Science.gov

Sample records for hijiori hdr test

  1. One month circulation test at the Hijiori HDR test site in 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Yoshiteru; Matsunaga, Isao; Nagai, Masahiro

    1996-12-31

    As shown in Table 1, four wells have been used for circulation tests at Hijiori. The diameters of all the open-hole sections of the wells are 8-{1/2} inches. SKG-2 is an injection well. An 1800 m deep reservoir was stimulated hydraulically by water injection into the open-hole section of SKG-2 in 1986. HDR-1 is also an injection well. A 2200 m deep reservoir was stimulated by water injection into the open-hole section of HDR-1 in 1992. HDR-2a and HDR-3 are used to produce steam and hot water from both reservoirs. The subsurface system was created In granodiorite basement rock with temperatures of 250 {degrees}C at a depth of 2,500 m and 270{degrees} C at depth of 2,700 m.

  2. HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long-Term Flow Test

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, David

    1992-03-24

    The long term flow test (LTFT) of the worlds largest, deepest, and hottest hot dry rock (HDR) reservoir currently underway at Fenton Hill, NM, is expected to demonstrate that thermal energy can be mined from hot rock within the earth on a sustainable basis with minimal water consumption. This test will simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings. Since the Fenton Hill system was designed as a research facility rather than strictly for production purposes, it will also not demonstrate economic viability, although it may well give indications of system modifications needed for economic HDR operations. A second production site must be constructed, ideally under the direction of the private geothermal community, to begin the process of proving that the vast HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale. This facility should be designed and engineered to produce and market energy at competitive prices. At the same time, a wide variety of techniques to advance the state-of-the-art of HDR technology must be pursued to develop this infant technology rapidly to its maximum potential. A number of design and operational techniques have been conceived which may lead to improved economics in HDR systems. After careful technical and economic scrutiny, those showing merit should be vigorously pursued. Finally, research and development work in areas such as reservoir interrogation, and system modeling must be accelerated to increase the competitiveness and geographical applications of HDR and the geothermal industry in general. This paper addresses the above issues in detail and outlines possible paths to future prosperity for the commercial geothermal industry.

  3. HDR opportunities and challenges beyond the long-term flow test

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, D.V.

    1992-01-01

    The long term flow test (LTFT) of the world's largest, deepest, and hottest hot dry rock (HDR) reservoir currently underway at Fenton Hill, NM, is expected to demonstrate that thermal energy can be mined from hot rock within the earth on a sustainable basis with minimal water consumption. This test will simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings. Since the Fenton Hill system was designed as a research facility rather than strictly for production purposes, it will also not demonstrate economic viability, although it may well give indications of system modifications needed for economic HDR operations. A second production site must be constructed, ideally under the direction of the private geothermal community, to begin the process of proving that the vast HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale. Finally, research and development work in areas such as reservoir interrogation, and system modeling must be accelerated to increase the competitiveness and geographical applications of HDR and the geothermal industry in general. This paper addresses the above issues in detail and outlines possible paths to future prosperity for the commercial geothermal industry.

  4. A summary of the Fire Testing Program at the German HDR Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nowlen, S.P.

    1995-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the fire safety experiments performed under the sponsorship of the German government in the containment building of the decommissioned pilot nuclear power plant known as HDR. This structure is a highly complex, multi-compartment, multi-level building which has been used as the test bed for a wide range of nuclear power plant operation safety experiments. These experiments have included numerous fire tests. Test fire fuel sources have included gas burners, wood cribs, oil pools, nozzle release oil fires, and cable in cable trays. A wide range of ventilation conditions including full natural ventilation, full forced ventilation, and combined natural and forced ventilation have been evaluated. During most of the tests, the fire products mixed freely with the full containment volume. Macro-scale building circulation patterns which were very sensitive to such factors as ventilation configuration were observed and characterized. Testing also included the evaluation of selective area pressurization schemes as a means of smoke control for emergency access and evacuation stairwells.

  5. Heat extracted from the long term flow test in the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Paul; Robinson, Bruce

    1994-01-20

    A long-term flow test was carried out in the Fenton Hill HDR Phase-2 reservoir for 14 months during 1992-1993 to examine the potential for supplying thermal energy at a sustained rate as a commercial demonstration of HDR technology. The test was accomplished in several segments with changes in mean flowrate due to pumping conditions. Re-test estimates of the extractable heat content above a minimum useful temperature were based on physical evidence of the size of the Fenton Hill reservoir. A numerical model was used to estimate the extent of heat extracted during the individual flow segments from the database of measured production data during the test. For a reservoir volume of 6.5x10{sup 6}m{sup 3}, the total heat content above a minimum temperature of 150{degree} C was 1.5x10{sup 15}J. For the total test period at the three sustained mean flowrates, the integrated heat extracted was 0.088x10{sup 15}J, with no discernable temperature decline of the produced fluid. The fraction of energy extracted above the abandonment temperature was 5.9%. On the basis of a constant thermal energy extraction rate, the lifetime of the reservoir (without reservoir growth) to the abandonment temperature would be 13.3 years, in good agreement with the pre-test estimate of 15.0 years for the given reservoir volume.

  6. HDR opportunities and challenges beyond the long-term flow test isco, CA, 24-26 Mar. 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchane, D. V.

    1992-06-01

    The long term flow test (LTFT) of the world's largest, deepest, and hottest hot dry rock (HDR) reservoir currently underway at Fenton Hill, NM is expected to demonstrate that thermal energy can be mined from hot rock within the earth on a sustainable basis with minimal water consumption. This test will simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings. Since the Fenton Hill system was designed as a research facility rather than strictly for production purposes, it will also not demonstrate economic viability, although it may well give indications of system modifications needed for economic HDR operations. A second production site must be constructed, ideally under the direction of the private geothermal community, to begin the process of proving that the vast HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale. Finally, research and development work in areas such as reservoir interrogation and system modeling must be accelerated to increase the competitiveness and geographical applications of HDR and the geothermal industry in general. This paper addresses the above issues in detail and outlines possible paths to future prosperity for the commercial geothermal industry.

  7. Comparison of the calculation of HDR RPV-1 blowdown loads for test V32 with the experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, G.A.; Santee, G.E. Jr.; Chang, F.H.; Brockett, G.F.; Gross, M.; Belytschko, T.

    1984-08-01

    Using the three-dimensional STEALTH/WHAMSE computer program, researchers calculated blowdown loads for HDR test V32 on a large-scale reactor vessel. The calculation, which compared well with test results, provides a good example of the predictive capability of the computer program. The program can be applied to nuclear and nonnuclear fluid-structure interaction problems.

  8. High level seismic/vibrational tests at the HDR: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.; Schrammel, D.; Malcher, L.; Steinhilber, H.; Costello, J.F.

    1991-12-31

    As part of the Phase II testing at the HDR Test Facility in Kahl/Main, FRG, two series of high-level seismic/vibrational experiments were performed. In the first of these (SHAG) a coast-down shaker, mounted on the reactor operating floor and capable of generating 1000 tonnes of force, was used to investigate full-scale structural response, soil-structure interaction (SSI), and piping/equipment response at load levels equivalent to those of a design basis earthquake. The HDR soil/structure system was tested to incipient failure exhibiting highly nonlinear response. In the load transmission from structure to piping/equipment significant response amplifications and shifts to higher frequencies occurred. The performance of various pipe support configurations was evaluated. This latter effort was continued in the second series of tests (SHAM), in which an in-plant piping system was investigated at simulated seismic loads (generated by two servo-hydraulic actuators each capable of generating 40 tonnes of force), that exceeded design levels manifold and resulted in considerable pipe plastification and failure of some supports (snubbers). The evaluation of six different support configurations demonstrated that proper system design (for a given spectrum) rather than number of supports or system stiffness is essential to limiting pipe stresses. Pipe strains at loads exceeding the design level eightfold were still tolerable, indicating that pipe failure even under extreme seismic loads is unlikely inspite of multiple support failures. Conservatively, an excess capacity (margin) of at least four was estimated for the piping system, and the pipe damping was found to be 4%. Comparisons of linear and nonlinear computational results with measurements showed that analytical predictions have wide scatter and do not necessarily yield conservative responses, underpredicting, in particular, peak support forces.

  9. High level seismic/vibrational tests at the HDR: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J. ); Schrammel, D.; Malcher, L. ); Steinhilber, H. ); Costello, J.F. . Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research)

    1991-01-01

    As part of the Phase II testing at the HDR Test Facility in Kahl/Main, FRG, two series of high-level seismic/vibrational experiments were performed. In the first of these (SHAG) a coast-down shaker, mounted on the reactor operating floor and capable of generating 1000 tonnes of force, was used to investigate full-scale structural response, soil-structure interaction (SSI), and piping/equipment response at load levels equivalent to those of a design basis earthquake. The HDR soil/structure system was tested to incipient failure exhibiting highly nonlinear response. In the load transmission from structure to piping/equipment significant response amplifications and shifts to higher frequencies occurred. The performance of various pipe support configurations was evaluated. This latter effort was continued in the second series of tests (SHAM), in which an in-plant piping system was investigated at simulated seismic loads (generated by two servo-hydraulic actuators each capable of generating 40 tonnes of force), that exceeded design levels manifold and resulted in considerable pipe plastification and failure of some supports (snubbers). The evaluation of six different support configurations demonstrated that proper system design (for a given spectrum) rather than number of supports or system stiffness is essential to limiting pipe stresses. Pipe strains at loads exceeding the design level eightfold were still tolerable, indicating that pipe failure even under extreme seismic loads is unlikely inspite of multiple support failures. Conservatively, an excess capacity (margin) of at least four was estimated for the piping system, and the pipe damping was found to be 4%. Comparisons of linear and nonlinear computational results with measurements showed that analytical predictions have wide scatter and do not necessarily yield conservative responses, underpredicting, in particular, peak support forces.

  10. Scientific progress on the Fenton Hill HDR project since 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.; Duchane, D.V.

    1998-02-01

    The modern HDR concept originated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and was first demonstrated at Fenton Hill, NM. Experience gained during the development of the deeper HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill clearly showed that HDR reservoirs are formed by opening pre-existing, but sealed, multiply connected joint sets. Subsequent flow testing indicated that sustained operation of HDR systems under steady state conditions is feasible. The most significant remaining HDR issues are related to economics and locational flexibility. Additional field test sites are needed to advance the understanding of HDR technology so that the vast potential of this resource can be economically realized around the world.

  11. The history of HDR research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, D.

    1998-12-31

    An energy source rivaling the sun exists in the form of the heat emanating from the interior of the earth. Although limited quantities of this geothermal energy are produced today by bringing natural hot fluids to the surface, most of the earth`s heat is trapped in hot dry rock (HDR). The application of hydraulic fracturing technology to tap this vast HDR resource was pioneered by Los Alamos National Laboratory beginning in 1970. Since that time, engineered geothermal reservoirs have been constructed and operated at numerous locations around the world. Major work at the US HDR facility at Fenton Hill, NM, and at the British HDR site in Cornwall, UK, has been completed, but advanced HDR field work continues at two sites on the island of Honshu in Japan and at Soultz in northeastern France. In addition, plans are currently being completed for the construction of an HDR system on the continent of Australia. Over the past three decades the worldwide research and development effort has taken HDR from its early conceptual stage to its present state as a demonstrated technology that is on the verge of becoming commercially feasible. Extended flow tests in the United States, Japan, and Europe have proven that sustained operation of HDR reservoirs is possible. In support of these field tests, an international body of scientists and engineers have pursued a variety of innovative approaches for assessing HDR resources, constructing and characterizing engineered geothermal reservoirs, and operating HDR systems. Taken together, these developments form a strong base upon which to build the practical HDR systems that will provide clean energy for the world in the 21st century.

  12. Image and video compression for HDR content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Reinhard, Erik; Agrafiotis, Dimitris; Bull, David R.

    2012-10-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) technology can offer high levels of immersion with a dynamic range meeting and exceeding that of the Human Visual System (HVS). A primary drawback with HDR images and video is that memory and bandwidth requirements are significantly higher than for conventional images and video. Many bits can be wasted coding redundant imperceptible information. The challenge is therefore to develop means for efficiently compressing HDR imagery to a manageable bit rate without compromising perceptual quality. In this paper, we build on previous work of ours and propose a compression method for both HDR images and video, based on an HVS optimised wavelet subband weighting method. The method has been fully integrated into a JPEG 2000 codec for HDR image compression and implemented as a pre-processing step for HDR video coding (an H.264 codec is used as the host codec for video compression). Experimental results indicate that the proposed method outperforms previous approaches and operates in accordance with characteristics of the HVS, tested objectively using a HDR Visible Difference Predictor (VDP). Aiming to further improve the compression performance of our method, we additionally present the results of a psychophysical experiment, carried out with the aid of a high dynamic range display, to determine the difference in the noise visibility threshold between HDR and Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) luminance edge masking. Our findings show that noise has increased visibility on the bright side of a luminance edge. Masking is more consistent on the darker side of the edge.

  13. ICFT: An initial closed-loop flow test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, Z.V.; Aguilar, R.G.; Dennis, B.R.; Dreesen, D.S.; Fehler, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; House, L.S.; Ito, H.; Kelkar, S.M.; Malzahn, M.V.

    1989-02-01

    A 30-day closed-loop circulation test of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was conducted to determine the thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and seismic characteristics of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,300 m/sup 3/ of hot water. Up to 10 MW/sub t/ was extracted when the production flow rate reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, the water-loss rate had decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water was recovered; 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Analysis of thermal, hydraulic, geochemical, tracer, and seismic data suggests the fractured volume of the reservoir was growing throughout the test. 19 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

  14. A JPEG backward-compatible HDR image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, Pavel; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2012-10-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) imaging is expected to become one of the technologies that could shape next generation of consumer digital photography. Manufacturers are rolling out cameras and displays capable of capturing and rendering HDR images. The popularity and full public adoption of HDR content is however hindered by the lack of standards in evaluation of quality, file formats, and compression, as well as large legacy base of Low Dynamic Range (LDR) displays that are unable to render HDR. To facilitate wide spread of HDR usage, the backward compatibility of HDR technology with commonly used legacy image storage, rendering, and compression is necessary. Although many tone-mapping algorithms were developed for generating viewable LDR images from HDR content, there is no consensus on which algorithm to use and under which conditions. This paper, via a series of subjective evaluations, demonstrates the dependency of perceived quality of the tone-mapped LDR images on environmental parameters and image content. Based on the results of subjective tests, it proposes to extend JPEG file format, as the most popular image format, in a backward compatible manner to also deal with HDR pictures. To this end, the paper provides an architecture to achieve such backward compatibility with JPEG and demonstrates efficiency of a simple implementation of this framework when compared to the state of the art HDR image compression.

  15. Next stages in HDR technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, D.V.

    1993-03-01

    Twenty years of research and development have brought HDR heat mining technology from the purely conceptual stage to the establishment of an engineering-scale heat mine at Fenton Hill, NM. In April 1992, a long-term flow test (LTFT) of the HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill was begun. The test was carried out under steady-state conditions on a continuous basis for four months, but a major equipment failure in late July forced a temporary suspension of operations. Even this short test provided valuable information and extremely encouraging results as summarized below: There was no indication of thermal drawdown of the reservoir. There was evidence of increasing access to hot rock with time. Water consumption was in the rangki of 10--12%. Measured pumping costs were $0.003 per kilowatt of energy produced. Temperature logs conducted in the reservoir production zone during and after the flow test confirmed the fact that there was no decline in the average temperature of the fluid being produced from the reservoir. In fact, tracer testing showed that the fluid was taking more indirect pathways and thus contacting a greater amount of hot rock as the test progressed. Water usage quickly dropped to a level of 10--15 gallons per minute, an amount equivalent to about 10--12% of the injected fluid volume. At a conversion rate of 10--15%, these would translate to effective ``fuel costs`` of 2--3{cents} per kilowatt hour of electricity production potential. The completion of the LTFT will set the stage for commercialization of HDR but will not bring HDR technology to maturity. Relatively samples extensions of the current technology may bring significant improvements in efficiency, and these should be rapidly investigated. In the longer run, advanced operational concepts could further improve the efficiency of HDR energy extraction and may even offer the possibility of cogeneration schemes which solve both energy and water problems throughout the world.

  16. The beginning of explosive eruptions on a location lacking volcanoes: A case study on the Hijiori volcano, Northeastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, I.

    2006-12-01

    The volcanic activity of Hijiori volcano (N38 36°f 35°f°f, E140 9°f 20°f°f, WGS84) is reported in detail as a case study to understand how a new felsic volcano commences the activity. Hijiori volcano, a small caldera with approximately 2 km in diameter, is one of the 108 active volcanoes in Japan, which erupted at about 12,000 years ago (in Calendar age) on the location where no volcanic body existed before the activity. From the field survey, it turns out that the suite of activities initiated by the major eruption that deposited a valley filling non-welded pumice flows. Finally the pumice flows covered the range 5 km to the southward and 9 km to the northward with total maximum thickness of about 150 m. The accompanying pumice fall and ash fall extends 60 km to the eastward. Although span of the activity is as short as the resolving power of radiocarbon dating, there recognized a quiescence for three times. After the every quiescence, phreatic (or phreatomagmatic) activities deposited lapilli falls and flows in the proximity. Total volume of the valley filling pyroclastic flows and the air falls are estimated to be 1.4 and 0.6 cubic km, respectively. All the pumices from the three major eruptions are similar in their phenocryst content (50- vol. percent), phenocryst assemblages (Pl, Qz, OPx, Hb, and Mt), bulk chemistry (c.a. 64 wt. percent SiO2), and in isotopic (Sr, Nd) compositions. Mt phenocrysts have no zoning profiles and their chemical compositions (Al2O3, Mg/Mn) are mostly unique through the eruptive sequences, suggesting that the physicochemical conditions of the magma were the same just before the each eruption. On the contrary Pl, Qz, OPx and Hb phenocrysts showed distinct zoning, suggesting that the magma chamber of Hijiori volcano had been disturbed repeatedly by such as magma mixing that continued intermittently before and during the eruptive activities. The observed difference between Mt and the other phenocrysts implies that there were

  17. Virtual HDR{sup SM} CyberKnife Treatment for Localized Prostatic Carcinoma: Dosimetry Comparison With HDR Brachytherapy and Preliminary Clinical Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Donald B. Naitoh, John; Lee, Charles; Hardy, Steven C.; Jin, Haoran

    2008-04-01

    Background: We tested our ability to approximate the dose (38 Gy), fractionation (four fractions), and distribution of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for prostate cancer with CyberKnife (CK) stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans. We also report early clinical observations of CK SBRT treatment. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were treated with CK. For each CK SBRT plan, an HDR plan was designed using common contour sets and simulated HDR catheters. Planning target volume coverage, intraprostatic dose escalation, and urethra, rectum, and bladder exposure were compared. Results: Planning target volume coverage by the prescription dose was similar for CK SBRT and HDR plans, whereas percent of volume of interest receiving 125% of prescribed radiation dose (V125) and V150 values were higher for HDR, reflecting higher doses near HDR source dwell positions. Urethra dose comparisons were lower for CK SBRT in 9 of 10 cases, suggesting that CK SBRT may more effectively limit urethra dose. Bladder maximum point doses were higher with HDR, but bladder dose falloff beyond the maximum dose region was more rapid with HDR. Maximum rectal wall doses were similar, but CK SBRT created sharper rectal dose falloff beyond the maximum dose region. Second CK SBRT plans, constructed by equating urethra radiation dose received by point of maximum exposure of volume of interest to the HDR plan, significantly increased V125 and V150. Clinically, 4-month post-CK SBRT median prostate-specific antigen levels decreased 86% from baseline. Acute toxicity was primarily urologic and returned to baseline by 2 months. Acute rectal morbidity was minimal and transient. Conclusions: It is possible to construct CK SBRT plans that closely recapitulate HDR dosimetry and deliver the plans noninvasively.

  18. User's manual for HDR3 computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Arundale, C.J.

    1982-10-01

    A description of the HDR3 computer code and instructions for its use are provided. HDR3 calculates space heating costs for a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal space heating system. The code also compares these costs to those of a specific oil heating system in use at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Flight Center at Wallops Island, Virginia. HDR3 allows many HDR system parameters to be varied so that the user may examine various reservoir management schemes and may optimize reservoir design to suit a particular set of geophysical and economic parameters.

  19. Summary of HDR Technology Commercialization Board Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, David V.

    1993-04-23

    The Hot Dry Rock Technology Commercialization Board met on April 15, 1993, to review the current status of the Los Alamos Program and suggest future courses of action. During the first part of the meeting, the position of the U.S. DOE was presented, the most recent results of the long-term testing program were reviewed, and an economic study prepared recently for the DOE was described. This was followed by several hours of wide-ranging discussions on the future of HDR.

  20. Live HDR video streaming on commodity hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamee, Joshua; Hatchett, Jonathan; Debattista, Kurt; Chalmers, Alan

    2015-09-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) video provides a step change in viewing experience, for example the ability to clearly see the soccer ball when it is kicked from the shadow of the stadium into sunshine. To achieve the full potential of HDR video, so-called true HDR, it is crucial that all the dynamic range that was captured is delivered to the display device and tone mapping is confined only to the display. Furthermore, to ensure widespread uptake of HDR imaging, it should be low cost and available on commodity hardware. This paper describes an end-to-end HDR pipeline for capturing, encoding and streaming high-definition HDR video in real-time using off-the-shelf components. All the lighting that is captured by HDR-enabled consumer cameras is delivered via the pipeline to any display, including HDR displays and even mobile devices with minimum latency. The system thus provides an integrated HDR video pipeline that includes everything from capture to post-production, archival and storage, compression, transmission, and display.

  1. Use of radiochromic dosimetry film for HDR brachytherapy quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Steidley, K D

    1998-01-01

    An important quality assurance (QA) procedure in high dose rate (HDR) remote afterloading brachytherapy is the verification of the system's control of the source by a direct test with dosimetry medium prior to the patient's first treatment. In this test radiochromic film is placed in direct contact with the applicator and the patient's proposed treatment is then run with their EPROM card. Examination of the film allows a quick appraisal of step size, number of steps, and offset. Advantages of this film include self-development so the image may be viewed immediately, insensitivity to normal room light, and archivability. The cost is about U.S. $2 per clinical case.

  2. Seismic investigations of the HDR Safety Program. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Malcher, L.; Schrammel, D.; Steinhilber, H.; Kot, C.A.

    1994-08-01

    The primary objective of the seismic investigations, performed at the HDR facility in Kahl/Main, FRG was to validate calculational methods for the seismic evaluation of nuclear-reactor systems, using experimental data from an actual nuclear plant. Using eccentric mass shaker excitation the HDR soil/structure system was tested to incipient failure, exhibiting highly nonlinear response and demonstrating that structures not seismically designed can sustain loads equivalent to a design basin earthquake (DBE). Load transmission from the structure to piping/equipment indicated significant response amplifications and shifts to higher frequencies, while the response of tanks/vessels depended mainly on their support conditions. The evaluation of various piping support configurations demonstrated that proper system design (for a given spectrum) rather than number of supports or system stiffness is important to limiting pipe greens. Piping at loads exceeding the DBE eightfold still had significant margins and failure is improbable inspite of multiple support failures. The mean value for pipe damping, even under extreme loads, was found to be about 4%. Comparison of linear and nonlinear computational results with piping response measurements showed that predictions have a wide scatter and do not necessarily yield conservative responses underpredicting, in particular, peak support forces. For the soil/structure system the quality of the predictions did not depend so much on the complexity of the modeling, but rather on whether the model captured the salient features and nonlinearities of the system.

  3. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Mao, Hui; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  4. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofeng Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian; Mao, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  5. The conception and implementation of a local HDR fusion algorithm depending on contrast and luminosity parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besrour, Amine; Abdelkefi, Fatma; Siala, Mohamed; Snoussi, Hichem

    2015-09-01

    Nowadays, the high dynamic range (HDR) imaging represents the subject of the most researches. The major problem lies in the implementation of the best algorithm to acquire the best video quality. In fact, the major constraint is to conceive an optimal fusion which must meet the rapid movement of video frames. The implemented merging algorithms were not quick enough to reconstitute the HDR video. In this paper, we detail each of the previous existing works before detailing our algorithm and presenting results from the acquired HDR images, tone mapped with various techniques. Our proposed algorithm guarantees a more enhanced and faster solution compared to the existing ones. In fact, it has the ability to calculate the saturation matrix related to the saturation rate of the neighboring pixels. The computed coefficients are affected respectively to each picture from the tested ones. This analysis provides faster and efficient results in terms of quality and brightness. The originality of our work remains on its processing method including the pixels saturation in the totality of the captured pictures and their combination in order to obtain the best pictures illustrating all the possible details. These parameters are computed for each zone depending on the contrast and the luminosity of the current pixel and its neighboring. The final HDR image's coefficients are calculated dynamically ensuring the best image quality equilibrating the brightness and contrast values and making the perfect final image.

  6. Creating cinematic wide gamut HDR-video for the evaluation of tone mapping operators and HDR-displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froehlich, Jan; Grandinetti, Stefan; Eberhardt, Bernd; Walter, Simon; Schilling, Andreas; Brendel, Harald

    2014-03-01

    High quality video sequences are required for the evaluation of tone mapping operators and high dynamic range (HDR) displays. We provide scenic and documentary scenes with a dynamic range of up to 18 stops. The scenes are staged using professional film lighting, make-up and set design to enable the evaluation of image and material appearance. To address challenges for HDR-displays and temporal tone mapping operators, the sequences include highlights entering and leaving the image, brightness changing over time, high contrast skin tones, specular highlights and bright, saturated colors. HDR-capture is carried out using two cameras mounted on a mirror-rig. To achieve a cinematic depth of field, digital motion picture cameras with Super-35mm size sensors are used. We provide HDR-video sequences to serve as a common ground for the evaluation of temporal tone mapping operators and HDR-displays. They are available to the scientific community for further research.

  7. Impact Analysis of Baseband Quantizer on Coding Efficiency for HDR Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Chau-Wai; Su, Guan-Ming; Wu, Min

    2016-10-01

    Digitally acquired high dynamic range (HDR) video baseband signal can take 10 to 12 bits per color channel. It is economically important to be able to reuse the legacy 8 or 10-bit video codecs to efficiently compress the HDR video. Linear or nonlinear mapping on the intensity can be applied to the baseband signal to reduce the dynamic range before the signal is sent to the codec, and we refer to this range reduction step as a baseband quantization. We show analytically and verify using test sequences that the use of the baseband quantizer lowers the coding efficiency. Experiments show that as the baseband quantizer is strengthened by 1.6 bits, the drop of PSNR at a high bitrate is up to 1.60dB. Our result suggests that in order to achieve high coding efficiency, information reduction of videos in terms of quantization error should be introduced in the video codec instead of on the baseband signal.

  8. Ghost removing for HDR real-time video stream generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouderbane, Mustapha; Dubois, Julien; Heyrman, Barthélémy; Lapray, Pierre-Jean; Ginhac, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) imaging generation from a set of low dynamic range images taken in different exposure times is a low cost and an easy technique. This technique provides a good result for static scenes. Temporal exposure bracketing cannot be applied directly for dynamic scenes, since camera or object motion in bracketed exposures creates ghosts in the resulting HDR image. In this paper we describe a real-time ghost removing hardware implementation on high dynamic range video ow added for our HDR FPGA based smart camera which is able to provide full resolution (1280 x 1024) HDR video stream at 60 fps. We present experimental results to show the efficiency of our implemented method in ghost removing.

  9. Cloning and analysis of 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl-4-diphosphate reductase genes HsHDR1 and HsHDR2 in Huperzia serrate

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Haizhou; Zhang, Xin; Liao, Baosheng; Liu, Wanjing; He, Liu; Song, Jingyuan; Sun, Chao; Luo, Hongmei; Chen, Shilin

    2015-01-01

    We cloned and analyzed the two genes of the 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl-4-diphosphate reductase (HDR) gene family from Huperzia serrate. The two transcripts coding HDR, named HsHDR1 and HsHDR2, were discovered in the transcriptome dataset of H. serrate and were cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The physicochemical properties, protein domains, protein secondary structure, and 3D structure of the putative HsHDR1 and HsHDR2 proteins were analyzed. The full-length cDNA of the HsHDR1 gene contained 1431 bp encoding a putative protein with 476 amino acids, whereas the HsHDR2 gene contained 1428 bp encoding a putative protein of 475 amino acids. These two proteins contained the conserved domain of 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl-4-diphosphate reductase (PF02401), but without the transmembrane region and signal peptide. The most abundant expression of HsHDR1 and HsHDR2 was detected in H. serrate roots, followed by the stems and leaves. Our results provide a foundation for exploring the function of HsHDR1 and HsHDR2 in terpenoid and sterol biosynthesis in Huperziaceae plants. PMID:26713274

  10. The effect of split pixel HDR image sensor technology on MTF measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deegan, Brian M.

    2014-03-01

    Split-pixel HDR sensor technology is particularly advantageous in automotive applications, because the images are captured simultaneously rather than sequentially, thereby reducing motion blur. However, split pixel technology introduces artifacts in MTF measurement. To achieve a HDR image, raw images are captured from both large and small sub-pixels, and combined to make the HDR output. In some cases, a large sub-pixel is used for long exposure captures, and a small sub-pixel for short exposures, to extend the dynamic range. The relative size of the photosensitive area of the pixel (fill factor) plays a very significant role in the output MTF measurement. Given an identical scene, the MTF will be significantly different, depending on whether you use the large or small sub-pixels i.e. a smaller fill factor (e.g. in the short exposure sub-pixel) will result in higher MTF scores, but significantly greater aliasing. Simulations of split-pixel sensors revealed that, when raw images from both sub-pixels are combined, there is a significant difference in rising edge (i.e. black-to-white transition) and falling edge (white-to-black) reproduction. Experimental results showed a difference of ~50% in measured MTF50 between the falling and rising edges of a slanted edge test chart.

  11. FY 1996 Summary of Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Power Project

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The report describes progress and status of the HDR project at Hijiori. The year was notable for a flow enhancement test of a system with two production wells in operation. Other items include a geochemical survey, reinterpretation of acoustic emission data from 1988 through 1995, borehole measurements to find intersections with fractures, a geological survey, preparation for modeling fractures, improvements in crack simulation in a reservoir analysis model, and environmental survey work. (DJE 2005)

  12. Evaluating HDR photos using Web 2.0 technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Guoping; Mei, Yujie; Duan, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) photography is an emerging technology that has the potential to dramatically enhance the visual quality and realism of digital photos. One of the key technical challenges of HDR photography is displaying HDR photos on conventional devices through tone mapping or dynamic range compression. Although many different tone mapping techniques have been developed in recent years, evaluating tone mapping operators prove to be extremely difficult. Web2.0, social media and crowd-sourcing are emerging Internet technologies which can be harnessed to harvest the brain power of the mass to solve difficult problems in science, engineering and businesses. Paired comparison is used in the scientific study of preferences and attitudes and has been shown to be capable of obtaining an interval-scale ordering of items along a psychometric dimension such as preference or importance. In this paper, we exploit these technologies for evaluating HDR tone mapping algorithms. We have developed a Web2.0 style system that enables Internet users from anywhere to evaluate tone mapped HDR photos at any time. We adopt a simple paired comparison protocol, Internet users are presented a pair of tone mapped images and are simply asked to select the one that they think is better or click a "no difference" button. These user inputs are collected in the web server and analyzed by a rank aggregation algorithm which ranks the tone mapped photos according to the votes they received. We present experimental results which demonstrate that the emerging Internet technologies can be exploited as a new paradigm for evaluating HDR tone mapping algorithms. The advantages of this approach include the potential of collecting large user inputs under a variety of viewing environments rather than limited user participation under controlled laboratory environments thus enabling more robust and reliable quality assessment. We also present data analysis to correlate user generated qualitative

  13. Designs of an HDR reservoir at Clearlake, California

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.; Burns, K.L.

    1994-08-01

    The Clearlake area of California lies within the Geysers/Clearlake geothermal anomaly, a region of some 270 square miles in Sonoma and Lake Counties exhibiting elevated heat flow. The bulk of the electric power generated from geothermal resources in the United States is produced from this geothermal anomaly. However, the quantity of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) resource within the Geysers/Clearlake geothermal anomaly is vastly larger than that of the hydrothermal resource, and could provide the basis for significant further electric power production. Of most interest from the standpoint of demonstrating the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) resource in this region is the extremely high heat flow that surrounds the City of Clearlake, as attested to by the very high temperatures measured in numerous dry (i.e., hydrothermally nonproductive) holes drilled there over the past 20 years.

  14. Vitamin D deficiency in a patient with HDR syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kostoglou-Athanassiou, Ifigenia; Stefanopoulos, Dimitrios; Karfi, Areti; Athanassiou, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    The case of a patient with clinical symptoms, laboratory and imaging findings of hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness, renal dysplasia HDR, or Barakat syndrome (hypoparathyroidism, deafness, renal dysplasia), and vitamin D deficiency, is presented. A Caucasian man aged 51 years with a history of chronic hypocalcaemia since childhood, was admitted with hypertonia of the body and extremities, and loss of consciousness. On admission, he was found to have severe hypocalcaemia, hyperphosphataemia, severe hypoparathyroidism, low serum magnesium and mild renal insufficiency. Calcium gluconate was administered intravenously supplemented with magnesium, and the patient recovered consciousness while clinical and laboratory findings improved. Evaluation revealed left renal aplasia and sensorineural deafness affecting both ears. Vitamin D deficiency was also present. He was given calcium and vitamin D supplements orally, and the hypocalcaemia was corrected. This case is described as it is an extremely rare case of HDR syndrome with concurrent vitamin D deficiency.

  15. WE-F-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy II: Integrating Imaging with HDR

    SciTech Connect

    Craciunescu, O; Todor, D; Leeuw, A de

    2014-06-15

    In recent years, with the advent of high/pulsed dose rate afterloading technology, advanced treatment planning systems, CT/MRI compatible applicators, and advanced imaging platforms, image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatments (IGABT) have started to play an ever increasing role in modern radiation therapy. The most accurate way to approach IGABT treatment is to provide the infrastructure that combines in a single setting an appropriate imaging device, a treatment planning system, and a treatment unit. The Brachytherapy Suite is not a new concept, yet the modern suites are incorporating state-of-the-art imaging (MRI, CBCT equipped simulators, CT, and /or US) that require correct integration with each other and with the treatment planning and delivery systems. Arguably, an MRI-equipped Brachytherapy Suite is the ideal setup for real-time adaptive brachytherapy treatments. The main impediment to MRI-IGABT adoption is access to MRI scanners. Very few radiation oncology departments currently house MRI scanners, and even fewer in a dedicated Brachytherapy Suite. CBCT equipped simulators are increasingly offered by manufacturers as part of a Brachytherapy Suite installation. If optimized, images acquired can be used for treatment planning, or can be registered with other imaging modalities. This infrastructure is relevant for all forms of brachytherapy, especially those utilizing multi-fractionated courses of treatment such as prostate and cervix. Moreover, for prostate brachytherapy, US imaging systems can be part of the suite to allow for real-time HDR/LDR treatments. Learning Objectives: Understand the adaptive workflow of MR-based IGBT for cervical cancer. Familiarize with commissioning aspects of a CBCT equipped simulator with emphasis on brachytherapy applications Learn about the current status and future developments in US-based prostate brachytherapy.

  16. Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ponden, Raymond F.

    1992-03-24

    With the completion of the surface test facilities at Fenton Hill, the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Program at Los Alamos is moving steadily into the next stage of development. Start-up operations of the surface facilities have begun in preparation for testing the Phase II reservoir and the initial steady-state phase of operations. A test program has been developed that will entail a number of operational strategies to characterize the thermal performance of the reservoir. The surface facilities have been designed to assure high reliability while providing the flexibility and control to support the different operating modes. This paper presents a review of the system design and provides a discussion of the preliminary results of plant operations and equipment performance.

  17. Vital role of volume and number of needles in HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanikowski, Marek; Skowronek, Janusz

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The quality of HDR-BT of prostate cancer depends on operator skills, anatomy, prostate volume and relation to surrounding tissues as well as previous diseases and treatments of a patient. There is a rare data available concerning the minimum number of needles and its influence on dose distribution, side effects and long-term outcome. The study is to determine the minimal prostate volume and minimum number of needles suitable for HDR-BT in order to obtain an implant of good quality. Material and methods 181 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with interstitial HDR-BT boost. 15 Gy from HDR-BT was administered after 50 Gy from EBRT. Clinical, volumetric and dosimetric data were collected. Treatment plans were divided into Group A, consisted of optimal treatment plans (P-D90 > 90%, P-V200 < 15%, U-D10 < 125%, U-Dmax < 160%, R-D10 < 85%) and Group B, with suboptimal plans. Results The difference between two groups was statistically significant (p = 0.013) with regard to number of needles. There was no statistically significant difference concerning prostatic volume. Median number of inserted needles in the first and the second group resulted in 15 (range 9-18) and 13 (range 8-18), respectively. Differences were the most eminent in patients with prostate glands of small volume (< 20 cc). In the study, either the minimum number of needles nor minimal prostate gland volume were not clearly defined in terms of high probability of achieving a good quality implant. Conclusions Larger volume and higher number of needles are related to an advanced probability of treatment plan with all DVC fulfilled. The minimum number of needles suggested is > 9, optimally ≥ 13. Furthermore, the minimal prostate volume recommended is > 12 cc, optimally ≥ 18 cc. The volume of insufficient size and/or small number of needles results in suboptimal treatment plans.

  18. HDR and PDR 192Ir source activity control procedures, as the part of the quality assurance system at Brachytherapy Department of Greater Poland Cancer Centre

    PubMed Central

    Błasiak, Barbara; Stefaniak, Patrycja; Bielęda, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    Purpose One of the main causes of treatment failures in brachytherapy is incorrect source strength specification in planning system or treatment delivery console. Source strength control is the only scheme to avoid such mistakes. The main aim of this work was to present results of three years of HDR and PDR sources activity control. Material and methods Study was based on data from 14 192Ir HDR and PDR sources exchanges. Sources were checked three times: at the exchange day and after one and two months. Measurements were performed twice with thimble chamber (PMMA phantom), and well chamber. The source strength were measured as air – kerma and recalculated to activity. Results Source activities measured using well chamber and thimble chamber, as well as activities provided by planning system, were presented for PDR and HDR, respectively. Differences between results obtained using each chamber and activities from planning system were presented graphically. The calculated and measured activities differed less than 5%. Wilcoxon test was performed as well, no statistically significant differences were observed among HDR or PDR activities. Conclusions Checking of source parameters is one of the most important parts of quality control system in brachytherapy facilities. Well chamber and thimble chamber based dosimetry systems are fast and reliable tools for 192Ir source parameters checking in working brachytherapy department conditions.

  19. SU-E-T-124: Dosimetric Comparison of HDR Brachytherapy and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J; Wu, H; Das, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is known to be able to deliver more radiation dose to tumor while minimizing radiation dose to surrounding normal tissues. Proton therapy also provides superior dose distribution due to Bragg peak. Since both HDR and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) are beneficial for their quick dose drop off, our goal in this study is to compare the pace of dose gradient drop-off between HDR and IMPT plans based on the same CT image data-set. In addition, normal tissues sparing were also compared among HDR, IMPT and SBRT. Methods: Five cervical cancer cases treated with EBRT + HDR boost combination with Tandem and Ovoid applicator were used for comparison purpose. Original HDR plans with prescribed dose of 5.5 Gy x 5 fractions were generated and optimized. The 100% isodose line of HDR plans was converted to a dose volume, and treated as CTV for IMPT and SBRT planning. The same HDR CT scans were also used for IMPT plan and SBRT plan for direct comparison. The philosophy of the IMPT and SBRT planning was to create the same CTV coverage as HDR plans. All three modalities treatment plans were compared to each other with a set of predetermined criteria. Results: With similar target volume coverage in cervix cancer boost treatment, HDR provides a slightly sharper dose drop-off from 100% to 50% isodose line, averagely in all directions compared to IMPT. However, IMPT demonstrated more dose gradient drop-off at the junction of the target and normal tissues by providing more normal tissue sparing and superior capability to reduce integral dose. Conclusion: IMPT is capable of providing comparable dose drop-off as HDR. IMPT can be explored as replacement for HDR brachytherapy in various applications.

  20. Realistic camera noise modeling with application to improved HDR synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Bart; Luong, Hiêp; Aelterman, Jan; Pižurica, Aleksandra; Philips, Wilfried

    2012-12-01

    Due to the ongoing miniaturization of digital camera sensors and the steady increase of the "number of megapixels", individual sensor elements of the camera become more sensitive to noise, even deteriorating the final image quality. To go around this problem, sophisticated processing algorithms in the devices, can help to maximally exploit the knowledge on the sensor characteristics (e.g., in terms of noise), and offer a better image reconstruction. Although a lot of research focuses on rather simplistic noise models, such as stationary additive white Gaussian noise, only limited attention has gone to more realistic digital camera noise models. In this article, we first present a digital camera noise model that takes several processing steps in the camera into account, such as sensor signal amplification, clipping, post-processing,.. We then apply this noise model to the reconstruction problem of high dynamic range (HDR) images from a small set of low dynamic range (LDR) exposures of a static scene. In literature, HDR reconstruction is mostly performed by computing a weighted average, in which the weights are directly related to the observer pixel intensities of the LDR image. In this work, we derive a Bayesian probabilistic formulation of a weighting function that is near-optimal in the MSE sense (or SNR sense) of the reconstructed HDR image, by assuming exponentially distributed irradiance values. We define the weighting function as the probability that the observed pixel intensity is approximately unbiased. The weighting function can be directly computed based on the noise model parameters, which gives rise to different symmetric and asymmetric shapes when electronic noise or photon noise is dominant. We also explain how to deal with the case that some of the noise model parameters are unknown and explain how the camera response function can be estimated using the presented noise model. Finally, experimental results are provided to support our findings.

  1. High dynamic range optical projection tomography (HDR-OPT).

    PubMed

    Fei, Peng; Yu, Zhilong; Wang, Xu; Lu, Peter J; Fu, Yusi; He, Zi; Xiong, Jingwei; Huang, Yanyi

    2012-04-01

    Traditional optical projection tomography (OPT) acquires a single image at each rotation angle, thereby suffering from limitations in CCD dynamic range; this conventional usage cannot resolve features in samples with highly heterogeneous absorption, such as in small animals with organs of varying size. We present a novel technique, applying multiple-exposure high dynamic range (HDR) imaging to OPT, and demonstrate its ability to resolve fine details in zebrafish embryos, without complicated chemical clearing. We implement the tomographic reconstruction algorithm on the GPU, yielding a performance increase of two orders of magnitude. These features give our method potential application in high-throughput, high-resolution in vivo 3D imaging.

  2. HDR geothermal energy - a progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Nunz, G.J.; Franke, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    A description of the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Program and a summary of the work completed to date are presented. The Fenton Hill Project is reviewed starting with the research system (Phase I) established in its initial configuration in 1977 with the research work completed in mid-1981. The engineering system (Phase II) initiated in parallel with the completion of the Phase I is now being developed in its interim configuration. The final system is planned for completion in FY 1985 with about one year of testing extending through FY 1986. Technical evaluations and test data to date are encouraging. The foreign involvement (FRG and Japan) is expected to continue along with positive support in the US.

  3. Hdr Imaging for Feature Detection on Detailed Architectural Scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontogianni, G.; Stathopoulou, E. K.; Georgopoulos, A.; Doulamis, A.

    2015-02-01

    3D reconstruction relies on accurate detection, extraction, description and matching of image features. This is even truer for complex architectural scenes that pose needs for 3D models of high quality, without any loss of detail in geometry or color. Illumination conditions influence the radiometric quality of images, as standard sensors cannot depict properly a wide range of intensities in the same scene. Indeed, overexposed or underexposed pixels cause irreplaceable information loss and degrade digital representation. Images taken under extreme lighting environments may be thus prohibitive for feature detection/extraction and consequently for matching and 3D reconstruction. High Dynamic Range (HDR) images could be helpful for these operators because they broaden the limits of illumination range that Standard or Low Dynamic Range (SDR/LDR) images can capture and increase in this way the amount of details contained in the image. Experimental results of this study prove this assumption as they examine state of the art feature detectors applied both on standard dynamic range and HDR images.

  4. An automated optimization tool for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy with divergent needle pattern.

    PubMed

    Borot de Battisti, M; Maenhout, M; Denis de Senneville, B; Hautvast, G; Binnekamp, D; Lagendijk, J J W; van Vulpen, M; Moerland, M A

    2015-10-01

    Focal high-dose-rate (HDR) for prostate cancer has gained increasing interest as an alternative to whole gland therapy as it may contribute to the reduction of treatment related toxicity. For focal treatment, optimal needle guidance and placement is warranted. This can be achieved under MR guidance. However, MR-guided needle placement is currently not possible due to space restrictions in the closed MR bore. To overcome this problem, a MR-compatible, single-divergent needle-implant robotic device is under development at the University Medical Centre, Utrecht: placed between the legs of the patient inside the MR bore, this robot will tap the needle in a divergent pattern from a single rotation point into the tissue. This rotation point is just beneath the perineal skin to have access to the focal prostate tumor lesion. Currently, there is no treatment planning system commercially available which allows optimization of the dose distribution with such needle arrangement. The aim of this work is to develop an automatic inverse dose planning optimization tool for focal HDR prostate brachytherapy with needle insertions in a divergent configuration. A complete optimizer workflow is proposed which includes the determination of (1) the position of the center of rotation, (2) the needle angulations and (3) the dwell times. Unlike most currently used optimizers, no prior selection or adjustment of input parameters such as minimum or maximum dose or weight coefficients for treatment region and organs at risk is required. To test this optimizer, a planning study was performed on ten patients (treatment volumes ranged from 8.5 cm(3)to 23.3 cm(3)) by using 2-14 needle insertions. The total computation time of the optimizer workflow was below 20 min and a clinically acceptable plan was reached on average using only four needle insertions. PMID:26378657

  5. An automated optimization tool for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy with divergent needle pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borot de Battisti, M.; Maenhout, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Hautvast, G.; Binnekamp, D.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; van Vulpen, M.; Moerland, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Focal high-dose-rate (HDR) for prostate cancer has gained increasing interest as an alternative to whole gland therapy as it may contribute to the reduction of treatment related toxicity. For focal treatment, optimal needle guidance and placement is warranted. This can be achieved under MR guidance. However, MR-guided needle placement is currently not possible due to space restrictions in the closed MR bore. To overcome this problem, a MR-compatible, single-divergent needle-implant robotic device is under development at the University Medical Centre, Utrecht: placed between the legs of the patient inside the MR bore, this robot will tap the needle in a divergent pattern from a single rotation point into the tissue. This rotation point is just beneath the perineal skin to have access to the focal prostate tumor lesion. Currently, there is no treatment planning system commercially available which allows optimization of the dose distribution with such needle arrangement. The aim of this work is to develop an automatic inverse dose planning optimization tool for focal HDR prostate brachytherapy with needle insertions in a divergent configuration. A complete optimizer workflow is proposed which includes the determination of (1) the position of the center of rotation, (2) the needle angulations and (3) the dwell times. Unlike most currently used optimizers, no prior selection or adjustment of input parameters such as minimum or maximum dose or weight coefficients for treatment region and organs at risk is required. To test this optimizer, a planning study was performed on ten patients (treatment volumes ranged from 8.5 cm3to 23.3 cm3) by using 2-14 needle insertions. The total computation time of the optimizer workflow was below 20 min and a clinically acceptable plan was reached on average using only four needle insertions.

  6. WE-E-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy I: Overview of Clinical Application and QA

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, B; Showalter, T

    2014-06-15

    With the increased usage of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and the introduction of dedicated image guided brachytherapy suites, it is necessary to review the processes and procedures associated with safely delivering these treatments in the expedited time scales that dedicated treatment suites afford. The speakers will present the clinical aspects of switching from LDR to HDR treatments, including guidelines for patient selection, and the clinical outcomes comparing LDR to HDR. The speakers will also discuss the HDR treatment process itself, because the shortened clinical timeline involved with a streamlined scan/plan/treat workflow can introduce other issues. Safety and QA aspects involved with the streamlined process, including increased personnel required for parallel tasks, and possible interfering tasks causing delays in patient treatments will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical aspects of HDR Brachytherapy, including common clinical indications, patient selection, and the evolving evidence in support of this therapeutic modality To review the current prominent clinical trials for HDR brachytherapy To interpret the established guidelines for HDR brachytherapy quality assurance for implementation into practical clinical settings. To introduce the basic requirements for image guided brachytherapy.

