  15. Cycle life characteristics of sealed silver-zinc cell with inorganic separator. [for synchronous orbit applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, J. W.; Imamura, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    Two batteries containing 18 cells have been cycling in a simulated synchronous (24-hour) orbit for over a year at 40% depth of discharge at 22 C. One battery is under individual cell monitoring and control and the other battery is controlled at the battery level. The battery with individual cell monitoring and protection has performed over 350 cycles with no sign of failure. The battery without individual cell protection failed at 270 cycles from failure to remain above the specified minimum discharge voltage. A significant conclusion is that the sealed Ag-Zn cells manufactured with the inorganic separator material have demonstrated their capability to cycle at a fairly high depth of discharge and are worthy of consideration in short life synchronous orbit applications.

  16. Stochastic synchronization analysis of cultured human glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balazsi, Gabor; Cornell-Bell, Ann; Simonotto, Enrico; Neiman, Alexander; Moss, Frank

    2000-03-01

    The production of calcium waves is a property of a healthy astrocyte culture when exposed to the neurotransmitter kainate [Jung et al, J. Neurophys, 79, 1098 (1998)]. Healthy and epileptic tissues differ to a great extent in their dynamics: while a healthy cell culture shows much pattern formation, and wave propagation, the epileptic tissue shows spatially irregular flickering activity or global oscillation. Developing statistical tools to describe healthy versus epileptic tissue dynamics could be very important in order to study the effects of specific drugs, or to identify oscillation centers in the epileptic brain. We perform a statistical analysis in terms of phase synchronization. We show that hyper active epileptic astrocyte cultures are characterized by synchronization between different regions of the network taken from the uncus part of the brain.

  17. Chaotic Synchronization between Coupled Pancreatic β-Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lading, B.; Mosekilde, E.; Yanchuk, S.; Maistrenko, Y.

    The paper first describes the main bifurcation structure for a typical model of an insulin producing pancreatic β-cell. Considering a system of two coupled identical and chaotically spiking β-cells, the paper continues to examine the bifurcations through which low periodic orbits embedded in the synchronized chaotic state lose their transverse stability and produce the characteristic picture of locally and globally riddled basins of attraction. We discuss the different types of riddled basins with the associated phenomena of attractor bubbling and on-off intermittency.

  18. High-power synchronously pumped femtosecond Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Churin, D; Olson, J; Norwood, R A; Peyghambarian, N; Kieu, K

    2015-06-01

    We report a high-power synchronously pumped femtosecond Raman fiber laser operating in the normal dispersion regime. The Raman laser is pumped by a picosecond Yb(3+)-doped fiber laser. It produces highly chirped pulses with energy up to 18 nJ, average power of 0.76 W and 88% efficiency. The pulse duration is measured to be 147 fs after external compression. We observed two different regimes of operation of the laser: coherent and noise-like regime. Both regimes were experimentally characterized. Numerical simulations are in a good agreement with experimental results.

  19. Synchronized Firing among Retinal Ganglion Cells Signals Motion Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Greg; Taylor, Sam; Fisher, Clark; Harris, Rob; Berry, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY We show that when a moving object suddenly reverses direction, there is a brief, synchronous burst of firing within a population of retinal ganglion cells. This burst can be driven by either the leading or trailing edge of the object. The latency is constant for movement at different speeds, objects of different size, and bright versus dark contrasts. The same ganglion cells that signal a motion reversal also respond to smooth motion. We show that the brain can build a pure reversal detector using only a linear filter that reads out synchrony from a group of ganglion cells. These results indicate that not only can the retina anticipate the location of a smoothly moving object, but that it can also signal violations in its own prediction. We show that the reversal response cannot be explained by models of the classical receptive field and suggest that nonlinear receptive field subunits may be responsible. PMID:17880898

  20. High-quality frame-synchronization for satellite video signal transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Shuji; Morikura, Masahiro; Kato, Shuzo

    1995-01-01

    A high-quality frame-synchronizer for video signal switching and freezing is proposed. In order to realize high-quality frame-synchronization, a novel high-speed and high-definition 11 bit analog-to-digital (A/D) converter which achieves the quite high unweighted S/N ratio performance of 63 dB is developed. It provides synchronized video signal switching by field freezing for high-quality video signal transmission.

  1. Illumination-based synchronization of high-speed vision sensors.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lei; Kagami, Shingo; Hashimoto, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    To acquire images of dynamic scenes from multiple points of view simultaneously, the acquisition time of vision sensors should be synchronized. This paper describes an illumination-based synchronization method derived from the phase-locked loop (PLL) algorithm. Incident light to a vision sensor from an intensity-modulated illumination source serves as the reference signal for synchronization. Analog and digital computation within the vision sensor forms a PLL to regulate the output signal, which corresponds to the vision frame timing, to be synchronized with the reference. Simulated and experimental results show that a 1,000 Hz frame rate vision sensor was successfully synchronized with 32 μs jitters.

  2. Cell cycle synchronization of skin fibroblast cells in four species of family Felidae.

    PubMed

    Wittayarat, M; Thongphakdee, A; Saikhun, K; Chatdarong, K; Otoi, T; Techakumphu, M

    2013-04-01

    This study was examined whether the species of felid affects synchronization accuracy at the G0/G1 stage of the cell cycle and the occurrence of apoptosis by different protocols, such as serum starvation, confluent and roscovitine treatment. Skin fibroblast cells were obtained from the Asian golden cat, marbled cat, leopard and Siamese cat. The cells from each animal were treated with either serum starvation for 1-5 days, cell confluency-contact inhibition for 5 days or roscovitine at various concentrations (7.5-30 μm). Flow cytometric analysis revealed that serum starvation for 3 days provided the highest cell population arrested at the G0/G1 stage, irrespective of the felid species. In all species, 100% confluency gave a significantly higher percentage of cells arrested at the G0/G1 stage compared with the non-treated control cells. The effects of roscovitine treatment and the appropriate concentration on the rates of G0/G1 cells differed among the felid species. Serum starvation for more than 4 days in the marbled cat and Siamese cat and roscovitine treatment with 30 μm in the Asian golden cat and leopard increased the rates of apoptosis. In conclusion, different felid species responded to different methods of cell cycle synchronization. Asian golden cat and Siamese cat fibroblast cells were successfully synchronized to G0/G1 stage using the serum starvation and roscovitine treatment, whereas only confluency-contact inhibition treatment induced cell synchronization in the leopard. Moreover, these three methods did not successfully induce cell synchronization of the marbled cat. These findings may be valuable for preparing their donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer in the future.

  3. Translational Profiling of Clock Cells Reveals Circadianly Synchronized Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanmei; Ainsley, Joshua A.; Reijmers, Leon G.; Jackson, F. Rob

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Genome-wide studies of circadian transcription or mRNA translation have been hindered by the presence of heterogeneous cell populations in complex tissues such as the nervous system. We describe here the use of a Drosophila cell-specific translational profiling approach to document the rhythmic “translatome” of neural clock cells for the first time in any organism. Unexpectedly, translation of most clock-regulated transcripts—as assayed by mRNA ribosome association—occurs at one of two predominant circadian phases, midday or mid-night, times of behavioral quiescence; mRNAs encoding similar cellular functions are translated at the same time of day. Our analysis also indicates that fundamental cellular processes—metabolism, energy production, redox state (e.g., the thioredoxin system), cell growth, signaling and others—are rhythmically modulated within clock cells via synchronized protein synthesis. Our approach is validated by the identification of mRNAs known to exhibit circadian changes in abundance and the discovery of hundreds of novel mRNAs that show translational rhythms. This includes Tdc2, encoding a neurotransmitter synthetic enzyme, which we demonstrate is required within clock neurons for normal circadian locomotor activity. PMID:24348200

  4. Results of continuous synchronous orbit testing of sealed nickel-cadmium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Test results from continuous synchronous orbit testing of sealed nickel cadmium cells are presented. The synchronous orbit regime simulates a space satellite maintaining a position over a fixed point on earth as the earth rotates on its axis and revolves about the sun. Characteristics of each lot of cells, test conditions, and charge control methods are described.

  5. Synchronous Renal Neoplasm: Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma and Papillary Urothelial Carcinoma in the Same Kidney.

    PubMed

    Benavides-Huerto, Miguel Armando; Chávez-Valencia, Venice; Lagunas-Rangel, Francisco Alejandro

    2017-02-01

    Abdominal computed tomography in a 64 year-old male presenting hematuria showed two malignant tumors in the left kidney, thus radical nephrectomy was realized. In histological preparations a clear cell renal cell carcinoma and a papillary urothelial carcinoma were identified occurring synchronously, which is a rare occurrence having only about 50 cases reported in the literature.

  6. Synchronization phenomena in mixed media of passive, excitable, and oscillatory cells.

    PubMed

    Kryukov, A K; Petrov, V S; Averyanova, L S; Osipov, G V; Chen, W; Drugova, O; Chan, C K

    2008-09-01

    We study collective phenomena in highly heterogeneous cardiac cell culture and its models. A cardiac culture is a mixture of passive (fibroblasts), oscillatory (pacemakers), and excitable (myocytes) cells. There is also heterogeneity within each type of cell as well. Results of in vitro experiments are modelled by Luo-Rudy and FitzHugh-Nagumo systems. For oscillatory and excitable media, we focus on the transitions from fully incoherent behavior to partially coherent behavior and then to global synchronization as the coupling strength is increased. These regimes are characterized qualitatively by spatiotemporal diagrams and quantitatively by profiles of dependence of individual frequencies on coupling. We find that synchronization clusters are determined by concentric and spiral waves. These waves arising due to the heterogeneity of medium push covered cells to oscillate in synchrony. We are also interested in the influence of passive and excitable elements on the oscillatory characteristics of low- and high-dimensional ensembles of cardiac cells. The mixture of initially silent excitable and passive cells shows the transitions to oscillatory behavior. In the media of oscillatory and passive or excitable cells, the effect of oscillation death is observed.

  7. Simulation Environment Synchronizing Real Equipment for Manufacturing Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inukai, Toshihiro; Hibino, Hironori; Fukuda, Yoshiro

    Recently, manufacturing industries face various problems such as shorter product life cycle, more diversified customer needs. In this situation, it is very important to reduce lead-time of manufacturing system constructions. At the manufacturing system implementation stage, it is important to make and evaluate facility control programs for a manufacturing cell, such as ladder programs for programmable logical controllers (PLCs) rapidly. However, before the manufacturing systems are implemented, methods to evaluate the facility control programs for the equipment while mixing and synchronizing real equipment and virtual factory models on the computers have not been developed. This difficulty is caused by the complexity of the manufacturing system composed of a great variety of equipment, and stopped precise and rapid support of a manufacturing engineering process. In this paper, a manufacturing engineering environment (MEE) to support manufacturing engineering processes using simulation technologies is proposed. MEE consists of a manufacturing cell simulation environment (MCSE) and a distributed simulation environment (DSE). MCSE, which consists of a manufacturing cell simulator and a soft-wiring system, is emphatically proposed in detail. MCSE realizes making and evaluating facility control programs by using virtual factory models on computers before manufacturing systems are implemented.

  8. Cell cycle synchronization reveals greater G2/M-phase accumulation of lung epithelial cells exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Medina-Reyes, Estefany I; Bucio-López, Laura; Freyre-Fonseca, Verónica; Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia; García-Cuéllar, Claudia M; Morales-Bárcenas, Rocío; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Chirino, Yolanda I

    2015-03-01

    Titanium dioxide has been classified in the 2B group as a possible human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and amid concerns of its exposure, cell cycle alterations are an important one. However, several studies show inconclusive effects, mainly because it is difficult to compare cell cycle effects caused by TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) exposure between different shapes and sizes of NP, cell culture types, and time of exposure. In addition, cell cycle is frequently analyzed without cell cycle synchronization, which may also mask some effects. We hypothesized that synchronization after TiO2 NP exposure could reveal dissimilar cell cycle progression when compared with unsynchronized cell population. To test our hypothesis, we exposed lung epithelial cells to 1 and 10 μg/cm(2) TiO2 NPs for 7 days and one population was synchronized by serum starvation and inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase using hydroxyurea. Another cell population was exposed to TiO2 NPs under the same experimental conditions, but after treatments, cell cycle was analyzed without synchronization. Our results showed that TiO2 NP-exposed cells without synchronization had no changes in cell cycle distribution; however, cell population synchronized after 1 and 10 μg/cm(2) TiO2 NP treatment showed a 1.5-fold and 1.66-fold increase, respectively, in proliferation. Synchronized cells also reveal a faster capability of TiO2 NP-exposed cells to increase cell population in the G2/M phase in the following 9 h after synchronization. We conclude that synchronization discloses a greater percentage of cells in the G2/M phase and higher proliferation than TiO2 NP-synchronized cells.

  9. CELL CYCLE SYNCHRONIZATION OF MOUSE LIVER EPITHELIAL CELLS BY ELUTRIATION CENTRIFUGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlman, Andrew L.; Bartholomew, James C.

    1980-06-01

    Detailed methods are described for the sorting and cell cycle synchronization by means of centrifugal elutriation of an established mouse liver epithelial cell line(NMuLi). In a comparison between three different elutriation media and between two different temperatures(4° and 20° C), the NMuLi cells were found to be most reproducibly sorted in the cell cycle when run in growth medium in the absence of serum and at the lower temperature. Under these conditions. and using decrements of rotor speed calculated from an empirically derived algorithm as described in the text an initially asynchronous population (38% G{sub 1}, 36% S, and 28% G{sub 2}M) was sorted into fractions enriched to 60% G{sub 1}, 75% S, and 50% G{sub 2}M. Of the cells loaded into the rotor, 30% were lost in the elutriation process, and about 20% recovered as aggregates. The remainder appeared in the various synchronized fractions. Epithelial cells sorted in this manner demonstrated no loss of viability, and upon replating showed significant movement in the cell cycle by 6 hrs post elutriation. The degree of synchronous movement through the cell cycle achieved by elutriation depended on the part of the cell cycle from which the original elutriated fraction came. Cells collected as late S and G{sub 2}M moved through the cell cycle with the tightest sychrony.

  10. Serum starvation and thymidine double blocking achieved efficient cell cycle synchronization and altered the expression of p27, p53, bcl-2 in canine breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jinjin; Sun, Dongdong; Yang, Chao; Wang, Yingxue; Sun, Sichao; Li, Qing; Bao, Jun; Liu, Yun

    2016-04-01

    Cell synchronization is an approach to obtain cell populations of the same stage, which is a prerequisite to studying the regulation of cell cycle progression in vivo. Serum starvation and thymidine double blocking (TdR) are two important practices in studying cell cycle synchronization. However, their effects on canine cancer cells as well as the regulatory mechanisms by these two methods are poorly understood. In this study, we determined the optimum conditions of serum starvation and TdR and their effects on cell cycle synchronization. We further explored the involvement of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in the cell cycle synchronization by investigating the expression of three key genes (p27, p53 and bcl-2). Serum starvation resulted in a reversible cell cycle arrest and synchronously progress through G0/G1. The highest percentage of CHMm cells (87.47%) in G0/G1 stage was obtained after 42 h incubation with 0.5% fetal bovine serum (FBS). TdR double blocking could arrest 98.9% of CHMm cells in G1/S phase (0 h of release), and could arrest 93.74% of CHMm cells in S phase after 4h of release. We also found that the p27, p53, bcl-2 genes were most highly expressed in G0/G1 phase. Our current work revealed that serum starvation and TdR methods could achieve sufficient synchronization of CHMm cells. Moreover, the expression of p27, p53 and bcl-2 genes was related to cyclical movements and apoptosis. Our results will provide a new insight into cell cycle regulation and reprogramming of canine cancer cells induced by serum starvation and TdR blocking.

  11. Fast-synchronizing high-fidelity spread-spectrum receiver

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Michael Roy; Smith, Stephen Fulton; Emery, Michael Steven

    2004-06-01

    A fast-synchronizing receiver having a circuit including an equalizer configured for manipulating an analog signal; a detector in communication with the equalizer; a filter in communication with the detector; an oscillator in communication with the filter; a gate for receiving the manipulated signal; a circuit portion for synchronizing and tracking the manipulated signal; a summing circuit in communication with the circuit portion; and an output gate.

  12. Chrna2-Martinotti Cells Synchronize Layer 5 Type A Pyramidal Cells via Rebound Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Richardson N.; Edwards, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    Martinotti cells are the most prominent distal dendrite–targeting interneurons in the cortex, but their role in controlling pyramidal cell (PC) activity is largely unknown. Here, we show that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α2 subunit (Chrna2) specifically marks layer 5 (L5) Martinotti cells projecting to layer 1. Furthermore, we confirm that Chrna2-expressing Martinotti cells selectively target L5 thick-tufted type A PCs but not thin-tufted type B PCs. Using optogenetic activation and inhibition, we demonstrate how Chrna2-Martinotti cells robustly reset and synchronize type A PCs via slow rhythmic burst activity and rebound excitation. Moreover, using optical feedback inhibition, in which PC spikes controlled the firing of surrounding Chrna2-Martinotti cells, we found that neighboring PC spike trains became synchronized by Martinotti cell inhibition. Together, our results show that L5 Martinotti cells participate in defined cortical circuits and can synchronize PCs in a frequency-dependent manner. These findings suggest that Martinotti cells are pivotal for coordinated PC activity, which is involved in cortical information processing and cognitive control. PMID:28182735

  13. Microbial fuel cell energy harvesting using synchronous flyback converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaraj, Muhannad; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Park, Jae-Do

    2014-02-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) use biodegradable substrates, such as wastewater and marine sediments to generate electrical energy. To harvest more energy from an MFC, power electronic converters have recently been used to replace resistors or charge pumps, because they have superior controllability on MFC's operating point and higher efficiency in energy storage for different applications. Conventional diode-based energy harvesters suffer from low efficiency because of the energy losses through the diode. Replacing the diode with a MOSFET can reduce the conduction loss, but it requires an isolated gate signal to control the floating secondary MOSFET, which makes the control circuitry complex. This study presents a new MFC energy harvesting regime using a synchronous flyback converter, which implements a transformer-based harvester with much simpler configuration and improves harvesting efficiency by 37.6% compared to a diode based boost converter, from 33.5% to 46.1%. The proposed harvester was able to store 2.27 J in the output capacitor out of 4.91 J generated energy from the MFC, while the boost converter can capture 1.67 J from 4.95 J.

  14. Methods of Synchronization of Yeast Cells for the Analysis of Cell Cycle Progression.

    PubMed

    Juanes, M Angeles

    2017-01-01

    Cell division is a fascinating and fundamental process that sustains life. By this process, unicellular organisms reproduce and multicellular organisms sustain development, growth, and tissue repair. Division of a mother cell gives rise to two daughter cells according to an ordered set of events within four successive phases called G1 (gap1), S (DNA Synthesis), G2 (gap2), and M (Mitosis) phase. How these different phases are orchestrated to ensure the physical separation of the two daughter cells is a tightly regulated process. Indeed, inappropriate cell division could lead to uncontrolled cell proliferation and ultimately to cancer. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model system for unraveling the secrets of cell division. A large community of researchers has chosen budding yeast as a model because of its advantages: rapid growth in simple and economical media, tractable genetics, powerful biochemistry, cell biology, and proteomics approaches. Furthermore, the cell cycle mechanisms, as elucidated in yeast, are conserved in higher eukaryotes. The ability to synchronize and get large numbers of cells in a particular stage of the cell cycle is crucial to properly explore the mechanisms of the cell cycle. An overview of the most common yeast synchronization techniques has been compiled in this chapter.

  15. Synchronization of mitochondrial DNA synthesis in Chinese hamster cells (line CHO) deprived of isoleucine.

    PubMed

    Ley, K D; Murphy, M M

    1973-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mit-DNA) synthesis was compared in suspension cultures of Chinese hamster cells (line CHO) whose cell cycle events had been synchronized by isoleucine deprivation or mitotic selection. At hourly intervals during cell cycle progression, synchronized cells were exposed to tritiated thymidine ([(3)H]TdR), homogenized, and nuclei and mitochondria isolated by differential centrifugation. Mit-DNA and nuclear DNA were isolated and incorporation of radioisotope measured as counts per minute ([(3)H]TdR) per microgram DNA. Mit-DNA synthesis in cells synchronized by mitotic selection began after 4 h and continued for approximately 9 h. This time-course pattern resembled that of nuclear DNA synthesis. In contrast, mit-DNA synthesis in cells synchronized by isoleucine deprivation did not begin until 9-12 h after addition of isoleucine and virtually all [(3)H]TdR was incorporated during a 3-h interval. We have concluded from these results that mit-DNA synthesis is inhibited in CHO cells which are arrested in G(1) because of isoleucine deprivation and that addition of isoleucine stimulates synchronous synthesis of mit-DNA. We believe this method of synchronizing mit-DNA synthesis may be of value in studies of factors which regulate synthesis of mit-DNA.

  16. Electrical coupling between Aplysia bag cell neurons: characterization and role in synchronous firing.

    PubMed

    Dargaei, Zahra; Colmers, Phillip L W; Hodgson, Heather M; Magoski, Neil S

    2014-12-01

    In neuroendocrine cells, hormone release often requires a collective burst of action potentials synchronized by gap junctions. This is the case for the electrically coupled bag cell neurons in the reproductive system of the marine snail, Aplysia californica. These neuroendocrine cells are found in two clusters, and fire a synchronous burst, called the afterdischarge, resulting in neuropeptide secretion and the triggering of ovulation. However, the physiology and pharmacology of the bag cell neuron electrical synapse are not completely understood. As such, we made dual whole cell recordings from pairs of electrically coupled cultured bag cell neurons. The junctional current was nonrectifying and not influenced by postsynaptic voltage. Furthermore, junctional conductance was voltage independent and, not surprisingly, strongly correlated with coupling coefficient magnitude. The electrical synapse also acted as a low-pass filter, although under certain conditions, electrotonic potentials evoked by presynaptic action potentials could drive postsynaptic spikes. If coupled neurons were stimulated to spike simultaneously, they presented a high degree of action potential synchrony compared with not-coupled neurons. The electrical synapse failed to pass various intracellular dyes, but was permeable to Cs(+), and could be inhibited by niflumic acid, meclofenamic acid, or 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid. Finally, extracellular and sharp-electrode recording from the intact bag cell neuron cluster showed that these pharmacological uncouplers disrupted both electrical coupling and afterdischarge generation in situ. Thus electrical synapses promote bag cell neuron firing synchrony and may allow for electrotonic spread of the burst through the network, ultimately contributing to propagation of the species.

  17. Synchronization of cells with activator-inhibitor pathways through adaptive environment-mediated coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghomsi, P. Guemkam; Moukam Kakmeni, F. M.; Tchawoua, C.; Kofane, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we report the synchronized dynamics of cells with activator-inhibitor pathways via an adaptive environment-mediated coupling scheme with feedbacks and control mechanisms. The adaptive character of the extracellular medium is modeled via its damping parameter as a physiological response aiming at annihilating the cellular differentiation existing between the chaotic biochemical pathways of the cells, in order to preserve homeostasis. We perform an investigation on the existence and stability of the synchronization manifold of the coupled system under the proposed coupling pattern. Both mathematical and computational tools suggest the accessibility of conducive prerequisites (conditions) for the emergence of a robust synchronous regime. The relevance of a phase-synchronized dynamics is appraised and several numerical indicators advocate for the prevalence of this fascinating phenomenon among the interacting cells in the phase space.

  18. High precision long-term stable fiber-based optical synchronization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yurong; Wang, Xiaochao; Jiang, Youen; Qiao, Zhi; Li, Rao; Fan, Wei

    2016-10-01

    A fiber-based high precision long-term stable time synchronization system for multi-channel laser pulses is presented using fiber pulse stacker combined with high-speed optical-electrical conversion and electronics processing technology. This scheme is used to synchronize two individual lasers including a mode-lock laser and a time shaping pulse laser system. The relative timing jitter between two laser pulses achieved with this system is 970 fs (rms) in five minutes and 3.5 ps (rms) in five hours. The synchronization system is low cost and can work at over several tens of MHz repetition rate.

  19. Laser synchronized high-speed shutter for spectroscopic application

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Paul C.; Porter, Eldon L.; Prast, Thomas L.; Sunnarborg, Duane A.

    2002-01-01

    A fast mechanical shutter, based on rotating chopper wheels, has been designed and implemented to shutter the entrance slit of a spectrograph. This device enables an exposure time of 9 .mu.s to be achieved for a 0.8 mm wide spectrograph entrance slit, achieves 100% transmission in the open state, and an essentially infinite extinction ratio. The device further incorporates chopper wheel position sensing electronics to permit the synchronous triggering of a laser source.

  20. High performance frame synchronization for continuous variable quantum key distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dakai; Huang, Peng; Huang, Duan; Wang, Chao; Peng, Jinye; Zeng, Guihua

    2015-08-24

    Considering a practical continuous variable quantum key distribution(CVQKD) system, synchronization is of significant importance as it is hardly possible to extract secret keys from unsynchronized strings. In this paper, we proposed a high performance frame synchronization method for CVQKD systems which is capable to operate under low signal-to-noise(SNR) ratios and is compatible with random phase shift induced by quantum channel. A practical implementation of this method with low complexity is presented and its performance is analysed. By adjusting the length of synchronization frame, this method can work well with large range of SNR values which paves the way for longer distance CVQKD.

  1. Detection of silent cells, synchronization and modulatory activity in developing cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, Johannes J J; Dawitz, Julia; Kroon, Tim; Pires, Johny; Dassen, Valerie J; Berkhout, Janna A; Emperador Melero, Javier; Nadadhur, Aish G; Alevra, Mihai; Toonen, Ruud F; Heine, Vivi M; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Meredith, Rhiannon M

    2016-04-01

    Developing networks in the immature nervous system and in cellular cultures are characterized by waves of synchronous activity in restricted clusters of cells. Synchronized activity in immature networks is proposed to regulate many different developmental processes, from neuron growth and cell migration, to the refinement of synapses, topographic maps, and the mature composition of ion channels. These emergent activity patterns are not present in all cells simultaneously within the network and more immature "silent" cells, potentially correlated with the presence of silent synapses, are prominent in different networks during early developmental periods. Many current network analyses for detection of synchronous cellular activity utilize activity-based pixel correlations to identify cellular-based regions of interest (ROIs) and coincident cell activity. However, using activity-based correlations, these methods first underestimate or ignore the inactive silent cells within the developing network and second, are difficult to apply within cell-dense regions commonly found in developing brain networks. In addition, previous methods may ignore ROIs within a network that shows transient activity patterns comprising both inactive and active periods. We developed analysis software to semi-automatically detect cells within developing neuronal networks that were imaged using calcium-sensitive reporter dyes. Using an iterative threshold, modulation of activity was tracked within individual cells across the network. The distribution pattern of both inactive and active, including synchronous cells, could be determined based on distance measures to neighboring cells and according to different anatomical layers.

  2. Nuclear transfer of synchronized african wild cat somatic cells into enucleated domestic cat oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Martha C; Jenkins, Jill A; Giraldo, Angelica; Harris, Rebecca F; King, Amy; Dresser, Betsy L; Pope, Charles Earle

    2003-09-01

    The African wild cat is one of the smallest wild cats and its future is threatened by hybridization with domestic cats. Nuclear transfer, a valuable tool for retaining genetic variability, offers the possibility of species continuation rather than extinction. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of somatic cell nuclei of the African wild cat (AWC) to dedifferentiate within domestic cat (DSH) cytoplasts and to support early development after nuclear transplantation. In experiment 1, distributions of AWC and DSH fibroblasts in each cell-cycle phase were assessed by flow cytometry using cells cultured to confluency and disaggregated with pronase, trypsin, or mechanical separation. Trypsin (89.0%) and pronase (93.0%) yielded higher proportions of AWC nuclei in the G0/G1 phase than mechanical separation (82.0%). In contrast, mechanical separation yielded higher percentages of DSH nuclei in the G0/G1 phase (86.6%) than pronase (79.7%) or trypsin (74.2%) treatments. In both species, pronase induced less DNA damage than trypsin. In experiment 2, the effects of serum starvation, culture to confluency, and exposure to roscovitine on the distribution of AWC and DSH fibroblasts in various phases of the cell cycle were determined. Flow cytometry analyses revealed that the dynamics of the cell cycle varied as culture conditions were modified. Specifically, a higher percentage of AWC and DSH nuclei were in the G0/G1 phase after cells were serum starved (83% vs. 96%) than were present in cycling cells (50% vs. 64%), after contact inhibition (61% vs. 88%), or after roscovitine (56% vs. 84%) treatment, respectively. In experiment 3, we evaluated the effects of cell synchronization and oocyte maturation (in vivo vs. in vitro) on the reconstruction and development of AWC-DSH- and DSH-DSH-cloned embryos. The method of cell synchronization did not affect the fusion and cleavage rate because only a slightly higher percentage of fused couplets cleaved when donor nuclei

  3. Nuclear transfer of synchronized African wild cat somatic cells into enucleated domestic cat oocytes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomez, M.C.; Jenkins, J.A.; Giraldo, A.; Harris, R.F.; King, A.; Dresser, B.L.; Pope, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    The African wild cat is one of the smallest wild cats and its future is threatened by hybridization with domestic cats. Nuclear transfer, a valuable tool for retaining genetic variability, offers the possibility of species continuation rather than extinction. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of somatic cell nuclei of the African wild cat (AWC) to dedifferentiate within domestic cat (DSH) cytoplasts and to support early development after nuclear transplantation. In experiment 1, distributions of AWC and DSH fibroblasts in each cell-cycle phase were assessed by flow cytometry using cells cultured to confluency and disaggregated with pronase, trypsin, or mechanical separation. Trypsin (89.0%) and pronase (93.0%) yielded higher proportions of AWC nuclei in the G0/G1 phase than mechanical separation (82.0%). In contrast, mechanical separation yielded higher percentages of DSH nuclei in the G0/G1 phase (86.6%) than pronase (79.7%) or trypsin (74.2%) treatments. In both species, pronase induced less DNA damage than trypsin. In experiment 2, the effects of serum starvation, culture to confluency, and exposure to roscovitine on the distribution of AWC and DSH fibroblasts in various phases of the cell cycle were determined. Flow cytometry analyses revealed that the dynamics of the cell cycle varied as culture conditions were modified. Specifically, a higher percentage of AWC and DSH nuclei were in the G0/G1 phase after cells were serum starved (83% vs. 96%) than were present in cycling cells (50% vs. 64%), after contact inhibition (61% vs. 88%), or after roscovitine (56% vs. 84%) treatment, respectively. In experiment 3, we evaluated the effects of cell synchronization and oocyte maturation (in vivo vs. in vitro) on the reconstruction and development of AWC-DSH- and DSH-DSH-cloned embryos. The method of cell synchronization did not affect the fusion and cleavage rate because only a slightly higher percentage of fused couplets cleaved when donor nuclei

  4. Cell-Type and State-Dependent Synchronization among Rodent Somatosensory, Visual, Perirhinal Cortex, and Hippocampus CA1

    PubMed Central

    Vinck, Martin; Bos, Jeroen J.; Van Mourik-Donga, Laura A.; Oplaat, Krista T.; Klein, Gerbrand A.; Jackson, Jadin C.; Gentet, Luc J.; Pennartz, Cyriel M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Beta and gamma rhythms have been hypothesized to be involved in global and local coordination of neuronal activity, respectively. Here, we investigated how cells in rodent area S1BF are entrained by rhythmic fluctuations at various frequencies within the local area and in connected areas, and how this depends on behavioral state and cell type. We performed simultaneous extracellular field and unit recordings in four connected areas of the freely moving rat (S1BF, V1M, perirhinal cortex, CA1). S1BF spiking activity was strongly entrained by both beta and gamma S1BF oscillations, which were associated with deactivations and activations, respectively. We identified multiple classes of fast spiking and excitatory cells in S1BF, which showed prominent differences in rhythmic entrainment and in the extent to which phase locking was modulated by behavioral state. Using an additional dataset acquired by whole-cell recordings in head-fixed mice, these cell classes could be compared with identified phenotypes showing gamma rhythmicity in their membrane potential. We next examined how S1BF cells were entrained by rhythmic fluctuations in connected brain areas. Gamma-synchronization was detected in all four areas, however we did not detect significant gamma coherence among these areas. Instead, we only found long-range coherence in the theta-beta range among these areas. In contrast to local S1BF synchronization, we found long-range S1BF-spike to CA1–LFP synchronization to be homogeneous across inhibitory and excitatory cell types. These findings suggest distinct, cell-type contributions of low and high-frequency synchronization to intra- and inter-areal neuronal interactions. PMID:26834582

  5. Cell-cycle research with synchronous cultures: an evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmstetter, C. E.; Thornton, M.; Grover, N. B.

    2001-01-01

    The baby-machine system, which produces new-born Escherichia coli cells from cultures immobilized on a membrane, was developed many years ago in an attempt to attain optimal synchrony with minimal disturbance of steady-state growth. In the present article, we put forward a model to describe the behaviour of cells produced by this method, and provide quantitative evaluation of the parameters involved, at each of four different growth rates. Considering the high level of selection achievable with this technique and the natural dispersion in interdivision times, we believe that the output of the baby machine is probably close to optimal in terms of both quality and persistence of synchrony. We show that considerable information on events in the cell cycle can be obtained from populations with age distributions very much broader than those achieved with the baby machine and differing only modestly from steady state. The data presented here, together with the long and fruitful history of findings employing the baby-machine technique, suggest that minimisation of stress on cells is the single most important factor for successful cell-cycle analysis.

  6. The Expression of Fibroblast Activation Protein in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinomas Is Associated with Synchronous Lymph Node Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Errarte, Peio; Guarch, Rosa; Pulido, Rafael; Blanco, Lorena; Nunes-Xavier, Caroline E.; Beitia, Maider; Gil, Javier; Angulo, Javier C.; López, José I.; Larrinaga, Gorka

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) is a heterogeneous and complex disease that frequently develops distant metastases. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a serine peptidase the expression of which in cancer-associated fibroblasts has been associated with higher risk of metastases and poor survival. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of FAP in metastatic CCRCC (mCCRCC). A series of 59 mCCRCC retrospectively collected was included in the study. Metastases developed either synchronous (n = 14) or metachronous to renal disease (n = 45). Tumor specimens were obtained from both primary lesion (n = 59) and metastases (n = 54) and FAP expression was immunohistochemically analyzed. FAP expression in fibroblasts from primary tumors correlated with FAP expression in the corresponding metastatic lesions. Also, primary and metastatic FAP expression was correlated with large tumor diameter (>7cm), high grade (G3/4), high stage (pT3/4), tumor necrosis and sarcomatoid transformation. The expression of FAP in primary tumors and in their metastases was associated both with synchronous metastases and also with metastases to the lymph nodes. FAP expression in the primary tumor was correlated with worse 10-year overall survival. Immunohistochemical detection of FAP in the stromal tumor fibroblasts could be a biomarker of early lymph node metastatic status and therefore could account for the poor prognosis of FAP positive CCRCC. PMID:28033421

  7. System and method to allow a synchronous motor to successfully synchronize with loads that have high inertia and/or high torque

    DOEpatents

    Melfi, Michael J.

    2015-10-20

    A mechanical soft-start type coupling is used as an interface between a line start, synchronous motor and a heavy load to enable the synchronous motor to bring the heavy load up to or near synchronous speed. The soft-start coupling effectively isolates the synchronous motor from the load for enough time to enable the synchronous motor to come up to full speed. The soft-start coupling then brings the load up to or near synchronous speed.

  8. Sub-synchronous resonance damping using high penetration PV plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayyatzadeh, M.; Kazemzadeh, R.

    2017-02-01

    The growing need to the clean and renewable energy has led to the fast development of transmission voltage-level photovoltaic (PV) plants all over the world. These large scale PV plants are going to be connected to power systems and one of the important subjects that should be investigated is the impact of these plants on the power system stability. Can large scale PV plants help to damp sub-synchronous resonance (SSR) and how? In this paper, this capability of a large scale PV plant is investigated. The IEEE Second Benchmark Model aggregated with a PV plant is utilized as the case study. A Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) based conventional damping controller is designed and added to the main control loop of PV plant in order to damp the SSR and also investigation of the destructive effect of time delay in remote feedback signal. A new optimization algorithm called teaching-learning-based-optimization (TLBO) algorithm has been used for managing the optimization problems. Fast Furrier Transformer (FFT) analysis and also transient simulations of detailed nonlinear system are considered to investigate the performance of the controller. Robustness of the proposed system has been analyzed by facing the system with disturbances leading to significant changes in generator and power system operating point, fault duration time and PV plant generated power. All the simulations are carried out in MATLAB/SIMULINK environment.

  9. Evaluation Program for Secondary Spacecraft Cells: Synchronous Orbit Testing of Sealed Nickel Cadmium Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Performance data concerning sealed nickel-cadmium cells operating under a synchronous orbit regime are presented. A space satellite maintaining a position over a fixed point on earth as the earth rotates on its axis and revolves about the sun was simulated. Results include: (1) exposure to synchronous orbit testing at a temperature of 40 C yields less than 6 years of life; (2) performance at -20 C presents a low capacity problem; (3) the capacity check, performed at the middle of each show period, provides a temporary red reconditioning effect on the cells in that the end-of-discharge voltages are higher, for approximately 7 to 10 days, following the capacity check than they were 7 to 10 days prior to the capacity check; (4) all the test packs at -20 C and 40 C have either failed or were discontinued because of low capacity; and (5) test packs at temperatures of 0 C and 10 C have delivered the best capacity during life and packs tested at 20 C showed better life capability than packs tested at -20 C and 40 C.

  10. ATS-5 solar cell experiment after 699 days in synchronous orbit.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.

    1972-01-01

    The data from the ATS-5 solar cell experiment for the first 699 days in synchronous orbit is presented. Comparison of the performance of several different types of solar cell/coverslide configurations is made. This behavior is in turn compared with the calculated performance for such cell/coverslide configurations in synchronous orbit and with the results of accelerator irradiations designed to simulate the omnidirectional electron environment. It is generally found that the cells on the flight experiment perform like the cells irradiated with the accelerator, but they degraded more than predicted by the calculation. Solar cells mounted on a thin kapton panel are degrading about the same as are their counterparts mounted on a rigid panel.

  11. Pterins in human hair follicle cells and in the synchronized murine hair cycle.

    PubMed

    Schallreuter, K U; Beazley, W D; Hibberts, N A; Tobin, D J; Paus, R; Wood, J M

    1998-10-01

    Human dermal papilla cells (HDPC) express mRNA for the key enzymes for de novo synthesis/recycling and regulation of the pterin (6R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (6BH4). HDPC had significantly higher enzyme activities and 6BH4 levels in a comparative study with dermal fibroblasts, epidermal melanocytes, and keratinocytes under in vitro conditions. In addition, a significantly more rapid uptake of 14C-L-phenylalanine was demonstrated in HDPC compared with fibroblasts, whereas the differences in turnover to L-tyrosine were insignificant, suggesting a pooling of L-phenylalanine in HDPC. These results suggested that HDPC driven 6BH4 synthesis could be of major functional importance in the hair cycle. In order to follow this hypothesis in vivo, expression of enzyme activities and levels of the produced cofactor during the synchronized hair cycle were determined employing the murine model C57BL/6. These data revealed a significantly increased de novo synthesis for 6BH4 via GTP-cyclohydrolase I concomitant with high levels of 6BH4, and the induction of phenylalanine hydroxylase activities during the telogen/early anagen stage (days 0-1). Pterin levels and enzyme activities fall on day 3 and plateau during the rest of the entire cycle. In addition, thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase activities were measured, where the latter enzyme remained constant but thioredoxin reductase activities showed a biphasic behavior. The first peak coincided with the induction of 6BH4 de novo synthesis at the beginning of the hair cycle. The second peak was observed at mid-anagen, when melanogenesis takes place. Taken together, our results show the presence of autocrine pterin synthesis/recycling in human hair follicle cells under in vitro conditions, and a possible role for 6BH4 in the synchronized murine hair cycle.

  12. Effective Suppression of Pathological Synchronization in Cortical Networks by Highly Heterogeneous Distribution of Inhibitory Connections

    PubMed Central

    Kada, Hisashi; Teramae, Jun-Nosuke; Tokuda, Isao T.

    2016-01-01

    Even without external random input, cortical networks in vivo sustain asynchronous irregular firing with low firing rate. In addition to detailed balance between excitatory and inhibitory activities, recent theoretical studies have revealed that another feature commonly observed in cortical networks, i.e., long-tailed distribution of excitatory synapses implying coexistence of many weak and a few extremely strong excitatory synapses, plays an essential role in realizing the self-sustained activity in recurrent networks of biologically plausible spiking neurons. The previous studies, however, have not considered highly non-random features of the synaptic connectivity, namely, bidirectional connections between cortical neurons are more common than expected by chance and strengths of synapses are positively correlated between pre- and postsynaptic neurons. The positive correlation of synaptic connections may destabilize asynchronous activity of networks with the long-tailed synaptic distribution and induce pathological synchronized firing among neurons. It remains unclear how the cortical network avoids such pathological synchronization. Here, we demonstrate that introduction of the correlated connections indeed gives rise to synchronized firings in a cortical network model with the long-tailed distribution. By using a simplified feed-forward network model of spiking neurons, we clarify the underlying mechanism of the synchronization. We then show that the synchronization can be efficiently suppressed by highly heterogeneous distribution, typically a lognormal distribution, of inhibitory-to-excitatory connection strengths in a recurrent network model of cortical neurons. PMID:27803659

  13. Synchronization of Cell Cycle Oscillator by Multi-pulse Chemical Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yihan; Li, Ying; Dinner, Aaron; Scherer, Norbert

    2011-03-01

    Oscillators underlie biological rhythms in various organisms and provide a timekeeping mechanism. Cell cycle oscillator, for example, controls the progression of cell cycle stage and drives cyclic reproduction in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The understanding of the underlying nonlinear regulatory network allows experimental design of external perturbations to interact and control cell cycle oscillation. We have previously demonstrated in experiment and in simulation that the cell cycle coherence of a model bacterium can be progressively tuned by the level of a histidine kinase. Here, we present our recent effort to synchronize the division of a population of bacterium cells by external pulsatile chemical perturbations. We were able to synchronize the cell population by phase-locking approach: the external oscillator (i.e. periodic perturbation) entrains the internal cell cycle oscillator which is in analogous to the phase-locking of circadian clock to external light/dark oscillator. We explored the ranges of frequencies for two external oscillators of different amplitudes where phase-locking occurred. To our surprise, non-periodic chemical perturbations could also cause synchronization of a cell population, suggesting a Markovian cell cycle oscillation dynamics.

  14. Cell type-specific synaptic dynamics of synchronized bursting in the juvenile CA3 rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Aradi, Ildiko; Maccaferri, Gianmaria

    2004-10-27

    Spontaneous synchronous bursting of the CA3 hippocampus in vitro is a widely studied model of physiological and pathological network synchronization. The role of inhibitory conductances during network bursting is not understood in detail, despite the fact that several antiepileptic drugs target GABA(A) receptors. Here, we show that the first manifestation of a burst event is a cell type-specific flurry of GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory input to pyramidal cells, but not to stratum oriens horizontal interneurons. Moreover, GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic input is proportionally smaller in these interneurons compared with pyramidal cells. Computational models and dynamic-clamp studies using experimentally derived conductance waveforms indicate that both these factors modulate spike timing during synchronized activity. In particular, the different kinetics and the larger strength of GABAergic input to pyramidal cells defer action potential initiation and contribute to the observed delay of firing, so that the interneuronal activity leads the burst cycle. In contrast, excitatory inputs to both neuronal populations during a burst are kinetically similar, as required to maintain synchronicity. We also show that the natural pattern of activation of inhibitory and excitatory conductances during a synchronized burst cycle is different within the same neuronal population. In particular, GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents activate earlier and outlast the excitatory components driving the bursts. Thus, cell type-specific balance and timing of GABA(A) receptor-mediated input are critical to set the appropriate spike timing in pyramidal cells and interneurons and coordinate additional neurotransmitter release modulating burst strength and network frequency.

  15. Effect of serum starvation and chemical inhibitors on cell cycle synchronization of canine dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Khammanit, R; Chantakru, S; Kitiyanant, Y; Saikhun, J

    2008-07-01

    The cell cycle stage of donor cells and the method of cell cycle synchronization are important factors influencing the success of somatic cell nuclear transfer. In this study, we examined the effects of serum starvation, culture to confluence, and treatment with chemical inhibitors (roscovitine, aphidicolin, and colchicine) on cell cycle characteristics of canine dermal fibroblast cells. The effect of the various methods of cell cycle synchronization was determined by flow cytometry. Short periods of serum starvation (24-72 h) increased (P<0.05) the proportion of cells at the G0/G1 phase (88.4-90.9%) as compared to the control group (73.6%). A similar increase in the percentage of G0/G1 (P<0.05) cells were obtained in the culture to confluency group (91.8%). Treatment with various concentrations of roscovitine did not increase the proportion of G0/G1 cells; conversely, at concentrations of 30 and 45 microM, it increased (P<0.05) the percentage of cells that underwent apoptosis. The use of aphidicolin led to increase percentages of cells at the S phase in a dose-dependent manner, without increasing apoptosis. Colchicine, at a concentration of 0.1 microg/mL, increased the proportion of cells at the G2/M phase (38.5%, P<0.05); conversely, it decreased the proportions of G0/G1 cells (51.4%, P<0.05). Concentrations of colchicines >0.1 microg/mL did not increase the percentage of G2/M phase cells. The effects of chemical inhibitors were fully reversible; their removal led to a rapid progression in the cell cycle. In conclusion, canine dermal fibroblasts were effectively synchronized at various stages of the cell cycle, which could have benefits for somatic cell nuclear transfer in this species.

  16. High-frequency stimulation-induced peptide release synchronizes arcuate kisspeptin neurons and excites GnRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian; Nestor, Casey C; Zhang, Chunguang; Padilla, Stephanie L; Palmiter, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) and neurokinin B (NKB) neurocircuits are essential for pubertal development and fertility. Kisspeptin neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Kiss1ARH) co-express Kiss1, NKB, dynorphin and glutamate and are postulated to provide an episodic, excitatory drive to gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH) neurons, the synaptic mechanisms of which are unknown. We characterized the cellular basis for synchronized Kiss1ARH neuronal activity using optogenetics, whole-cell electrophysiology, molecular pharmacology and single cell RT-PCR in mice. High-frequency photostimulation of Kiss1ARH neurons evoked local release of excitatory (NKB) and inhibitory (dynorphin) neuropeptides, which were found to synchronize the Kiss1ARH neuronal firing. The light-evoked synchronous activity caused robust excitation of GnRH neurons by a synaptic mechanism that also involved glutamatergic input to preoptic Kiss1 neurons from Kiss1ARH neurons. We propose that Kiss1ARH neurons play a dual role of driving episodic secretion of GnRH through the differential release of peptide and amino acid neurotransmitters to coordinate reproductive function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16246.001 PMID:27549338

  17. Oscillations in the synthesis of cell wall components in synchronized cultures of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hakenbeck, R; Messer, W

    1977-01-01

    The rate of cell wall synthesis with respect to both proteins and lipids was determined in synchronized cultures of Escherichia coli B/r. Whereas the rate of total protein synthesis showed an exponential increase with cell age, the rate of incorporation of proteins and lipids into cell wall had a maximum at a cell age of 30 to 35 min, 15 min before cell division. This oscillation was observed in both the cytoplasmic membrane and in the outer membrane of the cell envelope. PMID:321418

  18. Epileptiform synchronization and high-frequency oscillations in brain slices comprising piriform and entorhinal cortices.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, S; Lévesque, M; Avoli, M

    2014-12-05

    We employed field potential recordings in extended in vitro brain slices form Sprague-Dawley rats containing the piriform and entorhinal cortices (PC and EC, respectively) to identify the characteristics of epileptiform discharges and concomitant high-frequency oscillations (HFOs, ripples: 80-200Hz, fast ripples: 250-500Hz) during bath application of 4-aminopyridine (4AP, 50μM). Ictal-like discharges occurred in PC and EC either synchronously or independently of each other; synchronous ictal discharges always emerged from a synchronous "fast" interictal background whereas asynchronous ictal discharges were preceded by a "slow" interictal event. In addition, asynchronous ictal discharges had longer duration and interval of occurrence than synchronous ictal discharges, and contained a higher proportion of ripples and fast ripples. Cutting the connections between PC and EC made synchronicity disappear and increased ictal discharges duration in the EC but failed in changing HFO occurrence in both areas. Finally, antagonizing ionotropic glutamatergic receptors abolished ictal activity in all experiments, increased the duration and rate of occurrence of interictal discharges occurring in PC-EC interconnected slices while it did not influence the slow asynchronous interictal discharges in both areas. Our results identify some novel in vitro interactions between olfactory (PC) and limbic (EC) structures that presumably contribute to in vivo ictogenesis as well.

  19. Synchronous motor with soft start element formed between the motor rotor and motor output shaft to successfully synchronize loads that have high inertia and/or high torque

    DOEpatents

    Umans, Stephen D; Nisley, Donald L; Melfi, Michael J

    2014-10-28

    A line-start synchronous motor has a housing, a rotor shaft, and an output shaft. A soft-start coupling portion is operatively coupled to the output shaft and the rotor shaft. The soft-start coupling portion is configurable to enable the synchronous motor to obtain synchronous operation and to drive, at least near synchronous speed during normal steady state operation of the motor, a load having characteristics sufficient to prevent obtaining normal synchronous operation of the motor when the motor is operatively connected to the load in the absence of the soft-start coupling. The synchronous motor is sufficiently rated to obtain synchronous operation and to drive, at least near synchronous speed during normal steady state operation of the motor, a load having characteristics sufficient to prevent obtaining normal synchronous operation of the motor when the motor is operatively connected to the load in the absence of the soft-start coupling.

  20. Replication of the resident Marek's Disease virus genome in synchronized nonproducer MKT-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Lau, R Y; Nonoyama, M

    1980-02-01

    MKT-1, a virus nonproducer lymphoblastoid cell line established from a Marek's disease tumor, was synchronized by double thymidine block to determine the sequence of events in the synthesis of cellular and latent marek's disease virus DNA. Cellular DNA synthesis was measured by incorporation of [3H]thymidine, whereas viral DNA synthesis was determined by DNA-DNA reassociation kinetics. The results of these studies indicate that the resident Marek's disease viral DNA in MKT-1 cells replicates during the early S phase of the cell cycle, before the onset of active cellular DNA synthesis. This observation is similar to that seen in the replication of resident Epstein-Barr virus DNA in synchronized Raji cells.

  1. A ten-year search for synchronous cells: obstacles, solutions, and practical applications

    PubMed Central

    Helmstetter, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    My effort to use synchronously dividing cultures to examine the Escherichia coli cell cycle involved a 10-year struggle with failure after failure punctuated by a few gratifying successes, especially at the end. In this essay, I recount my personal journey in this obsessive experimental pursuit. That narrative is followed by a description of a simplified version of the “baby machine,” a technique that was developed to obtain minimally disturbed, synchronously growing E. coli cells. Subsequent studies with this methodology led to an understanding of the basic properties of the relationship between chromosome replication and cell division. Accordingly, I end this reminiscence with a simple, fool-proof graphical strategy for deducing the pattern of chromosome replication during the division cycle of cells growing at any rate. PMID:25870590

  2. FOXC2 and CLIP4 : a potential biomarker for synchronous metastasis of ≤7-cm clear cell renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jinwoo; Han, Kyung Seok; Heo, Jun Hyeok; Bang, Duhee; Kang, You Hyun; Jin, Hyun A; Hong, Sung Joon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Ham, Won Sik

    2016-08-09

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCC) smaller than 7-cm are heterogeneous and exhibit metastatic potential in approximately 15% of cases. Although large-scale characterization of mutations in clear cell RCC (ccRCC), the most common RCC subtype, has been established, the genetic alterations related to ≤7-cm ccRCCs undergoing synchronous metastasis are poorly understood. To discover biomarkers that can be used to estimate the risk of synchronous metastasis in these ccRCC patients, we performed whole exome sequencing on the formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples of 10 ccRCC patients with ≤7-cm tumors and synchronous metastasis and expanded our study using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) ccRCC dataset (n = 201). Recurrent mutations were selected according to functional prediction and statistical significance. Mutations in three candidate genes, RELN (1 out of 10), FOXC2 (1 out of 10), and CLIP4 (2 out of 10) were found in expanded analysis using a TCGA cohort. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated target gene knockdown (FOXC2 and CLIP4) and overexpression (RELN) assays showed that FOXC2 and CLIP4 significantly increased cell migration and viability in ccRCCs. Our study demonstrated that FOXC2 and CLIP4 activity correlates to the presence of ≤7-cm ccRCCs with synchronous metastasis and may be potential molecular predictors of synchronous metastasis of ≤7-cm ccRCCs.

  3. ATS-5 solar cell experiment results after one year in synchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the ATS-5 solar cell experiment after one year in synchronous orbit are reported. A partial failure in the experimental electronics package has caused a loss of data from half the 80 experimental solar cells. Procedures for extracting data due to a partial spacecraft failure are described and discussed. Data from the remaining 40 solar cells, including 15 mounted on a thin flexible structure are analyzed. Data are corrected to a solar intensity of 140 mW/sq cm and a temperature of 25 C. It was found that after one year in synchronous orbit: (1) cells with 1.52-mm-thick coverslides did not show a clear-cut advantage over those with 0.15-mm coverslides, (2) cells with solderless grid lines are degrading at the same rate as are cells with solder-dipped grid lines, (3) cells not quite completely covered with coverslides suffered a large power loss in comparison to cells fully covered, (4) no clear-cut advantage of 10-cm cells over 2-cm cells has yet been observed, (5) cells mounted on the flexible panel with relatively little backshielding did not degrade any faster than those with substantial backshielding, and (6) the flight data in large part confirms the adequacy of the ground-based techniques used in our preflight radiation test program.

  4. Diel Expression of Cell Cycle-Related Genes in Synchronized Cultures of Prochlorococcus sp. Strain PCC 9511

    PubMed Central

    Holtzendorff, J.; Partensky, F.; Jacquet, S.; Bruyant, F.; Marie, D.; Garczarek, L.; Mary, I.; Vaulot, D.; Hess, W. R.

    2001-01-01

    The cell cycle of the chlorophyll b-possessing marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus is highly synchronized under natural conditions. To understand the underlying molecular mechanisms we cloned and sequenced dnaA and ftsZ, two key cell cycle-associated genes, and studied their expression. An axenic culture of Prochlorococcus sp. strain PCC 9511 was grown in a turbidostat with a 12 h–12 h light-dark cycle for 2 weeks. During the light periods, a dynamic light regimen was used in order to simulate the natural conditions found in the upper layers of the world's oceans. This treatment resulted in strong cell cycle synchronization that was monitored by flow cytometry. The steady-state mRNA levels of dnaA and ftsZ were monitored at 4-h intervals during four consecutive division cycles. Both genes exhibited clear diel expression patterns with mRNA maxima during the replication (S) phase. Western blot experiments indicated that the peak of FtsZ concentration occurred at night, i.e., at the time of cell division. Thus, the transcript accumulation of genes involved in replication and division is coordinated in Prochlorococcus sp. strain PCC 9511 and might be crucial for determining the timing of DNA replication and cell division. PMID:11208789

  5. Oncogene-Selective Sensitivity to Synchronous Cell Death following Modulation of the Amino Acid Nutrient Cystine.

    PubMed

    Poursaitidis, Ioannis; Wang, Xiaomeng; Crighton, Thomas; Labuschagne, Christiaan; Mason, David; Cramer, Shira L; Triplett, Kendra; Roy, Rajat; Pardo, Olivier E; Seckl, Michael J; Rowlinson, Scott W; Stone, Everett; Lamb, Richard F

    2017-03-14

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism, altering both uptake and utilization of extracellular nutrients. We individually depleted amino acid nutrients from isogenic cells expressing commonly activated oncogenes to identify correspondences between nutrient supply and viability. In HME (human mammary epithelial) cells, deprivation of cystine led to increased cell death in cells expressing an activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant. Cell death occurred via synchronous ferroptosis, with generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydrogen peroxide promoted cell death, as both catalase and inhibition of NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) blocked ferroptosis. Blockade of EGFR or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling similarly protected cells from ferroptosis, whereas treatment of xenografts derived from EGFR mutant non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a cystine-depleting enzyme inhibited tumor growth in mice. Collectively, our results identify a potentially exploitable sensitization of some EGFR/MAPK-driven tumors to ferroptosis following cystine depletion.

  6. High-performance parallel interface to synchronous optical network gateway

    DOEpatents

    St. John, Wallace B.; DuBois, David H.

    1996-01-01

    A system of sending and receiving gateways interconnects high speed data interfaces, e.g., HIPPI interfaces, through fiber optic links, e.g., a SONET network. An electronic stripe distributor distributes bytes of data from a first interface at the sending gateway onto parallel fiber optics of the fiber optic link to form transmitted data. An electronic stripe collector receives the transmitted data on the parallel fiber optics and reforms the data into a format effective for input to a second interface at the receiving gateway. Preferably, an error correcting syndrome is constructed at the sending gateway and sent with a data frame so that transmission errors can be detected and corrected in a real-time basis. Since the high speed data interface operates faster than any of the fiber optic links the transmission rate must be adapted to match the available number of fiber optic links so the sending and receiving gateways monitor the availability of fiber links and adjust the data throughput accordingly. In another aspect, the receiving gateway must have sufficient available buffer capacity to accept an incoming data frame. A credit-based flow control system provides for continuously updating the sending gateway on the available buffer capacity at the receiving gateway.

  7. High-performance parallel interface to synchronous optical network gateway

    DOEpatents

    St. John, W.B.; DuBois, D.H.

    1996-12-03

    Disclosed is a system of sending and receiving gateways interconnects high speed data interfaces, e.g., HIPPI interfaces, through fiber optic links, e.g., a SONET network. An electronic stripe distributor distributes bytes of data from a first interface at the sending gateway onto parallel fiber optics of the fiber optic link to form transmitted data. An electronic stripe collector receives the transmitted data on the parallel fiber optics and reforms the data into a format effective for input to a second interface at the receiving gateway. Preferably, an error correcting syndrome is constructed at the sending gateway and sent with a data frame so that transmission errors can be detected and corrected in a real-time basis. Since the high speed data interface operates faster than any of the fiber optic links the transmission rate must be adapted to match the available number of fiber optic links so the sending and receiving gateways monitor the availability of fiber links and adjust the data throughput accordingly. In another aspect, the receiving gateway must have sufficient available buffer capacity to accept an incoming data frame. A credit-based flow control system provides for continuously updating the sending gateway on the available buffer capacity at the receiving gateway. 7 figs.

  8. Membrane potential hyperpolarization in Mammalian cardiac cells by synchronization modulation of Na/K pumps.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Dando, Robin

    2008-02-01

    In previously reported work, we developed a new technique, synchronization modulation, to electrically activate Na/K pump molecules. The fundamental mechanism involved in this technique is a dynamic entrainment procedure of the pump molecules, carried out in a stepwise pattern. The entrainment procedure consists of two steps: synchronization and modulation. We theoretically predicted that the pump functions can be activated exponentially as a function of the membrane potential. We have experimentally demonstrated synchronization of the Na/K pump molecules and acceleration of their pumping rates by many fold through use of voltage-clamp techniques, directly monitoring the pump currents. We further applied this technique to intact skeletal muscle fibers from amphibians and found significant effects on the membrane resting potential. Here, we extend our study to intact mammalian cardiomyocytes. We employed a noninvasive confocal microscopic fluorescent imaging technique to monitor electric field-induced changes in ionic concentration gradient and membrane resting potential. Our results further confirm that the well-designed synchronization modulation electric field can effectively accelerate the Na/K pumping rate, increasing the ionic concentration gradient across the cell membrane and hyperpolarizing the membrane resting potential.

  9. Traffic Signal Synchronization in the Saturated High-Density Grid Road Network

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaojian; Lu, Jian; Wang, Wei; Zhirui, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Most existing traffic signal synchronization strategies do not perform well in the saturated high-density grid road network (HGRN). Traffic congestion often occurs in the saturated HGRN, and the mobility of the network is difficult to restore. In order to alleviate traffic congestion and to improve traffic efficiency in the network, the study proposes a regional traffic signal synchronization strategy, named the long green and long red (LGLR) traffic signal synchronization strategy. The essence of the strategy is to control the formation and dissipation of queues and to maximize the efficiency of traffic flows at signalized intersections in the saturated HGRN. With this strategy, the same signal control timing plan is used at all signalized intersections in the HGRN, and the straight phase of the control timing plan has a long green time and a long red time. Therefore, continuous traffic flows can be maintained when vehicles travel, and traffic congestion can be alleviated when vehicles stop. Using the strategy, the LGLR traffic signal synchronization model is developed, with the objective of minimizing the number of stops. Finally, the simulation is executed to analyze the performance of the model by comparing it to other models, and the superiority of the LGLR model is evident in terms of delay, number of stops, queue length, and overall performance in the saturated HGRN. PMID:25663835

  10. Traffic signal synchronization in the saturated high-density grid road network.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaojian; Lu, Jian; Wang, Wei; Zhirui, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Most existing traffic signal synchronization strategies do not perform well in the saturated high-density grid road network (HGRN). Traffic congestion often occurs in the saturated HGRN, and the mobility of the network is difficult to restore. In order to alleviate traffic congestion and to improve traffic efficiency in the network, the study proposes a regional traffic signal synchronization strategy, named the long green and long red (LGLR) traffic signal synchronization strategy. The essence of the strategy is to control the formation and dissipation of queues and to maximize the efficiency of traffic flows at signalized intersections in the saturated HGRN. With this strategy, the same signal control timing plan is used at all signalized intersections in the HGRN, and the straight phase of the control timing plan has a long green time and a long red time. Therefore, continuous traffic flows can be maintained when vehicles travel, and traffic congestion can be alleviated when vehicles stop. Using the strategy, the LGLR traffic signal synchronization model is developed, with the objective of minimizing the number of stops. Finally, the simulation is executed to analyze the performance of the model by comparing it to other models, and the superiority of the LGLR model is evident in terms of delay, number of stops, queue length, and overall performance in the saturated HGRN.

  11. Preparing nuclei from cells in monolayer cultures suitable for counting and for following synchronized cells through the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Butler, W B

    1984-08-15

    A procedure is described for preparing nuclei from cells in monolayer culture so that they may be counted using an electronic particle counter. It takes only 10 to 15 min, and consists of swelling the cells in hypotonic buffer and then lysing them with the quaternary ammonium salt, ethylhexadecyldimethylammonium bromide. The cells are completely lysed, yielding a suspension of clean single nuclei which is stable, free of debris, and easily counted. The method was developed for a cell line of epithelial origin (MCF-7), which is often difficult to trypsinize to single cells. It works equally well at all cell densities up to and beyond confluence, and has been used with a variety of cells in culture, including 3T3 cells, bovine macrophages, rat mammary epithelial cells, mouse mammary tumor cell lines, and human fibroblasts. The size of the nuclei produced by this procedure is related to their DNA content, and the method is thus suitable for following cultures of synchronized cells through the cell cycle, and for performing differential counts of cells with substantial differences in DNA content.

  12. Synchronization of HeLa cell cultures by inhibition of DNA polymerase alpha with aphidicolin.

    PubMed Central

    Pedrali-Noy, G; Spadari, S; Miller-Faurès, A; Miller, A O; Kruppa, J; Koch, G

    1980-01-01

    Both the inhibitory effect of aphidicolin on the replicative alpha-polymerase and the reversibility of its action in vivo (Pedrali-Noy & Spadari, 1979, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 88, 1194-2002) allow the synchronization of cells in culture. Aphidicolin prevents G1 cells from entering the DNA synthetic period, blocks cells in "S" phase, allows G2, M and G1 cells to continue the cell cycle and to accumulate at the G1/S border. Aphidicolin is a more useful reagent than hydroxyurea and thymidine because it does not affect cell viability or "S" phase duration and does not interfere with the synthesis of dNTPs or DNA polymerases. In fact cells exposed to the drug continue to synthesize all three DNA polymerases alpha, beta and gamma as well as all dNTPs which, when the block is removed, are present at levels optimal for DNA initiation and replication. The technique is simple and can be applied to cells growing in suspension or monolayers and allows one to harvest large quantities of synchronized cells. PMID:6775308

  13. High-resolution microwave-photonic applications via precise synchronization between RF and mode-locked laser pulses (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Kebin; Lu, Xing; Lv, Zhiqiang

    2016-10-01

    Precise synchronization between radio frequency and mode-locked laser pulses provides a high resolution capability for detecting either time jitter in laser pulse train or phase noise in radio frequency. In this talk, we will present our recent progresses on radio frequency dissemination and fiber optical sensing based on sub-femtosecond level synchronization between radio frequency and mode-locked pulse train.

  14. Independent Tumor Origin in Two Cases of Synchronous Bilateral Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhengguo; Zhao, Jialu; Zhao, Tian; Han, Yuying; Zhang, Yujun; Ye, Haihong

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) pose a challenge for clinical treatment and management. Most bilateral RCCs are sporadic, and do not show a hereditary pattern indicative of VHL syndrome or other inherited cancers. The origin and evolution of these sporadic bilateral RCCs remains elusive. We obtained normal and tumor samples from two male patients suffering from early stage synchronous bilateral clear cell RCC (ccRCC), and analyzed genomic DNA using whole exome sequencing and bisulfite pyrosequencing. We detected distinct 3p loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in both tumors in each patient. Two tumors within the same patient harbored distinct driver mutations and different CpG hypermethylation sites in the VHL promoter. Moreover, tumors exhibit independent evolutionary trajectories. Therefore, distinct 3p LOH, combined with contingent driver gene mutations and independent VHL hypermethylation, led to independent tumor origin and parallel evolution of bilateral ccRCC in these two patients. Our results indicate that tumors in these two cases were not due to common germline oncogenic mutations. They were results of multiple de novo mutations in each kidney, rather than primary ccRCC with contralateral renal metastasis. Therefore, histopathologic and genetic profiling from single tumor specimen may underestimate the mutational burden and somatic heterogeneity of bilateral ccRCCs. PMID:27383411

  15. Surgical treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with isolated synchronous brain metastases.

    PubMed

    I, Hoseok; Lee, Jung Il; Nam, Do Hyun; Ahn, Yong Chan; Shim, Young Mog; Kim, Kwhanmien; Choi, Yong Soo; Kim, Jhingook

    2006-04-01

    This study is a retrospective examination of our experiences with patients who underwent treatment of isolated synchronous brain metastases coupled with primary non-small cell lung cancer. From January 1995 to June 2004, 12 patients presented with isolated synchronous brain metastases coupled with primary non-small cell lung cancer. The patient was comprised of 8 men and 4 women. The median age was 52 yr, in a range of 32 to 75 yr. Median follow-up duration was 10.6 months, in a range of 2 to 55.8 months. Recurrence developed in 7 patients, and the median interval from 1st treatment to recurrence was 4.5 months (2.8-6.5 months). The overall 1-yr survival rate was 61.7%. The 1-yr survival rates for pathologic N0 and N1 cases were 75% and 66.7%, respectively. The median survival duration for pathologic N2 was 6.2 months (95% CI, 4.8-7.5 months). The 1-yr survival rate for cases of single brain metastasis was 75%. Based on our current observations, we could speculate that aggressive management of primary non-small cell lung cancer and isolated synchronous brain metastases was beneficial in a selected group of patients, as long as the brain lesions and pulmonary lesions were limited or resectable.

  16. Synchronous presentation of invasive ductal carcinoma and mantle cell lymphoma: a diagnostic challenge in menopausal patients.

    PubMed

    Woo, Edward J; Baugh, Aaron D; Ching, Karen

    2016-01-22

    Synchronous presentation of breast carcinoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a rare occurrence (Bradford PT, Freedman DM, Goldstein AM, Tucker MA. Increased risk of second primary cancers after a diagnosis of melanoma. Arch Dermatol 2010; 146: :265-72; Dutta Roy S, Stafford JA, Scally J, Selvachandran SN. A rare case of breast carcinoma co-existing with axillary mantle cell lymphoma. World J Surg Oncol 2003; 1: :27; Suresh Attili VS, Dadhich HK, Rao CR, Bapsy PP, Batra U, Anupama G et al. A case of breast cancer coexisting with B-cell follicular lymphoma. Austral Asian J Cancer 2007; 6: :155-6). In particular, only two reported cases on synchronous presentation of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) exist in the English literature. Owing to the rarity, there is a lack of consensus about underlying mechanism as well as optimal treatment strategy, and diagnosing both malignancies together without a delay remains a complex clinical challenge. We report a case of synchronous presentation of IDC and MCL in a 67-year-old female patient whose MCL diagnosis was delayed due to a misinterpretation of her B symptoms as postmenopausal, with a review of the literature on concurrently occurring breast carcinoma and NHL.

  17. The Occurrence of Intercellular Bridges in Groups of Cells Exhibiting Synchronous Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Fawcett, Don W.; Ito, Susumu; Slautterback, David

    1959-01-01

    A previous electron microscopic study of the cat testis revealed that spermatids derived from the same spermatogonium are joined together by intercellular bridges. The present paper records the observation of similar connections between spermatocytes and between spermatids in Hydra, fruit-fly, opossum, pigeon, rat, hamster, guinea pig, rabbit, monkey, and man. In view of these findings, it is considered likely that a syncytial relationship within groups of developing male germ cells is of general occurrence and is probably responsible for their synchronous differentiation. When clusters of spermatids, freshly isolated from the germinal epithelium are observed by phase contrast microscopy, the constrictions between the cellular units of the syncytium disappear and the whole group coalesces into a spherical multinucleate mass. The significance of this observation in relation to the occurrence of abnormal spermatozoa in semen and the prevalence of multinucleate giant cells in pathological testes is discussed. In the ectoderm of Hydra, the clusters of cnidoblasts that arise from proliferation of interstitial cells are also connected by intercellular bridges. The development of nematocysts within these groups of conjoined cells is precisely synchronized. Both in the testis of vertebrates and the ectoderm of Hydra, a syncytium results from incomplete cytokinesis in the proliferation of relatively undifferentiated cells. The intercellular bridges between daughter cells are formed when the cleavage furrow encounters the spindle remnant and is arrested by it. The subsequent dissolution of the spindle filaments establishes free communication between the cells. The discovery of intercellular bridges in the two unrelated tissues discussed here suggests that a similar syncytial relationship may be found elsewhere in nature where groups of cells of common origin differentiate synchronously. PMID:13664686

  18. Clustering and synchronization of lightning flashes in adjacent thunderstorm cells from lightning location networks data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yair, Yoav Y.; Aviv, Reuven; Ravid, Gilad

    2009-05-01

    We analyzed sequences of lightning flashes in several thunderstorms on the basis of data from various ground-based lightning location systems. We identified patterns of clustering and synchronicity of flashes in separate thunderstorm cells, distanced by tens to hundreds of kilometers from each other. This is in-line with our early findings of lightning synchronicity based on space shuttle images (Yair et al., 2006), hinting at a possible mutual electromagnetic coupling of remote thunderstorms. We developed a theoretical model that is based on the leaky integrate-and-fire concept commonly used in models of neural activity, in order to simulate the flashing behavior of a coupled network of thunderstorm cells. In this type of network, the intensity of the electric field Ei within a specific region of thunderstorm (i) grows with time until it reaches the critical breakdown value and generates a lightning flash while its electric field drops to zero, simultaneously adding a delta E to the intensity of the internal electric field in all thundercloud cells (Ej,k,l…) that are linked to it. The value of ΔE is inversely proportional to the distance between the "firing" cell i and its neighbors j, k, l; we assumed that thunderstorm cells are not identical and occupy a grid with random spacing and organization. Several topologies of the thunderstorm network were tested with varying degrees of coupling, assuming a predetermined probability of links between active cells. The results suggest that when the group coupling in the network is higher than a certain threshold value, all thunderstorm cells will flash in a synchronized manner.

  19. Localization of LHCP II in the Golgi of synchronized Euglena cells by immuno-electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Osafune, Tetsuaki ); Schiff, J.A. ); Hase, E. )

    1990-05-01

    We have previously localized LHCP II apoprotein in the Golgi thylakoids of Euglena gracilis (bacillaris Z strain) using specific antibody protein A-gold, during plastid development induction of LHCP II synthesis by increased light intensity. Using light/dark synchronized cells we now show that thylakoids are always immunoreactive. There is no reaction in the Golgi at 0 h. (beginning of light period), but immunoreaction appears in the Golgi soon thereafter, rises to a peak at 8 h. declines again to zero by 16 h. (2 h. into the dark period). The peak in immunoreaction in the Golgi immediately precedes the peak in {sup 14}C-labeling of cellular LHCP, supporting our suggestion that processing in the Golgi precedes deposition of LHCP II apoprotein in the thylakoids. Synchronized mutant Gr{sub 1} which lacks LHCP apoprotein fails to show immunoreaction in the Golgi or thylakoids at any stage.

  20. Spontaneous emergence of large-scale cell cycle synchronization in amoeba colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segota, Igor; Boulet, Laurent; Franck, David; Franck, Carl

    2014-06-01

    Unicellular eukaryotic amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum are generally believed to grow in their vegetative state as single cells until starvation, when their collective aspect emerges and they differentiate to form a multicellular slime mold. While major efforts continue to be aimed at their starvation-induced social aspect, our understanding of population dynamics and cell cycle in the vegetative growth phase has remained incomplete. Here we show that cell populations grown on a substrate spontaneously synchronize their cell cycles within several hours. These collective population-wide cell cycle oscillations span millimeter length scales and can be completely suppressed by washing away putative cell-secreted signals, implying signaling by means of a diffusible growth factor or mitogen. These observations give strong evidence for collective proliferation behavior in the vegetative state.

  1. Climate events synchronize the dynamics of a resident vertebrate community in the high Arctic.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Brage B; Grøtan, Vidar; Aanes, Ronny; Sæther, Bernt-Erik; Stien, Audun; Fuglei, Eva; Ims, Rolf A; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Pedersen, Ashild Ø

    2013-01-18

    Recently accumulated evidence has documented a climate impact on the demography and dynamics of single species, yet the impact at the community level is poorly understood. Here, we show that in Svalbard in the high Arctic, extreme weather events synchronize population fluctuations across an entire community of resident vertebrate herbivores and cause lagged correlations with the secondary consumer, the arctic fox. This synchronization is mainly driven by heavy rain on snow that encapsulates the vegetation in ice and blocks winter forage availability for herbivores. Thus, indirect and bottom-up climate forcing drives the population dynamics across all overwintering vertebrates. Icing is predicted to become more frequent in the circumpolar Arctic and may therefore strongly affect terrestrial ecosystem characteristics.

  2. Synchronicity from synchronized chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Duane, Gregory

    2015-04-01

    The synchronization of loosely-coupled chaotic oscillators, a phenomenon investigated intensively for the last two decades, may realize the philosophical concept of “synchronicity”—the commonplace notion that related events mysteriously occur at the same time. When extended to continuous media and/or large discrete arrays, and when general (non-identical) correspondences are considered between states, intermittent synchronous relationships indeed become ubiquitous. Meaningful synchronicity follows naturally if meaningful events are identified with coherent structures, defined by internal synchronization between remote degrees of freedom; a condition that has been posited as necessary for synchronizability with an external system. The important case of synchronization between mind and matter is realized if mind is analogized to a computer model, synchronizing with a sporadically observed system, as in meteorological data assimilation. Evidence for the ubiquity of synchronization is reviewed along with recent proposals that: (1) synchronization of different models of the same objective process may be an expeditious route to improved computational modeling and may also describe the functioning of conscious brains; and (2) the nonlocality in quantum phenomena implied by Bell’s theorem may be explained in a variety of deterministic (hidden variable) interpretations if the quantum world resides on a generalized synchronization “manifold”.

  3. Synchronicity from synchronized chaos

    DOE PAGES

    Duane, Gregory

    2015-04-01

    The synchronization of loosely-coupled chaotic oscillators, a phenomenon investigated intensively for the last two decades, may realize the philosophical concept of “synchronicity”—the commonplace notion that related events mysteriously occur at the same time. When extended to continuous media and/or large discrete arrays, and when general (non-identical) correspondences are considered between states, intermittent synchronous relationships indeed become ubiquitous. Meaningful synchronicity follows naturally if meaningful events are identified with coherent structures, defined by internal synchronization between remote degrees of freedom; a condition that has been posited as necessary for synchronizability with an external system. The important case of synchronization between mind andmore » matter is realized if mind is analogized to a computer model, synchronizing with a sporadically observed system, as in meteorological data assimilation. Evidence for the ubiquity of synchronization is reviewed along with recent proposals that: (1) synchronization of different models of the same objective process may be an expeditious route to improved computational modeling and may also describe the functioning of conscious brains; and (2) the nonlocality in quantum phenomena implied by Bell’s theorem may be explained in a variety of deterministic (hidden variable) interpretations if the quantum world resides on a generalized synchronization “manifold”.« less

  4. Waves of Cdk1 Activity in S Phase Synchronize the Cell Cycle in Drosophila Embryos.

    PubMed

    Deneke, Victoria E; Melbinger, Anna; Vergassola, Massimo; Di Talia, Stefano

    2016-08-22

    Embryos of most metazoans undergo rapid and synchronous cell cycles following fertilization. While diffusion is too slow for synchronization of mitosis across large spatial scales, waves of Cdk1 activity represent a possible process of synchronization. However, the mechanisms regulating Cdk1 waves during embryonic development remain poorly understood. Using biosensors of Cdk1 and Chk1 activities, we dissect the regulation of Cdk1 waves in the Drosophila syncytial blastoderm. We show that Cdk1 waves are not controlled by the mitotic switch but by a double-negative feedback between Cdk1 and Chk1. Using mathematical modeling and surgical ligations, we demonstrate a fundamental distinction between S phase Cdk1 waves, which propagate as active trigger waves in an excitable medium, and mitotic Cdk1 waves, which propagate as passive phase waves. Our findings show that in Drosophila embryos, Cdk1 positive feedback serves primarily to ensure the rapid onset of mitosis, while wave propagation is regulated by S phase events.

  5. Highly efficient microfluidic sorting device for synchronizing developmental stages of C. elegans based on deflecting electrotaxis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xixian; Hu, Rui; Ge, Anle; Hu, Liang; Wang, Shanshan; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2015-06-07

    C. elegans as a powerful model organism has been widely used in fundamental biological studies. Many of these studies frequently need a large number of different stage-synchronized worms due to the stage-specific features of C. elegans among 4 distinct larval stages and the adult stage. In this work, we present an interesting and cost-effective microfluidic approach to realize simultaneous sorting of C. elegans of different developmental stages by deflecting electrotaxis. The microfluidic device was fabricated using PDMS consisting of symmetric sorting channels with specific angles, which was further hybridized to an agarose plate. While applying an electric field, different stages of C. elegans would crawl to the negative pore with different angles due to their deflecting electrotaxis. Thus, the worms were separated and synchronized by stages. lon-2 mutant was further used to study this electrotactic response and the results indicated that the body size plays a key role in determining the deflecting angle in matured adult worms. In addition to discriminating wild-type hermaphrodites, it could also be employed to sort mutants with abnormal development sizes and males. Therefore, our device provided a versatile and highly efficient platform for sorting C. elegans to meet the requirement of large numbers of different stage-synchronized worms. It can also be further used to investigate the neuronal basis of deflecting electrotaxis in worms.

  6. Development of a synchronous enzyme-reaction system for a highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Kuniyo; Ueno, Iori; Yokoyama, Shin-ichi; Sakaki, Toshiyuki

    2002-01-01

    A synchronous enzyme-reaction system using water-soluble formazan and a non-enzymatic electron mediator was developed and applied to an enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The reaction system consists of four steps: (I) dephosphorylation of NADP(+) to produce NAD(+) by alkaline phosphatase (ALP), (II) reduction of NAD(+) to produce NADH with oxidation of ethanol to yield acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), (III) reduction of water-soluble tetrazolium salt (WST-1) to produce formazan by NADH via 1-methoxy-5-methyl-phenazinium methyl sulfate (PMS), and (IV) re-reduction of NAD(+) to produce NADH by ADH. During each cycle, one molecule of tetrazolium is converted to one molecule of formazan. The concentration of formazan during the reaction was given by second-order polynomials of the reaction time. Kinetic studies strongly suggested that the synchronous enzyme-reaction system had the potential to detect an analyte at the attomole level in EIA. On the basis of the kinetic studies, optimal conditions for EIA incorporating the synchronous system were examined. NADP(+) was purified thoroughly to remove minor traces of NAD(+) in the preparation, and an ADH preparation contaminated with the lowest level of ALP activity was used. When the synchronous system was applied to a sandwich-type EIA for human C-reactive protein, the protein was detected with a sensitivity of 50 attomole per well of a micro-titer plate (0.1 ml) in a 1-h reaction. In addition, EIA with water-soluble formazan showed a more quantitative and sensitive result than that with insoluble formazan. These findings indicated that the (WST-1)-PMS system introduced in this study has a great potential for highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay.

  7. Spermatogonial multiplication in the Chinese hamster. I. Cell cycle properties and synchronization of differentiating spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Lok, D; de Rooij, D G

    1983-01-01

    The cell cycle properties of the six successive generations of differentiating spermatogonia in the Chinese hamster were analysed by the fraction of labelled mitoses technique (FLM). Except for the A1 spermatogonia most of which have a longer cell cycle time (Tc), Tc was found to be c. 60 hr for all types of differentiating spermatogonia. As in the mouse and the rat this represents c. 14% of the duration of the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. With ongoing differentiation, ts of the differentiating spermatogonia increases from 14 to 25 hr, while tG2 shortens from 22 to 10 hr, ts + tG2 remaining at around 35 hr throughout. Autoradiography of whole mounted seminiferous tubules at 1 hr after injection of [3H]thymidine, and experiments with Ara-C revealed that the differentiating spermatogonia traverse S in sharply defined tubular segments. Thus adjacent clones of differentiating spermatogonia start and finish their S phase at virtually the same moment. This synchronization is not yet fully established among the first generation, as clones of A1 spermatogonia in the S phase were found intermingled with A1 cells in other phases of the cell cycle. Since there is little variation in tS and tG2 in the A1 spermatogonia, it was concluded that adjacent clones of A2 spermatogonia do not always arise at the same moment. Yet A2 spermatogonia do start S synchronously, and the FLM study confirms the expected variability in their tG1. A hypothesis is proposed that each generation of differentiating spermatogonia receives a stimulus to divide from outside the spermatogonial compartment. This would ensure the synchronous behaviour of adjacent clones and the strict relationship of the pattern of proliferation to the stages of the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium.

  8. A Systemized Approach to Investigate Ca2+ Synchronization in Clusters of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem-Cell Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Aled R.; Edwards, David H.; Cummins, Michael J.; Williams, Alan J.; George, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (IPS-CM) are considered by many to be the cornerstone of future approaches to repair the diseased heart. However, current methods for producing IPS-CM typically yield highly variable populations with low batch-to-batch reproducibility. The underlying reasons for this are not fully understood. Here we report on a systematized approach to investigate the effect of maturation in embryoid bodies (EB) vs. “on plate” culture on spontaneous activity and regional Ca2+ synchronization in IPS-CM clusters. A detailed analysis of the temporal and spatial organization of Ca2+ spikes in IPS-CM clusters revealed that the disaggregation of EBs between 0.5 and 2 weeks produced IPS-CM characterized by spontaneous beating and high levels of regional Ca2+ synchronization. These phenomena were typically absent in IPS-CM obtained from older EBs (>2 weeks). The maintenance of all spontaneously active IPS-CM clusters under “on plate” culture conditions promoted the progressive reduction in regional Ca2+ synchronization and the loss of spontaneous Ca2+ spiking. Raising the extracellular [Ca2+] surrounding these quiescent IPS-CM clusters from ~0.4 to 1.8 mM unmasked discrete behaviors typified by either (a) long-lasting Ca2+ elevation that returned to baseline or (b) persistent, large-amplitude Ca2+ oscillations around an increased cytoplasmic [Ca2+]. The different responses of IPS-CM to elevated extracellular [Ca2+] could be traced back to their routes of derivation. The data point to the possibility of predictably influencing IPS-CM phenotype and response to external activation via defined interventions at early stages in their maturation. PMID:26793710

  9. The ATS-5 solar cell experiment after 6-1/2 years in synchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B.

    1976-01-01

    Several types of solar cell/coverslide combinations were launched into synchronous orbit. The cells were 2 and 10 ohm-cm crucible-grown silicon with thicknesses of 0.2 and 0.3 mm. Coverslides were fused silica, ranging in thickness from 0.15 to 1.52 mm. The cells were mounted on two panels, one a rigid aluminum honeycomb structure, giving essentially infinite backshielding; the other was a thin Kapton-fiberglass substrate, offering minimal protection to the rear surface of the cells. The current-voltage curves of the cells were measured. Correction of cell electrical output to standard temperature and solar intensity was performed, using empirical radiation-dependent corrections. It is found that the cells on the flexible panel degrade much more rapidly than predicted, while the rigid panel cells follow the predictions fairly well. The anomalous behavior of the flexible panel cells is attributed to the deposition of a contaminant on the cell coverslides.

  10. Multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver and its advantages in high-precision positioning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Danan; Chen, Wen; Cai, Miaomiao; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Minghua; Yu, Chao; Zheng, Zhengqi; Wang, Yuanfei

    2016-12-01

    The multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver is a high precision, low cost, and widely used emerging receiver. Using this type of receiver, the satellite and receiver clock errors can be eliminated simultaneously by forming between antenna single-differences, which is equivalent to the conventional double-difference model. However, current multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver products have not fully realized their potential to achieve better accuracy, efficiency, and broader applications. This paper introduces the conceptual design and derivable products of multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receivers involving the aspects of attitude determination, multipath effect mitigation, phase center variation correction, and ground-based carrier phase windup calibration. Through case studies, the advantages of multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receivers in high-precision positioning applications are demonstrated.

  11. Cell synchronization by inhibitors of DNA replication induces replication stress and DNA damage response: analysis by flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Halicka, H. Dorota; Zhao, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cell synchronization is often achieved by inhibition of DNA replication. The cells cultured in the presence of such inhibitors as hydroxyurea, aphidicolin or thymidine become arrested at the entrance to S-phase and upon release from the block they synchronously progress through S, G2 and M. We recently reported that exposure of cells to these inhibitors at concentrations commonly used to synchronize cell populations led to phosphorylation of histone H2AX on Ser139 (induction of γH2AX) through activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related protein kinase (ATR). These findings imply that the induction of DNA replication stress by these inhibitors activates the DNA damage response cell signaling pathways and caution about interpreting data obtained with the use of cells synchronized such way as representing unperturbed cells. The protocol presented in this chapter describes the methodology of assessment of phosphorylation of histone H2AX-Ser139, ATM/ATR substrate on Ser/Thr at SQ/TQ cluster domains as well as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase in cells treated with inhibitors of DNA replication. Phosphorylation of these proteins is detected in individual cell immunocytochemically with phospho-specific Ab and measured by flow cytometry. Concurrent measurement of cellular DNA content and phosphorylated proteins followed by multiparameter cytometric analysis allows one to correlate extent of their phosphorylation with cell cycle phase. PMID:21755443

  12. Clock Synchronization in High-end Computing Environments: A Strategy for Minimizing Clock Variance at Runtime

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Terry R; Koenig, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    We present a new software-based clock synchronization scheme that provides high precision time agreement among distributed memory nodes. The technique is designed to minimize variance from a reference chimer during runtime and with minimal time-request latency. Our scheme permits initial unbounded variations in time and corrects both slow and fast chimers (clock skew). An implementation developed within the context of the MPI message passing interface is described, and time coordination measurements are presented. Among our results, the mean time variance for a set of nodes improved from 20.0 milliseconds under standard Network Time Protocol (NTP) down to 2.29 secs under our scheme.

  13. A Clock Synchronization Strategy for Minimizing Clock Variance at Runtime in High-end Computing Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Terry R; Koenig, Gregory A

    2010-01-01

    We present a new software-based clock synchronization scheme designed to provide high precision time agreement among distributed memory nodes. The technique is designed to minimize variance from a reference chimer during runtime and with minimal time-request latency. Our scheme permits initial unbounded variations in time and corrects both slow and fast chimers (clock skew). An implementation developed within the context of the MPI message passing interface is described and time coordination measurements are presented. Among our results, the mean time variance among a set of nodes improved from 20.0 milliseconds under standard Network Time Protocol (NTP) to 2.29 secs under our scheme.

  14. Synchronization of high power vortex oscillators at multiple of the fundamental frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraduc, Claire; Martin, Sylvain; Thirion, Christophe; Liu, Yue; Dovek, Moris; Diény, Bernard

    2011-10-01

    RF vortex spin-transfer oscillators based on low RA magnetic tunnel junctions were investigated. A very high power of excitations has been obtained characterized by a power spectral density containing a very sharp peak at the fundamental frequency and a series of harmonics. The observed behaviour is attributed to the combined effect of Oersted-Ampère field generated by the large applied dc-current and of the spin transfer torque. We furthermore show the synchronization of a vortex oscillation by applying a RF bias microwave which frequency is twice the oscillator fundamental frequency.

  15. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour (GCT)-A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Anshu; Murgod, Gururaj; Korlhalli, Suresh

    2014-02-01

    Giant Cell Tumours (GCT) of bone account for 5% of all primary bone tumours. Multicentric variety is a rare variant of this condition, accounting for less than 1% of all cases and can occur as synchronous or metachronous lesions. We report a 22-year-old male patient with 18 months history of painful progressive swellings around the right knee. Radiographs revealed expansile lytic lesions in the distal femur, proximal tibia and fibula and core needle biopsy was typical of GCT. Biochemical parameters were normal and radiological investigations did not reveal any metastasis. The patient was treated by above knee amputation due to the extensive nature of the tumours. The excised tissue from all sites had features of giant cell tumor with no atypia or malignant cells seen. The patient is free from recurrence or metastasis at three years follow up.

  16. Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Locally Advanced Synchronous Esophageal and Head/Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Receiving Curative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Hao; Lu, Hung-I.; Chien, Chih-Yen; Lo, Chien-Ming; Wang, Yu-Ming; Chou, Shang-Yu; Su, Yan-Ye; Shih, Li-Hsueh; Li, Shau-Hsuan

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated clinical outcomes and prognostic factors of patients with locally advanced synchronous esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and head/neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) receiving curative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), and determined whether synchronous ESCC/HNSCC patients had worse prognosis compared to isolated ESCC patients. Using propensity score matching method, we compared 60 locally advanced synchronous ESCC/HNSCC patients with 60 matched isolated ESCC patients. Compared to 60 matched isolated ESCC patients, synchronous ESCC/HNSCC patients had significantly worse prognosis (13.5 months versus 17.2 months, P = 0.01), more grade 3–4 CCRT toxicity, and higher percentage of CCRT interruption. For synchronous ESCC/HNSCC group, the 1-year and 2-year survival rates were 52% and 13%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that early ESCC stage, non-T4b disease, and salvage operations were significantly associated with superior survival. In multivariate analysis, ESCC stage represented an independent prognosticator. For chemotherapy regimen during CCRT, cisplatin/5-fluorouracil had significantly more grade 3–4 mucositis/esophagitis and neutropenia than weekly cisplatin. In conclusion, synchronous ESCC/HNSCC patients receiving curative CCRT have worse prognosis and poorer compliance of CCRT compared to isolated ESCC patients. For these patients, ESCC stage and T4b disease were significantly associated with clinical outcomes, and salvage operation may improve overall survival. PMID:28134308

  17. A synchronous Gigabit Ethernet protocol stack for high-throughput UDP/IP applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Födisch, P.; Lange, B.; Sandmann, J.; Büchner, A.; Enghardt, W.; Kaever, P.

    2016-01-01

    State of the art detector readout electronics require high-throughput data acquisition (DAQ) systems. In many applications, e. g. for medical imaging, the front-end electronics are set up as separate modules in a distributed DAQ. A standardized interface between the modules and a central data unit is essential. The requirements on such an interface are varied, but demand almost always a high throughput of data. Beyond this challenge, a Gigabit Ethernet interface is predestined for the broad requirements of Systems-on-a-Chip (SoC) up to large-scale DAQ systems. We have implemented an embedded protocol stack for a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) capable of high-throughput data transmission and clock synchronization. A versatile stack architecture for the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) and Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) over Internet Protocol (IP) such as Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) as well as Precision Time Protocol (PTP) is presented. With a point-to-point connection to a host in a MicroTCA system we achieved the theoretical maximum data throughput limited by UDP both for 1000BASE-T and 1000BASE-KX links. Furthermore, we show that the random jitter of a synchronous clock over a 1000BASE-T link for a PTP application is below 60 ps.

  18. Synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential: A clinico-pathologic and molecular study.

    PubMed

    Raspollini, Maria Rosaria; Castiglione, Francesca; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    We report a rare case of synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential in the same kidney. The tumors were seen incidentally in a 45-year-old man. Pathologic study revealed that the former tumor was nucleolar grade 2, and the multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential was nucleolar grade 1. At immunohistochemistry, the clear cells in both tumors were positive for CD10 and CA IX. Interestingly, these uncommon synchronous tumors showed a different KRAS/NRAS mutation analysis that was characterized by KRAS mutation at codon p.G12C in the clear cell renal cell carcinoma, while this mutation was not present in the case of multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential. NRAS mutation was not seen in any of the tumors.

  19. Feature-linked synchronization of thalamic relay cell firing induced by feedback from the visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillito, Adam M.; Jones, Helen E.; Gerstein, George L.; West, David C.

    1994-06-01

    THE function of the massive feedback projection from visual cortex to its thalamic relay nucleus1,2 has so far eluded any clear overview. This feedback exerts a range of effects3-6, including an increase in the inhibition elicited by moving contours7,8, but the functional logic of the direct connections to the thalamic cells that relay the retinal input to the cortex9-11 remains largely unknown. In contrast to its thalamic nucleus, the visual cortex is characterized by cells that are strongly sensitive to the orientation of moving contours. Here we report that when driven by moving oriented visual stimuli the cortical feedback induces correlated firing in relay cells. This cortically induced correlation of relay cell activity produces coherent firing in those groups of relay cells with receptive field alignments appropriate to signalling the particular orientation of the moving contour to the cortex. Synchronization of relay cell firing means that they will elicit temporally overlapping excitatory postsynaptic potentials in their cortical target cells, thus increasing the chance that the cortical cells will fire. Effectively this increases the gain of the input for feature-linked events detected by the cortex. We propose that this feedback loop serves to lock or focus the appropriate circuitry onto the stimulus feature.

  20. Synchronization of high speed framing camera and intense electron-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Xinbing; Liu Jinliang; Hong Zhiqiang; Qian Baoliang

    2012-06-15

    A new trigger program is proposed to realize the synchronization of high speed framing camera (HSFC) and intense electron-beam accelerator (IEBA). The trigger program which include light signal acquisition radiated from main switch of IEBA and signal processing circuit could provide a trigger signal with rise time of 17 ns and amplitude of about 5 V. First, the light signal was collected by an avalanche photodiode (APD) module, and the delay time between the output voltage of APD and load voltage of IEBA was tested, it was about 35 ns. Subsequently, the output voltage of APD was processed further by the signal processing circuit to obtain the trigger signal. At last, by combining the trigger program with an IEBA, the trigger program operated stably, and a delay time of 30 ns between the trigger signal of HSFC and output voltage of IEBA was obtained. Meanwhile, when surface flashover occurred at the high density polyethylene sample, the delay time between the trigger signal of HSFC and flashover current was up to 150 ns, which satisfied the need of synchronization of HSFC and IEBA. So the experiment results proved that the trigger program could compensate the time (called compensated time) of the trigger signal processing time and the inherent delay time of the HSFC.

  1. Persistent synchronized oscillations in prolactin gene promoter activity in living pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    McFerran, D W; Stirland, J A; Norris, A J; Khan, R A; Takasuka, N; Seymour, Z C; Gill, M S; Robertson, W R; Loudon, A S; Davis, J R; White, M R

    2001-07-01

    PRL gene expression in the anterior pituitary gland responds rapidly to different hormonal signals. We have investigated the long-term timing of transcriptional activation from the PRL, GH, and cytomegalovirus promoters in response to different stimulus duration, using real-time imaging of luciferase expression in living stably transfected GH3 cells. Long-term stimulation of serum-starved cells with 50% serum induced a homogeneous rise in PRL promoter activity, with subsequent heterogeneous fluctuations in luciferase activity in individual cells. When cells were subjected to a 2-h pulse of 50% serum, followed by serum-free medium, there were long-term (approximately 50 h) synchronized, homogeneous oscillations in PRL promoter activity. This response was PRL-specific, because in GH3 cells expressing luciferase from the GH or cytomegalovirus promoters, a serum pulse elicited no oscillations in luciferase expression after an initial transient response to serum. The PRL promoter may therefore be a template for an unstable transcription complex subject to stochastic regulation, allowing an oscillatory transcriptional response to physiological signals. This suggests that precise timing and coordination of cell responses to different signal-duration may represent a novel mechanism for coordinating long-term dynamic changes in transcription in cell populations.

  2. Hetero-cellular prototyping by synchronized multi-material bioprinting for rotary cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jessica; Son, Ae Rin; Hamid, Qudus; Wu, Honglu; Sun, Wei

    2016-01-13

    Bottom-up tissue engineering requires methodological progress of biofabrication to capture key design facets of anatomical arrangements across micro, meso and macro-scales. The diffusive mass transfer properties necessary to elicit stability and functionality require hetero-typic contact, cell-to-cell signaling and uniform nutrient diffusion. Bioprinting techniques successfully build mathematically defined porous architecture to diminish resistance to mass transfer. Current limitations of bioprinted cell assemblies include poor micro-scale formability of cell-laden soft gels and asymmetrical macro-scale diffusion through 3D volumes. The objective of this work is to engineer a synchronized multi-material bioprinter (SMMB) system which improves the resolution and expands the capability of existing bioprinting systems by packaging multiple cell types in heterotypic arrays prior to deposition. This unit cell approach to arranging multiple cell-laden solutions is integrated with a motion system to print heterogeneous filaments as tissue engineered scaffolds and nanoliter droplets. The set of SMMB process parameters control the geometric arrangement of the combined flow's internal features and constituent material's volume fractions. SMMB printed hepatocyte-endothelial laden 200 nl droplets are cultured in a rotary cell culture system (RCCS) to study the effect of microgravity on an in vitro model of the human hepatic lobule. RCCS conditioning for 48 h increased hepatocyte cytoplasm diameter 2 μm, increased metabolic rate, and decreased drug half-life. SMMB hetero-cellular models present a 10-fold increase in metabolic rate, compared to SMMB mono-culture models. Improved bioprinting resolution due to process control of cell-laden matrix packaging as well as nanoliter droplet printing capability identify SMMB as a viable technique to improve in vitro model efficacy.

  3. Effect of cell cycle synchronization on the accuracy of murine and bovine embryo sex determination.

    PubMed

    Hossepian de Lima, V F; De Bem, A R; Jorge, W; Moreira-Filho, C A

    1994-02-01

    Different cell cycle synchronization methods were used to increase the mitotic index and accuracy of sex determination in murine and bovine embryos. For sexing purposes, colchicine treatment for 2, 4, 6 and 8 h and the FdU-thymidine-colchicine combination were tested in murine embryos. The best results were obtained with colchicine treatment for 8 h (96.88% accuracy) and with FdU-thymidine-colchicine (97.22% accuracy). Mitotic indexes differed significantly between the 2 treatments (21.71% for colchicine and 32.95% for FdU-thymidine-colchicine). For sex identification of murine and bovine demi-embryos, both treatments were demonstrated to be equally effective (nearly 90%). The mitotic index for the FdU-treated murine demi-embryos (19.04%) was higher than the one obtained for the 8-h colchicine treatment (15.62%).

  4. Studying the force characteristics of a high temperature superconducting linear synchronous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Luhai; Jin, Jianxun

    2011-08-01

    A single-sided high temperature superconducting (HTS) linear synchronous motor (HTSLSM) with an HTS bulk magnet array as its secondary has been developed. A field-cooled magnetization system has also been developed to obtain the magnet array with alternate magnetic poles. In order to identify the performance and force characteristics of the HTSLSM, an equivalent 3D finite element analysis (FEA) model has been built up to analyze its field distributions and cogging force characteristics, and an experimental system has been constructed to measure its thrust and normal force characteristics. The traits of the thrust and the normal force have been extracted by comprehensive experiments, including the trends versus different exciting currents, different air gap lengths and variable magnetic poles. The analysis and experimental results are fundamental to the electromagnetic optimum design and control scheme evaluation for the HTSLSM.

  5. Differential expression of cyclins A, B1, D3 and E in G1 phase of the cell cycle between the synchronized and asynchronously growing MOLT-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunzhao; Hu, Junbo; Feng, Yongdong; Tao, Deding; Wu, Jianhong; Qin, Jichao; Liu, Shuangyou; Zhang, Manchao; Wang, Gangduo; Li, Xiping; Zhao, Jinshun; Ding, Hong; Reed, Eddie; Li, Qingdi Q; Gong, Jianping

    2005-10-01

    The use of 'double-thymidine block' was the first widely accepted method for inducing cell synchrony and remains one of the most effective and frequently used techniques for analyzing the cell cycle today. While thymidine is in itself an inhibitor of DNA replication, thymidine blocks are typically used to generate cell synchrony at the G1/S boundary. We have previously presented the first evidence that shows the growth imbalance and altered expression levels of cyclins A, B1, D3 and E in MOLT-4 cells synchronized in the cell cycle by thymidine. The major objective of the present study was to compare the levels of cyclins A, B1, D3 and E in G1 phase of the cell cycle between synchronized and unperturbed asynchronously growing human lymphocyte leukemia MOLT-4 cells. Here, we demonstrate that the sorted, asynchronously growing MOLT-4 cells had considerably lower levels of cyclins A, B1, D3 and E than their counterparts of the cells arrested in G1/S phase, as assessed by flow cytometry. In addition, we confirmed these results by using post-sorting Western blotting, a new method we recently developed for examining protein expression in specific phases of sorted, synchronized or asynchronously growing cells. Our findings revealed that the levels of cyclins D3 and E in the asynchronously growing MOLT-4 cells were significantly lower than those in synchronized cultures. Interestingly, protein expression levels of cyclins A and B1 in the asynchronously growing MOLT-4 cells were barely measurable, suggesting that these proteins were either not expressed or under detectable levels. These studies indicate that our synchronization protocol may have disturbed cell proliferation and metabolism as evidenced by significant differences in the expression of cyclins between asynchronously growing and synchronized cells, and further suggest that the levels of cyclins A, B1, D3 and E in synchronized cultures cannot represent those in unperturbed, asynchronously growing cells. Thus, it

  6. Detection of G1 proteins in Chinese hamster cells synchronized by isoleucine deprivation or mitotic selection.

    PubMed

    Ley, K D

    1975-07-01

    Examination of labeling patterns of proteins in Chinese hamster cells(line CHO) revealed the presence of a class of protein(s) that is synthesized during G1 phase of the cell cycle. Cells arrested in G1 by isoleucine (Ile) deprivation were prelabeded with [14-C]Ile, induced to traverse G1 by addition of unlabeled Ile, and labeled with [3-H]Ile at hourly intervals. Cells were fractionated into neclear and cytoplasmic portions, and proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide get electrophoresis. Gel profiles of proteins in the 45,000-160,000 mol wt range from the cytoplasm of cells in G1 were similar to those from cells arrested in G1 except for the presence of a mojor peak of [1-H]Ile incorporated into a protein(s) of approximately 80,000 mol wt. Peaks of net [3-H]Ile incorporation were not detected in neclear preparations. Cellular fractionation by differential centrifugation showed the peak I protein was located in the soluble supernatant fraction of the cytoplasm. Time-course studies showed that synthesis of this protein began 1-2 h after initiation of G1 traverse; the protein reached maximum levels in 4-6 h and was reduced to undetectable levels by 9 h. A cytoplasmic protein with similar electrophoretic mobility was found in G1 phase of cells synchronized by mitotic selection. This class of proteins is synthesized by cells before entry into S phase and may be involved in initiation of DNA synthesis.

  7. Erythropoietin and IGF-1 signaling synchronize cell proliferation and maturation during erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Kadri, Zahra; Lefevre, Carine; Goupille, Olivier; Penglong, Tipparat; Granger-Locatelli, Marine; Fucharoen, Suthat; Maouche-Chretien, Leila; Leboulch, Philippe; Chretien, Stany

    2015-01-01

    Tight coordination of cell proliferation and differentiation is central to red blood cell formation. Erythropoietin controls the proliferation and survival of red blood cell precursors, while variations in GATA-1/FOG-1 complex composition and concentrations drive their maturation. However, clear evidence of cross-talk between molecular pathways is lacking. Here, we show that erythropoietin activates AKT, which phosphorylates GATA-1 at Ser310, thereby increasing GATA-1 affinity for FOG-1. In turn, FOG-1 displaces pRb/E2F-2 from GATA-1, ultimately releasing free, proproliferative E2F-2. Mice bearing a Gata-1S310A mutation suffer from fatal anemia when a compensatory pathway for E2F-2 production involving insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is simultaneously abolished. In the context of the GATA-1V205G mutation resulting in lethal anemia, we show that the Ser310 cannot be phosphorylated and that constitutive phosphorylation at this position restores partial erythroid differentiation. This study sheds light on the GATA-1 pathways that synchronize cell proliferation and differentiation for tissue homeostasis. PMID:26680303

  8. Gap junctions between CA3 pyramidal cells contribute to network synchronization in neonatal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Molchanova, Svetlana M; Huupponen, Johanna; Lauri, Sari E; Taira, Tomi

    2016-08-01

    Direct electrical coupling between neurons through gap junctions is prominent during development, when synaptic connectivity is scarce, providing the additional intercellular connectivity. However, functional studies of gap junctions are hampered by the unspecificity of pharmacological tools available. Here we have investigated gap-junctional coupling between CA3 pyramidal cells in neonatal hippocampus and its contribution to early network activity. Four different gap junction inhibitors, including the general blocker carbenoxolone, decreased the frequency of network activity bursts in CA3 area of hippocampus of P3-6 rats, suggesting the involvement of electrical connections in the generation of spontaneous network activity. In CA3 pyramidal cells, spikelets evoked by local stimulation of stratum oriens, were inhibited by carbenoxolone, but not by inhibitors of glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic transmission, signifying the presence of electrical connectivity through axo-axonic gap junctions. Carbenoxolone also decreased the success rate of firing antidromic action potentials in response to stimulation, and changed the pattern of spontaneous action potential firing of CA3 pyramidal cells. Altogether, these data suggest that electrical coupling of CA3 pyramidal cells contribute to the generation of the early network events in neonatal hippocampus by modulating their firing pattern and synchronization.

  9. Colon cancer stem cell markers CD44 and CD133 in patients with colorectal cancer and synchronous hepatic metastases.

    PubMed

    Jing, Feifeng; Kim, Hun Jin; Kim, Chang Hyun; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Hyeong Rok

    2015-04-01

    CD44 and CD133 mRNA expression as cancer stem cell markers in colorectal cancer were correlated with synchronous hepatic metastases and the clinicopathological factors, including patient survival. The CD44 and CD133 mRNA levels in 36 primary colorectal adenocarcinomas with synchronous hepatic metastasis were analyzed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, with normalization relative to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on samples with typical mRNA expression patterns to investigate protein expression. Both CD44 and CD133 gene expressions were highest in hepatic metastasis tissue, followed by colorectal cancer and normal mucosa. The differences were statistically significant among groups of normal mucosa, colorectal cancer and hepatic metastasis tissue. CD44 mRNA expression was significantly associated with the tumor location (P=0.019) and histology (P=0.026). With a median follow-up period of 38 months, the 5-year disease-free survival rate of the patients with high CD44 mRNA expression in the CD44 hepatic metastasis tissue group was significantly lower than that of the patients with low expression (P=0.002). While the mRNA expressions in groups of CD44 colorectal tumor, CD133 colorectal tumor, and CD133 hepatic metastasis tissue were not significant. CD44 and CD133 mRNA were highly correlatively co-expressed in colorectal cancer with hepatic metastases. CD44 expression was an independent factor associated with patient survival, while CD133 did not show this pattern. Thus, CD44 is a more reliable marker for predicting hepatic metastases and survival. Larger prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

  10. Magnetic isolation of Plasmodium falciparum schizonts iRBCs to generate a high parasitaemia and synchronized in vitro culture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The establishment of methods for an in vitro continuous culture of Plasmodium falciparum is essential for gaining knowledge into its biology and for the development of new treatments. Previously, several techniques have been used to synchronize, enrich and concentrate P. falciparum, although obtaining cultures with high parasitaemia continues being a challenging process. Current methods produce high parasitaemia levels of synchronized P. falciparum cultures by frequent changes of culture medium or reducing the haematocrit. However, these methods are time consuming and sometimes lead to the loss of synchrony. Methods A procedure that combines Percoll and sorbitol treatments, the use of magnetic columns, and the optimization of the in vitro culture conditions to reach high parasitaemia levels for synchronized Plasmodium falciparum cultures is described. Results A new procedure has been established using P. falciparum 3D7, combining previous reported methodologies to achieve in vitro parasite cultures that reach parasitaemia up to 40% at any intra-erythrocytic stage. High parasitaemia levels are obtained only one day after magnetic column purification without compromising the parasite viability and synchrony. Conclusions The described procedure allows obtaining a large scale synchronized parasite culture at a high parasitaemia with less manipulations than other methods previously described. PMID:24655321

  11. All-digital duty-cycle corrector with synchronous and high accuracy output for double date rate synchronous dynamic random-access memory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chih-Wei; Lo, Yu-Lung; Chang, Chia-Chen; Liu, Han-Ying; Yang, Wei-Bin; Cheng, Kuo-Hsing

    2017-04-01

    A synchronous and highly accurate all-digital duty-cycle corrector (ADDCC), which uses simplified dual-loop architecture, is presented in this paper. To explain the operational principle, a detailed circuit description and formula derivation are provided. To verify the proposed design, a chip was fabricated through the 0.18-µm standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process with a core area of 0.091 mm2. The measurement results indicate that the proposed ADDCC can operate between 300 and 600 MHz with an input duty-cycle range of 40–60%, and that the output duty-cycle error is less than 1% with a root-mean-square jitter of 3.86 ps.

  12. Synchronous activation of cell division by light or temperature stimuli in the dimorphic yeast Schizosaccharomyces japonicus.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Sho; Furuya, Kanji; Nozaki, Shingo; Aoki, Keita; Niki, Hironori

    2013-09-01

    Many fungi respond to light and regulate fungal development and behavior. A blue light-activated complex has been identified in Neurospora crassa as the product of the wc-1 and wc-2 genes. Orthologs of WC-1 and WC-2 have hitherto been found only in filamentous fungi and not in yeast, with the exception of the basidiomycete pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus. Here, we report that the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces japonicus responds to blue light depending on Wcs1 and Wcs2, orthologs of components of the WC complex. Surprisingly, those of ascomycete S. japonicus are more closely related to those of the basidiomycete. S. japonicus reversibly changes from yeast to hyphae in response to environmental stresses. After incubation at 30°C, a colony of yeast was formed, and then hyphal cells extended from the periphery of the colony. When light cycles were applied, distinct dark- and bright-colored hyphal cell stripes were formed because the growing hyphal cells had synchronously activated cytokinesis. In addition, temperature cycles of 30°C for 12 h and 35°C for 12 h or of 25°C for 12 h and 30°C for 12 h during incubation in the dark induced a response in the hyphal cells similar to that of light. The stripe formation of the temperature cycles was independent of the wcs genes. Both light and temperature, which are daily external cues, have the same effect on growing hyphal cells. A dual sensing mechanism of external cues allows organisms to adapt to daily changes of environmental alteration.