  7. Dosimetric analysis and comparison of IMRT and HDR brachytherapy in treatment of localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Murali, V; Kurup, P G G; Mahadev, P; Mahalakshmi, S

    2010-04-01

    Radical radiotherapy is one of the options for the management of prostate cancer. In external beam therapy, 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are the options for delivery of increased radiation dose, as vital organs are very close to the prostate and a higher dose to these structures leads to an increased toxicity. In brachytherapy, low dose rate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive seeds and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) with remote after loaders are available. A dosimetric analysis has been made on IMRT and HDR brachytherapy plans. Ten cases from each IMRT and HDR brachytherapy have been taken for the study. The analysis includes comparison of conformity and homogeneity indices, D100, D95, D90, D80, D50, D10 and D5 of the target. For the organs at risk (OAR), namely rectum and bladder, V100, V90 and V50 are compared. In HDR brachytherapy, the doses to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of urethra have also been studied. Since a very high dose surrounds the source, the 300% dose volumes in the target and within the catheters are also studied in two plans, to estimate the actual volume of target receiving dose over 300%. This study shows that the prescribed dose covers 93 and 92% of the target volume in IMRT and HDR brachytherapy respectively. HDR brachytherapy delivers a much lesser dose to OAR, compared to the IMRT. For rectum, the V50 in IMRT is 34.0cc whilst it is 7.5cc in HDR brachytherapy. With the graphic optimization tool in HDR brachytherapy planning, the dose to urethra could be kept within 120% of the target dose. Hence it is concluded that HDR brachytherapy may be the choice of treatment for cancer of prostate in the early stage.

  8. Spatial adaptive upsampling filter for HDR image based on multiple luminance range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian; Su, Guan-ming; Peng, Yin

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose an adaptive upsampling filter to spatially upscale HDR image based on luminance range of the HDR picture in each color channel. It first searches for the optimal luminance range values to partition an HDR image to three different parts: dark, mid-tone and highlight. Then we derive the optimal set of filter coefficients both vertically and horizontally for each part. When the HDR pixel is within the dark area, we apply one set of filter coefficients to vertically upsample the pixel. If the HDR pixel falls in mid-tone area, we apply another set of filter for vertical upsampling. Otherwise the HDR pixel is in highlight area, another set of filter will be applied for vertical upsampling. Horizontal upsampling will be carried out likewise based on its luminance. The inherent idea to partition HDR image to different luminance areas is based on the fact that most HDR images are created from multiple exposures. Different exposures usually demonstrate slight variation in captured signal statistics, such as noise level, subtle misalignment etc. Hence, to group different regions to three luminance partitions actually helps to eliminate the variation between signals, and to derive optimal filter for each group with signals of lesser variation is certainly more efficient than for the entire HDR image. Experimental results show that the proposed adaptive upsampling filter based on luminance ranges outperforms the optimal upsampling filter around 0.57dB for R channel, 0.44dB for G channel and 0.31dB for B channel.

  9. Dosimetric analysis and comparison of IMRT and HDR brachytherapy in treatment of localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murali, V.; Kurup, P. G. G.; Mahadev, P.; Mahalakshmi, S.

    2010-01-01

    Radical radiotherapy is one of the options for the management of prostate cancer. In external beam therapy, 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are the options for delivery of increased radiation dose, as vital organs are very close to the prostate and a higher dose to these structures leads to an increased toxicity. In brachytherapy, low dose rate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive seeds and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) with remote after loaders are available. A dosimetric analysis has been made on IMRT and HDR brachytherapy plans. Ten cases from each IMRT and HDR brachytherapy have been taken for the study. The analysis includes comparison of conformity and homogeneity indices, D100, D95, D90, D80, D50, D10 and D5 of the target. For the organs at risk (OAR), namely rectum and bladder, V100, V90 and V50 are compared. In HDR brachytherapy, the doses to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of urethra have also been studied. Since a very high dose surrounds the source, the 300% dose volumes in the target and within the catheters are also studied in two plans, to estimate the actual volume of target receiving dose over 300%. This study shows that the prescribed dose covers 93 and 92% of the target volume in IMRT and HDR brachytherapy respectively. HDR brachytherapy delivers a much lesser dose to OAR, compared to the IMRT. For rectum, the V50 in IMRT is 34.0cc whilst it is 7.5cc in HDR brachytherapy. With the graphic optimization tool in HDR brachytherapy planning, the dose to urethra could be kept within 120% of the target dose. Hence it is concluded that HDR brachytherapy may be the choice of treatment for cancer of prostate in the early stage. PMID:20589121

  10. Direct measurement of instantaneous source speed for a HDR brachytherapy unit using an optical fiber based detector

    SciTech Connect

    Minamisawa, R. A.; Rubo, R. A.; Seraide, R. M.; Rocha, J. R. O.; Almeida, A.

    2010-10-15

    a radiation source in a HDR brachytherapy unit traveling from the unit safe to the end of the catheter and between interdwell distances. The method is feasible and accurate to implement on quality assurance tests and provides a unique database for efficient computational simulations of the transient dose.

  11. Clinical application of radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter for dose verification of prostate HDR procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Shih-Ming; Yeh, Chien-Yi; Yeh, Tien-Chi; Hong, Ji-Hong; Tipton, Annie Y. H.; Chen, Wei-Li; Sun, Shung-Shung; Huang, David Y. C.

    2008-12-15

    High dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) is one of the many modalities for prostate cancer treatment. Due to the nature of HDR-BT, in vivo dosimetry is feasible and can be used to verify consistent dose delivery. In order to validate a dose verification system for HDR-BT prostate cancer treatment, a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter (RPLGD) was used and the measurements were compared with those from a thermoluminescent dosimeter. The RPLGD shows many advantages in HDR-BT dose measurement, such as repeatability, stability, and small effective size. These advantages make the RPLGD a superior option for use as a dosimeter in HDR-BT. The results described here show that the difference between the measured dose and the treatment planned dose is less than 5%. A Monte Carlo simulation for the dose was performed using Monte Carlo N -particle to investigate position error. This study concludes that the RPLGD is a promising and reliable dosimeter for HDR-BT in vivo dosimetry with clinically acceptable accuracy.

  12. A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR reservoir with double porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelet, R.; Loret, B.; Khalili, N.

    2012-07-01

    The constitutive thermo-hydro-mechanical equations of fractured media are embodied in the theory of mixtures applied to three-phase poroelastic media. The solid skeleton contains two distinct cavities filled with the same fluid. Each of the three phases is endowed with its own temperature. The constitutive relations governing the thermomechanical behavior, generalized diffusion and transfer are structured by, and satisfy, the dissipation inequality. The cavities exchange both mass and energy. Mass exchanges are driven by the jump in scaled chemical potential, and energy exchanges by the jump in coldness. The finite element approximation uses the displacement vector, the two fluid pressures and the three temperatures as primary variables. It is used to analyze a generic hot dry rock geothermal reservoir. Three parameters of the model are calibrated from the thermal outputs of Fenton Hill and Rosemanowes HDR reservoirs. The calibrated model is next applied to simulate circulation tests at the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir. The finer thermo-hydro-mechanical response provided by the dual porosity model with respect to a single porosity model is highlighted in a parameter analysis. Emphasis is put on the influence of the fracture spacing, on the effective stress response and on the permeation of the fluid into the porous blocks. The dual porosity model yields a thermally induced effective stress that is less tensile compared with the single porosity response. This effect becomes significant for large fracture spacings. In agreement with field data, fluid loss is observed to be high initially and to decrease with time.

  13. Tracer measurements during long-term circulation of the Rosemanowes HDR geothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwakwa, K.A.

    1988-01-01

    Circulation experiments have been in operation for over two years in the artificially stimulated hot dry rock (HDR) doublet of the Camborne School of Mines (CSM) research facility in Cornwall, England. During that period tracer tests have been run at intervals using inert and reactive compounds. Initially, the results of the inert tracer investigations showed that the active volume (indicated by modal and median volumes) of the circulating system was dormant. Then, after a period of sustained oscillation, notable increases in active volume were observed which depended on both the subsequent flow rate changes and circulation time. these dynamic changes had almost reached optimum values when a downhole pump was introduced in the production well. The drawdown in the production well caused a reduction of the modal volume, whilst the median volume remained almost the same. Since then, the active volume has remained unchanged and irresponsive to circulation time and flow rate. The results of the reactive tracer tests confirm increasing chemical reaction with increasing circulation time and correlate qualitatively with the opening of newer and hotter pathways within the reservoir. However, repeated production logs throughout the circulation have identified flow paths that have depleted thermally; a discrepancy that can be explained by the geometry of the system and the preferential downward reservoir growth.

  14. Source geometry factors for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, D. R.; Sander, T.; Nutbrown, R. F.

    2015-03-01

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated 192Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR 192Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, ksg, is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR 192Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR 192Ir Flexisource ksg was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  15. NPIP: A skew line needle configuration optimization system for HDR brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Siauw, Timmy; Cunha, Adam; Berenson, Dmitry; Atamtuerk, Alper; Hsu, I-Chow; Goldberg, Ken; Pouliot, Jean

    2012-07-15

    or fewer needles than the current HDR brachytherapy workflow. Combined with robot assisted brachytherapy, this system has the potential to reduce side effects associated with treatment. A physical trial should be done to test the implant feasibility of NPIP needle configurations.

  16. Crowdsourcing-based evaluation of privacy in HDR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, Pavel; Nemoto, Hiromi; Skodras, Athanassios; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2014-05-01

    The ability of High Dynamic Range imaging (HDRi) to capture details in high-contrast environments, making both dark and bright regions clearly visible, has a strong implication on privacy. However, the extent to which HDRi affects privacy when it is used instead of typical Standard Dynamic Range imaging (SDRi) is not yet clear. In this paper, we investigate the effect of HDRi on privacy via crowdsourcing evaluation using the Microworkers platform. Due to the lack of HDRi standard privacy evaluation dataset, we have created such dataset containing people of varying gender, race, and age, shot indoor and outdoor and under large range of lighting conditions. We evaluate the tone-mapped versions of these images, obtained by several representative tone-mapping algorithms, using subjective privacy evaluation methodology. Evaluation was performed using crowdsourcing-based framework, because it is a popular and effective alternative to traditional lab-based assessment. The results of the experiments demonstrate a significant loss of privacy when even tone-mapped versions of HDR images are used compared to typical SDR images shot with a standard exposure.

  17. High-temperature logging for basic development of HDR reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, M.; Pettitt, R.A.; Miles, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    The second phase of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Development Program at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, consists of two boreholes, directionally-drilled in a northeast direction, inclined at an angle of 35/sup 0/, with a vertical separation of 365 m (1200 ft). The two boreholes will be connected by 12 to 15 vertical parallel fractures to make a geothermal reservoir calculated to produce 20 MW(e) for 20 years. Accurate temperature measurements, borehole caliper logs, and directional surveys are required for the successful development and operation of this man-made system. Obtaining these data is extremely difficult because of the bottom hole static temperature of 335/sup 0/C (635/sup 0/F) at a depth of 4660 m (15,289 ft), the 35/sup 0/ deviation, the abrasive formation, and the presence of sticky drilling residue products. The efforts during July, August, and September 1980, to obtain these data are presented as a case history. The temperature logs and borehole directional survey produced realistic results; but the borehole caliper measurements were inconsistent and unreliable, due to the developmental stage of the caliper tools.

  18. The European HDR project at Soultz sous forets: Stimulation of the second deep well and first circulation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, J.; Jung, R.; Gerard, A.; Baria, R.; Garnish, J.

    1996-01-24

    By February 1995 the European HDR project at Soultz was operating 6 boreholes: 2 deep hydraulic test wells (GPK-1, 3590 m & GPK-2, 3876 m) and 4 seismic observation wells with depths between 1500 and 2200 m. In 1993 the first section of a deep underground exchanger had been created through massive stimulation (injection of some 45000 m³ of water). Between November 1994 until January 1995 a second deep well, GPK-2, was drilled at the periphery of this exchanger. A complex test programme involving the stimulation of GPK-2 (connecting it to the existing exchanger) and various circulation experiments with different production techniques (flash throttled and unthrottled, submersible pump) and varying injection rates was performed between June and August 1995.

  19. BrachyView, a novel in-body imaging system for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Experimental evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Safavi-Naeini, M.; Han, Z.; Alnaghy, S.; Cutajar, D.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Franklin, D. R.; Bucci, J.; Carrara, M.; Zaider, M.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: This paper presents initial experimental results from a prototype of high dose rate (HDR) BrachyView, a novel in-body source tracking system for HDR brachytherapy based on a multipinhole tungsten collimator and a high resolution pixellated silicon detector array. The probe and its associated position estimation algorithms are validated and a comprehensive evaluation of the accuracy of its position estimation capabilities is presented. Methods: The HDR brachytherapy source is moved through a sequence of positions in a prostate phantom, for various displacements in x, y, and z. For each position, multiple image acquisitions are performed, and source positions are reconstructed. Error estimates in each dimension are calculated at each source position and combined to calculate overall positioning errors. Gafchromic film is used to validate the accuracy of source placement within the phantom. Results: More than 90% of evaluated source positions were estimated with an error of less than one millimeter, with the worst-case error being 1.3 mm. Experimental results were in close agreement with previously published Monte Carlo simulation results. Conclusions: The prototype of HDR BrachyView demonstrates a satisfactory level of accuracy in its source position estimation, and additional improvements are achievable with further refinement of HDR BrachyView’s image processing algorithms.

  20. Error Analysis of non-TLD HDR Brachytherapy Dosimetric Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoush, Ahmad

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group Report43 (AAPM-TG43) and its updated version TG-43U1 rely on the LiF TLD detector to determine the experimental absolute dose rate for brachytherapy. The recommended uncertainty estimates associated with TLD experimental dosimetry include 5% for statistical errors (Type A) and 7% for systematic errors (Type B). TG-43U1 protocol does not include recommendation for other experimental dosimetric techniques to calculate the absolute dose for brachytherapy. This research used two independent experimental methods and Monte Carlo simulations to investigate and analyze uncertainties and errors associated with absolute dosimetry of HDR brachytherapy for a Tandem applicator. An A16 MicroChamber* and one dose MOSFET detectors† were selected to meet the TG-43U1 recommendations for experimental dosimetry. Statistical and systematic uncertainty analyses associated with each experimental technique were analyzed quantitatively using MCNPX 2.6‡ to evaluate source positional error, Tandem positional error, the source spectrum, phantom size effect, reproducibility, temperature and pressure effects, volume averaging, stem and wall effects, and Tandem effect. Absolute dose calculations for clinical use are based on Treatment Planning System (TPS) with no corrections for the above uncertainties. Absolute dose and uncertainties along the transverse plane were predicted for the A16 microchamber. The generated overall uncertainties are 22%, 17%, 15%, 15%, 16%, 17%, and 19% at 1cm, 2cm, 3cm, 4cm, and 5cm, respectively. Predicting the dose beyond 5cm is complicated due to low signal-to-noise ratio, cable effect, and stem effect for the A16 microchamber. Since dose beyond 5cm adds no clinical information, it has been ignored in this study. The absolute dose was predicted for the MOSFET detector from 1cm to 7cm along the transverse plane. The generated overall uncertainties are 23%, 11%, 8%, 7%, 7%, 9%, and 8% at 1cm, 2cm, 3cm

  1. SU-D-19A-07: Dosimetric Comparison of HDR Plesiotherapy and Electron Beam Therapy for Superficial Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, A; Jacob, D; Andreou, K; Raben, A; Chen, H; Koprowski, C; Mourtada, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Large superficial (skin, soft tissue sarcoma) lesions located on curved areas are hard to treat with electrons. The Freiburg Flap (Nucletron, Netherlands) is a flexible mesh style surface which can be easily shaped to fit curved surfaces for reproducible HDR fraction delivery. To understand the fundamental dosimetric differences, a dosimetric comparison was made between HDR plesiotherapy (Freiburg applicator for lesions over 4cm) and external electron beam radiotherapy over cases with varying target curvature (both stylized and clinical cases). Methods: Four stylized cases with variable complexity were created using artificial DICOM axial CT slices and RT structures (a square and three curved structures on a 4.5cm radius cylinder). They were planned using Oncentra v4.3 and exported to Pinnacle v9.6 for electrons planning. The HDR source dwell positions were optimized for the best coverage of the targets using graphical optimization. Electron treatment plans were created in Pinnacle using the same CT and RT structures of three HDR cases with surface lesions previously treated with the Freiburg flap. The En face electron plans used 6-12 MeV electrons and 0.5–1 cm bolus was added to increase surface dose. The electron plans were prescribed to an isodose line to conform to the target. Results: For all lesions, the average target dose coverage was similar (D90ave of 100% for HDR vs 101% for electrons). For lesions with high curvature, the HDR coverage was better (D90 102% vs D90 97% for electron). For all cases, adjacent structures high dose region was lower for HDR than electrons (D1cc 100% for HDR vs D1cc 111% for electrons). Conclusion: HDR plesiotherapy offers excellent target conformity for superficial targets similar to electrons. However, for lesions with complex curved surfaces, HDR has the advantage to achieve better dose distributions using graphical optimization to spare adjacent normal tissue while maximizing target coverage.

  2. Trans-Pacific HDR Satellite Communications Experiment Phase-2 Project Plan and Experimental Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Eddie; Kadowaki, Naoto; Yoshimura, Naoko; Takahashi, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Bergman, Larry; Bhasin, Kul

    2000-01-01

    The trans-Pacific high data rate (TP-HDR) satellite communications experiment was proposed at the Japan-U.S. Cooperation in Space (JUCS) Program Workshop held in Hawaii in 1993 and remote high definition video post-production was demonstrated as the first phase trial. ATM-based 45 Mbps trans-Pacific link was established in the first phase, and the following experiments with 155 Mbps was planned as the phase 2. This paper describes the experimental network configuration and project plan of TP-HDR experiment phase 2. Additional information is provided in the original.

  3. The First Turkish Case of Hypoparathyroidism, Deafness and Renal Dysplasia (HDR) Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Döneray, Hakan; Usui, Takeshi; Kaya, Avni; Dönmez, Ayşe Sena

    2015-06-01

    Hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness and renal dysplasia. We herein present the first Turkish patient with HDR syndrome, who has a p.R367X mutation. This report indicates that p.R367X is not a mutation specific for the Far Eastern populations and also that urological findings in infants with hypoparathyroidism should be carefully examined because clinical findings relating to the p.R367X mutation may show a variable age of onset.

  4. A Prospective Cohort Study to Compare Treatment Results Between 2 Fractionation Schedules of High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in Patients With Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Eng-Yen; Sun, Li-Min; Lin, Hao; Lan, Jen-Hong; Chanchien, Chan-Chao; Huang, Yu-Jie; Wang, Chang-Yu; Wang, Chong-Jong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the treatment results of 2 fractionation schedules for high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2001 through January 2008, 267 patients with stage IB-IVA cervical cancer were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent 4-field pelvic irradiation and HDR-ICBT. The median central and parametrial doses were 39.6 Gy and 45 Gy, respectively. Patient underwent either 6 Gy Multiplication-Sign 4 (HDR-4) (n=144) or 4.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 6 (HDR-6) (n=123) to point A of ICBT using {sup 192}Ir isotope twice weekly. The rates of overall survival, locoregional failure, distant metastasis, proctitis, cystitis, and enterocolitis were compared between HDR-4 and HDR-6. Results: There were no significant differences in the demographic data between HDR-4 and HDR-6 except for total treatment time. The 5-year proctitis rates were 23.0% and 21.5% in HDR-4 and HDR-6 (P=.399), respectively. The corresponding rates of grade 2-4 proctitis were 18.7% and 9.6% (P=.060). The corresponding rates of grades 3-4 proctitis were 5.2% and 1.3% (P=.231). Subgroup analysis revealed that HDR-4 significantly increased grade 2-4 proctitis in patients aged {>=}62 years old (P=.012) but not in patients aged <62 years (P=.976). The rates of overall survival, locoregional failure, distant metastasis, cystitis, and enterocolitis were not significantly different between HDR-4 and HDR-6 schedules. Conclusion: The small fraction size of HDR-ICBT is associated with grade 2 proctitis without compromise of prognosis in elderly patients. This schedule is suggested for patients who tolerate an additional 2 applications of HDR-ICBT.

  5. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Hardev; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2012-10-23

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem and ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  6. SU-E-T-205: Improving Quality Assurance of HDR Brachytherapy: Verifying Agreement Between Planned and Delivered Dose Distributions Using DICOM RTDose and Advanced Film Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A L; Bradley, D A; Nisbet, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: HDR brachytherapy is undergoing significant development, and quality assurance (QA) checks must keep pace. Current recommendations do not adequately verify delivered against planned dose distributions: This is particularly relevant for new treatment planning system (TPS) calculation algorithms (non TG-43 based), and an era of significant patient-specific plan optimisation. Full system checks are desirable in modern QA recommendations, complementary to device-centric individual tests. We present a QA system incorporating TPS calculation, dose distribution export, HDR unit performance, and dose distribution measurement. Such an approach, more common in external beam radiotherapy, has not previously been reported in the literature for brachytherapy. Methods: Our QA method was tested at 24 UK brachytherapy centres. As a novel approach, we used the TPS DICOM RTDose file export to compare planned dose distribution with that measured using Gafchromic EBT3 films placed around clinical brachytherapy treatment applicators. Gamma analysis was used to compare the dose distributions. Dose difference and distance to agreement were determined at prescription Point A. Accurate film dosimetry was achieved using a glass compression plate at scanning to ensure physically-flat films, simultaneous scanning of known dose films with measurement films, and triple-channel dosimetric analysis. Results: The mean gamma pass rate of RTDose compared to film-measured dose distributions was 98.1% at 3%(local), 2 mm criteria. The mean dose difference, measured to planned, at Point A was -0.5% for plastic treatment applicators and -2.4% for metal applicators, due to shielding not accounted for in TPS. The mean distance to agreement was 0.6 mm. Conclusion: It is recommended to develop brachytherapy QA to include full-system verification of agreement between planned and delivered dose distributions. This is a novel approach for HDR brachytherapy QA. A methodology using advanced film

  7. Systematic quantification of HDR and NHEJ reveals effects of locus, nuclease, and cell type on genome-editing.

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Berman, Jennifer R; Cooper, Samantha B; Mayerl, Steven J; Chan, Amanda H; Zhang, Bin; Karlin-Neumann, George A; Conklin, Bruce R

    2016-01-01

    Precise genome-editing relies on the repair of sequence-specific nuclease-induced DNA nicking or double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homology-directed repair (HDR). However, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), an error-prone repair, acts concurrently, reducing the rate of high-fidelity edits. The identification of genome-editing conditions that favor HDR over NHEJ has been hindered by the lack of a simple method to measure HDR and NHEJ directly and simultaneously at endogenous loci. To overcome this challenge, we developed a novel, rapid, digital PCR-based assay that can simultaneously detect one HDR or NHEJ event out of 1,000 copies of the genome. Using this assay, we systematically monitored genome-editing outcomes of CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), Cas9 nickases, catalytically dead Cas9 fused to FokI, and transcription activator-like effector nuclease at three disease-associated endogenous gene loci in HEK293T cells, HeLa cells, and human induced pluripotent stem cells. Although it is widely thought that NHEJ generally occurs more often than HDR, we found that more HDR than NHEJ was induced under multiple conditions. Surprisingly, the HDR/NHEJ ratios were highly dependent on gene locus, nuclease platform, and cell type. The new assay system, and our findings based on it, will enable mechanistic studies of genome-editing and help improve genome-editing technology. PMID:27030102

  8. Systematic quantification of HDR and NHEJ reveals effects of locus, nuclease, and cell type on genome-editing

    PubMed Central

    Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Berman, Jennifer R.; Cooper, Samantha B.; Mayerl, Steven J.; Chan, Amanda H.; Zhang, Bin; Karlin-Neumann, George A.; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Precise genome-editing relies on the repair of sequence-specific nuclease-induced DNA nicking or double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homology-directed repair (HDR). However, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), an error-prone repair, acts concurrently, reducing the rate of high-fidelity edits. The identification of genome-editing conditions that favor HDR over NHEJ has been hindered by the lack of a simple method to measure HDR and NHEJ directly and simultaneously at endogenous loci. To overcome this challenge, we developed a novel, rapid, digital PCR–based assay that can simultaneously detect one HDR or NHEJ event out of 1,000 copies of the genome. Using this assay, we systematically monitored genome-editing outcomes of CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), Cas9 nickases, catalytically dead Cas9 fused to FokI, and transcription activator–like effector nuclease at three disease-associated endogenous gene loci in HEK293T cells, HeLa cells, and human induced pluripotent stem cells. Although it is widely thought that NHEJ generally occurs more often than HDR, we found that more HDR than NHEJ was induced under multiple conditions. Surprisingly, the HDR/NHEJ ratios were highly dependent on gene locus, nuclease platform, and cell type. The new assay system, and our findings based on it, will enable mechanistic studies of genome-editing and help improve genome-editing technology. PMID:27030102

  9. SU-E-T-574: Fessiblity of Using the Calypso System for HDR Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J S; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is always a challenge to reconstruct the interstitial catheter for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy on patient CT or MR images. This work aims to investigate the feasibility of using the Calypso system (Varian Medical, CA) for HDR catheter reconstruction utilizing its accuracy on tracking the electromagnetic transponder location. Methods: Experiment was done with a phantom that has a HDR interstitial catheter embedded inside. CT scan with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm was taken for this phantom with two Calypso beacon transponders in the catheter. The two transponders were connected with a wire. The Calypso system was used to record the beacon transponders’ location in real time when they were gently pulled out with the wire. The initial locations of the beacon transponders were used for registration with the CT image and the detected transponder locations were used for the catheter path reconstruction. The reconstructed catheter path was validated on the CT image. Results: The HDR interstitial catheter was successfully reconstructed based on the transponders’ coordinates recorded by the Calypso system in real time when the transponders were pulled in the catheter. After registration with the CT image, the shape and location of the reconstructed catheter are evaluated against the CT image and the result shows an accuracy of 2 mm anywhere in the Calypso detectable region which is within a 10 cm X 10 cm X 10 cm cubic box for the current system. Conclusion: It is feasible to use the Calypso system for HDR interstitial catheter reconstruction. The obstacle for its clinical usage is the size of the beacon transponder whose diameter is bigger than most of the interstitial catheters used in clinic. Developing smaller transponders and supporting software and hardware for this application is necessary before it can be adopted for clinical use.

  10. HDR brachytherapy (HDR–BT) combined with stent placement in palliative treatment of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Skowronek, Janusz; Kubaszewska, Magda; Chichel, Adam; Piotrowski, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    Purpose In the study we present the initial results of palliative treatment using combined methods of HDR-BT and stent insertion in patients with advanced esophagus cancer. Material and methods Fifty patients were treated in the Great Poland Cancer Center using HDR-BT between June 2001 and December 2005 and they were enrolled into the study. All patients underwent endoscopic insertion of self-expanding, metal, endoesophageal stents owing to blockages in the lumen of the esophagus which excluded brachytherapy. The group included 41 men and 9 women, aged between 44 and 79 years (average 59.3 years). 36 of patients received 3 fractions of HDR once a week of 7.5 Gy, up to total dose of 22.5 Gy, 14 patients received 2 fractions of 7.5 Gy (15 Gy). Results The average patient observation period was 5.4 months. Complete remission (CR) was observed after 4 weeks in 2 cases (4%), partial remission (PR) in 31 (62%), no remission (NR) was seen in 6 patients (12%) and progression was noted in 11 cases (22%). Complications of brachytherapy for esophageal cancer were observed in 11 patients (22%), ulceration in 1 patient (2%), haemorrhage in 1 patient (2%) and bronchotracheal fistulas in 9 (18%) patients. The average observation period for patients with bronchotracheal fistulas was notably shorter than in remaining patients and amounted 3.5 months. Conclusions 1. Endoscopic implantation of stents to the lumen of the esophagus provides access to esophagus and, in many cases, allows application of HDR-BT. 2. HDR-BT for advanced esophageal cancer brought relief from dysphagia in most of patients. 3. The combination of the two methods of treatment represents an effective choice for palliative care of this group of patients, with a complication rate similar to observed one in the instance of brachytherapy alone.

  11. Design and implementation of a film dosimetry audit tool for comparison of planned and delivered dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Antony L; Lee, Chris; Ratcliffe, Ailsa J; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    A novel phantom is presented for 'full system' dosimetric audit comparing planned and delivered dose distributions in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy, using clinical treatment applicators. The brachytherapy applicator dosimetry test object consists of a near full-scatter water tank with applicator and film supports constructed of Solid Water, accommodating any typical cervix applicator. Film dosimeters are precisely held in four orthogonal planes bisecting the intrauterine tube, sampling dose distributions in the high risk clinical target volume, points A and B, bladder, rectum and sigmoid. The applicator position is fixed prior to CT scanning and through treatment planning and irradiation. The CT data is acquired with the applicator in a near clinical orientation to include applicator reconstruction in the system test. Gamma analysis is used to compare treatment planning system exported RTDose grid with measured multi-channel film dose maps. Results from two pilot audits are presented, using Ir-192 and Co-60 HDR sources, with a mean gamma passing rate of 98.6% using criteria of 3% local normalization and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). The mean DTA between prescribed dose and measured film dose at point A was 1.2 mm. The phantom was funded by IPEM and will be used for a UK national brachytherapy dosimetry audit.

  12. Handheld directional reflectometer: an angular imaging device to measure BRDF and HDR in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattison, Phillip R.; Dombrowski, Mark S.; Lorenz, James M.; Davis, Keith J.; Mann, Harley C.; Johnson, Philip; Foos, Bryan

    1998-10-01

    Many applications require quantitative measurements of surface light scattering, including quality control on production lines, inspection of painted surfaces, inspection of field repairs, etc. Instruments for measuring surface scattering typically fall into two main categories, namely bidirectional reflectometers, which measure the angular distribution of scattering, and hemispherical directional reflectometers, which measure the total scattering into the hemisphere above the surface. Measurement of the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) gives the greatest insight into how light is scattered from a surface. Measurements of BRDF, however, are typically very lengthy measurements taken by moving a source and detector to map the scattering. Since BRDF has four angular degrees of freedom, such measurements can require hours to days to complete. Instruments for measuring BRDF are also typically laboratory devices, although a field- portable bi-directional reflectometer does exist. Hemispherical directional reflectance (HDR) is a much easier measurement to make, although care must be taken to use the proper methodology when measuring at wavelengths beyond 10 micrometer, since integrating spheres (typically used to make such measurements) are very energy inefficient and lose their integrating properties at very long wavelengths. A few field- portable hemispherical directional reflectometers do exist, but typically measure HDR only at near-normal angles. Boeing Defense and Space Group and Surface Optics Corporation, under a contract from the Air Force Research Laboratory, have developed a new hand-held instrument capable of measuring both BRDF and HDR using a unique, patented angular imaging technique. A combination of an hemi-ellipsoidal mirror and an additional lens translate the angular scatter from a surface into a two-dimensional spatial distribution, which is recorded by an imaging array. This configuration fully maps the scattering from a half

  13. The Oryza sativa Regulator HDR1 Associates with the Kinase OsK4 to Control Photoperiodic Flowering

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xuean; Feng, Dan; Wang, Kai; Xu, Ming; Zhou, Li; Han, Xiao; Gu, Xiaofeng; Lu, Tiegang

    2016-01-01

    Rice is a facultative short-day plant (SDP), and the regulatory pathways for flowering time are conserved, but functionally modified, in Arabidopsis and rice. Heading date 1 (Hd1), an ortholog of Arabidopsis CONSTANS (CO), is a key regulator that suppresses flowering under long-day conditions (LDs), but promotes flowering under short-day conditions (SDs) by influencing the expression of the florigen gene Heading date 3a (Hd3a). Another key regulator, Early heading date 1 (Ehd1), is an evolutionarily unique gene with no orthologs in Arabidopsis, which acts as a flowering activator under both SD and LD by promoting the rice florigen genes Hd3a and RICE FLOWERING LOCUST 1 (RFT1). Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the flowering regulator Heading Date Repressor1 (HDR1) in rice. The hdr1 mutant exhibits an early flowering phenotype under natural LD in a paddy field in Beijing, China (39°54'N, 116°23'E), as well as under LD but not SD in a growth chamber, indicating that HDR1 may functionally regulate flowering time via the photoperiod-dependent pathway. HDR1 encodes a nuclear protein that is most active in leaves and floral organs and exhibits a typical diurnal expression pattern. We determined that HDR1 is a novel suppressor of flowering that upregulates Hd1 and downregulates Ehd1, leading to the downregulation of Hd3a and RFT1 under LDs. We have further identified an HDR1-interacting kinase, OsK4, another suppressor of rice flowering under LDs. OsK4 acts similarly to HDR1, suppressing flowering by upregulating Hd1 and downregulating Ehd1 under LDs, and OsK4 can phosphorylate HD1 with HDR1 presents. These results collectively reveal the transcriptional regulators of Hd1 for the day-length-dependent control of flowering time in rice. PMID:26954091

  14. A segmentation and point-matching enhanced efficient deformable image registration method for dose accumulation between HDR CT images.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xin; Chen, Haibin; Yan, Hao; Zhou, Linghong; Mell, Loren K; Yashar, Catheryn M; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun; Gu, Xuejun; Cervino, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) of fractional high-dose-rate (HDR) CT images is challenging due to the presence of applicators in the brachytherapy image. Point-to-point correspondence fails because of the undesired deformation vector fields (DVF) propagated from the applicator region (AR) to the surrounding tissues, which can potentially introduce significant DIR errors in dose mapping. This paper proposes a novel segmentation and point-matching enhanced efficient DIR (named SPEED) scheme to facilitate dose accumulation among HDR treatment fractions. In SPEED, a semi-automatic seed point generation approach is developed to obtain the incremented fore/background point sets to feed the random walks algorithm, which is used to segment and remove the AR, leaving empty AR cavities in the HDR CT images. A feature-based 'thin-plate-spline robust point matching' algorithm is then employed for AR cavity surface points matching. With the resulting mapping, a DVF defining on each voxel is estimated by B-spline approximation, which serves as the initial DVF for the subsequent Demons-based DIR between the AR-free HDR CT images. The calculated DVF via Demons combined with the initial one serve as the final DVF to map doses between HDR fractions. The segmentation and registration accuracy are quantitatively assessed by nine clinical HDR cases from three gynecological cancer patients. The quantitative analysis and visual inspection of the DIR results indicate that SPEED can suppress the impact of applicator on DIR, and accurately register HDR CT images as well as deform and add interfractional HDR doses. PMID:25790059

  15. A segmentation and point-matching enhanced efficient deformable image registration method for dose accumulation between HDR CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Xin; Chen, Haibin; Yan, Hao; Zhou, Linghong; Mell, Loren K.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun; Gu, Xuejun; Cervino, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) of fractional high-dose-rate (HDR) CT images is challenging due to the presence of applicators in the brachytherapy image. Point-to-point correspondence fails because of the undesired deformation vector fields (DVF) propagated from the applicator region (AR) to the surrounding tissues, which can potentially introduce significant DIR errors in dose mapping. This paper proposes a novel segmentation and point-matching enhanced efficient DIR (named SPEED) scheme to facilitate dose accumulation among HDR treatment fractions. In SPEED, a semi-automatic seed point generation approach is developed to obtain the incremented fore/background point sets to feed the random walks algorithm, which is used to segment and remove the AR, leaving empty AR cavities in the HDR CT images. A feature-based ‘thin-plate-spline robust point matching’ algorithm is then employed for AR cavity surface points matching. With the resulting mapping, a DVF defining on each voxel is estimated by B-spline approximation, which serves as the initial DVF for the subsequent Demons-based DIR between the AR-free HDR CT images. The calculated DVF via Demons combined with the initial one serve as the final DVF to map doses between HDR fractions. The segmentation and registration accuracy are quantitatively assessed by nine clinical HDR cases from three gynecological cancer patients. The quantitative analysis and visual inspection of the DIR results indicate that SPEED can suppress the impact of applicator on DIR, and accurately register HDR CT images as well as deform and add interfractional HDR doses.

  16. Dosimetric study of surface applicators of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes-Rivera, E. E-mail: modesto@fisica.ugto.mx Sosa, M. E-mail: modesto@fisica.ugto.mx Reyes, U. E-mail: modesto@fisica.ugto.mx Jesús Bernal-Alvarado, José de E-mail: theo@fisica.ugto.mx Córdova, T. E-mail: theo@fisica.ugto.mx Gil-Villegas, A. E-mail: theo@fisica.ugto.mx; Monzón, E.

    2014-11-07

    The cone type surface applicators used in HDR brachytherapy for treatment of small skin lesions are an alternative to be used with both electron beams and orthovoltage X-ray equipment. For a good treatment planning is necessary to know the dose distribution of these applicators, which can be obtained by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo simulation as well. In this study the dose distribution of surface applicators of 3 and 3.5 cm diameter, respectively of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment has been estimated using the Monte Carlo method, MCNP code. The applicators simulated were placed on the surface of a water phantom of 20 × 20 × 20 cm and the dose was calculated at depths from 0 to 3 cm with increments of 0.25 mm. The dose profiles obtained at depth show the expected gradients for surface therapy.

  17. A Novel Tone Mapping Based on Double-Anchoring Theory for Displaying HDR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinhua; Xu, De; Li, Bing

    In this paper, we present a Double-Anchoring Based Tone Mapping (DABTM) algorithm for displaying high dynamic range (HDR) images. First, two anchoring values are obtained using the double-anchoring theory. Second, we use the two values to formulate the compressing operator, which can achieve the aim of tone mapping directly. A new method based on accelerated K-means for the decomposition of HDR images into groups (frameworks) is proposed. Most importantly, a group of piecewise-overlap linear functions is put forward to define the belongingness of pixels to their locating frameworks. Experiments show that our algorithm is capable of achieving dynamic range compression, while preserving fine details and avoiding common artifacts such as gradient reversals, halos, or loss of local contrast.

  18. Dosimetric study of surface applicators of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Rivera, E.; Sosa, M.; Reyes, U.; Monzón, E.; de Jesús Bernal-Alvarado, José; Córdova, T.; Gil-Villegas, A.

    2014-11-01

    The cone type surface applicators used in HDR brachytherapy for treatment of small skin lesions are an alternative to be used with both electron beams and orthovoltage X-ray equipment. For a good treatment planning is necessary to know the dose distribution of these applicators, which can be obtained by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo simulation as well. In this study the dose distribution of surface applicators of 3 and 3.5 cm diameter, respectively of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment has been estimated using the Monte Carlo method, MCNP code. The applicators simulated were placed on the surface of a water phantom of 20 × 20 × 20 cm and the dose was calculated at depths from 0 to 3 cm with increments of 0.25 mm. The dose profiles obtained at depth show the expected gradients for surface therapy.

  19. Trans-Pacific HDR Satellite Communications Experiment Phase-2: Experimental Network and Demonstration Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadowaki, Naoto; Yoshimura, Naoko; Takahashi, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Hsu, Eddie; Bergman, Larry; Bhasin, Kul; Gary, Pat

    1998-01-01

    The trans-Pacific high data rate (TP-HDR) satellite communications experiment was proposed at the Japan-U.S. Cooperation in Space (JUCS) Program Workshop held in Hawaii in 1993 and remote high definition video post-production was demonstrated as the first phase trial. Following the first phase, the second phase experiment is currently prepared. This paper describes the experimental network configuration, application demonstration, and performance evaluation plan of the second phase experiment.

  20. HDR (Hot Dry Rock) technology transfer activities in the Clear Lake Area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.; Potter, R.

    1990-01-01

    A large Hot Dry Rock resource has been recognized in northern California. It underlies the region extending NE of The Geysers to N of the City of Clearlake. The long-range productive potential is thousands of megawatts. The geothermal resource is heterogeneous. There are two mechanisms of heat flow occurring together. One is fluid transport, up natural zones of permeability, to outflows as surface springs. The other is conductive heat flow through impermeable rock. The temperature isotherms are thought to be nearly level surfaces, for example, the 300{degree}C isotherm is at about 8000 ft depth, with spikes'' or ridges'' occurring around narrow zones of fluid flow. While there is accessible heat at shallow depth in the naturally permeable rocks, the really substantial resource is in the impermeable rock. This is the HDR resource. The potential reservoir rocks are Franciscan greywackes and greenstones. Recorded drilling problems appear to be mainly due to intersection with serpentinites or to the effects of stimulation, so are potentially avoidable. Greywacke is favoured as a reservoir rock, and is expected to fail by brittle fracture. The water shortages in Northern California appear to be surmountable. Leakoff rates are expected to be low. Sewerage water may be available for fill and makeup. There is a possibility of combining HDR heat power production with sewerage disposal. To establish the first HDR producer in Northern California offers challenges in technology transfer. Two significant challenges will be creation of dispersed permeability in a greywacke reservoir, and pressure management in the vicinity of naturally permeable zones. A successful demonstration of HDR production technology will improve the long-term prospects for the geothermal power industry in California. 29 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. A Study of Experimental Measurements of Dosimetric Parameters in HDR IR-192 Source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Menglong; Zhang Liangan; Yuan Shuyu; Dai Guangfu

    2010-01-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters have been used to perform dosimetry measurements for the widely used Ir-192 microSelectron-HDR source with an improved polystyrene phantom. Radial dose functions and anisotropy functions, main parameters of 2D dose-rate formalism from the TG-43U1 protocol, have been obtained experimentally. Measurement results are compared with that of the Monte Carlo calculations reported, and no difference has been found between them.

  2. IPIP: A new approach to inverse planning for HDR brachytherapy by directly optimizing dosimetric indices

    SciTech Connect

    Siauw, Timmy; Cunha, Adam; Atamtuerk, Alper; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean; Goldberg, Ken

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Many planning methods for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy require an iterative approach. A set of computational parameters are hypothesized that will give a dose plan that meets dosimetric criteria. A dose plan is computed using these parameters, and if any dosimetric criteria are not met, the process is iterated until a suitable dose plan is found. In this way, the dose distribution is controlled by abstract parameters. The purpose of this study is to develop a new approach for HDR brachytherapy by directly optimizing the dose distribution based on dosimetric criteria. Methods: The authors developed inverse planning by integer program (IPIP), an optimization model for computing HDR brachytherapy dose plans and a fast heuristic for it. They used their heuristic to compute dose plans for 20 anonymized prostate cancer image data sets from patients previously treated at their clinic database. Dosimetry was evaluated and compared to dosimetric criteria. Results: Dose plans computed from IPIP satisfied all given dosimetric criteria for the target and healthy tissue after a single iteration. The average target coverage was 95%. The average computation time for IPIP was 30.1 s on an Intel(R) Core{sup TM}2 Duo CPU 1.67 GHz processor with 3 Gib RAM. Conclusions: IPIP is an HDR brachytherapy planning system that directly incorporates dosimetric criteria. The authors have demonstrated that IPIP has clinically acceptable performance for the prostate cases and dosimetric criteria used in this study, in both dosimetry and runtime. Further study is required to determine if IPIP performs well for a more general group of patients and dosimetric criteria, including other cancer sites such as GYN.

  3. Radiation dose enhancement at tissue-tungsten interfaces in HDR brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z.; Safavi-Naeini, M.; Alnaghy, S.; Cutajar, DL; Guatelli, S.; Petasecca, M.; Franklin, DR; Malaroda, A.; Carrara, M.; Bucci, J.; Zaider, M.; Lerch, MLF; Rosenfeld, AB

    2014-11-01

    HDR BrachyView is a novel in-body dosimetric imaging system for real-time monitoring and verification of the source position in high dose rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy treatment. It is based on a high-resolution pixelated detector array with a semi-cylindrical multi-pinhole tungsten collimator and is designed to fit inside a compact rectal probe, and is able to resolve the 3D position of the source with a maximum error of 1.5 mm. This paper presents an evaluation of the additional dose that will be delivered to the patient as a result of backscatter radiation from the collimator. Monte Carlo simulations of planar and cylindrical collimators embedded in a tissue-equivalent phantom were performed using Geant4, with an 192Ir source placed at two different source-collimator distances. The planar configuration was replicated experimentally to validate the simulations, with a MOSkin dosimetry probe used to measure dose at three distances from the collimator. For the cylindrical collimator simulation, backscatter dose enhancement was calculated as a function of axial and azimuthal displacement, and dose distribution maps were generated at three distances from the collimator surface. Although significant backscatter dose enhancement was observed for both geometries immediately adjacent to the collimator, simulations and experiments indicate that backscatter dose is negligible at distances beyond 1 mm from the collimator. Since HDR BrachyView is enclosed within a 1 mm thick tissue-equivalent plastic shell, all backscatter radiation resulting from its use will therefore be absorbed before reaching the rectal wall or other tissues. dosimetry, brachytherapy, HDR

  4. SU-E-J-270: Study of PET Response to HDR Brachytherapy of Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, R; Le, Y; Armour, E; Efron, J; Azad, N; Wahl, R; Gearhart, S; Herman, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose-response studies in radiation therapy are typically using single response values for tumors across ensembles of tumors. Using the high dose rate (HDR) treatment plan dose grid and pre- and post-therapy FDG-PET images, we look for correlations between voxelized dose and FDG uptake response in individual tumors. Methods: Fifteen patients were treated for localized rectal cancer using 192Ir HDR brachytherapy in conjunction with surgery. FDG-PET images were acquired before HDR therapy and 6–8 weeks after treatment (prior to surgery). Treatment planning was done on a commercial workstation and the dose grid was calculated. The two PETs and the treatment dose grid were registered to each other using non-rigid registration. The difference in PET SUV values before and after HDR was plotted versus absorbed radiation dose for each voxel. The voxels were then separated into bins for every 400 cGy of absorbed dose and the bin average values plotted similarly. Results: Individual voxel doses did not correlate with PET response; however, when group into tumor subregions corresponding to dose bins, eighty percent of the patients showed a significant positive correlation (R2 > 0) between PET uptake difference in the targeted region and the absorbed dose. Conclusion: By considering larger ensembles of voxels, such as organ average absorbed dose or the dose bins considered here, valuable information may be obtained. The dose-response correlations as measured by FDG-PET difference potentially underlines the importance of FDG-PET as a measure of response, as well as the value of voxelized information.

  5. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for the treatment of benign obstructive endobronchial granulation tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Madu, Chika N. . E-mail: chikam@xrt.upenn.edu; Machuzak, Michael S.; Sterman, Daniel H.; Musani, Ali; Ahya, Vivek; McDonough, James; Metz, James M.

    2006-12-01

    Background: Severe airway obstruction can occur in the setting of benign granulation tissue forming at bronchial anastomotic sites after lung transplantation in up to 20% of patients. Many of these benign lesions respond to stent placement, laser ablation, or balloon bronchoplasty. However, in certain cases, proliferation of granulation tissue may persist despite all therapeutic attempts. This study describes a series of refractory patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for benign proliferation of granulation tissue, causing airway compromise. Methods and Materials: Between April 2002 and June 2005, 5 patients with significant airway compromise from recurrent granulation tissue were treated with HDR brachytherapy. All patients had previously failed to maintain a patent airway despite multiple bronchoscopic interventions. Treatment was delivered using an HDR brachytherapy afterloader with {sup 192}Ir. Dose prescription was to a depth of 1 cm. All patients were treated weekly, with total doses ranging from 10 Gy to 21 Gy in two to three fractions. Results: The median follow-up was 12 months. All patients experienced a reduction in therapeutic bronchoscopic procedures after HDR brachytherapy compared with the pretreatment period. With the exception of possible radiation-induced bronchitis in 1 patient, there were no other treatment related complications. At the time of this report, 2 patients have died and the other 3 are alive with marked symptomatic improvement and reduced bronchoscopic procedures. Conclusion: High-dose-rate brachytherapy is an effective treatment for benign proliferation of granulation tissue causing airway obstruction. The early response to therapy is encouraging and further follow-up is necessary to determine long-term durability and late effects.