  13. ROSA: A High-cadence, Synchronized Multi-camera Solar Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Damian Joseph; Jess, D. B.; Mahtioudakis, M.; Keenan, F. P.

    2011-05-01

    The Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) instrument is a synchronized, six-camera high-cadence solar imaging instrument developed by Queen's University Belfast and recently commissioned at the Dunn Solar Telescope at the National Solar Observatory in Sunspot, New Mexico, USA, as a common-user instrument. Consisting of six 1k x 1k Peltier-cooled frame-transfer CCD cameras with very low noise (0.02 - 15 e/pixel/s), each ROSA camera is capable of full-chip readout speeds in excess of 30 Hz, and up to 200 Hz when the CCD is windowed. ROSA will allow for multi-wavelength studies of the solar atmosphere at a high temporal resolution. We will present the current instrument set-up and parameters, observing modes, and future plans, including a new high QE camera allowing 15 Hz for Halpha. Interested parties should see https://habu.pst.qub.ac.uk/groups/arcresearch/wiki/de502/ROSA.html

  14. Detection of Changes in the Medicago sativa Retinoblastoma-Related Protein (MsRBR1) Phosphorylation During Cell Cycle Progression in Synchronized Cell Suspension Culture.

    PubMed

    Ayaydin, Ferhan; Kotogány, Edit; Ábrahám, Edit; Horváth, Gábor V

    2017-01-01

    Deepening our knowledge on the regulation of the plant cell division cycle depends on techniques that allow for the enrichment of cell populations in defined cell cycle phases. Synchronization of cell division can be achieved using different plant tissues; however, well-established cell suspension cultures provide large amount of biological sample for further analyses. Here, we describe the methodology of the establishment, propagation, and analysis of a Medicago sativa suspension culture that can be used for efficient synchronization of the cell division. A novel 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU)-based method is used for the estimation of cell fraction that enters DNA synthesis phase of the cell cycle and we also demonstrate the changes in the phosphorylation level of Medicago sativa retinoblastoma-related protein (MsRBR1) during cell cycle progression.

  15. In silico synchronization reveals regulators of nuclear ruptures in lamin A/C deficient model cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robijns, J.; Molenberghs, F.; Sieprath, T.; Corne, T. D. J.; Verschuuren, M.; de Vos, W. H.

    2016-07-01

    The nuclear lamina is a critical regulator of nuclear structure and function. Nuclei from laminopathy patient cells experience repetitive disruptions of the nuclear envelope, causing transient intermingling of nuclear and cytoplasmic components. The exact causes and consequences of these events are not fully understood, but their stochastic occurrence complicates in-depth analyses. To resolve this, we have established a method that enables quantitative investigation of spontaneous nuclear ruptures, based on co-expression of a firmly bound nuclear reference marker and a fluorescent protein that shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm during ruptures. Minimally invasive imaging of both reporters, combined with automated tracking and in silico synchronization of individual rupture events, allowed extracting information on rupture frequency and recovery kinetics. Using this approach, we found that rupture frequency correlates inversely with lamin A/C levels, and can be reduced in genome-edited LMNA knockout cells by blocking actomyosin contractility or inhibiting the acetyl-transferase protein NAT10. Nuclear signal recovery followed a kinetic that is co-determined by the severity of the rupture event, and could be prolonged by knockdown of the ESCRT-III complex component CHMP4B. In conclusion, our approach reveals regulators of nuclear rupture induction and repair, which may have critical roles in disease development.

  16. In silico synchronization reveals regulators of nuclear ruptures in lamin A/C deficient model cells

    PubMed Central

    Robijns, J.; Molenberghs, F.; Sieprath, T.; Corne, T. D. J.; Verschuuren, M.; De Vos, W. H.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a critical regulator of nuclear structure and function. Nuclei from laminopathy patient cells experience repetitive disruptions of the nuclear envelope, causing transient intermingling of nuclear and cytoplasmic components. The exact causes and consequences of these events are not fully understood, but their stochastic occurrence complicates in-depth analyses. To resolve this, we have established a method that enables quantitative investigation of spontaneous nuclear ruptures, based on co-expression of a firmly bound nuclear reference marker and a fluorescent protein that shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm during ruptures. Minimally invasive imaging of both reporters, combined with automated tracking and in silico synchronization of individual rupture events, allowed extracting information on rupture frequency and recovery kinetics. Using this approach, we found that rupture frequency correlates inversely with lamin A/C levels, and can be reduced in genome-edited LMNA knockout cells by blocking actomyosin contractility or inhibiting the acetyl-transferase protein NAT10. Nuclear signal recovery followed a kinetic that is co-determined by the severity of the rupture event, and could be prolonged by knockdown of the ESCRT-III complex component CHMP4B. In conclusion, our approach reveals regulators of nuclear rupture induction and repair, which may have critical roles in disease development. PMID:27461848

  17. Ultraviolet stress delays chromosome replication in light/dark synchronized cells of the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus marinus PCC9511

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus is very abundant in warm, nutrient-poor oceanic areas. The upper mixed layer of oceans is populated by high light-adapted Prochlorococcus ecotypes, which despite their tiny genome (~1.7 Mb) seem to have developed efficient strategies to cope with stressful levels of photosynthetically active and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. At a molecular level, little is known yet about how such minimalist microorganisms manage to sustain high growth rates and avoid potentially detrimental, UV-induced mutations to their DNA. To address this question, we studied the cell cycle dynamics of P. marinus PCC9511 cells grown under high fluxes of visible light in the presence or absence of UV radiation. Near natural light-dark cycles of both light sources were obtained using a custom-designed illumination system (cyclostat). Expression patterns of key DNA synthesis and repair, cell division, and clock genes were analyzed in order to decipher molecular mechanisms of adaptation to UV radiation. Results The cell cycle of P. marinus PCC9511 was strongly synchronized by the day-night cycle. The most conspicuous response of cells to UV radiation was a delay in chromosome replication, with a peak of DNA synthesis shifted about 2 h into the dark period. This delay was seemingly linked to a strong downregulation of genes governing DNA replication (dnaA) and cell division (ftsZ, sepF), whereas most genes involved in DNA repair (such as recA, phrA, uvrA, ruvC, umuC) were already activated under high visible light and their expression levels were only slightly affected by additional UV exposure. Conclusions Prochlorococcus cells modified the timing of the S phase in response to UV exposure, therefore reducing the risk that mutations would occur during this particularly sensitive stage of the cell cycle. We identified several possible explanations for the observed timeshift. Among these, the sharp decrease in transcript levels of the dnaA gene

  18. Effects of tyrosine kinase and phosphatase inhibitors on mitosis progression in synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Sheremet, Ya A; Yemets, A I; Azmi, A; Vissenberg, K; Verbelen, J P; Blume, Ya B

    2012-01-01

    To test whether reversible tubulin phosphorylation plays any role in the process of plant mitosis the effects of inhibitors of tyrosine kinases, herbimycin A, genistein and tyrphostin AG 18, and of an inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, sodium orthovanadate, on microtubule organization and mitosis progression in a synchronized BY-2 culture has been investigated. It was found that treatment with inhibitors of tyrosine kinases of BY-2 cells at the G2/M transition did not lead to visible disturbances of mitotic microtubule structures, while it did reduce the frequency of their appearance. We assume that a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation level could alter the microtubule dynamic instability parameters during interphase/prophase transition. All types of tyrosine kinase inhibitors used caused a prophase delay: herbimycin A and genistein for 2 h, and tyrphostin AG18 for 1 h. Thereafter the peak of mitosis was displaced for 1 h by herbimycin A or genistein exposure, but after tyrphostin AG18 treatment the timing of the mitosis-peak was comparable to that in control cells. Enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation induced by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor resulted in the opposite effect on BY-2 mitosis transition. Culture treatment with sodium orthovanadate during 1 h resulted in an accelerated start of the prophase and did not lead to the alteration in time of the mitotic index peak formation, as compared to control cells. We suppose that the reversible tyrosine phosphorylation can be involved in the regulation of interphase to M phase transition possibly through regulation of microtubule dynamics in plant cells.

  19. Chromoendoscopy to detect early synchronous second primary esophageal carcinoma in patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck?

    PubMed

    Komínek, Pavel; Vítek, Petr; Urban, Ondřej; Zeleník, Karol; Halamka, Magdaléna; Feltl, David; Cvek, Jakub; Matoušek, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the use of flexible esophagoscopy and chromoendoscopy with Lugol's solution in the detection of early esophageal carcinomas (second primary carcinomas) in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). Methods. All patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC underwent office-based Lugol's chromoendoscopy. After flexible esophagoscopy with white light, 3.0% Lugol's iodine solution was sprayed over the entire esophageal mucosa. Areas with less-intense staining (LVLs) were evaluated and biopsies taken. Results. 132 patients with HNSCC were enrolled in this study. The most frequent primary tumors were oropharyngeal (49/132), tumors of the oral cavity (36/132), and larynx (35/132). The majority of subjects (107/132 patients, 81.1%) had advanced HNSCC carcinomas (stages III and IV). Multiple LVLs were discovered in 24 subjects (18.2%) and no LVLs in 108 (81.8%) subjects. Fifty-five LVL biopsy specimens were obtained and assessed. Squamous cell carcinomas were detected in two patients, peptic esophagitis in 11 patients, gastric heterotopic mucosa in two patients, hyperplasia in two patients, and low- and high-grade dysplasia in three patients. Conclusion. Although only two patients with synchronous primary carcinomas were found among the patients, esophagoscopy should be recommended after detection of HNSCC to exclude secondary esophageal carcinoma or dysplasia.

  20. Synchronization of genetic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianshou; Zhang, Jiajun; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Chen, Luonan

    2008-09-01

    Synchronization of genetic or cellular oscillators is a central topic in understanding the rhythmicity of living organisms at both molecular and cellular levels. Here, we show how a collective rhythm across a population of genetic oscillators through synchronization-induced intercellular communication is achieved, and how an ensemble of independent genetic oscillators is synchronized by a common noisy signaling molecule. Our main purpose is to elucidate various synchronization mechanisms from the viewpoint of dynamics, by investigating the effects of various biologically plausible couplings, several kinds of noise, and external stimuli. To have a comprehensive understanding on the synchronization of genetic oscillators, we consider three classes of genetic oscillators: smooth oscillators (exhibiting sine-like oscillations), relaxation oscillators (displaying jump dynamics), and stochastic oscillators (noise-induced oscillation). For every class, we further study two cases: with intercellular communication (including phase-attractive and repulsive coupling) and without communication between cells. We find that an ensemble of smooth oscillators has different synchronization phenomena from those in the case of relaxation oscillators, where noise plays a different but key role in synchronization. To show differences in synchronization between them, we make comparisons in many aspects. We also show that a population of genetic stochastic oscillators have their own synchronization mechanisms. In addition, we present interesting phenomena, e.g., for relaxation-type stochastic oscillators coupled to a quorum-sensing mechanism, different noise intensities can induce different periodic motions (i.e., inhomogeneous limit cycles).

  1. Socially synchronized circadian oscillators.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Guy; Herzog, Erik D; Levine, Joel D; Schwartz, William J

    2013-08-22

    Daily rhythms of physiology and behaviour are governed by an endogenous timekeeping mechanism (a circadian 'clock'). The alternation of environmental light and darkness synchronizes (entrains) these rhythms to the natural day-night cycle, and underlying mechanisms have been investigated using singly housed animals in the laboratory. But, most species ordinarily would not live out their lives in such seclusion; in their natural habitats, they interact with other individuals, and some live in colonies with highly developed social structures requiring temporal synchronization. Social cues may thus be critical to the adaptive function of the circadian system, but elucidating their role and the responsible mechanisms has proven elusive. Here, we highlight three model systems that are now being applied to understanding the biology of socially synchronized circadian oscillators: the fruitfly, with its powerful array of molecular genetic tools; the honeybee, with its complex natural society and clear division of labour; and, at a different level of biological organization, the rodent suprachiasmatic nucleus, site of the brain's circadian clock, with its network of mutually coupled single-cell oscillators. Analyses at the 'group' level of circadian organization will likely generate a more complex, but ultimately more comprehensive, view of clocks and rhythms and their contribution to fitness in nature.

  2. Synchronous fire activity in the tropical high Andes: an indication of regional climate forcing.

    PubMed

    Román-Cuesta, R M; Carmona-Moreno, C; Lizcano, G; New, M; Silman, M; Knoke, T; Malhi, Y; Oliveras, I; Asbjornsen, H; Vuille, M

    2014-06-01

    Global climate models suggest enhanced warming of the tropical mid and upper troposphere, with larger temperature rise rates at higher elevations. Changes in fire activity are amongst the most significant ecological consequences of rising temperatures and changing hydrological properties in mountainous ecosystems, and there is a global evidence of increased fire activity with elevation. Whilst fire research has become popular in the tropical lowlands, much less is known of the tropical high Andean region (>2000 masl, from Colombia to Bolivia). This study examines fire trends in the high Andes for three ecosystems, the Puna, the Paramo and the Yungas, for the period 1982-2006. We pose three questions: (i) is there an increased fire response with elevation? (ii) does the El Niño- Southern Oscillation control fire activity in this region? (iii) are the observed fire trends human driven (e.g., human practices and their effects on fuel build-up) or climate driven? We did not find evidence of increased fire activity with elevation but, instead, a quasicyclic and synchronous fire response in Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia, suggesting the influence of high-frequency climate forcing on fire responses on a subcontinental scale, in the high Andes. ENSO variability did not show a significant relation to fire activity for these three countries, partly because ENSO variability did not significantly relate to precipitation extremes, although it strongly did to temperature extremes. Whilst ENSO did not individually lead the observed regional fire trends, our results suggest a climate influence on fire activity, mainly through a sawtooth pattern of precipitation (increased rainfall before fire-peak seasons (t-1) followed by drought spells and unusual low temperatures (t0), which is particularly common where fire is carried by low fuel loads (e.g., grasslands and fine fuel). This climatic sawtooth appeared as the main driver of fire trends, above local human influences and fuel build

  3. Current-Induced Generation and Synchronous Motion of Highly Packed Coupled Chiral Domain Walls.

    PubMed

    P Del Real, Rafael; Raposo, Victor; Martinez, Eduardo; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2017-03-08

    Chiral domain walls of Neel type emerge in heterostructures that include heavy metal (HM) and ferromagnetic metal (FM) layers owing to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction at the HM/FM interface. In developing storage class memories based on the current induced motion of chiral domain walls, it remains to be seen how dense such domain walls can be packed together. Here we show that a universal short-range repulsion that scales with the strength of the DM interaction exists among chiral domain walls. The distance between the two walls can be reduced with the application of the out-of-plane field, allowing the formation of coupled domain walls. Surprisingly, the current driven velocity of such coupled walls is independent of the out-of-plane field, enabling manipulation of significantly compressed coupled domain walls using current pulses. Moreover, we find that a single current pulse with optimum amplitude can create a large number of closely spaced domain walls. These features allow current induced generation and synchronous motion of highly packed chiral domain walls, a key feature essential for developing domain wall based storage devices.

  4. A high performance inverter-fed drive system of an interior permanent magnet synchronous machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, B. K.

    A high performance fully operational four-quadrant control scheme of an interior permanent magnet synchronous machine is described. The machine operates smoothly with full performance in constant-torque region, as well as in flux-weakening constant-power region in both directions of motion. The transition between constant-torque region and constant-power region is very smooth at all conditions of operation. The control in constant-torque region is based on vector or field-oriented technique with the direct-axis aligned to the total stator flux, whereas the constant-power region control is implemented by orientation of torque angle of the impressed square-wave voltage through the feedforward vector rotator. The control system is implemented digitally using distributed microcomputer system and all the essential feedback signals, such as torque, flux, etc., are estimated with precision. The control has been described with an outer torque control loop primarily for traction type applications, but speed and position control loops can be easily added to extend its application to other industrial drives. A 70 hp drive system using a Neodymium-Iron-Boron PM machine and transistor PWM inverter has been designed and extensively tested in laboratory on a dynamometer, and performances are found to be excellent.

  5. Chemoradiotherapy for Synchronous Multiple Primary Cancers with Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: a Case-control Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi-Wen; Zhu, Yu-Jia; Zhang, Wen-Wen; Yang, Han; Liang, Yao; Hu, Yong-Hong; Qiu, Bo; Liu, Meng-Zhong; Liu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in multiple primary cancers (MPC) of the upper digestive tract in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods: In a screening of 1193 consecutive patients diagnosed with ESCC and received radiotherapy, 53 patients presenting synchronous MPC in the upper digestive tract were retrospectively investigated. 53 consecutive patients with esophageal non-multiple primary cancer (NPC), matched by stage, age and sex, served as control. All of the patients received concurrent CRT. The median radiation dose was 60 Gy. Chemotherapy regimens were based on platinum and/or 5-fluorouracil. Clinical outcomes and treatment toxicities were compared. Results: Clinic-pathologic characteristics were well balanced between groups. MPC mostly located in esophagus (43, 81.8%), followed by hypopharynx (8, 15.1%) and stomach (2, 3.8%). In MPC and NPC patients, 94.3% and 96.2% completed the intended treatment. The immediate response rate was 73.6% vs 75.5%, with complete response rate of 11.3% vs 24.5% and partial response rate of 62.3% vs 51.0%. Two-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS) and distant progression-free survival (DPFS) were 52.2% vs 68.9% (p=0.026), 32.9% vs 54.0% (p=0.032), 60.8% vs 87.8% (p=0.002) and 64.0% vs 70.8% (p=0.22), respectively. Acute grade 3-4 toxicities were observed in 64.2% vs 54.7%, significantly higher in radiation esophagitis (49.1% vs 28.3%, p<0.001), and mucositis (11.3% vs 00p=0.027). Conclusions: Compared with matched NPC, ESCC accompanied with synchronous MPC was related to significantly impaired survival, elevated risk of locoregional disease progression and higher incidence of severe esophagitis and mucositis, following concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Future study on reasons for decreased efficacy of chemoradiotherapy will help to optimize treatment. Advanced radiation techniques may play a role

  6. Effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on C-myc transcript levels in nonsynchronized and synchronized human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Desjobert, H.; Nafziger, J.; Averlant, G.; Hillion, J.; Adolphe, M.

    1995-12-01

    The effects of 50 Hz electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on the expression of the c-myc oncogene, known to be involved in normal cell proliferation and possibly also in tumor processes, were investigated in nonsynchronized human lymphoid cells immortalized by Epstein-Barr virus. Viral injury to such cells makes them a good model for exploring the possible cancer-promoted effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields. Parallel experiments were conducted on human HL60 leukemic cells. Cells were exposed to sinusoidal 50 Hz EMFs at 10 {micro}T or 1 mT for 20 min, 1 h, 24 h, or 72 h. Exposure was performed either immediately after refeeding or 1.5 h after refeeding. C-myc transcript values were assessed by Northern blot analysis and normalized to those of the noninducible gene GaPDH. No statistically significant difference between the c-myc transcript levels of control and exposed cells was found in lymphoid or leukemic cells under their experimental conditions, either after short exposures of 20 min and 1 h or after longer exposures of 24 and 72 h. Other experiments were carried out with pseudosynchronized cells in an attempt to establish whether cells were especially sensitive to 50 Hz magnetic field exposure in any particular phase of the cell cycle. Accordingly, cells were pseudosynchronized in G0/G1 by serum deprivation and exposed for 20 min to a 50 Hz magnetic field, at 10 {micro}T for lymphoid cells and 1 mT for HL60 cells. No significant difference was observed between the c-myc transcript levels of control and exposed cells for either of the synchronized cell types. These results for synchronized cells correlated with those for nonsynchronized cells.

  7. Stochastic extinction of tumor cells due to synchronization effect through time periodic treatment in a tumor-immune interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisu, Ryota; Horita, Takehiko

    The response to a time periodic treatment of the immunotherapy in a stochastic model of tumor-immune interaction is numerically investigated. Due to the effect of synchronization among the intrinsic oscillation and the treatment, an enhanced extinction of the tumor cells is observed. It suggests that compared with the static treatment, by controlling the period of the treatment, the time periodic treatment could be an effective way of treatment leading to tumor extinction.

  8. Chromosome 17 aneusomy detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization in vulvar squamous cell carcinomas and synchronous vulvar skin.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J A; Healy, K; Tran, T A; Malfetano, J; Wilson, V L; Rohwedder, A; Ross, J S

    2000-09-01

    Vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) affects a spectrum of women with granulomatous vulvar diseases, human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, and chronic inflammatory vulvar dermatoses. To determine whether there is evidence of chromosomal instability occurring in synchronous skin surrounding vulvar SCCs, we investigated abnormalities in chromosome 17 copy number. Samples of SCC, vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), and surrounding vulvar skin were obtained from all vulvar excisions performed for squamous neoplasia at Albany Medical College from 1996 to 1997. Histological categorization, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for the alpha satellite region of chromosome 17, DNA content by image analysis, and Ki-67 labeling were evaluated. Controls of normal vulvar skin not associated with cancer were used for comparison. One hundred ten specimens were obtained from 33 patients with either SCC or VIN 3 and consisted of 49 neoplastic, 52 nonneoplastic, and 9 histologically normal vulvar skin samples. The majority of SCCs (88%) and a minority (18%) of VIN 3 excisions were associated with lichen sclerosus. Normal vulvar skin controls did not exhibit chromosome 17 polysomy (cells with more than four FISH signals), whereas 56% of normal vulvar skin associated with cancer did. Moreover, the frequency of polysomy significantly increased as the histological classification progressed from normal to inflammatory to neoplastic lesions. The largest mean value and variance for chromosome 17 copy number was identified in SCCs (2.4 +/- 1.0) with intermediate values identified, in decreasing order, for SCC in situ (2.1 +/- 1.0), VIN 2 (2.1 +/- 0.8), lichen sclerosus (2.0 +/- 0.5), lichen simplex chronicus (1.9 +/- 0.4), and normal skin associated with SCC (1.8 +/- 0.4) compared with control vulvar skin (1.5 +/- 0. 05). Concordance of chromosome 17 aneusomy between cancers and synchronous skin lesions was found in 48% of patients. Loss of chromosome 17 was identified 5% of all

  9. Cryptic diversity, high host specificity and reproductive synchronization in army ant-associated Vatesus beetles.

    PubMed

    von Beeren, Christoph; Maruyama, Munetoshi; Kronauer, Daniel J C

    2016-02-01

    Army ants and their arthropod symbionts represent one of the most species-rich animal associations on Earth, and constitute a fascinating example of diverse host-symbiont interaction networks. However, despite decades of research, our knowledge of army ant symbionts remains fragmentary due to taxonomic ambiguity and the inability to study army ants in the laboratory. Here, we present an integrative approach that allows us to reliably determine species boundaries, assess biodiversity, match different developmental stages and sexes, and to study the life cycles of army ant symbionts. This approach is based on a combination of community sampling, DNA barcoding, morphology and physiology. As a test case, we applied this approach to the staphylinid beetle genus Vatesus and its different Eciton army ant host species at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. DNA barcoding led to the discovery of cryptic biodiversity and, in combination with extensive community sampling, revealed strict host partitioning with no overlap in host range. Using DNA barcoding, we were also able to match the larval stages of all focal Vatesus species. In combination with studies of female reproductive physiology, this allowed us to reconstruct almost the complete life cycles of the different beetle species. We show that Vatesus beetles are highly adapted to the symbiosis with army ants, in that their reproduction and larval development are synchronized with the stereotypical reproductive and behavioural cycles of their host colonies. Our approach can now be used to study army ant-symbiont communities more broadly, and to obtain novel insights into co-evolutionary and ecological dynamics in species-rich host-symbiont systems.

  10. PSynUTC - Evaluation of a High-Precision Time Synchronization Prototype System for Ethernet LANs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    now been taken over by our spin-off company Oregano Systems (http://www.oregano.at). Roland Höller, Nikolaus Kerö Department of Computer Technology... Oregano Systems, will demonstrate the feasibility of GPS time distribution and time synchronization in Ethernet- based LANs with a worst-case

  11. Neocortical synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maksim; Seigneur, Joseé; Sejnowski, Terrence

    2011-01-01

    Summary Neuronal synchronization occurs when two or more neuronal events are coordinated across time. Local synchronization produces field potentials. Long-range synchronization between distant brain sites contributes to the electroencephalogram. Neuronal synchronization depends on synaptic (chemical/electrical), ephaptic, and extracellular interactions. For an expanded treatment of this topic see Jasper’s Basic Mechanisms of the Epilepsies, Fourth Edition (Noebels JL, Avoli M, Rogawski MA, Olsen RW, Delgado-Escueta AV, eds) published by Oxford University Press (available on the National Library of Medicine Bookshelf [NCBI] at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books). PMID:24850952

  12. High-Yield Superovulation in Adult Mice by Anti-Inhibin Serum Treatment Combined with Estrous Cycle Synchronization.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Ayumi; Mochida, Keiji; Inoue, Hiroki; Noda, Yoshihiro; Endo, Tamao; Watanabe, Gen; Ogura, Atsuo

    2016-01-01

    Producing many mature oocytes is of great importance for assisted reproductive technologies. In mice, superovulation by consecutive injections of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has been the gold standard for oocyte collection. However, the yield of mature oocytes by this regimen can fluctuate according to the stage of the estrous cycle, strain, and age. Therefore, our objective was to develop a high-yield superovulation protocol to collect higher numbers of oocytes from adult female mice of different strains and ages. First, we aimed to synchronize the estrous cycle using C57BL/6 (B6) female mice. Most (93%) were synchronized to metestrus after two daily injections of progesterone. Second, we found that with the injection of anti-inhibin serum (AIS) instead of eCG, the mean number of ovulated oocytes almost doubled (21 vs. 41 per mouse). Third, by combining estrous cycle synchronization with two AIS injections, we obtained 62 oocytes per mouse, about three times that with the eCG-hCG protocol. Importantly, this approach increased the proportion of mice that ovulated >25 oocytes from about 40% (eCG-hCG) to 90%. The same protocol was also effective in other inbred (BALB/cA), outbred (ICR), and hybrid (B6D2F1) strains. In addition, B6 female mice aged over 1 yr ovulated 1.8-fold more oocytes by this protocol. Thus, estrous cycle synchronization followed by AIS-hCG yielded a broadly applicable, highly efficient superovulation. This protocol should promote the effective use of invaluable female mouse strains and decrease the numbers of animals euthanized.

  13. High Efficiency Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbajal, B. G.

    1979-01-01

    The specific activity was to improve the tandem junction Cell (TJC) as a high efficiency solar cell. The TJC development was to be consistent with module assembly and should contribute to the overall goals of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. During 1978, TJC efficiency improved from approximately 11 percent to approximately 16 percent (AMI). Photogenerated current densities in excess of 42 mA/sq cm were observed at AMO. Open circuit voltages as high as 0.615 V were measured at AMO. Fill factor was only 0.68 - 0.75 due to a nonoptimum metal contact design. A device model was conceived in which the solar cell is modelled as a transitor. There are virtually no interconnect or packaging factor systems and the TJC is compatible with all conventional module fabrication systems. A modification of the TJC, the Front Surface Field (FSF) cell, was also explored.

  14. High Red Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms High red blood cell count By Mayo Clinic Staff A high red blood cell count is an increase in oxygen-carrying cells in your bloodstream. Red blood cells transport oxygen from your lungs to tissues throughout ...

  15. Cardiomyocyte Circadian Oscillations Are Cell-Autonomous, Amplified by β-Adrenergic Signaling, and Synchronized in Cardiac Ventricle Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks impact vital cardiac parameters such as blood pressure and heart rate, and adverse cardiac events such as myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death. In mammals, the central circadian pacemaker, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, synchronizes cellular circadian clocks in the heart and many other tissues throughout the body. Cardiac ventricle explants maintain autonomous contractions and robust circadian oscillations of clock gene expression in culture. In the present study, we examined the relationship between intrinsic myocardial function and circadian rhythms in cultures from mouse heart. We cultured ventricular explants or dispersed cardiomyocytes from neonatal mice expressing a PER2::LUC bioluminescent reporter of circadian clock gene expression. We found that isoproterenol, a β-adrenoceptor agonist known to increase heart rate and contractility, also amplifies PER2 circadian rhythms in ventricular explants. We found robust, cell-autonomous PER2 circadian rhythms in dispersed cardiomyocytes. Single-cell rhythms were initially synchronized in ventricular explants but desynchronized in dispersed cells. In addition, we developed a method for long-term, simultaneous monitoring of clock gene expression, contraction rate, and basal intracellular Ca2+ level in cardiomyocytes using PER2::LUC in combination with GCaMP3, a genetically encoded fluorescent Ca2+ reporter. In contrast to robust PER2 circadian rhythms in cardiomyocytes, we detected no rhythms in contraction rate and only weak rhythms in basal Ca2+ level. In summary, we found that PER2 circadian rhythms of cardiomyocytes are cell-autonomous, amplified by adrenergic signaling, and synchronized by intercellular communication in ventricle explants, but we detected no robust circadian rhythms in contraction rate or basal Ca2+. PMID:27459195

  16. Synchronous pumping of picosecond dye laser using high efficiency second harmonic generation from optical fibres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.; Bernardin, J. P.; Macdonald, R. L.; Demouchy, G.

    1991-01-01

    The stable operation of a mode-locked dye laser synchronously pumped by the second harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser produced in an Nd codoped germanosilicate optical fiber is reported. The optical fiber preparation technique, which results in a second harmonic conversion efficiency of 2 percent, is described. This optical fiber SHG conversion efficiency is the highest reported to date using a continuous-wave mode-locked laser.

  17. Survival of Dentate Hilar Mossy Cells after Pilocarpine-Induced Seizures and their Synchronized Burst Discharges with Area CA3 Pyramidal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Scharfman, H. E.; Smith, K.; Goodman, J. H.; Sollas, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    The clinical and basic literature suggest that hilar cells of the dentate gyrus are damaged after seizures, particularly prolonged and repetitive seizures. Of the cell types within the hilus, it appears that the mossy cell is one of the most vulnerable. Nevertheless, hilar neurons which resemble mossy cells appear in some published reports of animal models of epilepsy, and in some cases of human temporal lobe epilepsy. Therefore, mossy cells may not always be killed after severe, repeated seizures. However, mossy cell survival in these studies was not completely clear because the methods did allow discrimination between mossy cells and other hilar cell types. Furthermore, whether surviving mossy cells might have altered physiology after seizures was not examined. Therefore, intracellular recording and intracellular dye injection were used to characterize hilar cells in hippocampal slices from pilocarpine-treated rats that had status epilepticus and recurrent seizures (‘epileptic’ rats). For comparison, mossy cells were also recorded from age-matched, saline-injected controls, and pilocarpine-treated rats that failed to develop status epilepticus. Numerous hilar cells with the morphology, axon projection, and membrane properties of mossy cells were recorded in all three experimental groups. Thus, mossy cells can survive severe seizures, and those that survive retain many of their normal characteristics. However, mossy cells from epileptic tissue were distinct from mossy cells of control rats in that they generated spontaneous and evoked epileptiform burst discharges. Area CA3 pyramidal cells also exhibited spontaneous and evoked bursts. Simultaneous intracellular recordings from mossy cells and pyramidal cells demonstrated that their burst discharges were synchronized, with pyramidal cell discharges typically beginning first. From these data we suggest that hilar mossy cells can survive status epilepticus and chronic seizures. The fact that mossy cells have

  18. High Gradient Induction Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J

    2004-11-29

    A concept being developed for high current electron beams may have application to HEDP and is described here. It involves the use of planar Blumlein stacks placed inside an induction cell. The output end of the Blumlein stack is applied across a high gradient insulator (HGI). These insulators have been used successfully in the presence of kilo Ampere-level electron beam currents for tens of nanoseconds at gradients of 20 MV/meter.

  19. Modulation of olfactory bulb network activity by serotonin: synchronous inhibition of mitral cells mediated by spatially localized GABAergic microcircuits

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Loren J.

    2014-01-01

    Although inhibition has often been proposed as a central mechanism for coordinating activity in the olfactory system, relatively little is known about how activation of different inhibitory local circuit pathways can generate coincident inhibition of principal cells. We used serotonin (5-HT) as a pharmacological tool to induce spiking in ensembles of mitral cells (MCs), a primary output neuron in the olfactory bulb, and recorded intracellularly from pairs of MCs to directly assay coincident inhibitory input. We find that 5-HT disynaptically depolarized granule cells (GCs) only slightly but robustly increased the frequency of inhibitory postsynaptic inhibitory currents in MCs. Serotonin also triggered more coincident IPSCs in pairs of nearby MCs than expected by chance, including in MCs with truncated apical dendrites that lack glomerular synapses. That serotonin-triggered coincident inhibition in the absence of elevated GC somatic firing rates suggested that synchronized MC inhibition arose from glutamate receptor-mediated depolarization of GC dendrites or other (non-GC) interneurons outside the glomerular layer. Tetanic stimulation of GCL afferents to GCs triggered robust GC spiking, coincident inhibition in pairs of MCs, and recruited large-amplitude IPSCs in MCs. Enhancing neurotransmission through NMDARs by lowering the external Mg2+ concentration also increased inhibitory tone onto MCs but failed to promote synchronized inhibition. These results demonstrate that coincident MC inhibition can occur through multiple circuit pathways and suggests that the functional coordination between different GABAergic synapses in individual GCs can be dynamically regulated. PMID:25031366

  20. Endogenous synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) of basal cell carcinoma-initial study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Zhelyazkova, Al.; Keremedchiev, M.; Penkov, N.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O.; Avramov, L.

    2016-01-01

    The human skin is a complex, multilayered and inhomogeneous organ with spatially varying optical properties. Analysis of cutaneous fluorescence spectra could be a very complicated task; therefore researchers apply complex mathematical tools for data evaluation, or try to find some specific approaches, that would simplify the spectral analysis. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) allows improving the spectral resolution, which could be useful for the biological tissue fluorescence characterization and could increase the tumour detection diagnostic accuracy.

  1. Characteristics analysis of a high speed permanent magnet synchronous generator using the transfer relations theorem and equivalent circuit method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seok-Myeong; Ko, Kyoung-Jin; Park, Ji-Hoon; Cho, Han-Wook; Hong, Jung-Pyo

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents analytical methods to predict the magnetic field distribution, electrical parameters, and output characteristics of a high speed synchronous generator equipped with surface-mounted permanent magnet. In order to analyze the magnetic field distribution and to estimate the electrical parameters, electromagnetic transfer relation (TR) theorem is employed. Moreover, output characteristics for variable resistive load and the operating speed are also obtained by solving the permanent magnet machine's equivalent circuit equation. The analytical results are validated extensively by nonlinear finite element analysis and experimental results.

  2. High fidelity simulation of non-synchronous vibration for aircraft engine fan/compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hong-Sik

    The objectives of this research are to develop a high fidelity simulation methodology for turbomachinery aeromechanical problems and to investigate the mechanism of non-synchronous vibration (NSV) of an aircraft engine axial compressor. A fully conservative rotor/stator sliding technique is developed to accurately capture the unsteadiness and interaction between adjacent blade rows. Phase lag boundary conditions (BC) based on the time shift (direct store) method and the Fourier series phase lag BC are implemented to take into account the effect of phase difference for a sector of annulus simulation. To resolve the nonlinear interaction between flow and vibrating blade structure, a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) procedure that solves the structural modal equations and time accurate Navier-Stokes equations simultaneously is adopted. An advanced mesh deformation method that generates the blade tip block mesh moving with the blade displacement is developed to ensure the mesh quality. An efficient and low diffusion E-CUSP (LDE) scheme as a Riemann solver designed to minimize numerical dissipation is used with an improved hybrid RANS/LES turbulence strategy, delayed detached eddy simulation (DDES). High order accuracy (3rd and 5th order) weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes for inviscid flux and a conservative 2nd and 4th order viscous flux differencing are employed. Extensive validations are conducted to demonstrate high accuracy and robustness of the high fidelity FSI simulation methodology. The validated cases include: (1) DDES of NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack with massive separation. The DDES accurately predicts the drag whereas the URANS model significantly over predicts the drag. (2) The AGARD Wing 445.6 flutter boundary is accurately predicted including the point at supersonic incoming flow. (3) NASA Rotor 67 validation for steady state speed line and radial profiles at peak efficiency point and near stall point. The

  3. Ventral Medial Thalamic Nucleus Promotes Synchronization of Increased High Beta Oscillatory Activity in the Basal Ganglia–Thalamocortical Network of the Hemiparkinsonian Rat

    PubMed Central

    Brazhnik, Elena; McCoy, Alex J.; Novikov, Nikolay; Hatch, Christina E.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of dopamine is associated with increased synchronization and oscillatory activity in the subthalamic nucleus and basal ganglia (BG) output nuclei in both Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and animal models of PD. We have previously observed substantial increases in spectral power in the 25–40 Hz range in LFPs recorded in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) and motor cortex (MCx) in the hemiparkinsonian rat during treadmill walking. The current study explores the hypothesis that SNpr output entrains activity in the ventral medial thalamus (VM) in this frequency range after loss of dopamine, which in turn contributes to entrainment of the MCx and BG. Electrode bundles were implanted in MCx, SNpr, and VM of rats with unilateral dopamine cell lesions. Spiking and LFP activity were recorded during epochs of rest and walking on a circular treadmill. After dopamine cell lesion, 30–36 Hz LFP activity in the VM became more robust during treadmill walking and more coherent with LFP activity in the same range in MCx and SNpr. Infusion of the GABAA antagonist picrotoxin into the VM reduced both high beta power in MCx and SNpr and coherence between MCx and SNpr while temporarily restoring walking ability. Infusion of the GABAA agonist muscimol into the VM also reduced MCx–SNpr coherence and beta power but failed to improve walking. These results support the view that synchronized neuronal activity in the VM contributes to the emergence of high beta oscillations throughout the BG-thalamocortical network in the behaving parkinsonian rat. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Parkinson's disease symptoms are associated with dramatic increases in synchronized beta range (15–35 Hz) oscillatory local field activity in several brain areas involved in motor control, but the mechanisms promoting this activity and its functional significance remain unresolved. This oscillatory activity can be recorded in awake behaving rats with unilateral dopamine cell lesions using chronically

  4. Synchronous Quadruple Primary Neoplasms: Colon Adenocarcinoma, Collision Tumor of Neuroendocrine Tumor and Schwann Cell Hamartoma and Sessile Serrated Adenoma of the Appendix.

    PubMed

    Meeks, Marshall W; Grace, Shane; Chen, Yongxin; Petterchak, James; Bolesta, Edward; Zhou, Yihua; Lai, Jin-Ping

    2016-08-01

    Quadruple synchronous primary neoplasms are very rare with only three cases reported in the English-speaking literature to date. Collision tumors are also rare entities, especially of the appendix. We herein report a case of synchronous quadruple primary neoplasm in a 95-year-old female. She was diagnosed with colon adenocarcinoma, sessile serrated adenoma of the appendix and a collision tumor composed of a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor and Schwann cell hamartoma. Histological examination and immunohistochemistry supported these four lesions as separate entities. This case is unique because we report the diagnosis of quadruple synchronous primary, an extremely rare occurrence, in addition to a collision tumor of the appendix. We also provide a review of the literature for synchronous neoplasms and collision tumors.

  5. Relation of apical dendritic spikes to output decision in CA1 pyramidal cells during synchronous activation: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Ibarz, José M; Makarova, Ioulia; Herreras, Oscar

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies on the initiation and propagation of dendritic spikes have modified the classical view of postsynaptic integration. Earlier we reported that subthreshold currents and spikes recruited by synaptic currents play a critical role in defining outputs following synchronous activation. Experimental factors strongly condition these currents due to their nonlinear behaviour. Hence, we have performed a detailed parametric study in a CA1 pyramidal cell model to explore how different variables interact and initiate dendritic spiking, and how they influence cell output. The input pattern, the relative excitability of axon and dendrites, the presence/modulation of voltage-dependent channels, and inhibition were cross analysed. Subthreshold currents and spikes on synaptically excited branches fired spikes in other branches to jointly produce different modalities of apical shaft spiking with a variable impact on cell output. Synchronous activation initiated a varying number and temporal scatter of firing branches that produced in the apical shaft-soma axis nonpropagating spikes, pseudosaltatory or continuous forward conduction, or backpropagation. As few as 6-10 local spikes within a time window of 2 ms ensure cell output. However, the activation mode varied extremely when two or more variables were cross-analysed, becoming rather unpredictable when all the variables were considered. Spatially clustered inputs and upper modulation of dendritic Na(+) or Ca(2+) electrogenesis favour apical decision. In contrast, inhibition biased the output decision toward the axon and switched between dendritic firing modes. We propose that dendrites can discriminate input patterns and decide immediate cell output depending on the particular state of a variety of endogenous parameters.

  6. Synchronous digitization for high dynamic range lock-in amplification in beam-scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Ryan D.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2014-03-01

    Digital lock-in amplification (LIA) with synchronous digitization (SD) is shown to provide significant signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range advantages in beam-scanning microscopy measurements using pulsed laser sources. Direct comparisons between SD-LIA and conventional LIA in homodyne second harmonic generation measurements resulted in S/N enhancements consistent with theoretical models. SD-LIA provided notably larger S/N enhancements in the limit of low light intensities, through the smooth transition between photon counting and signal averaging developed in previous work. Rapid beam scanning instrumentation with up to video rate acquisition speeds minimized photo-induced sample damage. The corresponding increased allowance for higher laser power without sample damage is advantageous for increasing the observed signal content.

  7. Synchronous digitization for high dynamic range lock-in amplification in beam-scanning microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, Ryan D.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2014-03-15

    Digital lock-in amplification (LIA) with synchronous digitization (SD) is shown to provide significant signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range advantages in beam-scanning microscopy measurements using pulsed laser sources. Direct comparisons between SD-LIA and conventional LIA in homodyne second harmonic generation measurements resulted in S/N enhancements consistent with theoretical models. SD-LIA provided notably larger S/N enhancements in the limit of low light intensities, through the smooth transition between photon counting and signal averaging developed in previous work. Rapid beam scanning instrumentation with up to video rate acquisition speeds minimized photo-induced sample damage. The corresponding increased allowance for higher laser power without sample damage is advantageous for increasing the observed signal content.

  8. High voltage thermal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, David M.

    An experiment aimed at a search for new, high-energy cathodes for thermal cells is described. The experiment has begun to reduce the solubility, volatility, and mobility of the cathode materials by preparing and testing massive, relatively immobile cathode molecules. A good candidate for this is the vanadium series, which forms rings, chains, clusters and Keggin compounds. The first three compounds of this genre have been prepared: K3V5O14, Na6V10O28, and K7(Ni4+V13O30). Only the first of these compounds has been tested as a cathode material. The K3V5O14 demonstrated better performance than V2O5, but it is not as good as the FeS2 cells used for benchmarks.

  9. Selection of in-phase or out-of-phase synchronization in a model based on global coupling of cells undergoing metabolic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonze, Didier; Markadieu, Nicolas; Goldbeter, Albert

    2008-09-01

    On the basis of experimental observations, it has been suggested that glycolytic oscillations underlie the pulsatile secretion of insulin by pancreatic β cells, with a periodicity of about 13min. If β cells within an islet are synchronized through gap junctions, the question arises as to how β cells located in different islets of Langerhans synchronize to produce oscillations in plasma levels of insulin. We address this question by means of a minimal model that incorporates the secretion of insulin by cells undergoing glycolytic oscillations. Global coupling and synchronization result from the inhibition exerted by insulin on the production of glucose, which serves as the substrate for metabolic oscillations. Glycolytic oscillations are described by a simple two-variable model centered on the product-activated reaction catalyzed by the allosteric enzyme phosphofructokinase. We obtain bifurcation diagrams for the cases in which insulin secretion is controlled solely by the product or by the substrate of the metabolic oscillator. Remarkably, we find that the oscillating cells in these conditions synchronize, respectively, in phase or out of phase. Numerical simulations show that in-phase and out-of-phase synchronization can sometimes coexist when insulin release is controlled by both the substrate and the product of the metabolic oscillator. The results provide an example of a system in which the selection of in-phase or out-of-phase synchronization is governed by the nature of the coupling between the intracellular oscillations and the secretion of the biochemical signal through which the oscillating cells are globally coupled.

  10. Decoding Network Structure in On-Chip Integrated Flow Cells with Synchronization of Electrochemical Oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yanxin; Kiss, István Z.

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of network interactions among dynamical units and the impact of the coupling on self-organized structures is a challenging task with implications in many biological and engineered systems. We explore the coupling topology that arises through the potential drops in a flow channel in a lab-on-chip device that accommodates chemical reactions on electrode arrays. The networks are revealed by analysis of the synchronization patterns with the use of an oscillatory chemical reaction (nickel electrodissolution) and are further confirmed by direct decoding using phase model analysis. In dual electrode configuration, a variety coupling schemes, (uni- or bidirectional positive or negative) were identified depending on the relative placement of the reference and counter electrodes (e.g., placed at the same or the opposite ends of the flow channel). With three electrodes, the network consists of a superposition of a localized (upstream) and global (all-to-all) coupling. With six electrodes, the unique, position dependent coupling topology resulted spatially organized partial synchronization such that there was a synchrony gradient along the quasi-one-dimensional spatial coordinate. The networked, electrode potential (current) spike generating electrochemical reactions hold potential for construction of an in-situ information processing unit to be used in electrochemical devices in sensors and batteries. PMID:28387237

  11. Effect of synchronization of donor cells in early G1-phase using shake-off method on developmental potential of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in cattle.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yuji; Hirayama, Muneyuki; Takeda, Kazuya; Tukamoto, Nobuyuki; Sakata, Osamu; Kaeriyama, Hiroshi; Geshi, Masaya

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we compared the developmental ability of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos reconstructed with three bovine somatic cells that had been synchronized in G0-phase (G0-SCNT group) or early G1-phase (eG1-SCNT group). Furthermore, we investigated the production efficiency of cloned offspring for NT embryos derived from these donor cells. The G0-phase and eG1-phase cells were synchronized, respectively, using serum starvation and antimitotic reagent treatment combined with shaking of the plate containing the cells (shake-off method). The fusion rate in the G0-SCNT groups (64.2 ± 1.8%) was significantly higher than that of eG1-SCNT groups (39.2 ± 1.9%) (P < 0.05), but the developmental rates to the blastocyst stage of SCNT embryos per fused oocytes were similar for all groups. The overall production efficiency of the clone offspring in eG1-SCNT groups (12.7%) per recipient cow was higher than that in G0-SCNT groups (3%) (P < 0.05). The mean birth weight of cloned calves and the average calving score in the G0-SCNT groups (48.1 ± 3.4 kg and 3.3 ± 0.3, respectively) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of eG1-SCNT groups (37.2 ± 2.1 kg and 2.3 ± 0.2, respectively). Results of this study indicate that synchronization of donor cells in eG1-phase using the shake-off method improved the overall production efficiency of the clone offspring per transferred embryo.

  12. Double-layer rotor magnetic shield performance analysis in high temperature superconducting synchronous generators under short circuit fault conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hekmati, Arsalan; Aliahmadi, Mehdi

    2016-12-01

    High temperature superconducting, HTS, synchronous machines benefit from a rotor magnetic shield in order to protect superconducting coils against asynchronous magnetic fields. This magnetic shield, however, suffers from exerted Lorentz forces generated in light of induced eddy currents during transient conditions, e.g. stator windings short-circuit fault. In addition, to the exerted electromagnetic forces, eddy current losses and the associated effects on the cryogenic system are the other consequences of shielding HTS coils. This study aims at investigating the Rotor Magnetic Shield, RMS, performance in HTS synchronous generators under stator winding short-circuit fault conditions. The induced eddy currents in different circumferential positions of the rotor magnetic shield along with associated Joule heating losses would be studied using 2-D time-stepping Finite Element Analysis, FEA. The investigation of Lorentz forces exerted on the magnetic shield during transient conditions has also been performed in this paper. The obtained results show that double line-to-ground fault is of the most importance among different types of short-circuit faults. It was revealed that when it comes to the design of the rotor magnetic shields, in addition to the eddy current distribution and the associated ohmic losses, two phase-to-ground fault should be taken into account since the produced electromagnetic forces in the time of fault conditions are more severe during double line-to-ground fault.

  13. A high temperature superconducting induction/synchronous motor with a ten-fold improvement in torque density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Matsumura, K.; Nishimura, T.; Nagao, K.; Yamada, Y.; Amemiya, N.; Itoh, Y.; Terazawa, T.; Osamura, K.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the enhancement of the torque density in a high temperature superconductor (HTS) induction/synchronous machine is experimentally and theoretically investigated by the use of Bi-2223 windings. The basic structure of this machine is the same as that of a conventional squirrel-cage induction motor, and the secondary windings are replaced by the superconducting tapes. Firstly, quantitative values of the enhanced torque are measured in an experiment using a fabricated motor at 77 K. Then, such a torque result is theoretically confirmed based upon the analytical expression, which is derived from the nonlinear electrical equivalent circuit. It is shown that the theoretical and experimental results agree well with each other, and the torque value drastically increases by more than ten times compared to the conventional induction motor. These results indicate that it is possible to realize a compact sized high efficiency HTS motor in a simple structure.

  14. Spectral fingerprinting of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in high-volume ambient air samples by constant energy synchronous luminescence spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kerkhoff, M.J.; Lee, T.M.; Allen, E.R.; Lundgren, D.A.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    A high-volume sampler fitted with a glass-fiber filter and backed by polyurethane foam (PUF) was employed to collect airborne particulate and gas-phase polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient air. Samples were collected from four sources representing a range of environmental conditions: gasoline engine exhaust, diesel engine exhaust, air near a heavily traveled interstate site, and air from a moderately polluted urban site. Spectral fingerprints of the unseparated particulate and gas-phase samples were obtained by constant energy synchronous luminescence spectroscopy (CESLS). Five major PAHs in the gas-phase extracts were characterized and estimated. The compatibility of a high-volume sampling method using polyurethane foam coupled with CESLS detection is explored for use as a screening technique for PAHs in ambient air. ?? 1985 American Chemical Society.

  15. High efficiency solar cell processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, F.; Iles, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    At the time of writing, cells made by several groups are approaching 19% efficiency. General aspects of the processing required for such cells are discussed. Most processing used for high efficiency cells is derived from space-cell or concentrator cell technology, and recent advances have been obtained from improved techniques rather than from better understanding of the limiting mechanisms. Theory and modeling are fairly well developed, and adequate to guide further asymptotic increases in performance of near conventional cells. There are several competitive cell designs with promise of higher performance ( 20%) but for these designs further improvements are required. The available cell processing technology to fabricate high efficiency cells is examined.

  16. Frame Synchronization of High-Speed Vision Sensors with Respect to Temporally Encoded Illumination in Highly Dynamic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Lei; Kagami, Shingo; Hashimoto, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    The authors propose a Manchester Encoding inspired illumination modulation strategy to properly index the temporally-aligned vision frames, which are successfully synchronized by the LED reference signal. Based on signal normalization, Manchester Encoded reference signals carry temporal information owing to serial communication and thus can timestamp the output vision frame. Both simulated and experimental results show satisfactory robustness to various disturbances, such as dynamic targets, fluctuant optical intensity, and unfixed cameras, etc. The 1,000 Hz vision sensor is locked to 500 Hz temporally modulated LED illumination with only 24 μs jitters. This result is believed to be applicable to low-cost wireless vision sensor network. PMID:23535638

  17. Modeling synchronous theta activity in the medial septum: key role of local communications between different cell populations.

    PubMed

    Mysin, Ivan E; Kitchigina, Valentina F; Kazanovich, Yakov

    2015-08-01

    It is widely believed that the theta rhythm in the hippocampus is caused by the rhythmic input from the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca (MSDB). The main MSDB output is formed by GABAergic projection neurons which are divided into two subpopulations and fire at different phases of the hippocampal theta rhythm. The MSDB also contains projection cholinergic, glutamatergic, and non-projection GABAergic neurons. These cell populations innervate each other and also GABAergic projection neurons and participate in the formation of the synchronous rhythmic output to the hippocampus. The purpose of this study is to work out a model of interactions between all neural populations of the MSDB that underlie the formation of the synchronous septal theta signal. The model is built from biologically plausible neurons of the Hodgkin-Huxley type and its architecture reflects modern data on the morphology of neural connections in the MSDB. The model satisfies the following requirements: (1) a large portion of neurons is fast-spiking; (2) the subpopulations of GABAergic projection neurons contain endogenous pacemaker neurons; (3) the phase shift of activity between subpopulations of GABAergic projection neurons is equal to about 150°; and (4) the strengths of bidirectional connections between the subpopulations of GABAergic projection cells are different. It is shown that the theta rhythm generation can be performed by a system of glutamatergic and GABAergic non-projection neurons. We also show that bursting pacemaker neurons in the subpopulation of projection GABAergic neurons play a significant role in the formation of stable antiphase outputs from the MSDB to the hippocampus.

  18. Synchronizing Fireflies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Ying; Gall, Walter; Nabb, Karen Mayumi

    2006-01-01

    "Imagine a tenth of a mile of river front with an unbroken line of trees with fireflies on ever leaf flashing in synchronism. ... Then, if one's imagination is sufficiently vivid, he may form some conception of this amazing spectacle." So wrote the naturalist Hugh Smith. In this article we consider how one might model mathematically the…

  19. A Novel 500kW High-Speed Turbine PM Synchronous Generator Set for Distributed Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Sven; Benecke, Frank; Güldner, Henry

    The paper presents a power generation system based on the cogeneration of heat and electricity with a novel high speed turbogenerator. The machine consists of a single stage steam turbine and a directly coupled permanent magnet synchronous generator in one constructional unit. A PWM IGBT rectifier is the load to the generator and a PWM IGBT three-phase four-wire inverter feeds the power into the low voltage mains. In order to increase the turbine efficiency at light load, variable speed operation of the turbogenerator is realized. Different control schemes for mains parallel operation and stand alone operation are presented. The control schemes allow for the use of a lookup table based control with a speed-power-characteristic or for the use of a maximum power point tracker. Measurement results from the successfully tested turbogenerator set are presented.

  20. The reason for synchronous disturbances in the atmospheric electric field and high-frequency geoacoustic emission during the seismotectonic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulenko, O. P.; Marapulets, Yu. V.; Kuzmin, Yu. D.

    2015-03-01

    The atmospheric electric field, the geoacoustic emission at frequencies of 0.7-2.0 kHz at three points, the volumetric activity of radon and thoron in the surface ground layer, the atmospheric pressure, the velocity of wind, and the intensity of rain were synchronously measured from August 27 to October 17, 2012, at the interception zone of various faults 41 km southwest of the town of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy. It was found for the first time that the increase in radon and thoron concentration in the surface ground layer is accompanied by a decrease in the atmospheric electric field and simultaneous disturbance of the high-frequency geoacoustic emission. The stronger emission of these gases into the atmosphere due to the increase in velocity of the extension of subsurface sedimentary rocks during seismotectonic process is the most likely reason for the decrease in the electric field, which occured along with a geoacoustic disturbance.

  1. Investigating early events in receptor binding and translocation of colicin E9 using synchronized cell killing and proteolytic cleavage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Vankemmelbeke, Mireille N; Holland, Lisa E; Walker, David C; James, Richard; Penfold, Christopher N

    2008-06-01

    Enzymatic colicins such as colicin E9 (ColE9) bind to BtuB on the cell surface of Escherichia coli and rapidly recruit a second coreceptor, either OmpF or OmpC, through which the N-terminal natively disordered region (NDR) of their translocation domain gains entry into the cell periplasm and interacts with TolB. Previously, we constructed an inactive disulfide-locked mutant ColE9 (ColE9(s-s)) that binds to BtuB and can be reduced with dithiothreitol (DTT) to synchronize cell killing. By introducing unique enterokinase (EK) cleavage sites in ColE9(s-s), we showed that the first 61 residues of the NDR were inaccessible to cleavage when bound to BtuB, whereas an EK cleavage site inserted at residue 82 of the NDR remained accessible. This suggests that most of the NDR is occluded by OmpF shortly after binding to BtuB, whereas the extreme distal region of the NDR is surface exposed before unfolding of the receptor-binding domain occurs. EK cleavage of unique cleavage sites located in the ordered region of the translocation domain or in the distal region of the receptor-binding domain confirmed that these regions of ColE9 remained accessible at the E. coli cell surface. Lack of EK cleavage of the DNase domain of the cell-bound, oxidized ColE9/Im9 complex, and the rapid detection of Alexa Fluor 594-labeled Im9 (Im9(AF)) in the cell supernatant following treatment of cells with DTT, suggested that immunity release occurred immediately after unfolding of the colicin and was not driven by binding to BtuB.