  6. Radiation dose enhancement at tissue-tungsten interfaces in HDR brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Han, Z; Safavi-Naeini, M; Alnaghy, S; Cutajar, D L; Guatelli, S; Petasecca, M; Franklin, D R; Malaroda, A; Carrara, M; Bucci, J; Zaider, M; Lerch, M L F; Rosenfeld, A B

    2014-11-01

    HDR BrachyView is a novel in-body dosimetric imaging system for real-time monitoring and verification of the source position in high dose rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy treatment. It is based on a high-resolution pixelated detector array with a semi-cylindrical multi-pinhole tungsten collimator and is designed to fit inside a compact rectal probe, and is able to resolve the 3D position of the source with a maximum error of 1.5 mm. This paper presents an evaluation of the additional dose that will be delivered to the patient as a result of backscatter radiation from the collimator. Monte Carlo simulations of planar and cylindrical collimators embedded in a tissue-equivalent phantom were performed using Geant4, with an (192)Ir source placed at two different source-collimator distances. The planar configuration was replicated experimentally to validate the simulations, with a MOSkin dosimetry probe used to measure dose at three distances from the collimator. For the cylindrical collimator simulation, backscatter dose enhancement was calculated as a function of axial and azimuthal displacement, and dose distribution maps were generated at three distances from the collimator surface. Although significant backscatter dose enhancement was observed for both geometries immediately adjacent to the collimator, simulations and experiments indicate that backscatter dose is negligible at distances beyond 1 mm from the collimator. Since HDR BrachyView is enclosed within a 1 mm thick tissue-equivalent plastic shell, all backscatter radiation resulting from its use will therefore be absorbed before reaching the rectal wall or other tissues. dosimetry, brachytherapy, HDR.

  7. The Ansel Adams zone system: HDR capture and range compression by chemical processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, John J.

    2010-02-01

    We tend to think of digital imaging and the tools of PhotoshopTM as a new phenomenon in imaging. We are also familiar with multiple-exposure HDR techniques intended to capture a wider range of scene information, than conventional film photography. We know about tone-scale adjustments to make better pictures. We tend to think of everyday, consumer, silver-halide photography as a fixed window of scene capture with a limited, standard range of response. This description of photography is certainly true, between 1950 and 2000, for instant films and negatives processed at the drugstore. These systems had fixed dynamic range and fixed tone-scale response to light. All pixels in the film have the same response to light, so the same light exposure from different pixels was rendered as the same film density. Ansel Adams, along with Fred Archer, formulated the Zone System, staring in 1940. It was earlier than the trillions of consumer photos in the second half of the 20th century, yet it was much more sophisticated than today's digital techniques. This talk will describe the chemical mechanisms of the zone system in the parlance of digital image processing. It will describe the Zone System's chemical techniques for image synthesis. It also discusses dodging and burning techniques to fit the HDR scene into the LDR print. Although current HDR imaging shares some of the Zone System's achievements, it usually does not achieve all of them.

  8. Impact of using linear optimization models in dose planning for HDR brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, Aasa; Larsson, Torbjoern; Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Dose plans generated with optimization models hitherto used in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy have shown a tendency to yield longer dwell times than manually optimized plans. Concern has been raised for the corresponding undesired hot spots, and various methods to mitigate these have been developed. The hypotheses upon this work is based are (a) that one cause for the long dwell times is the use of objective functions comprising simple linear penalties and (b) that alternative penalties, as these are piecewise linear, would lead to reduced length of individual dwell times. Methods: The characteristics of the linear penalties and the piecewise linear penalties are analyzed mathematically. Experimental comparisons between the two types of penalties are carried out retrospectively for a set of prostate cancer patients. Results: When the two types of penalties are compared, significant changes can be seen in the dwell times, while most dose-volume parameters do not differ significantly. On average, total dwell times were reduced by 4.2%, with a reduction of maximum dwell times by 25%, when the alternative penalties were used. Conclusions: The use of linear penalties in optimization models for HDR brachytherapy is one cause for the undesired long dwell times that arise in mathematically optimized plans. By introducing alternative penalties, a significant reduction in dwell times can be achieved for HDR brachytherapy dose plans. Although various measures for mitigating the long dwell times are already available, the observation that linear penalties contribute to their appearance is of fundamental interest.

  9. Evaluation of hot dry rock exploration techniques in the Atlantic Coastal Plain: a test site on the Delmarva Peninsula of Maryland and Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Detailed investigation of a potential Hot Dry Rock (HDR) energy extraction site in the area of Crisfield, Maryland, and Wallops Island, Virginia, (referred to as the Cris-Wall site) was carried out to evaluate HDR exploration techniques in the Atlantic Coastal Plain province. The findings favor the HDR exploration program that is outlined for locating a deep test hole in an area with presumed HDR potential (higher than normal heat flow). Six potential sites for extracting HDR energy have been identified within the Cris-Wall area. Each site is thought to have temperatures at the basement rock surface in excess of 75/sup 0/C and to be at least 1 km away from the nearest fault.

  10. Tolerance and efficacy of preoperative intracavitary HDR brachytherapy in IB and IIA cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bialas, Brygida; Fijalkowski, Marek; Raczek-Zwierzycka, Katarzyna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this work is to analyze the efficacy and tolerance of preoperative intracavitary HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in patients with IB and IIA cervical cancer. Material and methods 139 patients with cervical cancer IB-IIA with preoperative HDR-BT, out of which 60 patients with cervical cancer IB (43.2%) and 79 with IIA (56.8%) were treated since 1996 to 2002. In preoperative BT total dose to point A ranged from 30-45 Gy in 6-9 fractions twice a week. The fraction dose was 4-5 Gy at point A. Six weeks after BT all patients underwent radical Wertheim-Meigs hysterectomy. Patients with disadvantageous risk factors or with positive specimen histology had a complementary therapy: external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) given to the whole pelvic volume in daily fractions of 2 Gy up to total dose of 36-52 Gy (20 patients) or EBRT with cisplatin-based chemotherapy with the dose of 30-40 mg/m2 in 5-7 fractions given weekly (7 patients) or chemotherapy (6 patients). Acute and late radiation toxicity was evaluated according to EORTC/RTOG. Results In postoperative specimen histopathology the number of 114 women (82%) had tumor-free specimen within brachytherapy target (in cervix and cavity), 96 women (60.1%) had tumor-free specimen both in and outside brachytherapy target (lymph nodes, parametra, adnexis). The 5-year and 10-year DFS were 93.8% and 88% for IB and 89.7% and 64.7% for IIA respectively. 7.9% of patients developed acute toxicity both in rectum and bladder (only in I and II grade of EORTC/RTOG). Late severe complication occurred in rectum in 2.2% of patients and in bladder 1.4%. Conclusions 1. Preoperative HDR-BT in patients with IB and IIA cervical cancer is an effective and well tolerated therapy with acceptable rate of side effects. 2. Preoperative HDR-BT followed by surgery in a group without risk factors is a sufficient treatment option with no additional adjuvant therapy requirement.

  11. Source geometry factors for HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations.

    PubMed

    Shipley, D R; Sander, T; Nutbrown, R F

    2015-03-21

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated (192)Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR (192)Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, k(sg), is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR (192)Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR (192)Ir Flexisource k(sg) was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  12. High dynamic range adaptive real-time smart camera: an overview of the HDR-ARTiST project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapray, Pierre-Jean; Heyrman, Barthélémy; Ginhac, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    Standard cameras capture only a fraction of the information that is visible to the human visual system. This is specifically true for natural scenes including areas of low and high illumination due to transitions between sunlit and shaded areas. When capturing such a scene, many cameras are unable to store the full Dynamic Range (DR) resulting in low quality video where details are concealed in shadows or washed out by sunlight. The imaging technique that can overcome this problem is called HDR (High Dynamic Range) imaging. This paper describes a complete smart camera built around a standard off-the-shelf LDR (Low Dynamic Range) sensor and a Virtex-6 FPGA board. This smart camera called HDR-ARtiSt (High Dynamic Range Adaptive Real-time Smart camera) is able to produce a real-time HDR live video color stream by recording and combining multiple acquisitions of the same scene while varying the exposure time. This technique appears as one of the most appropriate and cheapest solution to enhance the dynamic range of real-life environments. HDR-ARtiSt embeds real-time multiple captures, HDR processing, data display and transfer of a HDR color video for a full sensor resolution (1280 1024 pixels) at 60 frames per second. The main contributions of this work are: (1) Multiple Exposure Control (MEC) dedicated to the smart image capture with alternating three exposure times that are dynamically evaluated from frame to frame, (2) Multi-streaming Memory Management Unit (MMMU) dedicated to the memory read/write operations of the three parallel video streams, corresponding to the different exposure times, (3) HRD creating by combining the video streams using a specific hardware version of the Devebecs technique, and (4) Global Tone Mapping (GTM) of the HDR scene for display on a standard LCD monitor.

  13. Radiochromic film dosimetry of HDR {sup 192}Ir source radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    Aldelaijan, Saad; Mohammed, Huriyyah; Tomic, Nada; Liang Liheng; DeBlois, Francois; Sarfehnia, Arman; Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Seuntjens, Jan; Devic, Slobodan

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: A radiochromic film based dosimetry system for high dose rate (HDR) Iridium-192 brachytherapy source was described. A comparison between calibration curves established in water and Solid Water was provided. Methods: Pieces of EBT-2 model GAFCHROMIC film were irradiated in both water and Solid Water with HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source in a dose range from 0 to 50 Gy. Responses of EBT-2 GAFCHROMIC film were compared for irradiations in water and Solid Water by scaling the dose between media through Monte Carlo calculated conversion factor for both setups. To decrease uncertainty in dose delivery due to positioning of the film piece with respect to the radiation source, traceable calibration irradiations were performed in a parallel-opposed beam setup. Results: The EBT-2 GAFCHROMIC film based dosimetry system described in this work can provide an overall one-sigma dose uncertainty of 4.12% for doses above 1 Gy. The ratio of dose delivered to the sensitive layer of the film in water to the dose delivered to the sensitive layer of the film in Solid Water was calculated using Monte Carlo simulations to be 0.9941 {+-} 0.0007. Conclusions: A radiochromic film based dosimetry system using only the green color channel of a flatbed document scanner showed superior precision if used alone in a dose range that extends up to 50 Gy, which greatly decreases the complexity of work. In addition, Solid Water material was shown to be a viable alternative to water in performing radiochromic film based dosimetry with HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources.

  14. Characterization of GATA3 mutations in the hypoparathyroidism, deafness, and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, M Andrew; Bowl, Michael R; Harding, Brian; Ali, Asif; Ayala, Alejandro; Crowe, Carol; Dobbie, Angus; Hampson, Geeta; Holdaway, Ian; Levine, Michael A; McWilliams, Robert; Rigden, Susan; Sampson, Julian; Williams, Andrew J; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2004-05-21

    The hypoparathyroidism, deafness, and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations of the dual zinc finger transcription factor, GATA3. The C-terminal zinc finger (ZnF2) binds DNA, whereas the N-terminal finger (ZnF1) stabilizes this DNA binding and interacts with other zinc finger proteins, such as the Friends of GATA (FOG). We have investigated seven HDR probands and their families for GATA3 abnormalities and have identified two nonsense mutations (Glu-228 --> Stop and Arg-367 --> Stop); two intragenic deletions that result in frameshifts from codons 201 and 355 with premature terminations at codons 205 and 370, respectively; one acceptor splice site mutation that leads to a frameshift from codon 351 and a premature termination at codon 367; and two missense mutations (Cys-318 --> Arg and Asn-320 --> Lys). The functional effects of these mutations, together with a previously reported GATA3 ZnF1 mutation and seven other engineered ZnF1 mutations, were assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift, dissociation, yeast two-hybrid and glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays. Mutations involving GATA3 ZnF2 or adjacent basic amino acids resulted in a loss of DNA binding, but those of ZnF1 either lead to a loss of interaction with specific FOG2 ZnFs or altered DNA-binding affinity. These findings are consistent with the proposed three-dimensional model of ZnF1, which has separate DNA and protein binding surfaces. Thus, our results, which expand the spectrum of HDR-associated GATA3 mutations and report the first acceptor splice site mutation, help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that alter the function of this zinc finger transcription factor and its role in causing this developmental anomaly. PMID:14985365

  15. Is there any place for LDR brachytherapy for head and neck carcinomas in HDR era?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In Poland, the classical LDR brachytherapy for head and neck carcinomas with Ir-192 wires or hairpins has completely disappeared some time ago after 30 years of successful clinical use. Can this technique be fully and safely replaced by HDR or PDR application? This option seems attractive because of new possibilities of 3D reconstruction and computer real-time treatment planning and optimization. However, in my opinion, long time is needed to get a clinical and scientific experience that has been accumulated for decades with the use of LDR technique.

  16. Verification of computerized treatment planning for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy for gynaecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Buzdar, Saeed Ahmad; Gadhi, Muhammad Asghar; Rao, Muhammad Afzal; Laghari, Naeem Ahmad; Anees, Mohammad

    2009-02-01

    Treatment planning in both teletherapy and brachytherapy is time consuming practice but accurate determination of planning parameters is more important. This paper aims to verify the dose delivery time for the treatment of vaginal cancer, which is a vital parameter of High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning. Treatment time has been calculated by the computerized treatment planning system (ABACUS 3.1), and then it has been compared with the manually calculated time. The results obtained are in good agreement. Independent verification of nominal time by two different protocols assures the quality of treatment. This should always be practiced to increase the accuracy of treatment.

  17. Salvage high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for recurrent head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Syed, A.M. Nisar . E-mail: bvigil@memnet.org; Puthawala, Ajmel; Sharma, Anil; Frankel, Paul

    2005-08-01

    Background: A significant portion of head-and-neck cancer patients will develop persistent or recurrent disease after definitive treatment. Radiation therapy is often used as definitive therapy or as an adjunct to surgery. Recurrent cancer of the head and neck in the previously irradiated field is, thus, a common occurrence and poses a therapeutic challenge. Some studies have evaluated low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy as a therapeutic option, including a large case series with long-term follow-up by our own institution. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy offers therapeutic advantages over LDR brachytherapy. This study evaluates the local control and outcomes of patients with previously irradiated recurrent head-and-neck cancer treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2002, 30 patients who received prior radiation therapy for primary tumors of the head and neck were treated for biopsy-proven recurrent disease. All patients received previous radiation as definitive therapy alone or as adjunct to surgery. All patients were inoperable, refused surgery, or had gross residual disease after salvage surgery for their recurrent disease. Thirty-six sites on the 30 patients were implanted by application of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy techniques with mean tumor dose of 34 Gy (18-48 Gy) in twice daily fractions of 300 to 400cGy per fraction. Results: At a minimum follow-up of 12 months, local tumor control was achieved in 69% of implanted sites. Disease-specific survival at 1 and 2 years was 54% and 45%, respectively. Overall survival at 1 and 2 years was 56% and 37%, respectively. Grade 3/4 late complications occurred in 16% of the patients. No fatal complications occurred. Conclusion: HDR brachytherapy can play an important role in the salvage treatment of previously irradiated recurrent head-and-neck cancer. This study shows that comparable results are obtained by HDR brachytherapy with fewer late complications than

  18. WE-A-17A-10: Fast, Automatic and Accurate Catheter Reconstruction in HDR Brachytherapy Using An Electromagnetic 3D Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, E; Racine, E; Beaulieu, L; Binnekamp, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), actual catheter reconstruction protocols are slow and errors prompt. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for improved catheter reconstruction in HDR-B protocols. Methods: For this proof-of-principle, a total of 10 catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a Philips-design 18G biopsy needle (used as an EM stylet) and the second generation Aurora Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system exploits alternating current technology and generates 3D points at 40 Hz. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical CT system with a resolution of 0.089 mm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, 5 catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 seconds or less. This would imply that for a typical clinical implant of 17 catheters, the total reconstruction time would be less than 3 minutes. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.92 ± 0.37 mm and 1.74 ± 1.39 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be significantly more accurate (unpaired t-test, p < 0.05). A mean difference of less than 0.5 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusion: The EM reconstruction was found to be faster, more accurate and more robust than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators. We would like to disclose that the equipments, used in this study, is coming from a collaboration with Philips Medical.

  19. MO-C-17A-11: A Segmentation and Point Matching Enhanced Deformable Image Registration Method for Dose Accumulation Between HDR CT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, X; Chen, H; Zhou, L; Yan, H; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Gu, X; Mell, L; Yashar, C; Cervino, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To propose and validate a novel and accurate deformable image registration (DIR) scheme to facilitate dose accumulation among treatment fractions of high-dose-rate (HDR) gynecological brachytherapy. Method: We have developed a method to adapt DIR algorithms to gynecologic anatomies with HDR applicators by incorporating a segmentation step and a point-matching step into an existing DIR framework. In the segmentation step, random walks algorithm is used to accurately segment and remove the applicator region (AR) in the HDR CT image. A semi-automatic seed point generation approach is developed to obtain the incremented foreground and background point sets to feed the random walks algorithm. In the subsequent point-matching step, a feature-based thin-plate spline-robust point matching (TPS-RPM) algorithm is employed for AR surface point matching. With the resulting mapping, a DVF characteristic of the deformation between the two AR surfaces is generated by B-spline approximation, which serves as the initial DVF for the following Demons DIR between the two AR-free HDR CT images. Finally, the calculated DVF via Demons combined with the initial one serve as the final DVF to map doses between HDR fractions. Results: The segmentation and registration accuracy are quantitatively assessed by nine clinical HDR cases from three gynecological cancer patients. The quantitative results as well as the visual inspection of the DIR indicate that our proposed method can suppress the interference of the applicator with the DIR algorithm, and accurately register HDR CT images as well as deform and add interfractional HDR doses. Conclusions: We have developed a novel and robust DIR scheme that can perform registration between HDR gynecological CT images and yield accurate registration results. This new DIR scheme has potential for accurate interfractional HDR dose accumulation. This work is supported in part by the National Natural ScienceFoundation of China (no 30970866 and no

  20. Variability of Marker-Based Rectal Dose Evaluation in HDR Cervical Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhou; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Malhotra, Harish K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    In film-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer, position of the rectal markers may not accurately represent the anterior rectal wall. This study was aimed at analyzing the variability of rectal dose estimation as a result of interfractional variation of marker placement. A cohort of five patients treated with multiple-fraction tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was studied. The cervical os point and the orientation of the applicators were matched among all fractional plans for each patient. Rectal points obtained from all fractions were then input into each clinical treated plan. New fractional rectal doses were obtained and a new cumulative rectal dose for each patient was calculated. The maximum interfractional variation of distances between rectal dose points and the closest source positions was 1.1 cm. The corresponding maximum variability of fractional rectal dose was 65.5%. The percentage difference in cumulative rectal dose estimation for each patient was 5.4%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 23.4%, and 13.9%, respectively. In conclusion, care should be taken when using rectal markers as reference points for estimating rectal dose in HDR cervical brachytherapy. The best estimate of true rectal dose for each fraction should be determined by the most anterior point among all fractions.

  1. Ir-192 HDR transit dose and radial dose function determination using alanine/EPR dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán Calcina, Carmen S.; de Almeida, Adelaide; Oliveira Rocha, José R.; Abrego, Felipe Chen; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2005-03-01

    Source positioning close to the tumour in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is not instantaneous. An increment of dose will be delivered during the movement of the source in the trajectory to its static position. This increment is the transit dose, often not taken into account in brachytherapeutic treatment planning. The transit dose depends on the prescribed dose, number of treatment fractions, velocity and activity of the source. Combining all these factors, the transit dose can be 5% higher than the prescribed absorbed dose value (Sang-Hyun and Muller-Runkel, 1994 Phys. Med. Biol. 39 1181 8, Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209 34). However, it cannot exceed this percentage (Nath et al 1995). In this work, we use the alanine-EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetric system using analysis of the first derivative of the signal. The transit dose was evaluated for an HDR system and is consistent with that already presented for TLD dosimeters (Bastin et al 1993 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 26 695 702). Also using the same dosimetric system, the radial dose function, used to evaluate the geometric dose degradation around the source, was determined and its behaviour agrees better with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations (Nath et al 1995, Williamson and Nath 1991 Med. Phys. 18 434 48, Ballester et al 1997 Med. Phys. 24 1221 8, Ballester et al 2001 Phys. Med. Biol. 46 N79 90) than with TLD measurements (Nath et al 1990 Med. Phys. 17 1032 40).

  2. Preliminary geological and geophysical evaluation of the Castle Dome HDR geothermal prospect, Southwestern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Gutmann, J.T.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Ander, M.E.; Laney, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    The Castle Dome HDR geothermal prospect is located in Yuma County, Arizona, in a region centered about 80 km north of Yuma along US Rte. 95. The area of interest is broadly defined by a negative residual Bouguer gravity anomaly which is about 45 km across, steep-sided in many places, and as much as 30 mgals in magnitude. The geology of this Basin and Range area is poorly known, but the few published reports and current Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) field studies indicate that the Castle Dome Mountains and adjacent ranges are chiefly a thick pile of welded ash-flow tuffs of probable mid-Tertiary age. The tuffs rest unconformably on Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks exposed only outside steep edges of the gravity low. This gravity anomaly may reflect the presence of a large caldera. A regional magnetotelluric study now in progress will define the depths to electrical conductors within the crust and upper mantle and contribute to understanding of crustal structure, the gravity anomaly, and the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal potential of the Castle Dome area.

  3. Image guided Brachytherapy: The paradigm of Gynecologic and Partial Breast HDR Brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamantopoulos, S.; Kantemiris, I.; Konidari, A.; Zaverdinos, P.

    2015-09-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy uses high strength radioactive sources and temporary interstitial implants to conform the dose to target and minimize the treatment time. The advances of imaging technology enable accurate reconstruction of the implant and exact delineation of high-risk CTV and the surrounding critical structures. Furthermore, with sophisticated treatment planning systems, applicator devices and stepping source afterloaders, brachytherapy evolved to a more precise, safe and individualized treatment. At the Radiation Oncology Department of Metropolitan Hospital Athens, MRI guided HDR gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with brachytherapy are performed routinely. Contouring and treatment planning are based on the recommendations of the GEC - ESTRO Working group. The task of this presentation is to reveal the advantages of 3D image guided brachytherapy over 2D brachytherapy. Thus, two patients treated at our department (one GYN and one APBI) will be presented. The advantage of having adequate dose coverage of the high risk CTV and simultaneous low doses to the OARs when using 3D image- based brachytherapy will be presented. The treatment techniques, equipment issues, as well as implantation, imaging and treatment planning procedures will be described. Quality assurance checks will be treated separately.

  4. Varian HDR surface applicators - commissioning and clinical implementation.

    PubMed

    Iftimia, Ileana; McKee, Andrea B; Halvorsen, Per H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the dosimetric performance of Varian surface applicators with the source vertically positioned and develop procedures for clinical implementation. The Varian surface applicators with the source vertically positioned provide a wide range of apertures making them clinically advantageous, though the steep dose gradient in the region of 3-4 mm prescription depth presents multiple challenges. The following commissioning tests were performed: 1) verification of functional integrity and physical dimensions; and 2) dosimetric measurements to validate data provided by Varian as well as data obtained using the Acuros algorithm for heterogeneity corrected dose calculation. A solid water (SW) phantom was scanned and the Acuros algorithm was used to compute the dose at 5 mm depth and at surface for all applicators. Two sets of reference dose measurements were performed, with the source positioned at (i) -10 mm and (ii) -15 mm from the center of the first nominal dwell position. Measurements were taken at 5 mm depth in a SW phantom and in air at the applicator surface. The results were then compared to the vendor's data and to the Acuros calculated dose. Relative dose measurements using Gafchromic films were taken at a depth of 4 mm in SW. Percent depth ionization (PDI) measurements using ion chamber were performed in SW. The profiles generated from film measurements and the PDI plots were compared with those computed using the Acuros algorithm and vendor's data, when available. Preliminary leakage tests were performed using optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) and the results were compared with Acuros predictions. All applicators were found to be functional with physical dimensions within 1 mm of specifications. For scenario (ii) measurements taken in SW at 5 mm depth and in air at the surface of each applicator were within 10% and 4% agreement with vendor's data, respectively. Compared with Acuros predictions, these

  5. HDR-VDP-2.2: a calibrated method for objective quality prediction of high-dynamic range and standard images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narwaria, Manish; Mantiuk, Rafal K.; Da Silva, Mattheiu Perreira; Le Callet, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of high-dynamic range (HDR) imaging, the existing visual signal processing systems will need to deal with both HDR and standard dynamic range (SDR) signals. In such systems, computing the objective quality is an important aspect in various optimization processes (e.g., video encoding). To that end, we present a newly calibrated objective method that can tackle both HDR and SDR signals. As it is based on the previously proposed HDR-VDP-2 method, we refer to the newly calibrated metric as HDR-VDP-2.2. Our main contribution is toward improving the frequency-based pooling in HDR-VDP-2 to enhance its objective quality prediction accuracy. We achieve this by formulating and solving a constrained optimization problem and thereby finding the optimal pooling weights. We also carried out extensive cross-validation as well as verified the performance of the new method on independent databases. These indicate clear improvement in prediction accuracy as compared with the default pooling weights. The source codes for HDR-VDP-2.2 are publicly available online for free download and use.

  6. BrachyView, A novel inbody imaging system for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Design and Monte Carlo feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Safavi-Naeini, M.; Han, Z.; Cutajar, D.; Guatelli, S.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Franklin, D. R.; Jakubek, J.; Pospisil, S.; Bucci, J.; Zaider, M.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a form of radiation therapy for treating prostate cancer whereby a high activity radiation source is moved between predefined positions inside applicators inserted within the treatment volume. Accurate positioning of the source is essential in delivering the desired dose to the target area while avoiding radiation injury to the surrounding tissue. In this paper, HDR BrachyView, a novel inbody dosimetric imaging system for real time monitoring and verification of the radioactive seed position in HDR prostate brachytherapy treatment is introduced. The current prototype consists of a 15 Multiplication-Sign 60 mm{sup 2} silicon pixel detector with a multipinhole tungsten collimator placed 6.5 mm above the detector. Seven identical pinholes allow full imaging coverage of the entire treatment volume. The combined pinhole and pixel sensor arrangement is geometrically designed to be able to resolve the three-dimensional location of the source. The probe may be rotated to keep the whole prostate within the transverse plane. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the efficacy of the design through computer simulation, and to estimate the accuracy in resolving the source position (in detector plane and in 3D space) as part of the feasibility study for the BrachyView project.Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the GEANT4 radiation transport model, with a {sup 192}Ir source placed in different locations within a prostate phantom. A geometrically accurate model of the detector and collimator were constructed. Simulations were conducted with a single pinhole to evaluate the pinhole design and the signal to background ratio obtained. Second, a pair of adjacent pinholes were simulated to evaluate the error in calculated source location.Results: Simulation results show that accurate determination of the true source position is easily obtainable within the typical one second source dwell time. The maximum error in

  7. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between 99mTc and HDR 192Ir*

    PubMed Central

    de Campos, Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro; de Lima, Carla Flavia; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with 99mTc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and Methods Simulations of implants with 99mTc-filled and HDR 192Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results The 99mTc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h-1.mCi-1 and 0.190 cGyh-1.mCi-1 at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh-1.mCi-1, respectively, for the HDR 192Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the 99mTc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR 192Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion Temporary 99mTc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR 192Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. PMID:27141131

  8. Research on HDR image fusion algorithm based on Laplace pyramid weight transform with extreme low-light CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Wen; Li, Li; Jin, Weiqi; Qiu, Su; Zou, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Extreme-Low-Light CMOS has been widely applied in the field of night-vision as a new type of solid image sensor. But if the illumination in the scene has drastic changes or the illumination is too strong, Extreme-Low-Light CMOS can't both clearly present the high-light scene and low-light region. According to the partial saturation problem in the field of night-vision, a HDR image fusion algorithm based on the Laplace Pyramid was researched. The overall gray value and the contrast of the low light image is very low. We choose the fusion strategy based on regional average gradient for the top layer of the long exposure image and short exposure image, which has rich brightness and textural features. The remained layers which represent the edge feature information of the target are based on the fusion strategy based on regional energy. In the process of source image reconstruction with Laplacian pyramid image, we compare the fusion results with four kinds of basal images. The algorithm is tested using Matlab and compared with the different fusion strategies. We use information entropy, average gradient and standard deviation these three objective evaluation parameters for the further analysis of the fusion result. Different low illumination environment experiments show that the algorithm in this paper can rapidly get wide dynamic range while keeping high entropy. Through the verification of this algorithm features, there is a further application prospect of the optimized algorithm. Keywords: high dynamic range imaging, image fusion, multi-exposure image, weight coefficient, information fusion, Laplacian pyramid transform.

  9. Source position verification and dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy using an EPID

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. L.; Taylor, M. L.; McDermott, L. N.; Franich, R. D.; Haworth, A.; Millar, J. L.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Accurate treatment delivery in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy requires correct source dwell positions and dwell times to be administered relative to each other and to the surrounding anatomy. Treatment delivery inaccuracies predominantly occur for two reasons: (i) anatomical movement or (ii) as a result of human errors that are usually related to incorrect implementation of the planned treatment. Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were originally developed for patient position verification in external beam radiotherapy and their application has been extended to provide dosimetric information. The authors have characterized the response of an EPID for use with an {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source to demonstrate its use as a verification device, providing both source position and dosimetric information.Methods: Characterization of the EPID response using an {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source included investigations of reproducibility, linearity with dose rate, photon energy dependence, and charge build-up effects associated with exposure time and image acquisition time. Source position resolution in three dimensions was determined. To illustrate treatment verification, a simple treatment plan was delivered to a phantom and the measured EPID dose distribution compared with the planned dose.Results: The mean absolute source position error in the plane parallel to the EPID, for dwells measured at 50, 100, and 150 mm source to detector distances (SDD), was determined to be 0.26 mm. The resolution of the z coordinate (perpendicular distance from detector plane) is SDD dependent with 95% confidence intervals of ±0.1, ±0.5, and ±2.0 mm at SDDs of 50, 100, and 150 mm, respectively. The response of the EPID is highly linear to dose rate. The EPID exhibits an over-response to low energy incident photons and this nonlinearity is incorporated into the dose calibration procedure. A distance (spectral) dependent dose rate calibration procedure has been

  10. Determination of transit dose profile for a {sup 192}Ir HDR source

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, G. P.; Antunes, P. C. G.; Yoriyaz, H.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Several studies have reported methodologies to calculate and correct the transit dose component of the moving radiation source for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning systems. However, most of these works employ the average source speed, which varies significantly with the measurement technique used, and does not represent a realistic speed profile, therefore, providing an inaccurate dose determination. In this work, the authors quantified the transit dose component of a HDR unit based on the measurement of the instantaneous source speed to produce more accurate dose values. Methods: The Nucletron microSelectron-HDR Ir-192 source was characterized considering the Task Group 43 (TG-43U1) specifications. The transit dose component was considered through the calculation of the dose distribution using a Monte Carlo particle transport code, MCNP5, for each source position and correcting it by the source speed. The instantaneous source speed measurements were performed in a previous work using two optical fibers connected to a photomultiplier and an oscilloscope. Calculated doses were validated by comparing relative dose profiles with those obtained experimentally using radiochromic films. Results: TG-43U1 source parameters were calculated to validate the Monte Carlo simulations. These agreed with the literature, with differences below 1% for the majority of the points. Calculated dose profiles without transit dose were also validated by comparison with ONCENTRA{sup Registered-Sign} Brachy v. 3.3 dose values, yielding differences within 1.5%. Dose profiles obtained with MCNP5 corrected using the instantaneous source speed profile showed differences near dwell positions of up to 800% in comparison to values corrected using the average source speed, but they are in good agreement with the experimental data, showing a maximum discrepancy of approximately 3% of the maximum dose. Near a dwell position the transit dose is about 22% of the dwell dose delivered

  11. Calculated organ doses using Monte Carlo simulations in a reference male phantom undergoing HDR brachytherapy applied to localized prostate carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to obtain equivalent doses in radiosensitive organs (aside from the bladder and rectum) when applying high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to a localized prostate carcinoma using {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir sources. These data are compared with results in a water phantom and with expected values in an infinite water medium. A comparison with reported values from proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is also provided. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed using a voxelized phantom described in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 110, which reproduces masses and shapes from an adult reference man defined in ICRP Publication 89. Point sources of {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir with photon energy spectra corresponding to those exiting their capsules were placed in the center of the prostate, and equivalent doses per clinical absorbed dose in this target organ were obtained in several radiosensitive organs. Values were corrected to account for clinical circumstances with the source located at various positions with differing dwell times throughout the prostate. This was repeated for a homogeneous water phantom. Results: For the nearest organs considered (bladder, rectum, testes, small intestine, and colon), equivalent doses given by {sup 60}Co source were smaller (8%-19%) than from {sup 192}Ir. However, as the distance increases, the more penetrating gamma rays produced by {sup 60}Co deliver higher organ equivalent doses. The overall result is that effective dose per clinical absorbed dose from a {sup 60}Co source (11.1 mSv/Gy) is lower than from a {sup 192}Ir source (13.2 mSv/Gy). On the other hand, equivalent doses were the same in the tissue and the homogeneous water phantom for those soft tissues closer to the prostate than about 30 cm. As the distance increased, the differences of photoelectric effect in water and soft tissue, and appearance of other materials

  12. A BrachyPhantom for verification of dose calculation of HDR brachytherapy planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Austerlitz, C.; Campos, C. A. T.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a calibration phantom for {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy units that renders possible the direct measurement of absorbed dose to water and verification of treatment planning system.Methods: A phantom, herein designated BrachyPhantom, consists of a Solid Water™ 8-cm high cylinder with a diameter of 14 cm cavity in its axis that allows the positioning of an A1SL ionization chamber with its reference measuring point at the midheight of the cylinder's axis. Inside the BrachyPhantom, at a 3-cm radial distance from the chamber's reference measuring point, there is a circular channel connected to a cylindrical-guide cavity that allows the insertion of a 6-French flexible plastic catheter from the BrachyPhantom surface. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to calculate a factor, P{sub sw}{sup lw}, to correct the reading of the ionization chamber to a full scatter condition in liquid water. The verification of dose calculation of a HDR brachytherapy treatment planning system was performed by inserting a catheter with a dummy source in the phantom channel and scanning it with a CT. The CT scan was then transferred to the HDR computer program in which a multiple treatment plan was programmed to deliver a total dose of 150 cGy to the ionization chamber. The instrument reading was then converted to absorbed dose to water using the N{sub gas} formalism and the P{sub sw}{sup lw} factor. Likewise, the absorbed dose to water was calculated using the source strength, S{sub k}, values provided by 15 institutions visited in this work.Results: A value of 1.020 (0.09%, k= 2) was found for P{sub sw}{sup lw}. The expanded uncertainty in the absorbed dose assessed with the BrachyPhantom was found to be 2.12% (k= 1). To an associated S{sub k} of 27.8 cGy m{sup 2} h{sup −1}, the total irradiation time to deliver 150 cGy to the ionization chamber point of reference was 161.0 s. The deviation between the absorbed doses to water assessed with the Brachy

  13. Custom-designed mouthpiece for HDR brachytherapy of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the soft palate.

    PubMed

    Ekwelundu, Emmanuel; Krasin, Matthew J; Farr, Jonathan B

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of the mouthpiece used for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of a cancerous lesion in the soft palate of a pediatric patient. A custom mouth guard made with Thermo-forming material (Clear - Mouthguard) similar to those used by athletes, with a bite section, alveolar sulcus, hard and soft palate sections was made. Markers were placed around the lesion using a color transfer applicator and the impression transferred to the mouthpiece. Ten catheters arranged in a plane were placed on the inferior side (concave part) of the mouthpiece, and held in place by stitching each to the mouthpiece. Two pieces of lead (Pb) sheets with total thickness of 5.7 mm were placed beneath the catheters. Wax was used to create additional distance between the tongue and the catheters, and the entire assembly was covered with wax. PMID:25337134

  14. Custom-designed mouthpiece for HDR brachytherapy of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the soft palate.

    PubMed

    Ekwelundu, Emmanuel; Krasin, Matthew J; Farr, Jonathan B

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of the mouthpiece used for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of a cancerous lesion in the soft palate of a pediatric patient. A custom mouth guard made with Thermo-forming material (Clear - Mouthguard) similar to those used by athletes, with a bite section, alveolar sulcus, hard and soft palate sections was made. Markers were placed around the lesion using a color transfer applicator and the impression transferred to the mouthpiece. Ten catheters arranged in a plane were placed on the inferior side (concave part) of the mouthpiece, and held in place by stitching each to the mouthpiece. Two pieces of lead (Pb) sheets with total thickness of 5.7 mm were placed beneath the catheters. Wax was used to create additional distance between the tongue and the catheters, and the entire assembly was covered with wax.

  15. Custom-designed mouthpiece for HDR brachytherapy of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the soft palate

    PubMed Central

    Krasin, Matthew J.; Farr, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of the mouthpiece used for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of a cancerous lesion in the soft palate of a pediatric patient. A custom mouth guard made with Thermo-forming material (Clear – Mouthguard) similar to those used by athletes, with a bite section, alveolar sulcus, hard and soft palate sections was made. Markers were placed around the lesion using a color transfer applicator and the impression transferred to the mouthpiece. Ten catheters arranged in a plane were placed on the inferior side (concave part) of the mouthpiece, and held in place by stitching each to the mouthpiece. Two pieces of lead (Pb) sheets with total thickness of 5.7 mm were placed beneath the catheters. Wax was used to create additional distance between the tongue and the catheters, and the entire assembly was covered with wax. PMID:25337134

  16. Cloning, molecular characterization and functional analysis of 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl-4-diphosphate reductase (HDR) gene for diterpenoid tanshinone biosynthesis in Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge. f. alba.

    PubMed

    Hao, Gangping; Shi, Renjiu; Tao, Ru; Fang, Qian; Jiang, Xingyu; Ji, Haiwei; Feng, Lei; Huang, Luqi

    2013-09-01

    The enzyme 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl-4-diphosphate reductase (HDR) is a terminal-acting enzyme in the plastid MEP pathway, which produce isoprenoid precursors. The full-length cDNA of HDR, designated SmHDR1 (Genbank Accession No. JX516088), was isolated for the first time from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge. f. alba. SmHDR1 contains a 1389-bp open reading frame encoding 463 amino acids. The deduced SmHDR1 protein, which shows high identity to HDRs of other plant species, is predicted to possess a chloroplast transit peptide at the N-terminus and four conserved cysteine residues. Transcription pattern analysis revealed that SmHDR1 has high levels of transcription in leaves and low levels of transcription in roots and stems. The expression of SmHDR1 was induced by 0.1 mM methyl-jasmonate (MeJA) and salicylic acid (SA), but not by 0.1 mM abscisic acid (ABA), in the hairy roots of S. miltiorrhiza Bge. f. alba. Complementation of SmHDR1 in the Escherichia coli HDR mutant MG1655 ara < > ispH demonstrated the function of this enzyme. A functional color assay in E. coli showed that SmHDR1 accelerates the biosynthesis of β-carotene, indicating that SmHDR1 encodes a functional protein. Overexpression of SmHDR1 enhanced the production of tanshinones in cultured hairy roots of S. miltiorrhiza Bge. f. alba. These results indicate that SmHDR1 is a novel and important enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of diterpenoid tanshinones in S. miltiorrhiza Bge. f. alba.

  17. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvert, Marleen; Gorissen, Bram L.; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L.

    2015-01-01

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell time modulation restriction (DTMR) that limits dwell time differences between neighboring dwell positions has been suggested to eliminate this problem. DTMRs may additionally reduce the sensitivity for uncertainties in dwell positions that inevitably result from catheter reconstruction errors and afterloader source positioning inaccuracies. This study quantifies the reduction of high-dose subvolumes and the robustness against these uncertainties by applying a DTMR to template-based prostate HDR brachytherapy implants. Three different DTMRs were consecutively applied to a linear dose-based penalty model (LD) and a dose-volume based model (LDV), both obtained from literature. The models were solved with DTMR levels ranging from no restriction to uniform dwell times within catheters in discrete steps. Uncertainties were simulated on clinical cases using in-house developed software, and dose-volume metrics were calculated in each simulation. For the assessment of high-dose subvolumes, the dose homogeneity index (DHI) and the contiguous dose volume histogram were analysed. Robustness was measured by the improvement of the lowest D90% of the planning target volume (PTV) observed in the simulations. For (LD), a DTMR yields an increase in DHI of approximately 30% and reduces the size of the largest high-dose volume by 2-5 cc. However, this comes at a cost of a reduction in D90% of the PTV of 10%, which often implies that it drops below the desired minimum of 100%. For (LDV), none of the DTMRs were able to improve high-dose volume measures. DTMRs were not capable of improving robustness of PTV D90% against uncertainty in dwell positions for both models.

  18. Dosimetric analysis at ICRU reference points in HDR-brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Eich, H T; Haverkamp, U; Micke, O; Prott, F J; Müller, R P

    2000-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry in bladder and rectum as well as determining doses on suggested reference points following the ICRU report 38 contribute to quality assurance in HDR-brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma, especially to minimize side effects. In order to gain information regarding the radiation exposure at ICRU reference points in rectum, bladder, ureter and regional lymph nodes those were calculated (digitalisation) by means of orthogonal radiographs of 11 applications in patients with cervical carcinoma, who received primary radiotherapy. In addition, the doses at the ICRU rectum reference point was compared to the results of in vivo measurements in the rectum. The in vivo measurements were by factor 1.5 below the doses determined for the ICRU rectum reference point (4.05 +/- 0.68 Gy versus 6.11 +/- 1.63 Gy). Reasons for this were: calibration errors, non-orthogonal radiographs, movement of applicator and probe in the time span between X-ray and application, missing connection of probe and anterior rectal wall. The standard deviation of calculations at ICRU reference points was on average +/- 30%. Possible reasons for the relatively large standard deviation were difficulties in defining the points, identifying them on radiographs and the different locations of the applicators. Although 3 D CT, US or MR based treatment planning using dose volume histogram analysis is more and more established, this simple procedure of marking and digitising the ICRU reference points lengthened treatment planning only by 5 to 10 minutes. The advantages of in vivo dosimetry are easy practicability and the possibility to determine rectum doses during radiation. The advantages of computer-aided planning at ICRU reference points are that calculations are available before radiation and that they can still be taken into account for treatment planning. Both methods should be applied in HDR-brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma. PMID:10994367

  19. In vivo dosimeters for HDR brachytherapy: A comparison of a diamond detector, MOSFET, TLD, and scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Jamil; Nakano, Tatsuya; Law, Sue; Elsey, Justin; McKenzie, David R.; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2007-05-15

    The large dose gradients in brachytherapy necessitate a detector with a small active volume for accurate dosimetry. The dosimetric performance of a novel scintillation detector (BrachyFOD{sup TM}) is evaluated and compared to three commercially available detectors, a diamond detector, a MOSFET, and LiF TLDs. An {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source is used to measure the depth dependence, angular dependence, and temperature dependence of the detectors. Of the commercially available detectors, the diamond detector was found to be the most accurate, but has a large physical size. The TLDs cannot provide real time readings and have depth dependent sensitivity. The MOSFET used in this study was accurate to within 5% for distances of 20 to 50 mm from the {sup 192}Ir source in water but gave errors of 30%-40% for distances greater than 50 mm from the source. The BrachyFOD{sup TM} was found to be accurate to within 3% for distances of 10 to 100 mm from an HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source in water. It has an angular dependence of less than 2% and the background signal created by Cerenkov radiation and fluorescence of the plastic optical fiber is insignificant compared to the signal generated in the scintillator. Of the four detectors compared in this study the BrachyFOD{sup TM} has the most favorable combination of characteristics for dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy.

  20. In vivo dosimeters for HDR brachytherapy: a comparison of a diamond detector, MOSFET, TLD, and scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Jamil; Nakano, Tatsuya; Law, Sue; Elsey, Justin; McKenzie, David R; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2007-05-01

    The large dose gradients in brachytherapy necessitate a detector with a small active volume for accurate dosimetry. The dosimetric performance of a novel scintillation detector (BrachyFOD) is evaluated and compared to three commercially available detectors, a diamond detector, a MOSFET, and LiF TLDs. An 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source is used to measure the depth dependence, angular dependence, and temperature dependence of the detectors. Of the commercially available detectors, the diamond detector was found to be the most accurate, but has a large physical size. The TLDs cannot provide real time readings and have depth dependent sensitivity. The MOSFET used in this study was accurate to within 5% for distances of 20 to 50 mm from the 192Ir source in water but gave errors of 30%-40% for distances greater than 50 mm from the source. The BrachyFOD was found to be accurate to within 3% for distances of 10 to 100 mm from an HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source in water. It has an angular dependence of less than 2% and the background signal created by Cerenkov radiation and fluorescence of the plastic optical fiber is insignificant compared to the signal generated in the scintillator. Of the four detectors compared in this study the BrachyFOD has the most favorable combination of characteristics for dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy.

  1. A Feasibility Study of Fricke Dosimetry as an Absorbed Dose to Water Standard for 192Ir HDR Sources

    PubMed Central

    deAlmeida, Carlos Eduardo; Ochoa, Ricardo; de Lima, Marilene Coelho; David, Mariano Gazineu; Pires, Evandro Jesus; Peixoto, José Guilherme; Salata, Camila; Bernal, Mario Antônio

    2014-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) using 192Ir sources is well accepted as an important treatment option and thus requires an accurate dosimetry standard. However, a dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of the absolute dose to water for this particular source type is currently not available. An improved standard for the absorbed dose to water based on Fricke dosimetry of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources is presented in this study. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the potential usefulness of the Fricke dosimetry technique for the standardization of the quantity absorbed dose to water for 192Ir sources. A molded, double-walled, spherical vessel for water containing the Fricke solution was constructed based on the Fricke system. The authors measured the absorbed dose to water and compared it with the doses calculated using the AAPM TG-43 report. The overall combined uncertainty associated with the measurements using Fricke dosimetry was 1.4% for k = 1, which is better than the uncertainties reported in previous studies. These results are promising; hence, the use of Fricke dosimetry to measure the absorbed dose to water as a standard for HDR 192Ir may be possible in the future. PMID:25521914

  2. A feasibility study of Fricke dosimetry as an absorbed dose to water standard for 192Ir HDR sources.

    PubMed

    deAlmeida, Carlos Eduardo; Ochoa, Ricardo; Lima, Marilene Coelho de; David, Mariano Gazineu; Pires, Evandro Jesus; Peixoto, José Guilherme; Salata, Camila; Bernal, Mario Antônio

    2014-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) using 192Ir sources is well accepted as an important treatment option and thus requires an accurate dosimetry standard. However, a dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of the absolute dose to water for this particular source type is currently not available. An improved standard for the absorbed dose to water based on Fricke dosimetry of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources is presented in this study. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the potential usefulness of the Fricke dosimetry technique for the standardization of the quantity absorbed dose to water for 192Ir sources. A molded, double-walled, spherical vessel for water containing the Fricke solution was constructed based on the Fricke system. The authors measured the absorbed dose to water and compared it with the doses calculated using the AAPM TG-43 report. The overall combined uncertainty associated with the measurements using Fricke dosimetry was 1.4% for k = 1, which is better than the uncertainties reported in previous studies. These results are promising; hence, the use of Fricke dosimetry to measure the absorbed dose to water as a standard for HDR 192Ir may be possible in the future. PMID:25521914

  3. HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer – two years experience in Greater Poland Cancer Centre

    PubMed Central

    Skowronek, Janusz; Chicheł, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this work was to analyze the results and complications of three treatment schemes of patients with initially localized prostate cancer after two years of observation time. Material and methods Sixty-three patients were enrolled into the study and divided into groups according to radiation schemes (I group – EBRT 50 Gy/BRT 15 Gy, II – EBRT 46 Gy/BRT 2 × 10 Gy, III group – BRT 3 × 15 Gy). Group I, II and III consisted of 46 (73%), 14 (22.2%), 3 (4.8%) patients, respectively. The low-, intermediate- and high risk groups consisted of 23 (36.5%), 18 (28.5%) and 22 (35%) men, respectively. Results and tolerance of the treatment and acute complications in analyzed groups were discussed. Results Median observation time was 24 months. Complete remission was observed in 43 patients (68.3%) out of the whole group. Locoregional and distal metastases progression were noted in 4 patients (6.4%). Partial remission was observed in low-, intermediate- and high risk group: 7.9%, 9.5% and 9.5% of all men. Nadir of PSA results were estimated as mean value of 0.094 ng/ml, average 0.0-0.63. The mean value for the complete group decreased from 0.98 ng/ml (range 0.0-9.7) in the third months to 0.32 ng/ml after one year (0.0-3.34) of the end of treatment time. Urologic and gastrointenstinal side effects were noted in different rates according to 1 month observation (dysuria – 22.2%, urinary incontinence – 7.9%, frequency – 58.7%, weak stream – 68.3%, rectal bleeding – 15.9%). Conclusions 1. HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer can be used as a boost after or before the external beam radiation therapy in different treatment schemes. 2. In selected groups under investigation trials, sole HDR-BRT is a suitable method of treatment. 3. To confirm superiority of analyzed modality treatment a prospective investigation with larger groups of patients would be required.

  4. Fast, automatic, and accurate catheter reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Eric; Racine, Emmanuel; Beaulieu, Luc; Binnekamp, Dirk

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this technical note is to evaluate the accuracy and the robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for automated and real-time catheter reconstruction. Methods: For this preclinical study, a total of ten catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a 18G biopsy needle, used as an EM stylet and equipped with a miniaturized sensor, and the second generation Aurora{sup ®} Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system provides position and orientation value with precisions of 0.7 mm and 0.2°, respectively. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical computed tomography (CT) system with a spatial resolution of 89 μm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, five catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 s, leading to a total reconstruction time inferior to 3 min for a typical 17-catheter implant. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.66 ± 0.33 mm and 1.08 ± 0.72 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be more accurate. A maximum difference of less than 0.6 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusions: The EM reconstruction was found to be more accurate and precise than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators.

  5. A novel optical calorimetry dosimetry approach applied to an HDR Brachytherapy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavan, A.; Meyer, J.

    2013-06-01

    The technique of Digital Holographic Interferometry (DHI) is applied to the measurement of radiation absorbed dose distribution in water. An optical interferometer has been developed that captures the small variations in the refractive index of water due to the radiation induced temperature increase ΔT. The absorbed dose D is then determined with high temporal and spatial resolution using the calorimetric relation D=cΔT (where c is the specific heat capacity of water). The method is capable of time resolving 3D spatial calorimetry. As a proof-of-principle of the approach, a prototype DHI dosimeter was applied to the measurement of absorbed dose from a High Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy source. Initial results are in agreement with modelled doses from the Brachyvision treatment planning system, demonstrating the viability of the system for high dose rate applications. Future work will focus on applying corrections for heat diffusion and geometric effects. The method has potential to contribute to the dosimetry of diverse high dose rate applications which require high spatial resolution such as microbeam radiotherapy (MRT) or small field proton beam dosimetry but may potentially also be useful for interface dosimetry.

  6. The Application of Elliptic Cylindrical Phantom in Brachytherapy Dosimetric Study of HDR 192Ir Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Woo Sang; Park, Sung Ho; Jung, Sang Hoon; Choi, Wonsik; Do Ahn, Seung; Shin, Seong Soo

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the radial dose function of HDR 192Ir source based on Monte Carlo simulation using elliptic cylindrical phantom, similar to realistic shape of pelvis, in brachytherapy dosimetric study. The elliptic phantom size and shape was determined by analysis of dimensions of pelvis on CT images of 20 patients treated with brachytherapy for cervical cancer. The radial dose function obtained using the elliptic cylindrical water phantom was compared with radial dose functions for different spherical phantom sizes, including the Williamsion's data loaded into conventional planning system. The differences in the radial dose function for the different spherical water phantoms increase with radial distance, r, and the largest differences in the radial dose function appear for the smallest phantom size. The radial dose function of the elliptic cylindrical phantom significantly decreased with radial distance in the vertical direction due to different scatter condition in comparison with the Williamson's data. Considering doses to ICRU rectum and bladder points, doses to reference points can be underestimated up to 1-2% at the distance from 3 to 6 cm. The radial dose function in this study could be used as realistic data for calculating the brachytherapy dosimetry for cervical cancer.

  7. Enhancement and validation of Geant4 Brachytherapy application on clinical HDR 192Ir source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababneh, Eshraq; Dababneh, Saed; Qatarneh, Sharif; Wadi-Ramahi, Shada

    2014-10-01

    The Geant4 Monte Carlo MC associated Brachytherapy example was adapted, enhanced and several analysis techniques have been developed. The simulation studies the isodose distribution of the total, primary and scattered doses around a Nucletron microSelectron 192Ir source. Different phantom materials were used (water, tissue and bone) and the calculation was conducted at various depths and planes. The work provides an early estimate of the required number of primary events to ultimately achieve a given uncertainty at a given distance, in the otherwise CPU and time consuming clinical MC calculation. The adaptation of the Geant4 toolkit and the enhancements introduced to the code are all validated including the comprehensive decay of the 192Ir source, the materials used to build the geometry, the geometry itself and the calculated scatter to primary dose ratio. The simulation quantitatively illustrates that the scattered dose in the bone medium is larger than its value in water and tissue. As the distance away from the source increases, scatter contribution to dose becomes more significant as the primary dose decreases. The developed code could be viewed as a platform that contains detailed dose calculation model for clinical application of HDR 192Ir in Brachytherapy.

  8. Feasibility of MatriXX 2D detector array for HDR brachytherapy planning system assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, Jozef; Valenta, Jiri; Gabris, Frantisek; Grezdo, Jozef; Stastna, Simona

    2012-10-01

    IBA Dosimetry GmbH participated in the Joint Research Project ‘Increasing cancer treatment efficacy using 3D brachytherapy’ as a non-funded partner in the work package which was mostly dedicated to the determination of dose-to-water distribution from a high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy source. The dose distribution was measured with a MatriXX (MXX) 2D detector array and compared with Dose Cube Data, calculated by treatment planning systems (TPS). All measurements and calculations were performed in cooperation with OUSA, Bratislava and FNB, Prague. The comparison has been carried out for three irradiation geometries: single source position, single line and four line motions of the source, and with the effective point of measurement in a plane at 6 mm, 10 mm and 20 mm distance from the source position. The comparison of the MXX measurements and the TPS calculations was evaluated by the commercial IBA Dosimetry software OmniPro I'mRT (1) as the difference between maximum of measured and calculated values and (2) as the maximum difference between the two-dimensional distributions of measured and calculated values. The dose distribution was evaluated by the gamma method with parameters 3 mm and 3%. All differences of comparison of the MXX measurements and TPS calculations were within the range ±10% and the γ-index was less than 1 for 96% (or 97%, respectively) of the dose distribution in the plane at 10 mm distance from the source position.

  9. A dosimetry method in the transverse plane of HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy source using gafchromic EBT2 film.

    PubMed

    Uniyal, S C; Sharma, S D; Naithani, U C

    2012-04-01

    Radiochromic film dosimetry is increasingly used in brachytherapy applications for its higher resolution ability as compared to other experimental methods. The present study was aimed to assess the accuracy and suitability of use of the improved radiochromic film model, Gafchromic EBT2, to evaluate the dose distribution in the transverse plane of microselectron HDR (192)Ir source. A specially designed and locally fabricated Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom was used in this work for the experimental measurement of dose distribution around the source in its transverse plane. The AAPM TG-43U1 recommended radial dose function, g (r), and dose rate constant, Λ, for the source were measured using Gafchromic EBT2 film and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The EBT2 film measured dosimetric quantities were validated against their values obtained from the TLD measurements and previously published values for the same source available in literature. The dose rate constant and radial dose function for microselectron HDR (192)Ir source obtained from Gafchromic EBT2 film measurements are in agreement with their TLD measured results within 3.9% and 2.8% respectively. They also agree within the accepted range of uncertainty with their experimental and Monte Carlo calculated results reported in literature. This work demonstrates the suitability of using Gafchromic EBT2 film dosimetry in characterization of dose distribution in the transverse plane of HDR Ir-192 source. This is a more efficient method than TLD dosimetry at discrete and distant positions. Relative to TLD dosimetry, it is found to be better reproducible, easy to use and a less expensive method of dosimetry.

  10. SU-E-T-517: Analytic Formalism to Compute in Real Time Dose Distributions Delivered by HDR Units

    SciTech Connect

    Pokhrel, S; Loyalka, S; Palaniswaamy, G; Rangaraj, D; Izaguirre, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Develop an analytical algorithm to compute the dose delivered by Ir-192 dwell positions with high accuracy using the 3-dimensional (3D) dose distribution of an HDR source. Using our analytical function, the dose delivered by an HDR unit as treatment progresses can be determined using the actual delivered temporal and positional data of each individual dwell. Consequently, true delivered dose can be computed when each catheter becomes active. We hypothesize that the knowledge of such analytical formulation will allow developing HDR systems with a real time treatment evaluation tool to avoid mistreatments. Methods: In our analytic formulation, the dose is computed by using the full anisotropic function data of the TG 43 formalism with 3D ellipsoidal function. The discrepancy between the planned dose and the delivered dose is computed using an analytic perturbation method over the initial dose distribution. This methodology speeds up the computation because only changes in dose discrepancies originated by spatial and temporal deviations are computed. A dose difference map at the point of interest is obtained from these functions and this difference can be shown during treatment in real time to examine the treatment accuracy. Results: We determine the analytical solution and a perturbation function for the 3 translational 3 rotational, and 1D temporal errors in source distributions. The analytic formulation is a sequence of simple equations that can be processed in any modern computer in few seconds. Because computations are based in an analytical solution, small deviations of the dose when sub-millimeter positional changes occur can be detected. Conclusions: We formulated an analytical method to compute 4D dose distributions and dose differences based on an analytical solution and perturbations to the original dose. This method is highly accurate and can be.

  11. SU-C-16A-05: OAR Dose Tolerance Recommendations for Prostate and Cervical HDR Brachytherapy: Dose Versus Volume Metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Geneser, S; Cunha, J; Pouliot, J; Hsu, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: HDR brachytherapy consensus dose tolerance recommendations for organs at risk (OARs) remain widely debated. Prospective trials reporting metrics must be sufficiently data-dense to assess adverse affects and identify optimally predictive tolerances. We explore the tradeoffs between reporting dose-metrics versus volume-metrics and the potential impact on trial outcome analysis and tolerance recommendations. Methods: We analyzed 26 prostate patients receiving 15 Gy HDR single-fraction brachytherapy boost to 45 Gy external beam radiation therapy and 28 cervical patients receiving 28 Gy HDR brachytherapy monotherapy in 4 fractions using 2 implants. For each OAR structure, a robust linear regression fit was performed for the dose-metrics as a function of the volume-metrics. The plan quality information provided by recommended dose-metric and volume-metric values were compared. Results: For prostate rectal dose, D2cc and V75 lie close to the regression line, indicating they are similarly informative. Two outliers for prostate urethral dose are substantially different from the remaining cohort in terms of D0.1cc and V75, but not D1cc, suggesting the choice of reporting dose metric is essential. For prostate bladder and cervical bladder, rectum, and bowel, dose outliers are more apparent via V75 than recommended dose-metrics. This suggests that for prostate bladder dose and all cervical OAR doses, the recommended volume-metrics may be better predictors of clinical outcome than dose-metrics. Conclusion: For plan acceptance criteria, dose and volume-metrics are reciprocally equivalent. However, reporting dosemetrics or volume-metrics alone provides substantially different information. Our results suggest that volume-metrics may be more sensitive to differences in planned dose, and if one metric must be chosen, volumemetrics are preferable. However, reporting discrete DVH points severely limits the ability to identify planning tolerances most predictive of adverse

  12. Determination of contributions of scatter and distance error to the source strength of 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondel, Shwetha; Ravikumar, Manickam

    2016-09-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy commonly employs a 192Ir encapsulated source to deliver high dose to the malignant tissues. Calibrations of brachytherapy sources are performed by the manufacturer using a well-type chamber or by in-air measurement using a cylindrical ionization chamber. Calibration using the latter involves measurements to be carried out at several distances and room scatter can also be determined. The aim of the present study is to estimate the scatter contribution from the walls, floor and various materials in the room in order to determine the reference air kerma rate of an 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source by in-air measurements and also to evaluate the error in the setup distance between the source centre and chamber centre. Air kerma measurements were performed at multiple distances from 10 cm to 40 cm between the source and chamber. The room scatter correction factor was determined using the iterative technique. The distance error of -0.094 cm and -0.112 cm was observed for chamber with and without buildup cap respectively. The scatter component ranges from 0.3% to 5.4% for the chamber with buildup cap and 0.3% to 4.6% without buildup cap for distances between 10 to 40 cm respectively. Since the average of the results at multiple distances is considered to obtain the actual air kerma rate of the HDR source, the seven distance method and iterative technique are very effective in determining the scatter contribution and the error in the distance measurements.

  13. Evaluation of Scatter Contribution and Distance Error by Iterative Methods for Strength Determination of HDR {sup 192}Ir Brachytherapy Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, Panchapakesan; Sharma, Sunil D.; Subbaiah, Kamatam V.; Mayya, Yelia S.

    2010-10-01

    High-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources are commonly used for management of malignancies by brachytherapy applications. Measurement of source strength at the hospital is an important dosimetry requirement. The use of 0.6-cm{sup 3} cylindrical ionization chamber is one of the methods of measuring the source strength at the hospitals because this chamber is readily available for beam calibration and dosimetry. While using the cylindrical chamber for this purpose, it is also required to determine the positioning error of the ionization chamber, with respect to the source, commonly called a distance error (c). The contribution of scatter radiation (M{sub s}) from floor, walls, ceiling, and other materials available in the treatment room also need to be determined accurately so that appropriate correction can be applied while calculating the source strength from the meter reading. Iterative methods of Newton-Raphson and least-squares were used in this work to determine scatter contribution in the experimentally observed meter reading (pC/s) of a cylindrical ionization chamber. Monte Carlo simulation was also used to cross verify the results of the least-squares method. The experimentally observed, least-squares calculated and Monte Carlo estimated values of meter readings from HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source were in good agreement. Considering procedural simplicity, the method of least-squares is recommended for use at the hospitals to estimate values of f (constant of proportionality), c, and M{sub s} required to determine the strength of HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources.

  14. Estimation of distance error by fuzzy set theory required for strength determination of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Datta, D; Sharma, S D; Chourasiya, G; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2014-04-01

    Verification of the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of institutional quality assurance program. Either reference air-kerma rate (RAKR) or air-kerma strength (AKS) is the recommended quantity to specify the strength of gamma-emitting brachytherapy sources. The use of Farmer-type cylindrical ionization chamber of sensitive volume 0.6 cm(3) is one of the recommended methods for measuring RAKR of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. While using the cylindrical chamber method, it is required to determine the positioning error of the ionization chamber with respect to the source which is called the distance error. An attempt has been made to apply the fuzzy set theory to estimate the subjective uncertainty associated with the distance error. A simplified approach of applying this fuzzy set theory has been proposed in the quantification of uncertainty associated with the distance error. In order to express the uncertainty in the framework of fuzzy sets, the uncertainty index was estimated and was found to be within 2.5%, which further indicates that the possibility of error in measuring such distance may be of this order. It is observed that the relative distance li estimated by analytical method and fuzzy set theoretic approach are consistent with each other. The crisp values of li estimated using analytical method lie within the bounds computed using fuzzy set theory. This indicates that li values estimated using analytical methods are within 2.5% uncertainty. This value of uncertainty in distance measurement should be incorporated in the uncertainty budget, while estimating the expanded uncertainty in HDR (192)Ir source strength measurement.

  15. HDR {sup 192}Ir source speed measurements using a high speed video camera

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Rubo, Rodrigo A.; Sales, Camila P. de; Verhaegen, Frank

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The dose delivered with a HDR {sup 192}Ir afterloader can be separated into a dwell component, and a transit component resulting from the source movement. The transit component is directly dependent on the source speed profile and it is the goal of this study to measure accurate source speed profiles. Methods: A high speed video camera was used to record the movement of a {sup 192}Ir source (Nucletron, an Elekta company, Stockholm, Sweden) for interdwell distances of 0.25–5 cm with dwell times of 0.1, 1, and 2 s. Transit dose distributions were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the source movement. Results: The source stops at each dwell position oscillating around the desired position for a duration up to (0.026 ± 0.005) s. The source speed profile shows variations between 0 and 81 cm/s with average speed of ∼33 cm/s for most of the interdwell distances. The source stops for up to (0.005 ± 0.001) s at nonprogrammed positions in between two programmed dwell positions. The dwell time correction applied by the manufacturer compensates the transit dose between the dwell positions leading to a maximum overdose of 41 mGy for the considered cases and assuming an air-kerma strength of 48 000 U. The transit dose component is not uniformly distributed leading to over and underdoses, which is within 1.4% for commonly prescribed doses (3–10 Gy). Conclusions: The source maintains its speed even for the short interdwell distances. Dose variations due to the transit dose component are much lower than the prescribed treatment doses for brachytherapy, although transit dose component should be evaluated individually for clinical cases.

  16. Mixed integer programming improves comprehensibility and plan quality in inverse optimization of prostate HDR brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Gorissen, Bram L; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L

    2013-02-21

    Current inverse treatment planning methods that optimize both catheter positions and dwell times in prostate HDR brachytherapy use surrogate linear or quadratic objective functions that have no direct interpretation in terms of dose-volume histogram (DVH) criteria, do not result in an optimum or have long solution times. We decrease the solution time of the existing linear and quadratic dose-based programming models (LP and QP, respectively) to allow optimizing over potential catheter positions using mixed integer programming. An additional average speed-up of 75% can be obtained by stopping the solver at an early stage, without deterioration of the plan quality. For a fixed catheter configuration, the dwell time optimization model LP solves to optimality in less than 15 s, which confirms earlier results. We propose an iterative procedure for QP that allows us to prescribe the target dose as an interval, while retaining independence between the solution time and the number of dose calculation points. This iterative procedure is comparable in speed to the LP model and produces better plans than the non-iterative QP. We formulate a new dose-volume-based model that maximizes V(100%) while satisfying pre-set DVH criteria. This model optimizes both catheter positions and dwell times within a few minutes depending on prostate volume and number of catheters, optimizes dwell times within 35 s and gives better DVH statistics than dose-based models. The solutions suggest that the correlation between the objective value and the clinical plan quality is weak in the existing dose-based models. PMID:23363622

  17. SU-E-T-560: Commissioning An HDR Freiburg Flap Applicator for Skin Lesion Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dou, K; Li, B; Lerma, F; Aroumougame, V; Sarfaraz, M; Laser, B; Jacobs, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Flexible Freiburg flap used with high dose rate afterloaders is easy to cut into any size for any body site and to dwell with a precise source position, conforms to curved skin surface and then to the planned target. However, unlike intracavity or interstitial situations, incomplete scatter environment due to flap applicators exposed to air might lead to dose difference between the delivered and planned. This research is focused on the dose deviation of incomplete scatter versus full scatter. Methods: A 12x12 cm of Freiburg flap applicator was used for the validation. A Nucletron Oncentra Brachy Ver. 4.3 treatment planning system (TPS) was used for treatment planning. However, no heterogeneity correction incorporated into the brachytherap TPS needs to be considered. A Philips Brilliance CT Big Bore was employed for CT scan. Radiation was delivered using a Nucletron HDR remote afterloader system. A 10cm bolus was used to cover the flap for obtaining a full scatter. An OSL, ion chamber, and Gafchromic EBT2 film were used for commissioning the flap applicator. Results: The applicator calibration at 5mm depth was performed using an OSL dosimeter. Applicator source dwelling positions with 1D and 2D array exposed to and recorded by Gafchromic EBT2 film showed an agreement within 1mm. 1D array of Freiburg flap exhibited 4.2% cooler in dose with incomplete scatter than full scatter. 2D array showed 7.1% lower in dose for incomplete scatter than full scatter. The deviation was found more than 10% beyond 8cm in depth. Conclusion: Significant dose deviation caused by the incomplete scatter environment was found to be 7.1% at 1cm depth. This deviation was increased with increasing depth. The inaccuracy resulted from the incomplete scatter can be fixed by either placing a bolus on the top of the flap or making the plan at least 7% hotter.

  18. Non-melanoma skin cancer treated with HDR Valencia applicator: clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tormo, Alejandro; Celada, Francisco; Rodriguez, Silvia; Botella, Rafael; Ballesta, Antonio; Kasper, Michael; Ouhib, Zoubir; Santos, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Radiotherapy (RT) has played a significant role in treating non melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) approaches have a paramount relevance due to their adaptability, patient protection, and variable dose fractionation schedules. Several innovative applicators have been introduced to the brachytherapy community. The Valencia applicator is a new superficial device that improves the dose distribution compared with the Leipzig applicator. The purpose of this work is to assess the tumor control, cosmesis, and toxicity in patients with NMSC treated with the Valencia applicator and a new regimen of hypofractionation. Material and methods From January 2008 to March 2010, 32 patients with 45 NMSC lesions were treated with the Valencia applicator in the Hospital La Fe. The gross tumor volume was visually assessed, but the tumor depth was evaluated using ultrasound imaging. All lesions for the selected cases were limited to 4 mm depth. The prescription dose was 42 Gy in 6 or 7 fractions (biologically effective dose [BED] ≈ 70 Gy), delivered twice a week. Results Ninety-eight percent of the lesions were locally controlled at 47 months from treatment. Ninety-three percent of patients were out at least 36 months from treatment. The treatment was well tolerated in all cases. The highest skin toxicity was grade 1 RTOG/EORTC, having resolved with topical treatment at 4 weeks in all but one case which required 2 months. There were no grade 2 or higher late adverse events. Conclusions In patients with superficial basal cell carcinoma lesions less than 25 mm in maximum diameter, HDRBT treatment with the Valencia applicator using a hypofractionated regimen provides excellent results, for both cosmetic and local control at a minimum of 3 years follow-up. Moreover, the shorter hypofractionated regimen facilitates compliance, which is very relevant for the elderly patients in our series. Valencia applicators offer a simple, safe, quick, and

  19. Neonatal diagnosis of a patient with hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome associated with cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Juan Diego; Cervantes, Luisa; Puerta, Herminia; Bauer, Mislen; Diaz, Alejandro

    2014-09-01

    Hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness and renal dysplasia syndrome (HDRS) is comprised of a triad of conditions. It is an autosomal dominant condition caused by mutations in the GATA3 gene, located at 10p15, a critical region in the development of the embryonic parathyroid glands, inner ear, and kidneys. Here we describe the case of a patient with all three components of HDR syndrome diagnosed in the neonatal period who presented with cerebral infarction, hypocalcemia, and renal anomalies. Upon chromosomal microarray he was found to have an interstitial deletion at 10p, which produced a partial deletion in the GATA3 gene.

  20. Validation of a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc; Gardi, Lori; Barker, Kevin; Montreuil, Jacques; Fenster, Aaron

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, there is no integrated 3D ultrasound (3DUS) guidance system clinically available for breast brachytherapy. In this study, the authors present a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment. Methods: For this work, a new computer controlled robotic 3DUS system was built to perform a hybrid motion scan, which is a combination of a 6 cm linear translation with a 30° rotation at both ends. The new 3DUS scanner was designed to fit on a modified Kuske assembly, keeping the current template grid configuration but modifying the frame to allow the mounting of the 3DUS system at several positions. A finer grid was also tested. A user interface was developed to perform image reconstruction, semiautomatic segmentation of the surgical bed as well as catheter reconstruction and tracking. A 3D string phantom was used to validate the geometric accuracy of the reconstruction. The volumetric accuracy of the system was validated with phantoms using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) images. In order to accurately determine whether 3DUS can effectively replace CT for treatment planning, the authors have compared the 3DUS catheter reconstruction to the one obtained from CT images. In addition, in agarose-based phantoms, an end-to-end procedure was performed by executing six independent complete procedures with both 14 and 16 catheters, and for both standard and finer Kuske grids. Finally, in phantoms, five end-to-end procedures were performed with the final CT planning for the validation of 3DUS preplanning. Results: The 3DUS acquisition time is approximately 10 s. A paired Student t-test showed that there was no statistical significant difference between known and measured values of string separations in each direction. Both MRI and CT volume measurements were not statistically different from 3DUS volume (Student t-test: p > 0

  1. A linear programming model for optimizing HDR brachytherapy dose distributions with respect to mean dose in the DVH-tail

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, Åsa; Larsson, Torbjörn; Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Recent research has shown that the optimization model hitherto used in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy corresponds weakly to the dosimetric indices used to evaluate the quality of a dose distribution. Although alternative models that explicitly include such dosimetric indices have been presented, the inclusion of the dosimetric indices explicitly yields intractable models. The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for optimizing dosimetric indices that is easier to solve than those proposed earlier.Methods: In this paper, the authors present an alternative approach for optimizing dose distributions for HDR brachytherapy where dosimetric indices are taken into account through surrogates based on the conditional value-at-risk concept. This yields a linear optimization model that is easy to solve, and has the advantage that the constraints are easy to interpret and modify to obtain satisfactory dose distributions.Results: The authors show by experimental comparisons, carried out retrospectively for a set of prostate cancer patients, that their proposed model corresponds well with constraining dosimetric indices. All modifications of the parameters in the authors' model yield the expected result. The dose distributions generated are also comparable to those generated by the standard model with respect to the dosimetric indices that are used for evaluating quality.Conclusions: The authors' new model is a viable surrogate to optimizing dosimetric indices and quickly and easily yields high quality dose distributions.

  2. Dosimetric impact of applicator displacement during high dose rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 brachytherapy for cervical cancer: A planning study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, J. S.; Ung, N. M.; Jamalludin, Z.; Malik, R. A.; Wong, J. H. D.; Liew, Y. M.; Ng, K. H.

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the dosimetric impact of applicator displacement on dose specification during high dose rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 (Co-60) brachytherapy for cervical cancer through a planning study. Eighteen randomly selected HDR full insertion plans were restrospectively studied. The tandem and ovoids were virtually shifted translationally and rotationally in the x-, y- and z-axis directions on the treatment planning system. Doses to reference points and volumes of interest in the plans with shifted applicators were compared with the original plans. The impact of dose displacement on 2D (point-based) and 3D (volume-based) treatment planning techniques was also assessed. A ±2 mm translational y-axis applicator shift and ±4° rotational x-axis applicator shift resulted in dosimetric changes of more than 5% to organs at risk (OAR) reference points. Changes to the maximum doses to 2 cc of the organ (D2cc) in 3D planning were statistically significant and higher than the reference points in 2D planning for both the rectum and bladder (p<0.05). Rectal D2cc was observed to be the most sensitive to applicator displacement among all dose metrics. Applicator displacement that is greater than ±2 mm translational y-axis and ±4° rotational x-axis resulted in significant dose changes to the OAR. Thus, steps must be taken to minimize the possibility of applicator displacement during brachytherapy.

  3. SU-E-T-362: Automatic Catheter Reconstruction of Flap Applicators in HDR Surface Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Buzurovic, I; Devlin, P; Hansen, J; O'Farrell, D; Bhagwat, M; Friesen, S; Damato, A; Lewis, J; Cormack, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Catheter reconstruction is crucial for the accurate delivery of radiation dose in HDR brachytherapy. The process becomes complicated and time-consuming for large superficial clinical targets with a complex topology. A novel method for the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators is proposed in this study. Methods: We have developed a program package capable of image manipulation, using C++class libraries of The-Visualization-Toolkit(VTK) software system. The workflow for automatic catheter reconstruction is: a)an anchor point is placed in 3D or in the axial view of the first slice at the tip of the first, last and middle points for the curved surface; b)similar points are placed on the last slice of the image set; c)the surface detection algorithm automatically registers the points to the images and applies the surface reconstruction filter; d)then a structured grid surface is generated through the center of the treatment catheters placed at a distance of 5mm from the patient's skin. As a result, a mesh-style plane is generated with the reconstructed catheters placed 10mm apart. To demonstrate automatic catheter reconstruction, we used CT images of patients diagnosed with cutaneous T-cell-lymphoma and imaged with Freiburg-Flap-Applicators (Nucletron™-Elekta, Netherlands). The coordinates for each catheter were generated and compared to the control points selected during the manual reconstruction for 16catheters and 368control point Results: The variation of the catheter tip positions between the automatically and manually reconstructed catheters was 0.17mm(SD=0.23mm). The position difference between the manually selected catheter control points and the corresponding points obtained automatically was 0.17mm in the x-direction (SD=0.23mm), 0.13mm in the y-direction (SD=0.22mm), and 0.14mm in the z-direction (SD=0.24mm). Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility of the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators with a high level

  4. SU-C-16A-03: Direction Modulated Brachytherapy for HDR Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Han, D; Webster, M; Scanderbeg, D; Yashar, C; Choi, D; Song, B; Song, W; Devic, S; Ravi, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a new Directional Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT) intra-uterine tandem using various 192-Ir after-loaders. Methods: Dose distributions from the 192-Ir sources were modulated using a 6.3mm diameter tungsten shield (18.0g/cm3). The source moved along 6 longitudinal grooves, each 1.3mm in diameter, evenly spaced along periphery of the shield, The tungsten rod was enclosqed by 0.5mm thick Delrin (1.41g/cc). Monte Carlo N particle (MCNPX) was used to calculate dose distributions. 51million particles were calculated on 504 cores of a supercomputer. Fifteen different patients originally treated with a traditional tandem-and-ovoid applicator, with 5 fractions each, (15 patients X 5 fxs = 75 plans) were re-planned with the DMBT applicator combined with traditional ovoids, on an in-house developed HDR brachytherapy planning platform, which used intensity modulated planning capabilities using a constrained gradient optimization algorithm. For all plans the prescription dose was 6 Gy and they were normalized to match the clinical treated V100. Results: Generally, the DMBT plan quality was a remarkable improvement from conventional T and O plans because of the anisotropic dose distribution of DMBT. The largest difference was to the bladder which had a 0.59±0.87 Gy (8.5±28.7%) reduction in dose. This was because of the the horseshoe shape (U-shape) of the bladder. The dose reduction to rectum and sigmoid were 0.48±0.55 Gy (21.1±27.2%) and 0.10±0.38 Gy (40.6±214.9%), respectively. The D90 to the HRCTV was 6.55±0.96 Gy (conventional T and O) and 6.59±1.06 Gy (DMBT). Conclusion: For image guided adaptive brachytherapy, greater flexibility of radiation intensity is essential and DMBT can be the solution.

  5. Comparison of methods for the measurement of radiation dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: Ge-doped optical fiber, EBT3 Gafchromic film, and PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} radiochromic plastic

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A. L.; Di Pietro, P.; Alobaidli, S.; Issa, F.; Doran, S.; Bradley, D.; Nisbet, A.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Dose distribution measurement in clinical high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is challenging, because of the high dose gradients, large dose variations, and small scale, but it is essential to verify accurate treatment planning and treatment equipment performance. The authors compare and evaluate three dosimetry systems for potential use in brachytherapy dose distribution measurement: Ge-doped optical fibers, EBT3 Gafchromic film with multichannel analysis, and the radiochromic material PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} with optical-CT readout. Methods: Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} fibers with 6 {mu}m active core and 5.0 mm length were sensitivity-batched and their thermoluminescent properties used via conventional heating and annealing cycles. EBT3 Gafchromic film of 30 {mu}m active thickness was calibrated in three color channels using a nominal 6 MV linear accelerator. A 48-bit transmission scanner and advanced multichannel analysis method were utilized to derive dose measurements. Samples of the solid radiochromic polymer PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign }, 60 mm diameter and 100 mm height, were analyzed with a parallel beam optical CT scanner. Each dosimetry system was used to measure the dose as a function of radial distance from a Co-60 HDR source, with results compared to Monte Carlo TG-43 model data. Each system was then used to measure the dose distribution along one or more lines through typical clinical dose distributions for cervix brachytherapy, with results compared to treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. Purpose-designed test objects constructed of Solid Water and held within a full-scatter water tank were utilized. Results: All three dosimetry systems reproduced the general shape of the isolated source radial dose function and the TPS dose distribution. However, the dynamic range of EBT3 exceeded those of doped optical fibers and PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign }, and the latter two suffered from unacceptable noise and artifact. For the experimental

  6. Physics-aspects of dose accuracy in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: source dosimetry, treatment planning, equipment performance and in vivo verification techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a review of recent publications on the physics-aspects of dosimetric accuracy in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The discussion of accuracy is primarily concerned with uncertainties, but methods to improve dose conformation to the prescribed intended dose distribution are also noted. The main aim of the paper is to review current practical techniques and methods employed for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry. This includes work on the determination of dose rate fields around brachytherapy sources, the capability of treatment planning systems, the performance of treatment units and methods to verify dose delivery. This work highlights the determinants of accuracy in HDR dosimetry and treatment delivery and presents a selection of papers, focusing on articles from the last five years, to reflect active areas of research and development. Apart from Monte Carlo modelling of source dosimetry, there is no clear consensus on the optimum techniques to be used to assure dosimetric accuracy through all the processes involved in HDR brachytherapy treatment. With the exception of the ESTRO mailed dosimetry service, there is little dosimetric audit activity reported in the literature, when compared with external beam radiotherapy verification. PMID:23349649

  7. Absolute depth-dose-rate measurements for an {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source in water using MOSFET detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zilio, Valery Olivier; Joneja, Om Parkash; Popowski, Youri; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Chawla, Rakesh

    2006-06-15

    Reported MOSFET measurements concern mostly external radiotherapy and in vivo dosimetry. In this paper, we apply the technique for absolute dosimetry in the context of HDR brachytherapy using an {sup 192}Ir source. Measured radial dose rate distributions in water for different planes perpendicular to the source axis are presented and special attention is paid to the calibration of the R and K type detectors, and to the determination of appropriate correction factors for the sensitivity variation with the increase of the threshold voltage and the energy dependence. The experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo simulated dose rate distributions. The experimental results show a good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulations: the discrepancy between experimental and Monte Carlo results being within 5% for 82% of the points and within 10% for 95% of the points. Moreover, all points except two are found to lie within the experimental uncertainties, confirming thereby the quality of the results obtained.

  8. SU-E-T-507: Interfractional Variation of Fiducial Marker Position During HDR Brachytherapy with Cervical Interstitial Needle Template

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S; Kim, R; Benhabib, S; Araujo, J; Burnett, L; Duan, J; Popple, R; Wu, X; Cardan, R; Brezovich, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: HDR brachytherapy using interstitial needle template for cervical cancer is commonly delivered in 4-5 fractions. Routine verification of needle positions before each fraction is often based on radiographic imaging of implanted fiducial markers. The current study evaluated interfractional displacement of implanted fiducial markers using CT images. Methods: 9 sequential patients with cervical interstitial needle implants were evaluated. The superior and inferior borders of the target volumes were defined by fiducial markers in planning CT. The implant position was verified with kV orthogonal images before each fraction. A second CT was acquired prior 3rd fraction (one or 2 days post planning CT). Distances from inferior and superior fiducial markers to pubic symphysis plane (perpendicular to vaginal obtulator)were measured. Distance from needle tip of a reference needle (next to the inferior marker) to the pubic symphysis plane was also determined. The difference in fiducial marker distance or needle tip distance between planning CT and CT prior 3rd fraction were measured to assess markers migration and needle displacement. Results: The mean inferior marker displacement was 4.5 mm and ranged 0.9 to 11.3 mm. The mean superior marker displacement was 2.7 mm and ranged 0 to 10.4 mm. There was a good association between inferior and superior marker displacement (r=0.95). Mean averaged inferior and superior marker displacement was 3.3 mm and ranged from 0.1 to 10.9 mm, with a standard deviation of 3.2 mm. The mean needle displacement was 5.6 mm and ranged 0.2 to 15.6 mm. Needle displacements were reduced (p<0.05) after adjusting according to needle-to-fiducials distance. Conclusion: There were small fiducial marker displacements between HDR fractions. Our study suggests a target margin of 9.7 mm to cover interfractional marker displacements (in 95% cases) for pretreatment verification based on radiographic imaging.

  9. Endocavity Ultrasound Hyperthermia for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Patient-specific Modeling, Experimental Verification, and Combination with HDR Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Jeffery; Diederich, Chris; Chen Xin; Prakash, Punit; Juang, Titania

    2010-03-09

    The feasibility of targeted hyperthermia delivery by an intrauterine ultrasound applicator to patient-specific treatment volumes in conjunction with HDR brachytherapy was investigated using theory and experiment. 30 HDR brachytherapy treatment plans were inspected to define hyperthermia treatment volumes (HTVs) based on tumor and radiation target volumes. Several typical cases were imported into a patient-specific treatment planning platform that optimized acoustic output power from an endocavity multisectored tubular array to conform temperature and thermal dose to HTVs. Perfusion was within a clinical range of 0.5-3 kg m{sup -3} s{sup -1}. Applicators were constructed with 1-3 elements at 6.5-8 MHz with 90 deg. -360 deg. sectoring and 25-35 mm heating length housed in a water-cooled PET catheter. Acoustic output was compared to heating in ex vivo tissue assessed with implanted thermometry. Radiation attenuation through the device was measured in an ionization chamber. The HTV extends 2-4 cm in diameter and 2-4 cm in length. The bladder and rectum can be within 10-12 mm. HTV targets can be covered with temperature clouds >41 deg. and thermal dose t{sup 43}>5 min with 45 deg. C maximum temperature and rectal temperature <41.5 deg. C. Sectored applicators preferentially direct energy laterally into the parametrium to limit heating of rectum and bladder. Interstitial brachytherapy catheters within the HTV could be used for thermal feedback during HT treatment. Temperature distributions in phantom show preferential heating within sectors and align well with acoustic output. Heating control along the device length and in angle is evident. A 4-6% reduction in radiation transmission through the transducers was observed, which could likely be compensated for in planning. Patient-specific modeling and experimental heating demonstrated 3-D conformal heating capabilities of endocavity ultrasound applicators.

  10. Endocavity Ultrasound Hyperthermia for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Patient-specific Modeling, Experimental Verification, and Combination with HDR Brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, Jeffery; Chen, Xin; Prakash, Punit; Juang, Titania; Diederich, Chris

    2010-03-01

    The feasibility of targeted hyperthermia delivery by an intrauterine ultrasound applicator to patient-specific treatment volumes in conjunction with HDR brachytherapy was investigated using theory and experiment. 30 HDR brachytherapy treatment plans were inspected to define hyperthermia treatment volumes (HTVs) based on tumor and radiation target volumes. Several typical cases were imported into a patient-specific treatment planning platform that optimized acoustic output power from an endocavity multisectored tubular array to conform temperature and thermal dose to HTVs. Perfusion was within a clinical range of 0.5-3 kg m-3 s-1. Applicators were constructed with 1-3 elements at 6.5-8 MHz with 90°-360° sectoring and 25-35 mm heating length housed in a water-cooled PET catheter. Acoustic output was compared to heating in ex vivo tissue assessed with implanted thermometry. Radiation attenuation through the device was measured in an ionization chamber. The HTV extends 2-4 cm in diameter and 2-4 cm in length. The bladder and rectum can be within 10-12 mm. HTV targets can be covered with temperature clouds >41° and thermal dose t43>5 min with 45° C maximum temperature and rectal temperature <41.5° C. Sectored applicators preferentially direct energy laterally into the parametrium to limit heating of rectum and bladder. Interstitial brachytherapy catheters within the HTV could be used for thermal feedback during HT treatment. Temperature distributions in phantom show preferential heating within sectors and align well with acoustic output. Heating control along the device length and in angle is evident. A 4-6% reduction in radiation transmission through the transducers was observed, which could likely be compensated for in planning. Patient-specific modeling and experimental heating demonstrated 3-D conformal heating capabilities of endocavity ultrasound applicators.

  11. In vivo dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer--a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Anton, Mathias; Wagner, Daniela; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Hackel, Thomas; Hermann, Robert Michael; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Vorwerk, Hilke

    2009-05-01

    A phantom study for dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer is presented. The measurement method of the secondary standard of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt had to be slightly modified in order to be able to measure inside a Foley catheter. The absorbed dose to water response of the alanine dosimetry system to (192)Ir was determined with a reproducibility of 1.8% relative to (60)Co. The resulting uncertainty for measurements inside the urethra was estimated to be 3.6%, excluding the uncertainty of the dose rate constant Lambda. The applied dose calculated by a treatment planning system is compared to the measured dose for a small series of (192)Ir HDR irradiations in a gel phantom. The differences between the measured and applied dose are well within the limits of uncertainty. Therefore, the method is considered to be suitable for measurements in vivo.

  12. SU-E-T-634: Analysis of Volume Based GYN HDR Brachytherapy Plans for Dose Calculation to Organs At Risk(OAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, M; Li, C; White, M; Davis, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We have analyzed the dose volume histogram of 140 CT based HDR brachytherapy plans and evaluated the dose received to OAR ; rectum, bladder and sigmoid colon based on recommendations from ICRU and Image guided brachytherapy working group for cervical cancer . Methods: Our treatment protocol consist of XRT to whole pelvis with 45 Gy at 1.8Gy/fraction followed by 30 Gy at 6 Gy per fraction by HDR brachytherapy in 2 weeks . The CT compatible tandem and ovoid applicators were used and stabilized with radio opaque packing material. The patient was stabilized using special re-locatable implant table and stirrups for reproducibility of the geometry during treatment. The CT scan images were taken at 3mm slice thickness and exported to the treatment planning computer. The OAR structures, bladder, rectum and sigmoid colon were outlined on the images along with the applicators. The prescription dose was targeted to A left and A right as defined in Manchester system and optimized on geometry . The dosimetry was compared on all plans using the parameter Ci.sec.cGy-1 . Using the Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) obtained from the plans the doses to rectum, sigmoid colon and bladder for ICRU defined points and 2cc volume were analyzed and reported. The following criteria were used for limiting the tolerance dose by volume (D2cc) were calculated. The rectum and sigmoid colon doses were limited to <75Gy. The bladder dose was limited to < 90Gy from both XRT and HDR brachytherapy. Results: The average total (XRT+HDRBT) BED values to prescription volume was 120 Gy. Dose 2cc to rectum was 70Gy +/− 17Gy, dose to 2cc bladder was 82+/−32 Gy. The average Ci.sec.cGy-1 calculated for the HDR plans was 6.99 +/− 0.5 Conclusion: The image based treatment planning enabled to evaluati volume based dose to critical structures for clinical interpretation.

  13. SU-E-T-580: On the Significance of Model Based Dosimetry for Breast and Head and Neck 192Ir HDR Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E; Pantelis, E; Papagiannis, P; Major, T; Polgar, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric and radiobiological differences between TG43-based and model-based dosimetry in the treatment planning of {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy for breast and head and neck cancer. Methods: Two cohorts of 57 Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) and 22 head and neck (H&N) patients with oral cavity carcinoma were studied. Dosimetry for the treatment plans was performed using the TG43 algorithm of the Oncentra Brachy v4.4 treatment planning system (TPS). Corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using MCNP6 with input files automatically prepared by the BrachyGuide software tool from DICOM RT plan data. TG43 and MC data were compared in terms of % dose differences, Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) and related indices of clinical interest for the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and the Organs-At-Risk (OARs). A radiobiological analysis was also performed using the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD), mean survival fraction (S) and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) for the PTV, and the Normal Tissue Control Probability (N TCP) and the generalized EUD (gEUD) for the OARs. Significance testing of the observed differences performed using the Wilcoxon paired sample test. Results: Differences between TG43 and MC DVH indices, associated with the increased corresponding local % dose differences observed, were statistically significant. This is mainly attributed to their consistency however, since TG43 agrees closely with MC for the majority of DVH and radiobiological parameters in both patient cohorts. Differences varied considerably among patients only for the ipsilateral lung and ribs in the APBI cohort, with a strong correlation to target location. Conclusion: While the consistency and magnitude of differences in the majority of clinically relevant DVH indices imply that no change is needed in the treatment planning practice, individualized dosimetry improves accuracy and addresses instances of inter-patient variability observed. Research

  14. Enrichment of G2/M cell cycle phase in human pluripotent stem cells enhances HDR-mediated gene repair with customizable endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Diane; Scavuzzo, Marissa A; Chmielowiec, Jolanta; Sharp, Robert; Bajic, Aleksandar; Borowiak, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Efficient gene editing is essential to fully utilize human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in regenerative medicine. Custom endonuclease-based gene targeting involves two mechanisms of DNA repair: homology directed repair (HDR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). HDR is the preferred mechanism for common applications such knock-in, knock-out or precise mutagenesis, but remains inefficient in hPSCs. Here, we demonstrate that synchronizing synchronizing hPSCs in G2/M with ABT phase increases on-target gene editing, defined as correct targeting cassette integration, 3 to 6 fold. We observed improved efficiency using ZFNs, TALENs, two CRISPR/Cas9, and CRISPR/Cas9 nickase to target five genes in three hPSC lines: three human embryonic stem cell lines, neural progenitors and diabetic iPSCs. neural progenitors and diabetic iPSCs. Reversible synchronization has no effect on pluripotency or differentiation. The increase in on-target gene editing is locus-independent and specific to the cell cycle phase as G2/M phase enriched cells show a 6-fold increase in targeting efficiency compared to cells in G1 phase. Concurrently inhibiting NHEJ with SCR7 does not increase HDR or improve gene targeting efficiency further, indicating that HR is the major DNA repair mechanism after G2/M phase arrest. The approach outlined here makes gene editing in hPSCs a more viable tool for disease modeling, regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies. PMID:26887909

  15. Evaluation of Wall Correction Factor of INER's Air-Kerma Primary Standard Chamber and Dose Variation by Source Displacement for HDR 192Ir Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. H.; Wang, J. N.; Huang, T. T.; Su, S. H.; Chang, B. J.; Su, C. H.; Hsu, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the wall effect of the self-made spherical graphite-walled cavity chamber with the Monte Carlo method for establishing the air-kerma primary standard of high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy sources at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan). The Monte Carlo method established in this paper was also employed to respectively simulate wall correction factors of the 192Ir air-kerma standard chambers used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA) and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, UK) for comparisons and verification. The chamber wall correction calculation results will be incorporated into INER's HDR 192Ir primary standard in the future. For the brachytherapy treatment in the esophagus or in the bronchi, the position of the isotope may have displacement in the cavity. Thus the delivered dose would differ from the prescribed dose in the treatment plan. We also tried assessing dose distribution due to the position displacement of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source in a phantom with a central cavity by the Monte Carlo method. The calculated results could offer a clinical reference for the brachytherapy within the human organs with cavity. PMID:24222907

  16. Evaluation of wall correction factor of INER's air-kerma primary standard chamber and dose variation by source displacement for HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Wang, J N; Huang, T T; Su, S H; Chang, B J; Su, C H; Hsu, S M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the wall effect of the self-made spherical graphite-walled cavity chamber with the Monte Carlo method for establishing the air-kerma primary standard of high-dose-rate (HDR) ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy sources at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan). The Monte Carlo method established in this paper was also employed to respectively simulate wall correction factors of the ¹⁹²Ir air-kerma standard chambers used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA) and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, UK) for comparisons and verification. The chamber wall correction calculation results will be incorporated into INER's HDR ¹⁹²Ir primary standard in the future. For the brachytherapy treatment in the esophagus or in the bronchi, the position of the isotope may have displacement in the cavity. Thus the delivered dose would differ from the prescribed dose in the treatment plan. We also tried assessing dose distribution due to the position displacement of HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy source in a phantom with a central cavity by the Monte Carlo method. The calculated results could offer a clinical reference for the brachytherapy within the human organs with cavity. PMID:24222907

  17. Technical Note: Removing the stem effect when performing Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy in vivo dosimetry using plastic scintillation detectors: A relevant and necessary step

    PubMed Central

    Therriault-Proulx, Francois; Beddar, Sam; Briere, Tina M.; Archambault, Louis; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not a stem effect removal technique is necessary when performing Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy in vivo dosimetry using a scintillation detector. Methods: A red-green-blue photodiode connected to a multichannel electrometer was used to detect the light emitted from a plastic scintillation detector (PSD) during irradiation with an Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source. Accuracy in dose measurement was compared with and without the use of stem effect removal techniques. Monochromatic and polychromatic filtration techniques were studied. An in-house template was built for accurate positioning of catheters in which the source and the PSD were inserted. Dose distribution was measured up to 5 cm from source to detector in the radial and longitudinal directions. Results: The authors found the stem effect to be particularly important when the source was close to the optical fiber guide and far from the scintillation component of the detector. It can account for up to (72±3)% of the signal under clinically relevant conditions. The polychromatic filtration outperformed the monochromatic filtration as well as the absence of filtration in regard to dose measurement accuracy. Conclusions: It is necessary to implement a stem effect removal technique when building a PSD for in vivo dosimetry during Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy. The PSD that the authors have developed for this study would be suitable for such an application. PMID:21626951

  18. Endocervical ultrasound applicator for integrated hyperthermia and HDR brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Jeffery H.; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The clinical success of hyperthermia adjunct to radiotherapy depends on adequate temperature elevation in the tumor with minimal temperature rise in organs at risk. Existing technologies for thermal treatment of the cervix have limited spatial control or rapid energy falloff. The objective of this work is to develop an endocervical applicator using a linear array of multisectored tubular ultrasound transducers to provide 3-D conformal, locally targeted hyperthermia concomitant to radiotherapy in the uterine cervix. The catheter-based device is integrated within a HDR brachytherapy applicator to facilitate sequential and potentially simultaneous heat and radiation delivery. Methods: Treatment planning images from 35 patients who underwent HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer were inspected to assess the dimensions of radiation clinical target volumes (CTVs) and gross tumor volumes (GTVs) surrounding the cervix and the proximity of organs at risk. Biothermal simulation was used to identify applicator and catheter material parameters to adequately heat the cervix with minimal thermal dose accumulation in nontargeted structures. A family of ultrasound applicators was fabricated with two to three tubular transducers operating at 6.6-7.4 MHz that are unsectored (360 deg.), bisectored (2x180 deg.), or trisectored (3x120 deg.) for control of energy deposition in angle and along the device length in order to satisfy anatomical constraints. The device is housed in a 6 mm diameter PET catheter with cooling water flow for endocervical implantation. Devices were characterized by measuring acoustic efficiencies, rotational acoustic intensity distributions, and rotational temperature distributions in phantom. Results: The CTV in HDR brachytherapy plans extends 20.5{+-}5.0 mm from the endocervical tandem with the rectum and bladder typically <8 mm from the target boundary. The GTV extends 19.4{+-}7.3 mm from the tandem. Simulations indicate that for 60

  19. Pre-test estimates of temperature decline for the LANL Fenton Hill Long-Term Flow Test

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.A.; Kruger, P.