  2. Short baseline solution from multi-antenna synchronized GNSS receiver and its applications for high-precision positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Dong, Danan; Cai, Miaomiao; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Minghua; Zheng, Zhengqi; Yu, Chao; Kuang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Multi-antenna synchronized GNSS receiver (using the same receiver clock) is a new type of receivers with low cost, high accuracy and broad range of applications. Using this receiver, single difference carrier phase observations are able to eliminate both the satellite and receiver clock errors simultaneously, which are equivalent to classical double difference model. However, current commercial products of this type of receivers still adopt the double differencing algorithm and hence do not take full advantage of the receiver clock synchronizing for better accuracy, efficiency and broader applications. In this study, we develop a single differencing algorithm for this emerging receiver, especially for short baseline solutions. Our results indicate that the single differencing algorithm enhances the resolving accuracy and efficiency, it also widens the applications. In addition, this innovate algorithm is able to observe the ground-based carrier phase wind-up (GPWU) effects clearly for the first time. Our major research results are summarized as the followings: (1) A real-time attitude determination algorithm is developed based on single difference carrier phase observations from multi-antenna synchronized GNSS receiver. Comparing with the double differencing algorithm, it has more observations and redundancy. Its solutions show better repeatability and lower correlations among parameters. In this algorithm, we design an ambiguity substitution approach (ASA), which separates the fractional initial phase from the integer parts of single difference ambiguities effectively, thus narrows the searching space of ambiguities and improves the efficiency and correctness of integer ambiguity fixing. (2) We construct a Multipath Hemispherical Model (MHM) to mitigate the multipath effects. The MHM is applicable not only for static environment but also for dynamic carriers with static multipath environment such as ships and airplanes. (3) We also propose the Single Antenna Yaw

  3. The Synchronization of Replication and Division Cycles in Individual E. coli Cells.

    PubMed

    Wallden, Mats; Fange, David; Lundius, Ebba Gregorsson; Baltekin, Özden; Elf, Johan

    2016-07-28

    Isogenic E. coli cells growing in a constant environment display significant variability in growth rates, division sizes, and generation times. The guiding principle appears to be that each cell, during one generation, adds a size increment that is uncorrelated to its birth size. Here, we investigate the mechanisms underlying this "adder" behavior by mapping the chromosome replication cycle to the division cycle of individual cells using fluorescence microscopy. We have found that initiation of chromosome replication is triggered at a fixed volume per chromosome independent of a cell's birth volume and growth rate. Each initiation event is coupled to a division event after a growth-rate-dependent time. We formalize our findings in a model showing that cell-to-cell variation in division timing and cell size is mainly driven by variations in growth rate. The model also explains why fast-growing cells display adder behavior and correctly predict deviations from the adder behavior at slow growth.

  4. Robotic sequential right adrenalectomy and zero ischemia left partial nephrectomy in a patient with synchronous pheochromocytoma and renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Canda, Abdullah Erdem; Çakıcı, Özer Ural; Ener, Kemal; Atmaca, Ali Fuat

    2015-09-01

    Currently, most renal masses are detected incidentally while still small in size because of the widespread use of radiological imaging, and most pheochromocytomas are localized in the adrenal glands as unilateral lesions. A 5 × 4-cm right adrenal mass and a 19 × 13-mm exophytic left renal mass were synchronously detected by contrast enhancement on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in a 47-year-old male with hypertension. The patient's preoperative serum and 24-h urine catecholamine levels were elevated. Initially, robotic transperitoneal right adrenalectomy was performed, and histopathology confirmed a 4 cm pheochromocytoma. After 3 months, transperitoneal zero ischemia robotic left partial nephrectomy was performed, and histopathology demonstrated clear cell renal cell carcinoma, Fuhrman grade II, 17 mm in size with clear surgical margins. This case indicates that sequential robotic surgery is feasible and safe as a minimally invasive approach to remove bilateral renal and adrenal masses. Zero ischemia robotic partial nephrectomy is also feasible and safe for selected small renal masses.

  5. Implementing the Synchronous Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Jan A.

    2010-01-01

    This commentary describes an action research project conducted by selected staff at the Northern Valley Regional High School District in New Jersey. The project focused on the idea of developing a synchronous classroom to provide world language learning opportunities to students. Relevant research is provided as are ideas regarding logistics and…

  6. Synchronization of pathogenic protozoans.

    PubMed

    Svärd, Staffan; Troell, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Protozoans are single-cell eukaryotes and many of the best studied protozoans are parasitic to humans (e.g., Plasmodium falciparum causing malaria and Trypanosoma brucei causing sleeping sickness). These organisms are distantly related to humans but with retained eukaryotic type of cellular processes, making them good model systems for studies of the evolution of basic processes like the cell cycle. Giardia intestinalis causes 250 million cases of diarrhea yearly and is one of the earliest diverging protozoans. It has recently been possible to synchronize its cell cycle using compounds that inhibit different steps of the cell cycle and the detailed protocol is described here.

  7. Should aggressive thoracic therapy be performed in patients with synchronous oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer? A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dianhe; Wang, Haofei; Qiu, Min; Li, Na

    2017-01-01

    Background We performed a meta-analysis to compare overall survival (OS) outcomes in patients with synchronous oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who underwent aggressive thoracic therapy (ATT) with those who did not. Methods A systematic review of controlled trials of ATT on survival in synchronous oligometastatic NSCLC was conducted. Hazard ratio (HR) for the main endpoint OS was pooled using a fixed-effects model. Subgroup analysis was performed in patients with single organ metastases, or with different numbers of brain metastases, or with different stages of thoracic disease. Pooled survival curves of OS were constructed. Results Seven eligible retrospective observational cohort studies were identified including 668 synchronous oligometastatic NSCLC patients, of whom 227 (34.0%) received ATT. For patients with synchronous oligometastatic NSCLC, ATT was associated with a significant improvement of OS (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.39–0.60; P<0.00001). In subgroup analysis, the association with OS was similar or even strengthened, with a HR of 0.42 (95% CI, 0.31–0.56) in single organ metastases group, 0.49 (95% CI, 0.31–0.75) in solitary brain metastasis group, and 0.38 (95% CI, 0.20–0.73) in thoracic stage I–II group, respectively. The pooled cumulative survival rates for patients received ATT were 74.9% at 1 year, 52.1% at 2 years, 23.0% at 3 years, and 12.6% at 4 years. The corresponding pooled survival for patients who did not receive ATT were 32.3%, 13.7%, 3.7%, and 2.0%, respectively. Conclusions Survival benefit from ATT is common in synchronous oligometastatic patients. Selected patients with synchronous oligometastatic NSCLC could also achieve long-term survival with ATT. PMID:28275479

  8. Elevated gene expression in chalcone synthase enzyme suggests an increased production of flavonoids in skin and synchronized red cell cultures of North American native grape berries.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gina; Ananga, Anthony; Krastanova, Stoyanka; Sutton, Safira; Ochieng, Joel W; Leong, Stephen; Tsolova, Violetka

    2012-06-01

    Anthocyanins are antioxidants and are among the natural products synthesized via the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway. Anthocyanins have been recommended for dietary intake in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and age-related conditions such as Alzheimer's disease or dementia. With an increasingly aging population in many parts of the world, strategies for the commercial production of in vitro synchronized red cell cultures as natural antioxidants will be a significant contribution to human medicine. Red pigmented fruits such as grapes (Vitis sp.) are a major source of bioavailable anthocyanins and other polyphenols. Since the level of antioxidants varies among cultivars, this study is the first one that phytochemically and genetically characterizes native grape cultivars of North America to determine the optimal cultivar and berry cells for the production of anthocyanins as antioxidants. Using real-time PCR and bioinformatics approaches, we tested for the transcript expression of the chalcone synthase (CHS) gene, an enzyme involved in the flavonoid and anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway, in different parts of physiologically mature grape berries and in vitro synchronized red cells. A low level of expression was recorded in berry flesh, compared with an elevated expression in berry skins and in vitro synchronized red cells, suggesting increased production of flavonoids in skin and cell cultures. This preliminary study demonstrates the potential of functional genomics in natural products research as well as in systematic studies of North American native grapes, specifically in muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia).

  9. Synchronism in mitochondrial ROS flashes, membrane depolarization and calcium sparks in human carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Javadov, Sabzali; Saks, Valdur; Margreiter, Raimund; Grimm, Michael

    2017-03-06

    Mitochondria are major producers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in many cells including cancer cells. However, complex interrelationships between mitochondrial ROS (mitoROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and Ca(2+) are not completely understood. Using human carcinoma cells, we further highlight biphasic ROS dynamics: - gradual mitoROS increase followed by mitoROS flash. Also, we demonstrate heterogeneity in rates of mitoROS generation and flash initiation time. Comparing mitochondrial and near-extra-mitochondrial signals, we show that mechanisms of mitoROS flashes in single mitochondria, linked to mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening (ΔΨm collapse) and calcium sparks, may involve flash triggering by certain levels of external ROS released from the same mitochondria. In addition, mitochondria-mitochondria interactions can produce wave propagations of mitoROS flashes and ΔΨm collapses in cancer cells similar to phenomena of ROS-induced ROS release (RIRR). Our data suggest that in cancer cells RIRR, activation of mitoROS flashes and mitochondrial depolarization may involve participation of extramitochondrial-ROS produced either by individual mitochondria and/or by neighboring mitochondria. This could represent general mechanisms in ROS-ROS signaling with suggested role in both mitochondrial and cellular physiology and signaling.

  10. Heterogeneous populations of cells mediate spontaneous synchronous bursting in the developing hippocampus through a frequency-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Menendez de la Prida, L; Sanchez-Andres, J V

    2000-01-01

    Under normal conditions, hippocampal slices from newborn rats and rabbits (postnatal days 0-8) show spontaneous synchronous bursts known as giant depolarizing potentials. These bursts are recorded from CA3, CA1 and the fascia dentata in both intact slices and isolated hipocampal regions. Giant depolarizing potentials are network-driven events resulting from the synergistic activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxadepropionate and GABA(A) receptors, the latter playing an excitatory role. Recently, we showed that they spontaneously emerge in an all-or-none manner after the increase of synaptic and cellular activity beyond a threshold frequency [Menendez de la Prida L. and Sanchez-Andres J. V. (1999) J. Neurophysiol. 82, 202-208]. Under this framework, background levels of spontaneous activity at individual neurons build up network synchronization 100-300ms prior to the onset of giant depolarizing potentials. However, the role of distinct cellular populations and connectivity in determining the threshold frequency has not been examined. By performing simultaneous intracellular recordings from pyramidal cells, non-pyramidal cells and interneurons, we investigated their participation in the generation of giant depolarizing potentials. Electrodes containing Neurobiotin were used to examine the cellular morphology. We found that giant depolarizing potentials were not initiated from a single pacemaker cellular group; instead, they involved recurrent cooperation among these groups, which contributed differently according to their intrinsic firing capability. In all the neurons examined, the onset of these bursts took place in an all-or-none frequency-dependent manner, both spontaneously (depending on the frequency of the excitatory postsynaptic potentials) or when triggered by extracellular stimulation. The CA3 threshold of frequency was at 12Hz in both pyramidal cells and interneurons, while in the fascia dentata it was 17Hz. The

  11. Analysis of Factors Controlling Cell Cycle that Can Be Synchronized Nondestructively During Root Cap Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hawes, Martha

    2011-02-04

    Publications and presentations during the final funding period, including progress in defining the substrate specificity, the primary goal of the project, are listed below. Both short-term and long-term responses mediated by PsUGT1 have been characterized in transgenic or mutant pea, alfalfa, and Arabidopsis with altered expression of PsUGT1. Additional progress includes evaluation of the relationship between control of the cell cycle by PsUGT1 and other glycosyltransferase and glycosidase enzymes that are co-regulated in the legume root cap during the onset of mitosis and differentiation. Transcriptional profiling and multidimensional protein identification technology ('MudPIT') have been used to establish the broader molecular context for the mechanism by which PsUGT1 controls cell cycle in response to environmental signals. A collaborative study with the Norwegian Forest Research Institute (who provided $10,000.00 in supplies and travel funds for collaborator Dr. Toril Eldhuset to travel to Arizona and Dr. H. H. Woo to travel to Norway) made it possible to establish that the inducible root cap system for studying carbohydrate synthesis and solubilization is expressed in gymnosperm as well as angiosperm species. This discovery provides an important tool to amplify the potential applications of the research in defining conserved cell cycle machinery across a very broad range of plant species and habitats. The final work, published during 2009, revealed an additional surprising parallel with mammalian immune responses: The cells whose production is controlled by PsUGT1 appear to function in a manner which is analogous to that of white blood cells, by trapping and killing in an extracellular manner. This may explain why mutation within the coding region of PsUGT1 and its homolog in humans (UGT1) is lethal to plants and animals. The work has been the subject of invited reviews. A postdoctoral fellow, eight undergraduate students, four M.S. students and three Ph

  12. How to synchronize biological clocks.

    PubMed

    Russo, G; Di Bernardo, M

    2009-02-01

    This paper is concerned with a novel algorithm to study networks of biological clocks. A new set of conditions is established that can be used to verify whether an existing network synchronizes or to give guidelines to construct a new synthetic network of biological oscillators that synchronize. The methodology uses the so-called contraction theory from dynamical system theory and Gershgorin disk theorem. The strategy is validated on two examples: a model of glycolisis in yeast cells and a synthetic network of Repressilators that synchronizes.

  13. Changes in nucleosome repeat lengths precede replication in the early replicating metallothionein II gene region of cells synchronized in early S phase

    SciTech Connect

    D'Anna, J.A.; Tobey, R.A. )

    1989-04-04

    Previous investigations showed that inhibition of DNA synthesis by hydroxyurea, aphidicolin, or 5-fluorodeoxyuridine produced large changes in the composition and nucleosome repeat lengths of bulk chromatin. There the authors report results of investigations to determine whether the changes in nucleosome repeat lengths might be localized in the initiated replicons, as postulated. In most experiments, Chinese hamster (line CHO) cells were synchronized in G1, or they were synchronized in early S phase by allowing G1 cells to enter S phase in medium containing 1 mM hydroxyurea or 5 {mu}g mL{sup {minus}1} aphidicolin, a procedure believed to produce an accumulation of initiated replicons that arise from normally early replicating DNA. Measurements of nucleosome repeat lengths of bulk chromatin, the early replicating unexpressed metallothionein II (MTII) gene region, and a later replicating repeated sequence indicate that the changes in repeat lengths occur preferentially in the early replicating MTII gene region as G1 cells enter and become synchronized in early S phase. During that time, the MTII gene region is not replicated nor is there any evidence for induction of MTII messenger RNA. Thus, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in chromatin structure occur preferentially in the early replicating (presumably initiated) replicons at initiation or that changes in chromatin structure can precede replication during inhibition of DNA synthesis. The shortened repeat lengths that precede MTII replication are, potentially, reversible, because they become elongated when the synchronized early S-phase cells are released to resume cell cycle progression.

  14. Joint synchronization and high capacity data hiding for 3D meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itier, Vincent; Puech, William; Gesquière, Gilles; Pedeboy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) meshes are already profusely used in lot of domains. In this paper, we propose a new high capacity data hiding scheme for vertex cloud. Our approach is based on very small displacements of vertices, that produce very low distortion of the mesh. Moreover this method can embed three bits per vertex relying only on the geometry of the mesh. As an application, we show how we embed a large binary logo for copyright purpose.

  15. High-resolution timing of cell cycle-regulated gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rowicka, Maga; Kudlicki, Andrzej; Tu, Benjamin P.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek

    2007-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell division cycle depends on an intricate sequence of transcriptional events. Using an algorithm based on maximum-entropy deconvolution, and expression data from a highly synchronized yeast culture, we have timed the peaks of expression of transcriptionally regulated cell cycle genes to an accuracy of 2 min (≈1% of the cell cycle time). The set of 1,129 cell cycle-regulated genes was identified by a comprehensive analysis encompassing all available cell cycle yeast data sets. Our results reveal distinct subphases of the cell cycle undetectable by morphological observation, as well as the precise timeline of macromolecular complex assembly during key cell cycle events. PMID:17827275

  16. Predicting spike timing in highly synchronous auditory neurons at different sound levels

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Bertrand; Benichoux, Victor; Joris, Philip X.

    2013-01-01

    A challenge for sensory systems is to encode natural signals that vary in amplitude by orders of magnitude. The spike trains of neurons in the auditory system must represent the fine temporal structure of sounds despite a tremendous variation in sound level in natural environments. It has been shown in vitro that the transformation from dynamic signals into precise spike trains can be accurately captured by simple integrate-and-fire models. In this work, we show that the in vivo responses of cochlear nucleus bushy cells to sounds across a wide range of levels can be precisely predicted by deterministic integrate-and-fire models with adaptive spike threshold. Our model can predict both the spike timings and the firing rate in response to novel sounds, across a large input level range. A noisy version of the model accounts for the statistical structure of spike trains, including the reliability and temporal precision of responses. Spike threshold adaptation was critical to ensure that predictions remain accurate at different levels. These results confirm that simple integrate-and-fire models provide an accurate phenomenological account of spike train statistics and emphasize the functional relevance of spike threshold adaptation. PMID:23864375

  17. Treatment of synchronous mantle cell lymphoma and small lymphocytic lymphoma with bendamustine and rituximab.

    PubMed

    Kourelis, Taxiarchis V; Kahl, Brad S; Benn, Peter; Delach, Judith A; Bilgrami, Syed F

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we describe a case of a female patient in whom B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) were diagnosed simultaneously. She presented with anemia, thrombocytopenia and splenomegaly. Flow cytometry demonstrated two immunophenotypically distinct CD5-positive monoclonal B cell populations. Peripheral blood fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was positive for IGH/CCND1, consistent with t(11;14) translocation. She received 6 cycles of bendamustine 70 mg/m(2)/day for 2 days and rituximab on the first day every 4 weeks along with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. She had an excellent response, and repeat computed tomography after her third cycle of chemotherapy revealed no organomegaly or lymphadenopathy. Her peripheral blood lymphocytosis also resolved. Bone marrow examination revealed no detectable flow-cytometric evidence of MCL or CLL. Repeat cytogenetic and FISH analysis were also normal. The patient remains in complete remission 20 months after her initial diagnosis and is receiving maintenance rituximab 375 mg/m(2) weekly for 4 weeks every 6 months for 2 years.

  18. High density bit transition requirements versus the effects on BCH error correcting code. [bit synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingels, F. M.; Schoggen, W. O.

    1982-01-01

    The design to achieve the required bit transition density for the Space Shuttle high rate multiplexes (HRM) data stream of the Space Laboratory Vehicle is reviewed. It contained a recommended circuit approach, specified the pseudo random (PN) sequence to be used and detailed the properties of the sequence. Calculations showing the probability of failing to meet the required transition density were included. A computer simulation of the data stream and PN cover sequence was provided. All worst case situations were simulated and the bit transition density exceeded that required. The Preliminary Design Review and the critical Design Review are documented. The Cover Sequence Generator (CSG) Encoder/Decoder design was constructed and demonstrated. The demonstrations were successful. All HRM and HRDM units incorporate the CSG encoder or CSG decoder as appropriate.

  19. High Efficiency IMM Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharps, P.; Cho, B.; Chumney, D.; Cornfeild, A.; Guzie, B.; Hazlett, D.; Lin, Y.; Mackos, C.; Patel, P.; Stan, M.; Steinfeldt, J.; Tourino, C.

    2014-08-01

    We review the status of currently available commercial multi-junction cells, review options for next generation high efficiency cell architectures, and present the latest developments on the inverted metamorphic multi- junction (IMM) solar cell. Over 20,000 IMM cells have been prototyped to date, and efficiencies of up to 37% have been measured. We present the most recent performance data, including the response to particle radiation. The IMM cell can be used in a number of rigid or flexible configurations, and considerable effort is currently focused on cell packaging and panel integration. We discuss several design options, including a "drop in" replacement for the current 29.5% ZTJ cell technology. We will also address the reliability and cost of the IMM cell.

  20. Synchronous starphotometry and lidar measurements at Eureka in High Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baibakov, K.; O'Neill, N. T.; Ivanescu, L.; Duck, T. J.; Perro, C.; Herber, A.; Schulz, K.-H.; Schrems, O.

    2015-02-01

    We present recent progress related to the night-time retrievals of aerosol and cloud optical depth using starphotometry over the PEARL (Polar Environmental Atmospheric Research Laboratory) station at Eureka (Nunavut, Canada) in the High Arctic (80° N, 86° W). In the spring of 2011 and 2012, the SPSTAR starphotometer was employed to acquire aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements while vertical aerosol and cloud backscatter coefficient profiles were acquired using the CANDAC Raman Lidar (CRL). Several events were detected and characterized using starphotometry-lidar synergy: aerosols (short term aerosol events on 9 and 10 March 2011); a potential multi-night aerosol event across three polar nights (13-15 March 2012), a thin cloud event (21 February 2011) and a very low altitude ice crystals (10 March 2011). Using a simple backscatter coefficient threshold criterion we calculated fine and coarse (sub and super-micron) mode AODs from the vertically integrated CRL profiles. These were compared with their starphotometry analogues produced from a spectral deconvolution algorithm. The process-level analysis showed, in general, good agreement in terms of the physical coherence between high frequency starphotometry and lidar data. We argue that R2 (coefficient of determination) is the most robust means of comparing lidar and starphotometer data since it is sensitive to significant optico-physical variations associated with these two independent data sources while being minimally dependent on retrieval and calibration artifacts. Differences between the fine and course mode components of the starphotometry and lidar data is clearly also useful but is more dependent on such artifacts. Studying climatological seasonal aerosol trends necessitates effective cloud-screening procedures: temporal and spectral cloud screening of starphotometry data was found to agree moderately well with temporal cloud screening results except in the presence of thin homogeneous cloud. We conclude

  1. The brains of high functioning autistic individuals do not synchronize with those of others☆

    PubMed Central

    Salmi, J.; Roine, U.; Glerean, E.; Lahnakoski, J.; Nieminen-von Wendt, T.; Tani, P.; Leppämäki, S.; Nummenmaa, L.; Jääskeläinen, I.P.; Carlson, S.; Rintahaka, P.; Sams, M.

    2013-01-01

    Multifaceted and idiosyncratic aberrancies in social cognition characterize autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). To advance understanding of underlying neural mechanisms, we measured brain hemodynamic activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in individuals with ASD and matched-pair neurotypical (NT) controls while they were viewing a feature film portraying social interactions. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used as a measure of voxelwise similarity of brain activity (InterSubject Correlations—ISCs). Individuals with ASD showed lower ISC than NT controls in brain regions implicated in processing social information including the insula, posterior and anterior cingulate cortex, caudate nucleus, precuneus, lateral occipital cortex, and supramarginal gyrus. Curiously, also within NT group, autism-quotient scores predicted ISC in overlapping areas, including, e.g., supramarginal gyrus and precuneus. In ASD participants, functional connectivity was decreased between the frontal pole and the superior frontal gyrus, angular gyrus, superior parietal lobule, precentral gyrus, precuneus, and anterior/posterior cingulate gyrus. Taken together these results suggest that ISC and functional connectivity measure distinct features of atypical brain function in high-functioning autistic individuals during free viewing of acted social interactions. Our ISC results suggest that the minds of ASD individuals do not ‘tick together’ with others while perceiving identical dynamic social interactions. PMID:24273731

  2. Highly Stable Wideband Microwave Extraction by Synchronizing Widely Tunable Optoelectronic Oscillator with Optical Frequency Comb

    PubMed Central

    Hou, D.; Xie, X. P.; Zhang, Y. L.; Wu, J. T.; Chen, Z. Y.; Zhao, J. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Optical frequency combs (OFCs), based on mode-locked lasers (MLLs), have attracted considerable attention in many fields over recent years. Among the applications of OFCs, one of the most challenging works is the extraction of a highly stable microwave with low phase noise. Many synchronisation schemes have been exploited to synchronise an electronic oscillator with the pulse train from a MLL, helping to extract an ultra-stable microwave. Here, we demonstrate novel wideband microwave extraction from a stable OFC by synchronising a single widely tunable optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) with an OFC at different harmonic frequencies, using an optical phase detection technique. The tunable range of the proposed microwave extraction extends from 2 GHz to 4 GHz, and in a long-term synchronisation experiment over 12 hours, the proposed synchronisation scheme provided a rms timing drift of 18 fs and frequency instabilities at 1.2 × 10−15/1 s and 2.2 × 10−18/10000 s. PMID:24336459

  3. Synchronous polar winter starphotometry and lidar measurements at a High Arctic station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baibakov, K.; O'Neill, N. T.; Ivanescu, L.; Duck, T. J.; Perro, C.; Herber, A.; Schulz, K.-H.; Schrems, O.

    2015-09-01

    We present recent progress on nighttime retrievals of aerosol and cloud optical properties over the PEARL (Polar Environmental Atmospheric Research Laboratory) station at Eureka (Nunavut, Canada) in the High Arctic (80° N, 86° W). In the spring of 2011 and 2012, a star photometer was employed to acquire aerosol optical depth (AOD) data, while vertical aerosol and cloud backscatter profiles were measured using the CANDAC Raman Lidar (CRL). We used a simple backscatter coefficient threshold (βthr) to distinguish aerosols from clouds and, assuming that aerosols were largely fine mode (FM)/sub-micron, to distinguish FM aerosols from coarse mode (CM)/super-micron cloud or crystal particles. Using prescribed lidar ratios, we computed FM and CM AODs that were compared with analogous AODs estimated from spectral star photometry. We found (βthr dependent) coherences between the lidar and star photometer for both FM events and CM cloud and crystal events with averaged, FM absolute differences being <∼0.03 when associated R2 values were between 0.2 and 0.8. A βthr sensitivity study demonstrated that zero crossing absolute differences and R2 peaks were in comparable regions of the βthr range (or physical reasons were given for their disparity). The utility of spectral vs. temporal cloud screening of star photometer AODs was also illustrated. In general our results are critical to building confidence in the physical fidelity of derived, weak amplitude, star photometry AODs and, in turn, towards the development of AOD climatologies and validation databases for polar winter models and satellite sensors.

  4. Concomitantly elevated serum matrix metalloproteinases 3 and 9 can predict survival of synchronous squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aero-digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Lun; Chang, Wei-Lun; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Lee, Ching-Tai; Chang, Chi-Yang; Lin, Jaw-Town; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2013-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are elevated in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) over either the head and neck (HNSCC) or the esophagus (ESCC). Synchronous SCC with both HNSCC and ESCC predispose to worse survival. This study tested if serum MMP levels correlate with clinical features and predict survival for HNSCC, ESCC, and synchronous SCC. One hundred and thirty patients with SCCs in upper aero-digestive tract (70 ESCC, 20 HNSCC, and 40 synchronous SCC) and 74 healthy controls were assessed for serum MMP-3, -7, and -9 titers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The titers were validated to their correlations to clinical features and survival rates of the different SCC groups. Patients with SCCs had significantly higher serum MMP-3, -7, and -9 titers than the controls (P < 0.001) but there was no difference among the three SCC groups. Based on the optimal MMP cut-off values by ROC curve, elevated MMP-3 and MMP-9, but not MMP-7, correlated with distant metastasis and poor survival (P < 0.05). Concomitantly elevated MMP-3 (>14 ng/mL) and MMP-9 (>329.3 ng/mL) independently correlated with poor two-year survival (P = 0.002, by log rank test). Cox regression confirmed that such concomitant elevation was superior to the tumor stage of either ESCC or HNSCC in predicting survival for synchronous SCC. Serum MMPs are elevated in SCC of the upper aero-digestive tract. Especially for synchronous SCC, concomitantly elevated MMP-3 and MMP-9 levels serve as better biomarkers to predict prognosis than TNM staging of ESCC or HNSCC.

  5. Electrical synchronization of spin-torque oscillators driven by self-emitted high frequency current (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunegi, Sumito; Lebrun, Romain; Grimaldi, Eva; Jenkins, Alex S.; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yakushiji, Kay; Bortolotti, Paolo; Grollier, Julie; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Cros, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    The rich physics of spin transfer nano-oscillators (STNO) has provoked a huge interest to create a new generation of multi-functional microwave spintronic devices [1]. It has been often emphasized that their nonlinear behavior gives a unique opportunity to tune their radiofrequency (rf) properties but at the cost of large phase noise, not compatible with practical applications. To tackle this issue as well as to open the opportunities to new developments for non-boolean computations [1], one strategy is to use electrical synchronization of STOs through the rf current. Thereby, it is crucial to understand how the synchronization forces transmitted through the electric current. In this talk, we will first present the results of an experimental study showing the self-synchronization of STNO by re-injecting its rf current after a certain delay time [2]. In the second part, we demonstrate that the synchronization of two vortex-STNOs connected in parallel can be tuned either by an artificial delay or by the spin transfer torques [3]. The synchronization of spin-torque oscillators, combined with the drastic improvement of the rf-features (linewidth decreases by a factor of 2 and power increases by a factor of 4) in the synchronized state, marks an important milestone towards a new generation of rf-devices based on STNO. The authors acknowledge the financial support from ANR agency (SPINNOVA: ANR-11-NANO-0016) and EU grant (MOSAIC: ICT-FP7-317950). [1] N. Locatelli, V. Cros, and J. Grollier, Nat Mater 13, 11 (2014). [2] S. Tsunegi et al., arXiv:1509.05583 (2015) [3] R. Lebrun et al., arXiv:1601.01247 (2016)

  6. Cytoskeletal actin networks in motile cells are critically self-organized systems synchronized by mechanical interactions.

    PubMed

    Cardamone, Luca; Laio, Alessandro; Torre, Vincent; Shahapure, Rajesh; DeSimone, Antonio

    2011-08-23

    Growing networks of actin fibers are able to organize into compact, stiff two-dimensional structures inside lamellipodia of crawling cells. We put forward the hypothesis that the growing actin network is a critically self-organized system, in which long-range mechanical stresses arising from the interaction with the plasma membrane provide the selective pressure leading to organization. We show that a simple model based only on this principle reproduces the stochastic nature of lamellipodia protrusion (growth periods alternating with fast retractions) and several of the features observed in experiments: a growth velocity initially insensitive to the external force; the capability of the network to organize its orientation; a load-history-dependent growth velocity. Our model predicts that the spectrum of the time series of the height of a growing lamellipodium decays with the inverse of the frequency. This behavior is a well-known signature of self-organized criticality and is confirmed by unique optical tweezer measurements performed in vivo on neuronal growth cones.

  7. High average power pockels cell

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    A high average power pockels cell is disclosed which reduces the effect of thermally induced strains in high average power laser technology. The pockels cell includes an elongated, substantially rectangular crystalline structure formed from a KDP-type material to eliminate shear strains. The X- and Y-axes are oriented substantially perpendicular to the edges of the crystal cross-section and to the C-axis direction of propagation to eliminate shear strains.

  8. Synchronous bilateral non-Hodgkin’s diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the breast and left breast invasive ductal carcinoma: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weihua; Zhu, Hong; Zhou, Xiaoge

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoma of the breast is unusual, and synchronous bilateral lymphoma and carcinoma of the breast is extremely rare. We present the case of a 51-year-old woman who found a mass in her left breast. Ultrasound scan findings revealed nodules at the 2 o’clock position in her left breast and focal dilation of the duct at the 8-9 o’clock and 10 o’clock position in her right and left breasts, respectively. A left breast ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy and right breast segmental excisional biopsy were performed. Pathological and immunohistochemical examination revealed left breast invasive ductal carcinoma and right breast diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the non-germinal center type. Pathological examination of the left breast modified radical mastectomy specimen revealed synchronous invasive ductal carcinoma (grade III) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient received chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation in another hospital. Based on a review of the relevant literature, we discuss the diagnosis, clinical features, treatment, and prognosis of synchronous breast lymphoma and invasive ductal carcinoma. PMID:25400793

  9. Advanced high efficiency concentrator cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, R. . Varian Research Center)

    1992-06-01

    This report describes research to develop the technology needed to demonstrate a monolithic, multijunction, two-terminal, concentrator solar cell with a terrestrial power conversion efficiency greater than 35%. Under three previous subcontracts, Varian developed many of the aspects of a technology needed to fabricate very high efficiency concentrator cells. The current project was aimed at exploiting the new understanding of high efficiency solar cells. Key results covered in this report are as follows. (1) A 1.93-eV AlGaAs/1.42-eV GaAs metal-interconnected cascade cell was manufactured with a one-sun efficiency at 27.6% at air mass 1.5 (AM1.5) global. (2) A 1.0eV InGaAs cell was fabricated on the reverse'' side of a low-doped GaAs substrate with a one-sun efficiency of 2.5% AM1.5 diffuse and a short-circuit current of 14.4 mA/cm{sup 2}. (3) Small-scale manufacturing of GaAs p/n concentrator cells was attempted and obtained an excellent yield of high-efficiency cells. (4) Grown-in tunnel junction cell interconnects that are transparent and thermally stable using C and Si dopants were developed. 10 refs.

  10. In vitro developmental competence of pig nuclear transferred embryos: effects of GFP transfection, refrigeration, cell cycle synchronization and shapes of donor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Hai; Pan, Deng-Ke; Sun, Xiu-Zhu; Sun, Guo-Jie; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Tian, Xing-Hua; Li, Yan; Dai, Yun-Ping; Li, Ning

    2006-08-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of producing pig transgenic blastocysts expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) and to examine the effects of shape and preparation methods of donor cells on in vitro developmental ability of pig nuclear transferred embryos (NTEs). In experiment 1, the effect of GFP transfection on development of pig NTEs was evaluated. The cleavage and blastocyst rates showed no significant difference between NTEs derived from transfected and non-transfected donors. In experiment 2, the effect of different nuclear donor preparation methods on in vitro development of NTEs was examined. The cleavage rate showed no statistically significant differences among three preparation methods. The blastocyst rates of donor cells treated once at -4 degrees C and those of freshly digested cells were similar to each other (26.3% vs 17.9%). The lowest blastocyst rates (5.88%) were observed when cells cryopreserved at -196 degrees C were used as donors. In experiment 3, the effect of different cell cycle synchronization methods on the in vitro development potential of pig NTEs was evaluated. The cleavage rate of NTEs derived from cycling cells was much better than that of NTEs derived from serum-starved cells (64.4% vs 50.5%, p < 0.05), but no significant difference was observed between the the blastocyst rates of the two groups. In experiment 4, the effect of different shapes of cultured fibroblast cells on the in vitro development of pig NTEs was examined. The fusion rate for couplets derived from rough cells was poorer than that observed in couplets derived from round smooth cells (47.8% vs 76.8%, p < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences observed in the cleavage rate and blastocyst rate. In conclusion, the present study indicated that (i) refrigerated pig GFP-transfected cells could be used as donors in nuclear transfer and these NTEs could be effectively developed to blastocyst stage; (ii) serum starvation

  11. Self-organized synchronous oscillations in a network of excitable cells coupled by gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T J; Rinzel, J

    2000-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that electrical coupling plays a role in generating oscillatory behaviour in networks of neurons; however, the underlying mechanisms have not been identified. Using a cellular automata model proposed by Traub et al (Traub R D, Schmitz D, Jefferys J G and Draguhn A 1999 High-frequency population oscillations are predicted to occur in hippocampal pyramidal neural networks interconnected by axo-axonal gap junctions Neuroscience 92 407-26), we describe a novel mechanism for self-organized oscillations in networks that have strong, sparse random electrical coupling via gap junctions. The network activity is generated by random spontaneous activity that is moulded into regular population oscillations by the propagation of activity through the network. We explain how this activity gives rise to particular dependences of mean oscillation frequency on network connectivity parameters and on the rate of spontaneous activity, and we derive analytical expressions to approximate the mean frequency and variance of the oscillations. In doing so, we provide insight into possible mechanisms for frequency control and modulation in networks of neurons.

  12. Nutritional recommendations for synchronized swimming.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Sherry; Benardot, Dan; Mountjoy, Margo

    2014-08-01

    The sport of synchronized swimming is unique, because it combines speed, power, and endurance with precise synchronized movements and high-risk acrobatic maneuvers. Athletes must train and compete while spending a great amount of time underwater, upside down, and without the luxury of easily available oxygen. This review assesses the scientific evidence with respect to the physiological demands, energy expenditure, and body composition in these athletes. The role of appropriate energy requirements and guidelines for carbohydrate, protein, fat, and micronutrients for elite synchronized swimmers are reviewed. Because of the aesthetic nature of the sport, which prioritizes leanness, the risks of energy and macronutrient deficiencies are of significant concern. Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport and disordered eating/eating disorders are also of concern for these female athletes. An approach to the healthy management of body composition in synchronized swimming is outlined. Synchronized swimmers should be encouraged to consume a well-balanced diet with sufficient energy to meet demands and to time the intake of carbohydrate, protein, and fat to optimize performance and body composition. Micronutrients of concern for this female athlete population include iron, calcium, and vitamin D. This article reviews the physiological demands of synchronized swimming and makes nutritional recommendations for recovery, training, and competition to help optimize athletic performance and to reduce risks for weight-related medical issues that are of particular concern for elite synchronized swimmers.

  13. Synchronized reconstitution of muscle fibers, peripheral nerves and blood vessels by murine skeletal muscle-derived CD34(-)/45 (-) cells.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Okada, Yoshinori; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Tono, Kayoko; Masuda, Maki; Wada, Mika; Hoshi, Akio; Akatsuka, Akira

    2007-10-01

    In order to establish the practical isolation and usage of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs), we determined reconstitution capacity of CD34(-)/CD45(-) (Sk-DN) cells as a candidate somatic stem cell source for transplantation. Sk-DN cells were enzymatically isolated from GFP transgenic mice (C57/BL6N) skeletal muscle and sorted using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), and expanded by collagen gel-based cell culture with bFGF and EGF. The number of Sk-DN cells was small after sorting (2-8 x 10(4)); however, the number increased 10-20 fold (2-16 x 10(5)) after 6 days of expansion culture, and the cells maintained immature state and multipotency, expressing mRNAs for mesodermal and ectodermal cell lineages. Transplantation of expanded Sk-DN cells into the severe muscle damage model (C57/BL6N wild-type) resulted in the synchronized reconstitution of blood vessels, peripheral nerves and muscle fibers following significant recovery of total muscle mass (57%) and contractile function (55%), whereas the non-cell-transplanted control group showed around 20% recovery in both factors. These reconstitution capacities were supported by the intrinsic plasticity of Sk-DN cells that can differentiate into muscular (skeletal muscle), vascular (pericyte, endothelial cell and smooth muscle) and peripheral nerve (Schwann cells and perineurium) cell lineages that was revealed by transplantation to non-muscle tissue (beneath renal capsule) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis.

  14. High intensity solar cell radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W.; Spisz, E. W.

    1972-01-01

    Device can be employed under high intensity illumination conditions such as would occur in a close-solar-approach space mission or in monitoring high intensity lamps. Radiometer consists of silicon solar cells with thin semi-transparent coatings of aluminum deposited on the front surfaces to permit transmission of small percentage of light and reflect the remainder.

  15. High Temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Merritt, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The majority of satellites and near-earth probes developed to date have used photovoltaic arrays for power generation. If future mission to probe environments close to the sun will be able to use photovoltaic power, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. In this paper, we derive the optimum bandgap as a function of the operating temperature.

  16. Synchronization and hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Thomas; Qian, Bian; Breuer, Kenneth

    2008-03-01

    Cilia and flagella commonly beat in a coordinated manner. Examples include the flagella that Volvox colonies use to move, the cilia that sweep foreign particles up out of the human airway, and the nodal cilia that set up the flow that determines the left-right axis in developing vertebrate embryos. In this talk we present an experimental study of how hydrodynamic interactions can lead to coordination in a simple idealized system: two nearby paddles driven with fixed torques in a highly viscous fluid. The paddles attain a synchronized state in which they rotate together with a phase difference of 90 degrees. We discuss how synchronization depends on system parameters and present numerical calculations using the method of regularized stokeslets.

  17. High Performance Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Lin, Feng; Wu, Jiang; Wang, Zhiming M

    2016-05-01

    Perovskite solar cells fabricated from organometal halide light harvesters have captured significant attention due to their tremendously low device costs as well as unprecedented rapid progress on power conversion efficiency (PCE). A certified PCE of 20.1% was achieved in late 2014 following the first study of long-term stable all-solid-state perovskite solar cell with a PCE of 9.7% in 2012, showing their promising potential towards future cost-effective and high performance solar cells. Here, notable achievements of primary device configuration involving perovskite layer, hole-transporting materials (HTMs) and electron-transporting materials (ETMs) are reviewed. Numerous strategies for enhancing photovoltaic parameters of perovskite solar cells, including morphology and crystallization control of perovskite layer, HTMs design and ETMs modifications are discussed in detail. In addition, perovskite solar cells outside of HTMs and ETMs are mentioned as well, providing guidelines for further simplification of device processing and hence cost reduction.

  18. High Performance Perovskite Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Lin, Feng; Wu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells fabricated from organometal halide light harvesters have captured significant attention due to their tremendously low device costs as well as unprecedented rapid progress on power conversion efficiency (PCE). A certified PCE of 20.1% was achieved in late 2014 following the first study of long‐term stable all‐solid‐state perovskite solar cell with a PCE of 9.7% in 2012, showing their promising potential towards future cost‐effective and high performance solar cells. Here, notable achievements of primary device configuration involving perovskite layer, hole‐transporting materials (HTMs) and electron‐transporting materials (ETMs) are reviewed. Numerous strategies for enhancing photovoltaic parameters of perovskite solar cells, including morphology and crystallization control of perovskite layer, HTMs design and ETMs modifications are discussed in detail. In addition, perovskite solar cells outside of HTMs and ETMs are mentioned as well, providing guidelines for further simplification of device processing and hence cost reduction. PMID:27774402

  19. Synchronized fission yeast meiosis using an ATP analog-sensitive Pat1 protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Cipak, Lubos; Polakova, Silvia; Hyppa, Randy W.; Smith, Gerald R.; Gregan, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    Synchronous cultures are often indispensable for studying meiosis. Here, we present an optimized protocol for induction of synchronous meiosis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Chemical inactivation of an ATP analog-sensitive form of the Pat1 kinase (pat1-as2) by adding the ATP-analog 1-NM-PP1 in G1-arrested cells allows induction of synchronous meiosis at optimal temperature (25 °C). Importantly, this protocol eliminates detrimental effects of elevated temperature (34 °C) which is required to inactivate the commonly used temperature-sensitive Pat1 kinase mutant (pat1-114). Addition of the mat-Pc gene to a mat1-M strain further improves chromosome segregation and spore viability. Thus, our protocol offers highly synchronous meiosis at optimal temperature with most characteristics similar to those of wild-type meiosis. The synchronization protocol can be completed in 5 days. PMID:24385151

  20. High temperature sealed electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect

    Valentin Chung, Brice Hoani; Burke, Paul J.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2015-10-06

    A cell for high temperature electrochemical reactions is provided. The cell includes a container, at least a portion of the container acting as a first electrode. An extension tube has a first end and a second end, the extension tube coupled to the container at the second end forming a conduit from the container to said first end. A second electrode is positioned in the container and extends out of the container via the conduit. A seal is positioned proximate the first end of the extension tube, for sealing the cell.

  1. Synchronization waves in geometric networks.

    PubMed

    Leyva, I; Navas, A; Sendiña-Nadal, I; Buldú, J M; Almendral, J A; Boccaletti, S

    2011-12-01

    We report synchronization of networked excitable nodes embedded in a metric space, where the connectivity properties are mostly determined by the distance between units. Such a high clustered structure, combined with the lack of long-range connections, prevents full synchronization and yields instead the emergence of synchronization waves. We show that this regime is optimal for information transmission through the system, as it enhances the options of reconstructing the topology from the dynamics. Measurements of topological and functional centralities reveal that the wave-synchronization state allows detection of the most structurally relevant nodes from a single observation of the dynamics, without any a priori information on the model equations ruling the evolution of the ensemble.

  2. Collective synchronization of self/non-self discrimination in T cell activation, across multiple spatio-temporal scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altan-Bonnet, Gregoire

    The immune system is a collection of cells whose function is to eradicate pathogenic infections and malignant tumors while protecting healthy tissues. Recent work has delineated key molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with the ability to discriminate self from non-self agents. For example, structural studies have quantified the biophysical characteristics of antigenic molecules (those prone to trigger lymphocyte activation and a subsequent immune response). However, such molecular mechanisms were found to be highly unreliable at the individual cellular level. We will present recent efforts to build experimentally validated computational models of the immune responses at the collective cell level. Such models have become critical to delineate how higher-level integration through nonlinear amplification in signal transduction, dynamic feedback in lymphocyte differentiation and cell-to-cell communication allows the immune system to enforce reliable self/non-self discrimination at the organism level. In particular, we will present recent results demonstrating how T cells tune their antigen discrimination according to cytokine cues, and how competition for cytokine within polyclonal populations of cells shape the repertoire of responding clones. Additionally, we will present recent theoretical and experimental results demonstrating how competition between diffusion and consumption of cytokines determine the range of cell-cell communications within lymphoid organs. Finally, we will discuss how biochemically explicit models, combined with quantitative experimental validation, unravel the relevance of new feedbacks for immune regulations across multiple spatial and temporal scales.

  3. Studies on synchronous egress of coccidian parasites (Neospora caninum, Toxoplasma gondii, Eimeria bovis) from bovine endothelial host cells mediated by calcium ionophore A23187.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Jan H; Taubert, Anja; Zahner, Horst; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2008-04-01

    Neospora caninum, Toxoplasma gondii and Eimeria bovis are coccidian parasites of veterinary importance. Tachyzoites of N. caninum and T. gondii and sporozoites of E. bovis are able to invade and replicate in endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. As it holds true for all eukaryotic cells, the survival of parasitized host cells and the parasites themselves should be dependent on ion balances, especially on extra- and intracellular calcium concentrations. Addition of the calcium ionophore A23187 reliably did release merozoites from mature N. caninum and T. gondii meronts grown in cultured primary bovine umbilical vein endothelial cells (BUVEC). Extent and time course of merozoite release depended on both, maturity of the meronts and concentration of the calcium ionophore. Attempts, however, to achieve synchronous release of merozoites from E. bovis first generation meronts by ionophore treatment failed, suggesting a different biological behaviour of this parasite. According to microscopical observations, the quite variable time of E. bovis macromeront maturation and a hampered merozoite exit owing to dense parasite-induced cytoskeleton elements surrounding the meront may be a reason for the lack of inducible synchronous release.

  4. S-phase cells are more sensitive to high-linear energy transfer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Naidu, M.; Liu, S.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.

    2009-07-15

    S-phase cells are more resistant to low-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation (IR) than nonsynchronized and G{sub 1}-phase cells, because both nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination repair can repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the S phase. Although it was reported 3 decades ago that S-phase cells did not show more resistance to high-LET IR than cells in other phases, the mechanism remains unclear. We therefore attempted to study the phenotypes and elucidate the mechanism involved. Wild-type and NHEJ-deficient cell lines were synchronized using the double-thymidine approach. A clonogenic assay was used to detect the sensitivity of nonsynchronized, synchronized S-phase, and G{sub 2}-phase cells to high- and low-LET IR. The amounts of Ku bound to DSBs in the high- and low-LET-irradiated cells were also examined. S-phase wild-type cells (but not NHEJ-deficient cells) were more sensitive to high-LET IR than nonsynchronized and G{sub 2}-phase cells. In addition, S-phase wild-type cells showed less efficient Ku protein binding to DSBs than nonsynchronized and G{sub 2}-phase cells in response to high-LET IR, although all cells at all phases showed similarly efficient levels of Ku protein binding to DSBs in response to low-LET IR. S-phase cells are more sensitive to high-LET IR than nonsynchronized and G{sub 2}-phase cells, because of the following mechanism: it is more difficult for Ku protein to bind to high-LET IR-induced DNA DSBs in S-phase cells than in cells at other phases, which results in less efficient NHEJ.

  5. Synchronous occurrence of squamous-cell carcinoma "transformation" and EGFR exon 20 S768I mutation as a novel mechanism of resistance in EGFR-mutated lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Longo, Lucia; Mengoli, Maria Cecilia; Bertolini, Federica; Bettelli, Stefania; Manfredini, Samantha; Rossi, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of secondary EGFR mutation T790M in exon 20 and histologic "transformation" are common mechanisms underlying resistance to EGFR first- or second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). We describe here on a hitherto unreported mechanism of EGFR TKI resistance synchronously combining squamous-cell carcinoma change and occurrence of the EGFR exon 20 S768I secondary mutation in a 43 year-old woman with stage IV adenocarcinoma harbouring EGFR exon 21 L858R mutation. After 8 months of response to gefitinib, the patient experienced EGFR TKI resistance and died of leptomeningeal neoplastic dissemination.

  6. Variety of synchronous regimes in neuronal ensembles.

    PubMed

    Komarov, M A; Osipov, G V; Suykens, J A K

    2008-09-01

    We consider a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of oscillatory activity in neurons of the snail Helix pomatia. This model has a distinctive feature: It demonstrates multistability in oscillatory and silent modes that is typical for the thalamocortical neurons. A single neuron cell can demonstrate a variety of oscillatory activity: Regular and chaotic spiking and bursting behavior. We study collective phenomena in small and large arrays of nonidentical cells coupled by models of electrical and chemical synapses. Two single elements coupled by electrical coupling show different types of synchronous behavior, in particular in-phase and antiphase synchronous regimes. In an ensemble of three inhibitory synaptically coupled elements, the phenomenon of sequential synchronous dynamics is observed. We study the synchronization phenomena in the chain of nonidentical neurons at different oscillatory behavior coupled with electrical and chemical synapses. Various regimes of phase synchronization are observed: (i) Synchronous regular and chaotic spiking; (ii) synchronous regular and chaotic bursting; and (iii) synchronous regular and chaotic bursting with different numbers of spikes inside the bursts. We detect and study the effect of collective synchronous burst generation due to the cluster formation and the oscillatory death.

  7. Synchronous reactive programming in Ptolemy

    SciTech Connect

    Boulanger, F.; Vidal-Naquet, G.

    1996-12-31

    Synchronous reactive languages allow a high level deterministic description of reactive systems such as control-command systems. Their well defined mathematical semantics makes it possible to check formal properties on the control of a system. In previous work, we developed an object-oriented execution model for synchronous reactive modules. This model is implemented as a set of tools and a C++ class library, and allows us to use object-oriented methodologies and tools for the design of complex applications with both transformational and reactive parts. Among these design tools, the Ptolemy system stands as an object-oriented framework that supports various execution models, or {open_quotes}domains{close_quotes}. We are currently working on a translator from the output format of the Lustre and Esterel compilers to the Ptolemy language. Since no existing domain matches the reactive synchronous execution model, we also plan to develop a SEC (Synchronous Execution and Communication) domain. Such a domain will provide support for the execution of synchronous modules in Ptolemy. One of the most interesting features of Ptolemy is the communication between domains. Therefore we discuss the interface of the SEC domain to other domains to determine the meaning of communications between them. The main goal is to allow the use of synchronous reactive modules for the control of the behavior of data-flow or discrete event processes.

  8. Synchronization of Regular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caucal, Didier

    Functional graph grammars are finite devices which generate the class of regular automata. We recall the notion of synchronization by grammars, and for any given grammar we consider the class of languages recognized by automata generated by all its synchronized grammars. The synchronization is an automaton-related notion: all grammars generating the same automaton synchronize the same languages. When the synchronizing automaton is unambiguous, the class of its synchronized languages forms an effective boolean algebra lying between the classes of regular languages and unambiguous context-free languages. We additionally provide sufficient conditions for such classes to be closed under concatenation and its iteration.

  9. An optical tweezers, epi-fluorescence/spinning disk confocal- and microfluidic-setup for synchronization studies of glycolytic oscillations in living yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojica-Benavides, Martin; Adiels, Caroline B.; Goksör, Mattias

    2016-09-01

    Due to the significant importance of glycolytic oscillations studies and the recent breakthroughs on single cell analysis, a further interest arrives with intracellular and intercellular responses. Understanding cell-cell communication can give insight to oscillatory behaviors in biological systems, such as insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. The aim of this work consists on the manipulation of living yeast cells to study propagation and synchronization of induced glycolytic oscillations. A setup, consisting of an optical tweezers system and microfluidic devices coupled with fluorescence imaging was designed to perform a time dependent observation during artificially induced glycolytic oscillations. Multi-channel flow devices and diffusion chambers were fabricated using soft lithography. Automatized pumps controlled specific flow rates of infused glucose and cyanide solutions, used to induce the oscillations. Flow and diffusion in the microfluidic devices were simulated to assure experimentally the desired coverage of the solutions across the yeast cells, a requirement for time dependent measurements. Using near infrared optical tweezers, yeast cells were trapped and positioned in array configurations, ranging from a single cell to clusters of various symmetries, in order to obtain information about cell-cell communications during the metabolic cycles. Confocal illumination of an entire focal plane using a spinning disk, will allow acquirement of NADH periodic fluorescence signals during glycolytic oscillations. This method permits an improvement of the 2D projection images obtained with wide field microscopy to a tomographic description of the subcellular propagation of the oscillations.

  10. Mutual synchronization of weakly coupled gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rozental, R. M.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Ginzburg, N. S.

    2015-09-15

    The processes of synchronization of two weakly coupled gyrotrons are studied within the framework of non-stationary equations with non-fixed longitudinal field structure. With the allowance for a small difference of the free oscillation frequencies of the gyrotrons, we found a certain range of parameters where mutual synchronization is possible while a high electronic efficiency is remained. It is also shown that synchronization regimes can be realized even under random fluctuations of the parameters of the electron beams.

  11. How Synchronization Protects from Noise

    PubMed Central

    Tabareau, Nicolas; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Pham, Quang-Cuong

    2010-01-01

    The functional role of synchronization has attracted much interest and debate: in particular, synchronization may allow distant sites in the brain to communicate and cooperate with each other, and therefore may play a role in temporal binding, in attention or in sensory-motor integration mechanisms. In this article, we study another role for synchronization: the so-called “collective enhancement of precision”. We argue, in a full nonlinear dynamical context, that synchronization may help protect interconnected neurons from the influence of random perturbations—intrinsic neuronal noise—which affect all neurons in the nervous system. More precisely, our main contribution is a mathematical proof that, under specific, quantified conditions, the impact of noise on individual interconnected systems and on their spatial mean can essentially be cancelled through synchronization. This property then allows reliable computations to be carried out even in the presence of significant noise (as experimentally found e.g., in retinal ganglion cells in primates). This in turn is key to obtaining meaningful downstream signals, whether in terms of precisely-timed interaction (temporal coding), population coding, or frequency coding. Similar concepts may be applicable to questions of noise and variability in systems biology. PMID:20090826

  12. Synchronization in multistatic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubrink, H. G.

    1993-08-01

    This report gives a summary of multistatic radar principles and synchronization methods. Different methods are described using direct and indirect synchronization. The report also presents a general review of synchronization methods for the future. Two LORAN C receivers have been analyzed for use as local reference oscillators in multistatic radar.

  13. Synchronized dynamics of cortical neurons with time-delay feedback.

    PubMed

    Landsman, Alexandra S; Schwartz, Ira B

    2007-07-05

    The dynamics of three mutually coupled cortical neurons with time delays in the coupling are explored numerically and analytically. The neurons are coupled in a line, with the middle neuron sending a somewhat stronger projection to the outer neurons than the feedback it receives, to model for instance the relay of a signal from primary to higher cortical areas. For a given coupling architecture, the delays introduce correlations in the time series at the time-scale of the delay. It was found that the middle neuron leads the outer ones by the delay time, while the outer neurons are synchronized with zero lag times. Synchronization is found to be highly dependent on the synaptic time constant, with faster synapses increasing both the degree of synchronization and the firing rate. Analysis shows that pre-synaptic input during the inter-spike interval stabilizes the synchronous state, even for arbitrarily weak coupling, and independent of the initial phase. The finding may be of significance to synchronization of large groups of cells in the cortex that are spatially distanced from each other.