    1992-06-01

    Pre-test predications for the Long-Term Flow Test (LTFT) of the experimental Hot Dry Rock (HDR) reservoir at Fenton Hill were made using two models. Both models are dependent on estimates of the ``effective`` reservoir volume accessed by the fluid and the mean fracture spacing (MFS) of major joints for fluid flow. The effective reservoir volume was estimated using a variety of techniques, and the range of values for the MFS was set through experience in modeling the thermal cooldown of other experimental HDR reservoirs. The two pre-test predictions for cooldown to 210{degrees}C (a value taken to compare the models) from initial temperature of 240{degrees}C are 6.1 and 10.7 years. Assuming that a minimum of 10{degrees}C is required to provide an unequivocal indication of thermal cooldown, both models predict that the reservoir will not exhibit observable cooldown for at least two years.

  20. Implant strategies for endocervical and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia adjunct to HDR brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, Jeffery H.; Prakash, Punit; Hsu, I.-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-07-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound devices provide a method to deliver 3D conformable heating integrated with HDR brachytherapy delivery. Theoretical characterization of heating patterns was performed to identify implant strategies for these devices which can best be used to apply hyperthermia to cervical cancer. A constrained optimization-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform was used for the analysis. The proportion of tissue >=41 °C in a hyperthermia treatment volume was maximized with constraints Tmax <= 47 °C, Trectum <= 41.5 °C, and Tbladder <= 42.5 °C. Hyperthermia treatment was modeled for generalized implant configurations and complex configurations from a database of patients (n = 14) treated with HDR brachytherapy. Various combinations of endocervical (360° or 2 × 180° output; 6 mm OD) and interstitial (180°, 270°, or 360° output; 2.4 mm OD) applicators within catheter locations from brachytherapy implants were modeled, with perfusion constant (1 or 3 kg m-3 s-1) or varying with location or temperature. Device positioning, sectoring, active length and aiming were empirically optimized to maximize thermal coverage. Conformable heating of appreciable volumes (>200 cm3) is possible using multiple sectored interstitial and endocervical ultrasound devices. The endocervical device can heat >41 °C to 4.6 cm diameter compared to 3.6 cm for the interstitial. Sectored applicators afford tight control of heating that is robust to perfusion changes in most regularly spaced configurations. T90 in example patient cases was 40.5-42.7 °C (1.9-39.6 EM43 °C) at 1 kg m-3 s-1 with 10/14 patients >=41 °C. Guidelines are presented for positioning of implant catheters during the initial surgery, selection of ultrasound applicator configurations, and tailored power schemes for achieving T90 >= 41 °C in clinically practical implant configurations. Catheter-based ultrasound devices, when adhering to the guidelines, show potential to generate conformal therapeutic

  1. Adaptive error detection for HDR/PDR brachytherapy: Guidance for decision making during real-time in vivo point dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kertzscher, Gustavo Andersen, Claus E.; Tanderup, Kari

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: This study presents an adaptive error detection algorithm (AEDA) for real-timein vivo point dosimetry during high dose rate (HDR) or pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy (BT) where the error identification, in contrast to existing approaches, does not depend on an a priori reconstruction of the dosimeter position. Instead, the treatment is judged based on dose rate comparisons between measurements and calculations of the most viable dosimeter position provided by the AEDA in a data driven approach. As a result, the AEDA compensates for false error cases related to systematic effects of the dosimeter position reconstruction. Given its nearly exclusive dependence on stable dosimeter positioning, the AEDA allows for a substantially simplified and time efficient real-time in vivo BT dosimetry implementation. Methods: In the event of a measured potential treatment error, the AEDA proposes the most viable dosimeter position out of alternatives to the original reconstruction by means of a data driven matching procedure between dose rate distributions. If measured dose rates do not differ significantly from the most viable alternative, the initial error indication may be attributed to a mispositioned or misreconstructed dosimeter (false error). However, if the error declaration persists, no viable dosimeter position can be found to explain the error, hence the discrepancy is more likely to originate from a misplaced or misreconstructed source applicator or from erroneously connected source guide tubes (true error). Results: The AEDA applied on twoin vivo dosimetry implementations for pulsed dose rate BT demonstrated that the AEDA correctly described effects responsible for initial error indications. The AEDA was able to correctly identify the major part of all permutations of simulated guide tube swap errors and simulated shifts of individual needles from the original reconstruction. Unidentified errors corresponded to scenarios where the dosimeter position was

  2. Petrography and uplift history of the Quaternary Takidani Granodiorite: could it have hosted a supercritical (HDR) geothermal reservoir?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bando, Masatoshi; Bignall, Greg; Sekine, Kotaro; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2003-02-01

    The Quaternary Takidani Granodiorite (Japan Alps) is analogous to the type of deep-seated (3-5 km deep) intrusive-hosted fracture network system that might support (supercritical) hot dry/wet rock (HDR/HWR) energy extraction. The I-type Takidani Granodiorite comprises: porphyritic granodiorite, porphyritic granite, biotite-hornblende granodiorite, hornblende-biotite granodiorite, biotite-hornblende granite and biotite granite facies; the intrusion has a reverse chemical zonation, characterized by >70 wt% SiO 2 at its inferred margin and <67 wt% SiO 2 at the core. Fluid inclusion evidence indicates that fractured Takidani Granodiorite at one time hosted a liquid-dominated, convective hydrothermal system, with <380°C, low-salinity reservoir fluids at hydrostatic (mesothermal) pressure conditions. 'Healed' microfractures also trapped >600°C, hypersaline (˜35 wt% NaCl eq) fluids of magmatic origin, with inferred minimum pressures of formation being ˜600-750 bar, which corresponds to fluid entrapment at ˜2.4-3.0 km depth. Al-in-hornblende geobarometry indicates that hornblende crystallization occurred at about 1.45 Ma (7.7-9.4 km depth) in the (marginal) eastern Takidani Granodiorite, but later (at ˜1.25 Ma) and shallower (˜6.5-7.0 km) near the core of the intrusion. The average rate of uplift across the Takidani Granodiorite from the time of hornblende crystallization has been 5.1-5.9 mm/yr (although uplift was about 7.5 mm/yr prior to ˜1.2 Ma), which is faster than average uplift rates in the Japan Alps (˜3 mm/yr during the last 2 million years). A temperature-depth-time window, when the Takidani Granodiorite had potential to host an HDR system, would have been when the internal temperature of the intrusive was cooling from 500°C to ˜400°C. Taking into account the initial (7.5 mm/yr) rate of uplift and effects of erosion, an optimal temperature-time-depth window is proposed: for 500°C at 1.54-1.57 Ma and ˜5.2±0.9 km (drilling) depth; and 400°C at 1

  3. Development and implementation of a remote audit tool for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 brachytherapy using optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Kevin E.; Alvarez, Paola; Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Lawyer, Ann; Followill, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to create a mailable phantom with measurement accuracy suitable for Radiological Physics Center (RPC) audits of high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources at institutions participating in National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative clinical trials. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) were chosen as the dosimeter to be used with the phantom. Methods: The authors designed and built an 8 × 8 × 10 cm3 prototype phantom that had two slots capable of holding Al2O3:C OSLDs (nanoDots; Landauer, Glenwood, IL) and a single channel capable of accepting all 192Ir HDR brachytherapy sources in current clinical use in the United States. The authors irradiated the phantom with Nucletron and Varian 192Ir HDR sources in order to determine correction factors for linearity with dose and the combined effects of irradiation energy and phantom characteristics. The phantom was then sent to eight institutions which volunteered to perform trial remote audits. Results: The linearity correction factor was kL = (−9.43 × 10−5 × dose) + 1.009, where dose is in cGy, which differed from that determined by the RPC for the same batch of dosimeters using 60Co irradiation. Separate block correction factors were determined for current versions of both Nucletron and Varian 192Ir HDR sources and these vendor-specific correction factors differed by almost 2.6%. For the Nucletron source, the correction factor was 1.026 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.023–1.028], and for the Varian source, it was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.995–1.005). Variations in lateral source positioning up to 0.8 mm and distal/proximal source positioning up to 10 mm had minimal effect on dose measurement accuracy. The overall dose measurement uncertainty of the system was estimated to be 2.4% and 2.5% for the Nucletron and Varian sources, respectively (95% CI). This uncertainty was sufficient to establish a ±5% acceptance criterion for source strength audits under a formal RPC

  4. TU-F-BRF-02: MR-US Prostate Registration Using Patient-Specific Tissue Elasticity Property Prior for MR-Targeted, TRUS-Guided HDR Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Ogunleye, T; Jani, A; Curran, W; Liu, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has become a popular treatment modality for prostate cancer. Conventional transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate HDR brachytherapy could benefit significantly from MR-targeted, TRUS-guided procedure where the tumor locations, acquired from the multiparametric MRI, are incorporated into the treatment planning. In order to enable this integration, we have developed a MR-TRUS registration with a patient-specific biomechanical elasticity prior. Methods: The proposed method used a biomechanical elasticity prior to guide the prostate volumetric B-spline deformation in the MRI and TRUS registration. The patient-specific biomechanical elasticity prior was generated using ultrasound elastography, where two 3D TRUS prostate images were acquired under different probe-induced pressures during the HDR procedure, which takes 2-4 minutes. These two 3D TRUS images were used to calculate the local displacement (elasticity map) of two prostate volumes. The B-spline transformation was calculated by minimizing the Euclidean distance between the normalized attribute vectors of the prostate surface landmarks on the MR and TRUS. This technique was evaluated through two studies: a prostate-phantom study and a pilot study with 5 patients undergoing prostate HDR treatment. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of several landmarks in the post-registration and TRUS images; our registration results were compared with the surface-based method. Results: For the phantom study, the mean landmark displacement of the proposed method was 1.29±0.11 mm. For the 5 patients, the mean landmark displacement of the surface-based method was 3.25±0.51 mm; our method, 1.71±0.25 mm. Therefore, our proposed method of prostate registration outperformed the surfaced-based registration significantly. Conclusion: We have developed a novel MR-TRUS prostate registration approach based on patient-specific biomechanical elasticity prior

  5. Development and implementation of a remote audit tool for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 brachytherapy using optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Kevin E.; Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Alvarez, Paola; Lawyer, Ann

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to create a mailable phantom with measurement accuracy suitable for Radiological Physics Center (RPC) audits of high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources at institutions participating in National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative clinical trials. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) were chosen as the dosimeter to be used with the phantom.Methods: The authors designed and built an 8 × 8 × 10 cm{sup 3} prototype phantom that had two slots capable of holding Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSLDs (nanoDots; Landauer, Glenwood, IL) and a single channel capable of accepting all {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy sources in current clinical use in the United States. The authors irradiated the phantom with Nucletron and Varian {sup 192}Ir HDR sources in order to determine correction factors for linearity with dose and the combined effects of irradiation energy and phantom characteristics. The phantom was then sent to eight institutions which volunteered to perform trial remote audits.Results: The linearity correction factor was k{sub L}= (−9.43 × 10{sup −5}× dose) + 1.009, where dose is in cGy, which differed from that determined by the RPC for the same batch of dosimeters using {sup 60}Co irradiation. Separate block correction factors were determined for current versions of both Nucletron and Varian {sup 192}Ir HDR sources and these vendor-specific correction factors differed by almost 2.6%. For the Nucletron source, the correction factor was 1.026 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.023–1.028], and for the Varian source, it was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.995–1.005). Variations in lateral source positioning up to 0.8 mm and distal/proximal source positioning up to 10 mm had minimal effect on dose measurement accuracy. The overall dose measurement uncertainty of the system was estimated to be 2.4% and 2.5% for the Nucletron and Varian sources, respectively (95% CI). This uncertainty was sufficient to establish a ±5% acceptance

  6. Monte Carlo simulations and radiation dosimetry measurements of peripherally applied HDR 192Ir breast brachytherapy D-shaped applicators.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun; Rivard, Mark J

    2009-03-01

    Conformal dose coverage for accelerated partial breast irradiation or radiotherapy boost can be obtained with AccuBoost D-shaped brachytherapy applicators using a flattened surface positioned near the patient. Three D-shaped applicators (D45/D53/D60) were dosimetrically characterized using Monte Carlo methods (MCNP5), air ionization chambers (Farmer and Markus), and radiochromic film (GafChromic EBT) in polystyrene and ICRU 44 breast tissue. HDR 192Ir source dwell times were either constant or optimized to improve skin dose uniformity. Scatter dose decreased as depth decreased. 10 mm beyond the applicator aperture, dose reductions of 90% and 51% were observed at depths of 0 and 30 mm, respectively. Similarly, planar dose uniformity improved as depth decreased and was also due to scatter and applicator geometry. Dose uniformity inside the applicator aperture was approximately 11% and 15% for all three applicators at the skin and 30 mm deep, respectively. Depth dose measurements in polystyrene using ion chamber and radiochromic film agreed with Monte Carlo results within 2%. Discrepancies between film and Monte Carlo dose profiles at 30 mm depth were within 1%.

  7. Exploitation of secondary standard for calibration in units of Dw,1 cm and assessment of several HDR brachytherapy planning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabris, Frantisek; Zeman, Jozef; Valenta, Jiri; Selbach, Hans-Joachim

    2012-10-01

    A secondary standard of the BEV, calibrated at the PTB in terms of Dw,1 cm, was used for calibration of the well-type chamber-based measuring systems used in clinics. In addition to the calibration, we tried to employ it for assessment of treatment planning systems (TPS) used for each particular afterloader. The dose to water at 1 cm distance from the source position was calculated by the TPS, using reference data from the source producer certificate. The values were compared directly with the dose measured at the same distance from the source. The comparison has been carried out for GammaMed Plus and MicroSelectron HDR sources. Differences of secondary standard measurements and TPS calculations were lower than ±5%, which is below the achievable uncertainty of both dose measurement and dose determination by the TPS. Nevertheless, it is higher than generally accepted in the case of external beam radiotherapy. Additional direct measurements in terms of Dw,1 cm may improve the safety and reliability of patient treatment. Part of the EMRP JRP T02.J06 Project ‘Increasing Cancer Treatment Efficacy Using 3D Brachytherapy’.

  8. Computed Tomography-Guided Interstitial HDR Brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) of the Liver in Patients with Irresectable Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schnapauff, Dirk Denecke, Timm; Grieser, Christian; Colletini, Federico; Seehofer, Daniel; Sinn, Marianne; Wust, Peter; Gebauer, Bernhard

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the clinical outcome of patients with irresectable, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHC) treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided HDR-brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) for local tumor ablation.MethodFifteen consecutive patients with histologically proven cholangiocarcinoma were selected for this retrospective study. Patients were treated by high-dose-rate internal brachytherapy (HDRBT) using an Iridium-192 source in afterloading technique through CT-guided percutaneous placed catheters. A total of 27 brachytherapy treatments were performed in these patients between 2006 and 2009. Median tumor enclosing target dose was 20 Gy, and mean target volume of the radiated tumors was 131 ({+-} 90) ml (range, 10-257 ml). Follow-up consisted of clinical visits and magnetic resonance imaging of the liver every third month. Statistical evaluation included survival analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: After a median follow-up of 18 (range, 1-27) months after local ablation, 6 of the 15 patients are still alive; 4 of them did not get further chemotherapy and are regarded as disease-free. The reached median local tumor control was 10 months; median local tumor control, including repetitive local ablation, was 11 months. Median survival after local ablation was 14 months and after primary diagnosis 21 months. Conclusion: In view of current clinical data on the clinical outcome of cholangiocarcinoma, locally ablative treatment with CT-HDRBT represents a promising and safe technique for patients who are not eligible for tumor resection.

  9. A simplified analytical approach to estimate the parameters required for strength determination of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources using a Farmer-type ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D; Mayya, Y S

    2012-01-01

    Measuring the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of a quality assurance program. Owing to their ready availability in radiotherapy departments, the Farmer-type ionization chambers are also used to determine the strength of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. The use of a Farmer-type ionization chamber requires the estimation of the scatter correction factor along with positioning error (c) and the constant of proportionality (f) to determine the strength of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. A simplified approach based on a least squares method was developed for estimating the values of f and M(s). The seven distance method was followed to record the ionization chamber readings for parameterization of f and M(s). Analytically calculated values of M(s) were used to determine the room scatter correction factor (K(sc)). The Monte Carlo simulations were also carried out to calculate f and K(sc) to verify the magnitude of the parameters determined by the proposed analytical approach. The value of f determined using the simplified analytical approach was found to be in excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo simulated value (within 0.7%). Analytically derived values of K(sc) were also found to be in good agreement with the Monte Carlo calculated values (within 1.47%). Being far simpler than the presently available methods of evaluating f, the proposed analytical approach can be adopted for routine use by clinical medical physicists to estimate f by hand calculations.

  10. SU-C-BRD-02: A Team Focused Clinical Implementation and Failure Mode and Effects Analysis of HDR Skin Brachytherapy Using Valencia and Leipzig Surface Applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Sayler, E; Harrison, A; Eldredge-Hindy, H; Dinome, J; Munro, S; Anne, R; Comber, E; Lockamy, V

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: and Leipzig applicators (VLAs) are single-channel brachytherapy surface applicators used to treat skin lesions up to 2cm diameter. Source dwell times can be calculated and entered manually after clinical set-up or ultrasound. This procedure differs dramatically from CT-based planning; the novelty and unfamiliarity could lead to severe errors. To build layers of safety and ensure quality, a multidisciplinary team created a protocol and applied Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) to the clinical procedure for HDR VLA skin treatments. Methods: team including physicists, physicians, nurses, therapists, residents, and administration developed a clinical procedure for VLA treatment. The procedure was evaluated using FMEA. Failure modes were identified and scored by severity, occurrence, and detection. The clinical procedure was revised to address high-scoring process nodes. Results: Several key components were added to the clinical procedure to minimize risk probability numbers (RPN): -Treatments are reviewed at weekly QA rounds, where physicians discuss diagnosis, prescription, applicator selection, and set-up. Peer review reduces the likelihood of an inappropriate treatment regime. -A template for HDR skin treatments was established in the clinical EMR system to standardize treatment instructions. This reduces the chances of miscommunication between the physician and planning physicist, and increases the detectability of an error during the physics second check. -A screen check was implemented during the second check to increase detectability of an error. -To reduce error probability, the treatment plan worksheet was designed to display plan parameters in a format visually similar to the treatment console display. This facilitates data entry and verification. -VLAs are color-coded and labeled to match the EMR prescriptions, which simplifies in-room selection and verification. Conclusion: Multidisciplinary planning and FMEA increased delectability and

  11. Direct measurement of absorbed dose to water in HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy: Water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfehnia, Arman; Kawrakow, Iwan; Seuntjens, Jan

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Gafchromic film and ionometric calibration procedures for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources in terms of dose rate to water are presented and the experimental results are compared to the TG-43 protocol as well as with the absolute dose measurement results from a water calorimetry-based primary standard. Methods: EBT-1 Gafchromic films, an A1SL Exradin miniature Shonka thimble type chamber, and an SI HDR 1000 Plus well-type chamber (Standard Imaging, Inc., Middleton, WI) with an ADCL traceable S{sub k} calibration coefficient (following the AAPM TG-43 protocol) were used. The Farmer chamber and Gafchromic film measurements were performed directly in water. All results were compared to direct and absolute absorbed dose to water measurements from a 4 deg. C stagnant water calorimeter. Results: Based on water calorimetry, the authors measured the dose rate to water to be 361{+-}7 {mu}Gy/(h U) at a 55 mm source-to-detector separation. The dose rate normalized to air-kerma strength for all the techniques agree with the water calorimetry results to within 0.83%. The overall 1-sigma uncertainty on water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43 dose rate measurement amounts to 1.90%, 1.44%, 1.78%, and 2.50%, respectively. Conclusions: This work allows us to build a more realistic uncertainty estimate for absorbed dose to water determination using the TG-43 protocol. Furthermore, it provides the framework necessary for a shift from indirect HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy dosimetry to a more accurate, direct, and absolute measurement of absorbed dose to water.

  12. A dosimetric comparison of 169Yb and 192Ir for HDR brachytherapy of the breast, accounting for the effect of finite patient dimensions and tissue inhomogeneities.

    PubMed

    Lymperopoulou, G; Papagiannis, P; Angelopoulos, A; Karaiskos, P; Georgiou, E; Baltas, D

    2006-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulation dosimetry is used to compare 169Yb to 192Ir for breast high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy applications using multiple catheter implants. Results for bare point sources show that while 169Yb delivers a greater dose rate per unit air kerma strength at the radial distance range of interest to brachytherapy in homogeneous water phantoms, it suffers a greater dose rate deficit in missing scatter conditions relative to 192Ir. As a result of these two opposing factors, in the scatter conditions defined by the presence of the lung and the finite patient dimensions in breast brachytherapy the dose distributions calculated in a patient equivalent mathematical phantom by Monte Carlo simulations for the same implant of either 169Yb or 1921r commercially available sources are found comparable. Dose volume histogram results support that 169Yb could be at least as effective as 192Ir delivering the same dose to the lung and slightly reduced dose to the breast skin. The current treatment planning systems' approach of employing dosimetry data precalculated in a homogeneous water phantom of given shape and dimensions, however, is shown to notably overestimate the delivered dose distribution for 169Yb. Especially at the skin and the lung, the treatment planning system dose overestimation is on the order of 15%-30%. These findings do not undermine the potential of 169Yb HDR sources for breast brachytherapy relative to the most commonly used 192Ir HDR sources. They imply, however, that there could be a need for the amendment of dose calculation algorithms employed in clinical treatment planning of particular brachytherapy applications, especially for intermediate photon energy sources such as 169Yb.

  13. In-phantom response of LiF TLD-100 for dosimetry of 192Ir HDR source.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, A S; Quast, U

    2000-05-01

    An experiment was carried out to reevaluate the response of LiF TLD-100 rods (1 mmx1 mmx6 mm) at different depths in a water substituting phantom to provide an answer to a prevailing controversy about the over-response of LiF to the softened photon spectra of 192Ir HDR source at depths in phantom due to its photon energy dependence. Claims of some authors that LiF TLDs over-responds by 8.5% at 10 cm depth in phantom, necessitating depth-dependent correction factors even for an 192Ir source and of some others for no over-response were evaluated. The over-response of LiF TLD-100 rods, against a calibrated ion chamber having a photon energy-independent response within 2%, was found to be not exceeding 2.5% at a depth of 10 cm in the phantom as compared to a depth at 1 cm, for a precision of the order of +/- 1% (1sigma) in the TLD measurements. By using ISO equivalent photon beams, photon energy dependence of the dosimeters was evaluated and for LiF TLD-100 rods it was found to be in close agreement (within 3%) with the ratios of mass energy absorption coefficients of LiF and water in the range of effective photon energy from 26 keV to 1.25 MeV. Parameters that could contribute to the discrepancy in the reported values of experimental results have been discussed.

  14. Development of a water calorimetry-based standard for absorbed dose to water in HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfehnia, Arman; Seuntjens, Jan

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to develop and evaluate a primary standard for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy based on 4 deg. C stagnant water calorimetry. Methods: The absolute absorbed dose to water was directly measured for several different Nucletron microSelectron {sup 192}Ir sources of air kerma strength ranging between 21 000 and 38 000 U and for source-to-detector separations ranging between 25 and 70 mm. The COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS software was used to accurately calculate the heat transport in a detailed model geometry. Through a coupling of the ''conduction and convection'' module with the ''Navier-Stokes incompressible fluid'' module in the software, both the conductive and convective effects were modeled. Results: A detailed uncertainty analysis resulted in an overall uncertainty in the absorbed dose of 1.90%(1{sigma}). However, this includes a 1.5% uncertainty associated with a nonlinear predrift correction which can be substantially reduced if sufficient time is provided for the system to come to a new equilibrium in between successive calorimetric runs, an opportunity not available to the authors in their clinical setting due to time constraints on the machine. An average normalized dose rate of 361{+-}7 {mu}Gy/(h U) at a source-to-detector separation of 55 mm was measured for the microSelectron {sup 192}Ir source based on water calorimetry. The measured absorbed dose per air kerma strength agreed to better than 0.8%(1{sigma}) with independent ionization chamber and EBT-1 Gafchromic film reference dosimetry as well as with the currently accepted AAPM TG-43 protocol measurements. Conclusions: This work paves the way toward a primary absorbed dose to water standard in {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy.

  15. Comparison between beta radiation dose distribution due to LDR and HDR ocular brachytherapy applicators using GATE Monte Carlo platform.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Laoues; Rachid, Khelifi; Ahmed, Sidi Moussa

    2016-08-01

    Eye applicators with 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta-ray sources are generally used in brachytherapy for the treatment of eye diseases as uveal melanoma. Whenever, radiation is used in treatment, dosimetry is essential. However, knowledge of the exact dose distribution is a critical decision-making to the outcome of the treatment. The Monte Carlo technique provides a powerful tool for calculation of the dose and dose distributions which helps to predict and determine the doses from different shapes of various types of eye applicators more accurately. The aim of this work consisted in using the Monte Carlo GATE platform to calculate the 3D dose distribution on a mathematical model of the human eye according to international recommendations. Mathematical models were developed for four ophthalmic applicators, two HDR 90Sr applicators SIA.20 and SIA.6, and two LDR 106Ru applicators, a concave CCB model and a flat CCB model. In present work, considering a heterogeneous eye phantom and the chosen tumor, obtained results with the use of GATE for mean doses distributions in a phantom and according to international recommendations show a discrepancy with respect to those specified by the manufacturers. The QC of dosimetric parameters shows that contrarily to the other applicators, the SIA.20 applicator is consistent with recommendations. The GATE platform show that the SIA.20 applicator present better results, namely the dose delivered to critical structures were lower compared to those obtained for the other applicators, and the SIA.6 applicator, simulated with MCNPX generates higher lens doses than those generated by GATE. PMID:27499370

  16. High-resolution genomic assays provide insight into the division of labor between TLS and HDR in mammalian replication of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Livneh, Zvi; Cohen, Isadora S; Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Davidovsky, Dana; Carmi, Dalit; Swain, Umakanta; Mirlas-Neisberg, Nataly

    2016-08-01

    The multitude of DNA lesions that continuously form in DNA cannot all be detected and removed prior to replication. Thus, encounters of the replication fork with DNA damage become inevitable. Such encounters inhibit fork progression, leading to replication fork arrest or to replication re-priming downstream of the damage site. Either of these events will result in the formation of gap-lesion structures, in which a damaged base is located in a single stranded stretch of DNA, that is vulnerable to subsequent nicking. The double strand break that would ensue if ssDNA becomes nicked constitutes escalation of the damage from nucleotide(s)-specific to chromosomal scale. Cells employ two universal DNA damage tolerance (DDT) strategies to resolve these situations, by converting the gap-lesion structures into dsDNA without repairing the damage. The first is translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), in which a specialized low-fidelity DNA polymerase inserts a nucleotide opposite the damaged one. TLS is inherently mutagenic, due to the miscoding nature of most damaged nucleotides. The second strategy is homology-dependent repair (HDR), which relies on the presence of an identical intact sister chromatid. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the division of labor between these pathways are poorly understood. This review focuses on the balance between TLS and HDR in mammalian cells, discussing recent findings that were made possible thanks to newly developed high resolution genomic assays, and highlighting the role of the DNA lesion's properties in DDT pathway choice.

  17. Monte Carlo study of the impact of a magnetic field on the dose distribution in MRI-guided HDR brachytherapy using Ir-192

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beld, E.; Seevinck, P. R.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Viergever, M. A.; Moerland, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    In the process of developing a robotic MRI-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy treatment, the influence of the MRI scanner’s magnetic field on the dose distribution needs to be investigated. A magnetic field causes a deflection of electrons in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field, and it leads to less lateral scattering along the direction parallel with the magnetic field. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to determine the influence of the magnetic field on the electron behavior and on the total dose distribution around an Ir-192 source. Furthermore, the influence of air pockets being present near the source was studied. The Monte Carlo package Geant4 was utilized for the simulations. The simulated geometries consisted of a simplified point source inside a water phantom. Magnetic field strengths of 0 T, 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T were considered. The simulation results demonstrated that the dose distribution was nearly unaffected by the magnetic field for all investigated magnetic field strengths. Evidence was found that, from a dose perspective, the HDR prostate brachytherapy treatment using Ir-192 can be performed safely inside the MRI scanner. No need was found to account for the magnetic field during treatment planning. Nevertheless, the presence of air pockets in close vicinity to the source, particularly along the direction parallel with the magnetic field, appeared to be an important point for consideration.

  18. High-resolution genomic assays provide insight into the division of labor between TLS and HDR in mammalian replication of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Livneh, Zvi; Cohen, Isadora S; Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Davidovsky, Dana; Carmi, Dalit; Swain, Umakanta; Mirlas-Neisberg, Nataly

    2016-08-01

    The multitude of DNA lesions that continuously form in DNA cannot all be detected and removed prior to replication. Thus, encounters of the replication fork with DNA damage become inevitable. Such encounters inhibit fork progression, leading to replication fork arrest or to replication re-priming downstream of the damage site. Either of these events will result in the formation of gap-lesion structures, in which a damaged base is located in a single stranded stretch of DNA, that is vulnerable to subsequent nicking. The double strand break that would ensue if ssDNA becomes nicked constitutes escalation of the damage from nucleotide(s)-specific to chromosomal scale. Cells employ two universal DNA damage tolerance (DDT) strategies to resolve these situations, by converting the gap-lesion structures into dsDNA without repairing the damage. The first is translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), in which a specialized low-fidelity DNA polymerase inserts a nucleotide opposite the damaged one. TLS is inherently mutagenic, due to the miscoding nature of most damaged nucleotides. The second strategy is homology-dependent repair (HDR), which relies on the presence of an identical intact sister chromatid. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the division of labor between these pathways are poorly understood. This review focuses on the balance between TLS and HDR in mammalian cells, discussing recent findings that were made possible thanks to newly developed high resolution genomic assays, and highlighting the role of the DNA lesion's properties in DDT pathway choice. PMID:27262613

  19. A statistical approach to infer the minimum setup distance of a well chamber to the wall or to the floor for {sup 192}Ir HDR calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Liyun; Ho, S.-Y.; Chui, C.-S.; Lee, J.-H.; Du Yichun; Chen Tainsong

    2008-06-15

    We propose a new method based on statistical analysis technique to determine the minimum setup distance of a well chamber used in the calibration of {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR). The chamber should be placed at least this distance away from any wall or from the floor in order to mitigate the effect of scatter. Three different chambers were included in this study, namely, Sun Nuclear Corporation, Nucletron, and Standard Imaging. The results from this study indicated that the minimum setup distance varies depending on the particular chamber and the room architecture in which the chamber was used. Our result differs from that of a previous study by Podgorsak et al. [Med. Phys. 19, 1311-1314 (1992)], in which 25 cm was suggested, and also differs from that of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)-TECDOC-1079 report, which suggested 30 cm. The new method proposed in this study may be considered as an alternative approach to determine the minimum setup distance of a well-type chamber used in the calibration of {sup 192}Ir HDR.

  20. A phantom study of an in vivo dosimetry system using plastic scintillation detectors for real-time verification of 192Ir HDR brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Therriault-Proulx, Francois; Briere, Tina M.; Mourtada, Firas; Aubin, Sylviane; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of the present work was to evaluate the accuracy of a plastic scintillation detector (PSD) system to perform in-phantom dosimetry during 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatments. Methods: A PSD system capable of stem effect removal was built. A red–green–blue photodiode connected to a dual-channel electrometer was used to detect the scintillation light emitted from a green scintillation component and transmitted along a plastic optical fiber. A clinically relevant prostate treatment plan was built using the HDR brachytherapy treatment planning system. An in-house fabricated template was used for accurate positioning of the catheters, and treatment delivery was performed in a water phantom. Eleven catheters were inserted and used for dose delivery from 192Ir radioactive source, while two others were used to mimic dosimetry at the rectum wall and in the urethra using a PSD. The measured dose and dose rate data were compared to the expected values from the planning system. The importance of removing stem effects from in vivo dosimetry using a PSD during 192Ir HDR brachytherapy treatments was assessed. Applications for dwell position error detection and temporal verification of the treatment delivery were also investigated. Results: In-phantom dosimetry measurements of the treatment plan led to a ratio to the expected dose of 1.003 ± 0.004 with the PSD at different positions in the urethra and 1.043 ± 0.003 with the PSD inserted in the rectum. Verification for the urethra of dose delivered within each catheter and at specific dwell positions led to average measured to expected ratios of 1.015 ± 0.019 and 1.014 ± 0.020, respectively. These values at the rectum wall were 1.059 ± 0.045 within each catheter and 1.025 ± 0.028 for specific dwell positions. The ability to detect positioning errors of the source depended of the tolerance on the difference to the expected value. A 5-mm displacement of the source was

  1. SU-C-16A-01: In Vivo Source Position Verification in High Dose Rate (HDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Flat Panel Imager: Initial Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Franich, R; Smith, R; Millar, J; Haworth, A; Taylor, M; McDermott, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We report our initial clinical experience with a novel position-sensitive source-tracking system based on a flat panel imager. The system has been trialled with 4 prostate HDR brachytherapy patients (8 treatment fractions) in this initial study. Methods: The flat panel imaging system was mounted under a customised carbon fibre couch top assembly (Figure 1). Three gold fiducial markers were implanted into the prostate of each patient at the time of catheter placement. X-ray dwell position markers were inserted into three catheters and a radiograph acquired to locate the implant relative to the imaging device. During treatment, as the HDR source dwells were delivered, images were acquired and processed to determine the position of the source in the patient. Source positions measured by the imaging device were compared to the treatment plan for verification of treatment delivery. Results: Measured dwell positions provided verification of relative dwell spacing within and between catheters, in the coronal plane. Measurements were typically within 2.0mm (0.2mm – 3.3mm, s.d. 0.8mm) of the planned positions over 60 dwells (Figure 2). Discrimination between larger dwell intervals and catheter differentiation were clear. This confirms important delivery attributes such as correct transfer tube connection, source step size, relative catheter positions and therefore overall correct plan selection and delivery. The fiducial markers, visible on the radiograph, provided verification of treatment delivery to the correct anatomical location. The absolute position of the dwells was determined by comparing the measured dwell positions with the x-ray markers from the radiograph, validating the programmed treatment indexer length. The total impact on procedure time was less than 5 minutes. Conclusion: The novel, noninvasive HDR brachytherapy treatment verification system was used clinically with minor impact on workflow. The system allows verification of correct treatment

  2. Image-Guided High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Boost Localization Using MRI/MR Spectroscopy: A Correlation Study with Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Mbodji, Khaly; Racine, Louis G; Chevrette, Eric; Lavallee, Marie C; Martin, André-Guy; Despres, Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc

    2016-01-01

    93.7% (84.5% - 98.2%) and 82.1% (66.5% - 92.5%), respectively, and a PPV and NPV of 89.4% (79.4% - 95.6%) and 88.9% (73.9% - 96.9%), respectively. Finally, after combining MRI, MRS, and DWI-ADC mapping, compared with biopsy, we obtained a Sn, Sp, PPV, and NPV of 100% (94.8% - 100%), 49% (34.8% - 63.4%), 72.6% (62.5% - 81.3%), and 100% (86.3% - 100%), respectively. Conclusions: The combination of MRI/MRS is a sensitive tool for both the structural and metabolic evaluation of prostate cancer location. MRI/MRS exams are useful to delineate a DIL for high-dose-rate (HDR) intraprostatic boost.

  3. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 03: Current status of the NRC primary standard for {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mainegra-Hing, E; Downton, Brad

    2014-08-15

    The Canadian primary standard for {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy sources has been recently revised in a more accurate manner allowing for more realistic uncertainty estimation. Air-kerma strength S{sub k} is derived from measurements of the source's output using a graphite-walled spherical ionization chamber (2S) at several distances. Traceability to NRC primary standards for the {sup 192}Ir calibration coefficient N{sub k} is insured by estimating it as the inverse arithmetic mean of the inverse of the calibration coefficients for a {sup 137}Cs beam and the medium energy x-ray beam quality N250, both of which are traceable to NRC primary standards. The multiple-distance method is combined with a non-linear least squares fit to determine St, while at the same time removing the effects of room scatter and position offset. The previously used shadow-cone method for directly measuring the room scatter is found to be inadequate due to the increased scatter contribution from the lead cone itself, especially at short source-detector distances. Rather than including the reported 1% difference in source strength for {sup 192}Ir HDR sources of different construction into the total uncertainty, users are cautioned that the calibration coefficient provided by NRC is only valid for a microSelectron V2 model. A comprehensive uncertainty budged shows that the total one sigma uncertainty of the standard is actually 0.6% rather than the previously assumed 1.2%. NRC measured S{sub k} agrees within 0.03% of the manufacturer's value.

  4. SU-E-P-38: Comparison of Capri Applicator HDR Planning Methods to Meet the NCCN Uterine Neoplasm 2.2015 Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Klash, S; Steinman, J; Stanley, T; Kim, D; Yi, S; Yap, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To establish a systematic planning approach for Capri intravaginal multichannel balloon applicators that meet updated Version 2.2015 NCCN guidelines for uterine neoplasms, which dictate delivery of 400 to 600 cGy in 2 to 3 fractions prescribed to the vaginal mucosa for HDR combined with EBRT as well as a regimen of 600 cGy x 5 (to the vaginal mucosa) for HDR brachytherapy alone. Methods: Studies have shown three different channel configurations of the Capri applicator are optimal for dosimetric conformity: central channel combined with the six inner ring channels (R12), all inner and outer ring channels (R23), or all thirteen channels (R123). To minimize the dose to the vaginal mucosa, a traditional 0.5cm expansion contour from the Capri surface was created. Optimization limits were set to push 600 cGy to 100% of the Capri volume, while simultaneously restricting dose to the expansion contour. Results: Plans were created using all three configurations (R12, R23, R123) and evaluated to determine which was best for delivering 600 cGy to the vaginal mucosa. Our criteria was: Capri V100 > 98%, Vaginal Mucosa Dmax < 125%, Bladder Dmax < 100%, Rectum Dmax < 100%. All configurations show Capri V100 values greater than 98.5%, with differences between plans varying by less than 1%. Vaginal mucosal Dmax values showed differences of roughly 5% of prescription. The R12 configuration proved the lowest vaginal mucosa Dmax, on average. The OAR Dmax values showed an average dose difference of roughly 2% of prescription, with the R23 configuration having the best results. Conclusion: The R12 channel configuration optimally fits our planning criteria and NCCN guidelines for 600 cGy prescribed to the vaginal mucosa. On average, it produced the highest Capri V100, the lowest vaginal mucosal Dmax, and a marginally higher OAR Dmax doses compared to the R23 and R123 plans.

  5. SU-E-T-615: Investigation of the Dosimetric Impact of Tandem Loading in the Treatment of Cervical Cancer for HDR Brachytherapy Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, C; Patton, L; Nelson, K; Lin, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of the tandem loading in the treatment of cervical cancer for HDR brachytherapy procedures. Methods: Ten patients were evaluated, each of whom received 5 fractions of treatment. Tandem and ovoid sets were inserted into the uterine cavity based on institutional protocols and procedures. Following insertion and stabilization, CT image sets of 1.5mm slice thickness were acquired and sent to the Oncentra V4.3 Treatment Planning System. Critical structures such as the CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and bowel were contoured and a fractional dose of 5.5Gy was prescribed to Point A for each patient. Six different treatment plans were created for each fraction using varying tandem weightings; from 0.5 to 1.4 times that of the ovoids. Surface dose evaluation of various ovoid diameters, 2.0-3.5cm, at the vaginal fornices was also investigated. Results: Critical structures were evaluated based on varying dose and volume constraints, in particular the 2.0 cc volume recommendation cited by the gynecological GEC-ESTRO working group. Based on dose volume histogram evaluation, a reduction of dose to the critical structures was most often discovered when the tandem weighting was increased. CTV coverage showed little change as the tandem weighting was varied. Ovoid surface dose decreased by 50-65% as the tandem weighting increased. Conclusion: The advantage of 3D planning with HDR brachytherapy is the dose optimization for each individual treatment plan. This investigation shows that by utilizing large tandem weightings, 1.4 times greater than the ovoid, one can still achieve adequate coverage of the CTV and relatively low doses to the critical structures. In some cases, one would still have to optimize further per individual case. In addition, the ovoid surface dose was greatly decreased when large tandem weighting was utilized; especially for small ovoid diameters.

  6. Spectral and temperature-dependent infrared emissivity measurements of painted metals for improved temperature estimation during laser damage testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Sean M.; Keenan, Cameron; Marciniak, Michael A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2014-10-01

    A database of spectral and temperature-dependent emissivities was created for painted Al-alloy laser-damage-testing targets for the purpose of improving the uncertainty to which temperature on the front and back target surfaces may be estimated during laser-damage testing. Previous temperature estimates had been made by fitting an assumed gray-body radiance curve to the calibrated spectral radiance data collected from the back surface using a Telops Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS). In this work, temperature-dependent spectral emissivity measurements of the samples were made from room temperature to 500 °C using a Surface Optics Corp. SOC-100 Hemispherical Directional Reflectometer (HDR) with Nicolet FTS. Of particular interest was a high-temperature matte-black enamel paint used to coat the rear surfaces of the Al-alloy samples. The paint had been assumed to have a spectrally flat and temperatureinvariant emissivity. However, the data collected using the HDR showed both spectral variation and temperature dependence. The uncertainty in back-surface temperature estimation during laser-damage testing made using the measured emissivities was improved from greater than +10 °C to less than +5 °C for IFTS pixels away from the laser burn-through hole, where temperatures never exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR measurements. At beam center, where temperatures exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR, uncertainty in temperature estimates grew beyond those made assuming gray-body emissivity. Accurate temperature estimations during laser-damage testing are useful in informing a predictive model for future high-energy-laser weapon applications.

  7. SU-F-BRF-09: A Non-Rigid Point Matching Method for Accurate Bladder Dose Summation in Cervical Cancer HDR Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Zhen, X; Zhou, L; Zhong, Z; Pompos, A; Yan, H; Jiang, S; Gu, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To propose and validate a deformable point matching scheme for surface deformation to facilitate accurate bladder dose summation for fractionated HDR cervical cancer treatment. Method: A deformable point matching scheme based on the thin plate spline robust point matching (TPSRPM) algorithm is proposed for bladder surface registration. The surface of bladders segmented from fractional CT images is extracted and discretized with triangular surface mesh. Deformation between the two bladder surfaces are obtained by matching the two meshes' vertices via the TPS-RPM algorithm, and the deformation vector fields (DVFs) characteristic of this deformation is estimated by B-spline approximation. Numerically, the algorithm is quantitatively compared with the Demons algorithm using five clinical cervical cancer cases by several metrics: vertex-to-vertex distance (VVD), Hausdorff distance (HD), percent error (PE), and conformity index (CI). Experimentally, the algorithm is validated on a balloon phantom with 12 surface fiducial markers. The balloon is inflated with different amount of water, and the displacement of fiducial markers is benchmarked as ground truth to study TPS-RPM calculated DVFs' accuracy. Results: In numerical evaluation, the mean VVD is 3.7(±2.0) mm after Demons, and 1.3(±0.9) mm after TPS-RPM. The mean HD is 14.4 mm after Demons, and 5.3mm after TPS-RPM. The mean PE is 101.7% after Demons and decreases to 18.7% after TPS-RPM. The mean CI is 0.63 after Demons, and increases to 0.90 after TPS-RPM. In the phantom study, the mean Euclidean distance of the fiducials is 7.4±3.0mm and 4.2±1.8mm after Demons and TPS-RPM, respectively. Conclusions: The bladder wall deformation is more accurate using the feature-based TPS-RPM algorithm than the intensity-based Demons algorithm, indicating that TPS-RPM has the potential for accurate bladder dose deformation and dose summation for multi-fractional cervical HDR brachytherapy. This work is supported in part by

  8. SU-F-19A-02: Comparison of Absorbed Dose to Water Standards for HDR Ir-192 Brachytherapy Between the LCR, Brazil and NRC, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Salata, C; David, M; Almeida, C de; El Gamal, I; Cojocaru, C; Mainegra-Hing, E; McEwen, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare absorbed dose to water standards for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry developed by the Radiological Science Laboratory of Rio de Janeiro State University (LCR) and the National Research Council, Canada (NRC). Methods: The two institutions have separately developed absorbed dose standards based on the Fricke dosimetry system. There are important differences between the two standards, including: preparation and read-out of the Fricke solution, irradiation geometry of the Fricke holder in relation to the Ir-192 source, and determination of the G-value to be used at Ir-192 energies. All measurements for both standards were made directly at the NRC laboratory (i.e., no transfer instrument was used) using a single Ir-192 source (microSelectron v2). In addition, the NRC group has established a self-consistent method to determine the G-value for Ir-192, based on an interpolation between G-values obtained at Co-60 and 250kVp X-rays, and this measurement was repeated using the LCR Fricke solution to investigate possible systematic uncertainties. Results: G-values for Co-60 and 250 kVp x-rays, obtained using the LCR Fricke system, agreed with the NRC values within 0.5 % and 1 % respectively, indicating that the general assumption of universal G-values is appropriate in this case. The standard uncertainty in the determination of G for Ir-192 is estimated to be 0.6 %. For the comparison of absorbed dose measurements at the reference point for Ir-192 (1 cm depth in water, perpendicular to the seed long-axis), the ratio Dw(NRC)/Dw(LCR) was found to be 1.011 with a combined standard uncertainty of 1.7 %, k=1. Conclusion: The agreement in the absorbed dose to water values for the LCR and NRC systems is very encouraging. Combined with the lower uncertainty in this approach compared to the present air-kerma approach, these results reaffirm the use of Fricke solution as a potential primary standard for HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy.

  9. Comparison of organ doses for patients undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the breast with HDR 192Ir or electronic sources using Monte Carlo simulations in a heterogeneous human phantom1

    PubMed Central

    Mille, Matthew M.; Xu, X. George; Rivard, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation via interstitial balloon brachytherapy is a fast and effective treatment method for certain early stage breast cancers. The radiation can be delivered using a conventional high-dose rate (HDR) 192Ir gamma-emitting source or a novel electronic brachytherapy (eBx) source which uses lower energy x rays that do not penetrate as far within the patient. A previous study [A. Dickler, M. C. Kirk, N. Seif, K. Griem, K. Dowlatshahi, D. Francescatti, and R. A. Abrams, “A dosimetric comparison of MammoSite high-dose-rate brachytherapy and Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy,” Brachytherapy 6, 164–168 (2007)] showed that the target dose is similar for HDR 192Ir and eBx. This study compares these sources based on the dose received by healthy organs and tissues away from the treatment site. Methods: A virtual patient with left breast cancer was represented by a whole-body, tissue-heterogeneous female voxel phantom. Monte Carlo methods were used to calculate the dose to healthy organs in a virtual patient undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the left breast with HDR 192Ir or eBx sources. The dose-volume histograms for a few organs which received large doses were also calculated. Additional simulations were performed with all tissues in the phantom defined as water to study the effect of tissue inhomogeneities. Results: For both HDR 192Ir and eBx, the largest mean organ doses were received by the ribs, thymus gland, left lung, heart, and sternum which were close to the brachytherapy source in the left breast. eBx yielded mean healthy organ doses that were more than a factor of ∼1.4 smaller than for HDR 192Ir for all organs considered, except for the three closest ribs. Excluding these ribs, the average and median dose-reduction factors were ∼28 and ∼11, respectively. The volume distribution of doses in nearby soft tissue organs that were outside the PTV were also improved with eBx. However, the maximum dose to the closest

  10. Comparison of organ doses for patients undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the breast with HDR {sup 192}Ir or electronic sources using Monte Carlo simulations in a heterogeneous human phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Mille, Matthew M.; Xu, X. George; Rivard, Mark J.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation via interstitial balloon brachytherapy is a fast and effective treatment method for certain early stage breast cancers. The radiation can be delivered using a conventional high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir gamma-emitting source or a novel electronic brachytherapy (eBx) source which uses lower energy x rays that do not penetrate as far within the patient. A previous study [A. Dickler, M. C. Kirk, N. Seif, K. Griem, K. Dowlatshahi, D. Francescatti, and R. A. Abrams, ''A dosimetric comparison of MammoSite high-dose-rate brachytherapy and Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy,'' Brachytherapy 6, 164-168 (2007)] showed that the target dose is similar for HDR {sup 192}Ir and eBx. This study compares these sources based on the dose received by healthy organs and tissues away from the treatment site. Methods: A virtual patient with left breast cancer was represented by a whole-body, tissue-heterogeneous female voxel phantom. Monte Carlo methods were used to calculate the dose to healthy organs in a virtual patient undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the left breast with HDR {sup 192}Ir or eBx sources. The dose-volume histograms for a few organs which received large doses were also calculated. Additional simulations were performed with all tissues in the phantom defined as water to study the effect of tissue inhomogeneities. Results: For both HDR {sup 192}Ir and eBx, the largest mean organ doses were received by the ribs, thymus gland, left lung, heart, and sternum which were close to the brachytherapy source in the left breast. eBx yielded mean healthy organ doses that were more than a factor of {approx}1.4 smaller than for HDR {sup 192}Ir for all organs considered, except for the three closest ribs. Excluding these ribs, the average and median dose-reduction factors were {approx}28 and {approx}11, respectively. The volume distribution of doses in nearby soft tissue organs that were outside the PTV were also improved with e

  11. Systematic Review of Focal Prostate Brachytherapy and the Future Implementation of Image-Guided Prostate HDR Brachytherapy Using MR-Ultrasound Fusion.

    PubMed

    Peach, M Sean; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy found in North American and European men and the second most common cause of cancer related death. Since the practice of PSA screening has become common the disease is most often found early and can have a long indolent course. Current definitive therapy treats the whole gland but has considerable long-term side effects. Focal therapies may be able to target the cancer while decreasing dose to organs at risk. Our objective was to determine if focal prostate brachytherapy could meet target objectives while permitting a decrease in dose to organs at risk in a way that would allow future salvage treatments. Further, we wanted to determine if focal treatment results in less toxicity. Utilizing the Medline repository, dosimetric papers comparing whole gland to partial gland brachytherapy and clinical papers that reported toxicity of focal brachytherapy were selected. A total of 9 dosimetric and 6 clinical papers met these inclusion criteria. Together, these manuscripts suggest that focal brachytherapy may be employed to decrease dose to organs at risk with decreased toxicity. Of current technology, image-guided HDR brachytherapy using MRI registered to transrectal ultrasound offers the flexibility and efficiency to achieve such focal treatments. PMID:27293899

  12. Comparison of 3D dose distributions for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources with normoxic polymer gel dosimetry and treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Senkesen, Oznur; Tezcanli, Evrim; Buyuksarac, Bora; Ozbay, Ismail

    2014-10-01

    Radiation fluence changes caused by the dosimeter itself and poor spatial resolution may lead to lack of 3-dimensional (3D) information depending on the features of the dosimeter and quality assurance of dose distributions for high–dose rate (HDR) iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir) brachytherapy sources is challenging and experimental dosimetry methods used for brachytherapy sources are limited. In this study, we investigated 3D dose distributions of {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources for irradiation with single and multiple dwell positions using a normoxic gel dosimeter and compared them with treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. For dose calibration purposes, 100-mL gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses and then scanned in an magnetic resonance (MR) imaging unit. Gel phantoms prepared in 2 spherical glasses were irradiated with {sup 192}Ir for the calculated dwell positions, and MR scans of the phantoms were obtained. The images were analyzed with MATLAB software. Dose distributions and profiles derived with 1-mm resolution were compared with TPS calculations. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. The x-, y-, and z-axes were defined as the sagittal, coronal, and axial planes, respectively, the sagittal and axial planes were defined parallel to the long axis of the source while the coronal plane was defined horizontally to the long axis of the source. The differences between measured and calculated profile widths of 3-cm source length and point source for 70%, 50%, and 30% isodose lines were evaluated at 3 dose levels using 18 profiles of comparison. The calculations for 3-cm source length revealed a difference of > 3 mm in 1 coordinate at 50% profile width on the sagittal plane and 3 coordinates at 70% profile width and 2 coordinates at 50% and 30% profile widths on the axial plane. Calculations on the coronal plane for 3-cm source length showed > 3-mm difference in 1

  13. Application of a pelvic phantom in brachytherapy dosimetry for high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir source based on Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Woo Sang; Choi, Wonsik; Shin, Seong Soo; Jung, Jinhong

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we evaluate how the radial dose function is influenced by the source position as well as the phantom size and shape. A pelvic water phantom similar to the pelvic shape of a human body was designed by averaging dimensions obtained from computed tomography (CT) images of patients treated with brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Furthermore, for the study of the effects of source position on the dose distribution, the position of the source in the water phantom was determined by using the center of mass of the gross target volume (GTV) in the CT images. To obtain the dosimetric parameter of a high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir source, we performed Monte Carlo simulations by using the Monte Carlo n-particle extended code (MCNPX). The radial dose functions obtained using the pelvic water phantom were compared with those of spherical phantom with different sizes, including the Monte Carlo (MC) results of Williamson and Li. Differences between the radial dose functions from this study and the data in the literature increased with the radial distances. The largest differences appeared for spherical phantom with the smallest size. In contrast to the published MC results, the radial dose function of the pelvic water phantom significantly decreased with radial distance in the vertical direction because full scattering was not possible. When the source was located in posterior position 2 cm from the center in the pelvic water phantom, the differences between the radial dose functions rapidly decreased with the radial distance in the lower vertical direction. If the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements bladder and rectum points are considered, doses to these reference points could be underestimated by up to 1%-2% at a distance of 3 to 6 cm. Our simulation results provide a valid clinical reference data and can used to improve the accuracy of the doses delivered during brachytherapy applied to patients with cervical cancer.

  14. SU-F-19A-10: Recalculation and Reporting Clinical HDR 192-Ir Head and Neck Dose Distributions Using Model Based Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson Tedgren, A; Persson, M; Nilsson, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively re-calculate dose distributions for selected head and neck cancer patients, earlier treated with HDR 192Ir brachytherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and compare results to distributions from the planning system derived using TG43 formalism. To study differences between dose to medium (as obtained with the MC code) and dose to water in medium as obtained through (1) ratios of stopping powers and (2) ratios of mass energy absorption coefficients between water and medium. Methods: The MC code Algebra was used to calculate dose distributions according to earlier actual treatment plans using anonymized plan data and CT images in DICOM format. Ratios of stopping power and mass energy absorption coefficients for water with various media obtained from 192-Ir spectra were used in toggling between dose to water and dose to media. Results: Differences between initial planned TG43 dose distributions and the doses to media calculated by MC are insignificant in the target volume. Differences are moderate (within 4–5 % at distances of 3–4 cm) but increase with distance and are most notable in bone and at the patient surface. Differences between dose to water and dose to medium are within 1-2% when using mass energy absorption coefficients to toggle between the two quantities but increase to above 10% for bone using stopping power ratios. Conclusion: MC predicts target doses for head and neck cancer patients in close agreement with TG43. MC yields improved dose estimations outside the target where a larger fraction of dose is from scattered photons. It is important with awareness and a clear reporting of absorbed dose values in using model based algorithms. Differences in bone media can exceed 10% depending on how dose to water in medium is defined.

  15. Measurement of absorbed dose-to-water for an HDR {sup 192}Ir source with ionization chambers in a sandwich setup

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro; Ohno, Takeshi; Kakei, Kiyotaka; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki; Kawamura, Shinji

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: In this study, a dedicated device for ion chamber measurements of absorbed dose-to-water for a Nucletron microSelectron-v2 HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source is presented. The device uses two ionization chambers in a so-called sandwich assembly. Using this setup and by taking the average reading of the two chambers, any dose error due to difficulties in absolute positioning (centering) of the source in between the chambers is cancelled to first order. The method's accuracy was examined by comparing measurements with absorbed dose-to-water determination based on the AAPM TG-43 protocol.Methods: The optimal source-to-chamber distance (SCD) for {sup 192}Ir dosimetry was determined from ion chamber measurements in a water phantom. The {sup 192}Ir source was sandwiched between two Exradin A1SL chambers (0.057 cm{sup 3}) at the optimal SCD separation. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water using a {sup 60}Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo-calculated beam quality conversion factor, k{sub Q}, for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir. An uncertainty estimate of the proposed method was determined based on reproducibility of measurements at different institutions for the same type of source.Results: The optimal distance for the A1SL chamber measurements was determined to be 5 cm from the {sup 192}Ir source center, considering the depth dependency of k{sub Q} for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir and the chamber positioning. The absorbed dose to water measured at (5 cm, 90°) on the transverse axis was 1.3% lower than TG-43 values and its reproducibility and overall uncertainty were 0.8% and 1.7%, respectively. The measurement doses at anisotropic points agreed within 1.5% with TG-43 values.Conclusions: The ion chamber measurement of absorbed dose-to-water with a sandwich method for the {sup 192}Ir source provides a more accurate, direct, and reference dose compared to the dose-to-water determination based on air-kerma strength in the TG-43 protocol

  16. SU-E-T-23: A Novel Two-Step Optimization Scheme for Tandem and Ovoid (T and O) HDR Brachytherapy Treatment for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, M; Todor, D; Fields, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method allowing fast, true volumetric optimization of T and O HDR treatments and to quantify its benefits. Materials and Methods: 27 CT planning datasets and treatment plans from six consecutive cervical cancer patients treated with 4–5 intracavitary T and O insertions were used. Initial treatment plans were created with a goal of covering high risk (HR)-CTV with D90 > 90% and minimizing D2cc to rectum, bladder and sigmoid with manual optimization, approved and delivered. For the second step, each case was re-planned adding a new structure, created from the 100% prescription isodose line of the manually optimized plan to the existent physician delineated HR-CTV, rectum, bladder and sigmoid. New, more rigorous DVH constraints for the critical OARs were used for the optimization. D90 for the HR-CTV and D2cc for OARs were evaluated in both plans. Results: Two-step optimized plans had consistently smaller D2cc's for all three OARs while preserving good D90s for HR-CTV. On plans with “excellent” CTV coverage, average D90 of 96% (range 91–102), sigmoid D2cc was reduced on average by 37% (range 16–73), bladder by 28% (range 20–47) and rectum by 27% (range 15–45). Similar reductions were obtained on plans with “good” coverage, with an average D90 of 93% (range 90–99). For plans with inferior coverage, average D90 of 81%, an increase in coverage to 87% was achieved concurrently with D2cc reductions of 31%, 18% and 11% for sigmoid, bladder and rectum. Conclusions: A two-step DVH-based optimization can be added with minimal planning time increase, but with the potential of dramatic and systematic reductions of D2cc for OARs and in some cases with concurrent increases in target dose coverage. These single-fraction modifications would be magnified over the course of 4–5 intracavitary insertions and may have real clinical implications in terms of decreasing both acute and late toxicity.

  17. Development of a fast 3D treatment planning platform for clinical interstitial microwave hyperthermia within free-hand obliquely implanted HDR catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Serena J.; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Prakash, Punit; Curto, Sergio; Hsu, I.-Chow; Diederich, Chris J.

    2015-03-01

    A treatment planning platform for interstitial microwave hyperthermia was developed for practical, free-hand clinical implants. Such implants, consisting of non-parallel, moderately curved antennas with varying insertion depths, are used in HDR brachytherapy for treating locally advanced cancer. Numerical models for commercially available MA251 antennas (915 MHz, BSD Medical) were developed in COMSOL Multiphysics, a finite element analysis software package. To expedite treatment planning, electric fields, power deposition and temperature rises were computed for a single straight antenna in 2D axisymmetric geometry. A precomputed library of electric field and temperature solutions was created for a range of insertion depths (5-12 cm) and blood perfusion rates (0.5-5 kg/m3/s). 3D models of multiple antennas and benchtop phantoms experiments using temperature-sensitive liquid crystal paper to monitor heating by curved antennas were performed for comparative evaluation of the treatment planning platform. A patient-customizable hyperthermia treatment planning software package was developed in MATLAB with capabilities to interface with a commercial radiation therapy planning platform (Oncentra, Nucleotron), import patient and multicatheter implant geometries, calculate insertion depths, and perform hyperthermia planning with antennas operating in asynchronous or synchronous mode. During asynchronous operation, the net power deposition and temperature rises were approximated as a superposition sum of the respective quantities for one single antenna. During synchronous excitation, a superposition of complex electrical fields was performed with appropriate phasing to compute power deposition. Electric fields and temperatures from the pre-computed single-antenna library were utilized following appropriate non-rigid coordinate transformations. Comparison to 3D models indicated that superposition of electric fields around parallel antennas is valid when they are at least 15 mm

  18. SU-F-19A-12: Split-Ring Applicator with Interstitial Needle for Improved Volumetric Coverage in HDR Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sherertz, T; Ellis, R; Colussi, V; Mislmani, M; Traughber, B; Herrmann, K; Podder, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate volumetric coverage of a Mick Radionuclear titanium Split-Ring applicator (SRA) with/without interstitial needle compared to an intracavitary Vienna applicator (VA), interstitial-intracavitary VA, and intracavitary ring and tandem applicator (RTA). Methods: A 57 year-old female with FIGO stage IIB cervical carcinoma was treated following chemoradiotherapy (45Gy pelvic and 5.4Gy parametrial boost) with highdose- rate (HDR) brachytherapy to 30Gy in 5 fractions using a SRA. A single interstitial needle was placed using the Ellis Interstitial Cap for the final three fractions to increase coverage of left-sided gross residual disease identified on 3T-MRI. High-risk (HR) clinical target volume (CTV) and intermediate-risk (IR) CTV were defined using axial T2-weighted 2D and 3D MRI sequences (Philips PET/MRI unit). Organs-at-risks (OARs) were delineated on CT. Oncentra planning system was used for treatment optimization satisfying GEC-ESTRO guidelines for target coverage and OAR constraints. Retrospectively, treatment plans (additional 20 plans) were simulated using intracavitary SRA (without needle), intracavitary VA (without needle), interstitial-intracavitary VA, and intracavitary RTA with this same patient case. Plans were optimized for each fraction to maintain coverage to HR-CTV. Results: Interstitial-intracavitary SRA achieved the following combined coverage for external radiation and brachytherapy (EQD2): D90 HR-CTV =94.6Gy; Bladder-2cc =88.9Gy; Rectum-2cc =65.1Gy; Sigmoid-2cc =48.9Gy; Left vaginal wall (VW) =103Gy, Right VW =99.2Gy. Interstitial-intracavitary VA was able to achieve identical D90 HR-CTV =94.6Gy, yet Bladder-2cc =91.9Gy (exceeding GEC-ESTRO recommendations of 2cc<90Gy) and Left VW =120.8Gy and Right VW =115.5Gy. Neither the SRA nor VA without interstitial needle could cover HR-CTV adequately without exceeding dose to Bladder-2cc. Conventional RTA was unable to achieve target coverage for the HR-CTV >80Gy without severely

  19. WE-A-17A-06: Evaluation of An Automatic Interstitial Catheter Digitization Algorithm That Reduces Treatment Planning Time and Provide Means for Adaptive Re-Planning in HDR Brachytherapy of Gynecologic Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Dise, J; Liang, X; Lin, L; Teo, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate an automatic interstitial catheter digitization algorithm that reduces treatment planning time and provide means for adaptive re-planning in HDR Brachytherapy of Gynecologic Cancers. Methods: The semi-automatic catheter digitization tool utilizes a region growing algorithm in conjunction with a spline model of the catheters. The CT images were first pre-processed to enhance the contrast between the catheters and soft tissue. Several seed locations were selected in each catheter for the region growing algorithm. The spline model of the catheters assisted in the region growing by preventing inter-catheter cross-over caused by air or metal artifacts. Source dwell positions from day one CT scans were applied to subsequent CTs and forward calculated using the automatically digitized catheter positions. This method was applied to 10 patients who had received HDR interstitial brachytherapy on an IRB approved image-guided radiation therapy protocol. The prescribed dose was 18.75 or 20 Gy delivered in 5 fractions, twice daily, over 3 consecutive days. Dosimetric comparisons were made between automatic and manual digitization on day two CTs. Results: The region growing algorithm, assisted by the spline model of the catheters, was able to digitize all catheters. The difference between automatic and manually digitized positions was 0.8±0.3 mm. The digitization time ranged from 34 minutes to 43 minutes with a mean digitization time of 37 minutes. The bulk of the time was spent on manual selection of initial seed positions and spline parameter adjustments. There was no significance difference in dosimetric parameters between the automatic and manually digitized plans. D90% to the CTV was 91.5±4.4% for the manual digitization versus 91.4±4.4% for the automatic digitization (p=0.56). Conclusion: A region growing algorithm was developed to semi-automatically digitize interstitial catheters in HDR brachytherapy using the Syed-Neblett template. This automatic

  20. Dosimetric Analysis of 3D Image-Guided HDR Brachytherapy Planning for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer: Is Point A-Based Dose Prescription Still Valid in Image-Guided Brachytherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hayeon; Beriwal, Sushil; Houser, Chris; Huq, M. Saiful

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the dosimetric outcome of 3D image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer treatment and compare dose coverage of high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) to traditional Point A dose. Thirty-two patients with stage IA2-IIIB cervical cancer were treated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging-based image-guided HDR brachytherapy (IGBT). Brachytherapy dose prescription was 5.0-6.0 Gy per fraction for a total 5 fractions. The HRCTV and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated following the GYN GEC/ESTRO guidelines. Total doses for HRCTV, OARs, Point A, and Point T from external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy were summated and normalized to a biologically equivalent dose of 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2). The total planned D90 for HRCTV was 80-85 Gy, whereas the dose to 2 mL of bladder, rectum, and sigmoid was limited to 85 Gy, 75 Gy, and 75 Gy, respectively. The mean D90 and its standard deviation for HRCTV was 83.2 {+-} 4.3 Gy. This is significantly higher (p < 0.0001) than the mean value of the dose to Point A (78.6 {+-} 4.4 Gy). The dose levels of the OARs were within acceptable limits for most patients. The mean dose to 2 mL of bladder was 78.0 {+-} 6.2 Gy, whereas the mean dose to rectum and sigmoid were 57.2 {+-} 4.4 Gy and 66.9 {+-} 6.1 Gy, respectively. Image-based 3D brachytherapy provides adequate dose coverage to HRCTV, with acceptable dose to OARs in most patients. Dose to Point A was found to be significantly lower than the D90 for HRCTV calculated using the image-based technique. Paradigm shift from 2D point dose dosimetry to IGBT in HDR cervical cancer treatment needs advanced concept of evaluation in dosimetry with clinical outcome data about whether this approach improves local control and/or decreases toxicities.

  1. SU-E-T-525: Dose Volume Histograms (DVH) Analysis and Comparison with ICRU Point Doses in MRI Guided HDR Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Badkul, R; McClinton, C; Kumar, P; Mitchell, M

    2014-06-01

    .1 overestimated the bladder ICRU point dose up to 43% for conventional-techniques.Bladder-D2 provided a good estimation of ICRU bladder point-doses(within 3.6%) for conventional-techniques. This correlation is not observed for MGO plans perhaps due to steering of isodose line, leading to unpredictable dwell-weighting. Conclusion: MRI based HDR-planning provides accurate delineation of tumor volumes and normal structures, and optimized tumor-coverage can be achieved with acceptable normal-tissue doses. This study showed that for conventional techniques D0.1 rectum dose and D2 bladder dose are good representation of ICRU-reference-point doses.

  2. Determination of absorbed dose to water around a clinical HDR {sup 192}Ir source using LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs demonstrates an LET dependence of detector response

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa; Elia, Rouba; Hedtjaern, Haakan; Olsson, Sara; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Experimental radiation dosimetry with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), calibrated in a {sup 60}Co or megavoltage (MV) photon beam, is recommended by AAPM TG-43U1for verification of Monte Carlo calculated absorbed doses around brachytherapy sources. However, it has been shown by Carlsson Tedgren et al.[Med. Phys. 38, 5539-5550 (2011)] that for TLDs of LiF:Mg,Ti, detector response was 4% higher in a {sup 137}Cs beam than in a {sup 60}Co one. The aim of this work was to investigate if similar over-response exists when measuring absorbed dose to water around {sup 192}Ir sources, using LiF:Mg,Ti dosimeters calibrated in a 6 MV photon beam. Methods: LiF dosimeters were calibrated to measure absorbed dose to water in a 6 MV photon beam and used to measure absorbed dose to water at distances of 3, 5, and 7 cm from a clinical high dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. Measured values were compared to values of absorbed dose to water calculated using a treatment planning system (TPS) including corrections for the difference in energy absorption properties between calibration quality and the quality in the users'{sup 192}Ir beam and for the use of a PMMA phantom instead of the water phantom underlying dose calculations in the TPS. Results: Measured absorbed doses to water around the {sup 192}Ir source were overestimated by 5% compared to those calculated by the TPS. Corresponding absorbed doses to water measured in a previous work with lithium formate electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimeters by Antonovic et al. [Med. Phys. 36, 2236-2247 (2009)], using the same irradiation setup and calibration procedure as in this work, were 2% lower than those calculated by the TPS. The results obtained in the measurements in this work and those obtained using the EPR lithium formate dosimeters were, within the expanded (k = 2) uncertainty, in agreement with the values derived by the TPS. The discrepancy between the results using

  3. SU-E-T-263: Point Dose Variation Using a Single Ir-192 HDR Brachytherapy Plan for Two Treatments with a Single Tandem-Ovoid Insertion for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, X; Morrill, S; Hardee, M; Han, E; Penagaricano, J; Zhang, X; Vaneerat, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the point dose variations between Ir-192 HDR treatments on two consecutive days using a single tandem-ovoid insertion without replanning in cervical cancer patients. Methods: This study includes eleven cervical cancer patients undergoing HDR brachytherapy with a prescribed dose of 28 Gy in 4 fractions. Each patient had two tandemovoid insertions one week apart. Each insertion was treated on consecutive days with rescanning and replanning prior to each treatment. To study the effect of no replanning for day 2 treatments, the day 1 plan dwell position and dwell time with decay were applied to the day 2 CT dataset. The point dose variations on the prescription point H (defined according to American Brachytherapy Society), and normal tissue doses at point B, bladder, rectum and vaginal mucosa (based on ICRU Report 38) were obtained. Results: Without replanning, the mean point H dose variation was 4.6 ± 10.7% on the left; 2.3 ± 2.9% on the right. The mean B point variation was 3.8 ± 4.9% on the left; 3.6 ± 4.7% on the right. The variation in the left vaginal mucosal point was 12.2 ± 10.7%; 9.5 ± 12.5% on the right; the bladder point 5.5 ± 7.4%; and the rectal point 7.9 ± 9.1%. Conclusion: Without replanning, there are variations both in the prescription point and the normal tissue point doses. The latter can vary as much as 10% or more. This is likely due to the steep dose gradient from brachytherapy compounded by shifts in the positions of the applicator in relationship to the patients anatomy. Imaging prior to each treatment and replanning ensure effective and safe brachytherapy are recommended.

  4. Distinct expression patterns of two Ginkgo biloba 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl-4-diphosphate reductase/isopentenyl diphospahte synthase (HDR/IDS) promoters in Arabidopsis model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Kyoung; Nargis, Sultana; Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Soo-Un

    2013-01-01

    1-Hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl-4-diphosphate reductase (HDR) or isopentenyl diphosphate synthase (IDS) is an enzyme at the final step of the MEP pathway. The multi-copy nature of IDS gene in a gymnosperm Ginkgo biloba is known. To evaluate the function of each isogene, the roles of the promoters were examined in Arabidopsis model. Among the promoters of GbIDS series, about 1.3 kb of GbIDS1pro and 1.5 kb of GbIDS2pro were cloned and fused with GUS. The GbIDS1pro::GUS was introduced into Arabidopsis to show GUS expression in most organs except for roots, petals, and stamina, whereas the GbIDS2pro::GUS was expressed only in the young leaves, internodes where the flower and shoot branched, and notably in primary root junction. This pattern of GUS expression correlated with high transcript level of GbIDS2 compared to that of GbIDS1 in Ginkgo roots. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment resulted in down-regulated GbIDS1pro activity in Arabidopsis leaves and upregulated GbIDS2pro activity in roots. The same pattern of gene regulation in roots was also seen upon treatments of gibberellins, abscisic acid, and indole butyric acid.

  5. Field Observation of Joint Structures in Various Types of Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Shingo; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2006-05-01

    In this study, field observations of natural fracture network systems in some intrusive and extrusive rocks were undertaken, to clarify the fracturing mechanism in the rocks. Shallow intrusives, whose depth of emplacement was less than several hundred metres, include the Momo-iwa Dacite dome on Rebun Island (Hokkaido), and Jodogahama Rhyolite in Iwate prefecture. Extrusive complexes studied include the Tojinbo Andesite and Ojima Rhyodacite in Fukui prefecture. Rocks of `granitic' composition were collected from the Takidani (Japan Alps) and Hijiori (Yamagata prefecture) plutons. The joint structure in Hijiori Granite was evaluated by analysis of core samples extracted from the HDR-3 geothermal production well. Based on detailed field observation, joint structures related to thermal contraction of a rock mass could be classified according to their inferred depth of formation. Joints from a near surface setting, such as shallow intrusive rocks and extrusives, tend to form pentagonal — hexagonal columnar structures (for a variety of rock types), whilst granitic rocks (from a deeper setting) typically exhibit a parallelepiped structure. The apparent differences in joint form are inferred to be dependent on the confining pressure, which acts on joint generation and propagation. In cases of non-confining pressure, such as the near-surface (shallow intrusive/extrusive) setting, joint networks typically form a columnar structure. On the contrary, confining pressure is considerably greater for deeper rock masses, and these form a parallelepiped joint structure.

  6. SU-E-J-103: Propagation of Rectum and Bladder Contours for Tandem and Ring (T&R) HDR Treatment Using Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Y; Chao, M; Sheu, R; Dumane, V; Gupta, V; Lo, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using DIR to propagate the manually contoured rectum and bladder from the 1st insertion to the new CT images on subsequent insertions and evaluate the segmentation performance. Methods: Ten cervical cancer patients, who were treated by T&R brachytherapy in 3–4 insertions, were retrospectively collected. In each insertion, rectum and bladder were manually delineated on the planning CT by a physicist and verified by a radiation oncologist. Using VelocityAI (Velocity Medical Solutions, Atlanta, GA), a rigid registration was firstly employed to match the bony structures between the first insertion and each of the following insertions, then a multi-pass B-spine DIR was carried out to further map the sub volume that encompasses rectum and bladder. The resultant deformation fields propagated contours, and dice similarity coefficient (DSC) was used to quantitatively evaluate the agreement between the propagated contours and the manually-delineated organs. For the 3rd insertion, we also evaluated if the segmentation performance could be improved by propagating the contours from the most recent insertion, i.e., the 2nd insertion. Results: On average, the contour propagation took about 1 minute. The average and standard deviation of DSC over all insertions and patients was 0.67±0.10 (range: 0.44–0.81) for rectum, and 0.78±0.07 (range: 0.63–0.87) for bladder. For the 3rd insertion, propagating contours from the 2nd insertion could improve the segmentation performance in terms of DSC from 0.63±0.10 to 0.72±0.08 for rectum, and from 0.77±0.07 to 0.79±0.06 for bladder. A Wilcoxon signed rank test indicated that the improvement was statistically significant for rectum (p = 0.004). Conclusion: The preliminary results demonstrate that deformable image registration could efficiently and accurately propagate rectum and bladder contours between CT images in different T&R brachytherapy fractions. We are incorporating the propagated

  7. Chlamydia Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Amplification Test (NAAT); Chlamydia trachomatis Culture; Chlamydia trachomatis DNA Probe Related tests: Gonorrhea Testing , HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen , Syphilis Tests , Herpes Testing , HPV Test , Trichomonas Testing All content on Lab Tests Online has ...

  8. What State Tests Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Glenn W.

    What the Illinois Goal Assessment Program (IGAP) test actually tests and the consequences of these tests for funding decisions were studied with a random sample of 100 school districts in the Cook County suburbs of Chicago. Eighth-grade IGAP scores for reading were obtained from the state report card, a document prepared by each school district…

  9. Energy Conservation Designed into HDR's New Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Larry

    1974-01-01

    A new building has been engineered by its engineer-owner tenants with provisions for two gas-oil hot water generators and for an electric boiler, so that operating personnel could switch to whatever fuel is available. (Author/MLF)

  10. Gonorrhea Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... gonorrhoeae Culture; Neisseria gonorrhoeae Gram Stain; Neisseria gonorrhoeae DNA Probe Related tests: Chlamydia Testing , HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen , Syphilis Tests , Herpes Testing , HPV Test , Trichomonas Testing All content on Lab Tests Online has ...

  11. Susceptibility Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... page helpful? Also known as: Sensitivity Testing; Drug Resistance Testing; Culture and Sensitivity; C & S; Antimicrobial Susceptibility Formal name: Bacterial and Fungal Susceptibility Testing Related tests: Urine Culture ; ...

  12. Test plan :

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Stephen F.

    2013-05-01

    This test plan is a document that provides a systematic approach to the planned testing of rooftop structures to determine their actual load carrying capacity. This document identifies typical tests to be performed, the responsible parties for testing, the general feature of the tests, the testing approach, test deliverables, testing schedule, monitoring requirements, and environmental and safety compliance.

  13. Prenatal Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... X Home > Pregnancy > Prenatal care > Prenatal tests Prenatal tests E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... if you’re feeling fine. What are prenatal tests? Prenatal tests are medical tests you get during ...

  14. Thyroid Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... calories and how fast your heart beats. Thyroid tests check how well your thyroid is working. They ... thyroid diseases such as hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Thyroid tests include blood tests and imaging tests. Blood tests ...

  15. Pinworm test

    MedlinePlus

    Oxyuriasis test; Enterobiasis test; Tape test ... diagnose this infection is to do a tape test. The best time to do this is in ... to determine if there are eggs. The tape test may need to be done on 3 separate ...

  16. Testing? Testing? In Literature?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purves, Alan C.

    The assumptions behind secondary school literature course tests--whether asking students to recall aspects of literary works, to relate literary works to each other, or to analyze unfamiliar literary works--are open to question. They fail to acknowledge some of the most important aspects of literature which, if properly taught, should provide a…

  17. Testing "Compatibility Testing."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Elliot; Huston, Ted L.

    Most models of marital choice are attempts to explain choices within the field of available eligibles. The essence of compatibility testing is that people select their mates by evaluating the match between psychological characteristics after sorting the available field on the basis of social characteristics. A compatibility model seems to require…

  18. Ham test

    MedlinePlus

    Acid hemolysin test; Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria - Ham test; PNH - Ham test ... BJ. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  19. Coombs test

    MedlinePlus

    Direct antiglobulin test; Indirect antiglobulin test; Anemia - hemolytic ... No special preparation is necessary for this test. ... There are 2 types of the Coombs test: Direct Indirect The direct ... that are stuck to the surface of red blood cells. Many diseases ...

  20. Trichomonas Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaginalis by Amplified Detection; Trichomonas vaginalis by Direct Fluorescent Antibody (DFA) Related tests: Pap Smear , Chlamydia Testing , ... and men. Other methods. These include the direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test and a test that detects ...

  1. Prenatal Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests are suggested for all women, such as screenings for gestational diabetes, Down syndrome, and HIV. Other tests might be offered based on your: Age Personal or family health history Ethnic background Results of routine tests Some tests are screening tests. They detect risks for or signs of ...

  2. Thyroid Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations (PDF, 269 KB). Alternate Language URL Thyroid Tests Page Content On this page: What is the ... Top ] Why do health care providers perform thyroid tests? Health care providers perform thyroid tests to assess ...

  3. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  4. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Medical Devices Products and Medical Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Lab Tests Laboratory Tests Share Tweet Linkedin ... Approved Home and Lab Tests Find All In Vitro Diagnostic Products and Decision Summaries Since November 2003 ...

  5. IQ testing

    MedlinePlus

    Many IQ tests are used today. Whether they measure actual intelligence or simply certain abilities is controversial. IQ tests measure a specific functioning ability and may not accurately ... any intelligence test may be culturally biased. The more widely ...

  6. Test Madness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedrick, Wanda B., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    There's accountability and then there's the testing craze an iatrogenic practice that undermines real learning. Hedrick documents the negative effects of testing, giving teachers another weapon in their arsenal against mindless preparation for high-stakes tests.

  7. String test

    MedlinePlus

    Duodenal parasites test; Giardia - string test ... To have this test, you swallow a string with a weighted gelatin capsule on the end. The string is pulled out 4 hours later. Any bile , blood, or mucus attached to ...

  8. Testing Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Trace Laboratories is an independent testing laboratory specializing in testing printed circuit boards, automotive products and military hardware. Technical information from NASA Tech Briefs and two subsequent JPL Technical Support packages have assisted Trace in testing surface insulation resistance on printed circuit board materials. Testing time was reduced and customer service was improved because of Jet Propulsion Laboratory technical support packages.

  9. Workplace Testing: Who's Testing Whom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Eric Rolfe

    1989-01-01

    A survey conducted by the American Management Association on workplace-testing policies included questions about drug testing, polygraphs, and testing for the human immunodeficiency virus. The survey found that testing increased from 21 percent in 1986 to 37 percent in 1987 and 48 percent in the 1988 survey. (JOW)

  10. Net Test

    2001-09-01

    Nettest is a secure, real-time network utility. The nettest framework is designed to incorporate existing and new network tests, and be run as a daemon or an interactive process. Requests for network tests are received via a SSL connection or the user interface and are authorized using a ACL list (in the future authorization using Akenti will also be supported). For tests that require coordination between the two ends of the test, Nettest establishes anmore » SSL connection to accomplish this coordination. A test between two remote computers can be requested via the user interlace if the Nettest daemon is running on both remote machines and the user is authorized. Authorization for the test is through a chain of trust estabtished by the nettest daemons. Nettest is responsible for determining if the test request is authorized, but it does nothing further to secure the test once the test is running. Currently the Nettest framework incorporates lperf-vl.2, a simple ping type test, and a tuned TCP test that uses a given required throughput and ping results to determine the round trip time to set a buffer size (based on the delay bandwidth product) and then performs an iperf TCP throughput test. Additional network test tools can be integrated into the Nettest framework in the future.« less

  11. Pertussis Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... as: Whooping Cough Tests Formal name: Bordetella pertussis Culture; Bordetella pertussis by PCR; Bordetella pertussis Antibodies (IgA, ... outbreak, at least one case be confirmed using culture. Culture – this test was the "gold standard" for ...

  12. Electrolytes Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... include other tests such as BUN , creatinine , and glucose . Electrolyte measurements may be used to help investigate conditions that cause electrolyte imbalances such as dehydration , kidney disease , lung diseases , or heart conditions . Repeat testing may then ...

  13. Sweat Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... insipidus , and hypothyroidism . Edema can result in a false-negative result. The sweat chloride test should only ... kind of testing. Otherwise, problems in accuracy, including false negatives due to poor collection technique, can arise. ^ ...

  14. Malnutrition Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Malnutrition Share this page: Was this page helpful? Overview | Symptoms | Tests | Treatment | Related Pages Tests Malnutrition will often be noticeable to the doctor's trained ...

  15. Kidney Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... taking out waste products and making urine. Kidney tests check to see how well your kidneys are working. They include blood, urine, and imaging tests. Early kidney disease usually does not have signs ...

  16. Procalcitonin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests: C-Reactive Protein , Complete Blood Count , Blood Culture , CSF Analysis ... test is relatively new, but its utilization is increasing. Recent studies have shown that it has promise in helping ...

  17. Bilirubin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test in conjunction with other laboratory tests ( alkaline phosphatase , aspartate aminotransferase , alanine aminotransferase ) when someone shows signs ... Gilbert syndrome, due to low levels of the enzyme that produces conjugated bilirubin If conjugated (direct) bilirubin ...

  18. Tensilon test

    MedlinePlus

    Myasthenia gravis-tensilon ... Tensilon tests to help tell the difference between myasthenia gravis and other conditions. ... The test helps: Diagnose myasthenia gravis Tell the difference ... conditions Monitor treatment with oral anticholinesterase drugs ...

  19. HPV Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test for wider range of HPV types. 2009 Mar 13. US Food and Drug Administration. Available online ... approves two DNA tests to detect HPV. 2009 Mar 17. Infectious Disease News. Available online at http:// ...

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes three flame test demonstrations including "Student-Presented Demonstrations on the Colors of Transition Metal Complexes,""A Flame Test Demonstration Device," and "Vivid Flame Tests." Preparation and procedures are discussed. Included in the first demonstration is an evaluation scheme for grading student demonstrations. (CW)

  1. Schilling test

    MedlinePlus

    Vitamin B12 absorption test ... This test may be done in four different stages to find the cause of a low vitamin B12 level. ... can absorb vitamin B12. Stage II of the test can tell whether a low vitamin B12 level ...

  2. Allergy Testing.

    PubMed

    Tourlas, Konstantinos; Burman, Deepa

    2016-09-01

    Allergic diseases are common in outpatient primary care. Allergy testing can guide management to determine allergy as a cause of symptoms and target therapeutic interventions. This article provides a review of common methods of allergy testing available so that physicians may counsel and refer patients appropriately. Immediate-type hypersensitivity skin tests can be used for airborne allergens, foods, insect stings, and penicillin. Radioallergosorbent testing can be used to evaluate immediate-type hypersensitivity. Delayed-type hypersensitivity or patch-type skin tests are used in patients with suspected contact dermatitis. PMID:27545728

  3. Analytical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flannelly, W. G.; Fabunmi, J. A.; Nagy, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical methods for combining flight acceleration and strain data with shake test mobility data to predict the effects of structural changes on flight vibrations and strains are presented. This integration of structural dynamic analysis with flight performance is referred to as analytical testing. The objective of this methodology is to analytically estimate the results of flight testing contemplated structural changes with minimum flying and change trials. The category of changes to the aircraft includes mass, stiffness, absorbers, isolators, and active suppressors. Examples of applying the analytical testing methodology using flight test and shake test data measured on an AH-1G helicopter are included. The techniques and procedures for vibration testing and modal analysis are also described.

  4. Rubella Test

    MedlinePlus

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization ... for trustworthy health information. Verify Compliance . Produced by Advertisement

  5. Glucose Tests

    MedlinePlus

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization ... for trustworthy health information. Verify Compliance . Produced by Advertisement

  6. Cholesterol Test

    MedlinePlus

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization ... for trustworthy health information. Verify Compliance . Produced by Advertisement

  7. Performance tests.

    PubMed Central

    Wetherell, A

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of psychological performance tests to assess the effects of environmental stressors. The large number and the variety of performance tests are illustrated, and the differences between performance tests and other psychological tests are described in terms of their design, construction, use, and purpose. The stressor emphasis is on the effects of drugs since that is where most performance tests have found their main application, although other stressors, e.g., fatigue, toxic chemicals, are mentioned where appropriate. Diazepam is used as an example. There is no particular performance emphasis since the tests are intended to have wide applicability. However, vehicle-driving performance is discussed because it has been the subject of a great deal of research and is probably one of the most important areas of application. Performance tests are discussed in terms of the four main underlying models--factor analysis, general information processing, multiple resource and strategy models, and processing-stage models--and in terms of their psychometric properties--sensitivity, reliability, and content, criterion, construct, and face validity. Some test taxonomies are presented. Standardization is also discussed with reference to the reaction time, mathematical processing, memory search, spatial processing, unstable tracking, verbal processing, and dual task tests used in the AGARD STRES battery. Some comments on measurement strengths and appropriate study designs and methods are included. PMID:9182033

  8. Serotonin Test

    MedlinePlus

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization ... for trustworthy health information. Verify Compliance . Produced by Advertisement

  9. Software testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.

    2016-01-01

    Now more than ever, scientific results are dependent on sophisticated software and analysis. Why should we trust code written by others? How do you ensure your own code produces sensible results? How do you make sure it continues to do so as you update, modify, and add functionality? Software testing is an integral part of code validation and writing tests should be a requirement for any software project. I will talk about Python-based tools that make managing and running tests much easier and explore some statistics for projects hosted on GitHub that contain tests.

  10. Ammonia Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be ordered, along with other tests such as glucose , electrolytes , and kidney and liver function tests , to help diagnose the cause of ... Pages tab.) An increased ammonia level and decreased glucose ... may indicate that severe liver or kidney damage has impacted the body's ability ...

  11. Pharmacogenomic Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... with pharmacogenomic testing. Visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website for a list of drugs with pharmacogenomic information in their labeling. Did You Know? One size does not fit all. In the future, pharmacogenomic tests will be able to help many ...

  12. Erythropoietin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidney. These cells release more EPO when blood oxygen level is low. How the Test is Performed A blood sample is needed. How ... your doctor about the meaning of your specific test result. What ... in response to an event such as low blood oxygen level. The condition may occur at high altitudes ...

  13. Strength Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.

    1981-01-01

    Postural deviations resulting from strength and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying strength problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)

  14. Genetic Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic tests for several reasons. These include Finding genetic diseases in unborn babies Finding out if people carry a gene for a disease and might pass it on to their children Screening embryos for disease Testing for genetic diseases in adults before they cause ...

  15. Optical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyant, James; Hochberg, Eric; Breault, Robert; Greivenkamp, John; Hunt, Gary; Mason, Pete; Mcguire, James; Meinel, Aden; Morris, Mike; Scherr, Larry

    1992-01-01

    Optical testing is one of the most vital elements in the process of preparing an optical instrument for launch. Without well understood, well controlled, and well documented test procedures, current and future mission goals will be jeopardized. We should keep in mind that the reason we test is to provide an opportunity to catch errors, oversights, and problems on the ground, where solutions are possible and difficulties can be rectified. Consequently, it is necessary to create tractable test procedures that truly provide a measure of the performance of all optical elements and systems under conditions which are close to those expected in space. Where testing is not feasible, accurate experiments are required in order to perfect models that can exactly predict the optical performance. As we stretch the boundaries of technology to perform more complex space and planetary investigations, we must expand the technology required to test the optical components and systems which we send into space. As we expand the observational wavelength ranges, so must we expand our range of optical sources and detectors. As we increase resolution and sensitivity, our understanding of optical surfaces to accommodate more stringent figure and scatter requirements must expand. Only with research and development in these areas can we hope to achieve success in the ever increasing demands made on optical testing by the highly sophisticated missions anticipated over the next two decades. Technology assessment and development plan for surface figure, surface roughness, alignment, image quality, radiometric quantities, and stray light measurement are presented.

  16. Patch tests*

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarini, Rosana; Duarte, Ida; Ferreira, Alessandra Lindmayer

    2013-01-01

    Patch tests were introduced as a diagnostic tool in the late nineteenth century. Since then, they have improved considerably becoming what they are today. Patch tests are used in the diagnostic investigation of contact dermatitis worldwide. Batteries or series previously studied and standardized should be used in patch testing. The methodology is simple, but it requires adequate training for the results to be correctly interpreted and used. Despite having been used for over a century, it needs improvement like all other diagnostic techniques in the medical field. PMID:24474094

  17. AMA Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) IgM level Bilirubin Albumin Prothrombin time (PT) ... a liver panel (elevated liver enzymes), especially alkaline phosphatase (ALP) . An AMA or AMA-M2 test may ...

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  19. Genetic Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnose celiac disease, but have been on the gluten-free diet for a significant period of time, ... antibody test, measure the autoimmune response triggered by gluten that occurs at a point in time. (Think ...

  20. Troponins Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... significantly elevated troponin levels and, in particular, a rise in the results from a series of tests ... do not affect cardiac troponin levels. Troponin may rise following strenuous exercise, although in the absence of ...

  1. Cortisol Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is produced and secreted by the adrenal glands . Production of the hormone is regulated by the hypothalamus ... help determine its cause: Testing for Excess Cortisol Production If a person has a high blood cortisol ...

  2. Pregnancy Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hCG. hCG is made when a fertilized egg implants in the uterus. This usually happens about ... conception (when the man's sperm fertilizes the woman's egg). 1 Some home pregnancy tests are more sensitive ...

  3. Lead Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine lead sources, educating family members about lead poisoning , and instituting follow-up testing to monitor the ... high levels of lead, see the article on Lead Poisoning . The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has ...

  4. Test report :

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-10-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprising of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. Raytheon/KTech has developed an energy storage system that utilizes zinc-bromide flow batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the Raytheon/KTech Zinc-Bromide Energy Storage System.

  5. Test report :

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-08-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprised of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. Princeton Power Systems has developed an energy storage system that utilizes lithium ion phosphate batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the Princeton Power Systems Prototype Energy Storage System.

  6. Test report :

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-08-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors have supplied their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and a subset of these systems were selected for performance evaluation at the BCIL. The technologies tested were electro-chemical energy storage systems comprised of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. MILSPRAY Military Technologies has developed an energy storage system that utilizes lead acid batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited assessment of the Milspray Scorpion Energy Storage Device.

  7. Test Report :

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-10-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprising of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. GS Battery and EPC Power have developed an energy storage system that utilizes zinc-bromide flow batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the GS Battery, EPC Power HES RESCU.

  8. Neuropathy Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Neuropathy Share this page: Was this page helpful? Overview | ... of testing are: To diagnose the presence of neuropathy and distinguish it from other conditions that may ...

  9. Lipase test

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bowel (bowel obstruction) Celiac disease Duodenal ulcer Cancer of the pancreas Infection or swelling of the pancreas This test may also be done for familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency . Risks ... Update Date 2/4/2015 Updated ...

  10. VMA Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is primarily used to detect and rule out neuroblastomas in children with an abdominal mass or other ... homovanillic acid (HVA) test to help diagnose a neuroblastoma, to monitor the effectiveness of treatment, and to ...

  11. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these tests can help ... also be ordered when iron deficiency or iron overload is suspected. Early iron deficiency often goes unnoticed. ...

  12. Test Anxiety

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... Like other anxiety reactions, test anxiety affects the body and the mind. When you're under stress, your body releases ...

  13. VDRL test

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions may cause a false-positive test, including: HIV Lyme disease Certain types of pneumonia Malaria Systemic lupus erythematosus The body does not always produce antibodies specifically in response to the syphilis bacteria, so ...

  14. RPR test

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections and is routinely used to screen pregnant women for the disease. Several states also require that couples be screened for syphilis before getting a marriage license. The test is also used to see ...

  15. Prealbumin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to help detect and diagnose protein-calorie malnutrition as well as to monitor people receiving total ... be used to assess nutritional status or diagnose malnutrition. However, others believe that the test can be ...

  16. Calcium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... as thyroid disease , parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , cancer, or malnutrition An ionized calcium test may be ordered when ... albumin , which can result from liver disease or malnutrition , both of which may result from alcoholism or ...

  17. Genomic Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Working Group Independent Web site Informing the effective integration of genomics into health practice—Lynch syndrome ACCE Model for Evaluating Genetic Tests Recommendations by the EGAPP Working Group Top of ... ...

  18. Phosphorus Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Phosphorus Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... else I should know? How is it used? Phosphorus tests are most often ordered along with other ...

  19. Triglycerides Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Triglycerides Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: TG; TRIG Formal name: Triglycerides Related tests: Cholesterol ; HDL Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Direct ...

  20. ACT Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Also known as: ACT; Activated Coagulation Time Formal name: Activated Clotting Time Related tests: ... in the blood called platelets and proteins called coagulation factors are activated in a sequence of steps ...

  1. Fibrinogen Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related tests: PT and INR , PTT , D-dimer , Coagulation Factors , Thrombin Time , hs-CRP At a Glance ... and D-dimer to help diagnose disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) or abnormal fibrinolysis Occasionally to help monitor ...

  2. Sodium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Sodium Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Na Formal name: Sodium Related tests: Chloride , Bicarbonate , Potassium , Electrolytes , Osmolality , Basic ...

  3. Toxoplasmosis Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Toxoplasma gondii Molecular Detection by PCR Related tests: TORCH ; CSF Analysis ; Amniotic Fluid Analysis At a Glance ... may sometimes be performed as part of a TORCH panel . TORCH is an acronym for several infections ...