  14. Spike sorting of synchronous spikes from local neuron ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Pröpper, Robert; Alle, Henrik; Meier, Philipp; Geiger, Jörg R. P.; Obermayer, Klaus; Munk, Matthias H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous spike discharge of cortical neurons is thought to be a fingerprint of neuronal cooperativity. Because neighboring neurons are more densely connected to one another than neurons that are located further apart, near-synchronous spike discharge can be expected to be prevalent and it might provide an important basis for cortical computations. Using microelectrodes to record local groups of neurons does not allow for the reliable separation of synchronous spikes from different cells, because available spike sorting algorithms cannot correctly resolve the temporally overlapping waveforms. We show that high spike sorting performance of in vivo recordings, including overlapping spikes, can be achieved with a recently developed filter-based template matching procedure. Using tetrodes with a three-dimensional structure, we demonstrate with simulated data and ground truth in vitro data, obtained by dual intracellular recording of two neurons located next to a tetrode, that the spike sorting of synchronous spikes can be as successful as the spike sorting of nonoverlapping spikes and that the spatial information provided by multielectrodes greatly reduces the error rates. We apply the method to tetrode recordings from the prefrontal cortex of behaving primates, and we show that overlapping spikes can be identified and assigned to individual neurons to study synchronous activity in local groups of neurons. PMID:26289473

  15. High-efficiency photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Yang, H.T.; Zehr, S.W.

    1982-06-21

    High efficiency solar converters comprised of a two cell, non-lattice matched, monolithic stacked semiconductor configuration using optimum pairs of cells having bandgaps in the range 1.6 to 1.7 eV and 0.95 to 1.1 eV, and a method of fabrication thereof, are disclosed. The high band gap subcells are fabricated using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) to produce the required AlGaAs layers of optimized composition, thickness and doping to produce high performance, heteroface homojunction devices. The low bandgap subcells are similarly fabricated from AlGa(As)Sb compositions by LPE, MBE or MOCVD. These subcells are then coupled to form a monolithic structure by an appropriate bonding technique which also forms the required transparent intercell ohmic contact (IOC) between the two subcells. Improved ohmic contacts to the high bandgap semiconductor structure can be formed by vacuum evaporating to suitable metal or semiconductor materials which react during laser annealing to form a low bandgap semiconductor which provides a low contact resistance structure.

  16. Long-Term Survival in Patients With Synchronous, Solitary Brain Metastasis From Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Flannery, Todd W.; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Regine, William F.; Chin, Lawrence S.; Krasna, Mark J.; Shehata, Michael K.; Edelman, Martin J.; Kremer, Marnie; Patchell, Roy A.; Kwok, Young

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To report the outcome of patients with synchronous, solitary brain metastasis from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). Patients and Methods: Forty-two patients diagnosed with synchronous, solitary brain metastasis from NSCLC were treated with GKSRS between 1993 and 2006. The median Karnofsky performance status (KPS) was 90. Patients had thoracic Stage I-III disease (American Joint Committee on Cancer 2002 guidelines). Definitive thoracic therapy was delivered to 26/42 (62%) patients; 9 patients underwent chemotherapy and radiation, 12 patients had surgical resection, and 5 patients underwent preoperative chemoradiation and surgical resection. Results: The median overall survival (OS) was 18 months. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year actuarial OS rates were 71.3%, 34.1%, and 21%, respectively. For patients who underwent definitive thoracic therapy, the median OS was 26.4 months compared with 13.1 months for those who had nondefinitive therapy, and the 5-year actuarial OS was 34.6% vs. 0% (p < 0.0001). Median OS was significantly longer for patients with a KPS {>=}90 vs. KPS < 90 (27.8 months vs. 13.1 months, p < 0.0001). The prognostic factors significant on multivariate analysis were definitive thoracic therapy (p = 0.020) and KPS (p = 0.001). Conclusions: This is one of the largest series of patients diagnosed with synchronous, solitary brain metastasis from NSCLC treated with GKSRS. Definitive thoracic therapy and KPS significantly impacted OS. The 5-year OS of 21% demonstrates the potential for long-term survival in patients treated with GKSRS; therefore, patients with good KPS should be considered for definitive thoracic therapy.

  17. Combining cryogenic fiber optic probes with commercial spectrofluorimeters for the synchronous fluorescence Shpol'skii spectroscopy of high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Moore, Anthony F T; Barbosa, Fernando; Campiglia, Andres D

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic fiber optic probes are combined for the first time with a commercial spectrofluorometer for Shpol'skii spectroscopy measurements at liquid nitrogen (77 K) and liquid helium (4.2 K) temperatures. Accurate and reproducible acquisition of fluorescence spectra and signal intensities is demonstrated with three well known Shpol'skii systems, namely, anthracene/heptane, pyrene/hexane, and benzo[a]pyrene/octane. The ability to adjust the excitation and emission bandpass of the spectrofluorimeter to reach both site-resolution and analytically valuable signal-to-noise ratios was illustrated with benzo[a]pyrene in n-octane. The analytical potential of 4.2 K synchronous fluorescence Shpol'skii spectroscopy for the analysis of high molecular weight-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was then explored for the first time. The judicious optimization of wavelength offsets permitted the successful determination of dibenzo[a,l]pyrene, dibenzo[a,e]pyrene, dibenzo[a,h]pyrene, dibenzo[a,i]pyrene, and naphtho[2,3-a]pyrene without previous chromatographic separation from a soil extract with complex matrix composition. The simplicity of the experimental procedure, the competitive analytical figures of merit, and the selectivity of analysis turn 4.2 K synchronous fluorescence Shpol'skii spectroscopy into a valuable alternative for screening isomers of high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental samples.

  18. Development and testing of a 2.5 kW synchronous generator with a high temperature superconducting stator and permanent magnet rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Timing; Song, Peng; Yu, Xiaoyu; Gu, Chen; Li, Longnian; Li, Xiaohang; Wang, Dewen; Hu, Boping; Chen, Duxing; Zeng, Pan; Han, Zhenghe

    2014-04-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) armature windings have the potential for increasing the electric loading of a synchronous generator due to their high current transport capacity, which could increase the power density of an HTS rotating machine. In this work, a novel synchronous generator prototype with an HTS stator and permanent magnet rotor has been developed. It has a basic structure of four poles and six slots. The armature winding was constructed from six double-pancake race-track coils with 44 turns each. It was designed to deliver 2.5 kW at 300 rpm. A concentrated winding configuration was proposed, to prevent interference at the ends of adjacent HTS coils. The HTS stator was pressure mounted into a hollow Dewar cooled with liquid nitrogen. The whole stator could be cooled down to around 82 K by conduction cooling. In the preliminary testing, the machine worked properly and could deliver 1.8 kW power when the armature current was 14.4 A. Ic for the HTS coils was found to be suppressed due to the influence of the temperature and the leakage field.

  19. Properly synchronized measurements of droplet sizes for high-pressure intermittent coal-water slurry fuel sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihm, K. D.; Terracina, D. P.; Payne, S. E.; Caton, J. A.

    1993-11-01

    Experiments were completed to study intermittent coal-water slurry (CWS) fuel sprays injected from an electronically-controlled accumulator injector system. A new synchronization technique was developed using the light extinction signal as a triggering source for the data taking initiation with a laser diffraction particle analyzing (LDPA) technique. This technique allowed measurement of Sauter mean diameters (SMD's) near the spray tip where the light extinction was low and the data were free from the multiscattering bias. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading in mass containing 5 micron mass median diameter coal particulates was considered. A correlation of the SMD with the injection conditions was determined which show a satisfactory agreement with the measured SMD data. The spray SMD showed an increase with the distance of the axial measurement location and with the ambient gas density and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure.

  20. Noncoherent DTTLs for Symbol Synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin; Tkacenko, Andre

    2007-01-01

    Noncoherent data-transition tracking loops (DTTLs) have been proposed for use as symbol synchronizers in digital communication receivers. [Communication- receiver subsystems that can perform their assigned functions in the absence of synchronization with the phases of their carrier signals ( carrier synchronization ) are denoted by the term noncoherent, while receiver subsystems that cannot function without carrier synchronization are said to be coherent. ] The proposal applies, more specifically, to receivers of binary phase-shift-keying (BPSK) signals generated by directly phase-modulating binary non-return-to-zero (NRZ) data streams onto carrier signals having known frequencies but unknown phases. The proposed noncoherent DTTLs would be modified versions of traditional DTTLs, which are coherent. The symbol-synchronization problem is essentially the problem of recovering symbol timing from a received signal. In the traditional, coherent approach to symbol synchronization, it is necessary to establish carrier synchronization in order to recover symbol timing. A traditional DTTL effects an iterative process in which it first generates an estimate of the carrier phase in the absence of symbol-synchronization information, then uses the carrier-phase estimate to obtain an estimate of the symbol-synchronization information, then feeds the symbol-synchronization estimate back to the carrier-phase-estimation subprocess. In a noncoherent symbol-synchronization process, there is no need for carrier synchronization and, hence, no need for iteration between carrier-synchronization and symbol- synchronization subprocesses. The proposed noncoherent symbolsynchronization process is justified theoretically by a mathematical derivation that starts from a maximum a posteriori (MAP) method of estimation of symbol timing utilized in traditional, coherent DTTLs. In that MAP method, one chooses the value of a variable of interest (in this case, the offset in the estimated symbol

  1. High Efficiency Cascade Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shuguang Deng, Seamus Curran, Igor Vasiliev

    2010-09-28

    This report summarizes the main work performed by New Mexico State University and University of Houston on a DOE sponsored project High Efficiency Cascade Solar Cells. The main tasks of this project include materials synthesis, characterization, theoretical calculations, organic solar cell device fabrication and test. The objective of this project is to develop organic nano-electronic-based photovoltaics. Carbon nanotubes and organic conjugated polymers were used to synthesize nanocomposites as the new active semiconductor materials that were used for fabricating two device architectures: thin film coating and cascade solar cell fiber. Chemical vapor deposition technique was employed to synthesized a variety of carbon nanotubes (single-walled CNT, doubled-walled CNT, multi-walled CNT, N-doped SWCNT, DWCNT and MWCNT, and B-doped SWCNT, DWCNT and MWCNT) and a few novel carbon structures (CNT-based nanolance, nanocross and supported graphene film) that have potential applications in organic solar cells. Purification procedures were developed for removing amorphous carbons from carbon nanotubes, and a controlled oxidation method was established for partial truncation of fullerene molecules. Carbon nanotubes (DWCNT and DWCNT) were functionalized with fullerenes and dyes covalently and used to form nanocomposites with conjugated polymers. Biologically synthesized Tellurium nanotubes were used to form composite with the conjugated polymers as well, which generated the highest reported optical limiting values from composites. Several materials characterization technique including SEM/TEM, Raman, AFM, UV-vis, adsorption and EDS were employed to characterize the physical and chemical properties of the carbon nanotubes, the functionalized carbon nanotubes and the nanocomposites synthesized in this project. These techniques allowed us to have a spectroscopic and morphological control of the composite formation and to understand the materials assembled. A parallel 136-CPU

  2. Synchronization of chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pecora, Louis M.; Carroll, Thomas L.

    2015-09-15

    We review some of the history and early work in the area of synchronization in chaotic systems. We start with our own discovery of the phenomenon, but go on to establish the historical timeline of this topic back to the earliest known paper. The topic of synchronization of chaotic systems has always been intriguing, since chaotic systems are known to resist synchronization because of their positive Lyapunov exponents. The convergence of the two systems to identical trajectories is a surprise. We show how people originally thought about this process and how the concept of synchronization changed over the years to a more geometric view using synchronization manifolds. We also show that building synchronizing systems leads naturally to engineering more complex systems whose constituents are chaotic, but which can be tuned to output various chaotic signals. We finally end up at a topic that is still in very active exploration today and that is synchronization of dynamical systems in networks of oscillators.

  3. High Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Induces Both Acute and Persistent Changes in Broadband Cortical Synchronization: a Simultaneous tDCS-EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Abhrajeet; Baxter, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop methods for simultaneously acquiring electrophysiological data during high definition transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) using high resolution electroencephalography (EEG). Previous studies have pointed to the after effects of tDCS on both motor and cognitive performance, and there appears to be potential for using tDCS in a variety of clinical applications. However, little is known about the real-time effects of tDCS on rhythmic cortical activity in humans due to the technical challenges of simultaneously obtaining electrophysiological data during ongoing stimulation. Furthermore, the mechanisms of action of tDCS in humans are not well understood. We have conducted a simultaneous tDCS-EEG study in a group of healthy human subjects. Significant acute and persistent changes in spontaneous neural activity and event related synchronization (ERS) were observed during and after the application of high definition tDCS over the left sensorimotor cortex. Both anodal and cathodal stimulation resulted in acute global changes in broadband cortical activity which were significantly different than the changes observed in response to sham stimulation. For the group of 8 subjects studied, broadband individual changes in spontaneous activity during stimulation were apparent both locally and globally. In addition, we found that high definition tDCS of the left sensorimotor cortex can induce significant ipsilateral and contralateral changes in event related desynchronization (ERD) and ERS during motor imagination following the end of the stimulation period. Overall, our results demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring high resolution EEG during high definition tDCS and provide evidence that tDCS in humans directly modulates rhythmic cortical synchronization during and after its administration. PMID:24956615

  4. KPU-300, a Novel Benzophenone-Diketopiperazine-Type Anti-Microtubule Agent with a 2-Pyridyl Structure, Is a Potent Radiosensitizer That Synchronizes the Cell Cycle in Early M Phase.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Kohei; Kaida, Atsushi; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Hayashi, Yoshio; Harada, Kiyoshi; Miura, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    KPU-300 is a novel colchicine-type anti-microtubule agent derived from plinabulin (NPI-2358). We characterized the effects of KPU-300 on cell cycle kinetics and radiosensitization using HeLa cells expressing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci). Cells treated with 30 nM KPU-300 for 24 h were efficiently synchronized in M phase and contained clearly detectable abnormal Fucci fluorescence. Two-dimensional flow-cytometric analysis revealed a fraction of cells distinct from the normal Fucci fluorescence pattern. Most of these cells were positive for an M phase marker, the phosphorylated form of histone H3. Cells growing in spheroids responded similarly to the drug, and the inner quiescent fraction also responded after recruitment to the growth fraction. When such drug-treated cells were irradiated in monolayer, a remarkable radiosensitization was observed. To determine whether this radiosensitization was truly due to the synchronization in M phase, we compared the radiosensitivity of cells synchronized by KPU-300 treatment and cells in early M phase isolated by a combined method that took advantage of shake-off and the properties of the Fucci system. Following normalization against the surviving fraction of cells treated with KPU-300 alone, the surviving fractions of cells irradiated in early M phase coincided. Taken together with potential vascular disrupting function in vivo, we propose a novel radiosensitizing strategy using KPU-300.

  5. KPU-300, a Novel Benzophenone–Diketopiperazine–Type Anti-Microtubule Agent with a 2-Pyridyl Structure, Is a Potent Radiosensitizer That Synchronizes the Cell Cycle in Early M Phase

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama, Kohei; Kaida, Atsushi; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Hayashi, Yoshio; Harada, Kiyoshi; Miura, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    KPU-300 is a novel colchicine-type anti-microtubule agent derived from plinabulin (NPI-2358). We characterized the effects of KPU-300 on cell cycle kinetics and radiosensitization using HeLa cells expressing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci). Cells treated with 30 nM KPU-300 for 24 h were efficiently synchronized in M phase and contained clearly detectable abnormal Fucci fluorescence. Two-dimensional flow-cytometric analysis revealed a fraction of cells distinct from the normal Fucci fluorescence pattern. Most of these cells were positive for an M phase marker, the phosphorylated form of histone H3. Cells growing in spheroids responded similarly to the drug, and the inner quiescent fraction also responded after recruitment to the growth fraction. When such drug-treated cells were irradiated in monolayer, a remarkable radiosensitization was observed. To determine whether this radiosensitization was truly due to the synchronization in M phase, we compared the radiosensitivity of cells synchronized by KPU-300 treatment and cells in early M phase isolated by a combined method that took advantage of shake-off and the properties of the Fucci system. Following normalization against the surviving fraction of cells treated with KPU-300 alone, the surviving fractions of cells irradiated in early M phase coincided. Taken together with potential vascular disrupting function in vivo, we propose a novel radiosensitizing strategy using KPU-300. PMID:26716455

  6. Transient performance of permanent magnet synchronous motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borger, W. U.

    The performance of a permanent magnet synchronous machine is presented for transient conditions including: starting, load application and load removal. The machine studied possesses asynchronous torque for starting as well as synchronous torque for high efficiency and high power factor during normal operation. The transient performance of the synchronous machine is compared with a high efficiency induction machine of the same rating. The comparison presented is strictly analytical and is approached by developing the required equations for the idealized synchronous and induction machines. Solutions for the equations are approximated on the digital computer. Although the study is not universal in scope, it shows that the permanent magnet synchronous motor rivals the induction machine in weight and in transient performance while at the same time besting the induction machine from an efficiency and power factor standpoint.

  7. Synchronization by elastic neuronal latencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardi, Roni; Timor, Reut; Marom, Shimon; Abeles, Moshe; Kanter, Ido

    2013-01-01

    Psychological and physiological considerations entail that formation and functionality of neuronal cell assemblies depend upon synchronized repeated activation such as zero-lag synchronization. Several mechanisms for the emergence of this phenomenon have been suggested, including the global network quantity, the greatest common divisor of neuronal circuit delay loops. However, they require strict biological prerequisites such as precisely matched delays and connectivity, and synchronization is represented as a stationary mode of activity instead of a transient phenomenon. Here we show that the unavoidable increase in neuronal response latency to ongoing stimulation serves as a nonuniform gradual stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops. This apparent nuisance is revealed to be an essential mechanism in various types of neuronal time controllers, where synchronization emerges as a transient phenomenon and without predefined precisely matched synaptic delays. These findings are described in an experimental procedure where conditioned stimulations were enforced on a circuit of neurons embedded within a large-scale network of cortical cells in vitro, and are corroborated and extended by simulations of circuits composed of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with time-dependent latencies. These findings announce a cortical time scale for time controllers based on tens of microseconds stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops per spike. They call for a reexamination of the role of the temporal periodic mode in brain functionality using advanced in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  8. How to suppress undesired synchronization.

    PubMed

    Louzada, V H P; Araújo, N A M; Andrade, J S; Herrmann, H J

    2012-01-01

    Examples of synchronization can be found in a wide range of phenomena such as neurons firing, lasers cascades, chemical reactions, and opinion formation. However, in many situations the formation of a coherent state is not pleasant and should be mitigated. For example, the onset of synchronization can be the root of epileptic seizures, traffic congestion in networks, and the collapse of constructions. Here we propose the use of contrarians to suppress undesired synchronization. We perform a comparative study of different strategies, either requiring local or total knowledge, and show that the most efficient one solely requires local information. Our results also reveal that, even when the distribution of neighboring interactions is narrow, significant improvement is observed when contrarians sit at the highly connected elements. The same qualitative results are obtained for artificially generated networks and two real ones, namely, the Routers of the Internet and a neuronal network.

  9. Digital data detection and synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noack, T. L.; Morris, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The primary accomplishments have been in the analysis and simulation of receivers and bit synchronizers. It has been discovered that tracking rate effects play, a rather fundamental role in both receiver and synchronizer performance, but that data relating to recorder time-base-error, for the proper characterization of this phenomenon, is in rather short supply. It is possible to obtain operationally useful tape recorder time-base-error data from high signal-to-noise ratio tapes using synchronizers with relatively wideband tracking loops. Low signal-to-noise ratio tapes examined in the same way would not be synchronizable. Additional areas of interest covered are receiver false lock, cycle slipping, and other unusual phenomena, which have been described to some extent in this and earlier reports and simulated during the study.

  10. How to suppress undesired synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Louzada, V. H. P.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Andrade, J. S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Examples of synchronization can be found in a wide range of phenomena such as neurons firing, lasers cascades, chemical reactions, and opinion formation. However, in many situations the formation of a coherent state is not pleasant and should be mitigated. For example, the onset of synchronization can be the root of epileptic seizures, traffic congestion in networks, and the collapse of constructions. Here we propose the use of contrarians to suppress undesired synchronization. We perform a comparative study of different strategies, either requiring local or total knowledge, and show that the most efficient one solely requires local information. Our results also reveal that, even when the distribution of neighboring interactions is narrow, significant improvement is observed when contrarians sit at the highly connected elements. The same qualitative results are obtained for artificially generated networks and two real ones, namely, the Routers of the Internet and a neuronal network. PMID:22993685

  11. Synchronization with sound propagation delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haché, A.

    2010-04-01

    Complex systems that synchronize with acoustic signals, like chanting crowds and musical ensembles, have the intrinsic ability to maintain synchrony without external aid or visual cues, even when spread over wide areas. According to two models, the counterintuitive self-synchronization happens when the system's components have a spatial distribution that is sufficiently uniform. The roles of system size and density are examined for arrangements in 1, 2 and 3 dimensions. Asynchrony is predicted to become vanishingly small at high densities, and results suggest ways on how to minimize asynchrony in real-world situations.

  12. Three-Dimensional Human Cardiac Tissue Engineered by Centrifugation of Stacked Cell Sheets and Cross-Sectional Observation of Its Synchronous Beatings by Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Akiyuki; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Kobayashi, Mari; Iwana, Shin-ichi; Kabetani, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissues are engineered by stacking cell sheets, and these tissues have been applied in clinical regenerative therapies. The optimal fabrication technique of 3D human tissues and the real-time observation system for these tissues are important in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, cardiac physiology, and the safety testing of candidate chemicals. In this study, for aiming the clinical application, 3D human cardiac tissues were rapidly fabricated by human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiac cell sheets with centrifugation, and the structures and beatings in the cardiac tissues were observed cross-sectionally and noninvasively by two optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems. The fabrication time was reduced to approximately one-quarter by centrifugation. The cross-sectional observation showed that multilayered cardiac cell sheets adhered tightly just after centrifugation. Additionally, the cross-sectional transmissions of beatings within multilayered human cardiac tissues were clearly detected by OCT. The observation showed the synchronous beatings of the thicker 3D human cardiac tissues, which were fabricated rapidly by cell sheet technology and centrifugation. The rapid tissue-fabrication technique and OCT technology will show a powerful potential in cardiac tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery research. PMID:28326324

  13. Synchronous Control Method and Realization of Automated Pharmacy Elevator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang-Quan

    Firstly, the control method of elevator's synchronous motion is provided, the synchronous control structure of double servo motor based on PMAC is accomplished. Secondly, synchronous control program of elevator is implemented by using PMAC linear interpolation motion model and position error compensation method. Finally, the PID parameters of servo motor were adjusted. The experiment proves the control method has high stability and reliability.

  14. Synchronous Energy Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The synchronous technology requirements for large space power systems are summarized. A variety of technology areas including photovoltaics, thermal management, and energy storage, and power management are addressed.

  15. Synchronous high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion and adenocarcinoma in situ of cervix in a young woman presenting with hyperchromatic crowded groups in the cervical cytology specimen: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Nadeem; Balazs, Louisa; Benstein, Barbara D

    2008-11-01

    We report a 29-year-old woman who underwent routine gynecologic evaluation at a community clinic and had a cervical sample drawn for liquid-based cytologic evaluation. At cytology, many hyperchromatic crowded groups (HCG) were present, but a consensus could not be established whether the abnormal cells were primarily glandular or squamous with secondary endocervical glandular involvement. An interpretation of atypical endocervical cells, favor neoplastic, was rendered and biopsy advised if clinically appropriate. At biopsy, the cervix contained synchronous squamous cell carcinoma in situ, secondarily involving endocervical glands, and neighboring adenocarcinoma in situ. Immunohistochemistry for Ki-67 and p16(INK4A) crisply and precisely stained both the lesions, clearly separating them from the adjacent uninvolved mucosa. This case re-emphasizes the challenge associated with accurate evaluation of HCG at cytology, the significance of ancillary testing for surrogate markers of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) infection, the need for adjunct testing for HPV-DNA in the setting of HCG at cervical cytology, and a recommendation to set up studies to evaluate the role of surrogate markers of HR-HPV infection in cytologic samples with HCG.

  16. Simultaneous Retroperitoneal Robotic Partial Nephrectomy and Hepatectomy for Synchronous Renal-Cell Carcinoma and Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Cirrhotic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Khaa Hoo; Huang, Steven Kuan-Hua; Yen, Chia-Sheng; Tian, Yu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The development of laparoscopic and robotic surgeries represents the modern era with the objective of improving patient outcomes; this surgical method is widespread in urology and general surgery. Retroperitoneal laparoscopic/robotic surgery is common in urologic surgery, but not in liver surgery. Tumors located in the posterosuperior aspect of the liver are difficult to access using a transperitoneal approach, and control of bleeding can also be difficult, especially in patients with cirrhosis. Case Presentation: Herein, we present a 66-year-old man who had a cirrhotic liver with concurrent renal and hepatic tumors. The renal tumor was located at the upper pole of the right kidney and the liver tumor was located at the liver dome (segment VII); the patient underwent simultaneous robotic hepatectomy and partial nephrectomy with a retroperitoneal approach. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first case involving a retroperitoneal approach for a simultaneous robotic hepatectomy and partial nephrectomy; this method was feasible and safe. We hope this approach serves as an alternative surgical method for patients with synchronous renal and posterior segment liver tumors. PMID:27868101

  17. High-frequency stimulation of excitable cells and networks.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Seth H

    2013-01-01

    High-frequency (HF) stimulation has been shown to block conduction in excitable cells including neurons and cardiac myocytes. However, the precise mechanisms underlying conduction block are unclear. Using a multi-scale method, the influence of HF stimulation is investigated in the simplified FitzhHugh-Nagumo and biophysically-detailed Hodgkin-Huxley models. In both models, HF stimulation alters the amplitude and frequency of repetitive firing in response to a constant applied current and increases the threshold to evoke a single action potential in response to a brief applied current pulse. Further, the excitable cells cannot evoke a single action potential or fire repetitively above critical values for the HF stimulation amplitude. Analytical expressions for the critical values and thresholds are determined in the FitzHugh-Nagumo model. In the Hodgkin-Huxley model, it is shown that HF stimulation alters the dynamics of ionic current gating, shifting the steady-state activation, inactivation, and time constant curves, suggesting several possible mechanisms for conduction block. Finally, we demonstrate that HF stimulation of a network of neurons reduces the electrical activity firing rate, increases network synchronization, and for a sufficiently large HF stimulation, leads to complete electrical quiescence. In this study, we demonstrate a novel approach to investigate HF stimulation in biophysically-detailed ionic models of excitable cells, demonstrate possible mechanisms for HF stimulation conduction block in neurons, and provide insight into the influence of HF stimulation on neural networks.

  18. Are feedback loops destructive to synchronization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheshbolouki, A.; Zarei, M.; Sarbazi-Azad, H.

    2015-08-01

    We study the effects of directionality on synchronization of dynamical networks. Performing the linear stability analysis and the numerical simulation of the Kuramoto model in directed networks, we show that balancing in- and out-degrees of all nodes enhances the synchronization of sparse networks, especially in networks with high clustering coefficient and homogeneous degree distribution. Furthermore, by omitting all the feedback loops, we show that while hierarchical directed acyclic graphs are structurally highly synchronizable, their global synchronization is too sensitive to the choice of natural frequencies and is strongly affected by noise.

  19. Construction and Operation of a High-Speed, High-Precision Eye Tracker for Tight Stimulus Synchronization and Real-Time Gaze Monitoring in Human and Animal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Farivar, Reza; Michaud-Landry, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the fast and precise movements of the eye—critical to many vision, oculomotor, and animal behavior studies—can be made non-invasively by video oculography. The protocol here describes the construction and operation of a research-grade video oculography system with ~0.1° precision over the full typical viewing range at over 450 Hz with tight synchronization with stimulus onset. The protocol consists of three stages: (1) system assembly, (2) calibration for both cooperative, and for minimally cooperative subjects (e.g., animals or infants), and (3) gaze monitoring and recording. PMID:27683545

  20. Is whole-culture synchronization biology's 'perpetual-motion machine'?

    PubMed

    Cooper, Stephen

    2004-06-01

    Whole-culture or batch synchronization cannot, in theory, produce a synchronized culture because it violates a fundamental law that proposes that no batch treatment can alter the cell-age order of a culture. In analogy with the history of perpetual-motion machines, it is suggested that the study of these whole-culture 'synchronization' methods might lead to an understanding of general biological principles even though these methods cannot be used to study the normal cell cycle.

  1. EEG synchronization and migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Angelini, Leonardo; Pellicoro, Mario; Hu, Kun; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2004-03-01

    We investigate phase synchronization in EEG recordings from migraine patients. We use the analytic signal technique, based on the Hilbert transform, and find that migraine brains are characterized by enhanced alpha band phase synchronization in presence of visual stimuli. Our findings show that migraine patients have an overactive regulatory mechanism that renders them more sensitive to external stimuli.

  2. Elastic interactions synchronize beating in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ohad; Safran, Samuel A

    2016-07-13

    Motivated by recent experimental results, we study theoretically the synchronization of the beating phase and frequency of two nearby cardiomyocyte cells. Each cell is represented as an oscillating force dipole in an infinite, viscoelastic medium and the propagation of the elastic signal within the medium is predicted. We examine the steady-state beating of two nearby cells, and show that elastic interactions result in forces that synchronize the phase and frequency of beating in a manner that depends on their mutual orientation. The theory predicts both in-phase and anti-phase steady-state beating depending on the relative cell orientations, as well as how synchronized beating varies with substrate elasticity and the inter-cell distance. These results suggest how mechanics plays a role in cardiac efficiency, and may be relevant for the design of cardiomyocyte based micro devices and other biomedical applications.

  3. Synchronization On Hanoi Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shanshan; Boettcher, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Synchronization of coupled oscillators has been intensively studied on a variety of structures. It is believed that the dynamics is deeply associated with its structure. To explore this relation, we study the synchronization of coupled oscillators on Hanoi networks. We analyze the evolution of coupled units over time, and characterized the convergence to the global synchronized state. For this state, the results show a close connection to the spectrum of connectivity matrix. Inspired by this connection, we try to show a dynamical pattern that describes the entire synchronization process from the onset to the final state. This may unveil the unique hierarchical structure of these self-similar Hanoi networks. Our goal is to map the dynamics to the spectrum of the connectivity matrix that encodes significant information about the structure of the underlying system. This exploration may have implications on designing networks that synchronizes coupled units efficiently. Supported through NSF Grant DMR-1207431.

  4. Quantum-phase synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiderer, Lukas J.; Kuś, Marek; Braun, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    We study mechanisms that allow one to synchronize the quantum phase of two qubits relative to a fixed basis. Starting from one qubit in a fixed reference state and the other in an unknown state, we find that, contrary to the impossibility of perfect quantum cloning, the quantum phase can be synchronized perfectly through a joined unitary operation. When both qubits are initially in a pure unknown state, perfect quantum-phase synchronization through unitary operations becomes impossible. In this situation we determine the maximum average quantum-phase synchronization fidelity and the distribution of relative phases and fidelities, and we identify optimal quantum circuits that achieve this maximum fidelity. A subset of these optimal quantum circuits enable perfect quantum-phase synchronization for a class of unknown initial states restricted to the equatorial plane of the Bloch sphere.

  5. Synchronization of Sub-Picosecond Electron and Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Le Sage G.P.

    2000-08-15

    Sub-picosecond laser-electron synchronization is required to take full advantage of the experimental possibilities arising from the marriage of modern high intensity lasers and high brightness electron beams in the same laboratory. Two particular scenarios stand out in this regard, injection of ultra-short electron pulses in short wavelength laser-driven plasma accelerators, and Compton scattering of laser photons from short electron pulses. Both of these applications demand synchronization, which is subpicosecond, with tens of femtosecond synchronization implied for next-generation experiments. Typically, an RF electron accelerator is synchronized to a short pulse laser system by detecting the repetition signal of a laser oscillator, adjusted to an exact subharmonic of the linac RF frequency, and multiplying or phase locking this signal to produce the master RF clock. Pulse-to-pulse jitter characteristic of self-mode-locked laser oscillators represents a direct contribution to the ultimate timing jitter between a high intensity laser focus and electron beam at the interaction point, or a photocathode drive laser in an RF photoinjector. This timing jitter problem has been addressed most seriously in the context of the RF photoinjector, where the electron beam properties are sensitive functions of relative timing jitter. The timing jitter achieved in synchronized photocathode drive laser systems is near, or slightly below one picosecond. The ultimate time of arrival jitter of the beam at the photoinjector exit is typically a bit smaller than the photocathode drive-laser jitter due to velocity compression effects in the first RF cell of the gun. This tendency of the timing of the electron beam arrival at a given spatial point to lock to the RF lock is strongly reinforced by use of magnetic compression.

  6. Assembly of photosynthetic apparatus in Rhodobacter sphaeroides as revealed by functional assessments at different growth phases and in synchronized and greening cells.

    PubMed

    Kis, M; Asztalos, E; Sipka, G; Maróti, P

    2014-12-01

    The development of photosynthetic membranes of intact cells of Rhodobacter sphaeroides was tracked by light-induced absorption spectroscopy and induction and relaxation of the bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence. Changes in membrane structure were induced by three methods: synchronization of cell growth, adjustment of different growth phases and transfer from aerobic to anaerobic conditions (greening) of the bacteria. While the production of the bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoid pigments and the activation of light harvesting and reaction center complexes showed cell-cycle independent and continuous increase with characteristic lag phases, the accumulation of phospholipids and membrane potential (electrochromism) exhibited stepwise increase controlled by cell division. Cells in the stationary phase of growth demonstrated closer packing and tighter energetic coupling of the photosynthetic units (PSU) than in their early logarithmic stage. The greening resulted in rapid (within 0-4 h) induction of BChl synthesis accompanied with a dominating role for the peripheral light harvesting system (up to LH2/LH1 ~2.5), significantly increased rate (~7·10(4) s(-1)) and yield (F v/F max ~0.7) of photochemistry and modest (~2.5-fold) decrease of the rate of electron transfer (~1.5·10(4) s(-1)). The results are discussed in frame of a model of sequential assembly of the PSU with emphasis on crowding the LH2 complexes resulting in an increase of the connectivity and yield of light capture on the one hand and increase of hindrance to diffusion of mobile redox agents on the other hand.

  7. Cytology diagnosis of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma, synchronous to pancreas, and metachronous to thyroid and contralateral adrenal: Report of a case and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bokhari, Aqiba; Tiscornia-Wasserman, Patricia G

    2017-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma metastases to pancreas, thyroid, and contralateral adrenal gland are decidedly uncommon. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) is the most frequent subtype. Cytology diagnosis may be challenging. A 74-year-old male with remote history of vocal cord malignancy and hypertension presented with abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) revealed 8.4 cm left renal mass highly suspicious for renal cell carcinoma, a 1.8 cm mass within vessels near left adrenal and a 2.5 cm mass in pancreatic tail. Right pulmonary middle lobe showed two small nodules. Metastatic CCRCC was diagnosed on preoperative transgastric, endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration cytology of pancreatic tail mass. Left radical nephrectomy and distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy confirmed CCRCC (pT3bNxM1), with metastases in adrenal and pancreatic tail. The 3p deletion identification in pancreatic tumor suggested CCRCC origin. Follow-up positron emission tomography-CT (PET-CT) scan revealed left thyroid lower pole mass. Thyroid ultrasound showed three clustered 6 mm nodules in left mid pole. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) biopsies, 4-month post-nephrectomy, were consistent with metastatic renal cell carcinoma in lower, and atypia of undetermined significance in mid poles respectively. Left lobectomy and isthmus and pyramidal lobe resections confirmed metastatic renal cell carcinoma. One year post-radical nephrectomy, contralateral adrenal lesion noted on PET-CT was interpreted as metastatic CCRCC on CT-guided core biopsy with touch imprints. Rapid on-site evaluation was implemented, and immunoprofile typical of CCRCC substantiated cytomorphology at all three sites. Previously reported cases of renal cell carcinoma metastases to organs as in the described case are reviewed as well. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:161-167. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Don't homogenize, synchronize.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, M

    2001-01-01

    To be more responsive to customers, companies often break down organizational walls between their units--setting up all manner of cross-business and cross-functional task forces and working groups and promoting a "one-company" culture. But such attempts can backfire terribly by distracting business and functional units and by contaminating their strategies and processes. Fortunately, there's a better way, says the author. Rather than tear down organizational walls, a company can make them permeable to information. It can synchronize all its data on products, filtering the information through linked databases and applications and delivering it in a coordinated, meaningful form to customers. As a result, the organization can present a single, unified face to the customer--one that can change as market conditions warrant--without imposing homogeneity on its people. Such synchronization can lead not just to stronger customer relationships and more sales but also to greater operational efficiency. It allows a company, for example, to avoid the high costs of maintaining many different information systems with redundant data. The decoupling of product control from customer control in a synchronized company reflects a fundamental fact about business: While companies have to focus on creating great products, customers think in terms of the activities they perform and the benefits they seek. For companies, products are ends, but for customers, products are means. The disconnect between how customers think and how companies organize themselves is what leads to inefficiencies and missed opportunities, and that's exactly the problem that synchronization solves. Synchronized companies can get closer to customers, sustain product innovation, and improve operational efficiency--goals that have traditionally been very difficult to achieve simultaneously.

  9. High voltage planar multijunction solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Chai, A. T.; Goradia, C. P. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A high voltage multijunction solar cell is provided wherein a plurality of discrete voltage generating regions or unit cells are formed in a single generally planar semiconductor body. The unit cells are comprised of doped regions of opposite conductivity type separated by a gap or undiffused region. Metal contacts connect adjacent cells together in series so that the output voltages of the individual cells are additive. In some embodiments, doped field regions separated by a overlie the unit cells but the cells may be formed in both faces of the wafer.

  10. Using GLONASS signal for clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouzhva, Yuri G.; Gevorkyan, Arvid G.; Bogdanov, Pyotr P.; Ovchinnikov, Vitaly V.

    1994-01-01

    Although in accuracy parameters GLONASS is correlated with GPS, using GLONASS signals for high-precision clock synchronization was, up to the recent time, of limited utility due to the lack of specialized time receivers. In order to improve this situation, in late 1992 the Russian Institute of Radionavigation and Time (RMT) began to develop a GLONASS time receiver using as a basis the airborne ASN-16 receiver. This paper presents results of estimating user clock synchronization accuracy via GLONASS signals using ASN-16 receiver in the direct synchronization and common-view modes.

  11. Synchronous Discrete Harmonic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-17

    We introduce the synchronous discrete harmonic oscillator, and present an analytical, numerical and graphical study of its characteristics. The oscillator is synchronous when the time T for one revolution covering an angle of 2{pi} in phase space, is an integral multiple N of the discrete time step {delta}t. It is fully synchronous when N is even. It is pseudo-synchronous when T/{delta}t is rational. In the energy conserving hyperincursive representation, the phase space trajectories are perfectly stable at all time scales, and in both synchronous and pseudo-synchronous modes they cycle through a finite number of phase space points. Consequently, both the synchronous and the pseudo-synchronous hyperincursive modes of time-discretization provide a physically realistic and mathematically coherent, procedure for dynamic, background independent, discretization of spacetime. The procedure is applicable to any stable periodic dynamical system, and provokes an intrinsic correlation between space and time, whereby space-discretization is a direct consequence of background-independent time-discretization. Hence, synchronous discretization moves the formalism of classical mechanics towards that of special relativity. The frequency of the hyperincursive discrete harmonic oscillator is ''blue shifted'' relative to its continuum counterpart. The frequency shift has the precise value needed to make the speed of the system point in phase space independent of the discretizing time interval {delta}t. That is the speed of the system point is the same on the polygonal (in the discrete case) and the circular (in the continuum case) phase space trajectories.

  12. Synchronous Discrete Harmonic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-01

    We introduce the synchronous discrete harmonic oscillator, and present an analytical, numerical and graphical study of its characteristics. The oscillator is synchronous when the time T for one revolution covering an angle of 2π in phase space, is an integral multiple N of the discrete time step Δt. It is fully synchronous when N is even. It is pseudo-synchronous when T/Δt is rational. In the energy conserving hyperincursive representation, the phase space trajectories are perfectly stable at all time scales, and in both synchronous and pseudo-synchronous modes they cycle through a finite number of phase space points. Consequently, both the synchronous and the pseudo-synchronous hyperincursive modes of time-discretization provide a physically realistic and mathematically coherent, procedure for dynamic, background independent, discretization of spacetime. The procedure is applicable to any stable periodic dynamical system, and provokes an intrinsic correlation between space and time, whereby space-discretization is a direct consequence of background-independent time-discretization. Hence, synchronous discretization moves the formalism of classical mechanics towards that of special relativity. The frequency of the hyperincursive discrete harmonic oscillator is "blue shifted" relative to its continuum counterpart. The frequency shift has the precise value needed to make the speed of the system point in phase space independent of the discretizing time interval Δt. That is the speed of the system point is the same on the polygonal (in the discrete case) and the circular (in the continuum case) phase space trajectories.

  13. Stroboscope Based Synchronization of Full Frame CCD Sensors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Feng, Xiaobing; Zhang, Yuan; Shi, Min; Zhu, Dengming; Wang, Zhaoqi

    2017-04-07

    The key obstacle to the use of consumer cameras in computer vision and computer graphics applications is the lack of synchronization hardware. We present a stroboscope based synchronization approach for the charge-coupled device (CCD) consumer cameras. The synchronization is realized by first aligning the frames from different video sequences based on the smear dots of the stroboscope, and then matching the sequences using a hidden Markov model. Compared with current synchronized capture equipment, the proposed approach greatly reduces the cost by using inexpensive CCD cameras and one stroboscope. The results show that our method could reach a high accuracy much better than the frame-level synchronization of traditional software methods.

  14. Nonlocal chaotic phase synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Meng; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Hu, Gang; Peng, Xi-Hong

    2000-09-01

    A novel synchronization behavior, nonlocal chaotic phase synchronization, is investigated. For two coupled Rossler oscillators with only one forced by an injected periodic signal, the phase of the unforced oscillator can be locked to the phase of the periodic signal while the forced one is well unlocked by the signal; in a chain of coupled chaotic oscillators with nearest coupling, the phase of an oscillator (or a cluster) can be locked to another nonneighbor one. Moreover, the mechanism underlying the transition to nonlocal synchronization is discussed in detail.

  15. High density cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  16. High-temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Merritt, Danielle; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Scheiman, David

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of space probes to date have relied upon photovoltaic power generation. If future missions designed to probe environments close to the sun (Figure 1) will be able to use such power generation, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. The significant problem is that solar cells lose performance at high temperatures.

  17. High voltage battery cell scanner development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepisto, J. W.; Decker, D. K.; Graves, J.

    1983-01-01

    Battery cell voltage scanners have been previously used in low voltage spacecraft applications. In connection with future missions involving an employment of high-power high voltage power subsystems and/or autonomous power subsystem management for unattended operation, it will be necessary to utilize battery cell voltage scanners to provide battery cell voltage information for early detection of impending battery cell degradation/failures. In preparation for such missions, a novel battery cell voltage scanner design has been developed. The novel design makes use of low voltage circuit modules which can be applied to high voltage batteries in a building block fashion. A description is presented of the design concept and test results of the high voltage battery cell scanner, and its operation with an autonomously managed power subsystem is discussed.

  18. Control and synchronization of spatiotemporal chaos.

    PubMed

    Ahlborn, Alexander; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Chaos control methods for the Ginzburg-Landau equation are presented using homogeneously, inhomogeneously, and locally applied multiple delayed feedback signals. In particular, it is shown that a small number of control cells is sufficient for stabilizing plane waves or for trapping spiral waves, and that successful control is closely connected to synchronization of the dynamics in regions close to the control cells.

  19. Synchronization in complex networks

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, A.; Diaz-Guilera, A.; Moreno, Y.; Zhou, C.; Kurths, J.

    2007-12-12

    Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are in the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understand synchronization phenomena in natural systems take now advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also overview the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying pattern of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

  20. Advanced synchronous luminescence system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the condition of tissue or otherwise making chemical identifications includes exposing the sample to a light source, and using a synchronous luminescence system to produce a spectrum that can be analyzed for tissue condition.

  1. Multijunction high-voltage solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Goradia, C.; Chai, A. T.

    1981-01-01

    Multijunction cell allows for fabrication of high-voltage solar cell on single semiconductor wafer. Photovoltaic energy source using cell is combined on wafer with circuit it is to power. Cell consists of many voltage-generating regions internally or externally interconnected to give desired voltage and current combination. For computer applications, module is built on silicon wafer with energy for internal information processing and readouts derived from external light source.

  2. High rate, high reliability Li/SO2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chireau, R.

    1982-03-01

    The use of the lithium/sulfur dioxide system for aerospace applications is discussed. The high rate density in the system is compared to some primary systems: mercury zinc, silver zinc, and magnesium oxide. Estimates are provided of the storage life and shelf life of typical lithium sulfur batteries. The design of lithium cells is presented and criteria are given for improving the output of cells in order to achieve high rate and high reliability.

  3. Modulation of Olfactory Bulb Network Activity by Serotonin: Synchronous Inhibition of Mitral Cells Mediated by Spatially Localized GABAergic Microcircuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Loren J.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2014-01-01

    Although inhibition has often been proposed as a central mechanism for coordinating activity in the olfactory system, relatively little is known about how activation of different inhibitory local circuit pathways can generate coincident inhibition of principal cells. We used serotonin (5-HT) as a pharmacological tool to induce spiking in ensembles…

  4. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell has been designed and tested to deliver high capacity at a C/1.5 discharge rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet made at a discharge rate this high in the 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters, performance, and future test plans are described.

  5. Implementation of a sliding-mode-based position sensorless drive for high-speed micro permanent-magnet synchronous motors.

    PubMed

    Chi, Wen-Chun; Cheng, Ming-Yang

    2014-03-01

    Due to issues such as limited space, it is difficult if it is not impossible to employ a position sensor in the drive control of high-speed micro PMSMs. In order to alleviate this problem, this paper analyzes and implements a simple and robust position sensorless field-oriented control method of high-speed micro PMSMs based on the sliding-mode observer. In particular, the angular position and velocity of the rotor of the high-speed micro PMSM are estimated using the sliding-mode observer. This observer is able to accurately estimate rotor position in the low speed region and guarantee fast convergence of the observer in the high speed region. The proposed position sensorless control method is suitable for electric dental handpiece motor drives where a wide speed range operation is essential. The proposed sensorless FOC method is implemented using a cost-effective 16-bit microcontroller and tested in a prototype electric dental handpiece motor. Several experiments are performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Chaotic neuron dynamics, synchronization and feature binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arecchi, F. T.

    2004-07-01

    Neuroscience studies how a large collection of coupled neurons combines external data with internal memories into coherent patterns of meaning. Such a process is called “feature binding”, insofar as the coherent patterns combine together features which are extracted separately by specialized cells, but which do not make sense as isolated items. A powerful conjecture, with experimental confirmation, is that feature binding implies the mutual synchronization of axonal spike trains in neurons which can be far away and yet contribute to a well defined perception by sharing the same time code. Based on recent investigations of homoclinic chaotic systems, and how they mutually synchronize, a novel conjecture on the dynamics of the single neuron is formulated. Homoclinic chaos implies the recurrent return of the dynamical trajectory to a saddle focus, in whose neighbourhood the system susceptibility (response to an external perturbation) is very high and hence it is very easy to lock to an external stimulus. Thus homoclinic chaos appears as the easiest way to encode information by a train of equal spikes occurring at erratic times. In conventional measurements we read the number indicated by a meter's pointer and assign to the measured object a set position corresponding to that number. On the contrary, a time code requires a decision time T¯ sufficiently longer than the minimal interspike separation t1, so that the total number of different set elements is related in some way to the size T¯/t 1. In neuroscience it has been shown that T¯≃200 ms while t 1≃3 ms. In a sensory layer of the brain neocortex an external stimulus spreads over a large assembly of neurons building up a collective state, thus synchronization of trains of different individual neurons is the basis of a coherent perception. The percept space can be given a metric structure by introducing a distance measure. This distance is conjugate of the duration time in the sense that an uncertainty

  7. Synchronous clock stopper for microprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchin, David A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A synchronous clock stopper circuit for inhibiting clock pulses to a microprocessor in response to a stop request signal, and for reinstating the clock pulses in response to a start request signal thereby to conserve power consumption of the microprocessor when used in an environment of limited power. The stopping and starting of the microprocessor is synchronized, by a phase tracker, with the occurrences of a predetermined phase in the instruction cycle of the microprocessor in which the I/O data and address lines of the microprocessor are of high impedance so that a shared memory connected to the I/O lines may be accessed by other peripheral devices. The starting and stopping occur when the microprocessor initiates and completes, respectively, an instruction, as well as before and after transferring data with a memory. Also, the phase tracker transmits phase information signals over a bus to other peripheral devices which signals identify the current operational phase of the microprocessor.

  8. Hydrodynamics Versus Intracellular Coupling in the Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaranta, Greta; Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Tam, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The influence of hydrodynamic forces on eukaryotic flagella synchronization is investigated by triggering phase locking between a controlled external flow and the flagella of C. reinhardtii. Hydrodynamic forces required for synchronization are over an order of magnitude larger than hydrodynamic forces experienced in physiological conditions. Our results suggest that synchronization is due instead to coupling through cell internal fibers connecting the flagella. This conclusion is confirmed by observations of the vfl3 mutant, with impaired mechanical connection between the flagella.

  9. Hydrodynamics Versus Intracellular Coupling in the Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Greta; Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Tam, Daniel

    2015-12-04

    The influence of hydrodynamic forces on eukaryotic flagella synchronization is investigated by triggering phase locking between a controlled external flow and the flagella of C. reinhardtii. Hydrodynamic forces required for synchronization are over an order of magnitude larger than hydrodynamic forces experienced in physiological conditions. Our results suggest that synchronization is due instead to coupling through cell internal fibers connecting the flagella. This conclusion is confirmed by observations of the vfl3 mutant, with impaired mechanical connection between the flagella.

  10. Important loss mechanisms in high-efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sah, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify loss mechanisms in high efficiency silicon solar cells. The following were considered: (1) recombination loss mechanisms; (2) high efficiency cells; (3) very high efficiency cells; and (4) ultra high efficiency cells.

  11. Strategies to reduce short-chain organic acids and synchronously establish high-rate composting in acidic household waste.

    PubMed

    Bergersen, Ove; Bøen, Anne S; Sørheim, Roald

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to document whether addition of lime or increased amount of bulking agent would ensure, efficiently, a predictable composting process in acidic SSOW applicable in full scale plants. The results show that both lime addition and increasing the amount of bulking agent relative to waste support the development of high-rate respiration in composting. Both strategies are considered efficient in establishing desired microbial composting processes of acid household waste. Reduction in the content of different organic acids and loss on ignition were higher when more bulking agent was used compared with adding 5% lime to the acidic SSOW. Respiration was completely repressed in samples with 10% lime, where pH remained high. In addition fat and protein seem to degrade faster with increasing amount of bulking agent.

  12. Experimental Performance Evaluation of a High Speed Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor and Drive for a Flywheel Application at Different Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagorny, Aleksandr S.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Kankam, M. David

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental performance characterization study of a high speed, permanent magnet motor/generator (M/G) and drive applied to a flywheel module. Unlike the conventional electric machine the flywheel M/G is not a separated unit; its stator and rotor are integrated into a flywheel assembly. The M/G rotor is mounted on a flywheel rotor, which is magnetically levitated and sealed within a vacuum chamber during the operation. Thus, it is not possible to test the M/G using direct load measurements with a dynamometer and torque transducer. Accordingly, a new in-situ testing method had to be developed. The paper describes a new flywheel M/G and drive performance evaluation technique, which allows the estimation of the losses, efficiency and power quality of the flywheel high speed permanent magnet M/G, while working in vacuum, over wide frequency and torque ranges. This method does not require any hardware modification nor any special addition to the test rig. This new measurement technique is useful for high-speed applications, when applying an external load is technically difficult.

  13. Enhanced characterization of oil sands acid-extractable organics fractions using electrospray ionization-high-resolution mass spectrometry and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Anthony E; Frank, Richard A; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M; Hewitt, L Mark; Dixon, D George

    2015-05-01

    The open pit oil sands mining operations north of Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, are accumulating tailings waste at a rate approximately equal to 4.9 million m(3) /d. Naphthenic acids are among the most toxic components within tailings to aquatic life, but structural components have largely remained unidentified. In the present study, electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HRMS) and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) were used to characterize fractions derived from the distillation of an acid-extractable organics (AEO) mixture isolated from oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). Mean molecular weights of each fraction, and their relative proportions to the whole AEO extract, were as follows: fraction 1: 237 Da, 8.3%; fraction 2: 240 Da, 23.8%; fraction 3: 257 Da, 26.7%; fraction 4: 308 Da, 18.9%; fraction 5: 355 Da, 10.0%. With increasing mean molecular weight of the AEO fractions, a concurrent increase occurred in the relative abundance of nitrogen-, sulfur-, and oxygen-containing ions, double-bond equivalents, and degree of aromaticity. Structures present in the higher-molecular-weight fractions (fraction 4 and fraction 5) suggested the presence of heteroatoms, dicarboxyl and dihydroxy groups, and organic acid compounds with the potential to function as estrogens. Because organic acid compositions become dominated by more recalcitrant, higher-molecular-weight acids during natural degradation, these findings are important in the context of oil sands tailings pond water remediation.

  14. Increased Intraregional Synchronized Neural Activity in Adult Brain After Prolonged Adaptation to High-Altitude Hypoxia: A Resting-State fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Fan, Cunxiu; Li, Jinqiang; Han, Qiaoqing; Lin, Jianzhong; Yang, Tianhe; Zhang, Jiaxing

    2016-03-01

    The human brain is intrinsically plastic such that its functional architecture can be reorganized in response to environmental pressures and physiological changes. However, it remains unclear whether a compensatory modification of spontaneous neural activity occurs in adult brain during prolonged high-altitude (HA) adaptation. In this study, we obtained resting-state functional magnetic resonance (MR) images in 16 adults who have immigrated to Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (2300-4400 m) for 2 years and in 16 age-matched sea level (SL) controls. A validated regional homogeneity (Reho) method was employed to investigate the local synchronization of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals. Seed connectivity analysis was carried out subsequently. Cognitive and physiological assessments were made and correlated with the image metrics. Compared with SL controls, global mean Reho was significantly increased in HA immigrants as well as a regional increase in the right inferolateral sensorimotor cortex. Furthermore, mean z-Reho value extracted within the inferolateral sensorimotor area showed trend-level significant inverse correlation with memory search reaction time in HA immigrants. These observations, for the first time, provide evidence of adult brain resilience of spontaneous neural activity after long-term HA exposure without inherited and developmental effects. Resting-state fMRI could yield valuable information for central mechanisms underlying respiratory and cognitive compensations in adults during prolonged environmentally hypoxic adaptation, paving the way for future HA-adaptive training.

  15. Hydrodynamic synchronization of flagellar oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    In this review, we highlight the physics of synchronization in collections of beating cilia and flagella. We survey the nonlinear dynamics of synchronization in collections of noisy oscillators. This framework is applied to flagellar synchronization by hydrodynamic interactions. The time-reversibility of hydrodynamics at low Reynolds numbers requires swimming strokes that break time-reversal symmetry to facilitate hydrodynamic synchronization. We discuss different physical mechanisms for flagellar synchronization, which break this symmetry in different ways.

  16. Synchronization phenomena in nephron-nephron interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Yip, Kay-Pong; Sosnovtseva, Olga V.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2001-06-01

    Experimental data for tubular pressure oscillations in rat kidneys are analyzed in order to examine the different types of synchronization that can arise between neighboring functional units. For rats with normal blood pressure, the individual unit (the nephron) typically exhibits regular oscillations in its tubular pressure and flow variations. For such rats, both in-phase and antiphase synchronization can be demonstrated in the experimental data. For spontaneously hypertensive rats, where the pressure variations in the individual nephrons are highly irregular, signs of chaotic phase and frequency synchronization can be observed. Accounting for a hemodynamic as well as for a vascular coupling between nephrons that share a common interlobular artery, we develop a mathematical model of the pressure and flow regulation in a pair of adjacent nephrons. We show that this model, for appropriate values of the parameters, can reproduce the different types of experimentally observed synchronization.

  17. Chromatin structural changes in synchronized cells blocked in early S phase by sequential use of isoleucine deprivation and hydroxyurea blockade

    SciTech Connect

    D'Anna, J.A.; Prentice, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have investigated the loss of histone H1 from chromatin and the structure of chromatin from Chinese hamster (line CHO) cells blocked in early S phase by sequential use of isoleucine deprivation G/sub 1/ block and 1 mM hydroxyurea (HU) blockade. Measurements of H1 content in the cell and histone turnover indicate that H1 is lost from the cell and that there is negligible replacement synthesis of H1 during the period of the S-phase block. As H1 is lost, chromatin appears to undergo structural change. After 10 h of HU block, the new deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and a portion of the old DNA have measured nucleosome repeat lengths (37/sup 0/C digestion). By 24 h of HU block, nearly all of the chromatin has assumed a pseudoimmature conformation in which the nucleosome cores appear to be more closely packed along the DNA chain, but the new DNA is slightly more resistant than old DNA to attack by micrococcal nuclease. Electrophoretic analysis of nucleoprotein particles produced by micrococcal nuclease digestion of nuclei indicates that: the distribution of mononucleosome species changes during Hu block and some mononucleosome species appear to be enriched in normally minor proteins which may determine the electrophoretic mobility of the nucleoprotein particles in agarose-acrylamide gels. The results raise the possibility that: during the early stages of replication (or prior to the passage of the replication fork), H1 is dissociated from initiated replicons and H1 does not reassociate in a concerted fashion with the H1-depleted chromatin until the replication fork has passed and, perhaps, a substantial portion of the replicon has been replicated.

  18. Microarray and synchronization of neuronal differentiation with pathway changes in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databank in nerve growth factor-treated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Feng, Wayne

    2012-08-01

    The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway database creates networks from interrelations between molecular biology and underlying chemical elements. This allows for analysis of biologic networks, genomic information, and higher-order functional information at a systems level. We performed microarray experiments and used the KEGG database, systems biology analysis, and annotation of pathway function to study nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced differentiation of PC12 cells. Cells were cultured to 70%-80% confluence, treated with NGF for 1 or 3 hours (h), and RNA was extracted. Stage 1 data analysis involved analysis of variance (ANOVA), and stage 2 involved cluster analysis and heat map generation. We identified 2020 NGF-induced PC12 genes (1038 at 1 h and 1554 at 3 h). Results showed changes in gene expression over time. We compared these genes with 6035 genes from the KEGG database. Cross-matching resulted in 830 genes. Among these, we identified 395 altered genes (155 at 1 h and 301 at 3 h; 2-fold increase from 1 h to 3 h). We identified 191 biologic pathways in the KEGG database; the top 15 showed correlations with neuronal differentiation (mitogen-activated protein kinase [MAPK] pathway: 35 genes at 1 h, 54 genes at 3 h; genes associated with axonal guidance: 12 at 1 h, 26 at 3 h; Wnt pathway: 16 at 1 h, 25 at 3 h; neurotrophin pathway: 4 at 1 h, 14 at 3 h). Thus, we identified changes in neuronal differentiation pathways with the KEGG database, which were synchronized with NGF-induced differentiation.

  19. Electrotonic vascular signal conduction and nephron synchronization.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Donald J; Toma, Ildiko; Sosnovtseva, Olga V; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2009-04-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) and the myogenic mechanism control afferent arteriolar diameter in each nephron and regulate blood flow. Both mechanisms generate self-sustained oscillations, the oscillations interact, TGF modulates the frequency and amplitude of the myogenic oscillation, and the oscillations synchronize; a 5:1 frequency ratio is the most frequent. TGF oscillations synchronize in nephron pairs supplied from a common cortical radial artery, as do myogenic oscillations. We propose that electrotonic vascular signal propagation from one juxtaglomerular apparatus interacts with similar signals from other nephrons to produce synchronization. We tested this idea in tubular-vascular preparations from mice. Vascular smooth muscle cells were loaded with a fluorescent voltage-sensitive dye; fluorescence intensity was measured with confocal microscopy. Perfusion of the thick ascending limb activated TGF and depolarized afferent arteriolar smooth muscle cells. The depolarization spread to the cortical radial artery and other afferent arterioles and declined with distance from the perfused juxtaglomerular apparatus, consistent with electrotonic vascular signal propagation. With a mathematical model of two coupled nephrons, we estimated the conductance of nephron coupling by fitting simulated vessel diameters to experimental data. With this value, we simulated nephron pairs to test for synchronization. In single-nephron simulations, the frequency of the TGF oscillation varied with nephron length. Coupling nephrons of different lengths forced TGF frequencies of both pair members to converge to a common value. The myogenic oscillations also synchronized, and the synchronization between the TGF and the myogenic oscillations showed an increased stability against parameter perturbations. Electronic vascular signal propagation is a plausible mechanism for nephron synchronization. Coupling increased the stability of the various oscillations.

  20. High efficiency wraparound contact solar cells /HEWACS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillanders, M.; Opjorden, R.

    1980-01-01

    A cell technology, producing high efficiency wrap-around contact solar cells (HEWACS), with both electrical contacts on the back and AMO conversion efficiencies of almost 15%, is presented. A flow chart indicating the baseline process sequence along with the process changes is given. Tests checking for coating delamination and contact integrity, those measuring contact strength, and thermal cycle tests, successfully demonstrated that this cell technology is ready to be moved to the pilot production stage.

  1. Achieving High Performance Perovskite Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Recently, metal halide perovskite based solar cell with the characteristics of rather low raw materials cost, great potential for simple process and scalable production, and extreme high power conversion efficiency (PCE), have been highlighted as one of the most competitive technologies for next generation thin film photovoltaic (PV). In UCLA, we have realized an efficient pathway to achieve high performance pervoskite solar cells, where the findings are beneficial to this unique materials/devices system. Our recent progress lies in perovskite film formation, defect passivation, transport materials design, interface engineering with respect to high performance solar cell, as well as the exploration of its applications beyond photovoltaics. These achievements include: 1) development of vapor assisted solution process (VASP) and moisture assisted solution process, which produces perovskite film with improved conformity, high crystallinity, reduced recombination rate, and the resulting high performance; 2) examination of the defects property of perovskite materials, and demonstration of a self-induced passivation approach to reduce carrier recombination; 3) interface engineering based on design of the carrier transport materials and the electrodes, in combination with high quality perovskite film, which delivers 15 ~ 20% PCEs; 4) a novel integration of bulk heterojunction to perovskite solar cell to achieve better light harvest; 5) fabrication of inverted solar cell device with high efficiency and flexibility and 6) exploration the application of perovskite materials to photodetector. Further development in film, device architecture, and interfaces will lead to continuous improved perovskite solar cells and other organic-inorganic hybrid optoelectronics.

  2. Planar multijunction high voltage solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Chai, A. T.; Goradia, C.

    1980-01-01

    Technical considerations, preliminary results, and fabrication details are discussed for a family of high-voltage planar multi-junction (PMJ) solar cells which combine the attractive features of planar cells with conventional or interdigitated back contacts and the vertical multijunction (VMJ) solar cell. The PMJ solar cell is internally divided into many voltage-generating regions, called unit cells, which are internally connected in series. The key to obtaining reasonable performance from this device was the separation of top surface field regions over each active unit cell. Using existing solar cell fabricating methods, output voltages in excess of 20 volts per linear centimeter are possible. Analysis of the new device is complex, and numerous geometries are being studied which should provide substantial benefits in both normal sunlight usage as well as with concentrators.

  3. Synchronous oscillation of the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration and membrane potential in cultured epithelial cells (Intestine 407).

    PubMed

    Yada, T; Oiki, S; Ueda, S; Okada, Y

    1986-06-16

    Cultured epithelial Intestine 407 cells exhibit regular oscillations of the membrane potential with repeated hyperpolarizations. These hyperpolarizations were inhibited not only by K+ channel blockers (tetraethylammonium and nonyltriethylammonium) but also by inhibitors of the Ca2+-activated K+ channel (quinine and quinidine). Using Ca2+-selective microelectrodes, cyclic increases in the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration of more than 1 X 10(-6) M were found to coincide with the cyclic membrane hyperpolarizations. Thus, it appears that the potential oscillation is brought about by the oscillation of the intracellular free Ca2+ level which induces periodic activation of the Ca2+-dependent K+ channels. Neither the deprivation of extracellular Ca2+ nor the application of Ca2+ channel blockers (Co2+ and Ni2+) abolished the potential oscillation. Mitochondrial inhibitors (KCN, NaN3, antimycin A, FCCP and dinitrophenol) inhibited the potential oscillation, whereas glycolytic inhibitors (iodoacetic acid and NaF) had no effects. Caffeine and oxalate, which affect the microsomal Ca2+ transport, failed to exert any effect upon the potential oscillation. It is concluded that the cytosolic Ca2+ oscillation results from cyclic releases of Ca2+ from the intracellular storage site, which depends upon mitochondrial activities.

  4. High frequency of clonal IG and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements in histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenting; Qiu, Tian; Zeng, Linshu; Zheng, Bo; Ying, Jianming; Feng, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    The 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic criteria of histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms from hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues no longer required the absence of clonal B-cell/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. It is true that the clonal B-cell/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements have been identified in rare cases of histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms, such as those with or following lymphoma/leukemia or in some sporadic histiocytic/dendritic cell sarcomas, but the clonal features of such group of tumor are still not clear. Here we investigated the clonal status of 33 samples including Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), Langerhans cell sarcoma (LCS), follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS), interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma (IDCS) and histiocytic sarcoma (HS). Among them, twenty-eight cases were sporadic without current or past lymphoma/leukemia. Three cases were found with a past history of T-cell lymphoma, one case was followed by extraosseous plasmacytoma, and one case was found with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Our results showed that there was a high frequency of clonal IG and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements in these cases. Notably, 4 cases of LCH and 2 cases of FDCS showed both B and T cell receptor gene rearrangements concurrently. One case of FDCS synchronous with DLBCL showed identical clonal IGH in both tumor populations and clonal TCRβ in FDCS alone. No matter if the presence of clonal receptor gene rearrangements was associated with the tumor origin or tumorigenesis, it might serve as a novel tumor marker for developing target therapy. PMID:27823979

  5. Nonlinear frequency-dependent synchronization in the developing hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Prida, L M; Sanchez-Andres, J V

    1999-07-01

    Synchronous population activity is present both in normal and pathological conditions such as epilepsy. In the immature hippocampus, synchronous bursting is an electrophysiological conspicuous event. These bursts, known as giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs), are generated by the synchronized activation of interneurons and pyramidal cells via GABAA, N-methyl-D-aspartate, and AMPA receptors. Nevertheless the mechanism leading to this synchronization is still controversial. We have investigated the conditions under which synchronization arises in developing hippocampal networks. By means of simultaneous intracellular recordings, we show that GDPs result from local cooperation of active cells within an integration period prior to their onset. During this time interval, an increase in the number of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) takes place building up full synchronization between cells. These EPSPs are correlated with individual action potentials simultaneously occurring in neighboring cells. We have used EPSP frequency as an indicator of the neuronal activity underlying GDP generation. By comparing EPSP frequency with the occurrence of synchronized GDPs between CA3 and the fascia dentata (FD), we found that GDPs are fired in an all-or-none manner, which is characterized by a specific threshold of EPSP frequency from which synchronous GDPs emerge. In FD, the EPSP frequency-threshold for GDP onset is 17 Hz. GDPs are triggered similarly in CA3 by appropriate periodic stimulation of mossy fibers. The frequency threshold for CA3 GDP onset is 12 Hz. These findings clarify the local mechanism of synchronization underlying bursting in the developing hippocampus, indicating that GDPs are fired when background levels of EPSPs or action potentials have built up full synchronization by firing at specific frequencies (>12 Hz). Our results also demonstrate that spontaneous EPSPs and action potentials are important for the initiation of synchronous bursts in the

  6. Optimistic barrier synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    Barrier synchronization is fundamental operation in parallel computation. In many contexts, at the point a processor enters a barrier it knows that it has already processed all the work required of it prior to synchronization. The alternative case, when a processor cannot enter a barrier with the assurance that it has already performed all the necessary pre-synchronization computation, is treated. The problem arises when the number of pre-sychronization messages to be received by a processor is unkown, for example, in a parallel discrete simulation or any other computation that is largely driven by an unpredictable exchange of messages. We describe an optimistic O(log sup 2 P) barrier algorithm for such problems, study its performance on a large-scale parallel system, and consider extensions to general associative reductions as well as associative parallel prefix computations.

  7. High-Temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Merritt, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The vast majority of satellites and near-earth probes developed to date have relied upon photovoltaic power generation. If future missions to probe environments close to the sun will be able to use photovoltaic power, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. For example, the equilibrium temperature of a Mercury surface station will be about 450 C, and the temperature of solar arrays on the proposed "Solar Probe" mission will extend to temperatures as high as 2000 C (although it is likely that the craft will operate on stored power rather than solar energy during the closest approach to the sun). Advanced thermal design principles, such as replacing some of the solar array area with reflectors, off-pointing, and designing the cells to reflect rather than absorb light out of the band of peak response, can reduce these operating temperature somewhat. Nevertheless, it is desirable to develop approaches to high-temperature solar cell design that can operate under temperature extremes far greater than today's cells. Solar cells made from wide bandgap (WBG) compound semiconductors are an obvious choice for such an application. In order to aid in the experimental development of such solar cells, we have initiated a program studying the theoretical and experimental photovoltaic performance of wide bandgap materials. In particular, we have been investigating the use of GaP, SiC, and GaN materials for space solar cells. We will present theoretical results on the limitations on current cell technologies and the photovoltaic performance of these wide-bandgap solar cells in a variety of space conditions. We will also give an overview of some of NASA's cell developmental efforts in this area and discuss possible future mission applications.

  8. Very High Efficiency Solar Cell Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, A.; Kirkpatrick, D.; Honsberg, C.; Moore, D.; Wanlass, M.; Emery, K.; Schwartz, R.; Carlson, D.; Bowden, S.; Aiken, D.; Gray, A.; Kurtz, S.; Kazmerski, L., et al

    2009-01-01

    The Very High Efficiency Solar Cell (VHESC) program is developing integrated optical system - PV modules for portable applications that operate at greater than 50% efficiency. We are integrating the optical design with the solar cell design, and have entered previously unoccupied design space. Our approach is driven by proven quantitative models for the solar cell design, the optical design, and the integration of these designs. Optical systems efficiency with an optical efficiency of 93% and solar cell device results under ideal dichroic splitting optics summing to 42.7 {+-} 2.5% are described.

  9. Advanced high efficiency wraparound contact solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.; Uno, F. M.; Thornhill, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A significant advancement in the development of thin high efficiency wraparound contact silicon solar cells has been made by coupling space and terrestrial processing procedures. Although this new method for fabricating cells has not been completely reduced to practice, some of the initial cells have delivered over 20 mW/sq cm when tested at 25 C under AMO intensity. This approach not only yields high efficiency devices, but shows promise of allowing complete freedom of choice in both the location and size of the wraparound contact pad area

  10. Advanced high efficiency wraparound contact solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.; Uno, F. M.; Thornhill, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A significant advancement in the development of thin high efficiency wraparound contact silicon solar cells has been made by coupling space and terrestrial processing procedures. Although this new method for fabricating cells has not been completely reduced to practice, some of the initial cells have delivered over 20 mW/sq cm when tested at 25 C under AMO intensity. This approach not only yields high efficiency devices, but shows promise of allowing complete freedom of choice in both the location and size of the wraparound contact pad area.

  11. Synchronous trifocal colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charalampoudis, Petros; Kykalos, Stylianos; Stamopoulos, Paraskevas; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (SCRCs) have been increasingly diagnosed due to emerging diagnostic modalities. The presence of three or more synchronous colorectal cancers has, however, only rarely been reported. A 76-year-old white man presented for management of two concurrent colorectal adenocarcinomas in the left colon evidenced on total colonoscopy. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography and thoracoabdominal computed tomography were negative for metastatic disease. The patient underwent an elective left hemicolectomy. The pathology report ultimately showed the presence of three moderately differentiated, distinct colorectal cancers. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery. PMID:27695171

  12. High-efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. A.; Blakers, A. W.; Shi, J.; Keller, E. M.; Wenham, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon solar cells are described which operate at energy conversion efficiencies independently measured at 18.7 percent under standard terrestrial test conditions (AM1.5, 100 mW/sq cm, 28 C). These are apparently the most efficient silicon cells fabricated to date. The high-efficiency results from a combination of high open-circuit voltage due to the careful attention paid to the passivation of the top surface of the cell, high fill factor due to the high open-circuit voltage and low parasitic resistance losses, and high short-circuit current density due to the use of shallow diffusions, a low grid coverage, and an optimized double layer antireflection coating.

  13. High Radiation Resistance IMM Solar Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Noren

    2015-01-01

    Due to high launch costs, weight reduction is a key driver for the development of new solar cell technologies suitable for space applications. This project is developing a unique triple-junction inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology that enables the manufacture of very lightweight, low-cost InGaAsP-based multijunction solar cells. This IMM technology consists of indium (In) and phosphorous (P) solar cell active materials, which are designed to improve the radiation-resistant properties of the triple-junction solar cell while maintaining high efficiency. The intrinsic radiation hardness of InP materials makes them of great interest for building solar cells suitable for deployment in harsh radiation environments, such as medium Earth orbit and missions to the outer planets. NASA Glenn's recently developed epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process also will be applied to this new structure, which will enable the fabrication of the IMM structure without the substrate.

  14. High-efficiency silicon concentrator cell commercialization

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, R.A.; Swanson, R.M.

    1993-05-01

    This report summarizes the first phase of a forty-one month program to develop a commercial, high-efficiency concentrator solar cell and facility for manufacturing it. The period covered is November 1, 1990 to December 31, 1991. This is a joint program between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Sandia National Laboratories. (This report is also published by EPRI as EPRI report number TR-102035.) During the first year of the program, SunPower accomplished the following major objectives: (1) a new solar cell fabrication facility, which is called the Cell Pilot Line (CPL), (2) a baseline concentrator cell process has been developed, and (3) a cell testing facility has been completed. Initial cell efficiencies are about 23% for the baseline process. The long-range goal is to improve this efficiency to 27%.

  15. Synchronization of coupled single-electron circuits based on nanoparticles and tunneling junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervera, Javier; Manzanares, José A.; Mafé, Salvador

    2009-04-01

    We explore theoretically the synchronization properties of a device composed of coupled single-electron circuits whose building blocks are nanoparticles interconnected with tunneling junctions. Elementary nanoscillators can be achieved by a single-electron tunneling cell where the relaxation oscillation is induced by the tunneling. We develop a model to describe the synchronization of the nanoscillators and present sample calculations to demonstrate that the idea is feasible and could readily find applications. Instead of considering a particular system, we analyze the general properties of the device making use of an ideal model that emphasizes the essential characteristics of the concept. We define an order parameter for the system as a whole and demonstrate phase synchronization for sufficiently high values of the coupling resistance.

  16. High speed flow cytometric separation of viable cells

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Dennis T.; Van den Engh, Gerrit J.; Buckie, Anne-Marie

    1995-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell populations are separated to provide cell sets and subsets as viable cells with high purity and high yields, based on the number of original cells present in the mixture. High-speed flow cytometry is employed using light characteristics of the cells to separate the cells, where high flow speeds are used to reduce the sorting time.

  17. High speed flow cytometric separation of viable cells

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, D.T.; Van den Engh, G.J.; Buckie, A.M.

    1995-11-14

    Hematopoietic cell populations are separated to provide cell sets and subsets as viable cells with high purity and high yields, based on the number of original cells present in the mixture. High-speed flow cytometry is employed using light characteristics of the cells to separate the cells, where high flow speeds are used to reduce the sorting time.

  18. Practical high efficiency bifacial solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moehlecke, A.; Zanesco, I.; Luque, A.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, the authors present a practical process to obtain bifacial solar cells. These cells are made using p{sup +}nn{sup +} structure on high-medium base resistivity, continuous emitters and with a process that maintains high bulk minority carrier lifetime. Efficiencies of 19.1% and 18.1% are achieved under standard conditions when the cell is illuminated by n{sup +}n high-low junction and when it is illuminated by P{sup +}n junction, respectively. The authors remark that the n{sup +}n high-low junction provides a higher current density and a good ratio between generated current of each face is found to be of about 103%.

  19. Advanced synchronous luminescence system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1997-02-04

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the condition of tissue or otherwise making chemical identifications includes exposing the sample to a light source, and using a synchronous luminescence system to produce a spectrum that can be analyzed for tissue condition. 14 figs.

  20. Synchronized time stamp support

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalkowski, J.

    1994-02-16

    New software has been added to IOC core to maintain time stamps. The new software has the ability to maintain time stamps over all IOCs on a network. The purpose of this paper is to explain how EPICS will synchronize the time stamps. In addition, this paper will explain how to configure and use the new EPICS time stamp support software.

  1. [Respiratory synchronization and breast radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mège, A; Ziouèche-Mottet, A; Bodez, V; Garcia, R; Arnaud, A; de Rauglaudre, G; Pourel, N; Chauvet, B

    2016-10-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy following breast cancer surgery continues to improve locoregional control and overall survival. But the success of highly targeted-conformal radiotherapy such as intensity-modulated techniques, can be compromised by respiratory motion. The intrafraction motion can potentially result in significant under- or overdose, and also expose organs at risk. This article summarizes the respiratory motion and its effects on imaging, dose calculation and dose delivery by radiotherapy for breast cancer. We will review the methods of respiratory synchronization available for breast radiotherapy to minimize the respiratory impact and to spare organs such as heart and lung.

  2. Heat transparent high intensity high efficiency solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An improved solar cell design is described. A surface of each solar cell has a plurality of grooves. Each groove has a vertical face and a slanted face that is covered by a reflecting metal. Light rays are reflected from the slanted face through the vertical face where they traverse a photovoltaic junction. As the light rays travel to the slanted face of an adjacent groove, they again traverse the junction. The underside of the reflecting coating directs the light rays toward the opposite surface of solar cell as they traverse the junction again. When the light rays travel through the solar cell and reach the saw toothed grooves on the under side, the process of reflection and repeatedly traversing the junction again takes place. The light rays ultimately emerge from the solar cell. These solar cells are particularly useful at very high levels of insolation because the infrared or heat radiation passes through the cells without being appreciably absorbed to heat the cell.

  3. High-density MEA recordings unveil the dynamics of bursting events in Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Lonardoni, Davide; Di Marco, Stefano; Amin, Hayder; Maccione, Alessandro; Berdondini, Luca; Nieus, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    High density multielectrode arrays (MEAs) based on CMOS technology (CMOS-MEAs) can simultaneously record extracellular spiking activity in neuronal cultures from 4096 closely spaced microelectrodes. This allows for a finer investigation of neuronal network activity compared to conventional MEAs with a few tens of electrodes. However, the sensing properties of these devices differ. To highlight this aspect, here we investigate and discuss the differences observed when quantifying spontaneous synchronized bursting events (SBEs) in datasets acquired with conventional MEAs and high-density MEAs from comparable hippocampal cultures. We found that datasets acquired with high-density MEAs exhibit collective dynamics similar to conventional arrays, but are characterized by a higher percentage of random spikes, i.e. spikes that are not part of a burst, most probably resulting from the larger recording capability. Additionally, the percentage of electrodes that record a burst is remarkably small on high-density MEAs compared to what can be observed on conventional MEAs and SBEs appear to be propagating in time across the electrode array, by involving shorter sequences of spikes per electrode. Overall, these results highlight a lower level of network synchronization involved in SBEs compared to what has been debated for several decades based on conventional MEA recordings from cell cultures.

  4. High Efficiency Lithium-Thionyl Chloride Cell.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    AD-Al14 672 HONEYWELL POWER SOURCES CENTER HORSHAM PA F/S 10/3 HIGH EFFICIENCY LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE CELLo(U) APR 82 N DODDAPANEN! OAAK20-81-C...CHART NATIONAl BUREAU OF STANDARDS 1963 A Research and Development Technical Report DELET-TR-81-0381-3 HIGH EFFICIENCY LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE CELL...reverse aide it necessary and Identify by block number) Thionyl chloride , lithium , high discharge rates, low temperatures, catalysis, cyclic

  5. Feedthrough terminal for high-power cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1982-05-28

    A feedthrough terminal for a high power electrochemical storage cell providing low resistance coupling to the conductive elements therein while isolating the terminal electrode from the highly corrosive environment within the cell is disclosed. A large diameter, cylindrical copper electrode is enclosed in a stainless steel tube with a BN powder feedthrough seal maintained around the stainless steel tube by means of facing insulative bushings and an outer sleeve. One end of the copper conductor is silver-brazed directly to a flat, butterfly bus bar within the cell, with the adjacent end of the surrounding outer feedthrough sleeve welded to the bus bar. A threaded seal is fixedly positioned on a distal portion of the stainless steel tube immediately adjacent the distal insulative bushing so as to compress the feedthrough seal in tight fitting relation around the stainless steel tube in providing a rugged, leak-proof electrical feedthrough terminal for the power cell.

  6. Requirements for high-efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sah, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    Minimum recombination and low injection level are essential for high efficiency. Twenty percent AM1 efficiency requires a dark recombination current density of 2 x 10 to the minus 13th power A/sq cm and a recombination center density of less than 10 to the 10th power /cu cm. Recombination mechanisms at thirteen locations in a conventional single crystalline silicon cell design are reviewed. Three additional recombination locations are described at grain boundaries in polycrystalline cells. Material perfection and fabrication process optimization requirements for high efficiency are outlined. Innovative device designs to reduce recombination in the bulk and interfaces of single crystalline cells and in the grain boundary of polycrystalline cells are reviewed.

  7. Methodologies for high efficiency perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Nam-Gyu

    2016-06-01

    Since the report on long-term durable solid-state perovskite solar cell in 2012, perovskite solar cells based on lead halide perovskites having organic cations such as methylammonium CH3NH3PbI3 or formamidinium HC(NH2)2PbI3 have received great attention because of superb photovoltaic performance with power conversion efficiency exceeding 22 %. In this review, emergence of perovskite solar cell is briefly introduced. Since understanding fundamentals of light absorbers is directly related to their photovoltaic performance, opto-electronic properties of organo lead halide perovskites are investigated in order to provide insight into design of higher efficiency perovskite solar cells. Since the conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cell is found to depend significantly on perovskite film quality, methodologies for fabricating high quality perovskite films are particularly emphasized, including various solution-processes and vacuum deposition method.

  8. Methodologies for high efficiency perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Nam-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Since the report on long-term durable solid-state perovskite solar cell in 2012, perovskite solar cells based on lead halide perovskites having organic cations such as methylammonium CH3NH3PbI3 or formamidinium HC(NH2)2PbI3 have received great attention because of superb photovoltaic performance with power conversion efficiency exceeding 22 %. In this review, emergence of perovskite solar cell is briefly introduced. Since understanding fundamentals of light absorbers is directly related to their photovoltaic performance, opto-electronic properties of organo lead halide perovskites are investigated in order to provide insight into design of higher efficiency perovskite solar cells. Since the conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cell is found to depend significantly on perovskite film quality, methodologies for fabricating high quality perovskite films are particularly emphasized, including various solution-processes and vacuum deposition method.

  9. High-Frequency Mechanostimulation of Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kadem, Laith F; Suana, K Grace; Holz, Michelle; Wang, Wei; Westerhaus, Hannes; Herges, Rainer; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2017-01-02

    Cell adhesion is regulated by molecularly defined protein interactions and by mechanical forces, which can activate a dynamic restructuring of adhesion sites. Previous attempts to explore the response of cell adhesion to forces have been limited to applying mechanical stimuli that involve the cytoskeleton. In contrast, we here apply a new, oscillatory type of stimulus through push-pull azobenzenes. Push-pull azobenzenes perform a high-frequency, molecular oscillation upon irradiation with visible light that has frequently been applied in polymer surface relief grating. We here use these oscillations to address single adhesion receptors. The effect of molecular oscillatory forces on cell adhesion has been analyzed using single-cell force spectroscopy and gene expression studies. Our experiments demonstrate a reinforcement of cell adhesion as well as upregulated expression levels of adhesion-associated genes as a result of the nanoscale "tickling" of integrins. This novel type of mechanical stimulus provides a previously unprecedented molecular control of cellular mechanosensing.

  10. High power density carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.; Johnsen, R.; Doyon, J.; Allen, J.

    1996-12-31

    Carbonate fuel cell is a highly efficient and environmentally clean source of power generation. Many organizations worldwide are actively pursuing the development of the technology. Field demonstration of multi-MW size power plant has been initiated in 1996, a step toward commercialization before the turn of the century, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) is planning to introduce a 2.85MW commercial fuel cell power plant with an efficiency of 58%, which is quite attractive for distributed power generation. However, to further expand competitive edge over alternative systems and to achieve wider market penetration, ERC is exploring advanced carbonate fuel cells having significantly higher power densities. A more compact power plant would also stimulate interest in new markets such as ships and submarines where space limitations exist. The activities focused on reducing cell polarization and internal resistance as well as on advanced thin cell components.

  11. Synchronized fission yeast meiosis using an ATP analog-sensitive Pat1 protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Cipak, Lubos; Polakova, Silvia; Hyppa, Randy W; Smith, Gerald R; Gregan, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    Synchronous cultures are often indispensable for studying meiosis. Here we present an optimized protocol for induction of synchronous meiosis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Chemical inactivation of an ATP analog-sensitive form of the Pat1 kinase (pat1-as2) by adding the ATP analog 1-NM-PP1 in G1-arrested cells allows the induction of synchronous meiosis at optimal temperature (25°C). Importantly, this protocol eliminates detrimental effects of elevated temperature (34°C), which is required to inactivate the commonly used temperature-sensitive Pat1 kinase mutant (pat1-114). The addition of the mat-Pc gene to a mat1-M strain further improves chromosome segregation and spore viability. Thus, our protocol offers highly synchronous meiosis at optimal temperature, with most characteristics similar to those of wild-type meiosis. The synchronization protocol can be completed in 5 d (not including strain production, which may take as long as 2 or 3 months).

  12. Synchronization of EEG activity in patients with bipolar disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panischev, O. Yu; Demin, S. A.; Muhametshin, I. G.; Demina, N. Yu

    2015-12-01

    In paper we apply the method based on the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) to determine the differences in frequency-phase synchronization of the cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) activities in patients with bipolar disorder (BD). We found that for healthy subjects the frequency-phase synchronization of EEGs from long-range electrodes was significantly better for BD patients. In BD patients a high synchronization of EEGs was observed only for short-range electrodes. Thus, the FNS is a simple graphical method for qualitative analysis can be applied to identify the synchronization effects in EEG activity and, probably, may be used for the diagnosis of this syndrome.

  13. Chaos synchronization basing on symbolic dynamics with nongenerating partition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingyuan; Wang, Mogei; Liu, Zhenzhen

    2009-06-01

    Using symbolic dynamics and information theory, we study the information transmission needed for synchronizing unidirectionally coupled oscillators. It is found that when sustaining chaos synchronization with nongenerating partition, the synchronization error will be larger than a critical value, although the required coupled channel capacity can be smaller than the case of using a generating partition. Then we show that no matter whether a generating or nongenerating partition is in use, a high-quality detector can guarantee the lead of the response oscillator, while the lag responding can make up the low precision of the detector. A practicable synchronization scheme basing on a nongenerating partition is also proposed in this paper.

  14. Novel synchronization technique for two parallel connected sparkgap switches.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rohit; Mitra, S; Patel, A; Dwivedi, Rajesh; Kolge, T; Sharma, Ranjeet Archana; Chakravarthy, D P

    2012-08-01

    In this article a novel way of synchronizing two parallel connected sparkgap switches with accuracies of 1-5 ns for high frequency pulsed power applications is described. The circuit design of a synchronized sparkgap switch circuit is discussed. The circuit uses a combination of one master sparkgap and a set of inductor and capacitors to synchronize two sparkgaps and can be controlled via an IGBT switch. Critical issues for circuit design are presented together with analytical calculations and simulations. Experimental verification of the novel topology is carried out in a prototype experimental setup. Results showing nanosecond level of accuracy in synchronization are reported in this paper along with simulations and analysis.

  15. Synchronization in time-varying networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohar, Vivek; Ji, Peng; Choudhary, Anshul; Sinha, Sudeshna; Kurths, Jüergen

    2014-08-01

    We study the stability of the synchronized state in time-varying complex networks using the concept of basin stability, which is a nonlocal and nonlinear measure of stability that can be easily applied to high-dimensional systems [P. J. Menck, J. Heitzig, N. Marwan, and J. Kurths, Nature Phys. 9, 89 (2013), 10.1038/nphys2516]. The time-varying character is included by stochastically rewiring each link with the average frequency f. We find that the time taken to reach synchronization is lowered and the stability range of the synchronized state increases considerably in dynamic networks. Further we uncover that small-world networks are much more sensitive to link changes than random ones, with the time-varying character of the network having a significant effect at much lower rewiring frequencies. At very high rewiring frequencies, random networks perform better than small-world networks and the synchronized state is stable over a much wider window of coupling strengths. Lastly we show that the stability range of the synchronized state may be quite different for small and large perturbations, and so the linear stability analysis and the basin stability criterion provide complementary indicators of stability.

  16. Synchronization in time-varying networks.

    PubMed

    Kohar, Vivek; Ji, Peng; Choudhary, Anshul; Sinha, Sudeshna; Kurths, Jüergen

    2014-08-01

    We study the stability of the synchronized state in time-varying complex networks using the concept of basin stability, which is a nonlocal and nonlinear measure of stability that can be easily applied to high-dimensional systems [P. J. Menck, J. Heitzig, N. Marwan, and J. Kurths, Nature Phys. 9, 89 (2013)]. The time-varying character is included by stochastically rewiring each link with the average frequency f. We find that the time taken to reach synchronization is lowered and the stability range of the synchronized state increases considerably in dynamic networks. Further we uncover that small-world networks are much more sensitive to link changes than random ones, with the time-varying character of the network having a significant effect at much lower rewiring frequencies. At very high rewiring frequencies, random networks perform better than small-world networks and the synchronized state is stable over a much wider window of coupling strengths. Lastly we show that the stability range of the synchronized state may be quite different for small and large perturbations, and so the linear stability analysis and the basin stability criterion provide complementary indicators of stability.

  17. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell was designed and tested to deliver high capacity at steady discharge rates up to and including a C rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet of any type in a 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters and performance are described. Also covered is an episode of capacity fading due to electrode swelling and its successful recovery by means of additional activation procedures.

  18. Synchronous characterization of semiconductor microcavity laser beam.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Lippi, G L

    2015-06-01

    We report on a high-resolution double-channel imaging method used to synchronously map the intensity- and optical-frequency-distribution of a laser beam in the plane orthogonal to the propagation direction. The synchronous measurement allows us to show that the laser frequency is an inhomogeneous distribution below threshold, but that it becomes homogeneous across the fundamental Gaussian mode above threshold. The beam's tails deviations from the Gaussian shape, however, are accompanied by sizeable fluctuations in the laser wavelength, possibly deriving from manufacturing details and from the influence of spontaneous emission in the very low intensity wings. In addition to the synchronous spatial characterization, a temporal analysis at any given point in the beam cross section is carried out. Using this method, the beam homogeneity and spatial shape, energy density, energy center, and the defects-related spectrum can also be extracted from these high-resolution pictures.

  19. Synchronous characterization of semiconductor microcavity laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T. Lippi, G. L.

    2015-06-15

    We report on a high-resolution double-channel imaging method used to synchronously map the intensity- and optical-frequency-distribution of a laser beam in the plane orthogonal to the propagation direction. The synchronous measurement allows us to show that the laser frequency is an inhomogeneous distribution below threshold, but that it becomes homogeneous across the fundamental Gaussian mode above threshold. The beam’s tails deviations from the Gaussian shape, however, are accompanied by sizeable fluctuations in the laser wavelength, possibly deriving from manufacturing details and from the influence of spontaneous emission in the very low intensity wings. In addition to the synchronous spatial characterization, a temporal analysis at any given point in the beam cross section is carried out. Using this method, the beam homogeneity and spatial shape, energy density, energy center, and the defects-related spectrum can also be extracted from these high-resolution pictures.

  20. Interareal synchronization in the visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Bressler, S L

    1996-04-01

    The primary visual cortex (V1) is part of a highly interconnected network of cortical areas, hierarchically organized but operating concurrently across hierarchical levels. The high degree of reciprocal interconnection among visual cortical areas provides a framework for their interaction during the performance of visual scene analysis. The functional interdependency of visual cortical areas which develops during scene analysis can be investigated by techniques which measure interareal correlated activity. Evidence from monkeys performing a visual pattern discrimination suggests that synchronization of aperiodic activity from neuronal ensembles in cortical areas at different hierarchical levels is a relevant aspect of visual function. The near-periodic nature of the synchronized response to moving light bars in earlier studies may have been a result of the type of stimulus used. Various models of visual cortex are discussed in which interareal synchronization plays a functional role.

  1. The lack of synchronization between iron uptake and cell growth leads to iron overload in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during post-exponential growth modes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinkyu; McCormick, Sean P; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A

    2013-12-31

    Fermenting cells growing exponentially on rich (YPAD) medium underwent a transition to a slow-growing state as glucose levels declined and their metabolism shifted to respiration. During exponential growth, Fe import and cell-growth rates were matched, affording an approximately invariant cellular Fe concentration. During the transition period, the high-affinity Fe import rate declined slower than the cell-growth rate declined, causing Fe to accumulate, initially as Fe(III) oxyhydroxide nanoparticles but eventually as mitochondrial and vacuolar Fe. Once the cells had reached slow-growth mode, Fe import and cell-growth rates were again matched, and the cellular Fe concentration was again approximately invariant. Fermenting cells grown on minimal medium (MM) grew more slowly during the exponential phase and underwent a transition to a true stationary state as glucose levels declined. The Fe concentration of MM cells that just entered the stationary state was similar to that of YPAD cells, but MM cells continued to accumulate Fe in the stationary state. Fe initially accumulated as nanoparticles and high-spin Fe(II) species, but vacuolar Fe(III) also eventually accumulated. Surprisingly, Fe-packed 5-day-old MM cells suffered no more reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage than younger cells, suggesting that the Fe concentration alone does not accurately predict the extent of ROS damage. The mode and rate of growth at the time of harvesting dramatically affected cellular Fe content. A mathematical model of Fe metabolism in a growing cell was developed. The model included the import of Fe via a regulated high-affinity pathway and an unregulated low-affinity pathway. The import of Fe from the cytosol to vacuoles and mitochondria and nanoparticle formation were also included. The model captured essential trafficking behavior, demonstrating that cells regulate Fe import in accordance with their overall growth rate and that they misregulate Fe import when nanoparticles

  2. Robust Timing Synchronization in Aeronautical Mobile Communication Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Fu-Qin; Pinchak, Stanley

    2004-01-01

    This work details a study of robust synchronization schemes suitable for satellite to mobile aeronautical applications. A new scheme, the Modified Sliding Window Synchronizer (MSWS), is devised and compared with existing schemes, including the traditional Early-Late Gate Synchronizer (ELGS), the Gardner Zero-Crossing Detector (GZCD), and the Sliding Window Synchronizer (SWS). Performance of the synchronization schemes is evaluated by a set of metrics that indicate performance in digital communications systems. The metrics are convergence time, mean square phase error (or root mean-square phase error), lowest SNR for locking, initial frequency offset performance, midstream frequency offset performance, and system complexity. The performance of the synchronizers is evaluated by means of Matlab simulation models. A simulation platform is devised to model the satellite to mobile aeronautical channel, consisting of a Quadrature Phase Shift Keying modulator, an additive white Gaussian noise channel, and a demodulator front end. Simulation results show that the MSWS provides the most robust performance at the cost of system complexity. The GZCD provides a good tradeoff between robustness and system complexity for communication systems that require high symbol rates or low overall system costs. The ELGS has a high system complexity despite its average performance. Overall, the SWS, originally designed for multi-carrier systems, performs very poorly in single-carrier communications systems. Table 5.1 in Section 5 provides a ranking of each of the synchronization schemes in terms of the metrics set forth in Section 4.1. Details of comparison are given in Section 5. Based on the results presented in Table 5, it is safe to say that the most robust synchronization scheme examined in this work is the high-sample-rate Modified Sliding Window Synchronizer. A close second is its low-sample-rate cousin. The tradeoff between complexity and lowest mean-square phase error determines

  3. Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella and the Evolution of Multicellularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond

    2009-03-01

    Flagella, among the most highly conserved structures in eukaryotes, are responsible for such tasks as fluid transport, motility and phototaxis, establishment of embryonic left-right asymmetry, and intercellular communication, and are thought to have played a key role in the development of multicellularity. These tasks are usually performed by the coordinated action of groups of flagella (from pairs to thousands), which display various types of spatio-temporal organization. The origin and quantitative characterization of flagellar synchronization has remained an important open problem, involving interplay between intracellular biochemistry and interflagellar mechanical/hydrodynamic coupling. The Volvocine green algae serve as useful model organisms for the study of these phenomena, as they form a lineage spanning from unicellular Chlamydomonas to germ-soma differentiated Volvox, having as many as 50,000 biflagellated surface somatic cells. In this talk I will describe extensive studies [1], using micromanipulation and high-speed imaging, of the flagellar synchronization of two key species - Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri - over tens of thousands of cycles. With Chlamydomonas we find that the flagellar dynamics moves back and forth between a stochastic synchronized state consistent with a simple model of hydrodynamically coupled noisy oscillators, and a deterministic one driven by a large interflagellar frequency difference. These results reconcile previously contradictory studies, based on short observations, showing only one or the other of these two states, and, more importantly, show that the flagellar beat frequencies themselves are regulated by the cell. Moreover, high-resolution three-dimensional tracking of swimming cells provides strong evidence that these dynamical states are related to reorientation events in the trajectories, yielding a eukaryotic equivalent of the ``run and tumble'' motion of peritrichously flagellated bacteria. The degree

  4. Aging Affects Neural Synchronization to Speech-Related Acoustic Modulations

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Tine; Vercammen, Charlotte; Wouters, Jan; van Wieringen, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    As people age, speech perception problems become highly prevalent, especially in noisy situations. In addition to peripheral hearing and cognition, temporal processing plays a key role in speech perception. Temporal processing of speech features is mediated by synchronized activity of neural oscillations in the central auditory system. Previous studies indicate that both the degree and hemispheric lateralization of synchronized neural activity relate to speech perception performance. Based on these results, we hypothesize that impaired speech perception in older persons may, in part, originate from deviances in neural synchronization. In this study, auditory steady-state responses that reflect synchronized activity of theta, beta, low and high gamma oscillations (i.e., 4, 20, 40, and 80 Hz ASSR, respectively) were recorded in young, middle-aged, and older persons. As all participants had normal audiometric thresholds and were screened for (mild) cognitive impairment, differences in synchronized neural activity across the three age groups were likely to be attributed to age. Our data yield novel findings regarding theta and high gamma oscillations in the aging auditory system. At an older age, synchronized activity of theta oscillations is increased, whereas high gamma synchronization is decreased. In contrast to young persons who exhibit a right hemispheric dominance for processing of high gamma range modulations, older adults show a symmetrical processing pattern. These age-related changes in neural synchronization may very well underlie the speech perception problems in aging persons. PMID:27378906

  5. Wavelet phase synchronization and chaoticity.

    PubMed

    Postnikov, E B

    2009-11-01

    It has been shown that the so-called "wavelet phase" (or "time-scale") synchronization of chaotic signals is actually synchronization of smoothed functions with reduced chaotic fluctuations. This fact is based on the representation of the wavelet transform with the Morlet wavelet as a solution of the Cauchy problem for a simple diffusion equation with initial condition in a form of harmonic function modulated by a given signal. The topological background of the resulting effect is discussed. It is argued that the wavelet phase synchronization provides information about the synchronization of an averaged motion described by bounding tori instead of the fine-level classical chaotic phase synchronization.

  6. Synchronous intracortical adamantinomas with keratin cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Koo; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Han, Chung Soo

    2006-03-01

    Adamantinoma of the long bones is a rare primary bone tumor of uncertain embryogenesis. It tends to involve the tibia almost exclusively. We report on adamantinomas occurring in a 16-year-old male patient, with synchronous tibial and fibular lesions. Histologically, there were characteristic clusters of epithelial cells in a fibrous background, forming a keratin cyst. Immunohistochemically, these cells were strongly positive for cytokeratin. This keratin cyst formation is quite an unusual finding in classic adamantinoma.

  7. New high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Crotty, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    A design for silicon solar cells was investigated as an approach to increasing the cell open-circuit voltage and efficiency for flat-plate terrestrial photovoltaic applications. This deviates from past designs, where either the entire front surface of the cell is covered by a planar junction or the surface is textured before junction formation, which results in an even greater (up to 70%) junction area. The heavily doped front region and the junction space charge region are potential areas of high recombination for generated and injected minority carriers. The design presented reduces junction area by spreading equidiameter dot junctions across the surface of the cell, spaced about a diffusion length or less from each other. Various dot diameters and spacings allowed variations in total junction area. A simplified analysis was done to obtain a first-order design optimization. Efficiencies of up to 19% can be obtained. Cell fabrication involved extra masking steps for selective junction diffusion, and made surface passivation a key element in obtaining good collection. It also involved photolithography, with line widths down to microns. A method is demonstrated for achieving potentially high open-circuit voltages and solar-cell efficiencies.

  8. Optimal synchronization in space.

    PubMed

    Brede, Markus

    2010-02-01

    In this Rapid Communication we investigate spatially constrained networks that realize optimal synchronization properties. After arguing that spatial constraints can be imposed by limiting the amount of "wire" available to connect nodes distributed in space, we use numerical optimization methods to construct networks that realize different trade offs between optimal synchronization and spatial constraints. Over a large range of parameters such optimal networks are found to have a link length distribution characterized by power-law tails P(l) proportional to l(-alpha), with exponents alpha increasing as the networks become more constrained in space. It is also shown that the optimal networks, which constitute a particular type of small world network, are characterized by the presence of nodes of distinctly larger than average degree around which long-distance links are centered.

  9. Synchronously deployable truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G. (Inventor); Mikulas, M., Jr. (Inventor); Wallsom, E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A collapsible-expandable truss structure, including first and second spaced surface truss layers having an attached core layer is described. The surface truss layers are composed of a plurality of linear struts arranged in multiple triangular configurations. Each linear strut is hinged at the center and hinge connected at each end to a nodular joint. A passive spring serves as the expansion force to move the folded struts from a stowed collapsed position to a deployed operative final truss configuration. A damper controls the rate of spring expansion for the synchronized deployment of the truss as the folded configuration is released for deployment by the restrain belts. The truss is synchronously extended under the control of motor driven spools.

  10. Optimal synchronization in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brede, Markus

    2010-02-01

    In this Rapid Communication we investigate spatially constrained networks that realize optimal synchronization properties. After arguing that spatial constraints can be imposed by limiting the amount of “wire” available to connect nodes distributed in space, we use numerical optimization methods to construct networks that realize different trade offs between optimal synchronization and spatial constraints. Over a large range of parameters such optimal networks are found to have a link length distribution characterized by power-law tails P(l)∝l-α , with exponents α increasing as the networks become more constrained in space. It is also shown that the optimal networks, which constitute a particular type of small world network, are characterized by the presence of nodes of distinctly larger than average degree around which long-distance links are centered.

  11. Synchronization of micromasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis-Tilley, C.; Armour, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate synchronization effects in quantum self-sustained oscillators theoretically using the micromaser as a model system. We use the probability distribution for the relative phase as a tool for quantifying the emergence of preferred phases when two micromasers are coupled together. Using perturbation theory, we show that the behavior of the phase distribution is strongly dependent on exactly how the oscillators are coupled. In the quantum regime where photon occupation numbers are low we find that, although synchronization effects are rather weak, they are nevertheless significantly stronger than expected from a semiclassical description of the phase dynamics. We also compare the behavior of the phase distribution with the mutual information of the two oscillators and show that they can behave in rather different ways.

  12. Towards high performance inverted polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiong

    2013-03-01

    Bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells that can be fabricated by solution processing techniques are under intense investigation in both academic institutions and industrial companies because of their potential to enable mass production of flexible and cost-effective alternative to silicon-based electronics. Despite the envisioned advantages and recent technology advances, so far the performance of polymer solar cells is still inferior to inorganic counterparts in terms of the efficiency and stability. There are many factors limiting the performance of polymer solar cells. Among them, the optical and electronic properties of materials in the active layer, device architecture and elimination of PEDOT:PSS are the most determining factors in the overall performance of polymer solar cells. In this presentation, I will present how we approach high performance of polymer solar cells. For example, by developing novel materials, fabrication polymer photovoltaic cells with an inverted device structure and elimination of PEDOT:PSS, we were able to observe over 8.4% power conversion efficiency from inverted polymer solar cells.

  13. High vacuum cells for classical surface techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Imee Su; Baldelli, Steven

    2010-04-15

    Novel glass cells were designed and built to be able to perform surface potential and surface tension measurements in a contained environment. The cells can withstand pressures of approximately 1x10{sup -6} Torr, providing a reasonable level of control in terms of the amounts of volatile contaminants during experimentation. The measurements can take several hours; thus the cells help maintain the integrity of the sample in the course of the experiment. To test for the feasibility of the cell design, calibration measurements were performed. For the surface potential cell, the modified TREK 6000B-7C probe exhibited performance comparable to its unmodified counterpart. The correlation measurements between applied potential on the test surface and the measured potential showed R-values very close to 1 as well as standard deviation values of less than 1. Results also demonstrate improved measurement values for experiments performed in vacuum. The surface tension cell, on the other hand, which was used to perform the pendant drop method, was tested on common liquids and showed percentage errors of 0.5% when compared to literature values. The fabricated cells redefine measurements using classical surface techniques, providing unique and novel methods of sample preparation, premeasurement preparation, and sample analysis at highly beneficial expenditure cost.

  14. Instructional Design for Best Practice in the Synchronous Cyber Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastie, Megan; Chen, Nian-Shing; Kuo, Yen-Hung

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the correlation between the quality of instructional design and learning outcomes for early childhood students in the online synchronous cyber classroom. Today's generation of e-learners has access to highly engaging and well-designed multi-media synchronous classrooms. However little data exists on what constitutes…

  15. Digital Synchronizer without Metastability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simle, Robert M.; Cavazos, Jose A.

    2009-01-01

    A proposed design for a digital synchronizing circuit would eliminate metastability that plagues flip-flop circuits in digital input/output interfaces. This metastability is associated with sampling, by use of flip-flops, of an external signal that is asynchronous with a clock signal that drives the flip-flops: it is a temporary flip-flop failure that can occur when a rising or falling edge of an asynchronous signal occurs during the setup and/or hold time of a flip-flop. The proposed design calls for (1) use of a clock frequency greater than the frequency of the asynchronous signal, (2) use of flip-flop asynchronous preset or clear signals for the asynchronous input, (3) use of a clock asynchronous recovery delay with pulse width discriminator, and (4) tying the data inputs to constant logic levels to obtain (5) two half-rate synchronous partial signals - one for the falling and one for the rising edge. Inasmuch as the flip-flop data inputs would be permanently tied to constant logic levels, setup and hold times would not be violated. The half-rate partial signals would be recombined to construct a signal that would replicate the original asynchronous signal at its original rate but would be synchronous with the clock signal.

  16. Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2012-11-01

    From unicellular organisms as small as a few microns to the largest vertebrates on earth we find groups of beating flagella or cilia that exhibit striking spatio-temporal organization. This may take the form of precise frequency and phase locking as frequently found in the swimming of green algae, or beating with long-wavelength phase modulations known as metachronal waves, seen in ciliates and in our respiratory systems. The remarkable similarity in the underlying molecular structure of flagella across the whole eukaryotic world leads naturally to the hypothesis that a similarly universal mechanism might be responsible for synchronization. Although this mechanism is poorly understood, one appealing hypothesis is that it results from hydrodynamic interactions between flagella. In this talk I will describe a synthesis of recent experimental and theoretical studies of this issue that have provided the strongest evidence to date for the hydrodynamic origin of flagellar synchronization. At the unicellular level this includes studies of the beating of the two flagella of the wild type unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in their native state and under conditions of regrowth following autotomy, and of the flagellar dominance mutant ptx1, which displays unusual anti-phase synchronization. Analysis of the related multicellular organism Volvox carteri shows it to be an ideal model organism for the study of metachronal waves. Supported by BBSRC, EPSRC, ERC, and The Wellcome Trust.

  17. Synchronization trigger control system for flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    The use of cinematography or holographic interferometry for dynamic flow visualization in an internal combustion engine requires a control device that globally synchronizes camera and light source timing at a predefined shaft encoder angle. The device is capable of 0.35 deg resolution for rotational speeds of up to 73 240 rpm. This was achieved by implementing the shaft encoder signal addressed look-up table (LUT) and appropriate latches. The developed digital signal processing technique achieves 25 nsec of high speed triggering angle detection by using direct parallel bit comparison of the shaft encoder digital code with a simulated angle reference code, instead of using angle value comparison which involves more complicated computation steps. In order to establish synchronization to an AC reference signal whose magnitude is variant with the rotating speed, a dynamic peak followup synchronization technique has been devised. This method scrutinizes the reference signal and provides the right timing within 40 nsec. Two application examples are described.

  18. Experiments with synchronized sCMOS cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Iain A.; Jermak, Helen; Copperwheat, Chris M.; Smith, Robert J.; Poshyachinda, Saran; Soonthorntham, Boonrucksar

    2016-07-01

    Scientific-CMOS (sCMOS) cameras can combine low noise with high readout speeds and do not suffer the charge multiplication noise that effectively reduces the quantum efficiency of electron multiplying CCDs by a factor 2. As such they have strong potential in fast photometry and polarimetry instrumentation. In this paper we describe the results of laboratory experiments using a pair of commercial off the shelf sCMOS cameras based around a 4 transistor per pixel architecture. In particular using a both stable and a pulsed light sources we evaluate the timing precision that may be obtained when the cameras readouts are synchronized either in software or electronically. We find that software synchronization can introduce an error of 200-msec. With electronic synchronization any error is below the limit ( 50-msec) of our simple measurement technique.

  19. Synchronization system for Gamma-4 electrophysical facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishin, A. V.; Nazarenko, S. T.; Kozachek, A. V.; Kalashnikov, D. A.; Glushkov, S. L.; Mironychev, B. P.; Martynov, V. M.; Turutin, V. V.; Kul'dyushov, D. A.; Pavlov, V. S.; Demanov, V. A.; Shikhanova, T. F.; Esaeva, Yu. A.

    2015-01-01

    A synchronization system for the Gamma-4 four-module electrophysical facility has been developed. It has been shown that the synchronization system should provide triggering (with precision not worse than ±3 ns) of the high-voltage gas-filled trigatron-type switches of the facility modules (144 spark gaps with an operating voltage of 1 MV), the pre-pulse switches of the modules (24 spark gaps with an operating voltage of 3 MV) and eight Arkad'ev-Marx generators (40 spark gaps with an operating voltage of 100 kV).