  4. Testosterone Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... of other conditions, such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) . ^ Back to top What does the test result ... are normally low. Increased testosterone levels can indicate: PCOS Ovarian or adrenal gland tumor Congenital adrenal hyperplasia ^ ...

  5. Insulin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with type 2 diabetes , polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) , prediabetes or heart disease , or metabolic syndrome . A ... resistance), especially in obese individuals and those with PCOS . This test involves an IV-infusion of insulin, ...

  6. Testing Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A device for testing composites for strength characteristics has been developed by Acoustic Emission Technology Corporation. Called the Model 206AU, the system is lightweight and portable. It is comprised of three sections. The "pulser" section injects ultrasonic waves into the material under test. A receiver picks up the simulated stress waves as they pass through the material and relays the signals to the acoustic emission section, where they are electronically analyzed.

  7. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation after reduced intensity conditioning in patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Results of the HDR-ALLO study – a prospective clinical trial by the Grupo Español de Linfomas/Trasplante de Médula Osea (GEL/TAMO) and the Lymphoma Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sureda, Anna; Canals, Carme; Arranz, Reyes; Caballero, Dolores; Ribera, Josep Maria; Brune, Mats; Passweg, Jacob; Martino, Rodrigo; Valcárcel, David; Besalduch, Joan; Duarte, Rafael; León, Angel; Pascual, Maria Jesus; García-Noblejas, Ana; Corral, Lucia López; Xicoy, Bianca; Sierra, Jordi; Schmitz, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    the major remaining challenge in this setting. The HDR-Allo trial was registered in the European Clinical Trials Database (EUDRACT, https://eudract.ema.europa.eu/) with number 02-0036 PMID:21993674

  8. Source mechanisms of micro-earthquakes induced in a fluid injection experiment at the HDR site Soultz-sous-Forêts (Alsace) in 2003 and their temporal and spatial variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horálek, Josef; Jechumtálová, Zuzana; Dorbath, Louis; Šílený, Jan

    2010-06-01

    We have inverted the peak amplitudes of direct P waves of 45 micro-earthquakes with magnitudes between M = 1.4 and 2.9, which occurred during and after the 2003 massive fluid injection in the GPK3 borehole of the Soultz-sous-Forêts Hot Dry Rock facility. These events were recorded by a surface seismic network of 15 stations operated by the Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre, University of Strasbourg. The unconstrained moment tensor (MT) expression of the mechanism was applied, allowing the description of a general system of dipoles, that is, both double-couple (DC) and non-DC sources, as tensile fractures. The mechanisms of all but one event are dominantly DCs with a few per cent additional components at the most. We have checked carefully the reliability of the MT retrieval in bootstrap trials eliminating some data, by simulating the mislocation of the hypocentre and by applying simplified velocity models of the area in constructing Green's functions. In some of the trials non-DC components amounting to several tens of per cent appear, but the F-test classifies them as insignificant. Even the only micro-earthquake with an exceptionally high non-DC mechanism cannot be classified unambiguously-the F-test assigns similar significance to the pure DC solution. The massive dominance of the DC indicates the shear-slip as the mechanism of the micro-earthquakes investigated. The mechanisms display large variability and are of normal dip-slip, oblique normal to strike-slip types. The T-axes are fairly stable, being concentrated subhorizontally roughly in the E-W direction. On the contrary, the P-axes are ill constrained varying in the N-S direction from nearly vertical to nearly horizontal, which points to heterogeneous stress in the Soultz injected volume. This is in agreement with the stress pattern from in situ measurements: the minimum stress axis is well constrained to E-W, whereas the maximum and intermediate stress values are close to one another

  9. Testing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This bulletin from Sandia National Laboratories presents current research highlights in testing technology. Ion microscopy offers new nondestructive testing technique that detects high resolution invisible defects. An inexpensive thin-film gauge checks detonators on centrifuge. Laser trackers ride the range and track helicopters at low-level flights that could not be detected by radar. Radiation transport software predicts electron/photon effects via cascade simulation. Acoustic research in noise abatement will lead to quieter travelling for Bay Area Rapid Transport (BART) commuters.

  10. Rotational testing.

    PubMed

    Furman, J M

    2016-01-01

    The natural stimulus for the semicircular canals is rotation of the head, which also might stimulate the otolith organs. Vestibular stimulation usually induces eye movements via the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). The orientation of the subject with respect to the axis of rotation and the orientation of the axis of rotation with respect to gravity together determine which labyrinthine receptors are stimulated for particular motion trajectories. Rotational testing usually includes the measurement of eye movements via a video system but might use a subject's perception of motion. The most common types of rotational testing are whole-body computer-controlled sinusoidal or trapezoidal stimuli during earth-vertical axis rotation (EVAR), which stimulates primarily the horizontal semicircular canals bilaterally. Recently, manual impulsive rotations, known as head impulse testing (HIT), have been developed to assess individual horizontal semicircular canals. Most types of rotational stimuli are not used routinely in the clinical setting but may be used in selected research environments. This chapter will discuss clinically relevant rotational stimuli and several types of rotational testing that are used primarily in research settings. PMID:27638070

  11. Amylase Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests are sometimes used to monitor treatment of cancers involving the pancreas and after the removal of gallstones that have ... in people with pancreatic duct obstruction and pancreatic cancers . In ... cells in the pancreas. Decreased levels can also be due to kidney ...

  12. Microgrid Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Shirazi, M.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-01-01

    With the publication of IEEE 1574.4 Guide for Design, Operation, and Integration of Distributed Resource Island Systems with Electric Power Systems, there is an increasing amount of attention on not only the design and operations of microgrids, but also on the proper operation and testing of these systems. This standard provides alternative approaches and good practices for the design, operation, and integration of microgrids. This includes the ability to separate from and reconnect to part of the utility grid while providing power to the islanded power system. This presentation addresses the industry need to develop standardized testing and evaluation procedures for microgrids in order to assure quality operation in the grid connected and islanded modes of operation.

  13. Earthquake Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    During NASA's Apollo program, it was necessary to subject the mammoth Saturn V launch vehicle to extremely forceful vibrations to assure the moonbooster's structural integrity in flight. Marshall Space Flight Center assigned vibration testing to a contractor, the Scientific Services and Systems Group of Wyle Laboratories, Norco, California. Wyle-3S, as the group is known, built a large facility at Huntsville, Alabama, and equipped it with an enormously forceful shock and vibration system to simulate the liftoff stresses the Saturn V would encounter. Saturn V is no longer in service, but Wyle-3S has found spinoff utility for its vibration facility. It is now being used to simulate earthquake effects on various kinds of equipment, principally equipment intended for use in nuclear power generation. Government regulations require that such equipment demonstrate its ability to survive earthquake conditions. In upper left photo, Wyle3S is preparing to conduct an earthquake test on a 25ton diesel generator built by Atlas Polar Company, Ltd., Toronto, Canada, for emergency use in a Canadian nuclear power plant. Being readied for test in the lower left photo is a large circuit breaker to be used by Duke Power Company, Charlotte, North Carolina. Electro-hydraulic and electro-dynamic shakers in and around the pit simulate earthquake forces.

  14. Airlock Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Adminstration's Langley Research Center scientists use this plexiglass space station airlock test model to determine astronauts' ability to move in and out through an airlock with the restraint of a pressurized suit. Operations in space that call for crew transfer between spacecraft require airlocks of some kind. Mobility and performance in airlock systems must be determined to establish geometry and associated hardware for equipment suitable for manned space vehicle use. The airlock prevents artificial atmosphere loss when an astronaut transfers from one spacecraft to another or from the interior to the exterior in the performance of duties.

  15. Performance Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Systems Technology, Inc., Hawthorne, CA, developed an electronic Critical Tracking Task (CTT) system that analyzes and rates a subject's visual/motor responses for Ames Research Center. Originally applied to measuring the effects of long term confinement in the mid 1960's, the CTT system is now marketed as FACTOR 1000 by Performance Factors, Inc. Alameda, CA, under a licensing agreement with Systems Technology. The system is a non-invasive, self-administered test that takes less than a minute and detects impairment from a broad range of causes, including stress, fatigue, illness, drugs, or alcohol. It is used daily by Old Town Trolley Tours, San Diego, CA, to assess each driver's physical coordination skills prior to the start of each shift. FACTOR 1000 reduces liabilities and costs related to accidents, and costs less than one dollar per day per employee. Performance Factors is now BioFactors, Inc.

  16. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy quality assurance: a practical guide

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, DA

    2006-01-01

    The widespread adoption of high dose rate brachytherapy with its inherent dangers necessitates adoption of appropriate quality assurance measures to minimize risks to both patients and medical staff. This paper is aimed at assisting someone who is establishing a new program or revising one already in place into adhere to the recently issued Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USA) regulations and the guidelines from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. PMID:21614233

  17. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J.

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V{sub 100}{sup Prostate}>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V{sub 75}{sup Bladder}<1 cc, V{sub 75}{sup Rectum}<1 cc, V{sub 125}{sup Urethra}<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of catheter insertion. In addition, alternative catheter patterns may decrease toxicity by avoidance of the critical structures near the penile bulb while still fulfilling the RTOG criteria.

  18. Using HDR (Hot Dry Rock) technology to recharge The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.; Robinson, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The main reason for the productivity decline at The Geysers geothermal field is obvious: more fluid is being withdrawn from the reservoir than is being returned by reinjection and natural recharge. However, there is another factor that may be contributing to this decline --- the method of reinjection. By reinjecting cold condensate directly into the steam dome as is the current practice, the very large pressure difference between the injected condensate and the underpressured reservoir guarantees that the reinjected fluid will fall rapidly to the bottom of the reservoir, with very little residence time for heat transfer. This point is very important since the vast majority of the heat contained in The Geysers geothermal field is stored in the hot rock comprising the reservoir. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Spatial imaging in color and HDR: prometheus unchained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, John J.

    2013-03-01

    The Human Vision and Electronic Imaging Conferences (HVEI) at the IS and T/SPIE Electronic Imaging meetings have brought together research in the fundamentals of both vision and digital technology. This conference has incorporated many color disciplines that have contributed to the theory and practice of today's imaging: color constancy, models of vision, digital output, high-dynamic-range imaging, and the understanding of perceptual mechanisms. Before digital imaging, silver halide color was a pixel-based mechanism. Color films are closely tied to colorimetry, the science of matching pixels in a black surround. The quanta catch of the sensitized silver salts determines the amount of colored dyes in the final print. The rapid expansion of digital imaging over the past 25 years has eliminated the limitations of using small local regions in forming images. Spatial interactions can now generate images more like vision. Since the 1950's, neurophysiology has shown that post-receptor neural processing is based on spatial interactions. These results reinforced the findings of 19th century experimental psychology. This paper reviews the role of HVEI in color, emphasizing the interaction of research on vision and the new algorithms and processes made possible by electronic imaging.

  20. PPD skin test

    MedlinePlus

    Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Mantoux skin test (PPD test, purified protein derivative test, Tb test, tuberculin skin test, TST, tuberculosis test) - diagnostic. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . ...

  1. APU diaphragm testing. Test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) fuel (hydrazine) tanks have had to be removed from the Columbia Shuttle (OV-102) because they have been in service for 11 years, which is the limit of their useful life. As part of an effort to determine whether the useful life of the fuel tanks can be extended, examination of the ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) diaphragm and the metal from one of the APU tanks is required. The JSC Propulsion and Power Division has requested White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) to examine the EPR diaphragm thoroughly and the metal casing generally from one tank. The objective is to examine the EPR diaphragm for signs of degradation that may limit the life of its function in the APU propellant tank. The metal casing will also be examined for signs of surface corrosion.

  2. Hot dry rock: A versatile alternative energy technology

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, D.V.

    1995-01-01

    Hot dry rock (HDR) is the most abundant geothermal resource, and is found almost everywhere at depth. The technology to extract energy from HDR for practical use has been under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for more than twenty years. During the 1970`s, the possibility of mining the heat from HDR by circulating water through an engineered geothermal reservoir was first demonstrated on a small scale. Between 1980 and 1986 a larger, deeper, and hotter HDR reservoir was constructed. This large reservoir was subsequently mated to a permanent surface plant. A number of flow tests of this large HDR reservoir were conducted between 1991 and 1995. The results of these tests have indicated that it should be practical to operate an HDR heat mining facility to produce power on a sustained basis. An industry-led, government cost-shared project to produce and market energy generated from HDR is currently being put in place. That project should help demonstrate that HDR reservoirs can be operated to provide energy for long periods of time at rates sufficient to be commercially viable. In the longer run, additional applications of HDR technology such as water and waste treatment, and steam generation for oil field flooding may come into widespread use.

  3. Helicobacter pylori Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... pylori stool antigen test; H. pylori breath test; Urea breath test; CLO test; Rapid urease test (RUT) ... of H. pylori antigen in a stool sample Urea breath test A person drinks a liquid containing ...

  4. Screening Tests for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... or colonoscopy) Diabetes screening Gonorrhea test HIV test Syphilis test Get tested for chlamydia yearly through age ... to be tested for HIV. Get tested for syphilis if you are at increased risk or pregnant. ...

  5. A1C test

    MedlinePlus

    HbA1C test; Glycated hemoglobin test; Glycosylated hemoglobin test; Hemoglobin glycosylated test; Glycohemoglobin test ... have recently eaten does not affect the A1C test, so you do not need to fast to ...

  6. Mononucleosis spot test

    MedlinePlus

    Monospot test; Heterophile antibody test; Heterophile agglutination test; Paul-Bunnell test; Forssman antibody test ... The mononucleosis spot test is done when symptoms of mononucleosis are ... Fatigue Fever Large spleen (possibly) Sore throat Tender ...

  7. HPV DNA test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is generally not recommended for detecting low-risk HPV infections. ... Human papilloma virus - testing; Abnormal Pap smear - HPV testing; LSIL-HPV testing, Low-grade dysplasia - HPV testing; HSIL - HPV testing; High-grade dysplasia - HPV testing; HPV ...

  8. Context-dependent JPEG backward-compatible high-dynamic range image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, Pavel; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2013-10-01

    High-dynamic range (HDR) imaging is expected, together with ultrahigh definition and high-frame rate video, to become a technology that may change photo, TV, and film industries. Many cameras and displays capable of capturing and rendering both HDR images and video are already available in the market. The popularity and full-public adoption of HDR content is, however, hindered by the lack of standards in evaluation of quality, file formats, and compression, as well as large legacy base of low-dynamic range (LDR) displays that are unable to render HDR. To facilitate the wide spread of HDR usage, the backward compatibility of HDR with commonly used legacy technologies for storage, rendering, and compression of video and images are necessary. Although many tone-mapping algorithms are developed for generating viewable LDR content from HDR, there is no consensus of which algorithm to use and under which conditions. We, via a series of subjective evaluations, demonstrate the dependency of the perceptual quality of the tone-mapped LDR images on the context: environmental factors, display parameters, and image content itself. Based on the results of subjective tests, it proposes to extend JPEG file format, the most popular image format, in a backward compatible manner to deal with HDR images also. An architecture to achieve such backward compatibility with JPEG is proposed. A simple implementation of lossy compression demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed architecture compared with the state-of-the-art HDR image compression.

  9. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    GH suppression test; Glucose loading test; Acromegaly - blood test; Gigantism - blood test ... is not changed and stays high during the suppression test, the provider will suspect gigantism or acromegaly. ...

  10. Heart failure - tests

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... An echocardiogram (Echo) is a test that uses sound waves to create a moving picture of the heart. The picture is much more detailed than a plain ...

  11. Tests Related to Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to learn. Search form Search Tests related to pregnancy You are here Home Testing & Services Testing for ... to Genetic Counseling . What Are Tests Related to Pregnancy? Pregnancy related testing is done before or during ...

  12. Tests, Testing, and Genuine School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walberg, Herbert J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The pressing need to improve achievement in American schools is widely recognized. In "Tests, Testing, and Genuine School Reform," Herbert J. Walberg draws on scientific studies of tests and their uses to inform citizens, educators, and policy makers about well-established principles of testing, current problems, and promising evidence-based…

  13. Language in Education: Testing the Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oller, John W., Jr.; Perkins, Kyle

    This book addresses the question of what tests are measures of. Intelligence, achievement, and personality tests not based on empirical investigation have questionable validity. Some researchers now suspect that almost all tests given to students in all subjects, as well as general tests of intelligence and personality, are essentially language…

  14. Combined Load Test Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.

    2010-01-01

    A test fixture has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center that has the capability of applying compression load and shear load simultaneously to a test specimen. The test specimen size is 24-inches by 28-inches. This report describes the test specimen design, test specimen preparation, fixture assembly in the test machine, and a test operation plan.

  15. Heat pipe testing program test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bienert, W.B.

    1980-03-14

    A test plan is given which describes the tests to be conducted on several typical solar receiver heat pipes. The hardware to be used, test fixtures and rationale of the test program are discussed. The program objective is to perform life testing under simulated receiver conditions, and to conduct performance tests with selected heat pipes to further map their performance, particularly with regard to their transient behavior. Performance requirements are defined. Test fixtures designed for the program are described in detail, and their capabilities for simulating the receiver conditions and their limitations are discussed. The heat pipe design is given. (LEW)

  16. Lyme disease blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . If the ELISA test is positive, it must be confirmed with another ... were seen in your blood sample. If the ELISA test is negative, usually no other testing is needed. ...

  17. Mental status testing

    MedlinePlus

    Mental status exam; Neurocognitive testing; Dementia-mental status testing ... A health care provider will ask a number of questions. The test can be ... cognitive assessment (MoCA). The following may be tested: ...

  18. Visual acuity test

    MedlinePlus

    Eye test -- acuity; Vision test -- acuity; Snellen test ... from your face. This will test your near vision. ... examination, particularly if there is a change in vision or a problem with vision. In children, the ...

  19. Strep Throat Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Was this page helpful? Also known as: Throat Culture; Culture, Throat; Rapid Strep Test; Rapid Antigen Detection Test; ... beta hemolytic streptococcus Related tests: Influenza Tests ; Blood Culture ; ASO ; Anti-DNase B All content on Lab ...

  20. Tests for Reproductive Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... HSV (genital herpes) test Pap test (Pap smear) Syphilis test Urinalysis and urine culture Vaginal yeast infection ... to a lab for testing. Or, if a syphilis sore is present, fluid from the sore can ...

  1. Genetic Testing (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Genetic Testing KidsHealth > For Parents > Genetic Testing Print A ... blood, skin, bone, or other tissue is needed. Genetic Testing During Pregnancy For genetic testing before birth, ...

  2. Sickle Cell Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... after birth; therefore, this test may give a false-negative result if performed too early (if hemoglobin S ... of the date of testing, may cause a false-negative test result with some of the tests ( ...

  3. Coccidioides precipitin test

    MedlinePlus

    Coccidioidomycosis antibody test ... There is no special preparation for the test. ... The precipitin test is one of several tests that can be done to determine if you are infected with the fungus ...

  4. Lactose tolerance tests

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrogen breath test for lactose tolerance ... Two common methods include: Lactose tolerance blood test Hydrogen breath test The hydrogen breath test is the preferred method. It measures the amount of hydrogen in the air you breathe out. ...

  5. Sweat electrolytes test

    MedlinePlus

    Sweat test; Sweat chloride; Iontophoretic sweat test ... No special steps are needed before this test. ... The test is not painful. Some people have a tingling feeling at the site of the electrode. This feeling ...

  6. Ketones urine test

    MedlinePlus

    Ketone bodies - urine; Urine ketones; Ketoacidosis - urine ketones test; Diabetic ketoacidosis - urine ketones test ... Urine ketones are usually measured as a "spot test." This is available in a test kit that ...

  7. Liver Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... herbal supplements you are taking. What are normal ranges for liver function tests? Normal ranges for liver function tests can vary by age, ... other factors. Laboratory test results usually provide normal ranges for each liver function test with your results. ...

  8. Exams and Test Descriptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lab Test Results Understanding Your Pathology Report Imaging (Radiology) Tests Doctors use imaging tests to make pictures ( ... help determine if cancer treatment is working. Imaging (Radiology) Tests for Cancer Understanding Radiation Risk from Imaging ...

  9. Tests for H. pylori

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic ulcer disease - H. pylori ; PUD - H. pylori ... There are several methods to test for H. pylori infection. Breath Test (Carbon Isotope-urea Breath Test, or UBT) Up to 2 weeks before the test, you need to stop taking ...

  10. Allergy testing - skin

    MedlinePlus

    Patch tests - allergy; Scratch tests - allergy; Skin tests - allergy; RAST test ... There are three common methods of allergy skin testing. The skin prick test involves: Placing a small amount of substances that may be causing your symptoms on the skin, most often ...

  11. hCG Test (Pregnancy Test)

    MedlinePlus

    ... there is a significant hCG level, may give false-negative results. The test may be repeated a ... Blood or protein in the urine may cause false-positive pregnancy results. Urine hCG tests may give ...

  12. From Test Takers to Test Makers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kari

    2009-01-01

    As a classroom teacher, Kari Smith realized that traditional objective tests don't always assess what students actually know. But tests are so deeply embedded in the education system that it would be difficult to do away with them entirely. Smith decided to make tests into learning tools. In this article, Smith describes three strategies for…

  13. To Test or Not to Test?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Circle, David

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses whether music educators should push for national testing of music students. The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) did test music students in 1997. Even though the results of that test did not indicate students were very accomplished, there was a general feeling that at least NAEP and the nation recognized…

  14. Pyrovalve Blowby Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor; Keddy, Christopher P.; Julien, Howard L.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested to perform pyrovalve blowby tests in support of the Mars Observer Propulsion and Corrective Actions Test Program. Fifty-three tests were conducted in an attempt to characterize the blowby of commercial pyrovalves. Those pyrovalves used on NASA spacecraft are well represented, and the test data reported provide a basis for evaluating the performance of similar valves in other propulsion systems. The three test series conducted are subsequently described. All testing was done in the same test facility, with periodic changes that enhanced the test methodology.

  15. Stool guaiac test

    MedlinePlus

    gFOBT; Guaiac smear test; Fecal occult blood test - guaiac smear; Stool occult blood test - guaiac smear ... This test detects blood in the digestive tract. It may be done if: You are being screened or tested for colon cancer You ...

  16. Growth hormone stimulation test

    MedlinePlus

    Arginine test; Arginine-GHRH test ... of re-inserting the needle each time. The test takes between 2 to 5 hours. The procedure ... eat for 10 to 12 hours before the test. Eating food can change the test results. Some ...

  17. CO2 blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Bicarbonate test; HCO3-; Carbon dioxide test; TCO2; Total CO2; CO2 test - serum ... Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test. DO ...

  18. Longitudinal Multistage Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Steffi

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces longitudinal multistage testing (lMST), a special form of multistage testing (MST), as a method for adaptive testing in longitudinal large-scale studies. In lMST designs, test forms of different difficulty levels are used, whereas the values on a pretest determine the routing to these test forms. Since lMST allows for…

  19. Creative Written Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boykin, Kathleen G.

    By being creative in preparing tests and by allowing creativity on the part of students, language teachers can incorporate many of the principles associated with proficiency-oriented instruction into a traditional test format. Such test strategies are based on the following: (1) testing in context is better than testing with a series of unrelated…

  20. Sociolinguistic Test Item Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Donald L.

    Because the language of a multiple choice test is formal and often unfamiliar, certain linguistic features may lead a test-taker to misconstrue the test instructions, questions, or answers. When this happens, a shared understanding of meaning between tester and test-taker is not present, and the test results are invalid. Although this problem…

  1. Test vs. simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles C.

    1991-01-01

    The following topics are presented in tabular form: (1) simulation capability assessments (no propulsion system test); (2) advanced vehicle simulation capability assessment; (3) systems tests identified events; (4) main propulsion test article (MPTA) testing evaluation; (5) Saturn 5, 1B, and 1 testing evaluation. Special vehicle simulation issues that are propulsion related are briefly addressed.

  2. Transient Pressure Test Article Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vibbart, Charles M.

    1989-01-01

    The Transient Pressure Test Article (TPTA) test program is being conducted at a new test facility located in the East Test Area at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This facility, along with the special test equipment (STE) required for facility support, was constructed specifically to test and verify the sealing capability of the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) field, igniter, and nozzle joints. The test article consists of full scale RSRM hardware loaded with inert propellant and assembled in a short stack configuration. The TPTA is pressurized by igniting a propellant cartridge capable of inducing a pressure rise rate which stimulates the ignition transient that occurs during launch. Dynamic loads are applied during the pressure cycle to simulate external tank attach (ETA) strut loads present on the ETA ring. Sealing ability of the redesigned joints is evaluated under joint movement conditions produced by these combined loads since joint sealing ability depends on seal resilience velocity being greater than gap opening velocity. Also, maximum flight dynamic loads are applied to the test article which is either pressurized to 600 psia using gaseous nitrogen (GN2) or applied to the test article as the pressure decays inside the test article on the down cycle after the ignition transient cycle. This new test facility is examined with respect to its capabilities. In addition, both the topic of test effectiveness versus space vehicle flight performance and new aerospace test techniques, as well as a comparison between the old SRM design and the RSRM are presented.

  3. Cumulative experience of the US Hot Dry Rock Program

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    In over 20 years of research on the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy concept at Los Alamos National Laboratory, no obstacle has yet been found that would prevent its development as a major new energy source for the nation. To put the continuing development of the HDR concept in perspective, the most appropriate comparison is with fusion energy, the only other nonrenewable energy resource of the magnitude of HDR geothermal energy. In this context, research on fusion energy is currently so far from the demonstration stage that obstacles to its ultimate commercial development, such as induced radiation or neutron damage to structural materials, cannot yet be addressed from the standpoint of engineered solutions. For the commercialization of the HDR concept, on the other hand, we know what technical problems remain and are presently developing engineered solutions to address each of them. This document presents learned information on: the formation of HDR reservoirs; the structure of the deep precambrian basement; the mechanics of creating an HDR geothermal reservoir; peripheral water loss from deep HDR reservoirs; the determination of the size, orientation, and internal structure of the stimulated HDR region; and results from geochemical analyses and tracer testing.

  4. Cumulative experience of the US Hot Dry Rock Program

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.

    1993-04-01

    In over 20 years of research on the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy concept at Los Alamos National Laboratory, no obstacle has yet been found that would prevent its development as a major new energy source for the nation. To put the continuing development of the HDR concept in perspective, the most appropriate comparison is with fusion energy, the only other nonrenewable energy resource of the magnitude of HDR geothermal energy. In this context, research on fusion energy is currently so far from the demonstration stage that obstacles to its ultimate commercial development, such as induced radiation or neutron damage to structural materials, cannot yet be addressed from the standpoint of engineered solutions. For the commercialization of the HDR concept, on the other hand, we know what technical problems remain and are presently developing engineered solutions to address each of them. This document presents learned information on: the formation of HDR reservoirs; the structure of the deep precambrian basement; the mechanics of creating an HDR geothermal reservoir; peripheral water loss from deep HDR reservoirs; the determination of the size, orientation, and internal structure of the stimulated HDR region; and results from geochemical analyses and tracer testing.

  5. Gene conversion is strongly induced in human cells by double-strand breaks and is modulated by the expression of BCL-x(L)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Claudia; Pierce, Andrew J.; Gauny, Stacey S.; Jasin, Maria; Kronenberg, Amy; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) contributes to the maintenance of genomic stability in rodent cells, and it has been assumed that HDR is of similar importance in DSB repair in human cells. However, some outcomes of homologous recombination can be deleterious, suggesting that factors exist to regulate HDR. We demonstrated previously that overexpression of BCL-2 or BCL-x(L) enhanced the frequency of X-ray-induced TK1 mutations, including loss of heterozygosity events presumed to arise by mitotic recombination. The present study was designed to test whether HDR is a prominent DSB repair pathway in human cells and to determine whether ectopic expression of BCL-x(L) affects HDR. Using TK6-neo cells, we find that a single DSB in an integrated HDR reporter stimulates gene conversion 40-50-fold, demonstrating efficient DSB repair by gene conversion in human cells. Significantly, DSB-induced gene conversion events are 3-4-fold more frequent in TK6 cells that stably overexpress the antiapoptotic protein BCL-X(L). Thus, HDR plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity in human cells, and ectopic expression of BCL-x(L) enhances HDR of DSBs. This is the first study to highlight a function for BCL-x(L) in modulating DSB repair in human cells.

  6. Vendor System Vulnerability Testing Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Davidson

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prepared this generic test plan to provide clients (vendors, end users, program sponsors, etc.) with a sense of the scope and depth of vulnerability testing performed at the INL’s Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Test Bed and to serve as an example of such a plan. Although this test plan specifically addresses vulnerability testing of systems applied to the energy sector (electric/power transmission and distribution and oil and gas systems), it is generic enough to be applied to control systems used in other critical infrastructures such as the transportation sector, water/waste water sector, or hazardous chemical production facilities. The SCADA Test Bed is established at the INL as a testing environment to evaluate the security vulnerabilities of SCADA systems, energy management systems (EMS), and distributed control systems. It now supports multiple programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, other government agencies, and private sector clients. This particular test plan applies to testing conducted on a SCADA/EMS provided by a vendor. Before performing detailed vulnerability testing of a SCADA/EMS, an as delivered baseline examination of the system is conducted, to establish a starting point for all-subsequent testing. The series of baseline tests document factory delivered defaults, system configuration, and potential configuration changes to aid in the development of a security plan for in depth vulnerability testing. The baseline test document is provided to the System Provider,a who evaluates the baseline report and provides recommendations to the system configuration to enhance the security profile of the baseline system. Vulnerability testing is then conducted at the SCADA Test Bed, which provides an in-depth security analysis of the Vendor’s system.b a. The term System Provider replaces the name of the company/organization providing the system

  7. Test procedure for prism compression testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-26

    This procedure describes the setup and procedure for testing hollow clay tile (HCT) masonry prisms. The prism test is the standard engineering test used to determine values for f'{sub m} (specified compressive strength at 28 days) which are then used to obtain Code design allowable values. The prism compression test described herein produces load vs. deflection data which can be used to determine various properties such as the compressive strength, Modulus of Elasticity, and Poisson's ratio. The test prisms are obtained either by extraction from an existing wall or by fabrication using new materials. Prisms obtained from existing walls are fragile and tedious to extract and handle, but are very important because they provide data on the properties of existing walls. Laboratory-built prisms, used to supplement the in-situ prism test data, are easier to obtain, and allow for better control of the prism. Tests are to be made on prism specimens in two directions with respect to the cores: normal and parallel to the cores. Typically, in the Y-12 Plant buildings that have the HCT infill walls, the walls are constructed such that the cores in the HCT units run horizontally. Loading normal to the cores simulates vertical loading (gravity and vertical earthquake motions) on the walls, and loading parallel to the cores simulates the earthquake forces applied to a building wall in the horizontal direction. Prisms of single wythe 8-in. walls and the composite wythe 13-in. walls will be tested. A special Test Fixture (frame) has been designed and built to perform the in-house testing of prisms. Special handling fixtures have been designed to protect the prisms during removal from the wall site and transportation to the Test Fixture. The Test Fixture was designed for approximately a 400 kip allowable load limit.

  8. Test procedure for prism compression testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-26

    This procedure describes the setup and procedure for testing hollow clay tile (HCT) masonry prisms. The prism test is the standard engineering test used to determine values for f`{sub m} (specified compressive strength at 28 days) which are then used to obtain Code design allowable values. The prism compression test described herein produces load vs. deflection data which can be used to determine various properties such as the compressive strength, Modulus of Elasticity, and Poisson`s ratio. The test prisms are obtained either by extraction from an existing wall or by fabrication using new materials. Prisms obtained from existing walls are fragile and tedious to extract and handle, but are very important because they provide data on the properties of existing walls. Laboratory-built prisms, used to supplement the in-situ prism test data, are easier to obtain, and allow for better control of the prism. Tests are to be made on prism specimens in two directions with respect to the cores: normal and parallel to the cores. Typically, in the Y-12 Plant buildings that have the HCT infill walls, the walls are constructed such that the cores in the HCT units run horizontally. Loading normal to the cores simulates vertical loading (gravity and vertical earthquake motions) on the walls, and loading parallel to the cores simulates the earthquake forces applied to a building wall in the horizontal direction. Prisms of single wythe 8-in. walls and the composite wythe 13-in. walls will be tested. A special Test Fixture (frame) has been designed and built to perform the in-house testing of prisms. Special handling fixtures have been designed to protect the prisms during removal from the wall site and transportation to the Test Fixture. The Test Fixture was designed for approximately a 400 kip allowable load limit.

  9. Anthrax blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Anthrax serology test; Antibody test for anthrax; Serologic test for B anthracis ... A normal result means no antibodies to the anthrax bacteria were seen in your blood sample. However, during the early stages of infection, your body may only ...

  10. HIV Genotypic Resistance Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Anti-retroviral Drug Resistance Testing; ARV Resistance Testing Formal name: ...

  11. Home vision tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... portion. Do the test with each eye separately, first the right and then the left. Hold the test grid ... them for the test. Check each eye separately, first the right and then the left. Keep both eyes open ...

  12. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... measures the level of the protein AAT in blood. Alpha-1 antitrypsin phenotype testing evaluates the amount and type of AAT being produced and compares it to normal patterns. Alpha-1 antitrypsin genotype testing ( DNA testing) can ...

  13. Hepatitis A Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Hepatitis A Testing Share this page: Was this page ... HAV-Ab total; Anti-HAV Formal name: Viral Hepatitis A Antibody Related tests: Hepatitis B Testing ; Hepatitis ...

  14. Hepatitis B Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... IgM; anti-HBe; Hepatitis B e Antibody; HBV DNA Formal name: Hepatitis B Virus Testing Related tests: ... produced by the virus, and others detect viral DNA . The main uses for HBV tests include: To ...

  15. Urine specific gravity test

    MedlinePlus

    ... The osmolality test may not be needed. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

  16. CSF-VDRL test

    MedlinePlus

    Venereal disease research laboratory slide test - CSF ... provider's instructions on how to prepare for this test. ... The CSF-VDRL test is done to diagnose syphilis in the brain or spinal cord. Brain and spinal cord involvement is often a ...

  17. Copper urine test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The copper urine test is performed by collecting urine at specific times for a 24-hour period. The urine is tested for the amount of copper present. The copper urine test is used to determine the presence of Wilson ...

  18. Blood Test: Testosterone

    MedlinePlus

    ... secretes two hormones (luteinizing hormone, or LH; and follicle-stimulating hormone, or FSH) that work together to ... TOPIC Blood Test: Luteinizing Hormone (LH) Blood Test: Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) Blood Test: Estradiol Precocious Puberty ...

  19. PBG urine test

    MedlinePlus

    Porphobilinogen test ... temporarily stop taking medicines that may affect the test results. Be sure to tell your provider about ... This test involves only normal urination, and there is no discomfort.

  20. Breath alcohol test

    MedlinePlus

    Alcohol test - breath ... There are various brands of breath alcohol tests. Each one uses a different method to test the level of alcohol in the breath. The machine may be electronic or manual. One ...

  1. ALP isoenzyme test

    MedlinePlus

    Alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme test ... anything for 10 to 12 hours before the test, unless your health care provider tells you to do so. Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you ...

  2. Creatine phosphokinase test

    MedlinePlus

    CPK test ... vein. The procedure is called a venipuncture . This test may be repeated over 2 or 3 days ... helps determine which tissue has been damaged. This test may be used to: Diagnose heart attack Evaluate ...

  3. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... The test is done after you have not eaten for a while so fluid is all that remains in ... injected into your body. This is done to test the ability of the cells in the stomach ...

  4. Sickle cell test

    MedlinePlus

    Sickledex; Hgb S test ... This test is done to tell if a person has abnormal hemoglobin that causes sickle cell disease and sickle ... and no symptoms, or only mild ones. This test does not tell the difference between these two ...

  5. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  6. Liver Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... food, store energy, and remove poisons. Liver function tests are blood tests that check to see how well your liver ... hepatitis and cirrhosis. You may have liver function tests as part of a regular checkup. Or you ...

  7. Get Tested for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Beware: Online you can buy several HIV home test kits that are not approved by the FDA. Many ... This publication explains how the FDA-approved home test kit works, and warns consumers about purchasing home tests ...

  8. Regulation of Genetic Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... issue in 2010 with a report on the deceptive practices of direct-to-consumer tests, calling the ... tests: misleading test results are further complicated by deceptive marketing and other questionable practices. Washington, DC: US ...

  9. Teratology testing under REACH.

    PubMed

    Barton, Steve

    2013-01-01

    REACH guidelines may require teratology testing for new and existing chemicals. This chapter discusses procedures to assess the need for teratology testing and the conduct and interpretation of teratology tests where required.

  10. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  11. Assessment and Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapham, Caroline

    2000-01-01

    Explores the term "applied linguistics" and discusses the role of language testing within this discipline, the relationship between testing and teaching, and the relationship between testing and assessment (Author/VWL)

  12. Apple Interactive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugh, Michael L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an interactive testing program which uses a sequential text file containing test items. Once the file is created the program does the administration and grading of the test. The complete Applesoft program listing is included. (JN)

  13. Tests for Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Next Topic Liver cancer stages Tests for liver cancer If you have some of the signs ... cancer has come back (recurred). Other blood tests Liver function tests (LFTs): Because liver cancer often develops ...

  14. [Exercise test and respiratory muscle function test].

    PubMed

    Akashiba, Tsuneto

    2011-10-01

    Dyspnea on exertion is a chief complaint of patients with COPD, and it has a major effect on the quality of their lives. Dyspnea is, by definition, subjective, but objective approaches are needed for a comprehensive understanding of these patients' conditions. Thus, measuring changes in cardiopulmonary variables during exercise can be very helpful when evaluating patients with COPD. The main purpose of exercise testing is to evaluate exercise tolerance and to identify the factors limiting exercise. Although incremental exercise testing is ideal for these purposes, simple walking tests such as 6-minute walking test, are also useful. PMID:22073578

  15. Objective Testing: Urine and Other Drug Tests.

    PubMed

    Hadland, Scott E; Levy, Sharon

    2016-07-01

    Drug testing, when carefully collected and thoughtfully interpreted, offers a critical adjunct to clinical care and substance use treatment. However, because test results can be misleading if not interpreted in the correct clinical context, clinicians should always conduct a careful interview with adolescent patients to understand what testing is likely to show and then use testing to validate or refute their expectations. Because of the ease with which samples can be tampered, providers should also carefully reflect on their own collection protocols and sample validation procedures to ensure optimal accuracy." PMID:27338974

  16. Strapdown gyro test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, R. B.; Vanalstine, R.

    1977-01-01

    The power spectral noise characteristic performance of the Teledyne two-degree-of-freedom dry tuned gimbal gyroscope was determined. Tests were conducted using a current configuration SDG-5 gyro in conjunction with test equipment with minor modification. Long term bias stability tests were conducted as well as some first difference performance tests. The gyro, test equipment, and the tests performed are described. Results are presented.

  17. Test Analysis Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Frank F.

    2007-01-01

    Development of analysis guidelines for Exploration Life Support (ELS) technology tests was completed. The guidelines were developed based on analysis experiences gained from supporting Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) technology development in air revitalization systems and water recovery systems. Analyses are vital during all three phases of the ELS technology test: pre-test, during test and post test. Pre-test analyses of a test system help define hardware components, predict system and component performances, required test duration, sampling frequencies of operation parameters, etc. Analyses conducted during tests could verify the consistency of all the measurements and the performance of the test system. Post test analyses are an essential part of the test task. Results of post test analyses are an important factor in judging whether the technology development is a successful one. In addition, development of a rigorous model for a test system is an important objective of any new technology development. Test data analyses, especially post test data analyses, serve to verify the model. Test analyses have supported development of many ECLSS technologies. Some test analysis tasks in ECLSS technology development are listed in the Appendix. To have effective analysis support for ECLSS technology tests, analysis guidelines would be a useful tool. These test guidelines were developed based on experiences gained through previous analysis support of various ECLSS technology tests. A comment on analysis from an experienced NASA ECLSS manager (1) follows: "Bad analysis was one that bent the test to prove that the analysis was right to begin with. Good analysis was one that directed where the testing should go and also bridged the gap between the reality of the test facility and what was expected on orbit."

  18. Who fails lantern tests?

    PubMed

    Cole, B L; Vingrys, A J

    1983-05-01

    A battery of clinical colour vision tests was given to a group of 100 observers with abnormal colour vision who were also tested on the Farnsworth lantern and the Holmes-Wright lanterns types A and B. It was found that clinical colour vision tests are imperfect predictors of lantern test performance. However, observers classified as having a 'severe' colour vision defect were found to fail the lantern tests but only one half to two-thirds of those who fail the lantern tests can be identified in this way. It is not possible to identify with certainty any of the people likely to pass the lantern tests: about one-third to two-thirds of observers classified as being mildly affected fail the lantern tests. The Farnsworth D-15 and City University tests were found to be the best predictors of lantern test performance but other tests such as the Nagel anomaloscope, the H-16, L'Anthony's desaturated test can also be used. The lack of a strong correlation between clinical tests and the recognition of the small coloured stimuli presented by the lantern tests suggests that clinical tests do not test the same aspect of colour vision that is important to the recognition of signal lights. For this reason lantern tests should be retained for occupational testing of colour vision.

  19. Blood Test: Estradiol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testosterone Blood Test: Luteinizing Hormone (LH) Blood Test: Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) Understanding Early Sexual Development Precocious Puberty Understanding Puberty Endocrine System Getting a ...

  20. Test Wiseness and Analogy Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, James C.

    1971-01-01

    Subjects received self instruction on how to approach analogy questions. Instruction was directed toward knowledge of the general format of analogy questions in standarized tests and the 15 types of relationships commonly asked for in analogy questions. An analogies post-test showed a significant effect for the group. (Author)

  1. Testing: Let's Put It to the Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Phyllis, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    In this journal issue, articles examine various aspects of testing intelligence, creativity, and psychopathology. Featured articles include: (1) "Monglottosis: What's Wrong with the Idea of IQ Meritocracy and Its Racy Cousins?" (Johan W. Oller, Jr.), which shows empirically and theoretically that even nonverbal IQ tests mainly measure powers of…

  2. PACS component testing: beta and acceptance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeyman-Buck, Janice C.; Frost, Meryll M.; Staab, Edward V.

    1997-05-01

    The functionality and performance expectations of all PACS components must be specified at the time of purchase and tested completely upon delivery to assure customer satisfaction and successful adoption of the new technology. This process may be more elaborate if the customer agrees to serve as a Beta test site for a new component or a new revision of an existing component.A carefully designed test plan will save time at installation, will allow the customer and vendor to agree on expectations, and will assure that the installation will proceed as planned. This paper describes the test procedure used at the University of Florida to accept each PACS component, either a commercial product, or one developed in house. A set of documents contain descriptions of the pre-installation environment, sets of studies to be used in the test, installation checklist, functional usage reports, subjective evaluations, and problem reporting forms. Training and user documentation is also reviewed and 'help lists' are created to help users perform the most common functions. Although details in the documents are changed to match the type of component being tested, the general form of the test remains the same. A formal procedure for testing the functionality and performance of new equipment can save time for both the vendor and the customer and, if specified at the time of purchase, can serve to document the expectations of the customer. Following these procedures will assure a successful installation and improve customer satisfaction.

  3. Preschool Test Matrix: Individual Test Descriptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coordinating Office for Regional Resource Centers, Lexington, KY.

    Provided via a text matrix and individual test descriptor sheets is information on 127 tests intended for evaluation of and educational prescription for preschool handicapped children. Brief sections explain the procedures used for selection of assessment devices and define each of the descriptor dimensions--type of assessment device,…

  4. Test report for core drilling ignitability testing

    SciTech Connect

    Witwer, K.S.

    1996-08-08

    Testing was carried out with the cooperation of Westinghouse Hanford Company and the United States Bureau of Mines at the Pittsburgh Research Center in Pennsylvania under the Memorandum of Agreement 14- 09-0050-3666. Several core drilling equipment items, specifically those which can come in contact with flammable gasses while drilling into some waste tanks, were tested under conditions similar to actual field sampling conditions. Rotary drilling against steel and rock as well as drop testing of several different pieces of equipment in a flammable gas environment were the specific items addressed. The test items completed either caused no ignition of the gas mixture, or, after having hardware changes or drilling parameters modified, produced no ignition in repeat testing.

  5. Digface characterization test plan (remote testing)

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, K.; Hyde, R.; Allen, S.

    1993-08-01

    The objective of the Digface Characterization (DFC) Remote Testing project is to remotely deploy a sensor head (Mini-Lab) across a digface to determine if it can characterize the contents below the surface. The purpose of this project is to provide a robotics technology that allows removal of workers from hazards, increases speed of operations, and reduces life cycle costs compared to alternate methods and technologies. The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is funding the demonstration, testing, and evaluation of DFC. This document describes the test plan for the DFC remote deployment demonstration for the BWID. The purposes of the test plan are to establish test parameters so that the demonstration results are deemed useful and usable and perform the demonstration in a safe manner and within all regulatory requirements.

  6. Integrated Test and Evaluation Flight Test 3 Flight Test Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Michael Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The desire and ability to fly Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) is of increasing urgency. The application of unmanned aircraft to perform national security, defense, scientific, and emergency management are driving the critical need for less restrictive access by UAS to the NAS. UAS represent a new capability that will provide a variety of services in the government (public) and commercial (civil) aviation sectors. The growth of this potential industry has not yet been realized due to the lack of a common understanding of what is required to safely operate UAS in the NAS. NASA's UAS Integration into the NAS Project is conducting research in the areas of Separation Assurance/Sense and Avoid Interoperability, Human Systems Integration (HSI), and Communication to support reducing the barriers of UAS access to the NAS. This research is broken into two research themes namely, UAS Integration and Test Infrastructure. UAS Integration focuses on airspace integration procedures and performance standards to enable UAS integration in the air transportation system, covering Sense and Avoid (SAA) performance standards, command and control performance standards, and human systems integration. The focus of Test Infrastructure is to enable development and validation of airspace integration procedures and performance standards, including the integrated test and evaluation. In support of the integrated test and evaluation efforts, the Project will develop an adaptable, scalable, and schedulable relevant test environment capable of evaluating concepts and technologies for unmanned aircraft systems to safely operate in the NAS. To accomplish this task, the Project will conduct a series of Human-in-the-Loop and Flight Test activities that integrate key concepts, technologies and/or procedures in a relevant air traffic environment. Each of the integrated events will build on the technical achievements, fidelity and complexity of the previous tests and

  7. Role of test motivation in intelligence testing

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Angela Lee; Quinn, Patrick D.; Lynam, Donald R.; Loeber, Rolf; Stouthamer-Loeber, Magda

    2011-01-01

    Intelligence tests are widely assumed to measure maximal intellectual performance, and predictive associations between intelligence quotient (IQ) scores and later-life outcomes are typically interpreted as unbiased estimates of the effect of intellectual ability on academic, professional, and social life outcomes. The current investigation critically examines these assumptions and finds evidence against both. First, we examined whether motivation is less than maximal on intelligence tests administered in the context of low-stakes research situations. Specifically, we completed a meta-analysis of random-assignment experiments testing the effects of material incentives on intelligence-test performance on a collective 2,008 participants. Incentives increased IQ scores by an average of 0.64 SD, with larger effects for individuals with lower baseline IQ scores. Second, we tested whether individual differences in motivation during IQ testing can spuriously inflate the predictive validity of intelligence for life outcomes. Trained observers rated test motivation among 251 adolescent boys completing intelligence tests using a 15-min “thin-slice” video sample. IQ score predicted life outcomes, including academic performance in adolescence and criminal convictions, employment, and years of education in early adulthood. After adjusting for the influence of test motivation, however, the predictive validity of intelligence for life outcomes was significantly diminished, particularly for nonacademic outcomes. Collectively, our findings suggest that, under low-stakes research conditions, some individuals try harder than others, and, in this context, test motivation can act as a third-variable confound that inflates estimates of the predictive validity of intelligence for life outcomes. PMID:21518867

  8. Intelligence: Theories and Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanastasiou, Elena C.

    This paper reviews what is known about intelligence and the use of intelligence tests. Environmental and hereditary factors that affect performance on intelligence tests are reviewed, along with various theories that have been proposed about the basis of intelligence. Intelligence tests do not test intelligence per se but make inferences about a…

  9. Testing Our Limits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tempel, Melissa Bollow

    2012-01-01

    Computerized testing, including the widely used MAP test, has infiltrated the public schools in Milwaukee and across the nation, bringing with it a frightening future for public education. High-stakes standardized tests can be scored almost immediately via the internet, and testing companies can now easily link districts to their online data…

  10. Achievement Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    The Ohio Trade and Industrial Education Achievement Test battery is comprised of seven basic achievement tests: Machine Trades, Automotive Mechanics, Basic Electricity, Basic Electronics, Mechanical Drafting, Printing, and Sheet Metal. The tests were developed by subject matter committees and specialists in testing and research. The Ohio Trade and…

  11. EFL Vocabulary Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meara, Paul

    This volume contains a set of experimental English language vocabulary tests designed to be used with learners of English as a Second Language (ESL). The tests are graded into 6 levels of difficulty and there are 20 tests at each level. Teachers can use the tests to provide a rough lexical profile of individual students, or to monitor the progress…

  12. Pre-Test Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Pre-tests are a non-graded assessment tool used to determine pre-existing subject knowledge. Typically pre-tests are administered prior to a course to determine knowledge baseline, but here they are used to test students prior to topical material coverage throughout the course. While counterintuitive, the pre-tests cover material the student is…

  13. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive Liquid Rocket Engine testing is essential to risk reduction for Space Flight. Test capability represents significant national investments in expertise and infrastructure. Historical experience underpins current test capabilities. Test facilities continually seek proactive alignment with national space development goals and objectives including government and commercial sectors.

  14. Deconstructing Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putwain, David William

    2008-01-01

    Recent changes to educational policy which have focused attention on the use of high stakes testing as performance and accountability measures have renewed interest in test anxiety both in the UK and the USA. The aim of this paper is to provide a critical examination of the test anxiety construct, and explore the ways in which test anxiety is…

  15. Test Design and Speededness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2011-01-01

    A critical component of test speededness is the distribution of the test taker's total time on the test. A simple set of constraints on the item parameters in the lognormal model for response times is derived that can be used to control the distribution when assembling a new test form. As the constraints are linear in the item parameters, they can…

  16. Color identification testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brawner, E. L.; Martin, R.; Pate, W.

    1970-01-01

    Testing device, which determines ability of a technician to identify color-coded electric wires, is superior to standard color blindness tests. It tests speed of wire selection, detects partial color blindness, allows rapid testing, and may be administered by a color blind person.

  17. Language Testing in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, James Dean, Ed.; Yamashita, Sayoko Okada, Ed.

    Papers on second language testing in Japan include: "Differences Between Norm-Referenced and Criterion-Referenced Tests" (James Dean Brown); "Criterion-Referenced Test Construction and Evaluation" (Dale T. Griffe); "Behavioral Learning Objectives as an Evaluation Tool" (Judith A. Johnson); "Developing Norm- Referenced Tests for Program-Level…

  18. The Challenge to Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassie, J. R. Bruce

    1977-01-01

    Critics of testing have raised relevant issues about the use of tests. Most concerns relate to abuses made in construction, selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of standardized tests. The educator could respond by deciding not to use tests. Unfortunately, this cure would be worse than the disease itself. (Author)

  19. Flight Test Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlock, Kate Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Although the scope of flight test engineering efforts may vary among organizations, all point to a common theme: flight test engineering is an interdisciplinary effort to test an asset in its operational flight environment. Upfront planning where design, implementation, and test efforts are clearly aligned with the flight test objective are keys to success. This chapter provides a top level perspective of flight test engineering for the non-expert. Additional research and reading on the topic is encouraged to develop a deeper understanding of specific considerations involved in each phase of flight test engineering.

  20. Dtest Testing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan; Cameron, Jonathan M.; Myint, Steven

    2013-01-01

    This software runs a suite of arbitrary software tests spanning various software languages and types of tests (unit level, system level, or file comparison tests). The dtest utility can be set to automate periodic testing of large suites of software, as well as running individual tests. It supports distributing multiple tests over multiple CPU cores, if available. The dtest tool is a utility program (written in Python) that scans through a directory (and its subdirectories) and finds all directories that match a certain pattern and then executes any tests in that directory as described in simple configuration files.

  1. ITER test programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdou, M.; Baker, C.; Casini, G.

    1991-07-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) was designed to operate in two phases. The first phase, which lasts for 6 years, is devoted to machine checkout and physics testing. The second phase lasts for 8 years and is devoted primarily to technology testing. This report describes the technology test program development for ITER, the ancillary equipment outside the torus necessary to support the test modules, the international collaboration aspects of conducting the test program on ITER, the requirements on the machine major parameters and the R and D program required to develop the test modules for testing in ITER.

  2. Testing the Teacher? Or Teaching the Test?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    2001-08-01

    Tests, including those written by someone other than the teacher, are a good thing. They provide one useful measure of the success of a student, course, teacher, or school. But too much of a good thing can cause serious, long-term harm. Let us resolve to use tests judiciously, thoughtfully, and appropriately, and to influence others to do the same.

    Literature Cited

    1. High Stakes Testing for Tracking, Promotion, and Graduation; Heubert, J. P.; Hauser, R. M., Eds.; National Academy Press: Washington, DC, 1999; (accessed Jun 2001).
    2. Steinberg, J.; Henriques, D. B. None of the Above; The New York Times May 21, 2001, p A1; May 22, 2001, p A1.
    3. Glenn, T.; Akin, M. Questioning Testing; School Administrator 1996, 53, 26.
    4. Klein, S. P.; Hamilton, L. S.; McCaffrey, D. F.; Stecher, B. M. What Do Test Scores in Texas Tell Us? Educ. Policy Anal. Arch. 2000, 8 (49); (accessed Jun 2001).
    5. Morris, B. R. School Testing Bandwagon Spawns Web Coaching Sites; The New York Times May 24, 2001, p D6.
    6. Goodnough, A. High Stakes of Fourth-Grade Tests Are Driving Off Veteran Teachers; The New York Times June 14, 2001, p A1.

    7. Materials Testing and Automation

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Cooper, Wayne D.; Zweigoron, Ronald B.

      1980-07-01

      The advent of automation in materials testing has been in large part responsible for recent radical changes in the materials testing field: Tests virtually impossible to perform without a computer have become more straightforward to conduct. In addition, standardized tests may be performed with enhanced efficiency and repeatability. A typical automated system is described in terms of its primary subsystems — an analog station, a digital computer, and a processor interface. The processor interface links the analog functions with the digital computer; it includes data acquisition, command function generation, and test control functions. Features of automated testing are described with emphasis on calculated variable control, control of a variable that is computed by the processor and cannot be read directly from a transducer. Three calculated variable tests are described: a yield surface probe test, a thermomechanical fatigue test, and a constant-stress-intensity range crack-growth test. Future developments are discussed.

    8. Testing expert systems

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Chang, C. L.; Stachowitz, R. A.

      1988-01-01

      Software quality is of primary concern in all large-scale expert system development efforts. Building appropriate validation and test tools for ensuring software reliability of expert systems is therefore required. The Expert Systems Validation Associate (EVA) is a validation system under development at the Lockheed Artificial Intelligence Center. EVA provides a wide range of validation and test tools to check correctness, consistency, and completeness of an expert system. Testing a major function of EVA. It means executing an expert system with test cases with the intent of finding errors. In this paper, we describe many different types of testing such as function-based testing, structure-based testing, and data-based testing. We describe how appropriate test cases may be selected in order to perform good and thorough testing of an expert system.

    9. Serum bactericidal test.

      PubMed Central

      Stratton, C W

      1988-01-01

      The serum bactericidal test represents one of the few in vitro tests performed in the clinical microbiology laboratory that combines the interaction of the pathogen, the antimicrobial agent, and the patient. Although the use of such a test antedates the antimicrobial era, its performance, results, and interpretation have been subject to question and controversy. Much of the confusion concerning the serum bactericidal test can be avoided by an understanding of the various factors which influence bactericidal testing. In addition, the methodologic aspects of the serum bactericidal test have recently been addressed and should place this test on firmer ground. New information on the clinical utility of this test is becoming available; additional data are needed to establish more clearly the usefulness of the serum bactericidal test in specific infections. Such clinical trials from multiple centers will enable firmer recommendations for the future use of the serum bactericidal test. PMID:3060242

    10. Flight Test Series 3: Flight Test Report

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Marston, Mike; Sternberg, Daniel; Valkov, Steffi

      2015-01-01

      This document is a flight test report from the Operational perspective for Flight Test Series 3, a subpart of the Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) project. Flight Test Series 3 testing began on June 15, 2015, and concluded on August 12, 2015. Participants included NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, NASA Glenn Research Center, NASA Langley Research center, General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., and Honeywell. Key stakeholders analyzed their System Under Test (SUT) in two distinct configurations. Configuration 1, known as Pairwise Encounters, was subdivided into two parts: 1a, involving a low-speed UAS ownship and intruder(s), and 1b, involving a high-speed surrogate ownship and intruder. Configuration 2, known as Full Mission, involved a surrogate ownship, live intruder(s), and integrated virtual traffic. Table 1 is a summary of flights for each configuration, with data collection flights highlighted in green. Section 2 and 3 of this report give an in-depth description of the flight test period, aircraft involved, flight crew, and mission team. Overall, Flight Test 3 gathered excellent data for each SUT. We attribute this successful outcome in large part from the experience that was acquired from the ACAS Xu SS flight test flown in December 2014. Configuration 1 was a tremendous success, thanks to the training, member participation, integration/testing, and in-depth analysis of the flight points. Although Configuration 2 flights were cancelled after 3 data collection flights due to various problems, the lessons learned from this will help the UAS in the NAS project move forward successfully in future flight phases.

    11. Seat test program

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Bricker, R. W.

      1979-01-01

      The test program has the objectives to: (1) evaluate severity of newspaper ignition source with contemporary seats (determine weight loss, visual damage, and if ignition source is severe enough to show improvement with new material configurations); (2) compare damage with jet A-1 ignition source; and (3) determine if materials for seat tests pass FAR 25 and obtain L01. Test configurations, data acquired, material test results, seat test results, and conclusions are presented.

    12. Test Control Center exhibit

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      2000-01-01

      Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

    13. Signal conditioner test set

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Houck, W. H.; Stigberg, J. D. (Inventor)

      1974-01-01

      A system was developed for testing components contained in a signal conditioning module with a transistor and capacitor included in a circuit. The system includes a housing with a socket into which the module to be tested is plugged. A test switch is provided for selectively connecting a variable load to either a transistor or capacitor in the circuit for testing the operation. A signal generating circuit is provided for generating signals for use in testing the components of the module.

    14. Solderability test system

      DOEpatents

      Yost, Fred; Hosking, Floyd M.; Jellison, James L.; Short, Bruce; Giversen, Terri; Reed, Jimmy R.

      1998-01-01

      A new test method to quantify capillary flow solderability on a printed wiring board surface finish. The test is based on solder flow from a pad onto narrow strips or lines. A test procedure and video image analysis technique were developed for conducting the test and evaluating the data. Feasibility tests revealed that the wetted distance was sensitive to the ratio of pad radius to line width (l/r), solder volume, and flux predry time.

    15. Solderability test system

      DOEpatents

      Yost, F.; Hosking, F.M.; Jellison, J.L.; Short, B.; Giversen, T.; Reed, J.R.

      1998-10-27

      A new test method to quantify capillary flow solderability on a printed wiring board surface finish. The test is based on solder flow from a pad onto narrow strips or lines. A test procedure and video image analysis technique were developed for conducting the test and evaluating the data. Feasibility tests revealed that the wetted distance was sensitive to the ratio of pad radius to line width (l/r), solder volume, and flux predry time. 11 figs.

    16. Testing and Diagnostic Testing in Mathematics

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Cresswell, M.

      1977-01-01

      The author outlines some of the ways in which published mathematics tests, particularly the general standardized type, can be used in a constructive way by teachers to learn more about their pupils. (MN)

    17. Solid Propellant Test Article (SPTA) Test Stand

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      1991-01-01

      This photograph shows the Solid Propellant Test Article (SPTA) test stand with the Modified Nasa Motor (M-NASA) test article at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The SPTA test stand, 12-feet wide by 12-feet long by 24-feet high, was built in 1989 to provide comparative performance data on nozzle and case insulation material and to verify thermostructural analysis models. A modified NASA 48-inch solid motor (M-NASA motor) with a 12-foot blast tube and 10-inch throat makes up the SPTA. The M-NASA motor is being used to evaluate solid rocket motor internal non-asbestos insulation materials, nozzle designs, materials, and new inspection techniques. New internal motor case instrumentation techniques are also being evaluated.

    18. Testing, Testing: Good Teaching Is Difficult; so is Meaningful Testing

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Toby, Sidney; Plano, Richard J.

      2004-01-01

      The limitations of teaching and assessment of knowledge are emphasized, and an improved method is suggested to test the students. This superior examination technique would replace multiple-choice questions with free-response questions for numerical problems, wherein the numerical inputs fed in the computer would be optically scanned and graded…

    19. TESTING TESTS ON ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI MICROVARIABILITY

      SciTech Connect

      De Diego, Jose A.

      2010-03-15

      Literature on optical and infrared microvariability in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) reflects a diversity of statistical tests and strategies to detect tiny variations in the light curves of these sources. Comparison between the results obtained using different methodologies is difficult, and the pros and cons of each statistical method are often badly understood or even ignored. Even worse, improperly tested methodologies are becoming more and more common, and biased results may be misleading with regard to the origin of the AGN microvariability. This paper intends to point future research on AGN microvariability toward the use of powerful and well-tested statistical methodologies, providing a reference for choosing the best strategy to obtain unbiased results. Light curves monitoring has been simulated for quasars and for reference and comparison stars. Changes for the quasar light curves include both Gaussian fluctuations and linear variations. Simulated light curves have been analyzed using {chi}{sup 2} tests, F tests for variances, one-way analyses of variance and C-statistics. Statistical Type I and Type II errors, which indicate the robustness and the power of the tests, have been obtained in each case. One-way analyses of variance and {chi}{sup 2} prove to be powerful and robust estimators for microvariations, while the C-statistic is not a reliable methodology and its use should be avoided.

    20. Morpheus Vertical Test Bed Flight Testing

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Hart, Jeremy; Devolites, Jennifer

      2014-01-01

      NASA's Morpheus Project has developed and tested a prototype planetary lander capable of vertical takeoff and landing, that is designed to serve as a testbed for advanced spacecraft technologies. The lander vehicle, propelled by a LOX/Methane engine and sized to carry a 500kg payload to the lunar surface, provides a platform for bringing technologies from the laboratory into an integrated flight system at relatively low cost. Morpheus onboard software is autonomous from ignition all the way through landing, and is designed to be capable of executing a variety of flight trajectories, with onboard fault checks and automatic contingency responses. The Morpheus 1.5A vehicle performed 26 integrated vehicle test flights including hot-fire tests, tethered tests, and two attempted freeflights between April 2011 and August 2012. The final flight of Morpheus 1.5A resulted in a loss of the vehicle. In September 2012, development began on the Morpheus 1.5B vehicle, which subsequently followed a similar test campaign culminating in free-flights at a simulated planetary landscape built at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility. This paper describes the integrated test campaign, including successes and setbacks, and how the system design for handling faults and failures evolved over the course of the project.

    21. Nevada Test Site Sensor Test Facility

      SciTech Connect

      Gomez, B.J.; Boyer, W.B.

      1996-12-01

      A Sensor Test Facility (STF) was recently established at the Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site (NTS). It has been used for a series of sensor tests that have demonstrated the usefulness of the testbed. The facility consists of a cut-and-cover bunker complex and the two square mile surrounding area. The STF was developed as a scientific testbed optimized for the development and evaluation of advanced sensor systems, including ground sensor systems designed to identify and detect hardened underground facilities. This was accomplished by identifying a facility in a remote location where seismic, acoustic, and electromagnetic interference would be minimal, establishing a testbed that would be accommodating to field testing, and conducting a thorough geophysical characterization of the area surrounding the facility in order to understand the local geology and its effects on geophysical signals emanating from the facility. The STF is representative of a number of cut-and-cover bunkers around the world that are used for the manufacture and/or storage of weapons of mass destruction. This paper provides a general description of the Nevada Test Site, the Sensor Test Facility, and the Geophysical Site Characterization.

    22. Sensitivity Test Analysis

      1992-02-20

      SENSIT,MUSIG,COMSEN is a set of three related programs for sensitivity test analysis. SENSIT conducts sensitivity tests. These tests are also known as threshold tests, LD50 tests, gap tests, drop weight tests, etc. SENSIT interactively instructs the experimenter on the proper level at which to stress the next specimen, based on the results of previous responses. MUSIG analyzes the results of a sensitivity test to determine the mean and standard deviation of the underlying population bymore » computing maximum likelihood estimates of these parameters. MUSIG also computes likelihood ratio joint confidence regions and individual confidence intervals. COMSEN compares the results of two sensitivity tests to see if the underlying populations are significantly different. COMSEN provides an unbiased method of distinguishing between statistical variation of the estimates of the parameters of the population and true population difference.« less

    23. Thruster endurance test

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Collett, C.

      1976-01-01

      A test system was built and several short term tests were completed. The test system included, in addition to the 30-cm ion thruster, a console for powering the thruster and monitoring performance, a vacuum facility for simulating a space environment, and a storage and feed system for the thruster propellant. This system was used to perform three short term tests (one 100-hour and two 500-hour tests), an 1108-hour endurance test which was aborted by a vacuum facility failure, and finally the 10,000-hour endurance test. In addition to the two 400 series thrusters which were used in the short term and 1100-hour tests, four more 400 series thrusters were fabricated, checked out, and delivered to NASA. Three consoles similar to the one used in the test program were also fabricated and delivered.

    24. Testing (HIV). Quick test receives Singapore approval.

      PubMed

      1996-04-22

      Hema-Strip HIV 1/2 is a rapid HIV antibody immunoassay developed by Saliva Diagnostic Systems, Inc. (SDS) which can be used by anyone who can read the product insert. The test kit is comprised of a small lancet for a finger stick, a cylindrical tube with a capillary tip and a SDS diagnostic strip inside, and a vial of buffer. Once blood is drawn by the lancet, the capillary tip is placed upon the blood droplet and the blood is automatically drawn into the tube. The tube is then inserted tip first into the vial of buffer. The buffer and blood migrate over the diagnostic strip inside, yielding stable results within 15 minutes. Studies have found Hema-Strip HIV 1/2 to have a sensitivity and specificity greater than 99.4%, as accurate as most conventional HIV tests which require the use of laboratory equipment and trained staff, and possibly hours to produce results. Moreover, the test kit requires neither refrigeration nor special storage. Hema-Strip HIV 1/2 has received a certificate of free sale from the Ministry of Health in Singapore and is now being submitted for regulatory approval in Brazil, China, Russia, India, Malaysia, Thailand, and the UK. SDS products in production include Sero-Strip HIV 1/2, a rapid serum-based HIV antibody test; Omni-SAL, a saliva collector which is the principal sample collection device used by British insurance companies for HIV testing with other confirmatory tests; Omni-Swab, a serrated swab which collects body fluids or cells; Saliva-Sampler, a saliva collection device used for general testing purposes; and Saliva Check, a test which checks the composition of saliva samples. SDS is in the final stages of developing Saliva-Strip HIV-1/2, a rapid saliva-based HIV antibody test. The company also intends to complete development in 1996 of a rapid blood-based antibody test for the Helicobacter pylori bacteria, a pathogen linked to 80% of peptic ulcers and gastric cancers. PMID:12290908

  1. Programmable telemetry test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadiana, J. M.

    A portable programmable telemetry test system was designed to test shipboard telemetry systems used for evaluating performance of missile systems in the surface missile fleet. The test system accurately simulates any missile in the current Navy inventory, and provides test and calibration signals to verify telemetry systems. The total test system weighs just over 15 lbs and occupies less than 1 cubic foot. Internal batteries allow testing or calibration of RF front ends out on weather decks. The modulation section consists of an FM/PAM/PCM simulator and simple control circuitry, and is programmable via an Intel 2715 EPROM, the frame format memory. A second EPROM provides a wave-form library.

  2. Metamorphic Testing for Cybersecurity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsong Yueh; Kuo, Fei-Ching; Ma, Wenjuan; Susilo, Willy; Towey, Dave; Voas, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Testing is a major approach for the detection of software defects, including vulnerabilities in security features. This article introduces metamorphic testing (MT), a relatively new testing method, and discusses how the new perspective of MT can help to conduct negative testing as well as to alleviate the oracle problem in the testing of security-related functionality and behavior. As demonstrated by the effectiveness of MT in detecting previously unknown bugs in real-world critical applications such as compilers and code obfuscators, we conclude that software testing of security-related features should be conducted from diverse perspectives in order to achieve greater cybersecurity. PMID:27559196

  3. Rules for Optical Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    Based on 30 years of optical testing experience, a lot of mistakes, a lot of learning and a lot of experience, I have defined seven guiding principles for optical testing - regardless of how small or how large the optical testing or metrology task: Fully Understand the Task, Develop an Error Budget, Continuous Metrology Coverage, Know where you are, Test like you fly, Independent Cross-Checks, Understand All Anomalies. These rules have been applied with great success to the inprocess optical testing and final specification compliance testing of the JWST mirrors.

  4. Materials Test Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Gail

    2012-01-01

    The Materials Test Branch resides at Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processing laboratory and has a long history of supporting NASA programs from Mercury to the recently retired Space Shuttle. The Materials Test Branch supports its customers by supplying materials testing expertise in a wide range of applications. The Materials Test Branch is divided into three Teams, The Chemistry Team, The Tribology Team and the Mechanical Test Team. Our mission and goal is to provide world-class engineering excellence in materials testing with a special emphasis on customer service.

  5. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  6. VIEW OF EAST TEST SITE FROM TOP OF STATIC TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST TEST SITE FROM TOP OF STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW INCLUDES STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS TEST STAND COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND AND COMPONENTS TEST LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  7. Force limited vibration testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of conducting lab vibration tests of spacecraft equipment was developed to more closely simulate the vibration environment experienced when the spacecraft is launched on a rocket. The improved tests are tailored to identify equipment design and workmanship problems without inducing artificial failures that would not have occurred at launch. These new, less destructive types of vibration tests are essential to JPL's protoflight test approach in which lab testing is conducted using the flight equipment, often one of a kind, to save time and money. In conventional vibration tests, only the input vibratory motion is specified; the feedback, or reaction force, between the test item and the vibration machine is ignored. Most test failures occur when the test item goes into resonance, and the reaction force becomes very large. It has long been recognized that the large reaction force is a test artifact which does not occur with the lightweight, flexible mounting structures characteristic of spacecraft and space vehicles. In new vibration tests, both the motion and the force provided to the test item by the vibration machine are controlled, so that the vibration ride experienced by the test item is as in flight.

  8. ECN Pressure Test

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

    1991-07-18

    This note describes: the rationale for the test pressure of the inner ECN cryostat vessel, the equipment to be used in this test, the test procedure, the status of the vessel prior to the test, the actual test results, and a schematic diagram of the testing set up and the pressure testing permit. The test, performed in the evening of July 17, 1991, was a major success. Based on a neglible pressure drop indicated on the pressure gages (1/4 psi), the vessel appeared to be structurally sound throughout the duration of the test (approx. 1.5 hrs.). No pressure increases were observed on the indicators looking at the beam tube bellows volumes. There was no indication of bubbles form the soap test on the welds and most of the fittings that were checked. There were some slight deviations in the actual procedure used. The UO filter was removed after the vessel had bled down to about 18 psig in order to speed up that aspect of the test. The rationale was that the higher velocity gas had already passed through at the higher pressures and there was no visible traces of the black uo particles. The rate of 4 psi/10 minutes seemed incredibly slow and often that time was reduced to just over half that rate. The testing personnel was allowed to stay in the pit throughout the duration of the test; this was a slight relaxation of the rules.

  9. Flange weld pressure testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, C. F.

    1977-01-01

    Device allows localized high-pressure proof test. Use of tool eliminates need to block off far end of pipe; only small amount of pressurizing gas is needed; only small area needs to be cleared of personnel for proof test.

  10. Rotavirus antigen test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is not found in the stool. Note: Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

  11. Blood gases test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... an artery. The test is used to evaluate respiratory diseases and conditions that affect the lungs, and it is used to determine the effectiveness of oxygen therapy. The acid-base component of the test also ...

  12. Ovulation home test

    MedlinePlus

    ... women to help determine the time in the menstrual cycle when getting pregnant is most likely. The test ... start testing depends on the length of your menstrual cycle. For example, if your normal cycle is 28 ...

  13. ISS Update: Suitport Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update commentator Lynnette Madison interviews Joel Maganza, Test Director, about thermal vacuum chambers and unmanned and human-testing with the Suitport. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Jo...

  14. Chloride test - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... of body fluids and maintain the body's acid-base balance. This article is about the laboratory test ... signs that your body's fluid level or acid-base balance is disturbed. This test is most often ...

  15. Lactate dehydrogenase test

    MedlinePlus

    ... injury Muscle weakness and loss of muscle tissue ( muscular dystrophy ) New abnormal tissue formation (usually cancer) Pancreatitis Stroke ... test LDH isoenzyme blood test Liver disease Mononucleosis Muscular dystrophy Pernicious anemia Stroke Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia Update ...

  16. Alpha-1 antitrypsin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003715.htm Alpha-1 antitrypsin test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a laboratory test to measure the ...

  17. FTA-ABS test

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibodies to the bacteria Treponema pallidum, which causes syphilis. How the Test is Performed A blood sample ... to confirm whether a positive screening test for syphilis (either VDRL or RPR ) means you have a ...

  18. Understanding Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates the development and marketing of all laboratory tests that use test kits ... at the National Institutes of Health FOLLOW US Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT ...

  19. D-dimer test

    MedlinePlus

    D-dimer tests are used to check for blood clotting problems. Blood clots can cause health problems, such ... that you probably do not have problems with blood clotting. If you are getting the D-dimer test ...

  20. Capillary nail refill test

    MedlinePlus

    ... nail. This should not cause discomfort. Why the Test is Performed Tissues need oxygen to survive. Oxygen is carried to various parts of the body by the blood (vascular) system. This test measures how well the vascular system works in ...

  1. Albumin - blood (serum) test

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions for which the test may be performed: Burns (widespread) Wilson disease If you are receiving large amounts of intravenous fluids, the result of this test may be inaccurate. Albumin will be decreased during pregnancy.

  2. Hepatitis C Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test is "weakly positive," it may be a false positive . The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( ... or Indeterminate Negative Past infection or no infection ( false-positive screen); additional testing if indicated Positive or ...

  3. Lyme Disease Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... may have a very recent infection or a false-positive test result. If an IgM result is ... and symptoms Positive Negative Negative Early infection or false-positive IgM test due to cross reactive antibodies ...

  4. Standard environmental testing practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, R.; Gregory, E.; Stoker, J.; Vanbiene, F.; Woodbury, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Manual on procedural requirements for performing certain environmental tests on space flight equipment provides information for test equipment designers, quality control and production engineers. Contents of manual are summarized.

  5. Lung diffusion testing

    MedlinePlus

    Lung diffusion testing measures how well the lungs exchange gases. This is an important part of lung testing , because ... gases do not move normally across the lung tissues into the blood vessels of the lung. This ...

  6. Screening Tests and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Text size | Print | Screening Tests and Vaccines This information in Spanish ( en español ) Getting important screening tests and vaccines can save your life. Check this section of ...

  7. Blood Count Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Blood count tests measure the number and types of cells in ... helps doctors check on your overall health. The tests can also help to diagnose diseases and conditions ...

  8. Testing for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability (Biologics) HIV Home Test Kits Testing for HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  9. Uric acid test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  10. von Willebrand Factor Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Platelet Count , Platelet Function Tests , Complete Blood Count , Coagulation Factor VIII , PT , PTT At a Glance Test ... a protein , one of several components of the coagulation system that work together to stop bleeding and ...

  11. Vitamin A blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003570.htm Vitamin A blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The vitamin A test measures the level of vitamin A ...

  12. Campylobacter serology test

    MedlinePlus

    ... a blood test to look for antibodies to bacteria called campylobacter. ... An abnormal (positive) result means that antibodies against ... with the bacteria. Tests are often repeated during the course of ...

  13. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  14. Directory of Medical Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... variety of illnesses or signs of infection. Blood chemistry test. Basic blood chemistry tests measure the levels ...

  15. Commerical module test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smokier, M. I.

    1986-01-01

    The results are presented for a program of qualification testing of commercial crystalline silicon modules from nine manufacturers in five countries. The outcome demonstrated the effective role of the Block 5 Qualification Tests in the development of reliable modules.

  16. Growth hormone test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003706.htm Growth hormone test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone test measures the amount of growth hormone in ...

  17. ADH (Antidiuretic Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also known as: Vasopressin; AVP Formal name: Antidiuretic Hormone; Arginine Vasopressin Related tests: Osmolality , BUN , Creatinine , Sodium , ... should know? How is it used? The antidiuretic hormone (ADH) test is used to help detect, diagnose, ...

  18. Home Use Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hepatitis C Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Menopause Fecal Occult Blood Ovulation (Saliva Test) Ovulation (Urine Test) Pregnancy ... Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health Professionals Science & Research Industry Scroll back to top Popular Content ...

  19. Impact Tests for Woods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    Although it is well known that the strength of wood depends greatly upon the time the wood is under the load, little consideration has been given to this fact in testing materials for airplanes. Here, results are given of impact tests on clear, straight grained spruce. Transverse tests were conducted for comparison. Both Izod and Charpy impact tests were conducted. Results are given primarily in tabular and graphical form.

  20. Tests in Print II: An Index to Tests, Test Reviews, and the Literature on Specific Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buros, Oscar K., Ed.

    Tests in Print II is a comprehensive, annotated bibliography of all in-print tests published as separates for use with English-speaking subjects. The 1,155 two-column pages list 2,467 tests in print as of early 1974; 16,574 references through 1971 on specific tests; a reprinting of the 1974 APA-AERA-NCME Standards for Educational andPsychological…

  1. Blade Testing Trends (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Desmond, M.

    2014-08-01

    As an invited guest speaker, Michael Desmond presented on NREL's NWTC structural testing methods and capabilities at the 2014 Sandia Blade Workshop held on August 26-28, 2014 in Albuquerque, NM. Although dynamometer and field testing capabilities were mentioned, the presentation focused primarily on wind turbine blade testing, including descriptions and capabilities for accredited certification testing, historical methodology and technology deployment, and current research and development activities.

  2. Coaxial test fixture

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, W.F.

    1984-03-30

    This invention pertains to arrangements for performing electrical tests on contact material samples, and in particular for testing contact material test samples in an evacuated environment under high current loads. Frequently, it is desirable in developing high-current separable contact material, to have at least a preliminary analysis of selected candidate conductor materials. Testing of material samples will hopefully identify materials unsuitable for high current electrical contact without requiring incorporation of the materials into a completed and oftentimes complex structure.

  3. Uniform Test Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belov, Dmitry I.

    2008-01-01

    In educational practice, a test assembly problem is formulated as a system of inequalities induced by test specifications. Each solution to the system is a test, represented by a 0-1 vector, where each element corresponds to an item included (1) or not included (0) into the test. Therefore, the size of a 0-1 vector equals the number of items "n"…

  4. 3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY, DYNAMIC TEST FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY, DYNAMIC TEST FACILITY (SATURN V IN BACKGROUND). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. Blood Test: Glucose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Blood Test: Glucose KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Glucose Print A A A Text Size What's in ... de sangre: glucosa What It Is A blood glucose test measures the amount of glucose (the main ...

  6. Pilot Class Testing: Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle. Washington Foreign Language Program.

    Statistics derived from test score data from the pilot classes participating in the Washington Foreign Language Program are presented in tables in this report. An index accompanies the tables, itemizing the classes by level (FLES, middle, and high school), grade test, language skill, and school. MLA-Coop test performances for each class were…

  7. On Statistical Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Carl J.

    An approach to statistical testing, which combines Neyman-Pearson hypothesis testing and Fisher significance testing, is recommended. The use of P-values in this approach is discussed in some detail. The author also discusses some problems which are often found in introductory statistics textbooks. The problems involve the definitions of…

  8. Fluid dynamics test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayman, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Test method and apparatus determine fluid effective mass and damping in frequency range where effective mass may be considered as total mass less sum of slosh masses. Apparatus is designed so test tank and its mounting yoke are supported from structural test wall by series of flexures.

  9. XRCF Testing Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reily, Cary; Kegely, Jeff; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center's X-ray Calibration Facility has been recently modified to test Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) developmental mirrors at cryogenic temperatures (35 degrees Kelvin) while maintaining capability for performance testing of x-ray optics and detectors. The facility's current cryo-optical testing capability and potential modifications for future support of NGST will be presented.

  10. The Tyranny of Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Standardized tests which measure a narrow span of intelligence unfairly penalize students whose strengths don't fall within that range. Three kinds of intelligence (analytical, creative, practical) are discussed. Sternberg's Triarchic Abilities Test, currently being test-piloted, assesses all three aspects of intelligence in contrast to current…

  11. Addressing Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salend, Spencer J.

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that between 25% to 40% of students experience test anxiety, with students with disabilities and those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds having higher prevalence rates. Since test anxiety impacts student well-being and the validity of the important educational decisions based on testing data, this article…

  12. Anxiety and Test Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Kevin S.

    Test anxiety is a variable cognitive, affective, or physiological response, or any combination thereof, occurring during evaluative, self-report examinations. Research suggests that the cognitive, affective, and physiological components of test anxiety are interrelated and that these components in addition to global test anxiety, are negatively…

  13. Testing Historical Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baillie, Ray

    1980-01-01

    Outlines methods for including skill testing in teacher-made history tests. Focuses on distinguishing fact and fiction, evaluating the reliability of a source, distinguishing between primary and secondary sources, recognizing statements which support generalizations, testing with media, mapping geo-politics, and applying knowledge to new…

  14. Test Reviewing in Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagemeister, Carmen; Kersting, Martin; Stemmler, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, a (new) German standard for test reviewing was passed (Testkuratorium, 2006). There was already a European standard in place (European Federation of Psychologists' Associations, 2008). This article presents the German standard for test reviewing and explains how the German test review system was derived from demands in the German standard…

  15. Screening Tests for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... questions you have. Make sure to ask about: Alcohol use Depression Weight Screening tests Screening tests Screening tests Ages ... for high cholesterol, and ways to improve cholesterol levels through lifestyle changes. ... Sheets - Alcohol Use and Health - This fact sheet talks about ...

  16. NCCS Regression Test Harness

    SciTech Connect

    Tharrington, Arnold N.

    2015-09-09

    The NCCS Regression Test Harness is a software package that provides a framework to perform regression and acceptance testing on NCCS High Performance Computers. The package is written in Python and has only the dependency of a Subversion repository to store the regression tests.

  17. AMSD Cryo Actuator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullette, Mark; Matthews, Gary; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The actuator technology required for AMSD and subsequently NGST are critical in the successful development for future cryogenic systems. Kodak has undertaken an extensive test plan to determine the performance of the force actuators developed under the AMSD program. These actuators are currently in testing at MSFC and are expected to finish this test cycle in early June 2002.

  18. Testing on Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Standardized tests are under a microscope as states prepare to administer new PARCC and Smarter Balanced tests aligned to the Common Core State Standards. This brief takes on five concerns about testing and is designed to help funders reframe the larger conversation to preserve a critical source of information about school, teacher and student…

  19. Legal Issues in Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Ruth Axman

    Court cases are presented that illustrate some of the issues that courts have dealt with in the area of educational testing. While this study was developed primarily for parents, the booklet should also help school administrators and testing professionals learn about court cases and precedents relevant to some major issues in educational testing.…

  20. Diagnosing the Diagnostic Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    2009-01-01

    Scads of pseudodiagnostic tests are peddled by commercial vendors who recognize that desperate educators will do almost anything to dodge an impending accountability cataclysm. And this "almost anything" includes buying tests that promise to help a teacher raise test scores--even if they don't. Accordingly, today's educators need to be aware of…

  1. Test Administration Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Kirk A.; Bergstrom, Betty A.

    2013-01-01

    The need for increased exam security, improved test formats, more flexible scheduling, better measurement, and more efficient administrative processes has caused testing agencies to consider converting the administration of their exams from paper-and-pencil to computer-based testing (CBT). Many decisions must be made in order to provide an optimal…

  2. Testing Technology, June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Getsch, B; Floyd, H L; Parrott, L; Van Arsdall, A

    1992-01-01

    This report highlights the following topics: Photon Correlation Spectroscopy--a new application in jet fuel analysis, Testing news in brief; Solar test facility supports space station research; Shock isolation technique developed for piezoresistive accelerometer; High-speed photography captures Distant Image measurements; and, Radiation effects test revised for CMOS electronics.

  3. Thyroid Function Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Irving T.

    1979-01-01

    Describes two tests, T-4 and T-3, for hypothyroid based on the binding of the hormones by proteins. The tests were performed in courses for physicians, clinical chemists, laboratory technicians, and undergraduate science students by the individuals involved and on their own sera. These tests are commercially available in kit form. (GA)

  4. Propfan Test Assessment (PTA): Flight test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, B. H.; Bartel, H. W.; Reddy, N. N.; Swift, G.; Withers, C. C.; Brown, P. C.

    1989-01-01

    The Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) aircraft was flown to obtain glade stress and noise data for a 2.74m (9 ft.) diameter single rotation propfan. Tests were performed at Mach numbers to 0.85 and altitudes to 12,192m (40,000 ft.). The propfan was well-behaved structurally over the entire flight envelope, demonstrating that the blade design technology was completely adequate. Noise data were characterized by strong signals at blade passage frequency and up to 10 harmonics. Cabin noise was not so high as to preclude attainment of comfortable levels with suitable wall treatment. Community noise was not excessive.

  5. Drum drop test report

    SciTech Connect

    McBeath, R.S.

    1995-02-28

    Testing was performed to determine actual damage to drums when dropped from higher than currently stacked elevations. The drum configurations were the same as they are placed in storage; single drums and four drums banded to a pallet. Maximum drop weights were selected based on successful preliminary tests. Material was lost from each of the single drum tests while only a small amount of material was lost from one of the pelletized drums. The test results are presented in this report. This report also provides recommendations for further testing to determine the appropriate drum weight which can be stored on a fourth tier.

  6. Morpheus Lander Testing Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Jeremy J.; Mitchell, Jennifer D.

    2011-01-01

    NASA s Morpheus Project has developed and tested a prototype planetary lander capable of vertical takeoff and landing designed to serve as a testbed for advanced spacecraft technologies. The Morpheus vehicle has successfully performed a set of integrated vehicle test flights including hot-fire and tether tests, ultimately culminating in an un-tethered "free-flight" This development and testing campaign was conducted on-site at the Johnson Space Center (JSC), less than one year after project start. Designed, developed, manufactured and operated in-house by engineers at JSC, the Morpheus Project represents an unprecedented departure from recent NASA programs and projects that traditionally require longer development lifecycles and testing at remote, dedicated testing facilities. This paper documents the integrated testing campaign, including descriptions of test types (hot-fire, tether, and free-flight), test objectives, and the infrastructure of JSC testing facilities. A major focus of the paper will be the fast pace of the project, rapid prototyping, frequent testing, and lessons learned from this departure from the traditional engineering development process at NASA s Johnson Space Center.

  7. Test kit testing certifies soil screening accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, L.K.

    1994-08-01

    With quality controls and validation, site managers can use immunoassay with confidence. It is not enough to know which hazardous substances have contaminated a site. A manager must have an idea about how much is present and where. Traditionally, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry answered these questions, but today immunoassay soil test kits often provide more immediate results at a lower cost.

  8. Le test detourne (The Test Turned Around).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valderrania, Isabelle

    1994-01-01

    It is proposed that the multiple-choice test can be useful in helping language students understand the meaning of text better without overwhelming them. Techniques for drafting effective questions are discussed, and a sample list of questions is presented. (MSE)

  9. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  10. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOEpatents

    Gonsalves, J.M.

    1997-09-30

    A detector testing device is described which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: (1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, (2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and (3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements. 5 figs.

  11. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOEpatents

    Gonsalves, John M.

    1997-01-01

    A detector testing device which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: 1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, 2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and 3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements.

  12. COLD TEST LOOP INTEGRATED TEST LOOP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, TJ

    2003-10-22

    A testing facility (Cold Test Loop) was constructed and operated to demonstrate the efficacy of the Accelerated Waste Retrieval (AWR) Project's planned sluicing approach to the remediation of Silos 1 and 2 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, Ohio. The two silos contain almost 10,000 tons of radium-bearing low-level waste, which consists primarily of solids of raffinates from processing performed on ores from the Democratic Republic of Congo (commonly referred to as ''Belgium Congo ores'') for the recovery of uranium. These silos are 80 ft in diameter, 36 ft high to the center of the dome, and 26.75 ft to the top of the vertical side walls. The test facility contained two test systems, each designed for a specific purpose. The first system, the Integrated Test Loop (ITL), a near-full-scale plant including the actual equipment to be installed at the Fernald Site, was designed to demonstrate the sluicing operation and confirm the selection of a slurry pump, the optimal sluicing nozzle operation, and the preliminary design material balance. The second system, the Component Test Loop (CTL), was designed to evaluate many of the key individual components of the waste retrieval system over an extended run. The major results of the initial testing performed during July and August 2002 confirmed that the AWR approach to sluicing was feasible. The ITL testing confirmed the following: (1) The selected slurry pump (Hazleton 3-20 type SHW) performed well and is suitable for AWR application. However, the pump's motor should be upgraded to a 200-hp model and be driven by a 150-hp variable-frequency drive (VFD). A 200-hp VFD is not much more expensive and would allow the pump to operate at full speed. (2) The best nozzle performance was achieved by using 15/16-in. nozzles operated alternately. This configuration appeared to most effectively mine the surrogate. (3) The Solartron densitometer, which was tested as an alternative mass flow measurement

  13. Testing, Testing: Good Teaching Is Difficult; So Is Meaningful Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toby, Sidney; Plano, Richard J.

    2004-02-01

    Multiple-choice questions are usually employed in testing in large science courses for speed, accuracy, and fairness in grading. A significant disadvantage is that students are often presented with an unrealistic choice of answers that may make it possible to work backwards from the answer, rather than forwards from fundamentals. In the real world, answers to numerical problems are rarely displayed in a list, waiting for the correct value to be chosen. We have developed optical scanning forms and software that allow the choice of numerical values, which are then scanned optically and graded with the possibility of partial credit for near-misses or missing factors.

  14. Elevated drum testing Phase 1 test plan

    SciTech Connect

    McBeath, R.S.; Meeuwsen, P.V.

    1994-09-01

    An important part of the Hanford environmental mission is the packaging, transportation, and storage of solid radioactive wastes in metal drums. Presently storage drums are placed four to a wooden pallet with the drums banded to each other. Palletized drums are stacked three units high in pre-engineered steel structures in the 200 Area of the Hanford site. Permitted storage space is expensive to construct, maintain, and operate. Storage capacity is increased if additional drum can be stacked within existing facilities and a cost savings over new construction realized. The purpose of this plan is to outline the testing required to provide the safety criteria for elevated (i.e., tiers of four high) drum storage. The major safety concern with elevated drum storage is the danger of a significant fire in the storage facility. The major fire load within the storage facilities is combustible material contained in the drums. If a seismic event, fork lift accident, or other credible incident were to cause drum failure or lid separation, combustible material could be available for fuel. To increase the initial burn in the facilities, the drums must spill their combustible contents, making them free for ignition. If it can be shown that there is not sufficient damage to the drums to allow for release of their solid contents, then the data used for safety documentation will be re-examined. Preliminary tests conducted in the configurations detailed in this test plan have shown that drums maintain their integrity; that is the drum covers remain attached and the drums do not breach. These tests will be conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company, Equipment Development organization, who is the designated DOE Center of Excellence to conduct drop tests for Department of Transportation (DOT) certification of DOE designed packages and containers.

  15. GIRAFFE test results summary

    SciTech Connect

    Yokobori, S.; Arai, K.; Oikawa, H.

    1996-03-01

    A passive system can provide engineered safety features enhancing safety system reliability and plant simplicity. Toshiba has conducted the test Program to demonstrate the feasibility of the SBWR passive safety system using a full-height, integral system test facility GIRAFFE. The test facility GIRAFFE models the SBWR in full height to correctly present the gravity driving head forces with a 1/400 volume scale. The GIRAFFE test Program includes the certification tests of the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) to remove the post-accident decay heat and the gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) to replenish the reactor coolant inventory during a LOCA. The test results have confirmed the PCCS and GDCS design and in addition, have demonstrated the operation of the pCCS with the presence of a lighter-than-steam noncondensable as well as with the presence of a heavier-than-steam, noncondensable. The GIRAFFE test Program has also provided the database to qualify a best estimate thermal-hydraulic computer code TRAC. The post test analysis results have shown that TRAC can accurately predict the PCCS heat removal Performance and the containment pressure response to a LOCA. This paper summarizes the GIRAFFE test results to investigate post-LOCA PCCS heat removal performance and post-test analysis using TRAC.

  16. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort

    2003-11-01

    The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

  17. Nemesis Autonomous Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barltrop, Kevin J.; Lee, Cin-Young; Horvath, Gregory A,; Clement, Bradley J.

    2012-01-01

    A generalized framework has been developed for systems validation that can be applied to both traditional and autonomous systems. The framework consists of an automated test case generation and execution system called Nemesis that rapidly and thoroughly identifies flaws or vulnerabilities within a system. By applying genetic optimization and goal-seeking algorithms on the test equipment side, a "war game" is conducted between a system and its complementary nemesis. The end result of the war games is a collection of scenarios that reveals any undesirable behaviors of the system under test. The software provides a reusable framework to evolve test scenarios using genetic algorithms using an operation model of the system under test. It can automatically generate and execute test cases that reveal flaws in behaviorally complex systems. Genetic algorithms focus the exploration of tests on the set of test cases that most effectively reveals the flaws and vulnerabilities of the system under test. It leverages advances in state- and model-based engineering, which are essential in defining the behavior of autonomous systems. It also uses goal networks to describe test scenarios.

  18. Sperm function test

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Pankaj; Hayatnagarkar, Suryakant

    2015-01-01

    With absolute normal semen analysis parameters it may not be necessary to shift to specialized tests early but in cases with borderline parameters or with history of fertilization failure in past it becomes necessary to do a battery of tests to evaluate different parameters of spermatozoa. Various sperm function tests are proposed and endorsed by different researchers in addition to the routine evaluation of fertility. These tests detect function of a certain part of spermatozoon and give insight on the events in fertilization of the oocyte. The sperms need to get nutrition from the seminal plasma in the form of fructose and citrate (this can be assessed by fructose qualitative and quantitative estimation, citrate estimation). They should be protected from the bad effects of pus cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS) (leukocyte detection test, ROS estimation). Their number should be in sufficient in terms of (count), structure normal to be able to fertilize eggs (semen morphology). Sperms should have intact and functioning membrane to survive harsh environment of vagina and uterine fluids (vitality and hypo-osmotic swelling test), should have good mitochondrial function to be able to provide energy (mitochondrial activity index test). They should also have satisfactory acrosome function to be able to burrow a hole in zona pellucida (acrosome intactness test, zona penetration test). Finally, they should have properly packed DNA in the nucleus to be able to transfer the male genes (nuclear chromatic decondensation test) to the oocyte during fertilization. PMID:26157295

  19. Dynamic impact testing with servohydraulic testing machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardenheier, R.; Rogers, G.

    2006-08-01

    The design concept of “Crashworthiness” requires the information on material behaviour under dynamic impact loading in order to describe and predict the crash behaviour of structures. Especially the transport related industries, like car, railway or aircraft industry, pursue the concept of lightweight design for a while now. The materials' maximum constraint during loading is pushed to permanently increasing figures. This means in terms of crashworthiness that the process of energy absorption in structures and the mechanical behaviour of materials must well understood and can be described appropriately by material models. In close cooperation with experts from various industries and research institutes Instron has developed throughout the past years a new family of servohydraulic testing machines specifically designed to cope with the dynamics of high rate testing. Main development steps are reflected versus their experimental necessities.

  20. Test Results for CSTR Test 4

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.D.

    2001-05-31

    One of the 3 technologies currently being developed for the Savannah River Salt Waste Processing Program is the Small-Tank Tetraphenylborate Process (STTP). This process uses sodium tetraphenylborate to precipitate and remove radioactive Cs from the waste and monosodium titanate to sorb and remove radioactive Sr and actinides. ORNL is demonstrating this process at the 1:4000 scale using a 20-liter continuous-flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system. The primary goal of Test 4 was to verify that the STTP process could achieve and maintain the necessary Cs decontamination while TPB was actively decomposing. Even with TPB being decomposed by the off-normal conditions of this test, the decontaimination factor for {sup 137}Cs obtained for the filtrate from the Slurry Concentrating Tank ranged from 47,000 to 646,000, exceeding the WAC standard.