  20. Synchronous generator wind energy conversion control system

    SciTech Connect

    Medeiros, A.L.R.; Lima, A.M.N.; Jacobina, C.B.; Simoes, F.J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the performance evaluation and the design of the control system of a WECS (Wind Energy Conversion System) that employs a synchronous generator based on its digital simulation. The WECS discussed in this paper is connected to the utility grid through two Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) power converters. The structure of the proposed WECS enables us to achieve high performance energy conversion by: (i) maximizing the wind energy capture and (ii) minimizing the reactive power flowing between the grid and the synchronous generator. 8 refs., 19 figs.

  1. GPS synchronized power system phase angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert E.; Sterlina, Patrick S.

    1994-09-01

    This paper discusses the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) synchronized equipment for the measurement and analysis of key power system quantities. Two GPS synchronized phasor measurement units (PMU) were installed before testing. It was indicated that PMUs recorded the dynamic response of the power system phase angles when the northern California power grid was excited by the artificial short circuits. Power system planning engineers perform detailed computer generated simulations of the dynamic response of the power system to naturally occurring short circuits. The computer simulations use models of transmission lines, transformers, circuit breakers, and other high voltage components. This work will compare computer simulations of the same event with field measurement.

  2. Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Following Surgical Resection or Radiosurgery Plus Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Synchronous Solitary Brain Metastasis: A Curative Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Parlak, Cem; Mertsoylu, Hüseyin; Güler, Ozan Cem; Onal, Cem; Topkan, Erkan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose/Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of definitive thoracic chemoradiation therapy following surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) on the outcomes of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with synchronous solitary brain metastasis (SSBM). Methods and Materials: A total of 63 NSCLC patients with SSBM were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were staged using positron emission tomography-computed tomography in addition to conventional staging tools. Thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) with a total dose of 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions was delivered along with 2 cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy following either surgery plus 30 Gy of WBRT (n=33) or SRS plus 30 Gy of WBRT (n=30) for BM. Results: Overall, the treatment was well tolerated. All patients received planned TRT, and 57 patients (90.5%) were also able to receive 2 cycles of chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 25.3 months (7.1-52.1 months), the median months of overall, locoregional progression-free, neurological progression-free, and progression-free survival were 28.6, 17.7, 26.4, and 14.6, respectively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that patients with a T1-T2 thoracic disease burden (P=.001), a nodal stage of N0-N1 (P=.003), and no weight loss (P=.008) exhibited superior survival. Conclusions: In the present series, surgical and radiosurgical treatments directed toward SSBM in NSCLC patients were equally effective. The similarities between the present survival outcomes and those reported in other studies for locally advanced NSCLC patients indicate the potentially curative role of definitive chemoradiation therapy for highly selected patients with SSBM.

  3. Synchronization behaviors of coupled neurons under electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Wu, Fuqiang; Wang, Chunni

    2017-01-01

    Based on an improved neuronal model, in which the effect of magnetic flux is considered during the fluctuation and change of ion concentration in cells, the transition of synchronization is investigated by imposing external electromagnetic radiation on the coupled neurons, and networks, respectively. It is found that the synchronization degree depends on the coupling intensity and the intensity of external electromagnetic radiation. Indeed, appropriate intensity of electromagnetic radiation could be effective to realize intermittent synchronization, while stronger intensity of electromagnetic radiation can induce disorder of coupled neurons and network. Neurons show rhythm synchronization in the electrical activities by increasing the coupling intensity under electromagnetic radiation, and spatial patterns can be formed in the network under smaller factor of synchronization.

  4. Synchronized oscillations in a mathematical model of segmentation in zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Kang-Ling; Shih, Chih-Wen; Tseng, Jui-Pin

    2012-04-01

    Somitogenesis is a process for the development of somites which are transient, segmental structures that lie along the anterior-posterior axis of vertebrate embryos. The pattern of somites is governed by the segmentation clock and its timing is controlled by the clock genes which undergo synchronous oscillation over adjacent cells in the posterior presomitic mesoderm (PSM). In this paper, we analyze a mathematical model which depicts the kinetics of the zebrafish segmentation clock genes subject to direct autorepression by their own products under time delay, and cell-to-cell interaction through Delta-Notch signalling. Our goal is to elucidate how synchronous oscillations are generated for the cells in the posterior PSM, and how oscillations are arrested for the cells in the anterior PSM. For this system of delayed equations, an iteration technique is employed to derive the global convergence to the synchronous equilibrium, which corresponds to the oscillation-arrested. By applying the delay Hopf bifurcation theory and the center manifold theorem, we derive the criteria for the existence of stable synchronous oscillations for the cells at the tail bud of the PSM. Our analysis provides the basic parameter ranges and delay magnitudes for stable synchronous, asynchronous oscillation and oscillation-arrested. We exhibit how synchronous oscillations are affected by the degradation rates and delays. Extended from the analytic theory, further numerical findings linked to the segmentation process are presented.

  5. High-temperature, high-pressure optical cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R. P. (Inventor); Holland, L. R. (Inventor); Smith, R. E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The invention is an optical cell for containment of chemicals under conditions of high temperature and high pressure. The cell is formed of a vitreous silica tube, two optical windows comprising a vitreous silica rod inserted into the ends of a tube, and fused into position in the tube ends. Windows are spaced apart to form a cavity enclosed by the tube and the windows. A hole is drilled radially through the tube and into the cavity. Another vitreous silica tube is fused to the silica tube around the hole to form the stem, which is perpendicular to the long axis of the tube. The open end of the stem is used to load chemicals into the cavity. Then the stem may be sealed, and if desired, it may be shortened in order to reduce the volume of the cavity, which extends into the stem.

  6. High performance internal reforming unit for high temperature fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Ma, Zhiwen; Venkataraman, Ramakrishnan; Novacco, Lawrence J.

    2008-10-07

    A fuel reformer having an enclosure with first and second opposing surfaces, a sidewall connecting the first and second opposing surfaces and an inlet port and an outlet port in the sidewall. A plate assembly supporting a catalyst and baffles are also disposed in the enclosure. A main baffle extends into the enclosure from a point of the sidewall between the inlet and outlet ports. The main baffle cooperates with the enclosure and the plate assembly to establish a path for the flow of fuel gas through the reformer from the inlet port to the outlet port. At least a first directing baffle extends in the enclosure from one of the sidewall and the main baffle and cooperates with the plate assembly and the enclosure to alter the gas flow path. Desired graded catalyst loading pattern has been defined for optimized thermal management for the internal reforming high temperature fuel cells so as to achieve high cell performance.

  7. High efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sah, C. Tang

    1986-01-01

    A review of the entire research program since its inception ten years ago is given. The initial effort focused on the effects of impurities on the efficiency of silicon solar cells to provide figures of maximum allowable impurity density for efficiencies up to about 16 to 17%. Highly accurate experimental techniques were extended to characterize the recombination properties of the residual imputities in the silicon solar cell. A numerical simulator of the solar cell was also developed, using the Circuit Technique for Semiconductor Analysis. Recent effort focused on the delineation of the material and device parameters which limited the silicon efficiency to below 20% and on an investigation of cell designs to break the 20% barrier. Designs of the cell device structure and geometry can further reduce recombination losses as well as the sensitivity and criticalness of the fabrication technology required to exceed 20%. Further research is needed on the fundamental characterization of the carrier recombination properties at the chemical impurity and physical defect centers. It is shown that only single crystalline silicon cell technology can be successful in attaining efficiencies greater than 20%.

  8. High Lifetime Solar Cell Processing and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    In order to maximize efficiency a solar cell must: (1) absorb as much light as possible in electron-hole production, (2) transport as large a fraction as possible of the electrons to the n-type terminal and holes to the p-type terminal without their first recombining, and (3) produce as high as possible terminal voltage. Step (1) is largely fixed by the spectrum of sunlight and the fundamental absorption characteristics of silicon, although some improvements are possible through texturizing induced light trapping and back surface reflectors. Steps (2) and (3) are, however, dependent on the recombination mechanisms of the cell. The recombination, on the contrary, is strongly influenced by cell processing and design. Some of the lessons during the development of point-contact-cell are discussed. Cell dependence on recombination, surface recombination, and contact recombination are discussed. Results show the overwhelming influence of contact recombination on the operation of the cell when the other sources of recombination are reduced by careful processing.

  9. Heart Rates of Elite Synchronized Swimmers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gemma, Karen Erickson; Wells, Christine L.

    1987-01-01

    Heart rates were recorded by radiotelemetry in ten elite and national-class synchronized swimmers as they performed competitive figures of high degrees of difficulty. The focus was on changes in heart rates and electrocardiogram patterns for each body position, especially those requiring facial immersion and breath-holding. (Author/MT)

  10. Observation of Flow-Induced Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polin, M.; Tuval, I.; Drescher, K.; Goldstein, R. E.

    2008-11-01

    Colonial algae serve as model organisms for the study of evolutionary transitions to multicellularity, with species ranging from unicellular Chlamydomonas to Volvox, with thousands of biflagellated somatic cells. Locomotion and phototaxis of the multicellular species depends on the degree of coordination among those flagella, but little quantitative information has been available on the nature and degree of their spatio- temporal organization. Taking advantage of the spherical organism geometry, novel micromanipulation techniques, and high-speed imaging, we quantify in V. carteri the complex temporal dynamics of the flagella of individual somatic cells and the correlations of beat plane and beat phase between nearby cells. These flagella display the phenomenon of rhythm-splitting, well-known in the dynamics of coupled oscillators, and external flow is shown to strongly modify the degree of synchronization of flagella pairs.

  11. Coreless Concept for High Gradient Induction Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly; /SLAC

    2008-01-07

    An induction linac cell for a high gradient is discussed. The proposed solid state coreless approach for the induction linac topology (SLIM{reg_sign}) is based on nanosecond mode operation. This mode may have an acceleration gradient comparable with gradients of rf- accelerator structures. The discussed induction system has the high electric efficiency. The key elements are a solid state semiconductor switch and a high electric density dielectric with a thin section length. The energy in the induction system is storied in the magnetic field. The nanosecond current break-up produces the high voltage. The induced voltage is used for acceleration. This manner of an operation allows the use of low voltage elements in the booster part and achieves a high accelerating gradient. The proposed topology was tested in POP (proof of principle) experiments.

  12. HIGH SPEED KERR CELL FRAMING CAMERA

    DOEpatents

    Goss, W.C.; Gilley, L.F.

    1964-01-01

    The present invention relates to a high speed camera utilizing a Kerr cell shutter and a novel optical delay system having no moving parts. The camera can selectively photograph at least 6 frames within 9 x 10/sup -8/ seconds during any such time interval of an occurring event. The invention utilizes particularly an optical system which views and transmits 6 images of an event to a multi-channeled optical delay relay system. The delay relay system has optical paths of successively increased length in whole multiples of the first channel optical path length, into which optical paths the 6 images are transmitted. The successively delayed images are accepted from the exit of the delay relay system by an optical image focusing means, which in turn directs the images into a Kerr cell shutter disposed to intercept the image paths. A camera is disposed to simultaneously view and record the 6 images during a single exposure of the Kerr cell shutter. (AEC)

  13. Computer modeling of high intensity solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, J. L.; Lundstrom, M. S.; Schwartz, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to provide general analytic support to Sandia National Laboratories' effort to develop high efficiency, high concentration solar cells. This report covers work performed between November 5, 1984, and December 31, 1985, and includes reprints of three papers presented at the 18th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists' Conference. In the first paper, the factors that presently prevent achieving the predicted theoretical efficiencies (in excess of 30% at concentration) are examined. It is demonstrated, by two-dimensional computer simulations, that these efficiencies might be obtained by improved light trapping techniques and by fabrication of low resistance heteroface contacts. The second paper examines the Rose-Weaver lifetime and surface recombination velocity measurement technique. It is shown that the very small uncertainties in the measured quantities lead to large uncertainties in the computed lifetime and surface recombination velocity. This leads to radically different interpretations of how the recombination is distributed throughout the device, and therefore limits the usefulness of the measurement technique. Design options and constraints of GaAs concentrator cells are examined in the third paper. The effectiveness of various design options is assessed. It is shown that although such design options are of little use in increasing the efficiency of heteroface cells, they can improve the efficiency of shallow junction cells so that it is comparable to that of heteroface cells, In addition, documentation describing the use of both the one- and two-dimensional silicon codes, SCAP1D and SCAP2D, as well as the one-dimensional AlGaAs solar cell simulation code is included.

  14. High-efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    Fabrication and characterization of high-efficiency metal insulator, n-p (MINP) cells is described. Particular attention was paid to development of measurement methods for surface recombination and density of surface states. A modified Rosier test structure was used successfully for density of surface states. Silicon oxide and silicon nitride passivants were studied. Heat treatment after plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon nitride was shown to be beneficial. A more optimum emitter concentration profile was modeled.

  15. High voltage solar cell power generating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, E., Jr.; Opjorden, R. W.; Hoffman, A. C.

    1974-01-01

    A laboratory solar power system regulated by on-panel switches has been delivered for operating high power (3 kW), high voltage (15,000 volt) loads (communication tubes, ion thrusters). The modular system consists of 26 solar arrays, each with an integral light source and cooling system. A typical array contains 2,560 series-connected cells. Each light source consists of twenty 500-watt tungsten iodide lamps providing plus or minus 5 percent uniformity at one solar constant. An array temperature of less than 40 C is achieved using an infrared filter, a water-cooled plate, a vacuum hold-down system, and air flushing.

  16. Psychic energy and synchronicity.

    PubMed

    Zabriskie, Beverley

    2014-04-01

    Given Jung's interest in physics' formulations of psychic energy and the concept of time, overlaps and convergences in the themes addressed in analytical psychology and in quantum physics are to be expected. These are informed by the active intersections between the matter of mind and mindfulness re matter. In 1911, Jung initiated dinners with Einstein. Jung's definition of libido in the pivotal 1912 Fordham Lectures reveals the influence of these conversations. Twenty years later, a significant period in physics, Wolfgang Pauli contacted Jung. Their collaboration led to the theory of synchronicity.

  17. Generalized synchronization via nonlinear control.

    PubMed

    Juan, Meng; Xingyuan, Wang

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, the generalized synchronization problem of drive-response systems is investigated. Using the drive-response concept and the nonlinear control theory, a control law is designed to achieve the generalized synchronization of chaotic systems. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, a generalized synchronization condition is derived. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations further demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  18. Huygens synchronization of two clocks.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Henrique M; Melo, Luís V

    2015-07-23

    The synchronization of two pendulum clocks hanging from a wall was first observed by Huygens during the XVII century. This type of synchronization is observed in other areas, and is fundamentally different from the problem of two clocks hanging from a moveable base. We present a model explaining the phase opposition synchronization of two pendulum clocks in those conditions. The predicted behaviour is observed experimentally, validating the model.

  19. Planning for Victory: Joint Synchronization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-22

    Desert Storm . . . .. 13 V A JOINT SYNCHRONIZATION MATRIX .. ........ .. 16 Proposed Synchronization Matrixes Joint Sync Matrix: D-day, 1944 . . .. 16...campaigns. I will offer two such proposals. Joint Sync Matrix: D-day, 1944 . Figure 2 is offered as one proposal of how a joint synchronization matrix...CHANNEL sweep CENTRAL CHANNEL commence sweep AfW ALLIED completeI CHERBOURG-LE HAVRE FLEET sweep UTAH OMAHA GOLD JUNO SWORD ASUW SWEEPS ALLIED

  20. The emergence of synchronization behavior in Physarum polycephalum and its particle approximation.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Soichiro; Jones, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    The regeneration process of contractile oscillation in the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum is investigated experimentally and modelled computationally. When placed in a well, the Physarum cell restructures the body (fusion of small granule-like cells) and shows various complex oscillation patterns. After it completed the restructuring and regained synchronized oscillation within the body, the cell shows bilateral oscillation or rotating wave pattern. This regeneration process did not depend on the well size and all the cases tested here showed similar time course. Phase synchronization analysis based on Hilbert Transform also suggested that the cell can develop a fully synchronized oscillation within a fixed time no matter what the cell size is. A particle-based computational model was developed in order to model the emergence of oscillation patterns. Particles employing very simple and identical sensory and motor behaviors interacted with each other via the sensing and deposition of chemoattractants in a diffusive environment. From a random and almost homogeneous distribution, emergent domains of oscillatory activity emerged. By increasing the sensory radius the model simulated the regeneration process of the real plasmodium. In addition, the model replicated the rotating wave and bilateral oscillation pattern when the sensory radius was increased. The results suggest that complex emergent oscillatory behaviors (and thus the high-level systems which may utilize them, such as pumping and transport mechanisms) may be developed from simple materials inspired by Physarum slime mold.

  1. Approach to Synchronization Control of Magnetic Bearings Using Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Li-Farn

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a fuzzy-logic approach to the synthesis of synchronization control for magnetically suspended rotor system. The synchronization control enables a whirling rotor to undergo synchronous motion along the magnetic bearing axes; thereby avoiding the gyroscopic effect that degrade the stability of rotor systems when spinning at high speed. The control system features a fuzzy controller acting on the magnetic bearing device, in which the fuzzy inference system trained through fuzzy rules to minimize the differential errors between four bearing axes so that an error along one bearing axis can affect the overall control loop for the motion synchronization. Numerical simulations of synchronization control for the magnetically suspended rotor system are presented to show the effectiveness of the present approach.

  2. Method and system to synchronize acoustic therapy with ultrasound imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Neil (Inventor); Bailey, Michael R. (Inventor); Hossack, James (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Interference in ultrasound imaging when used in connection with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is avoided by employing a synchronization signal to control the HIFU signal. Unless the timing of the HIFU transducer is controlled, its output will substantially overwhelm the signal produced by ultrasound imaging system and obscure the image it produces. The synchronization signal employed to control the HIFU transducer is obtained without requiring modification of the ultrasound imaging system. Signals corresponding to scattered ultrasound imaging waves are collected using either the HIFU transducer or a dedicated receiver. A synchronization processor manipulates the scattered ultrasound imaging signals to achieve the synchronization signal, which is then used to control the HIFU bursts so as to substantially reduce or eliminate HIFU interference in the ultrasound image. The synchronization processor can alternatively be implemented using a computing device or an application-specific circuit.

  3. Preliminary chaotic model of snapover on high voltage solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Willie R.

    1995-01-01

    High voltage power systems in space will interact with the space plasma in a variety of ways. One of these, snapover, is characterized by sudden enlargement of the current collection area across normally insulating surfaces generating enhanced electron current collection. Power drain on solar array power systems results from this enhanced current collection. Optical observations of the snapover phenomena in the laboratory indicates a functional relation between glow area and bia potential as a consequence of the fold/cusp bifurcation in chaos theory. Successful characterizations of snapover as a chaotic phenomena may provide a means of snapover prevention and control through chaotic synchronization.

  4. Digitized synchronous demodulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodhouse, Christopher E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A digitized synchronous demodulator is constructed entirely of digital components including timing logic, an accumulator, and means to digitally filter the digital output signal. Indirectly, it accepts, at its input, periodic analog signals which are converted to digital signals by traditional analog-to-digital conversion techniques. Broadly, the input digital signals are summed to one of two registers within an accumulator, based on the phase of the input signal and medicated by timing logic. At the end of a predetermined number of cycles of the inputted periodic signals, the contents of the register that accumulated samples from the negative half cycle is subtracted from the accumulated samples from the positive half cycle. The resulting difference is an accurate measurement of the narrow band amplitude of the periodic input signal during the measurement period. This measurement will not include error sources encountered in prior art synchronous demodulators using analog techniques such as offsets, charge injection errors, temperature drift, switching transients, settling time, analog to digital converter missing code, and linearity errors.

  5. FPGA based fast synchronous serial multi-wire links synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2013-10-01

    The paper debates synchronization method of multi-wire, serial link of constant latency, by means of pseudo-random numbers generators. The solution was designed for various families of FPGA circuits. There were debated synchronization algorithm and functional structure of parameterized transmitter and receiver modules. The modules were realized in VHDL language in a behavioral form.

  6. High performance zinc air fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Pucheng; Ma, Ze; Wang, Keliang; Wang, Xizhong; Song, Mancun; Xu, Huachi

    2014-03-01

    A zinc air fuel cell (ZAFC) stack with inexpensive manganese dioxide (MnO2) as the catalyst is designed, in which the circulation flowing potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte carries the reaction product away and acts as a coolant. Experiments are carried out to investigate the characteristics of polarization, constant current discharge and dynamic response, as well as the factors affecting the performance and uniformity of individual cells in the stack. The results reveal that the peak power density can be as high as 435 mW cm-2 according to the area of the air cathode sheet, and the influence factors on cell performance and uniformity are cell locations, filled state of zinc pellets, contact resistance, flow rates of electrolyte and air. It is also shown that the time needed for voltages to reach steady state and that for current step-up or current step-down are both in milliseconds, indicating the ZAFC can be excellently applied to vehicles with rapid dynamic response demands.

  7. High energy density aluminum-oxygen cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudd, E. J.; Gibbons, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    An alternative to a secondary battery as the power source for vehicle propulsion is a fuel cell. An example of this is the metal-air fuel cell using metals such as aluminum, zinc, or iron. Aluminum is a particularly attractive candidate, having high energy and power densities, being environmentally acceptable, and having a large, established industrial base for production and distribution. An aluminum-oxygen system is currently under development for a UUV test vehicle, and recent work has focussed upon low corrosion aluminum alloys and an electrolyte management system for processing the by-products of the energy-producing reactions. This paper summarizes the progress made in both areas. Anode materials capable of providing high utilization factors over current densities ranging from S to 150 mA/sq cm have been identified. These materials are essential to realizing an acceptable mission life for the UUV. With respect to the electrolyte management system, a filter/precipitator unit has been successfully operated for over 250 hours in a large scale, half-cell system.

  8. High Energy Density aluminum/oxygen cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, E. J.; Gibbons, D. W.

    An alternative to a secondary battery as the power source for vehicle propulsion is a fuel cell, an example of which is the metal/air cell using metals such as aluminum, zinc, or iron. Aluminum is a particularly attractive candidate, with high energy and power densities, environmentally acceptable and having a large, established industrial base for production and distribution. An aluminum/oxygen system is currently under development for a prototype unmanned, undersea vehicle (UUV) for the US navy and recent work has focussed upon low corrosion aluminum alloys, and an electrolyte management system for processing the by-products of the energy-producing reactions. This paper summarizes the progress made in both areas. Anode materials capable of providing high utilization factors over current densities ranging from 5 to 150 mA/cm 2 have been identified, such materials being essential to realize mission life for the UUV. With respect to the electrolyte management system, a filter/precipitator unit has been successfully operated for over 250 h in a large scale, half-cell system.

  9. High energy density aluminum-oxygen cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, E. J.; Gibbons, D. W.

    1993-11-01

    An alternative to a secondary battery as the power source for vehicle propulsion is a fuel cell. An example of this is the metal-air fuel cell using metals such as aluminum, zinc, or iron. Aluminum is a particularly attractive candidate, having high energy and power densities, being environmentally acceptable, and having a large, established industrial base for production and distribution. An aluminum-oxygen system is currently under development for a UUV test vehicle, and recent work has focussed upon low corrosion aluminum alloys and an electrolyte management system for processing the by-products of the energy-producing reactions. This paper summarizes the progress made in both areas. Anode materials capable of providing high utilization factors over current densities ranging from S to 150 mA/sq cm have been identified. These materials are essential to realizing an acceptable mission life for the UUV. With respect to the electrolyte management system, a filter/precipitator unit has been successfully operated for over 250 hours in a large scale, half-cell system.

  10. Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella with an Imposed Periodic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaranta, Greta; Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Tam, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The eukaryotic cilia and flagella are subcellular structures able to beat in synchrony for long periods of time. Recent studies have characterized the dynamics of flagellar locomotion and have focused on the physical mechanisms driving synchronous beating and especially on the importance of hydrodynamic interactions. We explored the possibility to control the beating of the two flagella of a single C. reinhardtii cell by imposing an external periodic hydrodynamic force. We do so by generating an oscillatory background flow around a single cell. Our study shows that flagellar beating can be phase locked to an external hydrodynamic forcing of non-biological origin and the synchronization transition is well represented by a low-order stochastic model. Remarkably, the hydrodynamic forces needed to synchronize the flagella and the background flow are considerably larger than the forces typically experienced in physiological conditions. Our results suggest that the importance of hydrodynamics in flagellar synchronization may be limited.

  11. Synchronized sampling improves fault location

    SciTech Connect

    Kezunovic, M.; Perunicic, B.

    1995-04-01

    Transmission line faults must be located accurately to allow maintenance crews to arrive at the scene and repair the faulted section as soon as possible. Rugged terrain and geographical layout cause some sections of power transmission lines to be difficult to reach. In the past, a variety of fault location algorithms were introduced as either an add-on feature in protective relays or stand-alone implementation in fault locators. In both cases, the measurements of current and voltages were taken at one terminal of a transmission line only. Under such conditions, it may become difficult to determine the fault location accurately, since data from other transmission line ends are required for more precise computations. In the absence of data from the other end, existing algorithms have accuracy problems under several circumstances, such as varying switching and loading conditions, fault infeed from the other end, and random value of fault resistance. Most of the one-end algorithms were based on estimation of voltage and current phasors. The need to estimate phasors introduces additional difficulty in high-speed tripping situations where the algorithms may not be fast enough in determining fault location accurately before the current signals disappear due to the relay operation and breaker opening. This article introduces a unique concept of high-speed fault location that can be implemented either as a simple add-on to the digital fault recorders (DFRs) or as a stand-alone new relaying function. This advanced concept is based on the use of voltage and current samples that are synchronously taken at both ends of a transmission line. This sampling technique can be made readily available in some new DFR designs incorporating receivers for accurate sampling clock synchronization using the satellite Global Positioning System (GPS).

  12. High power density solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-10-12

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O (LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  13. High efficiency porphyrin sensitized mesoscopic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Fabrizio; Yi, Chenyi; Teuscher, Joël.; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M.; Grätzel, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSC) represents a reliable technology, ready for the market and able to compete with silicon solar cells for specific fields of application. Porphyrin dyes allow reaching high power conversion efficiency in conjunction with cobalt redox electrolytes due to larger open circuit potentials. The bigger size of the cobalt complexes compared to standard iodide/triiodide redox couple hampers its percolation through the meso-porous TiO2 network, thus impairing the regeneration process. In case of porphyrin dyes mass transport problems in the electrolyte need to be carefully handled, due to the large size of the sensitizing molecule and the bulky cobalt complexes. Herein we report the study of structural variations on porphyrin sensitizers and their influence on the DSSC performance with cobalt based redox electrolyte.

  14. Synchronization of sub-picosecond electron and laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Le Sage, G.P.

    1999-07-01

    Sub-picosecond laser-electron synchronization is required to take full advantage of the experimental possibilities arising from the marriage of modern high intensity lasers and high brightness electron beams in the same laboratory. Two particular scenarios stand out in this regard, injection of ultra-short electron pulses in short wavelength laser-driven plasma accelerators, and Compton scattering of laser photons from short electron pulses. Both of these applications demand synchronization, which is sub-picosecond, with tens of femtosecond synchronization implied for next generation experiments. The design of a microwave timing modulator system is now being investigated in more detail. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Synchronization of sub-picosecond electron and laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Le Sage, G. P.

    1999-07-12

    Sub-picosecond laser-electron synchronization is required to take full advantage of the experimental possibilities arising from the marriage of modern high intensity lasers and high brightness electron beams in the same laboratory. Two particular scenarios stand out in this regard, injection of ultra-short electron pulses in short wavelength laser-driven plasma accelerators, and Compton scattering of laser photons from short electron pulses. Both of these applications demand synchronization, which is sub-picosecond, with tens of femtosecond synchronization implied for next generation experiments. The design of a microwave timing modulator system is now being investigated in more detail.

  16. Quantum synchronization in a star-type cavity QED network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlin; Zhang, Fengyang; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2017-01-01

    We propose and analyze a quantum synchronization sharing scheme among the nodes of a star-type quantum network. Utilizing dark state resonances, we show the biggish differences between two subsystems can be corrected by magnified effective coupling although each subsystem is of relative weak coupling intensity and high dissipation effects. Moreover, we elucidate that the quantum synchronization contains available classical and quantum correlations simultaneously. In particular, synchronization measure shows high consistency with quantum concurrence for qubit system, which means it possesses nonlocality and can ensure the advantage of quantum information processing. Finally, a brief discussion about parameter selection is given so that our scheme can be applied expediently in relevant experiments.

  17. Synchronization of an uncertain chaotic system via recurrent neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wen; Wang, Yao-Nan

    2005-01-01

    Incorporating distributed recurrent networks with high-order connections between neurons, the identification and synchronization problem of an unknown chaotic system in the presence of unmodelled dynamics is investigated. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, the weights learning algorithm for the recurrent high-order neural network model is presented. Also, analytical results concerning the stability properties of the scheme are obtained. Then adaptive control law for eliminating synchronization error of uncertain chaotic plant is developed via Lyapunov methodology. The proposed scheme is applied to model and synchronize an unknown Rossler system.

  18. Benefits of Synchronous Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Scott; Smith, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Most online courses are offered as "asynchronous" courses and have no real-time contact with students. The Synchronous online alternative provides normal scheduled class time and allows students to login to a virtual online classroom with the instructor. We provide an overview of two different platforms for hosting synchronous classes…

  19. Chaos synchronization by nonlinear coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petereit, Johannes; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2017-03-01

    We study synchronization properties of three nonlinearly coupled chaotic maps. Coupling is introduced in such a way, that it cannot be reduced to pairwise terms, but includes combined action of all interacting units. For two models of nonlinear coupling we characterize the transition to complete synchrony, as well as partially synchronized states. Relation to hypernetworks of chaotic units is also discussed.

  20. Digital synchronization and communication techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, William C.

    1992-01-01

    Information on digital synchronization and communication techniques is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include phase shift keying, modems, characteristics of open loop digital synchronizers, an open loop phase and frequency estimator, and a digital receiver structure using an open loop estimator in a decision directed architecture.

  1. The future of high efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, J. C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Research approaches to obtain solar cell modules with 1 sun efficiencies of 20-30 percent at air mass 1 are now well understood. Such high efficiency modules should become available in the near future. It can be expected that these modules will be extensively used in terrestrial power generation, space power generation, and consumer electronics. To achieve practical module efficiencies significantly above 30 percent, it will be necessary to employ concepts other than spectral splitting, such as spectral compression and broad band detection. A major breakthrough in these areas is not anticipated at this time.

  2. Sensitivity to external signals and synchronization properties of a non-isochronous auto-oscillator with delayed feedback.

    PubMed

    Tiberkevich, Vasil S; Khymyn, Roman S; Tang, Hong X; Slavin, Andrei N

    2014-01-27

    For auto-oscillators of different nature (e.g. active cells in a human heart under the action of a pacemaker, neurons in brain, spin-torque nano-oscillators, micro and nano-mechanical oscillators, or generating Josephson junctions) a critically important property is their ability to synchronize with each other. The synchronization properties of an auto oscillator are directly related to its sensitivity to external signals. Here we demonstrate that a non-isochronous (having generation frequency dependent on the amplitude) auto-oscillator with delayed feedback can have an extremely high sensitivity to external signals and unusually large width of the phase-locking band near the boundary of the stable auto-oscillation regime. This property could be used for the development of synchronized arrays of non-isochronous auto-oscillators in physics and engineering, and, for instance, might bring a better fundamental understanding of ways to control a heart arrythmia in medicine.

  3. Sensitivity to external signals and synchronization properties of a non-isochronous auto-oscillator with delayed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberkevich, Vasil S.; Khymyn, Roman S.; Tang, Hong X.; Slavin, Andrei N.

    2014-01-01

    For auto-oscillators of different nature (e.g. active cells in a human heart under the action of a pacemaker, neurons in brain, spin-torque nano-oscillators, micro and nano-mechanical oscillators, or generating Josephson junctions) a critically important property is their ability to synchronize with each other. The synchronization properties of an auto oscillator are directly related to its sensitivity to external signals. Here we demonstrate that a non-isochronous (having generation frequency dependent on the amplitude) auto-oscillator with delayed feedback can have an extremely high sensitivity to external signals and unusually large width of the phase-locking band near the boundary of the stable auto-oscillation regime. This property could be used for the development of synchronized arrays of non-isochronous auto-oscillators in physics and engineering, and, for instance, might bring a better fundamental understanding of ways to control a heart arrythmia in medicine.

  4. Hypothesis test for synchronization: Twin surrogates revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, M. Carmen; Thiel, Marco; Kurths, Jürgen; Mergenthaler, Konstantin; Engbert, Ralf

    2009-03-01

    The method of twin surrogates has been introduced to test for phase synchronization of complex systems in the case of passive experiments. In this paper we derive new analytical expressions for the number of twins depending on the size of the neighborhood, as well as on the length of the trajectory. This allows us to determine the optimal parameters for the generation of twin surrogates. Furthermore, we determine the quality of the twin surrogates with respect to several linear and nonlinear statistics depending on the parameters of the method. In the second part of the paper we perform a hypothesis test for phase synchronization in the case of experimental data from fixational eye movements. These miniature eye movements have been shown to play a central role in neural information processing underlying the perception of static visual scenes. The high number of data sets (21 subjects and 30 trials per person) allows us to compare the generated twin surrogates with the "natural" surrogates that correspond to the different trials. We show that the generated twin surrogates reproduce very well all linear and nonlinear characteristics of the underlying experimental system. The synchronization analysis of fixational eye movements by means of twin surrogates reveals that the synchronization between the left and right eye is significant, indicating that either the centers in the brain stem generating fixational eye movements are closely linked, or, alternatively that there is only one center controlling both eyes.

  5. Synchronization through nonreciprocal connections in a hybrid hippocampus microcircuit

    PubMed Central

    Hilscher, Markus M.; Leão, Katarina E.; Leão, Richardson N.

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization among neurons is thought to arise from the interplay between excitation and inhibition; however, the connectivity rules that contribute to synchronization are still unknown. We studied these issues in hippocampal CA1 microcircuits using paired patch clamp recordings and real time computing. By virtually connecting a model interneuron with two pyramidal cells (PCs), we were able to test the importance of connectivity in synchronizing pyramidal cell activity. Our results show that a circuit with a nonreciprocal connection between pyramidal cells and no feedback from PCs to the virtual interneuron produced the greatest level of synchronization and mutual information between PC spiking activity. Moreover, we investigated the role of intrinsic membrane properties contributing to synchronization where the application of a specific ion channel blocker, ZD7288 dramatically impaired PC synchronization. Additionally, background synaptic activity, in particular arising from NMDA receptors, has a large impact on the synchrony observed in the aforementioned circuit. Our results give new insights to the basic connection paradigms of microcircuits that lead to coordination and the formation of assemblies. PMID:23888129

  6. Chua's Circuit: Control and Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimiciuc, Stefan-Andrei; Vasilovici, Ovidiu; Dimitriu, Dan-Gheorghe

    Chaos-based data encryption is one of the most reliable methods used in secure communications. This implies a good control of a chaotic system and a good synchronization between the involved systems. Here, experimental results are shown on the control and synchronization of Chua's circuits. The control of the chaotic circuit was achieved by using the switching method. The influence of the control signal characteristics (amplitude, frequency and shape) on the system's states was also investigated. The synchronization of two similar chaotic circuits was studied, emphasizing the importance of the chaotic state characteristics of the Master system in respect to those of Slave system. It was shown that the synchronization does not depend on the chaotic state type, neither on the dimension (x, y or z) used for synchronization.

  7. Robust Synchronization Schemes for Dynamic Channel Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Fugin

    2003-01-01

    Professor Xiong will investigate robust synchronization schemes for dynamic channel environment. A sliding window will be investigated for symbol timing synchronizer and an open loop carrier estimator for carrier synchronization. Matlab/Simulink will be used for modeling and simulations.

  8. Twin engine synchronizer

    SciTech Connect

    Kobus, J.R.

    1988-05-03

    This patent describes an apparatus for synchronizing the speeds of two engines, each having its own throttle level connected by an associated cable to a respective hand throttle lever, comprising moving means carried by the throttle lever of one of the engines for moving the throttle lever of the one engine independently of its associated cable and its respective hand throttle lever to increase or decrease the speed of the one engine until the speed of the one engine matches the speed of the other engine. The moving means moves the throttle lever of the one engine without moving its associated cable or its respective hand throttle lever, and actuating means mounted remote from the throttle lever of the one engine for actuating the moving means.

  9. Friction and Phase Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braiman, Y.; Protopopescu, V.; Family, F.; Hentschel, H. G. E.

    2000-03-01

    Spatiotemporal fluctuations in small discrete nonlinear arrays affect the dynamics of the center of mass. We derive the equations describing the dynamics of the center of mass and the spatial fluctuations for each coherent mode of the array. Analysis of these equations indicates that depending on array stiffness, size, and the external forcing - quantized jumps occur in the minimum friction (maximum velocity) of the array. We propose an analytical formalism to determine the occurrences of these jumps. We present numerical evidence indicating that phase synchronization is related to the frictional properties of sliding objects at the atomic scale and discuss mechanisms of tuning and controlling nanoscale friction. Y. Braiman, F. Family, H. G. E. Hentschel, C. Mak, and J. Krim, Phys. Rev. E 59, R4737 (1999). H. G. E. Hentschel, F. Family, and Y. Braiman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 104 (1999).

  10. Timesharing without synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.; Rubin, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    The capacity region of a multiple-access channel has recently been identified as the convex hull (barred K) of a certain set (K) of points in the first quadrant of the (R1,R2) plane. For a pair of rates in K, a more or less standard random-coding argument can be used to show the existence of a good pair of codes. But for points in barred K-K, it is apparently necessary for the two senders to use some form of time sharing to achieve the desired rates. However, in order to share time, at least one of the senders must have knowledge of the other's phase; and in many practical situations this knowledge does not exist. This paper investigates the problems which arise in coding for multiple-access channels when the senders cannot synchronize with each other.

  11. Synchronization properties of heterogeneous neuronal networks with mixed excitability type.

    PubMed

    Leone, Michael J; Schurter, Brandon N; Letson, Benjamin; Booth, Victoria; Zochowski, Michal; Fink, Christian G

    2015-03-01

    We study the synchronization of neuronal networks with dynamical heterogeneity, showing that network structures with the same propensity for synchronization (as quantified by master stability function analysis) may develop dramatically different synchronization properties when heterogeneity is introduced with respect to neuronal excitability type. Specifically, we investigate networks composed of neurons with different types of phase response curves (PRCs), which characterize how oscillating neurons respond to excitatory perturbations. Neurons exhibiting type 1 PRC respond exclusively with phase advances, while neurons exhibiting type 2 PRC respond with either phase delays or phase advances, depending on when the perturbation occurs. We find that Watts-Strogatz small world networks transition to synchronization gradually as the proportion of type 2 neurons increases, whereas scale-free networks may transition gradually or rapidly, depending upon local correlations between node degree and excitability type. Random placement of type 2 neurons results in gradual transition to synchronization, whereas placement of type 2 neurons as hubs leads to a much more rapid transition, showing that type 2 hub cells easily "hijack" neuronal networks to synchronization. These results underscore the fact that the degree of synchronization observed in neuronal networks is determined by a complex interplay between network structure and the dynamical properties of individual neurons, indicating that efforts to recover structural connectivity from dynamical correlations must in general take both factors into account.

  12. Vacuum MOCVD fabrication of high efficience cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partain, L. D.; Fraas, L. M.; Mcleod, P. S.; Cape, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Vacuum metal-organic-chemical-vapor-deposition (MOCVD) is a new fabrication process with improved safety and easier scalability due to its metal rather than glass construction and its uniform multiport gas injection system. It uses source materials more efficiently than other methods because the vacuum molecular flow conditions allow the high sticking coefficient reactants to reach the substrates as undeflected molecular beams and the hot chamber walls cause the low sticking coefficient reactants to bounce off the walls and interact with the substrates many times. This high source utilization reduces the materials costs power device and substantially decreases the amounts of toxic materials that must be handled as process effluents. The molecular beams allow precise growth control. With improved source purifications, vacuum MOCVD has provided p GaAs layers with 10-micron minority carrier diffusion lengths and GaAs and GaAsSb solar cells with 20% AMO efficiencies at 59X and 99X sunlight concentration ratios. Mechanical stacking has been identified as the quickest, most direct and logical path to stacked multiple-junction solar cells that perform better than the best single-junction devices. The mechanical stack is configured for immediate use in solar arrays and allows interconnections that improve the system end-of-life performance in space.

  13. High temperature solid electrolyte fuel cell configurations and interconnections

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1984-01-01

    High temperature fuel cell configurations and interconnections are made including annular cells having a solid electrolyte sandwiched between thin film electrodes. The cells are electrically interconnected along an elongated axial outer surface.

  14. Super-High Iii-V Tandem and Multijunction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Principles of super-high-efficiency multijunction solar cells * Epitaxial technologies for growing III-V compound cells * Monolithic vs. multi-terminal connection modes * Key issues for realising high-efficiency multijunction solar cells * High-efficiency InGaP/GaAs/Ge three-junction solar cells and their space applications * Multijunction solar cells: recent results * Future directions * Acknowledgements * References

  15. High efficiency low cost GaAs/Ge cell technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Frank

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on high efficiency low cost GaAs/Ge cell technology are presented. Topics covered include: high efficiency, low cost GaAs/Ge solar cells; advantages of Ge; comparison of typical production cells for space applications; panel level comparisons; and solar cell technology trends.

  16. Comparison of single neuron models in terms of synchronization propensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sungar, N.; Allaria, E.; Leyva, I.; Arecchi, F. T.

    2008-09-01

    A plausible model for coherent perception is the synchronization of chaotically distributed neural spike trains over wide cortical areas. A recently introduced propensity criterion provides a tool for a quantitative comparison of different neuron models in terms of their ability to synchronize to an applied perturbation. We explore the propensity of several systems and indicate the requirements to be satisfied by a plausible candidate for modeling neuronal activity. Our results show that the conflicting requirements of stability and sensitivity leading to high propensity to synchronization can be satisfied by a strongly nonuniform attractor made of two distinct regions: a saddle focus plus a sufficiently separated saddle node.

  17. Synchronous Cultures of Bacillus subtilis Obtained by Filtration with Glass Fiber Filters

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Michael G.

    1973-01-01

    A simple method of potentially wide applicability for obtaining synchronous cultures of Bacillus subtilis based on size selection is described. Using glass fiber filters, a population (about 1 to 2% of the parent population) can be obtained substantially enriched for small cells which grow synchronously. A method for rapidly concentrating dilute suspensions of cells is described. PMID:4200855

  18. Complex networks: when random walk dynamics equals synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriener, Birgit; Anand, Lishma; Timme, Marc

    2012-09-01

    Synchrony prevalently emerges from the interactions of coupled dynamical units. For simple systems such as networks of phase oscillators, the asymptotic synchronization process is assumed to be equivalent to a Markov process that models standard diffusion or random walks on the same network topology. In this paper, we analytically derive the conditions for such equivalence for networks of pulse-coupled oscillators, which serve as models for neurons and pacemaker cells interacting by exchanging electric pulses or fireflies interacting via light flashes. We find that the pulse synchronization process is less simple, but there are classes of, e.g., network topologies that ensure equivalence. In particular, local dynamical operators are required to be doubly stochastic. These results provide a natural link between stochastic processes and deterministic synchronization on networks. Tools for analyzing diffusion (or, more generally, Markov processes) may now be transferred to pin down features of synchronization in networks of pulse-coupled units such as neural circuits.

  19. Chaotic synchronization based on nonlinear state-observer and its application in secure communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming-Jie; Li, Dian-Pu; Zhang, Ai-Jun

    2004-06-01

    Chaotic synchronization is a branch of chaotic control. Nowadays, the research and application of chaotic synchronization have become a hot topic and one of the development directions is for the research on chaos. In this paper, a universal nonlinear state-observer is presented for a class of universal chaotic systems to realize the chaotic synchronization, according to the theory of state-observer in the modern control theory. And theoretic analysis and simulation results have illustrated the validity of the approach. Moreover, the approach of synchronization proposed in this paper is very easy, flexible and universal with high synchronization precision. When the approach is applied to secure communication, the results are satisfying.

  20. High performance vapour-cell frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Kang, S.; Bandi, T.; Gruet, F.; Pellaton, M.; Mileti, G.

    2016-06-01

    We report our investigations on a compact high-performance rubidium (Rb) vapour-cell clock based on microwave-optical double-resonance (DR). These studies are done in both DR continuous-wave (CW) and Ramsey schemes using the same Physics Package (PP), with the same Rb vapour cell and a magnetron-type cavity with only 45 cm3 external volume. In the CW-DR scheme, we demonstrate a DR signal with a contrast of 26% and a linewidth of 334 Hz; in Ramsey-DR mode Ramsey signals with higher contrast up to 35% and a linewidth of 160 Hz have been demonstrated. Short-term stabilities of 1.4×10-13 τ-1/2 and 2.4×10-13 τ-1/2 are measured for CW-DR and Ramsey-DR schemes, respectively. In the Ramsey-DR operation, thanks to the separation of light and microwave interactions in time, the light-shift effect has been suppressed which allows improving the long-term clock stability as compared to CW-DR operation. Implementations in miniature atomic clocks are considered.

  1. Nonlinear Chemical Dynamics and Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning

    Alan Turing's work on morphogenesis, more than half a century ago, continues to motivate and inspire theoretical and experimental biologists even today. That said, there are very few experimental systems for which Turing's theory is applicable. In this thesis we present an experimental reaction-diffusion system ideally suited for testing Turing's ideas in synthetic "cells" consisting of microfluidically produced surfactant-stabilized emulsions in which droplets containing the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) oscillatory chemical reactants are dispersed in oil. The BZ reaction has become the prototype of nonlinear dynamics in chemistry and a preferred system for exploring the behavior of coupled nonlinear oscillators. Our system consists of a surfactant stabilized monodisperse emulsion of drops of aqueous BZ solution dispersed in a continuous phase of oil. In contrast to biology, here the chemistry is understood, rate constants are measured and interdrop coupling is purely diffusive. We explore a large set of parameters through control of rate constants, drop size, spacing, and spatial arrangement of the drops in lines and rings in one-dimension (1D) and hexagonal arrays in two-dimensions (2D). The Turing model is regarded as a metaphor for morphogenesis in biology but not for prediction. Here, we develop a quantitative and falsifiable reaction-diffusion model that we experimentally test with synthetic cells. We quantitatively establish the extent to which the Turing model in 1D describes both stationary pattern formation and temporal synchronization of chemical oscillators via reaction-diffusion and in 2D demonstrate that chemical morphogenesis drives physical differentiation in synthetic cells.

  2. Synchronization of periodical cicada emergences.

    PubMed

    Hoppensteadt, F C; Keller, J B

    1976-10-15

    Synchronized insect emergences are shown to be a possible consequence of predation in the presence of a limited environmental carrying capacity through a mathematical model for cicada populations that includes these two features. Synchronized emergences, like those observed in 13- and 17-year cicades, are predicted for insects with sufficiently long life-spans. Balanced solutions, in which comparable emergences occur each year, are found for insects having sufficiently short life-spans, such as 3-, 4-, and 7-year cicadas. For the values used here, synchronized emergences occur for insects with life-spans of 10 years or more, and balanced emergences occur for life-spans of fewer than 10 years.

  3. The position of DNA cleavage by TALENs and cell synchronization influences the frequency of gene editing directed by single-stranded oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Strouse, Bryan; Bialk, Pawel; Niamat, Rohina A; Kmiec, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    With recent technological advances that enable DNA cleavage at specific sites in the human genome, it may now be possible to reverse inborn errors, thereby correcting a mutation, at levels that could have an impact in a clinical setting. We have been developing gene editing, using single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs), as a tool to direct site specific single base changes. Successful application of this technique has been demonstrated in many systems ranging from bacteria to human (ES and somatic) cells. While the frequency of gene editing can vary widely, it is often at a level that does not enable clinical application. As such, a number of stimulatory factors such as double-stranded breaks are known to elevate the frequency significantly. The majority of these results have been discovered using a validated HCT116 mammalian cell model system where credible genetic and biochemical readouts are available. Here, we couple TAL-Effector Nucleases (TALENs) that execute specific ds DNA breaks with ssODNs, designed specifically to repair a missense mutation, in an integrated single copy eGFP gene. We find that proximal cleavage, relative to the mutant base, is key for enabling high frequencies of editing. A directionality of correction is also observed with TALEN activity upstream from the target base being more effective in promoting gene editing than activity downstream. We also find that cells progressing through S phase are more amenable to combinatorial gene editing activity. Thus, we identify novel aspects of gene editing that will help in the design of more effective protocols for genome modification and gene therapy in natural genes.

  4. Response properties from turtle auditory hair cell afferent fibers suggest spike generation is driven by synchronized release both between and within synapses

    PubMed Central

    Schnee, M. E.; Castellano-Muñoz, M.

    2013-01-01

    Inner ear hair cell afferent fiber synapses are capable of transferring information at high rates for long periods of time with extraordinary fidelity. As at other sensory synapses, hair cells rely on graded receptor potentials and unique vesicle trafficking and release properties of ribbon synapses to relay intensity information. Postsynaptic recordings from afferent fibers of the turtle auditory papilla identified excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) that were fast AMPA receptor-based responses with rapid onset and decay times. EPSCs varied in amplitude by ∼15× per fiber, with kinetics that showed a tendency to slow at larger amplitudes. Complex EPSCs were produced by temporal summation of single events, likely across synapses. Complex EPSCs were more efficient at generating action potentials than single EPSCs. Potassium-evoked release increased the frequency of EPSCs, in particular complex events, but did not increase EPSC amplitudes. Temporal summation of EPSCs across synapses may underlie action potential generation at these synapses. Broad amplitude histograms were probed for mechanisms of multivesicular release with reduced external Ca2+ or the introduction of Cd2+ or Sr2+ to uncouple release. The results are consistent with broad amplitude histograms being generated by a combination of the variability in synaptic vesicle size and coordinated release of these vesicles. It is posited that multivesicular release plays less of a role in multisynaptic ribbon synapses than in single synaptic afferent fibers. PMID:23596330

  5. Response properties from turtle auditory hair cell afferent fibers suggest spike generation is driven by synchronized release both between and within synapses.

    PubMed

    Schnee, M E; Castellano-Muñoz, M; Ricci, A J

    2013-07-01

    Inner ear hair cell afferent fiber synapses are capable of transferring information at high rates for long periods of time with extraordinary fidelity. As at other sensory synapses, hair cells rely on graded receptor potentials and unique vesicle trafficking and release properties of ribbon synapses to relay intensity information. Postsynaptic recordings from afferent fibers of the turtle auditory papilla identified excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) that were fast AMPA receptor-based responses with rapid onset and decay times. EPSCs varied in amplitude by ≈ 15× per fiber, with kinetics that showed a tendency to slow at larger amplitudes. Complex EPSCs were produced by temporal summation of single events, likely across synapses. Complex EPSCs were more efficient at generating action potentials than single EPSCs. Potassium-evoked release increased the frequency of EPSCs, in particular complex events, but did not increase EPSC amplitudes. Temporal summation of EPSCs across synapses may underlie action potential generation at these synapses. Broad amplitude histograms were probed for mechanisms of multivesicular release with reduced external Ca(2+) or the introduction of Cd(2+) or Sr(2+) to uncouple release. The results are consistent with broad amplitude histograms being generated by a combination of the variability in synaptic vesicle size and coordinated release of these vesicles. It is posited that multivesicular release plays less of a role in multisynaptic ribbon synapses than in single synaptic afferent fibers.

  6. Traveling-wave synchronous coil gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David G.

    1991-01-01

    An outline is presented of the coilgun concept, excitation, switching, brush commutation, power supply, and performance. It is shown that a traveling-wave synchronous coilgun permits independent adjustment of the magnetic field and armature current for high velocity at low armature mass fraction. Magnetic field energy is transferred from the rear of the wave to the front without passing through the power supply. Elaborate switching is required.

  7. Synchronicity in predictive modelling: a new view of data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duane, G. S.; Tribbia, J. J.; Weiss, J. B.

    2006-11-01

    The problem of data assimilation can be viewed as one of synchronizing two dynamical systems, one representing "truth" and the other representing "model", with a unidirectional flow of information between the two. Synchronization of truth and model defines a general view of data assimilation, as machine perception, that is reminiscent of the Jung-Pauli notion of synchronicity between matter and mind. The dynamical systems paradigm of the synchronization of a pair of loosely coupled chaotic systems is expected to be useful because quasi-2D geophysical fluid models have been shown to synchronize when only medium-scale modes are coupled. The synchronization approach is equivalent to standard approaches based on least-squares optimization, including Kalman filtering, except in highly non-linear regions of state space where observational noise links regimes with qualitatively different dynamics. The synchronization approach is used to calculate covariance inflation factors from parameters describing the bimodality of a one-dimensional system. The factors agree in overall magnitude with those used in operational practice on an ad hoc basis. The calculation is robust against the introduction of stochastic model error arising from unresolved scales.

  8. Review of silicon solar cells for high concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, R. J.

    1982-06-01

    The factors that limit the performance of high concentration silicon solar cells are reviewed. The design of a conventional high concentration cell is discussed, together with the present state of the art. Unconventional cell designs that have been proposed to overcome the limitations of the conventional design are reviewed and compared. The current status of unconventional cells is reviewed. Among the unconventional cells discussed are the interdigitated back-contact cell, the double-sided cell, the polka dot cell, and the V-groove cell. It is noted that all the designs for unconventional cells require long diffusion lengths for high efficiency operation, even though the demands in this respect are less for those cells with the optical path longer than the diffusion path.

  9. Competing Synchronization of Nonlinear Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Epaminondas

    2006-03-01

    Coupled nonlinear oscillators abound in nature and in man-made devices. Think for example of two neurons in the brain competing to get the attention of a third neuron, and eventually developing some sort of synchronization process. This is a common feature involving oscillators in general, and can be studied using numerical simulations and/or experimental setups. In this talk, results involving electronic circuits and plasma discharges will be presented showing interesting features related to the types of oscillators and to the types of couplings. In particular, for the case of two oscillators competing for synchronization with a third one, the target oscillator synchronizes alternately to one or the other of the competing oscillators. The time intervals of synchronous states vary in a random-like manner. Numerical and experimental results will be presented and the consistency between them will be discussed.

  10. Synchronous identification of friendly targets

    DOEpatents

    Telle, John M.; Roger, Stutz A.

    1998-01-01

    A synchronous communication targeting system for use in battle. The present invention includes a transceiver having a stabilizing oscillator, a synchronous amplifier and an omnidirectional receiver, all in electrical communication with each other. A remotely located beacon is attached to a blackbody radiation source and has an amplitude modulator in electrical communication with a optical source. The beacon's amplitude modulator is set so that the optical source transmits radiation frequency at approximately the same or lower amplitude than that of the blackbody radiation source to which the beacon is attached. The receiver from the transceiver is adapted to receive frequencies approximately at or below blackbody radiation signals and sends such signals to the synchronous amplifier. The synchronous amplifier then rectifies and amplifies those signals which correspond to the predetermined frequency to therefore identify whether the blackbody radiation source is friendly or not.

  11. Synchronous behavior of two coupled electronic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, R. D.; Varona, P.; Volkovskii, A. R.; Szuecs, A.; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.; Rabinovich, M. I.

    2000-08-01

    We report on experimental studies of synchronization phenomena in a pair of analog electronic neurons (ENs). The ENs were designed to reproduce the observed membrane voltage oscillations of isolated biological neurons from the stomatogastric ganglion of the California spiny lobster Panulirus interruptus. The ENs are simple analog circuits which integrate four-dimensional differential equations representing fast and slow subcellular mechanisms that produce the characteristic regular/chaotic spiking-bursting behavior of these cells. In this paper we study their dynamical behavior as we couple them in the same configurations as we have done for their counterpart biological neurons. The interconnections we use for these neural oscillators are both direct electrical connections and excitatory and inhibitory chemical connections: each realized by analog circuitry and suggested by biological examples. We provide here quantitative evidence that the ENs and the biological neurons behave similarly when coupled in the same manner. They each display well defined bifurcations in their mutual synchronization and regularization. We report briefly on an experiment on coupled biological neurons and four-dimensional ENs, which provides further ground for testing the validity of our numerical and electronic models of individual neural behavior. Our experiments as a whole present interesting new examples of regularization and synchronization in coupled nonlinear oscillators. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  12. Synchronized Swimming of Two Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros; Novati, Guido; Abbati, Gabriele; Hejazialhosseini, Babak; van Rees, Wim

    2015-11-01

    We present simulations of two, self-propelled, fish-like swimmers that perform synchronized moves in a two-dimensional, viscous fluid. The swimmers learn to coordinate by receiving a reward for their synchronized actions. We analyze the swimming patterns emerging for different rewards in terms of their hydrodynamic efficiency and artistic impression. European Research Council (ERC) Advanced Investigator Award (No. 2-73985-14).

  13. Studying the role of synchronized and chaotic spiking neural ensembles in neural information processing.

    PubMed

    Rosselló, Josep L; Canals, Vicens; Oliver, Antoni; Morro, Antoni

    2014-08-01

    The brain is characterized by performing many diverse processing tasks ranging from elaborate processes such as pattern recognition, memory or decision making to more simple functionalities such as linear filtering in image processing. Understanding the mechanisms by which the brain is able to produce such a different range of cortical operations remains a fundamental problem in neuroscience. Here we show a study about which processes are related to chaotic and synchronized states based on the study of in-silico implementation of Stochastic Spiking Neural Networks (SSNN). The measurements obtained reveal that chaotic neural ensembles are excellent transmission and convolution systems since mutual information between signals is minimized. At the same time, synchronized cells (that can be understood as ordered states of the brain) can be associated to more complex nonlinear computations. In this sense, we experimentally show that complex and quick pattern recognition processes arise when both synchronized and chaotic states are mixed. These measurements are in accordance with in vivo observations related to the role of neural synchrony in pattern recognition and to the speed of the real biological process. We also suggest that the high-level adaptive mechanisms of the brain that are the Hebbian and non-Hebbian learning rules can be understood as processes devoted to generate the appropriate clustering of both synchronized and chaotic ensembles. The measurements obtained from the hardware implementation of different types of neural systems suggest that the brain processing can be governed by the superposition of these two complementary states with complementary functionalities (nonlinear processing for synchronized states and information convolution and parallelization for chaotic).

  14. Quantum synchronization and quantum state sharing in an irregular complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlin; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the quantum synchronization phenomenon of the complex network constituted by coupled optomechanical systems and prove that the unknown identical quantum states can be shared or distributed in the quantum network even though the topology is varying. Considering a channel constructed by quantum correlation, we show that quantum synchronization can sustain and maintain high levels in Markovian dissipation for a long time. We also analyze the state-sharing process between two typical complex networks, and the results predict that linked nodes can be directly synchronized, but the whole network will be synchronized only if some specific synchronization conditions are satisfied. Furthermore, we give the synchronization conditions analytically through analyzing network dynamics. This proposal paves the way for studying multi-interaction synchronization and achieving effective quantum information processing in a complex network.

  15. Synchronous motor with HTS-2G wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezhin, D.; Ilyasov, R.; Kozub, S.; Kovalev, K.; Verzhbitsky, L.

    2014-05-01

    One of the applications of new high-temperature superconductor materials (HTS) is field coils for synchronous electrical machines. The use of YBCO 2G HTS tapes (HTS-2G) allows increasing of magnetic flux density in the air gap, which will increase the output power and reduce the dimensions of the motor. Such motors with improved characteristics can be successfully used in transportation as traction motor. In MAI-based "Center of Superconducting machines and devices" with the support of "Rosatom" has been designed and tested a prototype of the 50 kW synchronous motor with radial magnetic flux from a field-coils based on HTS-2G tapes. The experimental and theoretical results are presented.

  16. Synchronization in networks with multiple interaction layers

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Charo I.; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Bonamassa, Ivan; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The structure of many real-world systems is best captured by networks consisting of several interaction layers. Understanding how a multilayered structure of connections affects the synchronization properties of dynamical systems evolving on top of it is a highly relevant endeavor in mathematics and physics and has potential applications in several socially relevant topics, such as power grid engineering and neural dynamics. We propose a general framework to assess the stability of the synchronized state in networks with multiple interaction layers, deriving a necessary condition that generalizes the master stability function approach. We validate our method by applying it to a network of Rössler oscillators with a double layer of interactions and show that highly rich phenomenology emerges from this. This includes cases where the stability of synchronization can be induced even if both layers would have individually induced unstable synchrony, an effect genuinely arising from the true multilayer structure of the interactions among the units in the network. PMID:28138540

  17. High-Collection-Efficiency Fluorescence Detection Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanisco, Thomas; Cazorla, Maria; Swanson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A new fluorescence cell has been developed for the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of formaldehyde. The cell is used to sample a flow of air that contains trace concentrations of formaldehyde. The cell provides a hermetically sealed volume in which a flow of air containing formaldehyde can be illuminated by a laser. The cell includes the optics for transmitting the laser beam that is used to excite the formaldehyde and for collecting the resulting fluorescence. The novelty of the cell is its small size and simple design that provides a more robust and cheaper alternative to the state of the art. Despite its simplicity, the cell provides the same sensitivity to detection as larger, more complicated cells.

  18. Synchronization in complex delayed dynamical networks with nonsymmetric coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianshe; Jiao, Licheng

    2007-12-01

    A new general complex delayed dynamical network model with nonsymmetric coupling is introduced, and then we investigate its synchronization phenomena. Several synchronization criteria for delay-independent and delay-dependent synchronization are provided which generalize some previous results. The matrix Jordan canonical formalization method is used instead of the matrix diagonalization method, so in our synchronization criteria, the coupling configuration matrix of the network does not required to be diagonalizable and may have complex eigenvalues. Especially, we show clearly that the synchronizability of a delayed dynamical network is not always characterized by the second-largest eigenvalue even though all the eigenvalues of the coupling configuration matrix are real. Furthermore, the effects of time-delay on synchronizability of networks with unidirectional coupling are studied under some typical network structures. The results are illustrated by delayed networks in which each node is a two-dimensional limit cycle oscillator system consisting of a two-cell cellular neural network, numerical simulations show that these networks can realize synchronization with smaller time-delay, and will lose synchronization when the time-delay increase larger than a threshold.

  19. Genesis and synchronization properties of fast neural oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenov, Maxim; Rulkov, Nikolai

    2008-03-01

    Fast neural network oscillations in gamma (30-80 Hz) range are associated with attentiveness and sensory perception and have strong relation to both cognitive processing and temporal binding of sensory stimuli. These oscillations are found in different brain systems including cerebral cortex, hippocampus and olfactory bulb. Cortical gamma oscillations may become synchronized within 1-2 msec over distances up to a few millimeters. In this study we used computational network models to analyze basic synaptic mechanisms and synchronization properties of fast neural oscillations. Using the network models of synaptically coupled pyramidal neurons (up to 500,000 cells) and fast spiking interneurons (up to 125,000 cells) we found that the strength of feedback inhibition determined the network synchronization state: either global network oscillations with near zero phase lag between remote sites or waves of gamma activity propagating through the network. Long-range excitatory connections between pyramidal cells were not required for long-range synchronization. The model predicts that local inhibitory circuits can mediate global network synchronization with phase delays being much smaller than activity propagation time between remote network sites.

  20. A review of high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.

    1986-01-01

    Various parameters that affect solar cell efficiency were discussed. It is not understood why solar cells produced from less expensive Czochralski (Cz) silicon are less efficient than cells fabricated from more expensive float-zone (Fz) silicon. Performance characteristics were presented for recently produced, high-efficient solar cells fabricated by Westinghouse Electric Corp., Spire Corp., University of New South Wales, and Stanford University.

  1. Space solar cells: High efficiency and radiation damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H., Jr.; Bernatowicz, D. T.

    1980-01-01

    The progress and status of efforts to increase the end-of-life efficiency of solar cells for space use is assessed. High efficiency silicon solar cells, silicon solar cell radiation damage, GaAs solar cell performance and radiation damage and 30 percent devices are discussed.

  2. Modeling and Analysis of Mixed Synchronous/Asynchronous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, Kevin R.; Madl. Gabor; Hall, Brendan

    2012-01-01

    Practical safety-critical distributed systems must integrate safety critical and non-critical data in a common platform. Safety critical systems almost always consist of isochronous components that have synchronous or asynchronous interface with other components. Many of these systems also support a mix of synchronous and asynchronous interfaces. This report presents a study on the modeling and analysis of asynchronous, synchronous, and mixed synchronous/asynchronous systems. We build on the SAE Architecture Analysis and Design Language (AADL) to capture architectures for analysis. We present preliminary work targeted to capture mixed low- and high-criticality data, as well as real-time properties in a common Model of Computation (MoC). An abstract, but representative, test specimen system was created as the system to be modeled.

  3. Correlation dimension signature of wideband chaos synchronization of semiconductor lasers.

    PubMed

    Kane, D M; Toomey, J P; Lee, M W; Shore, K A

    2006-01-01

    Chaos data analysis has been performed on the chaotic output power time series data from a synchronized transmitter-receiver pair of semiconductor lasers. The system uses an asymmetric, bidirectional coupling configuration between the master (transmitter), which is a laser diode with optical feedback, and a stand-alone slave semiconductor laser. The correlation dimension of the chaotic time series has a minimum value of 4, which was obtained from high-bandwidth measurements. The correlation dimensions for both the master and the synchronized slave are identical when the cross-correlation coefficient of the synchronized chaos is above 0.9. These results establish correlation dimension analysis as an effective tool for the determination of the quality of wideband chaos synchronization.

  4. Loss analysis of a 1 MW class HTS synchronous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, S. K.; Kwon, Y. K.; Kim, H. M.; Lee, J. D.; Kim, Y. C.; Park, H. J.; Kwon, W. S.; Park, G. S.

    2009-03-01

    The HTS (High-Temperature Superconducting) synchronous motor has advantages over the conventional synchronous motor such as smaller size and higher efficiency. Higher efficiency is due to smaller loss than the conventional motor, so it is important to do loss analysis in order to develop a machine with higher efficiency. This paper deals with machine losses those are dissipated in each part of a HTS synchronous motor. These losses are analyzed theoretically and compared with loss data obtained from experimental results of a 1 MW class HTS synchronous motor. Each machine loss is measured based on IEEE 115 standard and the results are analyzed and considered based on the manufacturing of the test machine.

  5. Preliminary Chaotic Model of Snapover on High Voltage Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Willie R.

    1995-01-01

    High voltage power systems in space will interact with the space plasma in a variety of ways. One of these, Snapover, is characterized by a sudden enlargement of the electron current collection area across normally insulating surfaces. A power drain on solar array power systems will results from this enhanced current collection. Optical observations of the snapover phenomena in the laboratory indicates a functional relation between bia potential and surface glow area. This paper shall explore the potential benefits of modeling the relation between current and bia potential as an aspect of bifurcation analysis in chaos theory. Successful characterizations of snapover as a chaotic phenomena may provide a means of snapover prevention and control through chaotic synchronization.

  6. Individual sarcomere length determination from isolated cardiac cells using high-resolution optical microscopy and digital image processing.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, K P; Brady, A J

    1982-01-01

    Discrete sarcomere lengths have been determined from dynamically contracting isolated cardiac cells with a high-speed, high-resolution direct optical imaging system. Calcium-tolerant cardiac cells from the rat are isolated by perfusion with collagenase and hyaluronidase. Individual sarcomere lengths can be determined by directly imaging the cell's striation pattern onto a solid-state charge-coupled device (CCD) detector interfaced with a digital computer. The precision of detection in a real light microscopic optical system is discussed in relation to the type of image detector, optical contract enhancement techniques, and digital image processing. The optical performance of the direct striation pattern image apparatus has been determined empirically with test grids under standard bright-field and Nomarski-differential interference contrast (DIC) conditions for application to real muscle imaging. Discrete striation positions of isolated cells have been detected and followed with high precision during phasic contraction-relaxation cycles down to average sarcomere lengths as short as 1.43 +/- 0.053 microns. The maximum rates of contraction and relaxation are rapid and synchronous in time course along the length of the cell. These results indicate that direct optical imaging can provide an accurate means to monitor discrete striations and sarcomere lengths along the length of Ca2+-tolerant heart cells. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 PMID:7183337

  7. A Novel Method of Clock Synchronization in Distributed System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Niu, M. J.; Cai, Y. S.; Chen, X.; Ren, Y. Q.

    2016-03-01

    Time synchronization plays an important role in application of aircraft flying formation and constellation autonomous navigation, etc. In application of clock synchronization in the network system, it is not always true that each observed node may be interconnected, therefore, it is difficult to achieve time synchronization of network system with high precision in the condition that a certain node can only obtain the measurement information of clock from one of its corresponding neighbors, and cannot obtain from other nodes. According to this special problem, a novel method of high precision time synchronization of network system has been proposed. In this paper, we regard each clock as a node in the network system, and based on different distributed topology definition, the following three control algorithms of time synchronization under three circumstances have been designed: without a master clock (reference clock), with a master clock (reference clock), and with a fixed communication delay in the network system. The validity of the designed clock synchronization protocol has been proved both theoretically and through numerical simulation.

  8. High voltage, high current Schottky barrier solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A Schottky barrier solar cell was described, which consists of a layer of wide band gap semiconductor material on which a very thin film of semitransparent metal was deposited to form a Schottky barrier. The layer of the wide band gap semiconductor material is on top of a layer of narrower band gap semiconductor material, to which one of the cell's contacts may be attached directly or through a substrate. The cell's other contact is a grid structure which is deposited on the thin metal film.

  9. System and method for clock synchronization and position determination using entangled photon pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Yanhua (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method for clock synchronization and position determination using entangled photon pairs is provided. The present invention relies on the measurement of the second order correlation function of entangled states. Photons from an entangled photon source travel one-way to the clocks to be synchronized. By analyzing photon registration time histories generated at each clock location, the entangled states allow for high accuracy clock synchronization as well as high accuracy position determination.

  10. High Efficiency, High Density Terrestrial Panel. [for solar cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Wihl, M.; Rosenfield, T.

    1979-01-01

    Terrestrial panels were fabricated using rectangular cells. Packing densities in excess of 90% with panel conversion efficiencies greater than 13% were obtained. Higher density panels can be produced on a cost competitive basis with the standard salami panels.

  11. High efficiency solar cell research for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    A review is given of NASA photovoltaic research with emphasis on the activities of the Lewis Research Center. High efficiency solar cell research is discussed, as well as solar arrays, multi-junction cell bandgaps, and plasmon coupling.

  12. Development of high-efficiency solar cells on silicon web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1984-01-01

    The development of high efficiency solar cells on a silicon web is discussed. Heat treatment effects on web quality; the influence of twin plane lamellae, trace impurities and stress on minority carrier lifetime; and the fabrication of cells are discussed.

  13. Highly sensitive SERS analysis of the cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp peptide ligands of cells using nanogap antennas.

    PubMed

    Portela, Alejandro; Yano, Taka-Aki; Santschi, Christian; Martin, Olivier J F; Tabata, Hitoshi; Hara, Masahiko

    2017-02-01

    The cyclic RGD (cRGD) peptide ligands of cells have become widely used for treating several cancers. We report a highly sensitive analysis of c(RGDfC) using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using single dimer nanogap antennas in aqueous environment. Good agreement between characteristic peaks of the SERS and the Raman spectra of bulk c(RGDfC) with its peptide's constituents were observed. The exhibited blinking of the SERS spectra and synchronization of intensity fluctuations, suggest that the SERS spectra acquired from single dimer nanogap antennas was dominated by the spectrum of single to a few molecules. SERS spectra of c(RGDfC) could be used to detect at the nanoscale, the cells' transmembrane proteins binding to its ligand. SERS of cyclic RGD on nanogap antenna.

  14. Synchronization of endothelial Dll4-Notch dynamics switch blood vessels from branching to expansion

    PubMed Central

    Ubezio, Benedetta; Blanco, Raquel Agudo; Geudens, Ilse; Stanchi, Fabio; Mathivet, Thomas; Jones, Martin L; Ragab, Anan; Bentley, Katie; Gerhardt, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Formation of a regularly branched blood vessel network is crucial in development and physiology. Here we show that the expression of the Notch ligand Dll4 fluctuates in individual endothelial cells within sprouting vessels in the mouse retina in vivo and in correlation with dynamic cell movement in mouse embryonic stem cell-derived sprouting assays. We also find that sprout elongation and branching associates with a highly differential phase pattern of Dll4 between endothelial cells. Stimulation with pathologically high levels of Vegf, or overexpression of Dll4, leads to Notch dependent synchronization of Dll4 fluctuations within clusters, both in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the Vegf-Dll4/Notch feedback system normally operates to generate heterogeneity between endothelial cells driving branching, whilst synchronization drives vessel expansion. We propose that this sensitive phase transition in the behaviour of the Vegf-Dll4/Notch feedback loop underlies the morphogen function of Vegfa in vascular patterning. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12167.001 PMID:27074663

  15. On the estimation of phase synchronization, spurious synchronization and filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Herrera, Wady A.; Escalona, Joaquín; Rivera López, Daniel; Müller, Markus F.

    2016-12-01

    Phase synchronization, viz., the adjustment of instantaneous frequencies of two interacting self-sustained nonlinear oscillators, is frequently used for the detection of a possible interrelationship between empirical data recordings. In this context, the proper estimation of the instantaneous phase from a time series is a crucial aspect. The probability that numerical estimates provide a physically relevant meaning depends sensitively on the shape of its power spectral density. For this purpose, the power spectrum should be narrow banded possessing only one prominent peak [M. Chavez et al., J. Neurosci. Methods 154, 149 (2006)]. If this condition is not fulfilled, band-pass filtering seems to be the adequate technique in order to pre-process data for a posterior synchronization analysis. However, it was reported that band-pass filtering might induce spurious synchronization [L. Xu et al., Phys. Rev. E 73, 065201(R), (2006); J. Sun et al., Phys. Rev. E 77, 046213 (2008); and J. Wang and Z. Liu, EPL 102, 10003 (2013)], a statement that without further specification causes uncertainty over all measures that aim to quantify phase synchronization of broadband field data. We show by using signals derived from different test frameworks that appropriate filtering does not induce spurious synchronization. Instead, filtering in the time domain tends to wash out existent phase interrelations between signals. Furthermore, we show that measures derived for the estimation of phase synchronization like the mean phase coherence are also useful for the detection of interrelations between time series, which are not necessarily derived from coupled self-sustained nonlinear oscillators.

  16. Astrocyte calcium signalling orchestrates neuronal synchronization in organotypic hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takuya; Ishikawa, Tomoe; Abe, Reimi; Nakayama, Ryota; Asada, Akiko; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are thought to detect neuronal activity in the form of intracellular calcium elevations; thereby, astrocytes can regulate neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission. Little is known, however, about how the astrocyte calcium signal regulates the activity of neuronal populations. In this study, we addressed this issue using functional multineuron calcium imaging in hippocampal slice cultures. Under normal conditions, CA3 neuronal networks exhibited temporally correlated activity patterns, occasionally generating large synchronization among a subset of cells. The synchronized neuronal activity was correlated with astrocyte calcium events. Calcium buffering by an intracellular injection of a calcium chelator into multiple astrocytes reduced the synaptic strength of unitary transmission between pairs of surrounding pyramidal cells and caused desynchronization of the neuronal networks. Uncaging the calcium in the astrocytes increased the frequency of neuronal synchronization. These data suggest an essential role of the astrocyte calcium signal in the maintenance of basal neuronal function at the circuit level. PMID:24710057

  17. Bodily synchronization underlying joke telling

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, R. C.; Nie, Lin; Franco, Alison; Richardson, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in video and time series analysis have greatly enhanced our ability to study the bodily synchronization that occurs in natural interactions. Past research has demonstrated that the behavioral synchronization involved in social interactions is similar to dynamical synchronization found generically in nature. The present study investigated how the bodily synchronization in a joke telling task is spread across different nested temporal scales. Pairs of participants enacted knock–knock jokes and times series of their bodily activity were recorded. Coherence and relative phase analyses were used to evaluate the synchronization of bodily rhythms for the whole trial as well as at the subsidiary time scales of the whole joke, the setup of the punch line, the two-person exchange and the utterance. The analyses revealed greater than chance entrainment of the joke teller’s and joke responder’s movements at all time scales and that the relative phasing of the teller’s movements led those of the responder at the longer time scales. Moreover, this entrainment was greater when visual information about the partner’s movements was present but was decreased particularly at the shorter time scales when explicit gesturing in telling the joke was performed. In short, the results demonstrate that a complex interpersonal bodily “dance” occurs during structured conversation interactions and that this “dance” is constructed from a set of rhythms associated with the nested behavioral structure of the interaction. PMID:25177287

  18. Synchronous Spike Patterns in Macaque Motor Cortex during an Instructed-Delay Reach-to-Grasp Task

    PubMed Central

    Torre, Emiliano; Quaglio, Pietro; Denker, Michael; Brochier, Thomas; Riehle, Alexa

    2016-01-01

    The computational role of spike time synchronization at millisecond precision among neurons in the cerebral cortex is hotly debated. Studies performed on data of limited size provided experimental evidence that low-order correlations occur in relation to behavior. Advances in electrophysiological technology to record from hundreds of neurons simultaneously provide the opportunity to observe coordinated spiking activity of larger populations of cells. We recently published a method that combines data mining and statistical evaluation to search for significant patterns of synchronous spikes in massively parallel spike trains (Torre et al., 2013). The method solves the computational and multiple testing problems raised by the high dimensionality of the data. In the current study, we used our method on simultaneous recordings from two macaque monkeys engaged in an instructed-delay reach-to-grasp task to determine the emergence of spike synchronization in relation to behavior. We found a multitude of synchronous spike patterns aligned in both monkeys along a preferential mediolateral orientation in brain space. The occurrence of the patterns is highly specific to behavior, indicating that different behaviors are associated with the synchronization of different groups of neurons (“cell assemblies”). However, pooled patterns that overlap in neuronal composition exhibit no specificity, suggesting that exclusive cell assemblies become active during different behaviors, but can recruit partly identical neurons. These findings are consistent across multiple recording sessions analyzed across the two monkeys. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons in the brain communicate via electrical impulses called spikes. How spikes are coordinated to process information is still largely unknown. Synchronous spikes are effective in triggering a spike emission in receiving neurons and have been shown to occur in relation to behavior in a number of studies on simultaneous recordings of few

  19. Replication of the rRNA and legumin genes in synchronized root cells of pea (Pisum sativum): evidence for transient EcoR I sites in replicating rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hof, J V; Hernandez, P; Bjerknes, C A; Kraszewska, E K; Lamm, S S

    1987-03-01

    The temporal pattern of replication of the rRNA and legumin genes differs in synchronized pea root cells. The relative number of rRNA genes replicated hourly during the first five hours of S phase ranges between 5 and 10 percent. In late S phase, during hours six through nine, the number of rRNA genes replicated increases reaching a maximum of about 25 percent at the ninth hour. Unlike the rRNA genes, the legumin genes have a wave-like pattern of replication peaking in early S phase at the third hour and again in late S phase at the eighth hour.Replicating rDNA, isolated by benzoylated naphthoylated DEAE-column chromatography, has EcoR I restriction sites that are absent in non-replicating rDNA sequences. The cleavage of these sites is independent of the time of rDNA replication. The transient nature of the EcoR I sites suggests that they exist in a hemimethylated state in parental DNA.The two Hind III repeat-size classes of rDNA of var. Alaska peas are replicated simultaneously as cells progress through S phase. Thus, even if the 9.0 kb and 8.6 kb repeat classes are located on different chromosomes, their temporal order of replication is the same.

  20. Weak synchronization and large-scale collective oscillation in dense bacterial suspensions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Liu, Song; Shi, Xia-Qing; Chaté, Hugues; Wu, Yilin

    2017-02-09

    Collective oscillatory behaviour is ubiquitous in nature, having a vital role in many biological processes from embryogenesis and organ development to pace-making in neuron networks. Elucidating the mechanisms that give rise to synchronization is essential to the understanding of biological self-organization. Collective oscillations in biological multicellular systems often arise from long-range coupling mediated by diffusive chemicals, by electrochemical mechanisms, or by biomechanical interaction between cells and their physical environment. In these examples, the phase of some oscillatory intracellular degree of freedom is synchronized. Here, in contrast, we report the discovery of a weak synchronization mechanism that does not require long-range coupling or inherent oscillation of individual cells. We find that millions of motile cells in dense bacterial suspensions can self-organize into highly robust collective oscillatory motion, while individual cells move in an erratic manner, without obvious periodic motion but with frequent, abrupt and random directional changes. So erratic are individual trajectories that uncovering the collective oscillations of our micrometre-sized cells requires individual velocities to be averaged over tens or hundreds of micrometres. On such large scales, the oscillations appear to be in phase and the mean position of cells typically describes a regular elliptic trajectory. We found that the phase of the oscillations is organized into a centimetre-scale travelling wave. We present a model of noisy self-propelled particles with strictly local interactions that accounts faithfully for our observations, suggesting that self-organized collective oscillatory motion results from spontaneous chiral and rotational symmetry breaking. These findings reveal a previously unseen type of long-range order in active matter systems (those in which energy is spent locally to produce non-random motion). This mechanism of collective oscillation may

  1. Weak synchronization and large-scale collective oscillation in dense bacterial suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chong; Liu, Song; Shi, Xia-Qing; Chaté, Hugues; Wu, Yilin

    2017-01-01

    Collective oscillatory behaviour is ubiquitous in nature, having a vital role in many biological processes from embryogenesis and organ development to pace-making in neuron networks. Elucidating the mechanisms that give rise to synchronization is essential to the understanding of biological self-organization. Collective oscillations in biological multicellular systems often arise from long-range coupling mediated by diffusive chemicals, by electrochemical mechanisms, or by biomechanical interaction between cells and their physical environment. In these examples, the phase of some oscillatory intracellular degree of freedom is synchronized. Here, in contrast, we report the discovery of a weak synchronization mechanism that does not require long-range coupling or inherent oscillation of individual cells. We find that millions of motile cells in dense bacterial suspensions can self-organize into highly robust collective oscillatory motion, while individual cells move in an erratic manner, without obvious periodic motion but with frequent, abrupt and random directional changes. So erratic are individual trajectories that uncovering the collective oscillations of our micrometre-sized cells requires individual velocities to be averaged over tens or hundreds of micrometres. On such large scales, the oscillations appear to be in phase and the mean position of cells typically describes a regular elliptic trajectory. We found that the phase of the oscillations is organized into a centimetre-scale travelling wave. We present a model of noisy self-propelled particles with strictly local interactions that accounts faithfully for our observations, suggesting that self-organized collective oscillatory motion results from spontaneous chiral and rotational symmetry breaking. These findings reveal a previously unseen type of long-range order in active matter systems (those in which energy is spent locally to produce non-random motion). This mechanism of collective oscillation may

  2. Direct evidence of flagellar synchronization through hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumley, Douglas; Polin, Marco; Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella exhibit striking coordination, from the synchronous beating of two flagella in Chlamydomonas to the metachronal waves and large-scale flows displayed by carpets of cilia. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for flagellar synchronization remain unclear. We perform a series of experiments involving two individual flagella in a quiescent fluid. Cells are isolated from the colonial alga Volvox carteri, held in place at a fixed distance d, and oriented so that their flagellar beating planes coincide. In this fashion, we are able to explicitly assess the role of hydrodynamics in achieving synchronization. For closely separated cells, the flagella are capable of exhibiting a phase-locked state for thousands of beats at a time, despite significant differences in their intrinsic frequencies. For intermediate values of d, synchronous periods are interrupted by brief phase slips, while for d >> 1 the flagellar phase difference drifts almost linearly with time. The coupling strength extracted through analysis of the synchronization statistics exhibits excellent agreement with hydrodynamic predictions. This study unambiguously reveals that flagella coupled only through hydrodynamics are capable of exhibiting robust synchrony.

  3. Life-cycle costs of high-performance cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, R.; Burger, D.; Reiter, L.

    1985-01-01

    A life cycle cost analysis of high efficiency cells was presented. Although high efficiency cells produce more power, they also cost more to make and are more susceptible to array hot-spot heating. Three different computer analysis programs were used: SAMICS (solar array manufacturing industry costing standards), PVARRAY (an array failure mode/degradation simulator), and LCP (lifetime cost and performance). The high efficiency cell modules were found to be more economical in this study, but parallel redundancy is recommended.

  4. Toward Interactive Mobile Synchronous Learning Environment with Context-Awareness Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yueh-Min; Kuo, Yen-Hung; Lin, Yen-Ting; Cheng, Shu-Chen

    2008-01-01

    Mobile synchronous learning is a new challenge in the e-learning domain. While popular mobile communication devices, such as cell phones, cannot directly accommodate traditional synchronous content due to the major limitation of display size, other constraints also restrict convenient interactions while using mobile devices in a synchronous…

  5. Complexin facilitates exocytosis and synchronizes vesicle release in two secretory model systems

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Yi; Rohan, Joyce G; Cai, Haijiang; Reim, Kerstin; Ko, Chien-Ping; Chow, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Complexins (Cplxs) are small, SNARE-associated proteins believed to regulate fast, calcium-triggered exocytosis. However, studies have pointed to either an inhibitory and/or facilitatory role in exocytosis, and the role of Cplxs in synchronizing exocytosis is relatively unexplored. Here, we compare the function of two types of complexin, Cplx 1 and 2, in two model systems of calcium-dependent exocytosis. In mouse neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), we find that lack of Cplx 1 significantly reduces and desynchronizes calcium-triggered synaptic transmission; furthermore, high-frequency stimulation elicits synaptic facilitation, instead of normal synaptic depression, and the degree of facilitation is highly sensitive to the amount of cytoplasmic calcium buffering. In Cplx 2-null adrenal chromaffin cells, we also find decreased and desynchronized evoked release, and identify a significant reduction in the vesicle pool close to the calcium channels (immediately releasable pool, IRP). Viral transduction with either Cplx 1 or 2 rescues both the size of the evoked response and the synchronicity of release, and it restores the IRP size. Our findings in two model systems are mutually compatible and indicate a role of Cplx 1 and 2 in facilitating vesicle priming, and also lead to the new hypothesis that Cplxs may synchronize vesicle release by promoting coupling between secretory vesicles and calcium channels. PMID:23401610

  6. Remote synchronization in star networks.

    PubMed

    Bergner, A; Frasca, M; Sciuto, G; Buscarino, A; Ngamga, E J; Fortuna, L; Kurths, J

    2012-02-01

    We study phase synchronization in a network motif with a starlike structure in which the central node's (the hub's) frequency is strongly detuned against the other peripheral nodes. We find numerically and experimentally a regime of remote synchronization (RS), where the peripheral nodes form a phase synchronized cluster, while the hub remains free with its own dynamics and serves just as a transmitter for the other nodes. We explain the mechanism for this RS by the existence of a free amplitude and also show that systems with a fixed or constant amplitude, such as the classic Kuramoto phase oscillator, are not able to generate this phenomenon. Further, we derive an analytic expression which supports our explanation of the mechanism.

  7. Linear Synchronous Motor Repeatability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.R.

    2002-10-18

    A cart system using linear synchronous motors was being considered for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). One of the applications in the PIP was the movement of a stack of furnace trays, filled with the waste form (pucks) from a stacking/unstacking station to several bottom loaded furnaces. A system was ordered to perform this function in the PIP Ceramic Prototype Test Facility (CPTF). This system was installed and started up in SRTC prior to being installed in the CPTF. The PIP was suspended and then canceled after the linear synchronous motor system was started up. This system was used to determine repeatability of a linear synchronous motor cart system for the Modern Pit Facility.

  8. Synchronization and information transmission in spatio-temporal networks of deformable units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukam Kakmeni, F. M.; Baptista, M. S.

    2008-06-01

    We study the relationship between synchronization and the rate with which information is exchanged between nodes in a spatio-temporal network that describes the dynamics of classical particles under a substrate Remoissenet-Peyrard potential. We also show how phase and complete synchronization can be detected in this network. The difficulty in detecting phase synchronization in such a network appears due to the highly non-coherent character of the particle dynamics which unables a proper definition of the phase dynamics. The difficulty in detecting complete synchronization appears due to the spatio character of the potential which results in an asymptotic state highly dependent on the initial state.

  9. Synchronization in an optomechanical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlomi, Keren; Yuvaraj, D.; Baskin, Ilya; Suchoi, Oren; Winik, Roni; Buks, Eyal

    2015-03-01

    We study self-excited oscillations (SEO) in an on-fiber optomechanical cavity. Synchronization is observed when the optical power that is injected into the cavity is periodically modulated. A theoretical analysis based on the Fokker-Planck equation evaluates the expected phase space distribution (PSD) of the self-oscillating mechanical resonator. A tomography technique is employed for extracting PSD from the measured reflected optical power. Time-resolved state tomography measurements are performed to study phase diffusion and phase locking of the SEO. The detuning region inside which synchronization occurs is experimentally determined and the results are compared with the theoretical prediction.

  10. State observer for synchronous motors

    DOEpatents

    Lang, Jeffrey H.

    1994-03-22

    A state observer driven by measurements of phase voltages and currents for estimating the angular orientation of a rotor of a synchronous motor such as a variable reluctance motor (VRM). Phase voltages and currents are detected and serve as inputs to a state observer. The state observer includes a mathematical model of the electromechanical operation of the synchronous motor. The characteristics of the state observer are selected so that the observer estimates converge to the actual rotor angular orientation and velocity, winding phase flux linkages or currents.

  11. Optimized multiparty quantum clock synchronization

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Av, Radel; Exman, Iaakov

    2011-07-15

    A multiparty protocol for distributed quantum clock synchronization has been claimed to provide universal limits on the clock accuracy, viz., that accuracy monotonically decreases with the number n of party members. But this is only true for synchronization when one limits oneself to W states. This work shows that the usage of Z (Symmetric Dicke) states, a generalization of W states, results in improved accuracy, having a maximum when Left-Floor n/2 Right-Floor of its members have their qubits with a |1> eigenstate.

  12. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, C.L.; Morris, J.S.; Agnew, S.F.

    1997-01-14

    Diamond anvil cell is described for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear. 4 figs.

  13. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, Curtis L.; Morris, John S.; Agnew, Stephen F.

    1997-01-01

    Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear.

  14. A cell sorting protocol for selecting high-producing sub-populations of Sf9 and High Five™ cells.

    PubMed

    Vidigal, João; Dias, Mafalda M; Fernandes, Fabiana; Patrone, Marco; Bispo, Cláudia; Andrade, Cláudia; Gardner, Rui; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M; Teixeira, Ana P

    2013-12-01

    Insect cell lines such as Sf9 and High Five™ have been widely used to produce recombinant proteins mostly by the lytic baculovirus vector system. We have recently established an expression platform in Sf9 cells using a fluorescence-based recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) strategy which has similar development timelines but avoids baculovirus infection. To expedite cell engineering efforts, a robust fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) protocol optimized for insect cells was developed here. The standard sorting conditions used for mammalian cells proved to be unsuitable, resulting in post-sorting viabilities below 10% for both cell lines. We found that the extreme sensitivity to the shear stress displayed by Sf9 and High Five™ cells was the limiting factor, and using Pluronic F-68 in the cell suspension could increase post-sorting viabilities in a dose dependent manner. The newly developed protocol was then used to sort stable populations of both cell lines tagged with a DsRed-expressing cassette. Before sorting, the average fluorescence intensity of the Sf9 cell population was 3-fold higher than that of the High Five™ cell population. By enriching with the 10% strongest DsRed-fluorescent cells, the productivity of both cell populations could be successfully improved. The established sorting protocol potentiates the use of RMCE technology for recombinant protein production in insect cells.

  15. One step lithography-less silicon nanomanufacturing for low cost high-efficiency solar cell production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Logan

    2014-03-01

    To improve light absorption, previously various antireflection material layers were created on solar wafer surface including multilayer dielectric film, nanoparticle sludges, microtextures, noble metal plasmonic nanoparticles and 3D silicon nanostructure arrays. All of these approaches involve nanoscale prepatterning, surface-area-sensitive assembly processes or extreme fabrication conditions; therefore, they are often limited by the associated high cost and low yield as well as the consequent industry incompatibility. In comparison, our nanomanufacturing, an unique synchronized and simultaneous top-down and bottom-up nanofabrication approach called simultaneous plasma enhanced reactive ion synthesis and etching (SPERISE), offers a better antireflection solution along with the potential to increase p-n junction surface area. High density and high aspect ratio anechoic nanocone arrays are repeatedly and reliably created on the entire surface of single and poly crystalline silicon wafers as well as amorphous silicon thin films within 5 minutes under room temperature. The nanocone surface had lower than 5% reflection over the entire solar spectrum and a desirable omnidirectional absorption property. Using the nanotextured solar wafer, a 156mm × 156mm 18.1%-efficient black silicon solar cell was fabricated, which was an 18.3% enhancement over the cell fabricated by standard industrial processes. This process also reduces silicon loss during the texturing step and enables tighter process control by creating more uniform surface structures. Considering all the above advantages, the demonstrated nanomanufacturing process can be readily translated into current industrial silicon solar cell fabrication lines to replace the costly and ineffective wet chemical texturing and antireflective coatings.

  16. High efficiency solar cells for laser power beaming applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding solar cell response to pulsed laser outputs is important for the evaluation of power beaming applications. The time response of high efficiency GaAs and silicon solar cells to a 25 nS monochromatic pulse input is described. The PC-1D computer code is used to analyze the cell current during and after the pulse for various conditions.

  17. Applications of ion implantation for high efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnucci, J. A.; Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1977-01-01

    Ion implantation is utilized for the dopant introduction processes necessary to fabricate a silicon solar cell. Implantation provides a versatile powerful tool for development of high efficiency cells. Advantages and problems of implantation and the present status of developmental use of the technique for solar cells are discussed.

  18. Burst annealing of high temperature GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brothers, P. R.; Horne, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    One of the major limitations of solar cells in space power systems is their vulnerability to radiation damage. One solution to this problem is to periodically heat the cells to anneal the radiation damage. Annealing was demonstrated with silicon cells. The obstacle to annealing of GaAs cells was their susceptibility to thermal damage at the temperatures required to completely anneal the radiation damage. GaAs cells with high temperature contacts and encapsulation were developed. The cells tested are designed for concentrator use at 30 suns AMO. The circular active area is 2.5 mm in diameter for an area of 0.05 sq cm. Typical one sun AMO efficiency of these cells is over 18 percent. The cells were demonstrated to be resistant to damage after thermal excursions in excess of 600 C. This high temperature tolerance should allow these cells to survive the annealing of radiation damage. A limited set of experiments were devised to investigate the feasibility of annealing these high temperature cells. The effect of repeated cycles of electron and proton irradiation was tested. The damage mechanisms were analyzed. Limitations in annealing recovery suggested improvements in cell design for more complete recovery. These preliminary experiments also indicate the need for further study to isolate damage mechanisms. The primary objective of the experiments was to demonstrate and quantify the annealing behavior of high temperature GaAs cells. Secondary objectives were to measure the radiation degradation and to determine the effect of repeated irradiation and anneal cycles.

  19. High speed CMOS/SOS standard cell notebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The NASA/MSFC high speed CMOS/SOS standard cell family, designed to be compatible with the PR2D (Place, Route in 2-Dimensions) automatic layout program, is described. Standard cell data sheets show the logic diagram, the schematic, the truth table, and propagation delays for each logic cell.

  20. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2014-10-14

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  1. High performance polymer tandem solar cell

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Wilson Jose; Schneider, Fabio Kurt; Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid bin; Jang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    A power conversion efficiency of 9.02% is obtained for a fully solution-processed polymer tandem solar cell, based on the diketopyrrolopyrrole unit polymer as a low bandgap photoactive material in the rear subcell, in conjunction with a new robust interconnecting layer. This interconnecting layer is optically transparent, electrically conductive, and physically strong, thus, the charges can be collected and recombined in the interconnecting layer under illumination, while the charge is generated and extracted under dark conditions. This indicates that careful interface engineering of the charge-carrier transport layer is a useful approach to further improve the performance of polymer tandem solar cells. PMID:26669577

  2. Electrochemical cell with high conductivity glass electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, P.A.; Bloom, I.D.; Roche, M.F.

    1987-04-21

    A secondary electrochemical cell with sodium-sulfur or other molten reactants is provided with a ionically conductive glass electrolyte. The cell is contained within an electrically conductive housing with a first portion at negative potential and a second portion insulated therefrom at positive electrode potential. The glass electrolyte is formed into a plurality of elongated tubes and placed lengthwise within the housing. The positive electrode material, for instance sulfur, is sealed into the glass electrolyte tubes and is provided with an elongated axial current collector. The glass electrolyte tubes are protected by shield tubes or sheets that also define narrow annuli for wicking of the molten negative electrode material. 6 figs.

  3. Electrochemical cell with high conductivity glass electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Paul A.; Bloom, Ira D.; Roche, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    A secondary electrochemical cell with sodium-sulfur or other molten reactants is provided with a ionically conductive glass electrolyte. The cell is contained within an electrically conductive housing with a first portion at negative potential and a second portion insulated therefrom at positive electrode potential. The glass electrolyte is formed into a plurality of elongated tubes and placed lengthwise within the housing. The positive electrode material, for instance sulfur, is sealed into the glass electrolyte tubes and is provided with an elongated axial current collector. The glass electrolyte tubes are protected by shield tubes or sheets that also define narrow annuli for wicking of the molten negative electrode material.

  4. Electrochemical cell with high conductivity glass electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, P.A.; Bloom, I.D.; Roche, M.F.

    1986-04-17

    A secondary electrochemical cell with sodium-sulfur or other molten reactants is provided with an ionically conductive glass electrolyte. The cell is contained within an electrically conductive housing with a first portion at negative potential and a second portion insulated therefrom at positive electrode potential. The glass electrolyte is formed into a plurality of elongated tubes and placed lengthwise within the housing. The positive electrode material, for instance sulfur, is sealed into the glass electrolyte tubes and is provided with an elongated axial current collector. The glass electrolyte tubes are protected by shield tubes or sheets that also define narrow annuli for wicking of the molten negative electrode material.

  5. Constructing a High Density Cell Culture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  6. High Efficiency Large Area Polysilicon Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, S. M.; Winter, C.

    1985-01-01

    Large area (100 sq cm) polysilicon solar cells having efficiencies of up to 14.1% (100 mW/sq cm, 25 C) were fabricated and a detailed analysis was performed to identify the efficiency loss mechanisms. The 1-5 characteristics of the best cell were dominated by recombination in the quasi-neutral base due to the combination of minority carrier diffusion length and base resistivity. An analysis of the microstructural defects present in the material and their effect on the electrical properties is presented.

  7. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2012-09-11

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  8. Self synchronization of surface discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegraud, Katia; Rousseau, Antoine

    2008-10-01

    Surface dielectric barrier discharges (SDBD) are mainly investigated for airflow control. In this paper, they are used to study surface processes in dielectric barrier discharges. A previous study has shown the self triggered behavior of a SDBD: the plasma initiates through several simultaneous and adjacent filaments around the electrode [1]. This phenomenon has been investigated under the name of collective effects, where the light of a first filament can trigger the ignitions its neighbors [1, 2]. It allows initiating several tens of streamers during a current peak of ˜50 ns. In the present study, we propose to investigate the self synchronization of the discharge in a two electrodes system: the setup consists of two high voltage electrodes on the same glass plate. A third electrode, under the plate, is grounded. ICCD measurements show that the discharge appears simultaneously on both electrodes on a 50 ns time scale. Nanosecond resolved measurements of the streamers propagation reveal that the ignitions on one electrode can be delayed by few nanoseconds in respect to the other one. This means that the discharge from a first electrode can trigger the second one. Finally, iCCD measurements allow calculating the streamers propagation velocity, varying from 3.4x10^7 cm/s at the beginning of the propagation to 0.7x10^7cm/s at the end of the propagation [3]. [1] K. Allegraud, O. Guaitella, A. Rousseau, J. Phys. D. : Appl. Phys. 40 7698--7706 (2007) [2] O. Guaitella, F. Thevenet, C. Guillard, A. Rousseau, J. Phys. D.: Appl. Phys. 39 2964--72 (2006) [3] K. Allegraud, A. Rousseau, submitted to IEEE Transactions on Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation

  9. Sustained synchronized neuronal network activity in a human astrocyte co-culture system

    PubMed Central

    Kuijlaars, Jacobine; Oyelami, Tutu; Diels, Annick; Rohrbacher, Jutta; Versweyveld, Sofie; Meneghello, Giulia; Tuefferd, Marianne; Verstraelen, Peter; Detrez, Jan R.; Verschuuren, Marlies; De Vos, Winnok H.; Meert, Theo; Peeters, Pieter J.; Cik, Miroslav; Nuydens, Rony; Brône, Bert; Verheyen, An

    2016-01-01

    Impaired neuronal network function is a hallmark of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer’s disease and is typically studied using genetically modified cellular and animal models. Weak predictive capacity and poor translational value of these models urge for better human derived in vitro models. The implementation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) allows studying pathologies in differentiated disease-relevant and patient-derived neuronal cells. However, the differentiation process and growth conditions of hiPSC-derived neurons are non-trivial. In order to study neuronal network formation and (mal)function in a fully humanized system, we have established an in vitro co-culture model of hiPSC-derived cortical neurons and human primary astrocytes that recapitulates neuronal network synchronization and connectivity within three to four weeks after final plating. Live cell calcium imaging, electrophysiology and high content image analyses revealed an increased maturation of network functionality and synchronicity over time for co-cultures compared to neuronal monocultures. The cells express GABAergic and glutamatergic markers and respond to inhibitors of both neurotransmitter pathways in a functional assay. The combination of this co-culture model with quantitative imaging of network morphofunction is amenable to high throughput screening for lead discovery and drug optimization for neurological diseases. PMID:27819315

  10. High performance, high durability non-precious metal fuel cell catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Thomas E.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Schmoeckel, Alison K.

    2016-03-15

    This invention relates to non-precious metal fuel cell cathode catalysts, fuel cells that contain these catalysts, and methods of making the same. The fuel cell cathode catalysts are highly nitrogenated carbon materials that can contain a transition metal. The highly nitrogenated carbon materials can be supported on a nanoparticle substrate.

  11. Production technology for high efficiency ion implanted solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.; Minnucci, J. A.; Greenwald, A. C.; Josephs, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Ion implantation is being developed for high volume automated production of silicon solar cells. An implanter designed for solar cell processing and able to properly implant up to 300 4-inch wafers per hour is now operational. A machine to implant 180 sq m/hr of solar cell material has been designed. Implanted silicon solar cells with efficiencies exceeding 16% AM1 are now being produced and higher efficiencies are expected. Ion implantation and transient processing by pulsed electron beams are being integrated with electrostatic bonding to accomplish a simple method for large scale, low cost production of high efficiency solar cell arrays.

  12. Estimation of population effects in synchronized budding yeast experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemistoe, Antti; Aho, Tommi; Thesleff, Henna; Tiainen, Mikko; Marjanen, Kalle; Linne, Marja-Leena; Yli-Harja, Olli P.

    2003-05-01

    An approach for estimating the distribution of a synchronized budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cell population is discussed. This involves estimation of the phase of the cell cycle for each cell. The approach is based on counting the number of buds of different sizes in budding yeast images. An image processing procedure is presented for the bud-counting task. The procedure employs clustering of the local mean-variance space for segmentation of the images. The subsequent bud-detection step is based on an object separation method which utilizes the chain code representation of objects as well as labeling of connected components. The procedure is tested with microscopic images that were obtained in a time-series experiment of a synchronized budding yeast cell population. The use of the distribution estimate of the cell population for inverse filtering of signals that are obtained in time-series microarray measurements is discussed as well.

  13. Development of high-efficiency solar cells on silicon web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Greggi, J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1986-01-01

    Work is reported aimed at identifying and reducing sources of carrier recombination both in the starting web silicon material and in the processed cells. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy measurements of several web cells were made and analyzed. The effect of the heavily twinned region on cell efficiency was modeled, and the modeling results compared to measured values for processed cells. The effects of low energy, high dose hydrogen ion implantation on cell efficiency and diffusion length were examined. Cells were fabricated from web silicon known to have a high diffusion length, with a new double layer antireflection coating being applied to these cells. A new contact system, to be used with oxide passivated cells and which greatly reduces the area of contact between metal and silicon, was designed. The application of DLTS measurements to beveled samples was further investigated.

  14. First Case Report of a Sporadic Adrenocortical Carcinoma With Gastric Metastasis and a Synchronous Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Kovecsi, Attila; Jung, Ioan; Bara, Tivadar; Bara, Tivadar; Azamfirei, Leonard; Kovacs, Zsolt; Gurzu, Simona

    2015-09-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare tumor with high aggresivity that can associate systemic metastases. A 71-year-old man was hospitalized for gastric cancer. The abdominal computed tomography also revealed a tumor above the right kidney. Total gastrectomy and right adrenalectomy were performed. The encapsulated tumor of the adrenal gland weighed 560 grams and presented diffuse tumor architecture under microscope, with capsular, sinusoidal, and vascular invasion. The large tumor cells had a polygonal shape, with slight basophilic, eosinophilic, or vacuolated cytoplasm, pleomorphic nuclei, and a high mitotic rate. In the stomach, the protruded tumor was covered by normal mucosa; under microscope, the tumor cells were observed only in the submucosal layer. In primary adrenal tumor and gastric metastasis the tumor cells were marked by vimentin, inhibin, synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, and calretinin. Based on these criteria, the diagnosis of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) with gastric metastasis and no lymph node metastases was established. A synchronous 10 × 10-mm-sized gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the stomach, without mitoses, was also identified. So far, as we know, this is the 15th case of ever reported synchronous/metachronous sporadic ACCs; the ACC-related gastric metastases either synchronous ACC and GIST, has not been reported in the literature previously.

  15. Highly sensitive magnetite nano clusters for MR cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingli; Gu, Hongchen; Zhang, Chunfu

    2012-03-31

    High sensitivity and suitable sizes are essential for magnetic iron oxide contrast agents for cell imaging. In this study, we have fabricated highly MR sensitive magnetite nanoclusters (MNCs) with tunable sizes. These clusters demonstrate high MR sensitivity. Especially, water suspensions of the MNCs with average size of 63 nm have transverse relaxivity as high as 630 s-1mM-1, which is among the most sensitive iron oxide contrast agents ever reported. Importantly, such MNCs have no adverse effects on cells (RAW 264.7). When used for cell imaging, they demonstrate much higher efficiency and sensitivity than those of SHU555A (Resovist), a commercially available contrast agent, both in vitro and in vivo, with detection limits of 3,000 and 10,000 labeled cells, respectively. The studied MNCs are sensitive for cell imaging and promising for MR cell tracking in clinics.

  16. Highly sensitive magnetite nano clusters for MR cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    High sensitivity and suitable sizes are essential for magnetic iron oxide contrast agents for cell imaging. In this study, we have fabricated highly MR sensitive magnetite nanoclusters (MNCs) with tunable sizes. These clusters demonstrate high MR sensitivity. Especially, water suspensions of the MNCs with average size of 63 nm have transverse relaxivity as high as 630 s-1mM-1, which is among the most sensitive iron oxide contrast agents ever reported. Importantly, such MNCs have no adverse effects on cells (RAW 264.7). When used for cell imaging, they demonstrate much higher efficiency and sensitivity than those of SHU555A (Resovist), a commercially available contrast agent, both in vitro and in vivo, with detection limits of 3,000 and 10,000 labeled cells, respectively. The studied MNCs are sensitive for cell imaging and promising for MR cell tracking in clinics. PMID:22462693

  17. Theoretical and experimental considerations for high silicon solar cell performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.; Keavney, C. J.; Geoffroy, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews ongoing research aimed at the attainment of highly efficient silicon solar cells. The importance of low-recombination highly-doped n(+) and p(+) regions and the manner in which such regions are fabricated are discussed. Theoretical light-trapping considerations are combined with experimental reflectance data to show that high quantum efficiency may be obtained from thin (100-micron) cells. The principal finding of this work is that thin solar cells with conversion efficiencies of over 20 percent may be fabricated if recombination at the front and back metal/silicon interfaces is reduced. Large-area cells (53 sq cm) with an efficiency of 18 percent are reported.

  18. The mutual synchronization of coupled delayed feedback klystron oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanov, V. V.; Emelianova, Yu. P.; Ryskin, N. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the results of a numerical investigation of the synchronization of two coupled klystron oscillators with an external feedback circuit. Simulation has been carried out using the particle-in-cell method. We have also considered the results of a numerical analysis of an amplifier klystron and an isolated klystron oscillator, which make it possible to choose the optimal values of parameters of coupled klystrons. The structure of the synchronization domain for various parameters has been analyzed. The possibility of increasing the total output power with an appropriate choice of parameter of coupling between the oscillators has been revealed.

  19. High glucose suppresses embryonic stem cell differentiation into neural lineage cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Penghua; Shen, Wei-bin; Reece, E. Albert; Chen, Xi; Yang, Peixin

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal neurogenesis occurs during embryonic development in human diabetic pregnancies and in animal models of diabetic embryopathy. Our previous studies in a mouse model of diabetic embryopathy have implicated that high glucose of maternal diabetes delays neurogenesis in the developing neuroepithelium leading to neural tube defects. However, the underlying process in high glucose-impaired neurogenesis is uncharacterized. Neurogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells provides a valuable model for understanding the abnormal neural lineage development under high glucose conditions. ES cells are commonly generated and maintained in high glucose (approximately 25 mM glucose). Here, the mouse ES cell line, E14, was gradually adapted to and maintained in low glucose (5 mM), and became a glucose responsive E14 (GR-E14) line. High glucose induced the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker, CHOP, in GR-E14 cells. Under low glucose conditions, the GR-E14 cells retained their pluripotency and capability to differentiate into neural lineage cells. GR-E14 cell differentiation into neural stem cells (Sox1 and nestin positive cells) was inhibited by high glucose. Neuron (Tuj1 positive cells) and glia (GFAP positive cells) differentiation from GR-E14 cells was also suppressed by high glucose. In addition, high glucose delayed GR-E14 differentiation into neural crest cells by decreasing neural crest markers, paired box 3 (Pax3) and paired box 7 (Pax7). Thus, high glucose impairs ES cell differentiation into neural lineage cells. The low glucose adapted and high glucose responsive GR-E14 cell line is a useful in vitro model for assessing the adverse effect of high glucose on the development of the central nervous system. PMID:26940741

  20. High glucose suppresses embryonic stem cell differentiation into neural lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Penghua; Shen, Wei-bin; Reece, E Albert; Chen, Xi; Yang, Peixin

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal neurogenesis occurs during embryonic development in human diabetic pregnancies and in animal models of diabetic embryopathy. Our previous studies in a mouse model of diabetic embryopathy have implicated that high glucose of maternal diabetes delays neurogenesis in the developing neuroepithelium leading to neural tube defects. However, the underlying process in high glucose-impaired neurogenesis is uncharacterized. Neurogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells provides a valuable model for understanding the abnormal neural lineage development under high glucose conditions. ES cells are commonly generated and maintained in high glucose (approximately 25 mM glucose). Here, the mouse ES cell line, E14, was gradually adapted to and maintained in low glucose (5 mM), and became a glucose responsive E14 (GR-E14) line. High glucose induced the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker, CHOP, in GR-E14 cells. Under low glucose conditions, the GR-E14 cells retained their pluripotency and capability to differentiate into neural lineage cells. GR-E14 cell differentiation into neural stem cells (Sox1 and nestin positive cells) was inhibited by high glucose. Neuron (Tuj1 positive cells) and glia (GFAP positive cells) differentiation from GR-E14 cells was also suppressed by high glucose. In addition, high glucose delayed GR-E14 differentiation into neural crest cells by decreasing neural crest markers, paired box 3 (Pax3) and paired box 7 (Pax7). Thus, high glucose impairs ES cell differentiation into neural lineage cells. The low glucose adapted and high glucose responsive GR-E14 cell line is a useful in vitro model for assessing the adverse effect of high glucose on the development of the central nervous system.